Science.gov

Sample records for oxygenated pure water

  1. Prediction of oxygen solubility in pure water and brines up to high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GENG, Ming; DUAN, Zhenhao

    2010-10-01

    A thermodynamic model is presented to calculate the oxygen solubility in pure water (273-600 K, 0-200 bar) and natural brines containing Na +, K +, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Cl -, SO 42-, over a wide range of temperature, pressure and ionic strength with or close to experimental accuracy. This model is based on an accurate equation of state to calculate vapor phase chemical potential and a specific particle interaction model for liquid phase chemical potential. With this approach, the model can not only reproduce the existing experimental data, but also extrapolate beyond the data range from simple aqueous salt system to complicated brine systems including seawater. Compared with previous models, this model covers much wider temperature and pressure space in variable composition brine systems. A program for this model can be downloaded from the website: http://www.geochem-model.org.

  2. Pure Water From a Pure Genius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate is widely used throughout the aerospace, munitions, and pyrotechnics industries as a primary ingredient in solid rocket and missile propellants, fireworks, and explosive charges. This highly soluble salt has tainted soils and water sources all over the world, and is believed to be an endocrine disrupter, adversely affecting the growth patterns of a fetus or a young child. UMPQUA Research Company (URC), once a small drinking water testing laboratory and a research and development contractor for NASA's manned spaceflight applications, has evolved to become a leader in water purification and analysis. With a total of 11 patents issued for new technologies created by URC under NASA SBIR contracts and a 25-year commitment to water recycling, the company clearly possessed the qualifications necessary to tackle the presence of perchlorate in water. An SBIR contract with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center that concentrated on the stringent water quality requirements of long-term, manned spaceflight was the source for URC's process and catalyst to facilitate the destruction of perchlorate and nitrate in water. URC licensed the rights of its unique reduction reaction process to Calgon Carbon Corporation for use with the company's perchlorate/nitrate remediation process, otherwise known as ISEP(R).

  3. Evaluation of the Draeger LAR V Pure Oxygen Scuba

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-08

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse aide If necessar’y and identify by block number) r- SCUBA -PURE OXYGEN CLOSED CIRCUIT OXYGEN A03UTRACT...apparatus des~igned and manufactured in the Federal Republic of Germany. The scuba is completely closed circuit and incorporates a demand type oxygen supply...incorporates many inherent design features which makes it easier to pre/post dive and to maintain than the Emerein closed circuit scuba Test were conducted by

  4. Physiological effects of positive pressure breathing with pure oxygen and a low oxygen gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaopeng; Xiao, Huajun; Shi, Weiru; Wen, Dongqing; Yu, Lihua; Chen, Jianzhang

    2015-01-01

    Positive pressure breathing (PPB) can cause circulatory dysfunction due to peripheral pooling of blood. This study explored a better way at ground level to simulate pure oxygen PPB at 59,055 ft (18,000 m) by comparing the physiological changes during PPB with pure oxygen and low oxygen at ground level. Six subjects were exposed to 3 min of 69-mmHg PPB and 3 min of 59-mmHg PPB with pure oxygen and low oxygen while wearing the thoracic counterpressure jerkin inflated to 1× breathing pressure and G-suit inflated to 3 and 4× breathing pressure. Stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), and peripheral oxygen saturation (Spo2) were measured. Subjects completed a simulating flying task (SFT) during 3-min PPB and scores were recorded. HR and SV responses differed significantly between breathing pure oxygen and low oxygen. CO response was not significantly different for pure oxygen and low oxygen, the two levels of PPB, and the two levels of G-suit pressure. Spo2 declined as a linear function of time during low-oxygen PPB and there was a significant difference in Spo2 response for the two levels of PPB. The average score of SFT during pure oxygen PPB was 3970.5 ± 1050.4, which was significantly higher than 2708.0 ± 702.7 with low oxygen PPB. Hypoxia and PPB have a synergistic negative effect on both the cardiovascular system and SFT performance. PPB with low oxygen was more appropriate at ground level to investigate physiological responses during PPB and evaluate the protective performance of garments. Liu X, Xiao H, Shi W, Wen D, Yu L, Chen J. Physiological effects of positive pressure breathing with pure oxygen and a low oxygen gas mixture.

  5. Laser ignition of bulk 1018 carbon steel in pure oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K.; Branch, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to study the ignition characteristics of bulk 1018 carbon steel in a pure oxygen environment. Cylindrical 1018 carbon steel specimens 5 mm in diameter and 5 mm high were ignited by a focused CW CO2 laser beam in a cool, static, pure oxygen environment at oxygen pressures ranging from 0.103 to 6.895 MPa. A two-color pyrometer was designed and used to measure the ignition temperatures of the specimens. The temperature history of a spot approximately 0.5 mm in diameter located at the center of the specimen top surface was recorded with a maximum time resolution of 25 microsec, and with an accuracy of a few percent. Ignition temperature of bulk 1018 carbon steel was identified from the temperature history curve with the aid of the light intensity curve. Results show that 1018 carbon steel specimens ignite at temperatures between 1388 and 1450 K, which are below the melting range of the alloy (1662-1685 K). The ignition temperature of 1018 carbon steel is mildly dependent on oxygen pressure over the range of oxygen pressure investigated in this study.

  6. Optical absorption coefficients of pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng; Zhao, Xianzhen; Fry, Edward S.

    2002-10-01

    The integrating cavity absorption meter(ICAM), which is independent of scattering effect, is used to measure the absolute values of small optical absorption coefficients of liquid. A modified ICAM is being used to measure the absorption of water in the wavelength range 300 to 700 nm. The ultrapure water produced by a two-stages water purification system reaches Type I quality. This is equal to or better than ASTM,CAP and NCCLS water quality standards. To avoid the fact that dissolved oxygen absorbs ultraviolet light due to the photochemical effect, the water sample is delivered through a nitrogen sealed system which will prevent the sample from contacting with oxygen. A compassion of our absorption spectrum with other existing data is given.

  7. Evidence for Argon Content in Pure Oxygen from Thermal Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steur, Peter P. M.; Yang, Inseok; Pavese, Franco

    2017-02-01

    Since many years it is known that argon impurities in oxygen change the temperature of the oxygen triple point by +12 K{\\cdot }mol^{-1} (positive, while most impurities decrease the temperature) without any effect on the melting range of this transition, for the impurity concentrations usually encountered in nominally pure gases. It has been hypothesized that thermal measurements on the α -β solid-to-solid transition at 23.8 K or the β -γ solid-to-solid transition at 43.8 K may give reliable evidence regarding the argon content. However, such measurements require very long times for full completion of each transition (with prohibitive costs if liquid helium is used) and for the α -β solid-to-solid transition the heat pulse method cannot be applied reliably. The availability of closed-cycle refrigerators permits the first obstacle to be surmounted. The automatic system earlier developed at INRIM during the EU Multicells project and used extensively for the project on the isotopic effect in neon is perfectly suited for such measurements. Thus, the uncertainties of the temperature measurements are similar to those obtained previously (of the order of 0.1 mK or less). Three argon-in-oxygen mixtures were prepared gravimetrically and certified at KRISS, just as was previously done for the work on the neon isotopic compositions. Results of continuous-current measurements on the α -β solid-to-solid transition, along with the triple-point data obtained with the heat pulse method, are presented for one cell with a known doped argon content, to be compared with similar data from a cell with oxygen of very high purity. In addition, some preliminary data for the β -γ solid-to-solid transition are given. The measurements on the mixture with the highest argon content, about 1002 μmol{\\cdot } mol^{-1}, imply a (linear) sensitivity of (116 ± 7) K{\\cdot }mol^{-1} for the α -β transition. This sensitivity may be different at much lower argon contents, and follow

  8. Calibration of sound velocimeter in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiwei; Zhang, Baofeng; Li, Tao; Zhu, Junchao; Xie, Ziming

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurement of sound speed is important to calibrate a sound velocity profiler which provides real-time sound velocity to the sonar equipment in oceanographic survey. The sound velocity profiler calculates the sound speed by measuring the time-of-flight of a 1 MHz single acoustic pulse to travel over about 300 mm path. A standard sound velocimeter instrument was invited to calibrate the sound velocity profiler in pure water at temperatures of 278,283, 288, 293, 298, 303 and 308K in a thermostatic vessel at one atmosphere. The sound velocity profiler was deployed in the thermostatic vessel alongside the standard sound velocimeter instrument and two platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) which were calibrated to 0.002k by comparison with a standard PRT. Time of flight circuit board was used to measure the time-of-flight to 22 picosecond precision. The sound speed which was measured by the sound velocity profiler was compared to the standard sound speed calculated by UNESCO to give the laboratory calibration coefficients and was demonstrated agreement with CTD-derived sound speed using Del Grosso's seawater equation after removing a bias.

  9. Evaluation of the persistence of micropollutants through pure-oxygen activated sludge nitrification and denitrification.

    PubMed

    Levine, Audrey D; Meyer, Michael T; Kish, George

    2006-10-01

    The persistence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and household and industrial chemicals through a pure-oxygen activated sludge, nitrification, denitrification wastewater treatment facility was evaluated. Of the 125 micropollutants that were tested in this study, 55 compounds were detected in the untreated wastewater, and 27 compounds were detected in the disinfected effluent. The persistent compounds included surfactants, fire-retardant chemicals, pesticides, fragrance compounds, hormones, and one pharmaceutical. Physical-chemical properties of micropollutants that affected partitioning onto wastewater solids included vapor pressure and octanol-water partition coefficients.

  10. Evaluation of the persistence of micropollutants through pure-oxygen activated sludge nitrification and denitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levine, A.D.; Meyer, M.T.; Kish, G.

    2006-01-01

    The persistence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and household and industrial chemicals through a pure-oxygen activated sludge, nitrification, denitrification wastewater treatment facility was evaluated. Of the 125 micropollutants that were tested in this study, 55 compounds were detected in the untreated wastewater, and 27 compounds were detected in the disinfected effluent. The persistent compounds included surfactants, fire-retardant chemicals, pesticides, fragrance compounds, hormones, and one pharmaceutical. Physical-chemical properties of micropollutants that affected partitioning onto wastewater solids included vapor pressure and octanol-water partition coefficients.

  11. Modification and expansion of a pure oxygen WWTP for biological nutrient removal (BNR).

    PubMed

    Randall, C W; Cokgor, E U

    2001-01-01

    A pure oxygen activated sludge system was converted to a VIP configuration BNR (biological nutrient removal) system wherein three of the five pure oxygen sections were retained, and performance was compared to that of a side-by-side air aeration MUCT (modified UCT) system. Because the pure oxygen BNR system could not obtain good nitrification, its treatment capacity had to be downgraded from 113,550 m3/d to a flow of only 60,000 m3/d. At the lesser flow, it was determined that adequate nitrification and improved denitrification could be accomplished in the pure oxygen system by continuously seeding it with 100% of the WAS from the MUCT system. Fortunately, while the capacity of the pure oxygen system had to be downgraded, it was determined that the capacity of the MUCT system was substantially greater than its design flow, and the combined system is capable of treating the entire design flow. However, this requires increasing the operating sludge age of the MUCT system. The pure oxygen BNR system performed better phosphorus removal than the MUCT system, both before and after seeding with the MUCT WAS. Apparently this was because the MUCT system was operated at a substantially higher sludge age than the pure oxygen system. However, both systems have consistently discharged effluent phosphorus concentrations of less than 2.0 mg/L TP, which is the Chesapeake Bay standard. Even with improved nitrification and denitrification in the pure oxygen BNR system, neither it nor the MUCT system have proven to be capable of meeting the Virginia Chesapeake Bay goal of 10 mg/L total nitrogen in the effluent.

  12. Pure-oxygen radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael

    1990-01-01

    Steady state radiative shock models in gas composed entirely of oxygen are calculated with the purpose of explaining observations of fast-moving knots in Cas A and other oxygen-rich SNRs. Models with electron thermal conduction differ significantly from models in which conduction is neglected. Conduction reduces postshock electron temperatures by a factor of 7-10 and flattens temperature gradients. The O III ion, whose forbidden emission usually dominates the observed spectra, is present over a wide range of shock velocities, from 100 to 170 km/s. The electron temperature in the O III forbidden line formation region is 30,000 K, in agreement with the 20,000 K derived from observations. All models with conduction have extensive warm (T above 4000 K) photoionization zones, which provides better agreement with observed optical O I line strengths.

  13. Pure-oxygen radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Shull, J. Michael

    1990-01-01

    Steady state radiative shock models in gas composed entirely of oxygen are calculated with the purpose of explaining observations of fast-moving knots in Cas A and other oxygen-rich SNRs. Models with electron thermal conduction differ significantly from models in which conduction is neglected. Conduction reduces postshock electron temperatures by a factor of 7-10 and flattens temperature gradients. The O III ion, whose forbidden emission usually dominates the observed spectra, is present over a wide range of shock velocities, from 100 to 170 km/s. The electron temperature in the O III forbidden line formation region is 30,000 K, in agreement with the 20,000 K derived from observations. All models with conduction have extensive warm (T above 4000 K) photoionization zones, which provides better agreement with observed optical O I line strengths.

  14. Aerobic and two-stage anaerobic-aerobic sludge digestion with pure oxygen and air aeration.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Gregor D; Ros, Milenko

    2008-01-01

    The degradability of excess activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant was studied. The objective was establishing the degree of degradation using either air or pure oxygen at different temperatures. Sludge treated with pure oxygen was degraded at temperatures from 22 degrees C to 50 degrees C while samples treated with air were degraded between 32 degrees C and 65 degrees C. Using air, sludge is efficiently degraded at 37 degrees C and at 50-55 degrees C. With oxygen, sludge was most effectively degraded at 38 degrees C or at 25-30 degrees C. Two-stage anaerobic-aerobic processes were studied. The first anaerobic stage was always operated for 5 days HRT, and the second stage involved aeration with pure oxygen and an HRT between 5 and 10 days. Under these conditions, there is 53.5% VSS removal and 55.4% COD degradation at 15 days HRT - 5 days anaerobic, 10 days aerobic. Sludge digested with pure oxygen at 25 degrees C in a batch reactor converted 48% of sludge total Kjeldahl nitrogen to nitrate. Addition of an aerobic stage with pure oxygen aeration to the anaerobic digestion enhances ammonium nitrogen removal. In a two-stage anaerobic-aerobic sludge digestion process within 8 days HRT of the aerobic stage, the removal of ammonium nitrogen was 85%.

  15. Pure culture response of ectomycorrhizal fungi to imposed water stress

    Treesearch

    Mark D. Coleman; Caroline S. Bledsoe; William Lopushinsky

    1989-01-01

    The ability of ectomycorrhizal fungal isolates to tolerate imposed water stress in pure culture was examined in 55 isolates of 18 species. Water potential treatments, adjusted with polyethylene glycol, were applied to Petri dish units. These units allowed colony diameter measurements of fungi grown on liquid media. Delayed growth initiation and inhibition of growth...

  16. The mechanism of oxygen isotopic fractionation during fungal denitrification - A pure culture study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrage-Moennig, Nicole; Rohe, Lena; Anderson, Traute-Heidi; Braker, Gesche; Flessa, Heinz; Giesemann, Annette; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Well, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) from soil denitrification originates from bacteria and - to an unknown extent - also from fungi. During fungal denitrification, oxygen (O) exchange takes place between H2O and intermediates of the denitrification process as in bacterial exchange[1,2]. However, information about enzymes involved in fungal O exchanges and the associated fractionation effects is lacking. The objectives of this study were to estimate the O fractionation and O exchange during the fungal denitrifying steps using a conceptual model[2] adapted from concepts for bacterial denitrification[3], implementing controls of O exchange proposed by Aerssens, et al.[4] and using fractionation models by Snider et al.[5] Six different pure fungal cultures (five Hypocreales, one Sordariales) known to be capable of denitrification were incubated under anaerobic conditions, either with nitrite or nitrate. Gas samples were analyzed for N2O concentration and its isotopic signatures (SP, average δ15N, δ18O). To investigate O exchange, both treatments were also established with 18O-labelled water as a tracer in the medium. The Hypocreales strains showed O exchange mainly at NO2- reductase (Nir) with NO2- as electron acceptor and no additional O exchange at NO3- reductase (Nar) with NO3- as electron acceptor. The only Hypocreales species having higher O exchange with NO3- than with NO2- also showed O exchange at Nar. The Sordariales species tested seems capable of O exchange at NO reductase (Nor) additionally to O exchange at Nir with NO2-. The data will help to better interpret stable isotope values of N2O from soils. .[1] D. M. Kool, N. Wrage, O. Oenema, J. Dolfing, J. W. Van Groenigen. Oxygen exchange between (de)nitrification intermediates and H2O and its implications for source determination of NO?3- and N2O: a review. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec. 2007, 21, 3569. [2] L. Rohe, T.-H. Anderson, B. Braker, H. Flessa, A. Giesemann, N. Wrage-Mönnig, R. Well. Fungal Oxygen Exchange between

  17. Pressure broadening of oxygen by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Payne, Vivienne; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Sung, Keeyoon; Mlawer, Eli

    2014-01-01

    A need for precise air-mass retrievals utilizing the near-infrared O2 A-band has motivated measurements of the water-broadening in oxygen. Experimental challenges have resulted in very little water broadened oxygen data. Existing water broadening data for the O2 A-band is of insufficient precision for application to the atmospheric data. Line shape theory suggests that approximate O2 pressure broadening parameters for one spectral region, such as the A-band, may be obtained from comparable spectral regions such as the O2 60 GHz Q-branch, which is also used prominently in remote sensing. We have measured precise O2-H2O broadening for the 60 GHz Q-branch and the pure-rotational transitions at room temperature with a Zeeman-modulated absorption cell using a frequency-multiplier spectrometer. Intercomparisons of these data and other O2 pressure broadening data sets confirm the expectation of only minor band-to-band scaling of pressure broadening. The measurement provides a basis for fundamental parameterization of retrieval codes for the long-wavelength atmospheric measured values. Finally, we demonstrate the use of these measurements for retrievals of air-mass via remote sensing of the oxygen A-band.

  18. Hydrogen- and oxygen from water.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, E A; Moen, R L

    1977-09-09

    The limitations of thermochemical energy storage devices are the limitations of Carnot devices. Entropy production entailed in product separation further limits the efficiency of thermochemical processes. Thus, high upper temperatures and few reaction steps are desirable. In this article, the one-step effusional separation of water into hydrogen and oxygen is considered. Membrane materials, design, and fabrication techniques are suggested. A parametric analysis of the process suggests that the idea is a tantalizing possibility.

  19. Super-Maxwellian helium evaporation from pure and salty water.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Christine; Kann, Zachary R; Faust, Jennifer A; Skinner, J L; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2016-01-28

    Helium atoms evaporate from pure water and salty solutions in super-Maxwellian speed distributions, as observed experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experiments are performed by monitoring the velocities of dissolved He atoms that evaporate from microjets of pure water at 252 K and 4-8.5 molal LiCl and LiBr at 232-252 K. The average He atom energies exceed the flux-weighted Maxwell-Boltzmann average of 2RT by 30% for pure water and 70% for 8.5m LiBr. Classical molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce the observed speed distributions and provide microscopic insight into the forces that eject the He atoms from solution. Comparisons of the density profile and He kinetic energies across the water-vacuum interface indicate that the He atoms are accelerated by He-water collisions within the top 1-2 layers of the liquid. We also find that the average He atom kinetic energy scales with the free energy of solvation of this sparingly soluble gas. This free-energy difference reflects the steeply decreasing potential of mean force on the He atoms in the interfacial region, whose gradient is the repulsive force that tends to expel the atoms. The accompanying sharp decrease in water density suppresses the He-water collisions that would otherwise maintain a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, allowing the He atom to escape at high energies. Helium is especially affected by this reduction in collisions because its weak interactions make energy transfer inefficient.

  20. Super-Maxwellian helium evaporation from pure and salty water

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Christine; Kann, Zachary R.; Faust, Jennifer A.; Skinner, J. L. E-mail: nathanson@chem.wisc.edu; Nathanson, Gilbert M. E-mail: nathanson@chem.wisc.edu

    2016-01-28

    Helium atoms evaporate from pure water and salty solutions in super-Maxwellian speed distributions, as observed experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experiments are performed by monitoring the velocities of dissolved He atoms that evaporate from microjets of pure water at 252 K and 4–8.5 molal LiCl and LiBr at 232–252 K. The average He atom energies exceed the flux-weighted Maxwell-Boltzmann average of 2RT by 30% for pure water and 70% for 8.5m LiBr. Classical molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce the observed speed distributions and provide microscopic insight into the forces that eject the He atoms from solution. Comparisons of the density profile and He kinetic energies across the water-vacuum interface indicate that the He atoms are accelerated by He–water collisions within the top 1-2 layers of the liquid. We also find that the average He atom kinetic energy scales with the free energy of solvation of this sparingly soluble gas. This free-energy difference reflects the steeply decreasing potential of mean force on the He atoms in the interfacial region, whose gradient is the repulsive force that tends to expel the atoms. The accompanying sharp decrease in water density suppresses the He–water collisions that would otherwise maintain a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, allowing the He atom to escape at high energies. Helium is especially affected by this reduction in collisions because its weak interactions make energy transfer inefficient.

  1. Super-Maxwellian helium evaporation from pure and salty water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Christine; Kann, Zachary R.; Faust, Jennifer A.; Skinner, J. L.; Nathanson, Gilbert M.

    2016-01-01

    Helium atoms evaporate from pure water and salty solutions in super-Maxwellian speed distributions, as observed experimentally and modeled theoretically. The experiments are performed by monitoring the velocities of dissolved He atoms that evaporate from microjets of pure water at 252 K and 4-8.5 molal LiCl and LiBr at 232-252 K. The average He atom energies exceed the flux-weighted Maxwell-Boltzmann average of 2RT by 30% for pure water and 70% for 8.5m LiBr. Classical molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce the observed speed distributions and provide microscopic insight into the forces that eject the He atoms from solution. Comparisons of the density profile and He kinetic energies across the water-vacuum interface indicate that the He atoms are accelerated by He-water collisions within the top 1-2 layers of the liquid. We also find that the average He atom kinetic energy scales with the free energy of solvation of this sparingly soluble gas. This free-energy difference reflects the steeply decreasing potential of mean force on the He atoms in the interfacial region, whose gradient is the repulsive force that tends to expel the atoms. The accompanying sharp decrease in water density suppresses the He-water collisions that would otherwise maintain a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, allowing the He atom to escape at high energies. Helium is especially affected by this reduction in collisions because its weak interactions make energy transfer inefficient.

  2. Optical absorption of pure water in the blue and ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng

    The key feature of the Integrating Cavity Absorption Meter (ICAM) is that it produces an isotropic illumination of the liquid sample and thereby dramatically minimizes scattering effects. The ICAM can produce an effective optical path length up to several meters. As a consequence, it is capable of measuring absorption coefficients as low as 0.001 m-1. The early version of the ICAM was used previously to measure the absorption spectrum of pure water over the 380-700 nm range. To extend its range into the ultraviolet, several modifications have been completed. The preliminary tests showed that the modified ICAM was able to measure the absorption of pure water for the wavelength down to 300 nm. After extensive experimental investigation and analysis, we found that the absorption of SpectralonRTM (the highly diffusive and reflective material used to build the ICAM) has a higher impact on measurements of absorption in the UV range than we had expected. Observations of high values for pure water absorption in the UV, specifically between 300 and 360 nm, are a consequence of absorption by the Spectralon RTM. These results indicated that even more serious modifications were required (e.g. SpectralonRTM can not be used for a cavity in the UV). Consequently, we developed a new diffuse reflecting material and used fused silica powder (sub-micron level) sealed inside a quartz cell to replace the inner SpectralonRTM cavity of the ICAM. The new data is in excellent agreement with the Pope and Fry data (380-600 nm) and fills the gap between the 320 nm data of Quickenden and Irvin and 380 nm data of Pope and Fry. We present definitive results for the absorption spectrum of pure water between 300 and 600 nm.

  3. The generation of oxygen radicals after drinking of oxygenated water.

    PubMed

    Schoenberg, M H; Hierl, T C; Zhao, J; Wohlgemuth, N; Nilsson, U A

    2002-03-28

    It has been speculated whether ingestion of oxygenated water can lead to an enhanced generation of oxygen radicals. The purpose of three prospective randomized blinded clinical studies was therefore to measure if, when and at which oxygen content in the water,drinking of oxygenated water induces the generation of radicals. Moreover in the fourth prospective,randomized, blinded study possible longterm effects of drinking oxygenated water were examined. Altogether 66 volunteers were drinking 300 ml oxygenated or tap water within 15 minutes. Before drinking, altogether 15 ml of blood from the antecubital vein was collected for determination of ascorbyl radicals with ESR, routine laboratory data (hemoglobin, erythrocytes, hematocrit, leukocytes, thrombocytes, uric acid) and the vitamins A,C,E by HPLC. After drinking the ascorbyl radical measurements were repeated from blood of the antecubital vein. In the longterm study ( fourth study) the volunteers had to undergo the same procedure, as described above, at day 1 and day 21. In the meantime they were drinking per day three times 300 ml either oxygenated water or tap water. All subjects exhibited normal vitamin levels in all three studies. Concommitantly in the fourth study there was no statistically relevant alteration of vitamin concentrations during the observation period of three weeks in the verum and placebo-group. 30 minutes after drinking oxygenated water the concentration of ascorbyl radicals increased significantly by median 42 % from median 48 to 65 nmol/l. This increase of ascorbyl radicals after 30 minutes was reproducible in all studies. The levels of ascorbyl radicals remained elevated for 60 minutes after drinking and returned to normal after 120 minutes. This increase was independent of the oxygen concentration in the water, beginning at 30 mg oxygen/l. Water containing 15 mg oxygen/l did not lead to an enhanced radical formation. Longterm consumption of oxygenated water attenuated the ascorbyl radical

  4. The effect of ultrasonic waves on the nucleation of pure water and degassed water.

    PubMed

    Yu, Deyang; Liu, Baolin; Wang, Bochun

    2012-05-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of nucleation of ice induced by ultrasound, ultrasonic waves have been applied to supercooled pure water and degassed water, respectively. For each experiment, water sample is cooled at a constant cooling rate of 0.15 °C/min and the ultrasonic waves are applied from the water temperature of 0 °C until the water in a sample vessel nucleates. This nucleation temperature is measured. The use of ultrasound increased the nucleation temperature of both degassed water and pure water. However, the undercooling temperature for pure water to nucleate is less than that of degassed water. It is concluded that cavitation and fluctuations of density, energy and temperature induced by ultrasound are factors that affect the nucleation of water. Cavitation is a major factor for sonocrystallisation of ice. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Studies of Water V. Five Phonons in Protonic Semiconductor Lattice Model of Pure Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Binbin; Sah, Chihtang

    2017-07-01

    We report physics based confirmation (~1% RMS deviation), by existing experimental data, of proton-prohol (proton-hole) ion product (pH) and mobilities in pure liquid water (0-100{}{{o}}C, 1-atm pressure) anticipated from our melted-ice Hexagonal-Close-Packed (H{}2O){}4 Lattice Model. Five phonons are identified. (1) A propagating protonic phonon (520.9 meV from lone-pair-blue-shifted stretching mode of isolated water molecule) absorbed to generate a proton-prohol pair or detrap a tightly-bound proton. (2) Two (173.4 and 196.6 meV) bending-breathing protonic-proholic or protonic phonons absorbed during de-trapping-limited proton or proton-prohol mobilities. (3) Two propagating oxygenic-wateric Debye-Dispersive phonons (30.3 and 27.5 meV) absorbed during scattering-limited proton or proton-prohol mobilities. Summer School in Theoretical Physics funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, on Soft Materials Physics, hosted by the Physics Department of Xiamen University, China, during August 1 to 14, 2016. This was also just presented at the 2017 March Meeting (March 14 to 16) of the American Physical Society in New Orleans, USA.

  6. SPECTRALLY RESOLVED PURE ROTATIONAL LINES OF WATER IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Salyk, Colette; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Kaeufl, Hans Ulrich

    2010-10-20

    We present ground-based high-resolution N-band spectra ({Delta}v = 15 km s{sup -1}) of pure rotational lines of water vapor in two protoplanetary disks surrounding the pre-main-sequence stars AS 205N and RNO 90, selected based on detections of rotational water lines by the Spitzer InfraRed Spectrograph. Using VISIR on the Very Large Telescope, we spectrally resolve individual lines and show that they have widths of 30-60 km s{sup -1}, consistent with an origin in Keplerian disks at radii of {approx}1 AU. The water lines have similar widths to those of the CO at 4.67 {mu}m, indicating that the mid-infrared water lines trace similar radii. The rotational temperatures of the water are 540 and 600 K in the two disks, respectively. However, the line ratios show evidence of non-LTE excitation, with low-excitation line fluxes being overpredicted by two-dimensional disk LTE models. Due to the limited number of observed lines and the non-LTE line ratios, an accurate measure of the water ortho/para (O/P) ratio is not available, but a best estimate for AS 205N is O/P =4.5 {+-} 1.0, apparently ruling out a low-temperature origin of the water. The spectra demonstrate that high-resolution spectroscopy of rotational water lines is feasible from the ground, and further that ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy is likely to significantly improve our understanding of the inner disk chemistry revealed by recent Spitzer observations.

  7. Studies of Pure and Iron Doped Yttrium BARIUM(2) COPPER(3) OXYGEN(7-DELTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Rezaul K.

    YBa_2(Cu_ {1-x}Fe_{ x})O_{7-delta } (YBCO) compounds for x = 0.0, 0.01, 0.02, 0.05, 0.15, and 0.25 were studied. Samples include fully oxygenated virgin, and oxygen deficient samples, and the oxygen deficient samples after reoxygenation. X-ray diffraction, oxygen content, and magnetization measurements were used for obtaining information respectively on crystal structure, oxygen stoichiometry, and superconducting (SC) critical temperature (T_{c}). By isothermal vacuum annealing (VA) pure (x = 0) YBCO superconducting samples in the temperature range 300-800C, some important results such as: (1) the steplike increase of c axis length, and (2) the familiar plateaus in T_{c} with oxygen stoichiometry were reproduced. For x = 0.02-0.05, the symmetry of crystal changed from orthorhombic to tetragonal, and for x = 0.25, sample became non SC. We find evidence that the Fe-O bonds in YBCO are stronger than the Cu-O bonds. Mossbauer studies of Fe doped virgin samples; by VA these virgin samples at 800C; and reoxygenating these oxygen desorbed samples at 410C were used for identifying Fe sites, and for determining oxygen coordination of Fe. Only three quadrupole doublets each corresponding to an Fe site were sufficient to fit room temperature (RT) Mossbauer spectra of virgin samples for x <= 0.15, while for x = 0.25, two additional magnetic sextets had to be added. The subspectra are explained in terms of square planar, pseudotetrahedral, and octahedral oxygen environment around Fe atoms in the crystal. Due to vacuum annealing samples at T_{a } >= 400C, new Fe sites appeared in all RT spectra, and depending on the value of x, and the annealing temperature, T_{a}, one or two magnetic sites evolved. From the Mossbauer spectra of virgin (x = 0.25 only), and oxygen deficient samples as a function of temperature we determined the magnetic ordering temperature, T_{ N}. The values of T_ {N} are 394K for the 25% virgin, and from 419-472K for the 2-25% samples vacuum annealed at 800C

  8. Water and Air Measures That Make 'PureSense'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Each day, we read about mounting global concerns regarding the ability to sustain supplies of clean water and to reduce air contamination. With water and air serving as life s most vital elements, it is important to know when these environmental necessities may be contaminated, in order to eliminate exposure immediately. The ability to respond requires an understanding of the conditions impacting safety and quality, from source to tap for water, and from outdoor to indoor environments for air. Unfortunately, the "time-to-know" is not immediate with many current technologies, which is a major problem, given the greater likelihood of risky situations in today s world. Accelerating alert and response times requires new tools, methods, and technologies. New solutions are needed to engage in more rapid detection, analysis, and response. This is the focus of a company called PureSense Environmental, Inc., which evolved out of a unique relationship with NASA. The need for real-time management and operations over the quality of water and air, and the urgency to provide new solutions, were reinforced by the events of September 11, 2001. This, and subsequent events, exposed many of the vulnerabilities facing the multiple agencies tasked with working in tandem to protect communities from harmful disaster. Much has been done since September 11 to accelerate responses to environmental contamination. Partnerships were forged across the public and private sectors to explore, test, and use new tools. Methods and technologies were adopted to move more astutely from proof-of-concept to working solutions.

  9. Alveolar gas composition during maximal and interrupted apnoeas in ambient air and pure oxygen.

    PubMed

    Fagoni, Nazzareno; Taboni, Anna; Vinetti, Giovanni; Bottarelli, Sara; Moia, Christian; Bringard, Aurélién; Ferretti, Guido

    2017-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the alveolar gas composition at the transition between the steady phase II (φ2) and the dynamic phase III (φ3) of the cardiovascular response to apnoea may lay on the physiological breaking point curve (Lin et al., 1974). Twelve elite divers performed maximal and φ2-interrupted apnoeas, in air and pure oxygen. We recorded beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure and heart rate; we measured alveolar oxygen and carbon dioxide pressures (PAO2 and PACO2, respectively) before and after apnoeas; we calculated the PACO2 difference between the end and the beginning of apnoeas (ΔPACO2). Cardiovascular responses to apnoea were similar compared to previous studies. PAO2 and PACO2 at the end of φ2-interrupted apnoeas, corresponded to those reported at the physiological breaking point. For maximal apnoeas, PACO2 was less than reported by Lin et al. (1974). ΔPACO2 was higher in oxygen than in air. The transition between φ2 and φ3 corresponds indeed to the physiological breaking point. We attribute this transition to ΔPACO2, rather than the absolute PACO2 values, both in air and oxygen apnoeas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pure and aerated water entry of a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z. H.; Causon, D. M.; Qian, L.; Mingham, C. G.; Mai, T.; Greaves, D.; Raby, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical investigation of the entry of a rigid square flat plate into pure and aerated water. Attention is focused on the measurement and calculation of the slamming loads on the plate. The experimental study was carried out in the ocean basin at Plymouth University's COAST laboratory. The present numerical approach extends a two-dimensional hydro-code to compute three-dimensional hydrodynamic impact problems. The impact loads on the structure computed by the numerical model compare well with laboratory measurements. It is revealed that the impact loading consists of distinctive features including (1) shock loading with a high pressure peak, (2) fluid expansion loading associated with very low sub-atmospheric pressure close to the saturated vapour pressure, and (3) less severe secondary reloading with super-atmospheric pressure. It is also disclosed that aeration introduced into water can effectively reduce local pressures and total forces on the flat plate. The peak impact loading on the plate can be reduced by half or even more with 1.6% aeration in water. At the same time, the lifespan of shock loading is prolonged by aeration, and the variation of impulse is less sensitive to the change of aeration than the peak loading.

  11. Modification of pure oxygen absorption equipment for concurrent stripping of carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watten, B.J.; Sibrell, P.L.; Montgomery, G.A.; Tsukuda, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    The high solubility of carbon dioxide precludes significant desorption within commercial oxygen absorption equipment. This operating characteristic of the equipment limits its application in recirculating water culture systems despite its ability to significantly increase allowable fish loading rates (kg/(L min)). Carbon dioxide (DC) is typically removed by air stripping. This process requires a significant energy input for forced air movement, air heating in cold climates and water pumping. We developed a modification for a spray tower that provides for carbon dioxide desorption as well as oxygen absorption. Elimination of the air-stripping step reduces pumping costs while allowing dissolved nitrogen to drop below saturation concentrations. This latter response provides for an improvement in oxygen absorption efficiency within the spray tower. DC desorption is achieved by directing head-space gases from the spray tower (O2, N2, CO2) through a sealed packed tower scrubber receiving a 2 N NaOH solution. Carbon dioxide is selectively removed from the gas stream, by chemical reaction, forming the product Na 2CO3. Scrubber off-gas, lean with regard to carbon dioxide but still rich with oxygen, is redirected through the spray tower for further stripping of DC and absorption of oxygen. Make-up NaOH is metered into the scrubbing solution sump on an as needed basis as directed by a feedback control loop programmed to maintain a scrubbing solution pH of 11.4-11.8. The spent NaOH solution is collected, then regenerated for reuse, in a batch process that requires relatively inexpensive hydrated lime (Ca(OH)2). A by-product of the regeneration step is an alkaline filter cake, which may have use in bio-solids stabilization. Given the enhanced gas transfer rates possible with chemical reaction, the required NaOH solution flow rate through the scrubber represents a fraction of the spray tower water flow rate. Further, isolation of the water being treated from the atmosphere (1

  12. Induction of Marangoni convection in pure water drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Yutaku; Askounis, Alexandros; Kohno, Masamichi; Takata, Yasuyuki; Kim, Jungho; Sefiane, Khellil

    2016-10-01

    We report on experimental observations/visualization of thermocapillary or Marangoni flows in a pure water drop via infrared thermography. The Marangoni flows were induced by imposing a temperature gradient on the drop by locally heating the substrate directly below the center with a laser. Evidently, a temperature gradient along the liquid-air interface of ca. 2.5 °C was required for the Marangoni flows to be initiated as twin vortices and a subsequent gradient of ca. 1.5 °C to maintain them. The vortices exhibited an oscillatory behavior where they merged and split in order for the drop to compensate for the non-uniform heating and cooling. The origin of these patterns was identified by comparing the dimensionless Marangoni and Rayleigh numbers, which showed the dominance of the Marangoni convection. This fact was further supported by a second set of experiments where the same flow patterns were observed when the drop was inverted (pendant drop).

  13. Electrical Mobility of Protons and Proton-Holes in Pure Water Characterized by Physics-Based Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Binbin; Sah, Chihtang

    Pure water has been characterized empirically for nearly a century, as dissociation into hydronium (H3O)1+ and hydroxide (HO)1- ions. Last March, we reported that the ~40 year experimental industrial standard of chemical equilibrium reaction constant, the ion product, can be accounted for by a statistical-physics-based concentration product of two electrical charge carriers, the positively charged protons, p+, and the negatively charged proton holes or prohols, p-, with a thermal activation energy or proton trapping well depth of Ep + / p - = 576 meV, in the 0-100OC pure liquid water. We now report that the empirically fitted industrial standard experimental data (1985, 1987, 2005) of the two dc ion mobilities in liquid water, can also be accounted for by trapping-limited drift of protons and prohols through proton channels of lower proton electrical potential valleys, Ep+/0 <= Ep-/0 <(Ep + / p -/3), in the tetrahedrally-directed electron-pair-bonded oxygen ions, O2-, in hexagonal lattice based on the 1935 Pauling statistical model using the 1933 Bernal-Fowler water rule.

  14. Nonisothermal reactors for the production of pure water from peritoneal dialysis waste waters.

    PubMed

    Diano, N; Ettari, G; Grano, V; Gaeta, F S; Rossi, S; Bencivenga, U; D'Alterio, C; Ruocco, G; Mita, L; De Santo, N G; Canciglia, P; Mita, D G

    2007-01-01

    The diffusion of peritoneal dialysis (PD) at home is somewhat restricted by the difficulty of transport and storage of a large amount of dialytic solutions. This problem is exacerbated in the case of hemodialysis. With the aim of producing pure water to be used in preparing the solution for peritoneal dialysis, or for hemodialysis in general, as one example, we purified the spent dialysate solution from PD. Experiments were carried out with 24 dialysate solutions taken from 8 patients. Pure water was obtained by means of a thermodialysis process in a hollow fiber reactor operating under nonisothermal conditions. Results show that the yield of the nonisothermal process is dependent on the temperature difference applied across the hydrophobic membranes. The production of pure water per square meter of membrane and per hour was equal to 0.55 or 1.2 or 2.0 liters, with a temperature difference of 11 degrees C or 21 degrees C or 28 degrees C, respectively. These results encourage the use of the thermodialysis process in the production of pure water for clinical uses.

  15. Module for Oxygenating Water without Generating Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Martin, Anuncia; Sidik, Reyimjan; Kim, Jinseong

    2004-01-01

    A module that dissolves oxygen in water at concentrations approaching saturation, without generating bubbles of oxygen gas, has been developed as a prototype of improved oxygenators for water-disinfection and water-purification systems that utilize photocatalyzed redox reactions. Depending on the specific nature of a water-treatment system, it is desirable to prevent the formation of bubbles for one or more reasons: (1) Bubbles can remove some organic contaminants from the liquid phase to the gas phase, thereby introducing a gas-treatment problem that complicates the overall water-treatment problem; and/or (2) in some systems (e.g., those that must function in microgravity or in any orientation in normal Earth gravity), bubbles can interfere with the flow of the liquid phase. The present oxygenation module (see Figure 1) is a modified version of a commercial module that contains >100 hollow polypropylene fibers with a nominal pore size of 0.05 m and a total surface area of 0.5 m2. The module was originally designed for oxygenation in a bioreactor, with no water flowing around or inside the tubes. The modification, made to enable the use of the module to oxygenate flowing water, consisted mainly in the encapsulation of the fibers in a tube of Tygon polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with an inside diameter of 1 in. (approx.=25 mm). In operation, water is pumped along the insides of the hollow fibers and oxygen gas is supplied to the space outside the hollow tubes inside the PVC tube. In tests, the pressure drops of water and oxygen in the module were found to be close to zero at water-flow rates ranging up to 320 mL/min and oxygen-flow rates up to 27 mL/min. Under all test conditions, no bubbles were observed at the water outlet. In some tests, flow rates were chosen to obtain dissolved-oxygen concentrations between 25 and 31 parts per million (ppm) . approaching the saturation level of approx.=35 ppm at a temperature of 20 C and pressure of 1 atm (approx.=0.1 MPa). As one

  16. A discovery of an ultra-pure water detection method based on water mark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hui-Wen; Jing, Yu-Peng; Zhao, Shi-Rui; Xu, Xin-Wei; Tian, He; Xin, Xin; Li, Xiao-Ning; Liu, Bo; Liu, Rui-Tao; Wang, Gang; Ge, Jie; Cai, Hua-Lin; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-02-01

    The purity evaluation of deionized (DI) water is highly desirable for VLSI or ULSI industry, as the traditional "reverse osmosis filter" cannot always meet the requirement towards the DI water. The filtered DI water may still contain many contaminations which are not up to the standard for the wet cleaning of wafer surface. A novel method is presented by analyzing the residues of a water droplet after the low-temperature evaporation. The contamination contained in the water will remain during the gasification. By analyzing the residual contamination's morphology, the purity of the DI water can be estimated by employing merely a 3D laser microscope. Compared to the traditional fluorescence detecting system for water quality monitoring, it is simpler and has a lower cost. The paper describes an excellent water detection method which is meaningful for preparing ultra-pure water. Experimental results have shown that the deionized distilled (DID) water can repeatedly get a higher purity using this detection method. The DID water can be applied to the wet cleaning of wafer surface, preparation of chemical reagents and many other aspects.

  17. Determination of pure neutron radiolysis yields for use in chemical modeling of supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Eric J.

    This work has determined pure neutron radical yields at elevated temperature and pressure up to supercritical conditions using a reactor core radiation. The data will be necessary to provides realistic conditions for material corrosion experiments for the supercritical water reactor (SCWR) through water chemistry modeling. The work has been performed at the University of Wisconsin Nuclear Reactor using an apparatus designed to transport supercritical water near the reactor core. Low LET yield data used in the experiment was provided by a similar project at the Notre Dame Radiation Lab. Radicals formed by radiolysis were measured through chemical scavenging reactions. The aqueous electron was measured by two methods, a reaction with N2O to produce molecular nitrogen and a reaction with SF6 to produce fluoride ions. The hydrogen radical was measured through a reaction with ethanol-D6 (CD3CD2OD) to form HD. Molecular hydrogen was measured directly. Gaseous products were measured with a mass spectrometer and ions were measured with an ion selective electrode. Radiation energy deposition was calibrated for neutron and gamma radiation separately with a neutron activation analysis and a radiolysis experiment. Pure neutron yields were calculated by subtracting gamma contribution using the calibrated gamma energy deposition and yield results from work at the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory. Pure neutron yields have been experimentally determined for aqueous electrons from 25°C to 400°C at 248 bar and for the hydrogen radical from 25°C to 350°C at 248 bar, Isothermal data has been acquired for the aqueous electron at 380°C and 400°C as a function of density. Molecular hydrogen yields were measured as a function of temperature and pressure, although there was evidence that chemical reactions with the walls of the water tubing were creating molecular hydrogen in addition to that formed through radiolysis. Critical hydrogen concentration behavior was investigated but a

  18. Solar-Light-Driven Pure Water Splitting with Ultrathin BiOCl Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Han, Zhongkang; Wang, Wenzhong; Li, Xiaoman; Su, Yang; Jiang, Dong; Lei, Xiaoling; Sun, Songmei

    2015-12-07

    A suitable photocatalyst for overall water splitting has been produced by overcoming the disadvantage of the band structure in bulk BiOCl by reducing the thickness to the quantum scale. The ultrathin BiOCl nanosheets with surface/subsurface defects realized the solar-driven pure water splitting in the absence of any co-catalysts or sacrificial agent. These surface defects cannot only shift both the valence band and conduction band upwards for band-gap narrowing but also promote charge-carrier separation. The amount of defects in the outer layer surface of BiOCl results in an enhancement of carrier density and faster charge transport. First-principles calculations provide clear evidence that the formation of surface oxygen vacancies is easier for the ultrathin BiOCl nanosheets than for its thicker counterpart. These defects can serve as active sites to effectively adsorb and dissociate H2 O molecules, resulting in a significantly improved water-splitting performance. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Effects of fluoride and dissolved oxygen concentrations on the corrosion behavior of pure titanium and titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaharu; Matsuya, Shigeki; Udoh, Koichi

    2002-06-01

    The effects of dissolved-oxygen concentration and fluoride concentration on the corrosion behaviors of commercial pure titanium, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys and experimentally produced Ti-0.2Pd and Ti-0.5Pt alloys were examined using the corrosion potential measurements. The amount of dissolved Ti was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. A decrease in the dissolved-oxygen concentration tended to reduce the corrosion resistance of Ti and Ti alloys. If there was no fluoride, however, corrosion did not occur. Under low dissolved-oxygen conditions, the corrosion of pure Ti and Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys might easily take place in the presence of small amounts of fluoride. They were corroded by half or less of the fluoride concentrations in commercial dentifrices. The Ti-0.2Pd and Ti-0.5Pt alloys did not corrode more, even under the low dissolved-oxygen conditions and a fluoride-containing environment, than pure Ti and Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys. These alloys are expected to be useful as new Ti alloys with high corrosion resistance in dental use.

  20. Transient oxygen clathrate-like hydrate and water networks induced by magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Sumio; Otsuka, Ichiro

    2006-10-19

    Recently, careful experiments of oxygen-dissolved pure water treated by high magnetic fields showed indirectly the existence of magnetic field-affecting water (MFA water), which brought about a decrease in the contact angle of water on metals, an increase in the electrolytic potential of water, inhibition of metal corrosion, and changes in the crystal structure of calcium carbonate due to magnetic treatment. Here we report the infrared and Raman spectroscopic evidence indicating quasi-stable structures in the MFA water; oxygen clathrate-like hydrate and developed water networks, which were induced by magnetic interactions while a vacuum-distilled water, followed by oxygen exposure, crossed a steady magnetic field. The mechanism of MFA water formation and survival under thermal fluctuation is a challenging problem for the science community.

  1. Water oxygenation by fluidic microbubble generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesař, V.; Peszynski, K.

    2014-03-01

    Oxygenation of water by standard means in waste water processing, in particular to improve the conditions for the micro-organisms that decompose organic wastes is rather ineffective. The classical approach to improvements - decreasing the size of the aerator exits - have already reached their limits. A recent new idea is to decrease the size of the generated air bubbles by oscillating the supplied air flow using fluidic oscillators. Authors made extensive performance measurements with an unusual high-frequency fluidic oscillator, designed to operate within the submersed aerator body. The performance was evaluated by the dynamic method of recording the oxygen concentration increase to saturation in the aerated water. Experiments proved the fluidic generator can demonstrably increase the aeration efficiency 4.22-times compared with the aeration from a plain end of a submerged air supply tube. Despite this significant improvement, the behaviour of the generator still provides an opportunity for further improvements.

  2. Libration induced stretching mode excitation for pump-probe spectroscopy in pure liquid water.

    PubMed

    Amir, Wafa; Gallot, Guilhem; Hache, François

    2004-10-22

    We developed an experimental approach to study pure liquid water in the infrared and avoid thermal effects. This technique is based on libration induced stretching excitation of water molecules. A direct correspondence between frequencies within the libration and OH stretching bands is demonstrated. Energy diffusion is studied in pure liquid water by measuring wave packet dynamics of OH stretching vibrator with infrared femtosecond spectroscopy. Wave packet dynamics reveals ultrafast energy dynamics and reflects 130 fs intermolecular energy transfer between water vibrators. Energy diffusion is almost two orders of magnitude faster than self diffusion in water.

  3. Electrolysis cell functions as water vapor dehumidifier and oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Water vapor is absorbed in hygroscopic electrolyte, and oxygen generated by absorbed water electrolysis at anode is added simultaneously to air stream. Cell applications include on-board aircraft oxygen systems, portable oxygen generators, oxygen concentration requirements, and commercial air conditioning and dehumidifying systems.

  4. Destruction of trace organics in otherwise ultra pure water

    SciTech Connect

    Prairie, M.R.; Stange, B.M.; Showalter, S.K.; Magrini, K.A.

    1995-12-01

    A number of experiments were conducted to determine the economic viability of applying various ultraviolet (UV) oxidation processes to a waste water stream containing approximately 12 mg/L total organic carbon (TOC), predominately ethylene glycol. In all experiments, a test solution was illuminated with either near-UV or a far-UV light alone or in combination with a variety of photocatalysts and oxidants. Based upon the outcomes of this project, both UV/photocatalysis and UV/ozone processes are capable of treating the water sample to below detection capabilities of TOC. However, the processes are fairly energy intensive; the most efficient case tested required 11 kWh per order of magnitude reduction in TOC per 1000 L. If energy consumption rates of 5-10 kWh/1000 L are deemed reasonable, then further investigation is recommended.

  5. Destruction of Trace Organics in Otherwise Ultra Pure Water

    SciTech Connect

    Prairie, M. R.; Stange, B. M.; Showalter, S. K.; Magrini, K. A.

    1995-12-01

    A number of experiments were conducted to determine the economic viability of applying various ultraviolet (UV) oxidation processes to a waste water stream containing approximately 12 mg/L total organic carbon (TOC), predominately ethylene glycol. In all experiments, a test solution was illuminated with either near-UV or a far-UV light alone or in combination with a variety of photocatalysts and oxidants. Based upon the outcomes of this project, both UV/photocatalysis and UV/ozone processes are capable of treating the water sample to below detection capabilities of TOC. However, the processes are fairly energy intensive; the most efficient case tested required 11 kWh per order of magnitude reduction in TOC per 1000 L. If energy consumption rates of 5-10 kWh/1000 L are deemed reasonable, then further investigation is recommended.

  6. Influence of sludge retention time and temperature on the sludge removal in a submerged membrane bioreactor: comparative study between pure oxygen and air to supply aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, F A; Leyva-Díaz, J C; Reboleiro-Rivas, P; González-López, J; Hontoria, E; Poyatos, J M

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a bench-scale wastewater treatment plant, which consisted of a membrane bioreactor, was monitored daily using pure oxygen and air to supply aerobic conditions with the aim of studying the increases of the aeration and sludge removal efficiencies and the effect of the temperature. The results showed the capacity of membrane bioreactor systems for removing organic matter. The alpha-factors of the aeration were determined for six different MLSS concentrations in order to understand the system working when pure oxygen and air were used to supply aerobic conditions in the system. Aeration efficiency was increased between 30.7 and 45.9% when pure oxygen was used in the operation conditions (a hydraulic retention time of 12 h and MLSS concentrations between 4,018 and 11,192 mg/L). Sludge removal efficiency increased incrementally, from 0.2 to 1.5% when pure oxygen was used at low sludge retention time and from 1.5% to 15.4% at medium sludge retention time when temperature conditions were lower than 20°C. Moreover, the difference between calculated and experimental sludge retention time was lesser when pure oxygen was used to provide aerobic conditions, so the influence of the temperature decreased when the pure oxygen was used. These results showed the convenience of using pure oxygen due to the improvement in the performance of the system.

  7. Water-based oxygen-sensor films.

    PubMed

    Habibagahi, Arezoo; Mébarki, Youssef; Sultan, Yasir; Yap, Glenn P A; Crutchley, Robert J

    2009-08-01

    The luminescent cyclometalated iridium complex [Ir(fppy)(2)(t-Bu-iCN)(2)]CF(3)SO(3), 1 (fppy = 4-(2-pyridyl)benzaldehyde, and t-Bu-iCN = tert-butyl isocyanide), was synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography and (1)H NMR, absorption, and emission spectroscopies. Complex 1 was quantitatively bound to the water-soluble amine-functionalized polymer Silamine D208-EDA by reductive amination, to produce 2. The quantum yield of emission and excited state lifetime of 2 (varphi(em) = 0.23 and tau = 20.6 mus) are comparable to that of the model complex [Ir(tpy)(2)(t-Bu-iCN)(2)]CF(3)SO(3), 3 (tpy = 2-(p- tolyl) pyridine) with varphi(em) = 0.28 and tau = 35.6 mus. Aqueous blends of 2 with Silamine and colloidal microcrystalline cellulose (MC) were used to prepare oxygen-sensor films. Oxygen sensitivities of these films were determined as a function of Silamine:MC ratio and obeyed Stern-Volmer kinetics. The optimum oxygen-sensor film composition was 2 in 1:1 Silamine:MC, which had an oxygen sensitivity of 0.502 over an atmospheric pressure range of 0.007-45 psi. Temperature sensitivity (percentage loss of intensity per degrees C) of this film was determined to be -1.1 and -1.4% degrees C(-1) at vacuum and 1 bar atmospheric pressure, respectively. These results were compared to those of films incorporating dispersions of 1 and 3. Luminescence microscopy of 9:1, 1:1, and 1:5 Silamine:MC films of 2 show that the charged iridium complex in 2 associates with the surface of MC and lifetime measurements of these films show an increase in lifetime with increasing MC fraction. The optimum quenching sensitivity observed for the 1:1 Silamine:MC film suggests that the diffusion of oxygen must decrease with increasing fraction of MC and thereby decrease oxygen sensitivity. These novel materials offer an environmentally friendly alternative to the preparation of oxygen-sensor films.

  8. Near-infrared spectroscopic assessment of oxygen delivery to free flaps on monkeys following vascular occlusions and inhalation of pure oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fenghua; Ding, Haishu; Cai, Zhigang; Wang, Guangzhi; Zhao, Fuyun

    2002-04-01

    In recent studies, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been considered as a potentially ideal noninvasive technique for the postoperative monitoring of plastic surgery. In this study, free flaps were raised on rhesus monkeys' forearms and oxygen delivery to these flaps was monitored following vascular occlusions and inhalation of pure oxygen. Optical fibers were adopted in the probe of the oximeter so that the detection could be performed in reflectance mode. The distance between emitter and detector can be adjusted easily to achieve the best efficacy. Different and repeatable patterns of changes were measured following vascular occlusions (arterial occlusion, venous occlusion and total occlusion) on flaps. It is clear that the near-infrared spectroscopy is capable of postoperatively monitoring vascular problems in flaps. NIRS showed high sensitivity to detect the dynamic changes in flaps induced by inhalation of pure oxygen in this study. The experimental results indicated that it was potential to assess tissue viability utilizing the dynamic changes induced by a noninvasive stimulation. It may be a new assessing method that is rapid, little influenced by other factors and brings less discomfort to patients.

  9. Particulate Photocatalyst Sheets Based on Carbon Conductor Layer for Efficient Z-Scheme Pure-Water Splitting at Ambient Pressure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Hisatomi, Takashi; Suzuki, Yohichi; Pan, Zhenhua; Seo, Jeongsuk; Katayama, Masao; Minegishi, Tsutomu; Nishiyama, Hiroshi; Takata, Tsuyoshi; Seki, Kazuhiko; Kudo, Akihiko; Yamada, Taro; Domen, Kazunari

    2017-02-01

    Development of sunlight-driven water splitting systems with high efficiency, scalability, and cost-competitiveness is a central issue for mass production of solar hydrogen as a renewable and storable energy carrier. Photocatalyst sheets comprising a particulate hydrogen evolution photocatalyst (HEP) and an oxygen evolution photocatalyst (OEP) embedded in a conductive thin film can realize efficient and scalable solar hydrogen production using Z-scheme water splitting. However, the use of expensive precious metal thin films that also promote reverse reactions is a major obstacle to developing a cost-effective process at ambient pressure. In this study, we present a standalone particulate photocatalyst sheet based on an earth-abundant, relatively inert, and conductive carbon film for efficient Z-scheme water splitting at ambient pressure. A SrTiO3:La,Rh/C/BiVO4:Mo sheet is shown to achieve unassisted pure-water (pH 6.8) splitting with a solar-to-hydrogen energy conversion efficiency (STH) of 1.2% at 331 K and 10 kPa, while retaining 80% of this efficiency at 91 kPa. The STH value of 1.0% is the highest among Z-scheme pure water splitting operating at ambient pressure. The working mechanism of the photocatalyst sheet is discussed on the basis of band diagram simulation. In addition, the photocatalyst sheet split pure water more efficiently than conventional powder suspension systems and photoelectrochemical parallel cells because H(+) and OH(-) concentration overpotentials and an IR drop between the HEP and OEP were effectively suppressed. The proposed carbon-based photocatalyst sheet, which can be used at ambient pressure, is an important alternative to (photo)electrochemical systems for practical solar hydrogen production.

  10. The characteristics of Ta2O5 films deposited by radio frequency pure oxygen ion assisted deposition (RFOIAD) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinghua; Zhang, Qiuhui; Fan, Weixing; Feng, Guoying; Li, Yaguo; Wei, Aixiang; Hu, Ruifeng; Gu, Qiongqiong

    2017-02-01

    The characteristics of Ta2O5 films deposited by radio frequency pure oxygen ion assisted deposition (RFOIAD) technology were compared to a gas mixture of oxygen and argon (O2/Ar) ion beam assisted deposition experimentally and theoretically, inclusive of optical, electronic, and laser-induced damage resistance. The results showed that the RFOIAD could make removal of the pinholes and oxygen vacancies in the film and increase of the band gap, which resulted in the enhancement of refractive index, breakdown voltage, and the diminution of absorptivity as well as leakage current. The laser induced damage testing suggested that the damage induced damage threshold of the film deposited by RFOIAD could be increased, but the cracks appeared easily due to the concentration of thermal stress. While for the Ta2O5 film deposited using a sputtering gas of the mixtures of oxygen and argon, the porous characteristics were helpful to relief the thermal stress concentration, and the formation of cracks can be avoided.

  11. Mechanism of Pt(IV) sonochemical reduction in formic acid media and pure water.

    PubMed

    Chave, Tony; Navarro, Nathalie M; Nitsche, Serge; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2012-03-26

    Sonochemical synthesis of platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) in formic acid solutions and pure water was investigated using a 20 kHz ultrasonic irradiation. The obtained results gave new insights on the underneath Pt(IV)  reduction mechanism in formic acid media under argon and in pure water under Ar/CO atmosphere. It was shown that in pure water sonochemical reduction of platinum ions occurs by hydrogen issued from homolytic water molecule split. Pt(IV) ion reduction appears to be a very slow process under argon atmosphere in pure water due to formation of oxidizing species like OH radicals and H(2)O(2) leading to reoxidation of intermediate Pt(II)  ions. Sonochemical reduction is accelerated manifold in the presence of formic acid or Ar/CO gas mixture. Solution and gas-phase analyses reveal that both CO and HCOOH act as OH(.) radical scavenger and reducing agent under ultrasonic irradiation. Their ability to reduce platinum ions at room temperature is enhanced due to the local heating in the liquid shell surround the cavitation bubble. An innovative synthesis route for monodispersed Pt NPs in pure water without any templates or capping agents in the presence of Ar/CO gas mixture is then proposed. Obtained Pt NPs within the range of 2-3 nm exhibited a strong stability towards sedimentation in water. Since Ar/CO atmosphere is the only restriction of the process, this procedure can be applied in various media and is also compatible with a large array of experimental conditions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. 38. DETAIL OF COOLING WATER BOOSTER PUMP FOR OXYGEN FURNACES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. DETAIL OF COOLING WATER BOOSTER PUMP FOR OXYGEN FURNACES, LANCES, AND FUME HOODS IN THE GAS WASHER PUMP HOUSE LOOKING EAST. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  13. IR spectroscopy of aqueous alkali halide solutions: Pure salt-solvated water spectra and hydration numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Chapados, Camille

    2001-08-01

    Extrapolation techniques were used to obtain pure salt-solvated water spectra from the attenuated total reflection infrared spectra (ATR-IR) of aqueous solutions of the nine alkali halide salts LiCl, NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaBr, KBr, NaI, KI, and CsI and the alkaline-earth chloride salt MgCl2. These salts ionize completely in water. The ions by themselves do not absorb in the IR, but their interactions with water can be observed and analyzed. A pure salt-solvated water spectrum is easier to analyze than that of a combined solution of pure water and salt-solvated water. Although the salt-solvated water spectra examined have distinctive signatures, they can be classified in three categories: those similar to NaCl; those not similar to NaCl; and MgCl2, in a class by itself. Each of the pure salt-solvated water spectra differs from that of liquid water, though the number of bands is the same. From the Gaussian band fitting, we found that the positions of the bands were fairly constant, whereas their intensities differed. The salt hydration numbers were determined: for NaCl, KCl, NaBr, KBr, and CsI solutions it is 5; for KI and MgCL2 it is 4; for NaI it is 3.5; for CsCl it is 3; and for LiCl it is 2. From these results we found that each pair of ions (monoatomic ions) of the ten salt solutions studied are close bound and form a complex in a cluster organization with a fixed number of water molecules.

  14. Water ICE: Ion Exclusion Chromatography of Very Weak Acids with a Pure Water Eluent.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hongzhu; Shelor, C Phillip; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2016-05-03

    Separation of ions or ionizable compounds with pure water as eluent and detecting them in a simple fashion has been an elusive goal. It has been known for some time that carbonic acid can be separated from strong acids by ion chromatography in the exclusion mode (ICE) using only water as the eluent. The practice of water ICE was shown feasible for very weak acids like silicate and borate with a dedicated element specific detector like an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS), but this is rarely practical in most laboratories. Direct conductometric detection is possible for H2CO3 but because of its weak nature, not especially sensitive; complex multistep ion exchange methods do not markedly improve this LOD. It will clearly be impractical in acids that are weaker still. By using a permeative amine introduction device (PAID, Anal. Chem. 2016 , 88 , 2198 - 2204 ) as a conductometric developing agent, we demonstrate that a variety of weak acids (silicate, borate, arsenite, cyanide, carbonate, and sulfide) cannot only be separated on an ion exclusion column, they can be sensitively detected (LODs 0.2-0.4 μM). We observe that the elution order is essentially the same as that on a nonfunctionalized poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) column using 1-10% acetonitrile as eluent and follows the reverse order of the polar surface area (PSA) of the analyte molecules. PSA values have been widely used to predict biological transport of pharmaceuticals across a membrane but never to predict chromatographic behavior. We demonstrate the application of the technique by measuring the silicate and borate depth profiles in the Pacific Ocean; the silicate results show an excellent match with results from a reference laboratory.

  15. Remote Sensing of Dissolved Oxygen and Nitrogen in Water using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, R.; Ganoe, R.

    2013-12-01

    The health of an estuarine ecosystem is largely driven by the abundance of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen available for maintenance of plant and animal life. An investigation was conducted to quantify the concentration of dissolved molecular oxygen and nitrogen in water by means of Raman spectroscopy. This technique is proposed for the remote sensing of dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay, which will be utilized by aircraft in order to survey large areas in real-time. A proof of principle experiment has demonstrated the ability to remotely detect dissolved oxygen and nitrogen in pure water (also Chesapeake Bay water) using a 355nm Nd:YAG laser and a simple monochromater to detect the shifted Raman oxygen and nitrogen backscattered signals at 376.2 and 387.5 nm respectively. The theoretical basis for the research, components of the experimental system, and key findings are presented. A 1.3-m water cell had an attached vertical column to house a Troll 9500 dissolved oxygen in-situ monitor (In-Situ Inc Troll 9500). The Raman oxygen signal could be calibrated with this devise. While Raman backscattered water signals are low a potential aircraft remote system was designed and will be presented.

  16. Water Processor and Oxygen Generation Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedard, John

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the results of the tasks which initiated efforts on design issues relating to the Water Processor (WP) and the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) Flight Hardware for the International Space Station. This report fulfills the Statement of Work deliverables requirement for contract H-29387D. The following lists the tasks required by contract H-29387D: (1) HSSSI shall coordinate a detailed review of WP/OGA Flight Hardware program requirements with personnel from MSFC to identify requirements that can be eliminated without affecting the technical integrity of the WP/OGA Hardware; (2) HSSSI shall conduct the technical interchanges with personnel from MSFC to resolve design issues related to WP/OGA Flight Hardware; (3) HSSSI will initiate discussions with Zellwegger Analytics, Inc. to address design issues related to WP and PCWQM interfaces.

  17. The infrared continuum of pure water vapor - Calculations and high-temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, J. M.; Perrin, M. Y.; Ma, Q.; Tippings, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical studies of medium infrared absorption by pure water vapor are reported. The experiments were performed in the 1900-2600/cm and 3900-4600/cm regions for temperatures and pressures of 500-900 K and 0-70 atm, respectively. The results are consistent with data in the literature and enable the determination of continuous absorption parameters.

  18. The infrared continuum of pure water vapor - Calculations and high-temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, J. M.; Perrin, M. Y.; Ma, Q.; Tippings, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical studies of medium infrared absorption by pure water vapor are reported. The experiments were performed in the 1900-2600/cm and 3900-4600/cm regions for temperatures and pressures of 500-900 K and 0-70 atm, respectively. The results are consistent with data in the literature and enable the determination of continuous absorption parameters.

  19. Visualization of oxygen transfer across the air-water interface using a fluorescence oxygen visualization method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhee

    2002-04-01

    Oxygen concentration fields in a water body were visualized by the fluorescence oxygen visualization (FOV) method. Pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) was used as a fluorescent indicator of oxygen, and an intensive charge coupled-device (ICCD) camera as an image detector. Sequential images (over 2000 images) of the oxygen concentration field around the surface water of the tank (1 x 1 x 0.75 m3) were produced during the 3 h experiment. From image processing, the accurate pathway of oxygen-rich, cold water at the water surface was also visualized. The amount of oxygen transferred through the air-water interface during the experiment was measured and the oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)) was determined as 0.22 m/d, which was much higher than that is expected in molecular diffusion. Results suggest that vertical penetration of cold water was the main pathway of oxygen in the water body in the tank. The average velocity of cold water penetrating downward in water body was also measured from consecutive images and the value was 0.3-0.6 mm/s. The FOV method used in this research should have wide application in experimental fluid mechanics and can also provide a phenomenological description of oxygen transfer under physically realizable natural conditions in lakes and reservoirs.

  20. Calibration of Mineralization Degree for Dynamic Pure-water Measurement in Horizontal Oil-water Two-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Weihang; Li, Lei; Kong, Lingfu; Liu, Xingbin

    2016-08-01

    In order to solve the problem of dynamic pure-water electrical conductivity measurement in the process of calculating water content of oil-water two-phase flow of production profile logging in horizontal wells, a six-group local-conductance probe (SGLCP) is proposed to measure dynamic pure-water electrical conductivity in horizontal oil-water two-phase flow. The structures of conductance sensors which include the SGLCP and ring-shaped conductance probe (RSCP) are analyzed by using the finite-element method (FEM). In the process of simulation, the electric field distribution generated by the SGLCP and RSCP are investigated, and the responses of the measuring electrodes are calculated under the different values of the water resistivity. The static experiments of the SGLCP and RSCP under different mineralization degrees in horizontal oil-water two-phase flow are carried out. Results of simulation and experiments demonstrate a nice linearity between the SGLCP and RSCP under different mineralization degrees. The SGLCP has also a good adaptability to stratified flow, stratified flow with mixing at the interface and dispersion of oil in water and water flow. The validity and feasibility of pure-water electrical conductivity measurement with the designed SGLCP under different mineralization degrees are verified by experimental results.

  1. Charge state distribution studies of pure and oxygen mixed krypton ECR plasma - signature of isotope anomaly and gas mixing effect.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pravin; Mal, Kedar; Rodrigues, G

    2016-11-01

    We report the charge state distributions of the pure, 25% and 50% oxygen mixed krypton plasma to shed more light on the understanding of the gas mixing and the isotope anomaly [A. G. Drentje, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 63 (1992) 2875 and Y Kawai, D Meyer, A Nadzeyka, U Wolters and K Wiesemann, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 10 (2001) 451] in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas. The krypton plasma was produced using a 10 GHz all-permanent-magnet ECR ion source. The intensities of the highly abundant four isotopes, viz. (82) Kr (~11.58%), (83) Kr (~11.49%), (84) Kr (~57%) and (86) Kr (17.3%) up to ~ +14 charge state have been measured by extracting the ions from the plasma and analysing them in the mass and the energy using a large acceptance analyzer-cum-switching dipole magnet. The influence of the oxygen gas mixing on the isotopic krypton ion intensities is clearly evidenced beyond +9 charge state. With and without oxygen mixing, the charge state distribution of the krypton ECR plasma shows the isotope anomaly with unusual trends. The anomaly in the intensities of the isotopes having quite closer natural abundance, viz. (82) Kr, (86) Kr and (83) Kr, (86) Kr is prominent, whereas the intensity ratio of (86) Kr to (84) Kr shows a weak signature of it. The isotope anomaly tends to disappear with increasing oxygen mixing in the plasma. The observed trends in the intensities of the krypton isotopes do not follow the prediction of linear Landau wave damping in the plasma. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Water structure and solvation of osmolytes at high hydrostatic pressure: pure water and TMAO solutions at 10 kbar versus 1 bar.

    PubMed

    Imoto, Sho; Forbert, Harald; Marx, Dominik

    2015-10-07

    Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) is a protecting osmolyte that stabilizes proteins against both temperature and pressure denaturation. Yet, even the solvation of TMAO itself is not well understood beyond ambient conditions. Here, using ab initio molecular dynamics, we analyze how its solvation structure changes upon compressing its ≈0.5 M aqueous solution from 1 bar to 10 kbar. The neat solvent, liquid water compressed to 10 kbar, is analyzed in detail to provide a meaningful gauge for the pressure-induced solvation changes of the solute. Pure water is shown to prefer to keep four H-bonded water molecules in a locally tetrahedral arrangement up to 10 kbar. The eye-catching shape changes of its oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function, where apparently the entire second peak is shifted into the first one, are traced back to about two more water molecules which are squeezed into the tetrahedral voids that are formed in the first shell by the H-bonded water molecules. These additional molecules increase the coordination number of pure water at 10 kbar significantly, but they are definitely not H-bonded to the central water molecule; rather they are its topological second to fourth H-bonded neighbors. The pressure response of TMAO(aq) is distinctly different, although its radial distribution functions do not change much. Under ambient conditions, the negatively charged oxygen site of the solute, which is strongly hydrophilic, predominantly accepts three H-bonds, whereas a roughly equal population of threefold and square-planar fourfold H-bonding is observed at 10 kbar. Moreover, only a negligible contribution of non-H-bonded water molecules is found in the first-shell region of TMAO even at 10 kbar, in contrast to the pressure response of water itself. In the hydrophobic region of TMAO, the solvating water molecules are found to straddle the three methyl groups at ambient pressure, which remains virtually unchanged upon compressing the solution to 10 kbar. Here, the

  3. A comparative study of oxygen-doped and pure beryllium clusters based on structural, energetic and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Ye; Wu, Di; Li, Ying; Li, Zhi-Ru

    2017-04-01

    The lowest-energy structures of the oxygen-doped Ben (n = 1-12) clusters are obtained at the B3PW91 level. Various energetic and electronic properties of the BenO clusters are systematically investigated using the QCISD(T) method, which are compared with those of pure Ben+1 clusters. The evolution of these properties with cluster size shows the unique stability of Be11O, which can actually be considered as an ionic compound (Be11)2+O2-. On the one hand, O2- has 8 valence electrons, satisfying the octet rule. On the other hand, the Be112+ moiety has a shell-closed electronic configuration, which renders itself particularly stable.

  4. Water oxidation on pure and doped hematite (0001) surfaces: prediction of Co and Ni as effective dopants for electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Peilin; Keith, John A; Carter, Emily A

    2012-08-15

    In photoelectrochemical cells, sunlight may be converted into chemical energy by splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen molecules. Hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) is a promising photoanode material for the water oxidation component of this process. Numerous research groups have attempted to improve hematite's photocatalytic efficiency despite a lack of foundational knowledge regarding its surface reaction kinetics. To elucidate detailed reaction mechanisms and energetics, we performed periodic density functional theory + U calculations for the water oxidation reaction on the fully hydroxylated hematite (0001) surface. We investigate two different concentrations of surface reactive sites. Our best model involves calculating water oxidation mechanisms on a pure (1×1) hydroxylated hematite slab (corresponding to 1/3 ML of reactive sites) with an additional overlayer of water molecules to model solvation effects. This yields an overpotential of 0.77 V, a value only slightly above the 0.5-0.6 V experimental range. To explore whether doped hematite can exhibit an even lower overpotential, we consider cation doping by substitution of Fe by Ti, Mn, Co, Ni, or Si and F anion doping by replacing O on the fully hydroxylated surface. The reaction energetics on pure or doped hematite surfaces are described using a volcano plot. The relative stabilities of holes on the active O anions are identified as the underlying cause for trends in energetics predicted for different dopants. We show that moderately charged O anions give rise to smaller overpotentials. Co- or Ni-doped hematite surfaces give the most thermodynamically favored reaction pathway (lowest minimum overpotential) among all dopants considered. Very recent measurements (Electrochim. Acta 2012, 59, 121-127) reported improved reactivity with Ni doping, further validating our predictions.

  5. Preparation of ultra-pure water and acids and investigation of background of an ICP-MS laboratory.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Hu, S; Tong, J; Zhao, L; Lin, S; Gao, S

    2000-09-05

    Ultra-pure water is prepared by distillation, and followed by ion exchange and passing through an E-PURE water purifier. The resulting ultra-pure water has an electrical conductivity of 18 MOmega. Ultra-pure nitric, hydrochloric, hydrofluoric and perchloric acids are prepared by sub-boiling distillation. Spectra for mass range 3-240 amu are scanned by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for tap, distilled, deionized and ultra-pure waters, and extra- and ultra-pure acids. The results show that the sub-boiling distillation greatly improves the quality of all the four acids under investigation. Metal impurities such as 75, 93, 121, 123, 134-138, 181 and 206-209 amu were remarkably reduced (sub-ppb level) after sub-boiling distillation. Configuration of peaks due to the formation of polyatomic ions was similar to the literature values reported elsewhere (S.H. Tan, G. Horlick, Appl. Spectrosc. 40 (4) (1986) 445).

  6. High-strength wastewater treatment in a pure oxygen thermophilic process: 11-year operation and monitoring of different plant configurations.

    PubMed

    Collivignarelli, M C; Bertanza, G; Sordi, M; Pedrazzani, R

    2015-01-01

    This research was carried out on a full-scale pure oxygen thermophilic plant, operated and monitored throughout a period of 11 years. The plant treats 60,000 t y⁻¹ (year 2013) of high-strength industrial wastewaters deriving mainly from pharmaceuticals and detergents production and landfill leachate. Three different plant configurations were consecutively adopted: (1) biological reactor + final clarifier and sludge recirculation (2002-2005); (2) biological reactor + ultrafiltration: membrane biological reactor (MBR) (2006); and (3) MBR + nanofiltration (since 2007). Progressive plant upgrading yielded a performance improvement chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was enhanced by 17% and 12% after the first and second plant modification, respectively. Moreover, COD abatement efficiency exhibited a greater stability, notwithstanding high variability of the influent load. In addition, the following relevant outcomes appeared from the plant monitoring (present configuration): up to 96% removal of nitrate and nitrite, due to denitrification; low-specific biomass production (0.092 kgVSS kgCODremoved⁻¹), and biological treatability of residual COD under mesophilic conditions (BOD5/COD ratio = 0.25-0.50), thus showing the complementarity of the two biological processes.

  7. Pure oxygen ventilation during general anaesthesia does not result in increased postoperative respiratory morbidity but decreases surgical site infection. An observational clinical study.

    PubMed

    von Bormann, Benno; Suksompong, Sirilak; Weiler, Jürgen; Zander, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pure oxygen ventilation during anaesthesia is debatable, as it may lead to development of atelectasis. Rationale of the study was to demonstrate the harmlessness of ventilation with pure oxygen. Methods. This is a single-centre, one-department observational trial. Prospectively collected routine-data of 76,784 patients undergoing general, gynaecological, orthopaedic, and vascular surgery during 1995-2009 were retrospectively analysed. Postoperative hypoxia, unplanned ICU-admission, surgical site infection (SSI), postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), and hospital mortality were continuously recorded. During 1996 the anaesthetic ventilation for all patients was changed from 30% oxygen plus 70% nitrous oxide to 100% oxygen in low-flow mode. Therefore, in order to minimize the potential of confounding due to a variety of treatments being used, we directly compared years 1995 (30% oxygen) and 1997 (100%), whereas the period 1998 to 2009 is simply described. Results. Comparing 1995 to 1997 pure oxygen ventilation led to a decreased incidence of postoperative hypoxic events (4.3 to 3.0%; p < 0.0001) and hospital mortality (2.1 to 1.6%; p = 0.088) as well as SSI (8.0 to 5.0%; p < 0.0001) and PONV (21.6 to 17.5%; p < 0.0001). There was no effect on unplanned ICU-admission (1.1 to 0.9; p = 0.18). Conclusions. The observed effects may be partly due to pure oxygen ventilation, abandonment of nitrous oxide, and application of low-flow anesthesia. Pure oxygen ventilation during general anaesthesia is harmless, as long as certain standards are adhered to. It makes anaesthesia simpler and safer and may reduce clinical morbidity, such as postoperative hypoxia and surgical site infection.

  8. Improving Settling Characteristics of Pure Oxygen Activated Sludge by Stripping of Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kundral, Somshekhar; Mudragada, Ratnaji; Coro, Ernesto; Moncholi, Manny; Mora, Nelson; Laha, Shonali; Tansel, Berrin

    2015-06-01

    Increased microbial activity at high ambient temperatures can be problematic for secondary clarifiers and gravity concentrators due to carbon dioxide (CO2) production. Production of CO2 in gravity concentrators leads to septic conditions and poor solids separation. The CO2 production can also be corrosive for the concrete surfaces. Effectiveness of CO2 stripping to improve solids settling was investigated using the sludge volume index (SVI) as the indicator parameter. Carbon dioxide was stripped by aeration from the sludge samples. Results from the study show that aeration also increased the pH values in the mixed liquor while removing CO2 and improving sludge settling. After 10 minutes of aeration at a rate of 0.37 m3 air/m3 water/min, 90% CO2 stripping was achieved. Based on the 30 min settling tests, the SVI increased by 26±1% after CO2 stripping while the pH increased by 0.8±0.1 pH units.

  9. 78 FR 73914 - In the Matter of ICC Worldwide, Inc., Innova Pure Water, Inc., Paladin Holdings, Inc., Performing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION In the Matter of ICC Worldwide, Inc., Innova Pure Water, Inc., Paladin Holdings, Inc., Performing... accurate information concerning the securities of Innova Pure Water, Inc. because it has not filed...

  10. The Anoxic Corrosion of Copper in Pure Water and Chloride Rich Brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilic, Emilija

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is developing an approach for the permanent geological disposal of nuclear waste. The waste will be encased in copper coated used fuel containers (UFCs) and placed in a deep geological repository (DGR). To support the NWMO in their investigations on the long-term corrosion of copper a lab scale simulation of the DGR environment was created. Copper wires were placed in glass electrochemical cells and exposed to one of two environments; pure anoxic water or chloride-rich anoxic brine. The systems were allowed to freely corrode and accumulate hydrogen within their headspaces over extended durations at 30 to 75 °C. The hydrogen was periodically purged and subsequently analyzed using a highly sensitive amperometric sensor; these measurements were utilized to calculate the corresponding copper corrosion rates. Corrosion with hydrogen evolution was demonstrated in both pure water and brines at slow rates below 1 and 10 nm/year, respectively.

  11. Droplet evaporation of pure water and protein solution on nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces of varying heights.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2009-07-07

    Evaporation of liquids on substrates is important for many applications including lab-on-a-chip, especially when they are in droplets. Unlike on planar substrates, droplet evaporation on micropatterned substrates has been studied only recently and none so far on nanopatterns. Driven by the applicability of nanostructured surfaces to biomaterials and tissue engineering, we report on the evaporative process of sessile droplets of pure water and a protein solution on superhydrophobic surfaces of sharp-tip post structures in a submicrometer pitch (230 nm) and varying heights (100-500 nm). We find that the nanotopographical three-dimensionalities such as structural height and sidewall profile affect the surface superhydrophobicity in such a way that only tall and slender nanostructures provide the surface with great superhydrophobicity (a contact angle more than 170 degrees). The evaporation process was different between the pure water and the protein solution; unlike pure water, a significant contact-line spreading and pinning effect was observed in a droplet of a protein solution with an intermediate transition from a dewetting (Cassie) to a wetting (Wenzel) state. Enabled by well-defined nanostructures, our results highlight that the surface superhydrophobicity and the droplet evaporation are significantly affected by the three-dimensional nanometric topography and the surface fouling such as protein adsorption.

  12. Generation of Radio Frequency Plasmas in Pure Water within Hole in Insulating Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehara, Tsunehiro; Matsutomo, Shinya; Yamamoto, Shin; Mukasa, Shinobu; Tanaka, Ayaka; Kawashima, Ayato

    2015-09-01

    Recently, various types of plasmas in water have been investigated. In some cases, it has been observed that plasmas in water are not in contact with the metal electrodes. In these systems, no metal electrodes contaminate water. Our research group has carried out experimental investigations on RF plasma enclosed in a bubble within a hole in an insulating plate. RF power was applied between two electrodes, and an insulating plate was placed between them. RF plasmas in pure water (0.2mS/m) and 1 wt% NaCl solution can be generated within the hole, apart from the electrodes. When hole diameter is 3-10 mm, the plasmas can be maintained stably. From finite element method, the electric field and heat density before breakdown were estimated, and on the basis of those calculations it was shown that bubble formation is a key factor for plasma generation, that is, in both the cases, the existence of a bubble increases the electric field at the side of the bubble increases. These facts suggest plasma generation occurs at around the side of the bubble. However, solution can be treated as a conductor in 1 wt% NaCl solution. On the other hand, in pure water, water behaves as an insulator. Therefore, different mechanisms lead to the plasma generation.

  13. Direct exfoliation and dispersion of two-dimensional materials in pure water via temperature control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinseon; Kwon, Sanghyuk; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Kang, Byunggil; Kwon, Hyukjoon; Kim, Youngchan; Park, Sung O.; Jung, Gwan Yeong; Shin, Eunhye; Kim, Wan-Gu; Lee, Hyungdong; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Choi, Minseok; Kim, Tae Hyeong; Oh, Junghoon; Park, Sungjin; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Yoon, Suk Wang; Byun, Doyoung; Lee, Zonghoon; Lee, Changgu

    2015-01-01

    The high-volume synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) materials in the form of platelets is desirable for various applications. While water is considered an ideal dispersion medium, due to its abundance and low cost, the hydrophobicity of platelet surfaces has prohibited its widespread use. Here we exfoliate 2D materials directly in pure water without using any chemicals or surfactants. In order to exfoliate and disperse the materials in water, we elevate the temperature of the sonication bath, and introduce energy via the dissipation of sonic waves. Storage stability greater than one month is achieved through the maintenance of high temperatures, and through atomic and molecular level simulations, we further discover that good solubility in water is maintained due to the presence of platelet surface charges as a result of edge functionalization or intrinsic polarity. Finally, we demonstrate inkjet printing on hard and flexible substrates as a potential application of water-dispersed 2D materials. PMID:26369895

  14. A new hematite photoanode doping strategy for solar water splitting: oxygen vacancy generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae-Youl; Kang, Ho-Young; Sim, Uk; Lee, Young-Joo; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Koo, Byungjin; Nam, Ki Tae; Joo, Young-Chang

    2013-02-14

    The enhancement of the electrical conductivity by doping is important in hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) photoanodes for efficient solar water oxidation. However, in spite of many successful demonstrations using extrinsic dopants, such as Sn, Ti, and Si, the achieved photocurrent is still lower than the practical requirement. There is still lack of our understanding of how intrinsic oxygen defects can change the photocurrent and interact with the extrinsic dopants. In this study, we systematically investigate the interplay of oxygen vacancies and extrinsic Sn dopants in the context of photoanodic properties. As a result, we demonstrate that the controlled generation of oxygen vacancies can activate the photoactivity of pure hematite remarkably and further enhance the Sn doping effects synergistically. Furthermore, the correlated behavior of oxygen vacancies and Sn dopants is closely linked to the variation of electrical conductance and results in the optimum concentration region to show the high photocurrent and low onset voltage.

  15. The oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation between sulfite species and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Inigo A.; Brunner, Benjamin; Breuer, Christian; Coleman, Max; Bach, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Sulfite is an important sulfoxy intermediate in oxidative and reductive sulfur cycling in the marine and terrestrial environment. Different aqueous sulfite species exist, such as dissolved sulfur dioxide (SO2), bisulfite (HSO3-), pyrosulfite (S2O52-) and sulfite sensu stricto (SO32-), whereas their relative abundance in solution depends on the concentration and the pH. Conversion of one species into another is rapid and involves in many cases incorporation of oxygen from, or release of oxygen to, water (e.g. SO2 + H2O ↔ HSO3- + H+), resulting in rapid oxygen isotope exchange between sulfite species and water. Consequently, the oxygen isotope composition of sulfite is strongly influenced by the oxygen isotope composition of water. Since sulfate does not exchange oxygen isotopes with water under most earth surface conditions, it can preserve the sulfite oxygen isotope signature that it inherits via oxidative and reductive sulfur cycling. Therefore, interpretation of δO values strongly hinges on the oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation between sulfite and water which is poorly constrained. This is in large part due to technical difficulties in extraction of sulfite from solution for oxygen isotope analysis.

  16. Origin of hydrophobicity and enhanced water hydrogen bond strength near purely hydrophobic solutes

    PubMed Central

    Grdadolnik, Joze; Merzel, Franci; Avbelj, Franc

    2017-01-01

    Hydrophobicity plays an important role in numerous physicochemical processes from the process of dissolution in water to protein folding, but its origin at the fundamental level is still unclear. The classical view of hydrophobic hydration is that, in the presence of a hydrophobic solute, water forms transient microscopic “icebergs” arising from strengthened water hydrogen bonding, but there is no experimental evidence for enhanced hydrogen bonding and/or icebergs in such solutions. Here, we have used the redshifts and line shapes of the isotopically decoupled IR oxygen–deuterium (O-D) stretching mode of HDO water near small purely hydrophobic solutes (methane, ethane, krypton, and xenon) to study hydrophobicity at the most fundamental level. We present unequivocal and model-free experimental proof for the presence of strengthened water hydrogen bonds near four hydrophobic solutes, matching those in ice and clathrates. The water molecules involved in the enhanced hydrogen bonds display extensive structural ordering resembling that in clathrates. The number of ice-like hydrogen bonds is 10–15 per methane molecule. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have confirmed that water molecules in the vicinity of methane form stronger, more numerous, and more tetrahedrally oriented hydrogen bonds than those in bulk water and that their mobility is restricted. We show the absence of intercalating water molecules that cause the electrostatic screening (shielding) of hydrogen bonds in bulk water as the critical element for the enhanced hydrogen bonding around a hydrophobic solute. Our results confirm the classical view of hydrophobic hydration. PMID:28028244

  17. Modeling Calcite-Water Oxygen Isotope Fractionation in Cave Calcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noronha, A. L.; Banner, J.; Jenson, J. W.; Partin, J. W.; Hardt, B. F.; Moore, M. W.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling Calcite-Water Oxygen Isotope Fractionation in Cave CalcitesMost speleothem proxy system models are concerned with modeling the effect of karst processes on cave drip water oxygen isotope ratios, generally opting for simple mixing models, and assume fractionation between calcite and water can be modeled as equilibrium. However, measured cave calcite oxygen isotope ratios are rarely in agreement with theoretically and experimentally derived predictions of equilibrium isotopic fractionation, frequently deviating from equilibrium values by up to 1 per mil. Here we use the result of 8 yrs of monthly collection of drip water and cave calcite at Jinapsan Cave, Guam to test existing models of isotope fractionation during cave calcite precipitation. We find that modeling calcite-water oxygen isotope fractionation as a Rayleigh process, and using the experimentally determined fractionation factor of Affek and Zaarur, [2014] yields good agreement with observed cave calcite oxygen isotope ratios. This confirms that drip rate is a key control on both speleothem oxygen isotope ratios and calcite deposition rate, and therefore we argue that while simple models of karst hydrology are adequate for accurate modeling of water oxygen isotope ratio, they are inadequate for accurate models of calcite oxygen isotope ratios. We provide recommendations on the minimum required site specific data for effective characterization of karst processes, and consider multi-proxy and multi-archive approaches to producing robust climate interpretations in the PRYSM [Dee et al., 2015] framework.

  18. Monitoring of glucose, salt and pure water in human whole blood: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Ullah, Hafeez; Akhtar, Munir; Sial, Muhammad Aslam; Ahmed, Ejaz; Durr-E-Sabeeh; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Hussain, Fayyaz

    2016-07-01

    Designing and implementation of non-invasive methods for glucose monitoring in blood is main focus of biomedical scientists to provide a relief from skin puncturing of diabete patient. The objective of this research work is to investigate the shape deformations and the aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) in the human blood after addition of three different analytes i) (0mM-400mM: Range) of glucose (C(6)H(12)O(6)), ii) (0mM-400mM: range) of pure salt (NaCl) and iii) (0mM- 350mM: range) of pure water (H(2)O). We have observed that the changes in the shape of individual cells from biconcave discs to spherical shapes and eventually the lysis of the cells at optimum concentration of glucose, salts and pure water. This demonstration also provides a base line to facilitate diabetes during partial diagnosis and monitoring of the glucose levels qualitatively both in research laboratories and clinical environment.

  19. Oxygen determination in oxygen-supersaturated drinking waters by NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Baumann, Thomas; Niessner, Reinhard

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, a rising number of different table waters supersaturated with oxygen have hit the market with claims of both positive health effects and an increase in athletic performance. In addition to research on the correctness of these claims and their possible physiological reasons, the appearance of oxygen supersaturation as a marketing promise also creates a need for appropriate analytical techniques allowing a rapid and reliable determination of oxygen contents in such waters. Here, we present NMR relaxometry as a possible analytical tool for such studies. NMR relaxation in oxygen supersaturated water is not only of interest in the context of monitoring the oxygen content in such drinking water products, but also might offer some interesting possibilities in medical and environmental science MRI applications. As a contact-less measuring method, NMR relaxometry avoids disturbance of the measurement due to outgassing. The method was applied in the concentration range from 10 mg l(-1) to over 100 mg l(-1) dissolved oxygen. In addition to freshly sampled drinking waters, also oxygen losses during storage of the water in open drinking vials was studied.

  20. Oxygen, nutrients, carbon and water exchange in the Skagerrak Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aure, Jan; Dahl, Einar

    1994-08-01

    The mean oxygen depletion rate at 600 m depth in the Skagerrak basin water was 0.04 ml l -1 per month between 1955 and 1991 and in the mean oxygen minimum concentration 5.6 ml l -1. No indication of long-term increase in oxygen depletion rate or decrease in oxygen minimum concentration was observed. The average period between major inflows to the Skagerrak Basin was about 25 months. The extra low oxygen minimum level observed in 1990 (4.8 ml l -1) was explained by the prolonged residence time (40 months) of the basin water between 1987 and 1991. The volume mean oxygen consumption rate ( CONS) was 0.055 ml l -1 per month during the stagnation period 1987-1991 and the volume mean oxygen depletion rate ( DEPL) contributed about 75% to CONS. The vertical diffusive flux of oxygen ( DIFF) into the basin water then reduced the oxygen depletion rate with about 25%. The total supply of particulate carbon below the 350 m level was estimated to about 430 000 ton y -1 (43 ton km -2 y -1), the total nitrogen supply about 80 000 ton y -1 and phosphorus 11 000 ton y -1. Assuming that the organic matter is composed according to Redfield ratios, we also found that a substantial denitrification process must take place in the bottom sediments (30-50%). The main source of organic matter to the Skagerrak Basin Water seems to be the North Sea.

  1. Ultra-pure, water-dispersed Au nanoparticles produced by femtosecond laser ablation and fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kubiliūtė, Reda; Maximova, Ksenia A; Lajevardipour, Alireza; Yong, Jiawey; Hartley, Jennifer S; Mohsin, Abu SM; Blandin, Pierre; Chon, James WM; Sentis, Marc; Stoddart, Paul R; Kabashin, Andrei; Rotomskis, Ričardas; Clayton, Andrew HA; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of ultra-pure gold nanoparticles have been prepared by methods of femtosecond laser ablation from a solid target and fragmentation from already formed colloids. Despite the absence of protecting ligands, the solutions could be (1) fairly stable and poly size-dispersed; or (2) very stable and monodispersed, for the two fabrication modalities, respectively. Fluorescence quenching behavior and its intricacies were revealed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in rhodamine 6G water solution. We show that surface-enhanced Raman scattering of rhodamine 6G on gold nanoparticles can be detected with high fidelity down to micromolar concentrations using the nanoparticles. Application potential of pure gold nanoparticles with polydispersed and nearly monodispersed size distributions are discussed. PMID:23888114

  2. Ultra-pure, water-dispersed Au nanoparticles produced by femtosecond laser ablation and fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Kubiliūtė, Reda; Maximova, Ksenia A; Lajevardipour, Alireza; Yong, Jiawey; Hartley, Jennifer S; Mohsin, Abu S M; Blandin, Pierre; Chon, James W M; Sentis, Marc; Stoddart, Paul R; Kabashin, Andrei; Rotomskis, Ričardas; Clayton, Andrew H A; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of ultra-pure gold nanoparticles have been prepared by methods of femtosecond laser ablation from a solid target and fragmentation from already formed colloids. Despite the absence of protecting ligands, the solutions could be (1) fairly stable and poly size-dispersed; or (2) very stable and monodispersed, for the two fabrication modalities, respectively. Fluorescence quenching behavior and its intricacies were revealed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy in rhodamine 6G water solution. We show that surface-enhanced Raman scattering of rhodamine 6G on gold nanoparticles can be detected with high fidelity down to micromolar concentrations using the nanoparticles. Application potential of pure gold nanoparticles with polydispersed and nearly monodispersed size distributions are discussed.

  3. Effect of different carbon sources on the biological phosphorus removal by a sequencing batch reactor using pressurized pure oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jie; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Higuchi, Takaya; Arfarita, Novi; Yamamoto, Koichi; Sekine, Masahiko; Kanno, Ariyo

    2014-01-01

    The effect of different carbon source on the efficiency of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from synthetic wastewater with acetate and two ratios of acetate/starch as a carbon source was investigated. Three pressurized pure oxygen sequencing batch reactor (POSBR) experiments were operated. The reactors (POSBR1, POSBR2 and POSBR3) were developed and studied at different carbon source ratios of 100% acetate, 75% acetate plus 25% starch and 50% acetate plus 50% starch, respectively. The results showed that POSBR1 had a higher phosphate release-to-uptake ratio and, respectively, in a much higher phosphorus removal efficiency (93.8%) than POSBR2 (84.7%) and POSBR3 (77.3%) within 30 days of operation. This indicated that the phosphorus removal efficiency decreased the higher the starch concentration was. It was also found that POSBR1 produced more polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) than the other reactors. Based on the effect of the carbon source on the PHA concentration and consumption, the conditions of POSBR1 were favourable for the growth of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms and therefore, beneficial for the biological phosphorus removal process. PMID:26019532

  4. Effect of different carbon sources on the biological phosphorus removal by a sequencing batch reactor using pressurized pure oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Higuchi, Takaya; Arfarita, Novi; Yamamoto, Koichi; Sekine, Masahiko; Kanno, Ariyo

    2014-05-04

    The effect of different carbon source on the efficiency of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from synthetic wastewater with acetate and two ratios of acetate/starch as a carbon source was investigated. Three pressurized pure oxygen sequencing batch reactor (POSBR) experiments were operated. The reactors (POSBR1, POSBR2 and POSBR3) were developed and studied at different carbon source ratios of 100% acetate, 75% acetate plus 25% starch and 50% acetate plus 50% starch, respectively. The results showed that POSBR1 had a higher phosphate release-to-uptake ratio and, respectively, in a much higher phosphorus removal efficiency (93.8%) than POSBR2 (84.7%) and POSBR3 (77.3%) within 30 days of operation. This indicated that the phosphorus removal efficiency decreased the higher the starch concentration was. It was also found that POSBR1 produced more polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) than the other reactors. Based on the effect of the carbon source on the PHA concentration and consumption, the conditions of POSBR1 were favourable for the growth of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms and therefore, beneficial for the biological phosphorus removal process.

  5. Deep oxygenated ground water: Anomaly or common occurrence?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winograd, I.J.; Robertson, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    Contrary to the prevailing notion that oxygen-depleting reactions in the soil zone and in the aquifer rapidly reduce the dissolved oxygen content of recharge water to detection limits, 2 to 8 milligrams per liter of dissolved oxygen is present in water from a variety of deep (100 to 1000 meters) aquifers in Nevada, Arizona, and the hot springs of the folded Appalachians and Arkansas. Most of the waters sampled are several thousand to more than 10,000 years old, and some are 80 kilometers from their point of recharge. Copyright ?? 1982 AAAS.

  6. Kinetic study and oxygen transfer efficiency evaluation using respirometric methods in a submerged membrane bioreactor using pure oxygen to supply the aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Francisco A; Poyatos, José M; Reboleiro-Rivas, Patricia; Osorio, Francisco; González-López, Jesús; Hontoria, Ernesto

    2011-05-01

    The performance of a wastewater bench-scale ultrafiltration membrane bioreactor (MBR) treatment plant using pure oxygen to supply the aerobic conditions for 95 days was studied. The results showed the capacity of the MBR systems to remove organic material under a hydraulic retention time of 12h and a sludge retention time of 39.91 days. Aeration represents its major power input; this is why the alpha-factor of the aeration and kinetic parameters (design parameters) were determined when the mixed liquid suspended solids (MLSS) was increased from 3420 to 12,600 mg/l in order to understand the system. An alpha-factor in the range 0.462-0.022 and the kinetic parameters measured with the respirometric method (K(M) of 73.954-3.647 mg/l, k(d) of 0.0142-0.104 day(-1), k(H) of 0.1266-0.655 day(-1), and the yield mean coefficient of 0.941) were obtained. Our study suggested significant changes in the behaviour of the biological system when the concentration of MLSS was increased.

  7. Tracer study of oxygen and hydrogen uptake by Mg alloys in air with water vapor

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, M. P.; Fayek, M.; Meyer, H. M.; ...

    2015-05-15

    We studied the pure oxidation of Mg, Mg–3Al–1Zn (AZ31B), and Mg–1Zn–0.25Zr–<0.5Nd (ZE10A) at 85 °C in humid air using sequential exposures with H218O and D216O for water vapor. Incorporation of 18O in the hydroxide/oxide films indicated that oxygen from water vapor participated in the reaction. Moreover, penetration of hydrogen into the underlying metal was observed, particularly for the Zr- and Nd-containing ZE10A. Isotopic tracer profiles suggested a complex mixed inward/outward film growth mechanism.

  8. A pathway of nanocrystallite fabrication by photo-assisted growth in pure water

    PubMed Central

    Jeem, Melbert; bin Julaihi, Muhammad Rafiq Mirza; Ishioka, Junya; Yatsu, Shigeo; Okamoto, Kazumasa; Shibayama, Tamaki; Iwasaki, Tomio; Kato, Takahiko; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    We report a new production pathway for a variety of metal oxide nanocrystallites via submerged illumination in water: submerged photosynthesis of crystallites (SPSC). Similar to the growth of green plants by photosynthesis, nanocrystallites shaped as nanoflowers and nanorods are hereby shown to grow at the protruded surfaces via illumination in pure, neutral water. The process is photocatalytic, accompanied with hydroxyl radical generation via water splitting; hydrogen gas is generated in some cases, which indicates potential for application in green technologies. Together with the aid of ab initio calculation, it turns out that the nanobumped surface, as well as aqueous ambience and illumination are essential for the SPSC method. Therefore, SPSC is a surfactant-free, low-temperature technique for metal oxide nanocrystallites fabrication. PMID:26076674

  9. Direct Substitution of Alcohols in Pure Water by Brønsted Acid Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Rosa; Herrera, Raquel P

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing concern for sustainability, the use of environmentally friendly media to perform chemical processes has attracted the attention of many research groups. Among them, the use of water, as the unique solvent for reactions, is currently an active area of research. One process of particular interest is the direct nucleophilic substitution of an alcohol avoiding its preliminary transformation into a good leaving group, since one of the by-products in this approach would be water. The direct substitution of allylic, benzylic, and tertiary alcohols has been achieved through SN1-type reactions with catalytic amounts of Brønsted or Lewis acids; however, organic solvents are often required. In this review, the pioneering SN1 approaches performed in pure water and in the absence of a metal based Lewis acid are compiled and discussed.

  10. Benzoic Acid and Chlorobenzoic Acids: Thermodynamic Study of the Pure Compounds and Binary Mixtures With Water.

    PubMed

    Reschke, Thomas; Zherikova, Kseniya V; Verevkin, Sergey P; Held, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Benzoic acid is a model compound for drug substances in pharmaceutical research. Process design requires information about thermodynamic phase behavior of benzoic acid and its mixtures with water and organic solvents. This work addresses phase equilibria that determine stability and solubility. In this work, Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT) was used to model the phase behavior of aqueous and organic solutions containing benzoic acid and chlorobenzoic acids. Absolute vapor pressures of benzoic acid and 2-, 3-, and 4-chlorobenzoic acid from literature and from our own measurements were used to determine pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. Two binary interaction parameters between water and/or benzoic acid were used to model vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibria of water and/or benzoic acid between 280 and 413 K. The PC-SAFT parameters and 1 binary interaction parameter were used to model aqueous solubility of the chlorobenzoic acids. Additionally, solubility of benzoic acid in organic solvents was predicted without using binary parameters. All results showed that pure-component parameters for benzoic acid and for the chlorobenzoic acids allowed for satisfying modeling phase equilibria. The modeling approach established in this work is a further step to screen solubility and to predict the whole phase region of mixtures containing pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An oxygen slow-releasing material and its application in water remediation as oxygen supplier.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanbo; Fang, Xingbin; Zhang, Zhiqing; Hu, Yonghua; Lu, Jun

    2017-01-12

    In this study, an oxygen slow-releasing material (OSRM) consisting of calcium peroxide (CaO2), stearic acid (SA) and quartz sand was used to improve oxygen supply during bioremediation. The oxygen-releasing rates of CaO2 powder and OSRM with different SA contents were investigated. The efficacy of OSRM as an oxygen supplier was assessed by water remediation experiments using activated sludge. Results showed that CaO2 powder was effectively embedded by SA under anhydrous conditions. The oxygen-releasing rate decreased with increasing SA contents. Moreover, the OSRM exhibited higher oxygen-releasing capacity, and more effective pH control ability than CaO2 powder. The water remediation experiments showed better removal of COD and [Formula: see text] with OSRM as the oxygen supplier. These results provided detailed information when CaO2 was applied as the oxygen supplier in water remediation, which can serve as references for field application of bioremediation.

  12. Energetic behavior of the pure silica ITQ-12 (ITW) zeolite under high pressure water intrusion.

    PubMed

    Khay, Ismail; Tzanis, Lydie; Daou, T Jean; Nouali, Habiba; Ryzhikov, Andrey; Patarin, Joël

    2013-12-14

    Experimental water intrusion-extrusion isotherms were obtained at room temperature on pure silica ITW-type zeolites (ITQ-12 zeosil). The water intrusion is obtained by applying a high hydraulic pressure corresponding to the intrusion step. When the pressure is released, the water extrusion occurs at a similar pressure to that of the intrusion one. Therefore, the "ITW zeosil-water" system behaves like a spring and the phenomenon is reproducible over several cycles. Several characterization techniques have been performed before and after water intrusion-extrusion experiments in order to reveal the presence or the lack of defects after such experiments. Structural modifications at the long range order cannot be observed by XRD analysis after three water intrusion-extrusion cycles. However, solid state NMR spectroscopy provides evidence of the presence of Q3 groups revealing the breaking of some siloxane bridges after the intrusion step. The "ITW zeosil-water" system can restore 100% of the stored energy corresponding to about 8 J g(-1).

  13. Ultraviolet (250-550  nm) absorption spectrum of pure water.

    PubMed

    Mason, John D; Cone, Michael T; Fry, Edward S

    2016-09-01

    Data for the spectral light absorption of pure water from 250 to 550 nm have been obtained using an integrating cavity made from a newly developed diffuse reflector with a very high UV reflectivity. The data provide the first scattering-independent measurements of absorption coefficients in the spectral gap between well-established literature values for the absorption coefficients in the visible (>400  nm) and UV (<200  nm). A minimum in the absorption coefficient has been observed in the UV at 344 nm; the value is 0.000811±0.000227  m-1.

  14. Discharge characteristics in liquid helium, liquid nitrogen and pure water preparatory to fabrication of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Shigematsu, Toshinobu; Imasaka, Kiminobu; Ohshima, Tamiko; Yagyu, Yoshihito; Suda, Yoshiaki

    2012-12-01

    Discharge characteristics and emission spectra of the discharges in low-temperature liquid such as liquid helium have been measured to investigate the conditions for fabrication of carbon nanomaterial by arc discharge in low-temperature liquid. Measurements of the discharge characteristics of the resulting plasma and observation of the associated optical emission spectra show that the behaviour of discharge current over time and the associated spectra depend strongly on discharge voltage and both may be related to the temperature of the carbon target. However, discharge voltage and current with time are almost the same regardless of whether the liquid is pure water, liquid nitrogen, liquid helium and superfluid liquid helium

  15. Electron-beam-assisted oxygen purification at low temperatures for electron-beam-induced pt deposits: towards pure and high-fidelity nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Plank, Harald; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lester, Kevin; Lewis, Brett B; Rack, Philip D

    2014-01-22

    Nanoscale metal deposits written directly by electron-beam-induced deposition, or EBID, are typically contaminated because of the incomplete removal of the original organometallic precursor. This has greatly limited the applicability of EBID materials synthesis, constraining the otherwise powerful direct-write synthesis paradigm. We demonstrate a low-temperature purification method in which platinum-carbon nanostructures deposited from MeCpPtIVMe3 are purified by the presence of oxygen gas during a post-electron exposure treatment. Deposit thickness, oxygen pressure, and oxygen temperature studies suggest that the dominant mechanism is the electron-stimulated reaction of oxygen molecules adsorbed at the defective deposit surface. Notably, pure platinum deposits with low resistivity and retain the original deposit fidelity were accomplished at an oxygen temperature of only 50 °C.

  16. A Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Evolution and Oxygen Reduction Reactions in Water

    PubMed Central

    Faschinger, Felix; Chattopadhyay, Samir; Bhakta, Snehadri; Mondal, Biswajit; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.; Müllegger, Stefan; Tebi, Stefano; Koch, Reinhold; Klappenberger, Florian; Paszkiewicz, Mateusz; Barth, Johannes V.; Rauls, Eva; Aldahhak, Hazem; Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oxygen reduction and water oxidation are two key processes in fuel cell applications. The oxidation of water to dioxygen is a 4 H+/4 e− process, while oxygen can be fully reduced to water by a 4 e−/4 H+ process or partially reduced by fewer electrons to reactive oxygen species such as H2O2 and O2 −. We demonstrate that a novel manganese corrole complex behaves as a bifunctional catalyst for both the electrocatalytic generation of dioxygen as well as the reduction of dioxygen in aqueous media. Furthermore, our combined kinetic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical study of manganese corroles adsorbed on different electrode materials (down to a submolecular level) reveals mechanistic details of the oxygen evolution and reduction processes. PMID:26773287

  17. A Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Evolution and Oxygen Reduction Reactions in Water

    PubMed Central

    Faschinger, Felix; Chattopadhyay, Samir; Bhakta, Snehadri; Mondal, Biswajit; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.; Müllegger, Stefan; Tebi, Stefano; Koch, Reinhold; Klappenberger, Florian; Paszkiewicz, Mateusz; Barth, Johannes V.; Rauls, Eva; Aldahhak, Hazem; Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oxygen reduction and water oxidation are two key processes in fuel cell applications. The oxidation of water to dioxygen is a 4 H+/4 e− process, while oxygen can be fully reduced to water by a 4 e−/4 H+ process or partially reduced by fewer electrons to reactive oxygen species such as H2O2 and O2 −. We demonstrate that a novel manganese corrole complex behaves as a bifunctional catalyst for both the electrocatalytic generation of dioxygen as well as the reduction of dioxygen in aqueous media. Furthermore, our combined kinetic, spectroscopic, and electrochemical study of manganese corroles adsorbed on different electrode materials (down to a submolecular level) reveals mechanistic details of the oxygen evolution and reduction processes. PMID:27478281

  18. Oxygen Isotopic Analyses of Water Extracted from Lunar Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn Martinez, M.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen exists in lunar materials in distinct phases having unique sources and equilibration histories. The oxygen isotopic composition (δ17O, δ18O) of various components of lunar materials has been studied extensively, but analyses of water in these samples are relatively sparse [1-3]. Samples collected on the lunar surface reflect not only the composition of their source reservoirs but also contributions from asteroidal and cometary impacts, interactions with solar wind and cosmic radiation, among other surface processes. Isotopic characterization of oxygen in lunar water could help resolve the major source of water in the Earth-Moon system by revealing if lunar water is primordial, asteroidal, or cometary in origin [1]. Methods: A lunar rock/soil sample is pumped to high vacuum to remove physisorbed water before heating step-wise to 50, 150, and 1000°C to extract extraterrestrial water without terrestrial contamination. The temperature at which water is evolved is proportional to the strength with which the water is bound in the sample and the relative difficulty of exchanging oxygen atoms in that water. This allows for the isolated extraction of water bound in different phases, which could have different source reservoirs and/or histories, as evidenced by the mass (in)dependence of oxygen compositions. A low blank procedure was developed to accommodate the low water content of lunar material [4]. Results: Oxygen isotopic analyses of lunar water extracted by stepwise heating lunar basalts and breccias with a range of compositions, petrologic types, and surface exposure ages will be presented. The cosmic ray exposure age of these samples varies by two orders of magnitude, and we will consider this in discussing the effects of solar wind and cosmic radiation on the oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O). I will examine the implications of our water analyses for the composition of the oxygen-bearing reservoir from which that water formed, the effects of surface

  19. Water induced dismutation of superoxide anion generates singlet molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Corey, E J; Mehrotra, M M; Khan, A U

    1987-06-15

    Direct spectroscopic measurement of 1268 nm singlet oxygen emission from KO2 suspensions at room temperature in three non-protonic solvents--CCl4, Cl2FCCClF2, and C6F14 by the action of water is reported. The results clearly show that the singlet oxygen generation is due to a water induced reaction, and suggest that one role of the enzyme superoxide dismutase may be the protection of biological structures, for example, lipid membranes, from degradation by singlet oxygen.

  20. Regeneration of oxygen from carbon dioxide and water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissbart, J.; Smart, W. H.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    In a closed ecological system it is necessary to reclaim most of the oxygen required for breathing from respired carbon dioxide and the remainder from waste water. One of the advanced physicochemical systems being developed for generating oxygen in manned spacecraft is the solid electrolyte-electrolysis system. The solid electrolyte system consists of two basic units, an electrolyzer and a carbon monoxide disproportionator. The electrolyzer can reclaim oxygen from both carbon dioxide and water. Electrolyzer preparation and assembly are discussed together with questions of reactor design and electrolyzer performance data.

  1. Regeneration of oxygen from carbon dioxide and water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissbart, J.; Smart, W. H.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    In a closed ecological system it is necessary to reclaim most of the oxygen required for breathing from respired carbon dioxide and the remainder from waste water. One of the advanced physicochemical systems being developed for generating oxygen in manned spacecraft is the solid electrolyte-electrolysis system. The solid electrolyte system consists of two basic units, an electrolyzer and a carbon monoxide disproportionator. The electrolyzer can reclaim oxygen from both carbon dioxide and water. Electrolyzer preparation and assembly are discussed together with questions of reactor design and electrolyzer performance data.

  2. Denatured Mammalian Protein Mixtures Exhibit Unusually High Solubility in Nucleic Acid-Free Pure Water

    PubMed Central

    Futami, Junichiro; Fujiyama, Haruna; Kinoshita, Rie; Nonomura, Hidenori; Honjo, Tomoko; Tada, Hiroko; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Abe, Yoshito; Kakimi, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is a major goal of biotechnology. Since protein aggregates are mainly comprised of unfolded proteins, protecting against denaturation is likely to assist solubility in an aqueous medium. Contrary to this concept, we found denatured total cellular protein mixture from mammalian cell kept high solubility in pure water when the mixture was nucleic acids free. The lysates were prepared from total cellular protein pellet extracted by using guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform mixture of TRIzol, denatured and reduced total protein mixtures remained soluble after extensive dialysis against pure water. The total cell protein lysates contained fully disordered proteins that readily formed large aggregates upon contact with nucleic acids or salts. These findings suggested that the highly flexible mixtures of disordered proteins, which have fully ionized side chains, are protected against aggregation. Interestingly, this unusual solubility is characteristic of protein mixtures from higher eukaryotes, whereas most prokaryotic protein mixtures were aggregated under identical conditions. This unusual solubility of unfolded protein mixtures could have implications for the study of intrinsically disordered proteins in a variety of cells. PMID:25405999

  3. Denatured mammalian protein mixtures exhibit unusually high solubility in nucleic acid-free pure water.

    PubMed

    Futami, Junichiro; Fujiyama, Haruna; Kinoshita, Rie; Nonomura, Hidenori; Honjo, Tomoko; Tada, Hiroko; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Abe, Yoshito; Kakimi, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is a major goal of biotechnology. Since protein aggregates are mainly comprised of unfolded proteins, protecting against denaturation is likely to assist solubility in an aqueous medium. Contrary to this concept, we found denatured total cellular protein mixture from mammalian cell kept high solubility in pure water when the mixture was nucleic acids free. The lysates were prepared from total cellular protein pellet extracted by using guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform mixture of TRIzol, denatured and reduced total protein mixtures remained soluble after extensive dialysis against pure water. The total cell protein lysates contained fully disordered proteins that readily formed large aggregates upon contact with nucleic acids or salts. These findings suggested that the highly flexible mixtures of disordered proteins, which have fully ionized side chains, are protected against aggregation. Interestingly, this unusual solubility is characteristic of protein mixtures from higher eukaryotes, whereas most prokaryotic protein mixtures were aggregated under identical conditions. This unusual solubility of unfolded protein mixtures could have implications for the study of intrinsically disordered proteins in a variety of cells.

  4. Measuring optical absorption coefficient of pure water in UV using the integrating cavity absorption meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling

    2008-10-01

    The integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) has been used successfully to measure the low absorption coefficient of pure water. The ICAM produces an effective total path length of several meters or even longer, although the physical size of the instrument is only several centimeters. The long effective total path length ensures a high sensitivity that enables the ICAM to measure liquid mediums with low absorption. Compared to the conventional transmission type of instruments that were used to measure the same medium with the same path length, the ICAM eliminates the effect of scattering by introducing isotropic illumination in the medium, and consequently measures the true absorption coefficient of the medium in stead of the attenuation coefficient. The original ICAM was constructed with Spectralon and used in the wavelength range from 380 nm to 700 nm. Later studies showed that Spectralon is not suitable for measurements in the UV region because of its relatively lower reflectivity in this region and, even worse, the continuously decaying reflectivity under the exposure to UV radiation. Thus, we have developed a new way to construct the ICAM utilizing the material fumed silica. The resulting ICAM has a high sensitivity even in the UV region and doesn't have the deterioration problem. The measurement results from the new ICAM are in good agreement with the existing results. The absorption coefficients of pure water at wavelengths between 250 nm and 400 nm are presented here.

  5. Chemical etching of silicon carbide in pure water by using platinum catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isohashi, Ai; Bui, P. V.; Toh, D.; Matsuyama, S.; Sano, Y.; Inagaki, K.; Morikawa, Y.; Yamauchi, K.

    2017-05-01

    Chemical etching of SiC was found to proceed in pure water with the assistance of a Pt catalyst. A 4H-SiC (0001) wafer was placed and slid on a polishing pad in pure water, on which a thin Pt film was deposited to give a catalytic nature. Etching of the wafer surface was observed to remove protrusions preferentially by interacting with the Pt film more frequently, thus flattening the surface. In the case of an on-axis wafer, a crystallographically ordered surface was obtained with a straight step-and-terrace structure, the height of which corresponds to that of an atomic bilayer of Si and C. The etching rate depended upon the electrochemical potential of Pt. The vicinal surface was observed at the potential at which the Pt surface was bare. The primary etching mechanism was hydrolysis with the assistance of a Pt catalyst. This method can, therefore, be used as an environmentally friendly and sustainable technology.

  6. Photodegradation kinetics and transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol in pure water and treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Salgado, R; Pereira, V J; Carvalho, G; Soeiro, R; Gaffney, V; Almeida, C; Vale Cardoso, V; Ferreira, E; Benoliel, M J; Ternes, T A; Oehmen, A; Reis, M A M; Noronha, J P

    2013-01-15

    Pharmaceutical compounds such as ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol are frequently detected at relatively high concentrations in secondary effluents from wastewater treatment plants. Therefore, it is important to assess their transformation kinetics and intermediates in subsequent disinfection processes, such as direct ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The photodegradation kinetics of these compounds using a medium pressure (MP) lamp was assessed in pure water, as well as in filtered and unfiltered treated wastewater. Ketoprofen had the highest time- and fluence-based rate constants in all experiments, whereas atenolol had the lowest values, which is consistent with the corresponding decadic molar absorption coefficient and quantum yield. The fluence-based rate constants of all compounds were evaluated in filtered and unfiltered wastewater matrices as well as in pure water. Furthermore, transformation products of ketoprofen, diclofenac and atenolol were identified and monitored throughout the irradiation experiments, and photodegradation pathways were proposed for each compound. This enabled the identification of persistent transformation products, which are potentially discharged from WWTP disinfection works employing UV photolysis.

  7. The influence of reactive oxygen species on local redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Redox conditions in natural waters are a fundamental control on biogeochemical processes and ultimately many ecosystem functions. While the dioxygen/water redox couple controls redox thermodynamics in oxygenated aquatic environments on geological timescales, it is kinetically inert in the extracellular environment on the much shorter timescales on which many biogeochemical processes occur. Instead, electron transfer processes on these timescales are primarily mediated by a relatively small group of trace metals and stable radicals, including the reactive oxygen species superoxide. Such processes are of critical biogeochemical importance because many of these chemical species are scarce nutrients, but may also be toxic at high concentrations. Furthermore, their bioavailability and potentially toxicity is typically strongly influenced by their redox state. In this paper, I examine to what extent redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters are expected to be reflected in the redox states of labile redox-active compounds that readily exchange electrons with the dioxygen/superoxide redox couple, and potentially with each other. Additionally, I present the hypothesis that that the relative importance of the dioxygen/superoxide and superoxide/hydrogen peroxide redox couples exerts a governing control on local redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters on biogeochemically important timescales. Given the recent discovery of widespread extracellular superoxide production by a diverse range of organisms, this suggests the existence of a fundamental mechanism for organisms to tightly regulate local redox conditions in their extracellular environment in oxygenated natural waters.

  8. Investigating Factors that Affect Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantzen, Paul G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes activities that demonstrate the effects of factors such as wind velocity, water temperature, convection currents, intensity of light, rate of photosynthesis, atmospheric pressure, humidity, numbers of decomposers, presence of oxidizable ions, and respiration by plants and animals on the dissolved oxygen concentration in water. (MA)

  9. Investigating Factors that Affect Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantzen, Paul G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes activities that demonstrate the effects of factors such as wind velocity, water temperature, convection currents, intensity of light, rate of photosynthesis, atmospheric pressure, humidity, numbers of decomposers, presence of oxidizable ions, and respiration by plants and animals on the dissolved oxygen concentration in water. (MA)

  10. Photoelectron spectroscopy of liquid water, some alcohols, and pure nonane in free micro jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubel, Manfred; Steiner, Björn; Toennies, J. Peter

    1997-06-01

    The recently developed technique of accessing volatile liquids in a high vacuum environment by using a very thin liquid jet is implemented to carry out the first measurements of photoelectron spectra of pure liquid water, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and benzyl alcohol as well as of liquid n-nonane. The apparatus, which consists of a commercial hemispherical (10 cm mean radius) electron analyzer and a hollow cathode discharge He I light source is described in detail and the problems of the sampling of the photoelectrons in such an environment are discussed. For water and most of the alcohols up to six different electronic bands could be resolved. The spectra of 1-butanol and n-nonane show two weakly discernable peaks from which the threshold ionization potential could be determined. A deconvolution of the photoelectron spectra is used to extract ionization potentials of individual molecular bands of molecules near the surface of the liquid and shifts of the order of 1 eV compared to the gas phase are observed. A molecular orientation for water molecules at the surface of liquid water is inferred from a comparison of the relative band strengths with the gas phase. Similar effects are also observed for some of the alcohols. The results are discussed in terms of a simple "Born-solvation" model.

  11. One-dimensional model for water and aqueous solutions. I. Pure liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2008-01-01

    Two simplified one-dimensional models for waterlike particles are studied. One is referred to as the primitive model which is a simplified version of a model introduced by Ben-Naim in 1992 [Statistical Thermodynamics for Chemists and Biochemists (Plenum, New York, 1992)]. The second, referred to as the primitive cluster model, is a simplified version of the model used by Lovett and Ben-Naim in 1969 [J. Chem. Phys. 51, 3108 (1969)]. The two models are shown to be nearly equivalent and both exhibit some of the most characteristic behavior of liquid water. It is argued that a key feature of the molecular interactions—the correlation between the strong binding energy and low local density—is essential for the manifestation of the anomalous behavior of liquid water. It is also essential for the understanding of the outstanding behavior of liquid water.

  12. Evaluation of Pure Oxygen Systems at the Umatilla Hatchery: Task 1-Review and Evaluation of Supplemental O2 Systems, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fish Factory

    1991-03-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council has established a goal of doubling the size of salmon runs in the Columbia River Basin. The achievement of this important goal is largely dependent upon expanding the production of hatchery fish. Pure oxygen has been commonly used to increase the carrying capacity of private sector salmonid hatcheries in the Pacific Northwest. The use of supplemental oxygen to increase hatchery production is significantly less expensive than the construction of new hatcheries and might save up to $500 million in construction costs.

  13. Oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water - An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    The oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water is studied to test the feasibility of using zeolites as low-temperature thermometers. The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between natural analcime and water is determined at 300, 350, and 400 C, and at fluid pressures ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 kbar. Also, isotope ratios for the analcime framework, the channel water, and bulk water are obtained. The results suggest that the channel water is depleted in O-18 relative to bulk water by a constant value of about 5 percent, nearly independent of temperature. The analcime-water fractionation curve is presented, showing that the exchange has little effect on grain morphology and does not involve recrystallization. The exchange is faster than any other observed for a silicate. The exchange rates suggest that zeolites in active high-temperature geothermal areas are in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient fluids. It is concluded that calibrated zeolites may be excellent low-temperature oxygen isotope geothermometers.

  14. Oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water - An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    The oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water is studied to test the feasibility of using zeolites as low-temperature thermometers. The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between natural analcime and water is determined at 300, 350, and 400 C, and at fluid pressures ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 kbar. Also, isotope ratios for the analcime framework, the channel water, and bulk water are obtained. The results suggest that the channel water is depleted in O-18 relative to bulk water by a constant value of about 5 percent, nearly independent of temperature. The analcime-water fractionation curve is presented, showing that the exchange has little effect on grain morphology and does not involve recrystallization. The exchange is faster than any other observed for a silicate. The exchange rates suggest that zeolites in active high-temperature geothermal areas are in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient fluids. It is concluded that calibrated zeolites may be excellent low-temperature oxygen isotope geothermometers.

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Estimation of Excited Species Generation in Pulsed Electron Beam-Generated Plasmas Produced in Pure Argon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Their Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-13

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6750--11-9333 Experimental and Theoretical Estimation of Excited Species Generation in ...Pulsed Electron Beam–Generated Plasmas Produced in Pure Argon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Their Mixtures May 13, 2011 Approved for public release...PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Experimental and Theoretical Estimation of Excited Species Generation in Pulsed Electron Beam

  16. Olefin oxygenation by water on an iridium center.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Tapas; Sarkar, Mithun; Dinda, Shrabani; Dutta, Indranil; Rahaman, S M Wahidur; Bera, Jitendra K

    2015-05-20

    Oxygenation of 1,5-cyclooctadiene (COD) is achieved on an iridium center using water as a reagent. A hydrogen-bonding interaction with an unbound nitrogen atom of the naphthyridine-based ligand architecture promotes nucleophilic attack of water to the metal-bound COD. Irida-oxetane and oxo-irida-allyl compounds are isolated, products which are normally accessed from reactions with H2O2 or O2. DFT studies support a ligand-assisted water activation mechanism.

  17. Correlating quartz dissolution kinetics in pure water from 25{degrees} to 625{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, Jefferson W.; Worley, W. Gabriel; Robiinson, Bruce A.; Grigsby, Charles O.; Feerer, Jeffrey L.

    1993-01-28

    A general empirical correlation for estimating the intrinsic dissolution rate of quartz in pure water from 25” to 625°C was presented. Data obtained from five different apparatus in this study correlated favorably to rate measurements reported by seven other research groups using both nominal and BET-determined surface area bases. More than eleven orders of magnitude of variation of dissolution rate occur over a 600°C temperature change exhibiting Arrhenius-like behavior with a global activation energy of about 97 kJ/mol SiO2. Discrepancies in low temperature (25°C) measurements were resolved by waiting sufficiently long to permit annealing processes to produce a “steady-state” dissolving surface.

  18. Pure water injection into porous rock with superheated steam and salt in a solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montegrossi, G.; Tsypkin, G.; Calore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Most of geothermal fields require injection of fluid into the hot rock to maintain pressure and productivity. The presence of solid salt in porous space may cause an unexpected change in the characteristics of the reservoir and produced fluids, and dramatically affect the profitability of the project. We consider an injection problem of pure water into high temperature geothermal reservoir, saturated with superheated vapour and solid salt. Pure water moves away from injection point and dissolves solid salt. When salty water reaches the low-pressure hot domain, water evaporation occurs and, consequently, salt precipitates. We develop a simplified analytical model of the process and derive the similarity solutions for a 1-D semi-infinite reservoir. These solutions are multi-valued and describe the reduction in permeability and porosity due to salt precipitation at the leading boiling front. If the parameters of the system exceed critical values, then similarity solution ceases to exist. We identify this mathematical behaviour with reservoir sealing in the physical system. The TOUGH2-EWASG code has been used to verify this hypothesis and investigate the precipitate formation for an idealized bounded 1-D geothermal system of a length of 500 m with water injection at one extreme and fluid extraction at the other one. Both boundaries are kept at constant pressure and temperature. The result for the semi-infinite numerical model show that the monotonic grow of the solid salt saturation to reach asymptotic similarity solution generally occurs over a very large length starting from the injection point. Reservoir sealing occurs if solid salt at the initial state occupies a considerable part of the porous space. Numerical experiments for the bounded 500 m system demonstrate that a small amount of salt is enough to get reservoir sealing. Generally, salt tend to accumulate near the production well, and salt plug forms at the elements adjacent to the extraction point. This type

  19. Low-oxygen waters limited habitable space for early animals

    PubMed Central

    Tostevin, R.; Wood, R. A.; Shields, G. A.; Poulton, S. W.; Guilbaud, R.; Bowyer, F.; Penny, A. M.; He, T.; Curtis, A.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Clarkson, M. O.

    2016-01-01

    The oceans at the start of the Neoproterozoic Era (1,000–541 million years ago, Ma) were dominantly anoxic, but may have become progressively oxygenated, coincident with the rise of animal life. However, the control that oxygen exerted on the development of early animal ecosystems remains unclear, as previous research has focussed on the identification of fully anoxic or oxic conditions, rather than intermediate redox levels. Here we report anomalous cerium enrichments preserved in carbonate rocks across bathymetric basin transects from nine localities of the Nama Group, Namibia (∼550–541 Ma). In combination with Fe-based redox proxies, these data suggest that low-oxygen conditions occurred in a narrow zone between well-oxygenated surface waters and fully anoxic deep waters. Although abundant in well-oxygenated environments, early skeletal animals did not occupy oxygen impoverished regions of the shelf, demonstrating that oxygen availability (probably >10 μM) was a key requirement for the development of early animal-based ecosystems. PMID:27659064

  20. Low-oxygen waters limited habitable space for early animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tostevin, R.; Wood, R. A.; Shields, G. A.; Poulton, S. W.; Guilbaud, R.; Bowyer, F.; Penny, A. M.; He, T.; Curtis, A.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Clarkson, M. O.

    2016-09-01

    The oceans at the start of the Neoproterozoic Era (1,000-541 million years ago, Ma) were dominantly anoxic, but may have become progressively oxygenated, coincident with the rise of animal life. However, the control that oxygen exerted on the development of early animal ecosystems remains unclear, as previous research has focussed on the identification of fully anoxic or oxic conditions, rather than intermediate redox levels. Here we report anomalous cerium enrichments preserved in carbonate rocks across bathymetric basin transects from nine localities of the Nama Group, Namibia (~550-541 Ma). In combination with Fe-based redox proxies, these data suggest that low-oxygen conditions occurred in a narrow zone between well-oxygenated surface waters and fully anoxic deep waters. Although abundant in well-oxygenated environments, early skeletal animals did not occupy oxygen impoverished regions of the shelf, demonstrating that oxygen availability (probably >10 μM) was a key requirement for the development of early animal-based ecosystems.

  1. Low-oxygen waters limited habitable space for early animals.

    PubMed

    Tostevin, R; Wood, R A; Shields, G A; Poulton, S W; Guilbaud, R; Bowyer, F; Penny, A M; He, T; Curtis, A; Hoffmann, K H; Clarkson, M O

    2016-09-23

    The oceans at the start of the Neoproterozoic Era (1,000-541 million years ago, Ma) were dominantly anoxic, but may have become progressively oxygenated, coincident with the rise of animal life. However, the control that oxygen exerted on the development of early animal ecosystems remains unclear, as previous research has focussed on the identification of fully anoxic or oxic conditions, rather than intermediate redox levels. Here we report anomalous cerium enrichments preserved in carbonate rocks across bathymetric basin transects from nine localities of the Nama Group, Namibia (∼550-541 Ma). In combination with Fe-based redox proxies, these data suggest that low-oxygen conditions occurred in a narrow zone between well-oxygenated surface waters and fully anoxic deep waters. Although abundant in well-oxygenated environments, early skeletal animals did not occupy oxygen impoverished regions of the shelf, demonstrating that oxygen availability (probably >10 μM) was a key requirement for the development of early animal-based ecosystems.

  2. Treatment of real coal gasification wastewater using a novel integrated system of anoxic hybrid two stage aerobic processes: performance and the role of pure oxygen microbubble.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Haifeng; Han, Hongjun; Shan, Shengdao

    2016-06-01

    A novel integrated system of anoxic-pure oxygen microbubble-activated sludge reactor-moving bed biofilm reactor was employed in treatment of real coal gasification wastewater. The results showed the integrated system had efficient performance of pollutants removal in short hydraulic retention time. While pure oxygen microbubble with the flow rate of 1.5 L/h and NaHCO3 dosage ratio of 2:1 (amount NaHCO3 to NH4 (+)-N ratio, mol: mol) were used, the removal efficiencies of COD, total phenols (TPh) and NH4 (+)-N reached 90, 95, and 95 %, respectively, with the influent loading rates of 3.4 kg COD/(m(3) d), 0.81 kg TPh/(m(3) d), and 0.28 kg NH4 (+)-N/(m(3) d). With the recycle ratio of 300 %, the concentrations of NO2 (-)-N and NO3 (-)-N in effluent decreased to 12 and 59 mg/L, respectively. Meanwhile, pure oxygen microbubble significantly improved the enzymatic activities and affected the effluent organic compositions and reduced the foam expansion. Thus, the novel integrated system with efficient, stable, and economical advantages was suitable for engineering application.

  3. EURAMET.QM-S7. Comparison meaurement of electrolytic conductivity at pure water level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    In this comparison the equivalence of conductivity measurement results has been investigated in the conductivity range from ultrapure water level (5.5 μS m-1) up to 1500 μS m-1). The measurements were performed in a closed pure water loop with primary methods and with commercial devices. To this end the conductivity measurement cells of the participating institutes were integrated in series with the primary cell of PTB, which in this way linked the results. In general the primary methods of PTB and DFM are consistent within an expanded uncertainty of 0.5 %. A slight inconsistency at the ultrapure water level resulted from a small leakage during that measurement. SP, using a commercial device, measured consistent values. CMI, also using a commercial device, underestimated its measurement uncertainty. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  4. Analysis of carbonic acid in water samples by ion-exclusion chromatography with pure water as eluent.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui; Ding, Mingyu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Hu, Wenzhi

    2005-02-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid ion-exclusion chromatographic method for the simultaneous separation of carbonic acid and short chain organic acids (formic acid, acetic acid, and propionic acid) has been developed. A weakly acidic cation exchange resin column TSKgel OApak-A was used for the separation; pure water, owing to its lower background conductance, was employed as eluent in order to obtain high detection sensitivity. A good separation of these weak acids was achieved in 16 min. The linear range of the peak area calibration curve for carbonic acid was from 3.0 mg/L to 500 mg/L. The conductivity detection limit calculated at S/N = 3 was 0.084 mg/L for carbonic acid. The method developed in this work was successfully applied to the determination of carbonic acid in several environmental water samples without any pretreatment.

  5. [Improving the quality of bathing water by oxygen releasing substances].

    PubMed

    Jessen, H J

    1989-06-01

    The bath water of an indoor swimming bath of 25m length has been preparatory acc. to TGL 37780/02 and by procedings of flocculation-filtration-chlorination. the filter drain water (clear water) had been supplemented by 20...30 percentage hydrogen peroxide or potassium peroxide sulphate. The reaction with chlorine existing in surplus and hydrogen peroxide results in a spontaneous formation of nascinating oxygen. The occurring wet oxidation of contents substances of the bath water also with an increased frequentation of the indoor swimming bath results in reduced rates of CSVMn and chloramine. This fact can be explained by the concurring reaction between oxygen and chlorine. Because of its low expense, the forced decomposition of hydrogen peroxide could be an alternative for utilization of ozone in small bathes. Contrary to this the combination potassium peroxide sulphate/chlorine will not result in such a significant improvement of the quality of bath water.

  6. Problems with the thermogravimetric determination of oxygen stoichiometries in pure and rare-earth substituted La2RuO5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegg, S.; Müller, T.; Ebbinghaus, S. G.

    2013-06-01

    The oxygen stoichiometries of pure and rare-earth substituted La2RuO5 have been investigated by thermogravimetry (TG) in reducing atmosphere. Assuming that the observed total weight loss is caused by the reduction of Ru4+ to Ru-metal, remarkable oxygen deficiencies were calculated. These would correspond to ruthenium oxidation states significantly lower than the ones experimentally observed by XANES. To explain this discrepancy we investigated the reduction products by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). EXAFS measurements at the Ru-K edge revealed the presence of an X-ray amorphous ruthenium oxide, indicating an incomplete reduction. The apparent oxygen deficiencies obtained for pure and rare-earth substituted samples correlate with the amount of remaining ruthenium oxide. The presence of a ruthenium oxide species was furthermore verified by Ru-LIII XANES investigations. Our results show that the determination of oxygen contents by thermogravimetry might fail even for the easily reducable nobel metal oxides and therefore has to be applied with caution if the reaction products cannot be identified unambiguously.

  7. Oxygen, water, and sodium chloride transport in soft contact lenses materials.

    PubMed

    Gavara, Rafael; Compañ, Vicente

    2017-11-01

    Oxygen permeability, diffusion coefficient of the sodium ions and water flux and permeability in different conventional hydrogel (Hy) and silicone-hydrogel (Si-Hy) contact lenses have been measured experimentally. The results showed that oxygen permeability and transmissibility requirements of the lens have been addressed through the use of siloxane containing hydrogels. In general, oxygen and sodium chloride permeability values increased with the water content of the lens but there was a percolation phenomenon from a given value of water uptake mainly in the Si-Hy lenses which appeared to be related with the differences between free water and bound water contents. The increase of ion permeability with water content did not follow a unique trend indicating a possible dependence of the chemical structure of the polymer and character ionic and non-ionic of the lens. Indeed, the salt permeability values for silicone hydrogel contact lenses were one order of magnitude below those of conventional hydrogel contact lenses, which can be explained by a diffusion of sodium ions occurring only through the hydrophilic channels. The increase of the ionic permeability in Si-Hy materials may be due to the confinement of ions in nanoscale water channels involving possible decreased degrees of freedom for diffusion of both water and ions. In general, ionic lenses presented values of ionic permeability and diffusivity higher than most non-ionic lenses. The tortuosity of the ionic lenses is lower than the non-ionic Si-Hy lenses. Frequency 55 and PureVision exhibited the highest water permeability and flux values and, these parameters were greater for ionic Si-Hy lenses than for ionic conventional hydrogel lenses. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2218-2231, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Water flow influences oxygen transport and photosynthetic efficiency in corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finelli, Christopher M.; Helmuth, Brian S. T.; Pentcheff, N. Dean; Wethey, David S.

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that the incidence and persistence of damage from coral reef bleaching are often highest in areas of restricted water motion, and that resistance to and recovery from bleaching is increased by enhanced water motion. We examined the hypothesis that water motion increases the efflux of oxygen from coral tissue thereby reducing oxidative stress on the photosynthetic apparatus of endosymbiotic zooxanthellae. We experimentally exposed colonies of Montastrea annularis and Agaricia agaricites to manipulations of water flow, light intensity, and oxygen concentration in the field using a novel mini-flume. We measured photosynthetic efficiency using a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer to test the short-term response of corals to our manipulations. Under normal oxygen concentrations, A. agaricites showed a significant 8% increase in photosynthetic efficiency from 0.238 (± 0.032) in still water to 0.256 (± 0.037) in 15 cm s-1 flow, while M. annularis exhibited no detectable change. Under high-ambient oxygen concentrations, the observed effect of flow on A. agaricites was reversed: photosynthetic efficiencies showed a significant 11% decrease from 0.236 (± 0.056) in still water to 0.211 (± 0.048) in 15 cm s-1 flow. These results support the hypothesis that water motion helps to remove oxygen from coral tissues during periods of maximal photosynthesis. Flow mitigation of oxidative stress may at least partially explain the increased incidence and severity of coral bleaching in low flow areas and observations of enhanced recovery in high-flow areas.

  9. Habitability of Waterworlds: Runaway Greenhouses, Atmospheric Expansion, and Multiple Climate States of Pure Water Atmospheres

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There are four different stable climate states for pure water atmospheres, as might exist on so-called “waterworlds.” I map these as a function of solar constant for planets ranging in size from Mars-sized to 10 Earth-mass. The states are as follows: globally ice covered (Ts⪅245 K), cold and damp (270⪅Ts⪅290 K), hot and moist (350⪅Ts⪅550 K), and very hot and dry (Tsx2A86;900 K). No stable climate exists for 290⪅Ts ⪅350 K or 550⪅Ts⪅900 K. The union of hot moist and cold damp climates describes the liquid water habitable zone, the width and location of which depends on planet mass. At each solar constant, two or three different climate states are stable. This is a consequence of strong nonlinearities in both thermal emission and the net absorption of sunlight. Across the range of planet sizes, I account for the atmospheres expanding to high altitudes as they warm. The emitting and absorbing surfaces (optical depth of unity) move to high altitude, making their area larger than the planet surface, so more thermal radiation is emitted and more sunlight absorbed (the former dominates). The atmospheres of small planets expand more due to weaker gravity; the effective runaway greenhouse threshold is about 35 W m−2 higher for Mars, 10 W m−2 higher for Earth or Venus, but only a few W m−2 higher for a 10 Earth-mass planet. There is an underlying (expansion-neglected) trend of increasing runaway greenhouse threshold with planetary size (40 W m−2 higher for a 10 Earth-mass planet than for Mars). Summing these opposing trends means that Venus-sized (or slightly smaller) planets are most susceptible to a runaway greenhouse. The habitable zone for pure water atmospheres is very narrow, with an insolation range of 0.07 times the solar constant. A wider habitable zone requires background gas and greenhouse gas: N2 and CO2 on Earth, which are biologically controlled. Thus, habitability depends on inhabitance. Key Words

  10. Habitability of waterworlds: runaway greenhouses, atmospheric expansion, and multiple climate states of pure water atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, Colin

    2015-05-01

    There are four different stable climate states for pure water atmospheres, as might exist on so-called "waterworlds." I map these as a function of solar constant for planets ranging in size from Mars-sized to 10 Earth-mass. The states are as follows: globally ice covered (Ts ⪅ 245 K), cold and damp (270 ⪅ Ts ⪅ 290 K), hot and moist (350 ⪅ Ts ⪅ 550 K), and very hot and dry (Tsx2A86;900 K). No stable climate exists for 290 ⪅ T s ⪅ 350 K or 550 ⪅ Ts ⪅ 900 K. The union of hot moist and cold damp climates describes the liquid water habitable zone, the width and location of which depends on planet mass. At each solar constant, two or three different climate states are stable. This is a consequence of strong nonlinearities in both thermal emission and the net absorption of sunlight. Across the range of planet sizes, I account for the atmospheres expanding to high altitudes as they warm. The emitting and absorbing surfaces (optical depth of unity) move to high altitude, making their area larger than the planet surface, so more thermal radiation is emitted and more sunlight absorbed (the former dominates). The atmospheres of small planets expand more due to weaker gravity; the effective runaway greenhouse threshold is about 35 W m(-2) higher for Mars, 10 W m(-2) higher for Earth or Venus, but only a few W m(-2) higher for a 10 Earth-mass planet. There is an underlying (expansion-neglected) trend of increasing runaway greenhouse threshold with planetary size (40 W m(-2) higher for a 10 Earth-mass planet than for Mars). Summing these opposing trends means that Venus-sized (or slightly smaller) planets are most susceptible to a runaway greenhouse. The habitable zone for pure water atmospheres is very narrow, with an insolation range of 0.07 times the solar constant. A wider habitable zone requires background gas and greenhouse gas: N2 and CO2 on Earth, which are biologically controlled. Thus, habitability depends on inhabitance.

  11. Comparative analysis of the secondary electron yield from carbon nanoparticles and pure water medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey; McKinnon, Sally; de Vera, Pablo; Surdutovich, Eugene; Guatelli, Susanna; Korol, Andrei V.; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-04-01

    The production of secondary electrons generated by carbon nanoparticles and pure water medium irradiated by fast protons is studied by means of model approaches and Monte Carlo simulations. It is demonstrated that due to a prominent collective response to an external field, the nanoparticles embedded in the medium enhance the yield of low-energy electrons. The maximal enhancement is observed for electrons in the energy range where plasmons, which are excited in the nanoparticles, play the dominant role. Electron yield from a solid carbon nanoparticle composed of fullerite, a crystalline form of C60 fullerene, is demonstrated to be several times higher than that from liquid water. Decay of plasmon excitations in carbon-based nanosystems thus represents a mechanism of increase of the low-energy electron yield, similar to the case of sensitizing metal nanoparticles. This observation gives a hint for investigation of novel types of sensitizers to be composed of metallic and organic parts. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey V. Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García and Eugene Surdutovich.

  12. Visible-Light-Driven BiOI-Based Janus Micromotor in Pure Water.

    PubMed

    Dong, Renfeng; Hu, Yan; Wu, Yefei; Gao, Wei; Ren, Biye; Wang, Qinglong; Cai, Yuepeng

    2017-02-08

    Light-driven synthetic micro-/nanomotors have attracted considerable attention due to their potential applications and unique performances such as remote motion control and adjustable velocity. Utilizing harmless and renewable visible light to supply energy for micro-/nanomotors in water represents a great challenge. In view of the outstanding photocatalytic performance of bismuth oxyiodide (BiOI), visible-light-driven BiOI-based Janus micromotors have been developed, which can be activated by a broad spectrum of light, including blue and green light. Such BiOI-based Janus micromotors can be propelled by photocatalytic reactions in pure water under environmentally friendly visible light without the addition of any other chemical fuels. The remote control of photocatalytic propulsion by modulating the power of visible light is characterized by velocity and mean-square displacement analysis of optical video recordings. In addition, the self-electrophoresis mechanism has been confirmed for such visible-light-driven BiOI-based Janus micromotors by demonstrating the effects of various coated layers (e.g., Al2O3, Pt, and Au) on the velocity of motors. The successful demonstration of visible-light-driven Janus micromotors holds a great promise for future biomedical and environmental applications.

  13. Influence of Local Heating on Marangoni Flows and Evaporation Kinetics of Pure Water Drops.

    PubMed

    Askounis, Alexandros; Kita, Yutaku; Kohno, Masamichi; Takata, Yasuyuki; Koutsos, Vasileios; Sefiane, Khellil

    2017-06-13

    The effect of localized heating on the evaporation of pure sessile water drops was probed experimentally by a combination of infrared thermography and optical imaging. In particular, we studied the effect of three different heating powers and two different locations, directly below the center and edge of the drop. In all cases, four distinct stages were identified according to the emerging thermal patterns. In particular, depending on heating location, recirculating vortices emerge that either remain pinned or move azimuthally within the drop. Eventually, these vortices oscillate in different modes depending on heating location. Infrared data allowed extraction of temperature distribution on each drop surface. In turn, the flow velocity in each case was calculated and was found to be higher for edge heating, due to the one-directional nature of the heating. Additionally, calculation of the dimensionless Marangoni and Rayleigh numbers yielded the prevalence of Marangoni convection. Heating the water drops also affected the evaporation kinetics by promoting the "stick-slip" regime. Moreover, both the total number of depinning events and the pinning strength were found to be highly dependent on heating location. Lastly, we report a higher than predicted relationship between evaporation rate and heating temperature, due to the added influence of the recirculating flows on temperature distribution and hence evaporation flux.

  14. Comparison of killing of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by pure singlet oxygen. [Salmonella typhimurium; Escherichia coli; Sarcina lutea; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus lactis; Streptococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, T.A.; Midden, W.R. ); Hartman, P.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria were found to display different sensitivities to pure singlet oxygen generated outside of cells. Killing curves for Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli strains were indicative of multihit killing, whereas curves for Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus lactis, and Streptococcus faecalis exhibited single-hit kinetics. The S. typhimurium deep rough strain TA1975, which lacks nearly all of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide coat and manifests concomitant enhancement of penetration by some exogenous substances, responded to singlet oxygen with initially faster inactivation than did the S. typhimurium wild-type strain, although the maximum rates of killing appeared to be quite similar. The structure of the cell wall thus plays an important role in susceptibility to singlet oxygen. The outer membrane-lipopolysaccharide portion of the gram-negative cell wall initially protects the bacteria from extracellular singlet oxygen, although it may also serve as a source for secondary reaction products which accentuate the rates of cell killing. S. typhimurium and E. coli strains lacking the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, showed no difference from strains containing glutathione in response to the toxic effects of singlet oxygen. Strains of Sarcina lutea and Staphylococcus aureus that contained carotenoids, however, were far more resistant to singlet oxygen lethality than were both carotenoidless mutants of the same species and other gram-positive species lacking high levels of protective carotenoids.

  15. Determining the Source of Water Vapor in a Cerium Oxide Electrochemical Oxygen Separator to Achieve Aviator Grade Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John; Taylor, Dale; Martinez, James

    2014-01-01

    More than a metric ton of water is transported to the International Space Station (ISS) each year to provide breathing oxygen for the astronauts. Water is a safe and compact form of stored oxygen. The water is electrolyzed on ISS and ambient pressure oxygen is delivered to the cabin. A much smaller amount of oxygen is used each year in spacesuits to conduct Extra Vehicular Activities (EVAs). Space suits need high pressure (>1000 psia) high purity oxygen (must meet Aviator Breathing Oxygen "ABO" specifications, >99.5% O2). The water / water electrolysis system cannot directly provide high pressure, high purity oxygen, so oxygen for EVAs is transported to ISS in high pressure gas tanks. The tanks are relatively large and heavy, and the majority of the system launch weight is for the tanks and not the oxygen. Extracting high purity oxygen from cabin air and mechanically compressing the oxygen might enable on-board production of EVA grade oxygen using the existing water / water electrolysis system. This capability might also benefit human spaceflight missions, where oxygen for EVAs could be stored in the form of water, and converted into high pressure oxygen on-demand. Cerium oxide solid electrolyte-based ion transport membranes have been shown to separate oxygen from air, and a supported monolithic wafer form of the CeO2 electrolyte membrane has been shown to deliver oxygen at pressures greater than 300 psia. These supported monolithic wafers can withstand high pressure differentials even though the membrane is very thin, because the ion transport membrane is supported on both sides (Fig 1). The monolithic supported wafers have six distinct layers, each with matched coefficients of thermal expansion. The wafers are assembled into a cell stack which allows easy air flow across the wafers, uniform current distribution, and uniform current density (Fig 2). The oxygen separation is reported to be "infinitely selective" to oxygen [1] with reported purity of 99.99% [2

  16. Sunlight creates oxygenated species in water-soluble fractions of Deepwater Horizon oil.

    PubMed

    Ray, Phoebe Z; Chen, Huan; Podgorski, David C; McKenna, Amy M; Tarr, Matthew A

    2014-09-15

    In order to assess the impact of sunlight on oil fate, Macondo well oil from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) rig was mixed with pure water and irradiated with simulated sunlight. After irradiation, the water-soluble organics (WSO) from the dark and irradiated samples were extracted and characterized by ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Liquid-liquid extraction yielded two fractions from dark and irradiated water/oil mixtures: acidic WSOs (negative-ion electrospray (ESI)), and base/neutral WSOs (positive-ion ESI) coupled to FT-ICR MS to catalog molecular-level transformations that occur to Macondo-derived WSOs after solar irradiation. Such direct measure of oil phototransformation has not been previously reported. The most abundant heteroatom class detected in the irradiated WSO acid fractions correspond to molecules that contain five oxygens (O5), while the most abundant acids in the dark samples contain two oxygen atoms per molecule (O2). Higher-order oxygen classes (O5-O9) were abundant in the irradiated samples, but <1.5% relative abundance in the dark sample. The increased abundance of higher-order oxygen classes in the irradiated samples relative to the dark samples indicates that photooxidized components of the Macondo crude oil become water-soluble after irradiation. The base/neutral fraction showed decreased abundance of pyridinic nitrogen (N1) concurrent with an increased abundance of N1Ox classes after irradiation. The predominance of higher-order oxygen classes indicates that multiple photochemical pathways exist that result in oxidation of petroleum compounds.

  17. SteamTablesGrid: An ActiveX control for thermodynamic properties of pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra P.

    2011-04-01

    An ActiveX control, steam tables grid ( StmTblGrd) to speed up the calculation of the thermodynamic properties of pure water is developed. First, it creates a grid (matrix) for a specified range of temperature (e.g. 400-600 K with 40 segments) and pressure (e.g. 100,000-20,000,000 Pa with 40 segments). Using the ActiveX component SteamTables, the values of selected properties of water for each element (nodal point) of the 41×41 matrix are calculated. The created grid can be saved in a file for its reuse. A linear interpolation within an individual phase, vapor or liquid is implemented to calculate the properties at a given value of temperature and pressure. A demonstration program to illustrate the functionality of StmTblGrd is written in Visual Basic 6.0. Similarly, a methodology is presented to explain the use of StmTblGrd in MS-Excel 2007. In an Excel worksheet, the enthalpy of 1000 random datasets for temperature and pressure is calculated using StmTblGrd and SteamTables. The uncertainty in the enthalpy calculated with StmTblGrd is within ±0.03%. The calculations were performed on a personal computer that has a "Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.2 GHz, RAM 1.0 GB" processor and Windows XP. The total execution time for the calculation with StmTblGrd was 0.3 s, while it was 60.0 s for SteamTables. Thus, the ActiveX control approach is reliable, accurate and efficient for the numerical simulation of complex systems that demand the thermodynamic properties of water at several values of temperature and pressure like steam flow in a geothermal pipeline network.

  18. Removal of Water Vapor in a Mist Singlet Oxygen Generator for Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Shigeki; Endo, Masamori; Nanri, Kenzo; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2004-02-01

    The mist singlet oxygen generator (Mist-SOG) for a chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) has been developed in order to increase basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) utilization. It was clarified that the Mist-SOG generated much more water vapor than conventional SOGs because the heat capacity of BHP is small. The water vapor deactivates the excited iodine and depresses the laser power. Therefore, a jet-cold trap was developed in order to remove the water vapor while maintaining a minimum deactivation of singlet oxygen. In this method, a nozzle was used to spray chilled H2O2 at 238 K as a thin layer directly to the gas flow to achieve a large specific surface area for water vapor. As a result, the water vapor mole fraction was reduced to 7% from 18% with the BHP utilization of 21% at the Cl2 consumption rate of 3.5 mmol/s (Cl2 input flow rate of 8.0 mmol/s) for 65-μm-diameter BHP droplets.

  19. Does oxygenated water support aerobic performance and lactate kinetics?

    PubMed

    Leibetseder, V; Strauss-Blasche, G; Marktl, W; Ekmekcioglu, C

    2006-03-01

    It has been asserted that the consumption of oxygenated water can support physical working capacity. As this has not been accurately investigated yet we analyzed effects of a two-week period of daily O2-water ingestion on spiroergometric parameters and lactate metabolism in healthy adults. Twenty men (24 +/- 2.5 years of age) with comparable aerobic abilities performed four exhaustive bicycle spiroergometric tests. Applying a double-blind crossover study design 10 subjects drank 1.5 liters of highly oxygenated water every day during the two weeks between the initial two tests whereas the other group consumed 1.5 liters untreated water from the same spring. After a two-week wash-out period subjects underwent a second period consuming the opposite type of water. Spiroergometric parameters and lactate kinetics between both groups at submaximal and maximal levels were analyzed using a MANOVA. Results showed no significant influence on aerobic parameters or lactate metabolism, neither at submaximal nor at maximal levels (all p-values > or = 0.050). Merely increments of VEO2 at submaximal levels were demonstrable (p = 0.048). We conclude that the consumption of oxygenated water does not enhance aerobic performance or lactate kinetics in standardized laboratory testing.

  20. Methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis in anoxic waters.

    PubMed

    Milucka, Jana; Kirf, Mathias; Lu, Lu; Krupke, Andreas; Lam, Phyllis; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Schubert, Carsten J

    2015-09-01

    Freshwater lakes represent large methane sources that, in contrast to the Ocean, significantly contribute to non-anthropogenic methane emissions to the atmosphere. Particularly mixed lakes are major methane emitters, while permanently and seasonally stratified lakes with anoxic bottom waters are often characterized by strongly reduced methane emissions. The causes for this reduced methane flux from anoxic lake waters are not fully understood. Here we identified the microorganisms and processes responsible for the near complete consumption of methane in the anoxic waters of a permanently stratified lake, Lago di Cadagno. Interestingly, known anaerobic methanotrophs could not be detected in these waters. Instead, we found abundant gamma-proteobacterial aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria active in the anoxic waters. In vitro incubations revealed that, among all the tested potential electron acceptors, only the addition of oxygen enhanced the rates of methane oxidation. An equally pronounced stimulation was also observed when the anoxic water samples were incubated in the light. Our combined results from molecular, biogeochemical and single-cell analyses indicate that methane removal at the anoxic chemocline of Lago di Cadagno is due to true aerobic oxidation of methane fuelled by in situ oxygen production by photosynthetic algae. A similar mechanism could be active in seasonally stratified lakes and marine basins such as the Black Sea, where light penetrates to the anoxic chemocline. Given the widespread occurrence of seasonally stratified anoxic lakes, aerobic methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis might have an important but so far neglected role in methane emissions from lakes.

  1. Methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis in anoxic waters

    PubMed Central

    Milucka, Jana; Kirf, Mathias; Lu, Lu; Krupke, Andreas; Lam, Phyllis; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel MM; Schubert, Carsten J

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater lakes represent large methane sources that, in contrast to the Ocean, significantly contribute to non-anthropogenic methane emissions to the atmosphere. Particularly mixed lakes are major methane emitters, while permanently and seasonally stratified lakes with anoxic bottom waters are often characterized by strongly reduced methane emissions. The causes for this reduced methane flux from anoxic lake waters are not fully understood. Here we identified the microorganisms and processes responsible for the near complete consumption of methane in the anoxic waters of a permanently stratified lake, Lago di Cadagno. Interestingly, known anaerobic methanotrophs could not be detected in these waters. Instead, we found abundant gamma-proteobacterial aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria active in the anoxic waters. In vitro incubations revealed that, among all the tested potential electron acceptors, only the addition of oxygen enhanced the rates of methane oxidation. An equally pronounced stimulation was also observed when the anoxic water samples were incubated in the light. Our combined results from molecular, biogeochemical and single-cell analyses indicate that methane removal at the anoxic chemocline of Lago di Cadagno is due to true aerobic oxidation of methane fuelled by in situ oxygen production by photosynthetic algae. A similar mechanism could be active in seasonally stratified lakes and marine basins such as the Black Sea, where light penetrates to the anoxic chemocline. Given the widespread occurrence of seasonally stratified anoxic lakes, aerobic methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis might have an important but so far neglected role in methane emissions from lakes. PMID:25679533

  2. CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF PURE AMMONIA AND AMMONIA-WATER ICES INDUCED BY HEAVY IONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bordalo, V.; Da Silveira, E. F.; Seperuelo Duarte, E.

    2013-09-10

    Cosmic rays are possibly the main agents to prevent the freeze-out of molecules onto grain surfaces in cold dense clouds. Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is one of the most abundant molecules present in dust ice mantles, with a concentration of up to 15% relative to water (H{sub 2}O). FTIR spectroscopy is used to monitor pure NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice samples as they are irradiated with Ni and Zn ion beams (500-600 MeV) at GANIL/France. New species, such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), diazene (N{sub 2}H{sub 2} isomers), molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) were identified after irradiation of pure NH{sub 3} ices. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), and hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2}OH) are some of the products of the NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice radiolysis. The spectral band at 6.85 {mu}m was observed after irradiation of both types of ice. Besides the likely contribution of ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and amino (NH{sub 2}) radicals, data suggest a small contribution of NH{sub 2}OH to this band profile after high fluences of irradiation of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ices. The spectral shift of the NH{sub 3} ''umbrella'' mode (9.3 {mu}m) band is parameterized as a function of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O ratio in amorphous ices. Ammonia and water destruction cross-sections are obtained, as well as the rate of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O (1:10) ice compaction, measured by the OH dangling bond destruction cross-section. Ammonia destruction is enhanced in the presence of H{sub 2}O in the ice and a power law relationship between stopping power and NH{sub 3} destruction cross-section is verified. Such results may provide relevant information for the evolution of molecular species in dense molecular clouds.

  3. Bioinspired molecular adhesive for water-resistant oxygen indicator films.

    PubMed

    Vu, Chau Hai Thai; Won, Keehoon

    2013-01-01

    Mussels can attach themselves to nearly all types of hard surfaces in wet environments. Such attractive adhesive ability of mussels is believed to rely on the amino acid composition of proteins found near the plaque-substrate interface. Dopamine (DA) is identified as a simplified mimic of mussel proteins, which are rich in 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine and lysine, because it contains both catechol and amine functional groups. In this work, we have first applied this bioinspired adhesive to tackle a dye leaching problem of colorimetric oxygen indicator films, which are widely used to ensure the absence of oxygen inside the package of oxygen-sensitive materials. Simple immersion of packaging films into a DA solution resulted in poly(DA) deposition, decreasing the water contact angle of the films from 105° to 65°. The poly(DA) coating could reduce the thionine leakage of the UV-activated oxygen indicator film. The effects of poly(DA) coating were found to be dependent on the DA solution pH, the coating time, and the DA concentration. The film resistant to dye leaching lost its dye color by 5 min UVB irradiation and regained the color in the presence of oxygen, demonstrating that it functioned successfully as UV-activated oxygen indicators.

  4. Effect of water on carbon monoxide-oxygen flame velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Glen E

    1954-01-01

    The flame velocities were measured of 20 percent oxygen and 80 percent carbon monoxide mixtures containing either light water or heavy water. The flame velocity increased from 34.5 centimeters per second with no added water to about 104 centimeters per second for a 1.8 percent addition of light water and to 84 centimeters per second for an equal addition of heavy water. The addition of heavy water caused greater increases in flame velocity with equilibrium hydrogen-atom concentration than would be predicted by the Tanford and Pease square-root relation. The ratio of the flame velocity of a mixture containing light water to that of a mixture containing heavy water was found to be 1.4. This value is the same as the ratio of the reaction rate of hydrogen to that of deuterium and oxygen. A ratio of reaction rates of 1.4 would also be required for the square-root law to give the observed ratio of flame-velocity changes.

  5. Ultra Pure Water Cleaning Baseline Study on NASA JSC Astromaterial Curation Gloveboxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Burkett, P. J.; Allton, J. H.; Allen, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Future sample return missions will require strict protocols and procedures for reducing inorganic and organic contamination in isolation containment systems. In 2012, a baseline study was orchestrated to establish the current state of organic cleanliness in gloveboxes used by NASA JSC astromaterials curation labs [1, 2]. As part of this in-depth organic study, the current curatorial technical support procedure (TSP) 23 was used for cleaning the gloveboxes with ultra pure water (UPW) [3-5]. Particle counts and identification were obtained that could be used as a benchmark for future mission designs that require glovebox decontamination. The UPW baseline study demonstrates that TSP 23 works well for gloveboxes that have been thoroughly degreased. However, TSP 23 could be augmented to provide even better glovebox decontamination. JSC 03243 could be used as a starting point for further investigating optimal cleaning techniques and procedures. DuPont Vertrel XF or other chemical substitutes to replace Freon- 113, mechanical scrubbing, and newer technology could be used to enhance glovebox cleanliness in addition to high purity UPW final rinsing. Future sample return missions will significantly benefit from further cleaning studies to reduce inorganic and organic contamination.

  6. Accurate evaporation rates of pure and doped water clusters in vacuum: A statistico-dynamical approach.

    PubMed

    Calvo, F; Douady, J; Spiegelman, F

    2010-01-14

    Unimolecular evaporation of selected pure (H(2)O)(n) and heterogeneous (H(2)O)(n-1)X(+) water clusters containing a single hydronium or ammonium impurity is investigated in the framework of phase space theory (PST) in its orbiting transition state version. Using the many-body polarizable Kozack-Jordan potential and its extensions for X(+)=H(3)O(+) and NH(4) (+), the thermal evaporation of clusters containing 21 and 50 molecules is simulated at several total energies. Numerous molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories at high internal energies provide estimates of the decay rate constant, as well as the kinetic energy and angular momentum released upon dissociation. Additional Monte Carlo simulations are carried out to determine the anharmonic densities of vibrational states, which combined with suitable forms for the rotational densities of states provide expressions for the energy-resolved differential rates. Successful comparison between the MD results and the independent predictions of PST for the distributions of kinetic energy and angular momentum released shows that the latter statistical approach is quantitative. Using MD data as a reference, the absolute evaporation rates are calculated from PST over broad energy and temperature ranges. Based on these results, the presence of an ionic impurity is generally found to decrease the rate, however the effect is much more significant in the 21-molecule clusters. Our calculations also suggest that due to backbendings in the microcanonical densities of states the variations of the evaporation rates may not be strictly increasing with energy or temperature.

  7. The electric double layer at a metal electrode in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüesch, Peter; Christen, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    Pure water is a weak electrolyte that dissociates into hydronium ions and hydroxide ions. In contact with a charged electrode a double layer forms for which neither experimental nor theoretical studies exist, in contrast to electrolytes containing extrinsic ions like acids, bases, and solute salts. Starting from a self-consistent solution of the one-dimensional modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation, which takes into account activity coefficients of point-like ions, we explore the properties of the electric double layer by successive incorporation of various correction terms like finite ion size, polarization, image charge, and field dissociation. We also discuss the effect of the usual approximation of an average potential as required for the one-dimensional Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and conclude that the one-dimensional approximation underestimates the ion density. We calculate the electric potential, the ion distributions, the pH-values, the ion-size corrected activity coefficients, and the dissociation constants close to the electric double layer and compare the results for the various model corrections.

  8. Photoelectrochemical water splitting in separate oxygen and hydrogen cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landman, Avigail; Dotan, Hen; Shter, Gennady E.; Wullenkord, Michael; Houaijia, Anis; Maljusch, Artjom; Grader, Gideon S.; Rothschild, Avner

    2017-06-01

    Solar water splitting provides a promising path for sustainable hydrogen production and solar energy storage. One of the greatest challenges towards large-scale utilization of this technology is reducing the hydrogen production cost. The conventional electrolyser architecture, where hydrogen and oxygen are co-produced in the same cell, gives rise to critical challenges in photoelectrochemical water splitting cells that directly convert solar energy and water to hydrogen. Here we overcome these challenges by separating the hydrogen and oxygen cells. The ion exchange in our cells is mediated by auxiliary electrodes, and the cells are connected to each other only by metal wires, enabling centralized hydrogen production. We demonstrate hydrogen generation in separate cells with solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 7.5%, which can readily surpass 10% using standard commercial components. A basic cost comparison shows that our approach is competitive with conventional photoelectrochemical systems, enabling safe and potentially affordable solar hydrogen production.

  9. Photoelectrochemical water splitting in separate oxygen and hydrogen cells.

    PubMed

    Landman, Avigail; Dotan, Hen; Shter, Gennady E; Wullenkord, Michael; Houaijia, Anis; Maljusch, Artjom; Grader, Gideon S; Rothschild, Avner

    2017-06-01

    Solar water splitting provides a promising path for sustainable hydrogen production and solar energy storage. One of the greatest challenges towards large-scale utilization of this technology is reducing the hydrogen production cost. The conventional electrolyser architecture, where hydrogen and oxygen are co-produced in the same cell, gives rise to critical challenges in photoelectrochemical water splitting cells that directly convert solar energy and water to hydrogen. Here we overcome these challenges by separating the hydrogen and oxygen cells. The ion exchange in our cells is mediated by auxiliary electrodes, and the cells are connected to each other only by metal wires, enabling centralized hydrogen production. We demonstrate hydrogen generation in separate cells with solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 7.5%, which can readily surpass 10% using standard commercial components. A basic cost comparison shows that our approach is competitive with conventional photoelectrochemical systems, enabling safe and potentially affordable solar hydrogen production.

  10. Ultra-Pure Water and Extremophilic Bacteria interactions with Germanium Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sah, Vasu R.

    Supported by a consortium of semiconductor industry sponsors, an international "TIE" project among 5 National Science Foundation (NSF) Industry/university Cooperative Research Centers discovered that a particular extremophilic microbe, Pseudomonas syzygii, persists in the UltraPure Water (UPW) supplies of chip fabrication facilities (FABs) and can bio-corrode germanium wafers to produce microbe-encased optically transparent crystals. Considered as potentially functional "biochips", this investigation explored mechanisms for the efficient and deliberate production of such microbe-germania adducts as a step toward later testing of their properties as sensors or switches in bioelectronic or biophotonic circuits. Recirculating UPW (Ultra-Pure Water) and other purified water, laminar-flow loops were developed across 50X20x1mm germanium (Ge) prisms, followed by subsequent examination of the prism surfaces using Multiple Attenuated Internal Reflection InfraRed (MAIR-IR) spectroscopy, Contact Potential measurements, Differential Interference Contrast Light Microscopy (DICLM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDS), and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA; XPS). P. syzygii cultures originally obtained from a working FAB at University of Arizona were successfully grown on R2A minimal nutrient media. They were found to be identical to the microbes in stored UPW from the same facility, such microbes routinely capable of nucleation and entrapment within GeO2 crystals on the Ge flow surfaces. Optimum flow rates and exposure times were 1 ml/minute (3.2 s-1 shear rate) for 4 days at room temperature, producing densest crystal arrays at the prism central zones 2-3 cm from the flow inlets. Other flow rates and exposure times have higher shear rate which induces a different nucleation mechanism and saturation of crystal formation. Nucleation events began with square and circular oxide deposits surrounding active attached bacteria

  11. Rapid biologically mediated oxygen isotope exchange between water and phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paytan, Adina; Kolodny, Yehoshua; Neori, Amir; Luz, Boaz

    2002-03-01

    In order to better constrain the rate of oxygen isotope exchange between water and phosphate via biochemical reactions a set of controlled experiments were conducted in 1988 at the Aquaculture Plant in Elat, Israel. Different species of algae and other organisms were grown in seawater tanks under controlled conditions, and the water temperature and oxygen isotopic composition (δ18Ow) were monitored. The oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate (δ18Op) in the organisms' food source, tissues, and the δ18Op of dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) were measured at different stages of the experiments. Results indicate that intracellular oxygen isotope exchange between phosphorus compounds and water is very rapid and occurs at all levels of the food chain. Through these reactions the soft tissue δ18Op values become 23-26‰ higher than δ18Ow, and δ18Op values of DIP become ~20‰ higher than δ18Ow. No correlation between δ18Op values and either temperature or P concentrations in these experiments was observed. Our data imply that biogenic recycling and intracellular phosphorus turnover, which involves kinetic fractionation effects, are the major parameters controlling the δ18Op values of P compounds dissolved in aquatic systems. This information is fundamental to any application of δ18Op of dissolved organic or inorganic phosphate to quantify the dynamics of phosphorus cycling in aquatic systems.

  12. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Paul R.; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1981-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO.sub.2) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) to form sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO.sub.3) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.

  13. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Paul R.; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1982-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO.sub.2) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) to form sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO.sub.3) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.

  14. The water catalysis at oxygen cathodes of lithium–oxygen cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fujun; Wu, Shichao; Li, De; Zhang, Tao; He, Ping; Yamada, Atsuo; Zhou, Haoshen

    2015-01-01

    Lithium–oxygen cells have attracted extensive interests due to their high theoretical energy densities. The main challenges are the low round-trip efficiency and cycling instability over long time. However, even in the state-of-the-art lithium–oxygen cells the charge potentials are as high as 3.5 V that are higher by 0.70 V than the discharge potentials. Here we report a reaction mechanism at an oxygen cathode, ruthenium and manganese dioxide nanoparticles supported on carbon black Super P by applying a trace amount of water in electrolytes to catalyse the cathode reactions of lithium–oxygen cells during discharge and charge. This can significantly reduce the charge overpotential to 0.21 V, and results in a small discharge/charge potential gap of 0.32 V and superior cycling stability of 200 cycles. The overall reaction scheme will alleviate side reactions involving carbon and electrolytes, and shed light on the construction of practical, rechargeable lithium–oxygen cells. PMID:26206379

  15. Tracer study of oxygen and hydrogen uptake by Mg alloys in air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M. P.; Fayek, M.; Meyer, H. M.; Leonard, D. N.; Elsentriecy, H. H.; Unocic, K. A.; Anovitz, L. M.; Cakmak, E.; Keiser, J. R.; Song, G. L.; Davis, B.

    2015-05-15

    We studied the pure oxidation of Mg, Mg–3Al–1Zn (AZ31B), and Mg–1Zn–0.25Zr–<0.5Nd (ZE10A) at 85 °C in humid air using sequential exposures with H218O and D216O for water vapor. Incorporation of 18O in the hydroxide/oxide films indicated that oxygen from water vapor participated in the reaction. Moreover, penetration of hydrogen into the underlying metal was observed, particularly for the Zr- and Nd-containing ZE10A. Isotopic tracer profiles suggested a complex mixed inward/outward film growth mechanism.

  16. The influence of surface oxygen and hydroxyl groups on the dehydrogenation of ethylene, acetic acid and hydrogenated vinyl acetate on pure Pd(1 0 0): A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanping; Dong, Xiuqin; Yu, Yingzhe; Zhang, Minhua

    2016-12-01

    On the basis of a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type mechanism, the dehydrogenation of ethylene, acetic acid and hydrogenated vinyl acetate (VAH) on pure Pd(1 0 0) with surface oxygen atoms (Os) and hydroxyl groups (OHs) was studied with density functional theory (DFT) method. Our calculation results show that both Os and OHs can consistently reduce the activation energies of dehydrogenation of ethylene, acetic acid and VAH to some degree with only one exception that OHs somehow increase the activation energy of VAH. Based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, the three dehydrogenation reactions in presence of surface Os and OHs are almost consistently favored, compared with the corresponding processes on clean Pd(1 0 0) surfaces, and thus a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type mechanism may not be excluded beforehand when investigating the microscopic performance of the oxygen-assisted vinyl acetate synthesis on Pd(1 0 0) catalysts.

  17. Triple oxygen isotope systematics of structurally bonded water in gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwartz, Daniel; Surma, Jakub; Voigt, Claudia; Assonov, Sergey; Staubwasser, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum mother water (gmw) is recorded in structurally bonded water in gypsum (gsbw). Respective fractionation factors have been determined experimentally for 18O/16O and 17O/16O. By taking previous experiments into account we suggest using 18αgsbw-gmw = 1.0037; 17αgsbw-gmw = 1.00195 and θgsbw-gmw = 0.5285 as fractionation factors in triple oxygen isotope space. Recent gypsum was sampled from a series of 10 ponds located in the Salar de Llamara in the Atacama Desert, Chile. Total dissolved solids (TDS) in these ponds show a gradual increase from 23 g/l to 182 g/l that is accompanied by an increase in pond water 18O/16O. Gsbw falls on a parallel curve to the ambient water from the saline ponds. The offset is mainly due to the equilibrium fractionation between gsbw and gmw. However, gsbw represents a time integrated signal biased towards times of strong evaporation, hence the estimated gmw comprises elevated 18O/16O compositions when compared to pond water samples taken on site. Gypsum precipitation is associated with algae mats in the ponds with lower salinity. No evidence for respective vital effects on the triple oxygen isotopic composition of gypsum hydration water is observed, nor are such effects expected. In principle, the array of δ18Ogsbw vs. 17Oexcess can be used to: (1) provide information on the degree of evaporation during gypsum formation; (2) estimate pristine meteoric water compositions; and (3) estimate local relative humidity which is the controlling parameter of the slope of the array for simple hydrological situations. In our case study, local mining activities may have decreased deep groundwater recharge, causing a recent change of the local hydrology.

  18. Oxygen isotope fractionation between human phosphate and water revisited.

    PubMed

    Daux, Valérie; Lécuyer, Christophe; Héran, Marie-Anne; Amiot, Romain; Simon, Laurent; Fourel, François; Martineau, François; Lynnerup, Niels; Reychler, Hervé; Escarguel, Gilles

    2008-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of human phosphatic tissues (delta18OP) has great potential for reconstructing climate and population migration, but this technique has not been applied to early human evolution. To facilitate this application we analyzed delta18OP values of modern human teeth collected at 12 sites located at latitudes ranging from 4 degrees N to 70 degrees N together with the corresponding oxygen composition of tap waters (delta18OW) from these areas. In addition, the delta18O of some raw and boiled foods were determined and simple mass balance calculations were performed to investigate the impact of solid food consumption on the oxygen isotope composition of the total ingested water (drinking water+solid food water). The results, along with those from three, smaller published data sets, can be considered as random estimates of a unique delta18OW/delta18OP linear relationship: delta18OW=1.54(+/-0.09)xdelta18OP-33.72(+/-1.51)(R2=0.87: p [H0:R2=0]=2x10(-19)). The delta18O of cooked food is higher than that of the drinking water. As a consequence, in a modern diet the delta18O of ingested water is +1.05 to 1.2 per thousand higher than that of drinking water in the area. In meat-dominated and cereal-free diets, which may have been the diets of some of our early ancestors, the shift is a little higher and the application of the regression equation would slightly overestimate delta18OW in these cases.

  19. A mechanism for water splitting and oxygen production in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Barber, James

    2017-04-03

    Sunlight is absorbed and converted to chemical energy by photosynthetic organisms. At the heart of this process is the most fundamental reaction on Earth, the light-driven splitting of water into its elemental constituents. In this way molecular oxygen is released, maintaining an aerobic atmosphere and creating the ozone layer. The hydrogen that is released is used to convert carbon dioxide into the organic molecules that constitute life and were the origin of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these organic molecules, either by respiration or combustion, leads to the recombination of the stored hydrogen with oxygen, releasing energy and reforming water. This water splitting is achieved by the enzyme photosystem II (PSII). Its appearance at least 3 billion years ago, and linkage through an electron transfer chain to photosystem I, directly led to the emergence of eukaryotic and multicellular organisms. Before this, biological organisms had been dependent on hydrogen/electron donors, such as H2S, NH3, organic acids and Fe(2+), that were in limited supply compared with the oceans of liquid water. However, it is likely that water was also used as a hydrogen source before the emergence of PSII, as found today in anaerobic prokaryotic organisms that use carbon monoxide as an energy source to split water. The enzyme that catalyses this reaction is carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH). Similarities between PSII and the iron- and nickel-containing form of this enzyme (Fe-Ni CODH) suggest a possible mechanism for the photosynthetic O-O bond formation.

  20. Comparison of different methods for the isolation of Burkholderia cepacia DNA from pure cultures and waste water.

    PubMed

    Merk, S; Neubauer, H; Meyer, H; Greiser-Wilke, I

    2001-11-01

    DNA from Burkholderia cepacia was prepared from suspensions of pure cultures and artificially contaminated waste water. The efficacy of four standard methods (lysis buffer containing proteinase K, phenol/chloroform/isoamylalcohol extraction, microwave treatment, heat treatment) and six commercially available kits (Puregene, High Pure PCR Template Preparation Kit, InstaGene, QIAamp Tissue Kit, DNAzol, Elu-Quik) was compared in terms of sensitivity in a subsequent PCR. The results showed that a simple and inexpensive procedure using a lysis buffer containing proteinase K was superior to all other methods tested.

  1. Nutrients, Water Temperature, and Dissolved Oxygen: Are Water Quality Standards Achievable for Forest Streams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ice, G. G.

    2002-12-01

    Water quality standards provide a performance measure for watershed managers. Three of the most important standards for rivers and streams are the key nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus; water temperature; and dissolved oxygen. The concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in waterbodies affects primary production and productivity. Too little nutrients and streams are sterile and unproductive. Too much and they are eutrophic. Water temperature is important because it influences chemical reaction rates in streams and metabolic rates in fish. Dissolved oxygen is necessary for respiration. Salmon, the focus of much of the conservation efforts in the Northwest, are known as organisms that require cool, highly oxygenated water to thrive. Still, it is important when setting a performance standard to determine if those standards are achievable. A survey of nutrient data for small forested streams has found that the ecoregion guidelines proposed by EPA are often unachievable, sometimes even for small, unmanaged reference watersheds. A pilot survey of water temperatures in Oregon wilderness areas and least impaired watersheds has found temperatures frequently exceed the state standards. While natural temperature exceedances are addressed in the water quality standards for Oregon for unmanaged watersheds, these temperatures for managed watersheds might be presumed to result from management activities, precipitating an expensive Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessment. Less is known about dissolved oxygen for small forest streams because work 20 years ago showed little risk of significant dissolved oxygen concentrations where shade was maintained near the stream and fine slash was kept out of the stream. However, work from the 1970's on intergravel dissolved oxygen also shows that stream with greater large woody debris (LWD) can have lower intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations, presumably due to trapping of fine organic and inorganic materials. Efforts to add LWD to

  2. Effect of pure oxygen fine bubbles on the organic matter removal and bacterial community evolution treating coal gasification wastewater by membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Haifeng; Hong, Xiaoting; Han, Hongjun; Shan, Shengdao

    2016-12-01

    A lab-scale study was investigated to evaluate the effect of pure oxygen fine bubbles on membrane bioreactor (O2-MBR) performance of treating coal gasification wastewater. Compared with conventional MBR using aeration source of air (CMBR), the removal efficiencies of COD and total phenols increased by 28% and 36%, and the organic compositions of treated effluent represented significant difference that was mainly attributed to the controlled the foam expansion and enhanced the enzymatic activities in O2-MBR. Moreover, membrane fouling mitigation was observed in O2-MBR, probably owing to the less EPS amount and larger PSD. It was notable that the pure oxygen with fine bubbles promoted marked evolution of bacterial community from CMBR to O2-MBR, particularly, the bacterial community richness and diversity in O2-MBR was lower than CMBR, and the genera Phycisphaera, Comamonas, Thauera and Ohtaekwangia composed the top four most relative abundance genera in O2-MBR, giving the total relative abundance of 26.7%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Vitrification of erythrocytes, cryoprotective solutions and pure water by rapid solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schedgick, David J.

    2003-06-01

    Vitrification has been used successfully in the past to cryopreserve biologically active materials in the presence of high concentrations of cryoprotectants. Rapid cooling and rapid rewarming were investigated to reduce or eliminate the concentrations of cryoprotectant necessary for cryopreservation. Glycerol based cryoprotectants were unidirectionally quenched and rewarmed to determine the depth at which a glass could form upon quenching while also avoiding subsequent crystallization upon rewarming. It was determined that, at sufficient cooling rates, pure water could be vitrified in thicknesses of 700 microns by quenching on free standing diamond wafers, and that solutions of greater than 50% glycerol are required to vitrify thicknesses equivalent to that of a human kidney. This process has been adapted to cryopreserve erythrocytes resuspended in isotonic saline. The cell suspensions were either drawn into small diameter glass tubes (500 micron inner diameter), loaded between thin glass plates (130--170 micron plate thickness), or formed into thin discs by shearing a drop of the suspension on a diamond film. The tubes, plates and sheared droplets were then quenched by immersion into liquid nitrogen. Erythrocyte survival after rewarming was measured at up to 97% of the unfrozen controls. Additionally, erythrocyte intracellular 2,3-DPG, ATP, and K+ were measured for the quenched cells and compared to the unfrozen controls. 2,3-DPG levels dropped 17.9% +/- 16.3%, ATP decreased 46.8% +/- 13.4%, and 52.8% +/- 3.4% of intracellular K+ remained after cryopreservation. The changes in intracellular indicators were similar to the changes observed in erythrocytes cryopreserved using the conventional glycerolized cryopreservation technique. Glass formation in erythrocyte suspensions upon cooling has been confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DS). Samples quenched in tubes, plates and on diamond films showed glass transition endotherms and crystallization exotherms

  4. Synergistic anticandidal activity of pure polyphenol curcumin I in combination with azoles and polyenes generates reactive oxygen species leading to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Manoharlal, Raman; Negi, Arvind Singh; Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-08-01

    We have shown previously that pure polyphenol curcumin I (CUR-I) shows antifungal activity against Candida species. By employing the chequerboard method, filter disc and time-kill assays, in the present study we demonstrate that CUR-I at non-antifungal concentration interacts synergistically with azoles and polyenes. For this, pure polyphenol CUR-I was tested for synergy with five azole and two polyene drugs - fluconazole (FLC), miconazole, ketoconazole (KTC), itraconazole (ITR), voriconazole (VRC), nystatin (NYS) and amphotericin B (AMB) - against 21 clinical isolates of Candida albicans with reduced antifungal sensitivity, as well as a drug-sensitive laboratory strain. Notably, there was a 10-35-fold drop in the MIC(80) values of the drugs when CUR-I was used in combination with azoles and polyenes, with fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) values ranging between 0.09 and 0.5. Interestingly, the synergistic effect of CUR-I with FLC and AMB was associated with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which could be reversed by the addition of an antioxidant such as ascorbic acid. Furthermore, the combination of CUR-I and FLC/AMB triggered apoptosis that could also be reversed by ascorbic acid. We provide the first evidence that pure CUR-I in combination with azoles and polyenes represents a novel therapeutic strategy to improve the activity of common antifungals.

  5. Polarizability calculations on water, hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, S.; Adams, S.; Rein, R.

    1973-01-01

    A semiclassical model of damped oscillators is used as a basis for the calculation of the dispersion of the refractive index, polarizability, and dielectric permeability in water, hydrogen, and oxygen in liquid and gaseous states, and in gaseous carbon dioxide. The absorption coefficient and the imaginary part of the refractive index are also calculated at corresponding wavelengths. A good agreement is obtained between the observed and calculated values of refractive indices, and between those of absorption coefficients in the region of absorption bands. The calculated values of oscillator strengths and damping factors are also discussed. The value of the polarizability of liquid water was about 2.8 times that of previous calculations.

  6. Polarizability calculations on water, hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, S.; Adams, S.; Rein, R.

    1973-01-01

    A semiclassical model of damped oscillators is used as a basis for the calculation of the dispersion of the refractive index, polarizability, and dielectric permeability in water, hydrogen, and oxygen in liquid and gaseous states, and in gaseous carbon dioxide. The absorption coefficient and the imaginary part of the refractive index are also calculated at corresponding wavelengths. A good agreement is obtained between the observed and calculated values of refractive indices, and between those of absorption coefficients in the region of absorption bands. The calculated values of oscillator strengths and damping factors are also discussed. The value of the polarizability of liquid water was about 2.8 times that of previous calculations.

  7. Effects of light intensity and water temperature on oxygen release from roots into water lettuce rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Soda, S; Ike, M; Ogasawara, Y; Yoshinaka, M; Mishima, D; Fujita, M

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen release rate into the rhizosphere by a floating aquatic plant-water lettuce-was determined under various light intensities (0.0-1.2x10(5)lx) and water temperatures (10-35 degrees C). The net specific oxygen release rate was expressed by a model equation comprising the gross oxygen release rate and the rhizosphere respiration terms. Experimental and simulated results show that the net specific oxygen release rate increased with light intensity up to the optimal value, but slight inhibition by higher light intensities was observed at 10-20 degrees C. With increased water temperature, the respiration rate became larger than the gross oxygen release rate. The maximum net specific oxygen release rate of 11.0-12.5mg-O(2)kg-wet(-1)h(-1) was obtained at the optimal condition of about 25 degrees C and 9.0x10(4)-1.1x10(5)lx. The net oxygen release rate was negligible at 35 degrees C at any light intensity because the respiration rate was much greater than the gross oxygen release rate into the rhizosphere.

  8. Phase pure α-Mn2O3 prisms and their bifunctional electrocatalytic activity in oxygen evolution and reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Maryam; Tominaka, Satoshi; Henzie, Joel

    2016-11-22

    Synthesizing manganese oxide materials with exact control of the nanoparticle shape and phase is difficult, making it challenging to understand the influence of the surface structure on electrocatalysis. Here we describe an inexpensive, low-temperature method to synthesize single-crystal orthorhombic phase α-Mn2O3 prisms bound by the {100} facets. The synthesis is the first method to use the cation bridging effect to assist in the creation of α-Mn2O3 prisms. According to structural analysis using X-ray diffraction, X-ray pair-distribution function (PDF) measurements and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, the material is composed exclusively of α-Mn2O3 prisms, and no additional amorphous or nanocrystalline phases are present. Heating the prisms transformed the material to a more symmetrical, cubic phase α-Mn2O3 that exhibited strong bifunctional electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen evolution (OER) and oxygen reduction (ORR) reactions. We compared the oxygen electrode activities (OEA) and found that the α-Mn2O3 prisms performed 79% better than commercially-produced α-Mn2O3 powders, indicating that these α-Mn2O3 prisms perform well as inexpensive, earth-abundant materials for reversible electrodes.

  9. Catalytic electron-transfer oxygenation of substrates with water as an oxygen source using manganese porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Mizuno, Takuya; Ojiri, Tetsuya

    2012-12-03

    Manganese(V)-oxo-porphyrins are produced by the electron-transfer oxidation of manganese-porphyrins with tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(III) ([Ru(bpy)(3)](3+); 2 equiv) in acetonitrile (CH(3)CN) containing water. The rate constants of the electron-transfer oxidation of manganese-porphyrins have been determined and evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer. Addition of [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) to a solution of olefins (styrene and cyclohexene) in CH(3)CN containing water in the presence of a catalytic amount of manganese-porphyrins afforded epoxides, diols, and aldehydes efficiently. Epoxides were converted to the corresponding diols by hydrolysis, and were further oxidized to the corresponding aldehydes. The turnover numbers vary significantly depending on the type of manganese-porphyrin used owing to the difference in their oxidation potentials and the steric bulkiness of the ligand. Ethylbenzene was also oxidized to 1-phenylethanol using manganese-porphyrins as electron-transfer catalysts. The oxygen source in the substrate oxygenation was confirmed to be water by using (18)O-labeled water. The rate constant of the reaction of the manganese(V)-oxo species with cyclohexene was determined directly under single-turnover conditions by monitoring the increase in absorbance attributable to the manganese(III) species produced in the reaction with cyclohexene. It has been shown that the rate-determining step in the catalytic electron-transfer oxygenation of cyclohexene is electron transfer from [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) to the manganese-porphyrins.

  10. [Generation of reactive oxygen species in water under exposure of visible or infrared irradiation at absorption band of molecular oxygen].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, S V; Karp, O E; Garmash, S A; Ivanov, V E; Chernikov, A V; Manokhin, A A; Astashev, M E; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Bruskov, V I

    2012-01-01

    It is found that in bidistilled water saturated with oxygen hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are formed under the influence of visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurs under the influence of both solar and artificial light sourses, including the coherent laser irradiation. The oxygen effect, i.e. the impact of dissolved oxygen concentration on production of hydrogen peroxide induced by light, is detected. It is shown that the visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen leads to the formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA in vitro. Physicochemical mechanisms of ROS formation in water when exposed to visible and infrared light are studied, and the involvement of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radicals in this process is shown.

  11. Potentiating Effect of Pure Oxygen on the Enhancement of Respiration by Ethylene in Plant Storage Organs: A Comparative Study 1

    PubMed Central

    Theologis, Athanasios; Laties, George G.

    1982-01-01

    A number of fruits and bulky storage organs were studied with respect to the effect of pure O2 on the extent and time-course of the respiratory rise induced by ethylene. In one group, of which potato (Solanum tuberosum var. Russet) and carrot (Daucus carota) are examples, the response to ethylene in O2 is much greater than in air. In a second group, of which avocado (Persea americana Mill. var. Hass) and banana (Musa cavendishii Lambert var. Valery) are examples, air and O2 are equally effective. When O2-responsive organs are peeled, air and O2 synergize the ethylene response to the same extent in parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), whereas O2 is more stimulatory than air in carrots. In the latter instance, carrot flesh is considered to contribute significantly to diffusion resistance. The release of CO2, an ethylene antagonist, is recognized as another element in the response to peeling. The potentiating effect of O2 is considered to be primarily on ethylene action in the development of the respiratory rise rather than on the respiration process per se. On the assumption that diffusion controls O2 movement into bulky organs and the peel represents the major diffusion barrier, simple calculations indicate that the O2 concentration in untreated organs in air readily sustains respiration. Furthermore, in ethylene-treated organs in pure O2, the internal O2 concentration is more than enough to maintain the high respiration rates. Skin conductivity to O2 is the fundamental parameter differentiating O2-responsive from O2-nonresponsive fruits and bulky storage organs. The large preceding the earliest response to ethylene, as well as the magnitude of the ethylene-induced respiratory rise, is also controlled by permeability characteristics of the peel. PMID:16662339

  12. Potentiating effect of pure oxygen on the enhancement of respiration by ethylene in plant storage organs: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Theologis, A; Laties, G G

    1982-05-01

    A number of fruits and bulky storage organs were studied with respect to the effect of pure O(2) on the extent and time-course of the respiratory rise induced by ethylene. In one group, of which potato (Solanum tuberosum var. Russet) and carrot (Daucus carota) are examples, the response to ethylene in O(2) is much greater than in air. In a second group, of which avocado (Persea americana Mill. var. Hass) and banana (Musa cavendishii Lambert var. Valery) are examples, air and O(2) are equally effective. When O(2)-responsive organs are peeled, air and O(2) synergize the ethylene response to the same extent in parsnip (Pastinaca sativa), whereas O(2) is more stimulatory than air in carrots. In the latter instance, carrot flesh is considered to contribute significantly to diffusion resistance. The release of CO(2), an ethylene antagonist, is recognized as another element in the response to peeling.The potentiating effect of O(2) is considered to be primarily on ethylene action in the development of the respiratory rise rather than on the respiration process per se. On the assumption that diffusion controls O(2) movement into bulky organs and the peel represents the major diffusion barrier, simple calculations indicate that the O(2) concentration in untreated organs in air readily sustains respiration. Furthermore, in ethylene-treated organs in pure O(2), the internal O(2) concentration is more than enough to maintain the high respiration rates. Skin conductivity to O(2) is the fundamental parameter differentiating O(2)-responsive from O(2)-nonresponsive fruits and bulky storage organs. The large preceding the earliest response to ethylene, as well as the magnitude of the ethylene-induced respiratory rise, is also controlled by permeability characteristics of the peel.

  13. The nucleation and growth of copper nanoclusters on silicon surfaces from deoxygenated ultra pure water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Andy

    Due to the recent adoption of copper interconnect technology by the semiconductor industry, there has been great interest in understanding the kinetics and mechanisms of copper metal deposition on silicon wafer surfaces in ultra pure water (UPW) solutions. To study copper deposition mechanisms on silicon surfaces, silicon [100] samples were immersed in deoxygenated and non-deoxygenated UPW solutions contaminated with a copper concentration ranging from 0.01 ppb to 1000 ppb while holding the dipping time constant at 300 seconds. By using synchrotron radiation total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in the TXRF geometry, the surface concentration as well as the chemical state of the deposited copper for ultra-low surface concentrations in the range of 4E9 atoms/cm2 (˜10 -6 ML) were determined. From these measurements, it was seen that metallic Cu is deposited in deoxygenated UPW solutions while a mixture of metallic Cu and Cu oxides are deposited in non-deoxygenated UPW solutions. In addition, the copper fluorescence signal was measured as a function of the angle of incidence of the incoming x-rays to determine whether the deposited copper was atomically dispersed or particle-like in nature. It was revealed that samples prepared in nondeoxygenated UPW had Cu that was atomically dispersed near the silicon surface, while the samples immersed in deoxygenated UPW had Cu particles that rose above the silicon surface. To further explore the growth of Cu particles in deoxygenated UPW solutions, silicon samples were immersed in deoxygenated UPW solutions copper concentrations of 100 ppb with dipping times ranging from 5 to 300 seconds. The size and surface density of the metallic copper nanoparticles deposited in deoxygenated UPW solutions was determined for the whole range of dipping times, by using AFM as well as measuring the fluorescence signal as a function of angle. Mathematical models were developed to describe

  14. Rate of oxygen isotope exchange between selenate and water.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masanori; Poulson, Simon R

    2012-04-17

    The rate of oxygen isotope exchange between selenate and water was investigated at conditions of 10 to 80 °C and pH -0.6 to 4.4. Oxygen isotope exchange proceeds as a first-order reaction, and the exchange rate is strongly affected by reaction temperature and pH, with increased rates of isotope exchange at higher temperature and lower pH. Selenate speciation (HSeO(4)(-) vs SeO(4)(2-)) also has a significant effect on the rate of isotope exchange. The half-life for isotope exchange at example natural conditions (25 °C and pH 7) is estimated to be significantly in excess of 10(6) years. The very slow rate of oxygen isotope exchange between selenate and water under most environmental conditions demonstrates that selenate-δ(18)O signatures produced by biogeochemical processes will be preserved and hence that it will be possible to use the value of selenate-δ(18)O to investigate the biogeochemical behavior of selenate, in an analogous fashion to the use of sulfate-δ(18)O to study the biogeochemical behavior of sulfate.

  15. Anaerobic glycolysis and specific gravity of the red blood cells of rats exposed to pure oxygen at 600 torr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabine, J. C.; Leon, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    Rats were exposed to 100% oxygen at 600 torr for up to 8 days. Highly significant increases in RBC anaerobic glycolysis occurred during the first 4 days of exposure and then subsided. Two significant peaks were found, one on days 1 and 2 and one on day 4. The first peak is attributed to reticulocytosis, which was maximal after 90 minutes and had disappeared by day 3. A second mechanism must account for the peak on day 4. An interpretation of the second peak is provided by existing evidence that selective removal of older RBCs occurs during the first few days of exposure to hypobaric oxygen, with maximum effect on day 4. Results in splenectomized, sham-operated and intact animals were indistinguishable from each other. A significant decrease in RBC specific gravity was found in exposed animals with spleens intact, but not in splenectomized animals. Theoretical aspects of age-related parameters as an aid to continuous detection and evaluation of changes in RBC populations are discussed.

  16. Anaerobic glycolysis and specific gravity of the red blood cells of rats exposed to pure oxygen at 600 torr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabine, J. C.; Leon, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    Rats were exposed to 100% oxygen at 600 torr for up to 8 days. Highly significant increases in RBC anaerobic glycolysis occurred during the first 4 days of exposure and then subsided. Two significant peaks were found, one on days 1 and 2 and one on day 4. The first peak is attributed to reticulocytosis, which was maximal after 90 minutes and had disappeared by day 3. A second mechanism must account for the peak on day 4. An interpretation of the second peak is provided by existing evidence that selective removal of older RBCs occurs during the first few days of exposure to hypobaric oxygen, with maximum effect on day 4. Results in splenectomized, sham-operated and intact animals were indistinguishable from each other. A significant decrease in RBC specific gravity was found in exposed animals with spleens intact, but not in splenectomized animals. Theoretical aspects of age-related parameters as an aid to continuous detection and evaluation of changes in RBC populations are discussed.

  17. Oxygen isotope fractionation processes in the water-calcite-aragonite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fohlmeister, Jens; Spötl, Christoph; Plessen, Birgit; Tjallingii, Rik; Schröder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Frank, Norbert; Arps, Jennifer; Leutz, Kathrin; Vollweiler, Nicole; Trüssel, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The O isotopic composition of speleothems in their pure calcite or pure aragonite polymorphs provides valuable insight into past climate variability. However, robust climatic interpretations become difficult when both polymorphs are present either in different growth layers or as intergrown fabrics. Experimental studies show that the O isotope fractionation between the dissolved carbonate species and CaCO3 is about 0.75‰ (at 10°C) larger for aragonite than for calcite (e.g., Kim et al., 2007, Kim and O'Neil, 1997). The temperature dependence of this offset is negligible for temperature variations typical of most cave systems. However, cave analogue experiments examining this offset are still lacking. Here, we present stable O isotope measurements of a Holocene speleothem from the Swiss Alps, which shows exactly one calcite-aragonite transition along individual growth layers. Oxygen isotope measurements along 'Hendy test'-like traverses across those transitions provide insight into the fractionation behavior of the water-calcite vs. water-aragonite system. We observed a fractionation offset smaller than predicted by laboratory experiments that varies by at least a factor of two. In addition, the observed variations correlate positively with growth rate and negatively with the isotopic composition of the calcite precipitating at the growth axis. The reason for this behavior is still unclear. Trace element analyses across the transitions of growth layers are planned to help understanding this pattern.

  18. Pure Rotational Spectra of the Reaction Products of Laser Ablated Thorium Metal and Oxygen Molecules Entrained Within Supersonic Expansions of Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, B. E.; Cooke, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    Thorium metal has been laser ablated in the presence of pure oxygen entrained in high pressure argon. The products of the ablation event have been supersonically expanded into the Fabry-Pérot cavity of a time-domain microwave spectrometer. New measurements have been performed on thorium monoxide, where the J = 1 ← 0 transition has been recorded in the v = 8, 9, and 10 vibrational levels. Further to this, a thorium-dependent spectral transition has been observed at 19251.8740(10) MHz. The carrier of this signal is to be determined, however, it requires an oxygen concentration of 0.1 % which is significantly higher than the optimal oxygen concentration required for observation of the thorium monoxide transitions. It is postulated that the presently unidentified thorium-containing compound is ThO_2 which has C_2v symmetry. Progress on the measurement of this spectra, together with other thorium experiments and supporting quantum chemical calculations, will be presented.

  19. Phase transition-induced band edge engineering of BiVO4 to split pure water under visible light.

    PubMed

    Jo, Won Jun; Kang, Hyun Joon; Kong, Ki-Jeong; Lee, Yun Seog; Park, Hunmin; Lee, Younghye; Buonassisi, Tonio; Gleason, Karen K; Lee, Jae Sung

    2015-11-10

    Through phase transition-induced band edge engineering by dual doping with In and Mo, a new greenish BiVO4 (Bi1-XInXV1-XMoXO4) is developed that has a larger band gap energy than the usual yellow scheelite monoclinic BiVO4 as well as a higher (more negative) conduction band than H(+)/H2 potential [0 VRHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) at pH 7]. Hence, it can extract H2 from pure water by visible light-driven overall water splitting without using any sacrificial reagents. The density functional theory calculation indicates that In(3+)/Mo(6+) dual doping triggers partial phase transformation from pure monoclinic BiVO4 to a mixture of monoclinic BiVO4 and tetragonal BiVO4, which sequentially leads to unit cell volume growth, compressive lattice strain increase, conduction band edge uplift, and band gap widening.

  20. Dispersed conductive polymer nanoparticles on graphitic carbon nitride for enhanced solar-driven hydrogen evolution from pure water.

    PubMed

    Sui, Yi; Liu, Jinghai; Zhang, Yuewei; Tian, Xike; Chen, Wei

    2013-10-07

    Developing new methods to improve the photocatalytic activity of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C₃N₄) for hydrogen (H₂) evolution has attracted intensive research interests. Here, we report that the g-C₃N₄ exhibits photocatalytic activity for H₂ evolution from pure water. And, the activity is dramatically improved by loading highly dispersed conductive polymer nanoparticles. The H₂ evolution rate increases up to 50 times for g-C₃N₄ with 1.5 wt% polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles on the surface. The reaction proceeding in a pure water system excludes the need for sacrificial agents. The role of the highly conductive PPy in enhancing H₂ evolution is as a surface junction to increase the number of photoinduced electrons, and to facilitate electron transfer to the interface.

  1. Phase transition-induced band edge engineering of BiVO4 to split pure water under visible light

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Won Jun; Kang, Hyun Joon; Kong, Ki-Jeong; Lee, Yun Seog; Park, Hunmin; Lee, Younghye; Buonassisi, Tonio; Gleason, Karen K.; Lee, Jae Sung

    2015-01-01

    Through phase transition-induced band edge engineering by dual doping with In and Mo, a new greenish BiVO4 (Bi1-XInXV1-XMoXO4) is developed that has a larger band gap energy than the usual yellow scheelite monoclinic BiVO4 as well as a higher (more negative) conduction band than H+/H2 potential [0 VRHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) at pH 7]. Hence, it can extract H2 from pure water by visible light-driven overall water splitting without using any sacrificial reagents. The density functional theory calculation indicates that In3+/Mo6+ dual doping triggers partial phase transformation from pure monoclinic BiVO4 to a mixture of monoclinic BiVO4 and tetragonal BiVO4, which sequentially leads to unit cell volume growth, compressive lattice strain increase, conduction band edge uplift, and band gap widening. PMID:26508636

  2. Fundamental study of green EUV lithography using natural polysaccharide for the use of pure water in developable process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    The eco-conscious lithography processes of using pure water instead of spin coating organic solvent and alkaline developer were described for extreme-ultraviolet and electron beam techniques of advanced photomask manufactural application. Natural polysaccharide was obtained by the esterification of the hydroxyl groups of the polysaccharide resulting in improved resolution and resist profiles after the purewater developing processes. The 100, 200, and, 300 nm line and space width, and straight profiles of polysaccharide-based resist material on hardmask underlayer were resolved at the doses of 30 μC/cm2. In addition to the superior resolution in the pure-water developing processes, the resist material containing the polysaccharide derivatives for these lithography showed good resist profiles and step filling performance on substrates.

  3. UV-Vis, infrared, and mass spectroscopy of electron irradiated frozen oxygen and carbon dioxide mixtures with water

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    Ozone has been detected on the surface of Ganymede via observation of the Hartley band through the use of ultraviolet spectroscopy and is largely agreed upon to be formed by radiolytic processing via interaction of magnetospheric energetic ions and/or electrons with oxygen-bearing ices on Ganymede's surface. Interestingly, a clearly distinct band near 300 nm within the shoulder of the UV-Vis spectrum of Ganymede was also observed, but currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. Consequently, the primary motivation behind this work was the collection of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy of ozone formation by energetic electron bombardment of a variety of oxygen-bearing ices (oxygen, carbon dioxide, water) relevant to this moon as well as other solar system. Ozone was indeed synthesized in pure ices of molecular oxygen, carbon dioxide and a mixture of water and oxygen, in agreement with previous studies. The Hartley band of the ozone synthesized in these ice mixtures was observed in the UV-Vis spectra and compared with the spectrum of Ganymede. In addition, a solid state ozone absorption cross section of 6.0 ± 0.6 × 10{sup –17} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup –1} was obtained from the UV-Vis spectral data. Ozone was not produced in the irradiated carbon dioxide-water mixtures; however, a spectrally 'red' UV continuum is observed and appears to reproduce well what is observed in a large number of icy moons such as Europa.

  4. Capability of pure water calibrated time-of-flight sensors for the determination of speed of sound in seawater.

    PubMed

    von Rohden, Christoph; Fehres, Felix; Rudtsch, Steffen

    2015-08-01

    Results from a laboratory investigation of commercial time-of-flight sensors designed for oceanographic in situ speed-of-sound measurements are presented. An older analog model and three modern digital units were calibrated in pure water in the temperature range of 1 °C to 50 °C. The speed of sound (w) was measured in salt solutions of varying concentration (NaCl, MgCl2, Na2SO4) and in samples of original and diluted North Atlantic seawater at atmospheric pressure. A high reproducibility of the time-of-flight readings was found, resulting in sound speed standard deviations in pure water between 0.033 m s(-1) and 0.015 m s(-1), depending on the individual instruments. This depicts the potential of the time-of-flight method. However, although simultaneously calibrated, the measurements revealed systematic speed-of-sound differences between the different sensors which exceeded the reproducibility by about 1 order of magnitude. As the cause of these deviations could not be determined within this study, this exhibits a constraint for the uncertainty of measurements in seawater relative to pure water. In comparison with recent equations this has been estimated at 0.3 m s(-1) (200 ppm) in original seawater. In seawater at temperatures >40 °C and in diluted seawater the results indicate relevant differences from the recent Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater-2010 equation of state.

  5. Oxygen isotope fractionation between hydroxide minerals and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yong-Fei

    The modified increment method has been applied to the calculation of oxygen isotope fractionation factors for hydroxide minerals. The results suggest the following sequence of 18O-enrichment in the common hydroxides: limonite > gibbsite > goethite > brucite > diaspore. The hydroxides are significantly enriched in 18O relative to the corresponding oxides. The sequence of 18O-enrichment in the hydroxides and oxides of trivalent cations is as follows: M(OH)3 > MO(OH) > M2O3. There are also considerable fractionations within the polymorphos of Al(OH)3. The internally consistent fractionation factors for hydroxide-water systems are obtained for the temperature range of 0 to 1200 °C, which are comparable with the data derived from synthesis experiments and natural samples at surficial temperatures. Temperature dependence of oxygen isotope fractionations between goethite, gibbsite, boehmite and diaspore and water are significant enough for the purpose of geothermometry. Thus the hydroxide-water pairs hold great promise of serving as reliable paleothermometers in surficial geological environments.

  6. Observation of hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide in a reaction system containing CH2OO and water vapor through pure rotational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Masakazu; Endo, Yasuki

    2015-10-01

    Pure rotational transitions of hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP) were observed in the discharged plasma of a CH2I2/O2/water gas mixture, where the water complex with the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO has been identified [M. Nakajima and Y. Endo, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 134302 (2014)]. Isotope experiments using heavy water support that the currently observed HMHP molecule was produced by the reaction of CH2OO with water vapor. The observed species was identified as the most stable conformer with the help of quantum chemical calculations. We also clarified that productions of formic acid and dioxirane are promoted by the existence of water vapor in the discharged reaction system.

  7. Thermochemistry of substellar atmospheres: Water, oxygen, sulfur, and phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Channon Wayne

    2006-09-01

    Thermochemical equilibrium and kinetic calculations are used to investigate atmospheric chemistry in substellar objects: giant planets, extrasolar giant planets (EGPs), and brown dwarfs. These studies include an assessment of the water and total oxygen inventories in the interiors of Jupiter and Saturn, and detailed modeling of sulfur and phosphorus chemistry in the atmospheres of substellar objects. In the first part of the dissertation, the water and total oxygen abundances in the deep atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are determined by considering the effects of H 2 O and O on the chemistry of CO, PH 3 , and SiH 4 . On Jupiter, the observed CO abundance indicates a water abundance of 0.4--1.4 times the protosolar H 2 O/H 2 ratio (8.96 × 10 -4 ). On Saturn, a combination of CO and PH 3 chemical constraints requires a water abundance of 1.9--6.1 times the protosolar abundance. Combining these results with Si mass balance considerations gives a total oxygen abundance of 0.7--1.7 and 3.2--6.4 times the protosolar O/H 2 ratio (1.16 × 10 -3 ) on Jupiter and Saturn, respectively. In both planets, oxygen is less enriched than other heavy elements (such as carbon) relative to hydrogen and the solar system composition. These results provide important constraints for giant planet formation mechanisms and models of tropospheric chemistry. The second part of the dissertation is a detailed study of sulfur and phosphorus chemistry in substellar atmospheres. The chemical behavior of individual S- and P-bearing gases and condensates is determined as a function of temperature, total pressure, and metallicity. Aside from minor amounts of sulfur removed by metal sulfide cloud formation, H 2 S is approximately representative of the sulfur inventory throughout substellar atmospheres. Silicon sulfide (SiS) is a potential tracer of weather in EGPs and L dwarfs. Phosphorus chemistry is considerably more complex than that of sulfur. Disequilibrium abundances of PH 3 approximately

  8. The temperature dependence of intermediate range oxygen-oxygen correlations in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Wikfeldt, K Thor; Skinner, Lawrie B; Benmore, Chris J; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2016-08-28

    We analyze the recent temperature dependent oxygen-oxygen pair-distribution functions from experimental high-precision x-ray diffraction data of bulk water by Skinner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214507 (2014)] with particular focus on the intermediate range where small, but significant, correlations are found out to 17 Å. The second peak in the pair-distribution function at 4.5 Å is connected to tetrahedral coordination and was shown by Skinner et al. to change behavior with temperature below the temperature of minimum isothermal compressibility. Here we show that this is associated also with a peak growing at 11 Å which strongly indicates a collective character of fluctuations leading to the enhanced compressibility at lower temperatures. We note that the peak at ∼13.2 Å exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that of the density with a maximum close to 277 K or 4 °C. We analyze simulations of the TIP4P/2005 water model in the same manner and find excellent agreement between simulations and experiment albeit with a temperature shift of ∼20 K.

  9. The temperature dependence of intermediate range oxygen-oxygen correlations in liquid water

    DOE PAGES

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Wikfeldt, K. Thor; Skinner, Lawrie B.; ...

    2016-08-25

    Here, we analyze the recent temperature dependent oxygen-oxygen pair-distribution functions from experimental high-precision x-ray diffraction data of bulk water by Skinner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214507 (2014)] with particular focus on the intermediate range where small, but significant, correlations are found out to 17 Å. The second peak in the pair-distribution function at 4.5 Å is connected to tetrahedral coordination and was shown by Skinner et al. to change behavior with temperature below the temperature of minimum isothermal compressibility. Here we show that this is associated also with a peak growing at 11 Å which strongly indicates amore » collective character of fluctuations leading to the enhanced compressibility at lower temperatures. We note that the peak at ~13.2 Å exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that of the density with a maximum close to 277 K or 4 °C. We analyze simulations of the TIP4P/2005 water model in the same manner and find excellent agreement between simulations and experiment albeit with a temperature shift of ~20 K.« less

  10. The temperature dependence of intermediate range oxygen-oxygen correlations in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesinger, Daniel; Wikfeldt, K. Thor; Skinner, Lawrie B.; Benmore, Chris J.; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the recent temperature dependent oxygen-oxygen pair-distribution functions from experimental high-precision x-ray diffraction data of bulk water by Skinner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214507 (2014)] with particular focus on the intermediate range where small, but significant, correlations are found out to 17 Å. The second peak in the pair-distribution function at 4.5 Å is connected to tetrahedral coordination and was shown by Skinner et al. to change behavior with temperature below the temperature of minimum isothermal compressibility. Here we show that this is associated also with a peak growing at 11 Å which strongly indicates a collective character of fluctuations leading to the enhanced compressibility at lower temperatures. We note that the peak at ˜13.2 Å exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that of the density with a maximum close to 277 K or 4 °C. We analyze simulations of the TIP4P/2005 water model in the same manner and find excellent agreement between simulations and experiment albeit with a temperature shift of ˜20 K.

  11. Phase pure epitaxial growth of BiFeO3 films: An effect of oxygen partial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Das, Sadhan; Majumdar, Abhijit; Katiyal, Sumant; Poojitha, Bommareddy; Saha, Surajit; Shripathi, T.

    2017-09-01

    We report the growth of bismuth ferrite, BiFeO3 (BFO), thin films by varying oxygen partial pressure (230, 100 and 10mTorr) in pulsed laser deposition system using 10% bismuth excess BFO target on SrTiO3 (001) [STO] substrates at 700 °C each for 15 min duration. X-ray diffraction shows the presence of an impurity phase along with BFO peaks for 230 mTorr film, whereas oriented BFO film is observed for 100 mTorr film with a small impurity phase. Importantly, epitaxial growth of BFO is observed without any impurity phase and with sufficiently increased strain for the 10 mTorr film, confirmed by the reciprocal space mapping of (002) and (103) reflections. UV-Raman measurements have been performed on as grown films and the 10 mTorr BFO film after annealing up to 500 °C to check its thermal stability. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) study reveals that the 10 mTorr BFO film shows a lower roughness as compared to 100 mTorr and 230 mTorr films. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis in AFM shows a fourfold symmetric structure suggesting the presence of both modes of pattern-orientation in 230 mTorr BFO film whereas an elongated bright spot along the y-direction in the FFT of 10 mTorr BFO film suggests the growth tendency to be along the y-direction.

  12. Time-resolved investigations of singlet oxygen luminescence in water, in phosphatidylcholine, and in aqueous suspensions of phosphatidylcholine or HT29 cells.

    PubMed

    Baier, Jürgen; Maier, Max; Engl, Roland; Landthaler, Michael; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2005-02-24

    Singlet oxygen was generated by energy transfer from the photoexcited sensitizer, Photofrin or 9-acetoxy-2,7,12,17-tetrakis-(beta-methoxyethyl)-porphycene (ATMPn), to molecular oxygen. Singlet oxygen was detected time-resolved by its luminescence at 1270 nm in an environment of increasing complexity, water (H2O), pure phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine in water (lipid suspensions), and aqueous suspensions of living cells. In the case of the lipid suspensions, the sensitizers accumulated in the lipids, whereas the localizations in the cells are the membranes containing phosphatidylcholine. By use of Photofrin, the measured luminescence decay times of singlet oxygen were 3.5 +/- 0.5 micros in water, 14 +/- 2 micros in lipid, 9 +/- 2 micros in aqueous suspensions of lipid droplets, and 10 +/- 3 micros in aqueous suspensions of human colonic cancer cells (HT29). The decay time in cell suspensions was much longer than in water and was comparable to the value in suspensions of phosphatidylcholine. That luminescence signal might be attributed to singlet oxygen decaying in the lipid areas of cellular membranes. The measured luminescence decay times of singlet oxygen excited by ATMPn in pure lipid and lipid suspensions were the same within the experimental error as for Photofrin. In contrast to experiments with Photofrin, the decay time in aqueous suspension of HT29 cells was 6 +/- 2 micros when using ATMPn.

  13. The Corrosion Behavior of Pure Iron under Solid Na2SO4 Deposit in Wet Oxygen Flow at 500 °C

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yanbing; Liu, Li; Fan, Lei; Li, Ying; Wang, Fuhui

    2014-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of pure Fe under a Na2SO4 deposit in an atmosphere of O2 + H2O was investigated at 500 °C by thermo gravimetric, and electrochemical measurements, viz. potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and surface characterization methods viz. X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS). The results showed that a synergistic effect occurred between Na2SO4 and O2 + H2O, which significantly accelerated the corrosion rate of the pure Fe. Briefly, NaFeO2 was formed in addition to the customary Fe oxides; at the same time, H2SO4 gas was produced by introduction of water vapor. Subsequently, an electrochemical corrosion reaction occurred due to the existence of Na2SO4, NaFeO2, and H2O. When this coupled to the chemical corrosion reaction, the progress of the chemical corrosion reaction was promoted and eventually resulted in the acceleration of the corrosion of the pure Fe. PMID:28788182

  14. Isomers and Energy Landscapes of Perchlorate-Water Clusters and a Comparison to Pure Water and Sulfate-Water Clusters.

    PubMed

    Hey, John C; Smeeton, Lewis C; Oakley, Mark T; Johnston, Roy L

    2016-06-16

    Hydrated ions are crucially important in a wide array of environments, from biology to the atmosphere, and the presence and concentration of ions in a system can drastically alter its behavior. One way in which ions can affect systems is in their interactions with proteins. The Hofmeister series ranks ions by their ability to salt-out proteins, with kosmotropes, such as sulfate, increasing their stability and chaotropes, such as perchlorate, decreasing their stability. We study hydrated perchlorate clusters as they are strongly chaotropic and thus exhibit different properties than sulfate. In this study we simulate small hydrated perchlorate clusters using a basin-hopping geometry optimization search with empirical potentials. We compare topological features of these clusters to data from both computational and experimental studies of hydrated sulfate ions and draw some conclusions about ion effects in the Hofmeister series. We observe a patterning conferred to the water molecules within the cluster by the presence of the perchlorate ion and compare the magnitude of this effect to that observed in previous studies involving sulfate. We also investigate the influence of the overall ionic charge on the low-energy structures adopted by these clusters.

  15. Effect of chitosan nanoparticles and pectin content on mechanical properties and water vapor permeability of banana puree films.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Milena R; Barros, Taís T; de Moura, Márcia R; Mattoso, Luiz H C; Assis, Odilio B G

    2013-01-01

    Puree prepared from over-ripe peeled bananas was used as raw material for films processing in a laboratory padder. Pectin and glycerol as plasticizer were added in small concentrations and chitosan nanoparticles (88.79 ± 0.42 nm medium size) incorporated at 0.2% (dry weight basis) as reinforcement material. The mechanical properties, water vapor transmission, thermal stability, and scanning electron microscopy of fractured film surfaces were characterized. Both pectin and glycerol demonstrated an important role in promoting elongation and film handability as was expected. The incorporation of nanoparticles promoted noticeable improvement of the mechanical properties and acted in reducing the water vapor permeation rate, by 21% for films processed with pectin and up to 38% for films processed without pectin, when compared to the control (puree films with no pectin and nanoparticles additions). Microscopic observation revealed a denser matrix when nanoparticles are incorporated into the films. The development of films from fruit purees head to a new strategy for plastic processing from natural resources. The over-ripe or even waste banana can be adequately prepared for batch films processed with reasonable mechanical and barrier properties, suitable for applications in the food segment. The addition of small fractions of chitosan nanoparticles, form nanocomposites enhancing mechanical and thermal stability broadening potential film applications. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope signatures of Northeast Atlantic water masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelker, Antje H. L.; Colman, Albert; Olack, Gerard; Waniek, Joanna J.; Hodell, David

    2015-06-01

    Only a few studies have examined the variation of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes of seawater in NE Atlantic water masses, and data are especially sparse for intermediate and deep-water masses. The current study greatly expands this record with 527 δ18O values from 47 stations located throughout the mid- to low-latitude NE Atlantic. In addition, δD was analyzed in the 192 samples collected along the GEOTRACES North Atlantic Transect GA03 (GA03_e=KN199-4) and the 115 Iberia-Forams cruise samples from the western and southern Iberian margin. An intercomparison study between the two stable isotope measurement techniques (cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy and magnetic-sector isotope ratio mass spectrometry) used to analyze GA03_e samples reveals relatively good agreement for both hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios. The surface (0-100 m) and central (100-500 m) water isotope data show the typical, evaporation related trend of increasing values equatorward with the exception for the zonal transect off Cape Blanc, NW Africa. Off Cape Blanc, surface water isotope signatures are modified by the upwelling of fresher Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) that generally has isotopic values of 0.0 to 0.5‰ for δ18O and 0 to 2‰ for δD. Along the Iberian margin the Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) is clearly distinguished by its high δ18O (0.5-1.1‰) and δD (3-6‰) values that can be traced into the open Atlantic. Isotopic values in the NE Atlantic Deep Water (NEADW) are relatively low (δ18O: -0.1 to 0.5‰; δD: -1 to 4‰) and show a broader range than observed previously in the northern and southern convection areas. The NEADW is best observed at GA03_e Stations 5 and 7 in the central NE Atlantic basin. Antarctic Bottom Water isotope values are relatively high indicating modification of the original Antarctic source water along the flow path. The reconstructed δ18O-salinity relationship for the complete data set has a slope of 0.51, i.e., slightly steeper than the 0

  17. Characterization of refractory matters in dyeing wastewater during a full-scale Fenton process following pure-oxygen activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Bae, Wookeun; Won, Hosik; Hwang, Byungho; de Toledo, Renata Alves; Chung, Jinwook; Kwon, Kiwook; Shim, Hojae

    2015-04-28

    Refractory pollutants in raw and treated dyeing wastewaters were characterized using fractional molecular weight cut-off, Ultraviolet-vis spectrophotometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI/MS). Significant organics and color compounds remained after biological (pure-oxygen activated sludge) and chemical (Fenton) treatments at a dyeing wastewater treatment plant (flow rate ∼100,000m(3)/d). HPLC-ESI/MS analysis revealed that some organic compounds disappeared after the biological treatment but reappeared after the chemical oxidation process, and some of that were originally absent in the raw dyeing wastewater was formed after the biological or chemical treatment. It appeared that the Fenton process merely impaired the color-imparting bonds in the dye materials instead of completely degrading them. Nevertheless, this process did significantly reduce the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD, 66%) and color (73%) remaining after initial biological treatment which reduced SCOD by 53% and color by 13% in raw wastewater. Biological treatment decreased the degradable compounds substantially, in such a way that the following Fenton process could effectively remove recalcitrant compounds, making the overall hybrid system more economical. In addition, ferric ion inherent to the Fenton reaction effectively coagulated particulate matters not removed via biological and chemical oxidation.

  18. The remarkable effect of oxygen on the N2 selectivity of water catalytic denitrification by hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Costas L; Costa, Costas N; Efstathiou, Angelos M

    2007-02-01

    The selective catalytic reduction of nitrates (NO3-) in pure water toward N2 formation by the use of gaseous H2 and in the presence of O2 (air) at 1 atm total pressure and 25 degrees C has been investigated over Pd-Cu supported on various mixed metal oxides, x wt % MO(x(/gamma-Al2O3 (MO(x) = CeO2, SrO, Mn2O3, Cr2O3, Y2O3, and TiO2). It is demonstrated for the firsttime that a remarkable improvement in N2 reaction selectivity (by 80 percentage units) can be achieved when oxygen is present in the reducing feed gas stream. In particular, significantly lower reaction selectivities toward NH4+ and NO2- can be obtained, whereas the rate of NO3- conversion is not significantly affected. Moreover, it was shown thatthe same effect is obtained over the Pd-Cu-supported catalysts irrespective to the chemical composition of support and the initial concentration of nitrates in water used. The Pd-Cu clusters supported on 4.8 wt%TiO2/gamma-Al2O3 resulted in a solid with the best catalytic behavior compared with the rest of supports examined, both in the presence and in the absence of oxygen in the reducing feed gas stream. DRIFTS studies performed following catalytic reduction by H2 of NO3- in water revealed that the presence of TiO2 in the Pd-Cu/TiO2-Al2O3 system enhanced the reactivity of adsorbed bidentate nitrate species toward H2. Nitrosyl species adsorbed on the alumina and titania support surfaces are considered as active intermediate species of the selective catalytic reduction of NO3- by H2 in water. Pd-Cu/TiO2-Al2O3 appears to be the most selective catalyst ever reported in the literature for the reduction of nitrates present in pure water into N2 by a reducing gas mixture of H2/air.

  19. Northern Regions of Russia as Alternative Sources of Pure Water for Sustainable Development: Challenges and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukerman, V. A.; Gudkov, A. V.; Ivanov, S. V.

    The paper discusses problems associated with the existing crisis of water scarcity in the modern conditions of the global water use. Available alternative sources of fresh water may be underground and surface waters of the North and the Arctic. Investigated the current situation and condition of fresh water resources in the technological and industrial development of the North and Arctic. The necessity of developing and using green technologies and measures to prevent pollution of surface and ground water from industrial sectors of the Northern regions is shown. Studied modern technologies and techniques for monitoring groundwater and determination of their age in order to avoid and prevent the effects of environmental contaminants. The ways of use of innovative production technologies of fresh and clean water of north Russia for sustainable development, and delivery of water in the needy regions of the world are investigated.

  20. Unexpected Sources of Reactive Oxygen Species in Natural Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahan, T.; Grossman, J. N.

    2016-12-01

    We report novel formation methods of hydroxyl radicals (OH) and singlet oxygen (1O2) relevant to surface waters and aqueous aerosols. In one set of studies, we demonstrate that 1O2 can be produced photochemically in aqueous solutions containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and halide ions under environmentally relevant conditions. This process may be important to oxidizing capacity and pollutant fate in saline waters including oceans and aqueous aerosols. In a second set of studies, we present a potentially important dark radical source. The Fenton reaction is a major dark radical source in natural waters, but it is negligibly slow at neutral pH due to the insolubility of Fe(III). We demonstrate that OH production rates from the dark Fenton reaction at pH 7 can be greatly increased by the iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella Oneidensis (SO). Our results suggest that OH production (and therefore oxidizing capacity) may be much greater than currently expected in dark circumneutral waters containing iron-reducing bacteria.

  1. Oxygen-18 Content of Atmospheric Oxygen Does Not Affect the Oxygen Isotope Relationship between Environmental Water and Cellulose in a Submerged Aquatic Plant, Egeria densa Planch.

    PubMed

    Cooper, L W; Deniro, M J

    1989-10-01

    We determined that the oxygen isotopic composition of cellulose synthesized by a submerged plant, Egeria densa Planch., is related to the isotopic composition of environmental water by a linear function, delta(18)O cellulose = 0.48 delta(18)O water + 24.1% per thousand. The observation of a slope of less than 1 indicates that a portion of cellulose oxygen is derived from an isotopically constant source other than water. We tested whether this source might be molecular oxygen by growing plants in the presence of high concentrations of (18)O in the form of O(2) bubbled into the bottom of an aquarium. Cellulose synthesized during this experiment did not have significantly different oxygen isotope ratios than that synthesized by control plants exposed to O(2) of normal (18)O abundance. We propose that oxygen in organic matter recycled from senescent portions of the plant is incorporated into cellulose. Our findings indicate that paleoclimatic models linking the oxygen isotope composition of environmental water to cellulose from fossil plants will have to be modified to account for contributions of oxygen from this or other sources besides water.

  2. Oxygen-18 Content of Atmospheric Oxygen Does Not Affect the Oxygen Isotope Relationship between Environmental Water and Cellulose in a Submerged Aquatic Plant, Egeria densa Planch 1

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lee W.; DeNiro, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    We determined that the oxygen isotopic composition of cellulose synthesized by a submerged plant, Egeria densa Planch., is related to the isotopic composition of environmental water by a linear function, δ18O cellulose = 0.48 δ18O water + 24.1%‰. The observation of a slope of less than 1 indicates that a portion of cellulose oxygen is derived from an isotopically constant source other than water. We tested whether this source might be molecular oxygen by growing plants in the presence of high concentrations of 18O in the form of O2 bubbled into the bottom of an aquarium. Cellulose synthesized during this experiment did not have significantly different oxygen isotope ratios than that synthesized by control plants exposed to O2 of normal 18O abundance. We propose that oxygen in organic matter recycled from senescent portions of the plant is incorporated into cellulose. Our findings indicate that paleoclimatic models linking the oxygen isotope composition of environmental water to cellulose from fossil plants will have to be modified to account for contributions of oxygen from this or other sources besides water. PMID:16667066

  3. Oxygen-18 content of atmospheric oxygen does not affect the oxygen isotope relationship between environmental water and cellulose in a submerged aquatic plant, Egeria densa Planch

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, L.W.; DeNiro, M.J. )

    1989-10-01

    We determined that the oxygen isotopic composition of cellulose synthesized by a submerged plant, Egeria densa Planch., is related to the isotopic composition of environmental water by a linear function, {delta}{sup 18}O cellulose = 0.48 {delta}{sup 18}O water + 24.1{per thousand}. The observation of a slope of less than 1 indicates that a portion of cellulose oxygen is derived from an isotopically constant source other than water. We tested whether this source might be molecular oxygen by growing plants in the presence of high concentrations of {sup 18}O in the form of O{sub 2} bubbled into the bottom of an aquarium. Cellulose synthesized during this experiment did not have significantly different oxygen isotope ratios than that synthesized by control plants exposed to O{sub 2} of normal {sup 18}O abundance. We propose that oxygen in organic matter recycled from senescent portions of the plant is incorporated into cellulose. Our findings indicate that paleoclimatic models linking the oxygen isotope composition of environmental water to cellulose from fossil plants will have to be modified to account for contributions of oxygen from this or other sources besides water.

  4. Decontaminating Solar Wind Samples with the Genesis Ultra-Pure Water Megasonic Wafer Spin Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2009-01-01

    The Genesis sample return capsule, though broken during the landing impact, contained most of the shattered ultra-pure solar wind collectors comprised of silicon and other semiconductor wafers materials. Post-flight analysis revealed that all wafer fragments were littered with surface particle contamination from spacecraft debris as well as soil from the impact site. This particulate contamination interferes with some analyses of solar wind. In early 2005, the Genesis science team decided to investigate methods for removing the surface particle contamination prior to solar wind analysis.

  5. Photocatalytic pure water splitting activities for ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} synthesized by various methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Chunmei; Hu, Tao; Hou, Nianjun; Liu, Siyao; Gao, Wenliang; Cong, Rihong; Yang, Tao

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • High temperature solid state reaction, hydrothermal, sol-gel methods were applied. • All ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples show UV-light catalytic activities on pure water splitting. • Bulk ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has a good photocatalytic activity per specific surface area. • Sol-gel is a superior method to prepare nanosized ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with a high activity. • The AQY for SG-ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} is 2.6% for pure water splitting under 313 nm irradiation. - Abstract: We studied and compared the photocatalytic water splitting performances for ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} prepared by high temperature solid state reaction (HTSSR), hydrothermal (HY) and sol-gel (SG) methods. HTSSR-ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has a relative large photocatalytic activity per surface area (1.6 μmol/h/m{sup 2}) in pure water by UV irradiation due to its high crystallinity. The HY- and SG-samples both have small particle sizes (20∼30 nm) and therefore high surface area (20 and 29 m{sup 2}/g, respectively), which leads to superior photocatalytic H{sub 2} evolution rates per unit mass (11.5 and 28.5 μmol/h/g). The apparent quantum yield of SG-ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} for pure water splitting under 313 nm irradiation is 2.6%. The existence of substantial surface defects is the major problem for HY- and SG-ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Consequently, the usage of sacrificial agents could greatly enhance the activities and indeed the H{sub 2} evolution rates in 20 Vol. % methanol aqueous solution increase to 100 and 142 μmol/h/g for HY- and SG-ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively.

  6. SELECTIVE EXTRACTION OF OXYGENATES FROM SAVORY AND PEPPERMINT USING SUBCRITICAL WATER. (R825394)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The yields of oxygenated and non-oxygenated flavour and fragrance compounds from savory (Satureja hortensis) and peppermint (Mentha piperita) were compared using subcritical water extraction, supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SFE) and hydrodistillation. Extraction rates wi...

  7. SELECTIVE EXTRACTION OF OXYGENATES FROM SAVORY AND PEPPERMINT USING SUBCRITICAL WATER. (R825394)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The yields of oxygenated and non-oxygenated flavour and fragrance compounds from savory (Satureja hortensis) and peppermint (Mentha piperita) were compared using subcritical water extraction, supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SFE) and hydrodistillation. Extraction rates wi...

  8. Mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking and intergranular attack in Alloy 600 in high temperature caustic and pure water

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have been conducted on the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and intergranular attack (IGA) of Alloy 600. A combination of SCC and IGA has been observed in Alloy 600 tubing on the hot leg of some operating steam generators in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants, and sodium hydroxide along with several other chemical species have been implicated in the tube degradations. SCC has been observed above and within the tube sheet, whereas IGA is generally localized within the tube sheet. Alloy 600 is also susceptible to SCC in pure and primary water. Various factors that influence SCC and IGA include metallurgical conditions of the alloy, concentrations of alkaline species, impurity content of the environment, temperature and stress. The mechanisms of these intergranular failures, however, are not well understood. Some of the possible mechanisms of the SCC and IGA in high temperature water and caustic are described in this paper.

  9. Bacteriological Evaluation of an Ultra-Pure Water-Distilling System

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, W. V.; Hickman, K. C. D.; Bond, W. W.; Favero, M. S.; Carson, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    A prototype distillation and storage system with recycle for producing ultrapure water was monitored for bacteriological contamination during a period of 24 months. Naturally occurring Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. cepacia were found to grow rapidly to levels of about 105/ml in water taken from the storage reservoir and also in commercially prepared distilled water. The system was found to eliminate bacterial contaminants introduced into the still with the feed water, but the reservoir, once contaminated, remained contaminated during prolonged recycle. After a single treatment with free chlorine, the entire system remained uncontaminated until accidental or purposeful shutdown. PMID:811168

  10. Bacteriological evaluation of an ultra-pure water-distilling system.

    PubMed

    Kayser, W V; Hickman, K C; Bond, W W; Favero, M S; Carson, L A

    1975-10-01

    A prototype distillation and storage system with recycle for producing ultrapure water was monitored for bacteriological contamination during a period of 24 months. Naturally occurring Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. cepacia were found to grow rapidly to levels of about 10(5)/ml in water taken from the storage reservoir and also in commercially prepared distilled water. The system was found to eliminate bacterial contaminants introduced into the still with the feed water, but the reservoir, once contaminated, remained contaminated during prolonged recycle, After a single treatment with free chlorine, the entire system remained uncontaminated until accidental or purposeful shutdown.

  11. Pressure Dependence of the Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition of Nanopore Water Doped Slightly with Hydroxylamine, and a Phase Behavior Predicted for Pure Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagoe, Atsushi; Iwaki, Shinji; Oguni, Masaharu; Tôzaki, Ken-ichi

    2014-09-01

    Phase transition behaviors of confined pure water and confined water doped with a small amount of hydroxylamine (HA) with a mole fraction of xHA = 0.03 were examined by high-pressure differential thermal analyses at 0.1, 50, 100, and 150 MPa; the average diameters of silica pores used were 2.0 and 2.5 nm. A liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) of the confined HA-doped water was clearly observed and its pressurization effect could be evaluated, unlike in the experiments on undoped water. It was found that pressurization causes the transition temperature (Ttrs) to linearly decrease, indicating that the low-temperature phase has a lower density than the high-temperature one. Transition enthalpy (ΔtrsH) decreased steeply with increasing pressure. Considering the linear decrease in Ttrs with increasing pressure, the steep decrease in ΔtrsH indicates that the LLPT effect of the HA-doped water attenuates with pressure. We present a new scenario of the phase behavior concerning the LLPT of pure water based on the analogy from the behavior of slightly HA-doped water, where a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) and a coexistence line are located in a negative-pressure regime but not in a positive-pressure one. It is reasonably understood that doping a small amount of HA into water results in negative chemical pressurization and causes the LLPT to occur even at ambient pressure.

  12. The triple isotopic composition of oxygen in leaf water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, A.; Barkan, E.; Yakir, D.; Luz, B.

    2006-08-01

    The isotopic composition of atmospheric O 2 depends on the rates of oxygen cycling in photosynthesis, respiration, photochemical reactions in the stratosphere and on δ17O and δ18O of ocean and leaf water. While most of the factors affecting δ17O and δ18O of air O 2 have been studied extensively in recent years, δ17O of leaf water—the substrate for all terrestrial photosynthesis—remained unknown. In order to understand the isotopic composition of atmospheric O 2 at present and in fossil air in ice cores, we studied leaf water in field experiments in Israel and in a European survey. We measured the difference in δ17O and δ18O between stem and leaf water, which is the result of isotope enrichment during transpiration. We calculated the slopes of the lines linking the isotopic compositions of stem and leaf water. The obtained slopes in ln( δ17O + 1) vs. ln( δ18O + 1) plots are characterized by very high precision (˜0.001) despite of relatively large differences between duplicates in both δ17O and δ18O (0.02-0.05‰). This is so because the errors in δ18O and δ17O are mass-dependent. The slope of the leaf transpiration process varied between 0.5111 ± 0.0013 and 0.5204 ± 0.0005, which is considerably smaller than the slope linking liquid water and vapor at equilibrium (0.529). We further found that the slope of the transpiration process decreases with atmospheric relative humidity ( h) as 0.522-0.008 × h, for h in the range 0.3-1. This slope is neither influenced by the plant species, nor by the environmental conditions where plants grow nor does it show strong variations along long leaves.

  13. Plants for water recycling, oxygen regeneration and food production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    During long-duration space missions that require recycling and regeneration of life support materials the major human wastes to be converted to usable forms are CO2, hygiene water, urine and feces. A Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) relies on the air revitalization, water purification and food production capabilities of higher plants to rejuvenate human wastes and replenish the life support materials. The key processes in such a system are photosynthesis, whereby green plants utilize light energy to produce food and oxygen while removing CO2 from the atmosphere, and transpiration, the evaporation of water from the plant. CELSS research has emphasized the food production capacity and efforts to minimize the area/volume of higher plants required to satisfy all human life support needs. Plants are a dynamic system capable of being manipulated to favour the supply of individual products as desired. The size and energy required for a CELSS that provides virtually all human needs are determined by the food production capacity. Growing conditions maximizing food production do not maximize transpiration of water; conditions favoring transpiration and scaling to recycle only water significantly reduces the area, volume, and energy inputs per person. Likewise, system size can be adjusted to satisfy the air regeneration needs. Requirements of a waste management system supplying inputs to maintain maximum plant productivity are clear. The ability of plants to play an active role in waste processing and the consequence in terms of degraded plant performance are not well characterized. Plant-based life support systems represent the only potential for self sufficiency and food production in an extra-terrestrial habitat.

  14. Plants for water recycling, oxygen regeneration and food production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    During long-duration space missions that require recycling and regeneration of life support materials the major human wastes to be converted to usable forms are CO2, hygiene water, urine and feces. A Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) relies on the air revitalization, water purification and food production capabilities of higher plants to rejuvenate human wastes and replenish the life support materials. The key processes in such a system are photosynthesis, whereby green plants utilize light energy to produce food and oxygen while removing CO2 from the atmosphere, and transpiration, the evaporation of water from the plant. CELSS research has emphasized the food production capacity and efforts to minimize the area/volume of higher plants required to satisfy all human life support needs. Plants are a dynamic system capable of being manipulated to favour the supply of individual products as desired. The size and energy required for a CELSS that provides virtually all human needs are determined by the food production capacity. Growing conditions maximizing food production do not maximize transpiration of water; conditions favoring transpiration and scaling to recycle only water significantly reduces the area, volume, and energy inputs per person. Likewise, system size can be adjusted to satisfy the air regeneration needs. Requirements of a waste management system supplying inputs to maintain maximum plant productivity are clear. The ability of plants to play an active role in waste processing and the consequence in terms of degraded plant performance are not well characterized. Plant-based life support systems represent the only potential for self sufficiency and food production in an extra-terrestrial habitat.

  15. A Pure Inorganic ZnO-Co3O4 Overlapped Membrane for Efficient Oil/Water Emulsions Separation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Weifeng; Cao, Yingze; Chen, Yuning; Feng, Lin; Wei, Yen

    2015-01-01

    The earth's environmental problems, especially for water remediation, need effective methods to solve. Materials with special wettability are developed for the separation of oil/water mixtures. However, the separation of emulsified oil/water mixtures can be a real challenge. There is still much deficiencies, on account of the surfactant, which could link water molecules and oil molecules to form a stabilized system. Here we report a pure inorganic ZnO-Co3O4 overlapped membrane to give a brand new solution to emulsified oil/water mixture separation. Fabricated by an easy and cost-efficient way, such a membrane combines the properties of under-water superoleophobicity and under-oil superhydrophobicity, which can be successfully used for the efficient separation of both surfactant-free and surfactant-stabilized emulsions, solely driven by gravity. This ZnO-Co3O4 overlapped membrane shows great potential applications to industrial wastewater treatment, domestic sewage purification and other water remediation. PMID:25900797

  16. Kinetic theory of oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criss, R.E.; Gregory, R.T.; Taylor, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic and mass conservation equations are used to describe oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water in "closed" and open hydrothermal systems. In cases where n coexisting mineral phases having different reaction rates are present, the exchange process is described by a system of n + 1 simultaneous differential equations consisting of n pseudo first-order rate equations and a conservation of mass equation. The simultaneous solutions to these equations generate curved exchange trajectories on ??-?? plots. Families of such trajectories generated under conditions allowing for different fluid mole fractions, different fluid isotopic compositions, or different fluid flow rates are connected by positive-sloped isochronous lines. These isochrons reproduce the effects observed in hydrothermally exchanged mineral pairs including 1) steep positive slopes, 2) common reversals in the measured fractionation factors (??), and 3) measured fractionations that are highly variable over short distances where no thermal gradient can be geologically demonstrated. ?? 1987.

  17. Quantitative self-assembly of a purely organic three-dimensional catenane in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Huacheng; Lammer, Aaron D.; Wang, Ming; Li, Xiaopeng; Lynch, Vincent M.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembly by means of coordinative bond formation has opened up opportunities for the high-yield synthesis of molecules with complex topologies. However, the preparation of purely covalent molecular architectures in aqueous media has remained a challenging task. Here, we present the preparation of a three-dimensional catenane through a self-assembly process that relies on the formation of dynamic hydrazone linkages in an acidic aqueous medium. The quantitative synthesis process and the mechanically interlocked structure of the resulting catenane were established by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, X-ray crystallography and HPLC studies. In addition, the labile hydrazone linkages of the individual [2]catenane components may be ‘locked’ by increasing the pH of the solution, yielding a relatively kinetically stable molecule. The present study thus details a simple approach to the creation and control of complex molecular architectures under reaction conditions that mimic biological milieux.

  18. Durability of Environmental Barrier Coatings in a Water Vapor/Oxygen Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holchin, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide (Sic) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) show potential for application in the hot sections of advanced jet engines. The oxidation behavior of these materials has been studied in great detail. In a pure oxygen environment, a silica (SiO2) layer forms on the surface and provides protection from further oxidation. Initial oxidation is rapid, but slows as silica layer grows; this is known as parabolic oxidation. When exposed to model fuel-lean combustion applications (standard in jet engines), wherein the partial pressure of water vapor is approximately 0.5 atm., these materials exhibit different characteristics. In such an environment, the primary oxidant to form silica is water vapor. At the same time, water vapor reacts with the surface oxide to form gaseous silicon hydroxide (Si(OH)4). The simultaneous formation of both silica and Si(OH)4 -the latter which is lost to the atmosphere- the material continues to recede. Recession rates for uncoated Sic and Si3N4 are unacceptably high, for use in jet engines, - on the order of 1mm/4000h. External coatings have been developed that protect Si-based materials from water vapor attack. One such coating consists of a Ba(0.75)Sr(0.25)Al2Si2O8 (BSAS) topcoat, a mullite/BSAS intermediate layer and a Si bond coat. The key function of the topcoat is to protect the Si-base material from water vapor; therefore it must be fairly stable in water vapor (recession rate of about 1mm/40,000h) and remain crack free. Although BSAS is much more resistant to water vapor attack than pure silica, it exhibits a linear weight loss in 50% H2O - 50% O2 at 1500 C. The objective of my research is to determine the oxidation behavior of a number of alternate hot-pressed monolithic top coat candidates. Potential coatings were exposed at 1500 C to a 50% H2O - 50% O2 gas mixture flowing at 4.4 cm/s . These included rare- earth silicates, barium-strontium aluminosilicates. When weight changes were measured with a continuously recording

  19. Durability of Environmental Barrier Coatings in a Water Vapor/Oxygen Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holchin, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide (Sic) and silicon nitride (Si3N4) show potential for application in the hot sections of advanced jet engines. The oxidation behavior of these materials has been studied in great detail. In a pure oxygen environment, a silica (SiO2) layer forms on the surface and provides protection from further oxidation. Initial oxidation is rapid, but slows as silica layer grows; this is known as parabolic oxidation. When exposed to model fuel-lean combustion applications (standard in jet engines), wherein the partial pressure of water vapor is approximately 0.5 atm., these materials exhibit different characteristics. In such an environment, the primary oxidant to form silica is water vapor. At the same time, water vapor reacts with the surface oxide to form gaseous silicon hydroxide (Si(OH)4). The simultaneous formation of both silica and Si(OH)4 -the latter which is lost to the atmosphere- the material continues to recede. Recession rates for uncoated Sic and Si3N4 are unacceptably high, for use in jet engines, - on the order of 1mm/4000h. External coatings have been developed that protect Si-based materials from water vapor attack. One such coating consists of a Ba(0.75)Sr(0.25)Al2Si2O8 (BSAS) topcoat, a mullite/BSAS intermediate layer and a Si bond coat. The key function of the topcoat is to protect the Si-base material from water vapor; therefore it must be fairly stable in water vapor (recession rate of about 1mm/40,000h) and remain crack free. Although BSAS is much more resistant to water vapor attack than pure silica, it exhibits a linear weight loss in 50% H2O - 50% O2 at 1500 C. The objective of my research is to determine the oxidation behavior of a number of alternate hot-pressed monolithic top coat candidates. Potential coatings were exposed at 1500 C to a 50% H2O - 50% O2 gas mixture flowing at 4.4 cm/s . These included rare- earth silicates, barium-strontium aluminosilicates. When weight changes were measured with a continuously recording

  20. Effect of bottom water oxygenation on oxygen consumption and benthic biogeochemical processes at the Crimean Shelf (Black Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtschlag, A.; Janssen, F.; Wenzhöfer, F.; Holtappels, M.; Struck, U.; Jessen, G.; Boetius, A.

    2012-04-01

    Hypoxia occurs where oxygen concentrations fall below a physiological threshold of many animals, usually defined as <63 µmol L-1. Oxygen depletion can be caused by anthropogenic influences, such as global warming and eutrophication, but as well occurs naturally due to restricted water exchange in combination with high nutrient loads (e.g. upwelling). Bottom-water oxygen availability not only influences the composition of faunal communities, but is also one of the main factors controlling sediment-water exchange fluxes and organic carbon degradation in the sediment, usually shifting processes towards anaerobic mineralization pathways mediated by microorganisms. The Black Sea is one of the world's largest meromictic marine basins with an anoxic water column below 180m. The outer shelf edge, where anoxic waters meet the seafloor, is an ideal natural laboratory to study the response of benthic ecosystems to hypoxia, including benthic biogeochemical processes. During the MSM 15/1 expedition with the German research vessel MARIA S. MERIAN, the NW area of the Black Sea (Crimean Shelf) was studied. The study was set up to investigate the influence of bottom water oxygenation on, (1) the respective share of fauna-mediated oxygen uptake, microbial respiration, or re-oxidation of reduced compounds formed in the deeper sediments for the total oxygen flux and (2) on the efficiency of benthic biogeochemical cycles. During our study, oxygen consumption and pathways of organic carbon degradation were estimated from benthic chamber incubations, oxygen microprofiles measured in situ, and pore water and solid phase profiles measured on retrieved cores under oxic, hypoxic, and anoxic water column conditions. Benthic oxygen fluxes measured in Crimean Shelf sediments in this study were comparable to fluxes from previous in situ and laboratory measurements at similar oxygen concentrations (total fluxes -8 to -12 mmol m-2 d-1; diffusive fluxes: -2 to -5 mmol m-2 d-1) with oxygen

  1. Processes controlling mid-water column oxygen minima over the Texas-Louisiana shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenxia; Hetland, Robert D.; DiMarco, Steven F.; Fennel, Katja

    2015-04-01

    We investigate distributions of dissolved oxygen over the Texas-Louisiana shelf using spatially highly resolved observations in combination with a regional circulation model with simple oxygen dynamics. The observations were collected using a towed, undulating CTD during the Mechanisms Controlling Hypoxia (MCH) program. Mid-water oxygen minimum layers (dissolved oxygen lower than 3.2 mL L-1) were detected in many transects. These oxygen minimum layers are connected with the bottom boundary layer and follow the pycnocline seaward as a tongue of low oxygen into the mid-water column. T-S diagrams highlighting the low oxygen minima in both observations and simulations imply direct connections between low-oxygen bottom water and the oxygen minimum layer. The dynamics of these oxygen minimum layers in the mid-water column are examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Convergence within the bottom boundary layer relative to density surfaces is calculated, results show that there is a convergence in the bottom boundary layer at the location where the pycnocline intersects the bottom. Buoyancy advection forced by bottom Ekman transport creates this convergent flow, and the corresponding low-oxygen intrusion. Similar intrusions of near-bottom water into the pycnocline are observed in other regions. The presence of hypoxia within the bottom boundary layer in the northern Gulf of Mexico creates a unique situation in which these intrusions are also associated with low dissolved oxygen.

  2. Photocatalytic degradation of pesticides in pure water and a commercial agricultural solution on TiO2 coated media.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, L; Brosillon, S; Wolbert, D

    2008-01-01

    Heterogeneous photocatalysis of pesticides is an effective process for removing pesticides from pure water. With a view to treating real agricultural effluents, this paper deals with the degradation of the chlortoluron and cyproconazole pesticides in pure water and the treatment of commercial solutions by photocatalysis on TiO2 coated media. The process was effective in degrading and mineralizing the pesticides. The changes of the fate of heteroatoms showed that during irradiation of the chlortoluron and cyproconazole, NH4+ and NO3(-) ions were produced. A release of chloride ions was observed from the beginning of the irradiation and stoichiometry was achieved. The photodegradation of chlortoluton and cyproconazole in commercial solutions was studied. For the degradation of chlortoluton in a commercial solution, the mineralization was completely achieved whereas in the case of the commercial cyproconazole solution, the degradation kinetic was lower. These results highlight the fact that the chemical nature of the additives in the commercial pesticide solutions does significantly affect the degradation yield of the target compound by photocatalysis.

  3. Photosynthetic water oxidation vs. mitochondrial oxygen reduction: distinct mechanistic parallels.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Todd P

    2011-08-01

    The photosynthetic oxygen evolving complex (PSII-OEC) and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) not only catalyze anti-parallel reactions (the OEC oxidizes water to dioxygen, whereas CcO reduces dioxygen to water), they also share a number of uncanny molecular and mechanistic similarities. Both feature a redox-active polymetallic cluster that includes a key tyrosine, and both utilize a two-phase mechanism. In one phase the polymetallic cluster undergoes four sequential one-electron transfers: In the PSII-OEC, four successive photooxidations of the photosystem II reaction center P680 (to P680(+)) allows acceptance of 4 × 1e- from the Mn(4)Ca cluster; in CcO, four reduced cytochrome c Fe(2+) cations donate 4 × 1e- to the bimetallic center. In the second phase for each enzyme, the polymetallic cluster undergoes a single four-electron transfer with the O(2)/2 H(2)O redox couple. Intriguing mechanistic similarities between these two complex redox enzymes first delineated over a decade ago by Hoganson/Proshlyakov/Babcock et al. are updated and expanded in this article.

  4. Pesticides water decontamination in oxygen-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Nicoleta Alina; Ferrari, Federico; Vasileiadis, Sotirios; Merli, Annalisa; Capri, Ettore; Trevisan, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a laboratory bioreactor, with a functioning principle similar with that of biobed systems but working in oxygen-limited conditions, suitable for decontaminating wastewater mixtures with pesticides. The system is composed by two cylindrical plastic containers. The first one, where the pesticides solution is collected, is open, whereas the second one, where the biomass is disposed, is closed. The pesticides solution was pumped at the biomass surface and subsequently recollected and disposed in the first container. Four pesticides with different physical-chemical characteristics were tested. The results obtained showed a relatively good capacity of the developed prototype to decontaminate waste water containing the mixture of pesticides. The time of the experiment, the number of cycles that the solution made in the system and the environmental temperature have a significantly influence for the decontamination of acetochlor and chlorpyrifos whereas for the decontamination of terbuthylazine and metalaxyl no significant influence was observed. Even if the present prototype could represent a valid solution to manage the water pesticides residues in a farm and to increase the confidence of bystanders and residents, the practical difficulties when replacing the biomass could represent a limit of the system.

  5. Investigations on optimizing the energy transmission of ultrafast optical pulses in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukofsky, David

    Many of today's communication and imaging technologies share the common challenge of signal deterioration due to water's large absorption coefficient. As an example, it is water molecules that contaminate the fused silica of optical fibers and account for most of the absorption they exhibit at communication wavelengths. It is also water (in the form of vapor) that makes it challenging to devise practical THz spectroscopic systems. As such, this thesis examines how the transmission of electromagnetic radiation through water could be improved as a stepping stone towards bettering a wide array of communication and imaging applications. Recent time-domain approaches have noted the connection between pulse rise-time and precursor waveform absorption. This thesis represents the first in-depth analysis of precursors using an intuitive frequency-domain approach. It was shown with well-known physical metrics that precursors are a linear effect resulting from the temporal representation of a Beer's law of absorption for broadband pulses. Experimental validation was achieved with a spatial light modulator used in conjunction with Frequency-Resolved-Optical-Gating (FROG) to obtain the first measurement of the amplitude and phase of an optical precursor. The semi-classical two-level atom model was used to infer the transitional dipole moments of the 1447 nm and 2:94 mum vibrational resonances of the medium. These values supported finite-difference-time-domain simulations suggesting how 52 fs sech2 pulses of 220 GW/cm2 peak intensity could propagate with negligible attenuation over 15 absorption lengths when tuned to the 2:94 mum transition of water. Extensive use of 1550 nm lasers in communication systems and the presence of the second vibrational overtone resonance of water at 1447 nm were the motivation for transmission experiments completed at the Naval Research Laboratory (Washington, DC) at this transition. As much as a 500% increase in absolute transmission was observed

  6. High strength, flexible and transparent nanofibrillated cellulose-nanoclay biohybrid films with tunable oxygen and water vapor permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulin, Christian; Salazar-Alvarez, German; Lindström, Tom

    2012-09-01

    A novel, technically and economically benign procedure to combine vermiculite nanoplatelets with nanocellulose fibre dispersions into functional biohybrid films is presented. Nanocellulose fibres of 20 nm diameters and several micrometers in length are mixed with high aspect ratio exfoliated vermiculite nanoplatelets through high-pressure homogenization. The resulting hybrid films obtained after solvent evaporation are stiff (tensile modulus of 17.3 GPa), strong (strength up to 257 MPa), and transparent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the hybrid films consist of stratified nacre-like layers with a homogenous distribution of nanoplatelets within the nanocellulose matrix. The oxygen barrier properties of the biohybrid films outperform commercial packaging materials and pure nanocellulose films showing an oxygen permeability of 0.07 cm3 μm m-2 d-1 kPa-1 at 50% relative humidity. The oxygen permeability of the hybrid films can be tuned by adjusting the composition of the films. Furthermore, the water vapor barrier properties of the biohybrid films were also significantly improved by the addition of nanoclay. The unique combination of excellent oxygen barrier behavior and optical transparency suggests the potential of these biohybrid materials as an alternative in flexible packaging of oxygen sensitive devices such as thin-film transistors or organic light-emitting diode displays, gas storage applications and as barrier coatings/laminations in large volume packaging applications.

  7. Determination of chlorobenzenes in pure, tap, and sea water by static headspace gas chromatography-electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongmei; Sun, Xiumei; Zhong, Zhi; Chen, Xuechang; Zhang, Xiaoning; Guo, Yuanming

    2012-11-01

    A simple, efficient, solvent-free, and commercial readily available approach for determination of 11 chlorobenzenes (CBs) in water samples using the static headspace (HS) sampling and gas chromatography-electron capture detector has been described. The proposed static HS sampling method was initially optimized and the optimum experimental conditions found were 10 mL water sample containing 20% (w/v) sodium chloride placed in a 20 mL vial and stirred at 70°C for 30 min. The linearity of the method ranged from 0.16 to 8.0 μg/L for dichlorobenzene isomers, 0.0176~0.88 μg/L for trichlorobenzene isomers, 0.004~0.2 μg/L for tetrachlorobenzene isomers, and from 0.001 to 0.05 μg/L for pentachlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.9992 and 0.9999. The limits of detection were in the low μg/L level, ranging between 0.0002 and 0.04 μg/L. The relative recoveries of spiked CBs with external calibration or standard addition method at different concentration levels in pure, tap, and sea water samples were 83~116%, 89~108%, and 93~112%, respectively, and with relative standard deviations of 1.9~6.3%, 1.6~5.4%, and 2.5~5.7% (n = 5), respectively. It is concluded that this method can be successfully applied for the determination of CBs in pure, tap, and sea water samples.

  8. Rate of change in cerebral oxygenation and blood pressure in response to passive changes in posture: a comparison between pure autonomic failure patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Tachtsidis, Ilias; Elwell, Clare E; Leung, Terence S; Bleasdale-Barr, Katharine; Hunt, Katharine; Toms, Nathan; Smith, Martin; Mathias, Christopher J; Delpy, David T

    2005-01-01

    The cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to head-up postural change are compromised in pure autonomic failure (PAF) patients because of sympathetic denervation. The aim of this study was to characterize the rate of change of systemic mean blood pressure (MBP) and cerebral haemodynamics in response to passive posture changes. Nine PAF patients and 9 age-matched controls took part in this study. MBP and oxy- (O2Hb), deoxy-haemoglobin (HHb), and tissue oxygenation index (TOI) on the forehead were continuously monitored non-invasively using the Portapres and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), respectively. From visual inspection of the haemoglobin difference signal (Hb(diff) = O2Hb-HHb), seven distinct phases were marked (1: supine, 2: start passive tilt, 3: head up to 60 degrees degrees, 4: end of tilt, 5: tilt reversal, 6: return to supine, 7: rest); the same time points were used for all of the other signals. For each phase, the slope was calculated using a linear regression algorithm. Significant differences were found between PAF patients and controls in the Hb(diff) slope magnitudes for phases 3 (P < .05) and 5 (P = .01), and the duration of phase 2 (P < .05). MBP slope magnitudes showed significant differences for phases 2 (P < .01) and 5 (P < .01). These differences in the rate of change suggest differences in blood vessel resistance related to sympathetic activation.

  9. Oxygen isotope fractionation between bird bone phosphate and drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiot, Romain; Angst, Delphine; Legendre, Serge; Buffetaut, Eric; Fourel, François; Adolfssen, Jan; André, Aurore; Bojar, Ana Voica; Canoville, Aurore; Barral, Abel; Goedert, Jean; Halas, Stanislaw; Kusuhashi, Nao; Pestchevitskaya, Ekaterina; Rey, Kevin; Royer, Aurélien; Saraiva, Antônio Álamo Feitosa; Savary-Sismondini, Bérengère; Siméon, Jean-Luc; Touzeau, Alexandra; Zhou, Zhonghe; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    Oxygen isotope compositions of bone phosphate (δ18Op) were measured in broiler chickens reared in 21 farms worldwide characterized by contrasted latitudes and local climates. These sedentary birds were raised during an approximately 3 to 4-month period, and local precipitation was the ultimate source of their drinking water. This sampling strategy allowed the relationship to be determined between the bone phosphate δ18Op values (from 9.8 to 22.5‰ V-SMOW) and the local rainfall δ18Ow values estimated from nearby IAEA/WMO stations (from -16.0 to -1.0‰ V-SMOW). Linear least square fitting of data provided the following isotopic fractionation equation: δ18Ow = 1.119 (±0.040) δ18Op - 24.222 (±0.644); R 2 = 0.98. The δ18Op-δ18Ow couples of five extant mallard ducks, a common buzzard, a European herring gull, a common ostrich, and a greater rhea fall within the predicted range of the equation, indicating that the relationship established for extant chickens can also be applied to birds of various ecologies and body masses. Applied to published oxygen isotope compositions of Miocene and Pliocene penguins from Peru, this new equation computes estimates of local seawater similar to those previously calculated. Applied to the basal bird Confuciusornis from the Early Cretaceous of Northeastern China, our equation gives a slightly higher δ18Ow value compared to the previously estimated one, possibly as a result of lower body temperature. These data indicate that caution should be exercised when the relationship estimated for modern birds is applied to their basal counterparts that likely had a metabolism intermediate between that of their theropod dinosaur ancestors and that of advanced ornithurines.

  10. Oxygen isotope fractionation between bird bone phosphate and drinking water.

    PubMed

    Amiot, Romain; Angst, Delphine; Legendre, Serge; Buffetaut, Eric; Fourel, François; Adolfssen, Jan; André, Aurore; Bojar, Ana Voica; Canoville, Aurore; Barral, Abel; Goedert, Jean; Halas, Stanislaw; Kusuhashi, Nao; Pestchevitskaya, Ekaterina; Rey, Kevin; Royer, Aurélien; Saraiva, Antônio Álamo Feitosa; Savary-Sismondini, Bérengère; Siméon, Jean-Luc; Touzeau, Alexandra; Zhou, Zhonghe; Lécuyer, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    Oxygen isotope compositions of bone phosphate (δ(18)Op) were measured in broiler chickens reared in 21 farms worldwide characterized by contrasted latitudes and local climates. These sedentary birds were raised during an approximately 3 to 4-month period, and local precipitation was the ultimate source of their drinking water. This sampling strategy allowed the relationship to be determined between the bone phosphate δ(18)Op values (from 9.8 to 22.5‰ V-SMOW) and the local rainfall δ(18)Ow values estimated from nearby IAEA/WMO stations (from -16.0 to -1.0‰ V-SMOW). Linear least square fitting of data provided the following isotopic fractionation equation: δ(18)Ow = 1.119 (±0.040) δ(18)Op - 24.222 (±0.644); R (2) = 0.98. The δ(18)Op-δ(18)Ow couples of five extant mallard ducks, a common buzzard, a European herring gull, a common ostrich, and a greater rhea fall within the predicted range of the equation, indicating that the relationship established for extant chickens can also be applied to birds of various ecologies and body masses. Applied to published oxygen isotope compositions of Miocene and Pliocene penguins from Peru, this new equation computes estimates of local seawater similar to those previously calculated. Applied to the basal bird Confuciusornis from the Early Cretaceous of Northeastern China, our equation gives a slightly higher δ(18)Ow value compared to the previously estimated one, possibly as a result of lower body temperature. These data indicate that caution should be exercised when the relationship estimated for modern birds is applied to their basal counterparts that likely had a metabolism intermediate between that of their theropod dinosaur ancestors and that of advanced ornithurines.

  11. A Pure Life: The Microbial Ecology of High Purity Industrial Waters.

    PubMed

    Mittelman, M W; Jones, A D G

    2016-02-15

    The microbial ecology of various natural environments has been an active area of research since the earlier part of the twentieth century. Remote and sometimes extreme environments such as the deep ocean and the deep terrestrial subsurface have revealed a remarkable array of microorganisms. The majority of these environments are nutrient limited, and microorganisms-principally, bacteria-have developed a number of survival strategies that enable their survival and, in some cases, replication. While planktonic microorganisms exist in oligotrophic environments, the predominant mode of survival and growth is associated with biofilms. There are a number of similarities between the physicochemistry of industrial water systems and some natural aquatic ecosystems, and these similarities extend to the microbial populations and the survival mechanisms that are employed. The "starvation-survival" mechanisms, including biofilm formation, may be associated with deleterious effects on industrial water systems. These effects include heat transfer inhibition, microbially influenced corrosion, and contamination of various products manufactured in a wide array of industries. Biological fouling of industrial water systems has significant direct and indirect (through antimicrobial chemical applications) impacts on engineered materials and on the etiology of some waterborne diseases. This review provides an overview of the microbial ecology of purified waters and discusses the impacts of biological activity on industrial systems.

  12. Quantitative determination of fluoride in pure water using luminescent europium complexes.

    PubMed

    Butler, Stephen J

    2015-07-11

    Two luminescent probes [Eu.L¹⁻²]⁺ are reported for the rapid detection of fluoride in water. Probes [Eu.L¹⁻²]⁺ exhibit exceptional enhancements in Eu emission in the presence of fluoride, permitting its selective determination within the environmentally relevant concentration range (20-210 μM).

  13. Theoretical study of oxygen adsorption on pure Au(n+1)+ and doped MAu(n)+ cationic gold clusters for M = Ti, Fe and n = 3-7.

    PubMed

    Torres, M Begoña; Fernández, Eva M; Balbás, Luis C

    2008-07-24

    A comparative study of the adsorption of an O2 molecule on pure Au(n+1)+ and doped MAu(n)+ cationic gold clusters for n = 3-7 and M = Ti, Fe is presented. The simultaneous adsorption of two oxygen atoms also was studied. This work was performed by means of first principles calculations based on norm-conserving pseudo-potentials and numerical basis sets. For pure Au4 +, Au6+, and Au7+ clusters, the O2 molecule is adsorbed preferably on top of low coordinated Au atoms, with an adsorption energy smaller than 0.5 eV. Instead, for Au5+ and Au8+, bridge adsorption sites are preferred with adsorption energies of 0.56 and 0.69 eV, respectively. The ground-state geometry of Au(n)+ is almost unperturbed after O2 adsorption. The electronic charge flows towards O2 when the molecule is adsorbed in bridge positions and towards the gold cluster when O2 is adsorbed on top of Au atoms, and both the adsorption energy and the O-O bond length of adsorbed oxygen increase when the amount of electronic charge on O2 increases. On the other hand, we studied the adsorption of an O2 molecule on doped MAu(n)+ clusters, leading to the formation of (MAu(n)O2+) ad complexes with different equilibrium configurations. The highest adsorption energy was obtained when both atoms of O2 bind on top of the M impurity, and it is larger for Ti doped clusters than for Fe doped clusters, showing an odd-even effect trend with size n, which is opposite for Ti as compared to Fe complexes. For those adsorption configurations of (MAu(n)O2+) ad involving only Au sites, the adsorption energy is similar to or smaller than that for similar configurations of Au(n)+1O2 + complexes. However, the highest adsorption energy of (MAu(n)O2+) ad is higher than that for (Au(n)+1O2+) ad by a factor of approximately 4.0 (1.2) for M = Ti (M = Fe). The trends with size n are rationalized in terms of O-O and O-M bond distances, as well as charge transfer between oxygen and cluster substrates. The spin multiplicity of those (MAu

  14. Real-time microwave sensor system for detection of polluting substances in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, A. L.; Georget, E.; Cochinaire, N.; Sabouroux, P.

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, a real-time coaxial sensor for detecting foreign substances in aqueous solutions was developed and tested. This tool, based on a coaxial propagation line for determining the electromagnetic parameters of materials, was updated into a liquid permittivity monitoring sensor of continuous flow. A few solutions of different nature were tested, and while adding a liquid or electrolyte substance, named "pollutant," variations in the base solution were documented. Ethanol and water mixtures were used as reference, while the ability of the system to detect emulsions (such as oil in water solutions) was also evaluated. The system shows great potential for the quantification and qualification of liquid mixtures, having a threshold of reduced volume/volume fractions of foreign substances or pollutants, a property which is shown to be extremely useful in an analogue of high glycaemia (diabetes disease)—thus, opening the possibilities of monitoring biological liquids.

  15. Rapid, automated gas chromatographic detection of organic compounds in ultra-pure water

    SciTech Connect

    MOWRY,CURTIS DALE; BLAIR,DIANNA S.; MORRISON,DENNIS J.; REBER,STEPHEN D.; RODACY,PHILIP J.

    2000-02-15

    An automated gas chromatography was used to analyze water samples contaminated with trace (parts-per-billion) concentrations of organic analytes. A custom interface introduced the liquid sample to the chromatography. This was followed by rapid chromatographic analysis. Characteristics of the analysis include response times less than one minute and automated data processing. Analytes were chosen based on their known presence in the recycle water streams of semiconductor manufacturers and their potential to reduce process yield. These include acetone, isopropanol, butyl acetate, ethyl benzene, p-xylene, methyl ethyl ketone and 2-ethoxy ethyl acetate. Detection limits below 20 ppb were demonstrated for all analytes and quantitative analysis with limited speciation was shown for multianalyte mixtures. Results are discussed with respect to the potential for on-line liquid process monitoring by this method.

  16. Identification of singlet oxygen photosensitizes in lambs drinking water in an alveld risk area in West Norway.

    PubMed

    Tønnesen, Hanne Hjorth; Mysterud, Ivar; Karlsen, Jan; Skulberg, Olav M; Laane, Carl M M; Schumacher, Trond

    2013-02-05

    Alveld is a hepatogenous photosensitivity disorder in lambs. Although alveld has been known in Norway for more than 100years, there are still questions related to the cause of the disease. Phytoporphyrin has long been incriminated as the photosensitizer in hepatogenous photosensitivity diseases but previous findings suggest that the photosensitizing mechanism in alveld is more complex, possibly involving other co-factors. The current work investigates the presence of non-hepatogenous photosensitizers originating in lamb's drinking water from various sources. In addition samples of two of the predominent cyanobacteria found in a representative biofilm (i.e. aggregates of microbes) were identified and isolated in axenic (i.e. pure) cultures. Information from the absorption-, fluorescence emission-, and -excitation spectra and the action spectrum for the formation of singlet oxygen was combined in order to identify the chromophores responsible for the formation of singlet oxygen, e.g. phycocyanins from the cyanobacteria. The highest level of singlet oxygen formation was detected in lotic (i.e. flowing) water in the period consistent with the outbreak of the alveld disease in the area. Meteorological data indicate a warm and wet May with a high radiation exposure leading up to a colder and wet June with an even higher solar irradiance. The seasonal variation in the amount of photosensitizers in lamb's drinking water combined meteorological data can be important to predict the outbreak of alveld. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cellulose gel dispersion: From pure hydrogel suspensions to encapsulated oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Napso, Sofia; Rein, Dmitry M; Khalfin, Rafail; Kleinerman, Olga; Cohen, Yachin

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose hydrogel particles were fabricated from molecularly-dissolved cellulose/IL solutions. The characteristics of the formed hydrogels (cellulose content, particles' size and porosity) were determined as a function of cellulose concentration in the precursor solutions. There is a significant change in the hydrogel structure when the initial cellulose solution concentration increases above about 7-9%wt. These changes include increase of the cellulose content in the hydrogel, and decrease in its pore size. The finest cellulose particle dispersions can be obtained using low concentration cellulose/IL solutions (cellulose concentration in dispersion less than 2%wt.) or hydrogels (concentration less than 1%wt.) in a dispersing medium consisting of IL with no more than 20%wt. water. Stable paraffin oil-in-water emulsions are achieved by mixing oil and water with cellulose/IL solutions. The optimal conditions for obtaining the finest particles (about 20μm in diameter) are attained using cellulose solutions of concentration between 0.7 and 4%wt. at temperature of 70°C and oil/cellulose mass ratios between 1 and 1.5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Steam tables for pure water as an ActiveX component in Visual Basic 6.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra P.

    2003-11-01

    The IAPWS-95 formulation for the thermodynamic properties of pure water was implemented as an ActiveX component ( SteamTables) in Visual Basic 6.0. For input parameters as temperature ( T=190-2000 K) and pressure ( P=3.23×10 -8-10,000 MPa) the program SteamTables calculates the following properties: volume ( V), density ( D), compressibility factor ( Z0), internal energy ( U), enthalpy ( H), Gibbs free energy ( G), Helmholtz free energy ( A), entropy ( S), heat capacity at constant pressure ( Cp), heat capacity at constant volume ( Cv), coefficient of thermal expansion ( CTE), isothermal compressibility ( Ziso), velocity of sound ( VelS), partial derivative of P with T at constant V (d Pd T), partial derivative of T with V at constant P (d Td V), partial derivative of V with P at constant T (d Vd P), Joule-Thomson coefficient ( JTC), isothermal throttling coefficient ( IJTC), viscosity ( Vis), thermal conductivity ( ThrmCond), surface tension ( SurfTen), Prandtl number ( PrdNum) and dielectric constant ( DielCons) for the liquid and vapor phases of pure water. It also calculates T as a function of P (or P as a function of T) along the sublimation, saturation and critical isochor curves, depending on the values of P (or T). The SteamTables can be incorporated in a program in any computer language, which supports object link embedding (OLE) in the Windows environment. An application of SteamTables is illustrated in a program in Visual Basic 6.0 to tabulate the values of the thermodynamic properties of water and vapor. Similarly, four functions, Temperature(Press), Pressure(Temp), State(Temp, Press) and WtrStmTbls(Temp, Press, Nphs, Nprop), where Temp, Press, Nphs and Nprop are temperature, pressure, phase number and property number, respectively, are written in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) to use the SteamTables in a workbook in MS-Excel.

  19. Back to the hydrated electron-how it is produced and monitored at the dropping mercury electrode in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyrovský, Michael; Pucciarelli, Filippo

    A reproducible current-voltage curve of pure water, obtained with the dropping mercury electrode (DME), contains a 1-2 V wide region where no faradaic processes take place. This region consists of three distinct parts according to different orientations of water molecules and their interactions with the mercury surface. On irradiation of the DME by UV and visible light a cathodic photocurrent is produced in the negative part of the nonfaradaic region, which increases with increasing voltage. The photocurrent appears in water in the absence of scavengers of hydrated electrons, and its magnitude is of the same order as that of the current due to photoemission of electrons into solutions of electrolytes containing scavengers. Additions of electrolytes decrease and ultimately suppress this kind of photocurrent. We explain the photocurrent by the effect of an electric field of the extended electrode double layer on the return of hydrated electrons, generated by photoemission, back to the electrode. Retarded by electrostatic repulsion from the negatively-charged electrode, some of the hydrated electrons undergo a relatively slow reaction with water, which under those conditions acts as a weak electron scavenger.

  20. Water-soluble naphthalene diimides as singlet oxygen sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Doria, Filippo; Manet, Ilse; Grande, Vincenzo; Monti, Sandra; Freccero, Mauro

    2013-08-16

    Bromo- and/or alkylamino-substituted and hydrosoluble naphthalene diimides (NDIs) were synthesized to study their multimodal photophysical and photochemical properties. Bromine-containing NDIs (i.e., 11) behaved as both singlet oxygen ((1)O2) photosensitizers and fluorescent molecules upon irradiation at 532 nm. Among the NDIs not containing Br, only 12 exhibited photophysical properties similar to those of Br-NDIs, by irradiation above 610 nm, suggesting that for these NDIs both singlet and triplet excited-state properties are strongly affected by length, structure of the solubilizing moieties, and pH of the solution. Laser flash photolysis confirmed that the NDI lowest triplet excited state was efficiently populated, upon excitation at both 355 and 532 nm, and that free amine moieties quenched both the singlet and triplet excited states by intramolecular electron transfer, with generation of detectable radical anions. Time-resolved experiments, monitoring the 1270 nm (1)O2 phosphorescence decay generated upon laser irradiation at 532 nm, allowed a ranking of the NDIs as sensitizers, based on their (1)O2 quantum yields (ΦΔ). The tetrafunctionalized 12, exhibiting a long-lived triplet state (τ ~ 32 μs) and the most promising absorptivity for photodynamic therapy application, was tested as efficient photosensitizers in the photo-oxidations of 1,5-dihydroxynaphthalene and 9,10-anthracenedipropionic acid in acetonitrile and water.

  1. Focal cerebral ischemic tolerance and change in blood-brain barrier permeability after repetitive pure oxygen exposure preconditioning in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Kang, Kai; Wang, Shiquan; Yao, Jianhua; Zhang, Xijing

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to demonstrate that repetitive pure oxygen exposure preconditioning (O2PC) for 8 hours per day for 3 or 7 days, a practicable preconditioning for clinical use, is able to induce cerebral ischemic tolerance (IT) and further clarify the accompanying changes in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that may be involved. METHODS A total of 68 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats and eight 1-day-old rat pups were used in this study. The adult rats were exposed to pure O2 (38 rats) 8 hours a day for 3 or 7 days or to room air (in an identical setup) for 8 hours a day for 7 days as controls (30 rats). Arterial O2 tension (PaO2) was measured in 6 rats exposed to O2 and 3 controls. Focal cerebral ischemia was elicited by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in 37 rats, of which 21 had been exposed to pure O2 for 3 or 7 days and 16 to room air for 7 days as controls. Neurological behavior was scored with the Garcia score in 15 MCAO rats, of which 10 had been exposed to pure O2 for 3 or 7 days and 5 to room air for 7 days as controls, and cerebral infarct volumes were assessed with TTC (2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride) staining in 10 rats (5 from each group) after 7 days of exposure. Formamide-extraction method was used to detect leakage of Evans blue (EB) dye in 7 rats exposed to pure O2 for 7 days and 7 exposed to room air for 7 days. Fluorescence microscopy was used to analyze the leaked EB in the nonischemic areas of 4 rats exposed to pure O2 for 7 days and 4 exposed to room air for 7 days before MCAO and the brain of the rats that had not been subjected to MCAO. Astrocyte changes associated with O2PC were evaluated by means of fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy in 14 rats that were exposed to the same O2 or control conditions as the MCAO rats but without MCAO. Astrocytes were also obtained from 8 rat pups and cultured; levels of AQP4 and VEGF were detected by Western blot and ELISA in cells with and without O2 treatment. RESULTS

  2. Kinetics of oxygen exchange between bisulfite ion and water as studied by oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, D.A.

    1984-08-01

    The nuclear magnetic relaxation times of oxygen-17 have been measured in aqueous sodium bisulfite solutions in the pH range from 2.5 to 5 as a function of temperature, pH, and S(IV) concentration, at an ionic strength of 1.0 m. The rate law for oxygen exchange between bisulfite ion and water was obtained from an analysis of the data, and is consistent with oxygen exchange occurring via the reaction SO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/O right reversible H/sup +/ + SHO/sub 3//sup -/. The value of k/sub -1/ is in agreement with relaxation measurements. Direct spectroscopic evidence was found for the existence of two isomers of bisulfite ion: one with the proton bonded to the sulfur (HSO/sub 3//sup -/) and the other with the proton bonded to an oxygen (SO/sub 3/H/sup -/). (The symbol SHO/sub 3//sup -/ in the above chemical equation refers to both isomeric forms of bisulfite ion.) The relative amounts of the two isomers were determined as a function of temperature, and the rate and mechanism of oxygen exchange between the two was investigated. One of the two isomers, presumably SO/sub 3/H/sup -/, exchanges oxygens with water much more rapidly than does the other. A two-pulse sequence was developed which greatly diminished the solvent peak in the NMR spectrum.

  3. Determination of Biochemical Oxygen Demand of Area Waters: A Bioassay Procedure for Environmental Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riehl, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    A graphical method for determining the 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) for a body of water is described. In this bioassay, students collect a sample of water from a designated site, transport it to the laboratory, and evaluate the amount of oxygen consumed by naturally occurring bacteria during a 5-day incubation period. An accuracy check,…

  4. Equilibrating metal-oxide cluster ensembles for oxidation reactions using oxygen in water

    Treesearch

    Ira A. Weinstock; Elena M. G. Barbuzzi; Michael W. Wemple; Jennifer J. Cowan; Richard S. Reiner; Dan M. Sonnen; Robert A. Heintz; James S. Bond; Craig L. Hill

    2001-01-01

    Although many enzymes can readily and selectively use oxygen in water--the most familiar and attractive of all oxidants and solvents, respectively–-the design of synthetic catalysts for selective water-based oxidation processes utilizing molecular oxygen remains a daunting task. Particularly problematic is the fact that oxidation of substrates by O2 involves radical...

  5. Determination of Biochemical Oxygen Demand of Area Waters: A Bioassay Procedure for Environmental Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riehl, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    A graphical method for determining the 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) for a body of water is described. In this bioassay, students collect a sample of water from a designated site, transport it to the laboratory, and evaluate the amount of oxygen consumed by naturally occurring bacteria during a 5-day incubation period. An accuracy check,…

  6. Reactive molecular dynamics of the initial oxidation stages of Ni111 in pure water: effect of an applied electric field.

    PubMed

    Assowe, O; Politano, O; Vignal, V; Arnoux, P; Diawara, B; Verners, O; van Duin, A C T

    2012-12-06

    Corrosion processes occurring in aqueous solutions are critically dependent upon the interaction between the metal electrode and the solvent. In this work, the interaction of a nickel substrate with water molecules has been investigated using reactive force field (ReaxFF) molecular dynamics simulations. This approach was originally developed by van Duin and co-workers to study hydrocarbon chemistry and the catalytic properties of organic compounds. To our knowledge, this method has not previously been used to study the corrosion of nickel. In this work, we studied the interaction of 480 molecules of water (ρ = 0.99 g·cm(-3)) with Ni(111) surfaces at 300 K. The results showed that a water "bilayer" was adsorbed on the nickel surface. In the absence of an applied electric field, no dissociation of water was observed. However, the nickel atoms at the surface were charged positively, whereas the first water layer was charged negatively, indicating the formation of an electric double layer. To study the corrosion of nickel in pure water, we introduced an external electric field between the metal and the solution. The electric field intensity varied between 10 and 20 MeV/cm. The presence of this electric field led to oxidation of the metal surface. The structural and morphological differences associated with the growth of this oxide film in the presence of the electric field were evaluated. The simulated atomic trajectories were used to analyze the atomic displacement during the reactive process. The growth of the oxide scale on the nickel surface was primarily due to the movement of anions toward the interior of the metal substrate and the migration of nickel toward the free surface. We found that increasing the electric field intensity sped up the corrosion of nickel. The results also showed that the oxide film thickness increased linearly with increasing electric field intensity.

  7. [Separation of bases, phenols and pharmaceuticals on ionic liquid-modified silica stationary phase with pure water as mobile phase].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xusheng; Qiu, Hongdeng; Liu, Xia; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2011-03-01

    N-methylimidazolium ionic liquid (IL) -modified silica was prepared with the reaction of 3-chloropropyl modified silica and N-methylimidazole using toluene as solvent. Based on the multiple interactions between N-methylimidazolium IL-modified silica and analytes such as hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic attraction, repulsion interaction, hydrogen-bonding, etc., the bases (cytosine, thymine, 2-aminopyrimidine and 6-chloroguanine), phenols (m-aminophenol, resorcinol and m-nitrophenol) and three pharmaceuticals (moroxydine hydrochloride, acyclovir and cephalexin hydrate) were separated successfully with only pure water as the mobile phase. These chromatographic separations are environmental friendly, economical and convenient, without any organic solvent or buffer additive. The retention mechanism of these samples on the stationary phase was also investigated.

  8. Hydrogen-rich pure water prevents cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema in SMP30 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yohei; Sato, Tadashi; Sugimoto, Masataka; Baskoro, Hario; Karasutani, Keiko; Mitsui, Aki; Nurwidya, Fariz; Arano, Naoko; Kodama, Yuzo; Hirano, Shin-Ichi; Ishigami, Akihito; Seyama, Kuniaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-10-07

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is predominantly a cigarette smoke (CS)-triggered disease with features of chronic systemic inflammation. Oxidants derived from CS can induce DNA damage and stress-induced premature cellular senescence in the respiratory system, which play significant roles in COPD. Therefore, antioxidants should provide benefits for the treatment of COPD; however, their therapeutic potential remains limited owing to the complexity of this disease. Recently, molecular hydrogen (H2) has been reported as a preventive and therapeutic antioxidant. Molecular H2 can selectively reduce hydroxyl radical accumulation with no known side effects, showing potential applications in managing oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and lipid metabolism. However, there have been no reports on the efficacy of molecular H2 in COPD patients. In the present study, we used a mouse model of COPD to investigate whether CS-induced histological damage in the lungs could be attenuated by administration of molecular H2. We administered H2-rich pure water to senescence marker protein 30 knockout (SMP30-KO) mice exposed to CS for 8 weeks. Administration of H2-rich water attenuated the CS-induced lung damage in the SMP30-KO mice and reduced the mean linear intercept and destructive index of the lungs. Moreover, H2-rich water significantly restored the static lung compliance in the CS-exposed mice compared with that in the CS-exposed H2-untreated mice. Moreover, treatment with H2-rich water decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage markers such as phosphorylated histone H2AX and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, and senescence markers such as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1, and β-galactosidase in the CS-exposed mice. These results demonstrated that H2-rich pure water attenuated CS-induced emphysema in SMP30-KO mice by reducing CS-induced oxidative DNA damage and premature cell senescence in the lungs. Our study suggests

  9. Schwertmannite formation adjacent to bacterial cells in a mine water treatment plant and in pure cultures of Ferrovum myxofaciens.

    PubMed

    Hedrich, Sabrina; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Kleeberg, Reinhard; Heide, Gerhard; Seifert, Jana; Schlömann, Michael

    2011-09-15

    Schwertmannite has previously been found in iron- and sulfate-rich mine waters at pH 2.8-4.5. In the present study, schwertmannite (Fe(8)O(8)(OH)(6)SO(4)) was shown to be the major mineral in a mine water treatment plant at pH 3, in which ferrous iron is mainly oxidized by bacteria belonging to the species Ferrovum myxofaciens. Strain EHS6, which is closely related to the type strain of Fv. myxofaciens, was isolated from the pilot plant and characterized as an acidophilic, iron-oxidizing bacterium. In contrast to the pilot plant, the mineral phase formed by a pure culture of Fv. myxofaciens EHS6 was a mixture of schwertmannite and jarosite (KFe(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(6)). In contrast to other reports of neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria, acidophilic microorganisms in the pilot plant and cultures of strain EHS6 did not show encrustation of the cell surface or deposition of minerals inside the cell, though a few cells appeared to be in contact with jarosite crystals. It was concluded that no direct biomineralization occurred in the pilot plant or in laboratory cultures. The lack of encrustation of bacterial cells in the pilot plant is considered advantageous since the cells are still able to get in contact with ferrous iron and the iron oxidation process in the mine water treatment plant can proceed.

  10. Graphene Jet Nanomotors in Remote Controllable Self-Propulsion Swimmers in Pure Water.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Omid; Saadati, Maryam; Jannesari, Marziyeh

    2016-09-14

    A remote controllable working graphite nanostructured swimmer based on a graphene jet nanomotor has been demonstrated for the first time. Graphite particles with pyramidal-like morphologies were fabricated by the creation of suitable defects in wide high-purity graphite flakes followed by a severe sonication. The particles were able to be self-exfoliated in water after Na intercalation between the graphene constituents. The self-exfoliation resulted in jet ejection of graphene flakes from the end of the swimmers (with speeds as high as ∼7000 m/s), producing a driving force (at least ∼0.7 L (pN) where L (μm) is swimmer size) and consequently the motion of the swimmer (with average speed of ∼17-40 μm/s). The jet ejection of the graphene flakes was assigned to the explosion of H2 nanobubbles produced between the Na intercalated flakes. The direction of motion of the swimmers equipped with TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) can be controlled by applying a magnetic field in the presence of UV irradiation (higher UV intensity, lower radius of rotation). In fact, the negative surface charge of the graphene flakes of the swimmers increased by UV irradiation due to transferring the photoexcited electrons of TiO2 NPs into the flakes. Because of higher production of H2 nanobubbles under UV irradiation, the speed of swimmers exposed to UV light significantly increased. In contrast, UV irradiation with various intensities could not affect total distance traversed by the self-exfoliated swimmers having the same initial sizes. These confirmed the mass ejection mechanism for motion of the swimmers. The self-exfoliation of swimmers (and so their motion) occurred only in water (and not, e.g., in organic solutions). Such swimmers promise the design of remote controllable nanovehicles with the capability of initiating and/or improving their operations in response to environmental changes in order to realize broad ranges of versatile and fantastic nanotechnology-based applications.

  11. Optically pure, water-stable metallo-helical ‘flexicate’ assemblies with antibiotic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howson, Suzanne E.; Bolhuis, Albert; Brabec, Viktor; Clarkson, Guy J.; Malina, Jaroslav; Rodger, Alison; Scott, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The helicates—chiral assemblies of two or more metal atoms linked by short or relatively rigid multidentate organic ligands—may be regarded as non-peptide mimetics of α-helices because they are of comparable size and have shown some relevant biological activity. Unfortunately, these beautiful helical compounds have remained difficult to use in the medicinal arena because they contain mixtures of isomers, cannot be optimized for specific purposes, are insoluble, or are too difficult to synthesize. Instead, we have now prepared thermodynamically stable single enantiomers of monometallic units connected by organic linkers. Our highly adaptable self-assembly approach enables the rapid preparation of ranges of water-stable, helicate-like compounds with high stereochemical purity. One such iron(II) ‘flexicate’ system exhibits specific interactions with DNA, promising antimicrobial activity against a Gram-positive bacterium (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA252), but also, unusually, a Gram-negative bacterium (Escherichia coli, MC4100), as well as low toxicity towards a non-mammalian model organism (Caenorhabditis elegans).

  12. The effect of plutonium dioxide water surface coverage on the generation of hydrogen and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, Douglas K.; Berg, John M.; Crowder, Mark L.

    2012-06-20

    The conditions for the production of oxygen during radiolysis of water adsorbed onto plutonium dioxide powder are discussed. Studies in the literature investigating the radiolysis of water show that both oxygen and hydrogen can be generated from water adsorbed on high-purity plutonium dioxide powder. These studies indicate that there is a threshold in the amount of water below which oxygen is not generated. The threshold is associated with the number of monolayers of adsorbed water and is shown to occur at approximately two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water. Material in equilibrium with 50% relative humidity (RH) will be at the threshold for oxygen generation. Using two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water as the threshold for oxygen production, the total pressure under various conditions is calculated assuming stoichiometric production of hydrogen and oxygen. The specific surface area of the oxide has a strong effect on the final partial pressure. The specific surface areas resulting in the highest pressures within a 3013 container are evaluated. The potential for oxygen generation is mitigated by reduced relative humidity, and hence moisture adsorption, at the oxide surface which occurs if the oxide is warmer than the ambient air. The potential for oxygen generation approaches zero as the temperature difference between the ambient air and the material approaches 6 C.

  13. Active Oxygen Species Generator by Low Pressure Silent Discharge and its Application to Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ikeda, Akira; Tanimura, Yasuhiro; Ohta, Koji; Yoshiyasu, Hajimu

    We have proposed the new water treatment using the active oxygen species such as an atomic oxygen with the oxidation power that is stronger than ozone. Based on the results of simulations we designed the silent discharge type active oxygen generator with a water ejector, which is operated on the discharge conditions of low pressure of 6.6kPa. and high temperature of about 200°C. The experimental results are as follows. (1) The yield of the active oxygen increases with the increase of the discharge tube temperature and the decrease of the gas pressure. (2) The life time of active oxygen is tens msec. (3) The active oxygen oxidizes efficiently the formic acid compared with ozone. It is assumed from these results that the active oxygen species having a strong oxidation power is generated.

  14. Oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in pigs and increases immune responses of pigs during Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2012-12-01

    It has been considered that drinking oxygenated water improves oxygen availability, which may increase vitality and improve immune functions. The present study evaluated the effects of oxygenated drinking water on immune function in pigs. Continuous drinking of oxygenated water markedly increased peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation, interleukin-1β expression level and the CD4(+):CD8(+) cell ratio in pigs. During Salmonella Typhimurium infection, total leukocytes and relative cytokines expression levels were significantly increased in pigs consuming oxygenated water compared with pigs consuming tap water. These findings suggest that oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in pigs and increases immune responses of pigs during S. Typhimurium Infection.

  15. Oxygenated water does not induce genotoxic effects in the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Schütz, Petra; Trenz, Kristina; Rothfuss, Andreas

    2002-07-21

    Drinking of oxygenated water (i.e. water with increased concentration of physically dissolved oxygen) is said to improve oxygen availability of the body and will do the consumer good. However, increased oxygen concentrations can also lead to an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). If antioxidant defences are not completely efficient, ROS can cause cell injury including DNA damage. We therefore investigated whether drinking of oxygenated water can lead to increased DNA damage in peripheral blood cells of test subjects. We also tested whether direct exposure of V79 Chinese hamster cells to oxygenated medium or oxygenated Hank's solution for various time periods induces DNA damage. Induction of DNA damage was measured with the alkaline comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis). The comet assay, in particular the modification with FPG post-treatment for the determination of oxidative DNA base damage, has been proven to be extremely sensitive for the detection of oxygen-induced DNA damage. However, both the in vivo and the in vitro studies with the comet assay in the absence and presence of FPG post-treatment did not provide evidence for a genotoxic effect of oxygenated water.

  16. Coupled Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Analysis of Water Along the Soil-Plant- Atmosphere Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Webb, E. A.; Longstaffe, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    The oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of water within a plant vary with transpiration rates and the isotopic composition of soil water. Both of these parameters are affected by temperature and relative humidity. A controlled-temperature, growth-chamber experiment was conducted to determine the relationships among temperature, relative humidity, soil water evaporation and plant-water isotope composition in cattails and horsetails. Typha, a cattail species that grows in wetland conditions, and Equisetum, a horsetail species that prefers dry soils, were each grown in four chambers at 15, 20, 25 and 30 degrees Celsius. The oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of watering water, soil water, vapour in the growth chambers and plant water from the leaves and stems were analyzed throughout the eight-month long artificial growing season. Although the oxygen isotope composition of the watering water remained constant, the soil water, atmospheric vapour and plant water were progressively enriched in oxygen-18 and deuterium in each of the four chambers from low to high temperatures as a result of increasing evaporation. The oxygen isotope composition of plant water along the length of a single stem or leaf was increasingly enriched in the heavier isotopes towards the apex. There was no significant difference in the magnitude of this trend between species. These results indicate that the isotopic composition of plant water is primarily controlled by environmental conditions. The oxygen isotope composition of the water vapour in the growing chamber increased with temperature, consistent with equilibration between the vapour and the oxygen-18 enriched soil and plant water reservoirs. The magnitude and interaction of these variables, as measured for these modern samples of cattails and horsetails, should be useful in calibrating paleoclimate proxies based on fossilized plant materials (e.g., cellulose, phytoliths).

  17. Scaling oxygen microprofiles at the sediment interface of deep stratified waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwefel, Robert; Hondzo, Miki; Wüest, Alfred; Bouffard, Damien

    2017-02-01

    Dissolved oxygen microprofiles at the sediment-water interface of Lake Geneva were measured concurrently with velocities 0.25 to 2 m above the sediment. The measurements and scaling analyses indicate dissolved oxygen fluctuations and turbulent fluxes in exceedance of molecular diffusion in the proximity of the sediment-water interface. The measurements allowed the parameterization of the turbulent diffusion as a function of the dimensionless height above the sediment and the turbulence above the sediment-water interface. Turbulent diffusion depended strongly on the friction velocity and differed from formulations reported in the literature that are based on concepts of turbulent and developed wall-bounded flows. The dissolved oxygen microprofiles and proposed parameterization of turbulent diffusion enable a foundation for the similarity scaling of oxygen microprofiles in proximity to the sediment. The proposed scaling allows the estimation of diffusive boundary layer thickness, oxygen flux, and oxygen microprofile distribution in the near-sediment boundary layer.

  18. Effect of dissolved oxygen in alcoholic beverages and drinking water on alcohol elimination in humans.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Su-jin; Chae, Jung-woo; Song, Byung-jeong; Lee, Eun-sil; Kwon, Kwang-il

    2013-02-01

    Oxygen plays an important role in the metabolism of alcohol. An increased dissolved oxygen level in alcoholic beverages reportedly accelerates the elimination of alcohol. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of dissolved oxygen in alcohol and the supportive effect of oxygenated water on alcohol pharmacokinetics after the excessive consumption of alcohol, i.e., 540 ml of 19.5% alcohol (v/v). Fifteen healthy males were included in this randomized, 3 × 3 crossover study. Three combinations were tested: X, normal alcoholic beverage and normal water; Y, oxygenated alcoholic beverage and normal water; Z, oxygenated alcoholic beverage and oxygenated water. Blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) were determined by conversion of breath alcohol concentrations. Four pharmacokinetic parameters (C(max), T(max), K(el), and AUCall) were obtained using non-compartmental analysis and the times to reach 0.05% and 0.03% BAC (T(0.05%) and T(0.03%)) were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's post hoc test. With combination Z, the BAC decreased to 0.05% significantly faster (p < 0.05) than with combination X. Analyzing the pharmacokinetic parameters, the mean K(el) was significantly higher for combination Z than for combinations X and Y (p < 0.05), whereas the mean values of C(max), T(max) and AUCall did not differ significantly among the combinations. Dissolved oxygen in drinks accelerates the decrease in BAC after consuming a large amount of alcohol. However, the oxygen dissolved in the alcoholic beverage alone did not have a sufficient effect in this case. We postulate that highly oxygenated water augments the effect of oxygen in the alcoholic beverage in alcohol elimination. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the supportive effect of ingesting additional oxygenated water after heavy drinking of normal alcoholic beverages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Air-Water Interface Effects on the Regioselectivity of Singlet Oxygenations of a Trisubstituted Alkene.

    PubMed

    Malek, Belaid; Ghogare, Ashwini A; Choudhury, Rajib; Greer, Alexander

    2015-07-22

    The regioselective synthesis of allylic hydroperoxide sulfonates by singlet oxygenation at the air-water interface has been found to depend on the concentration of the alkene sulfonate and added calcium salt. The regioselectivity is proposed to originate from an orthogonal alkene relative to the water surface for preferential methyl hydrogen abstraction by airborne singlet oxygen in an ene reaction. The findings hint that the air-water interface is a locale for synthetic reactions.

  20. Contrasting hydrological processes of meteoric water incursion during magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposition: An oxygen isotope study by ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Meteoric water convection has long been recognized as an efficient means to cool magmatic intrusions in the Earth's upper crust. This interplay between magmatic and hydrothermal activity thus exerts a primary control on the structure and evolution of volcanic, geothermal and ore-forming systems. Incursion of meteoric water into magmatic-hydrothermal systems has been linked to tin ore deposition in granitic plutons. In contrast, evidence from porphyry copper ore deposits suggests that crystallizing subvolcanic magma bodies are only affected by meteoric water incursion in peripheral zones and during late post-ore stages. We apply high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyze oxygen isotope ratios of individual growth zones in vein quartz crystals, imaged by cathodo-luminescence microscopy (SEM-CL). Existing microthermometric information from fluid inclusions enables calculation of the oxygen isotope composition of the fluid from which the quartz precipitated, constraining the relative timing of meteoric water input into these two different settings. Our results confirm that incursion of meteoric water directly contributes to cooling of shallow granitic plutons and plays a key role in concurrent tin mineralization. By contrast, data from two porphyry copper deposits suggest that downward circulating meteoric water is counteracted by up-flowing hot magmatic fluids. Our data show that porphyry copper ore deposition occurs close to a magmatic-meteoric water interface, rather than in a purely magmatic fluid plume, confirming recent hydrological modeling. On a larger scale, the expulsion of magmatic fluids against the meteoric water interface can shield plutons from rapid convective cooling, which may aid the build-up of large magma chambers required for porphyry copper ore formation.

  1. Dynamic Fracture of Borosilicate Glass with Plasma Confinement geometry in Pure Water by Laser-induced Shock Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kishimura, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Takanori

    2013-06-01

    In order to characterize dynamic fracture of borosilicate glass, we performed laser-shock-experiments of both an aluminum-ablator mounted glass and a glass with plasma confinement geometry in pure water by Q-switched Nd3+:YAG laser. The incident beam with 440 mJ were focused onto the target approximately 300 μm in diameter. The dynamic fracture of the glass targets is observed with high-speed digital framing-camera photography. For the aluminum-ablator mounted glass, propagation of the shock wave in water was observed, and the shock-wave velocity is obtained to be 1.65 +/- 0.02 km/s using image processing. Shock-pressure applied the target is estimated to be 180 MPa by Hugoniot relation. For the glass with plasma confinement geometry, generation of the micro-fragments from the rear side of the target was observed. This result indicates that shock-induced fragmentation by laser irradiation is enhanced by the plasma confinement effect. The soft-recovered fragments are separated according the size with PET mesh having deferent mesh size. As a result, the glass with plasma confinement geometry generated smaller fragment than the aluminum-ablator mounted glass.

  2. Radiation processing of water, oxygen and ozone ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teolis, Benjamin D.

    This thesis investigates sputtering, radiolysis and structural changes produced by ion irradiation in H2O, O2 and O 3 ices using several experimental techniques: mass spectrometry, microbalance gravimetry, reflectance spectroscopy and sputter depth profiling. The first measurements of the angular dependence of the sputtering of water ice are presented, showing that (i) the sputtering yield exhibits a cos -1.3theta dependence on the incidence angle theta of the projectiles (100 keV protons) and (ii) that the sputtered flux of H2O is more forward directed than that of O2. Using 100 keV Ar + projectiles, a complex fluence dependence in the sputtered flux of O2 is also identified. The fluence dependence is determined by (i) the thermal and irradiation history of the water ice and (ii) the deposition of ice overlayers. These results are explained by the production of trapped O2 in the ice, with the O2 concentration being governed by the rates of production, diffusion and removal of O 2 from the ice surface by sputtering and/or thermal desorption. Sputter depth profile measurements show that the primary fluence dependence of O 2 sputtering is due to the accumulation of trapped O2, and that O2 is produced preferentially near the ice surface due to out-diffusion of hydrogen in the form of H2 from that region. Removal of O2 from the surface is blocked if H2O is condensed concurrently with Ar+ irradiation, resulting in an enhancement of the concentration of O2 in the ice which is sufficient for the generation of ozone. This result represents the first reported synthesis of ozone by radiolysis of pure water ice, and may help to explain the presence of O3 in the surfaces of icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, where sputtered and sublimed H2O recondense onto surfaces that are simultaneously subject to irradiation by magnetospheric ions. As in the case of water ice, the sputtering yields of solid O2 and O3 were found to depend on the occurrence of radiation chemistry in the

  3. Water Induced Surface Reconstruction of the Oxygen (2x1) covered Ru(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Sabine; Cabrera-Sanfelix, Pepa; Stass, Ingeborg; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Arnau, Andres; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-08-06

    Low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) were used to study the adsorption of water on a Ru(0001) surface covered with half monolayer of oxygen. The oxygen atoms occupy hcp sites in an ordered structure with (2x1) periodicity. DFT predicts that water is weakly bound to the unmodified surface, 86 meV compared to the ~;;200 meV water-water H-bond. Instead, we found that water adsorption causes a shift of half of the oxygen atoms from hcp sites to fcc sites, creating a honeycomb structure where water molecules bind strongly to the exposed Ru atoms. The energy cost of reconstructing the oxygen overlayer, around 230 meV per displaced oxygen atom, is more than compensated by the larger adsorption energy of water on the newly exposed Ru atoms. Water forms hydrogen bonds with the fcc O atoms in a (4x2) superstructure due to alternating orientations of the molecules. Heating to 185 K results in the complete desorption of the water layer, leaving behind the oxygen honeycomb structure, which is metastable relative to the original (2x1). This stable structure is not recovered until after heating to temperatures close to 260K.

  4. Effectiveness of hypolimnetic oxygenation for preventing accumulation of Fe and Mn in a drinking water reservoir.

    PubMed

    Munger, Zackary W; Carey, Cayelan C; Gerling, Alexandra B; Hamre, Kathleen D; Doubek, Jonathan P; Klepatzki, Spencer D; McClure, Ryan P; Schreiber, Madeline E

    2016-12-01

    The accumulation of Fe and Mn in seasonally stratified drinking water reservoirs adversely impacts water quality. To control issues with Fe and Mn at the source, some drinking water utilities have deployed hypolimnetic oxygenation systems to create well-oxygenated conditions in the water column that are favorable for the oxidation, and thus removal, of Fe and Mn. However, in addition to being controlled by dissolved oxygen (DO), Fe and Mn concentrations are also influenced by pH and metal-oxidizing microorganisms. We studied the response of Fe and Mn concentrations to hypolimnetic oxygenation in a shallow drinking water reservoir in Vinton, Virginia, USA by sequentially activating and deactivating an oxygenation system over two summers. We found that maintaining well-oxygenated conditions effectively prevented the accumulation of soluble Fe in the hypolimnion. However, while the rate of Mn oxidation increased under well-oxygenated conditions, soluble Mn still accumulated in the slightly acidic to neutral (pH 5.6 to 7.5) hypolimnion. In parallel, we conducted laboratory incubation experiments, which showed that the presence of Mn-oxidizing microorganisms increased the rate of Mn oxidation in comparison with rates under oxic, abiotic conditions. Combined, our field and laboratory results demonstrate that increasing DO concentrations in the water column is important for stimulating the oxidation of Fe and Mn, but that the successful management of Mn is also tied to the activity of Mn-oxidizing organisms in the water column and favorable (neutral to alkaline) pH.

  5. Release of Gd-ions from peralkaline borosilicate glass in pure water for neutrino detection in Water-Cherenkov Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongol, R.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2017-09-01

    The addition of Gadolinium (Gd)-based salt, specially GdCl3, in the Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCDs) enhances the sensitivity to neutrino detection. However, the unwanted Cl-based byproducts, significantly reduces the transparency of water and sensitivity of WCDs. An alternative method, to introduce Gd-ions in the WCDs, is through Gd-release from a custom designed Gd-doped glass, when in contact with water. This can potentially eliminate the use of Gd-based salts and byproducts. In this work, we report the Gd-ions release for a Gd-doped peralkaline (Na/Al > 1) borosilicate glass, which closely represents photomultiplier tube (PMT) glass composition used in WCDs. The purpose of the paper is to show that the Gd-ion release from a custom designed glass in the form of beads or powders is feasible and could be used as a controlled Gd-source in future WCDs to enhance neutrino detection. In addition, we present our results of Gd-solubility in the base glass composition.

  6. Visible light-driven pure water splitting by a nature-inspired organic semiconductor-based system.

    PubMed

    Martin, David James; Reardon, Philip James Thomas; Moniz, Savio J A; Tang, Junwang

    2014-09-10

    For the first time, it is demonstrated that the robust organic semiconductor g-C3N4 can be integrated into a nature-inspired water splitting system, analogous to PSII and PSI in natural photosynthesis. Two parallel systems have been developed for overall water splitting under visible light involving graphitic carbon nitride with two different metal oxides, BiVO4 and WO3. Consequently, both hydrogen and oxygen can be evolved in an ideal ratio of 2:1, and evolution rates in both systems have been found to be dependent on pH, redox mediator concentration, and mass ratio between the two photocatalysts, leading to a stable and reproducible H2 and O2 evolution rate at 36 and 18 μmol h(-1) g(-1) from water over 14 h. Our findings demonstrate g-C3N4 can serve as a multifunctional robust photocatalyst, which could also be used in other systems such as PEC cells or coupled solar cell systems.

  7. Roles of Oxygen and Water Vapor in the Oxidation of Halogen Terminated Ge(111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shiyu; Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianette, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-12-18

    The initial stage of the oxidation of Cl and Br terminated Ge(111) surfaces is studied using photoelectron spectroscopy. The authors perform controlled experiments to differentiate the effects of different factors in oxidation, and find that water vapor and oxygen play different roles. Water vapor effectively replaces the halogen termination layers with the hydroxyl group, but does not oxidize the surfaces further. In contrast, little oxidation is observed for Cl and Br terminated surfaces with dry oxygen alone. However, with the help of water vapor, oxygen oxidizes the surface by breaking the Ge-Ge back bonds instead of changing the termination layer.

  8. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles obtained by pulsed laser ablation in pure water and in chloride solution

    PubMed Central

    Perito, Brunella; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have increasingly gained importance as antibacterial agents with applications in several fields due to their strong, broad-range antimicrobial properties. AgNP synthesis by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) permits the preparation of stable Ag colloids in pure solvents without capping or stabilizing agents, producing AgNPs more suitable for biomedical applications than those prepared with common, wet chemical preparation techniques. To date, only a few investigations into the antimicrobial effect of AgNPs produced by PLAL have been performed. These have mainly been performed by ablation in water with nanosecond pulse widths. We previously observed a strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal from such AgNPs by “activating” the NP surface by the addition of a small quantity of LiCl to the colloid. Such surface effects could also influence the antimicrobial activity of the NPs. Their activity, on the other hand, could also be affected by other parameters linked to the ablation conditions, such as the pulse width. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs was evaluated for NPs obtained either by nanosecond (ns) or picosecond (ps) PLAL using a 1064 nm ablation wavelength, in pure water or in LiCl aqueous solution, with Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis as references for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. In all cases, AgNPs with an average diameter less than 10 nm were obtained, which has been shown in previous works to be the most effective size for bactericidal activity. The measured zeta-potential values were very negative, indicating excellent long-term colloidal stability. Antibacterial activity was observed against both microorganisms for the four AgNP formulations, but the ps-ablated nanoparticles were shown to more effectively inhibit the growth of both microorganisms. Moreover, LiCl modified AgNPs were the most effective, showing minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values in a

  9. Interaction of water vapor with clean and oxygen-covered uranium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winer, K.; Colmenares, C. A.; Smith, R. L.; Wooten, F.

    1987-04-01

    The interaction of water vapor with clean and oxygen-covered high-purity polycrystalline uranium surfaces was studied between 85 and 298 K with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Saturation of the uranium surface with oxygen or water vapor produced an asymmetric O1s photoelectron peak that consisted of a main oxide contribution and a small component assigned to strongly chemisorbed oxygen or hydroxyl ions, respectively. Saturation of the clean or oxygen-covered surface with water vapor at 85 K produced multilayer ice that was converted to oxide and adsorbed hydroxyl ions after warming to room temperature. A significant difference in binding energies was observed in the O1s spectra between water vapor adsorption on clean and oxygen-covered surfaces that lends support to the oxygen inhibition of the water vapor-uranium reaction by a surface mechanism. The initial oxidation mechanisms of uranium with oxygen and water vapor are discussed.

  10. Measurement and interpretation of low levels of dissolved oxygen in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.; Solbau, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    A Rhodazine-D colorimetric technique was adapted to measure low-level dissolved oxygen concentrations in ground water. Prepared samples containing between 0 and 8.0 ??moles L-1 dissolved oxygen in equilibrium with known gas mixtures produced linear spectrophotometric absorbance with a lower detection limit of 0.2 ??moles L-1. Excellent reproducibility was found for solutions ranging in composition from deionized water to sea water with chemical interferences detected only for easily reduced metal species such as ferric ion, cupric ion, and hexavalent chromium. Such effects were correctable based on parallel reaction stoichiometries relative to oxygen. The technique, coupled with a downhole wire line tool, permitted low-level monitoring of dissolved oxygen in wells at the selenium-contaminated Kesterson Reservoir in California. Results indicated a close association between low but measurable dissolved oxygen concentrations and mobility of oxidized forms of selenium. -from Authors

  11. Plasma-Induced Oxygen Vacancies in Ultrathin Hematite Nanoflakes Promoting Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changqing; Li, Changli; Zheng, Maojun; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques

    2015-10-14

    The incorporation of oxygen vacancies in hematite has been investigated as a promising route to improve oxygen evolution reaction activity of hematite photoanodes used in photoelectrochemical water oxidation. However, introducing oxygen vacancies intentionally in α-Fe2O3 for active solar water splitting through facile and effective methods remains a challenge. Herein, air plasma treatment is shown to produce oxygen vacancies in α-Fe2O3, and ultrathin α-Fe2O3 nanoflakes are used to investigate the effect of oxygen vacancies on the performance of photoelectrochemical oxygen oxidation. Increasing the plasma treatment duration and power is found to increase the density of oxygen vacancies and leads to a significant enhancement of the photocurrent response. The nanoflake photoanode with the optimized plasma treatment yields an incident photo-to-current conversion efficiency of 35.4% at 350 nm under 1.6 V vs RHE without resorting to any other cocatalysts, an efficiency far exceeding that of the pristine α-Fe2O3 nanoflakes (∼2.2%). Evidence for the presence of high density of oxygen vacancies confined in nanoflakes is clarified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The increased number of oxygen vacancies after plasma treatment resulting in an increased carrier density is interpreted as the main cause for the enhanced oxygen evolution reaction activity.

  12. Rainbow trout responses to water temperature and dissolved oxygen stress in two southern California stream pools

    Treesearch

    K.R. Matthews; N.H. Berg

    1997-01-01

    Habitat use by rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss is described for a southern California stream where the summer water temperatures typically exceed the lethal limits for trout (>25) C). During August 1994, water temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and trout distribution were monitored in two adjacent pools in Sespe Creek, Ventura County, where summer water...

  13. Nanosized IrxRu1-xO2 electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction in proton exchange membrane water electrolyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanh Pham, Hong; Nguyen, Ngoc Phong; Linh Do, Chi; Thang Le, Ba

    2015-01-01

    Normally in proton exchange membrane water electrolysis (PEMWE), the anode has the largest overpotential at typical operating current densities. By development of the electrocatalytic material used for the oxygen evolving electrode, great improvements in efficiency can be performed. In electrochemistry, rare metallic oxides RuO2 and IrO2 exhibit the best catalytic properties for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in acid electrolytes compared to other noble metals. RuO2 is the most active catalyst and IrO2 is the most stable catalyst. An oxide containing both elements is therefore expected to be a good catalyst for the OER. In this study IrxRu1-xO2 nanosized powder electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction is synthesized by hydrolysis method. Cyclic voltammetry, anodic polarization and galvanostatic measurements were conducted in solution of 0.5 M H2SO4 to investigate electrocatalytic behavior and stability of the electrocatalyst. The mechanisms of the thermal decomposition process of RuCl3.nH2O and IrCl3.mH2O precursors to form oxide powders were studied by means of thermal gravity analysis (TGA). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used analysis for determination of the crystallographic structure, morphology and catalysts particle size. Based on the given results, the IrxRu1-xO2 (x = 0.5 0.7) compounds were found to be more active than pure IrO2 and more stable than pure RuO2.

  14. Particle control challenges in process chemicals and ultra-pure water for sub-10nm technology nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Abbas; Samayoa, Martin; House, Matthew; Kurtuldu, Hüseyin; Eah, Sang-Kee; Morse, Lauren; Harris-Jones, Jenah

    2014-04-01

    Particle contamination in ultra-pure water (UPW) and chemicals will eventually end up on the surface of a wafer and may result in killer defects. To improve the semiconductor processing yield in sub-10 nm half pitch nodes, it is necessary to control particle defectivity. In a systematic study of all major techniques for particle detection, counting, and sizing in solutions, we have shown that there is a gap in the required particle metrology which needs to be addressed by the industry. To reduce particles in solutions and improve filter retention for sub-10 nm particles with very low densities (<10 particles/mL), liquid particle counters that are able to detect small particles at low densities are required. Non-volatile residues in chemicals and UPW can result in nanoparticles. Measuring absolute non-volatile residues in UPW with concentrations in the ppb range is a challenge. However, by using energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis through transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of non-volatile residues we found silica both in dissolved and colloidal particle form which is present in one of the cleanest UPW that we tested. A particle capture/release technique was developed at SEMATECH which is able to collect particles from UPW and release them in a controlled manner. Using this system we showed sub-10 nm particles are present in UPW. In addition to colloidal silica, agglomerated carbon containing particles were also found in UPW.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of 3.5NiCrMoV steel in carbonated pure water

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiyama, Tomohiro; Matsumoto, Osamu; Nakayama, Takenori |

    1998-12-31

    SCC susceptibility of 3.5NiCrMoV steel in a carbonated pure water at 157 C decreased with the decrease of P content in steel. SCC susceptibility also decreased by the addition of Nb. It was also confirmed that the SCC cracks were primarily intergranular. An Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analysis revealed that P segregation to grain boundary might play an essential role in accelerating SCC susceptibility, and Nb could suppress the P segregation to grain boundary. The role of Nb in raising resistance to SCC is thought to be attributed to the decreasing P segregation to grain boundary, resulting from increasing segregation interface due to fine NbC formation in steel. The measurement of anodic current decay in a carbonated solution with and without HPO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} ion showed that HPO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} ion accelerates the repassivation of a fresh surface, indicating that P segregation to grain boundary might be mainly attributed to the crack-sharpening effect due to repassivation by the formation of phosphate species at the crack tip.

  16. Effect of in-water recompression with oxygen to 6 msw versus normobaric oxygen breathing on bubble formation in divers.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Pontier, Jean-Michel

    2009-07-01

    It is generally accepted that the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) from hyperbaric exposures is low when few or no bubbles are present in the circulation. To date, no data are available on the influence of in-water oxygen breathing on bubble formation following a provocative dive in man. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of post-dive hyperbaric versus normobaric oxygen breathing (NOB) on venous circulating bubbles. Nineteen divers carried out open-sea field air dives at 30 msw depth for 30 min followed by a 9 min stop at 3 msw. Each diver performed three dives: one control dive, and two dives followed by 30 min of hyperbaric oxygen breathing (HOB) or NOB; both HOB and NOB started 10 min after surfacing. For HOB, divers were recompressed in-water to 6 msw at rest, whereas NOB was performed in a dry room in supine position. Decompression bubbles were examined by a precordial pulsed Doppler. Bubble count was significantly lower for post-dive NOB than for control dives. HOB dramatically suppressed circulating bubble formation with a bubble count significantly lower than for NOB or controls. In-water recompression with oxygen to 6 msw is more effective in removing gas bubbles than NOB. This treatment could be used in situations of "interrupted" or "omitted" decompression, where a diver returns to the water in order to complete decompression prior to the onset of symptoms. Further investigations are needed before to recommend this protocol as an emergency treatment for DCS.

  17. Oxygen Electrocatalysts for Water Electrolyzers and Reversible Fuel Cells: Status and Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh Kyu; Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen production by electrochemical water electrolysis has received great attention as an alternative technology for energy conversion and storage. The oxygen electrode has a substantial effect on the performance and durability in water electrolyzers and reversible fuel cells because of its intrinsically slow kinetics for oxygen evolution/reduction and poor durability under harsh operating environments. To improve oxygen kinetics and durability of the electrode, extensive studies for highly active and stable oxygen electrocatalyst have been performed. However, due to the thermodynamic instability of transition metals in acidic media, noble metal compounds have been primarily utilized as electrocatalysts in water electrolyzers and reversible fuel cells. For water electrolyzer applications, single noble metal oxides such as ruthenium oxide and iridium oxide have been studied, and binary or ternary metal oxides have been developed to take synergestic effects of each component. On the other hand, a variety of bifunctional electrocatalysts with a combination of monofunctional electrocatalysts such as platinum for oxygen reduction and iridium oxide for oxygen evolution for reversible fuel cell applications have been mainly proposed. Practically, supported iridium oxide-on-platinum, its reverse type, and non-precious metal-supported platinum and iridium bifunctional electrocatalysts have been developed. Recent theoretical calculations and experimental studies in terms of water electrolysis and fuel cell technology suggest effective ways to cope with current major challenges of cost and durability of oxygen electrocatalysts for technical applications.

  18. The oxygen isotope partition function ratio of water and the structure of liquid water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Adami, L.H.

    1969-01-01

    By means of the CO2-equilibration technique, the temperature dependence and absolute values of the oxygen isotope partition function ratio of liquid water have been determined, often at 1?? intervals, from -2 to 85??. A linear relationship between In (Q2/Q1) (H2O) and T-1 was obtained that is explicable in terms of the Bigeleisen-Mayer theory of isotopic fractionation. The data are incompatible with conventional, multicomponent mixture models of water because liquid water behaves isotopically as a singly structured homogeneous substance over the entire temperature range studied. A two-species model of water is proposed in which approximately 30% of the hydrogen bonds in ice are broken on melting at 0?? and in which this per cent of monomer changes by only a small amount over the entire liquid range. Because of the high precision and the fundamental property determined, the isotopic fractionation technique is particularly well suited to the detection of thermal anomalies. No anomalies were observed and those previously reported are ascribed to under-estimates of experimental error.

  19. [Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of lake water and geothermal spring water in arid area of south Tibet].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ke; Shen, Li-Cheng; Wang, Peng

    2014-08-01

    The condition of water cycles in Tibet Plateau is a complex process, and the hydrogen and oxygen isotopes contain important information of this process. Based on the analysis of isotopic composition of freshwater lake, saltwater lake and geothermal water in the southern Tibetan Plateau, this study investigated water cycling, composition and variation of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes and the influencing factors in the study area. The study found that the mean values of delta18O and deltaD in Daggyaima lake water (-17.0 per thousand for delta18O and -138. 6 per thousand for deltaD), Langcuo lake water (-6.4 per thousand for delta18O and -87.4 per thousand for deltaD) and Dagejia geothermal water (-19.2 per thousand for delta18 and -158.2 per thousand for deltaD) all showed negative delta18O and deltaD values in Tibetan Plateau by the influence of altitude effects. Lake water and geothermal water were influenced by evaporation effects in inland arid area, and the slope of evaporation line was less than 8. Deuterium excess parameters of lake water and geothermal water were all negative. The temperature of geothermal reservoirs in Dagejia geothermal field was high,and oxygen shift existed in the relationship of hydrogen and oxygen isotopes.

  20. Using permeable membranes to produce hydrogen and oxygen from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, A. P.; Williams, R. J.; Downs, W. R.; Mcbryar, H.

    1975-01-01

    Concept may make it profitable to obtain hydrogen fuel from water. Laboratory tests have demonstrated that method enables decomposition of water several orders of magnitude beyond equilibrium state where only small amounts of free hydrogen are present.

  1. Techniques for the conversion to carbon dioxide of oxygen from dissolved sulfate in thermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nehring, N.L.; Bowen, P.A.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between dissolved sulfate ions and water provides a useful geothermometer for geothermal waters. The oxygen isotope composition of dissolved sulfate may also be used to indicate the source of the sulfate and processes of formation. The methods described here for separation, purification and reduction of sulfate to prepare carbon dioxide for mass spectrometric analysis are modifications of methods by Rafter (1967), Mizutani (1971), Sakai and Krouse (1971), and Mizutani and Rafter (1969). ?? 1976.

  2. Effects of bottom water dissolved oxygen variability on copper and lead fractionation in the sediments across the oxygen minimum zone, western continental margin of India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Jayachandran, Saranya; Madan, Ritu; Sarkar, Arindam; Linsy, P; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the effect of varying bottom-water oxygen concentration on geochemical fractionation (operational speciation) of Cu and Pb in the underneath sediments across the oxygen minimum zone (Arabian Sea) in the west coast of India. Both, Cu and Pb were redistributed among the different binding phases of the sediments with changing dissolved oxygen level (from oxic to hypoxic and close to suboxic) in the bottom water. The average lability of Cu-sediment complexes gradually decreased (i.e., stability increased) with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations of the bottom water. Decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration increased Cu association with sedimentary organic matter. However, Pb association with Fe/Mn-oxyhydroxide phases in the sediments gradually decreased with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentration of the overlying bottom water (due to dissolution of Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide phase). The lability of Pb-sediment complexes increased with the decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration. This study suggests that bottom-water oxygen concentration is one of the key factors governing stability and lability of Cu and Pb complexes in the underneath sediment. Sedimentary organic matter and Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide binding phases were the major hosting phases for Cu and Pb respectively in the study area. Increasing lability of Pb-complexes in bottom sediments may lead to positive benthic fluxes of Pb at low oxygen environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxygen consumption by a sediment bed for stagnant water: comparison to SOD with fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Makoto

    2011-10-01

    A model of sedimentary oxygen demand (SOD) for stagnant water in a lake or a reservoir is presented. For the purposes of this paper, stagnant water is defined as the bottom layer of stratified water columns in relatively unproductive systems that are underlain by silt and sand-dominated sediments with low-organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N). The modeling results are compared to those with fluid flow to investigate how flow over the sediment surface raises SOD compared to stagnant water, depending on flow velocity and biochemical activity in the sediment. SOD is found to be substantially limited by oxygen transfer in the water column when water is stagnant. When flow over the sediment surface is present, SOD becomes larger than that for stagnant water, depending on flow velocity and the biochemical oxygen uptake rate in the sediment. Flow over the sediment surface causes an insignificant raise in SOD when the biochemical oxygen uptake rate is small. The difference between SOD with fluid flow and SOD for stagnant water becomes significant as the biochemical oxygen uptake rate becomes larger, i.e. SOD is 10-100 times larger when flow over the sediment surface is present.

  4. Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beger, Lauren; Roberts, Lily; deGroh, Kim; Banks, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    In the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment, spacecraft surfaces can be altered during atomic oxygen exposure through oxidation and erosion. There can be terrestrial benefits of such interactions, such as the modification of hydrophobic or hydrophilic properties of polymers due to chemical modification and texturing. Such modification of the surface may be useful for biomedical applications. For example, atomic oxygen texturing may increase the hydrophilicity of polymers, such as chlorotrifluoroethylene (Aclar), thus allowing increased adhesion and spreading of cells on textured Petri dishes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after atomic oxygen exposure or changes with exposure, the contact angles between the polymer and a water droplet placed on the polymer s surface were measured. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a radio frequency (RF) plasma asher. Atomic oxygen plasma treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers. Significant decreases in the water contact angle occurred with atomic oxygen exposure. Fluorinated polymers were found to be less sensitive to changes in hydrophilicity for equivalent atomic oxygen exposures, and two of the fluorinated polymers became more hydrophobic. The majority of change in water contact angle of the non-fluorinated polymers was found to occur with very low fluence exposures, indicating potential cell culturing benefit with short treatment time.

  5. Water quality and processes affecting dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Blackwater River, Canaan Valley, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, M.C.; Wiley, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The water quality and environmental processes affecting dissolved oxygen were determined for the Blackwater River in Canaan Valley, West Virginia. Canaan Valley is oval-shaped (14 miles by 5 miles) and is located in the Allegheny Mountains at an average elevation of 3,200 feet above sea level. Tourism, population, and real estate development have increased in the past two decades. Most streams in Canaan Valley are a dilute calcium magnesium bicarbonate-type water. Streamwater typicaly was soft and low in alkalinity and dissolved solids. Maximum values for specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved solids occurred during low-flow periods when streamflow was at or near baseflow. Dissolved oxygen concentrations are most sensitive to processes affecting the rate of reaeration. The reaeration is affected by solubility (atmospheric pressure, water temperature, humidity, and cloud cover) and processes that determine stream turbulence (stream depth, width, velocity, and roughness). In the headwaters, photosynthetic dissolved oxygen production by benthic algae can result in supersaturated dissolved oxygen concentrations. In beaver pools, dissolved oxygen consumption from sediment oxygen demand and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand can result in dissolved oxygen deficits.

  6. Prospects for detecting oxygen, water, and chlorophyll on an exo-Earth

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Timothy D.; Spiegel, David S.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of finding and characterizing nearby Earth-like planets is driving many NASA high-contrast flagship mission concepts, the latest of which is known as the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST). In this article, we calculate the optimal spectral resolution R = λ/δλ and minimum signal-to-noise ratio per spectral bin (SNR), two central design requirements for a high-contrast space mission, to detect signatures of water, oxygen, and chlorophyll on an Earth twin. We first develop a minimally parametric model and demonstrate its ability to fit synthetic and observed Earth spectra; this allows us to measure the statistical evidence for each component’s presence. We find that water is the easiest to detect, requiring a resolution R ≳ 20, while the optimal resolution for oxygen is likely to be closer to R = 150, somewhat higher than the canonical value in the literature. At these resolutions, detecting oxygen will require approximately two times the SNR as water. Chlorophyll requires approximately six times the SNR as oxygen for an Earth twin, only falling to oxygen-like levels of detectability for a low cloud cover and/or a large vegetation covering fraction. This suggests designing a mission for sensitivity to oxygen and adopting a multitiered observing strategy, first targeting water, then oxygen on the more favorable planets, and finally chlorophyll on only the most promising worlds. PMID:25197095

  7. Prospects for detecting oxygen, water, and chlorophyll on an exo-Earth.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Timothy D; Spiegel, David S

    2014-09-16

    The goal of finding and characterizing nearby Earth-like planets is driving many NASA high-contrast flagship mission concepts, the latest of which is known as the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST). In this article, we calculate the optimal spectral resolution R = λ/δλ and minimum signal-to-noise ratio per spectral bin (SNR), two central design requirements for a high-contrast space mission, to detect signatures of water, oxygen, and chlorophyll on an Earth twin. We first develop a minimally parametric model and demonstrate its ability to fit synthetic and observed Earth spectra; this allows us to measure the statistical evidence for each component's presence. We find that water is the easiest to detect, requiring a resolution R ≳ 20, while the optimal resolution for oxygen is likely to be closer to R = 150, somewhat higher than the canonical value in the literature. At these resolutions, detecting oxygen will require approximately two times the SNR as water. Chlorophyll requires approximately six times the SNR as oxygen for an Earth twin, only falling to oxygen-like levels of detectability for a low cloud cover and/or a large vegetation covering fraction. This suggests designing a mission for sensitivity to oxygen and adopting a multitiered observing strategy, first targeting water, then oxygen on the more favorable planets, and finally chlorophyll on only the most promising worlds.

  8. Analysis of the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of beverage waters without prior water extraction using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chesson, Lesley A; Bowen, Gabriel J; Ehleringer, James R

    2010-11-15

    Hydrogen (δ(2)H) and oxygen (δ(18)O) stable isotope analysis is useful when tracing the origin of water in beverages, but traditional analytical techniques are limited to pure or extracted waters. We measured the isotopic composition of extracted beverage water using both isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS; specifically, wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We also analyzed beer, sodas, juices, and milk 'as is' using IRIS. For IRIS analysis, four sequential injections of each sample were measured and data were corrected for sample-to-sample memory using injections (a) 1-4, (b) 2-4, and (c) 3-4. The variation between δ(2)H and δ(18)O values calculated using the three correction methods was larger for unextracted (i.e., complex) beverages than for waters. The memory correction was smallest when using injections 3-4. Beverage water δ(2)H and δ(18)O values generally fit the Global Meteoric Water Line, with the exception of water from fruit juices. The beverage water stable isotope ratios measured using IRIS agreed well with the IRMS data and fit 1:1 lines, with the exception of sodas and juices (δ(2)H values) and beers (δ(18)O values). The δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of waters extracted from beer, soda, juice, and milk were correlated with complex beverage δ(2)H and δ(18)O values (r = 0.998 and 0.997, respectively) and generally fit 1:1 lines. We conclude that it is possible to analyze complex beverages, without water extraction, using IRIS although caution is needed when analyzing beverages containing sugars, which can clog the syringe and increase memory, or alcohol, a known spectral interference. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Apollo 11 ilmenite revisited. [lunar resources of oxygen and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, E. N.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the problems associated with beneficiation of the high-Ti regolith represented by Apollo 11's ilmenite sample. Magnetic and electrostatic separation, combined with sizing to reject all but the best fractions of the lunar regolith, will be essential; the production of high-grade ilmenite concentrates on the scale required for lunar oxygen production may still, however, be unachievable. These findings suggest that ilmenite production directly from high-Ti-content basalt may be a superior alternative.

  10. Interplay between oxygen demand reactions and kinetic gas-water transfer in porous media.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Sascha E; Griepentrog, Marco; Schirmer, Mario; Balcke, Gerd U

    2008-08-01

    Gas-water phase transfer associated with the dissolution of trapped gas in porous media is a key process that occurs during pulsed gas sparging operations in contaminated aquifers. Recently, we applied a numerical model that was experimentally validated for abiotic situations, where multi-species kinetic inter-phase mass transfer and dissolved gas transport occurred during pulsed gas penetration-dissolution events [Balcke, G.U., Meenken, S., Hoefer, C. and Oswald, S.E., 2007. Kinetic gas-water transfer and gas accumulation in porous media during pulsed oxygen sparging. Environmental Science & Technology 41(12), 4428-4434]. Here we extend the model by using a reactive term to describe dissolved oxygen demand reactions via the formation of a reaction product, and to study the effects of such an aerobic degradation process on gas-water mass transfer and dissolution of trapped gas in porous media. As a surrogate for microbial oxygen reduction, first-order oxygen demand reactions were based on the measured oxidation of alkaline pyrogallol in column experiments. This reaction allows for adjusting the rate to values close to expected biodegradation rates and detection of the reaction product. The experiments and model consistently demonstrated accelerated oxygen gas-water mass transfer with increasing oxygen demand rates associated with an influence on the partitioning of other gases. Thus, as the oxygen demand accelerates, less gas phase residues, consisting mainly of nitrogen, are observed, which is in general beneficial to the performance of field biosparging operations. Model results additionally predict how oxygen demand influences oxygen mass transfer for a range of biodegradation rates. A typical field case scenario was simulated to illustrate the observed coupling of oxygen consumption and gas bubble dissolution. The model provides a tool to improve understanding of trapped gas behavior in porous media and contributes to a model-assisted biosparging.

  11. Pulsating potentiometric titration technique for assay of dissolved oxygen in water at trace level.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, P; Ananthanarayanan, R; Malathi, N; Rajiniganth, M P; Murali, N; Swaminathan, P

    2010-06-11

    A simple but high performance potentiometric titration technique using pulsating sensors has been developed for assay of dissolved oxygen (DO) in water samples down to 10.0 microg L(-1) levels. The technique involves Winkler titration chemistry, commonly used for determination of dissolved oxygen in water at mg L(-1) levels, with modification in methodology for accurate detection of end point even at 10.0 microg L(-1) levels DO present in the sample. An indigenously built sampling cum pretreatment vessel has been deployed for collection and chemical fixing of dissolved oxygen in water samples from flowing water line without exposure to air. A potentiometric titration facility using pulsating sensors developed in-house is used to carry out titration. The power of the titration technique has been realised in estimation of very dilute solution of iodine equivalent to 10 microg L(-1) O(2). Finally, several water samples containing dissolved oxygen from mg L(-1) to microg L(-1) levels were successfully analysed with excellent reproducibility using this new technique. The precision in measurement of DO in water at 10 microg L(-1) O(2) level is 0.14 (n=5), RSD: 1.4%. Probably for the first time a potentiometric titration technique has been successfully deployed for assay of dissolved oxygen in water samples at 10 microg L(-1) levels. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing the Effects of Water Rights Purchases on Dissolved Oxygen, Stream Temperatures, and Fish Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzon, N. R.; Null, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Human impacts from land and water development have degraded water quality and altered the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of Nevada's Walker River. Reduced instream flows and increased nutrient concentrations affect native fish populations through warm daily stream temperatures and low nightly dissolved oxygen concentrations. Water rights purchases are being considered to maintain instream flows, improve water quality, and enhance habitat for native fish species, such as Lahontan cutthroat trout. This study uses the River Modeling System (RMSv4), an hourly, physically-based hydrodynamic and water quality model, to estimate streamflows, temperatures, and dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Walker River. We simulate thermal and dissolved oxygen changes from increased streamflow to prioritize the time periods and locations that water purchases most enhance native trout habitat. Stream temperatures and dissolved oxygen concentrations are proxies for trout habitat. Monitoring results indicate stream temperature and dissolved oxygen limitations generally exist in the 115 kilometers upstream of Walker Lake (about 37% of the study area) from approximately May through September, and this reach currently acts as a water quality barrier for fish passage.

  13. Dinitrogen Fixation Within and Adjacent to Oxygen Deficient Waters of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widner, B.; Mulholland, M. R.; Bernhardt, P. W.; Chang, B. X.; Jayakumar, A.

    2016-02-01

    Recent work suggests that planktonic diazotrophs are geographically more widely distributed than previously thought including relatively warm (14-23oC) aphotic oxygenated pelagic waters and in aphotic waters within oxygen deficient zones. Because the volume of aphotic water in the ocean is large and may increase in the future, if dinitrogen (N2) fixation is widely occurring at sub-euphotic depths, this could result in a dramatic upward revision of global nitrogen (N) inputs via this process. N2 fixation rates were measured during a cruise in the Eastern Tropical South Pacific using stable isotope tracer techniques that account for slow gas dissolution. Results are compared with light, nutrient, and oxygen gradients (and necessarily temperature gradients). In addition, rates of N2 fixation made in vertical profiles within and above oxygen deficient waters are compared with those measured in vertical profiles adjacent to oxygen deficient waters. Results suggest that while rates of N2 fixation were measurable in deeper anoxic waters, volumetric N2 fixation rates were higher in surface waters.

  14. Prediction of pure water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in nickel base alloys using crack growth rate models

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Krasodomski, H.T.; Lewis, N.; Makar, G.L.

    1995-02-22

    The Ford/Andresen slip dissolution SCC model, originally developed for stainless steel components in BWR environments, has been applied to Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 tested in deaerated pure water chemistry. A method is described whereby the crack growth rates measured in compact tension specimens can be used to estimate crack growth in a component. Good agreement was found between model prediction and measured SCC in X-750 threaded fasteners over a wide range of temperatures, stresses, and material condition. Most data support the basic assumption of this model that cracks initiate early in life. The evidence supporting a particular SCC mechanism is mixed. Electrochemical repassivation data and estimates of oxide fracture strain indicate that the slip dissolution model can account for the observed crack growth rates, provided primary rather than secondary creep rates are used. However, approximately 100 cross-sectional TEM foils of SCC cracks including crack tips reveal no evidence of enhanced plasticity or unique dislocation patterns at the crack tip or along the crack to support a classic slip dissolution mechanism. No voids, hydrides, or microcracks are found in the vicinity of the crack tips creating doubt about classic hydrogen related mechanisms. The bulk oxide films exhibit a surface oxide which is often different than the oxides found within a crack. Although bulk chromium concentration affects the rate of SCC, analytical data indicates the mechanism does not result from chromium depletion at the grain boundaries. The overall findings support a corrosion/dissolution mechanism but not one necessarily related to slip at the crack tip.

  15. Limited variability in upper thermal tolerance among pure and hybrid populations of a cold-water fish

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Zachery R. R.; McDonnell, Laura H.; Chapman, Lauren J.; Fraser, Dylan J.

    2016-01-01

    As climate warming threatens the persistence of many species and populations, it is important to forecast their responses to warming thermal regimes. Climate warming often traps populations in smaller habitat fragments, not only changing biotic parameters, but potentially decreasing adaptive potential by decreasing genetic variability. We examined the ability of six genetically distinct and different-sized populations of a cold-water fish (brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis) to tolerate acute thermal warming and whether this tolerance could be altered by hybridizing populations. Critical thermal maximum (CTmax) assays were conducted on juveniles from each population to assess thermal tolerance, and the agitation temperature was recorded for assessing behavioural changes to elevated temperatures. An additional metric, which we have called the ‘CTmax–agitation window’ (CTmax minus agitation temperature), was also assessed. The CTmax differed between five out of 15 population pairs, although the maximal CTmax difference was only 0.68°C (29.11–29.79°C). Hybridization between one large population and two small populations yielded no obvious heterosis in mean CTmax, and no differences in agitation temperature or CTmax–agitation window were detected among pure populations or hybrids. Summer variation in temperature within each stream was negatively correlated with mean CTmax and mean CTmax–agitation window, although the maximal difference was small. Despite being one of the most phenotypically divergent and plastic north temperate freshwater fishes, our results suggest that limited variability exists in CTmax among populations of brook trout, regardless of their population size, standing genetic variation and differing natural thermal regimes (temperature variation, minimum and maximum). This study highlights the level to which thermal tolerance is conserved between isolated populations of a vertebrate species, in the face of climate warming. PMID:27990291

  16. Treatment of iron(II)-rich acid mine water with limestone and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Mohajane, G B; Maree, J P; Panichev, N

    2014-01-01

    The main components of acid mine water are free acid, sulphate, and Fe²⁺. Limestone is the most cost-effective alkali that can be used for neutralization. The purpose of this investigation was to identify conditions where Fe²⁺ is removed with limestone and simultaneously oxidized with oxygen to Fe³⁺, in a polyvinyl chloride pipe under pressure. Gypsum scaling is prevented by passing rubber balls through the pipe of the so-called Oxygen-Pipe-Neutralization (OPeN) process pilot plant. Two synthetic waters were treated: (A) acid mine water containing 123 mg L⁻¹ Fe²⁺ representing gold mine water, and (B) acid mine water containing 6,032 mg L⁻¹ Fe²⁺ representing coal mine water. Batch studies were carried out in a pipe reactor and showed that the rate of Fe²⁺ oxidation depended on the Fe²⁺ concentration, oxygen pressure, amount of recycled sludge, limestone dosage and the mixing rate. Continuous studies in an OPeN process pilot plant resulted in 100% removal of total acidity from synthetic coal mine water and a 98% removal from synthetic gold mine water. Fe²⁺ was removed completely as precipitated Fe(OH)₃ from both synthetic coal and gold mine water at around pH 7 at 200 and 100 kPa oxygen pressure, respectively.

  17. Oxygen-17 hyperfine structures in the pure rotational spectra of SrO, SnO, BaO, HfO and ThO.

    PubMed

    Dewberry, Christopher T; Etchison, Kerry C; Grubbs Ii, Garry S; Powoski, Robert A; Serafin, Michal M; Peebles, Sean A; Cooke, Stephen A

    2007-11-28

    Hyperfine structures arising from the couplings of the nuclear spin angular momentum of (17)O (I = 5/2) with the end over end rotation of several metal-containing diatomic monoxides have been observed using a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The molecules have been produced by reacting (17)O(2) with laser ablated metal atoms. The oxygen-17 nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been determined for the title molecules and are interpreted in terms of a simple Townes-Dailey model. Also, the oxygen-17 nuclear spin-rotation constants have been determined and used to calculate the oxygen-17 shieldings for each molecule.

  18. Oxygen isotope biogeochemistry of pore water sulfate in the deep biosphere: Dominance of isotope exchange reactions with ambient water during microbial sulfate reduction (ODP Site 1130)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortmann, Ulrich G.; Chernyavsky, Boris; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Brunner, Benjamin; Böttcher, Michael E.; Swart, Peter K.

    2007-09-01

    Microbially mediated sulfate reduction affects the isotopic composition of dissolved and solid sulfur species in marine sediments. Experiments and field data show that the δ18O composition is also modified in the presence of sulfate-reducing microorganisms. This has been attributed either to a kinetic isotope effect during the reduction of sulfate to sulfite, cell-internal exchange reactions between enzymatically-activated sulfate (APS), and/or sulfite with cytoplasmic water. The isotopic fingerprint of these processes may be further modified by the cell-external reoxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur, and the subsequent disproportionation to sulfide and sulfate or by the oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. Here we report δ18O values from interstitial water samples of ODP Leg 182 (Site 1130) and provide the mathematical framework to describe the oxygen isotope fractionation of sulfate during microbial sulfate reduction. We show that a purely kinetic model is unable to explain our δ18O data, and that the data are well explained by a model using oxygen isotope exchange reactions. We propose that the oxygen isotope exchange occurs between APS and cytoplasmic water, and/or between sulfite and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) during APS formation. Model calculations show that cell external reoxidation of reduced sulfur species would require up to 3000 mol/m 3 of an oxidant at ODP Site 1130, which is incompatible with the sediment geochemical data. In addition, we show that the volumetric fluxes required to explain the observed δ18O data are on average 14 times higher than the volumetric sulfate reduction rates (SRR) obtained from inverse modeling of the porewater data. The ratio between the gross sulfate flux into the microbes and the net sulfate flux through the microbes is depth invariant, and independent of sulfide concentrations. This suggests that both fluxes are controlled by cell density and that cell-specific sulfate reduction rates remain constant with depth.

  19. High performance robust F-doped tin oxide based oxygen evolution electro-catalysts for PEM based water electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Moni Kanchan; Kadakia, Karan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I; Jampani, Prashanth H; Chung, Sung Jae; Poston, James A; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Kumta, Prashant N

    2013-01-01

    Identification and development of non-noble metal based electro-catalysts or electro-catalysts comprising compositions with significantly reduced amounts of expensive noble metal contents (e.g. IrO{sub 2}, Pt) with comparable electrochemical performance to the standard noble metal/metal oxide for proton exchange membrane (PEM) based water electrolysis would signify a major breakthrough in hydrogen generation via water electrolysis. Development of such systems would lead to two primary outcomes: first, a reduction in the overall capital costs of PEM based water electrolyzers, and second, attainment of the targeted hydrogen production costs (<$3.00/gge delivered by 2015) comparable to conventional liquid fuels. In line with these goals, by exploiting a two-pronged theoretical first principles and experimental approach herein, we demonstrate for the very first time a solid solution of SnO{sub 2}:10 wt% F containing only 20 at.% IrO{sub 2} [e.g. (Sn{sub 0.80}Ir{sub 0.20})O{sub 2}:10F] displaying remarkably similar electrochemical activity and comparable or even much improved electrochemical durability compared to pure IrO{sub 2}, the accepted gold standard in oxygen evolution electro-catalysts for PEM based water electrolysis. We present the results of these studies.

  20. Hydrogen and oxygen from water. V - The ROC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noring, J. E.; Diver, R. B.; Fletcher, E. A.

    1981-02-01

    A thermodynamic analysis of a two-membrane reactor-separator system is presented. The system can be made to operate at a reduced oxygen concentration (ROC) in the reactor-separator, thus greatly increasing the number and kinds of materials that may be considered candidates for separation membranes. The range of operation, thermal efficiencies and operating characteristics of an idealized model are presented. Candidate materials for hydrogen passing membranes are discussed. The unique characteristics of the ROC system make materials which might ordinarily be considered unsuitable in a reactor-separator environment worthy of experimental investigation.

  1. Ammonium and nitrite oxidation at nanomolar oxygen concentrations in oxygen minimum zone waters

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Laura A.; Dalsgaard, Tage; Tiano, Laura; Mills, Daniel B.; Bertagnolli, Anthony D.; Wright, Jody J.; Hallam, Steven J.; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E.; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Thamdrup, Bo

    2016-01-01

    A major percentage of fixed nitrogen (N) loss in the oceans occurs within nitrite-rich oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) via denitrification and anammox. It remains unclear to what extent ammonium and nitrite oxidation co-occur, either supplying or competing for substrates involved in nitrogen loss in the OMZ core. Assessment of the oxygen (O2) sensitivity of these processes down to the O2 concentrations present in the OMZ core (<10 nmol⋅L−1) is therefore essential for understanding and modeling nitrogen loss in OMZs. We determined rates of ammonium and nitrite oxidation in the seasonal OMZ off Concepcion, Chile at manipulated O2 levels between 5 nmol⋅L−1 and 20 μmol⋅L−1. Rates of both processes were detectable in the low nanomolar range (5–33 nmol⋅L−1 O2), but demonstrated a strong dependence on O2 concentrations with apparent half-saturation constants (Kms) of 333 ± 130 nmol⋅L−1 O2 for ammonium oxidation and 778 ± 168 nmol⋅L−1 O2 for nitrite oxidation assuming one-component Michaelis–Menten kinetics. Nitrite oxidation rates, however, were better described with a two-component Michaelis–Menten model, indicating a high-affinity component with a Km of just a few nanomolar. As the communities of ammonium and nitrite oxidizers were similar to other OMZs, these kinetics should apply across OMZ systems. The high O2 affinities imply that ammonium and nitrite oxidation can occur within the OMZ core whenever O2 is supplied, for example, by episodic intrusions. These processes therefore compete with anammox and denitrification for ammonium and nitrite, thereby exerting an important control over nitrogen loss. PMID:27601665

  2. Ammonium and nitrite oxidation at nanomolar oxygen concentrations in oxygen minimum zone waters.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Laura A; Dalsgaard, Tage; Tiano, Laura; Mills, Daniel B; Bertagnolli, Anthony D; Wright, Jody J; Hallam, Steven J; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Thamdrup, Bo

    2016-09-20

    A major percentage of fixed nitrogen (N) loss in the oceans occurs within nitrite-rich oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) via denitrification and anammox. It remains unclear to what extent ammonium and nitrite oxidation co-occur, either supplying or competing for substrates involved in nitrogen loss in the OMZ core. Assessment of the oxygen (O2) sensitivity of these processes down to the O2 concentrations present in the OMZ core (<10 nmol⋅L(-1)) is therefore essential for understanding and modeling nitrogen loss in OMZs. We determined rates of ammonium and nitrite oxidation in the seasonal OMZ off Concepcion, Chile at manipulated O2 levels between 5 nmol⋅L(-1) and 20 μmol⋅L(-1) Rates of both processes were detectable in the low nanomolar range (5-33 nmol⋅L(-1) O2), but demonstrated a strong dependence on O2 concentrations with apparent half-saturation constants (Kms) of 333 ± 130 nmol⋅L(-1) O2 for ammonium oxidation and 778 ± 168 nmol⋅L(-1) O2 for nitrite oxidation assuming one-component Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Nitrite oxidation rates, however, were better described with a two-component Michaelis-Menten model, indicating a high-affinity component with a Km of just a few nanomolar. As the communities of ammonium and nitrite oxidizers were similar to other OMZs, these kinetics should apply across OMZ systems. The high O2 affinities imply that ammonium and nitrite oxidation can occur within the OMZ core whenever O2 is supplied, for example, by episodic intrusions. These processes therefore compete with anammox and denitrification for ammonium and nitrite, thereby exerting an important control over nitrogen loss.

  3. Hydrogen and oxygen in brine shrimp chitin reflect environmental water and dietary isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Kristine E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2010-03-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of the common structural biopolymer chitin are a potential recorder of ecological and environmental information, but our understanding of the mechanisms of incorporation of H and O from environmental substrates into chitin is limited. We report the results of a set of experiments in which the isotopic compositions of environmental water and diet were varied independently in order to assess the contribution of these variables to the H and O isotopic composition of Artemia franciscana chitin. Hydrogen isotope ratios of chitin were strongly linearly correlated with both food and water, with approximately 26% of the hydrogen signal reflecting food and approximately 38% reflecting water. Oxygen isotopes were also strongly correlated with the isotopic composition of water and food, but whereas 69% of oxygen in chitin exchanged with environmental water, only 10% was derived from food. We propose that these observations reflect the position-specific, partial exchange of H and O atoms with brine shrimp body water during the processes of digestion and chitin biosynthesis. Comparison of culture experiments with a set of natural samples collected from the Great Salt Lake, UT in 2006 shows that, with some exceptions, oxygen isotope compositions of chitin track those of water, whereas hydrogen isotopes vary inversely with those of lake water. The different behavior of the two isotopic systems can be explained in terms of a dietary shift from allochthonous particulate matter with relatively higher δ 2H values in the early spring to autochthonous particulate matter with significantly lower δ 2H values in the late summer to autumn. These results suggest oxygen in chitin may be a valuable proxy for the oxygen isotopic composition of environmental water, whereas hydrogen isotope values from the same molecule may reveal ecological and biogeochemical changes within lakes.

  4. Dynamics of Proton Transfer to Internal Water during the Photosynthetic Oxygen-Evolving Cycle.

    PubMed

    Brahmachari, Udita; Barry, Bridgette A

    2016-11-10

    In photosynthesis, the light-driven oxidation of water is a sustainable process, which converts solar to chemical energy and produces protons and oxygen. To enable biomimetic strategies, the mechanism of photosynthetic oxygen evolution must be elucidated. Here, we provide information concerning a critical step in the oxygen-evolving, or S-state, cycle. During this S3-to-S0 transition, oxygen is produced, and substrate water binds to the manganese-calcium catalytic site. Our spectroscopic and H2(18)O labeling experiments show that this S3-to-S0 step is associated with the protonation of an internal water cluster in a hydrogen-bonding network, which contains calcium. When compared to the protonated water cluster, formed during a preceding step, the S1-to-S2 transition, the S3-to-S0 hydronium ion is likely to be coordinated by additional water molecules. This evidence shows that internal water and the hydrogen bonding network act as a transient proton acceptor at multiple points in the oxygen-evolving cycle.

  5. Industrial application of green chromatography--I. Separation and analysis of niacinamide in skincare creams using pure water as the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Strickland, Zackary; Kapalavavi, Brahmam; Marple, Ronita; Gamsky, Chris

    2011-03-15

    In this work, chromatographic separation of niacin and niacinamide using pure water as the sole component in the mobile phase has been investigated. The separation and analysis of niacinamide have been optimized using three columns at different temperatures and various flow rates. Our results clearly demonstrate that separation and analysis of niacinamide from skincare products can be achieved using pure water as the eluent at 60°C on a Waters XTerra MS C18 column, a Waters XBridge C18 column, or at 80°C on a Hamilton PRP-1 column. The separation efficiency, quantification quality, and analysis time of this new method are at least comparable with those of the traditional HPLC methods. Compared with traditional HPLC, the major advantage of this newly developed green chromatography technique is the elimination of organic solvents required in the HPLC mobile phase. In addition, the pure water chromatography separations described in this work can be directly applied in industrial plant settings without further modification of the existing HPLC equipment.

  6. Dissolved oxygen, stream temperature, and fish habitat response to environmental water purchases.

    PubMed

    Null, Sarah E; Mouzon, Nathaniel R; Elmore, Logan R

    2017-07-15

    Environmental water purchases are increasingly used for ecological protection. In Nevada's Walker Basin (western USA), environmental water purchases augment streamflow in the Walker River and increase lake elevation of terminal Walker Lake. However, water quality impairments like elevated stream temperatures and low dissolved oxygen concentrations also limit ecosystems and species, including federally-threatened Lahontan cutthroat trout. In this paper, we prioritize water volumes and locations that most enhance water quality for riverine habitat from potential environmental water rights purchases. We monitored and modeled streamflows, stream temperatures, and dissolved oxygen concentrations using River Modeling System, an hourly, physically-based hydrodynamic and water quality model. Modeled environmental water purchases ranged from average daily increases of 0.11-1.41 cubic meters per second (m(3)/s) during 2014 and 2015, two critically dry years. Results suggest that water purchases consistently cooled maximum daily stream temperatures and warmed nightly minimum temperatures. This prevented extremely low dissolved oxygen concentrations below 5.0 mg/L, but increased the duration of moderate conditions between 5.5 and 6.0 mg/L. Small water purchases less than approximately 0.71 m(3)/s per day had little benefit for Walker River habitat. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were affected by upstream environmental conditions, where suitable upstream water quality improved downstream conditions and vice versa. Overall, this study showed that critically dry water years degrade environmental water quality and habitat, but environmental water purchases of at least 0.71 m(3)/s were promising for river restoration. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Monitoring Dissolved Oxygen in New Jersey Coastal Waters Using Autonomous Gliders

    EPA Science Inventory

    The coastal ocean is a highly variable system with processes that have significant implications on the hydrographic and oxygen characteristics of the water column. The spatial and temporal variability of these fields can cause dramatic changes to water quality and in turn the h...

  8. Spatial and Temporal Monitoring of Dissolved Oxygen in NJ Coastal Waters using AUVs (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The coastal ocean is a highly variable system with processes that have significant implications on the hydrographic and oxygen characteristics of the water column. The spatial and temporal variability of these fields can cause dramatic changes to water quality and in turn the h...

  9. Water-soluble fullerene materials for bioapplications: photoinduced reactive oxygen species generation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The photoinduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation from several water-soluble fullerenes was examined. Macromolecular or small molecular water-soluble fullerene complexes/derivatives were prepared and their 1O2 and O2•- generation abilities were evaluated by EPR spin-trapping methods. As a r...

  10. Monitoring Dissolved Oxygen in New Jersey Coastal Waters Using Autonomous Gliders

    EPA Science Inventory

    The coastal ocean is a highly variable system with processes that have significant implications on the hydrographic and oxygen characteristics of the water column. The spatial and temporal variability of these fields can cause dramatic changes to water quality and in turn the h...

  11. Spatial and Temporal Monitoring of Dissolved Oxygen in NJ Coastal Waters using AUVs (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The coastal ocean is a highly variable system with processes that have significant implications on the hydrographic and oxygen characteristics of the water column. The spatial and temporal variability of these fields can cause dramatic changes to water quality and in turn the h...

  12. Spatial and Temporal Monitoring of Dissolved Oxygen (DO) in New Jersey Coastal Waters Using Autonomous Gliders

    EPA Science Inventory

    The coastal ocean is a highly variable system with processes that have significant implications on the hydrographic and oxygen characteristics of the water column. The spatial and temporal variability of these fields can cause dramatic changes to water quality and in turn the h...

  13. Influence of Molecular Oxygen on Ortho-Para Conversion of Water Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiev, R. R.; Minaev, B. F.

    2017-07-01

    The mechanism of influence of molecular oxygen on the probability of ortho-para conversion of water molecules and its relation to water magnetization are considered within the framework of the concept of paramagnetic spin catalysis. Matrix elements of the hyperfine ortho-para interaction via the Fermi contact mechanism are calculated, as well as the Maliken spin densities on water protons in H2O and O2 collisional complexes. The mechanism of penetration of the electron spin density into the water molecule due to partial spin transfer from paramagnetic oxygen is considered. The probability of ortho-para conversion of the water molecules is estimated by the quantum chemistry methods. The results obtained show that effective ortho-para conversion of the water molecules is possible during the existence of water-oxygen dimers. An external magnetic field affects the ortho-para conversion rate given that the wave functions of nuclear spin sublevels of the water protons are mixed in the complex with oxygen.

  14. Spatial and Temporal Monitoring of Dissolved Oxygen (DO) in New Jersey Coastal Waters Using Autonomous Gliders

    EPA Science Inventory

    The coastal ocean is a highly variable system with processes that have significant implications on the hydrographic and oxygen characteristics of the water column. The spatial and temporal variability of these fields can cause dramatic changes to water quality and in turn the h...

  15. Oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in broiler chicks and increases survivability against Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Nam, Kyoung-Woo; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2012-03-01

    It has been suggested that drinking oxygenated water may improve oxygen availability, which may increase vitality and improving immune activity. The present study evaluated the immune enhancing effects of oxygenated drinking water in broiler chicks and demonstrated the protective efficacy of oxygenated drinking water against Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks. Continuous drinking of oxygenated water markedly increased serum lysozyme activity, peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and the CD4(+)/CD8(+) splenocyte ratio in broiler chicks. In the chicks experimentally infected with S. Gallinarum, oxygenated drinking water alleviated symptoms and increased survival. These findings suggest that oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in broiler chicks, and increases survivability against S. Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks.

  16. Performance characteristics of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser without a water vapor trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Toshio; Tsuruyama, Toru; Uchiyama, Taro

    1988-09-01

    The effect of water vapor on the operation of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser without a water vapor trap is described. The maximum CW laser power of 87 W was obtained without the water vapor trap at a Cl2 flow rate of 740 mmol/min. An alkaline H2O2 solution (90 wt pct H2O2, 50 wt pct KOH) was cooled down to about -30 C in order to control the saturated H2O2-H2O vapor pressure to less than 100 mTorr. Two porous pipes made of carbon were utilized as a singlet oxygen generator.

  17. Bacterial Activity and Organic Matter Turnover in Oxygen Deficient Waters of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piontek, J.; Massmig, M.; Endres, S.; Le Moigne, F. A. C.; Bange, H. W.; Engel, A.

    2016-02-01

    The Baltic Sea is an enclosed marine system that suffers from expanding zones of oxygen deficiency due to limited ventilation by the episodic inflow of oxygenated North Sea water combined with high anthropogenic nutrient loads. In particular coastal areas are strongly influenced by eutrophication that leads to enhanced microbial oxygen consumption and sporadic anoxia even at shallow sites. It has been shown that oxygen availability is a powerful determinant of the taxonomic composition of prokaryotic communities in deep waters of the Baltic Sea. However, it remains unclear if community changes in response to low oxygen impact carbon remineralization or if functional redundancy prevents effects on major biogeochemical processes driven by bacterial activity. Our study includes monthly samplings at a coastal time series station over three annual cycles with recurring anoxic periods in late summer. Furthermore, sampling was accomplished in the deep Gotland Basin, where a permanent pycnocline prevents vertical mixing. We determined rates of extracellular glucosidase, aminopeptidase and phosphatase, as well as bacterial protein production using fluorescent and radioactive labelled substrate analogues, respectively. The rate measurements were combined with the analysis of organic matter concentration and composition by different analytical tools. Field data and experimental work show that enzymatic polymer hydrolysis, bacterial biomass production and growth rates in oxygen deficient waters of the Baltic Sea are not inherently lower than in oxic waters. Instead, results reveal that the reactivity of organic carbon and the availability of inorganic nutrients are more powerful constraints on organic matter turnover in oxygen deficient zones of the Baltic Sea. Our results imply that oxygen availability alone is not the decisive factor for heterotrophic bacterial activity in deep waters, instead it is part of a multiple environmental control of carbon remineralization.

  18. Novel water-resistant UV-activated oxygen indicator for intelligent food packaging.

    PubMed

    Vu, Chau Hai Thai; Won, Keehoon

    2013-09-01

    For the first time, alginate polymer has been applied to prevent dyes from leaching out of colorimetric oxygen indicator films, which enable people to notice the presence of oxygen in the package in an economic and simple manner. The dye-based oxygen indicator film suffers from dye leaching upon contact with water. In this work, UV-activated visual oxygen indicator films were fabricated using thionine, glycerol, P25 TiO2, and zein as a redox dye, a sacrificial electron donor, UV-absorbing semiconducting photocatalyst, and an encapsulation polymer, respectively. When this zein-coated film was immersed in water for 24h, the dye leakage was as high as 80.80±0.45%. However, introduction of alginate (1.25%) as the coating polymer considerably diminished the dye leaching to only 5.80±0.06%. This is because the ion-binding ability of alginate could prevent the cation dye from leaching into water. This novel water-resistant UV-activated oxygen indicator was also successfully photo-bleached and regained colour fast in the presence of oxygen.

  19. Behavior of sulfate reducing bacteria under oligotrophic conditions and oxygen stress in particle-free systems related to drinking water.

    PubMed

    Bade; Manz; Szewzyk

    2000-06-01

    The response of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) to oxygen stress under oligotrophic conditions in particle-free systems was studied in (i) sterile Berlin drinking water; (ii) mineral medium; and (iii) in coculture experiments with aerobic bacteria. Using a polyphasic approach including anaerobic cultivation, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital image analysis, the behavior of the strains zt3l and zt10e, isolated from Berlin groundwater and affiliated to the family Desulfovibrionaceae, was compared to the type strains Desulfomicrobium baculatum and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. Anaerobic deep agar dilution series were performed for the determination of cell culturability. FISH and subsequent digital image analysis of probe-conferred fluorescence intensities were used for the assessment of metabolic activity. For the in situ identification of both isolates in coculture tests, two strain-specific oligonucleotides were developed and evaluated. The total cell counts of stressed SRB in drinking water decreased during the course of the assay dependent on the strain. Both environmental isolates could be cultured for a longer period than cells of D. baculatum and D. desulfuricans, respectively. The FISH intensities showed a strain-specific behavior. When exposed to simultaneous oxygen stress and carbon limitation in mineral medium, total cell counts of all four strains remained constant throughout a period of 72 days. The rate of culturability differed between the investigated strains. The decrease of metabolic activity as assessed by FISH was a strain-specific property. Exposure of SRB to oxygen stress and carbon starvation in coculture experiments with Aquabacterium commune resulted in strain dependent prolonged culturability and a delayed decrease of the metabolic activity compared to pure culture tests for all strains tested. Total cell counts of SRB were constant throughout the whole experiment.

  20. Oxygen and air nanobubble water solution promote the growth of plants, fishes, and mice.

    PubMed

    Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Hirao, Makoto; Hashimoto, Jun; Kawato, Yoshitaka; Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Morimoto, Tokimitsu; Koizumi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Nanobubbles (<200 nm in diameter) have several unique properties such as long lifetime in liquid owing to its negatively charged surface, and its high gas solubility into the liquid owing to its high internal pressure. They are used in variety of fields including diagnostic aids and drug delivery, while there are no reports assessing their effects on the growth of lives. Nanobubbles of air or oxygen gas were generated using a nanobubble aerator (BUVITAS; Ligaric Company Limited, Osaka, Japan). Brassica campestris were cultured hydroponically for 4 weeks within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Sweetfish (for 3 weeks) and rainbow trout (for 6 weeks) were kept either within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Finally, 5 week-old male DBA1/J mice were bred with normal free-chaw and free-drinking either of oxygen-nanobubble water or of normal water for 12 weeks. Oxygen-nanobubble significantly increased the dissolved oxygen concentration of water as well as concentration/size of nanobubbles which were relatively stable for 70 days. Air-nanobubble water significantly promoted the height (19.1 vs. 16.7 cm; P<0.05), length of leaves (24.4 vs. 22.4 cm; P<0.01), and aerial fresh weight (27.3 vs. 20.3 g; P<0.01) of Brassica campestris compared to normal water. Total weight of sweetfish increased from 3.0 to 6.4 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 3.0 to 10.2 kg in air-nanobubble water. In addition, total weight of rainbow trout increased from 50.0 to 129.5 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 50.0 to 148.0 kg in air-nanobubble water. Free oral intake of oxygen-nanobubble water significantly promoted the weight (23.5 vs. 21.8 g; P<0.01) and the length (17.0 vs. 16.1 cm; P<0.001) of mice compared to that of normal water. We have demonstrated for the first time that oxygen and air-nanobubble water may be potentially effective tools for the growth of lives.

  1. Oxygen and Air Nanobubble Water Solution Promote the Growth of Plants, Fishes, and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ebina, Kosuke; Shi, Kenrin; Hirao, Makoto; Hashimoto, Jun; Kawato, Yoshitaka; Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Morimoto, Tokimitsu; Koizumi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Nanobubbles (<200 nm in diameter) have several unique properties such as long lifetime in liquid owing to its negatively charged surface, and its high gas solubility into the liquid owing to its high internal pressure. They are used in variety of fields including diagnostic aids and drug delivery, while there are no reports assessing their effects on the growth of lives. Nanobubbles of air or oxygen gas were generated using a nanobubble aerator (BUVITAS; Ligaric Company Limited, Osaka, Japan). Brassica campestris were cultured hydroponically for 4 weeks within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Sweetfish (for 3 weeks) and rainbow trout (for 6 weeks) were kept either within air-nanobubble water or within normal water. Finally, 5 week-old male DBA1/J mice were bred with normal free-chaw and free-drinking either of oxygen-nanobubble water or of normal water for 12 weeks. Oxygen-nanobubble significantly increased the dissolved oxygen concentration of water as well as concentration/size of nanobubbles which were relatively stable for 70 days. Air-nanobubble water significantly promoted the height (19.1 vs. 16.7 cm; P<0.05), length of leaves (24.4 vs. 22.4 cm; P<0.01), and aerial fresh weight (27.3 vs. 20.3 g; P<0.01) of Brassica campestris compared to normal water. Total weight of sweetfish increased from 3.0 to 6.4 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 3.0 to 10.2 kg in air-nanobubble water. In addition, total weight of rainbow trout increased from 50.0 to 129.5 kg in normal water, whereas it increased from 50.0 to 148.0 kg in air-nanobubble water. Free oral intake of oxygen-nanobubble water significantly promoted the weight (23.5 vs. 21.8 g; P<0.01) and the length (17.0 vs. 16.1 cm; P<0.001) of mice compared to that of normal water. We have demonstrated for the first time that oxygen and air-nanobubble water may be potentially effective tools for the growth of lives. PMID:23755221

  2. In-situ measurement of photosynthetic oxygen production in the water column.

    PubMed

    Häder, D P; Schäfer, J

    1994-09-01

    A novel hardware device is described to determine photosynthetic and respiratory oxygen uptake and release, respectively, in organisms in their natural habitat even under the rough conditions of their marine environment. Both macroalgae and phytoplankton can be utilized and oxygen exchange can be determined in solar radiation. The chamber can be used at or above the water surface or can be lowered into the water column. The data of oxygen concentration, irradiance and temperature are constantly monitored by a laptop computer and stored in disk files. The experimental data measured in some macroalgae as well as in phytoplankton indicate that the irradiance window for positive net photosynthetic oxygen production is fairly limited under natural conditions; at too low irradiances respiration exceeds photosynthesis and at too high irradiances photosynthesis is shut down by photoinhibition, at least in species not adapted to unattenuated solar radiation.

  3. Oxygen removal from water versus arterial oxygen delivery: calibrating the Fick equation in Pacific salmon.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Anthony P; Eliason, Erika J; Clark, Timothy D; Steinhausen, Maria F

    2014-10-01

    While it is well known that O2 is directly removed from the water by skin and gill tissues of fish, the mismatch between O2 removal from water (O2 uptake; [Formula: see text]) and the O2 delivered to tissues by the primary circulation (O2 consumption; [Formula: see text]) has never been measured directly. Using data from four recent studies that simultaneously measured [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] in 2-5 kg Pacific salmon, our analysis revealed that sockeye salmon can remove an additional 12-48 % more O2 from the water than the primary circulation delivers to the systemic tissues. This percentage did not change significantly during swimming activity, a result that contradicts an earlier prediction that the difference should decrease when [Formula: see text] increases during exercise. In resting Chinook salmon, a similar percentage difference in simultaneously measured [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] was observed, yet the difference tended to disappear during acute heat stress to a near lethal temperature. These results emphasize that caution should be exercised when using the Fick equation to estimate cardiac output because the overestimate of cardiac output that results from using the Fick equation in Pacific salmon is not small, may not be fixed and may exist in other teleosts.

  4. Water may inhibit oxygen binding in hemoprotein models.

    PubMed

    Collman, James P; Decréau, Richard A; Dey, Abhishek; Yang, Ying

    2009-03-17

    Three distal imidazole pickets in a cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) model form a pocket hosting a cluster of water molecules. The cluster makes the ferrous heme low spin, and consequently the O(2) binding slow. The nature of the rigid proximal imidazole tail favors a high spin/low spin cross-over. The O(2) binding rate is enhanced either by removing the water, increasing the hydrophobicity of the gas binding pocket, or inserting a metal ion that coordinates to the 3 distal imidazole pickets.

  5. Feasibility Analysis of Liquefying Oxygen Generated from Water Electrolysis Units on Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Frank F.

    2009-01-01

    Concepts for liquefying oxygen (O2) generated from water electrolysis subsystems on the Lunar surface were explored. Concepts for O2 liquefaction units capable of generating 1.38 lb/hr (0.63 kg/hr) liquid oxygen (LOX) were developed. Heat and mass balance calculations for the liquefaction concepts were conducted. Stream properties, duties of radiators, heat exchangers and compressors for the selected concepts were calculated and compared.

  6. Toward enhanced hydrogen generation from water using oxygen permeating LCF membranes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Yu; Chang, Le; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Kirchen, Patrick; Ghoniem, Ahmed F

    2015-04-21

    Hydrogen production from water thermolysis can be enhanced by the use of perovskite-type mixed ionic and electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes, through which oxygen permeation is driven by a chemical potential gradient. In this work, water thermolysis experiments were performed using 0.9 mm thick La0.9Ca0.1FeO3-δ (LCF-91) perovskite membranes at 990 °C in a lab-scale button-cell reactor. We examined the effects of the operating conditions such as the gas species concentrations and flow rates on the feed and sweep sides on the water thermolysis rate and oxygen flux. A single step reaction mechanism is proposed for surface reactions, and three-resistance permeation models are derived. Results show that water thermolysis is facilitated by the LCF-91 membrane especially when a fuel is added to the sweep gas. Increasing the gas flow rate and water concentration on the feed side or the hydrogen concentration on the sweep side enhances the hydrogen production rate. In this work, hydrogen is used as the fuel by construction, so that a single-step surface reaction mechanism can be developed and water thermolysis rate parameters can be derived. Both surface reaction rate parameters for oxygen incorporation/dissociation and hydrogen-oxygen reactions are fitted at 990 °C. We compare the oxygen fluxes in water thermolysis and air separation experiments, and identify different limiting steps in the processes involving various oxygen sources and sweep gases for this 0.9 mm thick LCF-91 membrane. In the air feed-inert sweep case, the bulk diffusion and sweep side surface reaction are the two limiting steps. In the water feed-inert sweep case, surface reaction on the feed side dominates the oxygen permeation process. Yet in the water feed-fuel sweep case, surface reactions on both the feed and sweep sides are rate determining when hydrogen concentration in the sweep side is in the range of 1-5 vol%. Furthermore, long term studies show that the surface morphology changes and

  7. Oxygen isotope fractionation in ferric oxide-water systems: Low temperature synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiming; Koch, Paul L.

    1999-03-01

    The magnitude and temperature-sensitivity of oxygen isotope fractionation in ferric oxide-water systems remain uncertain. In this study, three different synthetic methods are used to investigate the temperature dependence of the fractionation between water and hematite, akaganeite, and goethite at near-surface temperatures. Our results reveal two similarities among these ferric oxide-water systems. First, the fractionation of oxygen isotopes between water and ferric oxide is small (i.e., ferric oxide-water fractionation factors [α] are very close to 1.000). Second, these α values are relatively insensitive to change in temperature ( T). Hematite-water has a slightly higher α value and a greater temperature sensitivity than goethite-water at surface temperatures. While the issue requires further study, we speculate that differences in the washing and drying protocols applied to final precipitates may be one of the factors that have contributed to the discrepancies among published α- T curves. Owing to the rapid exchange of oxygen among the various hydrolytic Fe(III) species and ambient water, oxygen isotope equilibrium is probably attained between water and the ferric oxide gels and poorly-ordered ferrihydrite that are the initial precipitates in nearly all natural settings. Aging experiments suggest that isotopic compositions carried by ferric oxide gels and ferrihydrite are almost entirely erased by later exchange with ambient water during the maturation processes leading to formation of either hematite or goethite. These results suggest that dissolution and reprecipitation occur in the supposedly "solid-state transformation" from ferrihydrite to hematite. Thus the δ 18O value of natural crystalline ferric oxides may provide a record of the long-term average δ 18O value of local surface water, rather than that of the water from which the solid ferric oxide first formed.

  8. Atomic scale behavior of oxygen-based radicals in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlackt, C. C. W.; Neyts, E. C.; Bogaerts, A.

    2017-03-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas in and in contact with liquids represent a growing field of research for various applications. Understanding the interactions between the plasma generated species and the liquid is crucial. In this work we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on a quantum mechanical method, i.e. density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB), to examine the interactions of OH radicals and O atoms in bulk water. Our calculations reveal that the transport of OH radicals through water is not only governed by diffusion, but also by an equilibrium reaction of H-abstraction with water molecules. Furthermore, when two OH radicals encounter each other, they either form a stable cluster, or react, resulting in the formation of a new water molecule and an O atom. In addition, the O atoms form either oxywater (when in singlet configuration) or they remain stable in solution (when in triplet configuration), stressing the important role that O atoms can play in aqueous solution, and in contact with biomolecules. Our observations are in line with both experimental and ab initio results from the literature.

  9. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  10. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake

    PubMed Central

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Frindte, Katharina; Dziallas, Claudia; Eckert, Werner; Tang, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing paradigm in aquatic science is that microbial methanogenesis happens primarily in anoxic environments. Here, we used multiple complementary approaches to show that microbial methane production could and did occur in the well-oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake (Lake Stechlin, Germany). Oversaturation of methane was repeatedly recorded in the well-oxygenated upper 10 m of the water column, and the methane maxima coincided with oxygen oversaturation at 6 m. Laboratory incubations of unamended epilimnetic lake water and inoculations of photoautotrophs with a lake-enrichment culture both led to methane production even in the presence of oxygen, and the production was not affected by the addition of inorganic phosphate or methylated compounds. Methane production was also detected by in-lake incubations of lake water, and the highest production rate was 1.8–2.4 nM⋅h−1 at 6 m, which could explain 33–44% of the observed ambient methane accumulation in the same month. Temporal and spatial uncoupling between methanogenesis and methanotrophy was supported by field and laboratory measurements, which also helped explain the oversaturation of methane in the upper water column. Potentially methanogenic Archaea were detected in situ in the oxygenated, methane-rich epilimnion, and their attachment to photoautotrophs might allow for anaerobic growth and direct transfer of substrates for methane production. Specific PCR on mRNA of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A gene revealed active methanogenesis. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water represents a hitherto overlooked source of methane and can be important for carbon cycling in the aquatic environments and water to air methane flux. PMID:22089233

  11. Oxygen-deficient metal oxide nanostructures for photoelectrochemical water oxidation and other applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gongming; Ling, Yichuan; Li, Yat

    2012-11-07

    This review presents highlights of the latest results of studies directed at developing oxygen-deficient metal oxides, including TiO(2), WO(3), and α-Fe(2)O(3), nanostructures as electrode materials, which show significantly enhanced performance in applications for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The enhanced photoelectrochemical performance is attributed to improved electrical conductivities by controlled incorporation of oxygen vacancies as shallow donors for metal oxides. We also discuss the potential of these oxygen-deficient metal oxides for other energy conversion and storage applications, such as photocatalytic reactions and charge storage.

  12. Effects of anaerobic selector hydraulic retention time on biological foam control and enhanced biological phosphorus removal in a pure-oxygen activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Jolis, Domènec; Mitch, Azalea A; Marneri, Matina; Ho, Chu-Fei

    2007-05-01

    Increased anaerobic selector hydraulic retention times (HRTs) in a high-purity oxygen activated sludge process resulted in an increase in soluble orthophosphate release and biodegradable chemical oxygen demand removal, confirming that enhanced biological phosphorus removal occurs at aeration solids retention times (SRTs) below 1.7 days. Under operating conditions that included biological foam trapping and recycling, an anaerobic selector with HRTs higher than 55 minutes resulted in a decrease in filament counts and effective foam control. Effective norcardioform control is achieved through the combination of metabolic selective pressure and increased soluble organic substrate removal in the anaerobic selector and low aeration SRT.

  13. Oxygen isotope anomaly observed in water vapor from Alert, Canada and the implication for the stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Clayton, Robert N; Huang, Lin; Nakamura, Noboru; Lyons, James R

    2013-09-24

    To identify the possible anomalous oxygen isotope signature in stratospheric water predicted by model studies, 25 water vapor samples were collected in 2003-2005 at Alert station, Canada (82°30'N), where there is downward transport of stratospheric air to the polar troposphere, and were analyzed for δ(17)O and δ(18)O relative to Chicago local precipitation (CLP). The latter was chosen as a reference because the relatively large evaporative moisture source should erase any possible oxygen isotope anomaly from the stratosphere. A mass-dependent fractionation coefficient for meteoric waters, λMDF(H2O) = 0.529 ± 0.003 [2σ standard error (SE)], was determined from 27 CLP samples collected in 2003-2005. An oxygen isotopic anomaly of Δ(17)O = 76 ± 16 ppm (2σ SE) was found in water vapor samples from Alert relative to CLP. We propose that the positive oxygen isotope anomalies observed at Alert originated from stratospheric ozone, were transferred to water in the stratosphere, and subsequently mixed with tropospheric water at high latitudes as the stratospheric air descended into the troposphere. On the basis of this ground signal, the average Δ(17)O in stratospheric water vapor predicted by a steady-state box model is ∼40‰. Seven ice core samples (1930-1991) from Dasuopu glacier (Himalayas, China) and Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation did not show an obvious oxygen isotope anomaly, and Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water exhibited a negative Δ(17)O relative to CLP. Six Alert snow samples collected in March 2011 and measured at Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Gif sur Yvette, France, had (17)Oexcess of 45 ± 5 ppm (2σ SE) relative to Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water.

  14. Oxygen isotope anomaly observed in water vapor from Alert, Canada and the implication for the stratosphere

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying; Clayton, Robert N.; Huang, Lin; Nakamura, Noboru; Lyons, James R.

    2013-01-01

    To identify the possible anomalous oxygen isotope signature in stratospheric water predicted by model studies, 25 water vapor samples were collected in 2003−2005 at Alert station, Canada (82°30′N), where there is downward transport of stratospheric air to the polar troposphere, and were analyzed for δ17O and δ18O relative to Chicago local precipitation (CLP). The latter was chosen as a reference because the relatively large evaporative moisture source should erase any possible oxygen isotope anomaly from the stratosphere. A mass-dependent fractionation coefficient for meteoric waters, λMDF(H2O) = 0.529 ± 0.003 [2σ standard error (SE)], was determined from 27 CLP samples collected in 2003−2005. An oxygen isotopic anomaly of Δ17O = 76 ± 16 ppm (2σ SE) was found in water vapor samples from Alert relative to CLP. We propose that the positive oxygen isotope anomalies observed at Alert originated from stratospheric ozone, were transferred to water in the stratosphere, and subsequently mixed with tropospheric water at high latitudes as the stratospheric air descended into the troposphere. On the basis of this ground signal, the average Δ17O in stratospheric water vapor predicted by a steady-state box model is ∼40‰. Seven ice core samples (1930−1991) from Dasuopu glacier (Himalayas, China) and Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation did not show an obvious oxygen isotope anomaly, and Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water exhibited a negative Δ17O relative to CLP. Six Alert snow samples collected in March 2011 and measured at Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Gif sur Yvette, France, had 17Oexcess of 45 ± 5 ppm (2σ SE) relative to Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water. PMID:24009339

  15. Effects of Cold Water Immersion on Muscle Oxygenation During Repeated Bouts of Fatiguing Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Simon S.; Ting, Kin Hung; Hon, Maurice; Fung, Natalie Y.; Choi, Manfi M.; Cheng, Juno C.; Yeung, Ella W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Postexercise cold water immersion has been advocated to athletes as a means of accelerating recovery and improving performance. Given the effects of cold water immersion on blood flow, evaluating in vivo changes in tissue oxygenation during cold water immersion may help further our understanding of this recovery modality. This study aimed to investigate the effects of cold water immersion on muscle oxygenation and performance during repeated bouts of fatiguing exercise in a group of healthy young adults. Twenty healthy subjects performed 2 fatiguing bouts of maximal dynamic knee extension and flexion contractions both concentrically on an isokinetic dynamometer with a 10-min recovery period in between. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a cold water immersion (treatment) or passive recovery (control) group. Changes in muscle oxygenation were monitored continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy. Muscle performance was measured with isokinetic dynamometry during each fatiguing bout. Skin temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and muscle soreness ratings were also assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA analysis was used to evaluate treatment effects. The treatment group had a significantly lower mean heart rate and lower skin temperature compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Cold water immersion attenuated a reduction in tissue oxygenation in the second fatiguing bout by 4% when compared with control. Muscle soreness was rated lower 1 day post-testing (P < 0.05). However, cold water immersion had no significant effect on muscle performance in subsequent exercise. As the results show that cold water immersion attenuated decreased tissue oxygenation in subsequent exercise performance, the metabolic response to exercise after cold water immersion is worthy of further exploration. PMID:26735552

  16. Sulfur transformations at the hydrogen sulfide/oxygen interface in stratified waters and in cyanobacterial mats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Stratified water bodies allow the development of several microbial plates along the water column. The microbial plates develop in relation to nutrient availability, light penetration, and the distribution of oxygen and sulfide. Sulfide is initially produced in the sediment by sulfate-reducing bacteria. It diffuses along the water column creating a zone of hydrogen sulfide/oxygen interface. In the chemocline of Solar Lake oxygen and sulfide coexist in a 0 to 10 cm layer that moves up and down during a diurnal cycle. The microbial plate at the chemocline is exposed to oxygen and hydrogen sulfide, alternating on a diurnal basis. The cyanobacteria occupying the interface switch from anoxygenic photosynthesis in the morning to oxygenic photosynthesis during the rest of the day which results in a temporal build up of elemental sulfur during the day and disappears at night due to both oxidation to thiosulfate and sulfate by thiobacilli, and reduction to hydrogen sulfide by Desulfuromonas sp. and anaerobically respiring cyanobacteria. Sulfate reduction was enhanced in the light at the surface of the cyanobacterial mats. Microsulfate reduction measurements showed enhanced activity of sulfate reduction even under high oxygen concentrations of 300 to 800 micrometer. Apparent aerobic SO sub 4 reduction activity is explained by the co-occurrence of H sub 2. The physiology of this apparent sulfate reduction activity is studied.

  17. [Effects of water and light interaction on reactive oxygen metabolism in ginger leaves].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Zheng; Li, Hai-Dong; Li, Xiu; Xiao, Jing; Xu, Kun

    2013-12-01

    To explore the relationship between water supply in roots, light intensity on leaves and reactive oxygen metabolism, the effects of various treatments including natural light plus normal watering (T1), 50% shading plus normal watering (T2), natural light plus PEG-6000 simulated drought (T3), 50% shading plus simulated drought (T4) on reactive oxygen level and antioxidant enzyme activity in ginger leaves were studied. The results showed that, 6 days after treatment, the O2* production rate and H2O2 and MDA contents remarkably increased in ginger leaves at midday. Treatment T3 showed the greatest increment, followed by T4, T1 and T2 in order. In addition, the activities of SOD and POD in all treatments and CAT in T3 and T4 noticeably decreased, while CAT in T1 and T2 exhibited a high activity at midday. Throughout the whole treatment, reactive oxygen level and antioxidant enzyme activities of ginger leaves in T1 and T2 remained stable, with a higher activity in T1 than in T2. However, the reactive oxygen level kept increasing in leaves exposed to treatments T3 and T4. Meanwhile, the activities of antioxidant enzymes increased firstly and then decreased. Taken together, this study demonstrated that drought stress, especially drought plus light stress, led to an increased accumulation of reactive oxygen in ginger leaves, while shading was conducive to maintaining high activity of protective enzymes, and therefore to reducing reactive oxygen level and alleviate drought-induced injury.

  18. PERFORMANCE OF LIQUI-CEL EXTRA-FLOW MEMBRANE CONTRACTOR IN A PURE WATER AND IN A 0.2% SODIUM CHLORIDE SOLUTION (SNO-STR-2001-11).

    SciTech Connect

    YEH,M.; BOGER,J.; HAHN,R.L.

    2001-11-05

    After completion of SNO's first phase measurement of the neutrino charge current, two tons of salt were added into the SNO heavy water to increase the sensitivity of the neutral current measurement (Phase II). Liqui-Cel Extra-Flow Membrane Contactors (simply called Liqui-Cel) are used in the SNO heavy-water circulating system to remove the dissolved gases, such as oxygen, nitrogen, radon, and water vapor from the liquid water. One possible scenario with phase II operation is that the salt may leak through the Liqui-Cel Membrane and come in contact with the vacuum pumps and other metal components of the Heavy-Water Vapor Recovery System. In this scenario, corrosion will damage these components, especially the vacuum pump (Pfeiffer UniDry Pump with cast iron interior), and increase the operational difficulties. A series of tests for the behavior of the Liqui-Cel System in pure water and in salt systems was conducted at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in order to measure the transfer of (a) water vapor and (b) salt, if there is any, through the membrane. Initially a 10-inch by 28-inch Liqui-Cel unit, identical to those used in the SNO heavy-water circulating system, was obtained from SNO site. However, extensive analysis showed that the membrane in this unit was defective: a replacement membrane would cost several thousand dollars. Instead, a smaller, 2.5-inch x 8-inch Liqui-Cel, obtained from Dr. Richard Helmers of the University of British Columbia, was used in this experiment. A comparison of the present experiment with the SNO heavy-water system is done with theoretical calculations. The results are discussed in the following sections.

  19. Oats may grow better in water depleted in oxygen 18 and deuterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleason, J.D.; Friedman, I.

    1975-01-01

    WHILE growing oats at different temperatures in water of different 18O and deuterium (D) abundances, we noticed that oats grown in Antarctic water in which is depleted in 18O and D by -49??? and -400???, relative to standard mean ocean water (SMOW used as a comparative reference in hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies), showed initial growth 1-2 weeks sooner than did oats grown in water containing greater 18O and D concentrations. The oats seemed to grow better in water which was most depleted in the stable isotopes throughout the growth period. ?? 1975 Nature Publishing Group.

  20. The dead zones: oxygen-starved coastal waters.

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, S

    2000-01-01

    After the great Mississippi River flood of 1993, the hypoxic (or low-oxygen) "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico more than doubled its size, reaching an all-time high of over 7,700 square miles in July of 1999. Scientists attribute the Gulf of Mexico dead zone largely to nutrient runoff from agriculture in the Mississippi River basin. During the warm months, these nutrients fuel eutrophication, or high organic production, causing large algal blooms. When the algae decay, the result is hypoxia. Reports of such hypoxic events around the world have been increasing since the mid 1960s. Eutrophication and hypoxia have resulted in mortality of bottom-dwelling life in dozens of marine ecosystems and have stressed fisheries worldwide. Some algal blooms can alter the function of coastal ecosystems or, potentially, threaten human health. Anthropogenic nutrient loading from sources such as agriculture, fossil fuel emissions, and climate events is believed to be related to the global increase in frequency, size, and duration of certain algal blooms. PMID:10706539

  1. The dead zones: oxygen-starved coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Joyce, S

    2000-03-01

    After the great Mississippi River flood of 1993, the hypoxic (or low-oxygen) "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico more than doubled its size, reaching an all-time high of over 7,700 square miles in July of 1999. Scientists attribute the Gulf of Mexico dead zone largely to nutrient runoff from agriculture in the Mississippi River basin. During the warm months, these nutrients fuel eutrophication, or high organic production, causing large algal blooms. When the algae decay, the result is hypoxia. Reports of such hypoxic events around the world have been increasing since the mid 1960s. Eutrophication and hypoxia have resulted in mortality of bottom-dwelling life in dozens of marine ecosystems and have stressed fisheries worldwide. Some algal blooms can alter the function of coastal ecosystems or, potentially, threaten human health. Anthropogenic nutrient loading from sources such as agriculture, fossil fuel emissions, and climate events is believed to be related to the global increase in frequency, size, and duration of certain algal blooms.

  2. Comment on ;Realization of the triple points of pure and oxygen-contaminated nitrogen; by H.K. Lee et al. [Physica B 169 (1991) 451-452

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavese, F.

    2017-06-01

    The paper, which contains one of the few experiments available of accurate determination of the triple point temperature of nitrogen, also including the effect of oxygen impurity, reports values that significantly differ from other determinations available in the literature. The comment examines the possible reasons and suggests some causes and remedies in similar cases.

  3. Advancements in oxygen generation and humidity control by water vapor electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Sudar, M.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Regenerative processes for the revitalization of manned spacecraft atmospheres or other manned habitats are essential for realization of long-term space missions. These processes include oxygen generation through water electrolysis. One promising technique of water electrolysis is the direct conversion of the water vapor contained in the cabin air to oxygen. This technique is the subject of the present program on water vapor electrolysis development. The objectives were to incorporate technology improvements developed under other similar electrochemical programs and add new ones; design and fabricate a mutli-cell electrochemical module and a testing facility; and demonstrate through testing the improvements. Each aspect of the water vapor electrolysis cell was reviewed. The materials of construction and sizing of each element were investigated analytically and sometime experimentally. In addition, operational considerations such as temperature control in response to inlet conditions were investigated. Three specific quantitative goals were established.

  4. Observation of hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide in a reaction system containing CH{sub 2}OO and water vapor through pure rotational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Masakazu; Endo, Yasuki

    2015-10-28

    Pure rotational transitions of hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP) were observed in the discharged plasma of a CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/water gas mixture, where the water complex with the simplest Criegee intermediate CH{sub 2}OO has been identified [M. Nakajima and Y. Endo, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 134302 (2014)]. Isotope experiments using heavy water support that the currently observed HMHP molecule was produced by the reaction of CH{sub 2}OO with water vapor. The observed species was identified as the most stable conformer with the help of quantum chemical calculations. We also clarified that productions of formic acid and dioxirane are promoted by the existence of water vapor in the discharged reaction system.

  5. Effects of low oxygen concentrations on aerobic methane oxidation in seasonally hypoxic coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle, Lea; Maltby, Johanna; Treude, Tina; Kock, Annette; Bange, Hermann W.; Engbersen, Nadine; Zopfi, Jakob; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Niemann, Helge

    2017-03-01

    Coastal seas may account for more than 75 % of global oceanic methane emissions. There, methane is mainly produced microbially in anoxic sediments from which it can escape to the overlying water column. Aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) in the water column acts as a biological filter, reducing the amount of methane that eventually evades to the atmosphere. The efficiency of the MOx filter is potentially controlled by the availability of dissolved methane and oxygen, as well as temperature, salinity, and hydrographic dynamics, and all of these factors undergo strong temporal fluctuations in coastal ecosystems. In order to elucidate the key environmental controls, specifically the effect of oxygen availability, on MOx in a seasonally stratified and hypoxic coastal marine setting, we conducted a 2-year time-series study with measurements of MOx and physico-chemical water column parameters in a coastal inlet in the south-western Baltic Sea (Eckernförde Bay). We found that MOx rates generally increased toward the seafloor, but were not directly linked to methane concentrations. MOx exhibited a strong seasonal variability, with maximum rates (up to 11.6 nmol L-1 d-1) during summer stratification when oxygen concentrations were lowest and bottom-water temperatures were highest. Under these conditions, 2.4-19.0 times more methane was oxidized than emitted to the atmosphere, whereas about the same amount was consumed and emitted during the mixed and oxygenated periods. Laboratory experiments with manipulated oxygen concentrations in the range of 0.2-220 µmol L-1 revealed a submicromolar oxygen optimum for MOx at the study site. In contrast, the fraction of methane-carbon incorporation into the bacterial biomass (compared to the total amount of oxidized methane) was up to 38-fold higher at saturated oxygen concentrations, suggesting a different partitioning of catabolic and anabolic processes under oxygen-replete and oxygen-starved conditions, respectively. Our results

  6. Triple isotope composition of oxygen in atmospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Ryu; Barkan, Eugeni; Abe, Osamu; Luz, Boaz

    2010-02-01

    Recently, an excess of 17O (17O-excess) has been demonstrated in meteoric water and ice cores. Based on theory and experiments, it has been suggested that this excess originates from evaporation of ocean water into under-saturated air. However, there has never been direct demonstration of this excess in marine vapor. Here, we present results of the first measurements of δ17O and δ18O in vapor samples collected over the South Indian and the Southern Oceans. Our data show the existence of 17O-excess in marine vapor and also clear negative correlation between 17O-excess and relative humidity. Thus, 17O-excess is useful for constraining oceanic humidity in hydrological and climatic models. Using the obtained values of 17O-excess, we estimated the fractionation factor between H218O and H216O for diffusion in air above the ocean (18αdiff). The new estimation of 18αdiff (1.008) is larger than the widely accepted value in hydrological studies.

  7. Synergetic effect of Sn addition and oxygen-deficient atmosphere to design active hematite photoelectrodes for light-induced water splitting.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Andre Luiz Martins; Souza, Flavio L

    2017-09-08

    This work describes a microwave-assisted hydrothermal conditions method to design pure and Sn-hematite photoelectrodes at different synthesis time with additional thermal treatment under air and N2 atmosphere. The hematite photoelectrode designed under N2 atmosphere and Sn deposited on its surface, which is represented by material synthesized at 4 hours exhibit the highest performance. Hence, the Sn-addition followed by high annealing temperature conducted at oxygen-deficient atmosphere seems to create of oxygen vacancies and have prevented the dopant segregation to form SnO2 phase at the hematite crystal reducing its energy and suppressing the grain growth. The increased number of donor density provided by the oxygen vacancies (confirmed by X-ray photoelectron data) and a possible reduction in the grain boundary energy or hematite crystal interface might favor the charge separation and increase the electron transfer through the hematite into the back contact (FTO substrate). As consequence, the light-induced water oxidation reaction efficiency of Sn-hematite photoelectrode was significantly increased in comparison with pure ones, even though the vertical rod morphology was not preserved. This finding provides a novel insight on the intentional Sn-addition revealing that the dopant segregation at the hematite crystal surface (or at the grain boundaries) could be the more relevant factor for developing active hematite photoelectrodes by increasing the electron mobility than the columnar morphology control. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. Oxygen-deficient waters along the Japanese coast and their effects upon the estuarine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T

    2001-01-01

    Development of hypoxia in Japan has been confirmed in the inner part of almost every major bay of Japan on the Pacific Coast from Tokyo southward. This paper presents multiple aspects (present condition, hydraulic mechanism, effect upon fisheries, historical progress and nutrient budget between sediment and water) using Mikawa Bay, where Japan's most serious hypoxia occurs, as an example. Although hypoxia basically results from the increase of nutrient load input from domestic and livestock sources, the intense reclamation of shallows (including tidal flats) and the large reduction in river flow due to farmland irrigation drastically accelerated dissolved oxygen deficiency. Oxygen-deficient waters in Mikawa Bay are large enough to strip the water purification capacity of the remaining shallows. Unfortunately, the shallows have turned from a purifier to a source of nutrient load. These conditions are more or less common in all bays where the dissolved oxygen-deficient waters have been reported. To break this cycle, dissolved oxygen deficiency must be contained to the extent that the purification capacity of the shallows can be restored to an efficient level. For this purpose, the first thing to do is to restore tidal flats over an extensive area and to recover sufficient water flow, which may be a more urgent imperative than reducing the nutrient load input.

  9. Interaction of Oxygen and Water with the (100) Surface of Pyrite: Mechanism of Sulfur Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sit, Patrick H-L; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2012-09-06

    We present a density-functional study of the adsorption and reactions of oxygen and water with the (100) surface of pyrite. We find that dissociative adsorption is energetically favorable for oxygen, forming ferryl-oxo, Fe(4+)═O(2-), species. These transform easily to ferric-hydroxy, Fe(3+)-OH(-), in the presence of coadsorbed water, and the latter fully covers the surface under room conditions. A mechanism for surface oxidation is identified, which involves successive reactions with molecular oxygen and water, and leads to the complete oxidation of a surface sulfur to SO4(2-). The crucial recurring process is the surface O(2-) and OH(-) species acting as proton acceptors for incoming water molecules. Using a recently proposed method, we examine the oxidation state changes of the surface ions and the electron flow during the adsorption and oxidation processes. The oxidation mechanism is consistent with isotopic labeling experiments, suggesting that the oxygens in SO4(2-) from gas-phase oxidation are derived from water.

  10. Non-mass-dependent oxygen isotope effect observed in water vapor from Alert, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying

    Twenty-seven precipitation samples from Chicago, IL and northwest part of Indiana were collected from 2003 to 2005. Twenty-five water vapor samples were collected at Alert, Canada (82° 30'N, 62° 19'W) from 2002 to 2005 by Lin Huang and her co-workers. Seven ice core samples from Dasuopu glacier, Chinese Himalayas (28° 23' N, 85° 43'W) were drilled by Lonnie G. Thompson and prepared by Mary E. Davis. Sample of Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation (SLAP) is available in the laboratory. Water samples were reacted with bromine pentafluoride to produce oxygen, which were then purified through molecular sieve and measured by Delta E gas source mass spectrometer. A lambda(MDF) = 0.529 +/- 0.003 (2sigma) for water is determined from measurement of local precipitation samples. No significant oxygen isotopic anomaly is found in SLAP and in ice core samples from Dasuopu glacier, Chinese Himalayas. Delta17O(CLP), oxygen isotopic anomaly relative to Chicago local precipitation, of -0.009‰ to 0.167‰ with a mean of 0.076‰ and a 2sigma standard error of 0.016‰ is observed in water vapor from Alert, Canada. About half of these Delta17O(CLP) data exhibit statistically significant excesses. Stacked seasonal trend of Delta17O(CLP) observed at Alert, Canada points to a maximum in late spring when the intrusion of stratospheric air is at its maximum and the height of Arctic tropopause is the lowest. However, no significant oxygen isotopic anomalies are found in ice core samples from Dasuopu and in SLAP. The positive excesses in Delta17O(CLP) seen in tropospheric water vapor at Alert, Canada could be explained by the transfer of positive oxygen isotopic anomalies through O3 → NOx → HOx → H2O chain in the stratosphere, and the subsequent mixing of this anomalous stratospheric water with tropospheric water vapor at Alert, Canada where the tropopause is low and where downward mixing of stratospheric air with tropospheric air takes place. The positive oxygen isotopic

  11. Air-water oxygen exchange in a large whitewater river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Robert O.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.

    2012-01-01

    Air-water gas exchange governs fluxes of gas into and out of aquatic ecosystems. Knowing this flux is necessary to calculate gas budgets (i.e., O2) to estimate whole-ecosystem metabolism and basin-scale carbon budgets. Empirical data on rates of gas exchange for streams, estuaries, and oceans are readily available. However, there are few data from large rivers and no data from whitewater rapids. We measured gas transfer velocity in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, as decline in O2 saturation deficit, 7 times in a 28-km segment spanning 7 rapids. The O2 saturation deficit exists because of hypolimnetic discharge from Glen Canyon Dam, located 25 km upriver from Lees Ferry. Gas transfer velocity (k600) increased with slope of the immediate reach. k600 was -1 in flat reaches, while k600 for the steepest rapid ranged 3600-7700 cm h-1, an extremely high value of k600. Using the rate of gas exchange per unit length of water surface elevation (Kdrop, m-1), segment-integrated k600 varied between 74 and 101 cm h-1. Using Kdrop we scaled k600 to the remainder of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon. At the scale corresponding to the segment length where 80% of the O2 exchanged with the atmosphere (mean length = 26.1 km), k600 varied 4.5-fold between 56 and 272 cm h-1 with a mean of 113 cm h-1. Gas transfer velocity for the Colorado River was higher than those from other aquatic ecosystems because of large rapids. Our approach of scaling k600 based on Kdrop allows comparing gas transfer velocity across rivers with spatially heterogeneous morphology.

  12. Triple oxygen isotope composition of leaf waters in Mpala, central Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuning; Levin, Naomi E.; Soderberg, Keir; Dennis, Kate J.; Caylor, Kelly K.

    2017-06-01

    Variations in triple oxygen isotopes have been used in studies of atmospheric photochemistry, global productivity and increasingly in studies of hydroclimate. Understanding the distribution of triple oxygen isotopes in plant waters is critical to studying the fluxes of oxygen isotopes between the atmosphere and hydrosphere, in which plants play an important role. In this paper we report triple oxygen isotope data for stem and leaf waters from Mpala, Kenya and explore how Δ17 O, the deviation from an expected relationship between 17O /16O and 18O /16O ratios, in plant waters vary with respect to relative humidity and deuterium excess (d-excess). We observe significant variation in Δ17 O among waters in leaves and stems from a single plant (up to 0.16‰ range in Δ17 O in leaf water in a plant over the course of a signal day), which correlates to changes in relative humidity. A steady state model for evaporation in leaf water reproduces the majority of variation in Δ17 O and d-excess we observed in leaf waters, except for samples that were collected in the morning, when relative humidity is high and the degree of fractionation in the system is minimal. The data and the steady state model indicate that the slope, λtransp, that links δ17 O and δ18 O values of stem and leaf waters and characterizes the fractionation during transpiration, is strongly influenced by the isotopic composition of ambient vapor when relative humidity is high. We observe a strong, positive relationship between d-excess and Δ17 O, with a slope 2.2 ± 0.2 per meg ‰-1, which is consistent with the observed relationship in tropical rainfall and in water in an evaporating open pan. The strong linear relationship between d-excess and Δ17 O should be typical for any process involving evaporation or any other fractionation that is governed by kinetic effects.

  13. A Plant-Based Proxy for the Oxygen Isotope Ratio of Atmospheric Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helliker, B.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a major component of the global hydrological cycle, but the isotopic balance of vapor is largely unknown. It is shown here that the oxygen isotope ratio of leaf water in the epiphytic Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Tillandsia usneoides (Spanish Moss) is controlled by the oxygen isotope ratio of atmospheric water vapor in both field and lab studies. Assuming that the leaf-water isotopic signature (and hence the atmospheric water vapor signature) is recorded in plant organic material, the atmospheric water vapor oxygen isotope ratios for Miami, Florida (USA) were reconstructed for several years from 1878 to 2005 using contemporary and herbarium specimens. T. usneoides ranges from Virginia, USA southwards through the tropics to Argentina, and the CAM epiphytic lifeform is widespread in other species. Therefore, epiphytes may be used to reconstruct the isotope ratio of atmospheric water for spatial scales that span over 60° of latitude and temporal scales that cover the last century of global temperature increase.

  14. Glacial-interglacial changes in bottom-water oxygen content on the Portuguese margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogakker, Babette A. A.; Elderfield, Henry; Schmiedl, Gerhard; McCave, I. Nick; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2015-01-01

    During the last and penultimate glacial maxima, atmospheric CO2 concentrations were lower than present, possibly in part because of increased storage of respired carbon in the deep oceans. The amount of respired carbon present in a water mass can be calculated from its oxygen content through apparent oxygen utilization; the oxygen content can in turn be calculated from the carbon isotope gradient within the sediment column. Here we analyse the shells of benthic foraminifera occurring at the sediment surface and the oxic/anoxic interface on the Portuguese Margin to reconstruct the carbon isotope gradient and hence bottom-water oxygenation over the past 150,000 years. We find that bottom-water oxygen concentrations were 45 and 65 μmol kg-1 lower than present during the last and penultimate glacial maxima, respectively. We calculate that concentrations of remineralized organic carbon were at least twice as high as today during the glacial maxima. We attribute these changes to decreased ventilation linked to a reorganization of ocean circulation and a strengthened global biological pump. If the respired carbon pool was of a similar size throughout the entire glacial deep Atlantic basin, then this sink could account for 15 and 20 per cent of the glacial PCO2 drawdown during the last and penultimate glacial maxima.

  15. Seasonal transfer of oxygen isotopes from precipitation and soil to the tree ring: source water versus needle water enrichment.

    PubMed

    Treydte, Kerstin; Boda, Sonja; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Fonti, Patrick; Frank, David; Ullrich, Bastian; Saurer, Matthias; Siegwolf, Rolf; Battipaglia, Giovanna; Werner, Willy; Gessler, Arthur

    2014-05-01

    For accurate interpretation of oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ(18) O), it is necessary to disentangle the mechanisms underlying the variations in the tree's internal water cycle and to understand the transfer of source versus leaf water δ(18) O to phloem sugars and stem wood. We studied the seasonal transfer of oxygen isotopes from precipitation and soil water through the xylem, needles and phloem to the tree rings of Larix decidua at two alpine sites in the Lötschental (Switzerland). Weekly resolved δ(18) O records of precipitation, soil water, xylem and needle water, phloem organic matter and tree rings were developed. Week-to-week variations in needle-water (18) O enrichment were strongly controlled by weather conditions during the growing season. These short-term variations were, however, not significantly fingerprinted in tree-ring δ(18) O. Instead, seasonal trends in tree-ring δ(18) O predominantly mirrored trends in the source water, including recent precipitation and soil water pools. Modelling results support these findings: seasonal tree-ring δ(18) O variations are captured best when the week-to-week variations of the leaf water signal are suppressed. Our results suggest that climate signals in tree-ring δ(18) O variations should be strongest at temperate sites with humid conditions and precipitation maxima during the growing season.

  16. Experimental and computational study on the properties of pure and water mixed 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium L-(+)-lactate ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Santiago; Alcalde, Rafael; Atilhan, Mert

    2010-05-06

    Ionic liquids have attracted great attention, from both industry and academe, as alternative fluids for a large collection of applications. Although the term green is used frequently to describe ionic liquids in general, it is obvious that it cannot be applied to the huge quantity of possible ionic liquids, and thus, those with adequate environmental and technological profiles must be selected for further and deeper studies, from both basic science and applied approaches. In this work, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium L-(+)-lactate ionic liquid is studied, because of its remarkable properties, through a wide-ranging approach considering thermophysical, spectroscopic, and computational tools, to gain a deeper insight into its complex liquid structure, both pure and mixed with water, thus implying the main factors that would control the technological applications that could be designed using this fluid. The reported results shows a strongly structured pure ionic liquid, in which hydrogen bonding, because of the hydroxyl group of the lactate anion, develops a remarkable role, together with Coulombic forces to determine the fluid's behavior. Upon mixing with water, the ionic liquid retains its structure up to very high dilution levels, with the effect of the ionic liquid on the water structure being very large, even for very low ionic liquid mole fractions. Thus, in water solution, the studied ionic liquid evolves from noninteracting ions solvated by water molecules toward large interacting structures with increasing ionic liquid content.

  17. Incorporation of Molecular Oxygen and Water during Enzymatic Oxidation of Cyanide by Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C.; Kunz, D. A.; Venables, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    Cell extracts (high-speed [150,000 x g] supernatants) from Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764 catalyzed the oxidation of cyanide to CO(inf2) (and NH(inf3)). Conversion was both oxygen and NADH dependent, with 1 mol of each being consumed per mol of cyanide degraded. Analysis of (sup13)CO(inf2) by mass spectrometry indicated that one atom each of isotopically labelled oxygen 18 from molecular oxygen and water were incorporated during enzymatic conversion. The results confirm earlier reports of oxygenase-mediated cyanide conversion in this organism. A reaction pathway for cyanide oxidation involving initial monooxygenation followed by hydrolysis of a hypothetical oxygenated intermediate to CO(inf2) (and NH(inf3)) is proposed. PMID:16535345

  18. A model for the water-oxidation and recovery systems of the oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Yatabe, Takeshi; Kikkawa, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakai, Hidetaka; Kaneko, Kenji; Ogo, Seiji

    2014-02-28

    We propose a model for the water-oxidation and recovery systems of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of the photosystem II (PSII) enzyme. The whole system is constructed from two catalytic cycles, conducted as a tandem reaction: (i) a water-oxidation loop uses cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate as an oxidant to activate a dimanganese complex for water-oxidation and thereby liberate a molecule of O2 and (ii) a recovery loop begins with photoinhibition of the dimanganese complex but then uses O2 to reactivate the manganese centre. The net result is a catalytic water-oxidation catalyst that can use self-generated O2 for recovery.

  19. Theoretical investigation of the injection and evaporation of water in a hydrogen/oxygen steam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Stefan

    1991-07-01

    Water is injected into the gas stream for the purpose of cooling the reaction products resulting from the stochiometric combustion of hydrogen with oxygen. The penetration of the jet decisively influences the temperature profile across the flow cross section in the water vapor. The penetration of the water jet into the stream is calculated using the jet shedding model and compared with the garden hose model. Models for the evaporation of water droplets in superheated steam are developed for calculating the evaporation paths. The parameters which influence the injection and evaporation process are subjected to variation and their effects in the evaporation paths are analyzed.

  20. Persistently declining oxygen levels in the interior waters of the eastern subarctic Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Frank A.; Freeland, Howard J.; Robert, Marie

    2007-10-01

    Fifty years of measurements at Ocean Station Papa (OSP, 50°N, 145°W) show trends in the interior waters of the subarctic Pacific that are both impacted by short term (few years to bi-decadal) atmospheric or ocean circulation oscillations and by persistent climate trends. Between 1956 and 2006, waters below the ocean mixed layer to a depth of at least 1000 m have been warming and losing oxygen. On density surfaces found in the depth range 100-400 m ( σθ = 26.3-27.0), the ocean is warming at 0.005-0.012 °C y -1, whereas oxygen is declining at 0.39-0.70 μmol kg -1 y -1 or at an integrated rate of 123 mmol m -2 y -1 (decrease of 22% over 50 years). During this time, the hypoxic boundary (defined as 60 μmol O 2 kg -1) has shoaled from ∼400 to 300 m. In the Alaska Gyre, the 26.2 isopycnal occasionally ventilates, whereas at OSP 26.0 σθ has not been seen at the ocean surface since 1971 as the upper ocean continues to stratify. To interpret the 50 year record at OSP, the isopycnal transport of oxygenated waters within the interior of the subarctic Pacific is assessed by using a slightly modified “NO” parameter [Broecker, W., 1974. “NO” a conservative water-mass tracer. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 23, 100-107]. The highest nitrate-oxygen signature in interior waters of the North Pacific is found in the Bering Sea Gyre, Western Subarctic Gyre and East Kamchatka Current region as a consequence of winter mixing to the ∼26.6 isopycnal. By mixing with low NO waters found in the subtropics and Okhotsk Sea, this signature is diluted as waters flow eastward across the Pacific. Evidence of low NO waters flowing north from California is seen along the coasts of British Columbia and SE Alaska. Oxygen in the subsurface waters of the Alaskan Gyre was supplied ∼60% by subarctic and 40% by subtropical waters during WOCE surveys, whereas such estimates are shown to periodically vary by 20% at OSP. Other features discernable in the OSP data include periods of

  1. Characterization of water quality and simulation of temperature, nutrients, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen in the Wateree River, South Carolina, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2000-01-01

    In May 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey entered into a cooperative agreement with the Kershaw County Water and Sewer Authority to characterize and simulate the water quality in the Wateree River, South Carolina. Longitudinal profiling of dissolved-oxygen concentrations during the spring and summer of 1996 revealed dissolved-oxygen minimums occurring upstream from the point-source discharges. The mean dissolved-oxygen decrease upstream from the effluent discharges was 2.0 milligrams per liter, and the decrease downstream from the effluent discharges was 0.2 milligram per liter. Several theories were investigated to obtain an improved understanding of the dissolved-oxygen dynamics in the upper Wateree River. Data suggest that the dissolved-oxygen concentration decrease is associated with elevated levels of oxygen-consuming nutrients and metals that are flowing into the Wateree River from Lake Wateree. Analysis of long-term streamflow and water-quality data collected at two U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations suggests that no strong correlation exists between streamflow and dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Wateree River. However, a strong negative correlation does exist between dissolved-oxygen concentrations and water temperature. Analysis of data from six South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control monitoring stations for 1980.95 revealed decreasing trends in ammonia nitrogen at all stations where data were available and decreasing trends in 5-day biochemical oxygen demand at three river stations. The influence of various hydrologic and point-source loading conditions on dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Wateree River were determined by using results from water-quality simulations by the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model. The effects of five tributaries and four point-source discharges were included in the model. Data collected during two synoptic water-quality samplings on June 23.25 and August 11.13, 1997, were used to calibrate

  2. Electrochemistry-mass spectrometry for mechanism study of oxygen reduction at water/oil interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shu-Juan; Yu, Zheng-Wei; Qiao, Liang; Liu, Bao-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Electrochemistry methods have been widely employed in the development of renewable energy, and involved in various processes, e.g. water splitting and oxygen reduction. Remarkable progress notwithstanding, there are still many challenges in further optimization of catalysts to achieve high performance. For this purpose, an in-depth understanding of reaction mechanism is needed. In this study, an electrochemistry-mass spectrometry method based on a Y-shaped dual-channel microchip as electrochemical cell and ionization device was demonstrated. Combined solutions of aqueous phase and oil phase were introduced into mass spectrometer directly when electrochemical reactions were happening to study the reduction of oxygen by decamethylferrocene or tetrathiafulvalene under the catalysis of a metal-free porphyrin, tetraphenylporphyrin, at water/1,2-dichloroethane interfaces. Monoprotonated and diprotonated tetraphenylporphyrin were detected by mass spectrometer, confirming the previously proposed mechanism of the oxygen reduction reaction. This work offers a new approach to study electrochemical reactions at liquid-liquid interface.

  3. Modeling the thermostability of surface functionalisation by oxygen, hydroxyl, and water on nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Lin; Barnard, Amanda S.

    2011-06-01

    Understanding nanodiamond functionalisation is of great importance for biological and medical applications. Here we examine the stabilities of oxygen, hydroxyl, and water functionalisation of the nanodiamonds using the self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding simulations. We find that the oxygen and hydroxyl termination are thermodynamically favourable and form strong C-O covalent bonds on the nanodiamond surface in an O2 and H2 gas reservoir, which confirms previous experiments. Yet, the thermodynamic stabilities of oxygen and hydroxyl functionalisation decrease dramatically in a water vapour reservoir. In contrast, H2O molecules are found to be physically adsorbed on the nanodiamond surface, and forced chemical adsorption results in decomposition of H2O. Moreover, the functionalisation efficiency is found to be facet dependent. The oxygen functionalisation prefers the {100} facets as opposed to alternative facets in an O2 and H2 gas reservoir. The hydroxyl functionalisation favors the {111} surfaces in an O2 and H2 reservoir and the {100} facets in a water vapour reservoir, respectively. This facet selectivity is found to be largely dependent upon the environmental temperature, chemical reservoir, and morphology of the nanodiamonds.Understanding nanodiamond functionalisation is of great importance for biological and medical applications. Here we examine the stabilities of oxygen, hydroxyl, and water functionalisation of the nanodiamonds using the self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding simulations. We find that the oxygen and hydroxyl termination are thermodynamically favourable and form strong C-O covalent bonds on the nanodiamond surface in an O2 and H2 gas reservoir, which confirms previous experiments. Yet, the thermodynamic stabilities of oxygen and hydroxyl functionalisation decrease dramatically in a water vapour reservoir. In contrast, H2O molecules are found to be physically adsorbed on the nanodiamond surface, and forced

  4. Determining Permissible Oxygen and Water Vapor Transmission Rate for Non-Retort Military Ration Packaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    oxygen transmission rate ( OTR ) and water vapor transmission rate (WVTR), for the non-retort pouch found in the Meal, Ready to EatTM (MRETM) individual...water vapor ingress is 0.004 g/pouch/d. Cracker samples used to determine permissible OTR did not fall below the overall quality requirement for...sensory attributes during the 32-week study. Thus, an allowable OTR for the non-retort pouch cannot be calculated from the results obtained. 15

  5. BENTHIC AND WATER COLUMN PROCESSES IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Murrell, M.C., J.D. Hagy, J.G. Campbell and J.M. Caffrey. In press. Benthic and Water Column Processes in a Subtropical Estuary: Effects of Light on Oxygen Fluxes (Abstract). To be presented at the ASLO 2004 Summer Meeting: The Changing Landscapes of Oceans and Freshwater, 13-18 ...

  6. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea in the low-oxygen water column of the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beman, J.; Popp, B. N.; Francis, C. A.

    2006-12-01

    Archaea constitute a ubiquitous and exceptionally abundant component of marine microbial assemblages, yet their role in ocean biogeochemistry has remained elusive. Several recent lines of evidence suggest that many mesophilic Crenarchaeota are capable of performing ammonia oxidation, the first and rate-limiting step of chemoautotrophic nitrification. However, associations between these organisms and ammonia oxidation in the marine water column have yet to be explored--as has their means of survival under low oxygen conditions, where, paradoxically, they appear to be remarkably successful. In this study, we examined AOA diversity and abundance throughout the water column of the Gulf of California, which is characterized by highly productive near-surface waters and a pronounced oxygen minimum layer (OML) at depths below about 300 meters. We examined AOA both in the near surface and the OML of the Gulf of California, comparing across the transition to low oxygen conditions in two separate basins. Our results suggest that these organisms may play a key role in oxidizing ammonia in the Gulf of California water column, yet their presence and abundance under low oxygen conditions remains unresolved.

  7. A Simplified and Inexpensive Method for Measuring Dissolved Oxygen in Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, John

    1983-01-01

    A modified Winkler method for determining dissolved oxygen in water is described. The method does not require use of a burette or starch indicator, is simple and inexpensive and can be used in the field or laboratory. Reagents/apparatus needed and specific procedures are included. (JN)

  8. Ultimate biochemical oxygen demand in semi-intensively managed shrimp pond waters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three independent studies were conducted to quantified ultimate biochemical oxygen demand (UBOD) and the corresponding decomposition rate constant for production pond (average 21.5 ha each) waters and effluents on six semi-intensively managed marine shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) farms in Honduras. S...

  9. A Simplified and Inexpensive Method for Measuring Dissolved Oxygen in Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, John

    1983-01-01

    A modified Winkler method for determining dissolved oxygen in water is described. The method does not require use of a burette or starch indicator, is simple and inexpensive and can be used in the field or laboratory. Reagents/apparatus needed and specific procedures are included. (JN)

  10. DISSOLVED OXYGEN AND METHANE IN WATER BY A GC HEADSPACE EQUILIBRATION TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical procedure is described for the determination of dissolved oxygen and methane in groundwater samples. The method consists of generating a helium gas headspace in a water filled bottle, and analysis of the headspace by gas chromatography. Other permanent gases such as...

  11. Microbial hydroxylation of quinoline in contaminated groundwater: evidence for incorporation of the oxygen atom of water.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.; Leiker, T.J.; Updegraff, D.M.; Bennett, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Studies conducted in an aquifer contaminated by creosote suggest that quinoline is converted to 2(1H)quinolinone by an indigenous consortium of microorganisms. Laboratory microbial experiments using H218O indicate that water is the source of the oxygen atom for this hydroxylation reaction under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

  12. DISSOLVED OXYGEN AND METHANE IN WATER BY A GC HEADSPACE EQUILIBRATION TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical procedure is described for the determination of dissolved oxygen and methane in groundwater samples. The method consists of generating a helium gas headspace in a water filled bottle, and analysis of the headspace by gas chromatography. Other permanent gases such as...

  13. Recrystallization-induced oxygen isotope changes in inclusion-hosted water of speleothems - paleoclimatological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demény, Attila; Czuppon, György; Leél-Őssy, Szabolcs; Németh, Péter; Szabó, Máté; Tóth, Mária; Németh, Tibor

    2016-04-01

    Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope data of water trapped in fluid inclusions were collected for recently forming stalagmites and flowstones in order to determine how dripwater compositions are reflected and preserved in the inclusion water compositions. The samples were collected from different cave sites (with temperatures around 10 ± 1 °C) from the central and north-eastern parts of Hungary. Hydrogen isotope compositions were found to reflect dripwater values, whereas the oxygen isotope data were increasingly shifted from the local dripwater compositions with the time elapsed after deposition. The δ18O data are correlated with X-Ray diffraction full width at half maximum values (related to crystal domain size and lattice strain), suggesting that the oxygen isotope shift is related to recrystallization of calcite. Transmission electron microscope analyses detected the presence of nanocrystalline (<50 nm) calcite, whose crystallization to coarser-grained calcite crystals (>200 nm) may have induced re-equilibration between the carbonate and the trapped inclusion water. Additional data indicated that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) may have formed as a precursor of nanocrystalline calcite. ACC-calcite transformation followed by Ostwald ripening process provides an explanation for unexpectedly low oxygen isotope compositions in the inclusion water, especially in cold caves where carbonate may form first as an amorphous phase. This research was supported by the National Office for Research and Technology of Hungary (GVOP-3.2.1-2004-04-0235/3.0), the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA CK 80661 and OTKA NK 101664).

  14. BENTHIC AND WATER COLUMN PROCESSES IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Murrell, M.C., J.D. Hagy, J.G. Campbell and J.M. Caffrey. In press. Benthic and Water Column Processes in a Subtropical Estuary: Effects of Light on Oxygen Fluxes (Abstract). To be presented at the ASLO 2004 Summer Meeting: The Changing Landscapes of Oceans and Freshwater, 13-18 ...

  15. Decoupling between water column oxygenation and benthic phosphate dynamics in a shallow eutrophic estuary.

    PubMed

    Kraal, Peter; Burton, Edward D; Rose, Andrew L; Cheetham, Michael D; Bush, Richard T; Sullivan, Leigh A

    2013-04-02

    Estuaries are crucial biogeochemical filters at the land-ocean interface that are strongly impacted by anthropogenic nutrient inputs. Here, we investigate benthic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) dynamics in relation to physicochemical surface sediment properties and bottom water mixing in the shallow, eutrophic Peel-Harvey Estuary. Our results show the strong dependence of sedimentary P release on Fe and S redox cycling. The estuary contains surface sediments that are strongly reducing and act as net P source, despite physical sediment mixing under an oxygenated water column. This decoupling between water column oxygenation and benthic P dynamics is of great importance to understand the evolution of nutrient dynamics in marine systems in response to increasing nutrient loadings. In addition, the findings show that the relationship between P burial efficiency and bottom water oxygenation depends on local conditions; sediment properties rather than oxygen availability may control benthic P recycling. Overall, our results illustrate the complex response of an estuary to environmental change because of interacting physical and biogeochemical processes.

  16. Effects of oxygenated drinking water on gaseous emissions, rumen microorganisms and milk production in dairy cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dairy cattle production systems contribute to greenhouse gas emissions, predominantly in the form of methane. Enteric methane is formed by methanogenic archaea (methanogens) that require anaerobic conditions to thrive. A water treatment system (Oxion, Hugoton, KS) increases the dissolved oxygen conc...

  17. Advancing the visualization of pure water transport in porous materials by fast, talbot interferometry-based multi-contrast x-ray micro-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fei; Griffa, Michele; Hipp, Alexander; Derluyn, Hannelore; Moonen, Peter; Kaufmann, Rolf; Boone, Matthieu N.; Beckmann, Felix; Lura, Pietro

    2016-10-01

    The spatio-temporal distribution (4D) of water in porous materials plays a fundamental role in many natural and technological processes. The dynamics of water transport is strongly entangled with the material's pore-scale structure. Understanding their correlation requires imaging simultaneously the 4D water distribution and the porous microstructure. To date, 4D images with high temporal and spatial resolution have been mainly acquired by attenuation-based X-ray micro-tomography, whereby pure water is substituted by saline solutions with high atomic number components to improve image contrast. The use of saline solutions is however not always desirable, as the altered fluid properties may affect the transport process as well or, as it is the case for hydrating cement-based materials, they may modify the chemical reactions and their kinetics. In this study, we aimed at visualizing pure water transport in porous building materials by a new implementation of fast Talbot interferometry-based multi-contrast X-ray micro-tomography at the P07 beamline of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht at DESY. We report results from a mortar specimen imaged at three different stages during evaporative drying. We show the possibility of visualizing simultaneously the microstructure and the pore-scale water redistribution by the phase contrast images. In addition, different solid material phases are clearly distinguished in these images. The higher contrast between water and the porous substrate, achievable in the phase contrast images, compared with the attenuation ones, empowers new analysis and allows investigating the correlation between the drying process and the porous microstructure. The approach offers the possibility of studying other chemically inert or reactive water transport processes without any chemical or physical perturbation of the processes themselves.

  18. Quantitative estimation of surface ocean productivity and bottom water oxygen concentration using benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loubere, Paul

    1994-10-01

    An electronic supplement of this material may be obtained on adiskette or Anonymous FTP from KOSMOS.AGU.ORG. (LOGIN toAGU's FTP account using ANONYMOUS as the usemame andGUEST as the password. Go to the right directory by typing CDAPEND. Type LS to see what files are available. Type GET and thename of the file to get it. Finally, type EXIT to leave the system.)(Paper 94PA01624, Quantitative estimation of surface oceanproductivity and bottom water concentration using benthicforaminifera, by P. Loubere). Diskette may be ordered from AmericanGeophysical Union, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC20009; $15.00. Payment must accompany order.Quantitative estimation of surface ocean productivity and bottom water oxygen concentration with benthic foraminifera was attempted using 70 samples from equatorial and North Pacific surface sediments. These samples come from a well defined depth range in the ocean, between 2200 and 3200 m, so that depth related factors do not interfere with the estimation. Samples were selected so that foraminifera were well preserved in the sediments and temperature and salinity were nearly uniform (T = 1.5° C; S = 34.6‰). The sample set was also assembled so as to minimize the correlation often seen between surface ocean productivity and bottom water oxygen values (r² = 0.23 for prediction purposes in this case). This procedure reduced the chances of spurious results due to correlations between the environmental variables. The samples encompass a range of productivities from about 25 to >300 gC m-2 yr-1, and a bottom water oxygen range from 1.8 to 3.5 ml/L. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages were quantified using the >62 µm fraction of the sediments and 46 taxon categories. MANOVA multivariate regression was used to project the faunal matrix onto the two environmental dimensions using published values for productivity and bottom water oxygen to calibrate this operation. The success of this regression was measured with the multivariate r

  19. NADH plays the vital role for chiral pure D-(-)-2,3-butanediol production in Bacillus subtilis under limited oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Wang, Zhiwen; Chen, Tao; Liu, Weixi; Shi, Ting; Wang, Guanglu; Tang, Ya-jie; Zhao, Xueming

    2014-10-01

    Compared with traditional pathogenic producers, Bacillus subtilis as a Class I microorganism offers many advantages for industrial-scale 2,3-butanediol production. Unlike previous reports in which two stereoisomers (with a ratio of 3:2) were produced, we first found that wild type B. subtilis 168 generates only D-(-)-2,3-butanediol (purity >99%) under low oxygen conditions. The total high yield of 2,3-butanediol and acetoin, and acetoin reductase enzyme assay indicate that it is the high level of NADH availability, instead of high acetoin reductase activity, contributes more to 2,3-butanediol production in B. subtilis. The strategy for increasing the pool of NADH availability, the key factor for 2,3-butanediol production, was designed through low dissolved oxygen control, adding reducing substrates and rationally metabolic engineering. A transhydrogenase encoded by udhA was introduced to provide more NADH from NADPH and allowed enhanced 2,3-butanediol production. Finally, BSF20 produced 49.29 g/L D(-)-2,3-butanediol. These results demonstrated that B. subtilis is a competitive producer for chiral 2,3-butanediol production. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Measurement and analysis of micropore aeration system's oxygenating ability under operation condition in waste water treatment plant].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Shi, Han-Chang; Qiu, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Using the aeration pool in the fourth-stage at Wuxi Lucun Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) as experimental setup, off-gas method was selected to measure the oxygenating ability parameters of micropore aerators in a real WWTP operating condition and these values were compared with those in fresh water to evaluate the performance of the micropore aerators. Results showed that the micropore aerators which were distributed in different galleries of the aeration pool had significantly different oxygenating abilities under operation condition. The oxygenating ability of the micropore aerators distributed in the same gallery changed slightly during one day. Comparing with the oxygenating ability in fresh water, it decreased a lot in the real aeration pool, in more details, under the real WWTP operating condition, the values of oxygen transfer coefficient K(La) oxygenation capacity OC and oxygen utilization E(a) decreased by 43%, 57% and 76%, respectively.

  1. Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of bottled waters of the world.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Gabriel J; Winter, David A; Spero, Howard J; Zierenberg, Robert A; Reeder, Mathew D; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2005-01-01

    Bottled and packaged waters are an increasingly significant component of the human diet. These products are regulated at the regional, national, and international levels, and determining the authenticity of marketing and labeling claims represents a challenge to regulatory agencies. Here, we present a dataset of stable isotope ratios for bottled waters sampled worldwide, and consider potential applications of such data for regulatory, forensic and geochemical standardization applications. The hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of 234 samples of bottled water range from -147 per thousand to +15 per thousand and from -19.1 per thousand to +3.0 per thousand, respectively. These values fall within and span most of the normal range for meteoric waters, indicating that these commercially available products represent a source of waters for use as laboratory working standards in applications requiring standardization over a large range of isotope ratios. The measured values of bottled water samples cluster along the global meteoric water line, suggesting that bottled water isotope ratios preserve information about the water sources from which they were derived. Using the dataset, we demonstrate how bottled water isotope ratios provide evidence for substantial evaporative enrichment of water sources prior to bottling and for the marketing of waters derived from mountain and lowland sources under the same name. Comparison of bottled water isotope ratios with natural environmental water isotope ratios demonstrates that on average the isotopic composition of bottled water tends to be similar to the composition of naturally available local water sources, suggesting that in many cases bottled water need not be considered as an isotopically distinct component of the human diet. Our findings suggest that stable isotope ratios of bottled water have the power to distinguish ultimate (e.g., recharge) and proximal (e.g., reservoir) sources of bottled water and constitute a potential

  2. The role of dams in the water stability and oxygenation of semi-enclosed bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Ierotheos; Kountoura, Krystallia

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that dams were constructed in order to provide significant domestic and economic benefits. Apart from the advantages of these constructions, such as the hydroelectric power production, the flooding control and the storage of water for irrigation, there are also important impacts. Among the most serious of them upstream, is the conversion from a river system to a lake, the sediment transport and changes in the river's temperature and oxygen. However due to the irregular discharge resulting from the dams operation, there are also changes in biodiversity and in bio-geochemical cycle of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and phosphorus thereby causing changes in temperature, turbidity, stratification, dissolved oxygen, nutrients and heavy metals, downstream. In order to determine how the existence of dams affects both the water stability and the dissolved oxygen conditions, we studied the enclosed bay of Amvrakikos Gulf in Western Greece. The gulf receives freshwater inputs from north by two rivers along which there are three dams. Before the dams, the maximum discharges into the Amvrakikos Gulf were during late winter and spring months. During autumn and early winter stratification was weak and mixing could take place within the entire gulf. After the dams construction, the rivers have been discharging large amounts of freshwater into the gulf in accordance to the Public Power Corporation's needs. Due to the fact that large volumes of fresh water discharged into the system during summer and autumn, much later than would occur without the presence of dams, the water column is characterized by stratification during those periods. As a consequence, the pycnocline which is characterized by high static stability, prevents both the mixing between the surface and the bottom layer and the oxygenation of the isolated water near the bottom. On the other hand due to the limited hydropower needs during spring, the volume of fresh water which discharged into the system is

  3. Diffusion of oxygen in water and hydrocarbons using an electron spin resonance spin-label technique.

    PubMed Central

    Subczynski, W K; Hyde, J S

    1984-01-01

    The Smoluchowski equation for the bimolecular collision rate of dissolved oxygen molecules with spin labels yielded values for the diffusion constant of oxygen in water that are in agreement with the Stokes-Einstein equation (D infinity T/eta, where eta is the macroscopic viscosity) and with published values obtained by conventional methods. Heisenberg exchange at an interaction distance of 4.5 A occurs with a probability close to one for each encounter. In mixed hydrocarbons (olive oil, paraffin oils) and sec-butyl benzene, D infinity (T/eta)rho, where rho lies between 0.5 and 1. Oxygen diffuses in the hydrocarbons between 10 and 100 times more rapidly than predicted from the macroscopic viscosity. Similar results would be expected for diffusion of oxygen in model and biological membranes. Parallel measurements of rotational diffusion of the spin labels show little correlation with measurements of translational diffusion of oxygen. Dipolar interactions between spin labels and oxygen appear negligible except in the limit of highest viscosities. PMID:6326877

  4. Thermoneutral water immersion and hyperbaric oxygen do not alter cortisol regulation.

    PubMed

    Conaty, Betsy J; Shykoff, Barbara E; Florian, John P

    2015-01-01

    Research documenting changes in cortisol concentration following hyperbaric exposures has been contradictory, possibly due to the inclusion of many confounding factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to document short- and long-term cortisol responses following repeated water immersions arid/or exposure to raised partial pressure of oxygen under controlled conditions. Thirty-two Navy divers (31 ± 7 [19-44] years; mean ± SD) were exposed to one of three resting thermoneutral experimental conditions at a pressure of 1.35 atmospheres absolute (atm abs) for six hours on five consecutive days: (1) breathing air while immersed (air; n = 10); (2) breathing 100% oxygen in a hyperbaric chamber (dry; n = 12); or (3) breathing 100% oxygen while immersed (oxygen; n = 10). Divers were at rest for all conditions. Serum cortisol concentrations were measured one hour before and after each dive. The change in cortisol (ug/dL) after diving was similar for air (3.63 ± 5.56), dry (4.91 ± 3.68) and oxygen (3.50 ± 3.48) phases (p > 0.05). There were no differences in preor post-dive cortisol concentrations across dive days for any of the experimental conditions. This study provides evidence that repeated long-duration, thermoneutral immersions and/or hyperbaric oxygen exposures at 1.35 atm abs, under ideal conditions per se do not abnormally alter cortisol concentrations. Observed changes are likely the result of the natural circadian rhythm of cortisol.

  5. Challenges associated with modeling low-oxygen waters in Chesapeake Bay: a multiple model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irby, I. D.; Friedrichs, M. A. M.; Friedrichs, C. T.; Bever, A. J.; Hood, R. R.; Lanerolle, L. W. J.; Scully, M. E.; Sellner, K.; Shen, J.; Testa, J.; Li, M.; Wang, H.; Wang, P.; Linker, L.; Xia, M.

    2015-12-01

    As three-dimensional (3-D) aquatic ecosystem models are becoming used more frequently for operational water quality forecasts and ecological management decisions, it is important to understand the relative strengths and limitations of existing 3-D models of varying spatial resolution and biogeochemical complexity. To this end, two-year simulations of the Chesapeake Bay from eight hydrodynamic-oxygen models have been statistically compared to each other and to historical monitoring data. Results show that although models have difficulty resolving the variables typically thought to be the main drivers of dissolved oxygen variability (stratification, nutrients, and chlorophyll), all eight models have significant skill in reproducing the mean and seasonal variability of dissolved oxygen. In addition, models with constant net respiration rates independent of nutrient supply and temperature reproduced observed dissolved oxygen concentrations about as well as much more complex, nutrient-dependent biogeochemical models. This finding has significant ramifications for short-term hypoxia forecasts in the Chesapeake Bay, which may be possible with very simple oxygen parameterizations, in contrast to the more complex full biogeochemical models required for scenario-based forecasting. However, models have difficulty simulating correct density and oxygen mixed layer depths, which are important ecologically in terms of habitat compression. Observations indicate a much stronger correlation between the depths of the top of the pycnocline and oxycline than between their maximum vertical gradients, highlighting the importance of the mixing depth in defining the region of aerobic habitat in the Chesapeake Bay when low-oxygen bottom waters are present. Improvement in hypoxia simulations will thus depend more on the ability of models to reproduce the correct mean and variability of the depth of the physically driven surface mixed layer than the precise magnitude of the vertical density

  6. Challenges associated with modeling low-oxygen waters in Chesapeake Bay: a multiple model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irby, Isaac D.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Friedrichs, Carl T.; Bever, Aaron J.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Lanerolle, Lyon W. J.; Li, Ming; Linker, Lewis; Scully, Malcolm E.; Sellner, Kevin; Shen, Jian; Testa, Jeremy; Wang, Hao; Wang, Ping; Xia, Meng

    2016-04-01

    As three-dimensional (3-D) aquatic ecosystem models are used more frequently for operational water quality forecasts and ecological management decisions, it is important to understand the relative strengths and limitations of existing 3-D models of varying spatial resolution and biogeochemical complexity. To this end, 2-year simulations of the Chesapeake Bay from eight hydrodynamic-oxygen models have been statistically compared to each other and to historical monitoring data. Results show that although models have difficulty resolving the variables typically thought to be the main drivers of dissolved oxygen variability (stratification, nutrients, and chlorophyll), all eight models have significant skill in reproducing the mean and seasonal variability of dissolved oxygen. In addition, models with constant net respiration rates independent of nutrient supply and temperature reproduced observed dissolved oxygen concentrations about as well as much more complex, nutrient-dependent biogeochemical models. This finding has significant ramifications for short-term hypoxia forecasts in the Chesapeake Bay, which may be possible with very simple oxygen parameterizations, in contrast to the more complex full biogeochemical models required for scenario-based forecasting. However, models have difficulty simulating correct density and oxygen mixed layer depths, which are important ecologically in terms of habitat compression. Observations indicate a much stronger correlation between the depths of the top of the pycnocline and oxycline than between their maximum vertical gradients, highlighting the importance of the mixing depth in defining the region of aerobic habitat in the Chesapeake Bay when low-oxygen bottom waters are present. Improvement in hypoxia simulations will thus depend more on the ability of models to reproduce the correct mean and variability of the depth of the physically driven surface mixed layer than the precise magnitude of the vertical density gradient.

  7. Molecular mimicry of substrate oxygen atoms by water molecules in the beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Pujadas, G; Palau, J

    2001-08-01

    Soybean beta-amylase (EC 3.2.1.2) has been crystallized both free and complexed with a variety of ligands. Four water molecules in the free-enzyme catalytic cleft form a multihydrogen-bond network with eight strategic residues involved in enzyme-ligand hydrogen bonds. We show here that the positions of these four water molecules are coincident with the positions of four potential oxygen atoms of the ligands within the complex. Some of these waters are displaced from the active site when the ligands bind to the enzyme. How many are displaced depends on the shape of the ligand. This means that when one of the four positions is not occupied by a ligand oxygen atom, the corresponding water remains. We studied the functional/structural role of these four waters and conclude that their presence means that the conformation of the eight side chains is fixed in all situations (free or complexed enzyme) and preserved from unwanted or forbidden conformational changes that could hamper the catalytic mechanism. The water structure at the active pocket of beta-amylase is therefore essential for providing the ligand recognition process with plasticity. It does not affect the protein active-site geometry and preserves the overall hydrogen-bonding network, irrespective of which ligand is bound to the enzyme. We also investigated whether other enzymes showed a similar role for water. Finally, we discuss the potential use of these results for predicting whether water molecules can mimic ligand atoms in the active center.

  8. Covariance of oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition in plant water: Species effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, L.W.; DeNiro, M.J. )

    1989-12-01

    Leaf water becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen during evapotranspiration. The magnitude of the enrichment has been shown to be influenced by temperature and humidity, but the effects of species-specific factors on leaf water enrichment of D and {sup 18}O have not been studied for different plants growing together. To learn whether leaf water enrichment patterns and processes for D and {sup 18}O are different for individual species growing under the same environmental conditions the authors tested the proposal that leaf waters in plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) show high sloped (m in the leaf water equation {delta}D = m {delta}{sup 18}O + b) than in C{sub 3} plants. They determined the relationships between the stable hydrogen ({delta}D) and oxygen ({delta}{sup 18}O) isotope ratios of leaf waters collected during the diurnal cycle of evapotranspiration for Yucca schidigera, Ephedra aspera, Agave deserti, Prunus ilicifolia, Yucca whipplei, Heteromeles arbutifolia, Dyckia fosteriana, Simmondsia chinensis, and Encelia farinosa growing at two sites in southern California. The findings indicate that m in the aforementioned equation is related to the overall residence time for water in the leaf and proportions of water subjected to repeated evapotranspiration enrichments of heavy isotopes.

  9. Stable sulfur and oxygen isotopes as geochemical tracers of sulfate in karst waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Kobayashi, Tatsuaki; Strosnider, William H. J.; Wu, Pan

    2017-08-01

    Karst water resources, which are extremely sensitive to mining activities, are critical for the support of human societies and ecological systems in many regions worldwide. In order to determine the sources and fate of dissolved sulfate in low-pH karst waters, hydrochemical variations of karst waters with and without acid mine drainage (AMD) impacts were investigated along with stable isotope dynamics. As expected, hydrochemical characteristics and isotopic compositions of the AMD and AMD-downstream water (ADW) were dramatically different from that of the non-AMD-impacted water (NAW). The sources of sulfur isotopes in sulfate were predominantly pyrite oxidation for the AMD and ADW, and atmospheric deposition for the NAW. Based on the general isotope-balance model, the relative proportions of sulfate oxygen derived from water and air were calculated. The mean proportion of sulfate oxygen derived from water in ADW was roughly double that of AMD. This suggests that the sulfate associated with AMD is predominantly influenced by aerobic pyrite oxidation, while that of ADW is likely affected by the dissolution of pyrite under anaerobic conditions in reservoir sediment. This observation was coincident with the noted variations of hydrochemical characteristics and was supported by principal component analysis. These results provide a better understanding of how stable isotopes of sulfate and water can be used to track mining contamination in karst aquifers, which could benefit remediation planning for these distinctive systems.

  10. Structure and stability of graphene nanoribbons in oxygen, carbon dioxide, water, and ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitsonen, Ari P.; Saitta, A. Marco; Wassmann, Tobias; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco

    2010-09-01

    We determine, by means of density-functional theory, the stability and the structure of graphene-nanoribbon (GNR) edges in presence of molecules such as oxygen, water, ammonia, and carbon dioxide. As in the case of hydrogen-terminated nanoribbons, we find that the most stable armchair and zigzag configurations are characterized by a nonmetallic/nonmagnetic nature, and are compatible with Clar’s sextet rules, well known in organic chemistry. In particular, we predict that, at thermodynamic equilibrium, neutral GNRs in oxygen-rich atmosphere should preferentially be along the armchair direction while water-saturated GNRs should present zigzag edges. Our results promise to be particularly useful to GNRs synthesis since the most recent and advanced experimental routes are most effective in water and/or ammonia-containing solutions.

  11. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange reactions between clay minerals and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Kharaka, Y.K.

    1976-01-01

    The extent of hydrogen and oxygen isotope exchange between clay minerals and water has been measured in the temperature range 100-350?? for bomb runs of up to almost 2 years. Hydrogen isotope exchange between water and the clays was demonstrable at 100??. Exchange rates were 3-5 times greater for montmorillonite than for kaolinite or illite and this is attributed to the presence of interlayer water in the montmorillonite structure. Negligible oxygen isotope exchange occurred at these low temperatures. The great disparity in D and O18 exchange rates observed in every experiment demonstrates that hydrogen isotope exchange occurred by a mechanism of proton exchange independent of the slower process of O18 exchange. At 350?? kaolinite reacted to form pyrophyllite and diaspore. This was accompanied by essentially complete D exchange but minor O18 exchange and implies that intact structural units in the pyrophyllite were inherited from the kaolinite precursor. ?? 1976.

  12. Photophysical Properties and Singlet Oxygen Generation Efficiencies of Water-Soluble Fullerene Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Stasheuski, Alexander S; Galievsky, Victor A; Stupak, Alexander P; Dzhagarov, Boris M; Choi, Mi Jin; Chung, Bong Hyun; Jeong, Jin Young

    2014-01-01

    As various fullerene derivatives have been developed, it is necessary to explore their photophysical properties for potential use in photoelectronics and medicine. Here, we address the photophysical properties of newly synthesized water-soluble fullerene-based nanoparticles and polyhydroxylated fullerene as a representative water-soluble fullerene derivative. They show broad emission band arising from a wide-range of excitation energies. It is attributed to the optical transitions from disorder-induced states, which decay in the nanosecond time range. We determine the kinetic properties of the singlet oxygen (1O2) luminescence generated by the fullerene nanoparticles and polyhydroxylated fullerene to consider the potential as photodynamic agents. Triplet state decay of the nanoparticles was longer than 1O2 lifetime in water. Singlet oxygen quantum yield of a series of the fullerene nanoparticles is comparably higher ranging from 0.15 to 0.2 than that of polyhydroxylated fullerene, which is about 0.06. PMID:24893622

  13. THE RELATION OF OXYGEN SUPPLY TO WATER MOVEMENT AND TO UREA FORMATION IN SURVIVING LIVER TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Opie, Eugene L.

    1961-01-01

    Liver slices have been immersed during periods up to 4 hours at 38°C. in Krebs-Ringer solution with bicarbonate buffer and exposed to varied oxygen supply in the presence of carbon dioxide equal to that of venous blood. Water movement, urea, and amino acid formation by the liver tissue have been measured. Water contents of surviving liver tissue diminishes with increased oxygen supply, but during life the maximum limit of oxygen is determined by that brought by the arterial blood and has an approximate partial pressure of 100 mm. Hg. Urea formation by liver slices is increased by increased oxygen supply but does not occur with anoxia. Osmotic pressure within liver cells is maintained in part by amino acids and related substances, and in part by electrolytes. Diminished osmotic pressure and loss of water is explainable by oxidation of nitrogenous substances with formation of urea which leaves the cells. These changes within a limited range of variation are adjustable to functional needs. PMID:13731028

  14. Oxygen tolerance of an in silico-designed bioinspired hydrogen-evolving catalyst in water.

    PubMed

    Sit, Patrick H-L; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2013-02-05

    Certain bacterial enzymes, the diiron hydrogenases, have turnover numbers for hydrogen production from water as large as 10(4)/s. Their much smaller common active site, composed of earth-abundant materials, has a structure that is an attractive starting point for the design of a practical catalyst for electrocatalytic or solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water. In earlier work, our group has reported the computational design of [FeFe](P)/FeS(2), a hydrogenase-inspired catalyst/electrode complex, which is efficient and stable throughout the production cycle. However, the diiron hydrogenases are highly sensitive to ambient oxygen by a mechanism not yet understood in detail. An issue critical for practical use of [FeFe](P)/FeS(2) is whether this catalyst/electrode complex is tolerant to the ambient oxygen. We report demonstration by ab initio simulations that the complex is indeed tolerant to dissolved oxygen over timescales long enough for practical application, reducing it efficiently. This promising hydrogen-producing catalyst, composed of earth-abundant materials and with a diffusion-limited rate in acidified water, is efficient as well as oxygen tolerant.

  15. Undocumented water column sink for cadmium in open ocean oxygen-deficient zones

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, David J.; Conway, Tim M.; John, Seth G.; Christian, James R.; Kramer, Dennis I.; Pedersen, Tom F.; Cullen, Jay T.

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a micronutrient and a tracer of biological productivity and circulation in the ocean. The correlation between dissolved Cd and the major algal nutrients in seawater has led to the use of Cd preserved in microfossils to constrain past ocean nutrient distributions. However, linking Cd to marine biological processes requires constraints on marine sources and sinks of Cd. Here, we show a decoupling between Cd and major nutrients within oxygen-deficient zones (ODZs) in both the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans, which we attribute to Cd sulfide (CdS) precipitation in euxinic microenvironments around sinking biological particles. We find that dissolved Cd correlates well with dissolved phosphate in oxygenated waters, but is depleted compared with phosphate in ODZs. Additionally, suspended particles from the North Atlantic show high Cd content and light Cd stable isotope ratios within the ODZ, indicative of CdS precipitation. Globally, we calculate that CdS precipitation in ODZs is an important, and to our knowledge a previously undocumented marine sink of Cd. Our results suggest that water column oxygen depletion has a substantial impact on Cd biogeochemical cycling, impacting the global relationship between Cd and major nutrients and suggesting that Cd may be a previously unidentified tracer for water column oxygen deficiency on geological timescales. Similar depletions of copper and zinc in the Northeast Pacific indicate that sulfide precipitation in ODZs may also have an influence on the global distribution of other trace metals. PMID:24778239

  16. Modeling the thermostability of surface functionalisation by oxygen, hydroxyl, and water on nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lin; Barnard, Amanda S

    2011-06-01

    Understanding nanodiamond functionalisation is of great importance for biological and medical applications. Here we examine the stabilities of oxygen, hydroxyl, and water functionalisation of the nanodiamonds using the self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding simulations. We find that the oxygen and hydroxyl termination are thermodynamically favourable and form strong C–O covalent bonds on the nanodiamond surface in an O2 and H2 gas reservoir, which confirms previous experiments. Yet, the thermodynamic stabilities of oxygen and hydroxyl functionalisation decrease dramatically in a water vapour reservoir. In contrast, H2O molecules are found to be physically adsorbed on the nanodiamond surface, and forced chemical adsorption results in decomposition of H2O. Moreover, the functionalisation efficiency is found to be facet dependent. The oxygen functionalisation prefers the {100} facets as opposed to alternative facets in an O2 and H2 gas reservoir. The hydroxyl functionalisation favors the {111} surfaces in an O2 and H2 reservoir and the {100} facets in a water vapour reservoir, respectively. This facet selectivity is found to be largely dependent upon the environmental temperature, chemical reservoir, and morphology of the nanodiamonds.

  17. Undocumented water column sink for cadmium in open ocean oxygen-deficient zones.

    PubMed

    Janssen, David J; Conway, Tim M; John, Seth G; Christian, James R; Kramer, Dennis I; Pedersen, Tom F; Cullen, Jay T

    2014-05-13

    Cadmium (Cd) is a micronutrient and a tracer of biological productivity and circulation in the ocean. The correlation between dissolved Cd and the major algal nutrients in seawater has led to the use of Cd preserved in microfossils to constrain past ocean nutrient distributions. However, linking Cd to marine biological processes requires constraints on marine sources and sinks of Cd. Here, we show a decoupling between Cd and major nutrients within oxygen-deficient zones (ODZs) in both the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans, which we attribute to Cd sulfide (CdS) precipitation in euxinic microenvironments around sinking biological particles. We find that dissolved Cd correlates well with dissolved phosphate in oxygenated waters, but is depleted compared with phosphate in ODZs. Additionally, suspended particles from the North Atlantic show high Cd content and light Cd stable isotope ratios within the ODZ, indicative of CdS precipitation. Globally, we calculate that CdS precipitation in ODZs is an important, and to our knowledge a previously undocumented marine sink of Cd. Our results suggest that water column oxygen depletion has a substantial impact on Cd biogeochemical cycling, impacting the global relationship between Cd and major nutrients and suggesting that Cd may be a previously unidentified tracer for water column oxygen deficiency on geological timescales. Similar depletions of copper and zinc in the Northeast Pacific indicate that sulfide precipitation in ODZs may also have an influence on the global distribution of other trace metals.

  18. Oxygen tolerance of an in silico-designed bioinspired hydrogen-evolving catalyst in water

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Patrick H.-L.; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H.; Selloni, Annabella

    2013-01-01

    Certain bacterial enzymes, the diiron hydrogenases, have turnover numbers for hydrogen production from water as large as 104/s. Their much smaller common active site, composed of earth-abundant materials, has a structure that is an attractive starting point for the design of a practical catalyst for electrocatalytic or solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water. In earlier work, our group has reported the computational design of [FeFe]P/FeS2, a hydrogenase-inspired catalyst/electrode complex, which is efficient and stable throughout the production cycle. However, the diiron hydrogenases are highly sensitive to ambient oxygen by a mechanism not yet understood in detail. An issue critical for practical use of [FeFe]P/FeS2 is whether this catalyst/electrode complex is tolerant to the ambient oxygen. We report demonstration by ab initio simulations that the complex is indeed tolerant to dissolved oxygen over timescales long enough for practical application, reducing it efficiently. This promising hydrogen-producing catalyst, composed of earth-abundant materials and with a diffusion-limited rate in acidified water, is efficient as well as oxygen tolerant. PMID:23341607

  19. Denitrification Rates in the Low-Oxygen Waters of the Stratified Baltic Proper

    PubMed Central

    Rönner, Ulf; Sörensson, Fred

    1985-01-01

    Denitrification activity was shown in the deep, low-oxygen waters of the Baltic proper by both in vitro and in situ methods. The vertical distribution of NO3− in the water column showed nitrate consumption and NO2− and N2O maxima in the deep waters when O2 was below 0.2 ml liter−1, which is suggestive evidence for denitrification. Direct in situ evidence for denitrification was obtained by finding an N2 saturation of up to 108% in the deep waters. When these waters were incubated with 15NO3−, 15N2 was produced. Quantification of the denitrification rate done by the addition of C2H2 to water samples from the active depths showed a rate of about 0.10 μmol liter−1 day−1. PMID:16346913

  20. A cryptic sulfur cycle in oxygen-minimum-zone waters off the Chilean coast.

    PubMed

    Canfield, Don E; Stewart, Frank J; Thamdrup, Bo; De Brabandere, Loreto; Dalsgaard, Tage; Delong, Edward F; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Ulloa, Osvaldo

    2010-12-03

    Nitrogen cycling is normally thought to dominate the biogeochemistry and microbial ecology of oxygen-minimum zones in marine environments. Through a combination of molecular techniques and process rate measurements, we showed that both sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation contribute to energy flux and elemental cycling in oxygen-free waters off the coast of northern Chile. These processes may have been overlooked because in nature, the sulfide produced by sulfate reduction immediately oxidizes back to sulfate. This cryptic sulfur cycle is linked to anammox and other nitrogen cycling processes, suggesting that it may influence biogeochemical cycling in the global ocean.

  1. Bridging Hydroxyls on Anatase TiO2(101) by Water Dissociation in Oxygen Vacancies.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Immad M; Harrison, George T; Wilson, Axel; Pang, Chi L; Zegenhagen, Jörg; Thornton, Geoff

    2017-10-09

    Titanium dioxide is a promising candidate for photocatalytic H2 fuel production, and understanding water splitting on TiO2 surfaces is vital toward explaining and improving the generation of H2. In this work, we electron irradiate anatase TiO2(101) at room temperature to create metastable surface oxygen vacancies in order to investigate their ability to dissociate H2O. Our scanning tunneling microscopy investigations suggest that the surface oxygen vacancies can dissociate H2O by forming bridging OH species. This claim is supported by theoretical calculations from the literature and our previously published spectroscopic measurements.

  2. Theoretical investigation of the injection and evaporation of water in a hydrogen/oxygen steam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Stefan

    1990-05-01

    For the cooling of the reaction products resulting from a stoichiometric hydrogen/oxygen combustion, water is injected normal to the gas stream. The penetration of the jet strongly influences the temperature distribution across the streaming water vapor. The penetration of the jet is calculated by using the jet shedding model. The results are compared with the data of the garden hose model. To calculate the lifetime of a water droplet in super heated stream, several models are developed. The parameters of the injection and evaporation process are varied and analyzed.

  3. Ultra-pure soft water ameliorates atopic skin disease by preventing metallic soap deposition in NC/Tnd mice and reduces skin dryness in humans.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Akira; Jung, Kyungsook; Jang, Hyosun; Ahn, Ginnae; Ishizaka, Saori; Amagai, Yosuke; Oida, Kumiko; Arkwright, Peter D; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    Mineral ions in tap water react with fatty acids in soap, leading to the formation of insoluble precipitate (metallic soap) on skin during washing. We hypothesised that metallic soap might negatively alter skin conditions. Application of metallic soap onto the skin of NC/Tnd mice with allergic dermatitis further induced inflammation with elevation of plasma immunoglobulin E and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Pruritus and dryness were ameliorated when the back of mice was washed with soap in Ca2+- and Mg2+-free ultra-pure soft water (UPSW). Washing in UPSW, but not tap water, also protected the skin of healthy volunteers from the soap deposition. Furthermore, 4 weeks of showering with UPSW reduced dryness and pruritus of human subjects with dry skin. Washing with UPSW may be therapeutically beneficial in patients with skin troubles.

  4. Temporal and spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen in the Pearl River Estuary and adjacent coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kedong; Lin, Zhifeng; Ke, Zhiyuan

    2004-10-01

    The Pearl River is one of the large rivers in the world and it discharges to the northern part of the South China Sea. There has been a concern about the deterioration of dissolved oxygen conditions in the Pearl River estuary and adjacent coastal waters. In this study, historical data on dissolved oxygen (DO) from 1980s, recent data from a summer cruise in 1999, and a 10-year time series in DO for 1990-2000 were used to examine spatial and temporal distribution of DO in the Pearl River estuary and adjacent coastal waters near Hong Kong. In the adjacent coastal waters, low oxygen waters <4 mg l-1 occurred in large areas during the summer of 1981, but DO rarely dropped to <3 mg l-1. In the Pearl River estuary, DO was 3.5-4 mg l-1 in the eastern part, but was >4 mg l-1 in the western part in August 1984. In July 1999, DO was<4 mg l-1 in a near bottom 2 m layer in a large area of the estuary and was <2.5 mg l-1 in the eastern section, just inside the entrance of the estuary. In the coastal waters adjacent to Hong Kong, DO was>4 mg l-1. The 9-year time series showed that DO decreased periodically in summer, but rarely dropped to <3 mg l-1. There was no apparent trend of decreasing DO between 1990 and 2000. Compared to August 1984, DO decreased significantly during the summer of 1999 in the Pearl River estuary, but large scale hypoxia (<2 mg l-1) was not observed. The spatial distribution of low oxygen waters may be controlled by estuarine circulation because DO was significantly correlated with salinity in the summers of 1981 and 1984. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of DO in the bottom layer was parallel to the topography of the bottom, indicating the importance of benthic consumption of DO in the sediment and the subsequent flux of low DO waters from the sediment-water interface resuspended by physical mixing. Relative to the high loading of nitrogen from the Pearl River, the present PO4 concentration is still low. It is possible that the lack of large areas of

  5. Identification of sources and production processes of bottled waters by stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios.

    PubMed

    Brencic, Mihael; Vreca, Polona

    2006-01-01

    Bottled water is a food product that considerably depends on the environment from which it originates, not only at the place where it is produced, but predominantly on the conditions in the recharge area of the wells captured for bottling. According to their source and the bottling process, bottled waters can be divided into natural and artificially sparkling waters, still and flavoured waters. These waters originate from various parts of the hydrological cycle and their natural origin is reflected in their hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopic compositions (delta(2)H and delta(18)O). A total of 58 domestic and foreign brands and 16 replicates of bottled waters, randomly collected on the Slovene market in September 2004, were analysed for delta(2)H and delta(18)O. The isotopic composition varied between -83 per thousand and -46 per thousand with an average of -66 per thousand for hydrogen, and between -11.9 per thousand and -7.5 per thousand with an average of -9.6 per thousand for oxygen. This investigation helped (1) to determine and test the classification of bottled waters, (2) to determine the natural origin of bottled water, and (3) to indicate differences between the natural and production processes. The production process may influence the isotopic composition of flavoured waters and artificially sparkling waters. No such modification was observed for still and natural sparkling waters. The methods applied, together with hydrological knowledge, can be used for the authentication of bottled waters for regulatory and consumer control applications. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The triple oxygen isotope composition of leaf waters in Mpala, central Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Levin, N.; Soderberg, K.; Dennis, K. J.; Caylor, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    The triple oxygen isotopic composition of water is an emerging tool for investigating the hydrological environment. The δ18O-δ17O relationship differs during kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation, such that the 17O depletion can be sensitive to relative humidity (Rh) during kinetic fractionation, mixing among different pools, and to the specific mode of kinetic fractionation. It has been proposed that the δ18O-δ17O relationship during evapotranspiration, as characterized by the slope λ(stem-leaf) on a ln(δ17O+1) vs. ln(δ18O+1) plot, is mainly controlled by Rh but not affected by other environmental conditions or by plant species. In order to understand the sensitivity of λ(stem-leaf) to Rh and the utility of 17O-excess (the deviation of δ17O from a reference slope) in the terrestrial biosphere as a tracer of Rh conditions today and in the past, this study expands the triple oxygen isotope measurements of leaf waters to additional species in a semiarid environment. Paired stem and leaf waters of Acacia and grasses were collected in the Mpala Research Center in central Kenya and analyzed for their triple oxygen isotope composition. Leaf waters that were sampled diurnally (8 sampling intervals between 6 am and 5 pm) exhibit a range in δ18O and 17O-excess values of 11.2‰ and 107 per meg respectively for Acacia brevispica, and 14.4‰ and 147 per meg for the grass Panicum maximum. Except for one sample collected at 7am, the λ(stem-leaf) values for grasses are systematically lower (0.0012 to 0.0110) than Acacia λ(stem-leaf) values at the corresponding time of day; this might be explained by the progressive evaporative isotopic enrichment and mixing processes of leaf water along parallel veins of grass leaves. Most of the triple oxygen isotope composition of the Acacia leaf waters can be predicted using Craig-Gordon model. We built a mass balance model of an evolving leaf water system from nonsteady-state to steady-state conditions during

  7. Effect of administration of water enriched in O2 by injection or electrolysis on transcutaneous oxygen pressure in anesthetized pigs

    PubMed Central

    Charton, Antoine; Péronnet, François; Doutreleau, Stephane; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Klein, Alexis; Jimenez, Liliana; Geny, Bernard; Diemunsch, Pierre; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral administration of oxygenated water has been shown to improve blood oxygenation and could be an alternate way for oxygen (O2) supply. In this experiment, tissue oxygenation was compared in anesthetized pigs receiving a placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or a new electrolytic process. Methods Forty-two pigs randomized in three groups received either mineral water as placebo or water enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process (10 mL/kg in the stomach). Hemodynamic parameters, partial pressure of oxygen in the arterial blood (PaO2), skin blood flow, and tissue oxygenation (transcutaneous oxygen pressure, or TcPO2) were monitored during 90 minutes of general anesthesia. Absorption and tissue distribution of the three waters administered were assessed using dilution of deuterium oxide. Results Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, PaO2, arteriovenous oxygen difference, and water absorption from the gut were not significantly different among the three groups. The deuterium to protium ratio was also similar in the plasma, skin, and muscle at the end of the protocol. Skin blood flow decreased in the three groups. TcPO2 slowly decreased over the last 60 minutes of the experiment in the three groups, but when compared to the control group, the values remained significantly higher in animals that received the water enriched in O2 by electrolysis. Conclusions In this protocol, water enriched in O2 by electrolysis lessened the decline of peripheral tissue oxygenation. This observation is compatible with the claim that the electrolytic process generates water clathrates which trap O2 and facilitate O2 diffusion along pressure gradients. Potential applications of O2-enriched water include an alternate method of oxygen supply. PMID:25210438

  8. Direct atomic-scale imaging of hydrogen and oxygen interstitials in pure niobium using atom-probe tomography and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Jun; Tao, Runzhe; Klie, Robert F; Seidman, David N

    2013-01-22

    Imaging the three-dimensional atomic-scale structure of complex interfaces has been the goal of many recent studies, due to its importance to technologically relevant areas. Combining atom-probe tomography and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), we present an atomic-scale study of ultrathin (~5 nm) native oxide layers on niobium (Nb) and the formation of ordered niobium hydride phases near the oxide/Nb interface. Nb, an elemental type-II superconductor with the highest critical temperature (T(c) = 9.2 K), is the preferred material for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities in next-generation particle accelerators. Nb exhibits high solubilities for oxygen and hydrogen, especially within the RF-field penetration depth, which is believed to result in SRF quality factor losses. STEM imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy followed by ultraviolet laser-assisted local-electrode atom-probe tomography on the same needle-like sample reveals the NbO(2), Nb(2)O(5), NbO, Nb stacking sequence; annular bright-field imaging is used to visualize directly hydrogen atoms in bulk β-NbH.

  9. Cerium Anomalies in Fossil Fish Teeth Reveal Changes in Bottom Water Oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, C. O.; Scher, H. D.; Delaney, M. L.

    2007-12-01

    Shale-normalized rare earths and yttrium (REY) concentrations of fossil fish teeth in deep sea sediments display prominent negative cerium (Ce) anomalies and positive yttrium (Y) anomalies. These features are ultimately inherited from seawater and strongly indicate that fossil fish teeth preserve a seawater REY signature. In seawater, Ce+3 is oxidized to Ce+4, and Ce becomes depleted relative to the other REY's as it partitions into other phases (e.g., ferromanganese oxyhydroxides). The magnitude of Ce depletion in a water mass is thus related to its oxygen content. We hypothesize that changes in the oxygenation of bottom waters may be revealed by examining downcore variability in the magnitude of the Ce anomaly of fossil fish teeth. To test this hypothesis, REY concentrations were measured on samples of cleaned fossil fish teeth recovered from the late Paleogene to early Eocene sections of Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 1262 and 1263 (lower and upper Walvis Ridge, ODP Leg 208, South Atlantic Ocean). These sites are vertically offset (early Eocene paleodepths were 3700 and 1700 meters, respectively) and have been extensively studied to characterize the oceanic response to the Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Manganese enrichment factors (Mn EF) determined from total digestions of samples from these sites reveal abrupt changes in the oxygenation of bottom waters across the PETM interval. Mn EF's decrease to crustal values (~1) during the PETM, which reflects the reduction of Mn oxides as bottom water oxygen levels were depleted. Mn EF's begin to increase to 6-8 during the 'recovery phase' following the PETM. The Ce anomaly for these samples, Ce/Ce*, was calculated according to the geometric approach reported by Lawrence et al. (2006, Aquatic Geochemistry 12, 39-72), where Ce* represents an interpolation of the expected shale-normalized Ce concentration from near neighbors. In this notation, when Ce/Ce* = 1 no Ce anomaly is present. At upper Walvis Ridge

  10. The effect of water oxygen content on the production of greenhouse gases from shallow pond sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Adam; Quinton, John; Surridge, Ben; McNamara, Niall

    2014-05-01

    Shallow lakes and ponds, including those commonly found in agricultural landscapes are often only a few metres deep, with surface areas <1ha. Despite this, landscapes may contain a high number of these ponds, amounting to a considerable cumulative surface area. Many of these features, both naturally formed and man-made, receive and trap runoff with high nutrient and sediment loadings. As such, the potential for the production of greenhouse gases (GHGs) through biogeochemical cycling in the pond sediments may be significant. Furthermore, the abundance of available nutrients coupled with the shallow physical characteristics of these systems, mean that short, irregular eutrophic episodes during the summer are common, causing large fluctuations in the oxygen content of the overlying water column. The oxygen content of the water column is often cited as key factor in the production of GHGs in large lake and reservoir systems. Given the limited research focusing on shallow ponds/lakes, and potential for these systems to be important sources of GHGs, the impacts of variable water oxygen content should be investigated. Here we present the results from a sediment microcosm experiment utilising sediment cores from an agricultural pond system in Cumbria, UK. Intact sediment cores were incubated in the dark at in-situ temperature and continuously fed with filtered pond water for 2 weeks. During this time the oxygen content of the water was manipulated between fully oxygenated and anaerobic. Measurements of GHG release were based on calculated dissolved gas concentrations present in the water columns of these cores. Results indicated that during times of water column anoxia, production of methane and carbon dioxide increased significantly, despite the presence of substantial quantities of nitrate in the water columns. No change in N2O production was detected. These results indicate that while representing a significant cumulative carbon store in agricultural landscapes, shallow

  11. Remote Sensing of Dissolved Oxygen and Nitrogen in Water Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganoe, Rene; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    The health of an estuarine ecosystem is largely driven by the abundance of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen available for maintenance of plant and animal life. An investigation was conducted to quantify the concentration of dissolved molecular oxygen and nitrogen in water by means of Raman spectroscopy. This technique is proposed for the remote sensing of dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay, which will be utilized by aircraft in order to survey large areas in real-time. A proof of principle system has been developed and the specifications are being honed to maximize efficiency for the final application. The theoretical criteria of the research, components of the experimental system, and key findings are presented in this report

  12. Development of a solid electrolyte carbon dioxide and water reduction system for oxygen recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elikan, L.; Morris, J. P.; Wu, C. K.

    1972-01-01

    A 1/4-man solid electrolyte oxygen regeneration system, consisting of an electrolyzer, a carbon deposition reactor, and palladium membranes for separating hydrogen, was operated continuously in a 180-day test. Oxygen recovery from the carbon dioxide-water feed was 95%. One percent of the oxygen was lost to vacuum with the hydrogen off-gas. In a space cabin, the remaining 4% would have been recycled to the cabin and recovered. None of the electrolysis cells used in the 180-day test failed. Electrolysis power rose 20% during the test; the average power was 283.5 watts/man. Crew time was limited to 18 min/day of which 12 min/day was used for removing carbon. The success achieved in operating the system can be attributed to an extensive component development program, which is described. Stability of operation, ease of control, and flexibility in feed composition were demonstrated by the life test.

  13. Oxygen solubility and permeability of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Whitcombe, Michael J; Parker, Roger; Ring, Stephen G

    2005-06-13

    The saturated oxygen concentration in a series of aqueous solutions of sorbitol (up to 35% w/w) and maltitol (up to 50% w/w) was measured using colorimetric reagent vials based on Rhodazine D. The results indicate that the solubility of oxygen in low-water carbohydrates is considerably lower than its solubility in pure water. It was concluded that the low-oxygen solubility is a major factor contributing to the barrier properties of low-water content carbohydrates used in the encapsulation of flavours, lipids, peptides and other oxidisable species.

  14. Cognitive function in outbred house mice after 22 weeks of drinking oxygenated water.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Angela M; Bogusch, Corinna; Lerchl, Alexander

    2007-05-16

    Oxygen-enriched drinking water, which is increasingly sold worldwide, is claimed to "keep both the body and the mind healthy." However, currently there is no scientific evidence for such a statement. Therefore, we assessed the effect of 22 weeks of drinking oxygenated water on cognitive performance in healthy mice, using a spatial learning task and behavioral observations. Thirty-six female mice (age 3 to 6 months) received either hyperoxic or normal tap water (approximately 6.6 vs. 1.8 microg O(2) g(-1) day(-1), respectively) throughout the study period. Mice were weighed one to two times per month, and a blood sample was taken from the tail to determine the hematocrit. In addition, red blood cells were counted microscopically one and two months after the start of the experiment. Four weeks after the last blood sample (21 weeks after the start of the experiment), exploration behavior and locomotor activity were observed on a holeboard, and learning ability tests were performed using an elevated open maze. No significant differences were seen between groups for any of the parameters investigated. Thus, the study does not support the hypothesis that drinking oxygenated water improves cognitive function or hematological parameters in mice.

  15. Effects of purified oxygenated water on exercise performance during acute hypoxic exposure.

    PubMed

    Wing-Gaia, Stacie L; Subudhi, Andrew W; Askew, Eldon W

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of purified oxygenated water on exercise performance under hypoxic conditions. Nine recreational male cyclists (age = 26.6 +/- 5.2 y, weight = 87.6 +/- 19.5 kg, VO2peak = 46.5 +/- 5.9 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) completed two 600 kJ cycling time trials under hypoxic conditions (FIO2 = 13.6% O2, Pbar = 641 mmHg) separated by 2 wk. Trials were completed following 3 d ingestion of 35 mL x kg(-1) x d(-1) of control (CON) or experimental (EXP) water. Time to completion, heart rate (HR), rate of perceived exertion (RPE), pulse oximetry (SaO2), blood gases (PcO2 and PcCO2), and lactate were measured during the trials. Hydration was assessed with pre- and post-exercise body weight and 24-h urine specific gravity. Performance, hydration, and blood oxygenation were unaffected by EXP water. Results of this study suggest that purified oxygenated water does not improve exercise performance in moderately active males.

  16. Evolution of air breathing: oxygen homeostasis and the transitions from water to land and sky.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Connie C W; Schmitz, Anke; Lambertz, Markus; Perry, Steven F; Maina, John N

    2013-04-01

    Life originated in anoxia, but many organisms came to depend upon oxygen for survival, independently evolving diverse respiratory systems for acquiring oxygen from the environment. Ambient oxygen tension (PO2) fluctuated through the ages in correlation with biodiversity and body size, enabling organisms to migrate from water to land and air and sometimes in the opposite direction. Habitat expansion compels the use of different gas exchangers, for example, skin, gills, tracheae, lungs, and their intermediate stages, that may coexist within the same species; coexistence may be temporally disjunct (e.g., larval gills vs. adult lungs) or simultaneous (e.g., skin, gills, and lungs in some salamanders). Disparate systems exhibit similar directions of adaptation: toward larger diffusion interfaces, thinner barriers, finer dynamic regulation, and reduced cost of breathing. Efficient respiratory gas exchange, coupled to downstream convective and diffusive resistances, comprise the "oxygen cascade"-step-down of PO2 that balances supply against toxicity. Here, we review the origin of oxygen homeostasis, a primal selection factor for all respiratory systems, which in turn function as gatekeepers of the cascade. Within an organism's lifespan, the respiratory apparatus adapts in various ways to upregulate oxygen uptake in hypoxia and restrict uptake in hyperoxia. In an evolutionary context, certain species also become adapted to environmental conditions or habitual organismic demands. We, therefore, survey the comparative anatomy and physiology of respiratory systems from invertebrates to vertebrates, water to air breathers, and terrestrial to aerial inhabitants. Through the evolutionary directions and variety of gas exchangers, their shared features and individual compromises may be appreciated.

  17. Evolution of Air Breathing: Oxygen Homeostasis and the Transitions from Water to Land and Sky

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Connie C. W.; Schmitz, Anke; Lambertz, Markus; Perry, Steven F.; Maina, John N.

    2014-01-01

    Life originated in anoxia, but many organisms came to depend upon oxygen for survival, independently evolving diverse respiratory systems for acquiring oxygen from the environment. Ambient oxygen tension (PO2) fluctuated through the ages in correlation with biodiversity and body size, enabling organisms to migrate from water to land and air and sometimes in the opposite direction. Habitat expansion compels the use of different gas exchangers, for example, skin, gills, tracheae, lungs, and their intermediate stages, that may coexist within the same species; coexistence may be temporally disjunct (e.g., larval gills vs. adult lungs) or simultaneous (e.g., skin, gills, and lungs in some salamanders). Disparate systems exhibit similar directions of adaptation: toward larger diffusion interfaces, thinner barriers, finer dynamic regulation, and reduced cost of breathing. Efficient respiratory gas exchange, coupled to downstream convective and diffusive resistances, comprise the “oxygen cascade”—step-down of PO2 that balances supply against toxicity. Here, we review the origin of oxygen homeostasis, a primal selection factor for all respiratory systems, which in turn function as gatekeepers of the cascade. Within an organism's lifespan, the respiratory apparatus adapts in various ways to upregulate oxygen uptake in hypoxia and restrict uptake in hyperoxia. In an evolutionary context, certain species also become adapted to environmental conditions or habitual organismic demands. We, therefore, survey the comparative anatomy and physiology of respiratory systems from invertebrates to vertebrates, water to air breathers, and terrestrial to aerial inhabitants. Through the evolutionary directions and variety of gas exchangers, their shared features and individual compromises may be appreciated. PMID:23720333

  18. Different hydrodynamic processes regulated on water quality (nutrients, dissolved oxygen, and phytoplankton biomass) in three contrasting waters of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weihua; Yuan, Xiangcheng; Long, Aimin; Huang, Hui; Yue, Weizhong

    2014-03-01

    The subtropical Hong Kong (HK) waters are located at the eastern side of the Pearl River Estuary. Monthly changes of water quality, including nutrients, dissolved oxygen (DO), and phytoplankton biomass (Chl-a) were routinely investigated in 2003 by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in three contrasting waters of HK with different prevailing hydrodynamic processes. The western, eastern, and southern waters were mainly dominated by nutrient-replete Pearl River discharge, the nutrient-poor coastal/shelf oceanic waters, and mixtures of estuarine and coastal seawater and sewage effluent of Hong Kong, respectively. Acting in response, the water quality in these three contrasting areas showed apparently spatial–temporal variation pattern. Nutrients usually decreased along western waters to eastern waters. In the dry season, the water column was strongly mixed by monsoon winds and tidal currents, which resulted in relatively low Chl-a (<5 μg l(−1)) and high bottom DO (>4 mg l(−1)), suggesting that mixing enhanced the buffering capacity of eutrophication in HK waters. However, in the wet season, surface Chl-a was generally >10 μg l(−1) in southern waters in summer due to halocline and thermohaline stratification, adequate nutrients, and light availability. Although summer hypoxia (DO <2 mg l(−1)) was episodically observed near sewage effluent site and in southern waters induced by vertical stratification, the eutrophication impacts in HK waters were not as severe as expected owing to P limitation and short water residence time in the wet season.

  19. Geochemistry and origin of formation waters in the western Canada sedimentary basin-I. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitchon, B.; Friedman, I.

    1969-01-01

    Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen, together with chemical analyses, were determined for 20 surface waters, 8 shallow potable formation waters, and 79 formation waters from oil fields and gas fields. The observed isotope ratios can be explained by mixing of surface water and diagenetically modified sea water, accompanied by a process which enriches the heavy oxygen isotope. Mass balances for deuterium and total dissolved solids in the western Canada sedimentary basin demonstrate that the present distribution of deuterium in formation waters of the basin can be derived through mixing of the diagenetically modified sea water with not more than 2.9 times as much fresh water at the same latitude, and that the movement of fresh water through the basin has redistributed the dissolved solids of the modified sea water into the observed salinity variations. Statistical analysis of the isotope data indicates that although exchange of deuterium between water and hydrogen sulphide takes place within the basin, the effect is minimized because of an insignificant mass of hydrogen sulphide compared to the mass of formation water. Conversely, exchange of oxygen isotopes between water and carbonate minerals causes a major oxygen-18 enrichment of formation waters, depending on the relative masses of water and carbonate. Qualitative evidence confirms the isotopic fractionation of deuterium on passage of water through micropores in shales. ?? 1969.

  20. A heterojunction photocatalyst composed of zinc rhodium oxide, single crystal-derived bismuth vanadium oxide, and silver for overall pure-water splitting under visible light up to 740 nm.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryoya; Takashima, Toshihiro; Tanigawa, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Shugo; Ohtani, Bunsho; Irie, Hiroshi

    2016-10-12

    We recently reported the synthesis of a solid-state heterojunction photocatalyst consisting of zinc rhodium oxide (ZnRh2O4) and bismuth vanadium oxide (Bi4V2O11), which functioned as hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) evolution photocatalysts, respectively, connected with silver (Ag). Polycrystalline Bi4V2O11 (p-Bi4V2O11) powders were utilized to form ZnRh2O4/Ag/p-Bi4V2O11, which was able to photocatalyze overall pure-water splitting under red-light irradiation with a wavelength of 700 nm (R. Kobayashi et al., J. Mater. Chem. A, 2016, 4, 3061). In the present study, we replaced p-Bi4V2O11 with a powder obtained by pulverizing single crystals of Bi4V2O11 (s-Bi4V2O11) to form ZnRh2O4/Ag/s-Bi4V2O11, and demonstrated that this heterojunction photocatalyst had enhanced water-splitting activity. In addition, ZnRh2O4/Ag/s-Bi4V2O11 was able to utilize nearly the entire range of visible light up to a wavelength of 740 nm. These properties were attributable to the higher O2 evolution activity of s-Bi4V2O11.

  1. Oxygen depletion recorded in upper waters of the glacial Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zunli; Hoogakker, Babette A. A.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Zhou, Xiaoli; Thomas, Ellen; Gutchess, Kristina M.; Lu, Wanyi; Jones, Luke; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen depletion in the upper ocean is commonly associated with poor ventilation and storage of respired carbon, potentially linked to atmospheric CO2 levels. Iodine to calcium ratios (I/Ca) in recent planktonic foraminifera suggest that values less than ~2.5 μmol mol-1 indicate the presence of O2-depleted water. Here we apply this proxy to estimate past dissolved oxygen concentrations in the near surface waters of the currently well-oxygenated Southern Ocean, which played a critical role in carbon sequestration during glacial times. A down-core planktonic I/Ca record from south of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) suggests that minimum O2 concentrations in the upper ocean fell below 70 μmol kg-1 during the last two glacial periods, indicating persistent glacial O2 depletion at the heart of the carbon engine of the Earth's climate system. These new estimates of past ocean oxygenation variability may assist in resolving mechanisms responsible for the much-debated ice-age atmospheric CO2 decline.

  2. Oxygen depletion recorded in upper waters of the glacial Southern Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zunli; Hoogakker, Babette A. A.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Zhou, Xiaoli; Thomas, Ellen; Gutchess, Kristina M.; Lu, Wanyi; Jones, Luke; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen depletion in the upper ocean is commonly associated with poor ventilation and storage of respired carbon, potentially linked to atmospheric CO2 levels. Iodine to calcium ratios (I/Ca) in recent planktonic foraminifera suggest that values less than ∼2.5 μmol mol−1 indicate the presence of O2-depleted water. Here we apply this proxy to estimate past dissolved oxygen concentrations in the near surface waters of the currently well-oxygenated Southern Ocean, which played a critical role in carbon sequestration during glacial times. A down-core planktonic I/Ca record from south of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) suggests that minimum O2 concentrations in the upper ocean fell below 70 μmol kg−1 during the last two glacial periods, indicating persistent glacial O2 depletion at the heart of the carbon engine of the Earth's climate system. These new estimates of past ocean oxygenation variability may assist in resolving mechanisms responsible for the much-debated ice-age atmospheric CO2 decline. PMID:27029225

  3. Polymer Growth Rate in a Wire Chamber with Oxygen,Water, or Alcohol Gas Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarski, Adam; /SLAC

    2008-07-02

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium-isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a SEM/EDX instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is stored in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  4. Super Oxygen and Improved Water Vapor Barrier of Polypropylene Film with Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Nanocoatings.

    PubMed

    Song, Yixuan; Tzeng, Ping; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2016-06-01

    Biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) is widely used in packaging. Although its orientation increases mechanical strength and clarity, BOPP suffers from a high oxygen transmission rate (OTR). Multilayer thin films are deposited from water using layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. Polyethylenimine (PEI) is combined with either poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) or vermiculite (VMT) clay to impart high oxygen barrier. A 30-bilayer PEI/VMT nanocoating (226 nm thick) improves the OTR of 17.8 μm thick BOPP by more than 30X, rivaling most inorganic coatings. PEI/PAA multilayers achieve comparable barrier with only 12 bilayers due to greater thickness, but these films exhibit increased oxygen permeability at high humidity. The PEI/VMT coatings actually exhibit improved oxygen barrier at high humidity (and also improve moisture barrier by more than 40%). This high barrier BOPP meets the criteria for sensitive food and some electronics packaging applications. Additionally, this water-based coating technology is cost effective and provides an opportunity to produce high barrier polypropylene film on an industrial scale. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios in body water and hair: modeling isotope dynamics in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Shannon P; Valenzuela, Luciano O; Remien, Christopher H; Enright, Lindsey E; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Kaplan, Jay R; Wagner, Janice D; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2012-07-01

    The stable isotopic composition of drinking water, diet, and atmospheric oxygen influence the isotopic composition of body water ((2)H/(1)H, (18)O/(16)O expressed as δ(2) H and δ(18)O). In turn, body water influences the isotopic composition of organic matter in tissues, such as hair and teeth, which are often used to reconstruct historical dietary and movement patterns of animals and humans. Here, we used a nonhuman primate system (Macaca fascicularis) to test the robustness of two different mechanistic stable isotope models: a model to predict the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of body water and a second model to predict the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of hair. In contrast to previous human-based studies, use of nonhuman primates fed controlled diets allowed us to further constrain model parameter values and evaluate model predictions. Both models reliably predicted the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of body water and of hair. Moreover, the isotope data allowed us to better quantify values for two critical variables in the models: the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of gut water and the (18)O isotope fractionation associated with a carbonyl oxygen-water interaction in the gut (α(ow)). Our modeling efforts indicated that better predictions for body water and hair isotope values were achieved by making the isotopic composition of gut water approached that of body water. Additionally, the value of α(ow) was 1.0164, in close agreement with the only other previously measured observation (microbial spore cell walls), suggesting robustness of this fractionation factor across different biological systems.

  6. Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotope Ratios in Body Water and Hair: Modeling Isotope Dynamics in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    O’Grady, Shannon P.; Valenzuela, Luciano O.; Remien, Christopher H.; Enright, Lindsey E.; Jorgensen, Matthew J.; Kaplan, Jay R.; Wagner, Janice D.; Cerling, Thure E.; Ehleringer, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of drinking water, diet, and atmospheric oxygen influence the isotopic composition of body water (2H/1H, 18O/16O expressed as δ2H and δ18O). In turn, body water influences the isotopic composition of organic matter in tissues, such as hair and teeth, which are often used to reconstruct historical dietary and movement patterns of animals and humans. Here, we used a nonhuman primate system (Macaca fascicularis) to test the robustness of two different mechanistic stable isotope models: a model to predict the δ2H and δ18O values of body water and a second model to predict the δ2H and δ18O values of hair. In contrast to previous human-based studies, use of nonhuman primates fed controlled diets allowed us to further constrain model parameter values and evaluate model predictions. Both models reliably predicted the δ2H and δ18O values of body water and of hair. Moreover, the isotope data allowed us to better quantify values for two critical variables in the models: the δ2H and δ18O values of gut water and the 18O isotope fractionation associated with a carbonyl oxygen-water interaction in the gut (αow). Our modeling efforts indicated that better predictions for body water and hair isotope values were achieved by making the isotopic composition of gut water approached that of body water. Additionally, the value of αow was 1.0164, in close agreement with the only other previously measured observation (microbial spore cell walls), suggesting robustness of this fractionation factor across different biological systems. PMID:22553163

  7. Detection of Water Binding to the Oxygen Evolving Complex Using Low Frequency Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Jain, Prashant

    2017-06-01

    The oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in Photosystem II (PSII) is a hallmark catalyst for efficiently splitting water to generate molecular oxygen. Much of what is known about the structure of the OEC has been provided by X-ray analysis of PSII at low temperatures, from which the mechanism of water splitting has been inferred. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) offers an opportunity to build on our current understanding of this catalytic system as it can provide time-resolved, molecular vibrational information in a physiological environment. With low frequency SERS, we are able to separate the manganese oxide vibrational modes of the OEC from those in a complex, biological environment. With isotopically labelled water, we use SERS to identify water binding to the OEC. Raman spectra calculated by density functional theory support the assignment of water binding to a manganese atom outside of the cuboidal OEC. Detection of water binding sites on the OEC with SERS can not only compliment previous structural studies, but can also provide a powerful platform for in operando mechanistic studies.

  8. Antioxidant Defenses against Activated Oxygen in Pea Nodules Subjected to Water Stress.

    PubMed Central

    Gogorcena, Y.; Iturbe-Ormaetxe, I.; Escuredo, P. R.; Becana, M.

    1995-01-01

    The involvement of activated oxygen in the drought-induced damage of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Frilene) nodules was examined. To this purpose, various pro-oxidant factors, antioxidant enzymes and related metabolites, and markers of oxidative damage were determined in nodules of well-watered (nodule water potential approximately -0.29 MPa) and water-stressed (nodule water potential approximately -2.03 MPa) plants. Water-stressed nodules entered senescence as evidenced by the 30% decrease in leghemoglobin and total soluble protein. Drought also caused a decrease in the activities of catalase (25%), ascorbate peroxidase (18%), dehydroascorbate reductase (15%), glutathione reductase (31%), and superoxide dismutase (30%), and in the contents of ascorbate (59%), reduced (57%) and oxidized (38%) glutathione, NAD+ and NADH (43%), NADP+ (31%), and NADPH (17%). The decline in the antioxidant capacity of nodules may result from a restricted supply of NAD(P)H in vivo for the ascorbate-glutathione pathway and from the Fe-catalyzed Fenton reactions of ascorbate and glutathione with activated oxygen. The 2-fold increase in the content of "catalytic Fe" would also explain the augmented levels of lipid peroxides (2.4-fold) and oxidatively modified proteins (1.4-fold) found in water-stressed nodules because of the known requirement of lipid and protein oxidation for a transition catalytic metal. PMID:12228507

  9. Oxygen Isotope Fractionation Effects in Soil Water via Cations Adsorbed to High-CEC Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerter, E.; Finstad, K.; Schaefer, J.; Goldsmith, G. R.; Dawson, T. E.; Amundson, R.

    2012-12-01

    In isotope-based approaches to hydrology, soil and sediment are implicitly considered to be an inert matrix in which water resides or moves. Yet, this assumption is inconsistent with the fact that soils contain a wide range of solutes, and highly variable concentrations of chemically reactive clay particles, all of which may react with bulk water and create pools of energetically differing water with varying isotope compositions. The empirical basis of this hypothesis is the work of Sofer and Gat (1972, EPSL, 15(3)), who showed that the formation of hydration spheres around cations in aqueous solutions fractionate oxygen isotopes of water in ways that appear to be dependent on the cation's ionic potential and concentration. Because soil solutions commonly have high solid to fluid ratios, the potential for solids to create substantial pools of low free energy water, with corresponding isotope fractionation of the free and low energy waters, may be a common process. The potential for this to create measurable isotopic effects would be most evident in soils with high Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC). In order to test this hypothesis, montmorillonite (CEC ≈ 100 meq/100g), kaolinite (CEC≈10) and quartz (CEC≈0) mineral powders were saturated with 3M MgCl2 and KCl solutions (separately), rinsed with methanol and dried to saturate all available CEC sites with either Mg or K cations. Triplicate sets of monominerallic-deionized water mixtures were created at 5, 25, 50, 75 and 95% gravimetric water content. Each set of samples was then subjected to one of three water extraction techniques designed to access specific "pools" of soil water: (1) direct equilibration with CO2 to sample the soil's "free water", i.e. water not adsorbed to cations via hydration spheres; (2) centrifugation to simulate permanent wilting point conditions, thereby yielding most micro-pore, macro-pore, and free water; and (3) cryogenic vacuum distillation to recover all the soil water (free, pore and

  10. Long-term regularities and disturbances of oxygen regime in the NW Black Sea coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, L.; Gomoiu, M.-T.; Vasiliu, D.

    2012-04-01

    The paper presents temporal, seasonal and inter-annual variations of Dissolved Oxygen (DO) regime in the Romanian Black Sea coastal waters (Constanta area) based on measurements and samples collected daily, during 1959-2010, from a fixed near-shore station (sub-surface layer - bottom depth 1.5 m) and monthly/seasonally, during 1964-1980/1981-2010, from five stations (water column sampling with standard depths within 0-50 m) located on the transect East-Constanta (50 km length, bottom depths 16 m - 54 m), respectively. The climatic factors controlling seawater thermal regime, discharge fluctuations of the Danube River and water masses mixing as well as biological processes are mainly responsible for DO temporal variability in the Romanian coastal waters. Seasonally, DO showed the highest concentrations in winter (maximum monthly mean - 490.9 μM in February 2007), strongly linked to low seawater temperature and intense mixing processes leading to well-oxygenated waters in the cold season. The lowest DO concentrations were measured in the warm season (minimum monthly mean - 186.4 μM in August 1998), when higher seawater thermal regime and oxygen consumption for the organic matter decomposition contribute to decreased values. In terms of inter-annual variability, the highest winter DO concentrations (throughout the water column) were measured in cold and windy winters (maximum of 436.2 μM in 2003). Summer DO variation showed different patterns for the upper layers and bottom layers, respectively. In the surface layer, higher values (maximum - 387.2 μM in 1999) were measured in the years with larger summer discharges of the Danube River, which favor more intense photosynthetic processes due to increased nutrient stocks. In the bottom layers, DO showed lower values in the intense eutrophication period (1975 - 1988), when the seasonal cycle of primary production highlighted more pronounced summer maxima. Summers with higher seawater thermal regime showed lower DO

  11. Lake Louise Water (USGS47): A new isotopic reference water for stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Lorenz, Jennifer M.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Tarbox, Lauren V.; Mayer, Bernhard; Taylor, Steve

    2014-01-01

    RESULTS: The δ2H and δ18O values of this reference water are –150.2 ± 0.5 ‰ and –19.80 ± 0.02 ‰, respectively, relative to VSMOW on scales normalized such that the δ2H and δ18O values of SLAP reference water are, respectively, –428 and –55.5 ‰. Each uncertainty is an estimated expanded uncertainty (U = 2uc) about the reference value that provides an interval that has about a 95-percent probability of encompassing the true value. CONCLUSION: This isotopic reference material, designated as USGS47, is intended as one of two isotopic reference waters for daily normalization of stable hydrogen and stable oxygen isotopic analysis of water with a mass spectrometer or a laser absorption spectrometer. "

  12. Status of the International Space Station Regenerative ECLSS Water Recovery and Oxygen Generation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Cloud, Dale

    2005-01-01

    NASA is developing three racks containing regenerative water recovery and oxygen generation systems (WRS and OGS) for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS). The major assemblies included in these racks are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA), Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), and the Power Supply Module (PSM) supporting the OGA. The WPA and OGA are provided by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), Inc., while the UPA and PSM are developed in- house by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The assemblies have completed the manufacturing phase and are in various stages of testing and integration into the flight racks. This paper summarizes the status as of April 2005 and describes some of the technical challenges encountered and lessons learned over the past year.

  13. Evidence for an oxygen evolving iron-oxo-cerium intermediate in iron-catalysed water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Codolà, Zoel; Gómez, Laura; Kleespies, Scott T; Que, Lawrence; Costas, Miquel; Lloret-Fillol, Julio

    2015-01-22

    The non-haem iron complex α-[Fe(II)(CF3SO3)2(mcp)] (mcp=(N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,2-cis-diaminocyclohexane) reacts with Ce(IV) to oxidize water to O2, representing an iron-based functional model for the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. Here we trap an intermediate, characterized by cryospray ionization high resolution mass spectrometry and resonance Raman spectroscopy, and formulated as [(mcp)Fe(IV)(O)(μ-O)Ce(IV)(NO3)3](+), the first example of a well-characterized inner-sphere complex to be formed in cerium(IV)-mediated water oxidation. The identification of this reactive Fe(IV)-O-Ce(IV) adduct may open new pathways to validate mechanistic notions of an analogous Mn(V)-O-Ca(II) unit in the oxygen evolving complex that is responsible for carrying out the key O-O bond forming step.

  14. Status of the Node 3 Regenerative ECLSS Water Recovery and Oxygen Generation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Cloud, Dale; Bedard, Jake

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is providing three racks containing regenerative water recovery and oxygen generation systems (WRS and OGS) for flight on the International Space Station's (ISS) Node 3 element. The major assemblies included in these racks are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA), Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), and the Power Supply Module (PSM) supporting the OGA. The WPA and OGA are provided by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), while the UPA and PSM are being designed and manufactured in-house by MSFC. The assemblies are completing the manufacturing phase and are in various stages of ORU and system level testing, to be followed by integration into the flight racks. This paper gives a current status, along with technical challenges encountered and lessons learned.

  15. Status of the Node 3 Regenerative Environmental Cpntrol& Life Support System Water Recovery & Oxygen Generation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquillo, Robyn L.

    2003-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center is providing three racks containing regenerative water recovery and oxygen generation systems (WRS and OGS) for flight on the lnternational Space Station s (ISS) Node 3 element. The major assemblies included in these racks are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA), Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), and the Power Supply Module (PSM) supporting the OGA. The WPA and OGA are provided by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems lnternational (HSSSI), while the UPA and PSM are being designed and manufactured in-house by MSFC. The assemblies are currently in the manufacturing and test phase and are to be completed and integrated into flight racks this year. This paper gives an overview of the technologies and system designs, technical challenges encountered and solved, and the current status.

  16. Superoxide generation from the reduction of oxygen at the carbon-oil-water triple phase boundary.

    PubMed

    Nissim, Rita; Compton, Richard G

    2013-07-28

    The reduction of oxygen is studied in aqueous solutions of pH 6.22-8.01, at a carbon paste electrode fabricated from dioctyl phthalate (oil) and graphite. Two two-electron voltammetric waves are usually seen on carbon electrodes, associated with the formation of hydrogen peroxide and water, respectively. However, an additional signal is seen on the carbon paste electrode, which can attributed to the initial formation of the superoxide radical anion, O2˙(-). Data is presented to show that the predominant source of oxygen for this reaction is that dissolved in the carbon paste material, rather than in the aqueous solution, and that the superoxide is likely formed at the graphite-oil-water triple phase boundary. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the O2/O2˙(-) redox couple are reported.

  17. Status of the Node 3 Regenerative ECLSS Water Recovery and Oxygen Generation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Cloud, Dale; Bedard, Jake

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is providing three racks containing regenerative water recovery and oxygen generation systems (WRS and OGS) for flight on the International Space Station's (ISS) Node 3 element. The major assemblies included in these racks are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA), Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), and the Power Supply Module (PSM) supporting the OGA. The WPA and OGA are provided by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), while the UPA and PSM are being designed and manufactured in-house by MSFC. The assemblies are completing the manufacturing phase and are in various stages of ORU and system level testing, to be followed by integration into the flight racks. This paper gives a current status, along with technical challenges encountered and lessons learned.

  18. Communication: Heterogeneous water dynamics on a clathrate hydrate lattice detected by multidimensional oxygen nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei-Acheamfour, Mischa; Storek, Michael; Böhmer, Roland

    2017-05-01

    Previous deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance studies revealed conflicting evidence regarding the possible motional heterogeneity of the water dynamics on the hydrate lattice of an ice-like crystal. Using oxygen-17 nuclei as a sensitive quadrupolar probe, the reorientational two-time correlation function displays a clear nonexponentiality. To check whether this dispersive behavior is a consequence of dynamic heterogeneity or rather of an intrinsic nonexponentiality, a multidimensional, four-time magnetic resonance experiment was devised that is generally applicable to strongly quadrupolarly perturbed half-integer nuclei such as oxygen-17. Measurements of an appropriate four-time function demonstrate that it is possible to select a subensemble of slow water molecules. Its mean time scale is compared to theoretical predictions and evidence for significant motional heterogeneity is found.

  19. Molecular tools for investigating microbial community structure and function in oxygen-deficient marine waters.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Alyse K; Kheirandish, Sam; Mueller, Andreas; Leung, Hilary T C; Norbeck, Angela D; Brewer, Heather M; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hallam, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Water column oxygen (O2)-deficiency shapes food-web structure by progressively directing nutrients and energy away from higher trophic levels into microbial community metabolism resulting in fixed nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Although respiratory O2 consumption during organic matter degradation is a natural outcome of a productive surface ocean, global-warming-induced stratification intensifies this process leading to oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) expansion. Here, we describe useful tools for detection and quantification of potential key microbial players and processes in OMZ community metabolism including quantitative polymerase chain reaction primers targeting Marine Group I Thaumarchaeota, SUP05, Arctic96BD-19, and SAR324 small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes and protein extraction methods from OMZ waters compatible with high-resolution mass spectrometry for profiling microbial community structure and functional dynamics.

  20. On-line technique for measuring stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes from microliter quantities of water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, R. A.; Romanek, C. S.; Gibson, E. K. Jr; Gibson EK, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Detailed here is a method for extracting and analyzing oxygen and hydrogen isotopes from 10 microL-sized water samples. Based on the traditional CO2-H2O equilibration technique, the oxygen isotope exchange reaction is done exclusively in sealed 6-mm (o.d.) Pyrex tubes at 25 degrees C, with full isotope exchange completed in at least 28 h. Using the same water sample employed in the 18O equilibration, D/H extractions are done in separate sealed 6-mm (o.d.) Pyrex tubes by reaction with Zn at 450 degrees C to form H2(g). Provided that a correction factor is applied to 18O analyses, accuracy and precision for both 18O and D/H are comparable to standard techniques using much larger samples.

  1. Water-soluble nanocrystalline cellulose films with highly transparent and oxygen barrier properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shaoling; Zhang, Yapei; Cha, Ruitao; Yang, Jinliang; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-12-01

    By mixing a guar gum (GG) solution with a nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) dispersion using a novel circular casting technology, we manufactured biodegradable films as packaging materials with improved optical and mechanical properties. These films could act as barriers for oxygen and could completely dissolve in water within 5 h. We also compared the effect of nanocomposite films and commercial food packaging materials on the preservation of food.By mixing a guar gum (GG) solution with a nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) dispersion using a novel circular casting technology, we manufactured biodegradable films as packaging materials with improved optical and mechanical properties. These films could act as barriers for oxygen and could completely dissolve in water within 5 h. We also compared the effect of nanocomposite films and commercial food packaging materials on the preservation of food. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07647a

  2. Nitrogen cycling in shallow low-oxygen coastal waters off Peru from nitrite and nitrate nitrogen and oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Happy; Bourbonnais, Annie; Larkum, Jennifer; Bange, Hermann W.; Altabet, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    O2 deficient zones (ODZs) of the world's oceans are important locations for microbial dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction and subsequent loss of combined nitrogen (N) to biogenic N2 gas. ODZs are generally coupled to regions of high productivity leading to high rates of N-loss as found in the coastal upwelling region off Peru. Stable N and O isotope ratios can be used as natural tracers of ODZ N-cycling because of distinct kinetic isotope effects associated with microbially mediated N-cycle transformations. Here we present NO3- and nitrite (NO2-) stable isotope data from the nearshore upwelling region off Callao, Peru. Subsurface oxygen was generally depleted below about 30 m depth with concentrations less than 10 µM, while NO2- concentrations were high, ranging from 6 to 10 µM, and NO3- was in places strongly depleted to near 0 µM. We observed for the first time a positive linear relationship between NO2-δ15N and δ18O at our coastal stations, analogous to that of NO3- N and O isotopes during NO3- uptake and dissimilatory reduction. This relationship is likely the result of rapid NO2- turnover due to higher organic matter flux in these coastal upwelling waters. No such relationship was observed at offshore stations where slower turnover of NO2- facilitates dominance of isotope exchange with water. We also evaluate the overall isotope fractionation effect for N-loss in this system using several approaches that vary in their underlying assumptions. While there are differences in apparent fractionation factor (ɛ) for N-loss as calculated from the δ15N of NO3-, dissolved inorganic N, or biogenic N2, values for ɛ are generally much lower than previously reported, reaching as low as 6.5 ‰. A possible explanation is the influence of sedimentary N-loss at our inshore stations which incurs highly suppressed isotope fractionation.

  3. The influence of oxygenated water on the immune status, liver enzymes, and the generation of oxygen radicals: a prospective, randomised, blinded clinical study.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Rudolf; Axmann, S; Schoenberg, M H

    2005-06-01

    Oxygenated water with an oxygen concentration of 30-120 mg/l water is believed to improve the immune status, without any toxicological effects. The purpose of this clinical study was to assess the effects of long-term drinking of oxygenated water on the immune status. In this prospective, double-blinded, randomised study 24 volunteers of either sex (age 18-63 years) drank daily 3 times 500 ml either oxygenated (Verum-group: n=12) or normal mineral water (Placebo-group: n=12) for 28 days. On day 1 and day 28 standard laboratory tests, IgG, IgA and IgM, lymphocyte subpopulations and functional analysis of T-cells by flow cytometry, were done. Furthermore, the oxygen radicals were determined by the detection of the ascorbyl radicals. Drinking of normal or oxygenated water had no effect on whole blood count or the liver enzymes. Interestingly the volunteers in the Verum-group showed a significant increase in ascorbyl radicals after drinking oxygenated water for 14 and 21 days. CD4+ and CD4+CD45RA+ lymphocytes as well as lymphocyte activation marker (CD69) and soluble IL-2 receptor increased in both groups, in contrast T-helper2 cells and IgG decreased during the study. The only differences between the two groups were a significant decrease of NK-cells form 13.42%+ or -5.04 to 10.83%+ or -4.82 (P<.002) and an increase of the Th1/Th2-ratio from 2.77%+ or -1.07 to 6.68%+ or -5.33 (P<.03) in the Verum-group. Long-term consumption of oxygenated water has no apparent harmful effect on the liver, blood and the immune system. Moreover it leads to a transient moderate increase of oxygen radicals in the blood. An interesting observation is the increase of the Th1/Th2-ratio in the Verum group, whereas in both groups T-cell activation after mitogen stimulation, the soluble IL-2 receptor, the CD4+ and the naive CD4+CD45RA+ cells increased.

  4. Water-soluble nanocrystalline cellulose films with highly transparent and oxygen barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaoling; Zhang, Yapei; Cha, Ruitao; Yang, Jinliang; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-14

    By mixing a guar gum (GG) solution with a nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) dispersion using a novel circular casting technology, we manufactured biodegradable films as packaging materials with improved optical and mechanical properties. These films could act as barriers for oxygen and could completely dissolve in water within 5 h. We also compared the effect of nanocomposite films and commercial food packaging materials on the preservation of food.

  5. Effect of Morphology of Co3O4 for Oxygen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi-Zhi; Xu, Qi-Zhi; Su, Yu-Zhi; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hui; Hui, Yun-Ping; Li, Nan; Liu, Zhao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, three different morphological Co3O4 electrodes for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) have been synthesized. By comparing the three morphologies of Co3O4, the electrocatalytic properties show that the urchin-like spheres of Co3O4 electrode has relative low overpotential and good electrocatalysis stability, indicating that the structure of urchin-like Co3O4 spheres exhibit an easy OER for water splitting. PMID:25525423

  6. Coastal upwelling supplies oxygen-depleted water to the Columbia River estuary.

    PubMed

    Roegner, G Curtis; Needoba, Joseph A; Baptista, António M

    2011-04-20

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) is a common feature of many estuarine and shallow-water environments, and is often attributed to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment from terrestrial-fluvial pathways. However, recent events in the U.S. Pacific Northwest have highlighted that wind-forced upwelling can cause naturally occurring low DO water to move onto the continental shelf, leading to mortalities of benthic fish and invertebrates. Coastal estuaries in the Pacific Northwest are strongly linked to ocean forcings, and here we report observations on the spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentration in the Columbia River estuary. Hydrographic measurements were made from transect (spatial survey) or anchor station (temporal survey) deployments over a variety of wind stresses and tidal states during the upwelling seasons of 2006 through 2008. During this period, biologically stressful levels of dissolved oxygen were observed to enter the Columbia River estuary from oceanic sources, with minimum values close to the hypoxic threshold of 2.0 mg L(-1). Riverine water was consistently normoxic. Upwelling wind stress controlled the timing and magnitude of low DO events, while tidal-modulated estuarine circulation patterns influenced the spatial extent and duration of exposure to low DO water. Strong upwelling during neap tides produced the largest impact on the estuary. The observed oxygen concentrations likely had deleterious behavioral and physiological consequences for migrating juvenile salmon and benthic crabs. Based on a wind-forced supply mechanism, low DO events are probably common to the Columbia River and other regional estuaries and if conditions on the shelf deteriorate further, as observations and models predict, Pacific Northwest estuarine habitats could experience a decrease in environmental quality.

  7. Simple photosystem II water oxidation centre analogues in visible light oxygen and H+ generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Williams, David; Meldrum, Fiona C; Walsh, Dominic

    2013-01-14

    Calcium manganese oxide nanoparticles for application in water oxidation are synthesized by combination with a carboxylated biopolymer stabilizing agent to form very simple but effective analogues of the photosynthetic PSII oxygen evolving complex. The relative efficiency of these materials for production of O(2) and protons under visible light-promoted reactions is evaluated and prolonged reaction lifetimes are observed. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. In photosynthesis, oxygen comes from water: from a 1787 book for women by Monsieur De Fourcroy.

    PubMed

    Joliot, Pierre; Crofts, Antony R; Björn, Lars Olof; Yerkes, Christine T; Govindjee

    2016-07-01

    It is now well established that the source of oxygen in photosynthesis is water. The earliest suggestion previously known to us had come from René Bernard Wurmser (1930). Here, we highlight an earlier report by Monsieur De Fourcroy (1787), who had already discussed the broad outlines of such a hypothesis in a book on Chemistry written for women. We present here a free translation of a passage from this book, with the original text in French as an Appendix.

  9. Coastal Upwelling Supplies Oxygen-Depleted Water to the Columbia River Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Roegner, G. Curtis; Needoba, Joseph A.; Baptista, António M.

    2011-01-01

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) is a common feature of many estuarine and shallow-water environments, and is often attributed to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment from terrestrial-fluvial pathways. However, recent events in the U.S. Pacific Northwest have highlighted that wind-forced upwelling can cause naturally occurring low DO water to move onto the continental shelf, leading to mortalities of benthic fish and invertebrates. Coastal estuaries in the Pacific Northwest are strongly linked to ocean forcings, and here we report observations on the spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentration in the Columbia River estuary. Hydrographic measurements were made from transect (spatial survey) or anchor station (temporal survey) deployments over a variety of wind stresses and tidal states during the upwelling seasons of 2006 through 2008. During this period, biologically stressful levels of dissolved oxygen were observed to enter the Columbia River estuary from oceanic sources, with minimum values close to the hypoxic threshold of 2.0 mg L−1. Riverine water was consistently normoxic. Upwelling wind stress controlled the timing and magnitude of low DO events, while tidal-modulated estuarine circulation patterns influenced the spatial extent and duration of exposure to low DO water. Strong upwelling during neap tides produced the largest impact on the estuary. The observed oxygen concentrations likely had deleterious behavioral and physiological consequences for migrating juvenile salmon and benthic crabs. Based on a wind-forced supply mechanism, low DO events are probably common to the Columbia River and other regional estuaries and if conditions on the shelf deteriorate further, as observations and models predict, Pacific Northwest estuarine habitats could experience a decrease in environmental quality. PMID:21533083

  10. Effect of oxygen on survival of faecal pollution indicators in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Roslev, P; Bjergbaek, L A; Hesselsoe, M

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oxygen on the survival of faecal pollution indicators including Escherichia coli in nondisinfected drinking water. Aerobic and anaerobic drinking water microcosms were inoculated with E. coli ATCC 25922 or raw sewage. Survival of E. coli was monitored by membrane filtration combined with cultivation on standard media, and by in situ hybridization with 16S rRNA-targeted fluorescent oligonucleotide probes. Anaerobic conditions significantly increased the survival of E. coli in drinking water compared with aerobic conditions. Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 showed a biphasic decrease in survival under aerobic conditions with an initial first-order decay rate of -0.11 day(-1) followed by a more rapid rate of -0.35 day(-1). In contrast, the first-order decay rate under anaerobic conditions was only -0.02 day(-1). After 35 days, <0.01% of the initial E. coli ATCC 25922 population remained detectable in aerobic microcosms compared with 48% in anaerobic microcosms. A poor survival was observed under aerobic conditions regardless of whether E. coli ATCC 25922 or sewage-derived E. coli was examined, and regardless of the detection method used (CFU or fluorescent in situ hybridization). Aerobic conditions in drinking water also appeared to decrease the survival of faecal enterococci, somatic coliphages and coliforms other than E. coli. The results indicate that oxygen is a major regulator of the survival of E. coli in nondisinfected drinking water. The results also suggest that faecal pollution indicators other than E. coli may persist longer in drinking water under anaerobic conditions. The effect of oxygen should be considered when evaluating the survival potential of enteric pathogens in oligotrophic environments.

  11. Cleaning Genesis Mission Payload for Flight with Ultra-Pure Water and Assembly in ISO Class 4 Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.

    2012-01-01

    Genesis mission to capture and return to Earth solar wind samples had very stringent contamination control requirements in order to distinguish the solar atoms from terrestrial ones. Genesis mission goals were to measure solar composition for most of the periodic table, so great care was taken to avoid particulate contamination. Since the number 1 and 2 science goals were to determine the oxygen and nitrogen isotopic composition, organic contamination was minimized by tightly controlling offgassing. The total amount of solar material captured in two years is about 400 micrograms spread across one sq m. The contamination limit requirement for each of C, N, and O was <1015 atoms/sq cm. For carbon, this is equivalent to 10 ng/cm2. Extreme vigilance was used in pre-paring Genesis collectors and cleaning hardware for flight. Surface contamination on polished silicon wafers, measured in Genesis laboratory is approximately 10 ng/sq cm.

  12. Baboons, water, and the ecology of oxygen stable isotopes in an arid hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Gillian L; Fourie, Nicolaas; Yeakel, Justin D; Phillips-Conroy, Jane E; Jolly, Clifford J; Koch, Paul L; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2012-01-01

    Baboons regularly drink surface waters derived from atmospheric precipitation, or meteoric water. As a result, the oxygen isotope (δ(18)O) composition of their tissues is expected to reflect that of local meteoric waters. Animal proxies of the oxygen isotope composition of meteoric water have practical applications as paleoenvironmental recorders because they can be used to infer aridity and temperature in historic and fossil systems. To explore this premise, we measured the δ(18)O values of hair from two baboon species, Papio anubis and Papio hamadryas, inhabiting Awash National Park, Ethiopia. The hybridizing taxa differ in their ranging behavior and physiological response to heat. Papio hamadryas ranges more widely in the arid thornbush and is inferred to ingest a greater proportion of leaf water that is enriched in (18)O as a result of evaporative fractionation. It is also better able to conserve body water, which reduces its dependence on meteoric waters depleted in (18)O. Taken together, these factors would predict relatively higher δ(18)O values in the hair (δ(18)O(hair)) of P. hamadryas. We found that the δ(18)O(hair) values of P. hamadryas were higher than those of P. anubis, yet the magnitude of the difference was marginal. We attribute this result to a common source of drinking water, the Awash River, and the longer drinking bouts of P. hamadryas. Our findings suggest that differences in δ(18)O values among populations of Papio (modern or ancient) reflect different sources of drinking water (which might have ecological significance) and, further, that Papio has practical value as a paleoenvironmental recorder.

  13. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-05-01

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH-->Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH- oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion.

  14. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-05-20

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH→Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH(-) oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion.

  15. Separating hydrogen and oxygen evolution in alkaline water electrolysis using nickel hydroxide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2016-01-01

    Low-cost alkaline water electrolysis has been considered a sustainable approach to producing hydrogen using renewable energy inputs, but preventing hydrogen/oxygen mixing and efficiently using the instable renewable energy are challenging. Here, using nickel hydroxide as a redox mediator, we decouple the hydrogen and oxygen production in alkaline water electrolysis, which overcomes the gas-mixing issue and may increase the use of renewable energy. In this architecture, the hydrogen production occurs at the cathode by water reduction, and the anodic Ni(OH)2 is simultaneously oxidized into NiOOH. The subsequent oxygen production involves a cathodic NiOOH reduction (NiOOH→Ni(OH)2) and an anodic OH− oxidization. Alternatively, the NiOOH formed during hydrogen production can be coupled with a zinc anode to form a NiOOH-Zn battery, and its discharge product (that is, Ni(OH)2) can be used to produce hydrogen again. This architecture brings a potential solution to facilitate renewables-to-hydrogen conversion. PMID:27199009

  16. Flow strength of highly hydrated Mg- and Na-sulfate hydrate salts, pure and in mixtures with water ice, with application to Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kubo, T.; Kirby, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    We selected two Europan-ice-shell candidate highly hydrated sulfate salts for a laboratory survey of ductile flow properties: MgSO4 ?? 7H2O (epsomite) and Na2SO4 ?? 10H2O (mirabilite), called MS7 and NS10, respectively. Polycrystalline samples in pure form and in mixtures with water ice I were tested using our cryogenic high-pressure creep apparatus at temperatures 232 ??? T ??? 294 K, confining pressures P = 50 and 100 MPa, and strain rates 4 ?? 10-8 ??? ???dot;e ??? 7 ?? 10-5 s-1. Grain size of NS10 samples was > 100 ??m. The flow strength ?? of pure MS7 was over 100 times that of polycrystalline ice I at comparable conditions; that of pure NS10 over 20 times that of ice. In terms of the creep law ???dot;e = A??n e-Q/RT, where R is the gas constant, we determine parameter values of A = 1012.1 MPa-ns-1, n = 5.4, and Q = 128 kJ/mol for pure NS10. Composites of ice I and NS10 of volume fraction ?? NS10 have flow strength ??c = [??NS10??NS10J + (1 - ?? NS10)??iceIJ]1/J where J ??? -0.5, making the effect on the flow of ice with low volume fractions of NS10 much like that of virtually undeformable hard rock inclusions. Being much stronger and denser than ice, massive sulfate inclusions in the warmer, ductile layer of the Europan ice shell are less likely to be entrained in convective ice flow and more likely to be drawn to the base of the ice shell by gravitational forces and eventually expelled. With only smaller, dispersed sulfate inclusions, at probable sulfate ?? < 0.2, the shell may be treated rheologically as pure, polycrystalline ice, with boundary conditions perhaps influenced by the high density and low thermal conductivity of the hydrated salts. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. An automated system for oxygen-18 water recovery and fluorine-18 delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueller, Michael J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Schlyer, David J.

    2005-12-01

    BNL has recently purchased an EBCO TR-19 cyclotron for routine isotope production. A system has been built to recover oxygen-18 enriched water from the fluorine-18 target, and then transport the F-18 a distance of 50 m to a shielded dose splitter. The remotized system provides the operator with feedback on flow rates and radiation levels during processing. Recovery of the 2.6 mL of enriched water and transport of the F-18 to the radiochemistry labs takes under 10 min, with more than 80% of the activity arriving in the chemistry lab.

  18. On-line determination of oxygen isotope ratios of water or ice by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, M; Huber, C

    2002-09-15

    Oxygen isotope ratio determination on any of the water phases (water vapor, water, ice) is of great relevance in different research fields such as climate and paleoclimate studies, geological surveys, and hydrological studies. The conventional technique for oxygen isotope measurement involves equilibration with carbon dioxide gas for a given time with a subsequent isotope determination. The equilibration technique is available in different layouts, but all of them are rather time-consuming. Here we report a new on-line technique that processes water samples as well as ice samples. The same principal, CO2 hydration, is used but speeded up by (i) a direct injection and full dissolution of CO2 in the water, (ii) an increased isotope exchange temperature at 50 degrees C, and (iii) a rapid gas extraction by means of an air-permeable membrane into a continuous helium flux supplying the isotope ratio mass spectrometer with the sample gas. The precision is better than 0.1/1000 which is only slightly larger than with the conventional equilibration technique. This on-line technique allows analysis of 1 m of ice with a resolution of 1-3 cm, depending on the meltwater flux, within 1 h. Similarly, continuous and fast analysis can be performed for aqueous samples for hydrological, geological, and perhaps medical applications.

  19. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition—including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism—based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the 18O/16O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ∼30–40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered. PMID:27170190

  20. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E

    2016-05-24

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition-including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism-based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the (18)O/(16)O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ∼30-40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered.

  1. Probing the metabolic water contribution to intracellular water using oxygen isotope ratios of PO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Chan; Wang, Fei; Chang, Sae Jung; Yao, Jun; Blake, Ruth E.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the relative contributions of different water sources to intracellular fluids and body water is important for many fields of study, ranging from animal physiology to paleoclimate. The intracellular fluid environment of cells is challenging to study due to the difficulties of accessing and sampling the contents of intact cells. Previous studies of multicelled organisms, mostly mammals, have estimated body water composition—including metabolic water produced as a byproduct of metabolism—based on indirect measurements of fluids averaged over the whole organism (e.g., blood) combined with modeling calculations. In microbial cells and aquatic organisms, metabolic water is not generally considered to be a significant component of intracellular water, due to the assumed unimpeded diffusion of water across cell membranes. Here we show that the 18O/16O ratio of PO4 in intracellular biomolecules (e.g., DNA) directly reflects the O isotopic composition of intracellular water and thus may serve as a probe allowing direct sampling of the intracellular environment. We present two independent lines of evidence showing a significant contribution of metabolic water to the intracellular water of three environmentally diverse strains of bacteria. Our results indicate that ˜30-40% of O in PO4 comprising DNA/biomass in early stationary phase cells is derived from metabolic water, which bolsters previous results and also further suggests a constant metabolic water value for cells grown under similar conditions. These results suggest that previous studies assuming identical isotopic compositions for intracellular/extracellular water may need to be reconsidered.

  2. Estimation of Solvation Entropy and Enthalpy via Analysis of Water Oxygen-Hydrogen Correlations.

    PubMed

    Velez-Vega, Camilo; McKay, Daniel J J; Kurtzman, Tom; Aravamuthan, Vibhas; Pearlstein, Robert A; Duca, José S

    2015-11-10

    A statistical-mechanical framework for estimation of solvation entropies and enthalpies is proposed, which is based on the analysis of water as a mixture of correlated water oxygens and water hydrogens. Entropic contributions of increasing order are cast in terms of a Mutual Information Expansion that is evaluated to pairwise interactions. In turn, the enthalpy is computed directly from a distance-based hydrogen bonding energy algorithm. The resulting expressions are employed for grid-based analyses of Molecular Dynamics simulations. In this first assessment of the methodology, we obtained global estimates of the excess entropy and enthalpy of water that are in good agreement with experiment and examined the method's ability to enable detailed elucidation of solvation thermodynamic structures, which can provide valuable knowledge toward molecular design.

  3. Modelling chemical reactions in dc plasma inside oxygen bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Ishii, Y.; Yasuoka, K.

    2012-02-01

    Plasmas generated inside oxygen bubbles in water have been developed for water purification. Zero-dimensional numerical simulations were used to investigate the chemical reactions in plasmas driven by dc voltage. The numerical and experimental results of the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and ozone in the solution were compared with a discharge current between 1 and 7 mA. Upon increasing the water vapour concentration inside bubbles, we saw from the numerical results that the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased with discharge current, whereas the concentration of ozone decreased. This finding agreed with the experimental results. With an increase in the discharge current, the heat flux from the plasma to the solution increased, and a large amount of water was probably vaporized into the bubbles.

  4. Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim; Berger, Lauren; Roberts, Lily

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers for biomedical applications. Atomic oxygen treatment can alter the chemistry and morphology of polymer surfaces, which may increase the adhesion and spreading of cells on Petri dishes and enhance implant growth. Therefore, nine different polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen and water-contact angle, or hydrophilicity, was measured after exposure. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after initial atomic oxygen exposure, or changes with higher fluence exposures, the contact angles between the polymer and water droplet placed on the polymer s surface were measured versus AO fluence. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a 100-W, 13.56-MHz radio frequency (RF) plasma asher, and the treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers. Pristine samples were compared with samples that had been exposed to AO at various fluence levels. Minimum and maximum fluences for the ashing trials were set based on the effective AO erosion of a Kapton witness coupon in the asher. The time intervals for ashing were determined by finding the logarithmic values of the minimum and maximum fluences. The difference of these two values was divided by the desired number of intervals (ideally 10). The initial desired fluence was then multiplied by this result (2.37), as was each subsequent desired fluence. The flux in the asher was determined to be approximately 3.0 x 10(exp 15) atoms/sq cm/sec, and each polymer was exposed to a maximum fluence of 5.16 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm.

  5. Benchmark oxygen-oxygen pair-distribution function of ambient water from x-ray diffraction measurements with a wide Q-range.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Lawrie B; Huang, Congcong; Schlesinger, Daniel; Pettersson, Lars G M; Nilsson, Anders; Benmore, Chris J

    2013-02-21

    Four recent x-ray diffraction measurements of ambient liquid water are reviewed here. Each of these measurements represents a significant development of the x-ray diffraction technique applied to the study of liquid water. Sources of uncertainty from statistical noise, Q-range, Compton scattering, and self-scattering are discussed. The oxygen-hydrogen contribution to the measured x-ray scattering pattern was subtracted using literature data to yield an experimental determination, with error bars, of the oxygen-oxygen pair-distribution function, g(OO)(r), which essentially describes the distribution of molecular centers. The extended Q-range and low statistical noise of these measurements has significantly reduced truncation effects and related errors in the g(OO)(r) functions obtained. From these measurements and error analysis, the position and height of the nearest neighbor maximum in g(OO)(r) were found to be 2.80(1) Å and 2.57(5) respectively. Numerical data for the coherent differential x-ray scattering cross-section I(X)(Q), the oxygen-oxygen structure factor S(OO)(Q), and the derived g(OO)(r) are provided as benchmarks for calibrating force-fields for water.

  6. Water masses along the OVIDE 2010 section as identified by oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelker, Antje; Salgueiro, Emilia; Thierry, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    The OVIDE transect between the western Iberian Peninsula and the southern tip of Greenland is one of the hydrographic sections in the North Atlantic that is measured regularly to identify changes in water mass formation and transport and thus to evaluate the state of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (Mercier et al., 2015; García-Ibáñez et al., 2015; both in Progr. in Oceanography). During the OVIDE 2010 campaign seawater samples covering the complete water column were collected on the section between Portugal and the Reykjanes ridge for stable isotope analyses. Oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) stable isotope values were measured simultaneously by cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy using a L1102-i Picarro water isotope analyser at the Godwin Laboratory for Paleoclimate Research (Univ. Cambridge, UK). Within the upper water column the stable isotope values clearly mark the positions of the Portugal Current (40.3°N 11°W), the North Atlantic Drift (46.2°N 19.4°W) and of the subarctic front (51°N 23.5°W). Up to Station 36 (47.7°N 20.6°W) an upper (around 600 m) and lower (around 1000 m) branch of the Mediterranean Outflow water (MOW) can clearly be distinguished by high oxygen (0.5-0.7‰) and hydrogen (3-5‰) values. At Station 28 (42.3°N 15.1°W) strong MOW influence is also indicated between 1400 and 1600 m. In the west European Basin, lower oxygen isotope values reveal the presence of Labrador Sea Water (LSW) below the MOW (down to 2200 m). Close to and west of the subarctic front this water mass shallows and occupies the complete interval between 1000 and 2000 m water depth. In the Iceland basin, two additional levels with lower oxygen isotope values are observed. The deeper level (2200-3500 m) marks Iceland Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW) that based on its distinct isotopic signature (δ18O ≤ 0.25‰) can be traced as far east as 18.5°W (down to at least 3500 m). Close to the Reykjanes ridge both, the ISOW and LSW, are also

  7. How the oxygen isotope ratio of rain water influences the isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gregory; Grimes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The stable oxygen isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate was analysed from chicken eggs laid under free range, and organic farming regimes from across the UK. The eggshell carbonate oxygen isotope data shows a clear depletion in delta18O distribution from the southwest to the northeast. Although consistently offset by around 1 permil, the same isotopic distribution as that seen in eggshell carbonate is observed in the delta18O ratio of rainfall and groundwater from across the UK. This distribution is related to the Rayleigh distillation of rainfall driven by westerly winds across the UK landmass. The clear relationship observed between eggshell delta18O values and that of rainwater presumably reflects the nature of free range chickens which must be drinking locally derived rainwater and supplementing their diet and water intake with locally derived food. These results suggest that the oxygen isotope value of chicken eggshells can be used as a forensic tool to identify the locality that free range and organic eggs were laid within the UK. Furthermore, if suitable material is preserved in the archaeological and geological record then such a relationship can potentially be used to establish the oxygen isotope value of rainwater from which ancient and / or ancestral birds lived.

  8. A method for controlling hydrogen sulfide in water by adding solid phase oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Jie; Chang, Yi-Tang; Chen, Hsi-Jien

    2007-01-01

    This work evaluates the addition of solid phase oxygen, a magnesium peroxide (MgO(2)) formulation manufactured by Regenesis (oxygen-releasing compounds, ORC), to inhibit the production of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in an SRB-enriched environment. The initial rate of release of oxygen by the ORC was determined over a short period by adding sodium sulfite (Na(2)SO(3)), which was a novel approach developed for this study. The ability of ORCs to control H(2)S by releasing oxygen was evaluated in a bench-scale column containing cultured sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). After a series of batch tests, 0.4% ORC was found to be able to inhibit the formation of H(2)S for more than 40 days. In comparison, the concentration of H(2)S dropped from 20 mg S/L to 0.05 mg S/L immediately after 0.1% hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was added, but began to recover just four days later. Thus, H(2)O(2) does not seem to be able to inhibit the production of sulfide for an extended period of time. By providing long-term inhibition of the SRB population, ORC provides a good alternative means of controlling the production of H(2)S in water.

  9. Water-Induced Decoupling of Tracer and Electrochemical Oxygen Exchange Kinetics on Mixed Conducting Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Isotope exchange depth profiling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are usually regarded as complementary tools for measuring the surface oxygen exchange activity of mixed conducting oxides, for example used in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes. Only very few studies compared electrical (kq) and tracer (k*) exchange coefficients of solid–gas interfaces measured under identical conditions. The 1:1 correlation between kq and k* often made is thus more an assumption than experimentally verified. In this study it is shown that the measured rates of electrical and tracer exchange of oxygen may strongly differ. Simultaneous acquisition of kq and k* on La0.6Sr0.4FeO3-δ and SrTi0.3Fe0.7O3-δ thin film electrodes revealed that k* > 100 kq in humid oxidizing (16O2 + H218O) and humid reducing (H2 + H218O) atmospheres. These results are explained by fast water adsorption and dissociation on surface oxygen vacancies, forming two surface hydroxyl groups. Hence, interpreting experimentally determined k* values in terms of electrochemically relevant oxygen exchange is not straightforward. PMID:27389420

  10. Gold catalysts for pure hydrogen production in the water-gas shift reaction: activity, structure and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Burch, Robbie

    2006-12-21

    The production of hydrogen containing very low levels of carbon monoxide for use in polymer electrolyte fuel cells requires the development of catalysts that show very high activity at low temperatures where the equilibrium for the removal of carbon monoxide using the water-gas shift reaction is favourable. It has been claimed that oxide-supported gold catalysts have the required high activity but there is considerable uncertainty in the literature about the feasibility of using these catalysts under real conditions. By comparing the activity of gold catalysts with that of platinum catalysts it is shown that well-prepared gold catalysts are significantly more active than the corresponding platinum catalysts. However, the method of preparation and pre-treatment of the gold catalysts is critical and activity variations of several orders of magnitude can be observed depending on the methods chosen. It is shown that an intimate contact between gold and the oxide support is important and any preparative procedure that does not generate such an interaction, or any subsequent treatment that can destroy such an interaction, may result in catalysts with low activity. The oxidation state and structure of active gold catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction is shown to comprise gold primarily in a zerovalent metallic state but in intimate contact with the support. This close contact between small metallic gold particles and the support may result in the "atoms" at the point of contact having a net charge (most probably cationic) but the high activity is associated with the presence of metallic gold. Both in situ XPS and XANES appear unequivocal on this point and this conclusion is consistent with similar measurements on gold catalysts even when used for CO oxidation. In situ EXAFS measurements under water gas shift conditions show that the active form of gold is a small gold cluster in intimate contact with the oxide support. The importance of the gold/oxide interface is

  11. Molecular Simulations of the Vapor-Liquid Phase Interfaces of Pure Water Modeled with the SPC/E and the TIP4P/2005 Molecular Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinš, Václav; Celný, David; Planková, Barbora; Němec, Tomáš; Duška, Michal; Hrubý, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In our previous study [Planková et al., EPJWeb. Conf. 92, 02071 (2015)], several molecular simulations of vapor-liquid phase interfaces for pure water were performed using the DL_POLY Classic software. The TIP4P/2005 molecular model was successfully used for the modeling of the density profile and the thickness of phase interfaces together with the temperature dependence of the surface tension. In the current study, the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) model for water was employed for the investigation of vapor-liquid phase interfaces over a wide temperature range from 250 K to 600 K. The TIP4P/2005 model was also used with the temperature step of 25 K to obtain more consistent data compared to our previous study. Results of the new simulations are in a good agreement with most of the literature data. TIP4P/2005 provides better results for the saturated liquid density with its maximum close to 275 K, while SPC/E predicts slightly better saturated vapor density. Both models give qualitatively correct representation for the surface tension of water. The maximum absolute deviation from the IAPWS standard for the surface tension of ordinary water is 10.4 mN · m-1 and 4.1 mN · m-1 over the temperature range from 275 K to 600 K in case of SPC/E and TIP4P/2005, respectively.

  12. [Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of Precipitation and Its Water Vapor Sources in Eastern Qaidam Basin].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian-jia; Chen, Hui; Gong, Guo-li

    2015-08-01

    Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes can be used as a tracer to analyze water vapor sources of atmospheric precipitation. We choose Golmud and Delingha as our study areas, Golmud locates in the south of Qaidam basin, and Delingha locates in the northeast. Based on the analysis of monthly change of hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of precipitation during June to September of 2010, and the relationship between deltaD and delta18O in precipitation, we investigated the water vapor sources of precipitation in eastern Qaidam basin. The results show that: (1) meteoric water line between June to September in Golmud is: deltaD = 7.840 delta18O - 4.566 (R2 = 0.918, P < 0.001), and in Delingha is: deltaD = 7.833 delta18O + 8.606 (R2 = 0.986, P < 0.001). The slopes and intercepts of meteoric water line between June to September in both Golmud and Delingha are lower than the global average, and the intercept in Golmud is only -4.566, which indicates the extremely arid climate condition. (2) the delta18O content of precipitation is much higher in Golmud in early July, it shows the enrichment of some heavier isotopes. However, the delta18O content of precipitation becomes lower from late July to early September, especially for the late September. The 8180 content of precipitation in Delingha is higher in June to August than that in late September. (3) the water vapor sources of precipitation in Golmud and Delingha are different, Golmud area is the northern border of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau where the southwest monsoon can reach, and the southwest mo