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Sample records for oxylipin biosynthetic complex

  1. A Covalent Linker Allows for Membrane Targeting of An Oxylipin Biosynthetic Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, N.C.; Niebuhr, M.; Tsuruta, H.; Bordelon, T.; Ridderbusch, O.; Dassey, A.; Brash, A.R.; Bartlett, S.G.; Newcomer, M.E.

    2009-05-18

    A naturally occurring bifunctional protein from Plexaura homomalla links sequential catalytic activities in an oxylipin biosynthetic pathway. The C-terminal lipoxygenase (LOX) portion of the molecule catalyzes the transformation of arachidonic acid (AA) to the corresponding 8R-hydroperoxide, and the N-terminal allene oxide synthase (AOS) domain promotes the conversion of the hydroperoxide intermediate to the product allene oxide (AO). Small-angle X-ray scattering data indicate that in the absence of a covalent linkage the two catalytic domains that transform AA to AO associate to form a complex that recapitulates the structure of the bifunctional protein. The SAXS data also support a model for LOX and AOS domain orientation in the fusion protein inferred from a low-resolution crystal structure. However, results of membrane binding experiments indicate that covalent linkage of the domains is required for Ca2+-dependent membrane targeting of the sequential activities, despite the noncovalent domain association. Furthermore, membrane targeting is accompanied by a conformational change as monitored by specific proteolysis of the linker that joins the AOS and LOX domains. Our data are consistent with a model in which Ca2+-dependent membrane binding relieves the noncovalent interactions between the AOS and LOX domains and suggests that the C2-like domain of LOX mediates both protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions.

  2. Survey of volatile oxylipins and their biosynthetic precursors in bryophytes.

    PubMed

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2010-04-01

    Oxylipins are metabolites which are derived from the oxidative fragmentation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. These metabolites play central roles in plant hormonal regulation and defense. Here we survey the production of volatile oxylipins in bryophytes and report the production of a high structural variety of C5, C6, C8 and C9 volatiles of mosses. In liverworts and hornworts oxylipin production was not as pronounced as in the 23 screened mosses. A biosynthetic investigation revealed that both, C18 and C20 fatty acids serve as precursors for the volatile oxylipins that are mainly produced after mechanical wounding of the green tissue of mosses.

  3. Structural Insights Into the Evolutionary Paths of Oxylipin Biosynthetic Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.-S.; Nioche, P.; Hamberg, M.; Raman, C.S.

    2009-05-20

    The oxylipin pathway generates not only prostaglandin-like jasmonates but also green leaf volatiles (GLVs), which confer characteristic aromas to fruits and vegetables. Although allene oxide synthase (AOS) and hydroperoxide lyase are atypical cytochrome P450 family members involved in the synthesis of jasmonates and GLVs, respectively, it is unknown how these enzymes rearrange their hydroperoxide substrates into different products. Here we present the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana AOS, free and in complex with substrate or intermediate analogues. The structures reveal an unusual active site poised to control the reactivity of an epoxyallylic radical and its cation by means of interactions with an aromatic {pi}-system. Replacing the amino acid involved in these steps by a non-polar residue markedly reduces AOS activity and, unexpectedly, is both necessary and sufficient for converting AOS into a GLV biosynthetic enzyme. Furthermore, by combining our structural data with bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, we have discovered previously unknown hydroperoxide lyase in plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, AOS in coral, and epoxyalcohol synthase in amphioxus. These results indicate that oxylipin biosynthetic genes were present in the last common ancestor of plants and animals, but were subsequently lost in all metazoan lineages except Placozoa, Cnidaria and Cephalochordata.

  4. Isolation and structure elucidation of linolipins C and D, complex oxylipins from flax leaves.

    PubMed

    Chechetkin, Ivan R; Blufard, Alexander S; Khairutdinov, Bulat I; Mukhitova, Fakhima K; Gorina, Svetlana S; Yarin, Andrey Y; Antsygina, Larisa L; Grechkin, Alexander N

    2013-12-01

    Two complex oxylipins (linolipins C and D) were isolated from the leaves of flax plants inoculated with phytopathogenic bacteria Pectobacterium atrosepticum. Their structures were elucidated based on UV, MS and NMR spectroscopic data. Both oxylipins were identified as digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) molecular species. Linolipin C contains one residue of divinyl ether (ω5Z)-etherolenic acid and one α-linolenate residue at sn-1 and sn-2 positions, respectively. Linolipin D possesses two (ω5Z)-etherolenic acid residues at both sn-1 and sn-2 positions. The rapid formation (2-30min) of linolipins C and D alongside with linolipins A and B occurred in the flax leaves upon their damage by freezing-thawing.

  5. The Oxylipin Pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Creelman, Robert A.; Mulpuri, Rao

    2002-01-01

    Oxylipins are acyclic or cyclic oxidation products derived from the catabolism of fatty acids which regulate many defense and developmental pathways in plants. The dramatic increase in the volume of publications and reviews on these compounds since 1997 documents the increasing interest in this compound and its role in plants. Research on this topic has solidified our understanding of the chemistry and biosynthetic pathways for oxylipin production. However, more information is still needed on how free fatty acids are produced and the role of beta-oxidation in the biosynthetic pathway for oxylipins. It is also becoming apparent that oxylipin content and composition changes during growth and development and during pathogen or insect attack. Oxylipins such as jasmonic acid (JA) or 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid modulate the expression of numerous genes and influence specific aspects of plant growth, development and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Although oxylipins are believed to act alone, several examples were presented to illustrate that JA-induced responses are modulated by the type and the nature of crosstalk with other signaling molecules such as ethylene and salicylic acid. How oxylipins cause changes in gene expression and instigate a physiological response is becoming understood with the isolation of mutations in both positive and negative regulators in the jasmonate signaling pathway and the use of cDNA microarrays. PMID:22303193

  6. The oxylipin pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Creelman, Robert A; Mulpuri, Rao

    2002-01-01

    Oxylipins are acyclic or cyclic oxidation products derived from the catabolism of fatty acids which regulate many defense and developmental pathways in plants. The dramatic increase in the volume of publications and reviews on these compounds since 1997 documents the increasing interest in this compound and its role in plants. Research on this topic has solidified our understanding of the chemistry and biosynthetic pathways for oxylipin production. However, more information is still needed on how free fatty acids are produced and the role of beta-oxidation in the biosynthetic pathway for oxylipins. It is also becoming apparent that oxylipin content and composition changes during growth and development and during pathogen or insect attack. Oxylipins such as jasmonic acid (JA) or 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid modulate the expression of numerous genes and influence specific aspects of plant growth, development and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Although oxylipins are believed to act alone, several examples were presented to illustrate that JA-induced responses are modulated by the type and the nature of crosstalk with other signaling molecules such as ethylene and salicylic acid. How oxylipins cause changes in gene expression and instigate a physiological response is becoming understood with the isolation of mutations in both positive and negative regulators in the jasmonate signaling pathway and the use of cDNA microarrays.

  7. Biosynthesis and analysis of plant oxylipins.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, G

    2015-05-01

    The term oxylipin is applied to the generation of oxygenated products of polyunsaturated fatty acids that can arise either through non-enzymatic or enzymatic processes generating a complex array of products, including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, acids and hydrocarbon gases. The biosynthetic origin of these products has revealed an array of enzymes involved in their formation and more recently a radical pathway. These include lipoxygenases and α-dioxygenase that insert both oxygen atoms in to the acyl chain to initiate the pathways, to specialised P450 monooxygenases that are responsible for their downstream processing. This latter group include enzymes at the branch points such as allene oxide synthase, leading to jasmonate signalling, hydroperoxide lyase, responsible for generating pathogen/pest defensive volatiles and divinyl ether synthases and peroxygenases involved in the formation of antimicrobial compounds. The complexity of the products generated raises significant challenges for their rapid identification and quantification using metabolic screening methods. Here the current developments in oxylipin metabolism are reviewed together with the emerging technologies required to expand this important field of research that underpins advances in plant-pest/pathogen interactions.

  8. Reciprocal oxylipin-mediated cross-talk in the Aspergillus-seed pathosystem.

    PubMed

    Brodhagen, Marion; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I; Hornung, Ellen; Goebel, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Keller, Nancy P

    2008-01-01

    In Aspergilli, mycotoxin production and sporulation are governed, in part, by endogenous oxylipins (oxygenated, polyunsaturated fatty acids and metabolites derived therefrom). In Aspergillus nidulans, oxylipins are synthesized by the dioxygenase enzymes PpoA, PpoB and PpoC. Structurally similar oxylipins are synthesized in seeds via the action of lipoxygenase (LOX) enzymes. Previous reports have shown that exogenous application of seed oxylipins to Aspergillus cultures alters sporulation and mycotoxin production. Herein, we explored whether a plant oxylipin biosynthetic gene (ZmLOX3) could substitute functionally for A. nidulans ppo genes. We engineered ZmLOX3 into wild-type A. nidulans, and into a DeltappoAC strain that was reduced in production of oxylipins, conidia and the mycotoxin sterigmatocystin. ZmLOX3 expression increased production of conidia and sterigmatocystin in both backgrounds. We additionally explored whether A. nidulans oxylipins affect seed LOX gene expression during Aspergillus colonization. We observed that peanut seed pnlox2-3 expression was decreased when infected by A. nidulansDeltappo mutants compared with infection by wild type. This result provides genetic evidence that fungal oxylipins are involved in plant LOX gene expression changes, leading to possible alterations in the fungal/host interaction. This report provides the first genetic evidence for reciprocal oxylipin cross-talk in the Aspergillus-seed pathosystem.

  9. Oxylipins and plant abiotic stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, T V; Zastrijnaja, O M; Klimov, V V

    2014-04-01

    Oxylipins are signaling molecules formed enzymatically or spontaneously from unsaturated fatty acids in all aerobic organisms. Oxylipins regulate growth, development, and responses to environmental stimuli of organisms. The oxylipin biosynthesis pathway in plants includes a few parallel branches named after first enzyme of the corresponding branch as allene oxide synthase, hydroperoxide lyase, divinyl ether synthase, peroxygenase, epoxy alcohol synthase, and others in which various biologically active metabolites are produced. Oxylipins can be formed non-enzymatically as a result of oxygenation of fatty acids by free radicals and reactive oxygen species. Spontaneously formed oxylipins are called phytoprostanes. The role of oxylipins in biotic stress responses has been described in many published works. The role of oxylipins in plant adaptation to abiotic stress conditions is less studied; there is also obvious lack of available data compilation and analysis in this area of research. In this work we analyze data on oxylipins functions in plant adaptation to abiotic stress conditions, such as wounding, suboptimal light and temperature, dehydration and osmotic stress, and effects of ozone and heavy metals. Modern research articles elucidating the molecular mechanisms of oxylipins action by the methods of biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics are reviewed here. Data on the role of oxylipins in stress signal transduction, stress-inducible gene expression regulation, and interaction of these metabolites with other signal transduction pathways in cells are described. In this review the general oxylipin-mediated mechanisms that help plants to adjust to a broad spectrum of stress factors are considered, followed by analysis of more specific responses regulated by oxylipins only under certain stress conditions. New approaches to improvement of plant resistance to abiotic stresses based on the induction of oxylipin-mediated processes are discussed.

  10. Oxylipins in moss development and defense

    PubMed Central

    de León, Inés Ponce; Hamberg, Mats; Castresana, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Oxylipins are oxygenated fatty acids that participate in plant development and defense against pathogen infection, insects, and wounding. Initial oxygenation of substrate fatty acids is mainly catalyzed by lipoxygenases (LOXs) and α-dioxygenases but can also take place non-enzymatically by autoxidation or singlet oxygen-dependent reactions. The resulting hydroperoxides are further metabolized by secondary enzymes to produce a large variety of compounds, including the hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and short-chain green leaf volatiles. In flowering plants, which lack arachidonic acid, oxylipins are produced mainly from oxidation of polyunsaturated C18 fatty acids, notably linolenic and linoleic acids. Algae and mosses in addition possess polyunsaturated C20 fatty acids including arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids, which can also be oxidized by LOXs and transformed into bioactive compounds. Mosses are phylogenetically placed between unicellular green algae and flowering plants, allowing evolutionary studies of the different oxylipin pathways. During the last years the moss Physcomitrella patens has become an attractive model plant for understanding oxylipin biosynthesis and diversity. In addition to the advantageous evolutionary position, functional studies of the different oxylipin-forming enzymes can be performed in this moss by targeted gene disruption or single point mutations by means of homologous recombination. Biochemical characterization of several oxylipin-producing enzymes and oxylipin profiling in P. patens reveal the presence of a wider range of oxylipins compared to flowering plants, including C18 as well as C20-derived oxylipins. Surprisingly, one of the most active oxylipins in plants, JA, is not synthesized in this moss. In this review, we present an overview of oxylipins produced in mosses and discuss the current knowledge related to the involvement of oxylipin-producing enzymes and their products in moss development and defense. PMID:26191067

  11. Oxylipins in moss development and defense.

    PubMed

    Ponce de León, Inés; Hamberg, Mats; Castresana, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Oxylipins are oxygenated fatty acids that participate in plant development and defense against pathogen infection, insects, and wounding. Initial oxygenation of substrate fatty acids is mainly catalyzed by lipoxygenases (LOXs) and α-dioxygenases but can also take place non-enzymatically by autoxidation or singlet oxygen-dependent reactions. The resulting hydroperoxides are further metabolized by secondary enzymes to produce a large variety of compounds, including the hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and short-chain green leaf volatiles. In flowering plants, which lack arachidonic acid, oxylipins are produced mainly from oxidation of polyunsaturated C18 fatty acids, notably linolenic and linoleic acids. Algae and mosses in addition possess polyunsaturated C20 fatty acids including arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids, which can also be oxidized by LOXs and transformed into bioactive compounds. Mosses are phylogenetically placed between unicellular green algae and flowering plants, allowing evolutionary studies of the different oxylipin pathways. During the last years the moss Physcomitrella patens has become an attractive model plant for understanding oxylipin biosynthesis and diversity. In addition to the advantageous evolutionary position, functional studies of the different oxylipin-forming enzymes can be performed in this moss by targeted gene disruption or single point mutations by means of homologous recombination. Biochemical characterization of several oxylipin-producing enzymes and oxylipin profiling in P. patens reveal the presence of a wider range of oxylipins compared to flowering plants, including C18 as well as C20-derived oxylipins. Surprisingly, one of the most active oxylipins in plants, JA, is not synthesized in this moss. In this review, we present an overview of oxylipins produced in mosses and discuss the current knowledge related to the involvement of oxylipin-producing enzymes and their products in moss development and defense.

  12. Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes from Developing Maize Endosperm Associate in Multisubunit Complexes1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A.; Liu, Fushan; Marsh, Rebekah S.; Kim, Seungtaek; Gan, Qinglei; Tetlow, Ian J.; Emes, Michael J.; James, Martha G.; Myers, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations affecting specific starch biosynthetic enzymes commonly have pleiotropic effects on other enzymes in the same metabolic pathway. Such genetic evidence indicates functional relationships between components of the starch biosynthetic system, including starch synthases (SSs), starch branching enzymes (BEs), and starch debranching enzymes; however, the molecular explanation for these functional interactions is not known. One possibility is that specific SSs, BEs, and/or starch debranching enzymes associate physically with each other in multisubunit complexes. To test this hypothesis, this study sought to identify stable associations between three separate SS polypeptides (SSI, SSIIa, and SSIII) and three separate BE polypeptides (BEI, BEIIa, and BEIIb) from maize (Zea mays) amyloplasts. Detection methods included in vivo protein-protein interaction tests in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nuclei, immunoprecipitation, and affinity purification using recombinant proteins as the solid phase ligand. Eight different instances were detected of specific pairs of proteins associating either directly or indirectly in the same multisubunit complex, and direct, pairwise interactions were indicated by the in vivo test in yeast. In addition, SSIIa, SSIII, BEIIa, and BEIIb all comigrated in gel permeation chromatography in a high molecular mass form of approximately 600 kD, and SSIIa, BEIIa, and BEIIb also migrated in a second high molecular form, lacking SSIII, of approximately 300 kD. Monomer forms of all four proteins were also detected by gel permeation chromatography. The 600- and 300-kD complexes were stable at high salt concentration, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are involved in the association between subunits. PMID:18281416

  13. Starch biosynthetic enzymes from developing maize endosperm associate in multisubunit complexes.

    PubMed

    Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A; Liu, Fushan; Marsh, Rebekah S; Kim, Seungtaek; Gan, Qinglei; Tetlow, Ian J; Emes, Michael J; James, Martha G; Myers, Alan M

    2008-04-01

    Mutations affecting specific starch biosynthetic enzymes commonly have pleiotropic effects on other enzymes in the same metabolic pathway. Such genetic evidence indicates functional relationships between components of the starch biosynthetic system, including starch synthases (SSs), starch branching enzymes (BEs), and starch debranching enzymes; however, the molecular explanation for these functional interactions is not known. One possibility is that specific SSs, BEs, and/or starch debranching enzymes associate physically with each other in multisubunit complexes. To test this hypothesis, this study sought to identify stable associations between three separate SS polypeptides (SSI, SSIIa, and SSIII) and three separate BE polypeptides (BEI, BEIIa, and BEIIb) from maize (Zea mays) amyloplasts. Detection methods included in vivo protein-protein interaction tests in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nuclei, immunoprecipitation, and affinity purification using recombinant proteins as the solid phase ligand. Eight different instances were detected of specific pairs of proteins associating either directly or indirectly in the same multisubunit complex, and direct, pairwise interactions were indicated by the in vivo test in yeast. In addition, SSIIa, SSIII, BEIIa, and BEIIb all comigrated in gel permeation chromatography in a high molecular mass form of approximately 600 kD, and SSIIa, BEIIa, and BEIIb also migrated in a second high molecular form, lacking SSIII, of approximately 300 kD. Monomer forms of all four proteins were also detected by gel permeation chromatography. The 600- and 300-kD complexes were stable at high salt concentration, suggesting that hydrophobic effects are involved in the association between subunits.

  14. Nanolipoprotein particles comprising a natural rubber biosynthetic enzyme complex and related products, methods and systems

    DOEpatents

    Hoeprich, Paul D.; Whalen, Maureen

    2016-04-05

    Provided herein are nanolipoprotein particles that comprise a biosynthetic enzyme more particularly an enzyme capable of catalyzing rubber or other rubbers polymerization, and related assemblies, devices, methods and systems.

  15. Intimal smooth muscle cells are a source but not a sensor of anti-inflammatory CYP450 derived oxylipins

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Scott; Edin, Matthew L.; Lih, Fred B.; Yaqoob, Muhammad M.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Gilroy, Derek; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2015-08-07

    Vascular pathologies are associated with changes in the presence and expression of morphologically distinct vascular smooth muscle cells. In particular, in complex human vascular lesions and models of disease in pigs and rodents, an intimal smooth muscle cell (iSMC) which exhibits a stable epithelioid or rhomboid phenotype in culture is often found to be present in high numbers, and may represent the reemergence of a distinct developmental vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype. The CYP450-oxylipin - soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway is currently of great interest in targeting for cardiovascular disease. sEH inhibitors limit the development of hypertension, diabetes, atherosclerosis and aneurysm formation in animal models. We have investigated the expression of CYP450-oxylipin-sEH pathway enzymes and their metabolites in paired intimal (iSMC) and medial (mSMC) cells isolated from rat aorta. iSMC basally released significantly larger amounts of epoxy-oxylipin CYP450 products from eicosapentaenoic acid > docosahexaenoic acid > arachidonic acid > linoleic acid, and expressed higher levels of CYP2C12, CYP2B1, but not CYP2J mRNA compared to mSMC. When stimulated with the pro-inflammatory TLR4 ligand LPS, epoxy-oxylipin production did not change greatly in iSMC. In contrast, LPS induced epoxy-oxylipin products in mSMC and induced CYP2J4. iSMC and mSMC express sEH which metabolizes primary epoxy-oxylipins to their dihydroxy-counterparts. The sEH inhibitors TPPU or AUDA inhibited LPS-induced NFκB activation and iNOS induction in mSMC, but had no effect on NFκB nuclear localization or inducible nitric oxide synthase in iSMC; effects which were recapitulated in part by addition of authentic epoxy-oxylipins. iSMCs are a rich source but not a sensor of anti-inflammatory epoxy-oxylipins. Complex lesions that contain high levels of iSMCs may be more resistant to the protective effects of sEH inhibitors. - Highlights: • We examined oxylipin production in different

  16. Oxylipin diversity in the diatom family Leptocylindraceae reveals DHA derivatives in marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Deepak; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Gallo, Carmela; Zingone, Adriana; Fontana, Angelo

    2014-01-17

    Marine planktonic organisms, such as diatoms, are prospective sources of novel bioactive metabolites. Oxygenated derivatives of fatty acids, generally referred to as oxylipins, in diatoms comprise a highly diverse and complex family of secondary metabolites. These molecules have recently been implicated in several biological processes including intra- and inter-cellular signaling as well as in defense against biotic stressors and grazers. Here, we analyze the production and diversity of C20 and C22 non-volatile oxylipins in five species of the family Leptocylindraceae, which constitute a basal clade in the diatom phylogeny. We report the presence of species-specific lipoxygenase activity and oxylipin patterns, providing the first demonstration of enzymatic production of docosahexaenoic acid derivatives in marine diatoms. The differences observed in lipoxygenase pathways among the species investigated broadly reflected the relationships observed with phylogenetic markers, thus providing functional support to the taxonomic diversity of the individual species.

  17. Functional convergence of oxylipin and abscisic acid pathways controls stomatal closure in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Tatyana; Kolla, Venkat A; Wang, Chang-Quan; Nasafi, Zainab; Hicks, Derrick R; Phadungchob, Bpantamars; Chehab, Wassim E; Brandizzi, Federica; Froehlich, John; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2014-03-01

    Membranes are primary sites of perception of environmental stimuli. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are major structural constituents of membranes that also function as modulators of a multitude of signal transduction pathways evoked by environmental stimuli. Different stresses induce production of a distinct blend of oxygenated polyunsaturated fatty acids, "oxylipins." We employed three Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotypes to examine the oxylipin signature in response to specific stresses and determined that wounding and drought differentially alter oxylipin profiles, particularly the allene oxide synthase branch of the oxylipin pathway, responsible for production of jasmonic acid (JA) and its precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (12-OPDA). Specifically, wounding induced both 12-OPDA and JA levels, whereas drought induced only the precursor 12-OPDA. Levels of the classical stress phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) were also mainly enhanced by drought and little by wounding. To explore the role of 12-OPDA in plant drought responses, we generated a range of transgenic lines and exploited the existing mutant plants that differ in their levels of stress-inducible 12-OPDA but display similar ABA levels. The plants producing higher 12-OPDA levels exhibited enhanced drought tolerance and reduced stomatal aperture. Furthermore, exogenously applied ABA and 12-OPDA, individually or combined, promote stomatal closure of ABA and allene oxide synthase biosynthetic mutants, albeit most effectively when combined. Using tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Brassica napus verified the potency of this combination in inducing stomatal closure in plants other than Arabidopsis. These data have identified drought as a stress signal that uncouples the conversion of 12-OPDA to JA and have revealed 12-OPDA as a drought-responsive regulator of stomatal closure functioning most effectively together with ABA.

  18. Oxylipins produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa promote biofilm formation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Eriel; Campos-Gómez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The oxygenation of unsaturated fatty acids by dioxygenases occurs in all kingdoms of life and produces physiologically important lipids called oxylipins. The biological roles of oxylipins have been extensively studied in animals, plants, algae and fungi, but remain largely unidentified in prokaryotes. The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays a diol synthase activity that transforms several monounsaturated fatty acids into mono- and di-hydroxylated derivatives. Here we show that oxylipins derived from this activity inhibit flagellum-driven motility and upregulate type IV pilus-dependent twitching motility of P. aeruginosa. Consequently, these oxylipins promote bacterial organization in microcolonies, increasing the ability of P. aeruginosa to form biofilms in vitro and in vivo (in Drosophila flies). We also demonstrate that oxylipins produced by P. aeruginosa promote virulence in Drosophila flies and lettuce. Our study thus uncovers a role for prokaryotic oxylipins in the physiology and pathogenicity of bacteria. PMID:27929111

  19. CYP450-derived oxylipins mediate inflammatory resolution

    PubMed Central

    Gilroy, Derek W.; De Maeyer, Roel P. H.; Bystrom, Jonas; Newson, Justine; Lih, Fred B.; Stables, Melanie; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2016-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation has emerged as an active process in immunobiology, with cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system being critical in mediating efferocytosis and wound debridement and bridging the gap between innate and adaptive immunity. Here we investigated the roles of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-derived epoxy-oxylipins in a well-characterized model of sterile resolving peritonitis in the mouse. Epoxy-oxylipins were produced in a biphasic manner during the peaks of acute (4 h) and resolution phases (24–48 h) of the response. The epoxygenase inhibitor SKF525A (epoxI) given at 24 h selectively inhibited arachidonic acid- and linoleic acid-derived CYP450-epoxy-oxlipins and resulted in a dramatic influx in monocytes. The epoxI-recruited monocytes were strongly GR1+, Ly6chi, CCR2hi, CCL2hi, and CX3CR1lo. In addition, expression of F4/80 and the recruitment of T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells were suppressed. sEH (Ephx2)−/− mice, which have elevated epoxy-oxylipins, demonstrated opposing effects to epoxI-treated mice: reduced Ly6chi monocytes and elevated F4/80hi macrophages and B, T, and dendritic cells. Ly6chi and Ly6clo monocytes, resident macrophages, and recruited dendritic cells all showed a dramatic change in their resolution signature following in vivo epoxI treatment. Markers of macrophage differentiation CD11b, MerTK, and CD103 were reduced, and monocyte-derived macrophages and resident macrophages ex vivo showed greatly impaired phagocytosis of zymosan and efferocytosis of apoptotic thymocytes following epoxI treatment. These findings demonstrate that epoxy-oxylipins have a critical role in monocyte lineage recruitment and activity to promote inflammatory resolution and represent a previously unidentified internal regulatory system governing the establishment of adaptive immunity. PMID:27226306

  20. Intimal smooth muscle cells are a source but not a sensor of anti-inflammatory CYP450 derived oxylipins

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Scott; Edin, Matthew L.; Lih, Fred B.; Davies, Michael; Yaqoob, Muhammad M.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Gilroy, Derek; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2015-01-01

    Vascular pathologies are associated with changes in the presence and expression of morphologically distinct vascular smooth muscle cells. In particular, in complex human vascular lesions and models of disease in pigs and rodents, an intimal smooth muscle cell (iSMC) which exhibits a stable epithelioid or rhomboid phenotype in culture is often found to be present in high numbers, and may represent the reemergence of a distinct developmental vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype. The CYP450-oxylipin - soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway is currently of great interest in targeting for cardiovascular disease. sEH inhibitors limit the development of hypertension, diabetes, atherosclerosis and aneurysm formation in animal models. We have investigated the expression of CYP450-oxylipin-sEH pathway enzymes and their metabolites in paired intimal (iSMC) and medial (mSMC) cells isolated from rat aorta. iSMC basally released significantly larger amounts of epoxy-oxylipin CYP450 products from eicosapentaenoic acid > docosahexaenoic acid > arachidonic acid > linoleic acid, and expressed higher levels of CYP2C12, CYP2B1, but not CYP2J mRNA compared to mSMC. When stimulated with the pro-inflammatory TLR4 ligand LPS, epoxy-oxylipin production did not change greatly in iSMC. In contrast, LPS induced epoxy-oxylipin products in mSMC and induced CYP2J4. iSMC and mSMC express sEH which metabolizes primary epoxy-oxylipins to their dihydroxy-counterparts. The sEH inhibitors TPPU or AUDA inhibited LPS-induced NFκB activation and iNOS induction in mSMC, but had no effect on NFκB nuclear localization or inducible nitric oxide synthase in iSMC; effects which were recapitulated in part by addition of authentic epoxy-oxylipins. iSMCs are a rich source but not a sensor of anti-inflammatory epoxy-oxylipins. Complex lesions that contain high levels of iSMCs may be more resistant to the protective effects of sEH inhibitors. PMID:26086108

  1. Analysis of protein complexes in wheat amyloplasts reveals functional interactions among starch biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tetlow, Ian J; Beisel, Kim G; Cameron, Scott; Makhmoudova, Amina; Liu, Fushan; Bresolin, Nicole S; Wait, Robin; Morell, Matthew K; Emes, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions among enzymes of amylopectin biosynthesis were investigated in developing wheat (Triticum aestivum) endosperm. Physical interactions between starch branching enzymes (SBEs) and starch synthases (SSs) were identified from endosperm amyloplasts during the active phase of starch deposition in the developing grain using immunoprecipitation and cross-linking strategies. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments using peptide-specific antibodies indicate that at least two distinct complexes exist containing SSI, SSIIa, and either of SBEIIa or SBEIIb. Chemical cross linking was used to identify protein complexes containing SBEs and SSs from amyloplast extracts. Separation of extracts by gel filtration chromatography demonstrated the presence of SBE and SS forms in protein complexes of around 260 kD and that SBEII forms may also exist as homodimers. Analysis of cross-linked 260-kD aggregation products from amyloplast lysates by mass spectrometry confirmed SSI, SSIIa, and SBEII forms as components of one or more protein complexes in amyloplasts. In vitro phosphorylation experiments with gamma-(32)P-ATP indicated that SSII and both forms of SBEII are phosphorylated. Treatment of the partially purified 260-kD SS-SBE complexes with alkaline phosphatase caused dissociation of the assembly into the respective monomeric proteins, indicating that formation of SS-SBE complexes is phosphorylation dependent. The 260-kD SS-SBEII protein complexes are formed around 10 to 15 d after pollination and were shown to be catalytically active with respect to both SS and SBE activities. Prior to this developmental stage, SSI, SSII, and SBEII forms were detectable only in monomeric form. High molecular weight forms of SBEII demonstrated a higher affinity for in vitro glucan substrates than monomers. These results provide direct evidence for the existence of protein complexes involved in amylopectin biosynthesis.

  2. Production of Eicosanoids and Other Oxylipins by Pathogenic Eukaryotic Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Noverr, Mairi C.; Erb-Downward, John R.; Huffnagle, Gary B.

    2003-01-01

    Oxylipins are oxygenated metabolites of fatty acids. Eicosanoids are a subset of oxylipins and include the prostaglandins and leukotrienes, which are potent regulators of host immune responses. Host cells are one source of eicosanoids and oxylipins during infection; however, another potential source of eicosanoids is the pathogen itself. A broad range of pathogenic fungi, protozoa, and helminths produce eicosanoids and other oxylipins by novel synthesis pathways. Why do these organisms produce oxylipins? Accumulating data suggest that phase change and differentiation in these organisms are controlled by oxylipins, including prostaglandins and lipoxygenase products. The precise role of pathogen-derived eicosanoids in pathogenesis remains to be determined, but the potential link between pathogen eicosanoids and the development of TH2 responses in the host is intriguing. Mammalian prostaglandins and leukotrienes have been studied extensively, and these molecules can modulate Th1 versus Th2 immune responses, chemokine production, phagocytosis, lymphocyte proliferation, and leukocyte chemotaxis. Thus, eicosanoids and oxylipins (host or microbe) may be mediators of a direct host-pathogen “cross-talk” that promotes chronic infection and hypersensitivity disease, common features of infection by eukaryotic pathogens. PMID:12857780

  3. Crystal Structure of a Sulfur Carrier Protein Complex Found in the Cysteine Biosynthetic Pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgenson, Christopher T.; Burns, Kristin E.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-10-02

    The structure of the protein complex CysM-CysO from a new cysteine biosynthetic pathway found in the H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been determined at 1.53 {angstrom} resolution. CysM (Rv1336) is a PLP-containing {beta}-replacement enzyme and CysO (Rv1335) is a sulfur carrier protein with a ubiquitin-like fold. CysM catalyzes the replacement of the acetyl group of O-acetylserine by CysO thiocarboxylate to generate a protein-bound cysteine that is released in a subsequent proteolysis reaction. The protein complex in the crystal structure is asymmetric with one CysO protomer binding to one end of a CysM dimer. Additionally, the structures of CysM and CysO were determined individually at 2.8 and 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Sequence alignments with homologues and structural comparisons with CysK, a cysteine synthase that does not utilize a sulfur carrier protein, revealed high conservation of active site residues; however, residues in CysM responsible for CysO binding are not conserved. Comparison of the CysM-CysO binding interface with other sulfur carrier protein complexes revealed a similarity in secondary structural elements that contribute to complex formation in the ThiF-ThiS and MoeB-MoaD systems, despite major differences in overall folds. Comparison of CysM with and without bound CysO revealed conformational changes associated with CysO binding.

  4. Comparative genomics of the Fusarium fujikuroi species complex: biosynthetic pathways metabolite production and plant pathogenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium is a huge genus of filamentous fungi causing plant diseases in a wide range of host plants that result in high economic losses to world agriculture every year. Phylogenetic studies have shown that the genus Fusarium consists of different species complexes. One of them is the “Fusarium fujik...

  5. Characterization of a periplasmic nitrate reductase in complex with its biosynthetic chaperone.

    PubMed

    Dow, Jennifer M; Grahl, Sabine; Ward, Richard; Evans, Rachael; Byron, Olwyn; Norman, David G; Palmer, Tracy; Sargent, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a Gram-negative bacterium that can use nitrate during anaerobic respiration. The catalytic subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapA contains two types of redox cofactor and is exported across the cytoplasmic membrane by the twin-arginine protein transport pathway. NapD is a small cytoplasmic protein that is essential for the activity of the periplasmic nitrate reductase and binds tightly to the twin-arginine signal peptide of NapA. Here we show, using spin labelling and EPR, that the isolated twin-arginine signal peptide of NapA is structured in its unbound form and undergoes a small but significant conformational change upon interaction with NapD. In addition, a complex comprising the full-length NapA protein and NapD could be isolated by engineering an affinity tag onto NapD only. Analytical ultracentrifugation demonstrated that the two proteins in the NapDA complex were present in a 1 : 1 molar ratio, and small angle X-ray scattering analysis of the complex indicated that NapA was at least partially folded when bound by its NapD partner. A NapDA complex could not be isolated in the absence of the NapA Tat signal peptide. Taken together, this work indicates that the NapD chaperone binds primarily at the NapA signal peptide in this system and points towards a role for NapD in the insertion of the molybdenum cofactor.

  6. Structure of PqsD, a Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Biosynthetic Enzyme, in Complex with Anthranilate

    SciTech Connect

    Bera, A.; Atanasova, V; Robinson, H; Eisenstein, E; Coleman, J; Pesci, E; Parsons, J

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a structural and biophysical characterization of PqsD that includes several crystal structures of the enzyme, including that of the PqsD-anthranilate covalent intermediate and the inactive Cys112Ala active site mutant in complex with anthranilate. The structure reveals that PqsD is structurally similar to the FabH and chalcone synthase families of fatty acid and polyketide synthases. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains a PqsD dimer. The PqsD monomer is composed of two nearly identical 170-residue ????? domains. The structures show anthranilate-liganded Cys112 is positioned deep in the protein interior at the bottom of an 15 A long channel while a second anthraniloyl-CoA molecule is waiting in the cleft leading to the protein surface. Cys112, His257, and Asn287 form the FabH-like catalytic triad of PqsD. The C112A mutant is inactive, although it still reversibly binds anthraniloyl-CoA. The covalent complex between anthranilate and Cys112 clearly illuminates the orientation of key elements of the PqsD catalytic machinery and represents a snapshot of a key point in the catalytic cycle.

  7. Structure of PqsD, a Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Biosynthetic Enzyme, in Complex with Anthranilate†

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Asim K.; Atanasova, Vesna; Robinson, Howard; Eisenstein, Edward; Coleman, James P.; Pesci, Everett C.; Parsons, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone, is an intercellular alkyl quinolone signaling molecule produced by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Alkyl quinolone signaling is an atypical system that, in P. aeruginosa, controls the expression of numerous virulence factors. PQS is synthesized from the tryptophan pathway intermediate, anthranilate, which is either derived from the kynurenine pathway or from an alkyl quinolone specific anthranilate synthase encoded by phnAB. Anthranilate is converted to PQS by the enzymes encoded by the pqsABCDE operon and pqsH. PqsA forms an activated anthraniloyl-CoA thioester that shuttles anthranilate to the PqsD active site where it is transferred to Cys112 of PqsD. In the only biochemically characterized reaction, a condensation then occurs between anthraniloyl-PqsD and malonyl-CoA or malonyl-ACP, a second PqsD substrate, forming 2,4-dihydroxyquinoline (DHQ). The role PqsD plays in the biosynthesis of other alkyl quinolones, such as PQS, is unclear though it has been reported to be required for their production. No evidence however, exists that DHQ is a PQS precursor. Here we present a structural and biophysical characterization of PqsD that includes several crystal structures of the enzyme including that of the PqsD-anthranilate covalent intermediate and the inactive Cys112Ala active site mutant in complex with anthranilate. The structure reveals that PqsD is structurally similar to the FabH and chalcone synthase families of fatty acid and polyketide synthases. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains a PqsD dimer. The PqsD monomer is composed of two nearly identical ~170 residue αβαβα domains. The structures show anthranilate-liganded Cys112 is positioned deep in the protein interior at the bottom of a ~15 Å long channel while a second anthraniloyl-CoA molecule is waiting in the cleft leading to the protein surface. Cys112, His257, and Asn287 form the FabH-like catalytic triad

  8. Biologically Active Oxylipins from Enzymatic and Nonenzymatic Routes in Macroalgae

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Mariana; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B.

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae are rich and heterogeneous sources of great chemical diversity, among which oxylipins are a well-recognized class of natural products. Algal oxylipins comprise an assortment of oxygenated, halogenated, and unsaturated functional groups and also several carbocycles, varying in ring size and position in lipid chain. Besides the discovery of structurally diverse oxylipins in macroalgae, research has recently deciphered the role of some of these metabolites in the defense and innate immunity of photosynthetic marine organisms. This review is an attempt to comprehensively cover the available literature on the chemistry, biosynthesis, ecology, and potential bioactivity of oxylipins from marine macroalgae. For a better understanding, enzymatic and nonenzymatic routes were separated; however, both processes often occur concomitantly and may influence each other, even producing structurally related molecules. PMID:26805855

  9. Crystal Structure of the Streptomyces coelicolor TetR-Like Protein ActR Alone and in Complex with Actinorhodin or the Actinorhodin Biosynthetic Precursor (S)-DNPA

    SciTech Connect

    Willems,A.; Tahlan, K.; Taguchi, T.; Zhang, K.; Lee, Z.; Ichinose, K.; Junop, M.; Nodwell, J.

    2008-01-01

    Actinorhodin, an antibiotic produced by Streptomyces coelicolor, is exported from the cell by the ActA efflux pump. actA is divergently transcribed from actR, which encodes a TetR-like transcriptional repressor. We showed previously that ActR represses transcription by binding to an operator from the actA/actR intergenic region. Importantly, actinorhodin itself or various actinorhodin biosynthetic intermediates can cause ActR to dissociate from its operator, leading to derepression. This suggests that ActR may mediate timely self-resistance to an endogenously produced antibiotic by responding to one of its biosynthetic precursors. Here, we report the structural basis for this precursor-mediated derepression with crystal structures of homodimeric ActR by itself and in complex with either actinorhodin or the actinorhodin biosynthetic intermediate (S)-DNPA [4-dihydro-9-hydroxy-1-methyl-10-oxo-3-H-naphtho-[2, 3-c]-pyran-3-(S)-acetic acid]. The ligand-binding tunnel in each ActR monomer has a striking hydrophilic/hydrophobic/hydrophilic arrangement of surface residues that accommodate either one hexacyclic actinorhodin molecule or two back-to-back tricyclic (S)-DNPA molecules. Moreover, our work also reveals the strongest structural evidence to date that TetR-mediated antibiotic resistance may have been acquired from an antibiotic-producer organism.

  10. Biosynthetic inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi

    2006-08-25

    Inorganic chemistry and biology can benefit greatly from each other. Although synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry have been greatly successful in clarifying the role of metal ions in biological systems, the time may now be right to utilize biological systems to advance coordination chemistry. One such example is the use of small, stable, easy-to-make, and well-characterized proteins as ligands to synthesize novel inorganic compounds. This biosynthetic inorganic chemistry is possible thanks to a number of developments in biology. This review summarizes the progress in the synthesis of close models of complex metalloproteins, followed by a description of recent advances in using the approach for making novel compounds that are unprecedented in either inorganic chemistry or biology. The focus is mainly on synthetic "tricks" learned from biology, as well as novel structures and insights obtained. The advantages and disadvantages of this biosynthetic approach are discussed.

  11. Quantitative analysis of 3-OH oxylipins in fermentation yeast.

    PubMed

    Potter, Greg; Xia, Wei; Budge, Suzanne M; Speers, R Alex

    2017-02-01

    Despite the ubiquitous distribution of oxylipins in plants, animals, and microbes, and the application of numerous analytical techniques to study these molecules, 3-OH oxylipins have never been quantitatively assayed in yeasts. The formation of heptafluorobutyrate methyl ester derivatives and subsequent analysis with gas chromatography - negative chemical ionization - mass spectrometry allowed for the first determination of yeast 3-OH oxylipins. The concentration of 3-OH 10:0 (0.68-4.82 ng/mg dry cell mass) in the SMA strain of Saccharomyces pastorianus grown in laboratory-scale beverage fermentations was elevated relative to oxylipin concentrations in plant tissues and macroalgae. In fermenting yeasts, the onset of 3-OH oxylipin formation has been related to fermentation progression and flocculation initiation. When the SMA strain was grown in laboratory-scale fermentations, the maximal sugar consumption rate preceded the lowest concentration of 3-OH 10:0 by ∼4.5 h and a distinct increase in 3-OH 10:0 concentration by ∼16.5 h.

  12. Oxylipin biosynthesis in spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii: Molecular cloning and identification of divinyl ether synthases CYP74M1 and CYP74M3.

    PubMed

    Gorina, Svetlana S; Toporkova, Yana Y; Mukhtarova, Lucia S; Smirnova, Elena O; Chechetkin, Ivan R; Khairutdinov, Bulat I; Gogolev, Yuri V; Grechkin, Alexander N

    2016-04-01

    Nonclassical P450s of CYP74 family control the secondary conversions of fatty acid hydroperoxides to bioactive oxylipins in plants. At least ten genes attributed to four novel CYP74 subfamilies have been revealed by the recent sequencing of the spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii Hieron genome. Two of these genes CYP74M1 and CYP74M3 have been cloned in the present study. Both recombinant proteins CYP74M1 and CYP74M3 were active towards the 13(S)-hydroperoxides of α-linolenic and linoleic acids (13-HPOT and 13-HPOD, respectively) and exhibited the activity of divinyl ether synthase (DES). Products were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Individual oxylipins were purified by HPLC and finally identified by their NMR data, including the (1)H NMR, 2D-COSY, HSQC and HMBC. CYP74M1 (SmDES1) specifically converted 13-HPOT to (11Z)-etherolenic acid and 13-HPOD to (11Z)-etheroleic acid. CYP74M3 (SmDES2) turned 13-HPOT and 13-HPOD mainly to etherolenic and etheroleic acids, respectively. CYP74M1 and CYP74M3 are the first DESs detected in non-flowering plants. The obtained results demonstrate the existence of the sophisticated oxylipin biosynthetic machinery in the oldest taxa of vascular plants.

  13. Advances in Our Understanding of Oxylipins Derived from Dietary PUFAs12

    PubMed Central

    Gabbs, Melissa; Leng, Shan; Devassy, Jessay G; Monirujjaman, Md; Aukema, Harold M

    2015-01-01

    Oxylipins formed from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are the main mediators of PUFA effects in the body. They are formed via cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 pathways, resulting in the formation of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxy fatty acids (FAs), epoxy FAs, lipoxins, eoxins, hepoxilins, resolvins, protectins (also called neuroprotectins in the brain), and maresins. In addition to the well-known eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid, recent developments in lipidomic methodologies have raised awareness of and interest in the large number of oxylipins formed from other PUFAs, including those from the essential FAs and the longer-chain n–3 (ω-3) PUFAs. Oxylipins have essential roles in normal physiology and function, but can also have detrimental effects. Compared with the oxylipins derived from n–3 PUFAs, oxylipins from n–6 PUFAs generally have greater activity and more inflammatory, vasoconstrictory, and proliferative effects, although there are notable exceptions. Because PUFA composition does not necessarily reflect oxylipin composition, comprehensive analysis of the oxylipin profile is necessary to understand the overall physiologic effects of PUFAs mediated through their oxylipins. These analyses should include oxylipins derived from linoleic and α-linolenic acids, because these largely unexplored bioactive oxylipins constitute more than one-half of oxylipins present in tissues. Because collated information on oxylipins formed from different PUFAs is currently unavailable, this review provides a detailed compilation of the main oxylipins formed from PUFAs and describes their functions. Much remains to be elucidated in this emerging field, including the discovery of more oxylipins, and the understanding of the differing biological potencies, kinetics, and isomer-specific activities of these novel PUFA metabolites. PMID:26374175

  14. Hepatic oxylipin profiles in obese rats: Effect of antioxidant supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity induces biochemical changes in lipid metabolism. The extent to which enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid (per)oxidation products, oxylipins, are altered by obesity is of great interest. Conflicting data exist regarding oxidative damage to lipids in obesity. We investigated the extent to which ...

  15. Arabidopsis ERG28 Tethers the Sterol C4-Demethylation Complex to Prevent Accumulation of a Biosynthetic Intermediate That Interferes with Polar Auxin Transport[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Mialoundama, Alexis Samba; Jadid, Nurul; Brunel, Julien; Di Pascoli, Thomas; Heintz, Dimitri; Erhardt, Mathieu; Mutterer, Jérôme; Bergdoll, Marc; Ayoub, Daniel; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rahier, Alain; Nkeng, Paul; Geoffroy, Philippe; Miesch, Michel; Camara, Bilal; Bouvier, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Sterols are vital for cellular functions and eukaryotic development because of their essential role as membrane constituents. Sterol biosynthetic intermediates (SBIs) represent a potential reservoir of signaling molecules in mammals and fungi, but little is known about their functions in plants. SBIs are derived from the sterol C4-demethylation enzyme complex that is tethered to the membrane by Ergosterol biosynthetic protein28 (ERG28). Here, using nonlethal loss-of-function strategies focused on Arabidopsis thaliana ERG28, we found that the previously undetected SBI 4-carboxy-4-methyl-24-methylenecycloartanol (CMMC) inhibits polar auxin transport (PAT), a key mechanism by which the phytohormone auxin regulates several aspects of plant growth, including development and responses to environmental factors. The induced accumulation of CMMC in Arabidopsis erg28 plants was associated with diagnostic hallmarks of altered PAT, including the differentiation of pin-like inflorescence, loss of apical dominance, leaf fusion, and reduced root growth. PAT inhibition by CMMC occurs in a brassinosteroid-independent manner. The data presented show that ERG28 is required for PAT in plants. Furthermore, it is accumulation of an atypical SBI that may act to negatively regulate PAT in plants. Hence, the sterol pathway offers further prospects for mining new target molecules that could regulate plant development. PMID:24326590

  16. Limited value of pro-inflammatory oxylipins and cytokines as circulating biomarkers in endometriosis – a targeted ‘omics study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yie Hou; Cui, Liang; Fang, Jinling; Chern, Bernard Su Min; Tan, Heng Hao; Chan, Jerry K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common, complex gynecologic disorder characterized by the presence of endometrial-like tissues at extrauterine sites. Elevation in protein and lipid mediators of inflammation including oxylipins and cytokines within the peritoneum characterize the inflamed pelvic region and may contribute to the survival and growth of displaced endometrial tissues. The presence of a clinically silent but molecularly detectable systemic inflammation in endometriosis has been proposed. Thus, we examined serum oxylipin and immunomodulatory protein levels in 103 women undergoing laparoscopy to evaluate systematically any involvement in systemic pathophysiological inflammation in endometriosis. Oxylipin levels were similar between women with and without endometriosis. Stratification by menstrual phase or severity did not offer any difference. Women with ovarian endometriosis had significantly lower 12-HETE relative to peritoneal endometriosis (−50.7%). Serum oxylipin levels were not associated with pre-operative pain symptoms. Changes to immunomodulatory proteins were minimal, with IL-12(p70), IL-13 and VEGF significantly lower in mild endometriotic women compared to non-endometriotic women (−39%, −54% and −76% respectively). Verification using C-reactive protein as a non-specific marker of inflammation further showed similar levels between groups. The implications of our work suggest pro-inflammatory mediators in the classes studied may have potentially limited value as circulating biomarkers for endometriosis, suggesting of potentially tenuous systemic inflammation in endometriosis. PMID:27193963

  17. Oxylipins in the spikemoss Selaginella martensii: Detection of divinyl ethers, 12-oxophytodienoic acid and related cyclopentenones.

    PubMed

    Ogorodnikova, Anna V; Mukhitova, Fakhima K; Grechkin, Alexander N

    2015-10-01

    Green tissues of spikemoss Selaginella martensii Spring possessed the complex oxylipins patterns. Major oxylipins were the products of linoleic and α-linolenic acids metabolism via the sequential action of 13-lipoxygenase and divinyl ether synthase (DES) or allene oxide synthase (AOS). AOS products were represented by 12-oxophytodienoic acid (12-oxo-PDA) isomers. Exceptionally, S. martensii possesses high level of 12-oxo-9(13),15-PDA, which is very uncommon in flowering plants. Separate divinyl ethers were purified after micro-preparative incubations of linoleic or α-linolenic acids with homogenate of S. martensii aerial parts. The NMR data allowed us to identify all geometric isomers of divinyl ethers. Linoleic acid was converted to divinyl ethers etheroleic acid, (11Z)-etheroleic acid and a minority of (ω5Z)-etheroleic acid. With α-linolenate precursor, the specificity of divinyl ether biosynthesis was distinct. Etherolenic and (ω5Z)-etherolenic acids were the prevailing products while (11Z)-etherolenic acid was a minor one. Divinyl ethers are detected first time in non-flowering land plant. These are the first observations of fatty acid metabolism through the lipoxygenase pathway in spikemosses (Lycopodiophyta).

  18. Autoxidated linolenic acid inhibits aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus via oxylipin species.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shijuan; Liang, Yating; Zhang, Jindan; Chen, Zhuang; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus species are among the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds in nature. Although it has been known for a long time that seeds with high oil content are more susceptible to aflatoxin contamination, the role of fatty acids in aflatoxin biosynthesis remains controversial. Here we demonstrate in A. flavus that both the saturated stearic acid (C18:0) and the polyunsaturated linolenic acid (C18:3) promoted aflatoxin production, while C18:3, but not C18:0, inhibited aflatoxin biosynthesis after exposure to air for several hours. Further experiments showed that autoxidated C18:3 promoted mycelial growth, sporulation, and kojic acid production, but inhibited the expression of genes in the AF biosynthetic gene cluster. Mass spectrometry analyses of autoxidated C18:3 fractions that were able to inhibit aflatoxin biosynthesis led to the identification of multiple oxylipin species. These results may help to clarify the role of fatty acids in aflatoxin biosynthesis, and may explain why controversial results have been obtained for fatty acids in the past.

  19. AHL-priming functions via oxylipin and salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Sebastian T.; Schikora, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative action between the host plant and associated bacteria is crucial for the establishment of an efficient interaction. In bacteria, the synchronized behavior of a population is often achieved by a density-dependent communication called quorum sensing. This behavior is based on signaling molecules, which influence bacterial gene expression. N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) are such molecules in many Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, some AHLs are responsible for the beneficial effect of bacteria on plants, for example the long chain N-3-oxo-tetradecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (oxo-C14-HSL) can prime Arabidopsis and barley plants for an enhanced defense. This AHL-induced resistance phenomenon, named AHL-priming, was observed in several independent laboratories during the last two decades. Very recently, the mechanism of priming with oxo-C14-HSL was shown to depend on an oxylipin and salicylic acid (SA). SA is a key element in plant defense, it accumulates during different plant resistance responses and is the base of systemic acquired resistance. In addition, SA itself can prime plants for an enhanced resistance against pathogen attack. On the other side, oxylipins, including jasmonic acid (JA) and related metabolites, are lipid-derived signaling compounds. Especially the oxidized fatty acid derivative cis-OPDA, which is the precursor of JA, is a newly described player in plant defense. Unlike the antagonistic effect of SA and JA in plant–microbe interactions, the recently described pathway functions through a synergistic effect of oxylipins and SA, and is independent of the JA signaling cascade. Interestingly, the oxo-C14-HSL-induced oxylipin/SA signaling pathway induces stomata defense responses and cell wall strengthening thus prevents pathogen invasion. In this review, we summarize the findings on AHL-priming and the related signaling cascade. In addition, we discuss the potential of AHL-induced resistance in new strategies of plant protection. PMID

  20. Components of complex lipid biosynthetic pathways in developing castor (Ricinus communis) seeds identified by MudPIT analysis of enriched endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adrian P; Kroon, Johan T M; Topping, Jennifer F; Robson, Joanne L; Simon, William J; Slabas, Antoni R

    2011-08-05

    Ricinoleic acid is a feedstock for nylon-11 (N11) synthesis which is currently obtained from castor (Ricinus communis) oil. Production of this fatty acid in a temperate oilseed crop is of great commercial interest, but the highest reported level in transgenic plant oils is 30%, below the 90% observed in castor and insufficient for commercial exploitation. To identify castor oil-biosynthetic enzymes and inform strategies to improve ricinoleic acid yields, we performed MudPIT analysis on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) purified from developing castor bean endosperm. Candidate enzymes for all steps of triacylglycerol synthesis were identified among 72 proteins in the data set related to complex-lipid metabolism. Previous reported proteomic data from oilseeds had not included any membrane-bound enzyme that might incorporate ricinoleic acid into oil. Analysis of enriched ER enabled determination of which protein isoforms for these enzymes were in developing castor seed. To complement this data, quantitative RT-PCR experiments with castor seed and leaf RNA were performed for orthologues of Arabidopsis oil-synthetic enzymes, determining which were highly expressed in the seed. These data provide important information for further manipulation of ricinoleic acid content in oilseeds and peptide data for future quantification strategies.

  1. Activation of Shikimate, Phenylpropanoid, Oxylipins, and Auxin Pathways in Pectobacterium carotovorum Elicitors-Treated Moss

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Alfonso; Montesano, Marcos; Schmelz, Eric; Ponce de León, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Plants have developed complex defense mechanisms to cope with microbial pathogens. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are perceived by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to the activation of defense. While substantial progress has been made in understanding the activation of plant defense by PAMPs and DAMPs recognition in tracheophytes, far less information exists on related processes in early divergent plants like mosses. The aim of this study was to identify genes that were induced in P. patens in response to elicitors of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, using a cDNA suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method. A total of 239 unigenes were identified, including genes involved in defense responses related to the shikimate, phenylpropanoid, and oxylipin pathways. The expression levels of selected genes related to these pathways were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR, confirming their rapid induction by P.c. carotovorum derived elicitors. In addition, P. patens induced cell wall reinforcement after elicitor treatment by incorporation of phenolic compounds, callose deposition, and elevated expression of Dirigent-like encoding genes. Small molecule defense markers and phytohormones such as cinnamic acid, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, and auxin levels all increased in elicitor-treated moss tissues. In contrast, salicylic acid levels decreased while abscisic acid levels remained unchanged. P. patens reporter lines harboring an auxin-inducible promoter fused to β-glucuronidase revealed GUS activity in protonemal and gametophores tissues treated with elicitors of P.c. carotovorum, consistent with a localized activation of auxin signaling. These results indicate that P. patens activates the shikimate, phenylpropanoid, oxylipins, and auxin pathways upon treatment with P.c. carotovorum derived elicitors. PMID:27047509

  2. Activation of Shikimate, Phenylpropanoid, Oxylipins, and Auxin Pathways in Pectobacterium carotovorum Elicitors-Treated Moss.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Alfonso; Montesano, Marcos; Schmelz, Eric; Ponce de León, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Plants have developed complex defense mechanisms to cope with microbial pathogens. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are perceived by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to the activation of defense. While substantial progress has been made in understanding the activation of plant defense by PAMPs and DAMPs recognition in tracheophytes, far less information exists on related processes in early divergent plants like mosses. The aim of this study was to identify genes that were induced in P. patens in response to elicitors of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, using a cDNA suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method. A total of 239 unigenes were identified, including genes involved in defense responses related to the shikimate, phenylpropanoid, and oxylipin pathways. The expression levels of selected genes related to these pathways were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR, confirming their rapid induction by P.c. carotovorum derived elicitors. In addition, P. patens induced cell wall reinforcement after elicitor treatment by incorporation of phenolic compounds, callose deposition, and elevated expression of Dirigent-like encoding genes. Small molecule defense markers and phytohormones such as cinnamic acid, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, and auxin levels all increased in elicitor-treated moss tissues. In contrast, salicylic acid levels decreased while abscisic acid levels remained unchanged. P. patens reporter lines harboring an auxin-inducible promoter fused to β-glucuronidase revealed GUS activity in protonemal and gametophores tissues treated with elicitors of P.c. carotovorum, consistent with a localized activation of auxin signaling. These results indicate that P. patens activates the shikimate, phenylpropanoid, oxylipins, and auxin pathways upon treatment with P.c. carotovorum derived elicitors.

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis of Glycerol 3-Phosphate Acyltransferases in Opisthokonts Reveals Unexpected Ancestral Complexity and Novel Modern Biosynthetic Components

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Heather C.; Mast, Fred D.; Chilije, Maxwell F. J.; Tavassoli, Marjan; Dacks, Joel B.; Zaremberg, Vanina

    2014-01-01

    Glycerolipid synthesis represents a central metabolic process of all forms of life. In the last decade multiple genes coding for enzymes responsible for the first step of the pathway, catalyzed by glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), have been described, and characterized primarily in model organisms like Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mice. Notoriously, the fungal enzymes share low sequence identity with their known animal counterparts, and the nature of their homology is unclear. Furthermore, two mitochondrial GPAT isoforms have been described in animal cells, while no such enzymes have been identified in Fungi. In order to determine if the yeast and mammalian GPATs are representative of the set of enzymes present in their respective groups, and to test the hypothesis that metazoan orthologues are indeed absent from the fungal clade, a comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis was performed including organisms spanning the breadth of the Opisthokonta supergroup. Surprisingly, our study unveiled the presence of ‘fungal’ orthologs in the basal taxa of the holozoa and ‘animal’ orthologues in the basal holomycetes. This includes a novel clade of fungal homologues, with putative peroxisomal targeting signals, of the mitochondrial/peroxisomal acyltransferases in Metazoa, thus potentially representing an undescribed metabolic capacity in the Fungi. The overall distribution of GPAT homologues is suggestive of high relative complexity in the ancestors of the opisthokont clade, followed by loss and sculpting of the complement in the descendent lineages. Divergence from a general versatile metabolic model, present in ancestrally deduced GPAT complements, points to distinctive contributions of each GPAT isoform to lipid metabolism and homeostasis in contemporary organisms like humans and their fungal pathogens. PMID:25340523

  4. Dietary acetylenic oxylipin falcarinol differentially modulates GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Czyzewska, Marta Magdalena; Chrobok, Lukasz; Kania, Alan; Jatczak, Magdalena; Pollastro, Federica; Appendino, Giovanni; Mozrzymas, Jerzy Wladyslaw

    2014-12-26

    The dietary oxylipins falcarinol (1a) and falcarindiol (1b) trap thiols by direct nucleophilic addition to their diyne system, but despite this, only falcarinol (1a) is a reversible agonist of cannabinoid receptors, providing a rationale for comparing their activity also on other neuronal targets. Because GABAA receptors (GABAARs) are exquisitely sensitive to polyacetylenic oxylipins in terms of either potentiation (falcarindiol, 1b) or inhibition (oenanthotoxin, 2a), the activity of 1a was investigated on synaptic (α1β2γ2L) and extrasynaptic (α1β2δ and α1β2) subtypes of GABAARs. Falcarinol (1a) significantly enhanced the amplitude of currents mediated by α1β2γ2L receptors, but this effect was associated with a use-dependent block. Conversely, α1β2 receptors were inhibited without any sign of use-dependent block for the entire range of concentrations tested (1-10 μM). Interestingly, responses mediated by α1β2δ receptors, showing no or very little macroscopic desensitization, were strongly potentiated by 1a, exhibiting a fading reminiscent of macroscopic desensitization. When compared to the activity of falcarindiol (1b), falcarinol (1a) showed a higher affinity for GABAARs and, overall, a substantially different profile of pharmacological action. Taken together, the present data support the view that modulation of GABAARs might underlie the insecticidal and sedative activity of falcarinol (1a).

  5. Screening for wound-induced oxylipins in Arabidopsis thaliana by differential HPLC-APCI/MS profiling of crude leaf extracts and subsequent characterisation by capillary-scale NMR.

    PubMed

    Thiocone, Aly; Farmer, Edward E; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    A simple non-targeted differential HPLC-APCI/MS approach has been developed in order to survey metabolome modifications that occur in the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana following wound-induced stress. The wound-induced accumulation of metabolites, particularly oxylipins, was evaluated by HPLC-MS analysis of crude leaf extracts. A generic, rapid and reproducible pressure liquid extraction procedure was developed for the analysis of restricted leaf samples without the need for specific sample preparation. The presence of various oxylipins was determined by head-to-head comparison of the HPLC-MS data, filtered with a component detection algorithm, and automatically compared with the aid of software searching for small differences in similar HPLC-MS profiles. Repeatability was verified in several specimens belonging to different series. Wound-inducible jasmonates were efficiently highlighted by this non-targeted approach without the need for complex sample preparation as is the case for the 'oxylipin signature' procedure based on GC-MS. Furthermore this HPLC-MS screening technique allowed the isolation of induced compounds for further characterisation by capillary-scale NMR (CapNMR) after HPLC scale-up. In this paper, the screening method is described and applied to illustrate its potential for monitoring polar and non-polar stress-induced constituents as well as its use in combination with CapNMR for the structural assignment of wound-induced compounds of interest.

  6. Impact of circulating esterified eicosanoids and other oxylipins on endothelial function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eicosanoids including epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic (HETEs) and other oxylipins derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids have emerging roles in endothelial inflammation and its atherosclerotic consequences. Unlike many eicosanoids, they are known to be esterified in c...

  7. Changes in oxylipin synthesis after Phytophthora infestans infection of potato leaves do not correlate with resistance.

    PubMed

    Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Rojas-Beltran, Jorge; Dupuis, Brice; Delaplace, Pierre; Frettinger, Patrick; Gosset, Virginie; du Jardin, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Oxylipins constitute a class of molecules notably involved in host-pathogen interactions. In the potato-Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) De Barry (P. infestans) relationships, the role of colneleic and colnelenic acids, two oxylipins resulting from the consecutive action of lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.12) and divinyl ether synthase (EC 1.-) on respectively linoleic and linolenic acids have been previously reported. In the present paper, five potato cultivars with contrasting resistance to P. infestans were submitted to infection. Lipoxygenase pathway response was studied at both transcriptional and metabolic levels. A Northern blot preliminary study revealed that lipoxygenase (lox1 and lox3) and divinyl ether synthase genes were clearly up-regulated 96h after leaf inoculation with P. infestans. Profiling of free and esterified oxylipins performed 24h, 48h, 72h and 96h after inoculation, showed that esterified oxylipins are mainly produced with 9-derivatives in higher concentrations (esterified forms of colnelenic acid, 9-hydroxy octadecatrienoic acid, 9-hydroperoxy octadecatrienoic acid). Oxylipin accumulation is undetectable 24h after infection, slightly detectable after 48h, reaching highest concentrations after 96h. Cultivars show slightly different oxylipin profiles but the concentration of individual oxylipins differs markedly 96h after infection. No correlation was found between P. infestans resistance levels and oxylipin synthesis rates or concentration. To assess local and systemic effects of colneleic acid application before P. infestans infection, Bintje cultivar was sprayed with colneleic acid 72h before inoculation. Both application modes (local and systemic) resulted in lipoxygenase pathway activation without affecting the resistance level to the pathogen.

  8. Extraction and Analysis of Oxylipins from Macroalgae Illustrated on the Example Gracilaria vermiculophylla.

    PubMed

    Jacquemoud, Dominique; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Oxylipins are natural products that are derived by oxidative transformations of unsaturated fatty acids. These metabolites are found in a wide range of organisms from the animal kingdom to plants and algae. They represent an important class of signaling molecules, mediating intra- and intercellular processes such as development, inflammation, and other stress responses. In addition, these metabolites directly function as chemical defense against grazers and pathogens. In the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla, oxylipin production is initiated by mechanical tissue disruption and can also be induced in intact algae in response to external stress signals. The defense metabolites mostly result from the lipase- and lipoxygenase-mediated conversion of phospho- and galactolipids. Oxylipins can vary greatly in their size, degree of unsaturation, oxidation state, and functional groups. But also isomers with only subtle chemical differences are found. A variety of methods have been developed for separation, detection, and identification of oxylipins. This chapter focuses on the analysis of oxylipins in macroalgae and covers all aspects from sample preparation (including protocols for the investigation of oxylipins in wounded and intact algal tissue), extraction, purification, and subsequent analysis using liquid chromatography coupled to a UV detector or a mass spectrometer. The protocols developed for G. vermiculophylla can be readily adapted to the investigation of other macroalgae.

  9. Production of cross-kingdom oxylipins by pathogenic fungi: An update on their role in development and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Gregory J; Keller, Nancy P

    2016-03-01

    Oxylipins are a class of molecules derived from the incorporation of oxygen into polyunsaturated fatty acid substrates through the action of oxygenases. While extensively investigated in the context of mammalian immune responses, over the last decade it has become apparent that oxylipins are a common means of communication among and between plants, animals, and fungi to control development and alter host-microbe interactions. In fungi, some oxylipins are derived nonenzymatically while others are produced by lipoxygenases, cyclooxygenases, and monooxygenases with homology to plant and human enzymes. Recent investigations of numerous plant and human fungal pathogens have revealed oxylipins to be involved in the establishment and progression of disease. This review highlights oxylipin production by pathogenic fungi and their role in fungal development and pathogen/host interactions.

  10. Production of cross-kingdom oxylipins by pathogenic fungi: An update on their role in development and pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Gregory J.; Keller, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    Oxylipins are a class of molecules derived from the incorporation of oxygen into polyunsaturated fatty acid substrates through the action of oxygenases. While extensively investigated in the context of mammalian immune responses, over the last decade it has become apparent that oxylipins are a common means of communication among and between plants, animals, and fungi to control development and alter host-microbe interactions. In fungi, some oxylipins are derived non-enzymatically while others are produced by lipoxygenases, cyclooxygenases, and monooxygenases with homology to plant and human enzymes. Recent investigations of numerous plant and human fungal pathogens have revealed oxylipins to be involved in the establishment and progression of disease This review highlights oxylipin production by pathogenic fungi and their role in fungal development and pathogen/host interactions. PMID:26920885

  11. Generation of Bioactive Oxylipins from Exogenously Added Arachidonic, Eicosapentaenoic and Docosahexaenoic Acid in Primary Human Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Harold M; Winter, Tanja; Ravandi, Amir; Dalvi, Siddhartha; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-05-01

    The human blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood and is formed in part by microvessel endothelial cells. The brain contains significant amounts of arachidonic acid (ARA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which potentially give rise to the generation of bioactive oxylipins. Oxylipins are oxygenated fatty acid metabolites that are involved in an assortment of biological functions regulating neurological health and disease. Since it is not known which oxylipins are generated by human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs), they were incubated for up to 30 min in the absence or presence of 0.1-mM ARA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or DHA bound to albumin (1:1 molar ratio), and the oxylipins generated were examined using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). Of 135 oxylipins screened in the media, 63 were present at >0.1 ng/mL at baseline, and 95 were present after incubation with fatty acid. Oxylipins were rapidly generated and reached maximum levels by 2-5 min. While ARA, EPA and DHA each stimulated the production of oxylipins derived from these fatty acids themselves, ARA also stimulated the production of oxylipins from endogenous 18- and 20-carbon fatty acids, including α-linolenic acid. Oxylipins generated by the lipoxygenase pathway predominated both in resting and stimulated states. Oxylipins formed via the cytochrome P450 pathway were formed primarily from DHA and EPA, but not ARA. These data indicate that HBMECs are capable of generating a plethora of bioactive lipids that have the potential to modulate BBB endothelial cell function.

  12. Oxylipins, endocannabinoids, and related compounds in human milk: Levels and effects of storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junfang; Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Domellöf, Magnus; Zivkovic, Angela M; Nording, Malin L

    2016-01-01

    The presence of fatty acid derived oxylipins, endocannabinoids and related compounds in human milk may be of importance to the infant. Presently, clinically relevant protocols for storing and handling human milk that minimize error and variability in oxylipin and endocannabinoid concentrations are lacking. In this study, we compared the individual and combined effects of the following storage conditions on the stability of these fatty acid metabolites in human milk: state (fresh or frozen), storage temperature (4 °C, -20 °C or -80 °C), and duration (1 day, 1 week or 3 months). Thirteen endocannabinoids and related compounds, as well as 37 oxylipins were analyzed simultaneously by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Twelve endocannabinoids and related compounds (2-111 nM) and 31 oxylipins (1.2 pM-1242 nM) were detected, with highest levels being found for 2-arachidonoylglycerol and 17(R)hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid, respectively. The concentrations of most endocannabinoid-related compounds and oxylipins were dependent on storage condition, and especially storage at 4 °C introduced significant variability. Our findings suggest that human milk samples should be analyzed immediately after, or within one day of collection (if stored at 4 °C). Storage at -80 °C is required for long-term preservation, and storage at -20 °C is acceptable for no more than one week. These findings provide a protocol for investigating the oxylipin and endocannabinoid metabolome in human milk, useful for future milk-related clinical studies.

  13. LDS1-produced oxylipins are negative regulators of growth, conidiation and fumonisin synthesis in the fungal maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Valeria; Giorni, Paola; Cirlini, Martina; Ludovici, Matteo; Visentin, Ivan; Cardinale, Francesca; Fabbri, Anna A.; Fanelli, Corrado; Reverberi, Massimo; Battilani, Paola; Galaverna, Gianni; Dall'Asta, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Oxylipins are fatty acid-derived signaling compounds produced by all eukaryotes so far investigated; in mycotoxigenic fungi, they modulate toxin production and interactions with the host plants. Among the many enzymes responsible for oxylipin generation, Linoleate Diol Synthase 1 (LDS1) produces mainly 8-hydroperoxyoctadecenoic acid and subsequently different di-hydroxyoctadecenoic acids. In this study, we inactivated a copy of the putative LDS1 ortholog (acc. N. FVEG_09294.3) of Fusarium verticillioides, with the aim to investigate its influence on the oxylipin profile of the fungus, on its development, secondary metabolism and virulence. LC-MS/MS oxylipin profiling carried out on the selected mutant strain revealed significant quali-quantitative differences for several oxylipins when compared to the WT strain. The Fvlds1-deleted mutant grew better, produced more conidia, synthesized more fumonisins and infected maize cobs faster than the WT strain. We hypothesize that oxylipins may act as regulators of gene expression in the toxigenic plant pathogen F. verticillioides, in turn causing notable changes in its phenotype. These changes could relate to the ability of oxylipins to re-shape the transcriptional profile of F. verticillioides by inducing chromatin modifications and exerting a direct control on the transcription of secondary metabolism in fungi. PMID:25566199

  14. Biosynthesis of archetypal plant self-defensive oxylipins by an endophytic fungus residing in mangrove embryos.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling; Peschel, Gundela; Hertweck, Christian

    2012-12-21

    A tree's travel companion: a fungal endophyte (Fusarium incarnatum) isolated from a viviparous propagule (embryo) of a mangrove tree produces typical plant defense oxylipins. Stable-isotope labeling experiments revealed that the endophyte biosynthesizes coriolic acid, didehydrocoriolic acid, and an epoxy fatty acid derived from linoleic acid by a process involving Δ(15)-desaturation and 13-lipoxygenation.

  15. Plasma fatty acids, oxylipins, and risk of myocardial infarction: the Singapore Chinese health study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: We aimed to examine the prospective association between plasma fatty acids (FAs), oxylipins and risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a Singapore Chinese population. Methods: A nested case-control study with 744 incident AMI cases and 744 matched controls aged 47-83 years was condu...

  16. LIPOPROTEIN LIPASE RELEASES ESTERIFIED OXYLIPINS FROM VERY LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Defects in lipoprotein metabolism alter the lipoprotein distribution of oxidized PUFAs, and we speculate that lipoprotein lipase (LpL) is a determinant in the release of VLDL-associated oxylipins. Here, using 12 wk old normolipidemic (lean) and hyperlipidemic (obese) Zucker-rats, we measured PUFA al...

  17. Quantitative profiling of oxylipins through comprehensive lc-ms/ms analysis: Application in cardiac surgery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxylipins, including eicosanoids, affect a broad range of biological processes, such as the initiation and resolution of inflammation. These compounds, also referred to as lipid mediators, are (non-) enzymatically generated by oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA). A...

  18. Methods for the synthesis of tritium-labelled fatty acids and their derivatives, oxylipins and steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Valerii P.; Nagaev, Igor Yu; Myasoedov, Nikolai F.

    1999-10-01

    The achievements in the field of synthesis and application of tritium-labelled oxylipins, steroids, fatty acids, phospho-, sphingo- and other lipids are reviewed. The importance of these studies for the solution of current problems of biochemistry, biology and pharmacology is exemplified in the application of labelled compounds. The bibliography includes 148 references.

  19. Altered soluble epoxide hydrolase-derived oxylipins in patients with seasonal major depression: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Hennebelle, Marie; Otoki, Yurika; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce D; Levitt, Anthony J; Taha, Ameer Y; Swardfager, Walter

    2017-02-27

    Many cytochrome p450-derived lipids promote resolution of inflammation, in contrast to their soluble epoxide hydrolase(sEH)-derived oxylipin breakdown products. Here we compare plasma oxylipins and precursor fatty acids between seasons in participants with major depressive disorder with seasonal pattern (MDD-s). Euthymic participants with a history of MDD-s recruited in summer-fall were followed-up in winter. At both visits, a structured clinical interview (DSM-5 criteria) and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) were administered. Unesterified and total oxylipin pools were assayed by liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Precursor fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography. In nine unmedicated participants euthymic at baseline who met depression criteria in winter, BDI-II scores increased from 4.9±4.4 to 19.9±7.7. Four sEH-derived oxylipins increased in winter compared to summer-fall with moderate to large effect sizes. An auto-oxidation product (unesterified epoxyketooctadecadienoic acid) and lipoxygenase-derived 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid also increased in winter. The cytochrome p450-derived 20-COOH-leukotriene B4 (unesterified) and total 14(15)-epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, and the sEH-derived 14,15-dihydroxyeicostrienoic acid (unesterified), decreased in winter. We conclude that winter depression was associated with changes in cytochrome p450- and sEH-derived oxylipins, suggesting that seasonal shifts in omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acid metabolism mediated by sEH may underlie inflammatory states in symptomatic MDD-s.

  20. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids on the oxylipin composition of lipoproteins in hypertriglyceridemic, statin-treated subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Oxylipins mediate many physiological processes, including inflammation and vascular function. Generally considered local and transient, we suggest their presence in lipoproteins indicates they also mediate the effects lipoproteins have on inflammation and vascular biology. To support th...

  1. Biosynthetic infochemical communication.

    PubMed

    Olsson, S B; Challiss, R A J; Cole, M; Gardeniers, J G E; Gardner, J W; Guerrero, A; Hansson, B S; Pearce, T C

    2015-07-09

    There is an ever-increasing demand for data to be embedded in our environment at ever-decreasing temporal and spatial scales. Whilst current communication and storage technologies generally exploit the electromagnetic properties of media, chemistry offers us a new alternative for nanoscale signaling using molecules as messengers with high information content. Biological systems effectively overcome the challenges of chemical communication using highly specific biosynthetic pathways for signal generation together with specialized protein receptors and nervous systems. Here we consider a new approach for information transmission based upon nature's quintessential example of infochemical communication, the moth pheromone system. To approach the sensitivity, specificity and versatility of infochemical communication seen in nature, we describe an array of biologically-inspired technologies for the production, transmission, detection, and processing of molecular signals. We show how it is possible to implement each step of the moth pheromone pathway for biosynthesis, transmission, receptor protein binding/transduction, and antennal lobe processing of monomolecular and multimolecular signals. For each implemented step, we discuss the value, current limitations, and challenges for the future development and integration of infochemical communication technologies. Together, these building blocks provide a starting point for future technologies that can utilize programmable emission and detection of multimolecular information for a new and robust means of communicating chemical information.

  2. Serum-Based Oxylipins Are Associated with Outcomes in Primary Prevention Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyi; Guallar, Eliseo; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Harms, Amy C.; Vreeken, Rob J.; Hankemeier, Thomas; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Cheng, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with systolic heart failure are at risk of ventricular arrhythmias and all-cause mortality. Little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying these events. We sought to better understand if oxylipins, a diverse class of lipid metabolites derived from the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, were associated with these outcomes in recipients of primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). Methods Among 479 individuals from the PROSE-ICD study, baseline serum were analyzed and quantitatively profiled for 35 known biologically relevant oxylipin metabolites. Associations with ICD shocks for ventricular arrhythmias and all-cause mortality were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Six oxylipins, 17,18-DiHETE (HR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.70 to 0.99 per SD change in oxylipin level), 19,20-DiHDPA (HR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.98), 5,6-DiHETrE (HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.91), 8,9-DiHETrE (HR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.95), 9,10-DiHOME (HR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.00), and PGF1α (HR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.71) were associated with the risk of appropriate ICD shock after multivariate adjustment for clinical factors. Additionally, 4 oxylipin-to-precursor ratios, 15S-HEPE / FA (20:5-ω3), 17,18-DiHETE / FA (20:5-ω3), 19,20-DiHDPA / FA (20:5-ω3), and 5S-HEPE / FA (20:5-ω3) were positively associated with the risk of all-cause mortality. Conclusion In a prospective cohort of patients with primary prevention ICDs, we identified several novel oxylipin markers that were associated with appropriate shock and mortality using metabolic profiling techniques. These findings may provide new insight into the potential biologic pathways leading to adverse events in this patient population. PMID:27281224

  3. Distribution and evolution of fusarin mycotoxin biosynthetic genes in Fusarium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Fusarium/Gibberella, secondary metabolite biosynthetic (SMB) genes that have a narrow distribution within the genus can have complex evolutionary histories. Whether more widely distributed SMB genes have similarly complex histories is not known. Genes responsible for production of fusarin mycot...

  4. Design and synthesis of pro-apoptotic compounds inspired by diatom oxylipins.

    PubMed

    Romano, Giovanna; Manzo, Emiliano; Russo, Gian Luigi; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Cutignano, Adele; Russo, Maria; Fontana, Angelo

    2013-11-13

    Oxylipins are a large and diverse family of fatty acid derivatives exhibiting different levels of oxidation of the carbon chain. They are involved in many biological functions in mammals, plants and diatoms. In this last group of organisms, they are suggested to play a role in the reproductive failure of copepod predators, showing clear pro-apoptotic effects on newborn nauplii. In this work, these compounds were tested for the ability to induce mitotic arrest in sea urchin embryos. We show for the first time that oxylipins have an increased efficacy in their corresponding methylated form. Natural oxylipins were also used as an inspiration for the rational design and synthesis of stable chemical analogs with apoptotic activity against tumor cell lines. This approach led to the synthesis of the linear C15-ketol (22) that was shown to induce apoptosis in human leukemia U-937 cells. These results are proof of the concept of the use of eco-physiological considerations as a platform to guide the search for novel drug candidates.

  5. The Influence of Bioactive Oxylipins from Marine Diatoms on Invertebrate Reproduction and Development

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    Diatoms are one of the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems and occupy a vital link in the transfer of photosynthetically-fixed carbon through aquatic food webs. Diatoms produce an array of biologically-active metabolites, many of which have been attributed as a form of chemical defence and may offer potential as candidate marine drugs. Of considerable interest are molecules belonging to the oxylipin family which are broadly disruptive to reproductive and developmental processes. The range of reproductive impacts includes; oocyte maturation; sperm motility; fertilization; embryogenesis and larval competence. Much of the observed bioactivity may be ascribed to disruption of intracellular calcium signalling, induction of cytoskeletal instability and promotion of apoptotic pathways. From an ecological perspective, the primary interest in diatom-oxylipins is in relation to the potential impact on energy flow in planktonic systems whereby the reproductive success of copepods (the main grazers of diatoms) is compromised. Much data exists providing evidence for and against diatom reproductive effects; however detailed knowledge of the physiological and molecular processes involved remains poor. This paper provides a review of the current state of knowledge of the mechanistic impacts of diatom-oxylipins on marine invertebrate reproduction and development. PMID:19841721

  6. Synthesis of Oxylipin Mimics and Their Antifungal Activity against the Citrus Postharvest Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jimei; Li, Yupeng; Chen, Hangwei; Zeng, Zhen; Li, Zi-Long; Jiang, Hong

    2016-02-22

    Nine oxylipin mimics were designed and synthesized starting from d-mannose. Their antifungal activity against three citrus postharvest pathogens was evaluated by spore germination assay. The results indicated that all the compounds significantly inhibited the growth of Penicillium digitatum, Penicillium italicum and Aspergillus niger. The compound (3Z,6Z,8S,9R,10R)-octadeca-3,6-diene-8,9,10-triol (3) exhibited excellent inhibitory effect on both Penicillium digitatum (IC50 = 34 ppm) and Penicillium italicum (IC50 = 94 ppm). Their in vivo antifungal activities against citrus postharvest blue mold were tested with fruit inoculated with the pathogen Penicillium italicum. The compound (3R,4S)-methyl 3,4-dihydroxy-5-octyltetrahydrofuran-2-carboxylate (9) demonstrated significant efficacy by reducing the disease severity to 60%. The antifungal mechanism of these oxylipin mimics was postulated in which both inhibition of pathogenic mycelium and stimuli of the host oxylipin-mediated defense response played important roles.

  7. Relative and absolute reliability of measures of linoleic acid-derived oxylipins in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Bosson, Jenny A; Unosson, Jon; Behndig, Annelie F; Nording, Malin L; Fowler, Christopher J

    2015-09-01

    Modern analytical techniques allow for the measurement of oxylipins derived from linoleic acid in biological samples. Most validatory work has concerned extraction techniques, repeated analysis of aliquots from the same biological sample, and the influence of external factors such as diet and heparin treatment upon their levels, whereas less is known about the relative and absolute reliability of measurements undertaken on different days. A cohort of nineteen healthy males were used, where samples were taken at the same time of day on two occasions, at least 7 days apart. Relative reliability was assessed using Lin's concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Absolute reliability was assessed by Bland-Altman analyses. Nine linoleic acid oxylipins were investigated. ICC and CCC values ranged from acceptable (0.56 [13-HODE]) to poor (near zero [9(10)- and 12(13)-EpOME]). Bland-Altman limits of agreement were in general quite wide, ranging from ±0.5 (12,13-DiHOME) to ±2 (9(10)-EpOME; log10 scale). It is concluded that relative reliability of linoleic acid-derived oxylipins varies between lipids with compounds such as the HODEs showing better relative reliability than compounds such as the EpOMEs. These differences should be kept in mind when designing and interpreting experiments correlating plasma levels of these lipids with factors such as age, body mass index, rating scales etc.

  8. Emergent Biosynthetic Capacity in Simple Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hsuan-Chao; Levy, Roie; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have an astonishing capacity to transform their environments. Yet, the metabolic capacity of a single species is limited and the vast majority of microorganisms form complex communities and join forces to exhibit capabilities far exceeding those achieved by any single species. Such enhanced metabolic capacities represent a promising route to many medical, environmental, and industrial applications and call for the development of a predictive, systems-level understanding of synergistic microbial capacity. Here we present a comprehensive computational framework, integrating high-quality metabolic models of multiple species, temporal dynamics, and flux variability analysis, to study the metabolic capacity and dynamics of simple two-species microbial ecosystems. We specifically focus on detecting emergent biosynthetic capacity – instances in which a community growing on some medium produces and secretes metabolites that are not secreted by any member species when growing in isolation on that same medium. Using this framework to model a large collection of two-species communities on multiple media, we demonstrate that emergent biosynthetic capacity is highly prevalent. We identify commonly observed emergent metabolites and metabolic reprogramming patterns, characterizing typical mechanisms of emergent capacity. We further find that emergent secretion tends to occur in two waves, the first as soon as the two organisms are introduced, and the second when the medium is depleted and nutrients become limited. Finally, aiming to identify global community determinants of emergent capacity, we find a marked association between the level of emergent biosynthetic capacity and the functional/phylogenetic distance between community members. Specifically, we demonstrate a “Goldilocks” principle, where high levels of emergent capacity are observed when the species comprising the community are functionally neither too close, nor too distant. Taken together, our results

  9. Emergent biosynthetic capacity in simple microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hsuan-Chao; Levy, Roie; Borenstein, Elhanan

    2014-07-01

    Microbes have an astonishing capacity to transform their environments. Yet, the metabolic capacity of a single species is limited and the vast majority of microorganisms form complex communities and join forces to exhibit capabilities far exceeding those achieved by any single species. Such enhanced metabolic capacities represent a promising route to many medical, environmental, and industrial applications and call for the development of a predictive, systems-level understanding of synergistic microbial capacity. Here we present a comprehensive computational framework, integrating high-quality metabolic models of multiple species, temporal dynamics, and flux variability analysis, to study the metabolic capacity and dynamics of simple two-species microbial ecosystems. We specifically focus on detecting emergent biosynthetic capacity--instances in which a community growing on some medium produces and secretes metabolites that are not secreted by any member species when growing in isolation on that same medium. Using this framework to model a large collection of two-species communities on multiple media, we demonstrate that emergent biosynthetic capacity is highly prevalent. We identify commonly observed emergent metabolites and metabolic reprogramming patterns, characterizing typical mechanisms of emergent capacity. We further find that emergent secretion tends to occur in two waves, the first as soon as the two organisms are introduced, and the second when the medium is depleted and nutrients become limited. Finally, aiming to identify global community determinants of emergent capacity, we find a marked association between the level of emergent biosynthetic capacity and the functional/phylogenetic distance between community members. Specifically, we demonstrate a "Goldilocks" principle, where high levels of emergent capacity are observed when the species comprising the community are functionally neither too close, nor too distant. Taken together, our results

  10. Reprogramming of fatty acid and oxylipin synthesis in rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Mariutto, Martin; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Ongena, Marc; Laloux, Morgan; Wathelet, Jean-Paul; du Jardin, Patrick; Thonart, Philippe; Dommes, Jacques

    2014-03-01

    The rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BTP1 stimulates induced systemic resistance (ISR) in tomato. A previous work showed that the resistance is associated in leaves with the induction of the first enzyme of the oxylipin pathway, the lipoxygenase (LOX), leading to a faster accumulation of its product, the free 13-hydroperoxy octadecatrienoic acid (13-HPOT), 2 days after Botrytis cinerea inoculation. In the present study, we further investigated the stimulation of the oxylipin pathway: metabolites and enzymes of the pathway were analyzed to understand the fate of the 13-HPOT in ISR. Actually the stimulation began upstream the LOX: free linolenic acid accumulated faster in P. putida BTP1-treated plants than in control. Downstream, the LOX products 13-fatty acid hydroperoxides esterified to galactolipids and phospholipids were more abundant in bacterized plants than in control before infection. These metabolites could constitute a pool that will be used after pathogen attack to produce free fungitoxic metabolites through the action of phospholipase A2, which is enhanced in bacterized plants upon infection. Enzymatic branches which can use as substrate the fatty acid hydroperoxides were differentially regulated in bacterized plants in comparison to control plants, so as to lead to the accumulation of the most fungitoxic compounds against B. cinerea. Our study, which is the first to demonstrate the accumulation of an esterified defense metabolite during rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance, showed that the oxylipin pathway is differentially regulated. It suggests that this allows the plant to prepare to a future infection, and to respond faster and in a more effective way to B. cinerea invasion.

  11. Biosynthetic Pathways of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

  12. Evolutionary systems biology of amino acid biosynthetic cost in yeast.

    PubMed

    Barton, Michael D; Delneri, Daniela; Oliver, Stephen G; Rattray, Magnus; Bergman, Casey M

    2010-08-17

    a systems approach is necessary to unravel the full effects of amino acid biosynthetic cost in complex biological systems.

  13. Detection of omega-3 oxylipins in human plasma and response to treatment with omega-3 acid ethyl esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The long chain omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids have beneficial health effects, but the molecular mediators of these effects are not well-characterized. Oxygenated n-3 FAs (oxylipins) may be an important class of mediators. Members of this chemic...

  14. Plasma oxylipin profiling identifies polyunsaturated vicinal diols as responsive to arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid intake in growing piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dose-responsiveness of plasma oxylipins to incremental dietary intake of arachidonic (20:4n-6; ARA) and docosahexaenoic (22:6n-3; DHA) acid was determined in piglets. Piglets randomly received one of six formulas (n=8 per group) from day 3 to 27 postnatally. Diets contained varying ARA and DHA l...

  15. Differential effects of EPA versus DHA on postprandial vascular function and the plasma oxylipin profile in men[S

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Seán; Tejera, Noemi; Awwad, Khader; Rigby, Neil; Fleming, Ingrid; Cassidy, Aedin; Minihane, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the impact of EPA versus DHA on arterial stiffness and reactivity and underlying mechanisms (with a focus on plasma oxylipins) in the postprandial state. In a three-arm crossover acute test meal trial, men (n = 26, 35–55 years) at increased CVD risk received a high-fat (42.4 g) test meal providing 4.16 g of EPA or DHA or control oil in random order. At 0 h and 4 h, blood samples were collected to quantify plasma fatty acids, long chain n-3 PUFA-derived oxylipins, nitrite and hydrogen sulfide, and serum lipids and glucose. Vascular function was assessed using blood pressure, reactive hyperemia index, pulse wave velocity, and augmentation index (AIx). The DHA-rich oil significantly reduced AIx by 13% (P = 0.047) with the decrease following EPA-rich oil intervention not reaching statistical significance. Both interventions increased EPA- and DHA-derived oxylipins in the acute postprandial state, with an (1.3-fold) increase in 19,20-dihydroxydocosapentaenoic acid evident after DHA intervention (P < 0.001). In conclusion, a single dose of DHA significantly improved postprandial arterial stiffness as assessed by AIx, which if sustained would be associated with a significant decrease in CVD risk. The observed increases in oxylipins provide a mechanistic insight into the AIx effect. PMID:27170732

  16. Differential effects of EPA versus DHA on postprandial vascular function and the plasma oxylipin profile in men.

    PubMed

    McManus, Seán; Tejera, Noemi; Awwad, Khader; Vauzour, David; Rigby, Neil; Fleming, Ingrid; Cassidy, Aedin; Minihane, Anne Marie

    2016-09-01

    Our objective was to investigate the impact of EPA versus DHA on arterial stiffness and reactivity and underlying mechanisms (with a focus on plasma oxylipins) in the postprandial state. In a three-arm crossover acute test meal trial, men (n = 26, 35-55 years) at increased CVD risk received a high-fat (42.4 g) test meal providing 4.16 g of EPA or DHA or control oil in random order. At 0 h and 4 h, blood samples were collected to quantify plasma fatty acids, long chain n-3 PUFA-derived oxylipins, nitrite and hydrogen sulfide, and serum lipids and glucose. Vascular function was assessed using blood pressure, reactive hyperemia index, pulse wave velocity, and augmentation index (AIx). The DHA-rich oil significantly reduced AIx by 13% (P = 0.047) with the decrease following EPA-rich oil intervention not reaching statistical significance. Both interventions increased EPA- and DHA-derived oxylipins in the acute postprandial state, with an (1.3-fold) increase in 19,20-dihydroxydocosapentaenoic acid evident after DHA intervention (P < 0.001). In conclusion, a single dose of DHA significantly improved postprandial arterial stiffness as assessed by AIx, which if sustained would be associated with a significant decrease in CVD risk. The observed increases in oxylipins provide a mechanistic insight into the AIx effect.

  17. Effect of acute and chronic DSS induced colitis on plasma eicosanoid and oxylipin levels in the rat.

    PubMed

    Willenberg, Ina; Ostermann, Annika I; Giovannini, Samoa; Kershaw, Olivia; von Keutz, Anne; Steinberg, Pablo; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2015-07-01

    Eicosanoids and oxylipins are potent lipid mediators involved in the regulation of inflammation. In order to evaluate their role and suitability as biomarkers in colitis, we analyzed their systemic levels in the acute and chronic phase of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced colitis. Male Fischer 344 rats were treated in three cycles with 4% DSS in the drinking water (4 days followed by 10 days recovery) and blood was drawn 3 days prior to the first DSS treatment and on days 4, 11, 32 and 39. Histopathological evaluation of the colon tissue after 42 days showed that the animals developed a mild to severe chronic colitis. Consistently, prostaglandin levels were massively (twofold) elevated in the colonic tissue. LC-MS based targeted metabolomics was used to determine plasma oxylipin levels at the different time points. In the acute phase of inflammation directly after DSS treatment, epoxy-fatty acid (FA), dihydroxy-FA and hydroxy-FA plasma concentrations were uniformly elevated. With each treatment cycle the increase in these oxylipin levels was more pronounced. Our data suggest that in the acute phase of colitis release of polyunsaturated FAs from membranes in the inflamed tissue is reflected by a uniform increase of oylipins formed in different branches of the arachidonic acid cascade. However, during the recovery phases the systemic oxylipin pattern is not or only moderately altered and does not allow to evaluate the onset of chronic inflammation in the colon.

  18. Structure determination of bisacetylenic oxylipins in carrots (Daucus carota L.) and enantioselective synthesis of falcarindiol.

    PubMed

    Schmiech, Ludger; Alayrac, Carole; Witulski, Bernhard; Hofmann, Thomas

    2009-11-25

    Although bisacetylenic oxylipins have been demonstrated to exhibit diverse biological activities, the chemical structures of many representatives of this class of phytochemicals still remain elusive. As carrots play an important role in our daily diet and are known as a source of bisacetylenes, an extract made from Daucus carota L. was screened for bisacetylenic oxylipins, and, after isolation, their structures were determined by means of LC-MS and 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy. Besides the previously reported falcarinol, falcarindiol, and falcarindiol 3-acetate, nine additional bisacetylenes were identified, among which six derivatives are reported for the first time in literature and three compounds were previously not identified in carrots. To determine the absolute stereochemistry of falcarindiol in carrots, the (3R,8R)-, (3R,8S)-, (3S,8R)-, and (3S,8S)-stereoisomers of falcarindiol were synthesized according to a novel 10-step total synthesis involving a Cadiot-Chodkiewicz cross-coupling reaction of (S)- and (R)-trimethylsilanyl-4-dodecen-1-yn-3-ol and (R)- and (S)-5-bromo-1-penten-4-yn-3-ol, respectively. Comparative chiral HPLC analysis of the synthetic stereoisomers with the isolated phytochemical led to the unequivocal assignment of the (Z)-(3R,8S)-configuration for falcarindiol in carrot extracts from Daucus carota L.

  19. An Abscisic Acid-Independent Oxylipin Pathway Controls Stomatal Closure and Immune Defense in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mondy, Samuel; Tranchimand, Sylvain; Rumeau, Dominique; Boudsocq, Marie; Garcia, Ana Victoria; Douki, Thierry; Bigeard, Jean; Laurière, Christiane; Chevalier, Anne; Castresana, Carmen; Hirt, Heribert

    2013-01-01

    Plant stomata function in innate immunity against bacterial invasion and abscisic acid (ABA) has been suggested to regulate this process. Using genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that (i) the Arabidopsis thaliana nine-specific-lipoxygenase encoding gene, LOX1, which is expressed in guard cells, is required to trigger stomatal closure in response to both bacteria and the pathogen-associated molecular pattern flagellin peptide flg22; (ii) LOX1 participates in stomatal defense; (iii) polyunsaturated fatty acids, the LOX substrates, trigger stomatal closure; (iv) the LOX products, fatty acid hydroperoxides, or reactive electrophile oxylipins induce stomatal closure; and (v) the flg22-mediated stomatal closure is conveyed by both LOX1 and the mitogen-activated protein kinases MPK3 and MPK6 and involves salicylic acid whereas the ABA-induced process depends on the protein kinases OST1, MPK9, or MPK12. Finally, we show that the oxylipin and the ABA pathways converge at the level of the anion channel SLAC1 to regulate stomatal closure. Collectively, our results demonstrate that early biotic signaling in guard cells is an ABA-independent process revealing a novel function of LOX1-dependent stomatal pathway in plant immunity. PMID:23526882

  20. Insect herbivores selectively suppress the HPL branch of the oxylipin pathway in host plants.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Tatyana; Pearse, Ian S; Ignatia, Laura; Karban, Richard; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2013-02-01

    Insect herbivores have developed a myriad of strategies to manipulate the defense responses of their host plants. Here we provide evidence that chewing insects differentially alter the oxylipin profiles produced by the two main and competing branches of the plant defensive response pathway, the allene oxide synthase (AOS) and hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) branches, which are responsible for wound-inducible production of jasmonates (JAs), and green leafy volatiles (GLVs) respectively. Specifically, we used three Arabidopsis genotypes that were damaged by mechanical wounding or by insects of various feeding guilds (piercing aphids, generalist chewing caterpillars and specialist chewing caterpillars). We established that emission of GLVs is stimulated by wounding incurred mechanically or by aphids, but release of these volatiles is constitutively impaired by both generalist and specialist chewing insects. Simultaneously, however, these chewing herbivores stimulated JA production, demonstrating targeted insect suppression of the HPL branch of the oxylipin pathway. Use of lines engineered to express HPL constitutively, in conjunction with quantitative RT-PCR-based expression analyses, established a combination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional reprogramming of the HPL pathway genes as the mechanistic basis of insect-mediated suppression of the corresponding metabolites. Feeding studies suggested a potential evolutionary advantage of suppressing GLV production, as caterpillars preferably consumed leaf tissue from plants that had not been primed by these volatile cues.

  1. Drought stress modulates oxylipin signature by eliciting 12-OPDA as a potent regulator of stomatal aperture.

    PubMed

    Savchenko, Tatyana; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2014-01-01

    Through evolution, plants have developed a myriad of strategies to adapt to environmental perturbations. Using 3 Arabidopsis ecotypes in conjunction with various transgenic and mutant lines, we provide evidence that wounding and drought differentially alter the metabolic signatures derived from the 2 main competing oxylipin-pathway branches, namely the JA and its precursor 12-OPDA produced by Allene oxide synthase (AOS) branch, and aldehydes and corresponding alcohols generated by Hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) branch. Specifically, we show that wounding induces production of both HPL and AOS-derived metabolites whereas, drought stress only elicits production of hexenal but suppresses hexenol, and further uncouples the conversion of 12-OPDA to JA. This finding led to uncovering of 12-OPDA as a functional convergence point of oxylipin and ABA pathways to control stomatal aperture in plant adaptive responses to drought. In addition, using transgenic lines overexpressing plastidial and extraplastidial HPL enzyme establish the strong interdependence of AOS- and HPL-branch pathways, and the importance of this linkage in tailoring plant adaptive responses to the nature of perturbations.

  2. Biosynthetic Polymers as Functional Materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of functional polymers encoded with biomolecules has been an extensive area of research for decades. As such, a diverse toolbox of polymerization techniques and bioconjugation methods has been developed. The greatest impact of this work has been in biomedicine and biotechnology, where fully synthetic and naturally derived biomolecules are used cooperatively. Despite significant improvements in biocompatible and functionally diverse polymers, our success in the field is constrained by recognized limitations in polymer architecture control, structural dynamics, and biostabilization. This Perspective discusses the current status of functional biosynthetic polymers and highlights innovative strategies reported within the past five years that have made great strides in overcoming the aforementioned barriers. PMID:27375299

  3. 9-Lipoxygenase-Derived Oxylipins Activate Brassinosteroid Signaling to Promote Cell Wall-Based Defense and Limit Pathogen Infection1

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Ruth; Izquierdo, Yovanny; Vellosillo, Tamara; Kulasekaran, Satish; Cascón, Tomás; Hamberg, Mats; Castresana, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The oxylipins, a large family of oxygenated lipid derivatives, regulate plant development and immunity. Two members of the 9-lipoxygenase (9-LOX) oxylipin pathway, 9-hydroxyoctadecatrienoic acid and 9-ketooctadecatrienoic acid, control root development and plant defense. Studies in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using a series of 9-hydroxyoctadecatrienoic acid- and 9-ketooctadecatrienoic acid-insensitive nonresponding to oxylipins (noxy) mutants showed the importance of the cell wall as a 9-LOX-induced defense component and the participation of NOXY proteins in signaling cell wall damage. Here, we examined 9-LOX signaling using the mutants lox1lox5, which lacks 9-LOX activity, and noxy2-2, which shows oxylipin insensitivity and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mutants in brassinosteroids (BRs), a class of plant hormones necessary for normal plant growth and the control of cell wall integrity, were also analyzed. Several lines of evidence indicated that 9-LOX-derived oxylipins induce BR synthesis and signaling to activate cell wall-based responses such as callose deposition and that constitutive activation of BR signaling in bri1-EMS-suppressor 1-D (bes1-D) plants enhances this response. We found that constitutive BR signaling in bes1-D and brassinolide-resistant 1-1D (bzr1-1D) mutants conferred resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. bes1-D and bzr1-1D showed increased resistance to Golovinomyces cichoracearum, an obligate biotrophic fungus that penetrates the cell wall for successful infection, whereas susceptibility was enhanced in lox1lox5 and noxy2-2. Our results indicate a sequential action of 9-LOX and BR signaling in activating cell wall-based defense, and this response prevents pathogen infection. These results show interaction between the 9-LOX and BR pathways and help to clarify their role in modulating plant defense. PMID:26417008

  4. Mining and engineering natural-product biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Barrie; Micklefield, Jason

    2007-07-01

    Natural products continue to fulfill an important role in the development of therapeutic agents. In addition, with the advent of chemical genetics and high-throughput screening platforms, these molecules have become increasingly valuable as tools for interrogating fundamental aspects of biological systems. To access the vast portion of natural-product structural diversity that remains unexploited for these and other applications, genome mining and microbial metagenomic approaches are proving particularly powerful. When these are coupled with recombineering and related genetic tools, large biosynthetic gene clusters that remain intractable or cryptic in the native host can be more efficiently cloned and expressed in a suitable heterologous system. For lead optimization and the further structural diversification of natural-product libraries, combinatorial biosynthetic engineering has also become indispensable. However, our ability to rationally redesign biosynthetic pathways is often limited by our lack of understanding of the structure, dynamics and interplay between the many enzymes involved in complex biosynthetic pathways. Despite this, recent structures of fatty acid synthases should allow a more accurate prediction of the likely architecture of related polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase multienzymes.

  5. Effects of overexpressing individual lignin biosynthetic enzymes on feeding and growth of corn earworms and fall armyworms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin is an important insect resistance component of plants. Enhancing or disrupting the lignin biosynthetic pathway for different bioenergy uses may alter pest resistance. The lignin biosynthetic pathway is complex, and a number of pathway compounds are also involved in the biosynthesis of simpler...

  6. Sacrolide A, a new antimicrobial and cytotoxic oxylipin macrolide from the edible cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Naoya; Matsumoto, Miyako; Yonejima, Kohsuke; Tansei, Keijiroh

    2014-01-01

    Summary Macroscopic gelatinous colonies of freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum, a luxury ingredient for Japanese cuisine, were found to contain a new oxylipin-derived macrolide, sacrolide A (1), as an antimicrobial component. The configuration of two chiral centers in 1 was determined by a combination of chiral anisotropy analysis and conformational analysis of different ring-opened derivatives. Compound 1 inhibited the growth of some species of Gram-positive bacteria, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, and was also cytotoxic to 3Y1 rat fibroblasts. Concern about potential food intoxication caused by accidental massive ingestion of A. sacrum was dispelled by the absence of 1 in commercial products. A manual procedure for degrading 1 in raw colonies was also developed, enabling a convenient on-site detoxification at restaurants or for personal consumption. PMID:25161741

  7. Sacrolide A, a new antimicrobial and cytotoxic oxylipin macrolide from the edible cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum.

    PubMed

    Oku, Naoya; Matsumoto, Miyako; Yonejima, Kohsuke; Tansei, Keijiroh; Igarashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic gelatinous colonies of freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum, a luxury ingredient for Japanese cuisine, were found to contain a new oxylipin-derived macrolide, sacrolide A (1), as an antimicrobial component. The configuration of two chiral centers in 1 was determined by a combination of chiral anisotropy analysis and conformational analysis of different ring-opened derivatives. Compound 1 inhibited the growth of some species of Gram-positive bacteria, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, and was also cytotoxic to 3Y1 rat fibroblasts. Concern about potential food intoxication caused by accidental massive ingestion of A. sacrum was dispelled by the absence of 1 in commercial products. A manual procedure for degrading 1 in raw colonies was also developed, enabling a convenient on-site detoxification at restaurants or for personal consumption.

  8. Phospholipases and galactolipases trigger oxylipin-mediated wound-activated defence in the red alga Gracilaria chilensis against epiphytes.

    PubMed

    Lion, Ulrich; Wiesemeier, Theresa; Weinberger, Florian; Beltrán, Jessica; Flores, Verónica; Faugeron, Sylvain; Correa, Juan; Pohnert, Georg

    2006-03-01

    We investigated the wound response of the commercially important red alga, Gracilaria chilensis, in order to obtain insight into its interaction with epiphytic pests. After wounding, the host releases free fatty acids as well as the hydroxylated eicosanoids, 8R-hydroxy eicosatetraenoic acid (8-HETE) and 7S,8R-dihydroxy eicosatetraenoic acid (7,8-di-HETE). While the release of free arachidonic acid and subsequent formation of 8-HETE is controlled by phospholipase A, 7,8-di-HETE production is independent of this lipase. This dihydroxylated fatty acid might be directly released from galactolipids. Physiologically relevant concentrations of oxylipins reduced spore settlement of Acrochaetium sp. (Rhodophyta, Acrochaetiaceae) and suppressed the development of hapteria in Ceramium rubrum (Rhodophyta, Ceramiaceae) when these model epiphytes were exposed to artificial surfaces that contained 8-HETE or 7,8-di-HETE. Thus, the immediate release of oxylipins can be seen as G. chilensis defence against epiphytes.

  9. Effects of Three Volatile Oxylipins on Colony Development in Two Species of Fungi and on Drosophila Larval Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guohua; Padhi, Sally; Lee, Samantha; Hung, Richard; Zhao, Guozhu; Bennett, Joan W

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of three volatile oxylipins on colony development in two fungi and on Drosophila larval metamorphosis. Using an airborne exposure technique, three common and volatile oxylipins (1-octen-3-ol, (E)-2-hexenal, and 1-hexanol) were compared for their effects on spore germination and colony growth in Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum, as well as for their effects on the morphogenesis of larvae of Drosophila melanogaster. Conidia of both A. niger and P. chrysogenum plated in the presence of low concentrations (50 ppm) of these three volatile organic compounds (VOCs) formed fewer colony-forming units (CFUs) and exhibited reduced radial growth of colonies as compared to controls. When A. niger and P. chrysogenum spores were germinated in the presence of the enantiomers of 1-octen-3-ol, (R)-(-)-1-octen-3-ol had the greatest impact on colony morphology (decreased sporulation and colony diameter), while (S)-(+)-1-octen-3-ol and the racemic form yielded similar morphological changes but to a lesser extent. In addition, Drosophila larvae exposed to vapors of these oxylipins exhibited serious delays in metamorphosis and toxic effects on pupae and adult stages. Low concentration of these three VOCs can significantly inhibit the formation of CFUs and the growth of fungi. (R)-(-)-1-octen-3-ol imposed the greatest impact on fungal morphology compared to (S)-(+)-1-octen-3-ol and the racemic form. The three volatile oxylipins could also delay the metamorphosis of Drosophila and impose toxic effects on its pupae and adult stages.

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of an oxylipin-containing lyophilised biomass from a microalga in a murine recurrent colitis model.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Román, Javier; Talero, Elena; Rodríguez-Luna, Azahara; García-Mauriño, Sofía; Motilva, Virginia

    2016-12-01

    Diet and nutritional factors have emerged as possible interventions for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which are characterised by chronic uncontrolled inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. Microalgal species are a promising source of n-3 PUFA and derived oxylipins, which are lipid mediators with a key role in the resolution of inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of an oxylipin-containing lyophilised biomass from Chlamydomonas debaryana on a recurrent 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis mice model. Moderate chronic inflammation of the colon was induced in BALB/c mice by weekly intracolonic instillations of low dose of TNBS. Administration of the lyophilised microalgal biomass started 2 weeks before colitis induction and was continued throughout colitis development. Mice were killed 48 h after the last TNBS challenge. Oral administration of the microalgal biomass reduced TNBS-induced intestinal inflammation, evidenced by an inhibition of body weight loss, an improvement in colon morphology and a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17. This product also down-regulated colonic expressions of inducible nitric oxide, cyclo-oxygenase 2 and NF-κB, as well as increased PPAR-γ. In addition, lyophilised microalgal biomass up-regulated the expressions of the antioxidant transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 and the target gene heme oxygenase 1. This study describes for the first time the prophylactic effects of an oxylipin-containing lyophilised microalgae biomass from C. debaryana in the acute phase of a recurrent TNBS-induced colitis model in mice. These findings suggest the potential use of this microalga, or derived oxylipins, as a nutraceutical in the treatment of IBD.

  11. A biosynthetic pathway for anandamide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Lei; Harvey-White, Judith; Osei-Hyiaman, Douglas; Razdan, Raj; Gong, Qian; Chan, Andrew C.; Zhou, Zhifeng; Huang, Bill X.; Kim, Hee-Yong; Kunos, George

    2006-01-01

    The endocannabinoid arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide) is a lipid transmitter synthesized and released “on demand” by neurons in the brain. Anandamide is also generated by macrophages where its endotoxin (LPS)-induced synthesis has been implicated in the hypotension of septic shock and advanced liver cirrhosis. Anandamide can be generated from its membrane precursor, N-arachidonoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE) through cleavage by a phospholipase D (NAPE–PLD). Here we document a biosynthetic pathway for anandamide in mouse brain and RAW264.7 macrophages that involves the phospholipase C (PLC)-catalyzed cleavage of NAPE to generate a lipid, phosphoanandamide, which is subsequently dephosphorylated by phosphatases, including PTPN22, previously described as a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Bacterial endotoxin (LPS)-induced synthesis of anandamide in macrophages is mediated exclusively by the PLC/phosphatase pathway, which is up-regulated by LPS, whereas NAPE–PLD is down-regulated by LPS and functions as a salvage pathway of anandamide synthesis when the PLC/phosphatase pathway is compromised. Both PTPN22 and endocannabinoids have been implicated in autoimmune diseases, suggesting that the PLC/phosphatase pathway of anandamide synthesis may be a pharmacotherapeutic target. PMID:16938887

  12. Biosynthetic porphyrins and the origin of photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauzerall, D.; Ley, A.; Mercer-Smith, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Since the prebiotic atmosphere was anaerobic, if not reducing, a useful function of primordial photosynthesis would have been to photooxidize reduced substrates such as Fe(+2), S(-2) or reduced organic molecules and to emit hydrogen. Experiments have shown that the early biogenic pigments uroporphyrin and coproporphyrin do photooxidize organic compounds and emit hydrogen in the presence of a platinum catalyst. These experiments were carried out in dilute aqueous solution near neutral pH under anaerobic atmosphere, and quantum yields near 10-2 were obtained. Thus relevant prebiotic conditions were maintained. Rather then to further optimize conditions, attempts were made to replace the platinum catalyst by a more prebiotically suitable catalyst. Trials with an Fe4S4(SR)4 cluster, in analogy to the present hydrogenase and nitrogenase, were not successful. However, experiments using cobalt complexes to catalyze the formation of hydrogen are promising. In analogy with biological photosynthetic systems which group pigments, electron transfer molecules and enzymes in clusters for efficiency, it was found that binding the biogenic porphyrins to the polyvinyl alcohol used to support the platinum catalyst did increase the quantum yield of the reaction. It was also found that ultraviolet light can serve to photo-oxidize porphyrinogens to porphyrins under anaerobic conditions. Thus the formation of the colorless porphyriogens by the extraordinarily simple biosynthetic pathway would not be a problem because of the prevalence of UV light in the prebiotic, anoxic atmosphere.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized.

  14. Diversifying Carotenoid Biosynthetic Pathways by Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Umeno, Daisuke; Tobias, Alexander V.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms and plants synthesize a diverse array of natural products, many of which have proven indispensable to human health and well-being. Although many thousands of these have been characterized, the space of possible natural products—those that could be made biosynthetically—remains largely unexplored. For decades, this space has largely been the domain of chemists, who have synthesized scores of natural product analogs and have found many with improved or novel functions. New natural products have also been made in recombinant organisms, via engineered biosynthetic pathways. Recently, methods inspired by natural evolution have begun to be applied to the search for new natural products. These methods force pathways to evolve in convenient laboratory organisms, where the products of new pathways can be identified and characterized in high-throughput screening programs. Carotenoid biosynthetic pathways have served as a convenient experimental system with which to demonstrate these ideas. Researchers have mixed, matched, and mutated carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes and screened libraries of these “evolved” pathways for the emergence of new carotenoid products. This has led to dozens of new pathway products not previously known to be made by the assembled enzymes. These new products include whole families of carotenoids built from backbones not found in nature. This review details the strategies and specific methods that have been employed to generate new carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in the laboratory. The potential application of laboratory evolution to other biosynthetic pathways is also discussed. PMID:15755953

  15. Effect of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase on the Modulation of Coronary Reactive Hyperemia: Role of Oxylipins and PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Ahmad; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Morisseau, Christophe; Nayeem, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary reactive hyperemia (CRH) is a physiological response to ischemic insult that prevents the potential harm associated with an interruption of blood supply. The relationship between the pharmacologic inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) and CRH response to a brief ischemia is not known. sEH is involved in the main catabolic pathway of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which are converted into dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs). EETs protect against ischemia/reperfusion injury and have numerous beneficial physiological effects. We hypothesized that inhibition of sEH by t-AUCB enhances CRH in isolated mouse hearts through changing the oxylipin profiles, including an increase in EETs/DHETs ratio. Compared to controls, t-AUCB–treated mice had increased CRH, including repayment volume (RV), repayment duration, and repayment/debt ratio (p < 0.05). Treatment with t-AUCB significantly changed oxylipin profiles, including an increase in EET/DHET ratio, increase in EpOME/DiHOME ratio, increase in the levels of HODEs, decrease in the levels of mid-chain HETEs, and decrease in prostanoids (p < 0.05). Treatment with MS-PPOH (CYP epoxygenase inhibitor) reduced CRH, including RV (p < 0.05). Involvement of PPARγ in the modulation of CRH was demonstrated using a PPARγ-antagonist (T0070907) and a PPARγ-agonist (rosiglitazone). T0070907 reduced CRH (p < 0.05), whereas rosiglitazone enhanced CRH (p < 0.05) in isolated mouse hearts compared to the non-treated. These data demonstrate that sEH inhibition enhances, whereas CYP epoxygenases-inhibition attenuates CRH, PPARγ mediate CRH downstream of the CYP epoxygenases-EET pathway, and the changes in oxylipin profiles associated with sEH-inhibition collectively contributed to the enhanced CRH. PMID:27583776

  16. Trans-10,cis-12-conjugated linoleic acid worsens renal pathology and alters cyclooxygenase derived oxylipins in obesity-associated nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yang; Shi, Hong; Caligiuri, Stephanie P B; Wu, Yinghong; Declercq, Vanessa; Taylor, Carla G; Zahradka, Peter; Ogborn, Malcolm R; Aukema, Harold M

    2015-02-01

    Dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduces indicators of early renal disease progression and the associated elevated cyclooxygenase (COX) levels in young obese rats with obesity-associated nephropathy (OAN). Therefore, renal function and injury and COX and its metabolites were assessed in obese fa/fa Zucker rats with more advanced renal disease. Obese rats at 16 weeks of age were provided with either cis(c)9, trans(t)11 (fa/fa-9,11) or t10,c12 (fa/fa-10,12) CLA for 8 weeks, and compared to lean (lean-CTL) and obese (fa/fa-CTL) rats provided the control diet without CLA. Obese rats displayed significantly reduced renal function and increased renal injury compared to lean rats. In the obese rat groups, glomerular hypertrophy was reduced in both CLA-supplemented groups. While all other measures of renal function or injury were not different in fa/fa-9,11 compared to fa/fa-CTL rats, the fa/fa-10,12 rats had greater renal hypertrophy, glomerular fibrosis, fibrosis, tubular casts and macrophage infiltration compared to the fa/fa-CTL and fa/fa-9,11 groups. The fa/fa-10,12 group also had elevated levels of renal COX1, which was associated with increased levels of two oxylipins produced by this enzyme, 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1α), and thromboxane B₂. Renal linoleic acid and its lipoxygenase products also were lower in obese compared to lean rats, but CLA supplementation had no effect on these or any other lipoxygenase oxylipins. In summary, supplementation with c9,t11 CLA did not improve more advanced OAN and t10,c12 CLA worsened the renal pathology. Altered production of select COX1 derived oxylipins was associated with the detrimental effect of the t10,c12 isomer.

  17. Use of a biosynthetic intermediate to explore the chemical diversity of pseudo-natural fungal polyketides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Teigo; Tsukada, Kento; Ise, Satomi; Shirata, Naoki; Hashimoto, Makoto; Fujii, Isao; Gomi, Katsuya; Nakagawara, Kosuke; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2015-09-01

    The structural complexity and diversity of natural products make them attractive sources for potential drug discovery, with their characteristics being derived from the multi-step combination of enzymatic and non-enzymatic conversions of intermediates in each biosynthetic pathway. Intermediates that exhibit multipotent behaviour have great potential for use as starting points in diversity-oriented synthesis. Inspired by the biosynthetic pathways that form complex metabolites from simple intermediates, we developed a semi-synthetic process that combines heterologous biosynthesis and artificial diversification. The heterologous biosynthesis of fungal polyketide intermediates led to the isolation of novel oligomers and provided evidence for ortho-quinonemethide equivalency in their isochromene form. The intrinsic reactivity of the isochromene polyketide enabled us to access various new chemical entities by modifying and remodelling the polyketide core and through coupling with indole molecules. We thus succeeded in generating exceptionally diverse pseudo-natural polyketides through this process and demonstrated an advanced method of using biosynthetic intermediates.

  18. Type 2 diabetes associated changes in the plasma non-esterified fatty acids, oxylipins and endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Grapov, Dmitry; Adams, Sean H; Pedersen, Theresa L; Garvey, W Timothy; Newman, John W

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes has profound effects on metabolism that can be detected in plasma. While increases in circulating non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) are well-described in diabetes, effects on signaling lipids have received little attention. Oxylipins and endocannabinoids are classes of bioactive fatty acid metabolites with many structural members that influence insulin signaling, adipose function and inflammation through autocrine, paracrine and endocrine mechanisms. To link diabetes-associated changes in plasma NEFA and signaling lipids, we quantitatively targeted >150 plasma lipidome components in age- and body mass index-matched, overweight to obese, non-diabetic (n = 12) and type 2 diabetic (n = 43) African-American women. Diabetes related NEFA patterns indicated ∼60% increase in steroyl-CoA desaturase activity and ∼40% decrease in very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid chain shortening, patterns previously associated with the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Further, epoxides and ketones of eighteen carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids were elevated >80% in diabetes and strongly correlated with changes in NEFA, consistent with their liberation during adipose lipolysis. Endocannabinoid behavior differed by class with diabetes increasing an array of N-acylethanolamides which were positively correlated with pro-inflammatory 5-lipooxygenase-derived metabolites, while monoacylglycerols were negatively correlated with body mass. These results clearly show that diabetes not only results in an increase in plasma NEFA, but shifts the plasma lipidomic profiles in ways that reflect the biochemical and physiological changes of this pathological state which are independent of obesity associated changes.

  19. Circulating levels of endocannabinoids and oxylipins altered by dietary lipids in older women are likely associated with previously identified gene targets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postmenopausal women (PMW) report marginal n-3 PUFA intakes and are at risk of chronic diseases associated with the skeletal, muscular, and cardiovascular systems. Our investigation characterized the endocannabinoids (EC), oxylipins (OL), and global metabolites (GM) in white PMW (75 ± 7 y), randomiz...

  20. Conserved and species-specific oxylipin pathways in the wound-activated chemical defense of the noninvasive red alga Gracilaria chilensis and the invasive Gracilaria vermiculophylla

    PubMed Central

    Rempt, Martin; Weinberger, Florian; Grosser, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Summary Chemical defense of the invasive red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla has been studied and compared to that of the noninvasive but related Gracilaria chilensis. Both species rely on a wound-activated chemical defense that makes them less attractive to the herbivorous sea snail Echinolittorina peruviana. The chemical stress response of both species was monitored by LC–ESIMS-based metabolic profiling and revealed commonalities and differences. Both algae rely on a rapid lipoxygenase mediated transformation of arachidonic acid to known and novel oxylipins. Common products are 7,8-dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and a novel eicosanoid with an unusual γ-lactone moiety. Several prostaglandins were predominantly formed by the invasive species. The role of some of these metabolites was investigated by surveying the attachment of E. peruviana on artificial food containing the respective oxylipins. Both algae species are defended against this general herbivore by 7,8-dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, whereas the prostaglandins and the novel oxylipins were inactive at naturally occurring concentrations. The role of different oxylipins in the invasive potential of Gracilaria spp. is discussed. PMID:22423296

  1. Diatom-derived oxylipins induce cell death in sea urchin embryos activating caspase-8 and caspase 3/7.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Nadia; Varrella, Stefano; Romano, Giovanna; Ianora, Adrianna; Bentley, Matt G; Somma, Domenico; Leonardi, Antonio; Mellone, Stefano; Zuppa, Antonio; Costantini, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Diatoms are an important class of unicellular algae that produce bioactive secondary metabolites with cytotoxic activity collectively termed oxylipins, including polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs), hydroxyacids (HEPEs), oxo-acids and epoxyalcohols. Previous results showed that at higher concentrations, the PUA decadienal induced apoptosis on copepods and sea urchin embryos via caspase-3 activation; at lower concentrations decadienal affected the expression levels of the caspase-8 gene in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. In the present work, we studied the effects of other common oxylipins produced by diatoms: two PUAs (heptadienal and octadienal) and four hydroxyacids (5-, 9- 11- and 15-HEPE) on P. lividus cell death and caspase activities. Our results showed that (i) at higher concentrations PUAs and HEPEs induced apoptosis in sea urchin embryos, detected by microscopic observation and through the activation of caspase-3/7 and caspase-8 measured by luminescent assays; (ii) at low concentrations, PUAs and HEPEs affected the expression levels of caspase-8 and caspase-3/7 (isolated for the first time here in P. lividus) genes, detected by Real Time qPCR. These findings have interesting implications from the ecological point of view, given the importance of diatom blooms in nutrient-rich aquatic environments.

  2. Effects of the oxylipin-producing diatom Skeletonema marinoi on gene expression levels of the calanoid copepod Calanus sinicus.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, Chiara; Carotenuto, Ylenia; Vitiello, Valentina; Buttino, Isabella; Romano, Giovanna; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Ianora, Adrianna

    2015-12-01

    Diatoms are eukaryotic unicellular plants that constitute one of the major components of marine phytoplankton, comprising up to 40% of annual productivity at sea and representing 25% of global carbon-fixation. Diatoms have traditionally been considered a preferential food for zooplankton grazers such as copepods, but, in the last two decades, this beneficial role has been challenged after the discovery that many species of diatoms produce toxic metabolites, collectively termed oxylipins, that induce reproductive failure in zooplankton grazers. Diatoms are the dominant natural diet of Calanus sinicus, a cold-temperate calanoid copepod that supports secondary production of important fisheries in the shelf ecosystems of the Northwest Pacific Ocean, Yellow Sea, Sea of Japan and South China Sea. In this study, the effect of the oxylipin-producing diatom Skeletonema marinoi on C. sinicus has been evaluated by analyzing expression level changes of genes involved in defense and detoxification systems. Results show that C. sinicus is more resistant to a diet of this diatom species in terms of gene expression patterns, compared to the congeneric species Calanus helgolandicus which is an important constituent of the temperate waters of the Atlantic Ocean and northern Mediterranean Sea. These findings contribute to the better understanding of genetic and/or phenotypic flexibility of copepod species and their capabilities to cope with stress by identifying molecular markers (such as stress and detoxification genes) as biosensors for environmental perturbations (e.g. toxins and contaminants) affecting marine copepods.

  3. Development of a Streptomyces venezuelae-based combinatorial biosynthetic system for the production of glycosylated derivatives of doxorubicin and its biosynthetic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Han, Ah Reum; Park, Je Won; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Ban, Yeon Hee; Yoo, Young Ji; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Byung-Gee; Sohng, Jae Kyung; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2011-07-01

    Doxorubicin, one of the most widely used anticancer drugs, is composed of a tetracyclic polyketide aglycone and l-daunosamine as a deoxysugar moiety, which acts as an important determinant of its biological activity. This is exemplified by the fewer side effects of semisynthetic epirubicin (4'-epi-doxorubicin). An efficient combinatorial biosynthetic system that can convert the exogenous aglycone ε-rhodomycinone into diverse glycosylated derivatives of doxorubicin or its biosynthetic intermediates, rhodomycin D and daunorubicin, was developed through the use of Streptomyces venezuelae mutants carrying plasmids that direct the biosynthesis of different nucleotide deoxysugars and their transfer onto aglycone, as well as the postglycosylation modifications. This system improved epirubicin production from ε-rhodomycinone by selecting a substrate flexible glycosyltransferase, AknS, which was able to transfer the unnatural sugar donors and a TDP-4-ketohexose reductase, AvrE, which efficiently supported the biosynthesis of TDP-4-epi-l-daunosamine. Furthermore, a range of doxorubicin analogs containing diverse deoxysugar moieties, seven of which are novel rhodomycin D derivatives, were generated. This provides new insights into the functions of deoxysugar biosynthetic enzymes and demonstrates the potential of the S. venezuelae-based combinatorial biosynthetic system as a simple biological tool for modifying structurally complex sugar moieties attached to anthracyclines as an alternative to chemical syntheses for improving anticancer agents.

  4. [Biosynthetic study of actinomycetes-metabolites for creating novel analogs].

    PubMed

    Ito, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    The aminocyclitol family is a relatively new class of natural products such as gentamicin, kanamycin, and streptomycin, which have been used clinically for decades as potent antimicrobial agents. These secondary metabolites are chiefly produced by microorganisms, especially Actinomycetes. Their chemical structures most commonly contain a C7N unit, 2-epi-5-epi-valiolone or 3-amino-5-hydroxybenzoic acid (3,5-AHBA) which are known to be responsible for their biological activities. In the course of current study, the biosynthesis of the C7N-containing metabolites, validamycin and acarbose, pactamycin, have been evaluated. We studied N-formamide salicylic acid (FSA) moiety which is a C7N unit synthesized from tryptophan by microorganisms. A strong antifungal agent antimycin, isolated from several Streptomyces sp., contains an FSA moiety, and constitutes a unique nine-membered dilactone ring with L-threonine, short-chain fatty acid, and an amide linkage connecting it to an FSA moiety. Also, an antitumor antibiotic asukamycin, produced by Streptomyces nodosus subsp. asukaensis ATCC 29757, consists of both 3,4-AHBA and C5N, cyclohexane ring linked to trans-triens. To improve the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of these metabolites, further structural modification is needed. Total chemical synthesis of these complex compounds is difficult. Therefore, alternative approaches are required, e.g., biosynthetic or genetic modification methods. This review presents the biosynthetic study on these compounds for creating new analogs using mutasyntheis.

  5. Model of the haem biosynthetic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves-Brown, Jeanette; Williams, Tim J.; Parish, J. H.

    1995-03-01

    (delta) -Aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) is a photodynamic therapy (PDT) agent that utilizes the haem biosynthetic pathway to create therapeutic levels of photoactive agents within tissues. Photosensitizer dosimetry and drug concentrations in target tissues are areas of uncertainty within PDT research. A program is described that uses numerical methods to model mathematically the haem biosynthetic pathway from ALA to haem as a set of partial differential rate equations. The data generated allow analysis and correlation with functions describing the kinetic behavior governing the reactions. This analysis provides insight into the production of protoporphyrin IX and other photoactive agents from exogenous ALA and provides a method for optimizing parameters, and for highlighting metabolic steps to which the product formation is most sensitive.

  6. Elucidation of Pseurotin Biosynthetic Pathway Points to Trans-Acting C-Methyltransferase and Source of Chemical Diversity Generation**

    PubMed Central

    Tsunematsu, Yuta; Fukutomi, Manami; Saruwatari, Takayoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hotta, Kinya; Tang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Pseurotins comprise a family of structurally related Aspergillal natural products having interesting bioactivity. However, little is known about the biosynthetic steps involved in the formation of their complex chemical features. Here, we systematically deleted the pseurotin biosynthetic genes in A. fumigatus and performed in vivo and in vitro characterization of the tailoring enzymes to determine the biosynthetic intermediates and the gene products responsible for the formation of each intermediate. This allowed us to elucidate the main biosynthetic steps leading to the formation of pseurotin A from the predominant precursor, azaspirene. The study revealed the combinatorial nature of the biosynthesis of the pseurotin family of compounds and the intermediates. Most interestingly, we report the first identification of an epoxidase–C-methyltransferase bifunctional fusion protein PsoF that appears to methylate the nascent polyketide backbone carbon atom in trans. PMID:24939566

  7. Biosynthetic Genes for the Tetrodecamycin Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Gverzdys, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently described 13-deoxytetrodecamycin, a new member of the tetrodecamycin family of antibiotics. A defining feature of these molecules is the presence of a five-membered lactone called a tetronate ring. By sequencing the genome of a producer strain, Streptomyces sp. strain WAC04657, and searching for a gene previously implicated in tetronate ring formation, we identified the biosynthetic genes responsible for producing 13-deoxytetrodecamycin (the ted genes). Using the ted cluster in WAC04657 as a reference, we found related clusters in three other organisms: Streptomyces atroolivaceus ATCC 19725, Streptomyces globisporus NRRL B-2293, and Streptomyces sp. strain LaPpAH-202. Comparing the four clusters allowed us to identify the cluster boundaries. Genetic manipulation of the cluster confirmed the involvement of the ted genes in 13-deoxytetrodecamycin biosynthesis and revealed several additional molecules produced through the ted biosynthetic pathway, including tetrodecamycin, dihydrotetrodecamycin, and another, W5.9, a novel molecule. Comparison of the bioactivities of these four molecules suggests that they may act through the covalent modification of their target(s). IMPORTANCE The tetrodecamycins are a distinct subgroup of the tetronate family of secondary metabolites. Little is known about their biosynthesis or mechanisms of action, making them an attractive subject for investigation. In this paper we present the biosynthetic gene cluster for 13-deoxytetrodecamycin in Streptomyces sp. strain WAC04657. We identify related clusters in several other organisms and show that they produce related molecules. PMID:27137499

  8. Biosynthetic route towards saxitoxin and shunt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Shigeki; Cho, Yuko; Konoki, Keiichi; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Oshima, Yasukatsu; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Saxitoxin, the most potent voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, is one of the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) produced by cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates. Recently, putative biosynthetic genes of PSTs were reported in these microorganisms. We previously synthesized genetically predicted biosynthetic intermediates, Int-A’ and Int-C’2, and also Cyclic-C’ which was not predicted based on gene, and identified them all in the toxin-producing cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis (TA04) and the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense (Axat-2). This study examined the incorporation of 15N-labeled intermediates into PSTs (C1 and C2) in A. circinalis (TA04). Conversions from Int-A’ to Int-C’2, from Int-C’2 to Cyclic-C’, and from Int-A’ and Int-C’2 to C1 and C2 were indicated using high resolution-LC/MS. However, Cyclic-C’ was not converted to C1 and C2 and was detected primarily in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that Int-A’ and Int-C’2 are genuine precursors of PSTs, but Int-C’2 converts partially to Cyclic-C’ which is a shunt product excreted to outside the cells. This paper provides the first direct demonstration of the biosynthetic route towards saxitoxin and a shunt pathway. PMID:26842222

  9. Menadione-Induced Oxidative Stress Re-Shapes the Oxylipin Profile of Aspergillus flavus and Its Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Zaccaria, Marco; Ludovici, Matteo; Sanzani, Simona Marianna; Ippolito, Antonio; Aiese Cigliano, Riccardo; Sanseverino, Walter; Scarpari, Marzia; Scala, Valeria; Fanelli, Corrado; Reverberi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is an efficient producer of mycotoxins, particularly aflatoxin B1, probably the most hepatocarcinogenic naturally-occurring compound. Although the inducing agents of toxin synthesis are not unanimously identified, there is evidence that oxidative stress is one of the main actors in play. In our study, we use menadione, a quinone extensively implemented in studies on ROS response in animal cells, for causing stress to A. flavus. For uncovering the molecular determinants that drive A. flavus in challenging oxidative stress conditions, we have evaluated a wide spectrum of several different parameters, ranging from metabolic (ROS and oxylipin profile) to transcriptional analysis (RNA-seq). There emerges a scenario in which A. flavus activates several metabolic processes under oxidative stress conditions for limiting the ROS-associated detrimental effects, as well as for triggering adaptive and escape strategies. PMID:26512693

  10. Profiling the Oxylipin and Endocannabinoid Metabolome by UPLC-ESI-MS/MS in Human Plasma to Monitor Postprandial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Späth, Jana; Zivkovic, Angela M.; Nording, Malin L.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive lipids, including oxylipins, endocannabinoids, and related compounds may function as specific biochemical markers of certain aspects of inflammation. However, the postprandial responsiveness of these compounds is largely unknown; therefore, changes in the circulating oxylipin and endocannabinoid metabolome in response to a challenge meal were investigated at six occasions in a subject who freely modified her usual diet. The dietary change, and especially the challenge meal itself, represented a modification of precursor fatty acid status, with expectedly subtle effects on bioactive lipid levels. To detect even the slightest alteration, highly sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methods for bioactive lipid profiling was employed. A previously validated UPLC-ESI-MS/MS method for profiling the endocannabinoid metabolome was used, while validation of an UPLC-ESI-MS/MS method for oxylipin analysis was performed with acceptable outcomes for a majority of the parameters according to the US Food and Drug Administration guidelines for linearity (0.9938 < R2 < 0.9996), limit of detection (0.0005–2.1 pg on column), limit of quantification (0.0005–4.2 pg on column), inter- and intraday accuracy (85–115%) and precision (< 5%), recovery (40–109%) and stability (40–105%). Forty-seven of fifty-two bioactive lipids were detected in plasma samples at fasting and in the postprandial state (0.5, 1, and 3 hours after the meal). Multivariate analysis showed a significant shift of bioactive lipid profiles in the postprandial state due to inclusion of dairy products in the diet, which was in line with univariate analysis revealing seven compounds (NAGly, 9-HODE, 13-oxo-ODE, 9(10)-EpOME, 12(13)-EpOME, 20-HETE, and 11,12-DHET) that were significantly different between background diets in the postprandial state (but not at fasting). The only change in baseline levels at fasting

  11. Chemical characterization of new oxylipins from Cestrum parqui, and their effects on seed germination and early seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Antonio; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Dellagreca, Marina; Izzo, Angelina; Natale, Angela; Pascarella, Maria Teresa; Pacifico, Severina; Zarrelli, Armando; Monaco, Pietro

    2008-09-01

    Isolation, chemical characterization, and phytotoxicity of five new oxylipins, together with seven already known related compounds, from Cestrum parqui L' Hérl. is reported. All the structures were elucidated on the basis of their spectral data, especially 1D-(1H- and 13C-NMR, DEPT) and 2D-NMR (COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, HMBC, and NOESY). The configurations of the stereogenic C-atoms were determined by the Mosher's method. The compounds have been assayed for their phytotoxicity on Lactuca sativa at concentrations ranging between 10(-4) and 10(-8) M. The results of the phytotoxicity tests on the germination and growth of the test species, obtained by a cluster analysis, showed interesting relationship between the chemical structures of the compounds and their biological effects.

  12. Identification of Coq11, a New Coenzyme Q Biosynthetic Protein in the CoQ-Synthome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DOE PAGES

    Allan, Christopher M.; Awad, Agape M.; Johnson, Jarrett S.; ...

    2015-01-28

    Coenzyme Q (Q or ubiquinone) is a redox active lipid composed of a fully substituted benzoquinone ring and a polyisoprenoid tail and is required for mitochondrial electron transport. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Q is synthesized by the products of 11 known genes, COQ1–COQ9, YAH1, and ARH1. The function of some of the Coq proteins remains unknown, and several steps in the Q biosynthetic pathway are not fully characterized. Several of the Coq proteins are associated in a macromolecular complex on the matrix face of the inner mitochondrial membrane, and this complex is required for efficient Q synthesis. In thismore » paper, we further characterize this complex via immunoblotting and proteomic analysis of tandem affinity-purified tagged Coq proteins. We show that Coq8, a putative kinase required for the stability of the Q biosynthetic complex, is associated with a Coq6-containing complex. Additionally Q6 and late stage Q biosynthetic intermediates were also found to co-purify with the complex. A mitochondrial protein of unknown function, encoded by the YLR290C open reading frame, is also identified as a constituent of the complex and is shown to be required for efficient de novo Q biosynthesis. Finally, given its effect on Q synthesis and its association with the biosynthetic complex, we propose that the open reading frame YLR290C be designated COQ11.« less

  13. Alteration in the cytosolic triacylglycerol biosynthetic machinery leads to decreased cell growth and triacylglycerol synthesis in oleaginous yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Gangar, Akanksha; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2002-01-01

    Altered nutrient content (levels of glucose) caused a drastic reduction in cell growth and triacylglycerol (TAG) production in the wild-type (WT) Rhodotorula glutinis. This was due to the decreased level of synthesis of TAG biosynthetic enzymes, reflected by a reduction in enzyme activity. A similar observation was made in the case of non-lethal mutants of TAG-deficient oleaginous yeast, namely TAG1 and TAG2, which were generated by ethyl methane sulphonate mutagenesis. Metabolic labelling of TAG-deficient cells with [(14)C]acetate, [(32)P]orthophosphate and [(14)C]mevalonate showed a negligible TAG formation with minimal alterations in phospholipid and sterol compositions. Assays on the activities of cytosolic TAG biosynthetic enzymes revealed that lysophosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol acyltransferases (ATs) were defective in TAG1 and TAG2 respectively. The activity of membrane-bound isoforms of TAG biosynthetic enzymes remains unaltered in the mutants. Analysis of cytosolic TAG biosynthetic enzymes by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation indicated that the defective ATs were a part of the TAG biosynthetic multienzyme complex. Quantitatively, the cytosolic lysophosphatidic acid-AT was comparable between TAG1 and the WT. However, diacylglycerol-AT was relatively less in TAG2 than the WT. These results demonstrated that either by decreasing the nutrient content or mutating the enzymes of the soluble TAG biosynthetic pathway, TAG production was decreased with concomitant reduction in the cell growth. PMID:11972450

  14. PqqD Is a Novel Peptide Chaperone That Forms a Ternary Complex with the Radical S-Adenosylmethionine Protein PqqE in the Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Biosynthetic Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Latham, John A.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Barr, Ian; Juthani, Prerak V.; Klinman, Judith P.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a product of a ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified pathway consisting of five conserved genes, pqqA-E. PqqE is a radical S-adenosylmethionine (RS) protein with a C-terminal SPASM domain, and is proposed to catalyze the formation of a carbon-carbon bond between the glutamate and tyrosine side chains of the peptide substrate PqqA. PqqD is a 10-kDa protein with an unknown function, but is essential for PQQ production. Recently, in Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp), PqqD and PqqE were shown to interact; however, the stoichiometry and KD were not obtained. Here, we show that the PqqE and PqqD interaction transcends species, also occurring in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 (Me). The stoichiometry of the MePqqD and MePqqE interaction is 1:1 and the KD, determined by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), was found to be ∼12 μm. Moreover, using SPR and isothermal calorimetry techniques, we establish for the first time that MePqqD binds MePqqA tightly (KD ∼200 nm). The formation of a ternary MePqqA-D-E complex was captured by native mass spectrometry and the KD for the MePqqAD-MePqqE interaction was found to be ∼5 μm. Finally, using a bioinformatic analysis, we found that PqqD orthologues are associated with the RS-SPASM family of proteins (subtilosin, pyrroloquinoline quinone, anaerobic sulfatase maturating enzyme, and mycofactocin), all of which modify either peptides or proteins. In conclusion, we propose that PqqD is a novel peptide chaperone and that PqqD orthologues may play a similar role in peptide modification pathways that use an RS-SPASM protein. PMID:25817994

  15. Ascorbate as a Biosynthetic Precursor in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Debolt, Seth; Melino, Vanessa; Ford, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims l-Ascorbate (vitamin C) has well-documented roles in many aspects of redox control and anti-oxidant activity in plant cells. This Botanical Briefing highlights recent developments in another aspect of l-ascorbate metabolism: its function as a precursor for specific processes in the biosynthesis of organic acids. Scope The Briefing provides a summary of recent advances in our understanding of l-ascorbate metabolism, covering biosynthesis, translocation and functional aspects. The role of l-ascorbate as a biosynthetic precursor in the formation of oxalic acid, l-threonic acid and l-tartaric acid is described, and progress in elaborating the mechanisms of the formation of these acids is reviewed. The potential conflict between the two roles of l-ascorbate in plant cells, functional and biosynthetic, is highlighted. Conclusions Recent advances in the understanding of l-ascorbate catabolism and the formation of oxalic and l-tartaric acids provide compelling evidence for a major role of l-ascorbate in plant metabolism. Combined experimental approaches, using classic biochemical and emerging ‘omics’ technologies, have provided recent insight to previously under-investigated areas. PMID:17098753

  16. Investigation of early molybdopterin biosynthetic intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbens, M.M.; Rajagopalan, K.V. )

    1991-03-11

    Little information is available regarding the early steps in the biosynthetic pathway of molybdopterin (MPT). In order to explore these early reactions, and in particular to investigate the origin of the ring and side chain carbons of MPT, a metabolic approach employing the incorporation of {sup 14}C label was chosen. This method was facilitated by the recent purification and characterization of desulfomolybdopterin 2{prime},4{prime}-cyclic phosphate, the precursor which is converted directly to active molybdopterin in Escherichia coli by the addition of vicinal sulfurs to the side chain. This labile precursor readily oxidizes to Compound Z, a stable 6-alkyl pterin which retains all of the carbon atoms present in molybdopterin. Compound Z, rather than molybdopterin itself was chosen as the end product for labeling due to its overproduction in some MPT-deficient strains, as well as its stability and ease of purification. The authors report here the isolation of {sup 14}C-labelled Compound Z from E.coli chlN cells cultured in minimal media supplemented with U-{sup 14}C guanosine. Successive cleavage of the side chain carbons by permanganate treatment and UV light produced a decrease in the specific radioactivity of the resulting pterins. These data indicate that the early portion of the molybdopterin biosynthetic pathway may be similar to that of the bioactive pterins folate and biopterin, both of which are derived from guanosine triphosphate.

  17. Structural Biology of the Purine Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Morar, Mariya; Ealick, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    Purine biosynthesis requires ten enzymatic transformations to generate inosine monophosphate. PurF, PurD, PurL, PurM, PurC, and PurB are common to all pathways, while PurN or PurT, PurK/PurE-I or PurE-II, PurH or PurP, and PurJ or PurO catalyze the same steps in different organisms. X-ray crystal structures are available for all 15 purine biosynthetic enzymes, including seven ATP-dependent enzymes, two amidotransferases and two tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes. Here we summarize the structures of the purine biosynthetic enzymes, discuss similarities and differences, and present arguments for pathway evolution. Four of the ATP-dependent enzymes belong to the ATP-grasp superfamily and two to the PurM superfamily. The amidotransferases are unrelated with one utilizing an NTN-glutaminase and the other utilizing a triad glutaminase. Likewise the tetrahydrofolate-dependent enzymes are unrelated. Ancestral proteins may have included a broad specificity enzyme instead of PurD, PurT, PurK, PurC, and PurP, and a separate enzyme instead of PurM and PurL. PMID:18712276

  18. Linking Biosynthetic Gene Clusters to their Metabolites via Pathway-Targeted Molecular Networking

    PubMed Central

    Trautman, Eric P.; Crawford, Jason M.

    2016-01-01

    The connection of microbial biosynthetic gene clusters to the small molecule metabolites they encode is central to the discovery and characterization of new metabolic pathways with ecological and pharmacological potential. With increasing microbial genome sequence information being deposited into publicly available databases, it is clear that microbes have the coding capacity for many more biologically active small molecules than previously realized. Of increasing interest are the small molecules encoded by the human microbiome, as these metabolites likely mediate a variety of currently uncharacterized human-microbe interactions that influence health and disease. In this mini-review, we describe the ongoing biosynthetic, structural, and functional characterizations of the genotoxic colibactin pathway in gut bacteria as a thematic example of linking biosynthetic gene clusters to their metabolites. We also highlight other natural products that are produced through analogous biosynthetic logic and comment on some current disconnects between bioinformatics predictions and experimental structural characterizations. Lastly, we describe the use of pathway-targeted molecular networking as a tool to characterize secondary metabolic pathways within complex metabolomes and to aid in downstream metabolite structural elucidation efforts. PMID:26456470

  19. Dimeric pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids: synthetic approaches and biosynthetic hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Ma, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaolei; De, Saptarshi; Ma, Yuyong; Chen, Chuo

    2014-08-14

    The pyrrole-imidazole alkaloids are a group of structurally unique and biologically interesting marine sponge metabolites. Among them, the cyclic dimers have caught synthetic chemists' attention particularly. Numerous synthetic strategies have been developed and various biosynthetic hypotheses have been proposed for these fascinating natural products. We discuss herein the synthetic approaches and the biosynthetic insights obtained from these studies.

  20. Vascular endothelial overexpression of human CYP2J2 (Tie2-CYP2J2 Tr) modulates cardiac oxylipin profiles and enhances coronary reactive hyperemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Ahmad; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Morisseau, Christophe; Falck, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Arachidonic acid is metabolized to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) by cytochrome (CYP) P450 epoxygenases, and to ω-terminal hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) by ω-hydroxylases. EETs and HETEs often have opposite biologic effects; EETs are vasodilatory and protect against ischemia/reperfusion injury, while ω-terminal HETEs are vasoconstrictive and cause vascular dysfunction. Other oxylipins, such as epoxyoctadecaenoic acids (EpOMEs), hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids (HODEs), and prostanoids also have varied vascular effects. Post-ischemic vasodilation in the heart, known as coronary reactive hyperemia (CRH), protects against potential damage to the heart muscle caused by ischemia. The relationship among CRH response to ischemia, in mice with altered levels of CYP2J epoxygenases has not yet been investigated. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of endothelial overexpression of the human cytochrome P450 epoxygenase CYP2J2 in mice (Tie2-CYP2J2 Tr) on oxylipin profiles and CRH. Additionally, we evaluated the effect of pharmacologic inhibition of CYP-epoxygenases and inhibition of ω-hydroxylases on CRH. We hypothesized that CRH would be enhanced in isolated mouse hearts with vascular endothelial overexpression of human CYP2J2 through modulation of oxylipin profiles. Similarly, we expected that inhibition of CYP-epoxygenases would reduce CRH, whereas inhibition of ω-hydroxylases would enhance CRH. Compared to WT mice, Tie2-CYP2J2 Tr mice had enhanced CRH, including repayment volume, repayment duration, and repayment/debt ratio (P < 0.05). Similarly, inhibition of ω-hydroxylases increased repayment volume and repayment duration, in Tie2-CYP2J2 Tr compared to WT mice (P < 0.05). Endothelial overexpression of CYP2J2 significantly changed oxylipin profiles, including increased EETs (P < 0.05), increased EpOMEs (P < 0.05), and decreased 8-iso-PGF2α (P < 0.05). Inhibition of CYP epoxygenases with MS-PPOH attenuated CRH (P < 0.05). Ischemia caused a decrease in mid

  1. Flavoenzymes: Versatile Catalysts in Biosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Christopher T.; Wencewicz, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Riboflavin-based coenzymes, tightly bound to enzymes catalyzing substrate oxidations and reductions, enable an enormous range of chemical transformations in biosynthetic pathways. Flavoenzymes catalyze substrate oxidations involving amine and alcohol oxidations and desaturations to olefins, the latter setting up Diels-Alder cyclizations in lovastatin and solanapyrone biosyntheses. Both C4a and N5 of the flavin coenzymes are sites for covalent adduct formation. For example, the reactivity of dihydroflavins with molecular oxygen leads to flavin-4a-OOH adducts which then carry out a diverse range of oxygen transfers, including Baeyer-Villiger type ring expansions, olefin epoxidations, halogenations via transient HOCl generation, and an oxidative Favorskii rerrangement during enterocin assembly. PMID:23051833

  2. Nuclear localization of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Elzaouk, Lina; Laufs, Stephanie; Heerklotz, Dirk; Leimbacher, Walter; Blau, Nenad; Résibois, Annette; Thöny, Beat

    2004-01-05

    Biosynthesis of the tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) cofactor, essential for catecholamines and serotonin production and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, requires the enzymes GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS), and sepiapterin reductase (SR). Upon studying the distribution of GTPCH and PTPS with polyclonal immune sera in cross sections of rat brain, prominent nuclear staining in many neurons was observed besides strong staining in peri-ventricular structures. Furthermore, localization studies in transgenic mice expressing a Pts-LacZ gene fusion containing the N-terminal 35 amino acids of PTPS revealed beta-galactosidase in the nucleus of neurons. In contrast, PTPS-beta-galactosidase was exclusively cytoplasmic in the convoluted kidney tubules but nuclear in other parts of the nephron, indicating again that nuclear targeting may occur only in specific cell categories. Furthermore, the N terminus of PTPS acts as a domain able to target the PTPS-beta-galactosidase fusion protein to the nucleus. In transiently transfected COS-1 cells, which do not express GTPCH and PTPS endogenously, we found cytoplasmic and nuclear staining for GTPCH and PTPS. To further investigate nuclear localization of all three BH(4)-biosynthetic enzymes, we expressed Flag-fusion proteins in transiently transfected COS-1 cells and analyzed the distribution by immunolocalization and sub-cellular fractionation using anti-Flag antibodies and enzymatic assays. Whereas 5-10% of total GTPCH and PTPS and approximately 1% of total SR were present in the nucleus, only GTPCH was confirmed to be an active enzyme in nuclear fractions. The in vitro studies together with the tissue staining corroborate specific nuclear localization of BH(4)-biosynthetic proteins with yet unknown biological function.

  3. New Insights into the Biosynthetic Logic of Ribosomally Synthesized and Post-translationally Modified Peptide Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Manuel A; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2016-01-21

    Ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a large group of structurally diverse natural products. Their biological activities and unique biosynthetic pathways have sparked a growing interest in RiPPs. Furthermore, the relatively low genetic complexity associated with RiPP biosynthesis makes them excellent candidates for synthetic biology applications. This Review highlights recent developments in the understanding of the biosynthesis of several bacterial RiPP family members, the use of the RiPP biosynthetic machinery for generating novel macrocyclic peptides, and the implementation of tools designed to guide the discovery and characterization of novel RiPPs.

  4. Aphid Feeding Activates Expression of a Transcriptome of Oxylipin-Based Defense Signals in Wheat Involved in Resistance to Herbivory

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, C. MICHAEL; LIU, XUMING; WANG, LIANG J.; LIU, XIANG; CHEN, MING-SHUN; STARKEY, SHARON; BAI, JIANFA

    2013-01-01

    Damage by the Russian wheat aphid (RWA), Diuraphis noxia, significantly reduces wheat and barley yields worldwide. In compatible interactions, virulent RWA populations flourish and susceptible plants suffer extensive leaf chlorophyll loss. In incompatible interactions, RWA reproduction and population growth are significantly reduced and RWA-related chlorophyll loss in resistant plants is minor. The objectives of this study were to develop an understanding of the molecular and phytochemical bases of RWA resistance in plants containing the Dnx resistance gene. Microarray, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and phytohormone assays were conducted to identify transcriptome components unique to RWA-infested Dnx plants and susceptible (Dn0) plants, and to identify and characterize putative genes involved in Dnx plant defense responses. We found that RWA-infested Dnx plants upregulated > 180 genes related to reactive oxygen species, signaling, pathogen defense, and arthropod allelochemical and physical defense. The expression of several of these genes in RWA-infested Dnx plants increased significantly from 6- to 24-h post infestation (hpi), but their expression in Dn0 plants, when present, was delayed until 48- to 96 hpi. Concentrations of 16- and 18-carbon fatty acids, trans-methyl-12-oxophytodienoic acid, and abscisic acid were significantly greater in Dnx foliage than in Dn0 foliage after RWA infestation, suggesting that Dnx RWA defense and resistance genes may be regulated via the oxylipin pathway. These findings provide a foundation for the elucidation of the molecular basis for compatible- and incompatible plant-aphid interactions. PMID:20229216

  5. 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, a plant-derived oxylipin, attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in microglia.

    PubMed

    Taki-Nakano, Nozomi; Kotera, Jun; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-13

    Jasmonates are plant lipid-derived oxylipins that act as key signaling compounds in plant immunity, germination, and development. Although some physiological activities of natural jasmonates in mammalian cells have been investigated, their anti-inflammatory actions in mammalian cells remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether jasmonates protect mouse microglial MG5 cells against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. Among the jasmonates tested, only 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) suppressed LPS-induced expression of the typical inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor α. In addition, only OPDA reduced LPS-induced nitric oxide production through a decrease in the level of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Further mechanistic studies showed that OPDA suppressed neuroinflammation by inhibiting nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in LPS-activated MG5 cells. In addition, OPDA induced expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1), a negative regulator of inflammation, in MG5 cells. Finally, we found that the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 signaling cascade induced by OPDA is not involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of OPDA. These results demonstrate that OPDA inhibited LPS-induced cell inflammation in mouse microglial cells via multiple pathways, including suppression of nuclear factor κB, inhibition of p38, and activation of SOCS-1 signaling.

  6. Oxylipin Signaling: A Distinct Role for the Jasmonic Acid Precursor cis-(+)-12-Oxo-Phytodienoic Acid (cis-OPDA)

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Anuja; Graham, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxylipins are lipid-derived compounds, many of which act as signals in the plant response to biotic and abiotic stress. They include the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) and related jasmonate metabolites cis-(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), methyl jasmonate, and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile). Besides the defense response, jasmonates are involved in plant growth and development and regulate a range of processes including glandular trichome development, reproduction, root growth, and senescence. cis-OPDA is known to possess a signaling role distinct from JA-Ile. The non-enzymatically derived phytoprostanes are structurally similar to cis-OPDA and induce a common set of genes that are not responsive to JA in Arabidopsis thaliana. A novel role for cis-OPDA in seed germination regulation has recently been uncovered based on evidence from double mutants and feeding experiments showing that cis-OPDA interacts with abscisic acid (ABA), inhibits seed germination, and increases ABA INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5) protein abundance. Large amounts of cis-OPDA are esterified to galactolipids in A. thaliana and the resulting compounds, known as Arabidopsides, are thought to act as a rapidly available source of cis-OPDA. PMID:22645585

  7. Involvement of plasma membrane peroxidases and oxylipin pathway in the recovery from phytoplasma disease in apple (Malus domestica).

    PubMed

    Patui, Sonia; Bertolini, Alberto; Clincon, Luisa; Ermacora, Paolo; Braidot, Enrico; Vianello, Angelo; Zancani, Marco

    2013-06-01

    Apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh.) may be affected by apple proliferation (AP), caused by 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali'. Some plants can spontaneously recover from the disease, which implies the disappearance of symptoms through a phenomenon known as recovery. In this article it is shown that NAD(P)H peroxidases of leaf plasma membrane-enriched fractions exhibited a higher activity in samples from both AP-diseased and recovered plants. In addition, an increase in endogenous SA was characteristic of the symptomatic plants, since its content increased in samples obtained from diseased apple trees. In agreement, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activity, a key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway, was increased too. Jasmonic acid (JA) increased only during recovery, in a phase subsequent to the pathological state, and in concomitance to a decline of salicylic acid (SA). Oxylipin pathway, responsible for JA synthesis, was not induced during the development of AP-disease, but it appeared to be stimulated when the recovery occurred. Accordingly, lipoxygenase (LOX) activity, detected in plasma membrane-enriched fractions, showed an increase in apple leaves obtained from recovered plants. This enhancement was paralleled by an increase of hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) activity, detected in leaf microsomes, albeit the latter enzyme was activated in either the disease or recovery conditions. Hence, a reciprocal antagonism between SA- and JA-pathways could be suggested as an effective mechanism by which apple plants react to phytoplasma invasions, thereby providing a suitable defense response leading to the establishment of the recovery phenomenon.

  8. An eight-step synthesis of epicolactone reveals its biosynthetic origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbrock, Pascal; Armanino, Nicolas; Ilg, Marina K.; Webster, Robert; Trauner, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    Epicolactone is a recently isolated fungal metabolite that is highly complex for its size, and yet racemic. With its array of quaternary stereocentres, high degree of functionalization and intricate polycyclic structure, it poses a considerable challenge to synthesis, a challenge that can be met by understanding its biosynthetic origin. If drawn in a certain way, epicolactone reveals a pattern that resembles purpurogallin, the archetype of ubiquitous natural colourants formed via oxidative dimerization. Based on this insight, we designed a biomimetic synthesis of epicolactone that proceeds in only eight steps from vanillyl alcohol. We have isolated a key intermediate that supports our biosynthetic hypothesis and anticipate that an isomer of epicolactone stemming from our synthetic efforts could also be found as a natural product.

  9. The Sphingolipid Biosynthetic Pathway Is a Potential Target for Chemotherapy against Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koeller, Carolina Macedo; Heise, Norton

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of human Chagas disease, for which there currently is no cure. The life cycle of T. cruzi is complex, including an extracellular phase in the triatomine insect vector and an obligatory intracellular stage inside the vertebrate host. These phases depend on a variety of surface glycosylphosphatidylinositol-(GPI-) anchored glycoconjugates that are synthesized by the parasite. Therefore, the surface expression of GPI-anchored components and the biosynthetic pathways of GPI anchors are attractive targets for new therapies for Chagas disease. We identified new drug targets for chemotherapy by taking the available genome sequence information and searching for differences in the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathways (SBPs) of mammals and T. cruzi. In this paper, we discuss the major steps of the SBP in mammals, yeast and T. cruzi, focusing on the IPC synthase and ceramide remodeling of T. cruzi as potential therapeutic targets for Chagas disease. PMID:21603271

  10. Reassembled biosynthetic pathway for large-scale carbohydrate synthesis: alpha-Gal epitope producing "superbug".

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Liu, Ziye; Zhang, Jianbo; Zhang, Wei; Kowal, Przemyslaw; Wang, Peng George

    2002-01-04

    A metabolic pathway engineered Escherichia coli strain (superbug) containing one plasmid harboring an artificial gene cluster encoding all the five enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of Galalpha l,3Lac through galactose metabolism has been developed. The plasmid contains a lambda promoter, a c1857 repressor gene, an ampicillin resistance gene, and a T7 terminator. Each gene was preceded by a Shine - Dalgarno sequence for ribosome binding. In a reaction catalyzed by the recombinant E. coli strain, Galalpha 1,3Lac trisaccharide accumulated at concentrations of 14.2 mM (7.2 gL(-1)) in a reaction mixture containing galactose, glucose, lactose, and a catalytic amount of uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose. This work demonstrates that large-scale synthesis of complex oligosaccharides can be achieved economically and efficiently through a single, biosynthetic pathway engineered microorganism.

  11. Evolution-guided optimization of biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Raman, Srivatsan; Rogers, Jameson K; Taylor, Noah D; Church, George M

    2014-12-16

    Engineering biosynthetic pathways for chemical production requires extensive optimization of the host cellular metabolic machinery. Because it is challenging to specify a priori an optimal design, metabolic engineers often need to construct and evaluate a large number of variants of the pathway. We report a general strategy that combines targeted genome-wide mutagenesis to generate pathway variants with evolution to enrich for rare high producers. We convert the intracellular presence of the target chemical into a fitness advantage for the cell by using a sensor domain responsive to the chemical to control a reporter gene necessary for survival under selective conditions. Because artificial selection tends to amplify unproductive cheaters, we devised a negative selection scheme to eliminate cheaters while preserving library diversity. This scheme allows us to perform multiple rounds of evolution (addressing ∼10(9) cells per round) with minimal carryover of cheaters after each round. Based on candidate genes identified by flux balance analysis, we used targeted genome-wide mutagenesis to vary the expression of pathway genes involved in the production of naringenin and glucaric acid. Through up to four rounds of evolution, we increased production of naringenin and glucaric acid by 36- and 22-fold, respectively. Naringenin production (61 mg/L) from glucose was more than double the previous highest titer reported. Whole-genome sequencing of evolved strains revealed additional untargeted mutations that likely benefit production, suggesting new routes for optimization.

  12. Bioretrosynthetic construction of a didanosine biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Birmingham, William R.; Starbird, Chrystal A.; Panosian, Timothy D.; Nannemann, David P.; Iverson, T. M.; Bachmann, Brian O.

    2014-01-01

    Concatenation of engineered biocatalysts into multistep pathways dramatically increases their utility, but development of generalizable assembly methods remains a significant challenge. Herein we evaluate ‘bioretrosynthesis’, which is an application of the retrograde evolution hypothesis, for biosynthetic pathway construction. To test bioretrosynthesis, we engineered a pathway for synthesis of the antiretroviral nucleoside analog didanosine (2,3-dideoxyinosine). Applying both directed evolution and structure-based approaches, we began pathway construction with a retro-extension from an engineered purine nucleoside phosphorylase and evolved 1,5-phosphopentomutase to accept the substrate 2,3-dideoxyribose 5-phosphate with a 700-fold change in substrate selectivity and 3-fold increased turnover in cell lysate. A subsequent retrograde pathway extension, via ribokinase engineering, resulted in a didanosine pathway with a 9,500-fold change in nucleoside production selectivity and 50-fold increase in didanosine production. Unexpectedly, the result of this bioretrosynthetic step was not a retro-extension from phosphopentomutase, but rather the discovery of a fortuitous pathway-shortening bypass via the engineered ribokinase. PMID:24657930

  13. Polyamine biosynthetic diversity in plants and algae.

    PubMed

    Fuell, Christine; Elliott, Katherine A; Hanfrey, Colin C; Franceschetti, Marina; Michael, Anthony J

    2010-07-01

    Polyamine biosynthesis in plants differs from other eukaryotes because of the contribution of genes from the cyanobacterial ancestor of the chloroplast. Plants possess an additional biosynthetic route for putrescine formation from arginine, consisting of the enzymes arginine decarboxylase, agmatine iminohydrolase and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase, derived from the cyanobacterial ancestor. They also synthesize an unusual tetraamine, thermospermine, that has important developmental roles and which is evolutionarily more ancient than spermine in plants and algae. Single-celled green algae have lost the arginine route and are dependent, like other eukaryotes, on putrescine biosynthesis from the ornithine. Some plants like Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens have lost ornithine decarboxylase and are thus dependent on the arginine route. With its dependence on the arginine route, and the pivotal role of thermospermine in growth and development, Arabidopsis represents the most specifically plant mode of polyamine biosynthesis amongst eukaryotes. A number of plants and algae are also able to synthesize unusual polyamines such as norspermidine, norspermine and longer polyamines, and biosynthesis of these amines likely depends on novel aminopropyltransferases similar to thermospermine synthase, with relaxed substrate specificity. Plants have a rich repertoire of polyamine-based secondary metabolites, including alkaloids and hydroxycinnamic amides, and a number of polyamine-acylating enzymes have been recently characterised. With the genetic tools available for Arabidopsis and other model plants and algae, and the increasing capabilities of comparative genomics, the biological roles of polyamines can now be addressed across the plant evolutionary lineage.

  14. Deciphering the late biosynthetic steps of antimalarial compound FR-900098.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Tyler W; DeSieno, Matthew A; Griffin, Benjamin M; Thomas, Paul M; Kelleher, Neil L; Metcalf, William W; Zhao, Huimin

    2010-01-29

    FR-900098 is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of malaria. Here we report the heterologous production of this compound in Escherichia coli by reconstructing the entire biosynthetic pathway using a three-plasmid system. Based on this system, whole-cell feeding assays in combination with in vitro enzymatic activity assays reveal an unusual functional role of nucleotide conjugation and lead to the complete elucidation of the previously unassigned late biosynthetic steps. These studies also suggest a biosynthetic route to a second phosphonate antibiotic, FR-33289. A thorough understanding of the FR-900098 biosynthetic pathway now opens possibilities for metabolic engineering in E. coli to increase production of the antimalarial antibiotic and combinatorial biosynthesis to generate novel derivatives of FR-900098.

  15. Expanding the product profile of a microbial alkane biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Harger, Matthew; Zheng, Lei; Moon, Austin; Ager, Casey; An, Ju Hye; Choe, Chris; Lai, Yi-Ling; Mo, Benjamin; Zong, David; Smith, Matthew D; Egbert, Robert G; Mills, Jeremy H; Baker, David; Pultz, Ingrid Swanson; Siegel, Justin B

    2013-01-18

    Microbially produced alkanes are a new class of biofuels that closely match the chemical composition of petroleum-based fuels. Alkanes can be generated from the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway by the reduction of acyl-ACPs followed by decarbonylation of the resulting aldehydes. A current limitation of this pathway is the restricted product profile, which consists of n-alkanes of 13, 15, and 17 carbons in length. To expand the product profile, we incorporated a new part, FabH2 from Bacillus subtilis , an enzyme known to have a broader specificity profile for fatty acid initiation than the native FabH of Escherichia coli . When provided with the appropriate substrate, the addition of FabH2 resulted in an altered alkane product profile in which significant levels of n-alkanes of 14 and 16 carbons in length are produced. The production of even chain length alkanes represents initial steps toward the expansion of this recently discovered microbial alkane production pathway to synthesize complex fuels. This work was conceived and performed as part of the 2011 University of Washington international Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) project.

  16. CrBPF1 overexpression alters transcript levels of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic and regulatory genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun Yao; Leopold, Alex L.; Sander, Guy W.; Shanks, Jacqueline V.; Zhao, Le; Gibson, Susan I.

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus is a complex and highly regulated process. Understanding the biochemistry and regulation of the TIA pathway is of particular interest as it may allow the engineering of plants to accumulate higher levels of pharmaceutically important alkaloids. Toward this end, we generated a transgenic C. roseus hairy root line that overexpresses the CrBPF1 transcriptional activator under the control of a β-estradiol inducible promoter. CrBPF1 is a MYB-like protein that was previously postulated to help regulate the expression of the TIA biosynthetic gene STR. However, the role of CrBPF1 in regulation of the TIA and related pathways had not been previously characterized. In this study, transcriptional profiling revealed that overexpression of CrBPF1 results in increased transcript levels for genes from both the indole and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways that provide precursors for TIA biosynthesis, as well as for genes in the TIA biosynthetic pathway. In addition, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increases in the transcript levels for 11 out of 13 genes postulated to act as transcriptional regulators of genes from the TIA and TIA feeder pathways. Interestingly, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increased transcript levels for both TIA transcriptional activators and repressors. Despite the fact that CrBPF1 overexpression affects transcript levels of a large percentage of TIA biosynthetic and regulatory genes, CrBPF1 overexpression has only very modest effects on the levels of the TIA metabolites analyzed. This finding may be due, at least in part, to the up-regulation of both transcriptional activators and repressors in response to CrBPF1 overexpression, suggesting that CrBPF1 may serve as a “fine-tune” regulator for TIA biosynthesis, acting to help regulate the timing and amplitude of TIA gene expression. PMID:26483828

  17. Identification of Coq11, a New Coenzyme Q Biosynthetic Protein in the CoQ-Synthome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, Christopher M.; Awad, Agape M.; Johnson, Jarrett S.; Shirasaki, Dyna I.; Wang, Charles; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2015-01-28

    Coenzyme Q (Q or ubiquinone) is a redox active lipid composed of a fully substituted benzoquinone ring and a polyisoprenoid tail and is required for mitochondrial electron transport. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Q is synthesized by the products of 11 known genes, COQ1–COQ9, YAH1, and ARH1. The function of some of the Coq proteins remains unknown, and several steps in the Q biosynthetic pathway are not fully characterized. Several of the Coq proteins are associated in a macromolecular complex on the matrix face of the inner mitochondrial membrane, and this complex is required for efficient Q synthesis. In this paper, we further characterize this complex via immunoblotting and proteomic analysis of tandem affinity-purified tagged Coq proteins. We show that Coq8, a putative kinase required for the stability of the Q biosynthetic complex, is associated with a Coq6-containing complex. Additionally Q6 and late stage Q biosynthetic intermediates were also found to co-purify with the complex. A mitochondrial protein of unknown function, encoded by the YLR290C open reading frame, is also identified as a constituent of the complex and is shown to be required for efficient de novo Q biosynthesis. Finally, given its effect on Q synthesis and its association with the biosynthetic complex, we propose that the open reading frame YLR290C be designated COQ11.

  18. Bioengineering natural product biosynthetic pathways for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Cheng; Law, Brian; Wilkinson, Barrie; Micklefield, Jason

    2012-12-01

    With the advent of next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, the number of microbial genome sequences has increased dramatically, revealing a vast array of new biosynthetic gene clusters. Genomics data provide a tremendous opportunity to discover new natural products, and also to guide the bioengineering of new and existing natural product scaffolds for therapeutic applications. Notably, it is apparent that the vast majority of biosynthetic gene clusters are either silent or produce very low quantities of the corresponding natural products. It is imperative therefore to devise methods for activating unproductive biosynthetic pathways to provide the quantities of natural products needed for further development. Moreover, on the basis of our expanding mechanistic and structural knowledge of biosynthetic assembly-line enzymes, new strategies for re-programming biosynthetic pathways have emerged, resulting in focused libraries of modified products with potentially improved biological properties. In this review we will focus on the latest bioengineering approaches that have been utilised to optimise yields and increase the structural diversity of natural product scaffolds for future clinical applications.

  19. Ochratoxin A Producing Fungi, Biosynthetic Pathway and Regulatory Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Liuqing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhao, Yueju; Liu, Yang

    2016-03-21

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillum species, is one of the most important mycotoxin contaminants in agricultural products. It is detrimental to human health because of its nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, and immunosuppression. OTA structurally consists of adihydrocoumarin moiety linked with l-phenylalanine via an amide bond. OTA biosynthesis has been putatively hypothesized, although several contradictions exist on some processes of the biosynthetic pathway. We discuss recent information on molecular studies of OTA biosynthesis despite insufficient genetic background in detail. Accordingly, genetic regulation has also been explored with regard to the interaction between the regulators and the environmental factors. In this review, we focus on three aspects of OTA: OTA-producing strains, OTA biosynthetic pathway and the regulation mechanisms of OTA production. This can pave the way to assist in protecting food and feed from OTA contamination by understanding OTA biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanisms.

  20. Ochratoxin A Producing Fungi, Biosynthetic Pathway and Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Liuqing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhao, Yueju; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillum species, is one of the most important mycotoxin contaminants in agricultural products. It is detrimental to human health because of its nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, and immunosuppression. OTA structurally consists of adihydrocoumarin moiety linked with l-phenylalanine via an amide bond. OTA biosynthesis has been putatively hypothesized, although several contradictions exist on some processes of the biosynthetic pathway. We discuss recent information on molecular studies of OTA biosynthesis despite insufficient genetic background in detail. Accordingly, genetic regulation has also been explored with regard to the interaction between the regulators and the environmental factors. In this review, we focus on three aspects of OTA: OTA-producing strains, OTA biosynthetic pathway and the regulation mechanisms of OTA production. This can pave the way to assist in protecting food and feed from OTA contamination by understanding OTA biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27007394

  1. Natural Product Biosynthetic Diversity and Comparative Genomics of the Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dittmann, Elke; Gugger, Muriel; Sivonen, Kaarina; Fewer, David P

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are an ancient lineage of slow-growing photosynthetic bacteria and a prolific source of natural products with intricate chemical structures and potent biological activities. The bulk of these natural products are known from just a handful of genera. Recent efforts have elucidated the mechanisms underpinning the biosynthesis of a diverse array of natural products from cyanobacteria. Many of the biosynthetic mechanisms are unique to cyanobacteria or rarely described from other organisms. Advances in genome sequence technology have precipitated a deluge of genome sequences for cyanobacteria. This makes it possible to link known natural products to biosynthetic gene clusters but also accelerates the discovery of new natural products through genome mining. These studies demonstrate that cyanobacteria encode a huge variety of cryptic gene clusters for the production of natural products, and the known chemical diversity is likely to be just a fraction of the true biosynthetic capabilities of this fascinating and ancient group of organisms.

  2. Complete characterization of the seventeen step moenomycin biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ostash, Bohdan; Doud, Emma; Lin, Cecilie; Ostash, Iryna; Perlstein, Deborah; Fuse, Shinichiro; Wolpert, Manuel; Kahne, Daniel; Walker, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    The moenomycins are phosphoglycolipid antibiotics produced by Streptomyces ghanaensis and related organisms. The phosphoglycolipids are the only known active site inhibitors of the peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases, an important family of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the bacterial cell wall. Although these natural products have exceptionally potent antibiotic activity, pharmacokinetic limitations have precluded their clinical use. We previously identified the moenomycin biosynthetic gene cluster in order to facilitate biosynthetic approaches to new derivatives. Here we report a comprehensive set of genetic and enzymatic experiments that establish functions for the seventeen moenomycin biosynthetic genes involved in the synthesis moenomycin and variants. These studies reveal the order of assembly of the full molecular scaffold and define a subset of seven genes involved in the synthesis of bioactive analogs. This work will enable both in vitro and fermentation-based reconstitution of phosphoglycolipid scaffolds so that chemoenzymatic approaches to novel analogs can be explored. PMID:19640006

  3. Threonine biosynthetic genes are essential in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Kingsbury, Joanne M.; McCusker, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We identified and attempted to disrupt the Cryptococcus neoformans homoserine and/or threonine biosynthetic genes encoding aspartate kinase (HOM3), homoserine kinase (THR1), and threonine synthase (THR4), however, each gene proved recalcitrant to disruption. By replacing the endogenous promoters of HOM3 and THR1 with the copper-repressible CTR4-1 promoter, we showed that HOM3 and THR1 were essential for the growth of C. neoformans in rich media, when ammonium was the nitrogen source, or when threonine was supplied as an amino acid instead of a dipeptide. Moreover, the severity of the growth defect associated with HOM3- or THR1-repression increased with increasing incubation temperature. This study comprises the first demonstration of threonine biosynthetic genes being essential in a fungus. The necessity of these genes for C. neoformans growth, particularly at physiologically relevant temperatures, makes threonine biosynthetic genes ideal anti-cryptococcal drug targets. PMID:18757810

  4. Distinct cell-specific expression patterns of early and late gibberellin biosynthetic genes during Arabidopsis seed germination.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Kamiya, Y; Sun, T

    2001-11-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are biosynthesized through a complex pathway that involves several classes of enzymes. To predict sites of individual GA biosynthetic steps, we studied cell type-specific expression of genes encoding early and late GA biosynthetic enzymes in germinating Arabidopsis seeds. We showed that expression of two genes, AtGA3ox1 and AtGA3ox2, encoding GA 3-oxidase, which catalyzes the terminal biosynthetic step, was mainly localized in the cortex and endodermis of embryo axes in germinating seeds. Because another GA biosynthetic gene, AtKO1, coding for ent-kaurene oxidase, exhibited a similar cell-specific expression pattern, we predicted that the synthesis of bioactive GAs from ent-kaurene oxidation occurs in the same cell types during seed germination. We also showed that the cortical cells expand during germination, suggesting a spatial correlation between GA production and response. However, promoter activity of the AtCPS1 gene, responsible for the first committed step in GA biosynthesis, was detected exclusively in the embryo provasculature in germinating seeds. When the AtCPS1 cDNA was expressed only in the cortex and endodermis of non-germinating ga1-3 seeds (deficient in AtCPS1) using the AtGA3ox2 promoter, germination was not as resistant to a GA biosynthesis inhibitor as expression in the provasculature. These results suggest that the biosynthesis of GAs during seed germination takes place in two separate locations with the early step occurring in the provasculature and the later steps in the cortex and endodermis. This implies that intercellular transport of an intermediate of the GA biosynthetic pathway is required to produce bioactive GAs.

  5. Sequential Immunoprecipitation of Secretory Vesicle Proteins from Biosynthetically Labelled Cells.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabelling of cells with radioactive amino acids is a common method for studying the biosynthesis of proteins. The labelled proteins can then be immunoprecipitated and analysed by electrophoresis and imaging techniques. This chapter presents a protocol for the biosynthetic labelling and immunoprecipitation of pancreatic islet proteins which are known to be affected in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

  6. Regulation of Flavonoid Biosynthetic Genes in Germinating Arabidopsis Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Kubasek, WL; Shirley, BW; McKillop, A; Goodman, HM; Briggs, W; Ausubel, FM

    1992-01-01

    Many higher plants, including Arabidopsis, transiently display purple anthocyanin pigments just after seed germination. We observed that steady state levels of mRNAs encoded by four flavonoid biosynthetic genes, PAL1 (encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 1), CHS (encoding chalcone synthase), CHI (encoding chalcone isomerase), and DFR (encoding dihydroflavonol reductase), were temporally regulated, peaking in 3-day-old seedlings grown in continuous white light. Except for the case of PAL1 mRNA, mRNA levels for these flavonoid genes were very low in seedlings grown in darkness. Light induction studies using seedlings grown in darkness showed that PAL1 mRNA began to accumulate before CHS and CHI mRNAs, which, in turn, began to accumulate before DFR mRNA. This order of induction is the same as the order of the biosynthetic steps in flavonoid biosynthesis. Our results suggest that the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway is coordinately regulated by a developmental timing mechanism during germination. Blue light and UVB light induction experiments using red light- and dark-grown seedlings showed that the flavonoid biosynthetic genes are induced most effectively by UVB light and that blue light induction is mediated by a specific blue light receptor. PMID:12297632

  7. Evaluation of the cardiolipin biosynthetic pathway and its interactions in the diabetic heart

    PubMed Central

    Croston, Tara L.; Shepherd, Danielle L.; Thapa, Dharendra; Nichols, Cody E.; Lewis, Sara E.; Dabkowski, Erinne R.; Jagannathan, Rajaganapathi; Baseler, Walter A.; Hollander, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims We have previously reported alterations in cardiolipin content and inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) proteomic make-up specifically in interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) in the type 1 diabetic heart; however, the mechanism underlying this alteration is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine how the cardiolipin biosynthetic pathway and cardiolipin-IMM protein interactions are impacted by type 1 diabetes mellitus. Main methods Male FVB mice were made diabetic by multiple low-dose streptozotocin injections and sacrificed five weeks post-diabetic onset. Messenger RNA was measured and cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations were isolated. Further mitochondrial functional experimentation included evaluating the protein expression of the enzymes directly responsible for cardiolipin biosynthesis, as well as ATP synthase activity. Interactions between cardiolipin and ATP synthase subunits were also examined. Key findings Western blot analysis revealed a significant decrease in cardiolipin synthase (CRLS) protein content in diabetic IFM, with a concomitant decrease in its activity. ATP synthase activity was also significantly decreased. We identified two novel direct interactions between two subunits of the ATP synthase F0 complex (ATP5F1 and ATP5H), both of which were significantly decreased in diabetic IFM. Significance Overall, these results indicate that type 1 diabetes mellitus negatively impacts the cardiolipin biosynthetic pathway specifically at CRLS, contributing to decreased cardiolipin content and loss of interactions with key ATP synthase F0 complex constituents in the IFM. PMID:23872101

  8. A Systematic Computational Analysis of Biosynthetic Gene Cluster Evolution: Lessons for Engineering Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sali, Andrej; Takano, Eriko; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial secondary metabolites are widely used as antibiotics, anticancer drugs, insecticides and food additives. Attempts to engineer their biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) to produce unnatural metabolites with improved properties are often frustrated by the unpredictability and complexity of the enzymes that synthesize these molecules, suggesting that genetic changes within BGCs are limited by specific constraints. Here, by performing a systematic computational analysis of BGC evolution, we derive evidence for three findings that shed light on the ways in which, despite these constraints, nature successfully invents new molecules: 1) BGCs for complex molecules often evolve through the successive merger of smaller sub-clusters, which function as independent evolutionary entities. 2) An important subset of polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases evolve by concerted evolution, which generates sets of sequence-homogenized domains that may hold promise for engineering efforts since they exhibit a high degree of functional interoperability, 3) Individual BGC families evolve in distinct ways, suggesting that design strategies should take into account family-specific functional constraints. These findings suggest novel strategies for using synthetic biology to rationally engineer biosynthetic pathways. PMID:25474254

  9. Vascular Endothelial Over-Expression of Human Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase (Tie2-sEH Tr) Attenuates Coronary Reactive Hyperemia in Mice: Role of Oxylipins and ω-Hydroxylases

    PubMed Central

    Zeldin, Darryl C.; Morisseau, Christophe; Falck, John R.

    2017-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 metabolize arachidonic acid (AA) into two vasoactive oxylipins with opposing biologic effects: epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and omega-(ω)-terminal hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). EETs have numerous beneficial physiological effects, including vasodilation and protection against ischemia/reperfusion injury, whereas ω-terminal HETEs induce vasoconstriction and vascular dysfunction. We evaluated the effect of these oxylipins on post-ischemic vasodilation known as coronary reactive hyperemia (CRH). CRH prevents the potential harm associated with transient ischemia. The beneficial effects of EETs are reduced after their hydrolysis to dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). ω-terminal HETEs are formed by ω-hydroxylase family members. The relationship among endothelial over-expression of sEH (Tie2-sEH Tr), the changes in oxylipins it may produce, the pharmacologic inhibition of ω-hydroxylases, activation of PPARγ, and CRH response to a brief ischemia is not known. We hypothesized that CRH is attenuated in isolated mouse hearts with endothelial sEH over-expression through modulation of oxylipin profiles, whereas both inhibition of ω-hydroxylases and activation of PPARγ enhance CRH. Compared to WT mice, Tie2-sEH Tr mice had decreased CRH, including repayment volume, repayment duration, and repayment/debt ratio (P < 0.05), whereas inhibition of ω-hydroxylases increased these same CRH parameters in Tie2-sEH Tr mice. Inhibition of sEH with t-AUCB reversed the decreased CRH in Tie2-sEH Tr mice. Endothelial over-expression of sEH significantly changed oxylipin profiles, including decreases in DHETs, mid-chain HETEs, and prostaglandins (P < 0.05). Treatment with rosiglitazone, PPARγ-agonist, enhanced CRH (P < 0.05) in both Tie2-sEH Tr and wild type (WT) mice. These data demonstrate that endothelial over-expression of sEH (through changing the oxylipin profiles) attenuates CRH, whereas inhibition of

  10. Up-regulation of lipoxygenase, phospholipase, and oxylipin-production in the induced chemical defense of the red alga Gracilaria chilensis against epiphytes.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Florian; Lion, Ulrich; Delage, Ludovic; Kloareg, Bernard; Potin, Philippe; Beltrán, Jessica; Flores, Verónica; Faugeron, Sylvain; Correa, Juan; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-07-01

    The red alga Gracilaria chilensis is commercially farmed for the production of agar hydrocolloids, but some susceptible algae in farms suffer from intense epiphyte growth. We investigated the induced chemical defense response of G. chilensis against epiphytes and demonstrated that an extract of an epiphyte-challenged alga can trigger a defense response. The hormonally active metabolites were purified by RP-HPLC. Treatment with the extract or the purified fraction changed the chemical profile of the alga and increased resistance against epiphyte spores. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and enzyme assays demonstrated that this metabolic response occurs after an increase in lipoxygenase and phospholipase A2 activity. Although this suggests the involvement of regulatory oxylipins, neither jasmonic acid nor the algal metabolite prostaglandin E2 triggers comparable defense responses.

  11. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  12. Molecular Networking and Pattern-Based Genome Mining Improves Discovery of Biosynthetic Gene Clusters and their Products from Salinispora Species

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Katherine R.; Crüsemann, Max; Lechner, Anna; Sarkar, Anindita; Li, Jie; Ziemert, Nadine; Wang, Mingxun; Bandeira, Nuno; Moore, Bradley S.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-04-09

    Genome sequencing has revealed that bacteria contain many more biosynthetic gene clusters than predicted based on the number of secondary metabolites discovered to date. While this biosynthetic reservoir has fostered interest in new tools for natural product discovery, there remains a gap between gene cluster detection and compound discovery. In this paper, we apply molecular networking and the new concept of pattern-based genome mining to 35 Salinispora strains, including 30 for which draft genome sequences were either available or obtained for this study. The results provide a method to simultaneously compare large numbers of complex microbial extracts, which facilitated the identification of media components, known compounds and their derivatives, and new compounds that could be prioritized for structure elucidation. Finally, these efforts revealed considerable metabolite diversity and led to several molecular family-gene cluster pairings, of which the quinomycin-type depsipeptide retimycin A was characterized and linked to gene cluster NRPS40 using pattern-based bioinformatic approaches.

  13. Structure of DnmZ, a nitrososynthase in the Streptomyces peucetius anthracycline biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Lauren; Ibarra, Charmaine; Al-Mestarihi, Ahmad; Bachmann, Brian O.; Vey, Jessica L.

    2015-01-01

    The anthracyclines are a class of highly effective natural product chemotherapeutics and are used to treat a range of cancers, including leukemia. The toxicity of the anthracyclines has stimulated efforts to further diversify the scaffold of the natural product, which has led to renewed interest in the biosynthetic pathway responsible for the formation and modification of this family of molecules. DnmZ is an N-hydroxylating flavin monooxygenase (a nitrososynthase) that catalyzes the oxidation of the exocyclic amine of the sugar nucleotide dTDP-l-epi-vancosamine to its nitroso form. Its specific role in the anthracycline biosynthetic pathway involves the synthesis of the seven-carbon acetal moiety attached to C4 of l-daunosamine observed in the anthracycline baumycin. Here, X-ray crystallography was used to elucidate the three-dimensional structure of DnmZ. Two crystal structures of DnmZ were yielded: that of the enzyme alone, solved to 3.00 Å resolution, and that of the enzyme in complex with thymidine diphosphate, the nucleotide carrier portion of the substrate, solved to 2.74 Å resolution. These models add insights into the structural features involved in substrate specificity and conformational changes involved in thymidine diphosphate binding by the nitrososynthases. PMID:26457508

  14. Artificial chromosomes to explore and to exploit biosynthetic capabilities of actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Alduina, Rosa; Gallo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Actinomycetes are an important source of biologically active compounds, like antibiotics, antitumor agents, and immunosuppressors. Genome sequencing is revealing that this class of microorganisms has larger genomes relative to other bacteria and uses a considerable fraction of its coding capacity (5-10%) for the production of mostly cryptic secondary metabolites. To access actinomycetes biosynthetic capabilities or to improve the pharmacokinetic properties and production yields of these chemically complex compounds, genetic manipulation of the producer strains can be performed. Heterologous expression in amenable hosts can be useful to exploit and to explore the genetic potential of actinomycetes and not cultivable but interesting bacteria. Artificial chromosomes that can be stably integrated into the Streptomyces genome were constructed and demonstrated to be effective for transferring entire biosynthetic gene clusters from intractable actinomycetes into more suitable hosts. In this paper, the construction of several shuttle Escherichia coli-Streptomyces artificial chromosomes is discussed together with old and new strategies applied to improve heterologous production of secondary metabolites.

  15. The pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway modulates production of biofilm determinants in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Marco; Rossi, Elio; Landini, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria are often found in multicellular communities known as biofilms, which constitute a resistance form against environmental stresses. Extracellular adhesion and cell aggregation factors, responsible for bacterial biofilm formation and maintenance, are tightly regulated in response to physiological and environmental cues. We show that, in Escherichia coli, inactivation of genes belonging to the de novo uridine monophosphate (UMP) biosynthetic pathway impairs production of curli fibers and cellulose, important components of the bacterial biofilm matrix, by inhibiting transcription of the csgDEFG operon, thus preventing production of the biofilm master regulator CsgD protein. Supplementing growth media with exogenous uracil, which can be converted to UMP through the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway, restores csgDEFG transcription and curli production. In addition, however, exogenous uracil triggers cellulose production, particularly in strains defective in either carB or pyrB genes, which encode enzymes catalyzing the first steps of de novo UMP biosynthesis. Our results indicate the existence of tight and complex links between pyrimidine metabolism and curli/cellulose production: transcription of the csgDEFG operon responds to pyrimidine nucleotide availability, while cellulose production is triggered by exogenous uracil in the absence of active de novo UMP biosynthesis. We speculate that perturbations in the UMP biosynthetic pathways allow the bacterial cell to sense signals such as starvation, nucleic acids degradation, and availability of exogenous pyrimidines, and to adapt the production of the extracellular matrix to the changing environmental conditions.

  16. Bacterial Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Their Biosynthetic Genes, Functions, and Practical Use

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kiyohito; Hashimoto, Mikako; Hori, Ryuji; Adachi, Takumi; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Nagamine, Tadashi; Shimizu, Satoru; Ueno, Akio; Morita, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The nutritional and pharmaceutical values of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) such as arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids have been well recognized. These LC-PUFAs are physiologically important compounds in bacteria and eukaryotes. Although little is known about the biosynthetic mechanisms and functions of LC-PUFAs in bacteria compared to those in higher organisms, a combination of genetic, bioinformatic, and molecular biological approaches to LC-PUFA-producing bacteria and some eukaryotes have revealed the notably diverse organization of the pfa genes encoding a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase complex (PUFA synthase), the LC-PUFA biosynthetic processes, and tertiary structures of the domains of this enzyme. In bacteria, LC-PUFAs appear to take part in specific functions facilitating individual membrane proteins rather than in the adjustment of the physical fluidity of the whole cell membrane. Very long chain polyunsaturated hydrocarbons (LC-HCs) such as hentriacontanonaene are considered to be closely related to LC-PUFAs in their biosynthesis and function. The possible role of LC-HCs in strictly anaerobic bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic environments and the evolutionary relationships of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria carrying pfa-like genes are also discussed. PMID:27187420

  17. Identification of a plastidial phenylalanine exporter that influences flux distribution through the phenylalanine biosynthetic network

    PubMed Central

    Widhalm, Joshua R.; Gutensohn, Michael; Yoo, Heejin; Adebesin, Funmilayo; Qian, Yichun; Guo, Longyun; Jaini, Rohit; Lynch, Joseph H.; McCoy, Rachel M.; Shreve, Jacob T.; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Rhodes, David; Morgan, John A.; Dudareva, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    In addition to proteins, L-phenylalanine is a versatile precursor for thousands of plant metabolites. Production of phenylalanine-derived compounds is a complex multi-compartmental process using phenylalanine synthesized predominantly in plastids as precursor. The transporter(s) exporting phenylalanine from plastids, however, remains unknown. Here, a gene encoding a Petunia hybrida plastidial cationic amino-acid transporter (PhpCAT) functioning in plastidial phenylalanine export is identified based on homology to an Escherichia coli phenylalanine transporter and co-expression with phenylalanine metabolic genes. Radiolabel transport assays show that PhpCAT exports all three aromatic amino acids. PhpCAT downregulation and overexpression result in decreased and increased levels, respectively, of phenylalanine-derived volatiles, as well as phenylalanine, tyrosine and their biosynthetic intermediates. Metabolic flux analysis reveals that flux through the plastidial phenylalanine biosynthetic pathway is reduced in PhpCAT RNAi lines, suggesting that the rate of phenylalanine export from plastids contributes to regulating flux through the aromatic amino-acid network. PMID:26356302

  18. Identification of a plastidial phenylalanine exporter that influences flux distribution through the phenylalanine biosynthetic network.

    PubMed

    Widhalm, Joshua R; Gutensohn, Michael; Yoo, Heejin; Adebesin, Funmilayo; Qian, Yichun; Guo, Longyun; Jaini, Rohit; Lynch, Joseph H; McCoy, Rachel M; Shreve, Jacob T; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Rhodes, David; Morgan, John A; Dudareva, Natalia

    2015-09-10

    In addition to proteins, L-phenylalanine is a versatile precursor for thousands of plant metabolites. Production of phenylalanine-derived compounds is a complex multi-compartmental process using phenylalanine synthesized predominantly in plastids as precursor. The transporter(s) exporting phenylalanine from plastids, however, remains unknown. Here, a gene encoding a Petunia hybrida plastidial cationic amino-acid transporter (PhpCAT) functioning in plastidial phenylalanine export is identified based on homology to an Escherichia coli phenylalanine transporter and co-expression with phenylalanine metabolic genes. Radiolabel transport assays show that PhpCAT exports all three aromatic amino acids. PhpCAT downregulation and overexpression result in decreased and increased levels, respectively, of phenylalanine-derived volatiles, as well as phenylalanine, tyrosine and their biosynthetic intermediates. Metabolic flux analysis reveals that flux through the plastidial phenylalanine biosynthetic pathway is reduced in PhpCAT RNAi lines, suggesting that the rate of phenylalanine export from plastids contributes to regulating flux through the aromatic amino-acid network.

  19. Structure Determination and Interception of Biosynthetic Intermediates for the Plantazolicin Class of Highly Discriminating Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Molohon, Katie J.; Melby, Joel O.; Lee, Jaeheon; Evans, Bradley S.; Dunbar, Kyle L.; Bumpus, Stefanie B.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    The soil dwelling, plant-growth promoting bacterium, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42, is a prolific producer of complex natural products. Recently, a new FZB42 metabolite, plantazolicin (PZN), has been described as a member of the growing thiazole/oxazole-modified microcin (TOMM) family. TOMMs are biosynthesized from inactive, ribosomal peptides and undergo a series of cyclodehydrations, dehydrogenations, and other modifications to become bioactive natural products. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, chemoselective modification, genetic interruptions, and other spectroscopic tools, we have determined the molecular structure of PZN. In addition to two conjugated polyazole moieties, the amino-terminus of PZN has been modified to Nα,Nα-dimethylarginine. PZN exhibited a highly selective antibiotic activity towards Bacillus anthracis, but no other tested human pathogen. By altering oxygenation levels during fermentation, PZN analogs were produced that bear variability in their heterocycle content, which yielded insight into the order of biosynthetic events. Lastly, genome-mining has revealed the existence of four additional PZN-like biosynthetic gene clusters. Given their structural uniqueness and intriguing antimicrobial specificity, the PZN class of antibiotics may hold pharmacological value. PMID:21950656

  20. YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are required for Arabidopsis shade avoidance.

    PubMed

    Müller-Moulé, Patricia; Nozue, Kazunari; Pytlak, Melissa L; Palmer, Christine M; Covington, Michael F; Wallace, Andreah D; Harmer, Stacey L; Maloof, Julin N

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to neighbor shade by increasing stem and petiole elongation. Shade, sensed by phytochrome photoreceptors, causes stabilization of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR proteins and subsequent induction of YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes. To investigate the role of YUCCA genes in phytochrome-mediated elongation, we examined auxin signaling kinetics after an end-of-day far-red (EOD-FR) light treatment, and found that an auxin responsive reporter is rapidly induced within 2 hours of far-red exposure. YUCCA2, 5, 8, and 9 are all induced with similar kinetics suggesting that they could act redundantly to control shade-mediated elongation. To test this hypothesis we constructed a yucca2, 5, 8, 9 quadruple mutant and found that the hypocotyl and petiole EOD-FR and shade avoidance responses are completely disrupted. This work shows that YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are essential for detectable shade avoidance and that YUCCA genes are important for petiole shade avoidance.

  1. Biosynthetic Modularity Rules in the Bisintercalator Family of Antitumor Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Javier; Marín, Laura; Álvarez-Alonso, Raquel; Redondo, Saúl; Carvajal, Juan; Villamizar, Germán; Villar, Claudio J.; Lombó, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Diverse actinomycetes produce a family of structurally and biosynthetically related non-ribosomal peptide compounds which belong to the chromodepsipeptide family. These compounds act as bisintercalators into the DNA helix. They give rise to antitumor, antiparasitic, antibacterial and antiviral bioactivities. These compounds show a high degree of conserved modularity (chromophores, number and type of amino acids). This modularity and their high sequence similarities at the genetic level imply a common biosynthetic origin for these pathways. Here, we describe insights about rules governing this modular biosynthesis, taking advantage of the fact that nowadays five of these gene clusters have been made public (thiocoraline, triostin, SW-163 and echinomycin/quinomycin). This modularity has potential application for designing and producing novel genetic engineered derivatives, as well as for developing new chemical synthesis strategies. These would facilitate their clinical development. PMID:24821625

  2. YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are required for Arabidopsis shade avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Moulé, Patricia; Nozue, Kazunari; Pytlak, Melissa L.; Palmer, Christine M.; Covington, Michael F.; Wallace, Andreah D.; Harmer, Stacey L.

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to neighbor shade by increasing stem and petiole elongation. Shade, sensed by phytochrome photoreceptors, causes stabilization of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR proteins and subsequent induction of YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes. To investigate the role of YUCCA genes in phytochrome-mediated elongation, we examined auxin signaling kinetics after an end-of-day far-red (EOD-FR) light treatment, and found that an auxin responsive reporter is rapidly induced within 2 hours of far-red exposure. YUCCA2, 5, 8, and 9 are all induced with similar kinetics suggesting that they could act redundantly to control shade-mediated elongation. To test this hypothesis we constructed a yucca2, 5, 8, 9 quadruple mutant and found that the hypocotyl and petiole EOD-FR and shade avoidance responses are completely disrupted. This work shows that YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are essential for detectable shade avoidance and that YUCCA genes are important for petiole shade avoidance. PMID:27761349

  3. New biosynthetic pathway for pink pigments from uncultured oceanic viruses.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Benjamin; Béjà, Oded; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2016-12-01

    The pink open-chain tetrapyrrole pigment phycoerythrobilin (PEB) is employed by marine cyanobacteria, red algae and cryptophytes as a light-harvesting chromophore in phycobiliproteins. Genes encoding biosynthesis proteins for PEB have also been discovered in cyanophages, viruses that infect cyanobacteria, and mimic host pigment biosynthesis with the exception of PebS which combines the enzymatic activities of two host enzymes. In this study, we have identified novel members of the PEB biosynthetic enzyme families, heme oxygenases and ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductases. Encoding genes were found in metagenomic datasets and could be traced back to bacteriophage but not cyanophage origin. While the heme oxygenase exhibited standard activity, a new bilin reductase with highest homology to the teal pigment producing enzyme PcyA revealed PEB biosynthetic activity. Although PcyX possesses PebS-like activity both enzymes share only 9% sequence identity and likely catalyze the reaction via two independent mechanisms. Our data point towards the presence of phycobilin biosynthetic genes in phages that probably infect alphaproteobacteria and, therefore, further support a role of phycobilins outside oxygenic phototrophs.

  4. Urinary excretion of morphine and biosynthetic precursors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Grobe, Nadja; Lamshöft, Marc; Orth, Robert G.; Dräger, Birgit; Kutchan, Toni M.; Zenk, Meinhart H.; Spiteller, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It has been firmly established that humans excrete a small but steady amount of the isoquinoline alkaloid morphine in their urine. It is unclear whether it is of dietary or endogenous origin. There is no doubt that a simple isoquinoline alkaloid, tetrahydropapaveroline (THP), is found in human and rodent brain as well as in human urine. This suggests a potential biogenetic relationship between both alkaloids. Unlabeled THP or [1,3,4-D3]-THP was injected intraperitoneally into mice and the urine was analyzed. This potential precursor was extensively metabolized (96%). Among the metabolites found was the phenol-coupled product salutaridine, the known morphine precursor in the opium poppy plant. Synthetic [7D]-salutaridinol, the biosynthetic reduction product of salutaridine, injected intraperitoneally into live animals led to the formation of [7D]-thebaine, which was excreted in urine. [N-CD3]-thebaine was also administered and yielded [N-CD3]-morphine and the congeners [N-CD3]-codeine and [N-CD3]-oripavine in urine. These results show for the first time that live animals have the biosynthetic capability to convert a normal constituent of rodents, THP, to morphine. Morphine and its precursors are normally not found in tissues or organs, presumably due to metabolic breakdown. Hence, only that portion of the isoquinoline alkaloids excreted in urine unmetabolized can be detected. Analysis of urine by high resolution-mass spectrometry proved to be a powerful method for tracking endogenous morphine and its biosynthetic precursors. PMID:20421505

  5. Recent advances in biosynthetic modeling of nitric oxide reductases and insights gained from nuclear resonance vibrational and other spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Saumen; Reed, Julian; Sage, Timothy; Branagan, Nicole C.; Petrik, Igor D.; Miner, Kyle D.; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, E. Ercan; Lu, Yi

    2015-10-05

    This Forum Article focuses on recent advances in structural and spectroscopic studies of biosynthetic models of nitric oxide reductases (NORs). NORs are complex metalloenzymes found in the denitrification pathway of Earth's nitrogen cycle where they catalyze the proton-dependent twoelectron reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N2O). While much progress has been made in biochemical and biophysical studies of native NORs and their variants, a. clear mechanistic understanding of this important metalloenzyme related to its function is still elusive. We report herein UV vis and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) studies of mononitrosylated intermediates of the NOR reaction of a biosynthetic model. The ability to selectively substitute metals at either heme or nonheme metal sites allows the introduction of independent 57Fe probe atoms at either site, as well as allowing the preparation of analogues of stable reaction intermediates by replacing either metal with a redox inactive metal. Together with previous structural and spectroscopic results, we summarize insights gained from studying these biosynthetic models toward understanding structural features responsible for the NOR activity and its mechanism. As a result, the outlook on NOR modeling is also discussed, with an emphasis on the design of models capable of catalytic turnovers designed based on close mimics of the secondary coordination sphere of native NORs.

  6. Decoding Biosynthetic Pathways in Plants by Pulse-Chase Strategies Using 13CO2 as a Universal Tracer †

    PubMed Central

    Bacher, Adelbert; Chen, Fan; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    13CO2 pulse-chase experiments monitored by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry can provide 13C-isotopologue compositions in biosynthetic products. Experiments with a variety of plant species have documented that the isotopologue profiles generated with 13CO2 pulse-chase labeling are directly comparable to those that can be generated by the application of [U-13C6]glucose to aseptically growing plants. However, the application of the 13CO2 labeling technology is not subject to the experimental limitations that one has to take into account for experiments with [U-13C6]glucose and can be applied to plants growing under physiological conditions, even in the field. In practical terms, the results of biosynthetic studies with 13CO2 consist of the detection of pairs, triples and occasionally quadruples of 13C atoms that have been jointly contributed to the target metabolite, at an abundance that is well above the stochastic occurrence of such multiples. Notably, the connectivities of jointly transferred 13C multiples can have undergone modification by skeletal rearrangements that can be diagnosed from the isotopologue data. As shown by the examples presented in this review article, the approach turns out to be powerful in decoding the carbon topology of even complex biosynthetic pathways. PMID:27429012

  7. Structure and Functional Analysis of RifR, the Type II Thioesterase from the Rifamycin Biosynthetic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Claxton, Heather B.; Akey, David L.; Silver, Monica K.; Admiraal, Suzanne J.; Smith, Janet L.

    2009-03-16

    Two thioesterases are commonly found in natural product biosynthetic clusters, a type I thioesterase that is responsible for removing the final product from the biosynthetic complex and a type II thioesterase that is believed to perform housekeeping functions such as removing aberrant units from carrier domains. We present the crystal structure and the kinetic analysis of RifR, a type II thioesterase from the hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetases/polyketide synthase rifamycin biosynthetic cluster of Amycolatopsis mediterranei. Steady-state kinetics show that RifR has a preference for the hydrolysis of acyl units from the phosphopantetheinyl arm of the acyl carrier domain over the hydrolysis of acyl units from the phosphopantetheinyl arm of acyl-CoAs as well as a modest preference for the decarboxylated substrate mimics acetyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA over malonyl-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA. Multiple RifR conformations and structural similarities to other thioesterases suggest that movement of a helical lid controls access of substrates to the active site of RifR.

  8. Characterization of CYP76M5–8 Indicates Metabolic Plasticity within a Plant Biosynthetic Gene Cluster*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Hillwig, Matthew L.; Okada, Kazunori; Yamazaki, Kohei; Wu, Yisheng; Swaminathan, Sivakumar; Yamane, Hisakazu; Peters, Reuben J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports have revealed genomic clustering of enzymatic genes for particular biosynthetic pathways in plant specialized/secondary metabolism. Rice (Oryza sativa) carries two such clusters for production of antimicrobial diterpenoid phytoalexins, with the cluster on chromosome 2 containing four closely related/homologous members of the cytochrome P450 CYP76M subfamily (CYP76M5–8). Notably, the underlying evolutionary expansion of these CYP appears to have occurred after assembly of the ancestral biosynthetic gene cluster, suggesting separate roles. It has been demonstrated that CYP76M7 catalyzes C11α-hydroxylation of ent-cassadiene, and presumably mediates an early step in biosynthesis of the derived phytocassane class of phytoalexins. Here we report biochemical characterization of CYP76M5, -6, and -8. Our results indicate that CYP76M8 is a multifunctional/promiscuous hydroxylase, with CYP76M5 and -7 seeming to provide only redundant activity, while CYP76M6 seems to provide both redundant and novel activity, relative to CYP76M8. RNAi-mediated double knockdown of CYP76M7 and -8 suppresses elicitor inducible phytocassane production, indicating a role for these monooxygenases in phytocassane biosynthesis. In addition, our data suggests that CYP76M5, -6, and -8 may play redundant roles in production of the oryzalexin class of phytoalexins as well. Intriguingly, the preceding diterpene synthase for oryzalexin biosynthesis, unlike that for the phytocassanes, is not found in the chromosome 2 diterpenoid biosynthetic gene cluster. Accordingly, our results not only uncover a complex evolutionary history, but also further suggest some intriguing differences between plant biosynthetic gene clusters and the seemingly similar microbial operons. The implications for the underlying metabolic evolution of plants are then discussed. PMID:22215681

  9. Identification of a dTDP-rhamnose biosynthetic pathway that oscillates with the molting cycle in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Feng, Likui; Shou, Qingyao; Butcher, Rebecca A

    2016-06-01

    L-Rhamnose is a common component of cell-wall polysaccharides, glycoproteins and some natural products in bacteria and plants, but is rare in fungi and animals. In the present study, we identify and characterize a biosynthetic pathway for dTDP-rhamnose in Caenorhabditis elegans that is highly conserved across nematode species. We show that RML-1 activates glucose 1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) in the presence of either dTTP or UTP to yield dTDP-glucose or UDP-glucose, respectively. RML-2 is a dTDP-glucose 4,6-dehydratase, converting dTDP-glucose into dTDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose. Using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, we demonstrate that coincubation of dTDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose with RML-3 (3,5-epimerase) and RML-4 (4-keto-reductase) produces dTDP-rhamnose. RML-4 could only be expressed and purified in an active form through co-expression with a co-regulated protein, RML-5, which forms a complex with RML-4. Analysis of the sugar nucleotide pool in C. elegans established the presence of dTDP-rhamnose in vivo Targeting the expression of the rhamnose biosynthetic genes by RNAi resulted in significant reductions in dTDP-rhamnose, but had no effect on the biosynthesis of a closely related sugar, ascarylose, found in the ascaroside pheromones. Therefore, the rhamnose and ascarylose biosynthetic pathways are distinct. We also show that transcriptional reporters for the rhamnose biosynthetic genes are expressed highly in the embryo, in the hypodermis during molting cycles and in the hypodermal seam cells specifically before the molt to the stress-resistant dauer larval stage. These expression patterns suggest that rhamnose biosynthesis may play an important role in hypodermal development or the production of the cuticle or surface coat during molting.

  10. Identification of a dTDP-rhamnose biosynthetic pathway that oscillates with the molting cycle in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Likui; Shou, Qingyao; Butcher, Rebecca A.

    2016-01-01

    L-Rhamnose is a common component of cell-wall polysaccharides, glycoproteins and some natural products in bacteria and plants, but is rare in fungi and animals. In the present study, we identify and characterize a biosynthetic pathway for dTDP-rhamnose in Caenorhabditis elegans that is highly conserved across nematode species. We show that RML-1 activates glucose 1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) in the presence of either dTTP or UTP to yield dTDP-glucose or UDP-glucose, respectively. RML-2 is a dTDP-glucose 4,6-dehydratase, converting dTDP-glucose into dTDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose. Using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, we demonstrate that coincubation of dTDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose with RML-3 (3,5-epimerase) and RML-4 (4-keto-reductase) produces dTDP-rhamnose. RML-4 could only be expressed and purified in an active form through co-expression with a co-regulated protein, RML-5, which forms a complex with RML-4. Analysis of the sugar nucleotide pool in C. elegans established the presence of dTDP-rhamnose in vivo. Targeting the expression of the rhamnose biosynthetic genes by RNAi resulted in significant reductions in dTDP-rhamnose, but had no effect on the biosynthesis of a closely related sugar, ascarylose, found in the ascaroside pheromones. Therefore, the rhamnose and ascarylose biosynthetic pathways are distinct. We also show that transcriptional reporters for the rhamnose biosynthetic genes are expressed highly in the embryo, in the hypodermis during molting cycles and in the hypodermal seam cells specifically before the molt to the stress-resistant dauer larval stage. These expression patterns suggest that rhamnose biosynthesis may play an important role in hypodermal development or the production of the cuticle or surface coat during molting. PMID:27009306

  11. Transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Ksenia; Kayumov, Airat; Woyda, Kathrin; Ilinskaja, Olga; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-05-02

    The Bacillus subtilis glutamine synthetase (GS) plays a dual role in cell metabolism by functioning as catalyst and regulator. GS catalyses the ATP-dependent synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonium. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, GS becomes feedback-inhibited by high intracellular glutamine levels and then binds transcription factors GlnR and TnrA, which control the genes of nitrogen assimilation. While GS-bound TnrA is no longer able to interact with DNA, GlnR-DNA binding is shown to be stimulated by GS complex formation. In this paper we show a new physiological feature of the interaction between glutamine synthetase and TnrA. The transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in vivo and in vitro, while the GlnR protein does not affect the activity of the enzyme.

  12. First principles model calculations of the biosynthetic pathway in selinadiene synthase.

    PubMed

    Das, Susanta; Dixit, Mudit; Major, Dan Thomas

    2016-10-15

    Terpenes comprise the largest class of natural products currently known. These ubiquitous molecules are synthesized by terpene synthases via complex carbocationic reactions, incorporating highly reactive intermediates. In the current study, we present a mechanistic investigation of the biosynthetic pathway for the formation of selina-4(15),7(11)-diene. We employ density functional theory to study a model carbocation system in the gas-phase, and delineate the energetic feasibility of a plausible reaction path. Our results suggests that during formation of selina-4(15),7(11)-diene, the substrate is likely folded in a conformation conducive to sequential cyclizations. We propose that a required proton transfer cannot occur intramolecularly in the gas-phase due to a high free energy barrier, and that enzyme assistance is essential for this step. Hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics docking studies suggest that enzyme intervention could be realized through electrostatic guidance.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of the novobiocin biosynthetic gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Dangel, Volker; Härle, Johannes; Goerke, Christiane; Wolz, Christiane; Gust, Bertolt; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Heide, Lutz

    2009-12-01

    The aminocoumarin antibiotic novobiocin is a gyrase inhibitor formed by a Streptomyces strain. The biosynthetic gene cluster of novobiocin spans 23.4 kb and contains 20 coding sequences, among them the two regulatory genes novE and novG. We investigated the location of transcriptional promoters within this cluster by insertion of transcriptional terminator cassettes and RT-PCR analysis of the resulting mutants. The cluster was found to contain eight DNA regions with promoter activity. The regulatory protein NovG binds to a previously identified binding site within the promoter region located upstream of novH, but apparently not to any of the other seven promoters. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to compare the number of transcripts in a strain carrying an intact novobiocin cluster with strains carrying mutated clusters. Both in-frame deletion of the regulatory gene novG and insertion of a terminator cassette into the biosynthetic gene novH led to a strong reduction of the number of transcripts of the genes located between novH and novW. This suggested that these 16 biosynthetic genes form a single operon. Three internal promoters are located within this operon but appear to be of minor importance, if any, under our experimental conditions. Transcription of novG was found to depend on the presence of NovE, suggesting that the two regulatory genes, novE and novG, act in a cascade-like mechanism. The resistance gene gyrB(R), encoding an aminocoumarin-resistant gyrase B subunit, may initially be co-transcribed with the genes from novH to novW. However, when the gyrase inhibitor novobiocin accumulates in the cultures, gyrB(R) is transcribed from its own promoter. Previous work has suggested that this promoter is controlled by the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA.

  14. Diversity and abundance of phosphonate biosynthetic genes in nature

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaomin; Doroghazi, James R.; Janga, Sarath C.; Zhang, Jun Kai; Circello, Benjamin; Griffin, Benjamin M.; Labeda, David P.; Metcalf, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphonates, molecules containing direct carbon–phosphorus bonds, compose a structurally diverse class of natural products with interesting and useful biological properties. Although their synthesis in protozoa was discovered more than 50 y ago, the extent and diversity of phosphonate production in nature remains poorly characterized. The rearrangement of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to phosphonopyruvate, catalyzed by the enzyme PEP mutase (PepM), is shared by the vast majority of known phosphonate biosynthetic pathways. Thus, the pepM gene can be used as a molecular marker to examine the occurrence and abundance of phosphonate-producing organisms. Based on the presence of this gene, phosphonate biosynthesis is common in microbes, with ∼5% of sequenced bacterial genomes and 7% of genome equivalents in metagenomic datasets carrying pepM homologs. Similarly, we detected the pepM gene in ∼5% of random actinomycete isolates. The pepM-containing gene neighborhoods from 25 of these isolates were cloned, sequenced, and compared with those found in sequenced genomes. PEP mutase sequence conservation is strongly correlated with conservation of other nearby genes, suggesting that the diversity of phosphonate biosynthetic pathways can be predicted by examining PEP mutase diversity. We used this approach to estimate the range of phosphonate biosynthetic pathways in nature, revealing dozens of discrete groups in pepM amplicons from local soils, whereas hundreds were observed in metagenomic datasets. Collectively, our analyses show that phosphonate biosynthesis is both diverse and relatively common in nature, suggesting that the role of phosphonate molecules in the biosphere may be more important than is often recognized. PMID:24297932

  15. Heterologous activation of the actinorhodin biosynthetic pathway in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, N M; Parro, V; Malpartida, F; Mellado, R P

    1992-01-01

    A DNA fragment of Streptomyces fradiae is able to activate the antibiotic actinorhodin biosynthetic pathway when cloned in Streptomyces lividans. The activator DNA region has been sequenced and its transcription initiation and termination sites accurately mapped in vivo. This DNA encodes a 132 nucleotides long transcript which is apparently responsible for the actinorhodin production phenotype, possibly acting as an antisense RNA. The sequence of the activator gene revealed no homology with any other known Streptomyces coelicolor genes concerned with actinorhodin biosynthesis or its pleiotropic regulation. Images PMID:1614864

  16. Biosynthetic engineering of natural products for lead optimization and development.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Barrie; Moss, Steven J

    2005-11-01

    It is now possible to rapidly and rationally modify, at a genetic level, the machinery responsible for natural product biosynthesis. This provides the opportunity to design new structures and to optimize natural product lead compounds in a way that would be extremely difficult through synthetic chemistry means alone. The technology can also be used to overcome limitations of compound supply, which might otherwise preclude natural products from progressing into clinical trials. Described herein are some recent examples which highlight how biosynthetic engineering has been applied to drug discovery and development, and which attempt, in particular, to demonstrate how the technology functions most effectively when combined with synthetic organic and medicinal chemistry.

  17. Biosynthetic potential of phylogenetically unique endophytic actinomycetes from tropical plants.

    PubMed

    Janso, Jeffrey E; Carter, Guy T

    2010-07-01

    The culturable diversity of endophytic actinomycetes associated with tropical, native plants is essentially unexplored. In this study, 123 endophytic actinomycetes were isolated from tropical plants collected from several locations in Papua New Guinea and Mborokua Island, Solomon Islands. Isolates were found to be prevalent in roots but uncommon in leaves. Initially, isolates were dereplicated to the strain level by ribotyping. Subsequent characterization of 105 unique strains by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that 17 different genera were represented, and rare genera, such as Sphaerisporangium and Planotetraspora, which have never been previously reported to be endophytic, were quite prevalent. Phylogenetic analyses grouped many of the strains into clades distinct from known genera within Thermomonosporaceae and Micromonosporaceae, indicating that they may be unique genera. Bioactivity testing and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) profiling of crude fermentation extracts were performed on 91 strains. About 60% of the extracts exhibited bioactivity or displayed LC-MS profiles with spectra indicative of secondary metabolites. The biosynthetic potential of 29 nonproductive strains was further investigated by the detection of putative polyketide synthase (PKS) and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes. Despite their lack of detectable secondary metabolite production in fermentation, most were positive for type I (66%) and type II (79%) PKS genes, and all were positive for NRPS genes. These results suggest that tropical plants from New Guinea and the adjacent archipelago are hosts to unique endophytic actinomycetes that possess significant biosynthetic potential.

  18. Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-07-18

    Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

  19. Effect of photoperiod on gibberellin biosynthetic enzymes in spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, S.J.; Bleecker, A.B.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-04-01

    The photoperiodic control of stem elongation in spinach, a long day (LD) rosette plant, is mediated by gibberellins (GAs). The early 13-hydroxylated GA biosynthetic pathway from GA/sub 12/ to GA/sub 20/ operates in spinach: GA/sub 12/ ..-->.. GA/sub 53/ ..-->.. GA/sub 44/ ..-->.. GA/sub 19/ ..-->.. GA/sub 20/. Two enzymes of this pathway, those converting GA/sub 53/ to GA/sub 44/ (GA/sub 53/ oxidase) and GA/sub 19/ to GA/sub 20/ (GA/sub 19/ oxidase), are regulated by light. The enzyme converting GA/sub 44/ to GA/sub 19/ (GA/sub 44/ oxidase) is not light-regulated. In the light GA/sub 53/ and GA/sub 18/ oxidase activities are increased, therefore causing the GA biosynthetic pathway to be turned on. This leads to the production of an active GA in LD, which causes an increase in stem elongation. Two the enzymes, GA/sub 44/ and GA/sub 53/ oxidases, can be separated from one another by anion exchange HPLC. Estimates of the molecular weights of these two enzymes based on gel filtration HPLC will be reported.

  20. A coordinated expression of biosynthetic enzymes controls the flux of juvenile hormone precursors in the corpora allata of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Nouzova, Marcela; Edwards, Marten J; Mayoral, Jaime G; Noriega, Fernando G

    2011-09-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of metamorphosis and ovarian development in mosquitoes. Adult female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes show developmental and dynamically regulated changes of JH synthesis. Newly emerged females have corpora allata (CA) with low biosynthetic activity, but they produce high amounts of JH a day later; blood feeding results in a striking decrease in JH synthesis, but the CA returns to a high level of JH synthesis three days later. To understand the molecular bases of these dynamic changes we combined transcriptional studies of 11 of the 13 enzymes of the JH pathway with a functional analysis of JH synthesis. We detected up to a 1000-fold difference in the levels of mRNA in the CA among the JH biosynthetic enzymes studied. There was a coordinated expression of the 11 JH biosynthetic enzymes in female pupae and adult mosquito. Increases or decreases in transcript levels for all the enzymes resulted in increases or decreases of JH synthesis; suggesting that transcript changes are at least partially responsible for the dynamic changes of JH biosynthesis observed. JH synthesis by the CA was progressively increased in vitro by addition of exogenous precursors such as geranyl-diphosphate, farnesyl-diphosphate, farnesol, farnesal and farnesoic acid. These results suggest that the supply of these precursors and not the activity of the last 6 pathway enzymes is rate limiting in these glands. Nutrient reserves play a key role in the regulation of JH synthesis. Nutritionally deficient females had reduced transcript levels for the genes encoding JH biosynthetic enzymes and reduced JH synthesis. Our studies suggest that JH synthesis is controlled by the rate of flux of isoprenoids, which is the outcome of a complex interplay of changes in precursor pools, enzyme levels and external regulators such as nutrients and brain factors. Enzyme levels might need to surpass a minimum threshold to achieve a net flux of precursors through the biosynthetic

  1. Elucidation of Enzymatic Mechanism of Phenazine Biosynthetic Protein PhzF Using QM/MM and MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Wang, Xiaolei; Hu, Hongbo; Peng, Huasong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-01-01

    The phenazine biosynthetic pathway is of considerable importance for the pharmaceutical industry. The pathway produces two products: phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid. PhzF is an isomerase that catalyzes trans-2,3-dihydro-3-hydroxyanthranilic acid isomerization and plays an essential role in the phenazine biosynthetic pathway. Although the PhzF crystal structure has been determined recently, an understanding of the detailed catalytic mechanism and the roles of key catalytic residues are still lacking. In this study, a computational strategy using a combination of molecular modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations was used to elucidate these important issues. The Apo enzyme, enzyme–substrate complexes with negatively charged Glu45, enzyme–transition state analog inhibitor complexes with neutral Glu45, and enzyme–product complexes with negatively charged Glu45 structures were optimized and modeled using a 200 ns molecular dynamics simulation. Residues such as Gly73, His74, Asp208, Gly212, Ser213, and water, which play important roles in ligand binding and the isomerization reaction, were comprehensively investigated. Our results suggest that the Glu45 residue at the active site of PhzF acts as a general base/acid catalyst during proton transfer. This study provides new insights into the detailed catalytic mechanism of PhzF and the results have important implications for PhzF modification. PMID:26414009

  2. Identification and Functional Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Genes That Encode Proteins of the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Mariana S.; Junqueira, Caroline; Trigueiro, Ricardo C.; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Macedo, Cristiana S.; Araújo, Patrícia R.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Martinelli, Patrícia M.; Kimmel, Jürgen; Stahl, Philipp; Niehus, Sebastian; Schwarz, Ralph T.; Previato, José O.; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Teixeira, Santuza M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is a protist parasite that causes Chagas disease. Several proteins that are essential for parasite virulence and involved in host immune responses are anchored to the membrane through glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) molecules. In addition, T. cruzi GPI anchors have immunostimulatory activities, including the ability to stimulate the synthesis of cytokines by innate immune cells. Therefore, T. cruzi genes related to GPI anchor biosynthesis constitute potential new targets for the development of better therapies against Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings In silico analysis of the T. cruzi genome resulted in the identification of 18 genes encoding proteins of the GPI biosynthetic pathway as well as the inositolphosphorylceramide (IPC) synthase gene. Expression of GFP fusions of some of these proteins in T. cruzi epimastigotes showed that they localize in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Expression analyses of two genes indicated that they are constitutively expressed in all stages of the parasite life cycle. T. cruzi genes TcDPM1, TcGPI10 and TcGPI12 complement conditional yeast mutants in GPI biosynthesis. Attempts to generate T. cruzi knockouts for three genes were unsuccessful, suggesting that GPI may be an essential component of the parasite. Regarding TcGPI8, which encodes the catalytic subunit of the transamidase complex, although we were able to generate single allele knockout mutants, attempts to disrupt both alleles failed, resulting instead in parasites that have undergone genomic recombination and maintained at least one active copy of the gene. Conclusions/Significance Analyses of T. cruzi sequences encoding components of the GPI biosynthetic pathway indicated that they are essential genes involved in key aspects of host-parasite interactions. Complementation assays of yeast mutants with these T. cruzi genes resulted in yeast cell lines that can now be employed in high throughput screenings of drugs against this

  3. Determining the Biochemical Properties of the Oxalate Biosynthetic Component (Obc)1 from Burkholderia mallei

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxalic acid is produced by a variety of organisms ranging from simple microbes to complex animals. This acid has been proposed to fulfill various physiological and pathological functions which vary between organisms. In bacteria from the Burkholderia genus, oxalate secretion has been shown to be quorum sensing dependent and to support pathogenicity and cell viability. In light of the critical roles of oxalate in Burkholderia as well as other organisms, it is surprising that our understanding of how this simple dicarboxylate is biosynthesized remains incomplete. Here we report the expression, purification, and partial characterization of the first intact bacterial oxalate biosynthetic enzyme, Obc1, from B. mallei. An N-terminal His-tagged Bmobc1 was cloned into pDUET, expressed in E. coli BLR (DE3), and the recombinant enzyme purified by affinity chromatography. Oxalate biosynthetic enzyme assays coupled with HPLC analysis revealed that BmObc1 catalyzed the biosynthesis of oxalate, acetoacetate, and free CoA from oxaloacetate and a short chain acyl-CoA following Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Optimal enzyme activity was measured at pH 8.0 and a temperature around 44°C. Kinetic analysis conducted under conditions of saturating acetyl-CoA and varying oxaloacetate concentrations resulted in a calculated Km value for oxaloacetate of 94.3± 9.2 μM (mean ± SE). Under conditions of saturating oxaloacetate concentration and varying acyl-CoA (acetyl- or propionyl-CoA) concentrations kinetic analysis generated a calculated Km value of 26.8 ± 2.3 μM (mean ± SE) for acetyl-CoA and 104.4 ± 12.7 μM for propionyl-CoA. The significantly lower Km for acetyl-CoA suggests that it is strongly favored as a substrate over propionyl-CoA. PMID:27643499

  4. Identification and reconstitution of the rubber biosynthetic machinery on rubber particles from Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Haruhiko; Waki, Toshiyuki; Aoki, Yuichi; Mizuno, Makie; Yanbe, Fumihiro; Ishii, Tomoki; Funaki, Ayuta; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Miyagi-Inoue, Yukino; Fushihara, Kazuhisa; Nakayama, Toru; Takahashi, Seiji

    2016-10-28

    Natural rubber (NR) is stored in latex as rubber particles (RPs), rubber molecules surrounded by a lipid monolayer. Rubber transferase (RTase), the enzyme responsible for NR biosynthesis, is believed to be a member of the cis-prenyltransferase (cPT) family. However, none of the recombinant cPTs have shown RTase activity independently. We show that HRT1, a cPT from Heveabrasiliensis, exhibits distinct RTase activity in vitro only when it is introduced on detergent-washed HeveaRPs (WRPs) by a cell-free translation-coupled system. Using this system, a heterologous cPT from Lactucasativa also exhibited RTase activity, indicating proper introduction of cPT on RP is the key to reconstitute active RTase. RP proteomics and interaction network analyses revealed the formation of the protein complex consisting of HRT1, rubber elongation factor (REF) and HRT1-REF BRIDGING PROTEIN. The RTase activity enhancement observed for the complex assembled on WRPs indicates the HRT1-containing complex functions as the NR biosynthetic machinery.

  5. Identification and reconstitution of the rubber biosynthetic machinery on rubber particles from Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Haruhiko; Waki, Toshiyuki; Aoki, Yuichi; Mizuno, Makie; Yanbe, Fumihiro; Ishii, Tomoki; Funaki, Ayuta; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Miyagi-Inoue, Yukino; Fushihara, Kazuhisa; Nakayama, Toru; Takahashi, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Natural rubber (NR) is stored in latex as rubber particles (RPs), rubber molecules surrounded by a lipid monolayer. Rubber transferase (RTase), the enzyme responsible for NR biosynthesis, is believed to be a member of the cis-prenyltransferase (cPT) family. However, none of the recombinant cPTs have shown RTase activity independently. We show that HRT1, a cPT from Heveabrasiliensis, exhibits distinct RTase activity in vitro only when it is introduced on detergent-washed HeveaRPs (WRPs) by a cell-free translation-coupled system. Using this system, a heterologous cPT from Lactucasativa also exhibited RTase activity, indicating proper introduction of cPT on RP is the key to reconstitute active RTase. RP proteomics and interaction network analyses revealed the formation of the protein complex consisting of HRT1, rubber elongation factor (REF) and HRT1-REF BRIDGING PROTEIN. The RTase activity enhancement observed for the complex assembled on WRPs indicates the HRT1-containing complex functions as the NR biosynthetic machinery. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19022.001 PMID:27790974

  6. Detection of additional genes of the patulin biosynthetic pathway in Penicillium griseofulvum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes in the patulin biosynthetic pathway are likely to be arranged in a cluster as has been found for biosynthetic pathways of other mycotoxins. The mycotoxin patulin, common in apples and apple juice, is most often associated with Penicillium expansum. However, of 15 fungal species capable of sy...

  7. Examination of Triacylglycerol Biosynthetic Pathways via De Novo Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses in an Unsequenced Microalga

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-17

    Examination of Triacylglycerol Biosynthetic Pathways via De Novo Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses in an Unsequenced Microalga Michael T...dependent upon available genomic sequence data, and the lack of these data has hindered the pursuit of such analyses for many oleaginous microalgae . In order...to examine the triacylglycerol biosynthetic pathway in the unsequenced oleaginous microalga , Chlorella vulgaris, we have established a strategy with

  8. Physiological factors affecting transcription of genes involved in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in different rice varieties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqiong; Itani, Tomio; Wu, Xianjun; Chikawa, Yuuki; Irifune, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    Flavonoids play an important role in the grain color and flavor of rice. Since their characterization in maize, the flavonoid biosynthetic genes have been extensively studied in grape, Arabidopsis, and Petunia. However, we are still a long way from understanding the molecular features and mechanisms underlying the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. The present study was undertaken to understand the physiological factors affecting the transcription and regulation of these genes. We report that the expression of CHI, CHS, DFR, LAR, and ANS, the 5 flavonoid biosynthetic genes in different rice varieties, differ dramatically with respect to the stage of development, white light, and sugar concentrations. We further demonstrate that white light could induce the transcription of the entire flavonoid biosynthetic gene pathway; however, differences were observed in the degrees of sensitivity and the required illumination time. Our study provides valuable insights into understanding the regulation of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway.

  9. Manipulating Natural Product Biosynthetic Pathways via DNA Assembler

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    DNA assembler is an efficient synthetic biology method for constructing and manipulating biochemical pathways. The rapidly increasing number of sequenced genomes provides a rich source for discovery of gene clusters involved in synthesizing new natural products. However, both discovery and economical production are hampered by our limited knowledge in manipulating most organisms and the corresponding pathways. By taking advantage of yeast in vivo homologous recombination, DNA assembler synthesizes an entire expression vector containing the target biosynthetic pathway and the genetic elements needed for DNA maintenance and replication. Here we use the spectinabilin clusters originated from two hosts as examples to illustrate the guidelines of using DNA assembler for cluster characterization and silent cluster activation. Such strategies offer unprecedented versatility in cluster manipulation, bypass the traditional laborious strategies to elicit pathway expression, and provide a new platform for de novo cluster assembly and genome mining for discovering new natural products. PMID:24903884

  10. Limiting Cholesterol Biosynthetic Flux Spontaneously Engages Type I IFN Signaling.

    PubMed

    York, Autumn G; Williams, Kevin J; Argus, Joseph P; Zhou, Quan D; Brar, Gurpreet; Vergnes, Laurent; Gray, Elizabeth E; Zhen, Anjie; Wu, Nicholas C; Yamada, Douglas H; Cunningham, Cameron R; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Wilks, Moses Q; Casero, David; Gray, David H; Yu, Amy K; Wang, Eric S; Brooks, David G; Sun, Ren; Kitchen, Scott G; Wu, Ting-Ting; Reue, Karen; Stetson, Daniel B; Bensinger, Steven J

    2015-12-17

    Cellular lipid requirements are achieved through a combination of biosynthesis and import programs. Using isotope tracer analysis, we show that type I interferon (IFN) signaling shifts the balance of these programs by decreasing synthesis and increasing import of cholesterol and long chain fatty acids. Genetically enforcing this metabolic shift in macrophages is sufficient to render mice resistant to viral challenge, demonstrating the importance of reprogramming the balance of these two metabolic pathways in vivo. Unexpectedly, mechanistic studies reveal that limiting flux through the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway spontaneously engages a type I IFN response in a STING-dependent manner. The upregulation of type I IFNs was traced to a decrease in the pool size of synthesized cholesterol and could be inhibited by replenishing cells with free cholesterol. Taken together, these studies delineate a metabolic-inflammatory circuit that links perturbations in cholesterol biosynthesis with activation of innate immunity.

  11. Limiting cholesterol biosynthetic flux spontaneously engages type I IFN signaling

    PubMed Central

    York, Autumn G.; Williams, Kevin J.; Argus, Joseph P.; Zhou, Quan D.; Brar, Gurpreet; Vergnes, Laurent; Gray, Elizabeth E.; Zhen, Anjie; Wu, Nicholas C.; Yamada, Douglas H.; Cunningham, Cameron R.; Tarling, Elizabeth J.; Wilks, Moses Q.; Casero, David; Gray, David H.; Yu, Amy K.; Wang, Eric S.; Brooks, David G.; Sun, Ren; Kitchen, Scott G.; Wu, Ting-Ting; Reue, Karen; Stetson, Daniel B.; Bensinger, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cellular lipid requirements are achieved through a combination of biosynthesis and import programs. Using isotope tracer analysis, we show that type I interferon (IFN) signaling shifts the balance of these programs by decreasing synthesis and increasing import of cholesterol and long chain fatty acids. Genetically enforcing this metabolic shift in macrophages is sufficient to render mice resistant to viral challenge, demonstrating the importance of reprogramming the balance of these two metabolic pathways in vivo. Unexpectedly, mechanistic studies reveal that limiting flux through the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway spontaneously engages a type I IFN response in a STING-dependent manner. The upregulation of type I IFNs was traced to a decrease in the pool size of synthesized cholesterol, and could be inhibited by replenishing cells with free cholesterol. Taken together, these studies delineate a metabolic-inflammatory circuit that links perturbations in cholesterol biosynthesis with activation of innate immunity. PMID:26686653

  12. Hyperglycemia exacerbates colon cancer malignancy through hexosamine biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos-Dos-Santos, A; Loponte, H F B R; Mantuano, N R; Oliveira, I A; de Paula, I F; Teixeira, L K; de-Freitas-Junior, J C M; Gondim, K C; Heise, N; Mohana-Borges, R; Morgado-Díaz, J A; Dias, W B; Todeschini, A R

    2017-03-20

    Hyperglycemia is a common feature of diabetes mellitus, considered as a risk factor for cancer. However, its direct effects in cancer cell behavior are relatively unexplored. Herein we show that high glucose concentration induces aberrant glycosylation, increased cell proliferation, invasion and tumor progression of colon cancer. By modulating the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme, glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT), we demonstrate that hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) is involved in those processes. Biopsies from patients with colon carcinoma show increased levels of GFAT and consequently aberrant glycans' expression suggesting an increase of HBP flow in human colon cancer. All together, our results open the possibility that HBP links hyperglycemia, aberrant glycosylation and tumor malignancy, and suggest this pathway as a potential therapeutic target for colorectal cancer.

  13. Cloning and Heterologous Expression of the Grecocycline Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Bilyk, Oksana; Sekurova, Olga N.; Zotchev, Sergey B.; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast is a rapid and inexpensive method for cloning and assembly of large DNA fragments, which relies on natural homologous recombination. Two vectors, based on p15a and F-factor replicons that can be maintained in yeast, E. coli and streptomycetes have been constructed. These vectors have been successfully employed for assembly of the grecocycline biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. Acta 1362. Fragments of the cluster were obtained by PCR and transformed together with the “capture” vector into the yeast cells, yielding a construct carrying the entire gene cluster. The obtained construct was heterologously expressed in S. albus J1074, yielding several grecocycline congeners. Grecocyclines have unique structural moieties such as a dissacharide side chain, an additional amino sugar at the C-5 position and a thiol group. Enzymes from this pathway may be used for the derivatization of known active angucyclines in order to improve their desired biological properties. PMID:27410036

  14. Manipulating natural product biosynthetic pathways via DNA assembler.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-06-03

    DNA assembler is an efficient synthetic biology method for constructing and manipulating biochemical pathways. The rapidly increasing number of sequenced genomes provides a rich source for discovery of gene clusters involved in synthesizing new natural products. However, both discovery and economical production are hampered by our limited knowledge in manipulating most organisms and the corresponding pathways. By taking advantage of yeast in vivo homologous recombination, DNA assembler synthesizes an entire expression vector containing the target biosynthetic pathway and the genetic elements needed for DNA maintenance and replication. Here we use the spectinabilin clusters originated from two hosts as examples to illustrate the guidelines of using DNA assembler for cluster characterization and silent cluster activation. Such strategies offer unprecedented versatility in cluster manipulation, bypass the traditional laborious strategies to elicit pathway expression, and provide a new platform for de novo cluster assembly and genome mining for discovering new natural products.

  15. Pictet–Spengler reaction-based biosynthetic machinery in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei; Ge, Hui Ming; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Nan; Mei, Ya Ning; Jiang, Rong; Li, Sui Jun; Chen, Chao Jun; Jiao, Rui Hua; Xu, Qiang; Ng, Seik Weng; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The Pictet–Spengler (PS) reaction constructs plant alkaloids such as morphine and camptothecin, but it has not yet been noticed in the fungal kingdom. Here, a silent fungal Pictet–Spenglerase (FPS) gene of Chaetomium globosum 1C51 residing in Epinephelus drummondhayi guts is described and ascertained to be activable by 1-methyl-l-tryptophan (1-MT). The activated FPS expression enables the PS reaction between 1-MT and flavipin (fungal aldehyde) to form “unnatural” natural products with unprecedented skeletons, of which chaetoglines B and F are potently antibacterial with the latter inhibiting acetylcholinesterase. A gene-implied enzyme inhibition (GIEI) strategy has been introduced to address the key steps for PS product diversifications. In aggregation, the work designs and validates an innovative approach that can activate the PS reaction-based fungal biosynthetic machinery to produce unpredictable compounds of unusual and novel structure valuable for new biology and biomedicine. PMID:25425666

  16. Discovery of a widely distributed toxin biosynthetic gene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shaun W.; Mitchell, Douglas A.; Markley, Andrew L.; Hensler, Mary E.; Gonzalez, David; Wohlrab, Aaron; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Nizet, Victor; Dixon, Jack E.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriocins represent a large family of ribosomally produced peptide antibiotics. Here we describe the discovery of a widely conserved biosynthetic gene cluster for the synthesis of thiazole and oxazole heterocycles on ribosomally produced peptides. These clusters encode a toxin precursor and all necessary proteins for toxin maturation and export. Using the toxin precursor peptide and heterocycle-forming synthetase proteins from the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes, we demonstrate the in vitro reconstitution of streptolysin S activity. We provide evidence that the synthetase enzymes, as predicted from our bioinformatics analysis, introduce heterocycles onto precursor peptides, thereby providing molecular insight into the chemical structure of streptolysin S. Furthermore, our studies reveal that the synthetase exhibits relaxed substrate specificity and modifies toxin precursors from both related and distant species. Given our findings, it is likely that the discovery of similar peptidic toxins will rapidly expand to existing and emerging genomes. PMID:18375757

  17. Metabolic engineering of biosynthetic pathway for production of renewable biofuels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijai; Mani, Indra; Chaudhary, Dharmendra Kumar; Dhar, Pawan Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic engineering is an important area of research that involves editing genetic networks to overproduce a certain substance by the cells. Using a combination of genetic, metabolic, and modeling methods, useful substances have been synthesized in the past at industrial scale and in a cost-effective manner. Currently, metabolic engineering is being used to produce sufficient, economical, and eco-friendly biofuels. In the recent past, a number of efforts have been made towards engineering biosynthetic pathways for large scale and efficient production of biofuels from biomass. Given the adoption of metabolic engineering approaches by the biofuel industry, this paper reviews various approaches towards the production and enhancement of renewable biofuels such as ethanol, butanol, isopropanol, hydrogen, and biodiesel. We have also identified specific areas where more work needs to be done in the future.

  18. Overexpression, purification, and pharmacological activity of a biosynthetically derived conopeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ganesan Senthil; Ramasamy, Palanisamy; Sikdar, Sujit K.; Sarma, Siddhartha P. . E-mail: sidd@mbu.iisc.ernet.in

    2005-09-30

    A high yielding fusion protein system based on the protein cytochrome b {sub 5} has been used for the production of novel 13-residue acyclic conopeptide. This peptide, Mo1659, can be liberated from the carrier protein using CNBr cleavage and subsequent purification using RP-HPLC methods. The yield of isotopically enriched peptides is high, ranging from 3 to 4 mg of purified peptide from a 500 ml culture, indicating that this system can be widely used for peptide production. Biosynthetic Mo1659 is active on non-inactivating K{sup +} channel much like the natural Mo1659, despite the absence of C-terminal amidation. Heteronuclear NMR studies show that the peptide exists in a conformational equilibrium involving proline-10. To our knowledge this is the first report of the production of an isotopically {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-enriched conopeptide.

  19. Convergent biosynthetic pathways to β-lactam antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Five naturally-occurring β-lactams have inspired a class of drugs that constitute >60% of the antimicrobials used in human medicine. Their biosynthetic pathways reveal highly individualized synthetic strategies that yet converge on a common azetidinone ring assembled in structural contexts that confer selective binding and inhibition of D,D-transpeptidases that play essential roles in bacterial cell wall (peptidoglycan) biosynthesis. These enzymes belong to a single “clan” of evolutionarily distinct serine hydrolases whose active site geometry and mechanism of action is specifically matched by these antibiotics for inactivation that is kinetically competitive with their native function. Unusual enzyme-mediated reactions and catalytic multitasking in these pathways are discussed with particular attention to the diverse ways the β-lactam itself is generated, and more broadly how the intrinsic reactivity of this core structural element is modulated in natural systems through the introduction of ring strain and electronic effects. PMID:27693891

  20. Carlactone is an endogenous biosynthetic precursor for strigolactones.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yoshiya; Sado, Aika; Asami, Kei; Hanada, Atsushi; Umehara, Mikihisa; Akiyama, Kohki; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro

    2014-01-28

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a class of terpenoid plant hormones that regulate shoot branching as well as being known as root-derived signals for symbiosis and parasitism. SL has tricyclic-lactone (ABC-ring) and methyl butenolide (D-ring), and they are connected through an enol ether bridge. Recently, a putative biosynthetic intermediate called carlactone (CL), of which carbon skeleton is in part similar to those of SLs, was identified by biochemical analysis of three biosynthetic enzymes, DWARF27, CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE 7 (CCD7), and CCD8 in vitro. However, CL has never been identified from plant tissues, and the conversion of CL to SLs has not been proven in vivo. To address these questions, we chemically synthesized (13)C-labeled CL. We show that (13)C-labeled CL is converted to (-)-[(13)C]-2'-epi-5-deoxystrigol ((-)-2'-epi-5DS) and [(13)C]-orobanchol, endogenous SLs in rice, in the dwarf10 mutant, which is defective in CCD8. In addition, we successfully identified endogenous CL by using liquid chromatography-quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry in rice and Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we determined the absolute stereochemistry of endogenous CL to be (11R)-configuration, which is the same as that of (-)-2'-epi-5DS at the corresponding position. Feeding experiments showed that only the (11R)-isomer of CL, but not the (11S)-isomer, was converted to (-)-2'-epi-5DS in vivo. Taken together, our data provide conclusive evidence that CL is an endogenous SL precursor that is stereospecifically recognized in the biosynthesis pathway.

  1. Resorbable biosynthetic mesh for crural reinforcement during hiatal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Alicuben, Evan T; Worrell, Stephanie G; DeMeester, Steven R

    2014-10-01

    The use of mesh to reinforce crural closure during hiatal hernia repair is controversial. Although some studies suggest that using synthetic mesh can reduce recurrence, synthetic mesh can erode into the esophagus and in our opinion should be avoided. Studies with absorbable or biologic mesh have not proven to be of benefit for recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of hiatal hernia repair with modern resorbable biosynthetic mesh in combination with adjunct tension reduction techniques. We retrospectively analyzed all patients who had crural reinforcement during repair of a sliding or paraesophageal hiatal hernia with Gore BioA resorbable mesh. Objective follow-up was by videoesophagram and/or esophagogastroduodenoscopy. There were 114 patients. The majority of operations (72%) were laparoscopic primary repairs with all patients receiving a fundoplication. The crura were closed primarily in all patients and reinforced with a BioA mesh patch. Excessive tension prompted a crural relaxing incision in four per cent and a Collis gastroplasty in 39 per cent of patients. Perioperative morbidity was minor and unrelated to the mesh. Median objective follow-up was one year, but 18 patients have objective follow-up at two or more years. A recurrent hernia was found in one patient (0.9%) three years after repair. The use of crural relaxing incisions and Collis gastroplasty in combination with crural reinforcement with resorbable biosynthetic mesh is associated with a low early hernia recurrence rate and no mesh-related complications. Long-term follow-up will define the role of these techniques for hiatal hernia repair.

  2. Metabolic profiling of alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Mori, Valerio; Amici, Adolfo; Mazzola, Francesca; Di Stefano, Michele; Conforti, Laura; Magni, Giulio; Ruggieri, Silverio; Raffaelli, Nadia; Orsomando, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    NAD plays essential redox and non-redox roles in cell biology. In mammals, its de novo and recycling biosynthetic pathways encompass two independent branches, the "amidated" and "deamidated" routes. Here we focused on the indispensable enzymes gating these two routes, i.e. nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT), which in mammals comprises three distinct isozymes, and NAD synthetase (NADS). First, we measured the in vitro activity of the enzymes, and the levels of all their substrates and products in a number of tissues from the C57BL/6 mouse. Second, from these data, we derived in vivo estimates of enzymes'rates and quantitative contributions to NAD homeostasis. The NMNAT activity, mainly represented by nuclear NMNAT1, appears to be high and nonrate-limiting in all examined tissues, except in blood. The NADS activity, however, appears rate-limiting in lung and skeletal muscle, where its undetectable levels parallel a relative accumulation of the enzyme's substrate NaAD (nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide). In all tissues, the amidated NAD route was predominant, displaying highest rates in liver and kidney, and lowest in blood. In contrast, the minor deamidated route showed higher relative proportions in blood and small intestine, and higher absolute values in liver and small intestine. Such results provide the first comprehensive picture of the balance of the two alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in different mammalian tissues under physiological conditions. This fills a gap in the current knowledge of NAD biosynthesis, and provides a crucial information for the study of NAD metabolism and its role in disease.

  3. Recombinant lectins: an array of tailor-made glycan-interaction biosynthetic tools.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Carla; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2013-03-01

    Lectins are a heterogeneous group of proteins found in plants, animals and microorganisms, which possess at least one non-catalytic domain that binds reversibly to specific mono- or oligosaccharides. The range of lectins and respective biological activities is unsurprising given the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and the multiple modes of interaction with proteins. Recombinant DNA technology has been traditionally used for cloning and characterizing newly discovered lectins. It has also been employed as a means of producing pure and sequence-defined lectins for different biotechnological applications. This review focuses on the production of recombinant lectins in heterologous organisms, and highlighting the Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris expression systems, which are the most employed. The choice of expression host depends on the lectin. Non-glycosylated recombinant lectins are produced in E. coli and post-translational modified recombinant lectins are produced in eukaryotic organisms, namely P. pastoris and non-microbial hosts such as mammalian cells. Emphasis is given to the applications of the recombinant lectins especially (a) in cancer diagnosis and/or therapeutics, (b) as anti-microbial, anti-viral, and anti-insect molecules or (c) in microarrays for glycome profiling. Most reported applications are from recombinant plant lectins. These applications benefit from the tailor-made design associated with recombinant production and will aid in unraveling the complex biological mechanisms of glycan-interactions, bringing recombinant lectins to the forefront of glycobiology. In conclusion, recombinant lectins are developing into valuable biosynthetic tools for biomedical research.

  4. Common biosynthetic origins for polycyclic tetramate macrolactams from phylogenetically diverse bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Joshua A. V.; Oh, Dong-Chan; Cao, Shugeng; Currie, Cameron R.; Kolter, Roberto; Clardy, Jon

    2010-01-01

    A combination of small molecule chemistry, biosynthetic analysis, and genome mining has revealed the unexpected conservation of polycyclic tetramate macrolactam biosynthetic loci in diverse bacteria. Initially our chemical analysis of a Streptomyces strain associated with the southern pine beetle led to the discovery of frontalamides A and B, two previously undescribed members of this antibiotic family. Genome analyses and genetic manipulation of the producing organism led to the identification of the frontalamide biosynthetic gene cluster and several biosynthetic intermediates. The biosynthetic locus for the frontalamides’ mixed polyketide/amino acid structure encodes a hybrid polyketide synthase nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS), which resembles iterative enzymes known in fungi. No such mixed iterative PKS-NRPS enzymes have been characterized in bacteria. Genome-mining efforts revealed strikingly conserved frontalamide-like biosynthetic clusters in the genomes of phylogenetically diverse bacteria ranging from proteobacteria to actinomycetes. Screens for environmental actinomycete isolates carrying frontalamide-like biosynthetic loci led to the isolation of a number of positive strains, the majority of which produced candidate frontalamide-like compounds under suitable growth conditions. These results establish the prevalence of frontalamide-like gene clusters in diverse bacterial types, with medicinally important Streptomyces species being particularly enriched. PMID:20547882

  5. A retro-biosynthetic approach to the prediction of biosynthetic pathways from position-specific isotope analysis as shown for tramadol

    PubMed Central

    Romek, Katarzyna M.; Nun, Pierrick; Remaud, Gérald S.; Silvestre, Virginie; Taïwe, Germain Sotoing; Lecerf-Schmidt, Florine; Boumendjel, Ahcène; De Waard, Michel; Robins, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Tramadol, previously only known as a synthetic analgesic, has now been found in the bark and wood of roots of the African medicinal tree Nauclea latifolia. At present, no direct evidence is available as to the biosynthetic pathway of its unusual skeleton. To provide guidance as to possible biosynthetic precursors, we have adopted a novel approach of retro-biosynthesis based on the position-specific distribution of isotopes in the extracted compound. Relatively recent developments in isotope ratio monitoring by 13C NMR spectrometry make possible the measurement of the nonstatistical position-specific natural abundance distribution of 13C (δ13Ci) within the molecule with better than 1‰ precision. Very substantial variation in the 13C positional distribution is found: between δ13Ci = −11 and −53‰. Distribution is not random and it is argued that the pattern observed can substantially be interpreted in relation to known causes of isotope fractionation in natural products. Thus, a plausible biosynthetic scheme based on sound biosynthetic principals of precursor–substrate relationships can be proposed. In addition, data obtained from the 18O/16O ratios in the oxygen atoms of the compound add support to the deductions made from the carbon isotope analysis. This paper shows how the use of 13C NMR at natural abundance can help with proposing a biosynthetic route to compounds newly found in nature or those difficult to tackle by conventional means. PMID:26106160

  6. A retro-biosynthetic approach to the prediction of biosynthetic pathways from position-specific isotope analysis as shown for tramadol.

    PubMed

    Romek, Katarzyna M; Nun, Pierrick; Remaud, Gérald S; Silvestre, Virginie; Taïwe, Germain Sotoing; Lecerf-Schmidt, Florine; Boumendjel, Ahcène; De Waard, Michel; Robins, Richard J

    2015-07-07

    Tramadol, previously only known as a synthetic analgesic, has now been found in the bark and wood of roots of the African medicinal tree Nauclea latifolia. At present, no direct evidence is available as to the biosynthetic pathway of its unusual skeleton. To provide guidance as to possible biosynthetic precursors, we have adopted a novel approach of retro-biosynthesis based on the position-specific distribution of isotopes in the extracted compound. Relatively recent developments in isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C NMR spectrometry make possible the measurement of the nonstatistical position-specific natural abundance distribution of (13)C (δ(13)Ci) within the molecule with better than 1‰ precision. Very substantial variation in the (13)C positional distribution is found: between δ(13)Ci = -11 and -53‰. Distribution is not random and it is argued that the pattern observed can substantially be interpreted in relation to known causes of isotope fractionation in natural products. Thus, a plausible biosynthetic scheme based on sound biosynthetic principals of precursor-substrate relationships can be proposed. In addition, data obtained from the (18)O/(16)O ratios in the oxygen atoms of the compound add support to the deductions made from the carbon isotope analysis. This paper shows how the use of (13)C NMR at natural abundance can help with proposing a biosynthetic route to compounds newly found in nature or those difficult to tackle by conventional means.

  7. Second-generation probes for biosynthetic intermediate capture: towards a comprehensive profiling of polyketide assembly† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: General methods for the synthesis of chemical probes and LC-HRMS analysis of the biosynthetic intermediates isolated from S. lasaliensis. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cc04681a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkening, Ina; Gazzola, Silvia; Riva, Elena; Parascandolo, James S.; Song, Lijiang

    2016-01-01

    Malonyl carba(dethia) N-decanoyl cysteamine methyl esters and novel acetoxymethyl esters were utilised as second-generation probes for polyketide intermediate capture. The use of these tools in vivo led to the characterisation of an almost complete set of biosynthetic intermediates from a modular assembly line, providing a first kinetic overview of intermediate processing leading to complex natural product formation. PMID:27481638

  8. Evolution of galactoglycerolipid biosynthetic pathways--from cyanobacteria to primary plastids and from primary to secondary plastids.

    PubMed

    Petroutsos, Dimitris; Amiar, Souad; Abida, Heni; Dolch, Lina-Juana; Bastien, Olivier; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Jouhet, Juliette; Falconet, Denis; Block, Maryse A; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Bowler, Chris; Botté, Cyrille; Maréchal, Eric

    2014-04-01

    Photosynthetic membranes have a unique lipid composition that has been remarkably well conserved from cyanobacteria to chloroplasts. These membranes are characterized by a very high content in galactoglycerolipids, i.e., mono- and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG and DGDG, respectively). Galactoglycerolipids make up the bulk of the lipid matrix in which photosynthetic complexes are embedded. They are also known to fulfill specific functions, such as stabilizing photosystems, being a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids for various purposes and, in some eukaryotes, being exported to other subcellular compartments. The conservation of MGDG and DGDG suggests that selection pressures might have conserved the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis, but this does not appear to be the case. Important evolutionary transitions comprise primary endosymbiosis (from a symbiotic cyanobacterium to a primary chloroplast) and secondary endosymbiosis (from a symbiotic unicellular algal eukaryote to a secondary plastid). In this review, we compare biosynthetic pathways based on available molecular and biochemical data, highlighting enzymatic reactions that have been conserved and others that have diverged or been lost, as well as the emergence of parallel and alternative biosynthetic systems originating from other metabolic pathways. Questions for future research are highlighted.

  9. Biosynthetic hydrogels--studies on chemical and physical characteristics on long-term cellular response for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Thankam, Finosh Gnanaprakasam; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2014-07-01

    Biosynthetic hydrogels can meet the drawbacks caused by natural and synthetic ones for biomedical applications. In the current article we present a novel biosynthetic alginate-poly(propylene fumarate) copolymer based chemically crosslinked hydrogel scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications. Partially crosslinked PA hydrogel and fully cross linked PA-A hydrogel scaffolds were prepared. The influence of chemical and physical (morphology and architecture of hydrogel) characteristics on the long term cellular response was studied. Both these hydrogels were cytocompatible and showed no genotoxicity upon contact with fibroblast cells. Both PA and PA-A were able to resist deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species and sustain the viability of L929 cells. The hydrogel incubated oxidative stress induced cells were capable of maintaining the intra cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) expression to the normal level confirmed their protective effect. Relatively the PA hydrogel was found to be unstable in the cell culture medium. The PA-A hydrogel was able to withstand appreciable cyclic stretching. The cyclic stretching introduced complex macro and microarchitectural features with interconnected pores and more structured bound water which would provide long-term viability of around 250% after the 24th day of culture. All these qualities make PA-A hydrogel form a potent candidate for cardiac tissue engineering.

  10. Molecular Networking and Pattern-Based Genome Mining Improves Discovery of Biosynthetic Gene Clusters and their Products from Salinispora Species

    DOE PAGES

    Duncan, Katherine R.; Crüsemann, Max; Lechner, Anna; ...

    2015-04-09

    Genome sequencing has revealed that bacteria contain many more biosynthetic gene clusters than predicted based on the number of secondary metabolites discovered to date. While this biosynthetic reservoir has fostered interest in new tools for natural product discovery, there remains a gap between gene cluster detection and compound discovery. In this paper, we apply molecular networking and the new concept of pattern-based genome mining to 35 Salinispora strains, including 30 for which draft genome sequences were either available or obtained for this study. The results provide a method to simultaneously compare large numbers of complex microbial extracts, which facilitated themore » identification of media components, known compounds and their derivatives, and new compounds that could be prioritized for structure elucidation. Finally, these efforts revealed considerable metabolite diversity and led to several molecular family-gene cluster pairings, of which the quinomycin-type depsipeptide retimycin A was characterized and linked to gene cluster NRPS40 using pattern-based bioinformatic approaches.« less

  11. Sporopollenin Biosynthetic Enzymes Interact and Constitute a Metabolon Localized to the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Tapetum Cells[W

    PubMed Central

    Lallemand, Benjamin; Erhardt, Mathieu; Heitz, Thierry; Legrand, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The sporopollenin polymer is the major constituent of exine, the outer pollen wall. Recently fatty acid derivatives have been shown to be the precursors of sporopollenin building units. ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE, POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB, TETRAKETIDE α-PYRONE REDUCTASE1 (TKPR1) and TKPR2 have been demonstrated to be involved in sporopollenin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here all these sporopollenin biosynthetic enzymes but TKPR2 have been immunolocalized to endoplasmic reticulum of anther tapetal cells. Pull-down experiments demonstrated that tagged recombinant proteins interacted to form complexes whose constituents were characterized by immunoblotting. In vivo protein interactions were evidenced by yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid analysis and by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy/Förster resonance energy transfer studies in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana, which were used to test the possibility that the enzymes interact to form a biosynthetic metabolon. Various pairs of proteins fused to two distinct fluorochromes were coexpressed in N. benthamiana leaf tissues and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy/Förster resonance energy transfer measurements demonstrated that proteins interacted pairwise in planta. Taken together, these results suggest the existence of a sporopollenin metabolon. PMID:23632852

  12. Reconstruction of cytosolic fumaric acid biosynthetic pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fumaric acid is a commercially important component of foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals and industrial materials, yet the current methods of production are unsustainable and ecologically destructive. Results In this study, the fumarate biosynthetic pathway involving reductive reactions of the tricarboxylic acid cycle was exogenously introduced in S. cerevisiae by a series of simple genetic modifications. First, the Rhizopus oryzae genes for malate dehydrogenase (RoMDH) and fumarase (RoFUM1) were heterologously expressed. Then, expression of the endogenous pyruvate carboxylase (PYC2) was up-regulated. The resultant yeast strain, FMME-001 ↑PYC2 + ↑RoMDH, was capable of producing significantly higher yields of fumarate in the glucose medium (3.18 ± 0.15 g liter-1) than the control strain FMME-001 empty vector. Conclusions The results presented here provide a novel strategy for fumarate biosynthesis, which represents an important advancement in producing high yields of fumarate in a sustainable and ecologically-friendly manner. PMID:22335940

  13. Chlorella viruses contain genes encoding a complete polyamine biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Sascha; Sander, Adrianne; Gurnon, James R.; Yanai-Balser, Giane; VanEtten, James L.; Piotrowski, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Two genes encoding the putative polyamine biosynthetic enzymes agmatine iminohydrolase (AIH) and N-carbamoylputrescine amidohydrolase (CPA) were cloned from the chloroviruses PBCV-1, NY-2A and MT325. They were expressed in Escherichia coli to form C-terminal (His)6-tagged proteins and the recombinant proteins were purified by Ni2+- binding affinity chromatography. The biochemical properties of the two enzymes are similar to AIH and CPA enzymes from Arabidopsis thaliana and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Together with the previously known virus genes encoding ornithine/arginine decarboxlyase (ODC/ADC) and homospermidine synthase, the chloroviruses have genes that encode a complete set of functional enzymes that synthesize the rare polyamine homospermidine from arginine via agmatine, N-carbamoylputrescine and putrescine. The PBCV-1 aih and cpa genes are expressed early during virus infection together with the odc/adc gene, suggesting that biosynthesis of putrescine is important in early stages of viral replication. The aih and cpa genes are widespread in the chlorella viruses. PMID:17101165

  14. Translating biosynthetic gene clusters into fungal armor and weaponry

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Nancy P

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are renowned for the production of a diverse array of secondary metabolites (SMs) where the genetic material required for synthesis of a SM is typically arrayed in a biosynthetic gene cluster (BGC). These natural products are valued for their bioactive properties stemming from their functions in fungal biology, key among those protection from abiotic and biotic stress and establishment of a secure niche. The producing fungus must not only avoid self-harm from endogenous SMs but also deliver specific SMs at the right time to the right tissue requiring biochemical aid. This review highlights functions of BGCs beyond the enzymatic assembly of SMs, considering the timing and location of SM production and other proteins in the clusters that control SM activity. Specifically, self-protection is provided by both BGC-encoded mechanisms and non-BGC subcellular containment of toxic SM precursors; delivery and timing is orchestrated through cellular trafficking patterns and stress- and developmental-responsive transcriptional programs. PMID:26284674

  15. Evolution of the isoprene biosynthetic pathway in kudzu.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Thomas D; Yeh, Sansun; Wiberley, Amy E; Falbel, Tanya G; Gong, Deming; Fernandez, Donna E

    2005-02-01

    Isoprene synthase converts dimethylallyl diphosphate, derived from the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, to isoprene. Isoprene is made by some plants in substantial amounts, which affects atmospheric chemistry, while other plants make no isoprene. As part of our long-term study of isoprene synthesis, the genetics of the isoprene biosynthetic pathway of the isoprene emitter, kudzu (Pueraria montana), was compared with similar genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which does not make isoprene. The MEP pathway genes in kudzu were similar to the corresponding Arabidopsis genes. Isoprene synthase genes of kudzu and aspen (Populus tremuloides) were cloned to compare their divergence with the divergence seen in MEP pathway genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the terpene synthase gene family indicated that isoprene synthases are either within the monoterpene synthase clade or sister to it. In Arabidopsis, the gene most similar to isoprene synthase is a myrcene/ocimene (acyclic monoterpenes) synthase. Two phenylalanine residues found exclusively in isoprene synthases make the active site smaller than other terpene synthase enzymes, possibly conferring specificity for the five-carbon substrate rather than precursors of the larger isoprenoids. Expression of the kudzu isoprene synthase gene in Arabidopsis caused Arabidopsis to emit isoprene, indicating that whether or not a plant emits isoprene depends on whether or not it has a terpene synthase capable of using dimethylallyl diphosphate.

  16. Heterologous Expression of Novobiocin and Clorobiocin Biosynthetic Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Eustáquio, Alessandra S.; Gust, Bertolt; Galm, Ute; Li, Shu-Ming; Chater, Keith F.; Heide, Lutz

    2005-01-01

    A method was developed for the heterologous expression of biosynthetic gene clusters in different Streptomyces strains and for the modification of these clusters by single or multiple gene replacements or gene deletions with unprecedented speed and versatility. λ-Red-mediated homologous recombination was used for genetic modification of the gene clusters, and the attachment site and integrase of phage φC31 were employed for the integration of these clusters into the heterologous hosts. This method was used to express the gene clusters of the aminocoumarin antibiotics novobiocin and clorobiocin in the well-studied strains Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, which, in contrast to the natural producers, can be easily genetically manipulated. S. coelicolor M512 derivatives produced the respective antibiotic in yields comparable to those of natural producer strains, whereas S. lividans TK24 derivatives were at least five times less productive. This method could also be used to carry out functional investigations. Shortening of the cosmids' inserts showed which genes are essential for antibiotic production. PMID:15870333

  17. Detection of photoactive siderophore biosynthetic genes in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Gärdes, Astrid; Triana, Christopher; Amin, Shady A; Green, David H; Romano, Ariel; Trimble, Lyndsay; Carrano, Carl J

    2013-06-01

    Iron is an essential element for oceanic microbial life but its low bioavailability limits microorganisms in large areas of the oceans. To acquire this metal many marine bacteria produce organic chelates that bind and transport iron (siderophores). While it has been hypothesized that the global production of siderophores by heterotrophic bacteria and some cyanobacteria constitutes the bulk of organic ligands binding iron in the ocean because stability constants of siderophores and these organic ligands are similar, and because ligand concentrations rise sharply in response to iron fertilization events, direct evidence for this proposal is lacking. This lack is due to the difficulty in characterizing these ligands due both to their extremely low concentrations and their highly heterogeneous nature. The situation for characterizing photoactive siderophores in situ is more problematic because of their expected short lifetimes in the photic zone. An alternative approach is to make use of high sensitivity molecular technology (qPCR) to search for siderophore biosynthesis genes related to the production of photoactive siderophores. In this way one can access their "biochemical potential" and utilize this information as a proxy for the presence of these siderophores in the marine environment. Here we show, using qPCR primers designed to detect biosynthetic genes for the siderophores vibrioferrin, petrobactin and aerobactin that such genes are widespread and based on their abundance, the "biochemical potential" for photoactive siderophore production is significant. Concurrently we also briefly examine the microbial biodiversity responsible for such production as a function of depth and location across a North Atlantic transect.

  18. Chemically inducible expression of the PHB biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kourtz, Lauralynn; Dillon, Kevin; Daughtry, Sean; Peoples, Oliver P; Snell, Kristi D

    2007-12-01

    Arabidopsis plants were transformed with a multi-gene construct for expression of the polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) biosynthetic pathway containing a gene switch that can be activated by commercially available non-steroidal ecdysone analogs approved for use on some crops as pesticides. T(1) progeny of transgenic Arabidopsis plants were isolated and screened for PHB production in the presence of ecdysone analogs. T(2) progeny derived from selected T(1) lines were subjected to further analysis by comparing PHB production levels prior to treatment with inducing agent and 21 days after initiation of induction. Significant PHB production was delayed in many of the engineered plants until after induction. PHB levels of up to 14.3% PHB per unit dry weight were observed in young leaves harvested from engineered T(2) plants after applications of the commercial ecdysone analog Mimic. PHB in older leaves reached levels of up to 7% PHB per unit dry weight. This study represents a first step towards engineering a chemically inducible gene switch for PHB production in plants using inducing agents that are approved for field use.

  19. Fumonisin-nonproducing mutants exhibit differential expression of putative polyketide biosynthetic gene clusters in Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides produces a group of polyketide derived secondary metabolites called fumonisins. Fumonisins can cause diseases in animals, and have been correlated epidemiologically with esophageal cancer and birth defects in humans. The fumonisin biosynthetic gene clust...

  20. Comparative genomic analysis of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters in 207 isolates of Fusarium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium species are known for their ability to produce secondary metabolites (SMs), including plant hormones, pigments, mycotoxins, and other compounds with potential agricultural, pharmaceutical, and biotechnological impact. Understanding the distribution of SM biosynthetic gene clusters across th...

  1. Comparison of carotenoid accumulation and biosynthetic gene expression between Valencia and Rohde Red Valencia sweet oranges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carotenoid accumulation and biosynthetic gene expression levels during fruit maturation were compared between ordinary Valencia (VAL) and its more deeply colored mutant Rohde Red Valencia orange (RRV). The two cultivars exhibited different carotenoid profiles and regulatory mechanisms in flavedo and...

  2. Molecular Characterization of the Cercosporin Biosynthetic Pathway in the Fungal Plant Pathogen Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Newman, Adam G; Townsend, Craig A

    2016-03-30

    Perylenequinones are a class of photoactivated polyketide mycotoxins produced by fungal plant pathogens that notably produce reactive oxygen species with visible light. The best-studied perylenequinone is cercosporin-a product of the Cercospora species. While the cercosporin biosynthetic gene cluster has been described in the tobacco pathogen Cercospora nicotianae, little is known of the metabolite's biosynthesis. Furthermore, in vitro investigations of the polyketide synthase central to cercosporin biosynthesis identified the naphthopyrone nor-toralactone as its direct product-an observation in conflict with published biosynthetic proposals. Here, we present an alternative biosynthetic pathway to cercosporin based on metabolites characterized from a series of biosynthetic gene knockouts. We show that nor-toralactone is the key polyketide intermediate and the substrate for the unusual didomain protein CTB3. We demonstrate the unique oxidative cleavage activity of the CTB3 monooxygenase domain in vitro. These data advance our understanding of perylenequinone biosynthesis and expand the biochemical repertoire of flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

  3. Coordinated regulation of biosynthetic and regulatory genes coincides with anthocyanin accumulation in developing eggplant fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Violet to black pigmentation of eggplant (Solanum melongena) fruit is attributed to anthocyanin accumulation. Model systems support the interaction of biosynthetic and regulatory genes for anthocyanin biosynthesis. Anthocyanin structural gene transcription requires the expression of at least one m...

  4. Diurnal Regulation of the Brassinosteroid-Biosynthetic CPD Gene in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Bancos, Simona; Szatmári, Anna-Mária; Castle, Julie; Kozma-Bognár, László; Shibata, Kyomi; Yokota, Takao; Bishop, Gerard J.; Nagy, Ferenc; Szekeres, Miklós

    2006-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), are essential for normal photomorphogenesis. However, the mechanism by which light controls physiological functions via BRs is not well understood. Using transgenic plants carrying promoter-luciferase reporter gene fusions, we show that in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the BR-biosynthetic CPD and CYP85A2 genes are under diurnal regulation. The complex diurnal expression profile of CPD is determined by dual, light-dependent, and circadian control. The severely decreased expression level of CPD in phytochrome-deficient background and the red light-specific induction in wild-type plants suggest that light regulation of CPD is primarily mediated by phytochrome signaling. The diurnal rhythmicity of CPD expression is maintained in brassinosteroid insensitive 1 transgenic seedlings, indicating that its transcriptional control is independent of hormonal feedback regulation. Diurnal changes in the expression of CPD and CYP85A2 are accompanied by changes of the endogenous BR content during the day, leading to brassinolide accumulation at the middle of the light phase. We also show that CPD expression is repressed in extended darkness in a BR feedback-dependent manner. In the dark the level of the bioactive hormone did not increase; therefore, our data strongly suggest that light also influences the sensitivity of plants to BRs. PMID:16531479

  5. The Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase Biosynthetic Enzyme Has Distinct Catalytic and Metabolic Roles

    PubMed Central

    Frej, Anna D.; Clark, Jonathan; Le Roy, Caroline I.; Lilla, Sergio; Thomason, Peter A.; Otto, Grant P.; Churchill, Grant; Insall, Robert H.; Claus, Sandrine P.; Hawkins, Phillip; Stephens, Len

    2016-01-01

    Inositol levels, maintained by the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase (Ino1), are altered in a range of disorders, including bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. To date, most inositol studies have focused on the molecular and cellular effects of inositol depletion without considering Ino1 levels. Here we employ a simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum, to demonstrate distinct effects of loss of Ino1 and inositol depletion. We show that loss of Ino1 results in an inositol auxotrophy that can be rescued only partially by exogenous inositol. Removal of inositol supplementation from the ino1− mutant resulted in a rapid 56% reduction in inositol levels, triggering the induction of autophagy, reduced cytokinesis, and substrate adhesion. Inositol depletion also caused a dramatic generalized decrease in phosphoinositide levels that was rescued by inositol supplementation. However, loss of Ino1 triggered broad metabolic changes consistent with the induction of a catabolic state that was not rescued by inositol supplementation. These data suggest a metabolic role for Ino1 that is independent of inositol biosynthesis. To characterize this role, an Ino1 binding partner containing SEL1L1 domains (Q54IX5) and having homology to mammalian macromolecular complex adaptor proteins was identified. Our findings therefore identify a new role for Ino1, independent of inositol biosynthesis, with broad effects on cell metabolism. PMID:26951199

  6. Cloning, sequencing and characterization of the biosynthetic gene cluster of sanglifehrin A, a potent cyclophilin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xudong; Jiang, Nan; Xu, Fei; Shao, Lei; Tang, Gongli; Wilkinson, Barrie; Liu, Wen

    2011-03-01

    Sanglifehrin A (SFA), a potent cyclophilin inhibitor produced by Streptomyces flaveolus DSM 9954, bears a unique [5.5] spirolactam moiety conjugated with a 22-membered, highly functionalized macrolide through a linear carbon chain. SFA displays a diverse range of biological activities and offers significant therapeutic potential. However, the structural complexity of SFA poses a tremendous challenge for new analogue development via chemical synthesis. Based on a rational prediction of its biosynthetic origin, herein we report the cloning, sequencing and characterization of the gene cluster responsible for SFA biosynthesis. Analysis of the 92 776 bp contiguous DNA region reveals a mixed polyketide synthase (PKS)/non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) pathway which includes a variety of unique features for unusual PKS and NRPS building block formation. Our findings suggest that SFA biosynthesis requires a crotonyl-CoA reductase/carboxylase (CCR) for generation of the putative unusual PKS starter unit (2R)-2-ethylmalonamyl-CoA, an iterative type I PKS for the putative atypical extender unit (2S)-2-(2-oxo-butyl)malonyl-CoA and a phenylalanine hydroxylase for the NRPS extender unit (2S)-m-tyrosine. A spontaneous ketalization of significant note, may trigger spirolactam formation in a stereo-selective manner. This study provides a framework for the application of combinatorial biosynthesis methods in order to expand the structural diversity of SFA.

  7. Discovery of cahuitamycins as biofilm inhibitors derived from a convergent biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Ryeol; Tripathi, Ashootosh; Wu, Jianfeng; Schultz, Pamela J.; Yim, Isaiah; McQuade, Thomas J.; Yu, Fengan; Arevang, Carl-Johan; Mensah, Abraham Y.; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Xi, Chuanwu; Sherman, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms often have the ability to attach to a surface, building a complex matrix where they colonize to form a biofilm. This cellular superstructure can display increased resistance to antibiotics and cause serious, persistent health problems in humans. Here we describe a high-throughput in vitro screen to identify inhibitors of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms using a library of natural product extracts derived from marine microbes. Analysis of extracts derived from Streptomyces gandocaensis results in the discovery of three peptidic metabolites (cahuitamycins A–C), with cahuitamycin C being the most effective inhibitor (IC50=14.5 μM). Biosynthesis of cahuitamycin C proceeds via a convergent biosynthetic pathway, with one of the steps apparently being catalysed by an unlinked gene encoding a 6-methylsalicylate synthase. Efforts to assess starter unit diversification through selective mutasynthesis lead to production of unnatural analogues cahuitamycins D and E of increased potency (IC50=8.4 and 10.5 μM). PMID:26880271

  8. Discovery of cahuitamycins as biofilm inhibitors derived from a convergent biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Ryeol; Tripathi, Ashootosh; Wu, Jianfeng; Schultz, Pamela J; Yim, Isaiah; McQuade, Thomas J; Yu, Fengan; Arevang, Carl-Johan; Mensah, Abraham Y; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Xi, Chuanwu; Sherman, David H

    2016-02-16

    Pathogenic microorganisms often have the ability to attach to a surface, building a complex matrix where they colonize to form a biofilm. This cellular superstructure can display increased resistance to antibiotics and cause serious, persistent health problems in humans. Here we describe a high-throughput in vitro screen to identify inhibitors of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms using a library of natural product extracts derived from marine microbes. Analysis of extracts derived from Streptomyces gandocaensis results in the discovery of three peptidic metabolites (cahuitamycins A-C), with cahuitamycin C being the most effective inhibitor (IC50=14.5 μM). Biosynthesis of cahuitamycin C proceeds via a convergent biosynthetic pathway, with one of the steps apparently being catalysed by an unlinked gene encoding a 6-methylsalicylate synthase. Efforts to assess starter unit diversification through selective mutasynthesis lead to production of unnatural analogues cahuitamycins D and E of increased potency (IC50=8.4 and 10.5 μM).

  9. High-density biosynthetic fuels: the intersection of heterogeneous catalysis and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Benjamin G; Meylemans, Heather A; Gough, Raina V; Quintana, Roxanne L; Garrison, Michael D; Bruno, Thomas J

    2014-05-28

    Biosynthetic valencene, premnaspirodiene, and natural caryophyllene were hydrogenated and evaluated as high performance fuels. The parent sesquiterpenes were then isomerized to complex mixtures of hydrocarbons with the heterogeneous acid catalyst Nafion SAC-13. High density fuels with net heats of combustion ranging from 133-141 000 Btu gal(-1), or up to 13% higher than commercial jet fuel could be generated by this approach. The products of caryophyllene isomerization were primarily tricyclic hydrocarbons which after hydrogenation increased the fuel density by 6%. The isomerization of valencene and premnaspirodiene also generated a variety of sesquiterpenes, but in both cases the dominant product was δ-selinene. Ab initio calculations were conducted to determine the total electronic energies for the reactants and products. In all cases the results were in excellent agreement with the experimental distribution of isomers. The cetane numbers for the sesquiterpane fuels ranged from 20-32 and were highly dependent on the isomer distribution. Specific distillation cuts may have the potential to act as high density diesel fuels, while use of these hydrocarbons as additives to jet fuel will increase the range and/or time of flight of aircraft. In addition to the ability to generate high performance renewable fuels, the powerful combination of metabolic engineering and heterogeneous catalysis will allow for the preparation of a variety of sesquiterpenes with potential for pharmaceutical, flavor, and fragrance applications.

  10. Carotenoid profiling and the expression of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in developing coffee grain.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Andrew J; Kuntz, Marcel; Moreau, Helene; McCarthy, James

    2010-06-01

    Roasted coffee contains a complex array of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which make an important contribution to the characteristic flavour and aroma of the final beverage. It is thought that a few of the potent coffee aroma components, such as "beta-damascenone", could be derived from carotenoid precursors. In order to further investigate the potential link between carotenoids and coffee aroma profiles, we have measured the carotenoid content in developing coffee grain. The data obtained confirms the presence of lutein in the grain, and additionally shows that the immature coffee grain also contains significant amounts of beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin. Complimentary quantitative gene expression analysis revealed that all the carotenoid biosynthetic genes examined are expressed in the grain, and that the transcript levels are gene and stage dependent. Furthermore, consistent with the reduction of the carotenoid levels at the last stage of grain development (mature-red), most of the transcript levels were also found to be lower at the final developmental stage. Quantitative expression analysis of the carotenoid genes was also carried out for the developing pericarp tissue of the coffee cherries. Again, all the genes examined were expressed, and in most cases, the highest transcript levels were detected around the large green-yellow stages, a period when carotenoid synthesis is probably greatest.

  11. Cecropia peltata accumulates starch or soluble glycogen by differentially regulating starch biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Sylvain; Umhang, Martin; Eicke, Simona; Streb, Sebastian; Qi, Weihong; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2013-04-01

    The branched glucans glycogen and starch are the most widespread storage carbohydrates in living organisms. The production of semicrystalline starch granules in plants is more complex than that of small, soluble glycogen particles in microbes and animals. However, the factors determining whether glycogen or starch is formed are not fully understood. The tropical tree Cecropia peltata is a rare example of an organism able to make either polymer type. Electron micrographs and quantitative measurements show that glycogen accumulates to very high levels in specialized myrmecophytic structures (Müllerian bodies), whereas starch accumulates in leaves. Compared with polymers comprising leaf starch, glycogen is more highly branched and has shorter branches--factors that prevent crystallization and explain its solubility. RNA sequencing and quantitative shotgun proteomics reveal that isoforms of all three classes of glucan biosynthetic enzyme (starch/glycogen synthases, branching enzymes, and debranching enzymes) are differentially expressed in Müllerian bodies and leaves, providing a system-wide view of the quantitative programming of storage carbohydrate metabolism. This work will prompt targeted analysis in model organisms and cross-species comparisons. Finally, as starch is the major carbohydrate used for food and industrial applications worldwide, these data provide a basis for manipulating starch biosynthesis in crops to synthesize tailor-made polyglucans.

  12. Effects of polyamines and polyamine biosynthetic inhibitors on mitotic activity of Allium cepa root tips.

    PubMed

    Unal, Meral; Palavan-Unsal, Narcin; Tufekci, M A

    2008-03-01

    The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of exogenous polyamines (PAs), putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), spermine (Spm) and PA biosynthetic inhibitors, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), cyclohexilamine (CHA), methylglioxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) were investigated in the root meristems of Allium cepa L. The reduction of mitotic index and the induction of chromosomal aberrations such as bridges, stickiness, c-mitotic anaphases, micronuclei, endoredupliction by PAs and PA biosynthetic inhibitors were observed and these were used as evidence of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity.

  13. Evolution of a Biosynthetic Temporary Skin Substitute: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Richard; Woeller, Collynn; Rodeheaver, George; Naughton, Gail K.; Piney, Emmett; Hickerson, William; Branski, Ludwik; Holmes, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare PermeaDerm to first temporary biosynthetic skin substitute (Biobrane, cleared by the Food and Drug Administration in 1979). Methods: Different temporary skin substitutes (Biobrane, PermeaDerm, and PermeaDerm derivatives) were tested for physical differences, impact on healing wounds, inflammatory response, and ability to allow adequate growth of dermal fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells without accumulation of excessive scar-forming myofibroblasts. Proliferation of fibroblasts and stem cells on various skin substitutes was measured, and myofibroblast marker accumulation was evaluated by the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and fibronectin. Fibroblast migration was measured by tracking viable cells with MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] dye. Results: In vivo testing shows PermeaDerm works well as a temporary skin substitute, performing better than Biobrane with respect to inflammation and fluid accumulation. Tissue culture techniques revealed that cells on PermeaDerm grow in a more uniform fashion and migrated to a greater extent than cells on Biobrane. Furthermore, cells grown in the presence of PermeaDerm expressed lower levels of the myofibroblast markers α-smooth muscle actin and fibronectin than cells grown on Biobrane. Conclusion: PermeaDerm with variable porosity possesses all attributes and properties known to be important for a successful temporary skin substitute and enables the clinician to control porosity from essentially zero to what the wound requires. The ability of the clinician to minimize wound desiccation without fluid accumulation is related to the reduction of punctate scarring. PMID:26229573

  14. Specific estradiol biosynthetic pathway in choriocarcinoma (JEG-3) cell line.

    PubMed

    Samson, Mélanie; Labrie, Fernand; Luu-The, Van

    2009-09-01

    Estradiol (E2) plays a crucial role in all reproduction processes. In the placenta, it is well recognized that E2 is synthesized from fetal dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). However, there is some controversy about the biosynthetic pathway involved, some authors suggest that E2 is produced by aromatization of testosterone (T), while others suggest that E2 is produced by the conversion of estrone (E1) into E2 by type 1 17beta-HSD, subsequent to the aromatization of 4-androstenedione (4-dione) into E1. In the present report, using the precursor [(14)C]DHEA, inhibitors of steroidogenic enzymes (chemical inhibitors and siRNA) and a choriocarcinoma (JEG-3) cell line that expresses all the enzymes necessary to transform DHEA into E2, we could determine the sequential steps and the specific steroidogenic enzymes involved in the transformation of DHEA into E2. Quantification of mRNA expression levels using real-time PCR, strongly suggests that type 1 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD1), aromatase and type 1 17beta-HSD (17beta-HSD1) that are highly expressed in JEG-3 cells are the enzymes responsible for the transformation of DHEA into E2. Analysis of the intermediates produced in the absence and presence of 3beta-HSD, aromatase and 17beta-HSD1 inhibitors permits to determine the following sequential steps: DHEA is transformed into 4-dione by 3beta-HSD1, then 4-dione is aromatized into E1 by aromatase and E1 is finally transformed into E2 by 17beta-HSD1. Our data are clearly in favor of the pathway in which the step of aromatization precedes the step of reduction by 17beta-HSD.

  15. The Magnesium Branch of the Tetrapyrrole Biosynthetic Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, S. I.

    2004-05-11

    It should be noted that the focus of the research changed somewhat during the course of the current award. The initial focus is indicated by the title of the current grant, ''The Magnesium Branch of the Chlorophyll Biosynthetic Pathway''. During the current grant period, Dr. Robert Willows, a postdoctoral associate, joined the faculty of McQuarie University in Australia. When he left my lab, we decided that he should independently pursue research on structure/function relationships in Mg chelatase and that our laboratories would collaborate on regulatory studies of this enzyme. Also, during the current award period, I began collaborating with Dr. Ariane Atteia and Mr. Robert van Lis, who were at the time located at the Autonomous University of Mexico. Dr. Atteia has since joined my laboratory and Mr. van Lis will also do so when he obtains his Ph.D. in the near future. These individuals bring to the laboratory their interests and expertise in the respiratory components of Chlamydomonas and their desire to become experts in tetrapyrrole metabolism. Recently, in a collaboration with Dr. David Bollivar, a former postdoctoral associate who is now at Illinois Wesleyan University, and Dr. Caroline Walker, who was at Clemson University but has since left this research area, we recently made a major breakthrough on the oxygen-independent cyclase reaction, which has now become an important component of the current proposal. Finally, our research on phycobilin biosynthesis in Synechucystis has revealed that this organism can grow at very low oxygen concentrations and its genome contains several genes that may encode for enzymes that catalyze alternative oxygen-independent reactions for tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, so characterizing the genes, their enzymes, and regulation of expression have also become parts of the current proposal.

  16. Multicenter, Prospective, Longitudinal Study of the Recurrence, Surgical Site Infection, and Quality of Life After Contaminated Ventral Hernia Repair Using Biosynthetic Absorbable Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Michael J.; Bauer, Joel J.; Harmaty, Marco; Carbonell, Alfredo M.; Cobb, William S.; Matthews, Brent; Goldblatt, Matthew I.; Selzer, Don J.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Hansson, Bibi M. E.; Rosman, Camiel; Chao, James J.; Jacobsen, Garth R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate biosynthetic absorbable mesh in single-staged contaminated (Centers for Disease Control class II and III) ventral hernia (CVH) repair over 24 months. Background: CVH has an increased risk of postoperative infection. CVH repair with synthetic or biologic meshes has reported chronic biomaterial infections and high hernia recurrence rates. Methods: Patients with a contaminated or clean-contaminated operative field and a hernia defect at least 9 cm2 had a biosynthetic mesh (open, sublay, retrorectus, or intraperitoneal) repair with fascial closure (n = 104). Endpoints included overall Kaplan-Meier estimates for hernia recurrence and postoperative wound infection rates at 24 months, and the EQ-5D and Short Form 12 Health Survey (SF-12). Analyses were conducted on the intent-to-treat population, and health outcome measures evaluated using paired t tests. Results: Patients had a mean age of 58 years, body mass index of 28 kg/m2, 77% had contaminated wounds, and 84% completed 24-months follow-up. Concomitant procedures included fistula takedown (n = 24) or removal of infected previously placed mesh (n = 29). Hernia recurrence rate was 17% (n = 16). At the time of CVH repair, intraperitoneal placement of the biosynthetic mesh significantly increased the risk of recurrences (P ≤ 0.04). Surgical site infections (19/104) led to higher risk of recurrence (P < 0.01). Mean 24-month EQ-5D (index and visual analogue) and SF-12 physical component and mental scores improved from baseline (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In this prospective longitudinal study, biosynthetic absorbable mesh showed efficacy in terms of long-term recurrence and quality of life for CVH repair patients and offers an alternative to biologic and permanent synthetic meshes in these complex situations. PMID:28009747

  17. Regulation of the Omega-3 Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway in Atlantic Salmon Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruyter, Bente; Berge, Gerd Marit; Sun, Yajing; Østbye, Tone-Kari Knutsdatter

    2016-01-01

    Limited availability of the n-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA have led to an interest in better understanding of the n-3 biosynthetic pathway and its regulation. The biosynthesis of alpha-linolenic acid to EPA and DHA involves several complex reaction steps including desaturation-, elongation- and peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes. The aims of the present experiments were to gain more knowledge on how this biosynthesis is regulated over time by different doses and fatty acid combinations. Hepatocytes isolated from salmon were incubated with various levels and combinations of oleic acid, EPA and DHA. Oleic acid led to a higher expression of the Δ6 fatty acid desaturase (fad) genes Δ6fad_a, Δ6fad_b, Δ6fad_c and the elongase genes elovl2 compared with cells cultured in medium enriched with DHA. Further, the study showed rhythmic variations in expression over time. Levels were reached where a further increase in specific fatty acids given to the cells not stimulated the conversion further. The gene expression of Δ6fad_a_and Δ6fad_b responded similar to fatty acid treatment, suggesting a co-regulation of these genes, whereas Δ5fad and Δ6fad_c showed a different regulation pattern. EPA and DHA induced different gene expression patterns, especially of Δ6fad_a. Addition of radiolabelled alpha-linolenic acid to the hepatocytes confirmed a higher degree of elongation and desaturation in cells treated with oleic acid compared to cells treated with DHA. This study suggests a complex regulation of the conversion process of n-3 fatty acids. Several factors, such as that the various gene copies are differently regulated, the gene expression show rhythmic variations and gene expression only affected to a certain level, determines when you get the maximum conversion of the beneficial n-3 fatty acids. PMID:27973547

  18. Metagenomic natural product discovery in lichen provides evidence for a family of biosynthetic pathways in diverse symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Kampa, Annette; Gagunashvili, Andrey N.; Gulder, Tobias A. M.; Morinaka, Brandon I.; Daolio, Cristina; Godejohann, Markus; Miao, Vivian P. W.; Piel, Jörn; Andrésson, Ólafur S.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria are a major source of natural products that provide rich opportunities for both chemical and biological investigation. Although the vast majority of known bacterial metabolites derive from free-living organisms, increasing evidence supports the widespread existence of chemically prolific bacteria living in symbioses. A strategy based on bioinformatic prediction, symbiont cultivation, isotopic enrichment, and advanced analytics was used to characterize a unique polyketide, nosperin, from a lichen-associated Nostoc sp. cyanobacterium. The biosynthetic gene cluster and the structure of nosperin, determined from 30 μg of compound, are related to those of the pederin group previously known only from nonphotosynthetic bacteria associated with beetles and marine sponges. The presence of this natural product family in such highly dissimilar associations suggests that some bacterial metabolites may be specific to symbioses with eukaryotes and encourages exploration of other symbioses for drug discovery and better understanding of ecological interactions mediated by complex bacterial metabolites. PMID:23898213

  19. Metagenomic natural product discovery in lichen provides evidence for a family of biosynthetic pathways in diverse symbioses.

    PubMed

    Kampa, Annette; Gagunashvili, Andrey N; Gulder, Tobias A M; Morinaka, Brandon I; Daolio, Cristina; Godejohann, Markus; Miao, Vivian P W; Piel, Jörn; Andrésson, Ólafur S

    2013-08-13

    Bacteria are a major source of natural products that provide rich opportunities for both chemical and biological investigation. Although the vast majority of known bacterial metabolites derive from free-living organisms, increasing evidence supports the widespread existence of chemically prolific bacteria living in symbioses. A strategy based on bioinformatic prediction, symbiont cultivation, isotopic enrichment, and advanced analytics was used to characterize a unique polyketide, nosperin, from a lichen-associated Nostoc sp. cyanobacterium. The biosynthetic gene cluster and the structure of nosperin, determined from 30 μg of compound, are related to those of the pederin group previously known only from nonphotosynthetic bacteria associated with beetles and marine sponges. The presence of this natural product family in such highly dissimilar associations suggests that some bacterial metabolites may be specific to symbioses with eukaryotes and encourages exploration of other symbioses for drug discovery and better understanding of ecological interactions mediated by complex bacterial metabolites.

  20. Nonlinear biosynthetic gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Jeroen G; Ebbendorf, Bjorg; Woszczynska, Marta; Boer, Rémon; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2010-11-01

    Industrial penicillin production levels by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum increased dramatically by classical strain improvement. High-yielding strains contain multiple copies of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes three key enzymes of the β-lactam biosynthetic pathway. We have analyzed the gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production using the high-yielding P. chrysogenum strain DS17690 that was cured from its native clusters. The amount of penicillin V produced increased with the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster number but was saturated at high copy numbers. Likewise, transcript levels of the biosynthetic genes pcbAB [δ-(l-α-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine synthetase], pcbC (isopenicillin N synthase), and penDE (acyltransferase) correlated with the cluster copy number. Remarkably, the protein level of acyltransferase, which localizes to peroxisomes, was saturated already at low cluster copy numbers. At higher copy numbers, intracellular levels of isopenicillin N increased, suggesting that the acyltransferase reaction presents a limiting step at a high gene dose. Since the number and appearance of the peroxisomes did not change significantly with the gene cluster copy number, we conclude that the acyltransferase activity is limiting for penicillin biosynthesis at high biosynthetic gene cluster copy numbers. These results suggest that at a high penicillin production level, productivity is limited by the peroxisomal acyltransferase import activity and/or the availability of coenzyme A (CoA)-activated side chains.

  1. Engineered Streptomyces avermitilis host for heterologous expression of biosynthetic gene cluster for secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    KOMATSU, MAMORU; KOMATSU, KYOKO; KOIWAI, HANAE; YAMADA, YUUKI; KOZONE, IKUKO; IZUMIKAWA, MIHO; HASHIMOTO, JUNKO; TAKAGI, MOTOKI; OMURA, SATOSHI; SHIN-YA, KAZUO; CANE, DAVID E.; IKEDA, HARUO

    2014-01-01

    An industrial microorganism Streptomyces avermitilis, which is a producer of anthelmintic macrocyclic lactones, avermectins, has been constructed as a versatile model host for heterologous expression of genes encoding secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Twenty of the entire biosynthetic gene clusters for secondary metabolites were successively cloned and introduced into a versatile model host S. avermitilis SUKA17 or 22. Almost all S. avermitilis transformants carrying the entire gene cluster produced metabolites as a result of the expression of biosynthetic gene clusters introduced. A few transformants were unable to produce metabolites but their production was restored by the expression of biosynthetic genes using an alternative promoter or the expression of a regulatory gene in the gene cluster that controls the expression of biosynthetic genes in the cluster using an alternative promoter. Production of metabolites in some transformants of the versatile host was higher than that of the original producers and cryptic biosynthetic gene clusters in the original producer were also expressed in a versatile host. PMID:23654282

  2. The oxalic acid biosynthetic activity of Burkholderia mallei is encoded by a single locus.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2011-10-20

    Although it is known that oxalic acid provides a selective advantage to the secreting microbe our understanding of how this acid is biosynthesized remains incomplete. This study reports the identification, cloning, and partial characterization of the oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme from the animal bacterial pathogen, Burkholderia mallei. The discovered gene was named oxalate biosynthetic component (obc)1. Complementation of Burkholderia oxalate defective (Bod)1, a Burkholderia glumae mutant that lacks expression of a functional oxalic acid biosynthetic operon, revealed that the obc1 was able to rescue the no oxalate mutant phenotype. This single gene rescue is in contrast to the situation found in B. glumae which required the expression of two genes, obcA and obcB, to achieve complementation. Enzyme assays showed that even though the two Burkholderia species differed in the number of genes required to encode a functional enzyme, both catalyzed the same acyl-CoA dependent biosynthetic reaction. In addition, mutagenesis studies suggested a similar domain structure of the assembled oxalate biosynthetic enzymes whether encoded by one or two genes.

  3. Genomic insights into the evolution of hybrid isoprenoid biosynthetic gene clusters in the MAR4 marine streptomycete clade

    DOE PAGES

    Gallagher, Kelley A.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-11-17

    Background: Considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular genetics of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Coupled with increased access to genome sequence data, new insight can be gained into the diversity and distributions of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and the evolutionary processes that generate them. Here we examine the distribution of gene clusters predicted to encode the biosynthesis of a structurally diverse class of molecules called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs) in the genus Streptomyces. These compounds are derived from a mixed biosynthetic origin that is characterized by the incorporation of a terpene moiety onto a variety of chemicalmore » scaffolds and include many potent antibiotic and cytotoxic agents. Results: One hundred and twenty Streptomyces genomes were searched for HI biosynthetic gene clusters using ABBA prenyltransferases (PTases) as queries. These enzymes are responsible for a key step in HI biosynthesis. The strains included 12 that belong to the ‘MAR4’ clade, a largely marine-derived lineage linked to the production of diverse HI secondary metabolites. We found ABBA PTase homologs in all of the MAR4 genomes, which averaged five copies per strain, compared with 21 % of the non-MAR4 genomes, which averaged one copy per strain. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that MAR4 PTase diversity has arisen by a combination of horizontal gene transfer and gene duplication. Furthermore, there is evidence that HI gene cluster diversity is generated by the horizontal exchange of orthologous PTases among clusters. Many putative HI gene clusters have not been linked to their secondary metabolic products, suggesting that MAR4 strains will yield additional new compounds in this structure class. Finally, we confirm that the mevalonate pathway is not always present in genomes that contain HI gene clusters and thus is not a reliable query for identifying strains with the potential to produce HI secondary metabolites

  4. Genomic insights into the evolution of hybrid isoprenoid biosynthetic gene clusters in the MAR4 marine streptomycete clade

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Kelley A.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-11-17

    Background: Considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular genetics of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Coupled with increased access to genome sequence data, new insight can be gained into the diversity and distributions of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and the evolutionary processes that generate them. Here we examine the distribution of gene clusters predicted to encode the biosynthesis of a structurally diverse class of molecules called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs) in the genus Streptomyces. These compounds are derived from a mixed biosynthetic origin that is characterized by the incorporation of a terpene moiety onto a variety of chemical scaffolds and include many potent antibiotic and cytotoxic agents. Results: One hundred and twenty Streptomyces genomes were searched for HI biosynthetic gene clusters using ABBA prenyltransferases (PTases) as queries. These enzymes are responsible for a key step in HI biosynthesis. The strains included 12 that belong to the ‘MAR4’ clade, a largely marine-derived lineage linked to the production of diverse HI secondary metabolites. We found ABBA PTase homologs in all of the MAR4 genomes, which averaged five copies per strain, compared with 21 % of the non-MAR4 genomes, which averaged one copy per strain. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that MAR4 PTase diversity has arisen by a combination of horizontal gene transfer and gene duplication. Furthermore, there is evidence that HI gene cluster diversity is generated by the horizontal exchange of orthologous PTases among clusters. Many putative HI gene clusters have not been linked to their secondary metabolic products, suggesting that MAR4 strains will yield additional new compounds in this structure class. Finally, we confirm that the mevalonate pathway is not always present in genomes that contain HI gene clusters and thus is not a reliable query for identifying strains with the potential to produce HI secondary metabolites. In

  5. Interplay between Siderophores and Colibactin Genotoxin Biosynthetic Pathways in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Patricia; Marcq, Ingrid; Magistro, Giuseppe; Penary, Marie; Garcie, Christophe; Payros, Delphine; Boury, Michèle; Olier, Maïwenn; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Audebert, Marc; Chalut, Christian; Schubert, Sören; Oswald, Eric

    2013-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the biosynthetic pathways of several small iron-scavenging molecules known as siderophores (enterobactin, salmochelins and yersiniabactin) and of a genotoxin (colibactin) are known to require a 4′-phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase). Only two PPTases have been clearly identified: EntD and ClbA. The gene coding for EntD is part of the core genome of E. coli, whereas ClbA is encoded on the pks pathogenicity island which codes for colibactin. Interestingly, the pks island is physically associated with the high pathogenicity island (HPI) in a subset of highly virulent E. coli strains. The HPI carries the gene cluster required for yersiniabactin synthesis except for a gene coding its cognate PPTase. Here we investigated a potential interplay between the synthesis pathways leading to the production of siderophores and colibactin, through a functional interchangeability between EntD and ClbA. We demonstrated that ClbA could contribute to siderophores synthesis. Inactivation of both entD and clbA abolished the virulence of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) in a mouse sepsis model, and the presence of either functional EntD or ClbA was required for the survival of ExPEC in vivo. This is the first report demonstrating a connection between multiple phosphopantetheinyl-requiring pathways leading to the biosynthesis of functionally distinct secondary metabolites in a given microorganism. Therefore, we hypothesize that the strict association of the pks island with HPI has been selected in highly virulent E. coli because ClbA is a promiscuous PPTase that can contribute to the synthesis of both the genotoxin and siderophores. The data highlight the complex regulatory interaction of various virulence features with different functions. The identification of key points of these networks is not only essential to the understanding of ExPEC virulence but also an attractive and promising target for the development of anti-virulence therapy strategies

  6. Beta-lactam antibiotic biosynthetic genes have been conserved in clusters in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Burnham, M K; Bull, J H; Hodgson, J E; Ward, J M; Browne, P; Brown, J; Barton, B; Earl, A J; Turner, G

    1990-01-01

    A cosmid clone containing closely linked beta-lactam antibiotic biosynthetic genes was isolated from a gene library of Flavobacterium sp. SC 12,154. The location within the cluster of the DNA thought to contain the gene for delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS), the first step in the beta-lactam antibiotic biosynthetic pathway, was identified by a novel method. This DNA facilitated the isolation, by cross-hybridization, of the corresponding DNA from Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064, Penicillium chrysogenum Oli13 and Aspergillus nidulans R153. Evidence was obtained which confirmed that the cross-hybridizing sequences contained the ACVS gene. In each case the ACVS gene was found to be closely linked to other beta-lactam biosynthetic genes and constituted part of a gene cluster. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2107074

  7. Assembly of a novel biosynthetic pathway for production of the plant flavonoid fisetin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stahlhut, Steen G; Siedler, Solvej; Malla, Sailesh; Harrison, Scott J; Maury, Jérôme; Neves, Ana Rute; Forster, Jochen

    2015-09-01

    Plant secondary metabolites are an underutilized pool of bioactive molecules for applications in the food, pharma and nutritional industries. One such molecule is fisetin, which is present in many fruits and vegetables and has several potential health benefits, including anti-cancer, anti-viral and anti-aging activity. Moreover, fisetin has recently been shown to prevent Alzheimer's disease in mice and to prevent complications associated with diabetes type I. Thus far the biosynthetic pathway of fisetin in plants remains elusive. Here, we present the heterologous assembly of a novel fisetin pathway in Escherichia coli. We propose a novel biosynthetic pathway from the amino acid, tyrosine, utilizing nine heterologous enzymes. The pathway proceeds via the synthesis of two flavanones never produced in microorganisms before--garbanzol and resokaempferol. We show for the first time a functional biosynthetic pathway and establish E. coli as a microbial platform strain for the production of fisetin and related flavonols.

  8. Volatile terpenes from actinomycetes: a biosynthetic study correlating chemical analyses to genome data.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Patrick; Citron, Christian A; Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2013-11-25

    The volatile terpenes of 24 actinomycetes whose genomes have been sequenced (or are currently being sequenced) were collected by use of a closed-loop stripping apparatus and identified by GC/MS. The analytical data were compared against a phylogenetic analysis of all 192 currently available sequences of bacterial terpene cyclases (excluding geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases). In addition to the several groups of terpenes with known biosynthetic origin, selinadienes were identified as a large group of biosynthetically related sesquiterpenes that are produced by several streptomycetes. The detection of a large number of previously unrecognised side products of known terpene cyclases proved to be particularly important for an in depth understanding of biosynthetic pathways to known terpenes in actinomycetes. Interpretation of the chemical analytical data in the context of the phylogenetic tree of bacterial terpene cyclases pointed to the function of three new enzymes: (E)-β-caryophyllene synthase, selina-3,7(11)-diene synthase and aristolochene synthase.

  9. Polyketide synthase chemistry does not direct biosynthetic divergence between 9- and 10-membered enediynes.

    PubMed

    Horsman, Geoff P; Chen, Yihua; Thorson, Jon S; Shen, Ben

    2010-06-22

    Enediynes are potent antitumor antibiotics that are classified as 9- or 10-membered according to the size of the enediyne core structure. However, almost nothing is known about enediyne core biosynthesis, and the determinants of 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence remain elusive. Previous work identified enediyne-specific polyketide synthases (PKSEs) that can be phylogenetically distinguished as being involved in 9- versus 10-membered enediyne biosynthesis, suggesting that biosynthetic divergence might originate from differing PKSE chemistries. Recent in vitro studies have identified several compounds produced by the PKSE and associated thioesterase (TE), but condition-dependent product profiles make it difficult to ascertain a true catalytic difference between 9- and 10-membered PKSE-TE systems. Here we report that PKSE chemistry does not direct 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence as revealed by comparing the products from three 9-membered and two 10-membered PKSE-TE systems under identical conditions using robust in vivo assays. Three independent experiments support a common catalytic function for 9- and 10-membered PKSEs by the production of a heptaene metabolite from: (i) all five cognate PKSE-TE pairs in Escherichia coli; (ii) the C-1027 and calicheamicin cognate PKSE-TEs in Streptomyces lividans K4-114; and (iii) selected native producers of both 9- and 10-membered enediynes. Furthermore, PKSEs and TEs from different 9- and 10-membered enediyne biosynthetic machineries are freely interchangeable, revealing that 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence occurs beyond the PKSE-TE level. These findings establish a starting point for determining the origins of this biosynthetic divergence.

  10. Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis of Insulin Secretory Granule Proteins from Biosynthetically-Labeled Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse-chase radiolabeling of cells with radioactive amino acids is a common method for tracking the biosynthesis of proteins. Radiolabeled newly synthesized proteins can be analyzed by a number of techniques such as two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). This chapter presents a protocol for the biosynthetic labeling of pancreatic islets with (35)S-methionine in the presence of basal and stimulatory concentrations of glucose, followed by subcellular fractionation to produce a secretory granule fraction and analysis of the granule protein contents by 2DE. This provides a means of determining whether or not the biosynthetic rates of the entire granule constituents are coordinately regulated.

  11. 2D Gel Electrophoresis of Insulin Secretory Granule Proteins from Biosynthetically Labelled Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabelling of cells with radioactive amino acids such is a common method for investigating the biosynthetic rates of proteins. In this way, the abundance of newly synthesized proteins can be determined by several proteomic techniques including 2D gel electrophoresis (2DE). This chapter describes a protocol for labelling pancreatic islets with (35)S-methionine in the presence of low and high concentrations of glucose, followed by subcellular fractionation enrichment of secretory granule proteins and analysis of the granule protein contents by 2DE. This demonstrated that the biosynthetic rates of most of the granule proteins are co-ordinately regulated in the presence of stimulatory glucose concentrations.

  12. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  13. The mangotoxin biosynthetic operon (mbo) is specifically distributed within Pseudomonas syringae genomospecies 1 and was acquired only once during evolution.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Víctor J; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A; Arrebola, Eva; Bardaji, Leire; Codina, Juan C; de Vicente, Antonio; Cazorla, Francisco M; Murillo, Jesús

    2013-02-01

    Mangotoxin production was first described in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains. A phenotypic characterization of 94 P. syringae strains was carried out to determine the genetic evolution of the mangotoxin biosynthetic operon (mbo). We designed a PCR primer pair specific for the mbo operon to examine its distribution within the P. syringae complex. These primers amplified a 692-bp DNA fragment from 52 mangotoxin-producing strains and from 7 non-mangotoxin-producing strains that harbor the mbo operon, whereas 35 non-mangotoxin-producing strains did not yield any amplification. This, together with the analysis of draft genomes, allowed the identification of the mbo operon in five pathovars (pathovars aptata, avellanae, japonica, pisi, and syringae), all of which belong to genomospecies 1, suggesting a limited distribution of the mbo genes in the P. syringae complex. Phylogenetic analyses using partial sequences from housekeeping genes differentiated three groups within genomospecies 1. All of the strains containing the mbo operon clustered in groups I and II, whereas those lacking the operon clustered in group III; however, the relative branching order of these three groups is dependent on the genes used to construct the phylogeny. The mbo operon maintains synteny and is inserted in the same genomic location, with high sequence conservation around the insertion point, for all the strains in groups I and II. These data support the idea that the mbo operon was acquired horizontally and only once by the ancestor of groups I and II from genomospecies 1 within the P. syringae complex.

  14. Accumulation of Rutin and Betulinic Acid and Expression of Phenylpropanoid and Triterpenoid Biosynthetic Genes in Mulberry (Morus alba L.).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shicheng; Park, Chang Ha; Li, Xiaohua; Kim, Yeon Bok; Yang, Jingli; Sung, Gyoo Byung; Park, Nam Il; Kim, Soonok; Park, Sang Un

    2015-09-30

    Mulberry (Morus alba L.) is used in traditional Chinese medicine and is the sole food source of the silkworm. Here, 21 cDNAs encoding phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and 21 cDNAs encoding triterpene biosynthetic genes were isolated from mulberry. The expression levels of genes involved in these biosynthetic pathways and the accumulation of rutin, betulin, and betulinic acid, important secondary metabolites, were investigated in different plant organs. Most phenylpropanoid and triterpene biosynthetic genes were highly expressed in leaves and/or fruit, and most genes were downregulated during fruit ripening. The accumulation of rutin was more than fivefold higher in leaves than in other organs, and higher levels of betulin and betulinic acid were found in roots and leaves than in fruit. By comparing the contents of these compounds with gene expression levels, we speculate that MaUGT78D1 and MaLUS play important regulatory roles in the rutin and betulin biosynthetic pathways.

  15. Genetic and biosynthetic studies of the fungal prenylated xanthone shamixanthone and related metabolites in Aspergillus spp. revisited.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Thomas J

    2012-07-23

    Biosynthetic genes for the prenylated xanthone shamixanthone have been identified in the Aspergillus nidulans genome; based on assignment of putative functions from sequence analyses and selected gene deletions, a pathway was proposed leading from the anthraquinone emodin via the benzophenone carboxylic acid monodictyphenone and the xanthone emericellin to shamixanthone. Several aspects of this proposed pathway are inconsistent with previously identified biosynthetic intermediates: the anthraquinone chrysophanol and the benzophenone aldehyde derivatives arugosins F and A/B, isotopic labelling studies and chemical precedents. A new pathway is presented that provides a full rationale for the results of the gene deletion studies and reconciles them with previous biosynthetic results, and is in accord with established chemical and biosynthetic mechanisms. The importance of interpreting genetic information in terms of established biosynthetic events is discussed.

  16. Altered expression of polyketide biosynthetic gene clusters in fumonisin-deficient mutants of Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of maize and produces fumonisins, a group of polyketide derived secondary metabolites. Fumonisins cause diseases in animals, and they have been correlated epidemiologically with esophageal cancer and birth defects in humans. Fumonisin biosynthetic genes are c...

  17. Covariation and phenotypic integration in chemical communication displays: biosynthetic constraints and eco-evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Junker, Robert R; Kuppler, Jonas; Amo, Luisa; Blande, James D; Borges, Renee M; van Dam, Nicole M; Dicke, Marcel; Dötterl, Stefan; Ehlers, Bodil K; Etl, Florian; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Glinwood, Robert; Gols, Rieta; Groot, Astrid T; Heil, Martin; Hoffmeister, Mathias; Holopainen, Jarmo K; Jarau, Stefan; John, Lena; Kessler, Andre; Knudsen, Jette T; Kost, Christian; Larue-Kontic, Anne-Amélie C; Leonhardt, Sara Diana; Lucas-Barbosa, Dani; Majetic, Cassie J; Menzel, Florian; Parachnowitsch, Amy L; Pasquet, Rémy S; Poelman, Erik H; Raguso, Robert A; Ruther, Joachim; Schiestl, Florian P; Schmitt, Thomas; Tholl, Dorothea; Unsicker, Sybille B; Verhulst, Niels; Visser, Marcel E; Weldegergis, Berhane T; Köllner, Tobias G

    2017-03-03

    Chemical communication is ubiquitous. The identification of conserved structural elements in visual and acoustic communication is well established, but comparable information on chemical communication displays (CCDs) is lacking. We assessed the phenotypic integration of CCDs in a meta-analysis to characterize patterns of covariation in CCDs and identified functional or biosynthetically constrained modules. Poorly integrated plant CCDs (i.e. low covariation between scent compounds) support the notion that plants often utilize one or few key compounds to repel antagonists or to attract pollinators and enemies of herbivores. Animal CCDs (mostly insect pheromones) were usually more integrated than those of plants (i.e. stronger covariation), suggesting that animals communicate via fixed proportions among compounds. Both plant and animal CCDs were composed of modules, which are groups of strongly covarying compounds. Biosynthetic similarity of compounds revealed biosynthetic constraints in the covariation patterns of plant CCDs. We provide a novel perspective on chemical communication and a basis for future investigations on structural properties of CCDs. This will facilitate identifying modules and biosynthetic constraints that may affect the outcome of selection and thus provide a predictive framework for evolutionary trajectories of CCDs in plants and animals.

  18. Urban park soil microbiomes are a rich reservoir of natural product biosynthetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Pregitzer, Clara C; Lemetre, Christophe; Ternei, Melinda A; Maniko, Jeffrey; Hover, Bradley M; Calle, Paula Y; McGuire, Krista L; Garbarino, Jeanne; Forgione, Helen M; Charlop-Powers, Sarah; Brady, Sean F

    2016-12-20

    Numerous therapeutically relevant small molecules have been identified from the screening of natural products (NPs) produced by environmental bacteria. These discovery efforts have principally focused on culturing bacteria from natural environments rich in biodiversity. We sought to assess the biosynthetic capacity of urban soil environments using a phylogenetic analysis of conserved NP biosynthetic genes amplified directly from DNA isolated from New York City park soils. By sequencing genes involved in the biosynthesis of nonribosomal peptides and polyketides, we found that urban park soil microbiomes are both rich in biosynthetic diversity and distinct from nonurban samples in their biosynthetic gene composition. A comparison of sequences derived from New York City parks to genes involved in the biosynthesis of biomedically important NPs produced by bacteria originally collected from natural environments around the world suggests that bacteria producing these same families of clinically important antibiotics, antifungals, and anticancer agents are actually present in the soils of New York City. The identification of new bacterial NPs often centers on the systematic exploration of bacteria present in natural environments. Here, we find that the soil microbiomes found in large cities likely hold similar promise as rich unexplored sources of clinically relevant NPs.

  19. Dual biosynthetic pathways to phytosterol via cycloartenol and lanosterol in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Masashi; Kikuchi, Jun; Saito, Kazuki; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2009-01-01

    The differences between the biosynthesis of sterols in higher plants and yeast/mammals are believed to originate at the cyclization step of oxidosqualene, which is cyclized to cycloartenol in higher plants and lanosterol in yeast/mammals. Recently, lanosterol synthase genes were identified from dicotyledonous plant species including Arabidopsis, suggesting that higher plants possess dual biosynthetic pathways to phytosterols via lanosterol, and through cycloartenol. To identify the biosynthetic pathway to phytosterol via lanosterol, and to reveal the contributions to phytosterol biosynthesis via each cycloartenol and lanosterol, we performed feeding experiments by using [6-13C2H3]mevalonate with Arabidopsis seedlings. Applying 13C-{1H}{2H} nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, the elucidation of deuterium on C-19 behavior of phytosterol provided evidence that small amounts of phytosterol were biosynthesized via lanosterol. The levels of phytosterol increased on overexpression of LAS1, and phytosterols derived from lanosterol were not observed in a LAS1-knockout plant. This is direct evidence to indicate that the biosynthetic pathway for phytosterol via lanosterol exists in plant cells. We designate the biosynthetic pathway to phytosterols via lanosterol “the lanosterol pathway.” LAS1 expression is reported to be induced by the application of jasmonate and is thought to have evolved from an ancestral cycloartenol synthase to a triterpenoid synthase, such as β-amyrin synthase and lupeol synthase. Considering this background, the lanosterol pathway may contribute to the biosynthesis of not only phytosterols, but also steroids as secondary metabolites. PMID:19139393

  20. Conserved biosynthetic pathways for phosalacine, bialaphos and newly discovered phosphonic acid natural products

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Joshua A. V; Zhang, Jun Kai; Yu, Xiaomin; Metcalf, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products containing phosphonic or phosphinic acid functionalities often display potent biological activities with applications in medicine and agriculture. The herbicide phosphinothricin-tripeptide (PTT) was the first phosphinate natural product discovered, yet despite numerous studies, questions remain surrounding key transformations required for its biosynthesis. In particular, the enzymology required to convert phosphonoformate to carboxyphosphonoenolpyruvate and the mechanisms underlying phosphorus-methylation remain poorly understood. In addition, the model for NRPS assembly of the intact tripeptide product has undergone numerous revisions that have yet to be experimentally tested. To further investigate the biosynthesis of this unusual natural product, we completely sequenced the PTT biosynthetic locus from Streptomyces hygroscopicus and compared it to the orthologous cluster from Streptomyces viridochromogenes. We also sequenced and analysed the closely related phosalacine (PAL) biosynthetic locus from Kitasatospora phosalacinea. Using data drawn from the comparative analysis of the PTT and PAL pathways, we also evaluate three related recently discovered phosphonate biosynthetic loci from Streptomyces sviceus, Streptomyces sp. WM6386 and Frankia alni. Our observations address long-standing biosynthetic questions related to PTT and PAL production and suggest that additional members of this pharmacologically important class await discovery. PMID:26328935

  1. Conserved biosynthetic pathways for phosalacine, bialaphos and newly discovered phosphonic acid natural products.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Joshua A V; Zhang, Jun Kai; Yu, Xiaomin; Metcalf, William W

    2016-01-01

    Natural products containing phosphonic or phosphinic acid functionalities often display potent biological activities with applications in medicine and agriculture. The herbicide phosphinothricin-tripeptide (PTT) was the first phosphinate natural product discovered, yet despite numerous studies, questions remain surrounding key transformations required for its biosynthesis. In particular, the enzymology required to convert phosphonoformate to carboxyphosphonoenolpyruvate and the mechanisms underlying phosphorus methylation remain poorly understood. In addition, the model for non-ribosomal peptide synthetase assembly of the intact tripeptide product has undergone numerous revisions that have yet to be experimentally tested. To further investigate the biosynthesis of this unusual natural product, we completely sequenced the PTT biosynthetic locus from Streptomyces hygroscopicus and compared it with the orthologous cluster from Streptomyces viridochromogenes. We also sequenced and analyzed the closely related phosalacine (PAL) biosynthetic locus from Kitasatospora phosalacinea. Using data drawn from the comparative analysis of the PTT and PAL pathways, we also evaluate three related recently discovered phosphonate biosynthetic loci from Streptomyces sviceus, Streptomyces sp. WM6386 and Frankia alni. Our observations address long-standing biosynthetic questions related to PTT and PAL production and suggest that additional members of this pharmacologically important class await discovery.

  2. Sugars as the optimal biosynthetic carbon substrate of aqueous life throughout the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Our previous analysis of the energetics of metabolism showed that both the biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids from sugars, and the fermentation of organic substrates, were energetically driven by electron transfer reactions resulting in carbon redox disproportionation (Weber, 1997). Redox disproportionation--the spontaneous (energetically favorable) direction of carbon group transformation in biosynthesis--is brought about and driven by the energetically downhill transfer of electron pairs from more oxidized carbon groups (with lower half-cell reduction potentials) to more reduced carbon groups (with higher half-cell reduction potentials). In this report, we compare the redox and kinetic properties of carbon groups in order to evaluate the relative biosynthetic capability of organic substrates, and to identify the optimal biosubstrate. This analysis revealed that sugars (monocarbonyl alditols) are the optimal biosynthetic substrate because they contain the maximum number of biosynthetically useful high energy electrons/carbon atom while still containing a single carbonyl group needed to kinetically facilitate their conversion to useful biosynthetic intermediates. This conclusion applies to aqueous life throughout the Universe because it is based on invariant aqueous carbon chemistry--primarily, the universal reduction potentials of carbon groups.

  3. Sugars as the Optimal Biosynthetic Carbon Substrate of Aqueous Life throughout the Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1999-01-01

    Our previous analysis of the energetics of metabolism showed that both the biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids from sugars, and the fermentation of organic substrates, were energetically driven by electron transfer reactions resulting in carbon redox disproportionation (Weber 1997). Redox disproportionation -- the spontaneous (energetically favorable) direction of carbon group transformation in biosynthesis -- is brought about and driven by the energetically downhill transfer of electron pairs from more oxidized carbon groups (with lower half-cell reduction potentials) to more reduced carbon groups (with higher half-cell reduction potentials). In this report, we compare the redox and kinetic properties of carbon groups in order to evaluate the relative biosynthetic capability of organic substrates, and to identify the optimal biosubstrate. This analysis revealed that sugars (monocarbonyl alditols) are the optimal biosynthetic substrate because they contain the maximum number of biosynthetically useful .high energy electrons/carbon atom , while still containing a single carbonyl group needed to kinetically facilitate their conversion to useful biosynthetic intermediates. This conclusion applies to aqueous life throughout the Universe because it is based on invariant aqueous carbon chemistry -- primarily, the universal reduction potentials of carbon groups.

  4. The oxalic acid biosynthetic activity of Burkholderia mallei is encoded by a single locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although it is known that oxalic acid provides a selective advantage to the secreting microbe, our understanding of how this acid is biosynthesized remains incomplete. This study reports the identification, cloning, and partial characterization of the oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme from the animal ...

  5. Asymmetric Total Syntheses of (+)- and (−)-Versicolamide B and Biosynthetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Kenneth A.; Tsukamoto, Sachiko; Williams, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is one of the most well-studied, synthetically useful organic transformations. While a significant number of naturally occurring substances are postulated to arise by biosynthetic Diels-Alder reactions, rigorous confirmation of a mechanistically distinct natural Diels-Alderase enzyme remains elusive. Within this context, several related fungi within the Aspergillus genus produce a number of metabolites of opposite absolute configuration including (+)- or (−)-versicolamide B. These alkaloids are hypothesized to arise via biosynthetic Diels-Alder reactions implying that each Aspergillus species possesses enantiomerically distinct Diels-Alderases. Herein, experimental validation of these biosynthetic proposals via deployment of the IMDA reaction as a key step in the asymmetric total syntheses of (+)- and (−)-versicolamide B is described. Laboratory validation of the proposed biosynthetic Diels-Alder construction, coupled with the secondary metabolite profile of the producing fungi, reveals that each Aspergillus species has evolved enantiomerically distinct indole oxidases, as well as enantiomerically distinct Diels-Alderases. PMID:20300443

  6. Characterization of the fumonisin B2 biosynthetic gene cluster in Aspergillus niger and A. awamori.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus niger and A. awamori strains isolated from grapes cultivated in Mediterranean basin were examined for fumonisin B2 (FB2) production and presence/absence of sequences within the fumonisin biosynthetic gene (fum) cluster. Presence of 13 regions in the fum cluster was evaluated by PCR assay...

  7. Sugars as the Optimal Biosynthetic Carbon Substrate of Aqueous Life Throughout the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2000-01-01

    Our previous analysis of the energetics of metabolism showed that both the biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids from sugars, and the fermentation of organic substrates, were energetically driven by electron transfer reactions resulting in carbon redox disproportionation (Weber, 1997). Redox disproportionation - the spontaneous (energetically favorable) direction of carbon group transformation in biosynthesis - is brought about and driven by the energetically downhill transfer of electron pairs from more oxidized carbon groups (with lower half-cell reduction potentials) to more reduced carbon groups (with higher half-cell reduction potentials). In this report, we compare the redox and kinetic properties of carbon groups in order to evaluate the relative biosynthetic capability of organic substrates, and to identify the optimal biosubstrate. This analysis revealed that sugars (monocarbonyl alditols) are the optimal biosynthetic substrate because they contain the maximum number of biosynthetically useful high energy electrons/carbon atom while still containing a single carbonyl group needed to kinetically facilitate their conversion to useful biosynthetic intermediates. This conclusion applies to aqueous life throughout the Universe because it is based on invariant aqueous carbon chemistry - primarily, the universal reduction potentials of carbon groups.

  8. Molecular Characterization of the Cercosporin Biosynthetic Pathway in the Fungal Plant Pathogen Cercospora nicotianae

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Adam G.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Perylenequinones are a class of photoactivated polyketide mycotoxins produced by fungal plant pathogens that notably produce reactive oxygen species with visible light. The best-studied perylenequinone is cercosporin—a product of the Cercospora species. While the cercosporin biosynthetic gene cluster has been described in the tobacco pathogen Cercospora nicotianae, little is known of the metabolite’s biosynthesis. Furthermore, in vitro investigations of the polyketide synthase central to cercosporin biosynthesis identified the naphthopyrone nor-toralactone as its direct product—an observation in conflict with published biosynthetic proposals. Here, we present an alternative biosynthetic pathway to cercosporin based on metabolites characterized from a series of biosynthetic gene knockouts. We show that nor-toralactone is the key polyketide intermediate and the substrate for the unusual didomain protein CTB3. We demonstrate the unique oxidative cleavage activity of the CTB3 monooxygenase domain in vitro. These data advance our understanding of perylenequinone biosynthesis and expand the biochemical repertoire of flavin-dependent monooxygenases. PMID:26938470

  9. Detection of VM55599 and preparaherquamide from Aspergillus japonicus and Penicillium fellutanum: biosynthetic implications.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yousong; Gruschow, Sabine; Greshock, Thomas J; Finefield, Jennifer M; Sherman, David H; Williams, Robert M

    2008-09-01

    The secondary metabolites VM55599 (4) and preparaherquamide (5) have been identified by LC-MS(n) analysis as natural metabolites in cultures of Penicillium fellutanum, whereas preparaherquamide has been identified only in cultures of Aspergillus japonicus. In accord with a previous proposal, the identification of both metabolites, which have a diastereomeric relationship, provides indirect support for a unified biosynthetic scheme.

  10. Discovery of the rhizopodin biosynthetic gene cluster in Stigmatella aurantiaca Sg a15 by genome mining.

    PubMed

    Pistorius, Dominik; Müller, Rolf

    2012-02-13

    The field of bacterial natural product research is currently undergoing a paradigm change concerning the discovery of natural products. Previously most efforts were based on isolation of the most abundant compound in an extract, or on tracking bioactivity. However, traditional activity-guided approaches are limited by the available test panels and frequently lead to the rediscovery of already known compounds. The constantly increasing availability of bacterial genome sequences provides the potential for the discovery of a huge number of new natural compounds by in silico identification of biosynthetic gene clusters. Examination of the information on the biosynthetic machinery can further prevent rediscovery of known compounds, and can help identify so far unknown biosynthetic pathways of known compounds. By in silico screening of the genome of the myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca Sg a15, a trans-AT polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS/NRPS) gene cluster was identified that could not be correlated to any secondary metabolite known to be produced by this strain. Targeted gene inactivation and analysis of extracts from the resulting mutants by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS), in combination with the use of statistical tools resulted in the identification of a compound that was absent in the mutants extracts. By matching with our in-house database of myxobacterial secondary metabolites, this compound was identified as rhizopodin. A detailed analysis of the rhizopodin biosynthetic machinery is presented in this manuscript.

  11. Biosynthetic consequences of multiple sequential post-transition-state bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young Joo; Tantillo, Dean J

    2014-02-01

    Selectivity in chemical reactions that form complex molecular architectures from simpler precursors is usually rationalized by comparing competing transition-state structures that lead to different possible products. Herein we describe a system for which a single transition-state structure leads to the formation of many isomeric products via pathways that feature multiple sequential bifurcations. The reaction network described connects the pimar-15-en-8-yl cation to miltiradiene, a tricyclic diterpene natural product, and isomers via cyclizations and/or rearrangements. The results suggest that the selectivity of the reaction is controlled by (post-transition-state) dynamic effects, that is, how the carbocation structure changes in response to the distribution of energy in its vibrational modes. The inherent dynamical effects revealed herein (characterized through quasiclassical direct dynamics calculations using density functional theory) have implications not only for the general principles of selectivity prediction in systems with complex potential energy surfaces, but also for the mechanisms of terpene synthase enzymes and their evolution. These findings redefine the challenges faced by nature in controlling the biosynthesis of complex natural products.

  12. Functional conservation of coenzyme Q biosynthetic genes among yeasts, plants, and humans.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Ogiyama, Yuki; Yokomi, Kazumasa; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Kaino, Tomohiro; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an essential factor for aerobic growth and oxidative phosphorylation in the electron transport system. The biosynthetic pathway for CoQ has been proposed mainly from biochemical and genetic analyses of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae; however, the biosynthetic pathway in higher eukaryotes has been explored in only a limited number of studies. We previously reported the roles of several genes involved in CoQ synthesis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we expand these findings by identifying ten genes (dps1, dlp1, ppt1, and coq3-9) that are required for CoQ synthesis. CoQ10-deficient S. pombe coq deletion strains were generated and characterized. All mutant fission yeast strains were sensitive to oxidative stress, produced a large amount of sulfide, required an antioxidant to grow on minimal medium, and did not survive at the stationary phase. To compare the biosynthetic pathway of CoQ in fission yeast with that in higher eukaryotes, the ability of CoQ biosynthetic genes from humans and plants (Arabidopsis thaliana) to functionally complement the S. pombe coq deletion strains was determined. With the exception of COQ9, expression of all other human and plant COQ genes recovered CoQ10 production by the fission yeast coq deletion strains, although the addition of a mitochondrial targeting sequence was required for human COQ3 and COQ7, as well as A. thaliana COQ6. In summary, this study describes the functional conservation of CoQ biosynthetic genes between yeasts, humans, and plants.

  13. Characterization of the Promoter Region of Biosynthetic Enzyme Genes Involved in Berberine Biosynthesis in Coptis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Yoshida, Sayumi T.; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs), a plant-specific WRKY-type TF, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix TF, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4′OMT and CYP719A1) were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC) reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4′OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed. PMID:27642289

  14. Porphyrin Binding to Gun4 Protein, Facilitated by a Flexible Loop, Controls Metabolite Flow through the Chlorophyll Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Kopečná, Jana; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Adams, Nathan B P; Davison, Paul A; Brindley, Amanda A; Hunter, C Neil; Guallar, Victor; Sobotka, Roman

    2015-11-20

    In oxygenic phototrophs, chlorophylls, hemes, and bilins are synthesized by a common branched pathway. Given the phototoxic nature of tetrapyrroles, this pathway must be tightly regulated, and an important regulatory role is attributed to magnesium chelatase enzyme at the branching between the heme and chlorophyll pathway. Gun4 is a porphyrin-binding protein known to stimulate in vitro the magnesium chelatase activity, but how the Gun4-porphyrin complex acts in the cell was unknown. To address this issue, we first performed simulations to determine the porphyrin-docking mechanism to the cyanobacterial Gun4 structure. After correcting crystallographic loop contacts, we determined the binding site for magnesium protoporphyrin IX. Molecular modeling revealed that the orientation of α6/α7 loop is critical for the binding, and the magnesium ion held within the porphyrin is coordinated by Asn-211 residue. We also identified the basis for stronger binding in the Gun4-1 variant and for weaker binding in the W192A mutant. The W192A-Gun4 was further characterized in magnesium chelatase assay showing that tight porphyrin binding in Gun4 facilitates its interaction with the magnesium chelatase ChlH subunit. Finally, we introduced the W192A mutation into cells and show that the Gun4-porphyrin complex is important for the accumulation of ChlH and for channeling metabolites into the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway.

  15. Porphyrin Binding to Gun4 Protein, Facilitated by a Flexible Loop, Controls Metabolite Flow through the Chlorophyll Biosynthetic Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kopečná, Jana; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Adams, Nathan B. P.; Davison, Paul A.; Brindley, Amanda A.; Hunter, C. Neil; Guallar, Victor; Sobotka, Roman

    2015-01-01

    In oxygenic phototrophs, chlorophylls, hemes, and bilins are synthesized by a common branched pathway. Given the phototoxic nature of tetrapyrroles, this pathway must be tightly regulated, and an important regulatory role is attributed to magnesium chelatase enzyme at the branching between the heme and chlorophyll pathway. Gun4 is a porphyrin-binding protein known to stimulate in vitro the magnesium chelatase activity, but how the Gun4-porphyrin complex acts in the cell was unknown. To address this issue, we first performed simulations to determine the porphyrin-docking mechanism to the cyanobacterial Gun4 structure. After correcting crystallographic loop contacts, we determined the binding site for magnesium protoporphyrin IX. Molecular modeling revealed that the orientation of α6/α7 loop is critical for the binding, and the magnesium ion held within the porphyrin is coordinated by Asn-211 residue. We also identified the basis for stronger binding in the Gun4-1 variant and for weaker binding in the W192A mutant. The W192A-Gun4 was further characterized in magnesium chelatase assay showing that tight porphyrin binding in Gun4 facilitates its interaction with the magnesium chelatase ChlH subunit. Finally, we introduced the W192A mutation into cells and show that the Gun4-porphyrin complex is important for the accumulation of ChlH and for channeling metabolites into the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. PMID:26446792

  16. Multiple biosynthetic and uptake systems mediate siderophore-dependent iron acquisition in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 23877.

    PubMed

    Barona-Gómez, Francisco; Lautru, Sylvie; Francou, Francois-Xavier; Leblond, Pierre; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Challis, Gregory L

    2006-11-01

    Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition has been well studied in many bacterial pathogens because it contributes to virulence. In contrast, siderophore-mediated iron acquisition by saprophytic bacteria has received relatively little attention. The independent identification of the des and cch gene clusters that direct production of the tris-hydroxamate ferric iron-chelators desferrioxamine E and coelichelin, respectively, which could potentially act as siderophores in the saprophyte Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), has recently been reported. Here it is shown that the des cluster also directs production of desferrioxamine B in S. coelicolor and that very similar des and cch clusters direct production of desferrioxamines E and B, and coelichelin, respectively, in Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 23877. Sequence analyses of the des and cch clusters suggest that components of ferric-siderophore uptake systems are also encoded within each cluster. The construction and analysis of a series of mutants of S. coelicolor lacking just biosynthetic genes or both the biosynthetic and siderophore uptake genes from the des and cch clusters demonstrated that coelichelin and desferrioxamines E and B all function as siderophores in this organism and that at least one of these metabolites is required for growth under defined conditions even in the presence of significant quantities of ferric iron. These experiments also demonstrated that a third siderophore uptake system must be present in S. coelicolor, in addition to the two encoded within the cch and des clusters, which show selectivity for coelichelin and desferrioxamine E, respectively. The ability of the S. coelicolor mutants to utilize a range of exogenous xenosiderophores for iron acquisition was also examined, showing that the third siderophore-iron transport system has broad specificity for tris-hydroxamate-containing siderophores. Together, these results define a complex system of multiple biosynthetic and uptake pathways for

  17. Alternative Sigma Factor Over-Expression Enables Heterologous Expression of a Type II Polyketide Biosynthetic Pathway in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, David Cole; Conway, Kyle R.; Pearce, Nelson; Villegas-Peñaranda, Luis Roberto; Garza, Anthony G.; Boddy, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterologous expression of bacterial biosynthetic gene clusters is currently an indispensable tool for characterizing biosynthetic pathways. Development of an effective, general heterologous expression system that can be applied to bioprospecting from metagenomic DNA will enable the discovery of a wealth of new natural products. Methodology We have developed a new Escherichia coli-based heterologous expression system for polyketide biosynthetic gene clusters. We have demonstrated the over-expression of the alternative sigma factor σ54 directly and positively regulates heterologous expression of the oxytetracycline biosynthetic gene cluster in E. coli. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that σ54 promoters are present in nearly 70% of polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide biosynthetic pathways. Conclusions We have demonstrated a new mechanism for heterologous expression of the oxytetracycline polyketide biosynthetic pathway, where high-level pleiotropic sigma factors from the heterologous host directly and positively regulate transcription of the non-native biosynthetic gene cluster. Our bioinformatics analysis is consistent with the hypothesis that heterologous expression mediated by the alternative sigma factor σ54 may be a viable method for the production of additional polyketide products. PMID:23724102

  18. An Integrated Metabolomic and Genomic Mining Workflow To Uncover the Biosynthetic Potential of Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maansson, Maria; Vynne, Nikolaj G; Klitgaard, Andreas; Nybo, Jane L; Melchiorsen, Jette; Nguyen, Don D; Sanchez, Laura M; Ziemert, Nadine; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Andersen, Mikael R; Gram, Lone

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms are a rich source of bioactives; however, chemical identification is a major bottleneck. Strategies that can prioritize the most prolific microbial strains and novel compounds are of great interest. Here, we present an integrated approach to evaluate the biosynthetic richness in bacteria and mine the associated chemical diversity. Thirteen strains closely related to Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea isolated from all over the Earth were analyzed using an untargeted metabolomics strategy, and metabolomic profiles were correlated with whole-genome sequences of the strains. We found considerable diversity: only 2% of the chemical features and 7% of the biosynthetic genes were common to all strains, while 30% of all features and 24% of the genes were unique to single strains. The list of chemical features was reduced to 50 discriminating features using a genetic algorithm and support vector machines. Features were dereplicated by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) networking to identify molecular families of the same biosynthetic origin, and the associated pathways were probed using comparative genomics. Most of the discriminating features were related to antibacterial compounds, including the thiomarinols that were reported from P. luteoviolacea here for the first time. By comparative genomics, we identified the biosynthetic cluster responsible for the production of the antibiotic indolmycin, which could not be predicted with standard methods. In conclusion, we present an efficient, integrative strategy for elucidating the chemical richness of a given set of bacteria and link the chemistry to biosynthetic genes. IMPORTANCE We here combine chemical analysis and genomics to probe for new bioactive secondary metabolites based on their pattern of distribution within bacterial species. We demonstrate the usefulness of this combined approach in a group of marine Gram-negative bacteria closely related to Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea, which is a species known

  19. An Integrated Metabolomic and Genomic Mining Workflow To Uncover the Biosynthetic Potential of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Maansson, Maria; Vynne, Nikolaj G.; Klitgaard, Andreas; Nybo, Jane L.; Melchiorsen, Jette; Nguyen, Don D.; Sanchez, Laura M.; Ziemert, Nadine; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microorganisms are a rich source of bioactives; however, chemical identification is a major bottleneck. Strategies that can prioritize the most prolific microbial strains and novel compounds are of great interest. Here, we present an integrated approach to evaluate the biosynthetic richness in bacteria and mine the associated chemical diversity. Thirteen strains closely related to Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea isolated from all over the Earth were analyzed using an untargeted metabolomics strategy, and metabolomic profiles were correlated with whole-genome sequences of the strains. We found considerable diversity: only 2% of the chemical features and 7% of the biosynthetic genes were common to all strains, while 30% of all features and 24% of the genes were unique to single strains. The list of chemical features was reduced to 50 discriminating features using a genetic algorithm and support vector machines. Features were dereplicated by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) networking to identify molecular families of the same biosynthetic origin, and the associated pathways were probed using comparative genomics. Most of the discriminating features were related to antibacterial compounds, including the thiomarinols that were reported from P. luteoviolacea here for the first time. By comparative genomics, we identified the biosynthetic cluster responsible for the production of the antibiotic indolmycin, which could not be predicted with standard methods. In conclusion, we present an efficient, integrative strategy for elucidating the chemical richness of a given set of bacteria and link the chemistry to biosynthetic genes. IMPORTANCE We here combine chemical analysis and genomics to probe for new bioactive secondary metabolites based on their pattern of distribution within bacterial species. We demonstrate the usefulness of this combined approach in a group of marine Gram-negative bacteria closely related to Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea, which is a

  20. Structure, function and regulation of the enzymes in the starch biosynthetic pathway.

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Jim

    2013-11-30

    structure of ADP- Glucose pyrophosphorylase from potato in its inhibited conformation, and bound to both ATP and ADP-glucose. In addition, we have determined the first structure of glycogen synthase in its "closed", catalytically active conformation bound to ADP-glucose. We also determined the structure of glycogen synthase bound to malto-oligosaccharides, showing for the first time that an enzyme in the starch biosynthetic pathway recognizes glucans not just in its active site but on binding sites on the surface of the enzyme ten’s of Angstroms from the active site. In addition our structure of a glycogen branching enzyme bound to malto-oligosaccharides identified seven distinct binding sites distributed about the surface of the enzyme. We will now determine the function of these sites to get a molecular-level picture of exactly how these enzymes interact with their polymeric substrates and confer specificity leading to the complex structure of the starch granule. We will extend our studies to other isoforms of the enzymes, to understand how their structures give rise to their distinct function. Our goal is to understand what accounts for the various functional differences between SS and SBE isoforms at a molecular level.

  1. Structure of ThiM from Vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway of Staphylococcus aureus - Insights into a novel pro-drug approach addressing MRSA infections.

    PubMed

    Drebes, Julia; Künz, Madeleine; Windshügel, Björn; Kikhney, Alexey G; Müller, Ingrid B; Eberle, Raphael J; Oberthür, Dominik; Cang, Huaixing; Svergun, Dmitri I; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Wrenger, Carsten

    2016-03-10

    Infections caused by the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are today known to be a substantial threat for global health. Emerging multi-drug resistant bacteria have created a substantial need to identify and discover new drug targets and to develop novel strategies to treat bacterial infections. A promising and so far untapped antibiotic target is the biosynthesis of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Thiamin in its activated form, thiamin pyrophosphate, is an essential co-factor for all organisms. Therefore, thiamin analogous compounds, when introduced into the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway and further converted into non-functional co-factors by the bacterium can function as pro-drugs which thus block various co-factor dependent pathways. We characterized one of the key enzymes within the S. aureus vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway, 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole kinase (SaThiM; EC 2.7.1.50), a potential target for pro-drug compounds and analyzed the native structure of SaThiM and complexes with the natural substrate 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ) and two selected substrate analogues.

  2. Structure of ThiM from Vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway of Staphylococcus aureus – Insights into a novel pro-drug approach addressing MRSA infections

    PubMed Central

    Drebes, Julia; Künz, Madeleine; Windshügel, Björn; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Müller, Ingrid B.; Eberle, Raphael J.; Oberthür, Dominik; Cang, Huaixing; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Wrenger, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are today known to be a substantial threat for global health. Emerging multi-drug resistant bacteria have created a substantial need to identify and discover new drug targets and to develop novel strategies to treat bacterial infections. A promising and so far untapped antibiotic target is the biosynthesis of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Thiamin in its activated form, thiamin pyrophosphate, is an essential co-factor for all organisms. Therefore, thiamin analogous compounds, when introduced into the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway and further converted into non-functional co-factors by the bacterium can function as pro-drugs which thus block various co-factor dependent pathways. We characterized one of the key enzymes within the S. aureus vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway, 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole kinase (SaThiM; EC 2.7.1.50), a potential target for pro-drug compounds and analyzed the native structure of SaThiM and complexes with the natural substrate 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ) and two selected substrate analogues. PMID:26960569

  3. Pleiotropic consequences of gene knockouts in the phthiocerol dimycocerosate and phenolic glycolipid biosynthetic gene cluster of the opportunistic human pathogen Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Poornima; Budell, William C; Mueller, Emily; Au, Andrew; Bythrow, Glennon V; Quadri, Luis E N

    2016-03-01

    Phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIMs) and phenolic glycolipids (PGLs) contribute to the pathogenicity of several mycobacteria. Biosynthesis of these virulence factors requires polyketide synthases and other enzymes that represent potential targets for the development of adjuvant antivirulence drugs. We used six isogenic Mycobacterium marinum mutants, each with a different gene knockout in the PDIM/PGL biosynthetic pathway, to probe the pleiotropy of mutations leading to PDIM(-) PGL(-), PDIM(+) PGL(-) or PDIM(-) PGL(+) phenotypes. We evaluated the M. marinum mutants for changes in antibiotic susceptibility, cell envelope permeability, biofilm formation, surface properties, sliding motility and virulence in an amoeba model. The analysis also permitted us to begin exploring the hypothesis that different gene knockouts rendering the same PDIM and/or PGL deficiency phenotypes lead to M. marinum mutants with equivalent pleiotropic profiles. Overall, the results of our study revealed a complex picture of pleiotropic patterns emerging from different gene knockouts, uncovered unexpected phenotypic inequalities between mutants, and provided new insight into the phenotypic consequences of gene knockouts in the PDIM/PGL biosynthetic pathway.

  4. Structure of ThiM from Vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway of Staphylococcus aureus – Insights into a novel pro-drug approach addressing MRSA infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drebes, Julia; Künz, Madeleine; Windshügel, Björn; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Müller, Ingrid B.; Eberle, Raphael J.; Oberthür, Dominik; Cang, Huaixing; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Wrenger, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    Infections caused by the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are today known to be a substantial threat for global health. Emerging multi-drug resistant bacteria have created a substantial need to identify and discover new drug targets and to develop novel strategies to treat bacterial infections. A promising and so far untapped antibiotic target is the biosynthesis of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Thiamin in its activated form, thiamin pyrophosphate, is an essential co-factor for all organisms. Therefore, thiamin analogous compounds, when introduced into the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway and further converted into non-functional co-factors by the bacterium can function as pro-drugs which thus block various co-factor dependent pathways. We characterized one of the key enzymes within the S. aureus vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway, 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole kinase (SaThiM; EC 2.7.1.50), a potential target for pro-drug compounds and analyzed the native structure of SaThiM and complexes with the natural substrate 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ) and two selected substrate analogues.

  5. Improved herbivore resistance in cultivated tomato with the sesquiterpene biosynthetic pathway from a wild relative

    PubMed Central

    Bleeker, Petra M.; Mirabella, Rossana; Diergaarde, Paul J.; VanDoorn, Arjen; Tissier, Alain; Kant, Merijn R.; Prins, Marcel; de Vos, Martin; Haring, Michel A.; Schuurink, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato breeding has been tremendously efficient in increasing fruit quality and quantity but did not focus on improving herbivore resistance. The biosynthetic pathway for the production of 7-epizingiberene in a wild tomato was introduced into a cultivated greenhouse variety with the aim to obtain herbivore resistance. 7-Epizingiberene is a specific sesquiterpene with toxic and repellent properties that is produced and stored in glandular trichomes. We identified 7-epizingiberene synthase (ShZIS) that belongs to a new class of sesquiterpene synthases, exclusively using Z-Z-farnesyl-diphosphate (zFPP) in plastids, probably arisen through neo-functionalization of a common ancestor. Expression of the ShZIS and zFPP synthases in the glandular trichomes of cultivated tomato resulted in the production of 7-epizingiberene. These tomatoes gained resistance to several herbivores that are pests of tomato. Hence, introduction of this sesquiterpene biosynthetic pathway into cultivated tomatoes resulted in improved herbivore resistance. PMID:23169639

  6. Improved herbivore resistance in cultivated tomato with the sesquiterpene biosynthetic pathway from a wild relative.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, Petra M; Mirabella, Rossana; Diergaarde, Paul J; VanDoorn, Arjen; Tissier, Alain; Kant, Merijn R; Prins, Marcel; de Vos, Martin; Haring, Michel A; Schuurink, Robert C

    2012-12-04

    Tomato breeding has been tremendously efficient in increasing fruit quality and quantity but did not focus on improving herbivore resistance. The biosynthetic pathway for the production of 7-epizingiberene in a wild tomato was introduced into a cultivated greenhouse variety with the aim to obtain herbivore resistance. 7-Epizingiberene is a specific sesquiterpene with toxic and repellent properties that is produced and stored in glandular trichomes. We identified 7-epizingiberene synthase (ShZIS) that belongs to a new class of sesquiterpene synthases, exclusively using Z-Z-farnesyl-diphosphate (zFPP) in plastids, probably arisen through neo-functionalization of a common ancestor. Expression of the ShZIS and zFPP synthases in the glandular trichomes of cultivated tomato resulted in the production of 7-epizingiberene. These tomatoes gained resistance to several herbivores that are pests of tomato. Hence, introduction of this sesquiterpene biosynthetic pathway into cultivated tomatoes resulted in improved herbivore resistance.

  7. Biosynthetic Relationship between Acutumine and Dechloroacutumine in Menispermum dauricum Root Cultures.

    PubMed

    Babiker, H A; Sugimoto, Y; Saisho, T; Inanaga, S; Hashimoto, M; Isogai, A

    1999-01-01

    The biosynthetic relationship between acutumine 1 and dechloroacutumine 2 was studied using (13)C-labeled tyrosine and (3)H-labeled 2 as tracers. (13)C-NMR spectra of (13)C-labeled 1 and 2 showed that the alkaloids, each composed of two molecules of tyrosine, are derived from the same biosynthetic pathway. Feeding Menispermum dauricum (Menispermaceae) roots, cultured in a chloride-enriched medium, with (3)H-labeled 2 demonstrated that 1 is the only alkaloid metabolite of 2. Conversion (5%) of the exogenously applied 2, taken up by the roots, into 1 showed that 2 is the precursor of 1. Incomplete conversion of 2 into 1 suggests accumulation of the exogenously applied 2 in cell organelles and/or compartmentation of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of 1.

  8. Cellular Localization of Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Enzymes in Marchantia polymorpha. Uncovering a New Role of Oil Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Suire, Claude; Bouvier, Florence; Backhaus, Ralph A.; Bégu, Dominique; Bonneu, Marc; Camara, Bilal

    2000-01-01

    Like seed plants, liverworts synthesize and accumulate a myriad of isoprenoid compounds. Using antibodies raised against several isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes, we investigated their intracellular compartmentation by in situ immunolocalization from Marchantia polymorpha. The enzymes examined were deoxy-xylulose phosphate synthase, geranyl diphosphate synthase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, monoterpene synthase, geranylgeranyl diphosphate reductase, phytoene synthase, and phytoene desaturase. Our results show that liverwort oil bodies, which are organelles bound by a single unit membrane, possess isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in plastids and the cytosol. We postulate that oil bodies play a dynamic role in cell metabolism in addition to their role as sites of essential oil accumulation and sequestration. The occurrence of such enzymes in different cellular compartments might be due to multiple targeting of gene products to various organelles. PMID:11080275

  9. Computational genomic identification and functional reconstitution of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Covering: 2003 to 2016 The last decade has seen the first major discoveries regarding the genomic basis of plant natural product biosynthetic pathways. Four key computationally driven strategies have been developed to identify such pathways, which make use of physical clustering, co-expression, evolutionary co-occurrence and epigenomic co-regulation of the genes involved in producing a plant natural product. Here, we discuss how these approaches can be used for the discovery of plant biosynthetic pathways encoded by both chromosomally clustered and non-clustered genes. Additionally, we will discuss opportunities to prioritize plant gene clusters for experimental characterization, and end with a forward-looking perspective on how synthetic biology technologies will allow effective functional reconstitution of candidate pathways using a variety of genetic systems. PMID:27321668

  10. Producing the Ethylene Signal: Regulation and Diversification of Ethylene Biosynthetic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Booker, Matthew A; DeLong, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Strictly controlled production of ethylene gas lies upstream of the signaling activities of this crucial regulator throughout the plant life cycle. Although the biosynthetic pathway is enzymatically simple, the regulatory circuits that modulate signal production are fine tuned to allow integration of responses to environmental and intrinsic cues. Recently identified posttranslational mechanisms that control ethylene production converge on one family of biosynthetic enzymes and overlay several independent reversible phosphorylation events and distinct mediators of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. Although the core pathway is conserved throughout seed plants, these posttranslational regulatory mechanisms may represent evolutionarily recent innovations. The evolutionary origins of the pathway and its regulators are not yet clear; outside the seed plants, numerous biochemical and phylogenetic questions remain to be addressed.

  11. Insights into secondary metabolism from a global analysis of prokaryotic biosynthetic gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Cimermancic, Peter; Medema, Marnix H.; Claesen, Jan; Kurita, Kenji; Wieland Brown, Laura C.; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pati, Amrita; Godfrey, Paul A.; Koehrsen, Michael; Clardy, Jon; Birren, Bruce W.; Takano, Eriko; Sali, Andrej; Linington, Roger G.; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) have been discovered for hundreds of bacterial metabolites, our knowledge of their diversity remains limited. Here, we used a novel algorithm to systematically identify BGCs in the extensive extant microbial sequencing data. Network analysis of the predicted BGCs revealed large gene cluster families, the vast majority uncharacterized. We experimentally characterized the most prominent family, consisting of two subfamilies of hundreds of BGCs distributed throughout the Proteobacteria; their products are aryl polyenes, lipids with an aryl head group conjugated to a polyene tail. We identified a distant relationship to a third subfamily of aryl polyene BGCs, and together the three subfamilies represent the largest known family of biosynthetic gene clusters, with more than 1,000 members. Although these clusters are widely divergent in sequence, their small molecule products are remarkably conserved, indicating for the first time the important roles these compounds play in Gram-negative cell biology. PMID:25036635

  12. Streptomyces turgidiscabies possesses a functional cytokinin biosynthetic pathway and produces leafy galls.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Madhumita V; Loria, Rosemary

    2007-07-01

    Streptomyces turgidiscabies, a cause of potato scab, possesses a mobilizable pathogenicity island containing multiple virulence genes and a cytokinin biosynthetic pathway. These biosynthetic genes are homologous and collinear with the fas operon in Rhodococcus fascians. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction of S. turgidiscabies demonstrated that all six genes were transcribed in oat bran broth with and without glucose, though transcription was partially repressed by glucose. The supernatant of S. turgidiscabies cultures had cytokinin activity in callus initiation and differentiation assays. Arabidopsis and tobacco plants inoculated with a thaxtomin-deficient mutant (deltanos) produced leafy galls, indistinguishable from those produced by R. fascians. Deletion of the ipt gene in the pathway eliminated gall phenotype. Other symptoms on tobacco included production of hairy roots and de novo meristems.

  13. Recent advances in Cannabis sativa research: biosynthetic studies and its potential in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Sirikantaramas, Supaart; Taura, Futoshi; Morimoto, Satoshi; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2007-08-01

    Cannabinoids, consisting of alkylresorcinol and monoterpene groups, are the unique secondary metabolites that are found only in Cannabis sativa. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabichromene (CBC) are well known cannabinoids and their pharmacological properties have been extensively studied. Recently, biosynthetic pathways of these cannabinoids have been successfully established. Several biosynthetic enzymes including geranylpyrophosphate:olivetolate geranyltransferase, tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase, cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) synthase and cannabichromenic acid (CBCA) synthase have been purified from young rapidly expanding leaves of C. sativa. In addition, molecular cloning, characterization and localization of THCA synthase have been recently reported. THCA and cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), its substrate, were shown to be apoptosis-inducing agents that might play a role in plant defense. Transgenic tobacco hairy roots expressing THCA synthase can produce THCA upon feeding of CBGA. These results open the way for biotechnological production of cannabinoids in the future.

  14. Producing the Ethylene Signal: Regulation and Diversification of Ethylene Biosynthetic Enzymes1

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Matthew A.; DeLong, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Strictly controlled production of ethylene gas lies upstream of the signaling activities of this crucial regulator throughout the plant life cycle. Although the biosynthetic pathway is enzymatically simple, the regulatory circuits that modulate signal production are fine tuned to allow integration of responses to environmental and intrinsic cues. Recently identified posttranslational mechanisms that control ethylene production converge on one family of biosynthetic enzymes and overlay several independent reversible phosphorylation events and distinct mediators of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. Although the core pathway is conserved throughout seed plants, these posttranslational regulatory mechanisms may represent evolutionarily recent innovations. The evolutionary origins of the pathway and its regulators are not yet clear; outside the seed plants, numerous biochemical and phylogenetic questions remain to be addressed. PMID:26134162

  15. Evolution of alternative biosynthetic pathways for vitamin C following plastid acquisition in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Glen; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Pornsaksit, Varissa; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2015-03-13

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is an enzyme co-factor in eukaryotes that also plays a critical role in protecting photosynthetic eukaryotes against damaging reactive oxygen species derived from the chloroplast. Many animal lineages, including primates, have become ascorbate auxotrophs due to the loss of the terminal enzyme in their biosynthetic pathway, L-gulonolactone oxidase (GULO). The alternative pathways found in land plants and Euglena use a different terminal enzyme, L-galactonolactone dehydrogenase (GLDH). The evolutionary processes leading to these differing pathways and their contribution to the cellular roles of ascorbate remain unclear. Here we present molecular and biochemical evidence demonstrating that GULO was functionally replaced with GLDH in photosynthetic eukaryote lineages following plastid acquisition. GULO has therefore been lost repeatedly throughout eukaryote evolution. The formation of the alternative biosynthetic pathways in photosynthetic eukaryotes uncoupled ascorbate synthesis from hydrogen peroxide production and likely contributed to the rise of ascorbate as a major photoprotective antioxidant.

  16. Biosynthetic Machinery Involved in Aberrant Glycosylation: Promising Targets for Developing of Drugs Against Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos-dos-Santos, Andréia; Oliveira, Isadora A.; Lucena, Miguel Clodomiro; Mantuano, Natalia Rodrigues; Whelan, Stephen A.; Dias, Wagner Barbosa; Todeschini, Adriane Regina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells depend on altered metabolism and nutrient uptake to generate and keep the malignant phenotype. The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway is a branch of glucose metabolism that produces UDP-GlcNAc and its derivatives, UDP-GalNAc and CMP-Neu5Ac and donor substrates used in the production of glycoproteins and glycolipids. Growing evidence demonstrates that alteration of the pool of activated substrates might lead to different glycosylation and cell signaling. It is already well established that aberrant glycosylation can modulate tumor growth and malignant transformation in different cancer types. Therefore, biosynthetic machinery involved in the assembly of aberrant glycans are becoming prominent targets for anti-tumor drugs. This review describes three classes of glycosylation, O-GlcNAcylation, N-linked, and mucin type O-linked glycosylation, involved in tumor progression, their biosynthesis and highlights the available inhibitors as potential anti-tumor drugs. PMID:26161361

  17. Activation and Characterization of a Cryptic Polycyclic Tetramate Macrolactam Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunzi; Huang, Hua; Liang, Jing; Wang, Meng; Lu, Lu; Shao, Zengyi; Cobb, Ryan E.; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic tetramate macrolactams (PTMs) are a widely distributed class of natural products with important biological activities. However, many of them have not been characterized. Here we apply a plug and play synthetic biology strategy to activate a cryptic PTM biosynthetic gene cluster SGR810-815 from Streptomyces griseus and discover three potential PTMs. This gene cluster is highly conserved in phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains and contains an unusual hybrid polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) which resembles iterative PKSs known in fungi. To further characterize this gene cluster, we use the same synthetic biology approach to create a series of gene deletion constructs and elucidate the biosynthetic steps for the formation of the polycyclic system. The strategy we employ bypasses the traditional laborious processes to elicit gene cluster expression and should be generally applicable to many other silent or cryptic gene clusters for discovery and characterization of new natural products. PMID:24305602

  18. Biosynthetic Mechanism for Sunscreens of the Biocontrol Agent Lysobacter enzymogenes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaoyao; Wang, Yansheng; Wang, Yulan; Wright, Stephen; Li, Yuezhong; Shen, Yuemao; Liu, Fengquan; Du, Liangcheng

    2013-01-01

    Lysobacter are ubiquitous environmental bacteria emerging as novel biocontrol agents and new sources of anti-infectives. So far, very little effort has been invested in the study of the biology of these Gram-negative gliding bacteria. Many Lysobacter species are characterized by their yellow-orange appearance. Using transposon mutagenesis, we identified a stand-alone polyketide synthase (PKS) gene cluster required for the pigment production in L. enzymogenes OH11. The yellow pigments were abolished in the “white” mutants generated by target-specific deletions of ketosynthase (KS), acyl carrier protein, or ketoreductase. Spectroscopic data suggested that the pigments belong to xanthomonadin-like aryl polyenes. Polyene-type polyketides are known to be biosynthesized by modular PKS (Type I), not by stand-alone PKS (Type II) which always contain the heterodimer KS-CLF (chain-length factor) as the key catalytic component. Remarkably, this aryl polyene PKS complex only contains the KS (ORF17), but not the CLF. Instead, a hypothetical protein (ORF16) is located immediately next to ORF17. ORF16–17 homologs are widespread in numerous uncharacterized microbial genomes, in which an ORF17 homolog is always accompanied by an ORF16 homolog. The deletion of ORF16 eliminated pigment production, and homology modeling suggested that ORF16 shares a structural similarity to the N-terminal half of CLF. A point-mutation of glutamine (Q166A) that is the conserved active site of known CLF abolished pigment production. The “white” mutants are significantly more sensitive to UV/visible light radiation or H2O2 treatment than the wild type. These results unveil the first example of Type II PKS-synthesized polyene pigments and show that the metabolites serve as Lysobacter “sunscreens” that are important for the survival of these ubiquitous environmental organisms. PMID:23826105

  19. Functional characterization of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster of Penicillium chrysogenum Wisconsin54-1255.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Marco A; Westerlaken, Ilja; Leeflang, Chris; Kerkman, Richard; Bovenberg, Roel A L

    2007-09-01

    Industrial strain improvement via classical mutagenesis is a black box approach. In an attempt to learn from and understand the mutations introduced, we cloned and characterized the amplified region of industrial penicillin production strains. Upon amplification of this region Penicillium chrysogenum is capable of producing an increased amount of antibiotics, as was previously reported [Barredo, J.L., Diez, B., Alvarez, E., Martín, J.F., 1989a. Large amplification of a 35-kb DNA fragment carrying two penicillin biosynthetic genes in high yielding strains of Penicillium chrysogenum. Curr. Genet. 16, 453-459; Newbert, R.W., Barton, B., Greaves, P., Harper, J., Turner, G., 1997. Analysis of a commercially improved Penicillium chrysogenum strain series, involvement of recombinogenic regions in amplification and deletion of the penicillin gene cluster. J. Ind. Microbiol. 19, 18-27]. Bioinformatic analysis of the central 56.9kb, present as six direct repeats in the strains analyzed in this study, predicted 15 Open Reading Frames (ORFs). Besides the three penicillin biosynthetic genes (pcbAB, pcbC and penDE) only one ORF has an orthologue of known function in the database: the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene ERG25. Surprisingly, many genes known to encode direct or indirect steps beta-lactam biosynthesis like phenyl acetic acid CoA ligase and transporters are not present. Detailed analyses reveal a detectable transcript for most of the predicted ORFs under the conditions tested. We have studied the role of these in relation to penicillin production and amplification of the biosynthetic gene cluster. In contrast to what was expected, the genes encoding the three penicillin biosynthetic enzymes alone are sufficient to restore full beta-lactam synthesis in a mutant lacking the complete region. Therefore, the role of the other 12 ORFs in this region seems irrelevant for penicillin biosynthesis.

  20. Contribution of trehalose biosynthetic pathway to drought stress tolerance of Capparis ovata Desf.

    PubMed

    Ilhan, S; Ozdemir, F; Bor, M

    2015-03-01

    Trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway are important contributors and regulators of stress responses in plants. Among recent findings for trehalose and its metabolism, the role of signalling in the regulation of growth and development and its potential for use as a storage energy source can be listed. The xerophytic plant Capparis ovata (caper) is well adapted to drought and high temperature stress in arid and semi-arid regions of the Mediterranean. The contribution of trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway to drought stress responses and tolerance in C. ovata are not known. We investigated the effects of PEG-mediated drought stress in caper plants and analysed physiological parameters and trehalose biosynthetic pathway components, trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS), trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP), trehalase activity, trehalose and proline content in drought stress-treated and untreated plants. Our results indicated that trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway contributed to drought stress tolerance of C. ovata. Overall growth and leaf water status were not dramatically affected by drought, as both high relative growth rate and relative water content were recorded even after 14 days of drought stress. Trehalose accumulation increased in parallel to induced TPS and TPP activities and decreased trehalase activity in caper plants on day 14. Constitutive trehalose levels were 28.75 to 74.75 μg·g·FW(-1) , and drought stress significantly induced trehalose accumulation (385.25 μg·g·FW(-1) on day 14) in leaves of caper. On day 14 of drought, proline levels were lower than on day 7. Under drought stress the discrepancy between trehalose and proline accumulation trends might result from the mode of action of these osmoprotectant molecules in C. ovata.

  1. Poly(vinyl alcohol)-heparin biosynthetic microspheres produced by microfluidics and ultraviolet photopolymerisation

    PubMed Central

    Young, Cara; Rozario, Kester; Serra, Christophe; Poole-Warren, Laura; Martens, Penny

    2013-01-01

    Biosynthetic microspheres have the potential to address some of the limitations in cell microencapsulation; however, the generation of biosynthetic hydrogel microspheres has not been investigated or applied to cell encapsulation. Droplet microfluidics has the potential to produce more uniform microspheres under conditions compatible with cell encapsulation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand the effect of process parameters on biosynthetic microsphere formation, size, and morphology with a co-flow microfluidic method. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), a synthetic hydrogel and heparin, a glycosaminoglycan were chosen as the hydrogels for this study. A capillary-based microfluidic droplet generation device was used, and by varying the flow rates of both the polymer and oil phases, the viscosity of the continuous oil phase, and the interfacial surface tension, monodisperse spheres were produced from ∼200 to 800 μm. The size and morphology were unaffected by the addition of heparin. The modulus of spheres was 397 and 335 kPa for PVA and PVA/heparin, respectively, and this was not different from the bulk gel modulus (312 and 365 for PVA and PVA/heparin, respectively). Mammalian cells encapsulated in the spheres had over 90% viability after 24 h in both PVA and PVA/heparin microspheres. After 28 days, viability was still over 90% for PVA-heparin spheres and was significantly higher than in PVA only spheres. The use of biosynthetic hydrogels with microfluidic and UV polymerisation methods offers an improved approach to long-term cell encapsulation. PMID:24404042

  2. Studies Towards the Leucetta-derived Alkaloids Spirocalcaridine A and B - Possible Biosynthetic Implications.

    PubMed

    Koswatta, Panduka B; Das, Jayanta; Yousufuddin, Muhammed; Lovely, Carl J

    2015-04-01

    An exploration of an abiotic approach to spirocalcaridines A and B is described centered on electrophile-induced dearomatizing spirocyclization of aryl enyne derivatives. Elaboration of the α-iodoenone via an Ullmann-like, copper-catalyzed amidation provided a formamide which upon treatment with methylamine undergoes a dienol-arene rearrangement, providing the corresponding kealiinine-like framework. This observation suggests a possible biosynthetic links between the spirocalcaridines and the naphthimidazole group of Leucetta alkaloids.

  3. Studies Towards the Leucetta-derived Alkaloids Spirocalcaridine A and B – Possible Biosynthetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Koswatta, Panduka B.; Das, Jayanta; Yousufuddin, Muhammed; Lovely, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    An exploration of an abiotic approach to spirocalcaridines A and B is described centered on electrophile-induced dearomatizing spirocyclization of aryl enyne derivatives. Elaboration of the α–iodoenone via an Ullmann-like, copper-catalyzed amidation provided a formamide which upon treatment with methylamine undergoes a dienol-arene rearrangement, providing the corresponding kealiinine-like framework. This observation suggests a possible biosynthetic links between the spirocalcaridines and the naphthimidazole group of Leucetta alkaloids. PMID:26257576

  4. Genetic localization and in vivo characterization of a Monascus azaphilone pigment biosynthetic gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Bijinu; Karki, Suman; Chiu, Shih-Hau; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Suh, Jae-Won; Nam, Bora; Yoon, Yeo-Min; Chen, Chien-Chi; Kwon, Hyung-Jin

    2013-07-01

    Monascus spp. produce several well-known polyketides such as monacolin K, citrinin, and azaphilone pigments. In this study, the azaphilone pigment biosynthetic gene cluster was identified through T-DNA random mutagenesis in Monascus purpureus. The albino mutant W13 bears a T-DNA insertion upstream of a transcriptional regulator gene (mppR1). The transcription of mppR1 and the nearby polyketide synthase gene (MpPKS5) was significantly repressed in the W13 mutant. Targeted inactivation of MpPKS5 also gave rise to an albino mutant, confirming that mppR1 and MpPKS5 belong to an azaphilone pigment biosynthetic gene cluster. This M. purpureus sequence was used to identify the whole biosynthetic gene cluster in the Monascus pilosus genome. MpPKS5 contains SAT/KS/AT/PT/ACP/MT/R domains, and this domain organization is preserved in other azaphilone polyketide synthases. This biosynthetic gene cluster also encodes fatty acid synthase (FAS), which is predicted to assist the synthesis of 3-oxooactanoyl-CoA and 3-oxodecanoyl-CoA. These 3-oxoacyl compounds are proposed to be incorporated into the azaphilone backbone to complete the pigment biosynthesis. A monooxygenase gene (an azaH and tropB homolog) that is located far downstream of the FAS gene is proposed to be involved in pyrone ring formation. A homology search on other fungal genome sequences suggests that this azaphilone pigment gene cluster also exists in the Penicillium marneffei and Talaromyces stipitatus genomes.

  5. Structure of Nampt/PBEF/visfatin, a mammalian NAD[superscript +]biosynthetic enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Xiangbin; Bheda, Poonam; Revollo, Javier R.; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2010-07-22

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) synthesizes nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide in a mammalian NAD{sup +} biosynthetic pathway and is required for SirT1 activity in vivo. Nampt has also been presumed to be a cytokine (PBEF) or a hormone (visfatin). The crystal structure of Nampt in the presence and absence of NMN shows that Nampt is a dimeric type II phosphoribosyltransferase and provides insights into the enzymatic mechanism.

  6. Pre-malbrancheamide: Synthesis, Isotopic Labeling, Biosynthetic Incorporation, and Detection in Cultures of Malbranchea aurantiaca

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yousong; Greshock, Thomas J.; Miller, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    An advanced metabolite, named pre-malbrancheamide, involved in the biosynthesis of malbrancheamide (1) and malbrancheamide B (2) has been synthesized in double 13C-labeled form and was incorporated into the indole alkaloid 2 by Malbranchea aurantiaca. In addition, pre-malbrancheamide has been detected as a natural metabolite in cultures of M. aurantiaca. The biosynthetic implications of these experiments are discussed. PMID:18844365

  7. Investigation of Proposed Ladderane Biosynthetic Genes from Anammox Bacteria by Heterologous Expression in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Javidpour, Pouya; Deutsch, Samuel; Mutalik, Vivek K.; Hillson, Nathan J.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Beller, Harry R.

    2016-01-01

    Ladderanes are hydrocarbon chains with three or five linearly concatenated cyclobutane rings that are uniquely produced as membrane lipid components by anammox (anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing) bacteria. By virtue of their angle and torsional strain, ladderanes are unusually energetic compounds, and if produced biochemically by engineered microbes, could serve as renewable, high-energy-density jet fuel components. The biochemistry and genetics underlying the ladderane biosynthetic pathway are unknown, however, previous studies have identified a pool of 34 candidate genes from the anammox bacterium, Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, some or all of which may be involved with ladderane fatty acid biosynthesis. The goal of the present study was to establish a systematic means of testing the candidate genes from K. stuttgartiensis for involvement in ladderane biosynthesis through heterologous expression in E. coli under anaerobic conditions. This study describes an efficient means of assembly of synthesized, codon-optimized candidate ladderane biosynthesis genes in synthetic operons that allows for changes to regulatory element sequences, as well as modular assembly of multiple operons for simultaneous heterologous expression in E. coli (or potentially other microbial hosts). We also describe in vivo functional tests of putative anammox homologs of the phytoene desaturase CrtI, which plays an important role in the hypothesized ladderane pathway, and a method for soluble purification of one of these enzymes. This study is, to our knowledge, the first experimental effort focusing on the role of specific anammox genes in the production of ladderanes, and lays the foundation for future efforts toward determination of the ladderane biosynthetic pathway. Our substantial, but far from comprehensive, efforts at elucidating the ladderane biosynthetic pathway were not successful. We invite the scientific community to take advantage of the considerable synthetic biology resources and

  8. Functional Expression and Extension of Staphylococcal Staphyloxanthin Biosynthetic Pathway in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2012-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway for staphyloxanthin, a C30 carotenoid biosynthesized by Staphylococcus aureus, has previously been proposed to consist of five enzymes (CrtO, CrtP, CrtQ, CrtM, and CrtN). Here, we report a missing sixth enzyme, 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-aldehyde dehydrogenase (AldH), in the staphyloxanthin biosynthetic pathway and describe the functional expression of the complete staphyloxanthin biosynthetic pathway in Escherichia coli. When we expressed the five known pathway enzymes through artificial synthetic operons and the wild-type operon (crtOPQMN) in E. coli, carotenoid aldehyde intermediates such as 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4-al accumulated without being converted into staphyloxanthin or other intermediates. We identified an aldH gene located 670 kilobase pairs from the known staphyloxanthin gene cluster in the S. aureus genome and an aldH gene in the non-staphyloxanthin-producing Staphylococcus carnosus genome. These two putative enzymes catalyzed the missing oxidation reaction to convert 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4-al into 4,4′-diaponeurosporenoic acid in E. coli. Deletion of the aldH gene in S. aureus abolished staphyloxanthin biosynthesis and caused accumulation of 4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4-al, confirming the role of AldH in staphyloxanthin biosynthesis. When the complete staphyloxanthin biosynthetic pathway was expressed using an artificial synthetic operon in E. coli, staphyloxanthin-like compounds, which contained altered fatty acid acyl chains, and novel carotenoid compounds were produced, indicating functional expression and coordination of the six staphyloxanthin pathway enzymes. PMID:22535955

  9. Genome mining unearths a hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like-pteridine synthase biosynthetic gene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Bong; Perez, Corey E; Barber, Karl W; Rinehart, Jesse; Crawford, Jason M

    2017-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptides represent a large class of metabolites with pharmaceutical relevance. Pteridines, such as pterins, folates, and flavins, are heterocyclic metabolites that often serve as redox-active cofactors. The biosynthetic machineries for construction of these distinct classes of small molecules operate independently in the cell. Here, we discovered an unprecedented nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like-pteridine synthase hybrid biosynthetic gene cluster in Photorhabdus luminescens using genome synteny analysis. P. luminescens is a Gammaproteobacterium that undergoes phenotypic variation and can have both pathogenic and mutualistic roles. Through extensive gene deletion, pathway-targeted molecular networking, quantitative proteomic analysis, and NMR, we show that the genetic locus affects the regulation of quorum sensing and secondary metabolic enzymes and encodes new pteridine metabolites functionalized with cis-amide acyl-side chains, termed pepteridine A (1) and B (2). The pepteridines are produced in the pathogenic phenotypic variant and represent the first reported metabolites to be synthesized by a hybrid NRPS-pteridine pathway. These studies expand our view of the combinatorial biosynthetic potential available in bacteria. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25229.001

  10. Organization of the biosynthetic gene cluster for the macrolide antibiotic spiramycin in Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Karray, Fatma; Darbon, Emmanuelle; Oestreicher, Nathalie; Dominguez, Hélène; Tuphile, Karine; Gagnat, Josette; Blondelet-Rouault, Marie-Hélène; Gerbaud, Claude; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2007-12-01

    Spiramycin, a 16-membered macrolide antibiotic used in human medicine, is produced by Streptomyces ambofaciens; it comprises a polyketide lactone, platenolide, to which three deoxyhexose sugars are attached. In order to characterize the gene cluster governing the biosynthesis of spiramycin, several overlapping cosmids were isolated from an S. ambofaciens gene library, by hybridization with various probes (spiramycin resistance or biosynthetic genes, tylosin biosynthetic genes), and the sequences of their inserts were determined. Sequence analysis showed that the spiramycin biosynthetic gene cluster spanned a region of over 85 kb of contiguous DNA. In addition to the five previously described genes that encode the type I polyketide synthase involved in platenolide biosynthesis, 45 other genes have been identified. It was possible to propose a function for most of the inferred proteins in spiramycin biosynthesis, in its regulation, in resistance to the produced antibiotic or in the provision of extender units for the polyketide synthase. Two of these genes, predicted to be involved in deoxysugar biosynthesis, were inactivated by gene replacement, and the resulting mutants were unable to produce spiramycin, thus confirming their involvement in spiramycin biosynthesis. This work reveals the main features of spiramycin biosynthesis and constitutes a first step towards a detailed molecular analysis of the production of this medically important antibiotic.

  11. A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Marko; Djordjevic, Magdalena

    2012-10-01

    A recently emerging discipline of synthetic biology has the aim of constructing new biosynthetic pathways with useful biological functions. A major application of these pathways is generating a large amount of the desired product. However, toxicity due to the possible presence of toxic precursors is one of the main problems for such production. We consider here the problem of generating a large amount of product from a potentially toxic substrate. To address this, we propose a simple biosynthetic pathway, which can be induced in order to produce a large number of the product molecules, by keeping the substrate amount at low levels. Surprisingly, we show that the large product generation crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of the substrate molecules. We derive an optimal induction strategy, which allows as much as three orders of magnitude increase in the product amount through biologically realistic parameter values. We point to a recently discovered bacterial immune system (CRISPR/Cas in E. coli) as a putative example of the pathway analysed here. We also argue that the scheme proposed here can be used not only as a stand-alone pathway, but also as a strategy to produce a large amount of the desired molecules with small perturbations of endogenous biosynthetic pathways.

  12. Enhancement of cordyceps polysaccharide production via biosynthetic pathway analysis in Hirsutella sinensis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Baker, Peter James; Yi, Ming; Wu, Hui; Xu, Feng; Teng, Yi; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-11-01

    The addition of various sulfates for enhanced cordyceps polysaccharide (CP) production in submerged cultivation of H. sinensis was investigated, and manganese sulfate was found the most effective. 2mM of manganese sulfate on 0day (d) was investigated as the optimal adding condition, and the CP production reached optimum with 5.33%, increasing by 93.3% compared with the control. Furthermore, the consumption of three main precursors of CP was studied over cultivation under two conditions. Intracellular mannose content decreased by 43.1% throughout 6days cultivation, which corresponded to CP accumulation rate sharply increased from 0 d to 6 d, and mannose was considered as the most preferred precursor for generating CP. Subsequently, mannose biosynthetic pathway was constructed and verified for the first time in H. sinensis, which constituted the important part of CP biosynthesis, and transcriptional levels of the biosynthetic genes were studied. Transcriptional level of gene cpsA was significantly up-regulated 5.35-fold and it was a key gene involved both in mannose and CP biosynthesis. This study demonstrated that manganese sulfate addition is an efficient and simple way to improve CP production. Transcriptional analysis based on biosynthetic pathway was helpful to find key genes and better understand CP biosynthesis.

  13. Butenyl-spinosyns, a natural example of genetic engineering of antibiotic biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Donald R; Gustafson, Gary; Waldron, Clive; Bullard, Brian; Jackson, James D; Mitchell, Jon

    2006-02-01

    Spinosyns, a novel class of insect active macrolides produced by Saccharopolyspora spinosa, are used for insect control in a number of commercial crops. Recently, a new class of spinosyns was discovered from S. pogona NRRL 30141. The butenyl-spinosyns, also called pogonins, are very similar to spinosyns, differing in the length of the side chain at C-21 and in the variety of novel minor factors. The butenyl-spinosyn biosynthetic genes (bus) were cloned on four cosmids covering a contiguous 110-kb region of the NRRL 30141 chromosome. Their function in butenyl-spinosyn biosynthesis was confirmed by a loss-of-function deletion, and subsequent complementation by cloned genes. The coding sequences of the butenyl-spinosyn biosynthetic genes and the spinosyn biosynthetic genes from S. spinosa were highly conserved. In particular, the PKS-coding genes from S. spinosa and S. pogona have 91-94% nucleic acid identity, with one notable exception. The butenyl-spinosyn gene sequence codes for one additional PKS module, which is responsible for the additional two carbons in the C-21 tail. The DNA sequence of spinosyn genes in this region suggested that the S. spinosa spnA gene could have been the result of an in-frame deletion of the S. pogona busA gene. Therefore, the butenyl-spinosyn genes represent the putative parental gene structure that was naturally engineered by deletion to create the spinosyn genes.

  14. Characterization of the cobalamin (vitamin B12) biosynthetic genes of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, J R; Lawrence, J G; Rubenfield, M; Kieffer-Higgins, S; Church, G M

    1993-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium synthesizes cobalamin (vitamin B12) de novo under anaerobic conditions. Of the 30 cobalamin synthetic genes, 25 are clustered in one operon, cob, and are arranged in three groups, each group encoding enzymes for a biochemically distinct portion of the biosynthetic pathway. We have determined the DNA sequence for the promoter region and the proximal 17.1 kb of the cob operon. This sequence includes 20 translationally coupled genes that encode the enzymes involved in parts I and III of the cobalamin biosynthetic pathway. A comparison of these genes with the cobalamin synthetic genes from Pseudomonas denitrificans allows assignment of likely functions to 12 of the 20 sequenced Salmonella genes. Three additional Salmonella genes encode proteins likely to be involved in the transport of cobalt, a component of vitamin B12. However, not all Salmonella and Pseudomonas cobalamin synthetic genes have apparent homologs in the other species. These differences suggest that the cobalamin biosynthetic pathways differ between the two organisms. The evolution of these genes and their chromosomal positions is discussed. Images PMID:8501034

  15. Isolation and Characterization of the Gibberellin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Sphaceloma manihoticola▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bömke, Christiane; Rojas, Maria Cecilia; Gong, Fan; Hedden, Peter; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are tetracyclic diterpenoid phytohormones that were first identified as secondary metabolites of the fungus Fusarium fujikuroi (teleomorph, Gibberella fujikuroi). GAs were also found in the cassava pathogen Sphaceloma manihoticola, but the spectrum of GAs differed from that in F. fujikuroi. In contrast to F. fujikuroi, the GA biosynthetic pathway has not been studied in detail in S. manihoticola, and none of the GA biosynthetic genes have been cloned from the species. Here, we present the identification of the GA biosynthetic gene cluster from S. manihoticola consisting of five genes encoding a bifunctional ent-copalyl/ent-kaurene synthase (CPS/KS), a pathway-specific geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGS2), and three cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. The functions of all of the genes were analyzed either by a gene replacement approach or by complementing the corresponding F. fujikuroi mutants. The cluster organization and gene functions are similar to those in F. fujikuroi. However, the two border genes in the Fusarium cluster encoding the GA4 desaturase (DES) and the 13-hydroxylase (P450-3) are absent in the S. manihoticola GA gene cluster, consistent with the spectrum of GAs produced by this fungus. The close similarity between the two GA gene clusters, the identical gene functions, and the conserved intron positions suggest a common evolutionary origin despite the distant relatedness of the two fungi. PMID:18567680

  16. Understanding the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway through observation of four color variants of developing watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nanai)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway regulatory mechanisms leading to lycopene accumulation are well defined in the model fruit, tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). The regulatory mechanisms leading to accumulation of other carotenoids and flesh colors, however, are poorly understood. The variety ...

  17. Cloning and Heterologous Expression of a Large-sized Natural Product Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Streptomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    Nah, Hee-Ju; Pyeon, Hye-Rim; Kang, Seung-Hoon; Choi, Si-Sun; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Actinomycetes family including Streptomyces species have been a major source for the discovery of novel natural products (NPs) in the last several decades thanks to their structural novelty, diversity and complexity. Moreover, recent genome mining approach has provided an attractive tool to screen potentially valuable NP biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) present in the actinomycetes genomes. Since many of these NP BGCs are silent or cryptic in the original actinomycetes, various techniques have been employed to activate these NP BGCs. Heterologous expression of BGCs has become a useful strategy to produce, reactivate, improve, and modify the pathways of NPs present at minute quantities in the original actinomycetes isolates. However, cloning and efficient overexpression of an entire NP BGC, often as large as over 100 kb, remain challenging due to the ineffectiveness of current genetic systems in manipulating large NP BGCs. This mini review describes examples of actinomycetes NP production through BGC heterologous expression systems as well as recent strategies specialized for the large-sized NP BGCs in Streptomyces heterologous hosts. PMID:28360891

  18. A systematic analysis of biosynthetic gene clusters in the human microbiome reveals a common family of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Donia, Mohamed S.; Cimermancic, Peter; Schulze, Christopher J.; Wieland Brown, Laura C.; Martin, John; Mitreva, Makedonka; Clardy, Jon; Linington, Roger G.; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In complex biological systems, small molecules often mediate microbe-microbe and microbe-host interactions. Using a systematic approach, we identified 3,118 small molecule biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) in genomes of human-associated bacteria and studied their representation in 752 metagenomic samples from the NIH Human Microbiome Project. Remarkably, we discovered that BGCs for a class of antibiotics in clinical trials, thiopeptides, are widely distributed in genomes and metagenomes of the human microbiota. We purified and solved the structure of a new thiopeptide antibiotic, lactocillin, from a prominent member of the vaginal microbiota. We demonstrate that lactocillin has potent antibacterial activity against a range of Gram-positive vaginal pathogens, and we show that lactocillin and other thiopeptide BGCs are expressed in vivo by analyzing human metatranscriptomic sequencing data. Our findings illustrate the widespread distribution of small-molecule-encoding BGCs in the human microbiome, and they demonstrate the bacterial production of drug-like molecules in humans. PMID:25215495

  19. Molecular interaction of the first 3 enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirawake, Hiroko; Liao, Chien-Wei; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Morales, Jorge; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Fan, Chia-Kwung; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Inoue, Masayuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; and others

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An Escherichia coli strain co-expressing CPSII, ATC, and DHO of Trypanosoma cruzi was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of T. cruzi were demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPSII bound with both ATC and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATC bound with both CPSII and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A functional tri-enzyme complex might precede the establishment of the fused enzyme. -- Abstract: The first 3 reaction steps of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway are catalyzed by carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), respectively. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are structurally classified into 2 types: (1) a CPSII-DHO-ATC fusion enzyme (CAD) found in animals, fungi, and amoebozoa, and (2) stand-alone enzymes found in plants and the protist groups. In the present study, we demonstrate direct intermolecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The 3 enzymes were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their interactions were examined. Immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for each enzyme coupled with Western blotting-based detection using antibodies for the counterpart enzymes showed co-precipitation of all 3 enzymes. From an evolutionary viewpoint, the formation of a functional tri-enzyme complex may have preceded-and led to-gene fusion to produce the CAD protein. This is the first report to demonstrate the structural basis of these 3 enzymes as a model of CAD. Moreover, in conjunction with the essentiality of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the parasite, our findings provide a rationale for new strategies for developing drugs for Chagas disease, which target the intermolecular interactions of these 3 enzymes.

  20. Mass spectrometry profiling of oxylipins, endocannabinoids, and N-acylethanolamines in human lung lavage fluids reveals responsiveness of prostaglandin E2 and associated lipid metabolites to biodiesel exhaust exposure.

    PubMed

    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra; Karimpour, Masoumeh; Bosson, Jenny A; Blomberg, Anders; Unosson, Jon; Pourazar, Jamshid; Sandström, Thomas; Behndig, Annelie F; Nording, Malin L

    2017-04-01

    The adverse effects of petrodiesel exhaust exposure on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems are well recognized. While biofuels such as rapeseed methyl ester (RME) biodiesel may have ecological advantages, the exhaust generated may cause adverse health effects. In the current study, we investigated the responses of bioactive lipid mediators in human airways after biodiesel exhaust exposure using lipidomic profiling methods. Lipid mediator levels in lung lavage were assessed following 1-h biodiesel exhaust (average particulate matter concentration, 159 μg/m(3)) or filtered air exposure in 15 healthy individuals in a double-blinded, randomized, controlled, crossover study design. Bronchoscopy was performed 6 h post exposure and lung lavage fluids, i.e., bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), were sequentially collected. Mass spectrometry methods were used to detect a wide array of oxylipins (including eicosanoids), endocannabinoids, N-acylethanolamines, and related lipid metabolites in the collected BW and BAL samples. Six lipids in the human lung lavage samples were altered following biodiesel exhaust exposure, three from BAL samples and three from BW samples. Of these, elevated levels of PGE2, 12,13-DiHOME, and 13-HODE, all of which were found in BAL samples, reached Bonferroni-corrected significance. This is the first study in humans reporting responses of bioactive lipids following biodiesel exhaust exposure and the most pronounced responses were seen in the more peripheral and alveolar lung compartments, reflected by BAL collection. Since the responsiveness and diagnostic value of a subset of the studied lipid metabolites were established in lavage fluids, we conclude that our mass spectrometry profiling method is useful to assess effects of human exposure to vehicle exhaust.

  1. Genomics-driven discovery of the pneumocandin biosynthetic gene cluster in the fungus Glarea lozoyensis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The antifungal therapy caspofungin is a semi-synthetic derivative of pneumocandin B0, a lipohexapeptide produced by the fungus Glarea lozoyensis, and was the first member of the echinocandin class approved for human therapy. The nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-polyketide synthases (PKS) gene cluster responsible for pneumocandin biosynthesis from G. lozoyensis has not been elucidated to date. In this study, we report the elucidation of the pneumocandin biosynthetic gene cluster by whole genome sequencing of the G. lozoyensis wild-type strain ATCC 20868. Results The pneumocandin biosynthetic gene cluster contains a NRPS (GLNRPS4) and a PKS (GLPKS4) arranged in tandem, two cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, seven other modifying enzymes, and genes for L-homotyrosine biosynthesis, a component of the peptide core. Thus, the pneumocandin biosynthetic gene cluster is significantly more autonomous and organized than that of the recently characterized echinocandin B gene cluster. Disruption mutants of GLNRPS4 and GLPKS4 no longer produced the pneumocandins (A0 and B0), and the Δglnrps4 and Δglpks4 mutants lost antifungal activity against the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. In addition to pneumocandins, the G. lozoyensis genome encodes a rich repertoire of natural product-encoding genes including 24 PKSs, six NRPSs, five PKS-NRPS hybrids, two dimethylallyl tryptophan synthases, and 14 terpene synthases. Conclusions Characterization of the gene cluster provides a blueprint for engineering new pneumocandin derivatives with improved pharmacological properties. Whole genome estimation of the secondary metabolite-encoding genes from G. lozoyensis provides yet another example of the huge potential for drug discovery from natural products from the fungal kingdom. PMID:23688303

  2. Neopikromycin and novapikromycin from the pikromycin biosynthetic pathway of Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Kil; Park, Je Won; Kim, Ji Won; Jung, Won Seok; Park, Sung Ryeol; Choi, Cha Yong; Kim, Eung Soo; Kim, Beom Seok; Ahn, Jong Seog; Sherman, David H; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2006-05-01

    Two new macrolides from the pikromycin biosynthetic pathway of Streptomyces venezuelae, neopikromycin (9) and novapikromycin (10), were identified and structurally characterized through mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. The established structures showed that 9 and 10 have hydroxyl groups at C-14 (9) and at both C-12 and C-14 (10), on the basis of a comparison with narbomycin (7). The purified PikC cytochrome P450 monooxygenase catalyzes the in vitro hydroxylation of 7 and pikromycin (8) to yield 9 and 10, respectively, thus expanding the substrate- and regio-flexibility of this enzyme.

  3. New tools for reconstruction and heterologous expression of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunzi; Enghiad, Behnam; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-01-01

    Natural product scaffolds remain a major source and inspiration for human therapeutics. However, generation of a natural product in the post-genomic era often requires reconstruction of the corresponding biosynthetic gene cluster in a heterologous host. In the burgeoning fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, a significant amount of efforts has been devoted to develop DNA assembly techniques with higher efficiency, fidelity, and modularity, and heterologous expression systems with higher productivity and yield. Here we describe recent advances in DNA assembly and host engineering and highlight their applications in natural product discovery and engineering. PMID:26647833

  4. Genomics-Enabled Discovery of Phosphonate Natural Products and their Biosynthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Kou-San; Doroghazi, James R.; Metcalf, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphonate natural products have proven to be a rich source of useful pharmaceutical, agricultural and biotechnology products, whereas study of their biosynthetic pathways has revealed numerous intriguing enzymes that catalyze unprecedented biochemistry. Here we review the history of phosphonate natural product discovery, highlighting technological advances that have played a key role in the recent advances in their discovery. Central to these developments has been the application of genomics, which allowed discovery and development of a global phosphonate metabolic framework to guide research efforts. This framework suggests that the future of phosphonate natural products remains bright, with many new compounds and pathways yet to be discovered. PMID:24271089

  5. New tools for reconstruction and heterologous expression of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yunzi; Enghiad, Behnam; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-02-01

    Natural product scaffolds remain a major source and inspiration for human therapeutics. However, generation of a natural product in the post-genomic era often requires reconstruction of the corresponding biosynthetic gene cluster in a heterologous host. In the burgeoning fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, a significant amount of efforts has been devoted to develop DNA assembly techniques with higher efficiency, fidelity, and modularity, and heterologous expression systems with higher productivity and yield. Here we describe recent advances in DNA assembly and host engineering and highlight their applications in natural product discovery and engineering.

  6. Engineering for biofuels: exploiting innate microbial capacity or importing biosynthetic potential?

    PubMed

    Alper, Hal; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2009-10-01

    The ideal microorganism for biofuel production will possess high substrate utilization and processing capacities, fast and deregulated pathways for sugar transport, good tolerance to inhibitors and product, and high metabolic fluxes and will produce a single fermentation product. It is unclear whether such an organism will be engineered using a native, isolated strain or a recombinant, model organism as the starting point. The choice between engineering natural function and importing biosynthetic capacity is affected by current progress in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. This Review highlights some of the factors influencing the above decision, in light of current advances.

  7. Total syntheses of linear polythiazole/oxazole plantazolicin A and its biosynthetic precursor plantazolicin B.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Zoe E; Fenner, Sabine; Ley, Steven V

    2015-01-19

    Plantazolicin A, a linear decacyclic natural product, exhibits desirable selective activity against the causative agent of anthrax toxicity. The total synthesis of plantazolicin A and its biosynthetic precursor plantazolicin B was successfully achieved by an efficient, unified, and highly convergent route featuring dicyclizations to form 2,4-concatenated oxazoles and the mild synthesis of thiazoles from natural amino acids. This report represents the first synthesis of plantazolicin B and includes the first complete characterization data for both natural products.

  8. Unlabeled milk from cows treated with biosynthetic growth hormones: a case of regulatory abdication.

    PubMed

    Epstein, S S

    1996-01-01

    Levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are substantially elevated and more bioactive in the milk of cows hyperstimulated with the biosynthetic bovine growth hormones rBGH, and are further increased by pasteurization. IGF-1 is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, as evidenced by marked growth-promoting effects even in short-term tests in mature rats, and absorption is likely to be still higher in infants. Converging lines of evidence incriminate IGF-1 in rBGH milk as a potential risk factor for both breast and gastrointestinal cancers.

  9. Differential Activities of Thalidomide and Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway Inhibitors in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Sarah A.; Tong, Huaxiang; Hohl, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Thalidomide has emerged as an effective agent for treating multiple myeloma, however the precise mechanism of action remains unknown. Agents known to target the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) can have cytotoxic effects in myeloma cells. The interactions between thalidomide and IBP inhibitors in human multiple myeloma cells were evaluated. Enhanced cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis was observed in RPMI-8226 cells. Examination of intracellular levels of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) revealed a wide variance in basal levels and response to IBP inhibitors. These findings provide a mechanism for the differential sensitivity of myeloma cells to pharmacologic manipulation of the IBP. PMID:19646757

  10. Optimizing natural products by biosynthetic engineering: discovery of nonquinone Hsp90 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Qiang; Gaisser, Sabine; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Sheehan, Lesley S; Vousden, William A; Gaitatzis, Nikolaos; Peck, Gerrard; Coates, Nigel J; Moss, Steven J; Radzom, Markus; Foster, Teresa A; Sheridan, Rose M; Gregory, Matthew A; Roe, S Mark; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Pearl, Laurence; Boyd, Susan M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Martin, Christine J

    2008-09-25

    A biosynthetic medicinal chemistry approach was applied to the optimization of the natural product Hsp90 inhibitor macbecin. By genetic engineering, mutants have been created to produce novel macbecin analogues including a nonquinone compound (5) that has significantly improved binding affinity to Hsp90 (Kd 3 nM vs 240 nM for macbecin) and reduced toxicity (MTD > or = 250 mg/kg). Structural flexibility may contribute to the preorganization of 5 to exist in solution in the Hsp90-bound conformation.

  11. A branched biosynthetic pathway is involved in production of roquefortine and related compounds in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hazrat; Ries, Marco I; Nijland, Jeroen G; Lankhorst, Peter P; Hankemeier, Thomas; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Vreeken, Rob J; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2013-01-01

    Profiling and structural elucidation of secondary metabolites produced by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum and derived deletion strains were used to identify the various metabolites and enzymatic steps belonging to the roquefortine/meleagrin pathway. Major abundant metabolites of this pathway were identified as histidyltryptophanyldiketopiperazine (HTD), dehydrohistidyltryptophanyldi-ketopiperazine (DHTD), roquefortine D, roquefortine C, glandicoline A, glandicoline B and meleagrin. Specific genes could be assigned to each enzymatic reaction step. The nonribosomal peptide synthetase RoqA accepts L-histidine and L-tryptophan as substrates leading to the production of the diketopiperazine HTD. DHTD, previously suggested to be a degradation product of roquefortine C, was found to be derived from HTD involving the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase RoqR. The dimethylallyltryptophan synthetase RoqD prenylates both HTD and DHTD yielding directly the products roquefortine D and roquefortine C without the synthesis of a previously suggested intermediate and the involvement of RoqM. This leads to a branch in the otherwise linear pathway. Roquefortine C is subsequently converted into glandicoline B with glandicoline A as intermediates, involving two monooxygenases (RoqM and RoqO) which were mixed up in an earlier attempt to elucidate the biosynthetic pathway. Eventually, meleagrin is produced from glandicoline B involving a methyltransferase (RoqN). It is concluded that roquefortine C and meleagrin are derived from a branched biosynthetic pathway.

  12. Transcriptome and Metabolite analysis reveal candidate genes of the cardiac glycoside biosynthetic pathway from Calotropis procera

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Akansha; Swarnkar, Vishakha; Pandey, Tushar; Srivastava, Piush; Kanojiya, Sanjeev; Mishra, Dipak Kumar; Tripathi, Vineeta

    2016-01-01

    Calotropis procera is a medicinal plant of immense importance due to its pharmaceutical active components, especially cardiac glycosides (CG). As genomic resources for this plant are limited, the genes involved in CG biosynthetic pathway remain largely unknown till date. Our study on stage and tissue specific metabolite accumulation showed that CG’s were maximally accumulated in stems of 3 month old seedlings. De novo transcriptome sequencing of same was done using high throughput Illumina HiSeq platform generating 44074 unigenes with average mean length of 1785 base pair. Around 66.6% of unigenes were annotated by using various public databases and 5324 unigenes showed significant match in the KEGG database involved in 133 different pathways of plant metabolism. Further KEGG analysis resulted in identification of 336 unigenes involved in cardenolide biosynthesis. Tissue specific expression analysis of 30 putative transcripts involved in terpenoid, steroid and cardenolide pathways showed a positive correlation between metabolite and transcript accumulation. Wound stress elevated CG levels as well the levels of the putative transcripts involved in its biosynthetic pathways. This result further validated the involvement of identified transcripts in CGs biosynthesis. The identified transcripts will lay a substantial foundation for further research on metabolic engineering and regulation of cardiac glycosides biosynthesis pathway genes. PMID:27703261

  13. Discovery of Unusual Biaryl Polyketides by Activation of a Silent Streptomyces venezuelae Biosynthetic Gene Cluster.

    PubMed

    Thanapipatsiri, Anyarat; Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Song, Lijiang; Bibb, Maureen J; Al-Bassam, Mahmoud; Chandra, Govind; Thamchaipenet, Arinthip; Challis, Gregory L; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2016-11-17

    Comparative transcriptional profiling of a ΔbldM mutant of Streptomyces venezuelae with its unmodified progenitor revealed that the expression of a cryptic biosynthetic gene cluster containing both type I and type III polyketide synthase genes is activated in the mutant. The 29.5 kb gene cluster, which was predicted to encode an unusual biaryl metabolite, which we named venemycin, and potentially halogenated derivatives, contains 16 genes including one-vemR-that encodes a transcriptional activator of the large ATP-binding LuxR-like (LAL) family. Constitutive expression of vemR in the ΔbldM mutant led to the production of sufficient venemycin for structural characterisation, confirming its unusual biaryl structure. Co-expression of the venemycin biosynthetic gene cluster and vemR in the heterologous host Streptomyces coelicolor also resulted in venemycin production. Although the gene cluster encodes two halogenases and a flavin reductase, constitutive expression of all three genes led to the accumulation only of a monohalogenated venemycin derivative, both in the native producer and the heterologous host. A competition experiment in which equimolar quantities of sodium chloride and sodium bromide were fed to the venemycin-producing strains resulted in the preferential incorporation of bromine, thus suggesting that bromide is the preferred substrate for one or both halogenases.

  14. Para-position derivatives of fungal anthelmintic cyclodepsipeptides engineered with Streptomyces venezuelae antibiotic biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Koji; Sumida, Naomi; Okakura, Kaoru; Moriya, Tatsuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Murakami, Takeshi

    2004-07-01

    PF1022A, a cyclooctadepsipeptide possessing strong anthelmintic properties and produced by the filamentous fungus Rosellinia sp. PF1022, consists of four alternating residues of N-methyl-L-leucine and four residues of D-lactate or D-phenyllactate. PF1022A derivatives obtained through modification of their benzene ring at the para-position with nitro or amino groups act as valuable starting materials for the synthesis of compounds with improved anthelmintic activities. Here we describe the production of such derivatives by fermentation through metabolic engineering of the PF1022A biosynthetic pathway in Rosellinia sp. PF1022. Three genes cloned from Streptomyces venezuelae, and required for the biosynthesis of p-aminophenylpyruvate from chorismate in the chloramphenicol biosynthetic pathway, were expressed in a chorismate mutase-deficient strain derived from Rosellinia sp. PF1022. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and NMR analyses confirmed that this approach facilitated the production of PF1022A derivatives specifically modified at the para-position. This fermentation method is environmentally safe and can be used for the industrial scale production of PF1022A derivatives.

  15. Expression of parsley flavone synthase I establishes the flavone biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yun, Choong-Soo; Yamamoto, Tomio; Nozawa, Akira; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2008-04-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana lacks the flavone biosynthetic pathway, probably because of a lack or low activity of a flavone synthase. To establish this biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis, we subjected this model plant to transformation with the parsley gene for flavone synthase type I (FNS-I). Transgenic seedlings expressing FNS-I were cultured in liquid medium with or without naringenin, and plant extracts were then analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. In contrast to wild-type seedlings, the transgenic seedlings accumulated substantial amounts of apigenin, which is produced from naringenin by FNS-I, and the apigenin level correlated with the abundance of FNS-I mRNA in three different transgenic lines. These results indicate that the FNS-I transgene produces a functional enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of naringenin to apigenin in Arabidopsis. These FNS-I transgenic lines should prove useful in investigating the in vivo functions of enzymes that mediate the synthesis of the wide variety of flavones found in other plants.

  16. Stimulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways delays axonal degeneration after axotomy.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yo; Araki, Toshiyuki; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2006-08-16

    Axonal degeneration occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases and after traumatic injury and is a self-destructive program independent from programmed cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (Nmnat1) or exogenous application of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) can protect axons of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from degeneration caused by mechanical or neurotoxic injury. In mammalian cells, NAD can be synthesized from multiple precursors, including tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside (NmR), via multiple enzymatic steps. To determine whether other components of these NAD biosynthetic pathways are capable of delaying axonal degeneration, we overexpressed each of the enzymes involved in each pathway and/or exogenously administered their respective substrates in DRG cultures and assessed their capacity to protect axons after axotomy. Among the enzymes tested, Nmnat1 had the strongest protective effects, whereas nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase showed moderate protective activity in the presence of their substrates. Strong axonal protection was also provided by Nmnat3, which is predominantly located in mitochondria, and an Nmnat1 mutant localized to the cytoplasm, indicating that the subcellular location of NAD production is not crucial for protective activity. In addition, we showed that exogenous application of the NAD precursors that are the substrates of these enzymes, including nicotinic acid mononucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, and NmR, can also delay axonal degeneration. These results indicate that stimulation of NAD biosynthetic pathways via a variety of interventions may be useful in preventing or delaying axonal degeneration.

  17. Evidence of Selection for Low Cognate Amino Acid Bias in Amino Acid Biosynthetic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Rui; Savageau, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Summary If the enzymes responsible for biosynthesis of a given amino acid are repressed and the cognate amino acid pool suddenly depleted, then derepression of these enzymes and replenishment of the pool would be problematic, if the enzymes were largely composed of the cognate amino acid. In the proverbial ‘Catch 22’, cells would lack the necessary enzymes to make the amino acid, and they would lack the necessary amino acid to make the needed enzymes. Based on this scenario, we hypothesize that evolution would lead to the selection of amino acid biosynthetic enzymes that have a relatively low content of their cognate amino acid. We call this the ‘cognate bias hypothesis’. Here we test several implications of this hypothesis directly using data from the proteome of Escherichia coli. Several lines of evidence show that low cognate bias is evident in 15 of the 20 amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Comparison with closely related Salmonella typhimurium shows similar results. Comparison with more distantly related Bacillus subtilis shows general similarities as well as significant differences in the detailed profiles of cognate bias. Thus, selection for low cognate bias plays a significant role in shaping the amino acid composition for a large class of cellular proteins. PMID:15853887

  18. Sioxanthin, a novel glycosylated carotenoid reveals an unusual subclustered biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Taylor K.S.; Hughes, Chambers C.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Members of the marine actinomycete genus Salinispora constitutively produce a characteristic orange pigment during vegetative growth. Contrary to the understanding of widespread carotenoid biosynthesis pathways in bacteria, Salinispora carotenoid biosynthesis genes are not confined to a single cluster. Instead, bioinformatic and genetic investigations confirm that four regions of the S. tropica CNB-440 genome, consisting of two gene clusters and two independent genes, contribute to the in vivo production of a single carotenoid. This compound, namely (2’S)-1’-(β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-3’,4’-didehydro-1’,2’-dihydro-φ,ψ-caroten-2’-ol, is novel and has been given the trivial name “sioxanthin”. Sioxanthin is a C40-carotenoid, glycosylated on one end of the molecule and containing an aryl moiety on the opposite end. Glycosylation is unusual amongst actinomycete carotenoids, and sioxanthin joins a rare group of carotenoids with polar and non-polar head groups. Gene sequence homology predicts that the sioxanthin biosynthetic pathway is present in all of the Salinispora as well as other members of the family Micromonosporaceae. Additionally, this study’s investigations of clustering of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in heterotrophic bacteria show that a non-clustered genome arrangement is more common than previously suggested, with nearly half of the investigated genomes showing a non-clustered architecture. PMID:25329237

  19. Identification of an unusual type II thioesterase in the dithiolopyrrolone antibiotics biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Ying; Bai, Silei; Liu, Jingjing; Yang, Liyuan; Han, Li; Huang, Xueshi; He, Jing

    2016-04-22

    Dithiolopyrrolone group antibiotics characterized by an electronically unique dithiolopyrrolone heterobicyclic core are known for their antibacterial, antifungal, insecticidal and antitumor activities. Recently the biosynthetic gene clusters for two dithiolopyrrolone compounds, holomycin and thiomarinol, have been identified respectively in different bacterial species. Here, we report a novel dithiolopyrrolone biosynthetic gene cluster (aut) isolated from Streptomyces thioluteus DSM 40027 which produces two pyrrothine derivatives, aureothricin and thiolutin. By comparison with other characterized dithiolopyrrolone clusters, eight genes in the aut cluster were verified to be responsible for the assembly of dithiolopyrrolone core. The aut cluster was further confirmed by heterologous expression and in-frame gene deletion experiments. Intriguingly, we found that the heterogenetic thioesterase HlmK derived from the holomycin (hlm) gene cluster in Streptomyces clavuligerus significantly improved heterologous biosynthesis of dithiolopyrrolones in Streptomyces albus through coexpression with the aut cluster. In the previous studies, HlmK was considered invalid because it has a Ser to Gly point mutation within the canonical Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of thioesterases. However, gene inactivation and complementation experiments in our study unequivocally demonstrated that HlmK is an active distinctive type II thioesterase that plays a beneficial role in dithiolopyrrolone biosynthesis.

  20. The Sesquiterpene Synthase from the Botrydial Biosynthetic Gene Cluster of the Phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Pinedo, Cristina; Wang, Chieh-Mei; Pradier, Jean-Marc; Dalmais, Bérengère; Choquer, Mathias; Pêcheur, Pascal Le; Morgant, Guillaume; Collado, Isidro G.; Cane, David E.; Viaud, Muriel

    2009-01-01

    The fungus Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of the economically important gray mold disease that affects more than 200 ornamental and agriculturally important plant species. B. cinerea is a necrotrophic plant pathogen that secretes nonspecific phytotoxins, including the sesquiterpene botrydial and the polyketide botcinic acid. The region surrounding the previously characterized BcBOT1 gene has now been identified as the botrydial biosynthetic gene cluster. Five genes including BcBOT1 and BcBOT2 were shown by quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR to be co-regulated through the calcineurin signaling pathway. Inactivation of the BcBOT2 gene, encoding a putative sesquiterpene cyclase, abolished botrydial biosynthesis, which could be restored by in trans complementation. Inactivation of BcBOT2 also resulted in over-production of botcinic acid that was observed to be strain-dependent. Recombinant BcBOT2 protein converted farnesyl diphosphate to the parent sesquiterpene of the botrydial biosynthetic pathway, the tricyclic alcohol presilphiperfolan-8β-ol. PMID:19035644

  1. Genome Sequence of Thermofilum pendens Reveals an Exceptional Loss of Biosynthetic Pathways without Genome Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Rodriquez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, I.; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke; Elkins, James G; Mavromatis, K; Lykidis, A; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Detter, J C; Zhulin, Igor B; Olsen, Gary; Whitman, W. B.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching member of class Thermoproteales of Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first Crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have transporters of the phosphotransferase system. T. pendens is known to require an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than any other free-living organism. In addition to heterotrophy, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein from a new subfamily. Predicted highly expressed proteins include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins, suggesting that defense against viruses is a high priority.

  2. Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Anderson, Iain; Rodriguez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S.; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Detter, Chris; Zhulin, Igor B.; Olsen, Gary J.; Whitman, William; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching, hyperthermophilic member of the order Thermoproteales within the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It is an extracellular commensal, requiring an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. In fact T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than obligate intracellular parasites, although it does not display other features common among obligate parasites and thus does not appear to be in the process of becoming a parasite. It appears that T. pendens has adapted to life in an environment rich in nutrients. T. pendens was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have a transporter of the phosphotransferase system. In addition to fermentation, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein. Predicted highly expressed proteins do not include housekeeping genes, and instead include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins.

  3. Metabolic and functional diversity of saponins, biosynthetic intermediates and semi-synthetic derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Tessa; Papadopoulou, Kalliope K.

    2014-01-01

    Saponins are widely distributed plant natural products with vast structural and functional diversity. They are typically composed of a hydrophobic aglycone, which is extensively decorated with functional groups prior to the addition of hydrophilic sugar moieties, to result in surface-active amphipathic compounds. The saponins are broadly classified as triterpenoids, steroids or steroidal glycoalkaloids, based on the aglycone structure from which they are derived. The saponins and their biosynthetic intermediates display a variety of biological activities of interest to the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food sectors. Although their relevance in industrial applications has long been recognized, their role in plants is underexplored. Recent research on modulating native pathway flux in saponin biosynthesis has demonstrated the roles of saponins and their biosynthetic intermediates in plant growth and development. Here, we review the literature on the effects of these molecules on plant physiology, which collectively implicate them in plant primary processes. The industrial uses and potential of saponins are discussed with respect to structure and activity, highlighting the undoubted value of these molecules as therapeutics. PMID:25286183

  4. Analysis of the biosynthetic pathway for sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol in the purple bacterium R. sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, C.; Somerville, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The membrane lipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQD) can be found in all photosynthetically active membranes studied. In a green leaf, about 50% of the organic sulfur is bound in SQD. Therefore, this sulfolipid constitutes a major component of the global sulfur cycle. However, since the discovery of SQD, very little progress has been made towards the elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway. For a genetical analysis of the pathway of SQD, we selected the photosynthetic purple-nonsulfur bacterium R. sphaeroides, as our model system. We have been able to isolate several classes of mutants, which show reduced levels of SQD. Some of the mutants accumulate {sup 35}S-labeled, water soluble compounds. We expect that these compounds are related to precursors or are precursors, which accumulate due to a specific block in the biosynthetic pathway of SQD. To study the possible precursor function of these compounds, we developed an in vitro SQD biosynthesis system using cell free extracts from R. sphaeroides. In addition, we have been able to isolate cosmids prepared from WT DNA, which complement three classes of SQD mutants in R. sphaeroides. The analysis and expression of the genes encoded by these cosmids should facilitate the characterization of the proteins involved in SQD biosynthesis.

  5. Identification and developmental expression profiling of putative alkaloid biosynthetic genes in Corydalis yanhusuo bulbs.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dengqun; Wang, Pengfei; Jia, Chan; Sun, Peng; Qi, Jianjun; Zhou, Lili; Li, Xian'en

    2016-01-18

    Alkaloids in bulbs of Corydalis (C.) yanhusuo are the major pharmacologically active compounds in treatment of blood vessel diseases, tumors and various pains. However, due to the absence of gene sequences in C. yanhusuo, the genes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis and their expression during bulb development remain unknown. We therefore established the first transcriptome database of C. yanhusuo via Illumina mRNA-Sequencing of a RNA composite sample collected at Bulb initiation (Day 0), early enlargement (Day 10) and maturation (Day 30). 25,013,630 clean 90 bp paired-end reads were de novo assembled into 47,081 unigenes with an average length of 489 bp, among which 30,868 unigenes (65.56%) were annotated in four protein databases. Of 526 putative unigenes involved in biosynthesis o f various alkaloids, 187 were identified as the candidate genes involved in the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs), the only alkaloid type reported in C. yanhusuo untill now. BIAs biosynthetic genes were highly upregulated in the overall pathway during bulb development. Identification of alkaloid biosynthetic genes in C. yanhusuo provide insights on pathways and molecular regulation of alkaloid biosynthesis, to initiate metabolic engineering in order to improve the yield of interesting alkaloids and to identify potentially new alkaloids predicted from the transcriptomic information.

  6. Cellular and nerve regeneration within a biosynthetic extracellular matrix for corneal transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengfu; Carlsson, David; Lohmann, Chris; Suuronen, Erik; Vascotto, Sandy; Kobuch, Karin; Sheardown, Heather; Munger, Rejean; Nakamura, Masatsugu; Griffith, May

    2003-12-01

    Our objective was to determine whether key properties of extracellular matrix (ECM) macromolecules can be replicated within tissue-engineered biosynthetic matrices to influence cellular properties and behavior. To achieve this, hydrated collagen and N-isopropylacrylamide copolymer-based ECMs were fabricated and tested on a corneal model. The structural and immunological simplicity of the cornea and importance of its extensive innervation for optimal functioning makes it an ideal test model. In addition, corneal failure is a clinically significant problem. Matrices were therefore designed to have the optical clarity and the proper dimensions, curvature, and biomechanical properties for use as corneal tissue replacements in transplantation. In vitro studies demonstrated that grafting of the laminin adhesion pentapeptide motif, YIGSR, to the hydrogels promoted epithelial stratification and neurite in-growth. Implants into pigs' corneas demonstrated successful in vivo regeneration of host corneal epithelium, stroma, and nerves. In particular, functional nerves were observed to rapidly regenerate in implants. By comparison, nerve regeneration in allograft controls was too slow to be observed during the experimental period, consistent with the behavior of human cornea transplants. Other corneal substitutes have been produced and tested, but here we report an implantable matrix that performs as a physiologically functional tissue substitute and not simply as a prosthetic device. These biosynthetic ECM replacements should have applicability to many areas of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, especially where nerve function is required. regenerative medicine | tissue engineering | cornea | implantation | innervation

  7. Carotenoid biosynthetic pathway: molecular phylogenies and evolutionary behavior of crt genes in eubacteria.

    PubMed

    Phadwal, Kanchan

    2005-01-17

    Phylogenetic analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes and their evolutionary rate variations were studied among eubacterial taxa. The gene sequences for the enzymes involved in this pathway were obtained for major phylogenetic groups of eubacteria (green sulfur bacteria, green nonsulphur bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, proteobacteria, flavobacteria, cyanobacteria) and archeabacteria. These gene datasets were distributed under five major steps of carotenoid biosynthesis in eubacteria; isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis, phytoene synthesis, dehydrogenation of phytoene, lycopene cyclization, formation of acyclic xanthophylls, formation of cyclic xanthophylls and carotenoid biosynthesis regulation. The NJ algorithm was used on protein coding DNA sequences to deduce the evolutionary relationship for the respective crt genes among different eubacterial lineages. The rate of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions per nonsynonymous site (d(N)) and synonymous nucleotide substitutions per synonymous site (d(S)) were calculated for different clades of the respective phylogenetic tree for specific crt genes. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that evolutionary pattern of crt genes in eubacteria is characterized by lateral gene transfer and gene duplication events. The d(N) values indicate that carotenoid biosynthetic genes are more conserved in proteobacteria than in any other eubacterial phyla. Furthermore, of the genes involved in carotenoid biosynthesis pathway, structural genes evolve slowly than the regulatory genes in eubacteria.

  8. Repaglinide preserves nutrient-stimulated biosynthetic activity in rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Viñambres, C; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Valverde, I; Malaisse, W J

    1996-01-01

    The meglitinide analogue repaglinide is a novel non-sulphonylurea insulinotropic agent which, like hypoglycaemic sulphonylureas, causes the closing of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in islet cells. We have now explored the effect of repaglinide upon proinsulin biosynthesis in rat pancreatic islets. Groups of eight islets each were incubated for 90 min in the presence of L-[4-(3)H]phenylalanine (4 microM) and glucose (2.8 or 16.7 mM), in the absence or presence of repaglinide (10 microM). A rise in glucose concentration caused a four-fold increase of the incorporation of L-[4-(3)H]phenylalanine into TCA-precipitable material. Repaglinide failed to adversely affect protein biosynthesis, whether at low or high glucose concentrations. Further characterization of the biosynthetic response was achieved by separation of the tritiated peptides by gel filtration. In the absence of repaglinide, the (pro)insulin/total ratio of tritiated peptides averaged 33.3 +/- 10.2 and 58.7 +/- 1.7% (n = 6 in both cases) at 2.8 and 16.7 mM D-glucose, respectively. Repaglinide again failed to significantly affect such ratios. In conclusion, repaglinide may offer the advantage over hypoglycaemic sulphonylureas of preserving nutrient-stimulated biosynthetic activity in pancreatic islet cells.

  9. Detection of polyketide synthase and nonribosomal peptide synthetase biosynthetic genes from antimicrobial coral-associated actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Dong, Jun-De; Yang, Jian; Luo, Xiong-Ming; Zhang, Si

    2014-10-01

    The diversity and properties of actinobacteria, predominant residents in coral holobionts, have been rarely documented. In this study, we aimed to explore the species diversity, antimicrobial activities and biosynthetic potential of culturable actinomycetes within the tissues of the scleractinian corals Porites lutea, Galaxea fascicularis and Acropora millepora from the South China Sea. A total of 70 strains representing 13 families and 15 genera of actinobacteria were isolated. The antimicrobial activity and biosynthetic potential of fifteen representative filamentous actinomycetes were estimated. Crude fermentation extracts of 6 strains exhibited comparable or greater activities against Vibrio alginolyticus than ciprofloxacin. Seven of the 15 actinomycetes strains possess type I polyketide synthases (PKS-I) and/or nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) genes. Nine tested strains possess type II polyketide synthases (PKS-II). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that these PKS and NRPS gene screening positive strains belong to genera Nocardiopsis, Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Amycolatopsis and Prauserella. One PKS-I and four NRPS fragments showed <70% similarity to their closest relatives, which suggested the novelty of these genes. This study helps uncover the genetic capacity of stony coral-associated actinomycetes to produce bioactive molecules.

  10. Identification of a novel sesquiterpene biosynthetic machinery involved in astellolide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Yasutomo; Takahashi, Shunji; Osada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Yasuji

    2016-01-01

    Esterified drimane-type sesquiterpene lactones such as astellolides display various biological activities and are widely produced by plants and fungi. Given their low homology to known sesquiterpene cyclases, the genes responsible for their biosynthesis have not been uncovered yet. Here, we identified the astellolide gene cluster from Aspergillus oryzae and discovered a novel sesquiterpene biosynthetic machinery consisting of AstC, AstI, and AstK. All these enzymes are annotated as haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolases, whereas AstC also contains a DxDTT motif conserved in class II diterpene cyclases. Based on enzyme reaction analyses, we found that AstC catalysed the protonation-initiated cyclisation of farnesyl pyrophosphate into drimanyl pyrophosphate. This was successively dephosphorylated by AstI and AstK to produce drim-8-ene-11-ol. Moreover, we also identified and characterised a unique non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, AstA, responsible for esterifying aryl acids to drimane-type sesquiterpene lactones. In this study, we highlight a new biosynthetic route for producing sesquiterpene and its esterified derivative. Our findings shed light on the identification of novel sesquiterpenes via genome mining. PMID:27628599

  11. Expression of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes and changes in carotenoids during ripening in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Namitha, Kanakapura Krishnamurthy; Archana, Surya Narayana; Negi, Pradeep Singh

    2011-04-01

    To study the expression pattern of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes, changes in their expression at different stages of maturity in tomato fruit (cv. Arka Ahuti) were investigated. The genes regulating carotenoid production were quantified by a dot blot method using a DIG (dioxigenin) labelling and detection kit. The results revealed that there was an increase in the levels of upstream genes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway such as 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), 4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (Lyt B), phytoene synthase (PSY), phytoene desaturase (PDS) and ζ-carotene desaturase (ZDS) by 2-4 fold at the breaker stage as compared to leaf. The lycopene and β-carotene content was analyzed by HPLC at different stages of maturity. The lycopene (15.33 ± 0.24 mg per 100 g) and β-carotene (10.37 ± 0.46 mg per 100 g) content were found to be highest at 5 days post-breaker and 10 days post-breaker stage, respectively. The lycopene accumulation pattern also coincided with the color values at different stages of maturity. These studies may provide insight into devising gene-based strategies for enhancing carotenoid accumulation in tomato fruits.

  12. Identification of a Pantoea Biosynthetic Cluster That Directs the Synthesis of an Antimicrobial Natural Product

    PubMed Central

    Walterson, Alyssa M.; Smith, Derek D. N.; Stavrinides, John

    2014-01-01

    Fire Blight is a destructive disease of apple and pear caused by the enteric bacterial pathogen, Erwinia amylovora. E. amylovora initiates infection by colonizing the stigmata of apple and pear trees, and entering the plants through natural openings. Epiphytic populations of the related enteric bacterium, Pantoea, reduce the incidence of disease through competition and antibiotic production. In this study, we identify an antibiotic from Pantoea ananatis BRT175, which is effective against E. amylovora and select species of Pantoea. We used transposon mutagenesis to create a mutant library, screened approximately 5,000 mutants for loss of antibiotic production, and recovered 29 mutants. Sequencing of the transposon insertion sites of these mutants revealed multiple independent disruptions of an 8.2 kb cluster consisting of seven genes, which appear to be coregulated. An analysis of the distribution of this cluster revealed that it was not present in any other of our 115 Pantoea isolates, or in any of the fully sequenced Pantoea genomes, and is most closely related to antibiotic biosynthetic clusters found in three different species of Pseudomonas. This identification of this biosynthetic cluster highlights the diversity of natural products produced by Pantoea. PMID:24796857

  13. Molecular analysis of the cercosporin biosynthetic gene cluster in Cercospora nicotianae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiqin; Lee, Miin-Huey; Daub, Margret E; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2007-05-01

    We describe a core gene cluster, comprised of eight genes (designated CTB1-8), and associated with cercosporin toxin production in Cercospora nicotianae. Sequence analysis identified 10 putative open reading frames (ORFs) flanking the previously characterized CTB1 and CTB3 genes that encode, respectively, the polyketide synthase and a dual methyltransferase/monooxygenase required for cercosporin production. Expression of eight of the genes was co-ordinately induced under cercosporin-producing conditions and was regulated by the Zn(II)Cys(6) transcriptional activator, CTB8. Expression of the genes, affected by nitrogen and carbon sources and pH, was also controlled by another transcription activator, CRG1, previously shown to regulate cercosporin production and resistance. Disruption of the CTB2 gene encoding a methyltransferase or the CTB8 gene yielded mutants that were completely defective in cercosporin production and inhibitory expression of the other CTB cluster genes. Similar 'feedback' transcriptional inhibition was observed when the CTB1, or CTB3 but not CTB4 gene was inactivated. Expression of four ORFs located on the two distal ends of the cluster did not correlate with cercosporin biosynthesis and did not show regulation by CTB8, suggesting that the biosynthetic cluster was limited to CTB1-8. A biosynthetic pathway and a regulatory network leading to cercosporin formation are proposed.

  14. Analysis of Polygala tenuifolia Transcriptome and Description of Secondary Metabolite Biosynthetic Pathways by Illumina Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hongling; Xu, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Fusheng; Wang, Yaoqin; Guo, Shuhong; Qin, Xuemei; Du, Guanhua

    2015-01-01

    Radix polygalae, the dried roots of Polygala tenuifolia and P. sibirica, is one of the most well-known traditional Chinese medicinal plants. Radix polygalae contains various saponins, xanthones, and oligosaccharide esters and these compounds are responsible for several pharmacological properties. To provide basic breeding information, enhance molecular biological analysis, and determine secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways of P. tenuifolia, we applied Illumina sequencing technology and de novo assembly. We also applied this technique to gain an overview of P. tenuifolia transcriptome from samples with different years. Using Illumina sequencing, approximately 67.2% of unique sequences were annotated by basic local alignment search tool similarity searches against public sequence databases. We classified the annotated unigenes by using Nr, Nt, GO, COG, and KEGG databases compared with NCBI. We also obtained many candidates CYP450s and UGTs by the analysis of genes in the secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways, including putative terpenoid backbone and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway. With this transcriptome sequencing, future genetic and genomics studies related to the molecular mechanisms associated with the chemical composition of P. tenuifolia may be improved. Genes involved in the enrichment of secondary metabolite biosynthesis-related pathways could enhance the potential applications of P. tenuifolia in pharmaceutical industries. PMID:26543847

  15. Examination of Triacylglycerol Biosynthetic Pathways via De Novo Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses in an Unsequenced Microalga

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Michael T.; Nag, Ambarish; Smolinski, Sharon L.; Darzins, Al; Seibert, Michael; Pienkos, Philip T.

    2011-01-01

    Biofuels derived from algal lipids represent an opportunity to dramatically impact the global energy demand for transportation fuels. Systems biology analyses of oleaginous algae could greatly accelerate the commercialization of algal-derived biofuels by elucidating the key components involved in lipid productivity and leading to the initiation of hypothesis-driven strain-improvement strategies. However, higher-level systems biology analyses, such as transcriptomics and proteomics, are highly dependent upon available genomic sequence data, and the lack of these data has hindered the pursuit of such analyses for many oleaginous microalgae. In order to examine the triacylglycerol biosynthetic pathway in the unsequenced oleaginous microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, we have established a strategy with which to bypass the necessity for genomic sequence information by using the transcriptome as a guide. Our results indicate an upregulation of both fatty acid and triacylglycerol biosynthetic machinery under oil-accumulating conditions, and demonstrate the utility of a de novo assembled transcriptome as a search model for proteomic analysis of an unsequenced microalga. PMID:22043295

  16. Identification and developmental expression profiling of putative alkaloid biosynthetic genes in Corydalis yanhusuo bulbs

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Dengqun; Wang, Pengfei; Jia, Chan; Sun, Peng; Qi, Jianjun; Zhou, Lili; Li, Xian’en

    2016-01-01

    Alkaloids in bulbs of Corydalis (C.) yanhusuo are the major pharmacologically active compounds in treatment of blood vessel diseases, tumors and various pains. However, due to the absence of gene sequences in C. yanhusuo, the genes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis and their expression during bulb development remain unknown. We therefore established the first transcriptome database of C. yanhusuo via Illumina mRNA-Sequencing of a RNA composite sample collected at Bulb initiation (Day 0), early enlargement (Day 10) and maturation (Day 30). 25,013,630 clean 90 bp paired-end reads were de novo assembled into 47,081 unigenes with an average length of 489 bp, among which 30,868 unigenes (65.56%) were annotated in four protein databases. Of 526 putative unigenes involved in biosynthesis o f various alkaloids, 187 were identified as the candidate genes involved in the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs), the only alkaloid type reported in C. yanhusuo untill now. BIAs biosynthetic genes were highly upregulated in the overall pathway during bulb development. Identification of alkaloid biosynthetic genes in C. yanhusuo provide insights on pathways and molecular regulation of alkaloid biosynthesis, to initiate metabolic engineering in order to improve the yield of interesting alkaloids and to identify potentially new alkaloids predicted from the transcriptomic information. PMID:26777987

  17. Biosynthetic Potential of Phylogenetically Unique Endophytic Actinomycetes from Tropical Plants▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Janso, Jeffrey E.; Carter, Guy T.

    2010-01-01

    The culturable diversity of endophytic actinomycetes associated with tropical, native plants is essentially unexplored. In this study, 123 endophytic actinomycetes were isolated from tropical plants collected from several locations in Papua New Guinea and Mborokua Island, Solomon Islands. Isolates were found to be prevalent in roots but uncommon in leaves. Initially, isolates were dereplicated to the strain level by ribotyping. Subsequent characterization of 105 unique strains by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that 17 different genera were represented, and rare genera, such as Sphaerisporangium and Planotetraspora, which have never been previously reported to be endophytic, were quite prevalent. Phylogenetic analyses grouped many of the strains into clades distinct from known genera within Thermomonosporaceae and Micromonosporaceae, indicating that they may be unique genera. Bioactivity testing and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) profiling of crude fermentation extracts were performed on 91 strains. About 60% of the extracts exhibited bioactivity or displayed LC-MS profiles with spectra indicative of secondary metabolites. The biosynthetic potential of 29 nonproductive strains was further investigated by the detection of putative polyketide synthase (PKS) and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes. Despite their lack of detectable secondary metabolite production in fermentation, most were positive for type I (66%) and type II (79%) PKS genes, and all were positive for NRPS genes. These results suggest that tropical plants from New Guinea and the adjacent archipelago are hosts to unique endophytic actinomycetes that possess significant biosynthetic potential. PMID:20472734

  18. Discovery of Unusual Biaryl Polyketides by Activation of a Silent Streptomyces venezuelae Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Thanapipatsiri, Anyarat; Gomez‐Escribano, Juan Pablo; Song, Lijiang; Bibb, Maureen J.; Al‐Bassam, Mahmoud; Chandra, Govind

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Comparative transcriptional profiling of a ΔbldM mutant of Streptomyces venezuelae with its unmodified progenitor revealed that the expression of a cryptic biosynthetic gene cluster containing both type I and type III polyketide synthase genes is activated in the mutant. The 29.5 kb gene cluster, which was predicted to encode an unusual biaryl metabolite, which we named venemycin, and potentially halogenated derivatives, contains 16 genes including one—vemR—that encodes a transcriptional activator of the large ATP‐binding LuxR‐like (LAL) family. Constitutive expression of vemR in the ΔbldM mutant led to the production of sufficient venemycin for structural characterisation, confirming its unusual biaryl structure. Co‐expression of the venemycin biosynthetic gene cluster and vemR in the heterologous host Streptomyces coelicolor also resulted in venemycin production. Although the gene cluster encodes two halogenases and a flavin reductase, constitutive expression of all three genes led to the accumulation only of a monohalogenated venemycin derivative, both in the native producer and the heterologous host. A competition experiment in which equimolar quantities of sodium chloride and sodium bromide were fed to the venemycin‐producing strains resulted in the preferential incorporation of bromine, thus suggesting that bromide is the preferred substrate for one or both halogenases. PMID:27605017

  19. Comparative genomics of actinomycetes with a focus on natural product biosynthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Actinomycetes are a diverse group of medically, industrially and ecologically important bacteria, studied as much for the diseases they cause as for the cures they hold. The genomes of actinomycetes revealed that these bacteria have a large number of natural product gene clusters, although many of these are difficult to tie to products in the laboratory. Large scale comparisons of these clusters are difficult to perform due to the presence of highly similar repeated domains in the most common biosynthetic machinery: polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Results We have used comparative genomics to provide an overview of the genomic features of a set of 102 closed genomes from this important group of bacteria with a focus on natural product biosynthetic genes. We have focused on well-represented genera and determine the occurrence of gene cluster families therein. Conservation of natural product gene clusters within Mycobacterium, Streptomyces and Frankia suggest crucial roles for natural products in the biology of each genus. The abundance of natural product classes is also found to vary greatly between genera, revealing underlying patterns that are not yet understood. Conclusions A large-scale analysis of natural product gene clusters presents a useful foundation for hypothesis formulation that is currently underutilized in the field. Such studies will be increasingly necessary to study the diversity and ecology of natural products as the number of genome sequences available continues to grow. PMID:24020438

  20. Bacterial Biosynthetic Gene Clusters Encoding the Anti-cancer Haterumalide Class of Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Matilla, Miguel A.; Stöckmann, Henning; Leeper, Finian J.; Salmond, George P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Haterumalides are halogenated macrolides with strong antitumor properties, making them attractive targets for chemical synthesis. Unfortunately, current synthetic routes to these molecules are inefficient. The potent haterumalide, oocydin A, was previously identified from two plant-associated bacteria through its high bioactivity against plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. In this study, we describe oocydin A (ooc) biosynthetic gene clusters identified by genome sequencing, comparative genomics, and chemical analysis in four plant-associated enterobacteria of the Serratia and Dickeya genera. Disruption of the ooc gene cluster abolished oocydin A production and bioactivity against fungi and oomycetes. The ooc gene clusters span between 77 and 80 kb and encode five multimodular polyketide synthase (PKS) proteins, a hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase cassette and three flavin-dependent tailoring enzymes. The presence of two free-standing acyltransferase proteins classifies the oocydin A gene cluster within the growing family of trans-AT PKSs. The amino acid sequences and organization of the PKS domains are consistent with the chemical predictions and functional peculiarities associated with trans-acyltransferase PKS. Based on extensive in silico analysis of the gene cluster, we propose a biosynthetic model for the production of oocydin A and, by extension, for other members of the haterumalide family of halogenated macrolides exhibiting anti-cancer, anti-fungal, and other interesting biological properties. PMID:23012376

  1. Divergent evolutionary pattern of starch biosynthetic pathway genes in grasses and dicots.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Li, Qi-Gang; Dunwell, Jim M; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2012-10-01

    Starch is the most widespread and abundant storage carbohydrate in crops and its production is critical to both crop yield and quality. In regard to the starch content in the seeds of crop plants, there is a distinct difference between grasses (Poaceae) and dicots. However, few studies have described the evolutionary pattern of genes in the starch biosynthetic pathway in these two groups of plants. In this study, therefore, an attempt was made to compare evolutionary rate, gene duplication, and selective pattern of the key genes involved in this pathway between the two groups, using five grasses and five dicots as materials. The results showed 1) distinct differences in patterns of gene duplication and loss between grasses and dicots; duplication in grasses mainly occurred before the divergence of grasses, whereas duplication mostly occurred in individual species within the dicots; there is less gene loss in grasses than in dicots, 2) a considerably higher evolutionary rate in grasses than in dicots in most gene families analyzed, and 3) evidence of a different selective pattern between grasses and dicots; positive selection may have occurred asymmetrically in grasses in some gene families, for example, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase small subunit. Therefore, we deduced that gene duplication contributes to, and a higher evolutionary rate is associated with, the higher starch content in grasses. In addition, two novel aspects of the evolution of the starch biosynthetic pathway were observed.

  2. exo-Brevicomin biosynthetic pathway enzymes from the Mountain Pine Beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

    PubMed

    Song, Minmin; Delaplain, Patrick; Nguyen, Trang T; Liu, Xibei; Wickenberg, Leah; Jeffrey, Christopher; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2014-10-01

    exoBrevicomin (exo-7-ethyl-5-methyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane) is an important semiochemical for a number of beetle species, including the highly destructive Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae). It is also found in other insects and the African elephant. Despite its significance, very little is known about its biosynthesis. A recent microarray analysis implicated a small cluster of three D. ponderosae genes in exo-brevicomin biosynthesis, two of which had identifiable open reading frames (Aw et al., 2010; BMC Genomics 11:215). Here we report further expression profiling of two genes in that cluster and functional analysis of their recombinantly-produced enzymes. One encodes a short-chain dehydrogenase that used NAD(P)(+) as a co-factor to catalyze the oxidation of (Z)-6-nonen-2-ol to (Z)-6-nonen-2-one. We therefore named the enzyme (Z)-6-nonen-2-ol dehydrogenase (ZnoDH). The other encodes the cytochrome P450, CYP6CR1, which epoxidized (Z)-6-nonen-2-one to 6,7-epoxynonan-2-one with very high specificity and substrate selectivity. Both the substrates and products of the two enzymes are intermediates in the exo-brevicomin biosynthetic pathway. Thus, ZnoDH and CYP6CR1 are enzymes that apparently catalyze the antepenultimate and penultimate steps in the exo-brevicomin biosynthetic pathway, respectively.

  3. Variation in oxygen isotope fractionation during cellulose synthesis: intramolecular and biosynthetic effects.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Leonel; Pinzon, Maria Camila; Anderson, William T; Jahren, A Hope

    2006-10-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of plant cellulose is commonly used for the interpretations of climate, ecophysiology and dendrochronology in both modern and palaeoenvironments. Further applications of this analytical tool depends on our in-depth knowledge of the isotopic fractionations associated with the biochemical pathways leading to cellulose. Here, we test two important assumptions regarding isotopic effects resulting from the location of oxygen in the carbohydrate moiety and the biosynthetic pathway towards cellulose synthesis. We show that the oxygen isotopic fractionation of the oxygen attached to carbon 2 of the glucose moieties differs from the average fractionation of the oxygens attached to carbons 3-6 from cellulose by at least 9%, for cellulose synthesized within seedlings of two different species (Triticum aestivum L. and Ricinus communis L.). The fractionation for a given oxygen in cellulose synthesized by the Triticum seedlings, which have starch as their primary carbon source, is different than the corresponding fractionation in Ricinus seedlings, within which lipids are the primary carbon source. This observation shows that the biosynthetic pathway towards cellulose affects oxygen isotope partitioning, a fact heretofore undemonstrated. Our findings may explain the species-dependent variability in the overall oxygen isotope fractionation during cellulose synthesis, and may provide much-needed insight for palaeoclimate reconstruction using fossil cellulose.

  4. Genetic engineering and heterologous expression of the disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster via Red/ET recombineering.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qiang; Herrmann, Jennifer; Hu, Shengbiao; Raju, Ritesh; Bian, Xiaoying; Zhang, Youming; Müller, Rolf

    2016-02-15

    Disorazol, a macrocyclic polykitide produced by the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce12 and it is reported to have potential cytotoxic activity towards several cancer cell lines, including multi-drug resistant cells. The disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster (dis) from Sorangium cellulosum (So ce12) was identified by transposon mutagenesis and cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. The 58-kb dis core gene cluster was reconstituted from BACs via Red/ET recombineering and expressed in Myxococcus xanthus DK1622. For the first time ever, a myxobacterial trans-AT polyketide synthase has been expressed heterologously in this study. Expression in M. xanthus allowed us to optimize the yield of several biosynthetic products using promoter engineering. The insertion of an artificial synthetic promoter upstream of the disD gene encoding a discrete acyl transferase (AT), together with an oxidoreductase (Or), resulted in 7-fold increase in disorazol production. The successful reconstitution and expression of the genetic sequences encoding for these promising cytotoxic compounds will allow combinatorial biosynthesis to generate novel disorazol derivatives for further bioactivity evaluation.

  5. Construction of a controllable β-carotene biosynthetic pathway by decentralized assembly strategy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenping; Liu, Min; Lv, Xiaomei; Lu, Wenqiang; Gu, Jiali; Yu, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important platform organism for the synthesis of a great number of natural products. However, the assembly of controllable and genetically stable heterogeneous biosynthetic pathways in S. cerevisiae still remains a significant challenge. Here, we present a strategy for reconstructing controllable multi-gene pathways by employing the GAL regulatory system. A set of marker recyclable integrative plasmids (pMRI) was designed for decentralized assembly of pathways. As proof-of-principle, a controllable β-carotene biosynthesis pathway (∼16 kb) was reconstructed and optimized by repeatedly using GAL10-GAL1 bidirectional promoters with high efficiency (80-100%). By controling the switch time of the pathway, production of 11 mg/g DCW of total carotenoids (72.57 mg/L) and 7.41 mg/g DCW of β-carotene was achieved in shake-flask culture. In addition, the engineered yeast strain exhibited high genetic stability after 20 generations of subculture. The results demonstrated a controllable and genetically stable biosynthetic pathway capable of increasing the yield of target products. Furthermore, the strategy presented in this study could be extended to construct other pathways in S. cerevisisae.

  6. Efficient biosynthetic incorporation of tryptophan and indole analogs in an integral membrane protein

    PubMed Central

    Broos, Jaap; Gabellieri, Edi; Biemans-Oldehinkel, Esther; Strambini, Giovanni B.

    2003-01-01

    Biosynthetic incorporation of tryptophan (Trp) analogs such as 7-azatryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, and fluorotryptophan into a protein can facilitate its structural analysis by spectroscopic techniques such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, nuclear magnetic resonance, and Fourier transform infrared. Until now, the approach has dealt primarily with soluble proteins. In this article, we demonstrate that four different Trp analogs can be very efficiently incorporated into a membrane protein as demonstrated for the mannitol transporter of Escherichia coli (EIImtl). EIImtl overexpression was under control of the λPR promoter, and the E. coli Trp auxotroph M5219 was used as host. This strain constitutively expresses the heat labile repressor protein of the λPR promoter. Together with the presence of the repressor gene on the EIImtl plasmid, this resulted in a tightly controlled promoter system, a prerequisite for high Trp analog incorporation. A new method for determining the analog incorporation efficiency is presented that is suitable for membrane proteins. The procedure involves fitting of the phosphorescence spectrum as a linear combination of the Trp and Trp analog contributions, taking into account the influence of the protein environment on the Trp analog spectrum. The data show that the analog content of EIImtl samples is very high (>95%). In addition, we report here that biosynthetic incorporation of Trp analogs can also be effected with less expensive indole analogs, which in vivo are converted to L-Trp analogs. PMID:12930998

  7. Evolution of alternative biosynthetic pathways for vitamin C following plastid acquisition in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Glen; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Pornsaksit, Varissa; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is an enzyme co-factor in eukaryotes that also plays a critical role in protecting photosynthetic eukaryotes against damaging reactive oxygen species derived from the chloroplast. Many animal lineages, including primates, have become ascorbate auxotrophs due to the loss of the terminal enzyme in their biosynthetic pathway, l-gulonolactone oxidase (GULO). The alternative pathways found in land plants and Euglena use a different terminal enzyme, l-galactonolactone dehydrogenase (GLDH). The evolutionary processes leading to these differing pathways and their contribution to the cellular roles of ascorbate remain unclear. Here we present molecular and biochemical evidence demonstrating that GULO was functionally replaced with GLDH in photosynthetic eukaryote lineages following plastid acquisition. GULO has therefore been lost repeatedly throughout eukaryote evolution. The formation of the alternative biosynthetic pathways in photosynthetic eukaryotes uncoupled ascorbate synthesis from hydrogen peroxide production and likely contributed to the rise of ascorbate as a major photoprotective antioxidant. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06369.001 PMID:25768426

  8. Genetic engineering and heterologous expression of the disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster via Red/ET recombineering

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qiang; Herrmann, Jennifer; Hu, Shengbiao; Raju, Ritesh; Bian, Xiaoying; Zhang, Youming; Müller, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Disorazol, a macrocyclic polykitide produced by the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum So ce12 and it is reported to have potential cytotoxic activity towards several cancer cell lines, including multi-drug resistant cells. The disorazol biosynthetic gene cluster (dis) from Sorangium cellulosum (So ce12) was identified by transposon mutagenesis and cloned in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. The 58-kb dis core gene cluster was reconstituted from BACs via Red/ET recombineering and expressed in Myxococcus xanthus DK1622. For the first time ever, a myxobacterial trans-AT polyketide synthase has been expressed heterologously in this study. Expression in M. xanthus allowed us to optimize the yield of several biosynthetic products using promoter engineering. The insertion of an artificial synthetic promoter upstream of the disD gene encoding a discrete acyl transferase (AT), together with an oxidoreductase (Or), resulted in 7-fold increase in disorazol production. The successful reconstitution and expression of the genetic sequences encoding for these promising cytotoxic compounds will allow combinatorial biosynthesis to generate novel disorazol derivatives for further bioactivity evaluation. PMID:26875499

  9. Examination of triacylglycerol biosynthetic pathways via de novo transcriptomic and proteomic analyses in an unsequenced microalga.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Michael T; Nag, Ambarish; Smolinski, Sharon L; Darzins, Al; Seibert, Michael; Pienkos, Philip T

    2011-01-01

    Biofuels derived from algal lipids represent an opportunity to dramatically impact the global energy demand for transportation fuels. Systems biology analyses of oleaginous algae could greatly accelerate the commercialization of algal-derived biofuels by elucidating the key components involved in lipid productivity and leading to the initiation of hypothesis-driven strain-improvement strategies. However, higher-level systems biology analyses, such as transcriptomics and proteomics, are highly dependent upon available genomic sequence data, and the lack of these data has hindered the pursuit of such analyses for many oleaginous microalgae. In order to examine the triacylglycerol biosynthetic pathway in the unsequenced oleaginous microalga, Chlorella vulgaris, we have established a strategy with which to bypass the necessity for genomic sequence information by using the transcriptome as a guide. Our results indicate an upregulation of both fatty acid and triacylglycerol biosynthetic machinery under oil-accumulating conditions, and demonstrate the utility of a de novo assembled transcriptome as a search model for proteomic analysis of an unsequenced microalga.

  10. EPA, DHA, and Lipoic Acid Differentially Modulate the n-3 Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway in Atlantic Salmon Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bou, Marta; Østbye, Tone-Kari; Berge, Gerd M; Ruyter, Bente

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how EPA, DHA, and lipoic acid (LA) influence the different metabolic steps in the n-3 fatty acid (FA) biosynthetic pathway in hepatocytes from Atlantic salmon fed four dietary levels (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0%) of EPA, DHA or a 1:1 mixture of these FA. The hepatocytes were incubated with [1-(14)C] 18:3n-3 in the presence or absence of LA (0.2 mM). Increased endogenous levels of EPA and/or DHA and LA exposure both led to similar responses in cells with reduced desaturation and elongation of [1-(14)C] 18:3n-3 to 18:4n-3, 20:4n-3, and EPA, in agreement with reduced expression of the Δ6 desaturase gene involved in the first step of conversion. DHA production, on the other hand, was maintained even in groups with high endogenous levels of DHA, possibly due to a more complex regulation of this last step in the n-3 metabolic pathway. Inhibition of the Δ6 desaturase pathway led to increased direct elongation to 20:3n-3 by both DHA and LA. Possibly the route by 20:3n-3 and then Δ8 desaturation to 20:4n-3, bypassing the first Δ6 desaturase step, can partly explain the maintained or even increased levels of DHA production. LA increased DHA production in the phospholipid fraction of hepatocytes isolated from fish fed 0 and 0.5% EPA and/or DHA, indicating that LA has the potential to further increase the production of this health-beneficial FA in fish fed diets with low levels of EPA and/or DHA.

  11. Complete Biosynthetic Pathway of the C50 Carotenoid Bacterioruberin from Lycopene in the Extremely Halophilic Archaeon Haloarcula japonica

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Ando, Ai; Miyoko, Nobuhiro; Fukui, Toshiaki; Takaichi, Shinichi; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Haloarcula japonica, an extremely halophilic archaeon that requires high concentrations of NaCl for growth, accumulates the C50 carotenoid bacterioruberin (BR). By homology analysis, a gene cluster, including c0507, c0506, and c0505, was found and predicted to be involved in the synthesis of bacterioruberin. To elucidate the function of the encoded enzymes, we constructed Ha. japonica mutants of these genes and analyzed carotenoids produced by the mutants. Our research showed that c0507, c0506, and c0505 encoded a carotenoid 3,4-desaturase (CrtD), a bifunctional lycopene elongase and 1,2-hydratase (LyeJ), and a C50 carotenoid 2″,3″-hydratase (CruF), respectively. The above three carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes catalyze the reactions that convert lycopene to bacterioruberin in Ha. japonica. This is the first identification of functional CrtD and CruF in archaea and elucidation of the complete biosynthetic pathway of bacterioruberin from lycopene. IMPORTANCE Haloarcula japonica, an extremely halophilic archaeon, accumulates the C50 carotenoid bacterioruberin (BR). In this study, we have identified three BR biosynthetic enzymes and have elucidated their functions. Among them, two enzymes were found in an archaeon for the first time. Our results revealed the biosynthetic pathway responsible for production of BR in Ha. japonica and provide a basis for investigating carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in other extremely halophilic archaea. Elucidation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in Ha. japonica may also prove useful for producing the C50 carotenoid BR efficiently by employing genetically modified haloarchaeal strains. PMID:25712483

  12. Recent advances in awakening silent biosynthetic gene clusters and linking orphan clusters to natural products in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yi-Ming; Chang, Shu-Lin; Oakley, Berl R; Wang, Clay C C

    2011-02-01

    Secondary metabolites from microorganisms have a broad spectrum of applications, particularly in therapeutics. The growing number of sequenced microbial genomes has revealed a remarkably large number of natural product biosynthetic clusters for which the products are still unknown. These cryptic clusters are potentially a treasure house of medically useful compounds. The recent development of new methodologies has made it possible to begin unlock this treasure house, to discover new natural products and to determine their biosynthesis pathways. This review will highlight some of the most recent strategies to activate silent biosynthetic gene clusters and to elucidate their corresponding products and pathways.

  13. Biochemical Analysis of the Biosynthetic Pathway of an Anticancer Tetracycline SF2575

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Lauren B.; Kim, Woncheol; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Hui; Watanabe, Kenji; Gomi, Shuichi; Tang, Yi

    2009-01-01

    SF2575 1 is a tetracycline polyketide produced by Streptomyces sp. SF2575 and displays exceptionally potent anticancer activity towards a broad range of cancer cell lines. The structure of SF2575 is characterized by a highly substituted tetracycline aglycon. The modifications include methylation of the C-6 and C-12a hydroxyl groups, acylation of the 4-(S)-hydroxyl with salicylic acid, C-glycosylation of the C-9 of the D-ring with d-olivose and further acylation of the C4′-hydroxyl of d-olivose with the unusual angelic acid. Understanding the biosynthesis of SF2575 can therefore expand the repertoire of enzymes that can modify tetracyclines, and facilitate engineered biosynthesis of SF2575 analogs. In this study, we identified, sequenced and functionally analyzed the ssf biosynthetic gene cluster which contains 40 putative open reading frames. Genes encoding enzymes that can assemble the tetracycline aglycon, as well as installing these unique structural features are found in the gene cluster. Biosynthetic intermediates were isolated from the SF2575 culture extract to suggest the order of pendant groups addition is C-9 glycosylation, C-4 salicylation and O-4′ angelycylation. Using in vitro assays, two enzymes that are responsible for C-4 acylation of salicylic acid were identified. These enzymes include an ATP-dependent salicylyl-CoA ligase SsfL1 and a putative GDSL family acyltransferase SsfX3, both of which were shown to have relaxed substrate specificity towards substituted benzoic acids. Since the salicylic acid moiety is critically important for the anticancer properties of SF2575, verification of the activities of SsfL1 and SsfX3 sets the stage for biosynthetic modification of the C-4 group towards structural-activity relationship studies of SF2575. Using heterologous biosynthesis in Streptomyces lividans, we also determined that biosynthesis of the SF2575 tetracycline aglycon 8 parallels that of oxytetracycline 4 and diverges after the assembly of 4-keto

  14. Phenylpropanoids Accumulation in Eggplant Fruit: Characterization of Biosynthetic Genes and Regulation by a MYB Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Docimo, Teresa; Francese, Gianluca; Ruggiero, Alessandra; Batelli, Giorgia; De Palma, Monica; Bassolino, Laura; Toppino, Laura; Rotino, Giuseppe L.; Mennella, Giuseppe; Tucci, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Phenylpropanoids are major secondary metabolites in eggplant (Solanum melongena) fruits. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) accounts for 70–90% of total phenolics in flesh tissues, while anthocyanins are mainly present in the fruit skin. As a contribution to the understanding of the peculiar accumulation of these health-promoting metabolites in eggplant, we report on metabolite abundance, regulation of CGA and anthocyanin biosynthesis, and characterization of candidate CGA biosynthetic genes in S. melongena. Higher contents of CGA, Delphinidin 3-rutinoside, and rutin were found in eggplant fruits compared to other tissues, associated to an elevated transcript abundance of structural genes such as PAL, HQT, DFR, and ANS, suggesting that active in situ biosynthesis contributes to anthocyanin and CGA accumulation in fruit tissues. Putative orthologs of the two CGA biosynthetic genes PAL and HQT, as well as a variant of a MYB1 transcription factor showing identity with group six MYBs, were isolated from an Occidental S. melongena traditional variety and demonstrated to differ from published sequences from Asiatic varieties. In silico analysis of the isolated SmPAL1, SmHQT1, SmANS, and SmMyb1 promoters revealed the presence of several Myb regulatory elements for the biosynthetic genes and unique elements for the TF, suggesting its involvement in other physiological roles beside phenylpropanoid biosynthesis regulation. Transient overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves of SmMyb1 and of a C-terminal SmMyb1 truncated form (SmMyb1Δ9) resulted in anthocyanin accumulation only of SmMyb1 agro-infiltrated leaves. A yeast two-hybrid assay confirmed the interaction of both SmMyb1 and SmMyb1Δ9 with an anthocyanin-related potato bHLH1 TF. Interestingly, a doubled amount of CGA was detected in both SmMyb1 and SmMyb1Δ9 agro-infiltrated leaves, thus suggesting that the N-terminal region of SmMyb1 is sufficient to activate its synthesis. These data suggest that a deletion of the C

  15. Quantitative analysis of Penicillium chrysogenum Wis54-1255 transformants overexpressing the penicillin biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Theilgaard, H; van Den Berg, M; Mulder, C; Bovenberg, R; Nielsen, J

    2001-02-20

    The low penicillin-producing, single gene copy strain Wis54-1255 was used to study the effect of overexpressing the penicillin biosynthetic genes in Penicillium chrysogenum. Transformants of Wis54-1255 were obtained with the amdS expression-cassette using the four combinations: pcbAB, pcbC, pcbC-penDE, and pcbAB-pcbC-penDE of the three penicillin biosynthetic genes. Transformants showing an increased penicillin production were investigated during steady-state continuous cultivations with glucose as the growth-limiting substrate. The transformants were characterized with respect to specific penicillin productivity, the activity of the two pathway enzymes delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS) and isopenicillin N synthetase (IPNS) and the intracellular concentration of the metabolites: delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine (ACV), bis-delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine (bisACV), isopenicillin N (IPN), glutathione (GSH), and glutathione disulphide (GSSG). Transformants with the whole gene cluster amplified showed the largest increase in specific penicillin productivity (r(p))-124% and 176%, respectively, whereas transformation with the pcbC-penDE gene fragment resulted in a decrease in r(p) of 9% relative to Wis54-1255. A marked increase in r(p) is clearly correlated with a balanced amplification of both the ACVS and IPNS activity or a large amplification of either enzyme activity. The increased capacity of a single enzyme occurs surprisingly only in the transformants where all the three biosynthetic genes are overexpressed but is not found within the group of pcbAB or pcbC transformants. The indication of the pcbAB and pcbC genes being closely regulated in fungi might explain why high-yielding strains of P. chrysogenum have been found to contain amplifications of a large region including the whole penicillin gene cluster and not single gene amplifications. Measurements of the total ACV concentration showed a large

  16. Biosynthetic studies on the botcinolide skeleton: new hydroxylated lactones from Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Reino, José L; Durán-Patrón, Rosa M; Daoubi, Mourad; Collado, Isidro G; Hernández-Galán, Rosario

    2006-01-20

    [reaction: see text] The biosynthetic origin of the botcinolide skeleton was investigated by means of feeding 13C- and 2H-labeled precursors to Botrytis cinerea. Three new compounds, two homobotcinolide derivatives, 3-O-acetylhomobotcinolide (5) and 8-methylhomobotcinolide (6), and a new 11-membered lactone (7), were isolated. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data, including one-bond and long-range 1H-13C correlations. The relative stereochemistries were determined by combined analyses of NOE data and 1H-1H coupling constants. According to the results of feeding experiments with 13C- and 2H-labeled acetate and l-S-methylmethionine, 5 is an acetate-derived polyketide whose methyl groups originate from l-S-methylmethionine. This is a rare example of the incorporation of a methyl from methionine into a supposed C3 starter unit of the polyketide synthesis.

  17. Biosynthetic preparation of selectively deuterated phosphatidylcholine in genetically modified Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Maric, Selma; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Schiller, Jürgen; Marek, Magdalena; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William; Arleth, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a major component of eukaryotic cell membranes and one of the most commonly used phospholipids for reconstitution of membrane proteins into carrier systems such as lipid vesicles, micelles and nanodiscs. Selectively deuterated versions of this lipid have many applications, especially in structural studies using techniques such as NMR, neutron reflectivity and small-angle neutron scattering. Here we present a comprehensive study of selective deuteration of phosphatidylcholine through biosynthesis in a genetically modified strain of Escherichia coli. By carefully tuning the deuteration level in E. coli growth media and varying the deuteration of supplemented carbon sources, we show that it is possible to achieve a controlled deuteration for three distinct parts of the PC lipid molecule, namely the (a) lipid head group, (b) glycerol backbone and (c) fatty acyl tail. This biosynthetic approach paves the way for the synthesis of specifically deuterated, physiologically relevant phospholipid species which remain difficult to obtain through standard chemical synthesis. PMID:25301578

  18. Sex pheromone biosynthetic pathways are conserved between moths and the butterfly Bicyclus anynana.

    PubMed

    Liénard, Marjorie A; Wang, Hong-Lei; Lassance, Jean-Marc; Löfstedt, Christer

    2014-05-27

    Although phylogenetically nested within the moths, butterflies have diverged extensively in a number of life history traits. Whereas moths rely greatly on chemical signals, visual advertisement is the hallmark of mate finding in butterflies. In the context of courtship, however, male chemical signals are widespread in both groups although they likely have multiple evolutionary origins. Here, we report that in males of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, courtship scents are produced de novo via biosynthetic pathways shared with females of many moth species. We show that two of the pheromone components that play a major role in mate choice, namely the (Z)-9-tetradecenol and hexadecanal, are produced through the activity of a fatty acyl Δ11-desaturase and two specialized alcohol-forming fatty acyl reductases. Our study provides the first evidence of conservation and sharing of ancestral genetic modules for the production of FA-derived pheromones over a long evolutionary timeframe thereby reconciling mate communication in moths and butterflies.

  19. Complete set of glycosyltransferase structures in the calicheamicin biosynthetic pathway reveals the origin of regiospecificity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Aram; Singh, Shanteri; Helmich, Kate E; Goff, Randal D; Bingman, Craig A; Thorson, Jon S; Phillips, George N

    2011-10-25

    Glycosyltransferases are useful synthetic catalysts for generating natural products with sugar moieties. Although several natural product glycosyltransferase structures have been reported, design principles of glycosyltransferase engineering for the generation of glycodiversified natural products has fallen short of its promise, partly due to a lack of understanding of the relationship between structure and function. Here, we report structures of all four calicheamicin glycosyltransferases (CalG1, CalG2, CalG3, and CalG4), whose catalytic functions are clearly regiospecific. Comparison of these four structures reveals a conserved sugar donor binding motif and the principles of acceptor binding region reshaping. Among them, CalG2 possesses a unique catalytic motif for glycosylation of hydroxylamine. Multiple glycosyltransferase structures in a single natural product biosynthetic pathway are a valuable resource for understanding regiospecific reactions and substrate selectivities and will help future glycosyltransferase engineering.

  20. Complete set of glycosyltransferase structures in the calicheamicin biosynthetic pathway reveals the origin of regiospecificity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Aram; Singh, Shanteri; Helmich, Kate E.; Goff, Randal D.; Bingman, Craig A.; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, George N.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosyltransferases are useful synthetic catalysts for generating natural products with sugar moieties. Although several natural product glycosyltransferase structures have been reported, design principles of glycosyltransferase engineering for the generation of glycodiversified natural products has fallen short of its promise, partly due to a lack of understanding of the relationship between structure and function. Here, we report structures of all four calicheamicin glycosyltransferases (CalG1, CalG2, CalG3, and CalG4), whose catalytic functions are clearly regiospecific. Comparison of these four structures reveals a conserved sugar donor binding motif and the principles of acceptor binding region reshaping. Among them, CalG2 possesses a unique catalytic motif for glycosylation of hydroxylamine. Multiple glycosyltransferase structures in a single natural product biosynthetic pathway are a valuable resource for understanding regiospecific reactions and substrate selectivities and will help future glycosyltransferase engineering. PMID:21987796

  1. Sex pheromone biosynthetic pathways are conserved between moths and the butterfly Bicyclus anynana

    PubMed Central

    Liénard, Marjorie A; Wang, Hong-Lei; Lassance, Jean-Marc; Löfstedt, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Although phylogenetically nested within the moths, butterflies have diverged extensively in a number of life history traits. Whereas moths rely greatly on chemical signals, visual advertisement is the hallmark of mate finding in butterflies. In the context of courtship, however, male chemical signals are widespread in both groups although they likely have multiple evolutionary origins. Here, we report that in males of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, courtship scents are produced de novo via biosynthetic pathways shared with females of many moth species. We show that two of the pheromone components that play a major role in mate choice, namely the (Z)-9-tetradecenol and hexadecanal, are produced through the activity of a fatty acyl Δ11-desaturase and two specialized alcohol-forming fatty acyl reductases. Our study provides the first evidence of conservation and sharing of ancestral genetic modules for the production of FA-derived pheromones over a long evolutionary timeframe thereby reconciling mate communication in moths and butterflies. PMID:24862548

  2. Asymmetric syntheses of sceptrin and massadine and evidence for biosynthetic enantiodivergence

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaolei; Wang, Xiao; Rodriguez, Rodrigo A.; Moore, Curtis E.; Gao, Shuanhu; Tan, Xianghui; Ma, Yuyong; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Baran, Phil S.; Chen, Chuo

    2014-01-01

    Cycloaddition is an essential tool in chemical synthesis. Instead of using light or heat as a driving force, marine sponges promote cycloaddition with a more versatile but poorly understood mechanism in producing pyrrole–imidazole alkaloids sceptrin, massadine, and ageliferin. Through de novo synthesis of sceptrin and massadine, we show that sponges may use single-electron oxidation as a central mechanism to promote three different types of cycloaddition. Additionally, we provide surprising evidence that, in contrast to previous reports, sceptrin, massadine, and ageliferin have mismatched chirality. Therefore, massadine cannot be an oxidative rearrangement product of sceptrin or ageliferin, as is commonly believed. Taken together, our results demonstrate unconventional chemical approaches to achieving cycloaddition reactions in synthesis and uncover enantiodivergence as a new biosynthetic paradigm for natural products. PMID:25301624

  3. Complete set of glycosyltransferase structures in the calicheamicin biosynthetic pathway reveals the origin of regiospecificity

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Aram; Singh, Shanteri; Helmich, Kate E.; Goff, Randal D.; Bingman, Craig A.; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-03-15

    Glycosyltransferases are useful synthetic catalysts for generating natural products with sugar moieties. Although several natural product glycosyltransferase structures have been reported, design principles of glycosyltransferase engineering for the generation of glycodiversified natural products has fallen short of its promise, partly due to a lack of understanding of the relationship between structure and function. Here, we report structures of all four calicheamicin glycosyltransferases (CalG1, CalG2, CalG3, and CalG4), whose catalytic functions are clearly regiospecific. Comparison of these four structures reveals a conserved sugar donor binding motif and the principles of acceptor binding region reshaping. Among them, CalG2 possesses a unique catalytic motif for glycosylation of hydroxylamine. Multiple glycosyltransferase structures in a single natural product biosynthetic pathway are a valuable resource for understanding regiospecific reactions and substrate selectivities and will help future glycosyltransferase engineering.

  4. The antiSMASH database, a comprehensive database of microbial secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Blin, Kai; Medema, Marnix H.; Kottmann, Renzo; Lee, Sang Yup; Weber, Tilmann

    2017-01-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms are the main source of bioactive compounds that are in use as antimicrobial and anticancer drugs, fungicides, herbicides and pesticides. In the last decade, the increasing availability of microbial genomes has established genome mining as a very important method for the identification of their biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). One of the most popular tools for this task is antiSMASH. However, so far, antiSMASH is limited to de novo computing results for user-submitted genomes and only partially connects these with BGCs from other organisms. Therefore, we developed the antiSMASH database, a simple but highly useful new resource to browse antiSMASH-annotated BGCs in the currently 3907 bacterial genomes in the database and perform advanced search queries combining multiple search criteria. antiSMASH-DB is available at http://antismash-db.secondarymetabolites.org/. PMID:27924032

  5. Metagenomic approaches for exploiting uncultivated bacteria as a resource for novel biosynthetic enzymology.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Micheal C; Piel, Jörn

    2013-05-23

    Most biologically active microbial natural products are known from strains that can be isolated and cultivated in the laboratory. However, the genomics era has revealed that cultured bacteria represent a mere fraction of total estimated bacterial biodiversity. With the development of community genomics, termed metagenomics, the uncultivated majority became accessible for functional analysis. Through metagenomic studies, novel biocatalysts and biosynthetic pathways are being discovered at a pace previously not possible using traditional molecular biology techniques. Additionally, the study of uncultivated bacteria has provided valuable insights into previously overlooked biocatalysts from cultured strains. This perspective highlights recent discoveries from metagenomics of uncultivated bacteria and discusses the impact of those findings on the field of natural products.

  6. First Biosynthetic pathway of 1-hepten-3-one in Iporangaia pustulosa (Opiliones)

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Daniele F. O.; Wouters, Felipe C.; Machado, Glauco; Marsaioli, Anita J.

    2013-01-01

    Arthropods produce a great variety of natural compounds, many of which have unexplored biosynthesis. Among the armored harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) of the suborder Laniatores, the defensive gland exudates contain vinyl ketones and other constituents of supposed polyketide origin. We have studied the biosynthesis of 1-hepten-3-one in the Neotropical harvestman Iporangaia pustulosa by feeding individuals with 13C-labeled precursors, demonstrating its mixed acetate/propionate origin. 13C NMR spectroscopy showed an unusual labeling pattern suggesting different propionate sources for starting and extender units. Our analysis also indicates the presence of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, converting acetate into propionyl-CoA via succinyl-CoA, together with other C3 unit routes. This is the first biosynthetic study of alkyl vinyl ketones in arthropods. Our results shed light on the origin and diversification of chemical compounds in a major arthropod group. PMID:24193576

  7. Heparan sulfate biosynthetic gene Ndst1 is required for FGF signaling in early lens development.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Woodbury, Andrea; Esko, Jeffrey D; Grobe, Kay; Zhang, Xin

    2006-12-01

    Multiple signaling molecules, including bone morphogenic proteins (BMP) and fibroblast growth factors (FGF), play important roles in early lens development. However, how these morphogens are regulated is still largely unknown. Heparan sulfate participates in both morphogen transport and morphogen-receptor interaction. In this study, we demonstrate that inactivation of the heparan sulfate biosynthetic gene Ndst1 resulted in invagination defects of the early lens and in the disruption of lens-determination gene expression, leading to severe lens hypoplasia or anophthalmia. Ndst1 mutants exhibited reduced sulfation of heparan sulfate, but both BMP- and Wnt-signaling remained unchanged. Instead, these embryos showed diminished binding of a subset of FGF proteins to FGF receptors. Consistent with disruption of FGF signaling, expression of phospho-Erk and ERM were also downregulated in Ndst1-mutant lenses. Taken together, these results establish an important role of Ndst1 function in FGF signaling during lens development.

  8. Integrative genomic mining for enzyme function to enable engineering of a non-natural biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Wai Shun; Tran, Stephen; Marcheschi, Ryan; Bertolani, Steve; Thompson, James; Baker, David; Liao, James C.; Siegel, Justin B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to biosynthetically produce chemicals beyond what is commonly found in Nature requires the discovery of novel enzyme function. Here we utilize two approaches to discover enzymes that enable specific production of longer-chain (C5–C8) alcohols from sugar. The first approach combines bioinformatics and molecular modelling to mine sequence databases, resulting in a diverse panel of enzymes capable of catalysing the targeted reaction. The median catalytic efficiency of the computationally selected enzymes is 75-fold greater than a panel of naively selected homologues. This integrative genomic mining approach establishes a unique avenue for enzyme function discovery in the rapidly expanding sequence databases. The second approach uses computational enzyme design to reprogramme specificity. Both approaches result in enzymes with >100-fold increase in specificity for the targeted reaction. When enzymes from either approach are integrated in vivo, longer-chain alcohol production increases over 10-fold and represents >95% of the total alcohol products. PMID:26598135

  9. Revision of the stereochemistry of elisabethatriene, a putative biosynthetic intermediate of pseudopterosins.

    PubMed

    Nasuda, Masayuki; Ohmori, Miho; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Fujimoto, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    In the past, we have questioned the accuracy of the stereochemistry of elisabethatriene, a putative biosynthetic intermediate of pseudopterosins, in light of the configuration of elisabethatrienol isolated from Pseudopterogorgia elisabethae, which was represented as 1S,4R,9S,11S. We have reinvestigated the stereochemistry of elisabethatriene. Elisabethatriene with the reported 1S,4R,9R,11S configuration was synthesized starting from (-)-isopulegol in its enantiomeric form. The (1)H- and (13)C-NMR data of the synthesized compound differed from those reported for elisabethatriene. In addition to the fact that elisabethatriene is converted into pseudopterosins, this finding has allowed us to propose that elisabethatriene should have the 1S,4R,9S,11S stereochemistry, which is identical to that of elisabethatrienol.

  10. The antiSMASH database, a comprehensive database of microbial secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Blin, Kai; Medema, Marnix H; Kottmann, Renzo; Lee, Sang Yup; Weber, Tilmann

    2017-01-04

    Secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms are the main source of bioactive compounds that are in use as antimicrobial and anticancer drugs, fungicides, herbicides and pesticides. In the last decade, the increasing availability of microbial genomes has established genome mining as a very important method for the identification of their biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). One of the most popular tools for this task is antiSMASH. However, so far, antiSMASH is limited to de novo computing results for user-submitted genomes and only partially connects these with BGCs from other organisms. Therefore, we developed the antiSMASH database, a simple but highly useful new resource to browse antiSMASH-annotated BGCs in the currently 3907 bacterial genomes in the database and perform advanced search queries combining multiple search criteria. antiSMASH-DB is available at http://antismash-db.secondarymetabolites.org/.

  11. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping; Lowry, David; Jackson, Jennifer C; Roberson, Robert W; Lin, Xiaorong

    2016-03-22

    Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes.

  12. Biosynthetic pathway of the phytohormone auxin in insects and screening of its inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Yokokura, Junpei; Ito, Tsukasa; Arai, Ryoma; Yokoyama, Chiaki; Toshima, Hiroaki; Nagata, Shinji; Asami, Tadao; Suzuki, Yoshihito

    2014-10-01

    Insect galls are abnormal plant tissues induced by galling insects. The galls are used for food and habitation, and the phytohormone auxin, produced by the insects, may be involved in their formation. We found that the silkworm, a non-galling insect, also produces an active form of auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), by de novo synthesis from tryptophan (Trp). A detailed metabolic analysis of IAA using IAA synthetic enzymes from silkworms indicated an IAA biosynthetic pathway composed of a three-step conversion: Trp → indole-3-acetaldoxime → indole-3-acetaldehyde (IAAld) → IAA, of which the first step is limiting IAA production. This pathway was shown to also operate in gall-inducing sawfly. Screening of a chemical library identified two compounds that showed strong inhibitory activities on the conversion step IAAld → IAA. The inhibitors can be efficiently used to demonstrate the importance of insect-synthesized auxin in gall formation in the future.

  13. First Biosynthetic pathway of 1-hepten-3-one in Iporangaia pustulosa (Opiliones)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Daniele F. O.; Wouters, Felipe C.; Machado, Glauco; Marsaioli, Anita J.

    2013-11-01

    Arthropods produce a great variety of natural compounds, many of which have unexplored biosynthesis. Among the armored harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) of the suborder Laniatores, the defensive gland exudates contain vinyl ketones and other constituents of supposed polyketide origin. We have studied the biosynthesis of 1-hepten-3-one in the Neotropical harvestman Iporangaia pustulosa by feeding individuals with 13C-labeled precursors, demonstrating its mixed acetate/propionate origin. 13C NMR spectroscopy showed an unusual labeling pattern suggesting different propionate sources for starting and extender units. Our analysis also indicates the presence of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, converting acetate into propionyl-CoA via succinyl-CoA, together with other C3 unit routes. This is the first biosynthetic study of alkyl vinyl ketones in arthropods. Our results shed light on the origin and diversification of chemical compounds in a major arthropod group.

  14. Biosynthetic concepts for the production of β-lactam antibiotics in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stefan S; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2012-02-01

    Industrial production of β-lactam antibiotics by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is based on successive classical strain improvement cycles. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the results of this classical strain improvement process, and discusses avenues to improve β-lactam biosynthesis and to exploit P. chrysogenum as an industrial host for the production of other antibiotics and peptide products. Genomic and transcriptional analysis of strain lineages has led to the identification of several important alterations in high-yielding strains, including the amplification of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster, elevated transcription of genes involved in biosynthesis of penicillin and amino acid precursors, and genes encoding microbody proliferation factors. In recent years, successful metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches have resulted in the redirection of the penicillin pathway towards the production of cephalosporins. This sets a new direction in industrial antibiotics productions towards more sustainable methods for the fermentative production of unnatural antibiotics and related compounds.

  15. Elongating internodes of Zea mays (maize): Early steps in the GA biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Phinney, B.O. ); Gaskin, P.; MacMillan, J. )

    1989-04-01

    The early steps in the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway have yet to be defined for tissues that show a growth response to GAs. To this end we have synthesized the ({sup 13}C,{sup 3}H)-ent-kaurenoids, ent-kaurenol, ent-kaurenal ent-kaukenoic acid. We also have double-labeled ent-kaurene and double-labeled GA{sub 12}-aldehyde. We feed 1 - 10{mu}g of each substrate, individually, to 1.0g diced internodes in the appropriate buffer plus cofactors. We have observed up to 80% metabolism. We have identified (full scan GC-MS) 7{beta}-hydroxy-ent-kaurenoic acid as the major metabolite from double-labeled ent-kaurenoic acid feeds, thus defining the step ent-kaurenoic acid to 7{beta}-hydroxy-ent-kaurenoic acid.

  16. Water splitting-biosynthetic system with CO₂ reduction efficiencies exceeding photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chong; Colón, Brendan C; Ziesack, Marika; Silver, Pamela A; Nocera, Daniel G

    2016-06-03

    Artificial photosynthetic systems can store solar energy and chemically reduce CO2 We developed a hybrid water splitting-biosynthetic system based on a biocompatible Earth-abundant inorganic catalyst system to split water into molecular hydrogen and oxygen (H2 and O2) at low driving voltages. When grown in contact with these catalysts, Ralstonia eutropha consumed the produced H2 to synthesize biomass and fuels or chemical products from low CO2 concentration in the presence of O2 This scalable system has a CO2 reduction energy efficiency of ~50% when producing bacterial biomass and liquid fusel alcohols, scrubbing 180 grams of CO2 per kilowatt-hour of electricity. Coupling this hybrid device to existing photovoltaic systems would yield a CO2 reduction energy efficiency of ~10%, exceeding that of natural photosynthetic systems.

  17. Highlights of marine invertebrate-derived biosynthetic products: their biomedical potential and possible production by microbial associants.

    PubMed

    Radjasa, Ocky K; Vaske, Yvette M; Navarro, Gabriel; Vervoort, Hélène C; Tenney, Karen; Linington, Roger G; Crews, Phillip

    2011-11-15

    Coral reefs are among the most productive marine ecosystems and are the source of a large group of structurally unique biosynthetic products. Annual reviews of marine natural products continue to illustrate that the most prolific source of bioactive compounds consist of coral reef invertebrates-sponges, ascidians, mollusks, and bryozoans. This account examines recent milestone developments pertaining to compounds from invertebrates designated as therapeutic leads for biomedical discovery. The focus is on the secondary metabolites, their inspirational structural scaffolds and the possible role of micro-organism associants in their biosynthesis. Also important are the increasing concerns regarding the collection of reef invertebrates for the discovery process. The case examples considered here will be useful to insure that future research to unearth bioactive invertebrate-derived compounds will be carried out in a sustainable and environmentally conscious fashion. Our account begins with some observations pertaining to the natural history of these organisms. Many still believe that a serious obstacle to the ultimate development of a marine natural product isolated from coral reef invertebrates is the problem of compound supply. Recent achievements through total synthesis can now be drawn on to forcefully cast this myth aside. The tools of semisynthesis of complex natural products or insights from SAR efforts to simplify an active pharmacophore are at hand and demand discussion. Equally exciting is the prospect that invertebrate-associated micro-organisms may represent the next frontier to accelerate the development of high priority therapeutic candidates. Currently in the United States there are two FDA approved marine-derived therapeutic drugs and two others that are often cited as being marine-inspired. This record will be examined first followed by an analysis of a dozen of our favorite examples of coral reef invertebrate natural products having therapeutic

  18. An expanded two-state model accounts for homotropic cooperativity in biosynthetic threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Eisenstein, E; Yu, H D; Fisher, K E; Iacuzio, D A; Ducote, K R; Schwarz, F P

    1995-07-25

    The linkage between substrate and regulatory effector binding to separate sites on allosteric enzymes results in shifts in their sigmoidal kinetics to regulate metabolism. Control of branched chain amino acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli occurs in part through shifts in the sigmoidal dependence of alpha-ketobutyrate production promoted by isoleucine and valine binding to biosynthetic threonine deaminase. The structural similarity of threonine, valine, and isoleucine have given rise to suggestions that there may be competition among different ligands for the same sites on this tetrameric enzyme, resulting in a complex pattern of regulation. In an effort to provide a coherent interpretation of the cooperative association of ligands to the active sites and to the effector sites of threonine deaminase, binding studies using single amino acid variants were undertaken. A previously-isolated, feedback-resistant mutant identified in Salmonella typhimurium, ilvA219, has been cloned and sequenced. The phenotype is attributable to a single amino acid substitution in the regulatory domain of the enzyme in which leucine at position 447 is substituted with phenylalanine. The mutant exhibits hyperbolic saturation curves in both ligand binding and steady-state kinetics. These results, in addition to calorimetric and spectroscopic measurements of isoleucine and valine binding, indicate that the low affinity (T) state is destabilized in the mutant and that it exists predominantly in the high affinity (R) conformation in the absence of ligands, providing an explanation for its resistance to isoleucine. Chemical and spectroscopic analyses of another mutant, in which alanine has replaced an essential lysine at position 62 that forms a Schiff base with pyridoxal phosphate, indicate that the cofactor is complexed to exogenous threonine and is therefore unable to bind additional amino acids at the active sites. Isoleucine and valine binding to this inactive, active site

  19. Highlights of marine invertebrate-derived biosynthetic products: Their biomedical potential and possible production by microbial associants

    PubMed Central

    Radjasa, Ocky K.; Vaske, Yvette M.; Navarro, Gabriel; Vervoort, Hélène C.; Tenney, Karen; Linington, Roger G.; Crews, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs are among the most productive marine ecosystems and are the source of a large group of structurally unique biosynthetic products. Annual reviews of marine natural products continue to illustrate that the most prolific source of bioactive compounds consist of coral reef invertebrates—sponges, ascidians, mollusks, and bryozoans. This account examines recent milestone developments pertaining to compounds from invertebrates designated as therapeutic leads for biomedical discovery. The focus is on the secondary metabolites, their inspirational structural scaffolds and the possible role of microorganism associants in their biosynthesis. Also important are the increasing concerns regarding the collection of reef invertebrates for the discovery process. The case examples considered here will be useful to insure that future research to unearth bioactive invertebrate-derived compounds will be carried out in a sustainable and environmentally conscious fashion. Our account begins with some observations pertaining to the natural history of these organisms. Many still believe that a serious obstacle to the ultimate development of a marine natural product isolated from coral reef invertebrates is the problem of compound supply. Recent achievements through total synthesis can now be drawn on to forcefully cast this myth aside. The tools of semisynthesis of complex natural products or insights from SAR efforts to simplify an active pharmacophore are at hand and demand discussion. Equally exciting is the prospect that invertebrate-associated micro-organisms may represent the next frontier to accelerate the development of high priority therapeutic candidates. Currently in the United States there are two FDA approved marine-derived therapeutic drugs and two others that are often cited as being marine-inspired. This record will be examined first followed by an analysis of a dozen of our favorite examples of coral reef invertebrate natural products having therapeutic

  20. Revisiting sesquiterpene biosynthetic pathways leading to santalene and its analogues: a comprehensive mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Garima; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-10-21

    Santalene and bergamotene are the major olefinic sesquiterpenes responsible for the fragrance of sandalwood oil. Herein we report the details of density functional theory investigations on the biosynthetic pathway of this important class of terpenes. The mechanistic study has been found to be effective toward gaining significant new insight into different possibilities for the formation of the key intermediates involved in santalene and bergamotene biosynthesis. The stereoelectronic features of the transition states and intermediates for (i) ring closure of the initial bisabolyl cation, and (ii) skeletal rearrangements in the ensuing bicyclic carbocationic intermediates leading to (-)-epi-β-santalene, (-)-β-santalene, (-)-α-santalene, (+)-epi-β-santalene, exo-β-bergamotene, endo-β-bergamotene, exo-α-bergamotene, and endo-α-bergamotene are presented. Interesting structural features pertaining to certain new carbocationic intermediates (such as b) resulting from the ring closure of bisabolyl cation are discussed. Extensive conformational sampling of all key intermediates along the biosynthetic pathway offered new insight into the role of the isoprenyl side chain conformation in the formation of santalene and its analogues. Although the major bicyclic products in Santalum album appear to arise from the right or left handed helical form of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), different alternatives for their formation are found to be energetically feasible. The interconversion of the exo and endo isomers of bisabolyl cation and a likely epimerization, both with interesting mechanistic implications, are presented. The exo to endo conversion is identified to be energetically more favorable than another pathway emanating from the left handed helical FPP. The role of pyrophosphate (OPP(-)) in the penultimate deprotonation step leading to olefinic sesquiterpenes is also examined.

  1. Exopolysaccharide biosynthetic glycoside hydrolases can be utilized to disrupt and prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Perrin; Hill, Preston J.; Snarr, Brendan D.; Alnabelseya, Noor; Pestrak, Matthew J.; Lee, Mark J.; Jennings, Laura K.; Tam, John; Melnyk, Roman A.; Parsek, Matthew R.; Sheppard, Donald C.; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms present a significant medical challenge because they are recalcitrant to current therapeutic regimes. A key component of biofilm formation in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the biosynthesis of the exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl, which are involved in the formation and maintenance of the structural biofilm scaffold and protection against antimicrobials and host defenses. Given that the glycoside hydrolases PelAh and PslGh encoded in the pel and psl biosynthetic operons, respectively, are utilized for in vivo exopolysaccharide processing, we reasoned that these would provide specificity to target P. aeruginosa biofilms. Evaluating these enzymes as potential therapeutics, we demonstrate that these glycoside hydrolases selectively target and degrade the exopolysaccharide component of the biofilm matrix. PelAh and PslGh inhibit biofilm formation over a 24-hour period with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 69.3 ± 1.2 and 4.1 ± 1.1 nM, respectively, and are capable of disrupting preexisting biofilms in 1 hour with EC50 of 35.7 ± 1.1 and 12.9 ± 1.1 nM, respectively. This treatment was effective against clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa isolates and reduced biofilm biomass by 58 to 94%. These noncytotoxic enzymes potentiated antibiotics because the addition of either enzyme to a sublethal concentration of colistin reduced viable bacterial counts by 2.5 orders of magnitude when used either prophylactically or on established 24-hour biofilms. In addition, PelAh was able to increase neutrophil killing by ~50%. This work illustrates the feasibility and benefits of using bacterial exopolysaccharide biosynthetic glycoside hydrolases to develop novel antibiofilm therapeutics. PMID:27386527

  2. Betacyanin Biosynthetic Genes and Enzymes Are Differentially Induced by (a)biotic Stress in Amaranthus hypochondriacus

    PubMed Central

    Casique-Arroyo, Gabriela; Martínez-Gallardo, Norma; González de la Vara, Luis; Délano-Frier, John P.

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of key genes and enzymes of the betacyanin biosynthetic pathway in Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Ah) was performed. Complete cDNA sequence of Ah genes coding for cyclo-DOPA 5-O glucosyltransferase (AhcDOPA5-GT), two 4, 5-DOPA-extradiol-dioxygenase isoforms (AhDODA-1 and AhDODA-2, respectively), and a betanidin 5-O-glucosyltransferase (AhB5-GT), plus the partial sequence of an orthologue of the cytochrome P-450 R gene (CYP76AD1) were obtained. With the exception AhDODA-2, which had a closer phylogenetic relationship to DODA-like genes in anthocyanin-synthesizing plants, all genes analyzed closely resembled those reported in related Caryophyllales species. The measurement of basal gene expression levels, in addition to the DOPA oxidase tyrosinase (DOT) activity, in different tissues of three Ah genotypes having contrasting pigmentation levels (green to red-purple) was determined. Additional analyses were performed in Ah plants subjected to salt and drought stress and to two different insect herbivory regimes. Basal pigmentation accumulation in leaves, stems and roots of betacyanic plants correlated with higher expression levels of AhDODA-1 and AhB5-GT, whereas DOT activity levels coincided with pigment accumulation in stems and roots and with the acyanic nature of green plants, respectively, but not with pigmentation in leaves. Although the abiotic stress treatments tested produced changes in pigment levels in different tissues, pigment accumulation was the highest in leaves and stems of drought stressed betacyanic plants, respectively. However, tissue pigment accumulation in stressed Ah plants did not always correlate with betacyanin biosynthetic gene expression levels and/or DOT activity. This effect was tissue- and genotype-dependent, and further suggested that other unexamined factors were influencing pigment content in stressed Ah. The results obtained from the insect herbivory assays, particularly in acyanic plants, also support the proposal that

  3. Tracing the biosynthetic source of essential amino acids in marine turtles using delta13C fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Karen E; Kelez, Shaleyla; Larsen, Thomas; Choy, C Anela; Popp, Brian N

    2014-05-01

    Plants, bacteria, and fungi produce essential amino acids (EAAs) with distinctive patterns of delta13C values that can be used as naturally occurring fingerprints of biosynthetic origin of EAAs in a food web. Because animals cannot synthesize EAAs and must obtain them from food, their tissues reflect delta13C(EAA) patterns found in diet, but it is not known how microbes responsible for hindgut fermentation in some herbivores influence the delta13C values of EAAs in their hosts' tissues. We examined whether distinctive delta13C fingerprints of hindgut flora are evident in the tissues of green turtles (Chelonia mydas), which are known to be facultative hindgut fermenters. We determined delta13C(EAA) values in tissues of green turtles foraging herbivorously in neritic habitats of Hawaii and compared them with those from green, olive ridley, and loggerhead turtles foraging carnivorously in oceanic environments of the central and southeast Pacific Ocean. Results of multivariate statistical analysis revealed two distinct groups that could be distinguished based on unique delta13C(EAA) patterns. A three-end-member predictive linear discriminant model indicated that delta13C(EAA) fingerprints existed in the tissues of carnivorous turtles that resembled patterns found in microalgae, which form the base of an oceanic food web, whereas herbivorous turtles derive EAAs from a bacterial or seagrass source. This study demonstrates the capacity for delta13C fingerprinting to establish the biosynthetic origin of EAAs in higher consumers, and that marine turtles foraging on macroalgal diets appear to receive nutritional supplementation from bacterial symbionts in their digestive system.

  4. Analysis of occludin trafficking, demonstrating continuous endocytosis, degradation, recycling and biosynthetic secretory trafficking.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Sarah J; Iqbal, Mudassar; Jabbari, Sara; Stekel, Dov; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2014-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) link adjacent cells and are critical for maintenance of apical-basolateral polarity in epithelial monolayers. The TJ protein occludin functions in disparate processes, including wound healing and Hepatitis C Virus infection. Little is known about steady-state occludin trafficking into and out of the plasma membrane. Therefore, we determined the mechanisms responsible for occludin turnover in confluent Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial monolayers. Using various biotin-based trafficking assays we observed continuous and rapid endocytosis of plasma membrane localised occludin (the majority internalised within 30 minutes). By 120 minutes a significant reduction in internalised occludin was observed. Inhibition of lysosomal function attenuated the reduction in occludin signal post-endocytosis and promoted co-localisation with the late endocytic system. Using a similar method we demonstrated that ∼20% of internalised occludin was transported back to the cell surface. Consistent with these findings, significant co-localisation between internalised occludin and recycling endosomal compartments was observed. We then quantified the extent to which occludin synthesis and transport to the plasma membrane contributes to plasma membrane occludin homeostasis, identifying inhibition of protein synthesis led to decreased plasma membrane localised occludin. Significant co-localisation between occludin and the biosynthetic secretory pathway was demonstrated. Thus, under steady-state conditions occludin undergoes turnover via a continuous cycle of endocytosis, recycling and degradation, with degradation compensated for by biosynthetic exocytic trafficking. We developed a mathematical model to describe the endocytosis, recycling and degradation of occludin, utilising experimental data to provide quantitative estimates for the rates of these processes.

  5. Mice lacking Mrp1 have reduced testicular steroid hormone levels and alterations in steroid biosynthetic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    SIVILS, JEFFREY C.; GONZALEZ, IVEN; BAIN, LISA J.

    2010-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a member of the ABC active transporter family that can transport several steroid hormone conjugates, including 17β-estradiol glucuronide, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and estrone 3-sulfate. The present study investigated the role that MRP1 plays in maintaining proper hormone levels in the serum and testes. Serum and testicular steroid hormone levels were examined in both wild-type mice and Mrp1 null mice. Serum testosterone levels were reduced 5-fold in mice lacking Mrp1, while testicular androstenedione, testosterone, estradiol, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were significantly reduced by 1.7- to 4.5-fold in Mrp1 knockout mice. Investigating the mechanisms responsible for the reduction in steroid hormones in Mrp1-/- mice revealed no differences in the expression or activity of enzymes that inactivate steroids, the sulfotransferases or glucuronosyltransferases. However, steroid biosynthetic enzyme levels in the testes were altered. Cyp17 protein levels were increased by 1.6-fold, while Cyp17 activity using progesterone as a substrate was also increased by 1.4-2.0-fold in mice lacking Mrp1. Additionally, the ratio of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase to 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and steroidogenic factor 1 to 3βhydroxysteroid dehydrogenase were significantly increased in the testes of Mrp1-/- mice. These results indicate that Mrp1-/- mice have lowered steroid hormones levels, and suggests that upregulation of steroid biosynthetic enzymes may be an attempt to maintain proper steroid hormone homeostasis. PMID:20178799

  6. A Biosynthetic Scaffold that Facilitates Chondrocyte-Mediated Degradation and Promotes Articular Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar., Balaji V.; Dailing, Eric A.; Brock, J. Logan; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Randolph, Mark A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage remains a significant clinical challenge to repair because of its limited self-healing capacity. Interest has grown in the delivery of autologous chondrocytes to cartilage defects, and combining cell-based therapies with scaffolds that capture aspects of native tissue and allow cell-mediated remodeling could improve outcomes. Currently, scaffold-based therapies with encapsulated chondrocytes permit matrix production; however, resorption of the scaffold often does not match the rate of matrix production by chondrocytes, which can limit functional tissue regeneration. Here, we designed a hybrid biosynthetic system consisting of poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) endcapped with thiols and crosslinked by norbornene-functionalized gelatin via a thiol-ene photopolymerization. The protein crosslinker was selected to facilitate chondrocyte-mediated scaffold remodeling and matrix deposition. Gelatin was functionalized with norbornene to varying degrees (~4–17 norbornenes/gelatin), and the shear modulus of the resulting hydrogels was characterized (<0.1–0.5 kPa). Degradation of the crosslinked PEG-gelatin hydrogels by chondrocyte-secreted enzymes was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography. Finally, chondrocytes encapsulated in these biosynthetic scaffolds showed significantly increased glycosaminoglycan deposition over just 14 days of culture, while maintaining high levels of viability and producing a distributed matrix. These results indicate the potential of a hybrid PEG-gelatin hydrogel to permit chondrocyte-mediated remodeling and promote articular cartilage matrix production. Tunable scaffolds that can easily permit chondrocyte-mediated remodeling may be useful in designing treatment options for cartilage tissue engineering applications. PMID:26900597

  7. Exopolysaccharide biosynthetic glycoside hydrolases can be utilized to disrupt and prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Baker, Perrin; Hill, Preston J; Snarr, Brendan D; Alnabelseya, Noor; Pestrak, Matthew J; Lee, Mark J; Jennings, Laura K; Tam, John; Melnyk, Roman A; Parsek, Matthew R; Sheppard, Donald C; Wozniak, Daniel J; Howell, P Lynne

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial biofilms present a significant medical challenge because they are recalcitrant to current therapeutic regimes. A key component of biofilm formation in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the biosynthesis of the exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl, which are involved in the formation and maintenance of the structural biofilm scaffold and protection against antimicrobials and host defenses. Given that the glycoside hydrolases PelAh and PslGh encoded in the pel and psl biosynthetic operons, respectively, are utilized for in vivo exopolysaccharide processing, we reasoned that these would provide specificity to target P. aeruginosa biofilms. Evaluating these enzymes as potential therapeutics, we demonstrate that these glycoside hydrolases selectively target and degrade the exopolysaccharide component of the biofilm matrix. PelAh and PslGh inhibit biofilm formation over a 24-hour period with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 69.3 ± 1.2 and 4.1 ± 1.1 nM, respectively, and are capable of disrupting preexisting biofilms in 1 hour with EC50 of 35.7 ± 1.1 and 12.9 ± 1.1 nM, respectively. This treatment was effective against clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa isolates and reduced biofilm biomass by 58 to 94%. These noncytotoxic enzymes potentiated antibiotics because the addition of either enzyme to a sublethal concentration of colistin reduced viable bacterial counts by 2.5 orders of magnitude when used either prophylactically or on established 24-hour biofilms. In addition, PelAh was able to increase neutrophil killing by ~50%. This work illustrates the feasibility and benefits of using bacterial exopolysaccharide biosynthetic glycoside hydrolases to develop novel antibiofilm therapeutics.

  8. Multiplexed CRISPR/Cas9- and TAR-Mediated Promoter Engineering of Natural Product Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hahk-Soo; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2016-09-16

    The use of DNA sequencing to guide the discovery of natural products has emerged as a new paradigm for revealing chemistries encoded in bacterial genomes. A major obstacle to implementing this approach to natural product discovery is the transcriptional silence of biosynthetic gene clusters under laboratory growth conditions. Here we describe an improved yeast-based promoter engineering platform (mCRISTAR) that combines CRISPR/Cas9 and TAR to enable single-marker multiplexed promoter engineering of large gene clusters. mCRISTAR highlights the first application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to multiplexed promoter engineering of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. In this method, CRISPR/Cas9 is used to induce DNA double-strand breaks in promoter regions of biosynthetic gene clusters, and the resulting operon fragments are reassembled by TAR using synthetic gene-cluster-specific promoter cassettes. mCRISTAR uses a CRISPR array to simplify the construction of a CRISPR plasmid for multiplex CRISPR and a single auxotrophic selection to improve the inefficiency of using a CRISPR array for multiplex gene cluster refactoring. mCRISTAR is a simple and generic method for multiplexed replacement of promoters in biosynthetic gene clusters that will facilitate the discovery of natural products from the rapidly growing collection of gene clusters found in microbial genome and metagenome sequencing projects.

  9. Identification of a 12-gene fusaric acid biosynthetic gene cluster in Fusarium species through comparative and functional genomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fungi, genes involved in biosynthesis of a secondary metabolite (SM) are often located adjacent to one another in the genome and are coordinately regulated. These SM biosynthetic gene clusters typically encode enzymes, one or more transcription factors, and a transport protein. Fusaric acid is a ...

  10. Genomics of iron acquisition in the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora: insights in the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophore desferrioxamine E.

    PubMed

    Smits, Theo H M; Duffy, Brion

    2011-10-01

    Genomics has clarified the biosynthetic pathway for desferrioxamine E critical for iron acquisition in the enterobacterial fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Evidence for each of the individual steps and the role of desferrioxamine E biosynthesis in pathogen virulence and cell protection from host defenses is presented. Using comparative genomics, it can be concluded that desferrioxamine biosynthesis is ancestral within the genera Erwinia and Pantoea.

  11. Multiplex PCR analysis of fumonisin biosynthetic genes in fumonisin-nonproducing Aspergillus niger and A. awamori strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to determine the genetic basis for loss of fumonisin B¬2 (FB2) biosynthesis in FB2 non-producing A. niger strains, we developed multiplex PCR primer sets to amplify fragments of eight fumonisin biosynthetic pathway (fum) genes. Fragments of all eight fum genes were amplified in FB2-produci...

  12. Enhanced production of avermectin by deletion of type III polyketide synthases biosynthetic cluster rpp in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    PubMed

    Meng, L; Xiong, Z; Chu, J; Wang, Y

    2016-11-01

    The rpp biosynthetic gene cluster (sav7130-7131) in Streptomyces avermitilis contains a type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) and a cytochrome P450 and was reportedly involved in producing a diffusible brown pigment. Since the same precursor malonyl-CoA was used as substrate for the type I PKSs and type III PKSs, there might be a competition for precursor between rpp gene cluster and avermectin biosynthetic cluster. In this work, rpp biosynthetic gene cluster deletion mutants were constructed to improve avermectin production. In an industrial strain AV-LP, rpp deletion improved avermectin production from 1024 to 1262 mg l(-1) without any effect on the cell growth. In the same way, the production of an industrial overproducer increased from 3582 to 4450 mg l(-1) . Transcriptional analysis suggested that the deletion of rpp gene cluster stimulated transcription of aveR, leading to increased transcription of biosynthetic gene aveA1 and a consequent increase in avermectin production.

  13. Evolution of the Sterol Biosynthetic Pathway of Pythium insidiosum and Related Oomycetes Contributes to Antifungal Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Sangcakul, Areeporn; Lohnoo, Tassanee; Yingyong, Wanta; Rujirawat, Thidarat; Krajaejun, Theerapong

    2017-04-01

    Pythiosis is a life-threatening infectious disease caused by the oomycete Pythium insidiosum Direct exposure to Py. insidiosum zoospores can initiate infections of the eye, limb, gastrointestinal tract, or skin/subcutaneous tissue. Treatments for pythiosis have mostly relied on surgery. Antifungal drugs are generally ineffective against Py. insidiosum However, one patient with an invasive Py. insidiosum infection recovered completely following treatment with terbinafine and itraconazole. Additionally, the drug target sterol biosynthetic enzymes have been identified in the oomycete Aphanomyces euteiches It remains an open question whether Py. insidiosum is susceptible to the antifungal drugs and harbors any of the known drug target enzymes. Here, we determined the in vitro susceptibilities of terbinafine and itraconazole against 30 isolates of Py. insidiosum We also analyzed endogenous sterols and searched for genes encoding the sterol biosynthetic enzymes in the genomes of Py. insidiosum and related oomycetes. The susceptibility assay showed that the growth of each of the Py. insidiosum isolates was inhibited by the antifungal agents, but only at difficult-to-achieve concentrations, which explains the clinical resistance of the drugs in the treatment of pythiosis patients. Genome searches of Py. insidiosum and related oomycetes demonstrated that these organisms contained an incomplete set of sterol biosynthetic enzymes. Gas chromatographic mass spectrometry did not detect any sterol end products in Py. insidiosum In conclusion, Py. insidiosum possesses an incomplete sterol biosynthetic pathway. Resistance to antifungal drugs targeting enzymes in the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway in Py. insidiosum was due to modifications or losses of some of the genes encoding the drug target enzymes.

  14. Diversity of Culturable Thermophilic Actinobacteria in Hot Springs in Tengchong, China and Studies of their Biosynthetic Gene Profiles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lan; Salam, Nimaichand; Jiao, Jian-Yu; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Zhou, En-Min; Yin, Yi-Rui; Ming, Hong; Li, Wen-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The class Actinobacteria has been a goldmine for the discovery of antibiotics and has attracted interest from both academics and industries. However, an absence of novel approaches during the last few decades has limited the discovery of new microbial natural products useful for industries. Scientists are now focusing on the ecological aspects of diverse environments including unexplored or underexplored habitats and extreme environments in the search for new metabolites. This paper reports on the diversity of culturable actinobacteria associated with hot springs located in Tengchong County, Yunnan Province, southwestern China. A total of 58 thermophilic actinobacterial strains were isolated from the samples collected from ten hot springs distributed over three geothermal fields (e.g., Hehua, Rehai, and Ruidian). Phylogenetic positions and their biosynthetic profiles were analyzed by sequencing 16S rRNA gene and three biosynthetic gene clusters (KS domain of PKS-I, KSα domain of PKS-II and A domain of NRPS). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis, the 58 strains were affiliated with 12 actinobacterial genera: Actinomadura Micromonospora, Microbispora, Micrococcus, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Promicromonospora, Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces, Thermoactinospora, Thermocatellispora, and Verrucosispora, of which the two novel genera Thermoactinospora and Thermocatellisopora were recently described from among these strains. Considering the biosynthetic potential of these actinobacterial strains, 22 were positive for PCR amplification of at least one of the three biosynthetic gene clusters (PKS-I, PKS-II, and NRPS). These actinobacteria were further subjected to antimicrobial assay against five opportunistic human pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis). All of the 22 strains that were positive for PCR amplification of at least one of the biosynthetic gene domains exhibited

  15. Identification of flavonoids and expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes in two coloured tree peony flowers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Daqiu; Tang, Wenhui; Hao, Zhaojun; Tao, Jun

    2015-04-10

    Tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa Andr.) has been named the "king of flowers" because of its elegant and gorgeous flower colour. Among these colours, the molecular mechanisms of white formation and how white turned to red in P. suffruticosa is little known. In this study, flower colour variables, flavonoid accumulation and expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes of white ('Xueta') and red ('Caihui') P. suffruticosa were investigated. The results showed that the flower colours of both cultivars were gradually deepened with the development of flowers. Moreover, two anthoxanthin compositions apigenin 7-O-glucoside together with apigenin deoxyheso-hexoside were identified in 'Xueta' and 'Caihui', but one main anthocyanin composition peonidin 3,5-di-O-glucoside (Pn3G5G) was only found in 'Caihui'. Total contents of anthocyanins in 'Caihui' was increased during flower development, and the same trend was presented in anthoxanthins and flavonoids of these two cultivars, but the contents of these two category flavonoid in 'Caihui' were always higher than those in 'Xueta'. Furthermore, nine structural genes in flavonoid biosynthetic pathway were isolated including the full-length cDNAs of phenylalanine ammonialyase gene (PAL), chalcone synthase gene (CHS) and chalcone isomerase gene (CHI), together with the partial-length cDNAs of flavanone 3-hydroxylase gene (F3H), flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase gene (F3'H), dihydroflavonol 4-reductase gene (DFR), anthocyanidin synthase gene (ANS), UDP-glucose: flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase gene (UF3GT) and UDP-glucose: flavonoid 5-O-glucosyltransferase gene (UF5GT), and PAL, UF3GT and UF5GT were reported in P. suffruticosa for the first time. Their expression patterns showed that transcription levels of downstream genes in 'Caihui' were basically higher than those in 'Xueta', especially PsDFR and PsANS, suggesting that these two genes may play a key role in the anthocyanin biosynthesis which resulted in the shift from white to red in

  16. [Cloning and analysis of geldanamycin partial biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces hygroscopicus 17997].

    PubMed

    He, Wei-Qing; Wang, Yi-Guang

    2006-11-01

    A geldanamycin (GDM) producing strain, Streptomyces hygroscopicus 17997, was isolated from Yunnan China soil by our institute researchers. GDM is an ansamycin antibiotic, which has the ability to bind with Hsp90 (Heat Shock Protein 90) and alter its function. Hsp90 is a chaperone protein involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, cell growth, cell survival, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. So it plays a key role in regulating the physiology of cells exposed to environmental stress and in maintaining the malignant phenotype of tumor cells. As an inhibitor of Hsp90, GDM possesses potent antitumor and antivirus bioactivity, but the hypato-toxicity and poor solubility in water limits its clinical use. Two GDM derivatives, 17-(Allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) and 17-dimethylamino-ethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), both showing lesser hepato-toxicity, are now in Phase II and Phase I clinic trials. In order to accomplish the structure modification of GDM by genetic means, an attempt to obtain the biosynthetic gene cluster of GDM from S. hygroscopicus 17997 was made. In this study, a pair of primers was designed according to a conserved sequence of one of possible post-PKS (polyketides synthase) modification genes, the carbamoyltransferase (CT) gene (gdmN) in GDM biosynthesis. The 732 bp PCR product was obtained from the S. hygroscopicus 17997 genomic DNA. Through the colony-PCR Binary Search Method, using the CT gene primers, six positive cosmid clones, CT1-6, were identified from the S. hygroscopicus 17997 cosmid genomic library. The CT gene containing fragments were verified and localized by Southern blot. The CT-4 positive cosmid was then sub-cloned and sequenced. Approximately 28.356kb of foreign gene sequence from CT-4 cosmid and by further PCR extension reaction was obtained. Based on BLAST analysis, this sequence contains 13 possible ORFs and their deduced functions are believed to be involved in GDM production. The ORF1 encoding products

  17. The geographic distribution and complex evolutionary history of the NX-2 trichothecene chemotype from Fusarium graminearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    F. graminearum and 21 related species form a species complex (FSAMSC-1) characterized by production of type B trichothecenes. However, some F. graminearum strains were recently found to produce NX-2, a novel type A trichothecene, resulting from variation in the trichothecene biosynthetic enzyme Tri1...

  18. Glutamic acid promotes monacolin K production and monacolin K biosynthetic gene cluster expression in Monascus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chan; Liang, Jian; Yang, Le; Chai, Shiyuan; Zhang, Chenxi; Sun, Baoguo; Wang, Chengtao

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of glutamic acid on production of monacolin K and expression of the monacolin K biosynthetic gene cluster. When Monascus M1 was grown in glutamic medium instead of in the original medium, monacolin K production increased from 48.4 to 215.4 mg l(-1), monacolin K production increased by 3.5 times. Glutamic acid enhanced monacolin K production by upregulating the expression of mokB-mokI; on day 8, the expression level of mokA tended to decrease by Reverse Transcription-polymerase Chain Reaction. Our findings demonstrated that mokA was not a key gene responsible for the quantity of monacolin K production in the presence of glutamic acid. Observation of Monascus mycelium morphology using Scanning Electron Microscope showed glutamic acid significantly increased the content of Monascus mycelium, altered the permeability of Monascus mycelium, enhanced secretion of monacolin K from the cell, and reduced the monacolin K content in Monascus mycelium, thereby enhancing monacolin K production.

  19. Spliced X-box Binding Protein 1 Couples the Unfolded Protein Response to Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao V.; Deng, Yingfeng; Gao, Ningguo; Pedrozo, Zully; Li, Dan L.; Morales, Cyndi R.; Criollo, Alfredo; Luo, Xiang; Tan, Wei; Jiang, Nan; Lehrman, Mark A.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Lavandero, Sergio; Mammen, Pradeep P.A.; Ferdous, Anwarul; Gillette, Thomas G.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) generates UDP-GlcNAc (uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine) for glycan synthesis and O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) protein modifications. Despite the established role of the HBP in metabolism and multiple diseases, regulation of the HBP remains largely undefined. Here, we show that spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s), the most conserved signal transducer of the unfolded protein response (UPR), is a direct transcriptional activator of the HBP. We demonstrate that the UPR triggers HBP activation via Xbp1s-dependent transcription of genes coding for key, rate-limiting enzymes. We further establish that this previously unrecognized UPR-HBP axis is triggered in a variety of stress conditions. Finally, we demonstrate a physiologic role for the UPR-HBP axis, by showing that acute stimulation of Xbp1s in heart by ischemia/reperfusion confers robust cardioprotection in part through induction of the HBP. Collectively, these studies reveal that Xbp1s couples the UPR to the HBP to protect cells under stress. PMID:24630721

  20. Spliced X-box binding protein 1 couples the unfolded protein response to hexosamine biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao V; Deng, Yingfeng; Gao, Ningguo; Pedrozo, Zully; Li, Dan L; Morales, Cyndi R; Criollo, Alfredo; Luo, Xiang; Tan, Wei; Jiang, Nan; Lehrman, Mark A; Rothermel, Beverly A; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Lavandero, Sergio; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Ferdous, Anwarul; Gillette, Thomas G; Scherer, Philipp E; Hill, Joseph A

    2014-03-13

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) generates uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) for glycan synthesis and O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) protein modifications. Despite the established role of the HBP in metabolism and multiple diseases, regulation of the HBP remains largely undefined. Here, we show that spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s), the most conserved signal transducer of the unfolded protein response (UPR), is a direct transcriptional activator of the HBP. We demonstrate that the UPR triggers HBP activation via Xbp1s-dependent transcription of genes coding for key, rate-limiting enzymes. We further establish that this previously unrecognized UPR-HBP axis is triggered in a variety of stress conditions. Finally, we demonstrate a physiologic role for the UPR-HBP axis by showing that acute stimulation of Xbp1s in heart by ischemia/reperfusion confers robust cardioprotection in part through induction of the HBP. Collectively, these studies reveal that Xbp1s couples the UPR to the HBP to protect cells under stress.

  1. Dynamics of the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery in the stalked budding bacterium Hyphomonas neptunium.

    PubMed

    Cserti, Emöke; Rosskopf, Sabine; Chang, Yi-Wei; Eisheuer, Sabrina; Selter, Lars; Shi, Jian; Regh, Christina; Koert, Ulrich; Jensen, Grant J; Thanbichler, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Most commonly studied bacteria grow symmetrically and divide by binary fission, generating two siblings of equal morphology. An exception to this rule are budding bacteria, in which new offspring emerges de novo from a morphologically invariant mother cell. Although this mode of proliferation is widespread in diverse bacterial lineages, the underlying mechanisms are still incompletely understood. Here, we report the first molecular-level analysis of growth and morphogenesis in the stalked budding alphaproteobacterium Hyphomonas neptunium. Peptidoglycan labeling shows that, in this species, buds originate from a stalk-like extension of the mother cell whose terminal segment is gradually remodeled into a new cell compartment. As a first step toward identifying the machinery mediating the budding process, we performed comprehensive mutational and localization studies of predicted peptidoglycan biosynthetic proteins in H. neptunium. These analyses identify factors that localize to distinct zones of dispersed and zonal growth, and they suggest a critical role of the MreB-controlled elongasome in cell morphogenesis. Collectively, our work shows that the mechanism of growth in H. neptunium is distinct from that in related, polarly growing members of the order Rhizobiales, setting the stage for in-depth analyses of the molecular principles regulating the fascinating developmental cycle of this species.

  2. Identification of prostamides, fatty acyl ethanolamines, and their biosynthetic precursors in rabbit cornea[S

    PubMed Central

    Urquhart, Paula; Wang, Jenny; Woodward, David F.; Nicolaou, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide) and pros­taglandin ethanolamines (prostamides) are biologically active derivatives of arachidonic acid. Although available through different precursor phospholipids, there is considerable overlap between the biosynthetic pathways of arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids and anandamide-derived prostamides. Prostamides exhibit physiological actions and are involved in ocular hypotension, smooth muscle contraction, and inflammatory pain. Although topical application of bimatoprost, a structural analog of prostaglandin F2α ethanolamide (PGF2α-EA), is currently a first-line treatment for ocular hypertension, the endogenous production of prostamides and their biochemical precursors in corneal tissue has not yet been reported. In this study, we report the presence of anandamide, palmitoyl-, stearoyl-, α-linolenoyl docosahexaenoyl-, linoleoyl-, and oleoyl-ethanolamines in rabbit cornea, and following treatment with anandamide, the formation of PGF2α-EA, PGE2-EA, PGD2-EA by corneal extracts (all analyzed by LC/ESI-MS/MS). A number of N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamines, precursors of anandamide and other fatty acyl ethanolamines, were also identified in corneal lipid extracts using ESI-MS/MS. These findings suggest that the prostamide and fatty acid ethanolamine pathways are operational in the cornea and may provide valuable insight into corneal physiology and their potential influence on adjacent tissues and the aqueous humor. PMID:26031663

  3. Inhibition of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway promotes castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Akash K.; Shojaie, Ali; Panzitt, Katrin; Sonavane, Rajni; Venghatakrishnan, Harene; Manikkam, Mohan; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Putluri, Vasanta; Vasu, Vihas T.; Zhang, Yiqing; Khan, Ayesha S.; Lloyd, Stacy; Szafran, Adam T.; Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Bader, David A.; Stossi, Fabio; Li, Hangwen; Samanta, Susmita; Cao, Xuhong; Tsouko, Efrosini; Huang, Shixia; Frigo, Daniel E.; Chan, Lawrence; Edwards, Dean P.; Kaipparettu, Benny A.; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Weigel, Nancy L.; Mancini, Michael; McGuire, Sean E.; Mehra, Rohit; Ittmann, Michael M.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Putluri, Nagireddy; Palapattu, Ganesh S.; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2016-01-01

    The precise molecular alterations driving castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are not clearly understood. Using a novel network-based integrative approach, here, we show distinct alterations in the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) to be critical for CRPC. Expression of HBP enzyme glucosamine-phosphate N-acetyltransferase 1 (GNPNAT1) is found to be significantly decreased in CRPC compared with localized prostate cancer (PCa). Genetic loss-of-function of GNPNAT1 in CRPC-like cells increases proliferation and aggressiveness, in vitro and in vivo. This is mediated by either activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway in cells expressing full-length androgen receptor (AR) or by specific protein 1 (SP1)-regulated expression of carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) in cells containing AR-V7 variant. Strikingly, addition of the HBP metabolite UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) to CRPC-like cells significantly decreases cell proliferation, both in-vitro and in animal studies, while also demonstrates additive efficacy when combined with enzalutamide in-vitro. These observations demonstrate the therapeutic value of targeting HBP in CRPC. PMID:27194471

  4. Evolution of the Structure and Chromosomal Distribution of Histidine Biosynthetic Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fani, Renato; Mori, Elena; Tamburini, Elena; Lazcano, Antonio

    1998-10-01

    A database of more than 100 histidine biosynthetic genes from different organisms belonging to the three primary domains has been analyzed, including those found in the now completely sequenced genomes of Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Synechocystis sp., Methanococcus jannaschii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ubiquity of his genes suggests that it is a highly conserved pathway that was probably already present in the last common ancestor of all extant life. The chromosomal distribution of the his genes shows that the enterobacterial histidine operon structure is not the only possible organization, and that there is a diversity of gene arrays for the his pathway. Analysis of the available sequences shows that gene fusions (like those involved in the origin of the Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium hisIE and hisB gene structures) are not universal. In contrast, the elongation event that led to the extant hisA gene from two homologous ancestral modules, as well as the subsequent paralogous duplication that originated hisF, appear to be irreversible and are conserved in all known organisms. The available evidence supports the hypothesis that histidine biosynthesis was assembled by a gene recruitment process.

  5. Rational biosynthetic approaches for the production of new-to-nature compounds in fungi.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Simon; Zobel, Sophia; Meyer, Vera; Süssmuth, Roderich D

    2016-04-01

    Filamentous fungi have the ability to produce a wide range of secondary metabolites some of which are potent toxins whereas others are exploited as food additives or drugs. Fungal natural products still play an important role in the discovery of new chemical entities for potential use as pharmaceuticals. However, in most cases they cannot be directly used as drugs due to toxic side effects or suboptimal pharmacokinetics. To improve drug-like properties, including bioactivity and stability or to produce better precursors for semi-synthetic routes, one needs to generate non-natural derivatives from known fungal secondary metabolites. In this minireview, we describe past and recent biosynthetic approaches for the diversification of fungal natural products, covering examples from precursor-directed biosynthesis, mutasynthesis, metabolic engineering and biocombinatorial synthesis. To illustrate the current state-of-the-art, challenges and pitfalls, we lay particular emphasis on the class of fungal cyclodepsipeptides which have been studied longtime for product diversification and which are of pharmaceutical relevance as drugs.

  6. Discovery of an unusual biosynthetic origin for circular proteins in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Poth, Aaron G.; Colgrave, Michelle L.; Lyons, Russell E.; Daly, Norelle L.; Craik, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclotides are plant-derived proteins that have a unique cyclic cystine knot topology and are remarkably stable. Their natural function is host defense, but they have a diverse range of pharmaceutically important activities, including uterotonic activity and anti-HIV activity, and have also attracted recent interest as templates in drug design. Here we report an unusual biosynthetic origin of a precursor protein of a cyclotide from the butterfly pea, Clitoria ternatea, a representative member of the Fabaceae plant family. Unlike all previously reported cyclotides, the domain corresponding to the mature cyclotide from this Fabaceae plant is embedded within an albumin precursor protein. We confirmed the expression and correct processing of the cyclotide encoded by the Cter M precursor gene transcript following extraction from C. ternatea leaf and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry. The sequence was verified by direct chemical synthesis and the peptide was found to adopt a classic knotted cyclotide fold as determined by NMR spectroscopy. Seven additional cyclotide sequences were also identified from C. ternatea leaf and flower, five of which were unique. Cter M displayed insecticidal activity against the cotton budworm Helicoverpa armigera and bound to phospholipid membranes, suggesting its activity is modulated by membrane disruption. The Fabaceae is the third largest family of flowering plants and many Fabaceous plants are of huge significance for human nutrition. Knowledge of Fabaceae cyclotide gene transcripts should enable the production of modified cyclotides in crop plants for a variety of agricultural or pharmaceutical applications, including plant-produced designer peptide drugs. PMID:21593408

  7. Genome mining unveils widespread natural product biosynthetic capacity in human oral microbe Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liwei; Hao, Tingting; Xie, Zhoujie; Horsman, Geoff P.; Chen, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen causing human dental caries. As a Gram-positive bacterium with a small genome (about 2 Mb) it is considered a poor source of natural products. Due to a recent explosion in genomic data available for S. mutans strains, we were motivated to explore the natural product production potential of this organism. Bioinformatic characterization of 169 publically available genomes of S. mutans from human dental caries revealed a surprisingly rich source of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. Anti-SMASH analysis identified one nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster, seven polyketide synthase (PKS) gene clusters and 136 hybrid PKS/NRPS gene clusters. In addition, 211 ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) clusters and 615 bacteriocin precursors were identified by a combined analysis using BAGEL and anti-SMASH. S. mutans harbors a rich and diverse natural product genetic capacity, which underscores the importance of probing the human microbiome and revisiting species that have traditionally been overlooked as “poor” sources of natural products. PMID:27869143

  8. A symbiotic mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti reveals a novel genetic pathway involving succinoglycan biosynthetic functions.

    PubMed

    Griffitts, Joel S; Long, Sharon R

    2008-03-01

    A large-scale screen for symbiotic mutants was carried out using the model root nodulating bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Several mutations in the previously uncharacterized gene msbA2 were isolated. msbA2 encodes a member of the ATP-binding cassette exporter family. This protein family is known to export a wide variety of compounds from bacterial cells. S. meliloti MsbA2 is required for the invasion of nodule tissue, with msbA2 mutant cells stimulating nodule primordium morphogenesis, but failing to invade plant tissue beyond the epidermal cell layer. msbA2 mutants do not exhibit any of the free-living traits often found to correlate with symbiotic defects, suggesting that MsbA2 may take part in a specifically symbiotic function. In strains that overproduce the symbiotic signalling polysaccharide succinoglycan, loss of MsbA2 function is extremely deleterious. This synthetic lethal phenotype can be suppressed by disrupting the succinoglycan biosynthetic genes exoY or exoA. It can also be suppressed by disrupting putative glycosyltransferase-encoding genes found upstream of msbA2. Finally, the symbiotic phenotype of a msbA2 null mutant is suppressed by secondary mutations in these upstream transferase genes, indicating that the msbA2 mutant phenotype may be caused by an inhibitory accumulation of a novel polysaccharide that is synthesized from succinoglycan precursors.

  9. Engineering biosynthetic pathways for deoxysugars: branched-chain sugar pathways and derivatives from the antitumor tetracenomycin.

    PubMed

    Lombó, Felipe; Gibson, Miranda; Greenwell, Lisa; Braña, Alfredo F; Rohr, Jürgen; Salas, José A; Méndez, Carmen

    2004-12-01

    Sugar biosynthesis cassette genes have been used to construct plasmids directing the biosynthesis of branched-chain deoxysugars: pFL942 (NDP-L-mycarose), pFL947 (NDP-4-deacetyl-L-chromose B), and pFL946/pFL954 (NDP-2,3,4-tridemethyl-L-nogalose). Expression of pFL942 and pFL947 in S. lividans 16F4, which harbors genes for elloramycinone biosynthesis and the flexible ElmGT glycosyltransferase of the elloramycin biosynthetic pathway, led to the formation of two compounds: 8-alpha-L-mycarosyl-elloramycinone and 8-demethyl-8-(4-deacetyl)-alpha-L-chromosyl-tetracenomycin C, respectively. Expression of pFL946 or pFL954 failed to produce detectable amounts of a novel glycosylated tetracenomycin derivative. Formation of these two compounds represents examples of the sugar cosubstrate flexibility of the ElmGT glycosyltransferase. The use of these cassette plasmids also provided insights into the substrate flexibility of deoxysugar biosynthesis enzymes as the C-methyltransferases EryBIII and MtmC, the epimerases OleL and EryBVII, and the 4-ketoreductases EryBIV and OleU.

  10. Systematic silencing of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthetic genes reveals the major route to papaverine in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Desgagné-Penix, Isabel; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-10-01

    Papaverine, a major benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), is used as a vasodilator and antispasmodic. Conversion of the initial intermediate (S)-norcoclaurine to papaverine involves 3'-hydroxylation, four O-methylations and dehydrogenation. However, our understanding of papaverine biosynthesis remains controversial more than a century after an initial scheme was proposed. In vitro assays and in vivo labeling studies have been insufficient to establish the sequence of conversions, the potential role of the intermediate (S)-reticuline, and the enzymes involved. We used virus-induced gene silencing in opium poppy to individually suppress the expression of six genes with putative roles in papaverine biosynthesis. Suppression of the gene encoding coclaurine N-methyltransferase dramatically increased papaverine levels at the expense of N-methylated alkaloids, indicating that the main biosynthetic route to papaverine proceeds via N-desmethylated compounds rather than through (S)-reticuline. Suppression of genes encoding (S)-3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4-O-methyltransferase and norreticuline 7-O-methyltransferase, which accept certain N-desmethylated alkaloids, reduced papaverine content. In contrast, suppression of genes encoding N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase or reticuline 7-O-methyltransferase, which are specific for N-methylated alkaloids, did not affect papaverine levels. Suppression of norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase transcript levels significantly suppressed total alkaloid accumulation, implicating (S)-coclaurine as a key branch-point intermediate. The differential detection of N-desmethylated compounds in response to suppression of specific genes highlights the primary route to papaverine.

  11. Calmodulin-mediated suppression of 2-ketoisovalerate reductase in Beauveria bassiana beauvericin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Yoon, Deok-Hyo; Oh, Junsang; Hyun, Min-Woo; Han, Jae-Gu; Sung, Gi-Ho

    2016-11-01

    Ketoisovalerate reductase (KIVR, E.C. 1.2.7.7) mediates the specific reduction of 2-ketoisovalerate (2-Kiv) to d-hydroxyisovalerate (d-Hiv), a precursor for beauvericin biosynthesis. Beauvericin, a famous mycotoxin produced by many fungi, is a cyclooligomer depsipeptide, which has insecticidal, antimicrobial, antiviral, and cytotoxic activities. In this report, we demonstrated that Beauveria bassiana 2-ketoisovalerate reductase (BbKIVR) acts as a typical KIVR enzyme in the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana. In addition, we found that BbKIVR interacts with calmodulin (CaM) in vitro and in vivo. The functional role of CaM-binding to BbKIVR was to negatively regulate the BbKIVR activity in B. bassiana. Environmental stimuli such as light and salt stress suppressed BbKIVR activity in B. bassiana. Interestingly, this negative effect of BbKIVR activity by light and salt stress was recovered by CaM inhibitors, suggesting that the inhibitory mechanism is mediated through stimulation of CaM activity. Therefore, this work suggests that BbKIVR plays an important role in the beauvericin biosynthetic pathway mediated by environmental stimuli such as light and salt stress via the CaM signaling pathway.

  12. Marine Actinobacteria from the Gulf of California: diversity, abundance and secondary metabolite biosynthetic potential.

    PubMed

    Becerril-Espinosa, Amayaly; Freel, Kelle C; Jensen, Paul R; Soria-Mercado, Irma E

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of California is a coastal marine ecosystem characterized as having abundant biological resources and a high level of endemism. In this work we report the isolation and characterization of Actinobacteria from different sites in the western Gulf of California. We collected 126 sediment samples and isolated on average 3.1-38.3 Actinobacterial strains from each sample. Phylogenetic analysis of 136 strains identified them as members of the genera Actinomadura, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Saccharomonospora, Salinispora, Streptomyces and Verrucosispora. These strains were grouped into 26-56 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identities of 98-100 %. At 98 % sequence identity, three OTUs appear to represent new taxa while nine (35 %) have only been reported from marine environments. Sixty-three strains required seawater for growth. These fell into two OTUs at the 98 % identity level and include one that failed to produce aerial hyphae and was only distantly related (≤95.5 % 16S identity) to any previously cultured Streptomyces sp. Phylogenetic analyses of ketosynthase domains associated with polyketide synthase genes revealed sequences that ranged from 55 to 99 % nucleotide identity to experimentally characterized biosynthetic pathways suggesting that some may be associated with the production of new secondary metabolites. These results indicate that marine sediments from the Gulf of California harbor diverse Actinobacterial taxa with the potential to produce new secondary metabolites.

  13. Application of a Mass Spectrometric Approach to Detect the Presence of Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Lau, Benjamin Yii Chung; Clerens, Stefan; Morton, James D; Dyer, Jolon M; Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Ramli, Umi Salamah

    2016-04-01

    The details of plant lipid metabolism are relatively well known but the regulation of fatty acid production at the protein level is still not understood. Hence this study explores the importance of phosphorylation as a mechanism to control the activity of fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes using low and high oleic acid mesocarps of oil palm fruit (Elaeis guineensis variety of Tenera). Adaptation of neutral loss-triggered tandem mass spectrometry and selected reaction monitoring to detect the neutral loss of phosphoric acid successfully found several phosphoamino acid-containing peptides. These peptides corresponded to the peptides from acetyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase as identified by their precursor ion masses. These findings suggest that these enzymes were phosphorylated at 20th week after anthesis. Phosphorylation could have reduce their activities towards the end of fatty acid biosynthesis at ripening stage. Implication of phosphorylation in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis at protein level has never been reported.

  14. Cloning and engineering of the cinnamycin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces cinnamoneus cinnamoneus DSM 40005

    PubMed Central

    Widdick, D. A.; Dodd, H. M.; Barraille, P.; White, J.; Stein, T. H.; Chater, K. F.; Gasson, M. J.; Bibb, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized oligopeptide antibiotics that contain lanthionine bridges derived by the posttranslational modification of amino acid residues. Here, we describe the cinnamycin biosynthetic gene cluster (cin) from Streptomyces cinnamoneus cinnamoneus DSM 40005, the first, to our knowledge, lantibiotic gene cluster from a high G+C bacterium to be cloned and sequenced. The cin cluster contains many genes not found in lantibiotic clusters from low G+C Gram-positive bacteria, including a Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein regulatory gene, and lacks others found in such clusters, such as a LanT-type transporter and a LanP-type protease. Transfer of the cin cluster to Streptomyces lividans resulted in heterologous production of cinnamycin. Furthermore, modification of the cinnamycin structural gene (cinA) led to production of two naturally occurring lantibiotics, duramycin and duramycin B, closely resembling cinnamycin, whereas attempts to make a more widely diverged derivative, duramycin C, failed to generate biologically active material. These results provide a basis for future attempts to construct extensive libraries of cinnamycin variants. PMID:12642677

  15. Sex pheromone biosynthetic pathway for disparlure in the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar

    PubMed Central

    Jurenka, Russell A.; Subchev, Mitko; Abad, José-Luis; Choi, Man-Yeon; Fabriàs, Gemma

    2003-01-01

    The pheromone biosynthetic pathway for production of the sex pheromone disparlure, 2-methyl-7R,8S-epoxy-octadecane, was determined for the gypsy moth. Each step in the pathway was followed by using deuterium-labeled compounds that could be identified by using GC/MS. This approach provides unequivocal determination of specific reactions in the pathway. It was shown that the alkene precursor, 2-methyl-Z7-octadecene, is most likely made in oenocyte cells associated with abdominal epidermal cells. The pathway begins with valine contributing carbons for chain initiation, including the methyl-branched carbon, followed by chain elongation to 19 carbons. The double bond is introduced with an unusual Δ12 desaturase that utilizes a methyl-branched substrate. The resulting 18-methyl-Z12-nonadecenoate is decarboxylated to the hydrocarbon, 2-methyl-Z7-octadecene. The alkene is then transported to the pheromone gland through the hemolymph, most probably by lipophorin. At the pheromone gland, the alkene is unloaded and transformed into the epoxide disparlure for release into the environment. A chiral HPLC column was used to demonstrate that the (R,S)-stereoisomer of the epoxide, (+)-disparlure is found in pheromone glands. PMID:12533665

  16. A biosynthetic model of cytochrome c oxidase as an electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sohini; Mukherjee, Arnab; Bhagi-Damodaran, Ambika; Mukherjee, Manjistha; Lu, Yi; Dey, Abhishek

    2015-10-12

    Creating an artificial functional mimic of the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) has been a long-term goal of the scientific community as such a mimic will not only add to our fundamental understanding of how CcO works but may also pave the way for efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells. Here we develop an electrocatalyst for reducing oxygen to water under ambient conditions. We use site-directed mutants of myoglobin, where both the distal Cu and the redox-active tyrosine residue present in CcO are modelled. In situ Raman spectroscopy shows that this catalyst features very fast electron transfer rates, facile oxygen binding and O-O bond lysis. An electron transfer shunt from the electrode circumvents the slow dissociation of a ferric hydroxide species, which slows down native CcO (bovine 500 s(-1)), allowing electrocatalytic oxygen reduction rates of 5,000 s(-1) for these biosynthetic models.

  17. Genome mining unveils widespread natural product biosynthetic capacity in human oral microbe Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liwei; Hao, Tingting; Xie, Zhoujie; Horsman, Geoff P; Chen, Yihua

    2016-11-21

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen causing human dental caries. As a Gram-positive bacterium with a small genome (about 2 Mb) it is considered a poor source of natural products. Due to a recent explosion in genomic data available for S. mutans strains, we were motivated to explore the natural product production potential of this organism. Bioinformatic characterization of 169 publically available genomes of S. mutans from human dental caries revealed a surprisingly rich source of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. Anti-SMASH analysis identified one nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster, seven polyketide synthase (PKS) gene clusters and 136 hybrid PKS/NRPS gene clusters. In addition, 211 ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) clusters and 615 bacteriocin precursors were identified by a combined analysis using BAGEL and anti-SMASH. S. mutans harbors a rich and diverse natural product genetic capacity, which underscores the importance of probing the human microbiome and revisiting species that have traditionally been overlooked as "poor" sources of natural products.

  18. The lysine biosynthetic enzyme Lys4 influences iron metabolism, mitochondrial function and virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Do, Eunsoo; Park, Minji; Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Kronstad, James W; Jung, Won Hee

    2016-09-02

    The lysine biosynthesis pathway via α-aminoadipate in fungi is considered an attractive target for antifungal drugs due to its absence in mammalian hosts. The iron-sulfur cluster-containing enzyme homoaconitase converts homocitrate to homoisocitrate in the lysine biosynthetic pathway, and is encoded by LYS4 in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we identified the ortholog of LYS4 in the human fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus neoformans, and found that LYS4 expression is regulated by iron levels and by the iron-related transcription factors Hap3 and HapX. Deletion of the LYS4 gene resulted in lysine auxotrophy suggesting that Lys4 is essential for lysine biosynthesis. Our study also revealed that lysine uptake was mediated by two amino acid permeases, Aap2 and Aap3, and influenced by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). Furthermore, the lys4 mutant showed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, agents that challenge cell wall/membrane integrity, and azole antifungal drugs. We showed that these phenotypes were due in part to impaired mitochondrial function as a result of LYS4 deletion, which we propose disrupts iron homeostasis in the organelle. The combination of defects are consistent with our observation that the lys4 mutant was attenuated virulence in a mouse inhalation model of cryptococcosis.

  19. Diversity and distribution of a key sulpholipid biosynthetic gene in marine microbial assemblages.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Laura; Bale, Nicole; Hopmans, Ellen C; Schouten, Stefan; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe

    2014-03-01

    Sulphoquinovosyldiacylglycerols (SQDG) are polar sulphur-containing membrane lipids, whose presence has been related to a microbial strategy to adapt to phosphate deprivation. In this study, we have targeted the sqdB gene coding the uridine 5'-diphosphate-sulphoquinovose (UDP-SQ) synthase involved in the SQDG biosynthetic pathway to assess potential microbial sources of SQDGs in the marine environment. The phylogeny of the sqdB-coding protein reveals two distinct clusters: one including green algae, higher plants and cyanobacteria, and another one comprising mainly non-photosynthetic bacteria, as well as other cyanobacteria and algal groups. Evolutionary analysis suggests that the appearance of UDP-SQ synthase occurred twice in cyanobacterial evolution, and one of those branches led to the diversification of the protein in members of the phylum Proteobacteria. A search of homologues of sqdB-proteins in marine metagenomes strongly suggested the presence of heterotrophic bacteria potential SQDG producers. Application of newly developed sqdB gene primers in the marine environment revealed a high diversity of sequences affiliated to cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria in microbial mats, while in North Sea surface water, most of the detected sqdB genes were attributed to the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Lipid analysis revealed that specific SQDGs were characteristic of microbial mat depth, suggesting that SQDG lipids are associated with specific producers.

  20. Testing a biosynthetic theory of the genetic code: fact or artifact?

    PubMed

    Ronneberg, T A; Landweber, L F; Freeland, S J

    2000-12-05

    It has long been conjectured that the canonical genetic code evolved from a simpler primordial form that encoded fewer amino acids [e.g., Crick, F. H. C. (1968) J. Mol. Biol. 38, 367-379]. The most influential form of this idea, "code coevolution" [Wong, J. T.-F. (1975) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 72, 1909-1912], proposes that the genetic code coevolved with the invention of biosynthetic pathways for new amino acids. It further proposes that a comparison of modern codon assignments with the conserved metabolic pathways of amino acid biosynthesis can inform us about this history of code expansion. Here we re-examine the biochemical basis of this theory to test the validity of its statistical support. We show that the theory's definition of "precursor-product" amino acid pairs is unjustified biochemically because it requires the energetically unfavorable reversal of steps in extant metabolic pathways to achieve desired relationships. In addition, the theory neglects important biochemical constraints when calculating the probability that chance could assign precursor-product amino acids to contiguous codons. A conservative correction for these errors reveals a surprisingly high 23% probability that apparent patterns within the code are caused purely by chance. Finally, even this figure rests on post hoc assumptions about primordial codon assignments, without which the probability rises to 62% that chance alone could explain the precursor-product pairings found within the code. Thus we conclude that coevolution theory cannot adequately explain the structure of the genetic code.

  1. Allosteric regulation of an essential trypanosome polyamine biosynthetic enzyme by a catalytically dead homolog

    PubMed Central

    Willert, Erin K.; Fitzpatrick, Richard; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2007-01-01

    African sleeping sickness is a fatal disease that is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Polyamine biosynthesis is an essential pathway in the parasite and is a validated drug target for treatment of the disease. S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) catalyzes a key step in polyamine biosynthesis. Here, we show that trypanosomatids uniquely contain both a functional AdoMetDC and a paralog designated prozyme that has lost catalytic activity. The T. brucei prozyme forms a high-affinity heterodimer with AdoMetDC that stimulates its activity by 1,200-fold. Both genes are expressed in T. brucei, and analysis of AdoMetDC activity in T. brucei extracts supports the finding that the heterodimer is the functional enzyme in vivo. Thus, prozyme has evolved to be a catalytically dead but allosterically active subunit of AdoMetDC, providing an example of how regulators of multimeric enzymes can evolve through gene duplication and mutational drift. These data identify a distinct mechanism for regulating AdoMetDC in the parasite that suggests new strategies for the development of parasite-specific inhibitors of the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. PMID:17485680

  2. Modification of Monolignol Biosynthetic Pathway in Jute: Different Gene, Different Consequence.

    PubMed

    Shafrin, Farhana; Ferdous, Ahlan Sabah; Sarkar, Suprovath Kumar; Ahmed, Rajib; Amin, Al-; Hossain, Kawsar; Sarker, Mrinmoy; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Del Rio, Jose C; Sanan-Mishra, Neeti; Khan, Haseena

    2017-01-04

    Lignin, a cross-linked macromolecule of hydrophobic aromatic structure, provides additional rigidity to a plant cell wall. Although it is an integral part of the plant cell, presence of lignin considerably reduces the quality of the fiber of fiber-yielding plants. Decreasing lignin in such plants holds significant commercial and environmental potential. This study aimed at reducing the lignin content in jute-a fiber crop, by introducing hpRNA-based vectors for downregulation of two monolignoid biosynthetic genes- cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT). Transgenic generations, analyzed through Southern, RT-PCR and northern assays showed downregulation of the selected genes. Transgenic lines exhibited reduced level of gene expression with ~ 16-25% reduction in acid insoluble lignin for the whole stem and ~13-14% reduction in fiber lignin content compared to the control lines. Among the two transgenic plant types one exhibited an increase in cellulose content and concomitant improvement of glucose release. Composition of the lignin building blocks was found to alter and this alteration resulted in a pattern, different from other plants where the same genes were manipulated. It is expected that successful COMT-hpRNA and C4H-hpRNA transgenesis in jute will have far-reaching commercial implications leading to product diversification and value addition.

  3. Reconstitution and Minimization of a Micrococcin Biosynthetic Pathway in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Bennallack, Philip R.; Bewley, Kathryn D.; Burlingame, Mark A.; Robison, Richard A.; Miller, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thiopeptides represent one of several families of highly modified peptide antibiotics that hold great promise for natural product engineering. These macrocyclic peptides are produced by a combination of ribosomal synthesis and extensive posttranslational modification by dedicated processing enzymes. We previously identified a compact, plasmid-borne gene cluster for the biosynthesis of micrococcin P1 (MP1), an archetypal thiopeptide antibiotic. In an effort to genetically dissect this pathway, we have reconstituted it in Bacillus subtilis. Successful MP1 production required promoter engineering and the reassembly of essential biosynthetic genes in a modular plasmid. The resulting system allows for rapid pathway manipulation, including protein tagging and gene deletion. We find that 8 processing proteins are sufficient for the production of MP1 and that the tailoring enzyme TclS catalyzes a C-terminal reduction step that distinguishes MP1 from its sister compound micrococcin P2. IMPORTANCE The emergence of antibiotic resistance is one of the most urgent human health concerns of our day. A crucial component in an integrated strategy for countering antibiotic resistance is the ability to engineer pathways for the biosynthesis of natural and derivatized antimicrobial compounds. In this study, the model organism B. subtilis was employed to reconstitute and genetically modularize a 9-gene system for the biosynthesis of micrococcin, the founding member of a growing family of thiopeptide antibiotics. PMID:27381911

  4. Saponin determination, expression analysis and functional characterization of saponin biosynthetic genes in Chenopodium quinoa leaves.

    PubMed

    Fiallos-Jurado, Jennifer; Pollier, Jacob; Moses, Tessa; Arendt, Philipp; Barriga-Medina, Noelia; Morillo, Eduardo; Arahana, Venancio; de Lourdes Torres, Maria; Goossens, Alain; Leon-Reyes, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a highly nutritious pseudocereal with an outstanding protein, vitamin, mineral and nutraceutical content. The leaves, flowers and seed coat of quinoa contain triterpenoid saponins, which impart bitterness to the grain and make them unpalatable without postharvest removal of the saponins. In this study, we quantified saponin content in quinoa leaves from Ecuadorian sweet and bitter genotypes and assessed the expression of saponin biosynthetic genes in leaf samples elicited with methyl jasmonate. We found saponin accumulation in leaves after MeJA treatment in both ecotypes tested. As no reference genes were available to perform qPCR in quinoa, we mined publicly available RNA-Seq data for orthologs of 22 genes known to be stably expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana using geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper algorithms. The quinoa ortholog of At2g28390 (Monensin Sensitivity 1, MON1) was stably expressed and chosen as a suitable reference gene for qPCR analysis. Candidate saponin biosynthesis genes were screened in the quinoa RNA-Seq data and subsequent functional characterization in yeast led to the identification of CqbAS1, CqCYP716A78 and CqCYP716A79. These genes were found to be induced by MeJA, suggesting this phytohormone might also modulate saponin biosynthesis in quinoa leaves. Knowledge of the saponin biosynthesis and its regulation in quinoa may aid the further development of sweet cultivars that do not require postharvest processing.

  5. An Unusual Role for a Mobile Flavin in StaC-like Indolocarbazole Biosynthetic Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Peter J.; Ryan, Katherine S.; Hamill, Michael J.; Howard-Jones, Annaleise R.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Elliott, Sean J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2012-10-09

    The indolocarbazole biosynthetic enzymes StaC, InkE, RebC, and AtmC mediate the degree of oxidation of chromopyrrolic acid on route to the natural products staurosporine, K252a, rebeccamycin, and AT2433-A1, respectively. Here, we show that StaC and InkE, which mediate a net 4-electron oxidation, bind FAD with a micromolar K{sub d}, whereas RebC and AtmC, which mediate a net 8-electron oxidation, bind FAD with a nanomolar K{sub d} while displaying the same FAD redox properties. We further create RebC-10x, a RebC protein with ten StaC-like amino acid substitutions outside of previously characterized FAD-binding motifs and the complementary StaC-10x. We find that these mutations mediate both FAD affinity and product specificity, with RebC-10x displaying higher StaC activity than StaC itself. X-ray structures of this StaC catalyst identify the substrate of StaC as 7-carboxy-K252c and suggest a unique mechanism for this FAD-dependent enzyme.

  6. Antimicrobial biosynthetic potential and genetic diversity of endophytic actinomycetes associated with medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Gohain, Anwesha; Gogoi, Animesh; Debnath, Rajal; Yadav, Archana; Singh, Bhim P; Gupta, Vijai K; Sharma, Rajeev; Saikia, Ratul

    2015-10-01

    Endophytic actinomycetes are one of the primary groups that share symbiotic relationships with medicinal plants and are key reservoir of biologically active compounds. In this study, six selective medicinal plants were targeted for the first time for endophytic actinomycetes isolation from Gibbon Wild Life Sanctuary, Assam, India, during winter and summer and 76 isolates were obtained. The isolates were found to be prevalent in roots followed by stem and leaves. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed 16 genera, including rare genera, Verrucosispora, Isoptericola and Kytococcus, which have never been previously reported as endophytic. The genus Streptomyces (66%) was dominant in both seasons. Shannon's diversity index showed that Azadirachta indica (1.49), Rauwolfia serpentina (1.43) and Emblica officinalis (1.24) were relatively good habitat for endophytic actinomycetes. Antimicrobial strains showed prevalence of polyketide synthase (PKS) type-II (85%) followed by PKS type-I (14%) encoded in the genomes. Expression studies showed 12-fold upregulation of PKSII gene in seventh day of incubation for Streptomyces antibioticus (EAAG90). Our results emphasize that the actinomycetes assemblages within plant tissue exhibited biosynthetic systems encoding for important biologically active compounds.

  7. Discovery of an unusual biosynthetic origin for circular proteins in legumes.

    PubMed

    Poth, Aaron G; Colgrave, Michelle L; Lyons, Russell E; Daly, Norelle L; Craik, David J

    2011-06-21

    Cyclotides are plant-derived proteins that have a unique cyclic cystine knot topology and are remarkably stable. Their natural function is host defense, but they have a diverse range of pharmaceutically important activities, including uterotonic activity and anti-HIV activity, and have also attracted recent interest as templates in drug design. Here we report an unusual biosynthetic origin of a precursor protein of a cyclotide from the butterfly pea, Clitoria ternatea, a representative member of the Fabaceae plant family. Unlike all previously reported cyclotides, the domain corresponding to the mature cyclotide from this Fabaceae plant is embedded within an albumin precursor protein. We confirmed the expression and correct processing of the cyclotide encoded by the Cter M precursor gene transcript following extraction from C. ternatea leaf and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry. The sequence was verified by direct chemical synthesis and the peptide was found to adopt a classic knotted cyclotide fold as determined by NMR spectroscopy. Seven additional cyclotide sequences were also identified from C. ternatea leaf and flower, five of which were unique. Cter M displayed insecticidal activity against the cotton budworm Helicoverpa armigera and bound to phospholipid membranes, suggesting its activity is modulated by membrane disruption. The Fabaceae is the third largest family of flowering plants and many Fabaceous plants are of huge significance for human nutrition. Knowledge of Fabaceae cyclotide gene transcripts should enable the production of modified cyclotides in crop plants for a variety of agricultural or pharmaceutical applications, including plant-produced designer peptide drugs.

  8. C5-C10 directly bonded tetrodotoxin analogues: possible biosynthetic precursors of tetrodotoxin from newts.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yuta; Yamashita, Yoko; Mebs, Dietrich; Cho, Yuko; Konoki, Keiichi; Yasumoto, Takeshi; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari

    2014-12-22

    The identification of novel tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1) analogues would significantly contribute to the elucidation of its biosynthetic pathway. In this study, the first C5-C10 directly bonded TTX analogues, 4,9-anhydro-10-hemiketal-5-deoxyTTX (2) and 4,9-anhydro-8-epi-10-hemiketal-5,6,11-trideoxyTTX (3), were found in the newt Cynops ensicauda popei by using a screening method involving HILIC-LC-MS/MS focused on the fragment ions of TTX analogues, and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Compound 2 was detected in a wide range of newt species, and the 2 and TTX contents of 22 newt specimens were correlated (rs =0.88). Based on these results and its structural features, 2 was predicted to serve as a precursor of TTX that would be directly converted into 4,9-anhydroTTX (4) by Baeyer-Villiger-like oxidation or via 4,9-anhydro-5-deoxyTTX formed by cleavage of the C5-C10 bond. The bicyclic carbon skeletons of 2 and 3 suggested a possible monoterpene origin for TTX.

  9. The effects of some polyamine biosynthetic inhibitors on growth and morphology of phytopathogenic fungi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajam, M. V.; Galston, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the effects of two polyamine biosynthetic inhibitors, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), and of polyamines (PAs), alone and in combination, on mycelial growth and morphology of four phytopathogenic fungi: Botrytis sp, B. cinerea, Rhizoctonia solani and Monilinia fructicola. The inhibitors were added to a Czapek agar medium to get final concentrations of 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mM. DFMO and DFMA, suicide inhibitors of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and arginine decarboxylase (ADC) respectively, inhibited mycelial growth strongly; the effect was generally more pronounced with DFMA than with DFMO, but each fungus had its own response pattern. The addition of the PAs putrescine (Put) and spermidine (Spd) to the culture medium resulted in a promotion of growth. In Botrytis sp and Monilinia fructicola exposed to inhibitors plus PAs, mycelial growth was actually increased above control values. Mycelial morphology was altered and cell size dramatically reduced in plates containing inhibitors alone, whereas with PAs alone, or in combination with inhibitors, morphology was normal, but cell length and diameters increased considerably. These results suggest that PAs are essential for growth in fungal mycelia. The inhibition caused by DFMA may be due to its arginase-mediated conversion to DFMO.

  10. Accumulation of kaempferitrin and expression of phenyl-propanoid biosynthetic genes in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shicheng; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Dong Ha; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Park, Sang Un

    2014-10-23

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) is cultivated worldwide for its fiber; however, the medicinal properties of this plant are currently attracting increasing attention. In this study, we investigated the expression levels of genes involved in the biosynthesis of kaempferitrin, a compound with many biological functions, in different kenaf organs. We found that phenylalanine ammonia lyase (HcPAL) was more highly expressed in stems than in other organs. Expression levels of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (HcC4H) and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (Hc4CL) were highest in mature leaves, followed by stems and young leaves, and lowest in roots and mature flowers. The expression of chalcone synthase (HcCHS), chalcone isomerase (HcCHI), and flavone 3-hydroxylase (HcF3H) was highest in young flowers, whereas that of flavone synthase (HcFLS) was highest in leaves. An analysis of kaempferitrin accumulation in the different organs of kenaf revealed that the accumulation of this compound was considerably higher (>10-fold) in leaves than in other organs. On the basis of a comparison of kaempferitrin contents with the expression levels of different genes in different organs, we speculate that HcFLS plays an important regulatory role in the kaempferitrin biosynthetic pathway in kenaf.

  11. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of Chalcone Synthase from Freesia hybrid in Flavonoid Biosynthetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Meng, Xiangyu; Liang, Lingjie; Jiang, Wangshu; Huang, Yafei; He, Jing; Hu, Haiyan; Almqvist, Jonas; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Chalcone synthase (CHS) catalyzes the first committed step in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. In this study, the cDNA (FhCHS1) encoding CHS from Freesia hybrida was successfully isolated and analyzed. Multiple sequence alignments showed that both the conserved CHS active site residues and CHS signature sequence were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of FhCHS1. Meanwhile, crystallographic analysis revealed that protein structure of FhCHS1 is highly similar to that of alfalfa CHS2, and the biochemical analysis results indicated that it has an enzymatic role in naringenin biosynthesis. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the transcript levels of FhCHS1 in flowers and different tissues, and patterns of FhCHS1 expression in flowers showed significant correlation to the accumulation patterns of anthocyanin during flower development. To further characterize the functionality of FhCHS1, its ectopic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana tt4 mutants and Petunia hybrida was performed. The results showed that overexpression of FhCHS1 in tt4 mutants fully restored the pigmentation phenotype of the seed coats, cotyledons and hypocotyls, while transgenic petunia expressing FhCHS1 showed flower color alteration from white to pink. In summary, these results suggest that FhCHS1 plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of flavonoid in Freesia hybrida and may be used to modify the components of flavonoids in other plants. PMID:25742495

  12. Modification of Monolignol Biosynthetic Pathway in Jute: Different Gene, Different Consequence

    PubMed Central

    Shafrin, Farhana; Ferdous, Ahlan Sabah; Sarkar, Suprovath Kumar; Ahmed, Rajib; Amin, Al-; Hossain, Kawsar; Sarker, Mrinmoy; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; del Rio, Jose C.; Sanan-Mishra, Neeti; Khan, Haseena

    2017-01-01

    Lignin, a cross-linked macromolecule of hydrophobic aromatic structure, provides additional rigidity to a plant cell wall. Although it is an integral part of the plant cell, presence of lignin considerably reduces the quality of the fiber of fiber-yielding plants. Decreasing lignin in such plants holds significant commercial and environmental potential. This study aimed at reducing the lignin content in jute-a fiber crop, by introducing hpRNA-based vectors for downregulation of two monolignoid biosynthetic genes- cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT). Transgenic generations, analyzed through Southern, RT-PCR and northern assays showed downregulation of the selected genes. Transgenic lines exhibited reduced level of gene expression with ~ 16–25% reduction in acid insoluble lignin for the whole stem and ~13–14% reduction in fiber lignin content compared to the control lines. Among the two transgenic plant types one exhibited an increase in cellulose content and concomitant improvement of glucose release. Composition of the lignin building blocks was found to alter and this alteration resulted in a pattern, different from other plants where the same genes were manipulated. It is expected that successful COMT-hpRNA and C4H-hpRNA transgenesis in jute will have far-reaching commercial implications leading to product diversification and value addition. PMID:28051165

  13. Harvesting the biosynthetic machineries that cultivate a variety of indispensable plant natural products

    PubMed Central

    Vickery, Christopher R; La Clair, James J; Burkart, Michael D; Noel, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    Plants are a sustainable resource for valuable natural chemicals best illustrated by large-scale farming centered on specific products. Here, we review recent discoveries of plant metabolic pathways producing natural products with unconventional biomolecular structures. Prenylation of polyketides by aromatic prenyltransferases (aPTases) ties together two of the major groups of plant specialized chemicals, terpenoids and polyketides, providing a core modification leading to new bioactivities and downstream metabolic processing. Moreover, PTases that biosynthesize Z-terpenoid precursors for small molecules such as lycosantalene have recently been found in the tomato family. Gaps in our understanding of how economically important compounds such as cannabinoids are produced are being identified using next-generation ‘omics’ to rapidly advance biochemical breakthroughs at an unprecedented rate. For instance, olivetolic acid cyclase, a polyketide synthase (PKS) co-factor from Cannabis sativa, directs the proper cyclization of a polyketide intermediate. Elucidations of spatial and temporal arrangements of biosynthetic enzymes into metabolons, such as those used to control the efficient production of natural polymers such as rubber and defensive small molecules such as linamarin and lotaustralin, provide blueprints for engineering streamlined production of plant products. PMID:26851514

  14. Cloning of three human multifunctional de novo purine biosynthetic genes by functional complementation of yeast mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Schild, D; Brake, A J; Kiefer, M C; Young, D; Barr, P J

    1990-01-01

    Functional complementation of mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to clone three multifunctional human genes involved in de novo purine biosynthesis. A HepG2 cDNA library constructed in a yeast expression vector was used to transform yeast strains with mutations in adenine biosynthetic genes. Clones were isolated that complement mutations in the yeast ADE2, ADE3, and ADE8 genes. The cDNA that complemented the ade8 (phosphoribosylglycinamide formyltransferase, GART) mutation, also complemented the ade5 (phosphoribosylglycinamide synthetase) and ade7 [phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase (AIRS; also known as PAIS)] mutations, indicating that it is the human trifunctional GART gene. Supporting data include homology between the AIRS and GART domains of this gene and the published sequence of these domains from other organisms, and localization of the cloned gene to human chromosome 21, where the GART gene has been shown to map. The cDNA that complemented ade2 (phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase) also complemented ade1 (phosphoribosylaminoimidazole succinocarboxamide synthetase), supporting earlier data suggesting that in some organisms these functions are part of a bifunctional protein. The cDNA that complemented ade3 (formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase) is different from the recently isolated human cDNA encoding this enzyme and instead appears to encode a related mitochondrial enzyme. Images PMID:2183217

  15. Transactivation of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes following transfer of B regulatory genes into maize tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Goff, S A; Klein, T M; Roth, B A; Fromm, M E; Cone, K C; Radicella, J P; Chandler, V L

    1990-01-01

    The C1, B and R genes regulating the maize anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway encode tissue-specific regulatory proteins with similarities to transcriptional activators. The C1 and R regulatory genes are usually responsible for pigmentation of seed tissues, and the B-Peru allele of B, but not the B-I allele, can substitute for R function in the seed. In this study, members of the B family of regulatory genes were delivered to intact maize tissues by high velocity microprojectiles. In colorless r aleurones or embryos, the introduction of the B-Peru genomic clone or the expressed cDNAs of B-Peru or B-I resulted in anthocyanin-producing cells. Luciferase produced from the Bronze1 anthocyanin structural gene promoter was induced 100-fold when co-introduced with the expressed B-Peru or B-I cDNAs. This quantitative transactivation assay demonstrates that the proteins encoded by these two B alleles are equally able to transactivate the Bronze1 promoter. Analogous results were obtained using embryogenic callus cells. These observations suggest that one major contribution towards tissue-specific anthocyanin synthesis controlled by the various alleles of the B and R genes is the differential expression of functionally similar proteins. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2369901

  16. Cloning and expression analyses of the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in mulberry plants.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiwu; Shuai, Qin; Chen, Hu; Fan, Li; Zeng, Qiwei; He, Ningjia

    2014-10-01

    Anthocyanins are natural food colorants produced by plants that play important roles in their growth and development. Mulberry fruits are rich in anthocyanins, which are the most important active components of mulberry and have many potentially beneficial effects on human health. The study of anthocyanin biosynthesis will bring benefits for quality improvement and industrial exploration of mulberry fruits. In the present study, nine putative genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis in mulberry plants were identified and cloned. Sequence analysis revealed that the mulberry anthocyanin biosynthetic genes were conserved and had counterparts in other plants. Spatial transcriptional analysis showed detectable expression of eight of these genes in different tissues. The results of expression and UPLC analyses in two mulberry cultivars with differently colored fruit indicated that anthocyanin concentrations correlated with the expression levels of genes associated with anthocyanin biosynthesis including CHS1, CHI, F3H1, F3'H1, and ANS during the fruit ripening process. The present studies provide insight into anthocyanin biosynthesis in mulberry plants and may facilitate genetic engineering for improvement of the anthocyanin content in mulberry fruit.

  17. Identification of Nocobactin NA Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in Nocardia farcinica▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Yasutaka; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Ishino, Keiko; Fukai, Toshio; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Yazawa, Katsukiyo; Mikami, Yuzuru; Ishikawa, Jun

    2011-01-01

    We identified the biosynthetic gene clusters of the siderophore nocobactin NA. The nbt clusters, which were discovered as genes highly homologous to the mycobactin biosynthesis genes by the genomic sequencing of Nocardia farcinica IFM 10152, consist of 10 genes separately located at two genomic regions. The gene organization of the nbt clusters and the predicted functions of the nbt genes, particularly the cyclization and epimerization domains, were in good agreement with the chemical structure of nocobactin NA. Disruptions of the nbtA and nbtE genes, respectively, reduced and abolished the productivity of nocobactin NA. The heterologous expression of the nbtS gene revealed that this gene encoded a salicylate synthase. These results indicate that the nbt clusters are responsible for the biosynthesis of nocobactin NA. We also found putative IdeR-binding sequences upstream of the nbtA, -G, -H, -S, and -T genes, whose expression was more than 10-fold higher in the low-iron condition than in the high-iron condition. These results suggest that nbt genes are regulated coordinately by IdeR protein in an iron-dependent manner. The ΔnbtE mutant was found to be impaired in cytotoxicity against J774A.1 cells, suggesting that nocobactin NA production is required for virulence of N. farcinica. PMID:21097631

  18. A new genome-mining tool redefines the lasso peptide biosynthetic landscape.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Jonathan I; Schwalen, Christopher J; Patel, Parth S; Maxson, Tucker; Blair, Patricia M; Tai, Hua-Chia; Zakai, Uzma I; Mitchell, Douglas A

    2017-02-28

    Ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide (RiPP) natural products are attractive for genome-driven discovery and re-engineering, but limitations in bioinformatic methods and exponentially increasing genomic data make large-scale mining of RiPP data difficult. We report RODEO (Rapid ORF Description and Evaluation Online), which combines hidden-Markov-model-based analysis, heuristic scoring, and machine learning to identify biosynthetic gene clusters and predict RiPP precursor peptides. We initially focused on lasso peptides, which display intriguing physicochemical properties and bioactivities, but their hypervariability renders them challenging prospects for automated mining. Our approach yielded the most comprehensive mapping to date of lasso peptide space, revealing >1,300 compounds. We characterized the structures and bioactivities of six lasso peptides, prioritized based on predicted structural novelty, including one with an unprecedented handcuff-like topology and another with a citrulline modification exceptionally rare among bacteria. These combined insights significantly expand the knowledge of lasso peptides and, more broadly, provide a framework for future genome-mining efforts.

  19. A Fivefold Parallelized Biosynthetic Process Secures Chlorination of Armillaria mellea (Honey Mushroom) Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Jonas; Heine, Daniel; Lackner, Gerald; Misiek, Mathias; Tauber, James; Jagusch, Hans; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The basidiomycetous tree pathogen Armillaria mellea (honey mushroom) produces a large variety of structurally related antibiotically active and phytotoxic natural products, referred to as the melleolides. During their biosynthesis, some members of the melleolide family of compounds undergo monochlorination of the aromatic moiety, whose biochemical and genetic basis was not known previously. This first study on basidiomycete halogenases presents the biochemical in vitro characterization of five flavin-dependent A. mellea enzymes (ArmH1 to ArmH5) that were heterologously produced in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate that all five enzymes transfer a single chlorine atom to the melleolide backbone. A 5-fold, secured biosynthetic step during natural product assembly is unprecedented. Typically, flavin-dependent halogenases are categorized into enzymes acting on free compounds as opposed to those requiring a carrier-protein-bound acceptor substrate. The enzymes characterized in this study clearly turned over free substrates. Phylogenetic clades of halogenases suggest that all fungal enzymes share an ancestor and reflect a clear divergence between ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. PMID:26655762

  20. Biosynthetic gene clusters for relevant secondary metabolites produced by Penicillium roqueforti in blue cheeses.

    PubMed

    García-Estrada, Carlos; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2016-10-01

    Ripening of blue-veined cheeses, such as the French Bleu and Roquefort, the Italian Gorgonzola, the English Stilton, the Danish Danablu or the Spanish Cabrales, Picón Bejes-Tresviso, and Valdeón, requires the growth and enzymatic activity of the mold Penicillium roqueforti, which is responsible for the characteristic texture, blue-green spots, and aroma of these types of cheeses. This filamentous fungus is able to synthesize different secondary metabolites, including andrastins, mycophenolic acid, and several mycotoxins, such as roquefortines C and D, PR-toxin and eremofortins, isofumigaclavines A and B, and festuclavine. This review provides a detailed description of the main secondary metabolites produced by P. roqueforti in blue cheese, giving a special emphasis to roquefortine, PR-toxin and mycophenolic acid, and their biosynthetic gene clusters and pathways. The knowledge of these clusters and secondary metabolism pathways, together with the ability of P. roqueforti to produce beneficial secondary metabolites, is of interest for commercial purposes.

  1. Evolution of the Tetrapyrrole Biosynthetic Pathway in Secondary Algae: Conservation, Redundancy and Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Horák, Aleš; Oborník, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles such as chlorophyll and heme are indispensable for life because they are involved in energy fixation and consumption, i.e. photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation. In eukaryotes, the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway is shaped by past endosymbioses. We investigated the origins and predicted locations of the enzymes of the heme pathway in the chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans, the cryptophyte Guillardia theta, the “green” dinoflagellate Lepidodinium chlorophorum, and three dinoflagellates with diatom endosymbionts (“dinotoms”): Durinskia baltica, Glenodinium foliaceum and Kryptoperidinium foliaceum. Bigelowiella natans appears to contain two separate heme pathways analogous to those found in Euglena gracilis; one is predicted to be mitochondrial-cytosolic, while the second is predicted to be plastid-located. In the remaining algae, only plastid-type tetrapyrrole synthesis is present, with a single remnant of the mitochondrial-cytosolic pathway, a ferrochelatase of G. theta putatively located in the mitochondrion. The green dinoflagellate contains a single pathway composed of mostly rhodophyte-origin enzymes, and the dinotoms hold two heme pathways of apparently plastidal origin. We suggest that heme pathway enzymes in B. natans and L. chlorophorum share a predominantly rhodophytic origin. This implies the ancient presence of a rhodophyte-derived plastid in the chlorarachniophyte alga, analogous to the green dinoflagellate, or an exceptionally massive horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27861576

  2. Elucidation of the complete ferrichrome A biosynthetic pathway in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Winterberg, Britta; Uhlmann, Stefanie; Linne, Uwe; Lessing, Franziska; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Eichhorn, Heiko; Kahmann, Regine; Schirawski, Jan

    2010-03-01

    Iron is an important element for many essential processes in living organisms. To acquire iron, the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis synthesizes the iron-chelating siderophores ferrichrome and ferrichrome A. The chemical structures of these siderophores have been elucidated long time ago but so far only two enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have been described. Sid1, an ornithine monoxygenase, is needed for the biosynthesis of both siderophores, and Sid2, a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), is involved in ferrichrome generation. In this work we identified four novel enzymes, Fer3, Fer4, Fer5 and Hcs1, involved in ferrichrome A biosynthesis in U. maydis. By HPLC-MS analysis of siderophore accumulation in culture supernatants of deletion strains, we show that Fer3, an NRPS, Fer4, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA)-hydratase, and Fer5, an acylase, are required for ferrichrome A production. We demonstrate by conditional expression of the hydroxymethyl glutaryl (HMG)-CoA synthase Hcs1 in U. maydis that HMG-CoA is an essential precursor for ferrichrome A. In addition, we heterologously expressed and purified Hcs1, Fer4 and Fer5, and demonstrated the enzymatic activities by in vitro experiments. Thus, we describe the first complete fungal siderophore biosynthetic pathway by functionally characterizing four novel genes responsible for ferrichrome A biosynthesis in U. maydis.

  3. Reconstruction of the Carotenoid Biosynthetic Pathway of Cronobacter sakazakii BAA894 in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Hu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Liqin; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii could form yellow-pigmented colonies. However, the chemical structure and the biosynthetic pathway of the yellow pigments have not been identified. In this study, the yellow pigments of C. sakazakii BAA894 were purified and analyzed. The major components of the yellow pigments were confirmed as zeaxanthin-monoglycoside and zeaxanthin-diglycoside. A gene cluster containing seven genes responsible for the yellow pigmentation in C. sakazakii BAA894 was identified. The seven genes of C. sakazakii BAA894 or parts of them were reconstructed in a heterologous host Escherichia coli DH5α. The pigments formed in these E. coli strains were isolated and analyzed by thin layer chromatography, UV-visible spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography, and electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry. These redesigned E. coli strains could produce different carotenoids. E. coli strain expressing all the seven genes could produce zeaxanthin-monoglycoside and zeaxanthin-diglycoside; E. coli strains expressing parts of the seven genes could produce lycopene, β-carotene, cryptoxanthin or zeaxanthin. This study identified the gene cluster responsible for the yellow pigmentation in C. sakazakii BAA894. PMID:24466219

  4. Mechanisms for autophagy modulation by isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Kaitlyn M; Allen, Cheryl; Born, Ella J; Tong, Huaxiang; Holstein, Sarah A

    2015-12-08

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the production of monoclonal protein (MP). We have shown previously that disruption of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) causes a block in MP secretion through a disruption of Rab GTPase activity, leading to an enhanced unfolded protein response and subsequent apoptosis in MM cells. Autophagy is induced by cellular stressors including nutrient deprivation and ER stress. IBP inhibitors have been shown to have disparate effects on autophagy. Here we define the mechanisms underlying the differential effects of IBP inhibitors on autophagic flux in MM cells utilizing specific pharmacological inhibitors. We demonstrate that IBP inhibition induces a net increase in autophagy as a consequence of disruption of isoprenoid biosynthesis which is not recapitulated by direct geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. IBP inhibitor-induced autophagy is a cellular defense mechanism as treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 enhances the cytotoxic effects of GGPP depletion, but not geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies revealed that IBP inhibitors disrupt ER to Golgi trafficking of monoclonal light chain protein and that this protein is not a substrate for alternative degradative pathways such as aggresomes and autophagosomes. These studies support further development of specific GGTase II inhibitors as anti-myeloma agents.

  5. Marine Actinobacteria from the Gulf of California: diversity, abundance and secondary metabolite biosynthetic potential

    PubMed Central

    Becerril-Espinosa, Amayaly; Freel, Kelle C.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    The Gulf of California is a coastal marine ecosystem characterized as having abundant biological resources and a high level of endemism. In this work we report the isolation and characterization of Actinobacteria from different sites in the western Gulf of California. We collected 126 sediment samples and isolated on average 3.1–38.3 Actinobacterial strains from each sample. Phylogenetic analysis of 136 strains identified them as members of the genera Actinomadura, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Saccharomonospora, Salinispora, Streptomyces and Verrucosispora. These strains were grouped into 26–56 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identities of 98–100 %. At 98 % sequence identity, three OTUs appear to represent new taxa while nine (35 %) have only been reported from marine environments. Sixty-three strains required seawater for growth. These fell into two OTUs at the 98 % identity level and include one that failed to produce aerial hyphae and was only distantly related (≤95.5 % 16S identity) to any previously cultured Streptomyces sp. Phylogenetic analyses of ketosynthase domains associated with polyketide synthase genes revealed sequences that ranged from 55 to 99 % nucleotide identity to experimentally characterized biosynthetic pathways suggesting that some may be associated with the production of new secondary metabolites. These results indicate that marine sediments from the Gulf of California harbor diverse Actinobacterial taxa with the potential to produce new secondary metabolites. PMID:23229438

  6. A biosynthetic model of cytochrome c oxidase as an electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sohini; Mukherjee, Arnab; Bhagi-Damodaran, Ambika; Mukherjee, Manjistha; Lu, Yi; Dey, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    Creating an artificial functional mimic of the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) has been a long-term goal of the scientific community as such a mimic will not only add to our fundamental understanding of how CcO works but may also pave the way for efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells. Here we develop an electrocatalyst for reducing oxygen to water under ambient conditions. We use site-directed mutants of myoglobin, where both the distal Cu and the redox-active tyrosine residue present in CcO are modelled. In situ Raman spectroscopy shows that this catalyst features very fast electron transfer rates, facile oxygen binding and O–O bond lysis. An electron transfer shunt from the electrode circumvents the slow dissociation of a ferric hydroxide species, which slows down native CcO (bovine 500 s−1), allowing electrocatalytic oxygen reduction rates of 5,000 s−1 for these biosynthetic models. PMID:26455726

  7. Improvement of gougerotin and nikkomycin production by engineering their biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Du, Deyao; Zhu, Yu; Wei, Junhong; Tian, Yuqing; Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2013-07-01

    Nikkomycins and gougerotin are peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics with broad biological activities. The nikkomycin biosynthetic gene cluster comprises one pathway-specific regulatory gene (sanG) and 21 structural genes, whereas the gene cluster for gougerotin biosynthesis includes one putative regulatory gene, one major facilitator superfamily transporter gene, and 13 structural genes. In the present study, we introduced sanG driven by six different promoters into Streptomyces ansochromogenes TH322. Nikkomycin production was increased significantly with the highest increase in engineered strain harboring hrdB promoter-driven sanG. In the meantime, we replaced the native promoter of key structural genes in the gougerotin (gou) gene cluster with the hrdB promoters. The heterologous producer Streptomyces coelicolor M1146 harboring the modified gene cluster produced gougerotin up to 10-fold more than strains carrying the unmodified cluster. Therefore, genetic manipulations of genes involved in antibiotics biosynthesis with the constitutive hrdB promoter present a robust, easy-to-use system generally useful for the improvement of antibiotics production in Streptomyces.

  8. The flavonoid biosynthetic enzyme chalcone isomerase modulates terpenoid production in glandular trichomes of tomato.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin-Ho; McRoberts, John; Shi, Feng; Moreno, Javier E; Jones, A Daniel; Howe, Gregg A

    2014-03-01

    Flavonoids and terpenoids are derived from distinct metabolic pathways but nevertheless serve complementary roles in mediating plant interactions with the environment. Here, we show that glandular trichomes of the anthocyanin free (af) mutant of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fail to accumulate both flavonoids and terpenoids. This pleiotropic metabolic deficiency was associated with loss of resistance to native populations of coleopteran herbivores under field conditions. We demonstrate that Af encodes an isoform (SlCHI1) of the flavonoid biosynthetic enzyme chalcone isomerase (CHI), which catalyzes the conversion of naringenin chalcone to naringenin and is strictly required for flavonoid production in multiple tissues of tomato. Expression of the wild-type SlCHI1 gene from its native promoter complemented the anthocyanin deficiency in af. Unexpectedly, the SlCHI1 transgene also complemented the defect in terpenoid production in glandular trichomes. Our results establish a key role for SlCHI1 in flavonoid production in tomato and reveal a link between CHI1 and terpenoid production. Metabolic coordination of the flavonoid and terpenoid pathways may serve to optimize the function of trichome glands in dynamic environments.

  9. MoeH5: a natural glycorandomizer from the moenomycin biosynthetic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ostash, Bohdan; Campbell, Jennifer; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Walker, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Summary The biosynthesis of the phosphoglycolipid antibiotic moenomycin A attracts the attention of researchers hoping to develop new moenomycin-based antibiotics against multidrug resistant Gram-positive infections. There is detailed understanding of most steps of this biosynthetic pathway in Streptomyces ghanaensis (ATCC14672), except for the ultimate stage, where a single pentasaccharide intermediate is converted into a set of unusually modified final products. Here we report that only one gene, moeH5, encoding a homologue of the glutamine amidotransferase (GAT) enzyme superfamily, is responsible for the observed diversity of terminally decorated moenomycins. Genetic and biochemical evidence support the idea that MoeH5 is a novel member of the GAT superfamily, whose homologues are involved in the synthesis of various secondary metabolites as well as K and O antigens of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Our results provide insights into the mechanism of MoeH5 and its counterparts, and give us a new tool for the diversification of phosphoglycolipid antibiotics. PMID:24164498

  10. Higher transcription levels in ascorbic acid biosynthetic and recycling genes were associated with higher ascorbic acid accumulation in blueberry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenghong; Wang, Lei; Gu, Liang; Zhao, Wei; Su, Hongyan; Cheng, Xianhao

    2015-12-01

    In our preliminary study, the ripe fruits of two highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cultivars, cv 'Berkeley' and cv 'Bluecrop', were found to contain different levels of ascorbic acid. However, factors responsible for these differences are still unknown. In the present study, ascorbic acid content in fruits was compared with expression profiles of ascorbic acid biosynthetic and recycling genes between 'Bluecrop' and 'Berkeley' cultivars. The results indicated that the l-galactose pathway was the predominant route of ascorbic acid biosynthesis in blueberry fruits. Moreover, higher expression levels of the ascorbic acid biosynthetic genes GME, GGP, and GLDH, as well as the recycling genes MDHAR and DHAR, were associated with higher ascorbic acid content in 'Bluecrop' compared with 'Berkeley', which indicated that a higher efficiency ascorbic acid biosynthesis and regeneration was likely to be responsible for the higher ascorbic acid accumulation in 'Bluecrop'.

  11. Harnessing the synthetic capabilities of glycopeptide antibiotic tailoring enzymes: characterization of the UK-68,597 biosynthetic cluster.

    PubMed

    Yim, Grace; Kalan, Lindsay; Koteva, Kalinka; Thaker, Maulik N; Waglechner, Nicholas; Tang, Irene; Wright, Gerard D

    2014-11-24

    In this study, a draft genome sequence of Actinoplanes sp. ATCC 53533 was assembled, and an 81-kb biosynthetic cluster for the unusual sulfated glycopeptide UK-68,597 was identified. Glycopeptide antibiotics are important in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Glycopeptides contain heptapeptide backbones that are modified by many tailoring enzymes, including glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, methyltransferases, and halogenases, generating extensive chemical and functional diversity. Several tailoring enzymes in the cluster were examined in vitro for their ability to modify glycopeptides, resulting in the synthesis of novel molecules. Tailoring enzymes were also expressed in the producer of the glycopeptide aglycone A47934, generating additional chemical diversity. This work characterizes the biosynthetic program of UK-68,597 and demonstrates the capacity to expand glycopeptide chemical diversity by harnessing the unique chemistry of tailoring enzymes.

  12. PQQ: Biosynthetic studies in Methylobacterium AM1 and Hyphomicrobium X using specific TC labeling and NMR. [Pyrroloquinoline quinones

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Hanners, J.L.; Unkefer, C.J.; van Kleef, M.A.G.; Duine, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Using TC labeling and NMR spectroscopy we have determined biosynthetic precursors of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in two closely related serine-type methylotrophs, Methylobacterium AM1 and Hyphomicrobium X. Analysis of the TC-labeling data revealed that PQQ is constructed from two amino acids: the portion containing N-6, C-7,8,9 and the two carboxylic acid groups, C-7' and 9', is derived-intact-from glutamate. The remaining portion is derived from tyrosine; the phenol side chain provides the six carbons of the ring containing the orthoquinone, whereas internal cyclization of the amino acid backbone forms the pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid moiety. This is analogous to the cyclization of dopaquinone to form dopachrome. Dopaquinone is a product of the oxidation of tyrosine (via dopa) in reactions catalyzed by monophenol monooxygenase (EC 1.14.18.1). Starting with tyrosine and glutamate, we will discuss possible biosynthetic routes to PQQ. 29 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. ClbM is a versatile, cation-promiscuous MATE transporter found in the colibactin biosynthetic gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Jarrod J; Newsome, Rachel C; Yang, Ye; Jobin, Christian; Bruner, Steven D

    2017-01-22

    Multidrug transporters play key roles in cellular drug resistance to toxic molecules, yet these transporters are also involved in natural product transport as part of biosynthetic clusters in bacteria and fungi. The genotoxic molecule colibactin is produced by strains of virulent and pathobiont Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. In the biosynthetic cluster is a multidrug and toxic compound extrusion protein (MATE) proposed to transport the prodrug molecule precolibactin across the cytoplasmic membrane, for subsequent cleavage by the peptidase ClbP and cellular export. We recently determined the X-ray structure of ClbM, and showed preliminary data suggesting its specific role in precolibactin transport. Here, we define a functional role of ClbM by examining transport capabilities under various biochemical conditions. Our data indicate ClbM responds to sodium, potassium, and rubidium ion gradients, while also having substantial transport activity in the absence of alkali cations.

  14. IMG-ABC: An Atlas of Biosynthetic Gene Clusters to Fuel the Discovery of Novel Secondary Metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I-Min; Chu, Ken; Ratner, Anna; Palaniappan, Krishna; Huang, Jinghua; Reddy, T. B.K.; Cimermancic, Peter; Fischbach, Michael; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Pati, Amrita

    2014-10-28

    In the discovery of secondary metabolites (SMs), large-scale analysis of sequence data is a promising exploration path that remains largely underutilized due to the lack of relevant computational resources. We present IMG-ABC (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/abc/) -- An Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters within the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system1. IMG-ABC is a rich repository of both validated and predicted biosynthetic clusters (BCs) in cultured isolates, single-cells and metagenomes linked with the SM chemicals they produce and enhanced with focused analysis tools within IMG. The underlying scalable framework enables traversal of phylogenetic dark matter and chemical structure space -- serving as a doorway to a new era in the discovery of novel molecules.

  15. Molecular characterization of tocopherol biosynthetic genes in sweetpotato that respond to stress and activate the tocopherol production in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chang Yoon; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Ho Soo; Ke, Qingbo; Kim, Gun-Woo; Park, Sung-Chul; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2016-09-01

    Tocopherol (vitamin E) is a chloroplast lipid that is presumed to be involved in the plant response to oxidative stress. In this study, we isolated and characterized five tocopherol biosynthetic genes from sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam) plants, including genes encoding 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (IbHPPD), homogentisate phytyltransferase (IbHPT), 2-methyl-6-phytylbenzoquinol methyltransferase (IbMPBQ MT), tocopherol cyclase (IbTC) and γ-tocopherol methyltransferase (IbTMT). Fluorescence microscope analysis indicated that four proteins localized into the chloroplast, whereas IbHPPD observed in the nuclear. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression patterns of the five tocopherol biosynthetic genes varied in different plant tissues and under different stress conditions. All five genes were highly expressed in leaf tissues, whereas IbHPPD and IbHPT were highly expressed in the thick roots. The expression patterns of these five genes significantly differed in response to PEG, NaCl and H2O2-mediated oxidative stress. IbHPPD was strongly induced following PEG and H2O2 treatment and IbHPT was strongly induced following PEG treatment, whereas IbMPBQ MT and IbTC were highly expressed following NaCl treatment. Upon infection of the bacterial pathogen Pectobacterium chrysanthemi, the expression of IbHPPD increased sharply in sweetpotato leaves, whereas the expression of the other genes was reduced or unchanged. Additionally, transient expression of the five tocopherol biosynthetic genes in tobacco (Nicotiana bentamiana) leaves resulted in increased transcript levels of the transgenes expressions and tocopherol production. Therefore, our results suggested that the five tocopherol biosynthetic genes of sweetpotato play roles in the stress defense response as transcriptional regulators of the tocopherol production.

  16. The hidden universal distribution of amino acid biosynthetic networks: a genomic perspective on their origins and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Montes, Georgina; Díaz-Mejía, J Javier; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Segovia, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Background Twenty amino acids comprise the universal building blocks of proteins. However, their biosynthetic routes do not appear to be universal from an Escherichia coli-centric perspective. Nevertheless, it is necessary to understand their origin and evolution in a global context, that is, to include more 'model' species and alternative routes in order to do so. We use a comparative genomics approach to assess the origins and evolution of alternative amino acid biosynthetic network branches. Results By tracking the taxonomic distribution of amino acid biosynthetic enzymes, we predicted a core of widely distributed network branches biosynthesizing at least 16 out of the 20 standard amino acids, suggesting that this core occurred in ancient cells, before the separation of the three cellular domains of life. Additionally, we detail the distribution of two types of alternative branches to this core: analogs, enzymes that catalyze the same reaction (using the same metabolites) and belong to different superfamilies; and 'alternologs', herein defined as branches that, proceeding via different metabolites, converge to the same end product. We suggest that the origin of alternative branches is closely related to different environmental metabolite sources and life-styles among species. Conclusion The multi-organismal seed strategy employed in this work improves the precision of dating and determining evolutionary relationships among amino acid biosynthetic branches. This strategy could be extended to diverse metabolic routes and even other biological processes. Additionally, we introduce the concept of 'alternolog', which not only plays an important role in the relationships between structure and function in biological networks, but also, as shown here, has strong implications for their evolution, almost equal to paralogy and analogy. PMID:18541022

  17. Impairment of chondrocyte biosynthetic activity by exposure to 3-tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging is temporary.

    PubMed

    Sunk, Ilse-Gerlinde; Trattnig, Siegfried; Graninger, Winfried B; Amoyo, Love; Tuerk, Birgit; Steiner, Carl-Walter; Smolen, Josef S; Bobacz, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    The influence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices at high field strengths on living tissues is unknown. We investigated the effects of a 3-tesla electromagnetic field (EMF) on the biosynthetic activity of bovine articular cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage was obtained from juvenile and adult animals. Whole joints or cartilage explants were subjected to a pulsed 3-tesla EMF; controls were left unexposed. Synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) was measured by using [35S]sulfate incorporation; mRNA encoding the cartilage markers aggrecan and type II collagen, as well as IL-1beta, were analyzed by RT-PCR. Furthermore, effects of the 3-tesla EMF were determined over the course of time directly after exposure (day 0) and at days 3 and 6. In addition, the influence of a 1.5-tesla EMF on cartilage sGAG synthesis was evaluated. Chondrocyte cell death was assessed by staining with Annexin V and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Exposure to the EMF resulted in a significant decrease in cartilage macromolecule synthesis. Gene expression of both aggrecan and IL-1beta, but not of collagen type II, was reduced in comparison with controls. Staining with Annexin V and TUNEL revealed no evidence of cell death. Interestingly, chondrocytes regained their biosynthetic activity within 3 days after exposure, as shown by proteoglycan synthesis rate and mRNA expression levels. Cartilage samples exposed to a 1.5-tesla EMF remained unaffected. Although MRI devices with a field strength of more than 1.5 T provide a better signal-to-noise ratio and thereby higher spatial resolution, their high field strength impairs the biosynthetic activity of articular chondrocytes in vitro. Although this decrease in biosynthetic activity seems to be transient, articular cartilage exposed to high-energy EMF may become vulnerable to damage.

  18. Identification of (2S,3S)-β-Methyltryptophan as the Real Biosynthetic Intermediate of Antitumor Agent Streptonigrin

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Dekun; Zou, Yi; Zhang, Zhang; Xu, Fei; Brock, Nelson L.; Zhang, Liping; Deng, Zixin; Lin, Shuangjun

    2016-01-01

    Streptonigrin is a potent antitumor antibiotic, active against a wide range of mammalian tumor cells. It was reported that its biosynthesis relies on (2S,3R)-β-methyltryptophan as an intermediate. In this study, the biosynthesis of (2S,3R)-β-methyltryptophan and its isomer (2S,3S)-β-methyltryptophan by enzymes from the streptonigrin biosynthetic pathway is demonstrated. StnR is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent aminotransferase that catalyzes a transamination between L-tryptophan and β-methyl indolepyruvate. StnQ1 is an S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent C-methyltransferase and catalyzes β-methylation of indolepyruvate to generate (R)-β-methyl indolepyruvate. Although StnR exhibited a significant preference for (S)-β-methyl indolepyruvate over the (R)-epimer, StnQ1 and StnR together catalyze (2S,3R)-β-methyltryptophan formation from L-tryptophan. StnK3 is a cupin superfamily protein responsible for conversion of (R)-β-methyl indolepyruvate to its (S)-epimer and enables (2S,3S)-β-methyltryptophan biosynthesis from L-tryptophan when combined with StnQ1 and StnR. Most importantly, (2S,3S)-β-methyltryptophan was established as the biosynthetic intermediate of the streptonigrin pathway by feeding experiments with a knockout mutant, contradicting the previous proposal that stated (2S,3R)-β-methyltryptophan as the intermediate. These data set the stage for the complete elucidation of the streptonigrin biosynthetic pathway, which would unlock the potential of creating new streptonigrin analogues by genetic manipulation of the biosynthetic machinery. PMID:26847951

  19. Binding of a biosynthetic intermediate to AtrA modulates the production of lidamycin by Streptomyces globisporus.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingxing; Yu, Tengfei; He, Qing; McDowall, Kenneth J; Jiang, Bingya; Jiang, Zhibo; Wu, Linzhuan; Li, Guangwei; Li, Qinglian; Wang, Songmei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lifei; Hong, Bin

    2015-06-01

    The control of secondary production in streptomycetes involves the funneling of environmental and physiological signals to the cluster-situated (transcriptional) regulators (CSRs) of the biosynthetic genes. For some systems, the binding of biosynthetic products to the CSR has been shown to provide negative feedback. Here we show for the production of lidamycin (C-1027), a clinically relevant antitumor agent, by Streptomyces globisporus that negative feedback can extend to a point higher in the regulatory cascade. We show that the DNA-binding activity of the S. globisporus orthologue of AtrA, which was initially described as a transcriptional activator of actinorhodin biosynthesis in S. coelicolor, is inhibited by the binding of heptaene, a biosynthetic intermediate of lidamycin. Additional experiments described here show that S. globisporus AtrA binds in vivo as well as in vitro to the promoter region of the gene encoding SgcR1, one of the CSRs of lidamycin production. The feedback to the pleiotropic regulator AtrA is likely to provide a mechanism for coordinating the production of lidamycin with that of other secondary metabolites. The activity of AtrA is also regulated by actinorhodin. As AtrA is evolutionarily conserved, negative feedback of the type described here may be widespread within the streptomycetes.

  20. Biosynthetic potential-based strain prioritization for natural product discovery: a showcase for diterpenoid-producing actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pengfei; Ma, Ming; Rateb, Mostafa E; Shaaban, Khaled A; Yu, Zhiguo; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Zhao, Li-Xing; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Yan, Yijun; Peterson, Ryan M; Lohman, Jeremy R; Yang, Dong; Yin, Min; Rudolf, Jeffrey D; Jiang, Yi; Duan, Yanwen; Shen, Ben

    2014-02-28

    Natural products remain the best sources of drugs and drug leads and serve as outstanding small-molecule probes to dissect fundamental biological processes. A great challenge for the natural product community is to discover novel natural products efficiently and cost effectively. Here we report the development of a practical method to survey biosynthetic potential in microorganisms, thereby identifying the most promising strains and prioritizing them for natural product discovery. Central to our approach is the innovative preparation, by a two-tiered PCR method, of a pool of pathway-specific probes, thereby allowing the survey of all variants of the biosynthetic machineries for the targeted class of natural products. The utility of the method was demonstrated by surveying 100 strains, randomly selected from our actinomycete collection, for their biosynthetic potential of four classes of natural products, aromatic polyketides, reduced polyketides, nonribosomal peptides, and diterpenoids, identifying 16 talented strains. One of the talented strains, Streptomyces griseus CB00830, was finally chosen to showcase the discovery of the targeted classes of natural products, resulting in the isolation of three diterpenoids, six nonribosomal peptides and related metabolites, and three polyketides. Variations of this method should be applicable to the discovery of other classes of natural products.

  1. Identification of the chelocardin biosynthetic gene cluster from Amycolatopsis sulphurea: a platform for producing novel tetracycline antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lukežič, Tadeja; Lešnik, Urška; Podgoršek, Ajda; Horvat, Jaka; Polak, Tomaž; Šala, Martin; Jenko, Branko; Raspor, Peter; Herron, Paul R; Hunter, Iain S; Petković, Hrvoje

    2013-12-01

    Tetracyclines (TCs) are medically important antibiotics from the polyketide family of natural products. Chelocardin (CHD), produced by Amycolatopsis sulphurea, is a broad-spectrum tetracyclic antibiotic with potent bacteriolytic activity against a number of Gram-positive and Gram-negative multi-resistant pathogens. CHD has an unknown mode of action that is different from TCs. It has some structural features that define it as 'atypical' and, notably, is active against tetracycline-resistant pathogens. Identification and characterization of the chelocardin biosynthetic gene cluster from A. sulphurea revealed 18 putative open reading frames including a type II polyketide synthase. Compared to typical TCs, the chd cluster contains a number of features that relate to its classification as 'atypical': an additional gene for a putative two-component cyclase/aromatase that may be responsible for the different aromatization pattern, a gene for a putative aminotransferase for C-4 with the opposite stereochemistry to TCs and a gene for a putative C-9 methylase that is a unique feature of this biosynthetic cluster within the TCs. Collectively, these enzymes deliver a molecule with different aromatization of ring C that results in an unusual planar structure of the TC backbone. This is a likely contributor to its different mode of action. In addition CHD biosynthesis is primed with acetate, unlike the TCs, which are primed with malonamate, and offers a biosynthetic engineering platform that represents a unique opportunity for efficient generation of novel tetracyclic backbones using combinatorial biosynthesis.

  2. antiSMASH 3.0-a comprehensive resource for the genome mining of biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tilmann; Blin, Kai; Duddela, Srikanth; Krug, Daniel; Kim, Hyun Uk; Bruccoleri, Robert; Lee, Sang Yup; Fischbach, Michael A; Müller, Rolf; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko; Medema, Marnix H

    2015-07-01

    Microbial secondary metabolism constitutes a rich source of antibiotics, chemotherapeutics, insecticides and other high-value chemica