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Sample records for ozone hole 1999-2005

  1. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Mario J.

    Observations of Antarctic ozone levels and the discovery of a hole in the Antarctic region are examined. The effects of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) on the level of stratospheric ozone are analyzed. Three cycles explaining the cause of ozone depletion in the poles are proposed. A comparison of field data and proposed depletion cycles reveals that the chemical origin of the ozone hole is due to CFCs. The potential global effects of the Antarctic ozone hole are discussed.

  2. Antarctic Ozone Hole, 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Each spring the ozone layer over Antarctica nearly disappears, forming a 'hole' over the entire continent. The hole is created by the interaction of some man-made chemicals-freon, for example-with Antarctica's unique weather patterns and extremely cold temperatures. Ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet radiation from the sun, thereby protecting living things. Since the ozone hole was discovered many of the chemicals that destroy ozone have been banned, but they will remain in the atmosphere for decades. In 2000, the ozone hole grew quicker than usual and exceptionally large. By the first week in September the hole was the largest ever-11.4 million square miles. The top image shows the average total column ozone values over Antarctica for September 2000. (Total column ozone is the amount of ozone from the ground to the top of the atmosphere. A relatively typical measurement of 300 Dobson Units is equivalent to a layer of ozone 0.12 inches thick on the Earth's surface. Levels below 220 Dobson Units are considered to be significant ozone depletion.) The record-breaking hole is likely the result of lower than average ozone levels during the Antarctic fall and winter, and exceptionally cold temperatures. In October, however (bottom image), the hole shrank dramatically, much more quickly than usual. By the end of October, the hole was only one-third of it's previous size. In a typical year, the ozone hole does not collapse until the end of November. NASA scientists were surprised by this early shrinking and speculate it is related to the region's weather. Global ozone levels are measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). For more information about ozone, read the Earth Observatory's ozone fact sheet, view global ozone data and see these ozone images. Images by Greg Shirah, NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio.

  3. Ozone Hole Over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) show the progressive depletion of ozone over Antarctica from 1979 to 1999. This 'ozone hole' has extended to cover an area as large as 10.5 million square miles in September 1998. The previous record of 10.0 million square miles was set in 1996. The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year between late August and early October. Regions with higher levels of ozone are shown in red. NASA and NOAA instruments have been measuring Antarctic ozone levels since the early 1970s. Large regions of depleted ozone began to develop over Antarctica in the early 1980s. Ozone holes of substantial size and depth are likely to continue to form during the next few years, scientists hope to see a reduction in ozone loss as levels of ozone-destroying CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) are gradually reduced. Credit: Images by Greg Shirah, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

  4. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Anna E.

    2008-07-01

    Since the mid 1970s, the ozone layer over Antarctica has experienced massive destruction during every spring. In this article, we will consider the atmosphere, and what ozone and the ozone layer actually are. We explore the chemistry responsible for the ozone destruction, and learn about why conditions favour ozone destruction over Antarctica. For the historical perspective, the events leading up to the discovery of the 'hole' are presented, as well as the response from the international community and the measures taken to protect the ozone layer now and into the future.

  5. The Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Processes that may be responsible for the thinning in the ozone layer above the South Pole are described. The chlorine catalytic cycle which destroys ozone is described, as are the major types of reactions that are believed to interfere with this cycle by forming chlorine reservoirs. The suspected contributions of polar stratospheric clouds to these processes are examined. Finally, the possibility that the ozone hole may be due more to a shift in atmospheric dynamics than to chemical destruction is addressed.

  6. The Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (1987) and the findings of the British Antarctic Survey (1985). Proposes two theories for the appearance of the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica which appears each spring; air pollution and natural atmospheric shifts. Illustrates the mechanics of both. Supports worldwide chlorofluorocarbon…

  7. The Antarctic Ozone Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anna E.

    2008-01-01

    Since the mid 1970s, the ozone layer over Antarctica has experienced massive destruction during every spring. In this article, we will consider the atmosphere, and what ozone and the ozone layer actually are. We explore the chemistry responsible for the ozone destruction, and learn about why conditions favour ozone destruction over Antarctica. For…

  8. The Hole in the Ozone Layer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamers, Jeanne S.; Jacob, Anthony T.

    This document contains information on the hole in the ozone layer. Topics discussed include properties of ozone, ozone in the atmosphere, chlorofluorocarbons, stratospheric ozone depletion, effects of ozone depletion on life, regulation of substances that deplete the ozone layer, alternatives to CFCs and Halons, and the future of the ozone layer.…

  9. The 2002 Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Nash, E. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1979, the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million km2. This area is most strongly controlled by levels of inorganic chlorine and bromine oncentrations. In addition, dynamical variations modulate the size of the ozone hole by either cooling or warming the polar vortex collar region. We will review the size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. Using a simple trajectory model, we will demonstrate the sensitivity of the ozone hole to dynamical forcing, and we will use these observations to discuss the size of the ozone hole during the 2002 Austral spring. We will further show how the Cly decreases in the stratosphere will cause the ozone hole to decrease by 1-1.5% per year. We will also show results from a 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) that has been continuously run since 1999. These CTM results directly show how strong dynamics acts to reduce the size of the ozone hole.

  10. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole demonstrates large-scale, man-made affects on our atmosphere. Surface observations now show that human produced ozone depleting substances (ODSs) are declining. The ozone hole should soon start to diminish because of this decline. In this talk we will demonstrate an ozone hole parametric model. This model is based upon: 1) a new algorithm for estimating 61 and Br levels over Antarctica and 2) late-spring Antarctic stratospheric temperatures. This parametric model explains 95% of the ozone hole area's variance. We use future ODS levels to predict ozone hole recovery. Full recovery to 1980 levels will occur in approximately 2068. The ozone hole area will very slowly decline over the next 2 decades. Detection of a statistically significant decrease of area will not occur until approximately 2024. We further show that nominal Antarctic stratospheric greenhouse gas forced temperature change should have a small impact on the ozone hole.

  11. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Stephen A.; Schauffler, Sue

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole demonstrates large-scale, man-made affects on our atmosphere. Surface observations now show that human produced ozone depleting substances (ODSs) are declining. The ozone hole should soon start to diminish because of this decline. Herein we demonstrate an ozone hole parametric model. This model is based upon: 1) a new algorithm for estimating C1 and Br levels over Antarctica and 2) late-spring Antarctic stratospheric temperatures. This parametric model explains 95% of the ozone hole area s variance. We use future ODS levels to predict ozone hole recovery. Full recovery to 1980 levels will occur in approximately 2068. The ozone hole area will very slowly decline over the next 2 decades. Detection of a statistically significant decrease of area will not occur until approximately 2024. We further show that nominal Antarctic stratospheric greenhouse gas forced temperature change should have a small impact on the ozone hole.

  12. When will the Antarctic ozone hole recover?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Stephen A.; Schauffler, Sue M.

    2006-06-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole demonstrates large-scale, man-made affects on our atmosphere. Surface observations now show that human produced ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are declining. The ozone hole should soon start to diminish because of this decline. We demonstrate a parametric model of ozone hole area that is based upon a new algorithm for estimating chlorine and bromine levels over Antarctica and late spring Antarctic stratospheric temperatures. This model explains 95% of the ozone hole area's variance. We then use future ODS levels to predict ozone hole recovery. Full recovery to 1980 levels will occur around 2068 and the area will very slowly decline between 2001 and 2017. Detection of a statistically significant decrease of area will not occur until about 2024. We further show that nominal Antarctic stratospheric greenhouse gas forced temperature change should have a small impact on the ozone hole.

  13. Recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve; Schauffler, Sue; Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Pawson, Steven; Nielsen, J. Eric

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the TOMS and OMI instruments. The severity of the hole has been assessed using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole), the average size during the September-October period, and the ozone mass deficit. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. We use two methods to estimate ozone hole recovery. First, we use projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates in a parametric model. Second, we use a coupled chemistry climate model to assess recovery. We find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. Furthermore, full recovery to 1980 levels will not occur until approximately 2068. We will also show some error estimates of these dates and the impact of climate change on the recovery.

  14. When will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the .TOMS instrument. The severity of the hole has been assessed from TOMS using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average size during the September-October period. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to, both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. The ozone hole will begin to show first signs of recovery in about 2023, and the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels in approximately 2070. This 2070 recovery is 20 years later than recent projections.

  15. When Will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve

    2005-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the TOMS instrument. The severity of the hole has been assessed from TOMS using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average size during the September-October period. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. We will show estimates of both when the ozone hole will begin to show first signs of recovery, and when the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels.

  16. Formation of the 1988 Antarctic ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, A.J.; Stolarski, R.S.; Schoeberl, M.R. )

    1989-05-01

    The 1988 Antarctic ozone hole, as observed with the Nimbus 7 TOMS instrument, formed in August but failed to deepen significantly during September. The structure of the surrounding total ozone maxima also differed from the prior year. The 1987 total ozone pattern was pole centered and symmetrical. During 1988 a persistent strong wavenumber 1 perturbation in total ozone developed in August which resulted in displacement of the polar ozone minimum to the base of the Antarctic Peninsula. Subsequently, a series of transient events diminished and a larger scale decrease in polar total ozone began. The decrease lasted less than two weeks, resulting in a net change of only 25 DU compared with the nearly 100 DU decline observed during the same period in 1987. The minimum values remained roughly constant until October 19, 1988 and then increased rapidly. The 1988 Antarctic ozone hole subsequently drifted off the Antarctic continent in late October and dissipated in mid-November.

  17. Chemistry and Dynamics of the Unusual 2015 Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2016-04-01

    The Global Atmosphere Watch of the World Meteorological Organization includes several stations in Antarctica that keep a close eye on the ozone layer during the ozone hole season. Observations made during the unusually large ozone hole of 2015 will be compared to ozone holes from 2003 to 2014 and interpreted in light of the meteorological conditions. Satellite observations will be used to get a more general picture of the size and depth of the ozone hole and will also be used to calculate various metrics for ozone hole severity. In 2003, 2005 and 2006, the ozone hole was relatively large with more ozone loss than normal. This is in particular the case for 2006, which by most ozone hole metrics was the most severe ozone hole on record. On the other hand, the ozone holes of 2004, 2007, 2010 and 2012, 2013 and 2014 were less severe than normal, and only the very special ozone hole of 2002 had less ozone depletion when one regards the ozone holes of the last decade. The South Polar vortex of 2015 was unusually stable and long-lived, so ozone depletion lasted longer than seen in recent years. The ozone hole area, i.e. the area where total ozone is less that 220 DU, averaged over the worst 60 consecutive days was larger in 2015 than in any other year since the beginning of the ozone hole era in the early 1980s.

  18. Antarctic Ozone Hole on September 17, 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Satellite data show the area of this year's Antarctic ozone hole peaked at about 26 million square kilometers-roughly the size of North America-making the hole similar in size to those of the past three years, according to scientists from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Researchers have observed a leveling-off of the hole size and predict a slow recovery. Over the past several years the annual ozone hole over Antarctica has remained about the same in both its size and in the thickness of the ozone layer. 'This is consistent with human-produced chlorine compounds that destroy ozone reaching their peak concentrations in the atmosphere, leveling off, and now beginning a very slow decline,' said Samuel Oltmans of NOAA's Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory, Boulder, Colo. In the near future-barring unusual events such as explosive volcanic eruptions-the severity of the ozone hole will likely remain similar to what has been seen in recent years, with year-to-year differences associated with meteorological variability. Over the longer term (30-50 years) the severity of the ozone hole in Antarctica is expected to decrease as chlorine levels in the atmosphere decline. The image above shows ozone levels on Spetember 17, 2001-the lowest levels observed this year. Dark blue colors correspond to the thinnest ozone, while light blue, green, and yellow pixels indicate progressively thicker ozone. For more information read: 2001 Ozone Hole About the Same Size as Past Three Years. Image courtesy Greg Shirah, GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio, based on data from the TOMS science team

  19. Largest-ever Ozone Hole over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA instrument has detected an Antarctic ozone 'hole' (what scientists call an 'ozone depletion area') that is three times larger than the entire land mass of the United States-the largest such area ever observed. The 'hole' expanded to a record size of approximately 11 million square miles (28.3 million square kilometers) on Sept. 3, 2000. The previous record was approximately 10.5 million square miles (27.2 million square km) on Sept. 19, 1998. The ozone hole's size currently has stabilized, but the low levels in its interior continue to fall. The lowest readings in the ozone hole are typically observed in late September or early October each year. 'These observations reinforce concerns about the frailty of Earth's ozone layer. Although production of ozone-destroying gases has been curtailed under international agreements, concentrations of the gases in the stratosphere are only now reaching their peak. Due to their long persistence in the atmosphere, it will be many decades before the ozone hole is no longer an annual occurrence,' said Dr. Michael J. Kurylo, manager of the Upper Atmosphere Research Program, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. Ozone molecules, made up of three atoms of oxygen, comprise a thin layer of the atmosphere that absorbs harmful ultraviolet radiation from the Sun. Most atmospheric ozone is found between approximately six miles (9.5 km) and 18 miles (29 km) above the Earth's surface. Scientists continuing to investigate this enormous hole are somewhat surprised by its size. The reasons behind the dimensions involve both early-spring conditions, and an extremely intense Antarctic vortex. The Antarctic vortex is an upper-altitude stratospheric air current that sweeps around the Antarctic continent, confining the Antarctic ozone hole. 'Variations in the size of the ozone hole and of ozone depletion accompanying it from one year to the next are not unexpected,' said Dr. Jack Kaye, Office of Earth Sciences Research Director, NASA Headquarters

  20. Total ozone changes in the 1987 Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Doiron, Scott D.; Sechrist, Frank; Galimore, Reginald

    1988-01-01

    The development of the Antarctic ozone minimum was observed in 1987 with the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument. In the first half of August the near-polar (60 and 70 deg S) ozone levels were similar to those of recent years. By September, however, the ozone at 70 and 80 deg S was clearly lower than any previous year including 1985, the prior record low year. The levels continued to decrease throughout September until October 5 when a new record low of 109 DU was established at a point near the South Pole. This value is 29 DU less than the lowest observed in 1985 and 48 DU less than the 1986 low. The zonal mean total ozone at 60 deg S remained constant throughout the time of ozone hole formation. The ozone decline was punctuated by local minima formed away from the polar night boundary at about 75 deg S. The first of these, on August 15 to 17, formed just east of the Palmer Peninsula and appears to be a mountain wave. The second major minimum formed on September 5 to 7 again downwind of the Palmer Peninsula. This event was larger in scale than the August minimum and initiated the decline of ozone across the polar region. The 1987 ozone hole was nearly circular and pole centered for its entire life. In previous years the hole was perturbed by intrusions of the circumpolar maximum into the polar regions, thus causing the hole to be elliptical. The 1987 hole also remained in place until the end of November, a few days longer than in 1985, and this persistence resulted in the latest time for recovery to normal values yet observed.

  1. The Antarctic Ozone Hole: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Solomon, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The stratospheric ozone hole, an annual occurrence during austral spring, is caused by heterogeneous conversion of hydrogen chloride and chlorine nitrate to chlorine radicals. These reactions take place of polar stratospheric cloud particles in the cold, isolate Antarctic winter vortex. The chlorine radicals participate in chemical reactions that rapidly deplete ozone when sunlight returns at the end of polar night. International agreements eliminated production of the culprit anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons in the late 1990s, but due to their long stratospheric lifetime (50-100 years), the ozone hole will continue its annual appearance for years to come.

  2. CANOZE measurements of the Arctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. F. J.; Kerr, J. B.; Fast, H.

    1988-01-01

    In CANOZE 1 (Canadian Ozone Experiment), a series of 20 ozone profile measurements were made in April, 1986 from Alert at 82.5 N. CANOZE is the Canadian program for study of the Arctic winter ozone layer. In CANOZE 2, ozone profile measurements were made at Saskatoon, Edmonton, Churchill and Resolute during February and March, 1987 with ECC ozonesondes. Ground based measurements of column ozone, nitrogen dioxide and hydrochloric acid were conducted at Saskatoon. Two STRATOPROBE balloon flights were conducted on February 26 and March 19, 1987. Two aerosol flights were conducted by the University of Wyoming. The overall results of this study will be reported and compared with the NOZE findings. The results from CANOZE 3 in 1988, are also discussed. In 1988, as part of CANOZE 3, STRATOPROBE balloon flights were conducted from Saskatchewan on January 27 and February 13. A new lightweight infrared instrument was developed and test flown. A science flight was successfully conducted from Alert (82.5 N) on March 9, 1988 when the vortex was close to Alert; a good measurement of the profile of nitric acid was obtained. Overall, the Arctic spring ozone layer exhibits many of the features of the Antarctic ozone phenomenon, although there is obviously not a hole present every year. The Arctic ozone field in March, 1986 demonstrated many similarities to the Antarctic ozone hole. The TOMS imagery showed a crater structure in the ozone field similar to the Antarctic crater in October. Depleted layers of ozone were found in the profiles around 15 km, very similar to those reported from McMurdo. Enhanced levels of nitric acid were measured in air which had earlier been in the vortex. The TOMS imagery for March 1987 did not show an ozone crater, but will be examined for an ozone crater in February and March, 1988, the target date for the CANOZE 3 project.

  3. Ozone Hole Not Yet Recovering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-08-01

    The depletion of ozone in the stratospherecaused by chemicals such as chlorofluorocarbons(CFCs)-and the resulting annualhole in the ozone layer over Antarctica-isnot getting any worse, although recovery hasnot yet begun, according to two of the scientistswho discovered the cause of the ozonehole 20 years ago.

  4. The Ozone Hole -- a Mystery Reborn?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hobe, M.; Grooß, J.; Müller, R.; Stroh, F.

    2007-12-01

    In 1985, Farman et al. discovered the near complete disappearance of the stratospheric ozone layer over Antarctica in spring. This 'Ozone Hole' took the atmospheric research community by surprise as it could not be explained by the known catalytic cycles removing ozone in the stratosphere. McElroy et al. (1986) and Molina and Molina (1987) seemed to have solved the enigma by proposing two new catalytic cycles -- the ClO-BrO-cycle and the ClO dimer cycle -- that could rapidly destroy ozone at cold temperatures and high zenith angles. Subsequent work describing the kinetics of these cycles as well as stratospheric observations of chlorine and bromine compounds supported their theory and led to atmospheric chemistry models reproducing observed ozone loss reasonably well. Today, more than 20 years after the discovery of the ozone hole and the ratification of the Montreal Protocol, a new laboratory study (Pope et al., 2007) -- suggesting much smaller absorption cross sections and hence photolysis rates of the ClO dimer -- seriously calls into question our understanding of how ozone is destroyed in the spring polar stratosphere. With the new cross sections, both the dimer cycle and the ClO-BrO-cycle run much slower, and observations of neither chlorine compounds nor ozone loss are reproduced by model simulations (von Hobe et al., 2007): the known catalytic cycles cannot cause an ozone hole. Obviously, this also calls into question our ability to predict future polar ozone depletion. In search for an explanation, we discuss possible shortcomings of the Pope et al. experiment that could lead to an underestimation of the dimer absorption and examine various new chemical processes for their likelihood to influence chlorine partitioning and cause significant ozone loss in the atmosphere and at the same time go undetected in laboratory based kinetic studies. A strategy is presented for designing the tests needed to unambiguously confirm or rule out proposed solutions to the

  5. Heterogeneous physicochemistry of the polar ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Processes occurring in the polar winter stratosphere, which involve polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), are investigated using observations from the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. In particular, data on the properties of PSCs and their physical chemistry, the microphysical processes and time constants for cloud processes, the heterogeneous chemical processes and their time constants, and nonlinearities in the long-term ozone trend associated with physical and chemical processes are examined. The chemical reactions leading to the depletion of the inert chlorine reservoir in a presence of type I PSCs are established, and it is shown that type II PSCs contribute to chemical processing that sustains the chemical imbalance of the polar stratosphere. It is shown that, using a simple model, the decadal evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole may be understood through nonlinearities in the heterogeneous chemistry, with possible contributing effects of variations in stratospheric temperatures and water vapor concentrations.

  6. Unequivocal detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic Ozone Hole through significant increases in atmospheric layers with minimum ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, Jos; van Weele, Michiel; van der A, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    An important new landmark in present day ozone research is presented through MLS satellite observations of significant ozone increases during the ozone hole season that are attributed unequivocally to declining ozone depleting substances. For many decades the Antarctic ozone hole has been the prime example of both the detrimental effects of human activities on our environment as well as how to construct effective and successful environmental policies. Nowadays atmospheric concentrations of ozone depleting substances are on the decline and first signs of recovery of stratospheric ozone and ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole have been observed. The claimed detection of significant recovery, however, is still subject of debate. In this talk we will discuss first current uncertainties in the assessment of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole by using multi-variate regression methods, and, secondly present an alternative approach to identify ozone hole recovery unequivocally. Even though multi-variate regression methods help to reduce uncertainties in estimates of ozone recovery, great care has to be taken in their application due to the existence of uncertainties and degrees of freedom in the choice of independent variables. We show that taking all uncertainties into account in the regressions the formal recovery of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole cannot be established yet, though is likely before the end of the decade (before 2020). Rather than focusing on time and area averages of total ozone columns or ozone profiles, we argue that the time evolution of the probability distribution of vertically resolved ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole contains a better fingerprint for the detection of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone hole. The advantages of this method over more tradition methods of trend analyses based on spatio-temporal average ozone are discussed. The 10-year record of MLS satellite measurements of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole shows a

  7. Impact of ozone mini-holes on the heterogeneous destruction of stratospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Stenke, A; Grewe, V

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive study of ozone mini-holes over the mid-latitudes of both hemispheres is presented, based on model simulations with the coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM representing atmospheric conditions in 1960, 1980, 1990 and 2015. Ozone mini-holes are synoptic-scale regions of strongly reduced total ozone, directly associated with tropospheric weather systems. Mini-holes are supposed to have chemical and dynamical impacts on ozone levels. Since ozone levels over northern mid-latitudes show a negative trend of approximately -4%/decade and since it exists a negative correlation between total column ozone and erythemally active solar UV-radiation reaching the surface it is important to understand and assess the processes leading to the observed ozone decline. The simulated mini-hole events are validated with a mini-hole climatology based on daily ozone measurements with the TOMS (total ozone mapping spectrometer) instrument on the satellite Nimbus-7 between 1979 and 1993. Furthermore, possible trends in the event frequency and intensity over the simulation period are assessed. In the northern hemisphere the number of mini-hole events in early winter decreases between 1960 and 1990 and increases towards 2015. In the southern hemisphere a positive trend in mini-hole event frequency is detected between 1960 and 2015 in spring associated with the increasing Antarctic Ozone Hole. Finally, the impact of mini-holes on the stratospheric heterogeneous ozone chemistry is investigated. For this purpose, a computer-based detection routine for mini-holes was developed for the use in ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM. This method prevents polar stratospheric cloud formation and therefore heterogeneous ozone depletion inside mini-holes. Heterogeneous processes inside mini-holes amount to one third of heterogeneous ozone destruction in general over northern mid- and high-latitudes during winter (January-April) in the simulation.

  8. Estimating when the Antarctic Ozone Hole will Recover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Pawson, Steven; Stolarski, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early spring (late September - early October). The severity of the hole has been assessed from satellites using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average area coverage during this September-October period. Profile information shows that ozone is completely destroyed in the 14-2 1 km layer by early October. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen (chlorine and bromine) catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international a'greements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. We estimate that the ozone hole will begin to show first signs of size decrease in about 2023, and the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels in approximately 2070. Estimates of the ozone hole's recovery from models reveal important differences that will be discussed.

  9. Estimating When the Antarctic Ozone Hole Will Recover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Pawson, Steven; Stolarski, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early spring (late September - early October). The severity of the hole has been assessed from satellites using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average area coverage during this September-October period. Profile information shows that ozone is completely destroyed in the 14-21 km layer by early October. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen (chlorine and bromine) catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. We estimate that the ozone hole will begin to show first signs of size decrease in about 2023, and the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels in approximately 2070. Estimates of the ozone hole's recovery from models reveal important differences that will be discussed.

  10. Detecting the Recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the TOMS instrument. The severity of the hole has been assessed from TOMS using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average size during the September-October period. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. We will show estimates of both when the ozone hole will begin to show first signs of recovery, and when the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels.

  11. A Review of the 2005 Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. S.; Zhou, S.; Miller, A. J.; Gelman, M. E.; Flynn, L. E.; Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    The 2005 Antarctic ozone hole, through early September, rivaled the very large 2003 Antarctic ozone hole in area size. How did the 2005 ozone hole progress? How did it compare to those of past years? What are the factors that influenced its size, depth, and duration? NOAA has been analyzing and assessing the state of the stratosphere and the ozone layer for more than two decades. Various resources have been used to assess the relationship of the stratosphere to the Antarctic ozone hole. Publications of these assessments have been made since 1991. Within this presentation we provide our analysis and assessment of the 2005 Antarctic ozone hole. Similarities and unique features of this year's Antarctic ozone hole with those preceding it are discussed. The state of the stratosphere and its evolution during the austral winter/spring are also reviewed in the context of previous years. Finally, we put forth for comment additional monitoring parameters that can be used to better understand the state of the stratosphere and ozone depletion in the polar regions.

  12. On the Size of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2002-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole is a region of extremely large ozone depletion that is roughly centered over the South Pole. Since 1979, the area coverage of the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million sq km. In the 8-year period from 1981 to 1989, the area expanded by 18 Million sq km. During the last 5 years, the hole has been observed to exceed 25 Million sq km over brief periods. In the spring of 2002, the size of the ozone hole barely reached 20 Million sq km for only a couple of days. We will review these size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. The area is derived from the area enclosed by the 220 DU total ozone contour. We will discuss the rationale for the choice of 220 DU: 1) it is located near the steep gradient between southern mid-latitudes and the polar region, and 2) 220 DU is a value that is lower than the pre-1979 ozone observations over Antarctica during the spring period. The phenomenal growth of the ozone hole was directly caused by the increases of chlorine and bromine compounds in the stratosphere. In this talk, we will show the relationship of the ozone hole's size to the interannual variability of Antarctic spring temperatures. In addition, we will show the relationship of these same temperatures to planetary-scale wave forcings.

  13. Impact of dynamically induced ozone mini-hole events on PSC formation and chemical ozone destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenke, A.; Grewe, V.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of ozone mini-holes over the extra-tropics of the northern hemisphere on the heterogeneous ozone chemistry is investigated, based on simulations with the coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM. Ozone mini-holes are synoptic-scale regions of strongly reduced total ozone, directly associated with upper troposphere high pressure systems. The simulated mini-hole events are validated with a mini-hole climatology based on daily ozone measurements with the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the satellite Nimbus-7 between 1979 and 1993. Furthermore, the impact of mini-holes on the stratospheric heterogeneous ozone chemistry is investigated indirectly. For this purpose, polar stratospheric cloud formation inside mini-holes is suppressed during the model simulation. Heterogeneous processes inside mini-holes amount to one third of the heterogeneous ozone destruction in general over northern mid- and high-latitudes during winter (January-April). This ozone perturbation subsides and recovers during summer with an e-folding time of two months.

  14. Springtime ozone minimum (ozone hole) in Antarctica - Observational evidence and possible causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat'ev, K. Ia.

    A review has been made of satellite and conventional (surface and balloon) observational data on total ozone content in the antarctic stratosphere which has led to the discovery of the springtime total ozone minimum (ozone hole) repeatability. Probable natural and anthropogenic factors of the springtime ozone minimum formation have been analyzed including an impact of large-scale stratospheric dynamics (planetary waves), polar stratospheric clouds, heterogeneous chemical reactions and solar activity.

  15. Is the Ozone Hole over Your Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Eugene C.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a survey of first year university science students regarding their understanding of the ozone layer, ozone depletion, and the effect of ozone depletion on Australia. Suggests that better teaching resources for environmental issues such as ozone depletion and global warming are needed before improvements in student understanding can be…

  16. What Controls the Size of the Antarctic Ozone Hole?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor); Newman, Paul A.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Nash, Eric R.

    2002-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole is a region of extremely large ozone depletion that is roughly centered over the South Pole. Since 1979, the area coverage of the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million square kilometers. In the 8-year period from 1981 to 1989, the area expanded by 18 Million square kilometers. During the last 5 years, the hole has been observed to exceed 25 Million square kilometers over brief periods. We will review these size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. The area is derived from the area enclosed by the 220 DU total ozone contour. We will discuss the rationale for the choice of 220 DU: 1) it is located near the steep gradient between southern mid-latitudes and the polar region, and 2) 220 DU is a value that is lower than the pre- 1979 ozone observations over Antarctica during the spring period. The phenomenal growth of the ozone hole was directly caused by the increases of chlorine and bromine compounds in the stratosphere. In this talk, we will show the relationship of the ozone hole's size to the interannual variability of Antarctic spring temperatures. In addition, we will show the relationship of these same temperatures to planetary-scale wave forcings.

  17. The Ozone Hole of 2002 as Measured by TOMS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; McPeters, Richard D.; Newman, Paul A.

    2005-03-01

    Since its discovery in 1985, the ozone hole has been regularly mapped using the data from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments on several satellites. The current TOMS, on the Earth Probe satellite, has been taking measurements since 1996. The ozone hole first appeared during the 1980s. Since 1990, the hole has consistently developed during each Antarctic spring over a broad area with the minimum total ozone value reaching about 100 Dobson units (DU; 1 DU = 2.69 × 1016 molecules cm-2) in late September or early October. The year 2002 was markedly different from the past 12 years. A series of strong wave events weakened the South Polar vortex. In late September, a major stratospheric warming took place, reversing the direction of the polar flow and the latitudinal temperature gradient. This warming resulted in a division of the ozone hole into two pieces, one that migrated to lower latitudes and disappeared and one that reformed over the Pole in a weakened form. The development of this year's unusual ozone hole is shown here and is contrasted to a climatology of the years since 1990. Minimum daily values of total ozone barely reached 150 DU in contrast to values nearer to 100. The area of the ozone hole briefly reached 18 × 106 km2, then dropped rapidly to only 2 × 106 km2, and finally recovered to about 8 × 106 km2 before disappearing in early November. The positive anomaly compared with the last 12 yr near the Pole was accompanied by a smaller negative anomaly north of 45°S.

  18. Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectrometer observations of the 1993 ozone hole

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, J.R.; Newman, P.A.; Mcpeters, R.; Krueger, A.J.; Bhartia, P.K.; Seftor, C.J.; Torres, O.; Jaross, G.; Cebula, R.P.; Larko, D. |

    1995-02-01

    The development of the springtime (September-November) Antarctic ozone hole was observed by the Meteor 3/total ozone mapping spectromter (TOMS) to result in the lowest ozone value, 85 DU (Dobson units) on October 8, 1993, ever measured by TOMS. During late September and early October the region of extremely low ozone values was centered on the geographical pole between 85 deg S and 90 deg S. The geographical extent of the ozone hole region, the area within the 220-DU contour, reached a maximum during the first week in October at a near-circular area covering 24 x 10(exp 6) sq km reaching to the southern tip of South America. This approximately matched the 1992 area record. After the maximum area was reached in early October, the 1993 ozone hole region was significantly larger than during 1992 throughout the remainder of the month of October. The very low ozone values over the Antarctic continent have been confirmed by independent ground-based data. Unlike 1992, the formation of the 1993 Antarctic ozone hole does not coincide with unusually low ozone values observed over most of the globe for the past 2 years. The most recent ozone data from Meteor 3/TOMS show that there has been a recovery at all latitudes from the extraordinarily low values observed during 1992 and part of 1993 after the June 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo. Meteor 3/TOMS is described and compared with Nimbus 7/TOMS during the 1991 to May 1993 overlap period. Observations of the 1992 ozone hole are presented from both instruments and are shown to agree within 5 DU.

  19. Forecasts and assimilation experiments of the Antarctic ozone hole 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemming, J.; Inness, A.; Jones, L.; Eskes, H. J.; Huijnen, V.; Schultz, M. G.; Stein, O.; Cariolle, D.; Kinnison, D.; Brasseur, G.

    2011-03-01

    The 2008 Antarctic ozone hole was one of the largest and most long-lived in recent years. Predictions of the ozone hole were made in near-real time (NRT) and hindcast mode with the Integrated Forecast System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The forecasts were carried out both with and without assimilation of satellite observations from multiple instruments to provide more realistic initial conditions. Three different chemistry schemes were applied for the description of stratospheric ozone chemistry: (i) a linearization of the ozone chemistry, (ii) the stratospheric chemical mechanism of the Model of Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 3, (MOZART-3) and (iii) the relaxation to climatology as implemented in the Transport Model, version 5, (TM5). The IFS uses the latter two schemes by means of a two-way coupled system. Without assimilation, the forecasts showed model-specific shortcomings in predicting start time, extent and duration of the ozone hole. The assimilation of satellite observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), the Solar Backscattering Ultraviolet radiometer (SBUV-2) and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY) led to a significant improvement of the forecasts when compared with total columns and vertical profiles from ozone sondes. The combined assimilation of observations from multiple instruments helped to overcome limitations of the ultraviolet (UV) sensors at low solar elevation over Antarctica. The assimilation of data from MLS was crucial to obtain a good agreement with the observed ozone profiles both in the polar stratosphere and troposphere. The ozone analyses by the three model configurations were very similar despite the different underlying chemistry schemes. Using ozone analyses as initial conditions had a very beneficial but variable effect on the predictability of the ozone hole over 15 days. The

  20. The signs of Antarctic ozone hole recovery.

    PubMed

    Kuttippurath, Jayanarayanan; Nair, Prijitha J

    2017-04-03

    Absorption of solar radiation by stratospheric ozone affects atmospheric dynamics and chemistry, and sustains life on Earth by preventing harmful radiation from reaching the surface. Significant ozone losses due to increases in the abundances of ozone depleting substances (ODSs) were first observed in Antarctica in the 1980s. Losses deepened in following years but became nearly flat by around 2000, reflecting changes in global ODS emissions. Here we show robust evidence that Antarctic ozone has started to recover in both spring and summer, with a recovery signal identified in springtime ozone profile and total column measurements at 99% confidence for the first time. Continuing recovery is expected to impact the future climate of that region. Our results demonstrate that the Montreal Protocol has indeed begun to save the Antarctic ozone layer.

  1. An Ozone Increase in the Antarctic Summer Stratosphere: A Dynamical Response to the Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Douglass, A. R.; Gupta, M.; Newman, P. A.; Pawson, S.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Nielsen, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Profiles of ozone concentration retrieved from the SBUV series of satellites show an increase between 1979 and 1997 in the summertime Antarctic middle stratosphere (approx. 25-10 hPa). Data over the South Pole from ozone sondes confirm the increase. A similar ozone increase is produced in a chemistry climate model that allows feedback between constituent changes and the stratospheric circulation through radiative heating. A simulation that excludes the radiative coupling between predicted ozone and the circulation does not capture this ozone increase. We show that the ozone increase in our model simulations is caused by a dynamical feedback in response to the changes in the stratospheric wind fields forced by the radiative perturbation associated with the Antarctic ozone hole.

  2. Forecasts and assimilation experiments of the Antarctic Ozone Hole 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemming, J.; Inness, A.; Jones, L.; Eskes, H. J.; Huijnen, V.; Schultz, M. G.; Stein, O.; Cariolle, D.; Kinnison, D.; Brasseur, G.

    2010-04-01

    The 2008 Antarctic ozone hole was one of the largest and most long-lived in recent years. Predictions of the ozone hole were made in near-real time (NRT) and hindcast mode with the Integrated Forecast System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The forecasts were carried out both with and without assimilation of satellite observations from multiple instruments to provide more realistic initial conditions. Three different chemistry schemes were applied for the description of stratospheric ozone chemistry: (i) a linearization of the ozone chemistry, (ii) the stratospheric chemical mechanism of the MOZART-3 chemical transport model (CTM) and (iii) the relaxation to a climatology as implemented in the TM5 CTM. The IFS uses the latter two schemes by means of a two-way coupled system. Without assimilation, the forecasts showed model-specific shortcomings in predicting start time, extent and duration of the ozone hole. The assimilation of satellite observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), the Solar Backscattering Ultraviolet radiometer (SBUV-2) and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY) led to a significant improvement of the forecasts when compared with total columns and vertical profiles from ozone sondes. The combined assimilation of observations from multiple instruments helped to overcome limitations of the ultraviolet (UV) sensors at low solar elevation over Antarctica. The assimilation of data from MLS was crucial to obtain a good agreement with the observed ozone profiles both in the polar stratosphere and troposphere. The ozone analyses by the three model configurations were very similar despite the different underlying chemistry schemes. During the chemically instigated development of the ozone hole, differences quickly developed in the initialized forecasts by the different schemes. The predictions of the ozone-hole closure, which

  3. Bromine-Chlorine Coupling in the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Prather, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution from the chlorine and bromine species in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole is evaluated. Since chlorine and bromine compounds are of different industrial origin, it is desirable, from a policy point of view, to be able to attribute chlorine-catalyzed loss of ozone with those reactions directly involving chlorine species, and likewise for bromine-catalyzed loss. In the stratosphere, however, most of the chemical families are highly coupled, and, for example, changes in the chlorine abundance will alter the partitioninig in other families and thus the rate of ozone loss. This modeling study examines formation of the Antarctic ozone hole for a wide range of bromine concentrations (5 - 25 pptv) and for chlorine concentrations typical of the last two decades (1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 ppbv). We follow the photochemical evolution of a single parcel of air, typical of the inner Antarctic vortex (50 mbar, 70 deg. S, NO(sub y) = 2 ppbv, with Polar Stratospheric Clouds(PSC)) from August 1 to November 1. For all of these ranges of chlorine and bromine loading, we would predict a substantial ozone hole (local depletion greater than 90%) within the de-nitrified, PSC- perturbed vortex. The contributions of the different catalytic cycles responsible for ozone loss are tabulated. The deep minimum in ozone is driven primarily by the chlorine abundance. As bromine levels decrease, the magnitude of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss increases to take up the slack. This is because bromine suppresses ClO by accelerating the conversion of ClO an Cl2O2 back to HCI. For this range of conditions, the local relative efficiency of ozone destruction per bromine atom to that per chlorine atom (alpha-factor) ranges from 33 to 55, decreasing with increase of bromine.

  4. Causes and effects of a hole. [in Antarctic ozone layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margitan, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary results from the U.S. National Ozone Expedition (NOZE) to Antarctica are reviewed. The NOZE ozonesonde measurements showed significant vertical structure in the hole, with 80 percent depletion in some of the 1 km layers but only 20 percent in adjacent layers. The depletion was confined to the 12-20 km region, beginning first at higher altitude and progressing downward. This is strong evidence against the theory that the ozone hole is due to solar activity producing odd nitrogen at high altitudes which is transported downwards, leading to enhanced odd-nitrogen catalytic cycles that destroy ozone. Nitrous oxide data show unusually low concentrations within the polar vortex, which is evidence against the theory that the hole is caused by a purely dynamical mechanism in which rising air motions within the polar vortex lead to reduced column densities of ozone. It is tentatively concluded that a chemical mechanism involving man-made chlorofluorocarbons is the likely cause of ozone depletion in the hole.

  5. The 2010 Antarctic ozone hole: observed reduction in ozone destruction by minor sudden stratospheric warmings.

    PubMed

    de Laat, A T J; van Weele, M

    2011-01-01

    Satellite observations show that the 2010 Antarctic ozone hole is characterized by anomalously small amounts of photochemical ozone destruction (40-60% less than the 2005-2009 average). Observations from the MLS instrument show that this is mainly related to reduced photochemical ozone destruction between 20-25 km altitude. Lower down between 15-20 km the atmospheric chemical composition and photochemical ozone destruction is unaffected. The modified chemical composition and chemistry between 20-25 km altitude in 2010 is related to the occurrence of a mid-winter minor Antarctic Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW). The measurements indicate that the changes in chemical composition are related to downward motion of air masses rather than horizontal mixing, and affect stratospheric chemistry for several months. Since 1979, years with similar anomalously small amounts of ozone destruction are all characterized by either minor or major SSWs, illustrating that their presence has been a necessary pre-condition for reduced Antarctic stratospheric ozone destruction.

  6. Monitoring and future projections of the Antarctic Ozone Hole using the new Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramarova, N. A.; Newman, P. A.; Nash, E. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; McPeters, R. D.; Rault, D. F.; Seftor, C. J.; Xu, P.

    2013-12-01

    Using the new Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), launched October 2011 on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite, we have studied the structure and evolution of the 2012 and 2013 ozone holes. The 1st ozone hole observations by OMPS began in 2012. We quality check the OMPS measurements by comparing to other satellite instruments (Aura MLS, OMI and SBUV) and ozone sonde balloon measurements. The comparisons reveal that OMPS is producing excellent Antarctic ozone hole information, and, thus, OMPS data can be used to continue the historical record of Antarctic ozone observations. In 2012 the ozone hole developed quite normally in the August to-late September 2012 period, but disappeared much more rapidly during the late-September to November period than it would be expected in a normal year. This resulted in the second weakest ozone hole observed since 1988. Some have suggested that the rapid 2012 disappearance is evidence that the Montreal Protocol is working. However, the development of the ozone hole in August and September is largely driven by chlorine and bromine from human-produced compounds, and the normal development of the ozone hole in August-September 2012 suggests that chlorine and bromine levels were roughly the same as previous years. At the same time, observations from meteorological data show that there were stronger than average weather systems, faster warming during the September -November period, and stronger vertical motions, that led to a rapid decay of the 2012 ozone hole. Hence, the weak ozone hole of 2012 is not evidence that the Montreal Protocol has impacted the ozone hole. The characteristics of the 2013 ozone hole, as observed by OMPS, will also be shown in the presentation. Model predictions suggest that the ozone hole will begin showing signs of recovery in about 2018, and it will be fully recovered back to 1980 levels in about 2065. We will update projections of the ozone hole recovery using a parametric model

  7. Hidden homicide increases in the USA, 1999-2005.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guoqing; Webster, Daniel; Baker, Susan P

    2008-07-01

    Prior to 1999, dramatic fluctuations in homicide rates were driven by changes in the rates of firearm homicide among men aged 15-24. Since 2000, the overall homicide rate has appeared stable, masking any changes in population subgroups. We analyzed recent trends in homicide rates by weapon, age, race, gender, state, and urbanization to determine whether the risk of victimization increased substantially during 1999-2005 for demographic subgroups. The analysis of WISQARS data and Wonder data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed no trend in the homicide rate nationally between 1999 and 2005; this obscured large increases in firearm homicide rates among black men aged 25-44 and among white men aged 25-34. Between 1999 and 2005, for ages 25-44 combined, the increase for black men was 31% compared with 12% for white men. Significant increases among men aged 25-44 occurred in Alabama, California, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Washington. The firearm homicide rate increased the most in large central metropolitan areas (+32%) and large fringe metropolitan areas (+30%) for men aged 25-44. We conclude that the recent, unrecognized increases in firearm homicide among men aged 25-44, especially black men, in large metropolitan areas merit the attention of policymakers.

  8. The 1989 Antarctic ozone hole as observed by TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer)

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarski, R.S.; Schoeberl, M.R.; McPeters, R.D.; Krueger, A.J. ); Newman, P.A. )

    1990-08-01

    In 1989 the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aboard the Nimbus 7 satellite observed the springtime decrease in Antarctic total ozone for the 11th consecutive year. The 1989 minimum values of total ozone measured by TOMS declined throughout the month of September a6t a rate nearly identical to 1987. The National Meteorological Center analysis of lower stratospheric temperatures in August and September 1989 also showed conditions similar to those observed in 1987. A minimum in total ozone of 111 DU was reached on October 7, 1989. Within uncertainties this is the same as previously observed minimum on October 5, 1987. The area of the ozone hole as defined by the 220 DU contour grew rapidly during early September. It reached a mid-September peak of 7.5% of the southern hemisphere or 19 million square kilometers, essentially the same as observed in 1987. From mid October through November 1989, minimum polar total ozone values increased and the are within the 220 DU contour decreased more rapidly than during the comparable period of 1987. The more rapid erosion of the 1989 ozone hole resulted from strong wave number one perturbations of the vortex dynamics in late October.

  9. Does the Antarctic ozone hole have a future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, S. Fred

    1988-11-01

    In spite of recent discoveries related to the mechanism of the Antarctic ozone hole (AOH), we do not as yet have a sufficient scientific base to answer important policy questions: is the AOH a completely new phenomenon, or is it are current one? Is it produced by human activities? And what can and should be done about it? I suggest here a hypothesis concerning the cause of the AOH, which may provide at least partial answers.The AOH is more than a scientific curiosity. Its dramatic discovery in 1985 raised fears about the fate of global ozone and provided the impetus for an international effort to limit and roll back the worldwide production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), synthetic chemicals widely used in refrigeration and industrial processes.

  10. Association of Smoking with Body Weight in US High School Students, 1999-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Jiang, Nan; Kolbe, Lloyd J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the association of current smoking with body mass index (BMI) and perceived body weight among high school students in the United States. Methods: We analyzed data from the 1999-2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Results: Perceived body weight and BMI were associated with adolescents' current smoking. Adjusted odds ratios…

  11. Effects of solar UV irradiation on dynamics of ozone hole in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, O.; Gabis, I.

    2005-01-01

    To study relationship between changes in solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance and dynamics of the Antarctic ozone hole during the final breakup of the Antarctic polar vortex the composite Mg II index has been used as a proxy for the solar UV irradiance. The short-term changes in the UV-irradiation have been separated after removing the long- and middle term variations. Examination of maps of the total ozone distribution above Antarctica showed that the ozone hole collapse succeeds displacement of the hole center from the South Pole, where the absolute minimum of total ozone is usually located. Comparison with variations of the UV irradiation reveals that phase of the quick decay of the ozone hole is preceded by the maximal solar UV irradiation in course of the regular 27-days variation. Analysis of the vertical profiles of ozone density, temperature, wind speed and total column ozone above station Amundsen Scott showed that ozone hole is filled up in spring typically in two phases. During the first gradual phase the ozone filling occurs very slowly, whereas the second phase is characterized by sudden and sharp increase of the ozone content (about 50 100 Dobson units in few days). In this period the strong wind disturbances are observed in the higher stratosphere as well. Conclusion is made that rate of the ozone hole filling during the Antarctic later spring depends on the intensity of solar UV, and high level of the UV irradiation turns out to be sufficient to initiate the dynamical processes leading to the collapse of the winter circumpolar vortex.

  12. Decending motion of particle and its effect on ozone hole chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaka, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Particle descending motion is one possible process which causes ozone loss near the tropopause in the Antarctic spring. However, this particle size distribution has not yet been measured. Particle settling is an important redistribution process of the chemical constituents contained in the particles. To understand particle settling effects on the Ozone Hole, information on the size distribution and the chemical composition of the particles is necessary.

  13. Transport, radiative, and dynamical effects of the antarctic ozone hole: A GFDL SKYHI' model experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahlman, J.D; Umscheid, L.J. ); Pinto, J.P. )

    1994-02-15

    The GFDL SKYHI' general circulation model has been used to simulate the effect of the Antarctic ozone hole' phenomenon on the radiative and dynamical environment of the lower stratosphere. Both the polar ozone destruction and photochemical restoration chemistries are calculated by parameterized simplifications of the still somewhat uncertain chemical processes. The modeled total column ozone depletions are near 25% in spring over Antarctica, with 1% depletion reaching equatorial latitudes by the end of the 4 1/2-year model experiment. In the lower stratosphere, ozone reductions of 5% reach to the equator. Large coolings of about 8 K are simulated in the lower stratospheric over Antarctica in late spring, while a general cooling of about 1-1.5 K is present throughout the Southern Hemisphere lower stratosphere. The model atmosphere experiences a long-term positive temperature-chemical feedback because significant ozone reductions carry over into the next winter. The overall temperature response to the reduced ozone is essentially radiative in character. However, substantial dynamical changes are induced by the ozone hole effect. The Antarctic middle stratosphere in late spring warms by about 6 K over Antarctica and the lower midlatitude stratosphere warms by approximately 1 K. These warming spots are produced mainly by an increased residual circulation intensity. Also, the Antarctic vortex becomes tighter and more confined as a result of the reduced ozone. These two dynamical effects combine to steepen the meridional slope of quasi-conservative trace constituent isolines. Thus, the entire transport, radiative, and dynamical climatology of the springtime stratosphere is affected to an important degree by the ozone hole phenomenon. Over the entire year, however, these dynamical effects are considerably smaller. 27 refs., 13 figs.

  14. Impact of biogenic very short-lived bromine on the Antarctic ozone hole during the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Rafael P.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso

    2017-02-01

    Active bromine released from the photochemical decomposition of biogenic very short-lived bromocarbons (VSLBr) enhances stratospheric ozone depletion. Based on a dual set of 1960-2100 coupled chemistry-climate simulations (i.e. with and without VSLBr), we show that the maximum Antarctic ozone hole depletion increases by up to 14 % when natural VSLBr are considered, which is in better agreement with ozone observations. The impact of the additional 5 pptv VSLBr on Antarctic ozone is most evident in the periphery of the ozone hole, producing an expansion of the ozone hole area of ˜ 5 million km2, which is equivalent in magnitude to the recently estimated Antarctic ozone healing due to the implementation of the Montreal Protocol. We find that the inclusion of VSLBr in CAM-Chem (Community Atmosphere Model with Chemistry, version 4.0) does not introduce a significant delay of the modelled ozone return date to 1980 October levels, but instead affects the depth and duration of the simulated ozone hole. Our analysis further shows that total bromine-catalysed ozone destruction in the lower stratosphere surpasses that of chlorine by the year 2070 and indicates that natural VSLBr chemistry would dominate Antarctic ozone seasonality before the end of the 21st century. This work suggests a large influence of biogenic bromine on the future Antarctic ozone layer.

  15. Transport, radiative, and dynamical effects of the antarctic ozone hole: A GFDL 'SKYHI' model experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahlman, J.D.; Pinto, J.P.; Umscheid, L.J.

    1994-02-15

    The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory 'SKYHI' general circulation model has been used to simulate the effect of the Antarctic 'ozone hole' phenomenon on the radiative and dynamical environment of the lower stratosphere. Both the polar ozone destruction and photochemical restoration chemistries are calculated by parameterized simplifications of the still uncertain, more complete chemical processes. The modeled total column ozone depletions are near 25% in spring over Antarctica, with 1% depletion reaching equatorial latitudes by the end of the 4 1/2 year model experiment. In the lower stratosphere, ozone reductions of 5% reach to the equator. Large coolings of about 8 C are simulated in the lower stratosphere over Antarctica in late spring, while a general cooling of about 1-1.5 C is present throughout the Southern Hemisphere lower stratosphere. The model atmosphere experiences a long-term positive temperature-chemical feedback because significant ozone reductions carry over into the next winter. The overall temperature response to the reduced ozone is essentially radiative in character. However, substantial dynamical changes are induced by the ozone hole effect. The Antarctic middle stratosphere in late spring warms by about 6 C over Antarctica and the lower mid-latitude stratosphere warms by approximately one degree. These warming spots are produced mainly by an increased residual circulation intensity.

  16. Increase in SO2 and NO2 column density during ozone-hole event at Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshin, S. K.; Chakrabarty, D. K.

    A Brewer spectrophotometer was installed at Maitri 70 7 o S 11 7 o E in the Antarctica in July 1999 by the India Meteorological Department It began taking routine observations of O 3 SO 2 and NO 2 column density and UV-flux at ground from September 1999 We present here the results of analysis of these observations made from September 1999 to December 2003 during ozone-hole event We have chosen two species SO 2 which is below the ozone-depleted region and NO 2 which is above the ozone-depleted region We found an increase in SO 2 column during ozone-hole event An increase in NO 2 column was also found during this event but not identical with that of SO 2 The increase in SO 2 was found to be in phase with the increase in UV-flux at the ground level During ozone-hole event the SO 2 column increased from a value less than 0 5 to sim 2 5 DU NO 2 column increased from a value less than 0 1 to sim 1DU and UV-flux at ground increased from a value less than 40 to sim 200mW m -2 SO 2 lies mainly in the upper troposphere The increase in SO 2 is due to the penetration and increase of UV-B flux in the troposphere under ozone-depleted condition of the stratosphere during ozone-hole event The increase in NO 2 is due to the seasonal variation of NO in the stratosphere

  17. Arctic "ozone hole" in a cold volcanic stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Tabazadeh, A; Drdla, K; Schoeberl, M R; Hamill, P; Toon, O B

    2002-03-05

    Optical depth records indicate that volcanic aerosols from major eruptions often produce clouds that have greater surface area than typical Arctic polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). A trajectory cloud-chemistry model is used to study how volcanic aerosols could affect springtime Arctic ozone loss processes, such as chlorine activation and denitrification, in a cold winter within the current range of natural variability. Several studies indicate that severe denitrification can increase Arctic ozone loss by up to 30%. We show large PSC particles that cause denitrification in a nonvolcanic stratosphere cannot efficiently form in a volcanic environment. However, volcanic aerosols, when present at low altitudes, where Arctic PSCs cannot form, can extend the vertical range of chemical ozone loss in the lower stratosphere. Chemical processing on volcanic aerosols over a 10-km altitude range could increase the current levels of springtime column ozone loss by up to 70% independent of denitrification. Climate models predict that the lower stratosphere is cooling as a result of greenhouse gas built-up in the troposphere. The magnitude of column ozone loss calculated here for the 1999--2000 Arctic winter, in an assumed volcanic state, is similar to that projected for a colder future nonvolcanic stratosphere in the 2010 decade.

  18. Australian Students' Appreciation of the Greenhouse Effect and the Ozone Hole.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Brian

    1998-01-01

    Examines students' explanations of the greenhouse effect and the hole in the ozone layer, using a life-world and scientific dichotomy. Illuminates ideas often expressed in classrooms and sheds light on the progression in students' developing powers of explanation. Contains 17 references. (DDR)

  19. Evidence for diabatic cooling and poleward transport within and around the 1987 Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profitt, M. H.; Kelly, K. K.; Powell, J. A.; Gary, B. L.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Chan, K. R.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric dynamics at altitudes of 17.5-19 km were analyzed using measurements of N2O, total water, total odd-nitrogen species, and potential vorticity (derived from pressures, temperatures, and wind speeds) obtained aboard the ER-2 aircraft flown in the period between August 23 and September 22 during the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. Results indicated a consistent gradual poleward movement of air, extending from about 10 deg in latitude outside the boundary of the ozone hole to about 5 deg inside. Evidence is presented of ongoing diabatic cooling throughout this zone, both inside and outside the chemically perturbed region.

  20. Evolution of the Antarctic polar vortex in spring: Response of a GCM to a prescribed Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boville, B. A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Briegleb, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    The possible effect of the Antartic ozone hole on the evolution of the polar vortex during late winter and spring using a general circulation model (GCM) is examined. The GCM is a version of the NCAR Community Climate Model whose domain extends from the surface to the mesosphere and is similar to that described on Boville and Randel (1986). Ozone is not a predicted variable in the model. A zonally averaged ozone distribution is specified as a function of latitude, pressure and month for the radiation parameterization. Rather that explicitly address reasons for the formation of the ozone hole, researchers postulate its existence and ask what effect it has on the subsequent evolution of the vortex. The evolution of the model when an ozone hole is imposed is then discussed.

  1. Radiative aspects of Antarctic ozone hole in 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akiyoshi, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Uryu, M.

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the radiative heating effects of aerosols during September - October, 1985, at Antarctica, researchers solved the radiative transfer equation using a one-dimensional model, which includes the absorption of solar energy by water vapor, carbon dioxide, ozone and aerosols, the thermal emission and absorption by the above species and in addition, Rayleigh and Mie scattering, and the surface scattering effects. In this calculation, they used data of ozone density, water vapor density and aerosol extinction at 0.385, 0.453, 0.525 and 1.02 mu m in the stratosphere obtained by SAGE II satellite and meteorological data from NOAA. Results show that the Antarctic stratosphere is nearly in radiative equilibrium during that period, if the effects of aerosols are excluded. It is also shown that the heating effects of aerosols are too small to cause effective upward motions, in spite of some ambiguous parameters such as aerosol composition. The parameter dependences of results are also discussed.

  2. Epidemiology of Ebstein anomaly: prevalence and patterns in Texas, 1999-2005.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Philip J; Langlois, Peter H; Mitchell, Laura E

    2011-05-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare but serious cardiac defect, however, little is known about the etiology of this condition. The goal of this study was to expand our limited understanding of the epidemiology of Ebstein anomaly. Data for cases with Ebstein anomaly, as well as all live births, were obtained from the Texas Birth Defects Registry (TBDR) and Center for Health Statistics for the period 1999-2005. Descriptive analyses and estimates of birth prevalence and crude prevalence ratios were used to characterize this defect in Texas during the study period. There were 188 definite cases of Ebstein anomaly identified in the TBDR. The overall prevalence was 0.72 per 10,000 live births. Variables associated with an increased prevalence of non-syndromic Ebstein anomaly included: maternal age >39 years (compared to those 20-24 years), maternal residence along the Texas-Mexico border (compared to non-border residence), and conception in fall or winter (compared to summer). In addition, infants with Ebstein anomaly were at a greater risk of preterm birth and being small for gestational age. These findings help to define subgroups of women at increased risk of having offspring affected by Ebstein anomaly. Furthermore, our findings add to the limited body of literature on this rare but serious malformation.

  3. An Earlier Natural Mechanism Proposal for the Closure of the Ozone Hole and the Present 30% Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Shahinaz M.; Al-Kuhaimi, Siham A.; Bebars, Aisha

    2011-06-01

    A prolonged period of reduced solar activity of the order of few decades is expected owing to the presence of weak solar cycles series like those around 1800 and 1900 AD. Reduced UV flux is forecasted. The multitude of phytoplanktons in the Antarctic Ocean which are harmed by excessive UV passing through the ozone hole are expected to recover owing to the reduced solar UV doze even with the existence of ozone hole. An increase of only 10% of the phytoplankton would remove about 5 Gigatons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere annually (which is equal to the amount of carbon dioxide emitted currently by fossil fuel utilization) and sink it into the ocean. Reduction of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere will lead to cooling of the troposphere and hence warming of Antarctic stratospheric clouds which are the sight of ozone destruction. Eventually, this procedure will hopefully lead to Antarctic ozone hole closure. The paper also discuss the implication of the 1997 solar induced climate change on the appearance of the Arctic ozone hole and the reduction of the Antarctic ozone hole. Anther more serious solar indsolarinduced climate change is currently on due to the end of the first weak solar cycle number 23 and the start of predicated second weaker solar cycle number 24. A climate change, which has already brought global cooling to the earth. The Ozone hole has been closed by 30% in 2007 as prdicted which a triumph is for the subject of sun-Earth connections. It is also predicted that further closures in the coming few years will occur due to solar induced climate changes. The forecast of the ozone hole closure was predicted in earlier papers.

  4. Effects of injected ice particles in the lower stratosphere on the Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, H.; Kinnison, D. E.; Petersen, A. K.; Vitt, F.; Brasseur, G. P.

    2015-05-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole will continue to be observed in the next 35-50 years, although the emissions of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have gradually been phased out during the last two decades. In this paper, we suggest a geo-engineering approach that will remove substantial amounts of hydrogen chloride (HCl) from the lower stratosphere in fall, and hence limit the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole in late winter and early spring. HCl will be removed by ice from the atmosphere at temperatures higher than the threshold under which polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are formed if sufficiently large amounts of ice are supplied to produce water saturation. A detailed chemical-climate numerical model is used to assess the expected efficiency of the proposed geo-engineering method, and specifically to calculate the removal of HCl by ice particles. The size of ice particles appears to be a key parameter: larger particles (with a radius between 10 and 100 µm) appear to be most efficient for removing HCl. Sensitivity studies lead to the conclusions that the ozone recovery is effective when ice particles are supplied during May and June in the latitude band ranging from 70°S to 90°S and in the altitude layer ranging from 10 to 26 km. It appears, therefore, that supplying ice particles to the Antarctic lower stratosphere could be effective in reducing the depth of the ozone hole. In addition, photodegradation of CFCs might be accelerated when ice is supplied due to enhanced vertical transport of this efficient greenhouse gas.

  5. The impacts of the Antarctic ozone hole on the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sun

    1999-07-01

    The large ozone depletion in the southern polar lower stratosphere during austral spring changes the climate in the middle atmosphere. Comparisons between simulations using the GISS/Global Climate Middle Atmospheric Model and observational data analysis are carried out in this study. In the model simulations, it was found that planetary wave propagation from the troposphere plays an essential role in the interannual variability of the size of the ozone hole. The ozone hole can reach higher altitudes and lower latitudes in years of smaller July wave energy. From September onward, the temperatures in the polar lower stratosphere decrease due to local reduction in the solar radiation absorption. In October and November, the temperature changes in the polar lower stratosphere reach about -6 to -12 K. The enhanced meridional temperature gradient in the lower stratosphere increases the zonal winds at subpolar middle stratosphere and tightens the polar vortex. The changed zonal winds change the planetary wave propagation in October and November, with greater Eliassen-Palm (E-P) flux convergence in subpolar to polar latitudes, and maintain a changed residual circulation. The ascent of the changed residual circulation provides cooling in middle latitudes, and the descent, warming in the polar region. The changed residual circulation changes the N2O and CFC-11 distributions significantly in October and November. It takes about 2-3 months for the changes in the distributions to significantly affect the N2O and the CFC-11 lifetimes. In February, the N2O lifetime is reduced by about 5 years, and the CFC-11 lifetime, by about 0.8 years. Multivariate linear regression is carried out to correlate National Meteorological Center (NMC) temperatures, total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) ozone, equatorial zonal winds at 30 mb, and solar variations. The nonlocal linear regression shows temperature change patterns similar to those predicted by model simulations in the southern

  6. Polar stratospheric ozone: interactions with climate change, results from the EU project RECONCILE, and the 2010/11 Arctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hobe, Marc

    2013-04-01

    One of the most profound and well known examples of human impacts on atmospheric chemistry is the so called ozone hole. During the second half of the 20th century, anthropogenic emissions of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) led to a significant increase in stratospheric chlorine levels and hence the rate of ozone removal by catalytic cycles involving chlorine. While CFCs were essentially banned by the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its subsequent amendments, and stratospheric chlorine levels have recently started to decline again, another anthropogenic influence may at least delay the recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer: climate change, with little doubt a result of human emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, has led to changes in stratospheric temperature and circulation. The large ozone losses that typically occur in polar regions in spring are particularly affected by these changes. Here, we give an overview of the ozone-climate interactions affecting polar stratospheric ozone loss, and present latest results from the international research project RECONCILE funded by the European Commission. Remaining open questions will be discussed including the possible impacts of recently suggested geoengineering concepts to artificially enhance the stratospheric aerosol loading. A special focus will also be put on the 2010/11 Arctic winter that saw the first Arctic Ozone hole, including an impact study on surface UV radiation in the densely populated northern mid-latitudes.

  7. Ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The author discusses the debate over whether concern about a hole in the ozone layer in Antarctic is real or science fiction. There is a growing consensus that efforts must be taken to protect the ozone layer. The issue now is not whether chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) should be controlled and regulated but how much and how soon. The United States has urged that the production of dangerous CFCs, and any other chemicals that affect the ozone layer, be restricted immediately to current levels and that their use be reduced 95 percent over the next decade. The American position was too strong for many European nations and the Japanese. Negotiations at an international conference on the matter broke down. The breakdown is due in part to a more acute concern for environmental matters in the United States than exists in many countries. Meanwhile CFCs are linked to another environmental problem that equally threatens the world - the Greenhouse Effect. The earth is in a natural warming period, but man could be causing it to become even warmer. The Greenhouse Effect could have a catastrophic impact on mankind, although nothing has been proven yet.

  8. Influence of the heterogeneous reaction HCl + HOCl on an ozone hole model with hydrocarbon additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Scott; Cicerone, Ralph J.; Turco, Richard P.; Drdla, Katja; Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    1994-02-01

    Injection of ethane or propane has been suggested as a means for reducing ozone loss within the Antarctic vortex because alkanes can convert active chlorine radicals into hydrochloric acid. In kinetic models of vortex chemistry including as heterogeneous processes only the hydrolysis and HCl reactions of ClONO2 and N2O5, parts per billion by volume levels of the light alkanes counteract ozone depletion by sequestering chlorine atoms. Introduction of the surface reaction of HCl with HOCl causes ethane to deepen baseline ozone holes and generally works to impede any mitigation by hydrocarbons. The increased depletion occurs because HCl + HOCl can be driven by HOx radicals released during organic oxidation. Following initial hydrogen abstraction by chlorine, alkane breakdown leads to a net hydrochloric acid activation as the remaining hydrogen atoms enter the photochemical system. Lowering the rate constant for reactions of organic peroxy radicals with ClO to 10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 does not alter results, and the major conclusions are insensitive to the timing of the ethane additions. Ignoring the organic peroxy radical plus ClO reactions entirely restores remediation capabilities by allowing HOx removal independent of HCl. Remediation also returns if early evaporation of polar stratospheric clouds leaves hydrogen atoms trapped in aldehyde intermediates, but real ozone losses are small in such cases.

  9. Climatology of ozone ``mini-hole'' events and their influence on UV solar radiation in Barcelona (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, J.; Sola, Y.; Campmany, E.; de Cabo, X.; Redaño, A.

    2009-03-01

    The total ozone column (TOC) shows a strong annual cycle, so the threshold to define its lower values is better characterized as deviations from local climatological mean levels. A complete analysis of the effects of low total ozone on the UV radiation measured in Barcelona (Northeast of Spain) is described in the present work. The ozone "mini-holes" climatology in Barcelona, obtained from the daily ozone satellite data series (1978-2006), shows a seasonal behaviour with a maximum number of episodes in winter and early spring. Nevertheless there are a great number of events in the study area during September, when the UV irradiance reaching the Earth's surface is still high and consequently the biological effects such as erythema could be more important. In fact, daily low ozone columnar contents in comparison with climatological means are detected throughout the year generally associated to weather systems passing. The deepest ozone "mini-hole" reported in the area was in 2004. It lasted three days with a minimum on 10 January, when daily TOC was 40% lower than the January climatological mean. During those days under cloud-free conditions the aerosol properties remained constant indicating that only low ozone levels were responsible of the increase in UV solar radiation. The erythemal irradiance at noon was 36% higher than the day before the extreme low ozone event. Although in absolute terms this increase is high, the erythemal effects are not so considerable because the UV levels in winter are low. On the other hand, the "mini-hole" event observed in this area at the end of spring had more harmful biological consequences although the ozone decrease was not so great: on 20 April 2004, low ozone levels and high solar elevation favoured the increase in UVB radiation detected by an operative spectroradiometer. At 300 nm, the irradiance was 80% higher than the day before, declining to 31% at 305 nm. In this occasion the UV Index at 12 UTC increased in one unit.

  10. On the relevance of the methane oxidation cycle to ozone hole chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Rolf; Crutzen, Paul J.

    1994-01-01

    High concentrations of active chlorine are clearly responsible for the observed ozone depletion during the Antarctic polar spring. However, the mechanism behind the activation of chlorine from the reservoirs species HCl and ClONO2 and the maintenance of extremely high levels of active chlorine after polar sunrise is less well understood. Here, we focus on the influence of the methane oxidation cycle on 'ozone hole' chemistry through its effect on HOx and ClOx radicals. We demonstrate the great potential importance of the heterogeneous reaction HCl + HOCl yields Cl2 + H2O and the gasphase reaction ClO + CH3O2 yields ClOO + CH3O under sunlight conditions in polar spring. Under these conditions, the heterogeneous reaction is the main sink for HOx radicals. Through this channel, the HCl reservoir may be almost completely depleted. The gas phase reaction may control the levels of the CH3O2 radical, provided that high levels of ClO exist. Otherwise this radical initiates a sequence of reactions leading to a considerable loss of active chlorine. Moreover, the production of HOx radicals is reduced, and thereby the efficiency of the heterogeneous reaction limited. The two reactions together may accomplish the complete conversion of HCl into active chlorine, thereby leading to a rapid destruction of ozone.

  11. Exposure of bovine dermal tissue to ultraviolet light under the Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ogura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Keisuke; Hattori, Shunji; Kudoh, Sakae; Imura, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Bovine dermis was exposed outdoors in the Antarctic in 2013 to study the skin damage caused by short-wavelength ultraviolet light under the ozone hole. Collagen was extracted from the exposed dermis with pepsin. The amount of solubilized collagen in the exposed dermis was only 20%-40% of that in dermis shielded from ultraviolet light. The dermis was most difficult to extract when exposed in summer, and then when exposed in spring. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to determine the melting endothermic behavior of the dermal tissue. The peak temperature was highest for the dermis exposed in summer. The exposed dermis was degraded with cyanogen bromide to determine whether cross-linking had occurred. Cross-linked peptides were detected in the dermis exposed in summer or spring, but the dermis exposed in autumn did not differ markedly from the light-shielded dermis. These data show that cross-linkages were readily formed in the collagen molecule chains in dermis exposed to ultraviolet light in summer, when solar elevation is highest and the period of sunshine is longest. A comparison of the dermis exposed in spring and that exposed in autumn showed that cross-linkages were formed more readily by ultraviolet light in spring, when the ozone hole occurred.

  12. Tracing the second stage of ozone recovery in the Antarctic ozone-hole with a "big data" approach to multivariate regressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, A. T. J.; van der A, R. J.; van Weele, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a sensitivity analysis of multivariate regressions of recent springtime Antarctic vortex ozone trends using a "big data" ensemble approach. Our results indicate that the poleward heat flux (Eliassen-Palm flux) and the effective chlorine loading respectively explain most of the short-term and long-term variability in different Antarctic springtime total ozone records. The inclusion in the regression of stratospheric volcanic aerosols, solar variability and the quasi-biennial oscillation is shown to increase rather than decrease the overall uncertainty in the attribution of Antarctic springtime ozone because of large uncertainties in their respective records. Calculating the trend significance for the ozone record from the late 1990s onwards solely based on the fit of the effective chlorine loading is not recommended, as this does not take fit residuals into account, resulting in too narrow uncertainty intervals, while the fixed temporal change of the effective chlorine loading does not allow for any flexibility in the trends. When taking fit residuals into account in a piecewise linear trend fit, we find that approximately 30-60% of the regressions in the full ensemble result in a statistically significant positive springtime ozone trend over Antarctica from the late 1990s onwards. Analysis of choices and uncertainties in time series show that, depending on choices in time series and parameters, the fraction of statistically significant trends in parts of the ensemble can range from negligible to a complete 100% significance. We also find that, consistent with expectations, the number of statistically significant trends increases with increasing record length. Although our results indicate that the use multivariate regressions is a valid approach for assessing the state of Antarctic ozone hole recovery, and it can be expected that results will move towards more confidence in recovery with increasing record length, uncertainties in choices

  13. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactive form of oxygen. In the upper atmosphere, ozone forms a protective layer that shields us from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. At ground level, ozone is a harmful air pollutant and a primary ...

  14. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    Ozone is a gas. It can be good or bad, depending on where it is. "Good" ozone occurs naturally about 10 to 30 miles above ... the sun's ultraviolet rays. Part of the good ozone layer is gone. Man-made chemicals have destroyed ...

  15. The Antarctic Ice Sheet, Sea Ice, and the Ozone Hole: Satellite Observations of how they are Changing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.

    2012-01-01

    Antarctica is the Earth's coldest and highest continent and has major impacts on the climate and life of the south polar vicinity. It is covered almost entirely by the Earth's largest ice sheet by far, with a volume of ice so great that if all the Antarctic ice were to go into the ocean (as ice or liquid water), this would produce a global sea level rise of about 60 meters (197 feet). The continent is surrounded by sea ice that in the wintertime is even more expansive than the continent itself and in the summertime reduces to only about a sixth of its wintertime extent. Like the continent, the expansive sea ice cover has major impacts, reflecting the sun's radiation back to space, blocking exchanges between the ocean and the atmosphere, and providing a platform for some animal species while impeding other species. Far above the continent, the Antarctic ozone hole is a major atmospheric phenomenon recognized as human-caused and potentially quite serious to many different life forms. Satellites are providing us with remarkable information about the ice sheet, the sea ice, and the ozone hole. Satellite visible and radar imagery are providing views of the large scale structure of the ice sheet never seen before; satellite laser altimetry has produced detailed maps of the topography of the ice sheet; and an innovative gravity-measuring two-part satellite has allowed mapping of regions of mass loss and mass gain on the ice sheet. The surrounding sea ice cover has a satellite record that goes back to the 1970s, allowing trend studies that show a decreasing sea ice presence in the region of the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas, to the west of the prominent Antarctic Peninsula, but increasing sea ice presence around much of the rest of the continent. Overall, sea ice extent around Antarctica has increased at an average rate of about 17,000 square kilometers per year since the late 1970s, as determined from satellite microwave data that can be collected under both light and

  16. Use of cigarettes and other tobacco products among students aged 13-15 years--worldwide, 1999-2005.

    PubMed

    2006-05-26

    The use of tobacco in any form is a major preventable cause of premature death and disease. Globally, nearly 5 million persons die every year from tobacco-related illnesses, with disproportionately higher mortality occurring in developing countries. The Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS), initiated in 1999 by the World Health Organization (WHO), CDC, and the Canadian Public Health Association, is a school-based survey that includes questions on prevalence of cigarette and other tobacco use; attitudes toward tobacco; access to tobacco products; exposure to secondhand smoke, school curricula on tobacco, media, and advertising; and smoking cessation. This report presents estimates of self-reported cigarette and other tobacco-product use during 1999-2005 in 132 different countries and the Gaza Strip/West Bank. The data are aggregated within each of the six WHO regions. GYTS data indicate that nearly two of every 10 students reported currently using a tobacco product, with no statistically significant difference between the proportion of those reporting cigarette smoking (8.9%) and other tobacco use (11.2%). Use of tobacco by adolescents is a major public health problem in all six WHO regions. Worldwide, more countries need to develop, implement, and evaluate their tobacco-control programs to address the use of all types of tobacco products, especially among girls.

  17. Device performance and lifetime of polymer:fullerene solar cells with UV-ozone-irradiated hole-collecting buffer layers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungsoo; Nam, Sungho; Lee, Hyena; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2011-11-18

    We report the influence of UV-ozone irradiation of the hole-collecting buffer layers on the performance and lifetime of polymer:fullerene solar cells. UV-ozone irradiation was targeted at the surface of the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) layers by varying the irradiation time up to 600 s. The change of the surface characteristics in the PEDOT:PSS after UV-ozone irradiation was measured by employing optical absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements, while Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques were introduced for more microscopic analysis. Results showed that the UV-ozone irradiation changed the chemical structure/composition of the surface of the PEDOT:PSS layers leading to the gradual increase of ionization potential with irradiation time in the presence of up-and-down variations in the contact angle (polarity). This surface property change was attributed to the formation of oxidative components, as evidenced by XPS and Auger electron images, which affected the sheet resistance of the PEDOT:PSS layers. Interestingly, device performance was slightly improved by short irradiation (up to 10 s), whereas it was gradually decreased by further irradiation. The short-duration illumination test showed that the lifetime of solar cells with the UV-ozone irradiated PEDOT:PSS layer was improved due to the protective role of the oxidative components formed upon UV-ozone irradiation against the attack of sulfonic acid groups in the PEDOT:PSS layer to the active layer.

  18. Formation of the Antarctic ozone hole by the ClO dimer mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, J. W.; Solomon, P. M.; De Zafra, R. L.; Jaramillo, M.; Emmons, L.

    1988-01-01

    New measurements of the low-altitude ClO profile, made during September 1987, are presented along with detailed observations of ozone depletion over McMurdo Station, Antarctica during the same period. The results show that both the rate and altitude range of ozone depletion can be quantitatively accounted for by a mechanism in which the ClO dimer is the important intermediary in the catalytic destruction of ozone. An alternative bromine mechanism appears capable of contributing only 5-15 percent to the ozone loss rate.

  19. The creation of ozone holes as a consequence of meteoroids falls into the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumov, B. A.

    2001-01-01

    The falling of a large celestial body into the ocean causes a large number of compounds (like, HCl, Cl, Br, Na, H 2O, OH, and NO) that destroy ozone molecules directly or indirectly to be ejected to stratospheric altitudes. The bleaching of the atmosphere in the UV range as a result of such ozone destruction creates negative feedback that restores the ozone. The characteristic time for such restoration in the stratosphere decreases sharply with altitude, ranging from several months at 30 km to several days at 20 km.

  20. From closing the atmospheric ozone hole to reducing climate change. Lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Ewart, Gary W; Rom, William N; Braman, Sidney S; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2015-02-01

    Global warming presents U.S. and transnational leaders with enormous political and policy challenges. World leadership addressed a similar worldwide environmental challenge in the 1980s and 1990s when scientists advised that accelerating emission of man-made chlorofluorocarbons was depleting the ozone layer of the earth's atmosphere. The process that led to global agreement on reducing depletion of the ozone layer holds valuable lessons, and some ironies, for scientists and policy makers seeking now to address global climate change. By understanding the international treaty process, how science informed that process, and how the physician community played a constructive role in the transition away from commercial use of ozone-depleting gases three decades ago, environmental activists can better understand the challenges, opportunities, and potential solutions under current consideration in affecting global climate change.

  1. Some aspects of the interaction between chemical and dynamic processes relating to the Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckman, R. S.; Turner, R. E.; Blackshear, W. T.; Fairlie, T. D. A.; Grose, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    Observational and modeling studies have been conducted to examine the interaction between the chemical and dynamical processes that occur during springtime in the lower stratosphere of the Southern Hemisphere. The temporal evolution of the ozone distribution and the circulation during 1987 is contrasted with that for 1988 as an illustrative example of how dynamical processes and the resulting meteorological conditions modulate the ozone depletion. Concurrently with the observational analysis, an effort was initiated to simulate the ozone depletion during austral spring using a 3D chemical/transport model. The model includes a parameterized representation of the heterogeneous processes thought to be important in this region. The simulation indicates that the inclusion of this additional chemistry, which results in the release of free chlorine and the redistribution of odd nitrogen into reservoir species, reproduces many aspects of the observations.

  2. Large-scale variations in ozone and polar stratospheric clouds measured with airborne lidar during formation of the 1987 ozone hole over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Poole, Lamont R.; Mccormick, M. Patrick; Ismail, Syed; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.; Szedlmayer, Margaret M.; Jones, Rod; Krueger, Arlin J.; Tuck, Adrian

    1988-01-01

    A joint field experiment between NASA and NOAA was conducted during August to September 1987 to obtain in situ and remote measurements of key gases and aerosols from aircraft platforms during the formation of the ozone (O3) hole over Antarctica. The ER-2 (advanced U-2) and DC-8 aircraft from the NASA Ames Research Center were used in this field experiment. The NASA Langley Research Center's airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system was operated from the DC-8 to obtain profiles of O3 and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere during long-range flights over Antarctica from August 28 to September 29, 1987. The airborne DIAL system was configured to transmit simultaneously four laser wavelengths (301, 311, 622, and 1064 nm) above the DC-8 for DIAL measurements of O3 profiles between 11 to 20 km ASL (geometric altitude above sea level) and multiple wavelength aerosol backscatter measurements between 11 to 24 km ASL. A total of 13 DC-8 flights were made over Antarctica with 2 flights reaching the South Pole. Polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) were detected in multiple thin layers in the 11 to 21 km ASL altitude range with each layer having a typical thickness of less than 1 km. Two types of PSC's were found based on aerosol backscattering ratios: predominantly water ice clouds (type 2) and clouds with scattering characteristics consistent with binary solid nitric acid/water clouds (type 1). Large-scale cross sections of O3 distributions were obtained. The data provides additional information about a potentially important transport mechanism that may influence the O3 budget inside the vortex. There is also some evidence that strong low pressure systems in the troposphere are associated with regions of lower stratospheric O3. This paper discusses the spatial and temporal variations of O3 inside and outside the polar vortex region during the development of the O3 hole and relates these data to other measurements obtained during this field experiment.

  3. Polar processing and development of the 2004 Antarctic ozone hole : first results from MLS on Aura

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Froidevaux, L.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Read, W. G.; Schwartz, M. J.; Waters, J. W.; Harwood, R. S.

    2005-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on Aura is providing an extensive data set on stratospheric winter polar processing, including the first daily global observations of HCl, together with simultaneous measurements of ClO, HNO3, H2O, O3, N2O, and temperature (among others). We present first results charting the evolution of these quantities during the 2004 Antarctic late winter. MLS observations of chlorine deactivation and ozone loss during this period are shown to be consistent with results from the SLIMCAT chemical transport model.

  4. Observations of chlorine monoxide over Scott Base, Antarctica, during the ozone hole, 1996-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connor, Brian; Solomon, Philip; Barrett, James; Mooney, Thomas; Parrish, Alan

    2007-01-01

    We report observations of chlorine monoxide, ClO, in the lower stratosphere, made from Scott Base (77.85º S, 166.77º E) in springtime during each year, 1996-2005. The ClO amounts in the atmosphere are retrieved from remote measurements of microwave emission spectra. ClO column densities of up to about 2.5 × 1015 cm-2 are recorded during September, when chlorine is present in chemically active forms due to reactions on the surface of Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) particles. Maximum mixing ratios of ClO are approximately 2 ppbv. The annual average of ClO column density during the activation period is anticorrelated with similar averages of ozone column measured at nearby Arrival Heights, with correlation coefficient of –0.81, and with averages of ozone mass integrated over the entire polar region, with similar correlation coefficients. There was a substantial decrease in ClO amounts during 2002-2004. There has been no systematic change in the timing of chlorine deactivation attributable to secular change in the Antarctic vortex

  5. From ozone mini-holes and mini-highs towards extreme value theory: New insights from extreme events and non-stationarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.; Peter, T.; Davison, A. C.

    2009-04-01

    Over the last few decades negative trends in stratospheric ozone have been studied because of the direct link between decreasing stratospheric ozone and increasing surface UV-radiation. Recently a discussion on ozone recovery has begun. Long-term measurements of total ozone extending back earlier than 1958 are limited and only available from a few stations in the northern hemisphere. The world's longest total ozone record is available from Arosa, Switzerland (Staehelin et al., 1998a,b). At this site total ozone measurements have been made since late 1926 through the present day. Within this study (Rieder et al., 2009) new tools from extreme value theory (e.g. Coles, 2001; Ribatet, 2007) are applied to select mathematically well-defined thresholds for extreme low and extreme high total ozone. A heavy-tail focused approach is used by fitting the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) to the Arosa time series. Asymptotic arguments (Pickands, 1975) justify the use of the GPD for modeling exceedances over a sufficiently high (or below a sufficiently low) threshold (Coles, 2001). More precisely, the GPD is the limiting distribution of normalized excesses over a threshold, as the threshold approaches the endpoint of the distribution. In practice, GPD parameters are fitted, to exceedances by maximum likelihood or other methods - such as the probability weighted moments. A preliminary step consists in defining an appropriate threshold for which the asymptotic GPD approximation holds. Suitable tools for threshold selection as the MRL-plot (mean residual life plot) and TC-plot (stability plot) from the POT-package (Ribatet, 2007) are presented. The frequency distribution of extremes in low (termed ELOs) and high (termed EHOs) total ozone and their influence on the long-term changes in total ozone are analyzed. Further it is shown that from the GPD-model the distribution of so-called ozone mini holes (e.g. Bojkov and Balis, 2001) can be precisely estimated and that the

  6. Interannual Variability of the Antarctic Ozone Hole in a GCM. Part II: A Comparison of Unforced and QBO-Induced Variability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindell, Drew T.; Rind, David; Balachandran, Nambath

    1999-06-01

    Simulations were performed with the Goddard Institute for Space Studies GCM including a prescribed quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), applied at a constant maximum value, and a physically realistic parameterization of the heterogeneous chemistry responsible for severe polar ozone loss. While the QBO is primarily a stratospheric phenomenon, in this model the QBO modulates the amount and propagation of planetary wave energy in the troposphere as well as in the stratosphere. Dynamical activity is greater in the easterly than in the unforced case, while westerly years are dynamically more quiescent. By altering zonal winds and potential vorticity, the QBO forcing changes the refraction of planetary waves beginning in midwinter, causing the lower-stratospheric zonal average temperatures at Southern Hemisphere high latitudes to be 3-5 K warmer in the easterly phase than in the westerly during the late winter and early spring. Ozone loss varies nonlinearly with temperature, due to the sharp threshold for formation of heterogeneous chemistry surfaces, so that the mean daily total mass of ozone depleted in this region during September was 8.7 × 1010 kg in the QBO easterly maximum, as compared with 12.0 × 1010 kg in the westerly maximum and 10.3 × 1010 kg in the unforced case. Through this mechanism, the midwinter divergence of the Eliassen-Palm flux is well correlated with the subsequent springtime total ozone loss (R2 = 0.6). The chemical ozone loss differences are much larger than QBO-induced transport differences in our model.Inclusion of the QBO forcing also increased the maximum variability in total ozone loss from the 20% value found in the unforced runs to 50%. These large variations in ozone depletion are very similar in size to the largest observed variations in the severity of the ozone hole. The results suggest that both random variability and periodic QBO forcing are important components, perhaps explaining some of the difficulties encountered in previous

  7. Observation of ozone and aerosols in the Antarctic ozone hole of 1991 under the Polar Patrol Balloon (PPB) Project. Preliminary result

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Masahiko; Murata, Isao; Iwasaka, Yasunobu; Kondo, Yutaka; Kanzawa, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    We present preliminary results for the PPB (Polar Patrol Balloon) experiment. The balloon was launched at 07:55 UT on 23 September and dropped at 21 UT on 28 September 1991. During the period, ozone and aerosol concentrations were measured correspondingly along the track. During the Lagrangian type observation, drastic change of ozone concentration in 'same air mass' and positive correlation between ozone concentration and sulfate aerosol amount were obtained at the level within 80-78 hPa. During the descent motion at 80 deg S active PSC's (type-1 and -2) were observed from 200 hPa to 80 hPa.

  8. Identification of influential events concerning the Antarctic ozone hole over southern Brazil and the biological effects induced by UVB and UVA radiation in an endemic treefrog species.

    PubMed

    Passaglia Schuch, André; Dos Santos, Mauricio Beux; Mendes Lipinski, Victor; Vaz Peres, Lucas; Dos Santos, Caroline Peripolli; Zanini Cechin, Sonia; Jorge Schuch, Nelson; Kirsh Pinheiro, Damaris; da Silva Loreto, Elgion Lúcio

    2015-08-01

    The increased incidence of solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) due to ozone depletion has been affecting both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and it may help to explain the enigmatic decline of amphibian populations in specific localities. In this work, influential events concerning the Antarctic ozone hole were identified in a dataset containing 35 years of ozone measurements over southern Brazil. The effects of environmental doses of UVB and UVA radiation were addressed on the morphology and development of Hypsiboas pulchellus tadpole (Anura: Hylidae), as well as on the induction of malformation after the conclusion of metamorphosis. These analyzes were complemented by the detection of micronucleus formation in blood cells. 72 ozone depletion events were identified from 1979 to 2013. Surprisingly, their yearly frequency increased three-fold during the last 17 years. The results clearly show that H. pulchellus tadpole are much more sensitive to UVB than UVA light, which reduces their survival and developmental rates. Additionally, the rates of micronucleus formation by UVB were considerably higher compared to UVA even after the activation of photolyases enzymes by a further photoreactivation treatment. Consequently, a higher occurrence of malformation was observed in UVB-irradiated individuals. These results demonstrate the severe genotoxic impact of UVB radiation on this treefrog species and its importance for further studies aimed to assess the impact of the increased levels of solar UVB radiation on declining species of the Hylidae family.

  9. CO2 and O3 vertical distributions over the Showa Station, Antarctica before and during the ozone hole formation in 2014, measured by balloon-borne CO2 and O3 instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaji, K.; Matsumi, Y.; Nakayama, T.; Ouchi, M.; Imasu, R.; Kawasaki, M.

    2015-12-01

    The vertical and horizontal distributions of CO2 mixing ratio in the troposphere and stratosphere are considered to include the information on the source and sink of CO2, as well as transport of air masses in the atmosphere. However, only a limited number of vertical profiles for CO2 mixing ratio, which were typically obtained based on aircraft-based observations, are available. We have originally developed a new balloon-born instrument (CO2 sonde) to measure CO2 vertical profile from surface up to about 10 km in altitude. The ozone hole formation is typically observed in the early spring over Antarctica. To our knowledge, no study focusing on the change in the CO2 vertical profile before and after the ozone hole formation has been reported. In the present study, we launched four CO2 sondes at Syowa Station, Antarctica between June and October in 2014 to obtain CO2 vertical distributions before and during the ozone hole formation. Observations of ozone vertical distributions using traditional ozone sondes were also conducted on the same days. In the presentation, we will report the relationships between the vertical distributions of CO2 and ozone.

  10. Tracing the second stage of Antarctic ozone hole recovery with a "big data" approach to multi-variate regressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, A. T. J.; van der A, R. J.; van Weele, M.

    2014-07-01

    This study presents a sensitivity analysis of multi-variate regressions of recent springtime Antarctic vortex ozone trends using a "big data" ensemble approach. Multi-variate regression methods are widely used for studying the variability and detection of ozone trends. Based on multi-variate regression analysis of total Antarctic springtime vortex ozone it has been suggested that the observed increase of ozone since the late 1990s is statistically significant and can be attributed to decreasing stratospheric halogens (Salby et al., 2011, 2012; Kuttippurath et al., 2013). We find that, when considering uncertainties that have not been addressed in these studies, this conclusion on ozone recovery is not warranted. An ensemble of regressions is constructed based on the analysis of uncertainties in the applied ozone record as well as of uncertainties in the various applied regressors. The presented combination of ensemble members spans up the uncertainty range with about 35 million different regressions. The poleward heat flux (Eliassen-Palm Flux) and the effective chlorine loading explain, respectively, most of the short-term and long-term variability in different Antarctic springtime total ozone records. The inclusion in the regression of stratospheric volcanic aerosols, solar variability, the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode is shown to increase rather than to decrease the overall uncertainty in the attribution of Antarctic springtime ozone because of large uncertainties in their respective records. Calculating the trend significance for the ozone record from the late 1990s onwards solely based on the fit of the effective chlorine loading should be avoided, as this does not take fit residuals into account and thereby results in too narrow uncertainty intervals. When taking fit residuals into account, we find that less than 30% of the regressions in the full ensemble result in a statistically significant positive springtime ozone trend over

  11. Not just about sunburn--the ozone hole's profound effect on climate has significant implications for Southern Hemisphere ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sharon A; Erickson, David J

    2015-02-01

    Climate scientists have concluded that stratospheric ozone depletion has been a major driver of Southern Hemisphere climate processes since about 1980. The implications of these observed and modelled changes in climate are likely to be far more pervasive for both terrestrial and marine ecosystems than the increase in ultraviolet-B radiation due to ozone depletion; however, they have been largely overlooked in the biological literature. Here, we synthesize the current understanding of how ozone depletion has impacted Southern Hemisphere climate and highlight the relatively few documented impacts on terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Reviewing the climate literature, we present examples of how ozone depletion changes atmospheric and oceanic circulation, with an emphasis on how these alterations in the physical climate system affect Southern Hemisphere weather, especially over the summer season (December-February). These potentially include increased incidence of extreme events, resulting in costly floods, drought, wildfires and serious environmental damage. The ecosystem impacts documented so far include changes to growth rates of South American and New Zealand trees, decreased growth of Antarctic mosses and changing biodiversity in Antarctic lakes. The objective of this synthesis was to stimulate the ecological community to look beyond ultraviolet-B radiation when considering the impacts of ozone depletion. Such widespread changes in Southern Hemisphere climate are likely to have had as much or more impact on natural ecosystems and food production over the past few decades, than the increased ultraviolet radiation due to ozone depletion.

  12. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  13. Unprecedented Arctic ozone loss in 2011.

    PubMed

    Manney, Gloria L; Santee, Michelle L; Rex, Markus; Livesey, Nathaniel J; Pitts, Michael C; Veefkind, Pepijn; Nash, Eric R; Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Froidevaux, Lucien; Poole, Lamont R; Schoeberl, Mark R; Haffner, David P; Davies, Jonathan; Dorokhov, Valery; Gernandt, Hartwig; Johnson, Bryan; Kivi, Rigel; Kyrö, Esko; Larsen, Niels; Levelt, Pieternel F; Makshtas, Alexander; McElroy, C Thomas; Nakajima, Hideaki; Parrondo, Maria Concepción; Tarasick, David W; von der Gathen, Peter; Walker, Kaley A; Zinoviev, Nikita S

    2011-10-02

    Chemical ozone destruction occurs over both polar regions in local winter-spring. In the Antarctic, essentially complete removal of lower-stratospheric ozone currently results in an ozone hole every year, whereas in the Arctic, ozone loss is highly variable and has until now been much more limited. Here we demonstrate that chemical ozone destruction over the Arctic in early 2011 was--for the first time in the observational record--comparable to that in the Antarctic ozone hole. Unusually long-lasting cold conditions in the Arctic lower stratosphere led to persistent enhancement in ozone-destroying forms of chlorine and to unprecedented ozone loss, which exceeded 80 per cent over 18-20 kilometres altitude. Our results show that Arctic ozone holes are possible even with temperatures much milder than those in the Antarctic. We cannot at present predict when such severe Arctic ozone depletion may be matched or exceeded.

  14. Ozone Layer Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been monitoring the ozone layer from space using optical remote sensing techniques since 1970. With concern over catalytic destruction of ozone (mid-1970s) and the development of the Antarctic ozone hole (mid-1980s), long term ozone monitoring has become the primary focus of NASA's series of ozone measuring instruments. A series of TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) instruments has produced a nearly continuous record of global ozone from 1979 to the present. These instruments infer ozone by measuring sunlight backscattered from the atmosphere in the ultraviolet through differential absorption. These measurements have documented a 15 Dobson Unit drop in global average ozone since 1980, and the declines in ozone in the antarctic each October have been far more dramatic. Instruments that measure the ozone vertical distribution, the SBUV and SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) instruments for example, show that the largest changes are occurring in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. The goal of ozone measurement in the next decades will be to document the predicted recovery of the ozone layer as CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) levels decline. This will require a continuation of global measurements of total column ozone on a global basis, but using data from successor instruments to TOMS. Hyperspectral instruments capable of measuring in the UV will be needed for this purpose. Establishing the relative roles of chemistry and dynamics will require instruments to measure ozone in the troposphere and in the stratosphere with good vertical resolution. Instruments that can measure other chemicals important to ozone formation and destruction will also be needed.

  15. Recovery of the Ozone Layer: The Ozone Depleting Gas Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, David J.; Montzka, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    The stratospheric ozone layer, through absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation, protects all biological systems on Earth. In response to concerns over the depletion of the global ozone layer, the U.S. Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 mandates that NASA and NOAA monitor stratospheric ozone and ozone-depleting substances. This information is critical for assessing whether the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer, an international treaty that entered into force in 1989 to protect the ozone layer, is having its intended effect of mitigating increases in harmful ultraviolet radiation. To provide the information necessary to satisfy this congressional mandate, both NASA and NOAA have instituted and maintained global monitoring programs to keep track of ozone-depleting gases as well as ozone itself. While data collected for the past 30 years have been used extensively in international assessments of ozone layer depletion science, the language of scientists often eludes the average citizen who has a considerable interest in the health of Earth's protective ultraviolet radiation shield. Are the ozone-destroying chemicals declining in the atmosphere? When will these chemicals decline to pre-ozone hole levels so that the Antarctic ozone hole might disappear? Will this timing be different in the stratosphere above midlatitudes?

  16. Stratospheric ozone is decreasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1988-03-01

    The recent discovery that chlorofluorocarbons create the Antarctic ozone hole every October through reactions mediated by ice particles formed at the lowest temperatures of the stratosphere is discussed. A large-scale reanalysis of measurements reveals that protective stratospheric ozone has decreased during the past 17 yrs with some decreases greatly exceeding predictions. It is noted that standard models did not, and still do not, include the ice in their reaction schemes. A tendency toward larger losses at higher colder latitudes is seen.

  17. Nimbus-7 TOMS Antarctic ozone atlas: August through November, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Penn, Lanning M.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.; Guimaraes, Patricia T.

    1990-01-01

    Because of the great environmental significance of ozone and to support continuing research at the Antarctic and other Southern Hemisphere stations, the development of the 1989 ozone hole was monitored using data from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, produced in near-real-time. This Atlas provides a complete set of daily polar orthographic projections of the TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere for the period August 1 through November 30, 1989. The 1989 ozone hole developed in a manner similar to that of 1987, reaching a comparable depth in early October. This was in sharp contrast to the much weaker hole of 1988. The 1989 ozone hole remained at polar latitudes as it filled in November, in contrast to other recent years when the hole drifted to mid-latitudes before disappearing. Daily ozone values above selected Southern Hemisphere stations are presented, along with comparisons of the 1989 ozone distribution to that of other years.

  18. Polar Ozone Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, a great deal of attention has been focused on the polar regions to both identify the chemistry and physics of the large losses, and to provide an understanding of the future of polar ozone. In this review talk, I will discuss the secular trends of ozone in both the Antarctic and Arctic regions, and I will review some of the principal research results of the last few years. In particular, I will emphasize some of the results from the SOLVE-THESEO 2000 campaign that occurred over the course of the winter of 1999-2000.

  19. Correlation between cosmic rays and ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Q-B

    2009-03-20

    This Letter reports reliable satellite data in the period of 1980-2007 covering two full 11-yr cosmic ray (CR) cycles, clearly showing the correlation between CRs and ozone depletion, especially the polar ozone loss (hole) over Antarctica. The results provide strong evidence of the physical mechanism that the CR-driven electron-induced reaction of halogenated molecules plays the dominant role in causing the ozone hole. Moreover, this mechanism predicts one of the severest ozone losses in 2008-2009 and probably another large hole around 2019-2020, according to the 11-yr CR cycle.

  20. Scientific assessment of stratospheric ozone: 1989, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A scientific review is presented of the current understanding of stratospheric ozone. There have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's protective ozone layer. There are four major findings that each heighten the concern that chlorine and bromine containing chemicals can lead to a significant depletion of stratospheric ozone: (1) Antarctic ozone hole (the weight of evidence indicates that chlorinated and brominated chemicals are responsible for the ozone hole; (2) Perturbed arctic chemistry (the same potentially ozone destroying processes were identified in the Arctic stratosphere); (3) Long term ozone decreases; and (4) Model limitations (gaps in theoretical models used for assessment studies).

  1. The unusual persistence of an ozone hole over a southern mid-latitude station during the Antarctic spring 2009: a multi-instrument study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfram, E. A.; Salvador, J.; Orte, F.; D'Elia, R.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Kuttippurath, J.; Pazmiño, A.; Goutail, F.; Casiccia, C.; Zamorano, F.; Paes Leme, N.; Quel, E. J.

    2012-10-01

    Record-low ozone column densities (with a minimum of 212 DU) persisted over three weeks at the Río Gallegos NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) station (51.5° S, 69.3° W) in November 2009. Total ozone remained two standard deviations below the climatological mean for five consecutive days during this period. The statistical analysis of 30 years of satellite data from the Multi Sensor Reanalysis (MSR) database for Río Gallegos revealed that such a long-lasting low-ozone episode is a rare occurrence. The event is examined using height-resolved ozone lidar measurements at Río Gallegos, and observations from satellite and ground-based instruments. The computed relative difference between the measured total ozone and the climatological monthly mean shows reductions varying between 10 and 30% with an average decrease of 25%. The mean absolute difference of total ozone column with respect to climatological monthly mean ozone column is around 75 DU. Extreme values of the UV index (UVI) were measured at the ground for this period, with the daily maximum UVI of around 13 on 15 and 28 November. The high-resolution MIMOSA-CHIM (Modélisation Isentrope du transport Méso-échelle de l'Ozone Stratosphérique par Advection) model was used to interpret the ozone depletion event. An ozone decrease of about 2 ppmv was observed in mid-November at the 550 K isentropic level (~22 km). The position of Río Gallegos relative to the polar vortex was classified using equivalent latitude maps. During the second week of November, the vortex was over the station at all isentropic levels, but after 20 November and until the end of the month, only the 10 lower levels in the stratosphere were affected by vortex overpasses with ozone poor air masses. A rapid recovery of the ozone column density was observed later, due to an ozone rich filament moving over Río Gallegos between 18 and 24 km in the first two weeks of December 2009.

  2. Polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of investigations into the correlation between the depletion of ozone and the formation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). Satellite measurements from Nimbus 7 showed that over the years the depletion from austral spring to austral spring has generally worsened. Approximately 70 percent of the ozone above Antarctica, which equals about 3 percent of the earth's ozone, is lost during September and October. Various hypotheses for ozone depletion are discussed including the theory suggesting that chlorine compounds might be responsible for the ozone hole, whereby chlorine enters the atmosphere as a component of chlorofluorocarbons produced by humans. The three types of PSCs, nitric acid trihydrate, slowly cooling water-ice, and rapidly cooling water-ice clouds act as important components of the Antarctic ozone depletion. It is indicated that destruction of the ozone will be more severe each year for the next few decades, leading to a doubling in area of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  3. Children's and adults' knowledge and models of reasoning about the ozone layer and its depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Bisanz, Gay L.

    2003-01-01

    As environmental concepts, the ozone layer and ozone hole are important to understand because they can profoundly influence our health. In this paper, we examined: (a) children's and adults' knowledge of the ozone layer and its depletion, and whether this knowledge increases with age' and (b) how the 'ozone layer' and 'ozone hole' might be structured as scientific concepts. We generated a standardized set of questions and used it to interview 24 kindergarten students, 48 Grade 3 students, 24 Grade 5 students, and 24 adults in university, in Canada. An analysis of participants' responses revealed that adults have more knowledge than children about the ozone layer and ozone hole, but both adults and children exhibit little knowledge about protecting themselves from the ozone hole. Moreover, only some participants exhibited 'mental models' in their conceptual understanding of the ozone layer and ozone hole. The implications of these results for health professionals, educators, and scientists are discussed.

  4. The ozone backlash

    SciTech Connect

    Taubes, G.

    1993-06-11

    While evidence for the role of chlorofluorocarbons in ozone depletion grows stronger, researchers have recently been subjected to vocal public criticism of their theories-and their motives. Their understanding of the mechanisms of ozone destruction-especially the annual ozone hole that appears in the Antarctic-has grown stronger, yet everywhere they go these days, they seem to be confronted by critics attacking their theories as baseless. For instance, Rush Limbaugh, the conservative political talk-show host and now-best-selling author of The Way Things Ought to Be, regularly insists that the theory of ozone depletion by CFCs is a hoax: bladerdash and poppycock. Zoologist Dixy Lee Ray, former governor of the state of Washington and former head of the Atomic Energy Commission, makes the same argument in her book, Trashing the Planet. The Wall Street Journal and National Review have run commentaries by S. Fred Singer, a former chief scientists for the Department of Transportation, purporting to shoot holes in the theory of ozone depletion. Even the June issue of Omni, a magazine with a circulation of more than 1 million that publishes a mixture of science and science fiction, printed a feature article claiming to expose ozone research as a politically motivated scam.

  5. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  6. Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Antarctic ozone atlas: August through November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, A.J.; Penn, L.M.; Scott, C.J.; Larko, D.E.

    1992-08-01

    Because of the great environmental significance of stratospheric ozone, and to support continuing research at the Antarctic Southern Hemisphere stations, the development of the 1991 ozone hole was monitored using data from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, produced in near-real-time. This atlas provides a complete set of daily polar orthographic projections of the TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere for the period August 1 through November 30, 1991. The 1991 ozone hole developed in a manner similar to that of the 1987, 1989, and 1990 holes, reaching a comparable depth in early October. However, the 1991 ozone hole filled far more rapidly than in 1987 or 1989, and nearly 4 weeks earlier than in 1990.

  7. Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Antarctic ozone atlas: August through November 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Penn, Lanning M.; Scott, Courtney J.; Larko, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Because of the great environmental significance of stratospheric ozone, and to support continuing research at the Antarctic Southern Hemisphere stations, the development of the 1991 ozone hole was monitored using data from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, produced in near-real-time. This atlas provides a complete set of daily polar orthographic projections of the TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere for the period August 1 through November 30, 1991. The 1991 ozone hole developed in a manner similar to that of the 1987, 1989, and 1990 holes, reaching a comparable depth in early October. However, the 1991 ozone hole filled far more rapidly than in 1987 or 1989, and nearly 4 weeks earlier than in 1990.

  8. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules.

  9. Record low ozone measured at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, during the austral spring of 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.J.; Deshler, T.

    1994-12-31

    The annual springtime ozone hole over Antarctica has been studied extensively since it was first reported. The University of Wyoming has participated in monitoring the development of the ozone hole over Antarctica since 1986 using balloonborne instruments to measure vertical profiles of ozone and particles at McMurdo Station, Antarctica. During austral spring 1993, record minimums in total column ozone were observed along with a record low within the main ozone layer at 12-20 kilometers (km). 6 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Calculations of Polar Ozone Loss Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Wu, J.

    1999-01-01

    We calculate vortex-averaged ozone loss rates at 465-K potential temperature during the Aug.-Sept. time period in the southern hemisphere and Feb.-Mar. time period in the northern hemisphere. Ozone loss rates are calculated two ways. First, from the time series of measurements of 03. Second, from measurements of ClO, from which ozone loss is inferred based on our theories of Cl-catalyzed ozone destruction. Both measurement sets are from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument. We find good agreement between vortex-averaged ozone loss rates calculated from these methods. Our analysis provides no support for recent work suggesting that current theories of Cl-catalyzed ozone loss underestimate the observed decrease in polar ozone during the ozone "hole" period.

  11. The 1988 Antarctic ozone monitoring Nimbus-7 TOMS data atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Penn, Lanning M.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.; Guimaraes, Patricia T.

    1989-01-01

    Because of the great environmental significance of ozone and to support continuing research at McMurdo, Syowa, and other Southern Hemisphere stations, the development of the 1988 ozone hole was monitored using data from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, produced in near-real-time. This Atlas provides a complete set of daily polar orthographic projections of the TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere for the period August 1 through November 17, 1988. Although total ozone in mini-holes briefly dropped below 150 DU in late August, the main ozone hole is seen to be much less pronounced than in 1987. Minimum values, observed in late September and early October 1988, were seldom less than 175 DU. Compared with the same period in 1987, when a pronounced ozone hole whose minimum value of 109 Dobson Units (DU) was the lowest total ozone ever observed, the 1988 ozone hole is displaced from the South Pole, opposing a persistent maximum with values consistently above 500 DU. Daily ozone values above selected Southern Hemisphere stations are presented, along with comparisons of the 1988 ozone distribution to that of other years.

  12. A feasibility study of methods for stopping the depletion of ozone over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Ways of stopping the ozone depletion in the ozone hole over Antarctica were studied. The basic objectives were: (1) to define and understand the phenomenon of the ozone hole; (2) to determine possible methods of stopping the ozone depletion; (3) to identify unknowns about the hole and possible solutions. Two basic ways of attacking the problem were identified. First is replenishment of ozone as it is being depleted. Second is elimination of ozone destroying agents from the atmosphere. The second method is a more permanent form of the solution. Elimination and replenishment methods are discussed in detail.

  13. Spatial observation of the ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin-Beekmann, Sophie

    2010-04-01

    This article provides an overview of the various satellite instruments, which have been used to observe stratospheric ozone and other chemical compounds playing a key role in stratospheric chemistry. It describes the various instruments that have been launched since the late 1970s for the measurement of total ozone column and ozone vertical profile, as well as the major satellite missions designed for the study of stratospheric chemistry. Since the discovery of the ozone hole in the early 1980s, spatial ozone measurements have been widely used to evaluate and quantify the spatial extension of polar ozone depletion and global ozone decreasing trends as a function of latitude and height. Validation and evaluation of satellite ozone data have been the subject of intense scientific activity, which was reported in the various ozone assessments of the state of the ozone layer published after the signature of the Montreal protocol. Major results, based on satellite observations for the study of ozone depletion at the global scale and chemical polar ozone loss, are provided. The use of satellite observations for the validation of chemistry climate models that simulate the recovery of the ozone layer and in data assimilation is also described.

  14. Ozone Basics

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn the difference between good (stratospheric) and bad (tropospheric) ozone, how bad ozone affects our air quality, health, and environment, and what EPA is doing about it through regulations and standards.

  15. Assimilation of MLS and OMI Ozone Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Wargan, K.; Chang, L.-P.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone data from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were assimilated into the ozone model at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). This assimilation produces ozone fields that are superior to those from the operational GMAO assimilation of Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) instrument data. Assimilation of Aura data improves the representation of the "ozone hole" and the agreement with independent Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III and ozone sonde data. Ozone in the lower stratosphere is captured better: mean state, vertical gradients, spatial and temporal variability are all improved. Inclusion of OMI and MLS data together, or separately, in the assimilation system provides a way of checking how consistent OMI and MLS data are with each other, and with the ozone model. We found that differences between OMI total ozone column data and model forecasts decrease after MLS data are assimilated. This indicates that MLS stratospheric ozone profiles are consistent with OMI total ozone columns. The evaluation of error characteristics of OMI and MLS ozone will continue as data from newer versions of retrievals becomes available. We report on the initial step in obtaining global assimilated ozone fields that combine measurements from different Aura instruments, the ozone model at the GMAO, and their respective error characteristics. We plan to use assimilated ozone fields in estimation of tropospheric ozone. We also plan to investigate impacts of assimilated ozone fields on numerical weather prediction through their use in radiative models and in the assimilation of infrared nadir radiance data from NASA's Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS).

  16. A Comparison of Runoff Quantity and Quality from Two Small Basins Undergoing Implementation of Conventional and Low-Impact-Development (LID) Strategies: Cross Plains, Wisconsin, Water Years 1999-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, William R.; Bannerman, Roger T.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental managers are often faced with the task of designing strategies to accommodate development while minimizing adverse environmental impacts. Low-impact development (LID) is one such strategy that attempts to mitigate environmental degradation commonly associated with impervious surfaces. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, studied two residential basins in Cross Plains, Wis., during water years 1999?2005. A paired-basin study design was used to compare runoff quantity and quality from the two basins, one of which was developed in a conventional way and the other was developed with LID. The conventional-developed basin (herein called ?conventional basin?) consisted of curb and gutter, 40-foot street widths, and a fully connected stormwater-conveyance system. The LID basin consisted of grassed swales, reduced impervious area (32-foot street widths), street inlets draining to grass swales, a detention pond, and an infiltration basin. Data collected in the LID basin represented predevelopment through near-complete build-out conditions. Smaller, more frequent precipitation events that produced stormwater discharge from the conventional basin were retained in the LID basin. Only six events with precipitation depths less than or equal to 0.4 inch produced measurable discharge from the LID basin. Of these six events, five occurred during winter months when underlying soils are commonly frozen, and one was likely a result of saturated soil from a preceding storm. In the conventional basin, the number of discharge events, using the same threshold of precipitation depth, was 180, with nearly one-half of those resulting from precipitation depths less than 0.2 inch. Precipitation events capable of producing appreciable discharge in the LID basin were typically those of high intensity or precipitation depth or those that occurred after soils were already saturated. Total annual discharge volume measured from

  17. Contrasts between Antarctic and Arctic ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Susan; Portmann, Robert W; Thompson, David W J

    2007-01-09

    This work surveys the depth and character of ozone depletion in the Antarctic and Arctic using available long balloon-borne and ground-based records that cover multiple decades from ground-based sites. Such data reveal changes in the range of ozone values including the extremes observed as polar air passes over the stations. Antarctic ozone observations reveal widespread and massive local depletion in the heart of the ozone "hole" region near 18 km, frequently exceeding 90%. Although some ozone losses are apparent in the Arctic during particular years, the depth of the ozone losses in the Arctic are considerably smaller, and their occurrence is far less frequent. Many Antarctic total integrated column ozone observations in spring since approximately the 1980s show values considerably below those ever observed in earlier decades. For the Arctic, there is evidence of some spring season depletion of total ozone at particular stations, but the changes are much less pronounced compared with the range of past data. Thus, the observations demonstrate that the widespread and deep ozone depletion that characterizes the Antarctic ozone hole is a unique feature on the planet.

  18. A search For Artic ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Four atmospheric scientists took off with their instruments for Greenland last week, where they will try to see if depletion of stratospheric ozone in the Arctic can be detected as it has been in Antarctica since 1985.Members of the scientific team include Susan Solomon and George Mount of the Aeronomy Laboratory at the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration (NOAA) in Boulder, Colo., and Ryan Sanders and Roger Jakoubec of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science in Norman, Okla. These four participated in previous National Ozone Expedition (NOZE) investigations at McMurdo Station in Antarctica that helped document the ozonehole,” decreases of up to 50% in ozone during the early austral spring in September and October of the last 2 years (1986-1987).

  19. Emergence of healing in the Antarctic ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Susan; Ivy, Diane J.; Kinnison, Doug; Mills, Michael J.; Neely, Ryan R.; Schmidt, Anja

    2016-07-01

    Industrial chlorofluorocarbons that cause ozone depletion have been phased out under the Montreal Protocol. A chemically driven increase in polar ozone (or “healing”) is expected in response to this historic agreement. Observations and model calculations together indicate that healing of the Antarctic ozone layer has now begun to occur during the month of September. Fingerprints of September healing since 2000 include (i) increases in ozone column amounts, (ii) changes in the vertical profile of ozone concentration, and (iii) decreases in the areal extent of the ozone hole. Along with chemistry, dynamical and temperature changes have contributed to the healing but could represent feedbacks to chemistry. Volcanic eruptions have episodically interfered with healing, particularly during 2015, when a record October ozone hole occurred after the Calbuco eruption.

  20. Emergence of healing in the Antarctic ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Susan; Ivy, Diane J; Kinnison, Doug; Mills, Michael J; Neely, Ryan R; Schmidt, Anja

    2016-07-15

    Industrial chlorofluorocarbons that cause ozone depletion have been phased out under the Montreal Protocol. A chemically driven increase in polar ozone (or "healing") is expected in response to this historic agreement. Observations and model calculations together indicate that healing of the Antarctic ozone layer has now begun to occur during the month of September. Fingerprints of September healing since 2000 include (i) increases in ozone column amounts, (ii) changes in the vertical profile of ozone concentration, and (iii) decreases in the areal extent of the ozone hole. Along with chemistry, dynamical and temperature changes have contributed to the healing but could represent feedbacks to chemistry. Volcanic eruptions have episodically interfered with healing, particularly during 2015, when a record October ozone hole occurred after the Calbuco eruption.

  1. The World Already Avoided: Quantifying the Ozone Benefits Achieved by the Montreal Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipperfield, Martyn; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu; McKenzie, Richard; Velders, Guus; Pyle, John

    2015-04-01

    Chlorine and bromine-containing ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are controlled by the 1987 Montreal Protocol. In consequence, atmospheric equivalent chlorine peaked in 1993 and has been declining slowly since then. Consistent with this, models project a gradual increase in stratospheric ozone with the Antarctic Ozone Hole expected to disappear by ~2050. However, we show that by 2014 the Montreal Protocol has already achieved significant benefits for the ozone layer. Using an off-line 3-D atmospheric chemistry model, we demonstrate that much larger ozone depletion than observed has been avoided by the protocol, with benefits for surface UV and climate. A deep Arctic Ozone Hole, with column values <120 DU, would have occurred given the meteorological conditions in 2011. The Antarctic Ozone Hole would have grown in size by 40% by 2013, with enhanced loss at subpolar latitudes. The ozone decline over northern hemisphere middle latitudes would have continued, more than doubling to ~15% by 2013.

  2. Ozone Layer Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Ozone Layer Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Ozone Layer Protection Welcome to EPA's ozone layer protection web ...

  3. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates.

  4. Ozone decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  5. Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Known as tropospheric or ground-level ozone, this gas is harmful to human heath and the environment. Since it forms from emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx), these pollutants are regulated under air quality standards.

  6. Ozone, Tropospheric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    1995-01-01

    In the early part of the 20th century, ground-based and balloon-borne measurements discovered that most of atmosphere's ozone is located in the stratosphere with highest concentrations located between 15 and 30 km (9,3 and 18.6 miles). For a long time, it was believed that tropospheric ozone originated from the stratosphere and that most of it was destroyed by contact with the earth's surface. Ozone, O3, was known to be produced by the photo-dissociation of molecular oxygen, O2, a process that can only occur at wavelengths shorter than 242 nm. Because such short-wave-length radiation is present only in the stratosphere, no tropospheric ozone production is possible by this mechanism. In the 1940s, however, it became obvious that production of ozone was also taking place in the troposphere. The overall reaction mechanism was eventually identified by Arie Haagen-Smit of the California Institute of Technology, in highly polluted southern California. The copious emissions from the numerous cars driven there as a result of the mass migration to Los Angeles after World War 2 created the new unpleasant phenomenon of photochemical smog, the primary component of which is ozone. These high levels of ozone were injuring vegetable crops, causing women's nylons to run, and generating increasing respiratory and eye-irritation problems for the populace. Our knowledge of tropospheric ozone increased dramatically in the early 1950s as monitoring stations and search centers were established throughout southern California to see what could be done to combat this threat to human health and the environment.

  7. Retrospective on the National Ozone Expeditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S.

    2002-05-01

    In 1985, the British Antarctic Survey discovered the Antarctic ozone hole. In March of l986, a small group of American scientists began planning an emergency mission to Antarctica to try to gain insights as to its cause. On August 22, l986, they arrived in Antarctica and began a series of ground-based and balloon-borne measurements that ultimately helped show that the ozone hole is caused primarily by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Multiple instruments measured ozone's rapid disappearance in September, documenting the rate of its destruction and helping to substantiate the validity of the remarkable ozone trend. Others measured chemical compounds such as HCl, nitrogen dioxide, and HF. A second expedition occurred in 1987, and some of the investigators continued a series of measurements for multiple years. Key measurements were those of de Zafra and coworkers, which focussed on observations of chlorine monoxide using ground-based microwave emission techniques. The contributions of these National Ozone Expeditions to the evolution of understanding of the Antarctic ozone hole will be reviewed in this lecture.

  8. High-Resolution Ozone Imager (HIROIG)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    right place at the right time. Earth -based measurements may also be adversely affected by weather or may be denied access to certain launch sites. On...enough into the atmosphere to be affected by an ozone hole beyond a certain depth. Thus, the signature of an ozone hole is a localized intensifica- tion...100 spatial pixels give a pixel size of 1 km at nadir when the Earth is viewed from a Sun-synchronous altitude of approximately 800 km. The two outer

  9. Looking at Ozone From a New Angle: Shuttle Ozone Limb Sounding Experiment-2 (SOLSE-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Hilsenrath, Ernest; Janz, Scott; Brown, Tammy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ozone layer above Earth is our planet's fragile sunscreen, protecting people, vegetation, and wildlife. NASA has been measuring ozone for more than 20 years by looking down, but SOLSE-2 will show that more information is available by looking at ozone from the side, at Earth's limb or atmospheric boundary. When the ozone layer is compromised, increased ultraviolet (UV) levels from the sun cause health problems ranging from severe sunburns to skin cancer and cataracts. A concerted global effort has been made to reduce or eliminate the production of chemicals that deplete ozone, but the ozone layer is not expected to recover for many decades because these chemicals can remain active in the atmosphere for up to 100 years. We know now that ozone monitoring needs to be focused in the lower stratosphere. The discovery of the ozone hole in 1985 demonstrated that very large changes in ozone were occurring in the lower stratosphere near 20 km, instead of the upper stratosphere as first expected, and where current ozone instruments are focused. Measuring ozone from a tangential perspective that is centered at the limb provides ozone profiles concentrated in the lower stratosphere. The first flight of SOLSE proved that this technique achieves the accuracy and coverage of traditional measurements, and surpasses the altitude resolution and depth of retrieval of conventional techniques. Results from the first flight convinced the science community to design the next generation ozone monitoring satellite based on SOLSE. The Ozone Mapping and Profiling Suite (OMPS) is currently being built for the NPOESS satellite. The primary objective of SOLSE-2 is to confirm the promising results of the first flight over a wider range of viewing conditions and spectral wavelengths. Sometimes a really hard problem can be solved when you look at it from a different angle! While scientists conduct research, protect yourself by observing the UV index and spend less unprotected time outdoors.

  10. Children's Models of Understanding of Two Major Global Environmental Issues (Ozone Layer and Greenhouse Effect).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyes, Edward; Stanisstreet, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Aims to quantify the models that 13- and 14 year-old students hold about the causes of the greenhouse effect and ozone layer depletion. Assesses the prevalence of those ideas that link the two phenomena. Twice as many students think that holes in the ozone layer cause the greenhouse effect than think the greenhouse effect causes ozone depletion.…

  11. Children's and Adults' Knowledge and Models of Reasoning about the Ozone Layer and Its Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Bisanz, Gay L.

    2003-01-01

    Examines children's and adults' knowledge of the ozone layer and its depletion, whether this knowledge increases with age, and how the ozone layer and ozone hole might be structured as scientific concepts. Uses a standardized set of questions to interview children and adults in Canada. Discusses implications of the results for health…

  12. Quantifying the ozone and ultraviolet benefits already achieved by the Montreal Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipperfield, M. P.; Dhomse, S. S.; Feng, W.; McKenzie, R. L.; Velders, G. J. M.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    Chlorine- and bromine-containing ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are controlled by the 1987 Montreal Protocol. In consequence, atmospheric equivalent chlorine peaked in 1993 and has been declining slowly since then. Consistent with this, models project a gradual increase in stratospheric ozone with the Antarctic ozone hole expected to disappear by ~2050. However, we show that by 2013 the Montreal Protocol had already achieved significant benefits for the ozone layer. Using a 3D atmospheric chemistry transport model, we demonstrate that much larger ozone depletion than observed has been avoided by the protocol, with beneficial impacts on surface ultraviolet. A deep Arctic ozone hole, with column values <120 DU, would have occurred given meteorological conditions in 2011. The Antarctic ozone hole would have grown in size by 40% by 2013, with enhanced loss at subpolar latitudes. The decline over northern hemisphere middle latitudes would have continued, more than doubling to ~15% by 2013.

  13. Quantifying the ozone and ultraviolet benefits already achieved by the Montreal Protocol.

    PubMed

    Chipperfield, M P; Dhomse, S S; Feng, W; McKenzie, R L; Velders, G J M; Pyle, J A

    2015-05-26

    Chlorine- and bromine-containing ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are controlled by the 1987 Montreal Protocol. In consequence, atmospheric equivalent chlorine peaked in 1993 and has been declining slowly since then. Consistent with this, models project a gradual increase in stratospheric ozone with the Antarctic ozone hole expected to disappear by ∼2050. However, we show that by 2013 the Montreal Protocol had already achieved significant benefits for the ozone layer. Using a 3D atmospheric chemistry transport model, we demonstrate that much larger ozone depletion than observed has been avoided by the protocol, with beneficial impacts on surface ultraviolet. A deep Arctic ozone hole, with column values <120 DU, would have occurred given meteorological conditions in 2011. The Antarctic ozone hole would have grown in size by 40% by 2013, with enhanced loss at subpolar latitudes. The decline over northern hemisphere middle latitudes would have continued, more than doubling to ∼15% by 2013.

  14. Quantifying the ozone and ultraviolet benefits already achieved by the Montreal Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Chipperfield, M. P.; Dhomse, S. S.; Feng, W.; McKenzie, R. L.; Velders, G.J.M.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine- and bromine-containing ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) are controlled by the 1987 Montreal Protocol. In consequence, atmospheric equivalent chlorine peaked in 1993 and has been declining slowly since then. Consistent with this, models project a gradual increase in stratospheric ozone with the Antarctic ozone hole expected to disappear by ∼2050. However, we show that by 2013 the Montreal Protocol had already achieved significant benefits for the ozone layer. Using a 3D atmospheric chemistry transport model, we demonstrate that much larger ozone depletion than observed has been avoided by the protocol, with beneficial impacts on surface ultraviolet. A deep Arctic ozone hole, with column values <120 DU, would have occurred given meteorological conditions in 2011. The Antarctic ozone hole would have grown in size by 40% by 2013, with enhanced loss at subpolar latitudes. The decline over northern hemisphere middle latitudes would have continued, more than doubling to ∼15% by 2013. PMID:26011106

  15. Nimbus-7 TOMS Antarctic ozone atlas: August - December 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Penn, Lanning M.; Guimaraes, Patricia T.; Scott, Courtney J.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.

    1991-01-01

    Because of the great environmental significance of ozone and to support continuing research at the Antarctic and other Southern Hemisphere stations, the development of the 1990 ozone hole was monitored using data from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument, produced in near-real-time. This Atlas provides a complete set of daily polar orthographic projections of the TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere for the period 1 Aug. through 31 Dec. 1990. The 1990 ozone hole developed in a manner similar to that of 1987 and 1989, reaching a comparable depth in early October. This was in sharp contrast to the much weaker hold of 1988. The 1990 ozone hole remained at polar latitudes as it filled in Nov., in contrast to other recent years when the hold drifted to mid-latitudes before disappearing. Daily ozone values above selected Southern Hemisphere stations are presented, along with comparisons of the 1990 ozone distribution to that of other years. A new calibration scheme (Version 6) was used to process 1990 ozone values, as well as to reprocess those of previous years.

  16. Detection and Attribution of the Recovery of Polar Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, E. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Pawson, S.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2008-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early spring (late September - early October). The severity of the hole has been assessed from satellites using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole), calculating the average area coverage during this September-October period, and by estimating ozone mass deficit. Profile information shows that ozone is completely destroyed in the 14-2 1 km layer by early October. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen (chlorine and bromine) catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Both models and projections of ozone depleting substances (ODSs) into the 21St century reveal that polar ozone levels should recover in the 2060- 2070 period. In this talk, we will review current projections of polar ozone recovery. Using models and ODs projections, we explore both the past, near future (2008-2025), and far future (> 2025) levels of polar ozone. Finally, we will discuss various factors that complicate recovery such as greenhouse gas changes (e.g., cooling in the upper stratosphere) and the acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation.

  17. Black holes

    PubMed Central

    Brügmann, B.; Ghez, A. M.; Greiner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in black hole research is illustrated by three examples. We discuss the observational challenges that were met to show that a supermassive black hole exists at the center of our galaxy. Stellar-size black holes have been studied in x-ray binaries and microquasars. Finally, numerical simulations have become possible for the merger of black hole binaries. PMID:11553801

  18. Black holes.

    PubMed

    Brügmann, B; Ghez, A M; Greiner, J

    2001-09-11

    Recent progress in black hole research is illustrated by three examples. We discuss the observational challenges that were met to show that a supermassive black hole exists at the center of our galaxy. Stellar-size black holes have been studied in x-ray binaries and microquasars. Finally, numerical simulations have become possible for the merger of black hole binaries.

  19. UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Observations of Upper Atmosphere Ozone and Chlorine Monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R.; Read, W.; Waters, J.

    1994-01-01

    UARS MLS observations of stratospheric ozone and chlorine monoxide are described. Enhanced concentrations of ClO, the predominant form of reactive chlorine responsible for ozone depletion, are seen within both the northern and southern winter polar vortices. In the southern hemisphere, this leads directly to the development of the annual Antarctic ozone hole. While ozone depletion is also observed in the north, it is less severe and there is considerable interannual variability.

  20. "Holes" in Student Understanding: Addressing Prevalent Misconceptions regarding Atmospheric Environmental Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Sara C.; Walz, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    There is a misconception among undergraduate students that global warming is caused by holes in the ozone layer. In this study, we evaluated the presence of this and other misconceptions surrounding atmospheric chemistry that are responsible for the entanglement of the greenhouse effect and the ozone hole in students' conceptual frameworks. We…

  1. Tropopause Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, M.; Zhu, X.; Hsu, J.; Neu, J.; Tang, Q.

    2009-04-01

    The tropopause, however defined, is meant to describe the boundary between the well mixed troposphere and the stably stratified stratosphere. Ozone abundances in the vicinity of the tropopause exhibit large variations with latitude and season, being controlled by a combination of large-scale transport like the Brewer-Dobson circulation, small-scale turbulent mixing unresolved by global models, and photochemistry. A clear, instantaneous, 3-D definition of the tropopause is needed for diagnostics that separate stratosphere from troposphere, e.g., strat-trop exchange fluxes. In the UCI CTM, we define the stratosphere-troposphere boundary with what is effectively an age-of-air tracer: a tracer emitted uniformly from the surface with a uniform e-fold of 90 days (designated e90). Where the abundance of e90 falls below about 70% of the mass-median value (i.e., 33 days-old), we define as the stratosphere. With this diagnostic of the mixing barrier between stratosphere and troposphere the CTM with EC IFS forecast meteorology is able to match much of the observed seasonal cycle of the tropopause pressure and ozone abundance. With the CTM we examine the importance of chemistry vs. transport in controlling tropopause ozone. For example, we note that photolysis of molecular oxygen in the upper troposphere contributes significantly to tropopause ozone in the tropics and sub-tropics.

  2. Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition Preparation: Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This video shows the rollout of the ER-2 and DC-8 at Ames, takeoffs and landings, and operations aboard the DC-8 and ER-2 in Puntas Arenas, Chile. Animation of the north polar regions showing the ozone hole is also included.

  3. Modelling stratospheric polar ozone using objective analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandilands, J. W.; Kaminski, J. W.; Mcconnell, J. C.; Beagley, S. R.; Mcfarlane, N.

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the development of the austral ozone hole using a 3-D spectral chemical transport model at R15 resolution for the period 15th September to 15th October, 1991. The model is driven by objectively analyzed wind fields obtained from the Canadian Meteorological Center and uses the chemical module developed by Kaminski (1992). Although extensive processing of NO(y) and Cl(x) occurs within the model, the ozone hole that develops appears shallow and ephemeral. Analysis of the results indicate that the meridional transport of ozone is sufficient to overwhelm the substantial chemical depletion that does occur. We suggest that the low resolution objectively analyzed data used is unable to capture the essential isolated nature of the vortex.

  4. Characteristics of Ozone Generation using a Micro Hollow Cathode Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Yasunobu; Yasuoka, Koichi; Ishii, Shozo

    A new type of ozone generator using a micro hollow cathode discharge has been developed and evaluated on its operating characteristics. The electrode system consists of two thin metal cathodes and a ceramic spacer with a center hole of a few 100 µm diameter. By feeding high- pressure oxygen gas through the center hole, the residence time of the oxygen gas within the discharge space decreases to the order of micro second. The ozone generation efficiency increases up to 45 g/kWh at the ozone concentration of 7.6 g/Nm3 without any cooling systems. In this ozone generating system, the ozone decomposition mechanisms such as electron impacts and the heat rise of oxygen gas are effectively removed by decreasing the gas-residence time.

  5. The potential for ozone depletion in the Arctic polar stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, W. H.; Anderson, J. G.; Toohey, D. W.; Fahey, D. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Poole, L. R.

    1991-01-01

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. Most of the available chlorine (CHl and ClONO2) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl2O2 thoroughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO3, and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15 percent at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8 percent losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50 percent over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  6. The potential for ozone depletion in the arctic polar stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Brune, W H; Anderson, J G; Toohey, D W; Fahey, D W; Kawa, S R; Jones, R L; McKenna, D S; Poole, L R

    1991-05-31

    The nature of the Arctic polar stratosphere is observed to be similar in many respects to that of the Antarctic polar stratosphere, where an ozone hole has been identified. Most of the available chlorine (HCl and ClONO(2)) was converted by reactions on polar stratospheric clouds to reactive ClO and Cl(2)O(2) throughout the Arctic polar vortex before midwinter. Reactive nitrogen was converted to HNO(3), and some, with spatial inhomogeneity, fell out of the stratosphere. These chemical changes ensured characteristic ozone losses of 10 to 15% at altitudes inside the polar vortex where polar stratospheric clouds had occurred. These local losses can translate into 5 to 8% losses in the vertical column abundance of ozone. As the amount of stratospheric chlorine inevitably increases by 50% over the next two decades, ozone losses recognizable as an ozone hole may well appear.

  7. The chemistry of stratospheric ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, A.

    1997-01-01

    In the early 1980`s the Antarctic ozone hole was discovered. The ozone loss was 50 percent in the lower stratosphere during springtime, which is made possible by the conditions over Antarctica in winter. The absence of sunlight in the stratosphere during polar winter causes the stratospheric air column there to cool and sink, drawing air from lower latitudes into the upper stratosphere. This lower-latitude air gets closer to the Earth`s axis of rotation as it moves poleward and is accelerated by the need to conserve angular momentum to greater and greater westerly wind speeds forming a vortex bounded by the polar night jet stream. The air entering the vortex contains reactive ozone-destroying species. The observed ozone losses occurred concurrently with increases of chlorofluorocarbon increases.

  8. Issues in Stratospheric Ozone Depletion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Steven Andrew

    Following the announcement of the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985 there have arisen a multitude of questions pertaining to the nature and consequences of polar ozone depletion. This thesis addresses several of these specific questions, using both computer models of chemical kinetics and the Earth's radiation field as well as laboratory kinetic experiments. A coupled chemical kinetic-radiative numerical model was developed to assist in the analysis of in situ field measurements of several radical and neutral species in the polar and mid-latitude lower stratosphere. Modeling was used in the analysis of enhanced polar ClO, mid-latitude diurnal variation of ClO, and simultaneous measurements of OH, HO_2, H_2 O and O_3. Most importantly, such modeling was instrumental in establishing the link between the observed ClO and BrO concentrations in the Antarctic polar vortex and the observed rate of ozone depletion. The principal medical concern of stratospheric ozone depletion is that ozone loss will lead to the enhancement of ground-level UV-B radiation. Global ozone climatology (40^circS to 50^ circN latitude) was incorporated into a radiation field model to calculate the biologically accumulated dosage (BAD) of UV-B radiation, integrated over days, months, and years. The slope of the annual BAD as a function of latitude was found to correspond to epidemiological data for non-melanoma skin cancers for 30^circ -50^circN. Various ozone loss scenarios were investigated. It was found that a small ozone loss in the tropics can provide as much additional biologically effective UV-B as a much larger ozone loss at higher latitudes. Also, for ozone depletions of > 5%, the BAD of UV-B increases exponentially with decreasing ozone levels. An important key player in determining whether polar ozone depletion can propagate into the populated mid-latitudes is chlorine nitrate, ClONO_2 . As yet this molecule is only indirectly accounted for in computer models and field

  9. The search for signs of recovery of the ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherhead, Elizabeth C.; Andersen, Signe Bech

    2006-05-01

    Evidence of mid-latitude ozone depletion and proof that the Antarctic ozone hole was caused by humans spurred policy makers from the late 1980s onwards to ratify the Montreal Protocol and subsequent treaties, legislating for reduced production of ozone-depleting substances. The case of anthropogenic ozone loss has often been cited since as a success story of international agreements in the regulation of environmental pollution. Although recent data suggest that total column ozone abundances have at least not decreased over the past eight years for most of the world, it is still uncertain whether this improvement is actually attributable to the observed decline in the amount of ozone-depleting substances in the Earth's atmosphere. The high natural variability in ozone abundances, due in part to the solar cycle as well as changes in transport and temperature, could override the relatively small changes expected from the recent decrease in ozone-depleting substances. Whatever the benefits of the Montreal agreement, recovery of ozone is likely to occur in a different atmospheric environment, with changes expected in atmospheric transport, temperature and important trace gases. It is therefore unlikely that ozone will stabilize at levels observed before 1980, when a decline in ozone concentrations was first observed.

  10. The search for signs of recovery of the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Weatherhead, Elizabeth C; Andersen, Signe Bech

    2006-05-04

    Evidence of mid-latitude ozone depletion and proof that the Antarctic ozone hole was caused by humans spurred policy makers from the late 1980s onwards to ratify the Montreal Protocol and subsequent treaties, legislating for reduced production of ozone-depleting substances. The case of anthropogenic ozone loss has often been cited since as a success story of international agreements in the regulation of environmental pollution. Although recent data suggest that total column ozone abundances have at least not decreased over the past eight years for most of the world, it is still uncertain whether this improvement is actually attributable to the observed decline in the amount of ozone-depleting substances in the Earth's atmosphere. The high natural variability in ozone abundances, due in part to the solar cycle as well as changes in transport and temperature, could override the relatively small changes expected from the recent decrease in ozone-depleting substances. Whatever the benefits of the Montreal agreement, recovery of ozone is likely to occur in a different atmospheric environment, with changes expected in atmospheric transport, temperature and important trace gases. It is therefore unlikely that ozone will stabilize at levels observed before 1980, when a decline in ozone concentrations was first observed.

  11. Earth's Endangered Ozone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panofsky, Hans A.

    1978-01-01

    Included are (1) a discussion of ozone chemistry; (2) the effects of nitrogen fertilizers, fluorocarbons, and high level aircraft on the ozone layer; and (3) the possible results of a decreasing ozone layer. (MR)

  12. Observations and theories related to Antarctic ozone changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D.; Watson, R. T.; Cox, Richard A.; Kolb, C.; Mahlman, J.; Mcelroy, M.; Plumb, A.; Ramanathan, V.; Schoeberl, M.; Solomon, S.

    1989-01-01

    In 1985, there was a report of a large, sudden, and unanticipated decrease in the abundance of springtime Antarctic ozone over the last decade. By 1987, ozone decreases of more than 50 percent in the total column, and 95 percent locally between 15 and 20 km, had been observed. The scientific community quickly rose to the challenge of explaining this remarkable discovery; theoreticians soon developed a series of chemical and dynamical hypotheses to explain the ozone loss. Three basic theories were proposed to explain the springtime ozone hole. (1) The ozone hole is caused by the increasing atmospheric loadings of manmade chemicals containing chlorine (chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) and bromine (halons)). These chemicals efficiently destroy ozone in the lower stratosphere in the Antarctic because of the special geophysical conditions, of an isolated air mass (polar vortex) with very cold temperatures, that exist there. (2) The circulation of the atmosphere in spring has changed from being predominantly downward over Antarctica to upward. This would mean that ozone poor air from the troposphere, instead of ozone rich air from the upper stratosphere, would be transported into the lower Antarctic stratosphere. (3) The abundance of the oxides of nitrogen in the lower Antarctic stratosphere is periodically enhanced by solar activity. Nitrogen oxides are produced in the upper mesosphere and thermosphere and then transported downward into the lower stratosphere in Antarctica, resulting in the chemical destruction of ozone. The climatology and trends of ozone, temperature, and polar stratospheric clouds are discussed. Also, the transport and chemical theories for the Antarctic ozone hole are presented.

  13. Record low ozone at the south pole in the Spring of 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, D.J.; Oltmans, S.J.; Lathrop, J.A.; Harris, J.M.; Voemel, H. )

    1994-03-15

    On October 12, 1993, a balloon-borne ozone detector recorded a total ozone value of 91[+-]5 Dobson Units (DU) at the US Amundsen-Scott Station at the south pole. This is the lowest value of total ozone ever recorded anywhere, 13% below the previous low of 105 DU at the south pole in October of 1992. A region with a thickness of 5 km, from 14 to 19 km, was totally devoid of ozone as compared to only about half this thickness for the ozone void in 1992. Sub-100 DU total ozone values were observed on several soundings during 1993 whereas the 105 DU value was observed on only one occasion in 1992. The vertical profile of ozone indicates that the main reason for the record low ozone values in 1993 was an approximately 1 km upward extension of the ozone hole caused by unusual ozone loss in the 18-23 km region. Temperatures in this region were unusually low in September and October. Thus, the extension of the ozone hole may have been the result of the prolonged presence of polar stratospheric clouds at 18-23 km combined with the continued presence of sulfate aerosol from the Pinatubo eruption and, finally, increased chlorine levels. This scenario resulted in elevated ozone loss in a region where the ozone loss process is normally not saturated. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Ozone depletion at northern and southern latitudes derived from January 1979 to December 1991 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer Data

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, J.R.; McPeters, R.; Larko, D.

    1993-07-20

    Long-term ozone depletion rates (percentage change) have been computed from 13 years of Nimbus 8/Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data as a function of latitude, longitude, and month for the period January 1, 1979, to December 31, 1991. In both hemispheres the amount of ozone has decreased at latitudes above 30{degrees} by amounts that are larger than predicted by homogeneous chemistry models for the 13-year time period. The largest rates of ozone decrease occur in the southern hemisphere during winter and spring, with partial recovery during the summer and autumn. Outside of the Antarctic ozone hole region, the 12-year ozone depletion rates reach 8-10% per decade during the winter and spring at 55{degrees}S. Ozone depletion rates in excess of 7% per decade occur over populated regions in the southern hemisphere poleward of 45{degrees}S for 7 months of the year. Similar rates of decrease occur during northern winter and spring over large populated regions. The enhanced zonal average ozone depletion rates at northern mid-latitudes (40-50{degrees}N) during January, February, and March, that correspond to five geographically localized regions of high ozone depletion rates, are probably associated with long-term dynamical or temperature changes. Only the equatorial band between {+-}20{degrees} shows little or no long-term ozone change since January 1979. Ozone time series data have been examined for effect of volcanic eruptions on stratospheric ozone observed by TOMS, with only the Mount Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol injection affecting ozone amounts for a few months after the eruption in June 1991. Errors caused by the short-term presence of stratospheric aerosols in the TOMS zonally averaged ozone data are less than 1% before correction, and have no significant effect on ozone trend determination. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Change in ozone trends at southern high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, E.-S.; Cunnold, D. M.; Newchurch, M. J.; Salawitch, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term ozone variations at 60-70degS in spring are investigated using ground-based and satellite measurements. Strong positive correlation is shown between year-to-year variations of ozone and temperature in the Antarctic collar region in Septembers and Octobers. Based on this relationship, the effect of year-to-year variations in vortex dynamics has been filtered out. This process results in an ozone time series that shows increasing springtime ozone losses over the Antarctic until the mid-1990s. Since approximately 1997 the ozone losses have leveled off. The analysis confirms that this change is consistent across all instruments and is statistically significant at the 95% confidence level. This analysis quantifies the beginning of the recovery of the ozone hole, which is expected from the leveling off of stratospheric halogen loading due to the ban on CFCs and other halocarbons initiated by the Montreal Protocol.

  16. The Changing South Polar Cap of Mars: 1999-2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    13 July 2005 The south polar residual cap of Mars is composed of layered, frozen carbon dioxide. In 1999, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) showed that the carbon dioxide layers have been eroded to form a variety of circular pits, arcuate scarps, troughs, buttes, and mesas. In 2001, MOC images designed to provide repeated views of the areas imaged in 1999 -- with the hope of creating stereo (3-D) images, so that the height of scarps and depth of pits could be measured -- showed that the scarps had retreated, pits enlarged, and buttes and mesas shrank. Only carbon dioxide is volatile enough in the martian environment to have caused such dramatic changes -- the scarps were seen to retreat at an average rate of 3 meters (about 3 yards) per Mars year. Most of the scarp retreat occurs during the southern summer season; in some areas the scarps move as much as 8 meters, in others, only 1 meter per Mars year.

    Three Mars years have now elapsed since MOC first surveyed the south polar cap in 1999. Over the past several months, MGS MOC has been re-imaging areas that were seen in 1999, 2001, and 2003, to develop a detailed look at how the landscape has been changing. This animated GIF provides an example of the dramatic changes that have occurred during the past three martian years. The first image, a sub-frame of M09-05244, was acquired on 21 November 1999. The second image, a sub-frame of S06-00973, was obtained on 11 May 2005. The animation shows the changes that have occurred between 1999 and 2005. Each summer, the cap has lost more carbon dioxide. This may mean that the carbon dioxide content of the martian atmosphere has been increasing, bit by very tiny little bit, each of the years that MGS has been orbiting the red planet. These observations also imply that there was once a time, in the not-too-distant past (because there are no impact craters on the polar cap), when the atmosphere was somewhat thinner and colder, to permit the layers of carbon dioxide to form in the first place. Just as Earth's environment is very different today than it was just 11,000 or so years ago, the martian environment has also been changing on a similar time scale.

    Location near: 88.9oS, 25.7oW Image width: width: 0.6 km (0.4 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  17. Educating Older Adults: Discourses, Ideologies & Policies 1999-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This article tells the story of policies relevant to education, ageism and older adults between 1999 and 2005. It follows an article published in a previous "New Zealand Journal of Adult Learning" that described and critiqued policy developments between the 1980s and 2001. The story is located in the context of ongoing historical…

  18. Massive global ozone loss predicted following regional nuclear conflict.

    PubMed

    Mills, Michael J; Toon, Owen B; Turco, Richard P; Kinnison, Douglas E; Garcia, Rolando R

    2008-04-08

    We use a chemistry-climate model and new estimates of smoke produced by fires in contemporary cities to calculate the impact on stratospheric ozone of a regional nuclear war between developing nuclear states involving 100 Hiroshima-size bombs exploded in cities in the northern subtropics. We find column ozone losses in excess of 20% globally, 25-45% at midlatitudes, and 50-70% at northern high latitudes persisting for 5 years, with substantial losses continuing for 5 additional years. Column ozone amounts remain near or <220 Dobson units at all latitudes even after three years, constituting an extratropical "ozone hole." The resulting increases in UV radiation could impact the biota significantly, including serious consequences for human health. The primary cause for the dramatic and persistent ozone depletion is heating of the stratosphere by smoke, which strongly absorbs solar radiation. The smoke-laden air rises to the upper stratosphere, where removal mechanisms are slow, so that much of the stratosphere is ultimately heated by the localized smoke injections. Higher stratospheric temperatures accelerate catalytic reaction cycles, particularly those of odd-nitrogen, which destroy ozone. In addition, the strong convection created by rising smoke plumes alters the stratospheric circulation, redistributing ozone and the sources of ozone-depleting gases, including N(2)O and chlorofluorocarbons. The ozone losses predicted here are significantly greater than previous "nuclear winter/UV spring" calculations, which did not adequately represent stratospheric plume rise. Our results point to previously unrecognized mechanisms for stratospheric ozone depletion.

  19. Evolution of the total ozone field during the breakdown of the Antarctic circumpolar vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.P. )

    1990-09-20

    Nine years of total ozone measurements from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on Nimbus 7 are used to study the evolution of the southern hemisphere total ozone field during the breakdown of the Antarctic circumpolar vortex. The TOMS data provide detailed maps of the morphology of the ozone field and reliable estimates of the vertically integrated meridional transport of ozone during the springtime period when the breakdown occurs (September, October, November). In estimating the ozone transport, chemical effects, including those thought to be responsible for the Antarctic ozone hole, are neglected. This approximation appears to be valid for times scales of a few days to a week. On this time scale, local ozone changes are primarily due to transport. Planetary-scale waves, especially zonal wave numbers 1 and 2 dominate the eddy variance and ozone transport. Wave number 1 is quasistationary, while wave number 2 is eastward moving with a period of {approximately}10 days. Before the breakdown the planetary-scale waves transport ozone poleward (equatorward) as their amplitude increases (decreases). During the vortex breakdown and filling of the ozone hole, when poleward ozone transport is large, planetary wave amplitudes generally decrease.

  20. Simulation of stratospheric ozone in global forecast model using linear photochemistry parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Gill-Ran; Monge-Sanz, Beatriz M.; Lee, Eun-Hee; Ziemke, Jerald R.

    2016-11-01

    The two types of ozone, the simulation with interactive (prognostic) ozone using linear photochemistry parameterization (LPP) (INTR) and the simulation with non-interactive ozone using ozone climatology (CLIM), were used in the global forecast model. These two types of ozone were compared with ozone observations from the Aura Microwave Lim Sounder (MLS) and ozonesondes from 16-30 September 2008. The INTR is sensitive to LPP schemes while less sensitive to the time average of initial ozone data. Among three LPP schemes, CARIOLLE, COPCAT, and LINOZ, the COPCAT produces ozone profiles with least differences from MLS and ozonesondes. CLIM overestimates MLS at 200-20 hPa while INTR with COPCAT scheme underestimates MLS ozone above 5 hPa. Over the Antarctic in the lower stratosphere CLIM overestimates MLS and ozonesondes whereas INTR underestimates MLS but overestimates the ozonesonde data. Thus, COPCAT agrees better with ozonesonde data than any other LPP schemes and CLIM. Changing the ozone distribution from CLIM to INTR affects temperature profiles mainly through the modification of differential radiative fluxes. The correlations between ozone, differential radiative fluxes, and temperature are distinguished by altitude (or pressure levels). The correlations are strong or moderate between 3-1000 hPa (lower atmosphere) and weak above 3 hPa (upper atmosphere). This study demonstrates that the simulation of ozone using an appropriate LPP scheme is excellent in overcoming the drawbacks of using climatological ozone profiles that poorly agree with observations in extreme ozone hole events.

  1. Spatial regression analysis on 32 years total column ozone data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knibbe, J. S.; van der A, R. J.; de Laat, A. T. J.

    2014-02-01

    latitudes. We observe ozone contributing effects for potential vorticity and day length, negative effect on ozone for geopotential height and variable ozone effects due to the polar vortex at regions to the north and south of the polar vortices. Recovery of ozone is identified globally. However, recovery rates and uncertainties strongly depend on choices that can be made in defining the explanatory variables. In particular the recovery rates over Antarctica might not be statistically significant. Furthermore, the results show that there is no spatial homogeneous pattern which regression model and explanatory variables provide the best fit to the data and the most accurate estimates of the recovery rates. Overall these results suggest that care has to be taken in determining ozone recovery rates, in particular for the Antarctic ozone hole.

  2. Multi sensor reanalysis of total ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der A, R. J.; Allaart, M. A. F.; Eskes, H. J.

    2010-11-01

    A single coherent total ozone dataset, called the Multi Sensor Reanalysis (MSR), has been created from all available ozone column data measured by polar orbiting satellites in the near-ultraviolet Huggins band in the last thirty years. Fourteen total ozone satellite retrieval datasets from the instruments TOMS (on the satellites Nimbus-7 and Earth Probe), SBUV (Nimbus-7, NOAA-9, NOAA-11 and NOAA-16), GOME (ERS-2), SCIAMACHY (Envisat), OMI (EOS-Aura), and GOME-2 (Metop-A) have been used in the MSR. As first step a bias correction scheme is applied to all satellite observations, based on independent ground-based total ozone data from the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Data Center. The correction is a function of solar zenith angle, viewing angle, time (trend), and effective ozone temperature. As second step data assimilation was applied to create a global dataset of total ozone analyses. The data assimilation method is a sub-optimal implementation of the Kalman filter technique, and is based on a chemical transport model driven by ECMWF meteorological fields. The chemical transport model provides a detailed description of (stratospheric) transport and uses parameterisations for gas-phase and ozone hole chemistry. The MSR dataset results from a 30-year data assimilation run with the 14 corrected satellite datasets as input, and is available on a grid of 1× 1 1/2° with a sample frequency of 6 h for the complete time period (1978-2008). The Observation-minus-Analysis (OmA) statistics show that the bias of the MSR analyses is less than 1% with an RMS standard deviation of about 2% as compared to the corrected satellite observations used.

  3. Climate change and atmospheric chemistry: how will the stratospheric ozone layer develop?

    PubMed

    Dameris, Martin

    2010-10-25

    The discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica in 1985 was a surprise for science. For a few years the reasons of the ozone hole was speculated about. Soon it was obvious that predominant meteorological conditions led to a specific situation developing in this part of the atmosphere: Very low temperatures initiate chemical processes that at the end cause extreme ozone depletion at altitudes of between about 15 and 30 km. So-called polar stratospheric clouds play a key role. Such clouds develop at temperatures below about 195 K. Heterogeneous chemical reactions on cloud particles initiate the destruction of ozone molecules. The future evolution of the ozone layer will not only depend on the further development of concentrations of ozone-depleting substances, but also significantly on climate change.

  4. 75 FR 78557 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Amendments to the Section 608 Leak Repair Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... public health concerns include cataracts and immune suppression. Since the appearance of an ozone hole..., pressure or vacuum tests, fluorescent dye and black light, infrared or near infrared tests, and...

  5. About ozone depletion in stratosphere over Brazil in last decade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Inácio M.; Imai, Takeshi; Seguchi, Tomio

    The depletion of stratospheric ozone, resulting from the emission of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), has become a major issue since 1980. The decrease in stratospheric ozone over the polar regions has been pronounced at the South Pole than at the North Pole. In mid-latitude and equatorial regions, ozone depletion becomes less important; it depends on seasonal effects and on the characteristics of a particular region. The detailed mechanism by which the polar ozone holes form is different from that for the mid-latitude thinning, but the most important process in both trends is the catalytic destruction of ozone by atomic chlorine and bromine. The main source of these halogen atoms in the stratosphere is photodissociation of CFC compounds, commonly called freons, and of bromofluorocarbon compounds known as halons. These compounds are transported into the stratosphere after being emitted at the surface. Both ozone depletion mechanisms strengthened as emissions of CFCs and halons increased [1]. Measurements of stratospheric ozone carried out on several locations in Brazil and on the South Pole in the last decade (1996-2005), using detectors placed on ground, stratospheric balloons and Earth Probe TOMS satellites, are presented here. Detailed series analysis from 1980 up to the present describes a mean ozone depletion of 4[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozone/depletion.

  6. What Would Have Happened to the Ozone Layer if Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) had not been Regulated?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Oman, L. D.; Douglass, A. R.; Fleming, E. L.; Frith, S. M.; Hurwitz, M. M.; Kawa, S. R.; Jackman, C. H.; Krotkov, N. A.; Nash, E. R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Pawson, S.; Stolarski, R. S.; Velders, G. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Ozone depletion by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) was first proposed by Molina and Rowland in their 1974 Nature paper. Since that time, the sci entific connection between ozone losses and CFCs and other ozone depl eting substances (ODSs) has been firmly established with laboratory m easurements, atmospheric observations, and modeling research. This science research led to the implementation of international agreements t hat largely stopped the production of ODSs. In this study we use a fu lly-coupled radiation-chemical-dynamical model to simulate a future world where ODSs were never regulated and ODS production grew at an ann ual rate of 3%. In this "world avoided" simulation 1.7 % of the globa lly-average column ozone is destroyed by 2020, and 67% is destroyed b y 2065 in comparison to 1980. Large ozone depletions in the polar region become year-round rather than just seasonal as is currently observ ed in the Antarctic ozone hole. Very large temperature decreases are observed in response to circulation changes and decreased shortwave radiation absorption by ozone. Ozone levels in the tropical lower strat osphere remain constant until about 2053 and then collapse to near ze ro by 2058 as a result of heterogeneous chemical processes (as curren tly observed in the Antarctic ozone hole). The tropical cooling that triggers the ozone collapse is caused by an increase of the tropical upwelling. In response to ozone changes, ultraviolet radiation increa ses, more than doubling the erythemal radiation in the northern summer midlatitudes by 2060.

  7. Ozone mapper survives Soviet coup

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-06

    NASA's latest satellite-borne monitor of the Earth's protective ozone layer went operational a little earlier than planned last month. The unprecedented launch - on a Soviet weather satellite - of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) took place on 15 August. Three days later so did the coup that has shaken the Soviet Union to its foundations. So, instead of waiting weeks to let the instrument adjust to space conditions, NASA engineers, who were in Moscow to monitor the launch, turned TOMS on before going home - just 5 days post-launch. No problems resulted, and the orbiting instrument, which for the first 2 months of its 2-year mission will track the formation of this year's Antarctic ozone hole, is now returning data to both US and Soviet ground stations. The launch of a new TOMS was an urgent imperative for US atmospheric researchers. The old one, now approaching its 13th year in orbit on the NASA satellite Nimbus-7, was showing its age and threatened to quit working. Because of the tight launch schedules following the Challenger disaster, NASA sought outside help to get TOMS off the ground. The Soviet Union turned out to be the best partner: it is developing a new network of Meteor meteorology satellites, and the 1987 US/USSR space cooperation agreement allowed the Soviet Cyclone booster to become the Americans' savior.

  8. Ozone hits low levels over Antarctica, U. S

    SciTech Connect

    Zurer, P.

    1993-10-04

    This year's Antarctic ozone hole is as deep as any ever observed and is approaching the record geographical extent of 1992, according to preliminary satellite data. In addition, both groundbased and satellite observations indicate that ozone concentrations over the U.S. hit record lows earlier this year. For more than a decade, almost all the ozone at certain altitudes over Antarctica has been destroyed as the Sun returns to the polar region in September. This dramatic photochemical depletion, catalyzed by chlorine and bromine from man-made compounds, reaches its nadir in early October. Ozone levels return to near normal later in the season, when the circular pattern of winds that isolates air over Antarctica breaks down, and ozone-rich air pours in from the north.

  9. The sensitivity of polar ozone depletion to proposed geoengineering schemes.

    PubMed

    Tilmes, Simone; Müller, Rolf; Salawitch, Ross

    2008-05-30

    The large burden of sulfate aerosols injected into the stratosphere by the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 cooled Earth and enhanced the destruction of polar ozone in the subsequent few years. The continuous injection of sulfur into the stratosphere has been suggested as a "geoengineering" scheme to counteract global warming. We use an empirical relationship between ozone depletion and chlorine activation to estimate how this approach might influence polar ozone. An injection of sulfur large enough to compensate for surface warming caused by the doubling of atmospheric CO2 would strongly increase the extent of Arctic ozone depletion during the present century for cold winters and would cause a considerable delay, between 30 and 70 years, in the expected recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole.

  10. A video atlas of TOMS ozone data, 1978-88

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.; Krueger, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), on-board NASA's Nimbus-7 weather satellite, has been observing ozone over the earth once daily for the last 10 yr. A time-lapse atlas of 3440 color-coded images drawn from the TOMS archive from 1978 to 1988 has been visualized on a standard VHS videotape that is now available from NASA. The rapid and complex ozone variations presented demonstrate the difficulty of separating man-induced climate changes from natural variability. This article presents a few images from the atlas and describes interesting features in the animation, such as the correlation between ozone and 'the weather', and the recent deepening of the annual ozone hole over the South Pole. Originally intended as a browsing tool for the TOMS digital database, the videotape is a vivid presentation of the earth's atmospheric dynamics and chemistry that is recommended for scientists, educators, policy makers, and citizens concerned about the global environment.

  11. Plasmadynamic ozone generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, Yu. N.; Ogurechnikov, V. A.; Chizhov, Yu. L.

    2009-10-01

    The formation of ozone in a low-temperature supersonic flow of a mixture of air and partly dissociated oxygen supplied from a discharge plasmatron has been experimentally studied. For an oxygen mass fraction of 1.1% in the total gas flow supplied to this ozone generator, an ozone-air mixture containing 4.88 × 10-3 kg/m3 ozone is obtained at a specific energy consumption of 25.8 MJ/(kg ozone). In this regime, the ozone generator could operate for several dozen minutes.

  12. The ASSET intercomparison of ozone analyses: method and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, A. J.; Lahoz, W. A.; Bekki, S.; Bormann, N.; Errera, Q.; Eskes, H. J.; Fonteyn, D.; Jackson, D. R.; Juckes, M. N.; Massart, S.; Peuch, V.-H.; Rharmili, S.; Segers, A.

    2006-12-01

    This paper aims to summarise the current performance of ozone data assimilation (DA) systems, to show where they can be improved, and to quantify their errors. It examines 11 sets of ozone analyses from 7 different DA systems. Two are numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems based on general circulation models (GCMs); the other five use chemistry transport models (CTMs). The systems examined contain either linearised or detailed ozone chemistry, or no chemistry at all. In most analyses, MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) ozone data are assimilated; two assimilate SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography) observations instead. Analyses are compared to independent ozone observations covering the troposphere, stratosphere and lower mesosphere during the period July to November 2003. Biases and standard deviations are largest, and show the largest divergence between systems, in the troposphere, in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere, in the upper-stratosphere and mesosphere, and the Antarctic ozone hole region. However, in any particular area, apart from the troposphere, at least one system can be found that agrees well with independent data. In general, none of the differences can be linked to the assimilation technique (Kalman filter, three or four dimensional variational methods, direct inversion) or the system (CTM or NWP system). Where results diverge, a main explanation is the way ozone is modelled. It is important to correctly model transport at the tropical tropopause, to avoid positive biases and excessive structure in the ozone field. In the southern hemisphere ozone hole, only the analyses which correctly model heterogeneous ozone depletion are able to reproduce the near-complete ozone destruction over the pole. In the upper-stratosphere and mesosphere (above 5 hPa), some ozone photochemistry schemes caused large but easily remedied biases. The diurnal cycle of ozone in the

  13. Impact of climate variability on tropospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Grewe, Volker

    2007-03-01

    A simulation with the climate-chemistry model (CCM) E39/C is presented, which covers both the troposphere and stratosphere dynamics and chemistry during the period 1960 to 1999. Although the CCM, by its nature, is not exactly representing observed day-by-day meteorology, there is an overall model's tendency to correctly reproduce the variability pattern due to an inclusion of realistic external forcings, like observed sea surface temperatures (e.g. El Niño), major volcanic eruption, solar cycle, concentrations of greenhouse gases, and Quasi-Biennial Oscillation. Additionally, climate-chemistry interactions are included, like the impact of ozone, methane, and other species on radiation and dynamics, and the impact of dynamics on emissions (lightning). However, a number of important feedbacks are not yet included (e.g. feedbacks related to biogenic emissions and emissions due to biomass burning). The results show a good representation of the evolution of the stratospheric ozone layer, including the ozone hole, which plays an important role for the simulation of natural variability of tropospheric ozone. Anthropogenic NO(x) emissions are included with a step-wise linear trend for each sector, but no interannual variability is included. The application of a number of diagnostics (e.g. marked ozone tracers) allows the separation of the impact of various processes/emissions on tropospheric ozone and shows that the simulated Northern Hemisphere tropospheric ozone budget is not only dominated by nitrogen oxide emissions and other ozone pre-cursors, but also by changes of the stratospheric ozone budget and its flux into the troposphere, which tends to reduce the simulated positive trend in tropospheric ozone due to emissions from industry and traffic during the late 80s and early 90s. For tropical regions the variability in ozone is dominated by variability in lightning (related to ENSO) and stratosphere-troposphere exchange (related to Northern Hemisphere Stratospheric

  14. Basic Ozone Layer Science

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the ozone layer and how human activities deplete it. This page provides information on the chemical processes that lead to ozone layer depletion, and scientists' efforts to understand them.

  15. Ozone Trend Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The detection of anthropogenic disturbances in the Earth's ozone layer was studied. Two topics were addressed: (1) the level at which a trend in total ozoning is detected by existing data sources; and (2) empirical evidence in the prediction of the depletion in total ozone. Error sources are identified. The predictability of climatological series, whether empirical models can be trusted, and how errors in the Dobson total ozone data impact trend detectability, are discussed.

  16. Ozone drinking water treatment handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This book explains how ozone can be used to provide primary disinfection, while minimizing halogenated by-products. This is of use to those who design pilot plant studies in full scale ozone plants-and those who employ ozone and regulatory personnel. Detailed section on components of an ozonization system outlines feed gas preparation (air and oxygen), ozone generation, ozone contacting, ozone off gas destruction, monitoring and control of ozonation systems, engineering aspects of ozone, cost factors in ozone technology, case histories (European and U.S.).

  17. Ozone Antimicrobial Efficacy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is a potent germicide that has been used extensively for water purification. In Europe, 90 percent of the municipal water systems are treated with ozone, and in France, ozone has been used to treat drinking water since 1903. However, there is limited information on the bioc...

  18. CFCs, their replacements, and the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Noakes, T J

    1995-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have become widely used in a variety of applications, ranging from aerosols to refrigeration, through their unique combination of the properties of nonflammability and general inertness. However, their chemical stability, which makes CFCs relatively safe and non-toxic, is also responsible for their potential to damage the environment. From 1974 opinion developed that CFCs might indirectly affect the stratospheric 'ozone layer' through their ability to transport halogens, particularly chlorine, to this level. By the mid 1980s a consensus emerged that atmospheric CFCs could contribute significantly to ozone depletion and an annual thinning (a 'hole') in the ozone layer over the Antarctic was reported. Some of the atmospheric chemistry which is believed to occur, and some of the measurements made on the ozone 'layer' are reviewed together with the environmental regulatory actions that have been taken. These are leading to a controlled rapid phase out of a number of industrial chemicals, including CFCs. The pharmaceutical industry uses significant quantities of CFCs as propellants in metered dose inhalers (MDIs). Two suitable alternative molecules, the hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs) HFA134a and HFA227, which have the required properties but are not ozone depleting, are introduced.

  19. Brane holes

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that in models with large extra dimensions under special conditions one can extract information from the interior of 4D black holes. For this purpose we study an induced geometry on a test brane in the background of a higher-dimensional static black string or a black brane. We show that, at the intersection surface of the test brane and the bulk black string or brane, the induced metric has an event horizon, so that the test brane contains a black hole. We call it a brane hole. When the test brane moves with a constant velocity V with respect to the bulk black object, it also has a brane hole, but its gravitational radius r{sub e} is greater than the size of the bulk black string or brane r{sub 0} by the factor (1-V{sup 2}){sup -1}. We show that bulk ''photon'' emitted in the region between r{sub 0} and r{sub e} can meet the test brane again at a point outside r{sub e}. From the point of view of observers on the test brane, the events of emission and capture of the bulk photon are connected by a spacelike curve in the induced geometry. This shows an example in which extra dimensions can be used to extract information from the interior of a lower-dimensional black object. Instead of the bulk black string or brane, one can also consider a bulk geometry without a horizon. We show that nevertheless the induced geometry on the moving test brane can include a brane hole. In such a case the extra dimensions can be used to extract information from the complete region of the brane-hole interior. We discuss thermodynamic properties of brane holes and interesting questions which arise when such an extra-dimensional channel for the information mining exists.

  20. History of Ozone Research: From Schonbein to the Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    In 1840, C.F. Schonbein recognized that the smell generated in several different electrical and chemical processes was a single substance. He named this substance "ozein" from the Greek for "to smell". This substance we know today as ozone. Several periods can be distinguished in the continued development of our understanding of ozone. Throughout the late 19th century, the identity and properties of ozone were established and described. Ozone was recognized to be a constituent of normal air and tests were established to measure its concentration. Its disinfectant properties were recognized. New methods were developed for making ozone in the laboratory. In 1879, ultraviolet spectroscopic techniques were applied to the measurement of the solar spectrum and it was discovered by Comu that the spectrum was cut off at about 300 nm wavelength. Hartley suggested, based on laboratory measurements, that this cutoff was due to ozone in the atmosphere which he correctly asserted was somewhere in the upper atmosphere. This began the period of development of the amount and distribution of ozone throughout the atmosphere. In 1930, Chapman put forward the first theory of the formation and destruction of ozone. By the mid-1960s it was becoming obvious that the description of the chemical loss term was inadequate. By the early 1970s the chemical destruction of ozone by the oxides of hydrogen, nitrogen, chlorine, and bromine was recognized as an essential element in the chemical balance determining the ozone concentration. Today, ozone is a broad research project which crosses the boundaries of traditional disciplines. Stratospheric ozone loss due to chlorofluorocarbons is a newsworthy item. The Antarctic ozone hole opens up every spring. The provisions of the Montreal Protocol were agreed upon by countries around the world and promise to reduce the future levels of ozone-destroying chlorine in the stratosphere. Ozone concentrations in polluted cities are a subject of local and

  1. Overview of ozone bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenberg, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    The potential impact of the pulp and paper industry on the environment may be reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone. The reactivity of ozone coupled with the heterogeneity of pulp allows many types of reactions to occur during pulp bleaching. Ozone cleaves the aromatic rings and side chain double bonds in lignin in Criegee-type mechanisms. Activated carbon-hydrogen bonds are fragmented in lignin side chains, as well as Cl carbons of {beta}-glycosides, by way of a 1,3 dipolar insertion forming a hydrotrioxide intermediate. Ozone also attacks carbohydrates at acetal oxygens, depolymerizing at the glycosidic bond. Unsaturated sites are ozonated before aliphatic sites resulting in a predominance of lignin reactions over carbohydrate reactions until lignin is substantially removed from the pulp. Important factors in the successful application of ozone bleaching include minimizing ozone decomposition and other secondary reactions, reducing exposure of cellulose to high concentrations of ozone and radicals, and promoting uniform exposure of ozone to lignin. The quantity of chlorinated organic compounds in effluents can be drastically reduced by replacing chlorine-based bleaching reagents with ozone; less organochlorine is formed and there can be greater recycle of bleach plant wastes back to the recovery cycle. Recycling of bleach plant waste also reduces total organic loading in the effluent. The toxicity of ozone filtrates is variable compared to conventional filtrates and depends on several parameters including bleaching conditions, biological treatment, and target organisms.

  2. Spring polar ozone behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding of the springtime behavior of polar stratospheric ozone as of mid 1990 is summarized. Heterogeneous reactions on polar stratospheric clouds as hypothesis for ozone loss are considered and a simplified description of the behavior of Antarctic ozone in winter and spring is given. Evidence that the situation is more complicated than described by the theory is produced. Many unresolved scientific issues remain and some of the most important problems are identified. Ozone changes each spring since 1979 have clearly established for the first time that man made chlorine compounds influence stratospheric ozone. Long before important advances in satellite and in situ investigations, it was Dobson's decision to place a total ozone measuring spectrometer at Halley Bay in Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year and subsequent continuous monitoring which led to the discovery that ozone was being destroyed each spring by chlorine processed by polar stratospheric clouds.

  3. Ozone and the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, Tatsuo

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the stratospheric ozone is effective in absorbing almost all radiation below 300 nm at heights below 300 km. The distribution of global ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, and the latitudinal variations of the total ozone column over four seasons are considered. The theory of the ozone layer production is discussed together with catalytic reactions for ozone loss and the mechanisms of ozone transport. Special attention is given to the anthropogenic perturbations, such as SST exhaust gases and freon gas from aerosol cans and refrigerators, that may cause an extensive destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer and thus have a profound impact on the world climate and on life.

  4. Stratospheric ClO and ozone from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Manney, G. L.; Elson, L. S.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Harwood, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of atmospheric ozone and of ClO (the predominant form of reactive chlorine responsible for stratospheric ozone depletion) are reported for both the Arctic and Antarctic winters of the past 18 months. Chlorine in the lower stratosphere was almost completely converted to chemically reactive forms in both the northern and southern polar winter vortices. This occurred in the south long before the development of the Antarctic ozone hole, suggesting that ozone loss can be masked by influx of ozone-rich air.

  5. Chemical Loss of Polar Ozone: Present Understanding and Remaining Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, Ross; Canty, Tim; Cunnold, Derek; Dorf, Marcel; Frieler, Katja; Godin-Beekman, Sophie; Newchurch, Michael; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Rex, Markus; Stimpfle, Rick; Streibel, Martin; vonderGathen, Peter; Weisenstein, Debra; Yan, Eun-Su

    2005-01-01

    Not long after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, it was established that halogen compounds, supplied to the atmosphere mainly by anthropogenic activities, are the primary driver of polar ozone loss. We will briefly review the chemical mechanisms that cause polar ozone loss and the early evidence showing the key role played by anthropogenic halogens. Recently, stratospheric halogen loading has leveled off, due to adherence to the Montreal Protocol and its amendments that has essentially banned CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) and other halocarbons. We will describe recent reports of the first stage of recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole (e.g., a statistically significant slowing of the downward trend), associated with the leveling off of stratospheric halogens. Despite this degree of understanding, we will discuss the tendency of photochemical models to underestimate the observed rate of polar ozone loss and a hypothesis that has recently been put forth that might resolve this discrepancy. Finally, we will briefly discuss chemical loss of Arctic ozone, which

  6. Chemical Loss of Polar Ozone: Present Understanding and Remaining Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Canty, T.; Cunnold, D.; Dorf, M.; Frieler, K.; Godin-Beekman, S.; Newchurch, M. J.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Rex, M.; Stimpfle, R. M.; Streibel, M.; von der Gathen, P.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Yang, E.

    2005-12-01

    Not long after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, it was established that halogen compounds, supplied to the atmosphere mainly by anthropogenic activities, are the primary driver of polar ozone loss. We will briefly review the chemical mechanisms that cause polar ozone loss and the early evidence showing the key role played by anthropogenic halogens. Recently, stratospheric halogen loading has leveled off, due to adherence to the Montreal Protocol and its amendments that has essentially banned CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) and other halocarbons. We will describe recent reports of the first stage of recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole (e.g., a statistically significant slowing of the downward trend), associated with the leveling off of stratospheric halogens. Despite this degree of understanding, we will discuss the tendency of photochemical models to underestimate the observed rate of polar ozone loss and a hypothesis that has recently been put forth that might resolve this discrepancy. Finally, we will briefly discuss chemical loss of Arctic ozone, which also involves anthropogenic halogens but is governed primarily by year-to-year variability in stratospheric temperature.

  7. Sensitivity of the FVGCM to Changes in Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski; Pawson, S.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Douglass, A.; Newman, P.

    2004-01-01

    We have carried out an experiment with the finite volume general circulation model (FVGCM). This experiment consisted of two different imposed changes in the climatological ozone fields assumed in the radiation code. for conditions with no significant ozone hole. This distribution was obtained from a 50-year simulation of the full stratospheric ozone chemistry, with a time-dependent chlorine loading, done with our off-line chemical transport model (CTM). Three years (1978-1980) of this simulation were averaged to form a monthly, zonal-mean ozone distribution that was used in the 20-year integration of the FVGCM for "unperturbed" conditions. The second 20-year GCM integration included a fully-developed ozone hole. This ozone distribution was from three years, 1998-2000, from the same CTM simulation. The goal of this work is to determine the coupled response of the chemistry and dynamics of the stratosphere. These experiments are the first step in understanding the coupled response. An important initial question concerns the significance of the signals: if 20-year integrations turn out to be too short, the runs will be extended.

  8. Decadal evolution of atmospheric ozone and remote sensing of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yibo

    1997-09-01

    In chapter 1, the decadal evolution of the Antarctic ozone hole is studied by using ozone column amounts obtained by the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) in the southern polar region during late austral winter and spring (Days 240-300) for 1980-1991 using area- mapping techniques and area-weighted vortex averages. The vortex here is defined using the -50 PVU contour on the 500 K isentropic surface. There is a distinct change after 1985 in the vortex averaged column ozone depletion rate during September and October, the period of maximum ozone loss. The mean ozone depletion rate in the vortex between Day 240 and the day of minimum vortex-averaged ozone is about 1 DU/day at the beginning of the decade, increasing to about 1.8 DU/day by 1985, and then apparently saturating thereafter. The vortex-average column ozone during September and October has declined at the rate of 11.3 DU/yr (3.8%) from 1980 to 1987 and at a smaller rate of 2 DU/yr (0.9%) from 1987 to 1991. In chapter 2, we show that standard deviation of column ozone from the zonal mean (COSDZ) provides a measure of the longitudinal inhomogeneity in column ozone and dynamical wave activities in the atmosphere. Simulation of this quantity by three-dimensional (3-D) models could provide a sensitive check on the wave activities in the stratosphere that are responsible for ozone transport. Analysis of the TOMS data shows a profound secular change in COSDZ from 1979 to 1992. In the southern higher latitudes, COSDZ shows a significant increase around 65o in August and September, whereas the changes are much smaller in the northern higher latitudes in the boreal spring. In chapter 3, an estimate of tropospheric ozone levels over tropical pacific South America is obtained from the difference in the TOMS data between the high Andes and the Pacific Ocean. From 1979 to 1992 tropospheric ozone apparently increased by 1.47 ± 0.40 %/yr or 0.21 ± 0.06 DU/yr over South America and the surrounding oceans. We model

  9. The 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment: the Nimbus-7 TOMS Data Atlas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin J.; Ardanuy, Philip E.; Sechrist, Frank S.; Penn, Lanning M.; Larko, David E.; Doiron, Scott D.; Galimore, Reginald N.

    1988-01-01

    Total ozone data taken by the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) played a central role in the successful outcome of the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment. The near-real-time TOMS total ozone observations were suppled within hours of real time to the operations center in Punta Arenas, Chile, over a telecommunications network designed specifically for this purpose. The TOMS data preparation and method of transfer over the telecommunications links are reviewed. This atlas includes a complete set of the near-real-time TOMS orbital overpass data over regions around the Palmer Peninsula of Antarctica for the period of August 8 through September 29, 1987. Also provided are daily polar orthographic projections of TOMS total ozone measurements over the Southern Hemisphere from August through November 1987. In addition, a chronology of the salient points of the experiment, along with some latitudinal cross sections and time series at locations of interest of the TOMS total ozone observations are presented. The TOMS total ozone measurements are evaluated along the flight tracks of each of the ER-2 and DC-8 missions during the experiment. The ozone hole is shown here to develop in a monotonic progression throughout late August and September. The minimum total ozone amount was found on 5 October, when its all-time lowest value of 109 DU is recorded. The hole remains well defined, but fills gradually from mid-October through mid-November. The hole's dissolution is observed here to begin in mid-November, when it elongates and begins to rotate. By the end of November, the south pole is no longer located within the ozone hole.

  10. Coronal Holes.

    PubMed

    Cranmer, Steven R

    Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations), and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are established in the extended corona. For example, the importance of kinetic plasma physics and turbulence in coronal holes has been affirmed by surprising measurements from the UVCS instrument on SOHO that heavy ions are heated to hundreds of times the temperatures of protons and electrons. These observations point to specific kinds of collisionless Alfvén wave damping (i.e., ion cyclotron resonance), but complete theoretical models do not yet exist. Despite our incomplete knowledge of the complex multi-scale plasma physics, however, much progress has been made toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms ultimately responsible for producing the observed properties of coronal holes.

  11. Impact of polar ozone depletion on subtropical precipitation.

    PubMed

    Kang, S M; Polvani, L M; Fyfe, J C; Sigmond, M

    2011-05-20

    Over the past half-century, the ozone hole has caused a poleward shift of the extratropical westerly jet in the Southern Hemisphere. Here, we argue that these extratropical circulation changes, resulting from ozone depletion, have substantially contributed to subtropical precipitation changes. Specifically, we show that precipitation in the southern subtropics in austral summer increases significantly when climate models are integrated with reduced polar ozone concentrations. Furthermore, the observed patterns of subtropical precipitation change, from 1979 to 2000, are very similar to those in our model integrations, where ozone depletion alone is prescribed. In both climate models and observations, the subtropical moistening is linked to a poleward shift of the extratropical westerly jet. Our results highlight the importance of polar regions for the subtropical hydrological cycle.

  12. Reinterpretation of ozone data from Base Roi Baudouin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelder, H.; Muller, C.

    1994-01-01

    The ozone Dobson measurements obtained in Antarctica at the Belgian 'Base Roi Baudouin' (70 deg 26 min S, 24 deg 19 min E) in 1965 and 1966 were retrieved from the KNMI (Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute) archives in De Bilt. Despite excellent treatment at the time by the meteorologists in charge at the KNMI (Wisse and Meerburg, 1969), a study of the original observers notes was made in order to check possible seasonal ozone phenomena. No systematic anomaly in the first analysis was found; meteorological data from the site together with Brewer-Mast ozone soundings concur that the conditions did not correspond either in 1965 nor 1966 to the current ozone hole (Farman et al., 1985) situation, however, the data yields excellent correlation with stratospheric temperature and shows in 1966 a clear November maximum in opposition to an October value around 344 Dobson units.

  13. Organic pollutants removal in wastewater by heterogeneous photocatalytic ozonation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiadong; Xie, Yongbing; Cao, Hongbin

    2015-02-01

    Heterogeneous photocatalysis and ozonation are robust advanced oxidation processes for eliminating organic contaminants in wastewater. The combination of these two methods is carried out in order to enhance the overall mineralization of refractory organics. An apparent synergism between heterogeneous photocatalysis and ozonation has been demonstrated in many literatures, which gives rise to an improvement of total organic carbon removal. The present overview dissects the heterogeneous catalysts and the influences of different operational parameters, followed by the discussion on the kinetics, mechanism, economic feasibility and future trends of this integrated technology. The enhanced oxidation rate mainly results from a large amount of hydroxyl radicals generated from a synergistically induced decomposition of dissolved ozone, besides superoxide ion radicals and the photo-induced holes. Six reaction pathways possibly exist for the generation of hydroxyl radicals in the reaction mechanism of heterogeneous photocatalytic ozonation.

  14. Dynamic aspects of the ozone anomalies formation in the Antarctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapo, Palina; Svetashev, Alexander; Krasouski, Alexander; Barodka, Siarhei

    2013-04-01

    The ozone layer is a unique shield protecting all living creatures on our planet. However, it has become subject of active research only after the first ozone hole was discovered over Antarctica. Ozone layer depletion over Antarctica is an even more acute problem, since Antarctica is the only continent having a very endemic, rich nature with least human impact. It has been shown that extreme temperature conditions in polar stratosphere and polar stratospheric clouds formation in addition to photochemical reactions involving ozone and ozone-depleting substances act as a primary cause of ozone-layer depletion. In the present study we review the dynamic aspects of ozone anomalies formation in the Antarctic region by numerical simulation. For that purpose we consider the ozone hole which formed over Antarctica in the period of September-October 2011. Using the WRF modelling system and its PolarWRF modification, we simulate meteorological situation over Antarctica in the time periods of ozone hole formation and destruction, and also in the time period when the ozone hole is absent. Based on the modelling results, we argue that a cold air mass (anticyclone) formed over the territory of Antarctica during the formation of the ozone hole. Absence of solar irradiation and strong cooling of the atmosphere contribute to formation of such meteorological conditions during the Antarctic winter. In the stratosphere there is a region of low atmospheric pressure, which is clearly visible on a pressure topography map. Under the effect of the tropospheric and the stratospheric vortices, air patches movement leads to ozone concentration decrease and formation of the ozone anomalies. From the WRF system modelling results we calculate several basic meteorological characteristics and analyze surface maps and aerological (skew-T) diagrams for atmospheric variables with the NCL scripting language. We conclude that atmospheric dynamics has an impact on ozone depression. Also, we evaluate the

  15. Investigations of Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange of Ozone Derived From MLS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Mark A.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Ziemke, Jerry R.

    2006-01-01

    Daily high-resolution maps of stratospheric ozone have been constructed using observations by MLS combined with trajectory information. These fields are used to determine the extratropical stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) of ozone for the year 2005 using two diagnostic methods. The resulting two annual estimates compare well with past model- and observational-based estimates. Initial analyses of the seasonal characteristics indicate that significant STE of ozone in the polar regions occurs only during spring and early summer. We also examine evidence that the Antarctic ozone hole is responsible for a rapid decrease in the rate of ozone STE during the SH spring. Subtracting the high-resolution stratospheric ozone fiom OMI total column measurements creates a high-resolution tropospheric ozone residual (HTOR) product. The HTOR fields are compared to the spatial distribution of the ozone STE. We show that the mean tropospheric ozone maxima tend to occur near locations of significant ozone STE. This suggests that STE may be responsible for a significant fraction of many mean tropospheric ozone anomalies.

  16. Past changes, current state and future evolution of the ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin-Beekmann, S.

    2013-05-01

    The ozone layer has been under scrutiny since the discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica in the mid-eighties (Farman et al., 1985). The rapid disclosure of the main processes involved in polar ozone destruction lead to the signature of the Montreal Protocol that regulates the emission of ozone depleting substances (ODS). The objective of this presentation is to review the current understanding of past changes and current state of the ozone layer, the evolution of ODS concentration in the atmosphere and assess the projections of ozone recovery. Satellite measurements revealed a peak of ODS concentration in the mid and end of the nineties and ODS concentrations have started to decrease, albeit at a slower pace than during the increase period due to the atmospheric lifetimes of these compounds. The total ozone content has stabilized at global scale since the beginning of the 21st century. In 2009, integrated ozone content was about 3.5 % smaller in the 60°S-60°N region compared to values prior to 1980 (WMO, 2011). Climate change will influence the recovery of stratospheric. Both ozone depletion and increase of carbon dioxide induce a cooling of the stratosphere. In the winter polar stratosphere, this cooling enhances the formation of polar stratospheric clouds involved in the formation of the ozone hole. In the high stratosphere, it slows the chemical reactions destroying ozone and accelerates its reformation (WMO, 2011). Besides, most chemistry-climate models predict an acceleration of the stratospheric meridional circulation, which would speed up the ozone recovery (Eyring et al., 2010). This recovery is forecasted in periods ranging between 2015 and 2030 and between 2030 and 2040 in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. The Antarctic ozone hole will not disappear before 2050. Because of the acceleration of the meridional circulation, models simulate a super-recovery of ozone in the high latitude regions and an under recovery in the tropics. At

  17. Massive global ozone loss predicted following regional nuclear conflict

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Michael J.; Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard P.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Garcia, Rolando R.

    2008-01-01

    We use a chemistry-climate model and new estimates of smoke produced by fires in contemporary cities to calculate the impact on stratospheric ozone of a regional nuclear war between developing nuclear states involving 100 Hiroshima-size bombs exploded in cities in the northern subtropics. We find column ozone losses in excess of 20% globally, 25–45% at midlatitudes, and 50–70% at northern high latitudes persisting for 5 years, with substantial losses continuing for 5 additional years. Column ozone amounts remain near or <220 Dobson units at all latitudes even after three years, constituting an extratropical “ozone hole.” The resulting increases in UV radiation could impact the biota significantly, including serious consequences for human health. The primary cause for the dramatic and persistent ozone depletion is heating of the stratosphere by smoke, which strongly absorbs solar radiation. The smoke-laden air rises to the upper stratosphere, where removal mechanisms are slow, so that much of the stratosphere is ultimately heated by the localized smoke injections. Higher stratospheric temperatures accelerate catalytic reaction cycles, particularly those of odd-nitrogen, which destroy ozone. In addition, the strong convection created by rising smoke plumes alters the stratospheric circulation, redistributing ozone and the sources of ozone-depleting gases, including N2O and chlorofluorocarbons. The ozone losses predicted here are significantly greater than previous “nuclear winter/UV spring” calculations, which did not adequately represent stratospheric plume rise. Our results point to previously unrecognized mechanisms for stratospheric ozone depletion. PMID:18391218

  18. Ozone therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-02-22

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics.

  19. Ozone therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-01-01

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics. PMID:22574088

  20. Tropospheric Ozone Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltmans, S. J.; Lefohn, A. S.; Scheel, H.; Brunke, E. G.; Claude, H.; Tarasick, D. W.; Galbally, I.; Bodeker, G.; Redondas, A.; Simmonds, P.; Koide, T.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Harris, J. M.; Johnson, B. J.; Davies, J.; Cuevas, E.; Meyer, C.; Shadwick, D.

    2008-12-01

    Growing recognition of the role of "background" tropospheric ozone on climate forcing and as a boundary condition for air quality changes highlights the importance of obtaining a broad picture of tropospheric ozone changes. Key surface and ozonesonde observing sites with tropospheric ozone measurement records longer than ~15 years have been selected to characterize longer term tropospheric ozone changes over broad geographic regions. The sites chosen vary from those with minimal impact by local ozone pollution sources to those that are in relatively close proximity to ozone precursor emissions and are thus affected in part by these sources. Consideration is given to the extent to which various time series represent broad geographic scales. Some series with more limited geographic representativeness can provide valuable information because of the length of the record, particularly in an underrepresented region. The vertical profile information from the ozonesonde stations, which have some of the longest tropospheric ozone records, provides a unique perspective on ozone in the free troposphere that is much less influenced by more local conditions. The general slowing or flattening of ozone increases seen at a number of locations beginning in the early 1990s has generally continued. At Naha, Japan there has been a significant increase in recent years that has not been seen at other Japanese ozonesonde locations. At high latitudes over North America a decade long decline in tropospheric ozone beginning in the 1980s has generally reversed with amounts now similar to those at the beginning of the record. In the S.H. several sites in the mid latitudes have shown significant increases. Although some overall patterns on changes emerge on regional scales and in some cases on continental scales, more general conclusions on hemispheric and global scales do not emerge. This is likely consistent with the varied pattern of ozone lifetimes, precursor emission changes, and

  1. Modeling the climate impact of Southern Hemisphere ozone depletion: The importance of the ozone data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. J.; Davis, S. M.; Hassler, B.; Solomon, S.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The ozone hole is an important driver of recent Southern Hemisphere (SH) climate change, and capturing these changes is a goal of climate modeling. Most climate models are driven by off-line ozone data sets. Previous studies have shown that there is a substantial range in estimates of SH ozone depletion, but the implications of this range have not been examined systematically. We use a climate model to evaluate the difference between using the ozone forcing (Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate (SPARC)) used by many Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project) models and one at the upper end of the observed depletion estimates (Binary Database of Profiles (BDBP)). In the stratosphere, we find that austral spring/summer polar cap cooling, geopotential height decreases, and zonal wind increases in the BDBP simulations are all doubled compared to the SPARC simulations, while tropospheric responses are 20-100% larger. These results are important for studies attempting to diagnose the climate fingerprints of ozone depletion.

  2. The ASSET intercomparison of ozone analyses: method and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, A. J.; Lahoz, W. A.; Bekki, S.; Bormann, N.; Errera, Q.; Eskes, H. J.; Fonteyn, D.; Jackson, D. R.; Juckes, M. N.; Massart, S.; Peuch, V.-H.; Rharmili, S.; Segers, A.

    2006-06-01

    This paper examines 11 sets of ozone analyses from 7 different data assimilation systems. Two are numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems based on general circulation models (GCMs); the other five use chemistry transport models (CTMs). These systems contain either linearised or detailed ozone chemistry, or no chemistry at all. In most analyses, MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) ozone data are assimilated. Two examples assimilate SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography) observations. The analyses are compared to independent ozone observations covering the troposphere, stratosphere and lower mesosphere during the period July to November 2003. Through most of the stratosphere (50 hPa to 1 hPa), biases are usually within ±10% and standard deviations less than 10% compared to ozonesondes and HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment). Biases and standard deviations are larger in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere, in the troposphere, the mesosphere, and the Antarctic ozone hole region. In these regions, some analyses do substantially better than others, and this is mostly due to differences in the models. At the tropical tropopause, many analyses show positive biases and excessive structure in the ozone fields, likely due to known deficiencies in assimilated tropical wind fields and a degradation in MIPAS data at these levels. In the southern hemisphere ozone hole, only the analyses which correctly model heterogeneous ozone depletion are able to reproduce the near-complete ozone destruction over the pole. In the upper-stratosphere and mesosphere (above 5 hPa), some ozone photochemistry schemes caused large but easily remedied biases. The diurnal cycle of ozone in the mesosphere is not captured, except by the one system that includes a detailed treatment of mesospheric chemistry. In general, similarly good results are obtained no matter what the assimilation method (Kalman filter, three or

  3. Balloonborne measurements of ozone and aerosol profiles at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, during the austral spring of 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.J.; Deshler, T. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports some of the findings of an overall study of the ozone hole over Antarctica. Vertical profiles of ozone and aerosols were measured, and the inclusion of aerosols from the June 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo was of particular interest. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  4. SMM mesospheric ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.

    1990-01-01

    The main objective was to understand the secular and seasonal behavior of ozone in the lower mesosphere, 50 to 70 km. This altitude region is important in understanding the factors which determine ozone behavior. A secondary objective is the study of stratospheric ozone in the polar regions. Use is made of results from the SBUV satellite borne instrument. In the Arctic the interaction between chlorine compounds and low molecular weight hydrocarbons is studied. More than 30,000 profiles were obtained using the UVSP instrument on the SMM spacecraft. Several orbits of ozone data per day were obtained allowing study of the current rise in solar activity from the minimum until the present. Analysis of Nimbus 7 SBUV data in Antarctic spring indicates that ozone is depleted within the polar vortex relative to ozone outside the vortex. This depletion confirms the picture of ozone loss at altitudes where polar stratospheric clouds exist. In addition, there is ozone loss above the cloud level indicating that there is another mechanism in addition to ozone loss initiated by heterogeneous chlorine reactions on cloud particles.

  5. Robust response of the Amundsen Sea Low to stratospheric ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Mark R.; Polvani, Lorenzo M.; Smith, Karen L.; Landrum, Laura; Holland, Marika M.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of stratospheric ozone depletion on the Amundsen Sea Low (ASL), a climatological low-pressure center important for the climate of West Antarctica, remains uncertain. Using state-of-the-art climate models, we here show that stratospheric ozone depletion can cause a statistically significant deepening of the ASL in summer with an amplitude of approximately 1 hPa per decade. We are able to attribute the modeled changes in the ASL to stratospheric ozone depletion by contrasting ensembles of historical integrations with and without a realistic ozone hole. In the presence of very large natural variability, the robustness of the ozone impact on the ASL is established by (1) examining ensembles of model runs to isolate the forced response, (2) repeating the analysis with two different climate models, and (3) considering the entire period of stratospheric ozone depletion, the beginning of which predates the satellite era by a couple of decades.

  6. Seven years of total ozone from the TOMS instrument - A report on data quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, Albert J.; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Wellemeyer, Charles G.; Silberstein, David S.

    1986-01-01

    Seven years of TOMS total ozone data are currently available. Recently a new ozone retrieval algorithm based on improved ozone absorption cross section was implemented that has introduced 6-7 percent discontinuity in the archived data sets at the end of the fifth year of instrument operation. Until all data are reprocessed with the new algorithm users can use a table of correction factors given in this paper to make the data set internally consistent. This paper also presents a comparison of TOMS results with Amundsen Scott Dobson station. Though the agrement in most years is good, in 1983-84 the Dobson station reported unusually high values of ozone while TOMS saw the very low ozone values associated with the Antarctica ozone hole.

  7. The effect of representing bromine from VSLS on the simulation and evolution of Antarctic ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, Luke D.; Douglass, Anne R.; Salawitch, Ross J.; Canty, Timothy P.; Ziemke, Jerald R.; Manyin, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We use the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model, a contributor to both the 2010 and 2014 World Meteorological Organization Ozone Assessment Reports, to show that inclusion of 5 parts per trillion (ppt) of stratospheric bromine (Bry) from very short lived substances (VSLS) is responsible for about a decade delay in ozone hole recovery. These results partially explain the significantly later recovery of Antarctic ozone noted in the 2014 report, as bromine from VSLS was not included in the 2010 Assessment. We show multiple lines of evidence that simulations that account for VSLS Bry are in better agreement with both total column BrO and the seasonal evolution of Antarctic ozone reported by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument on NASA's Aura satellite. In addition, the near-zero ozone levels observed in the deep Antarctic lower stratospheric polar vortex are only reproduced in a simulation that includes this Bry source from VSLS.

  8. Dumb holes: analogues for black holes.

    PubMed

    Unruh, W G

    2008-08-28

    The use of sonic analogues to black and white holes, called dumb or deaf holes, to understand the particle production by black holes is reviewed. The results suggest that the black hole particle production is a low-frequency and low-wavenumber process.

  9. Extreme Events: low and high total ozone over Arosa, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.; Peter, T.; Davison, A. C.

    2009-04-01

    The frequency distribution of days with extreme low (termed ELOs) and high (termed EHOs) total ozone is analyzed for the world's longest total ozone record (Arosa, Switzerland - for details see Staehelin et al.,1998a,b), with new tools from extreme value theory (e.g. Coles, 2001; Ribatet, 2007). A heavy-tail focused approach is used through the fitting of the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) to the Arosa time series. Asymptotic arguments (Pickands, 1975) justify the use of the GPD for modeling exceedances over a high (or below a low) enough threshold (Coles, 2001). The analysis shows that the GPD is appropriate for modeling the frequency distribution in total ozone above or below a mathematically well-defined threshold. While previous studies focused on so termed ozone mini-holes and mini-highs (e.g. Bojkov and Balis, 2001, Koch et al., 2005), this study is the first to present a mathematical description of extreme events in low and high total ozone for a northern mid-latitudes site (Rieder et al., 2009). The results show (a) an increase in days with extreme low (ELOs) and (b) a decrease in days with extreme high total ozone (EHOs) during the last decades, (c) that the general trend in total ozone is strongly determined by these extreme events and (d) that fitting the GPD is an appropriate method for the estimation of the frequency distribution of so-called ozone mini-holes. Furthermore, this concept allows one to separate the effect of Arctic ozone depletion from that of in situ mid-latitude ozone loss. As shown by this study, ELOs and EHOs have a strong influence on mean values in total ozone and the "extremes concept" could be further used also for validation of Chemistry-Climate-Models (CCMs) within the scientific community. References: Bojkov, R. D., and Balis, D.S.: Characteristics of episodes with extremely low ozone values in the northern middle latitudes 1975-2000, Ann. Geophys., 19, 797-807, 2001. Coles, S.: An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of

  10. Ozone and temperature trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Fioletov, Vitali; Bishop, Lane; Godin, Sophie; Bojkov, Rumen D.; Kirchhoff, Volker; Chanin, Marie-Lise; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Zerefos, Christos S.; Chu, William

    1991-01-01

    An update of the extensive reviews of the state of knowledge of measured ozone trends published in the Report of the International Ozone Trends Panel is presented. The update contains a review of progress since these reports, including reviewing of the ozone records, in most cases through March 1991. Also included are some new, unpublished reanalyses of these records including a complete reevaluation of 29 stations located in the former Soviet Union. The major new advance in knowledge of the measured ozone trend is the existence of independently calibrated satellite data records from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAG) instruments. These confirm many of the findings, originally derived from the Dobson record, concerning northern mid-latitude changes in ozone. We now have results from several instruments, whereas the previously reported changes were dependent on the calibration of a single instrument. This update will compare the ozone records from many different instruments to determine whether or not they provide a consistent picture of the ozone change that has occurred in the atmosphere. The update also briefly considers the problem of stratospheric temperature change. As in previous reports, this problem received significantly less attention, and the report is not nearly as complete. This area needs more attention in the future.

  11. Saving Our Ozone Shield.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacoste, Beatrice

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the introduction and continued use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as related to stratospheric ozone depletion. Presents the characteristics of CFCs conducive to the chemical reaction with ozone, the history of CFC use and detection of related environmental problems, health hazards, and alternatives to CFC use. (MCO)

  12. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  13. Observing trends in total ozone and extreme ozone events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2014-05-01

    The ozone layer in the stratosphere has been recovering since the 1989 Montreal Protocol reduced the use of ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons. Fitzka et al. observed trends in total ozone levels and the vertical distribution of ozone at Hoher Sonnblick, a mountain in Austria, from 1994 to 2011.

  14. The Impact of the chemical Propulsion on the Ozone Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeyev, Yu. S.; Serbin, V. V.; Fomin, S. P.; Petlyak, O. G.

    The space activity is considered in the investigation real trend changes of total column ozone amounts (TCO). In combustion gas of all propulsion systems, especially solid ones, there are main ozone destroyers - Cl, NOx, OH, condensed particles Al2O3 etc. During every launch several tons such substances are practically immediately going into the atmosphere on 20-30 km altitude (i.e. layer with maximum ozone concentration) inaccessible for other ozone destroyers. The determination real consequences interaction between combustion gas and stratospheric ozone is the urgent problem of the practical astronautics. The analytical estimates for atmospheric ozone destroyed in a rocket plume are made more then 20 years. The results very differ even for the same rocket types and prognoses vary from extremely pessimistic to restrained optimistic ones. Such divergence is a result, first of all, high chemical kinetics calculations sensitivity to the rate constants values varying more then several times for the numerous reactions taking into account, initial data for a rocket plume, initial data for the atmosphere performance etc. The wide known comparisons the calculated results with the real TCO change above the space-vehicle launching sites are absent till now despite the regular TCO space monitoring is conducted since 1978 year. In the article the analyses of the spline-interpolation total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) measurements [1,2] is presented. We have examined 773 launches space rockets ARIAN, CZ, DELTA, PROTON, SHUTTLE, TITAN, ZENIT families was made for period since 1978 until 2001 year. For every launch the ozone level maps for regions corresponding to 10o latitude on 20o longitude during 7 days elapsed time have been built. For ~30% launches we have exposed the areas with TCO decreased on 15-20 Dobson units. The areas have shape either "spots" with 200-300km diameter or "stripes" 200-300km width parallel to plume. Such local ozone "holes" appear in 1-2 days

  15. Ozone depletion and UVB radiation: impact on plant DNA damage in southern South America.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, M C; Ballaré, C L; Giordano, C V; Scopel, A L; Zima, A M; Szwarcberg-Bracchitta, M; Searles, P S; Caldwell, M M; Díaz, S B

    1999-12-21

    The primary motivation behind the considerable effort in studying stratospheric ozone depletion is the potential for biological consequences of increased solar UVB (280-315 nm) radiation. Yet, direct links between ozone depletion and biological impacts have been established only for organisms of Antarctic waters under the influence of the ozone "hole;" no direct evidence exists that ozone-related variations in UVB affect ecosystems of temperate latitudes. Indeed, calculations based on laboratory studies with plants suggest that the biological impact of ozone depletion (measured by the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in DNA) is likely to be less marked than previously thought, because UVA quanta (315-400 nm) may also cause significant damage, and UVA is unaffected by ozone depletion. Herein, we show that the temperate ecosystems of southern South America have been subjected to increasingly high levels of ozone depletion during the last decade. We found that in the spring of 1997, despite frequent cloud cover, the passages of the ozone hole over Tierra del Fuego (55 degrees S) caused concomitant increases in solar UV and that the enhanced ground-level UV led to significant increases in DNA damage in the native plant Gunnera magellanica. The fluctuations in solar UV explained a large proportion of the variation in DNA damage (up to 68%), particularly when the solar UV was weighted for biological effectiveness according to action spectra that assume a sharp decline in quantum efficiency with increasing wavelength from the UVB into the UVA regions of the spectrum.

  16. Optical effects of polar stratospheric clouds on the retrieval of TOMS total ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Ahmad, Z.; Herman, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Small areas of sharply reduced ozone density appear frequently in the maps produced from polar region total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) data. These mini-holes are of the order of 1000 km in extent with a lifetime of a few days. On the basis of measurements from ground-based instruments, balloon-borne ozonesondes, and simultaneous measurements of aerosol and ozone concentrations during aircraft flights in the Arctic and Antarctic regions, the appearance of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are frequently associated with false reductions in ozone derived from the TOMS albedo data. By combining radiative transfer calculations with the observed PSC and ozone data, it is shown that PSCs located near or above the ozone density maximum (with optical thickness greater than 0.1) can explain most of the differences between TOMS ozone data and ground or in situ ozone measurements. Several examples of real and false TOMS mini-hole phenomenon are investigated using data from the 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) and from balloon flights over Norway and Sweden.

  17. The Two Faces of Ozone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Provides answers to questions regarding the ozone problem: (1) nature of ozone in the troposphere and stratosphere; (2) possibility of sending the excess ozone at ground level to the stratosphere; (3) possibility of producing pure ozone and carrying it to the stratosphere; and (4) banning chlorofluorocarbons. (YP)

  18. Fundamentals of ISCO Using Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using ozone involves the introduction of ozone gas (O3) into the subsurface to degrade organic contaminants of concern. Ozone is tri-molecular oxygen (O2) that is a gas under atmospheric conditions and is a strong oxidant. Ozone may react with ...

  19. Ozone - plant surface reactions an important ozone loss term?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Canaval, Eva; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billions dollar per year. Plant injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. But a striking question remains: How much ozone enters the plant through open stomata and how much ozone is lost by chemical reactions at the plant surface? Until now surface losses are estimated from measured total ozone deposition fluxes and calculated stomatal conductance values. While stomatal conductance of CO2 and H2O is well understood and extensively used in describing plant atmosphere gas exchange, stomatal conductance of ozone is not well known. Here we use different Nicotiana tabacum varieties and find that surface reactions of ozone with diterpenoids synthesized by glandular trichomes reduce ozone flux through open stomata. Our measurements reveal that fast ozone loss at the plant surface is accompanied with prompt release of oxygenated volatile compounds. In the ozone fumigation experiments of different Nicotiana tabacum varieties the release of specific volatile oxy-VOCs allowed to identify the semi volatile precursor compounds at the plant surface. Ozone fumigation experiments with Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), two common species in the Northern Hemisphere, show also a significant ozone loss at the plant surface for Picea abies. Fluid dynamic calculations of ozone transport in the diffusive leaf boundary layer reveal a vertical but no horizontal ozone gradient thus reducing ozone fluxes through the pores in case of efficient ozone scavenging plant surfaces. We explain this efficient ozone protection mechanism by the porous surface architecture of plants in combination with unsaturated semi-volatile compounds deposited at the plant surface. These results show that unsaturated semi-volatile compounds at

  20. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  1. Stratospheric ozone depletion and future levels of atmospheric chlorine and bromine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael J.; Watson, Robert T.

    1990-01-01

    The rise in atmospheric chlorine levels caused by the emission of chlorofluorocarbons and other halocarbons is thought to be the main cause of the appearance of the Antarctic ozone 'hole' in the late 1970s, and the more modest ozone depletion observed over parts of the Northern Hemisphere. Atmospheric bromine, also associated with halocarbon emissions, is believed to contribute to ozone depletion. Over the next decade, further increases in these compounds are inevitable. Model calculations show that by the end of the next century, atmospheric chlorine and bromine levels may return to those prevalent before the onset of the ozone hole, but only if more stringent regulations are applied to halocarbon production than those currently proposed.

  2. Spatial regression analysis on 32 years of total column ozone data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knibbe, J. S.; van der A, R. J.; de Laat, A. T. J.

    2014-08-01

    between 30° N and 30° S, particularly over the Pacific. The contribution of explanatory variables describing seasonal ozone variation is generally large at mid- to high latitudes. We observe ozone increases with potential vorticity and day length and ozone decreases with geopotential height and variable ozone effects due to the polar vortex in regions to the north and south of the polar vortices. Recovery of ozone is identified globally. However, recovery rates and uncertainties strongly depend on choices that can be made in defining the explanatory variables. The application of several trend models, each with their own pros and cons, yields a large range of recovery rate estimates. Overall these results suggest that care has to be taken in determining ozone recovery rates, in particular for the Antarctic ozone hole.

  3. Ozone Profiles and Tropospheric Ozone from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Sioris, C. E.; Sparr, R. J. D.; Kuregm, T. P.; Martin, R. V.; Newchurch, M. J.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2003-01-01

    Ozone profiles are derived from backscattered radiances in the ultraviolet spectra (290-340 nm) measured by the nadir-viewing Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment using optimal estimation. Tropospheric O3 is directly retrieved with the tropopause as one of the retrieval levels. To optimize the retrieval and improve the fitting precision needed for tropospheric O3, we perform extensive wavelength and radiometric calibrations and improve forward model inputs. Retrieved O3 profiles and tropospheric O3 agree well with coincident ozonesonde measurements, and the integrated total O3 agrees very well with Earth Probe TOMS and Dobson/Brewer total O3. The global distribution of tropospheric O3 clearly shows the influences of biomass burning, convection, and air pollution, and is generally consistent with our current understanding.

  4. Ozone depletion and climate change: impacts on UV radiation.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, R L; Aucamp, P J; Bais, A F; Björn, L O; Ilyas, M; Madronich, S

    2011-02-01

    The Montreal Protocol is working, but it will take several decades for ozone to return to 1980 levels. The atmospheric concentrations of ozone depleting substances are decreasing, and ozone column amounts are no longer decreasing. Mid-latitude ozone is expected to return to 1980 levels before mid-century, slightly earlier than predicted previously. However, the recovery rate will be slower at high latitudes. Springtime ozone depletion is expected to continue to occur at polar latitudes, especially in Antarctica, in the next few decades. Because of the success of the Protocol, increases in UV-B radiation have been small outside regions affected by the Antarctic ozone hole, and have been difficult to detect. There is a large variability in UV-B radiation due to factors other than ozone, such as clouds and aerosols. There are few long-term measurements available to confirm the increases that would have occurred as a result of ozone depletion. At mid-latitudes UV-B irradiances are currently only slightly greater than in 1980 (increases less than ~5%), but increases have been substantial at high and polar latitudes where ozone depletion has been larger. Without the Montreal Protocol, peak values of sunburning UV radiation could have been tripled by 2065 at mid-northern latitudes. This would have had serious consequences for the environment and for human health. There are strong interactions between ozone depletion and changes in climate induced by increasing greenhouse gases (GHGs). Ozone depletion affects climate, and climate change affects ozone. The successful implementation of the Montreal Protocol has had a marked effect on climate change. The calculated reduction in radiative forcing due to the phase-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) far exceeds that from the measures taken under the Kyoto protocol for the reduction of GHGs. Thus the phase-out of CFCs is currently tending to counteract the increases in surface temperature due to increased GHGs. The amount of

  5. Analysis of the Suitability of OMPS LP Ozone Profile Dataset for Extending the Aura MLS Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramarova, N. A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Stolarski, R. S.; DeLand, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    The new Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), launched on 28 October 2011 on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite, represents the next generation of the US ozone monitoring system. The OMPS Limb Profiler (LP) sensor measures solar radiances scattered from the atmospheric limb in the UV and visible spectral ranges and reconstruct the vertical ozone profiles from the cloud top up to 60 km. The regular LP observations started in early 2012, and now the LP data record exceeds 2.5 years. In this presentation we will demonstrate capability of the new LP sensor to characterize the vertical ozone distribution in different atmospheric regions that are most sensitive to the changes in the stratospheric composition and dynamics. We will consider: a) the seasonal ozone patterns in the lower stratosphere - upper troposphere; b) the vertical ozone distribution inside the Antarctic ozone hole; c) the ozone patterns forced by the Quasi-Biennial Oscillations in the lower tropical stratosphere. The main focus of this study is to perform a comprehensive analysis of ozone patterns obtained from OMPS LP with those observed by Aura MLS to isolate similarities and differences between two sensors in characterizing these processes. We will examine how well LP reproduces the named above natural signals in comparison with MLS in terms of amplitude, phase and vertical structure. One of the key issues is that two instruments measure ozone in different coordinate systems: the LP measures ozone profiles as number density on a regular altitude scale, while Aura MLS retrieves ozone profiles as mixing ratios on pressure vertical grids. The comparison of two measurements requires unit conversion that in turn involves temperature profiles. Thus, the uncertainties related to the unit conversion should be accounted during the analysis. This scientific validation is critical for the further LP algorithm improvement and continuation of the Aura MLS ozone record in the future.

  6. An Estimation of the Climatic Effects of Stratospheric Ozone Losses during the 1980s. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Robert M.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Shia, Run-Lie; Yang, Yajaing; Zhou, Shuntai; Molnar, Gyula

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the potential climatic effects of the ozone hole more directly and to assess the validity of previous lower resolution model results, the latest high spatial resolution version of the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., seasonal radiative dynamical climate model is used to simulate the climatic effects of ozone changes relative to the other greenhouse gases. The steady-state climatic effect of a sustained decrease in lower stratospheric ozone, similar in magnitude to the observed 1979-90 decrease, is estimated by comparing three steady-state climate simulations: 1) 1979 greenhouse gas concentrations and 1979 ozone, II) 1990 greenhouse gas concentrations with 1979 ozone, and III) 1990 greenhouse gas concentrations with 1990 ozone. The simulated increase in surface air temperature resulting from nonozone greenhouse gases is 0.272 K. When changes in lower stratospheric ozone are included, the greenhouse warming is 0.165 K, which is approximately 39% lower than when ozone is fixed at the 1979 concentrations. Ozone perturbations at high latitudes result in a cooling of the surface-troposphere system that is greater (by a factor of 2.8) than that estimated from the change in radiative forcing resulting from ozone depiction and the model's 2 x CO, climate sensitivity. The results suggest that changes in meridional heat transport from low to high latitudes combined with the decrease in the infrared opacity of the lower stratosphere are very important in determining the steady-state response to high latitude ozone losses. The 39% compensation in greenhouse warming resulting from lower stratospheric ozone losses is also larger than the 28% compensation simulated previously by the lower resolution model. The higher resolution model is able to resolve the high latitude features of the assumed ozone perturbation, which are important in determining the overall climate sensitivity to these perturbations.

  7. Impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander

    ozone layer here. The mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the polar ozone by means of modification of sulphate aerosol distribution in the atmosphere has been revealed and investigated, too. Numerical experiments show that enhancement of the surface area density of sulphate aerosol in the stratosphere caused by the growth of the greenhouse gases will reduce significantly the ozone depletion during the Antarctic ozone hole.

  8. Ozone Therapy in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Domb, William C

    2014-01-01

    Summary The 21st century dental practice is quite dynamic. New treatment protocols and new materials are being developed at a rapid pace. Ozone dental therapy falls into the category of new treatment protocols in dentistry, yet ozone is not new at all. Ozone therapy is already a major treatment modality in Europe, South America and a number of other countries. What is provided here will not be an exhaustive scientific treatise so much as a brief general introduction into what dentists are now doing with ozone therapies and the numerous oral/systemic links that make this subject so important for physicians so that, ultimately, they may serve their patients more effectively and productively. PMID:25363268

  9. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  10. Ozone Correlative Measurements Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the necessary parameters for the correlation of data on Earth ozone. Topics considered were: (1) measurement accuracy; (2) equipment considerations (SBUV); and (3) ground based measurements to support satellite data.

  11. Ozone profile measurements at McMurdo Station Antarctica during the spring of 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, D. J.; Harder, J. W.; Rosen, J. M.; Hereford, J.; Carpenter, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    During the Antarctic spring of 1986, 33 ozone soundings were conducted from McMurdo Station. These data indicated that the springtime decrease in ozone occurred rapidly between the altitudes of 12 and 20 km. During 1987, these measurements were repeated with 50 soundings between 29 August and 9 November. Digital conversions of standard electrochemical cell ozonesondes were again employed. The ozonesonde pumps were individually calibrated for flow rate as the high altitude performance of these pumps have been in question. While these uncertainties are not large in the region of the ozone hole, they are significant at high altitude and apparently resulted in an underestimate of total ozone of about 7 percent (average) as compared to the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) in 1986, when the flow rate recommended by the manufacturer was used. At the upper altitudes (approx. 30 km) the flow rate may be overestimated by as much as 15 percent using recommended values (see Harder et al., The UW Digital Ozonesonde: Characteristics and Flow Rate Calibration, poster paper, this workshop). These upper level values are used in the extrapolation, at constant mixing ratio, required to complete the sounding for total ozone. The first sounding was on 29 August, prior to major ozone depletion, when 274 DU total ozone (25 DU extrapolated) was observed. By early October total ozone had decreased to the 150 DU range; it then increased during mid-October owing to motion of the vortex and returned to a value of 148 DU (29 DU extrapolated) on 27 October.

  12. A new-generation 3D ozone FACE (Free Air Controlled Exposure).

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Elena; Materassi, Alessandro; Fasano, Gianni; Hoshika, Yasutomo; Carriero, Giulia; Silaghi, Diana; Badea, Ovidiu

    2017-01-01

    To artificially simulate the impacts of ground-level ozone (O3) on vegetation, ozone FACE (Free Air Controlled Exposure) systems are increasingly recommended. We describe here a new-generation, three-dimensional ozone FACE, with O3 diffusion through laser-generated micro-holes, pre-mixing of air and O3, O3 generator with integral oxygen generator, continuous (day/night) exposure and full replication. Based on three O3 levels and assumptions on the pre-industrial O3 levels, we describe principles to calculate relative yield/biomass and estimate impacts even at lower-than-ambient O3 levels. The case study is called FO3X, and is at present the only ozone FACE in Mediterranean climate and one of the very few ozone FACEs investigating more than one stressor at a time. The results presented here will give further impulse to the research on O3 impacts on vegetation all over the world.

  13. Influence of polar stratospheric clouds on the depletion of Antarctic ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, Ross J.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Mcelroy, Michael B.

    1988-01-01

    Precipitation of nitrate in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) can provide a significant sink for Antarctic stratospheric odd nitrogen. It is argued that the depth of the Ozone Hole is sensitive to the occurrence of temperatures below about 196 K. An increase in the prevalence of temperatures below 196 K would enhance ozone loss by increasing the spatial extent and persistence of PSCs, and by decreasing the level of HNO3 that remains following PSC evaporation. Concentrations of halogen gases in the 1960s and earlier were insufficient to support major ozone loss, even if thermal conditions were favorable.

  14. Simulations of Arctic ozone depletion with current and doubled levels of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butchart, Neal; Austin, John; Shine, Keith P.

    1994-01-01

    Results from idealized 3-D simulations of a dynamical-radiative-photochemical model of the stratosphere are presented for the Northern Hemisphere winter and spring. For a simulation of a quiescent winter, it is found that with current levels of CO2 only modest polar ozone depletion occurs, consistent with observations. For a second simulation with the same planetary wave amplitudes in the upper troposphere but with doubled CO2, the model predicts a northern hemisphere ozone hole comparable to that observed in Antarctica with almost complete ozone destruction at 20 km. Reasons for the marked difference between the simulations are identified.

  15. Comparisons between TOMS, TOVS and DOBSON observations - Satellite and surface views of total column ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, Dennis; Neuendorffer, Arthur

    1990-01-01

    The reliability of the ozone retrievals by the TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) calculated with the newly developed physical algorithm is investigated by comparing the quality of the TOVS total ozone soundings to the corresponding values obtained by the Nimbus-7 TOMS and by the ground-based DOBSON network. The three-way comparison concentrates on observations during the last 4 months of 1987, the period of the great Antarctic 'ozone hole'. It is shown that each instrument has characteristic strengths and weaknesses, and that each of the three systems makes serious errors under some conditions.

  16. Analysis of 1970-1995 Trends in Tropospheric Ozone at Northern Hemisphere Midlatitudes with the GEOS-CHEM Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusco, Andrew C.; Logan, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    breakup of the ozone hole.

  17. Latest tendency in the Antarctic ozone longitudinal distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milinevsky, Gennadi; Grytsai, Asen; Klekociuk, Andrew; Evtushevsky, Olexander

    2014-05-01

    Significant ozone depletion was observed within the southern polar vortex during spring in the 1980s - early 1990s. Later, a stabilization in total ozone levels and ozone hole area has been observed. Atmosphere models predict a consequent recovery of the Antarctic ozone. Nevertheless, identification of the long-term processes is complicated by high interannual variability hiding their general regularities. In particular, a large stratosphere warming in 2002 resulted in significant increase in total ozone levels. The Antarctic ozone hole is formed inside polar stratospheric vortex, which is under influence of large-scale planetary waves. The components of the quasi-stationary wave (QSW) in the spring Southern Hemisphere (SH) stratosphere is mainly contributed by zonal wave number 1 which in turn determines the location of the total ozone extremes in spring: QSW minimum (maximum) is located in the South Atlantic (Australian) sector. In our work the satellite data of TOMS/Nimbus-7, TOMS/Earth Probe and OMI/Aura (http://ozoneaq.gsfc.nasa.gov/) have been used to investigate longitudinal distribution of the total ozone in Antarctic region. The gap in these satellite observations (1993-1995) was filled by the Multi-Sensor Reanalysis data (http://www.temis.nl/). Ozone distribution in the SH high and mid latitudes 80-50S were analyzed for southern spring season including months from September to November. The zonal distribution is considered along seven latitude circles from 80S to 50S with step of five degrees. To distinguish long-term processes and to obtain a quasi-stationary pattern, daily September - November ozone was averaged. Our previous study demonstrated a systematic eastward shift of the QSW minimum region. In this study, we extended the analysis to 2013 and obtained new results that exhibited a probable cessation in that eastward shift. Polynomial fit for all chosen latitudes is even evidence of a change in the tendency to opposite. It more time needs to

  18. Dynamical component of seasonal and year-to-year changes in Antarctic and global ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tung, Ka Kit; Yang, HU

    1988-01-01

    The dynamics of the ozone concetration components of the Antarctic ozone hole as related to seasonal and year-to-year temperature changes in August, September, October, and November during the 1979-1985 period is studied using a zonally averaged model in which all transport fields are fixed by input temperature data. The results suggest that, prior to 1984, both the seasonal and year-to year variability of the zonal-mean Antarctic ozone minimum and the surrounding maximum can be accounted for by temperature dynamics without invoking changes in chemical composition (e.g., chlorine content) or special chemistry. The same dynamical mechanism also accounts for the good simulation of the observed seasonal and latitudinal structure of column ozone in other parts of the world. However, chemical depletion of ozone may have become more important after 1984. The model also appears to underpredict the September ozone decline in years, leading to an underprediction of the recent minimum values in the Antarctic ozone hole.

  19. Nonisolated dynamic black holes and white holes

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, M. L.; Anderson, Kaem; Bardahl, Kirk

    2008-05-15

    Modifying the Kerr-Schild transformation used to generate black and white hole spacetimes, new dynamic black and white holes are obtained using a time-dependent Kerr-Schild scalar field. Physical solutions are found for black holes that shrink with time and for white holes that expand with time. The black hole spacetimes are physical only in the vicinity of the black hole, with the physical region increasing in radius with time. The white hole spacetimes are physical throughout. Unlike the standard Schwarzschild solution the singularities are nonisolated, since the time dependence introduces a mass-energy distribution. The surfaces in the metrics where g{sub tt}=g{sup rr}=0 are dynamic, moving inward with time for the black holes and outward for the white holes, which leads to a question of whether these spacetimes truly have event horizons--a problem shared with Vaidya's cosmological black hole spacetimes. By finding a surface that shrinks or expands at the same rate as the null geodesics move, and within which null geodesics move inward or outward faster than the surfaces shrink or expand, respectively, it is verified that these do in fact behave like black and white holes.

  20. The Ozone Problem | Ground-level Ozone | New England | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    Many factors impact ground-level ozone development, including temperature, wind speed and direction, time of day, and driving patterns. Due to its dependence on weather conditions, ozone is typically a summertime pollutant and a chief component of summertime smog.

  1. Potential Effects of Methane and Nitrous Oxide on the Recovery of Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Wuebbles, D. J.

    2005-05-01

    Stratospheric ozone concentrations have been significantly reduced in recent decades as a result of human activities. The international agreement to protect stratospheric ozone, the Montreal Protocol, has effectively reduced the human-related emissions of halocarbons containing chlorine and bromine. Since the implementation of the international controls on ozone depleting chemicals, an important focus in studies of stratospheric ozone has been on the detection of a turnaround in the downward trend and determination of when a recovery will occur, where a recovery is defined as a return to levels of ozone in the 1970s before the existence of the Antarctica ozone "hole". If halocarbons remained the only relevant human-related factor affecting ozone, the ozone layer would be expected to recover by roughly 2040-2045. However, there are a number of other factors, including non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions, affecting the future recovery of ozone. In this study, we considered a range of scenarios for future trace gases emissions developed by IPCC (2001) using the UIUC two-dimensional Chemical-Transport Model (UIUC 2D CTM). We found that the future recovery depended greatly on future emissions of two major greenhouse gases, methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Evaluation of the effects of scenarios developed by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001) for future emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, and other gases suggests that these gases could greatly affect ozone recovery, including the possibility of ozone not recovering in this century. In addition, under all cases, the ozone distribution is always greatly different than that in the pre-1980 atmosphere.

  2. A New Linearized Photochemistry Parameterization for Operational Ozone Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, J. P.; Allen, D. R.; Coy, L.; Eckermann, S. D.; Stajner, I.

    2005-12-01

    The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) will deliver real-time ozone data for assimilation in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. This information will benefit forecasts by improving the modeled stratospheric heating rates and providing better first-guess temperature profiles needed for infrared satellite radiance retrieval algorithms. Operational ozone data assimilation for NWP requires a fast, accurate treatment of stratospheric ozone photochemistry. We present results from the new NRL CHEM2D Ozone Photochemistry Parameterization (CHEM2D-OPP), which is based on output from the zonally averaged NRL-CHEM2D middle atmosphere photochemical-transport model. CHEM2D-OPP is a linearized parameterization of gas-phase stratospheric ozone photochemistry developed for NOGAPS-ALPHA, the Navy's prototype global high altitude NWP model. A recent study of NOGAPS-ALPHA ozone simulations found that a preliminary version of the CHEM2D-based photochemistry parameterization generally performed better than other current photochemistry schemes that are now widely used in operational NWP and data assimilation systems. A new, improved version of CHEM2D-OPP is now available. Here we report the first quantitative performance assessments of the updated CHEM2D-OPP package in the NRL Global Ozone Assimilation Testing System (GOATS). This study compares the mean differences between GOATS ozone analyses and SBUV/2 ozone measurements (both vertical profile and total column) during September 2002 using several different ozone photochemistry schemes. We find that CHEM2D-OPP generally delivers the best performance out of all the photochemistry schemes we tested. Future development plans for CHEM2D-OPP, such as interfacing it with a "cold tracer" parameterization for heterogeneous ozone-hole chemistry, will also be presented.

  3. Airborne measurements of stratospheric constituents over Antarctica in the austral spring 1987. I - Method and ozone observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankin, William G.; Coffey, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer was flown aboard a DC-8 on 10 flights over Antarctica during August and September, 1987, as part of the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE). Observing the sun at infrared wavelengths, it was possible to determine the integrated column amount above the flight altitude for ozone and a number of other chemical species that are believed to be important in the perturbed chemistry of the 'ozone hole'. The paper describes the method, the observations, the data analysis procedure, and the ozone results. During the observation period, ozone developed a steep gradient near the edge of the polar vortex; deep within the vortex, the average ozone column decreased by about 1.6 percent per day during September.

  4. Deburring small intersecting holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-08-01

    Deburring intersecting holes is one of the most difficult deburring tasks faced by many industries. Only 14 of the 37 major deburring processes are applicable to most intersecting hole applications. Only five of these are normally applicable to small or miniature holes. Basic process capabilities and techniques used as a function of hole sizes and intersection depths are summarized.

  5. Children's Models of the Ozone Layer and Ozone Depletion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Koulaidis, Vasilis

    1996-01-01

    The views of 40 primary students on ozone and its depletion were recorded through individual, semi-structured interviews. The data analysis resulted in the formation of a limited number of models concerning the distribution and role of ozone in the atmosphere, the depletion process, and the consequences of ozone depletion. Identifies five target…

  6. CONTRIBUTION TO INDOOR OZONE LEVELS OF AN OZONE GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of a study of a commonly used commercially available ozone generator, undertaken to determine its impact on indoor ozone levels. xperiment were conducted in a typical mechanically ventilated office and in a test house. he generated ozone and the in-room ...

  7. Achievements in Stratospheric Ozone Protection

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report describes achievements in protecting the ozone layer, the benefits of these achievements, and strategies involved (e.g., using alternatives to ozone-depleting substances, phasing out harmful substances, and creating partnerships).

  8. Air Quality Guide for Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    Local Air Quality Conditions Zip Code: State : My Current Location Air Quality Guide for Ozone Ground-level ozone is one ... exposure and protect your health. For your local air quality, visit www.airnow.gov View or print guide ...

  9. Ozone Minimums, 1979 to 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    Minimum concentration of ozone in the southern hemisphere for each year from 1979-2013 (there is no data from 1995). Each image is the day of the year with the lowest concentration of ozone. A grap...

  10. Health Effects of Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Inhaling ozone can cause coughing, shortness of breath, worse asthma or bronchitis symptoms, and irritation and damage to airways.You can reduce your exposure to ozone pollution by checking air quality where you live.

  11. "OZONE SOURCE APPORTIONMENT IN CMAQ'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone source attribution has been used to support various policy purposes including interstate transport (Cross State Air Pollution Rule) by U.S. EPA and ozone nonattainment area designations by State agencies. Common scientific applications include tracking intercontinental tran...

  12. Mars ozone: Mariner 9 revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of the UV spectroscopy technique used by Mariner 9 to remotely measure ozone abundance at Mars is discussed. Previously-inferred ozone abundances could be underestimated by as much as a factor of 3, and much of the observed variability in the ozone abundance could be due to temporal and spatial variability in cloud and dust amount.

  13. Ames ER-2 ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, R., Jr.; Vedder, James F.; Starr, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research is to study ozone (O3) in the stratosphere. Measurements of the ozone mixing ratio at 1 s intervals are obtained with an ultraviolet photometer which flies on the ER-2 aircraft. The photometer determines the amount of ozone in air by measuring the transmission of ultraviolet light through a fixed path with and without ambient O3 present.

  14. Inorganic chlorine variability in the Antarctic vortex and implications for ozone recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahan, S. E.; Douglass, A. R.; Newman, P. A.; Steenrod, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    We infer the interannual variability of inorganic chlorine in the Antarctic lower stratospheric vortex using 9 years of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) nitrous oxide (N2O) measurements and a previously measured compact correlation. Inorganic chlorine (Cly) is the sum of the destruction products of long-lived chlorine-containing source gases. Its correlation with N2O, derived from observations in the year 2000, is scaled to the years 2004-2012 to account for subsequent N2O growth and chlorofluorocarbon decline. The expected annual Cly change due to the Montreal Protocol is -20 ppt/yr, but the MLS-inferred Cly varies year-to-year from -200 to +150 ppt. Because of this large variability, attributing Antarctic ozone recovery to a statistically significant chlorine trend requires 10 years of chlorine decline. We examine the relationship between equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC) and ozone hole area. Temperature variations driven by dynamics are a primary contributor to area variability, but we find a clear linear relationship between EESC and area during years when Antarctic collar temperatures are 1σ or more below the mean. This relationship suggests that smaller ozone hole areas in recent cold years 2008 and 2011 are responding to decreased chlorine loading. Using ozone hole areas from 1979 to 2013, the projected EESC decline, and the inferred interannual Cly variability, we expect ozone hole areas greater than 20 million km2 will occur during very cold years until 2040. After that time, all ozone hole areas are likely to be below that size due to reduced EESC levels.

  15. Stratospheric ozone in the 21st Century: The chlorofluorocarbon problem

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, F.S. )

    1991-04-01

    Ozone (O{sub 3}) exists in a dynamic equilibrium in the stratosphere, balanced between formation by solar ultraviolet photolysis ({lambda} < 242 nm) of molecular O{sub 2} (O + O{sub 2} {yields} O{sub 3}) and destruction by various chemical processes including several chain reaction sequences triggered by HO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, and ClO{sub x} radicals. The ozone dissipates over Antarctica by November through northward mixing, only to begin reappearing in late August of the following year. Substantial ozone losses have also appeared, although not as spectacularly as over Antarctica, in the Northern Hemisphere's temperate and polar regions. The primary cause for the Antarctic ozone loss, and the probable cause for the northern losses, is the increasing concentration in the stratosphere of anthropogenic chlorine, especially chlorine released by solar UV photolysis from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds such as CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2} (CFC-12), CCl{sub 3}F (CFC-11) and CCl{sub 2}FCClF{sub 2} (CFC-113). Because these molecules have average atmospheric lifetimes of many decades, excess anthropogenic chlorine will persist in the stratosphere for comparable time periods, and the Antarctic ozone hole will be an important atmospheric phenomenon throughout the 21st century.

  16. Persistent polar depletion of stratospheric ozone and emergent mechanisms of ultraviolet radiation-mediated health dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Dugo, Mark A; Han, Fengxiang; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    Year 2011 noted the first definable ozone "hole" in the Arctic region, serving as an indicator to the continued threat of dangerous ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure caused by the deterioration of stratospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere. Despite mandates of the Montreal Protocol to phase out the production of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs), the relative stability of ODCs validates popular notions of persistent stratospheric ozone for several decades. Moreover, increased UVR exposure through stratospheric ozone depletion is occurring within a larger context of physiologic stress and climate change across the biosphere. In this review, we provide commentaries on stratospheric ozone depletion with relative comparisons between the well-known Antarctic ozone hole and the newly defined ozone hole in the Arctic. Compared with the Antarctic region, the increased UVR exposure in the Northern Hemisphere poses a threat to denser human populations across North America, Europe, and Asia. In this context, we discuss emerging targets of UVR exposure that can potentially offset normal biologic rhythms in terms of taxonomically conserved photoperiod-dependent seasonal signaling and entrainment of circadian clocks. Consequences of seasonal shifts during critical life history stages can alter fitness and condition, whereas circadian disruption is increasingly becoming associated as a causal link to increased carcinogenesis. We further review the significance of genomic alterations via UVR-induced modulations of phase I and II transcription factors located in skin cells, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2), with emphasis on mechanism that can lead to metabolic shifts and cancer. Although concern for adverse health consequences due to increased UVR exposure are longstanding, recent advances in biochemical research suggest that AhR and Nrf2 transcriptional regulators are likely targets for UVR

  17. Fundamental differences between Arctic and Antarctic ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Susan; Haskins, Jessica; Ivy, Diane J; Min, Flora

    2014-04-29

    Antarctic ozone depletion is associated with enhanced chlorine from anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons and heterogeneous chemistry under cold conditions. The deep Antarctic "hole" contrasts with the generally weaker depletions observed in the warmer Arctic. An unusually cold Arctic stratospheric season occurred in 2011, raising the question of how the Arctic ozone chemistry in that year compares with others. We show that the averaged depletions near 20 km across the cold part of each pole are deeper in Antarctica than in the Arctic for all years, although 2011 Arctic values do rival those seen in less-depleted years in Antarctica. We focus not only on averages but also on extremes, to address whether or not Arctic ozone depletion can be as extreme as that observed in the Antarctic. This information provides unique insights into the contrasts between Arctic and Antarctic ozone chemistry. We show that extreme Antarctic ozone minima fall to or below 0.1 parts per million by volume (ppmv) at 18 and 20 km (about 70 and 50 mbar) whereas the lowest Arctic ozone values are about 0.5 ppmv at these altitudes. At a higher altitude of 24 km (30-mbar level), no Arctic data below about 2 ppmv have been observed, including in 2011, in contrast to values more than an order of magnitude lower in Antarctica. The data show that the lowest ozone values are associated with temperatures below -80 °C to -85 °C depending upon altitude, and are closely associated with reduced gaseous nitric acid concentrations due to uptake and/or sedimentation in polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  18. A Dancing Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre; Smith, Kenneth; Schnetter, Erik; Fiske, David; Laguna, Pablo; Pullin, Jorge

    2002-04-01

    Recently, stationary black holes have been successfully simulated for up to times of approximately 600-1000M, where M is the mass of the black hole. Considering that the expected burst of gravitational radiation from a binary black hole merger would last approximately 200-500M, black hole codes are approaching the point where simulations of mergers may be feasible. We will present two types of simulations of single black holes obtained with a code based on the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura formulation of the Einstein evolution equations. One type of simulations addresses the stability properties of stationary black hole evolutions. The second type of simulations demonstrates the ability of our code to move a black hole through the computational domain. This is accomplished by shifting the stationary black hole solution to a coordinate system in which the location of the black hole is time dependent.

  19. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  20. Changes in Ozone and UV Index of Australian Cities (1958-2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus-Deschamps, L.; Easson, J.; Skingfield, P.

    2007-05-01

    Ground-based total ozone data sets are compared with ERA40 and TOMS and then used to estimate the total ozone variations for several Australian cities over the period 1958 to 2004. The data sets are deseasonalized and the differences with the pre-ozone-hole period 1970-1980 are calculated. All data sets show changes in the rate of the total ozone decline during the 80's while the ozone decline during the 90's is fairly constant. Ozone decline may have an important impact in the amount of surface UV radiation, if all other factors remain constant. Consideration of the changes in UV levels is particularly important for this region as Australia has one of the highest rates of skin cancer in the world. UV Index distributions within the period 1958-2004 are calculated using the ground-based total ozone as input to the "single column model version" of the Australian Ozone and UV forecasting system. The UV Index is also compared with the occurrence of non-melanoma skin cancer rate over Australia.

  1. Increased polar stratospheric ozone losses and delayed eventual recovery owing to increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindell, Drew T.; Rind, David; Lonergan, Patrick

    1998-04-01

    The chemical reactions responsible for stratospheric ozone depletion are extremely sensitive to temperature. Greenhouse gases warm the Earth's surface but cool the stratosphere radiatively and therefore affect ozone depletion. Here we investigate the interplay between projected future emissions of greenhouse gases and levels of ozone-depleting halogen species using a global climate model that incorporates simplified ozone-depletion chemistry. Temperature and wind changes induced by the increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations alter planetary-wave propagation in our model, reducing the frequency of sudden stratospheric warmings in the Northern Hemisphere. This results in a more stable Arctic polar vortex, with significantly colder temperatures in the lower stratosphere and concomitantly increased ozone depletion. Increased concentrations of greenhouse gases might therefore be at least partly responsible for the very large Arctic ozone losses observed in recent winters. Arctic losses reach a maximum in the decade 2010 to 2019 in our model, roughly a decade after the maximum in stratospheric chlorine abundance. The mean losses are about the same as those over the Antarctic during the early 1990s, with geographically localized losses of up to two-thirds of the Arctic ozone column in the worst years. The severity and the duration of the Antarctic ozone hole are also predicted to increase because of greenhouse-gas-induced stratospheric cooling over the coming decades.

  2. Impact of interactive chemistry of stratospheric ozone on Southern Hemisphere paleoclimate simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Satoshi; Kodera, Kunihiko; Adachi, Yukimasa; Deushi, Makoto; Kitoh, Akio; Mizuta, Ryo; Murakami, Shigenori; Yoshida, Kohei; Yoden, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of the mid-Holocene (6 kyr B.P.) climate are performed by using an Earth System Model of the Meteorological Research Institute of the Japan Meteorological Agency to investigate the impact of stratospheric ozone distribution, which is modulated by the change in orbital elements of the Earth, on the surface climate. The results of interactive ozone chemistry calculations for the mid-Holocene and preindustrial periods are compared with those of the corresponding experiments in the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), in which the ozone distribution was prescribed to the 1850 Common Era level. The contribution of the interactive ozone chemistry in a quasi-equilibrium state reveals a significant anomaly of up to +1.7 K in the Antarctic region for the annual mean zonal mean surface air temperature. This impact on the surface climate is explained by a similar mechanism to the cooling influence of the Antarctic ozone hole but opposite in sign: Weakening of the westerly jet associated with the Southern Annular Mode provides weakening of equatorward ocean surface current, sea ice retreat, and then warm sea surface temperature and surface air temperature. All the mid-Holocene runs by CMIP5 models with the prescribed ozone had cold bias in sea surface temperature when compared with geological proxy data, whereas the bias is reduced in our simulations by using interactive ozone chemistry. We recommend that climate models include interactive sea ice and ozone distribution that are consistent with paleosolar insolation.

  3. The evolution of the ozone collar in the Antarctic lower stratosphere during early August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Mariotti, A.; Mechoso, C.R.; Legras, B.; Daniel, V.

    2000-02-01

    The ozone evolution in the lower stratosphere of the Southern Hemisphere during the period 5--10 August 1994 is analyzed. The analysis focuses on the ozone collar (the band of maximum values in ozone mixing ratio around the Antarctic ozone hole at these altitudes) and the development of collar filaments. Ozone mixing ratios provided by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and by an ER-2 aircraft participating in the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of stratospheric Aircraft campaign are compared with values at corresponding locations in high-resolution isentropic maps obtained by using the numerical scheme of contour advection with surgery (CAS). The CAS reconstructed ozone maps provide a view of the way in which air masses are exported from the outskirts of the collar to form the tongues of higher mixing ratios observed at lower latitudes on MLS synoptic maps. There is an overall consistency between the datasets insofar as the collar location is concerned. This location seems to be primarily defined by the local properties of the flow. Nevertheless the CAS reconstructed collar tends to become weaker than that depicted by MLS data. By means of radioactive calculation estimates, it is argued that diabatic descent may be responsible for maintaining the ozone concentration approximately constant in the collar while filaments isentropically disperse collarlike mixing ratios from this region toward lower latitudes.

  4. Observations of Ozone-aerosol Correlated Behaviour in the Lower Stratosphere During the EASOE Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digirolamo, P.; Cacciani, M.; Disarra, A.; Fiocco, G.; Fua, D.; Joergensen, T. S.; Knudsen, B.; Larsen, N.

    1992-01-01

    The question of possible interactions between ozone and stratospheric aerosol has been open for a long time. Measurements carried out after the Mt. Agung and El Chicon eruptions showed evidence of negative correlations between the presence of volcanic stratospheric aerosols and ozone concentration. Evidence for negative correlations in the polar winter has been also found. It is only after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole that catalytic effects related to low temperature heterogeneous chemistry have become the object of much investigation, now extended to the role of volcanic aerosol in the ozone reduction. These phenomena can be the object of various interpretations, not mutually exclusive, including the effect of transport, diffuse radiation as well as heterogeneous chemistry. The present paper provides preliminary results of simultaneous measurements of ozone and aerosol, carried out at Thule, Greenland, during the winter 1991-92. The European Stratospheric Ozone Experiment (EASOE) was aimed at monitoring the winter Arctic stratosphere in order to obtain a deeper insight of the ozone destruction processes taking place in the polar regions. A large amount of aerosol was injected into the lower stratosphere by the recent eruption of Volcano Pinatubo. A lidar system, already operational in Thule since November 1990, has provided detailed measurements of the stratospheric aerosol concentration during EASOE. In the same period, a large number of ozonesondes were launched. Although no PSC formation was detected over Thule, the simultaneous measurement of the stratospheric aerosol and ozone profiles give the possibility to study interactions occurring in the stratosphere between these two constituents.

  5. Physicochemical patterns of ozone absorption by wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    Results from studying aspen and pine wood ozonation are presented. The effect the concentration of ozone, the reagent residence time, and the content of water in a sample of wood has on ozone consumption rate and ozone demand are analyzed. The residence time is shown to determine the degree of ozone conversion degree and the depth of substrate destruction. The main patterns of ozone absorption by wood with different moisture content are found. Ways of optimizing the ozonation of plant biomass are outlined.

  6. Total Ozone Prediction: Stratospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Kawa, S. Ramdy; Douglass, Anne R.

    2003-01-01

    The correct prediction of total ozone as a function of latitude and season is extremely important for global models. This exercise tests the ability of a particular model to simulate ozone. The ozone production (P) and loss (L) will be specified from a well- established global model and will be used in all GCMs for subsequent prediction of ozone. This is the "B-3 Constrained Run" from M&MII. The exercise mostly tests a model stratospheric dynamics in the prediction of total ozone. The GCM predictions will be compared and contrasted with TOMS measurements.

  7. Precision ozone vapor pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D.; Mauersberger, K.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure above liquid ozone has been measured with a high accuracy over a temperature range of 85 to 95 K. At the boiling point of liquid argon (87.3 K) an ozone vapor pressure of 0.0403 Torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 0.7 percent. A least square fit of the data provided the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for liquid ozone; a latent heat of 82.7 cal/g was calculated. High-precision vapor pressure data are expected to aid research in atmospheric ozone measurements and in many laboratory ozone studies such as measurements of cross sections and reaction rates.

  8. Karlson ozone sterilizer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.

    1984-05-07

    The authors have a functional sterilization system employing ozone as a sterilization agent. This final report covers the work that led to the first medical sterilizer using ozone as the sterilizing agent. The specifications and the final design were set by hospital operating room personnel and public safety standards. Work on kill tests using bacteria, viruses and fungi determined the necessary time and concentration of ozone necessary for sterilization. These data were used in the Karlson Ozone Sterilizer to determine the length of the steps of the operating cycle and the concentration of ozone to be used. 27 references.

  9. Infrared measurements in the spring 1987 ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Goldman, Aaron; Keys, J. G.; Matthews, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    Solar spectra were recorded from Arrival Heights (McMurdo), Antartica, with a FTIR system during the austral spring of 1987. Spectra were recorded on 22 days from September 13 through October 28. The instrument was setup with 2 detectors for simultaneous operation in 2 wavelength regions. Several stratospheric gases have measurable absorptions in these regions including HCl, HNO3, O3, ClONO2, and NO2. The system is equipped with an automatic solar tracking system and records data on tape cartridges. A portable personal computer allows Fourier transforming and initial processing of some of the data. The HNO3 gas column amount shows large variations, but no apparent correlation with stratospheric temperature. The HCl column shows a steady increase from 0.9 x 10 to the 15th power molecules/sq.cm. on September 13 to 1.5 x 10 to the 15th power on October 6. McMurdo moved out of the polar vortex for a few days, and the HCl column jumped to 2.9 x 10 to the 15th power by October 11. Although McMurdo moved back under the vortex, the HCl continued to increase, reaching 3.4 x 10 to the 15th power at the end of the period.

  10. Interactive Ozone and Methane Chemistry in GISS-E2 Historical and Future Climate Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.; Pechony, O.; Voulgarakis, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Nazarenko. L.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Bowman, K.; Milly, G.; Kovari, B.; Ruedy, R.; Schmidt, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    The new generation GISS climate model includes fully interactive chemistry related to ozone in historical and future simulations, and interactive methane in future simulations. Evaluation of ozone, its tropospheric precursors, and methane shows that the model captures much of the largescale spatial structure seen in recent observations. While the model is much improved compared with the previous chemistry-climate model, especially for ozone seasonality in the stratosphere, there is still slightly too rapid stratospheric circulation, too little stratosphere-to-troposphere ozone flux in the Southern Hemisphere and an Antarctic ozone hole that is too large and persists too long. Quantitative metrics of spatial and temporal correlations with satellite datasets as well as spatial autocorrelation to examine transport and mixing are presented to document improvements in model skill and provide a benchmark for future evaluations. The difference in radiative forcing (RF) calculated using modeled tropospheric ozone versus tropospheric ozone observed by TES is only 0.016W/sq. m. Historical 20th Century simulations show a steady increase in whole atmosphere ozone RF through 1970 after which there is a decrease through 2000 due to stratospheric ozone depletion. Ozone forcing increases throughout the 21st century under RCP8.5 owing to a projected recovery of stratospheric ozone depletion and increases in methane, but decreases under RCP4.5 and 2.6 due to reductions in emissions of other ozone precursors. RF from methane is 0.05 to 0.18W/ sq. m higher in our model calculations than in the RCP RF estimates. The surface temperature response to ozone through 1970 follows the increase in forcing due to tropospheric ozone. After that time, surface temperatures decrease as ozone RF declines due to stratospheric depletion. The stratospheric ozone depletion also induces substantial changes in surface winds and the Southern Ocean circulation, which may play a role in a slightly stronger

  11. Simulation of Stratospheric Ozone in the KIAPSGM NWP model using linear photochemistry parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G. R.; Monge-Sanz, B.; Cariolle, D.; Lee, E. H.; Jin, E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Stratospheric ozone plays important roles in the Earth's weather and climate systems due to its physiochemical properties and a wide range of spectral absorption. Because of complicated chemical equations and expensive computational cost, NWP community has introduced a linear photochemistry parameterization (LPP) that Cariolle and Déqué suggested in 1986 with an insight of ozone-temperature relationships, to weather forecasting system. In this study, we simulated stratospheric ozone using recent LPP coefficients in a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, the KIAPS-GM (Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems - Global Model), and evaluated model results with observations. The KIAPS-GM uses three dimensional hydrostatic dynamical core based on the High-Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME) in cubed sphere with a horizontal resolution of ne30np4 and 70 vertical layers up to 85km. LPP scheme was fully implemented into the KIAPS-GM including the ozone tracer advection. Prognostic ozone was estimated through interaction with local ozone field, temperature field, and radiation field as those physics fields were updated while climatological ozone (Fortuin and Kelder, 1998) was constantly fed into radiation fields in every month. ERA-interim ozone and meteorological data (Dee et al., 2011) were used as initial data. Simulation period was year 2008 when larger ozone hole events occurred than usual. We compared interactive ozone case with climatological ozone case. For the sensitivity studies to initial ozone fields and LPP coefficients, ERA-interim hourly and monthly ozone data were used; and LPP coefficients such as Cariolle and Teyssadre (2007) and Monge-Sanz et al. (2011) were interpolated into instantaneous pressure levels, respectively. Preliminary results show that the ozone concentration in interactive ozone case is higher than climatological one in the lower stratosphere and troposphere while the former is lower than the latter in the upper

  12. High efficiency ozone generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.L.

    1990-01-09

    This final report entails research prepared to verify the workings and the efficiency of producing ozone with the ELK'' Ozone Generator, which operates at an elevated gas pressure of up to 20 MPA (3000 psi) and is an improvement of the corona discharge ozone generator. The increased pressure produces an increase in the density of oxygen gas fed into the generator. This, in turn, leads to an increased yield of ozone in the ozone oxygen gas mixture leaving the generator. The design of this new ozone generator incorporates a novel positioning of the dielectric to preserve its mechanical integrity at high operating pressures and also incorporates a novel heat removal technique. A large number of ozone production runs have been made at different pressures. Large populations of data such as, temperature points throughout the generator, gas flow, cooling water flow parameters, operating gas pressure, ozone concentration, and data on the dielectric cooling, have been compiled and fed into our computer. This new data indicates not only that high pressures used in a controlled fashion will produce more ozone per watt hour but also indicates what problems exist when pressures are increased, such as the generation of high temperatures not only in the area of ozone generation but within the dielectric. The data also shows the necessary residence time for maximum ozone production at a particular pressure, voltage, temperature and electrode spacing. 14 refs., 22 figs.

  13. Assimilation of Satellite Ozone Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Winslow, N.; Wargan, K.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Rood, R.

    2003-01-01

    This talk will discuss assimilation of ozone data from satellite-borne instruments. Satellite observations of ozone total columns and profiles have been measured by a series of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) instruments, and more recently by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment. Additional profile data are provided by instruments on NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and by occultation instruments on other platforms. Instruments on Envisat' and future EOS Aura satellite will supply even more comprehensive data about the ozone distribution. Satellite data contain a wealth of information, but they do not provide synoptic global maps of ozone fields. These maps can be obtained through assimilation of satellite data into global chemistry and transport models. In the ozone system at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO) any combination of TOMS, SBUV, and Microwave Limb sounder (MLS) data can be assimilated. We found that the addition of MLS to SBUV and TOMS data in the system helps to constrain the ozone distribution, especially in the polar night region and in the tropics. The assimilated ozone distribution in the troposphere and lower stratosphere is sensitive also to finer changes in the SBUV and TOMS data selection and to changes in error covariance models. All results are established by comparisons of assimilated ozone with independent profiles from ozone sondes and occultation instruments.

  14. Ozone decomposing filter

    SciTech Connect

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.; Whinnery, L.L. Jr.

    1999-11-02

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  15. Ozone decomposing filter

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.; Whinnery, Jr., LeRoy L.

    1999-01-01

    In an improved ozone decomposing air filter carbon fibers are held together with a carbonized binder in a perforated structure. The structure is made by combining rayon fibers with gelatin, forming the mixture in a mold, freeze-drying, and vacuum baking.

  16. Dobson ozone spectrophotometer modification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a modified version of the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer in which several outdated electronic design features have been replaced by circuitry embodying more modern design concepts. The resulting improvement in performance characteristics has been obtained without changing the principle of operation of the original instrument.

  17. Ozone, CFCs and aerosols.

    PubMed

    1989-07-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are, from the chemist's point of view, unique compounds with very valuable properties. They are inert, cheap and stable. But they also have devastating effects on the environment, destroying the ozone layer and adding to global warming or the greenhouse effect.

  18. Ozone Layer Educator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide has been developed through a collaborative effort involving the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It is part of an ongoing commitment to ensure that the results of scientific research on ozone depletion are…

  19. Ozone and Cavitation Combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreon, Ernestina; Traversoni, Leonardo

    2009-09-01

    From laboratory measurements it is well known that the addition of ozone and cavitation enhances the properties of both, understanding for that the ones related to disinfection and carbon removal from waste water. This paper shows modeling of such phenomena that gives some light to the understanding of it and also provides the opportunity to improve the effectiveness of the current procedures.

  20. Stratospheric Ozone-induced Indirect Radiative Effects on Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Xia, Y.; LIU, J.; Huang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that the Antarctic Ozone Hole has important influences on Antarctic sea ice. While all these have focused on stratospheric ozone-induced dynamic effects on sea ice, here we show results that ozone-induced indirect radiative effects have important influences on Antarctic sea ice. Our simulations demonstrate that the recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole causes equatorward shift of clouds over the Southern Ocean. The cloud-band shift leads to reduction of downward infrared radiation, which causes surface cooling. On the other hand, it also causes increasing solar radiation on the surface. However, the increase in solar radiation is offset by surface reflection due to increasing sea ice. As a result solar radiation absorbed by the surface is reduced, which also causes surface cooling. Therefore, the overall ozone-induced cloud radiative effect is to cool the surface and causes expansion of sea ice around the Antarctic. As shown in previous studies, the cloud-band shift is associated with the equatorward shift of the westerly jet stream around the Antarctic. Our simulations also demonstrate increasing snow rate near the sea ice edge, which also contributes to Antarctic sea-ice expansion. The ozone-induced cloud radiative effect would mitigate Antarctic sea-ice melting due to greenhouse warming in the 21st century.

  1. Particle Events as a Possible Source of Large Ozone Loss during Magnetic Polarity Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonKoenig, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Jackman, C. H.; Kallenrode, M.-B.; Kuenzi, K. F.; Quack, M.

    2002-01-01

    The energy deposition in the mesosphere and stratosphere during large extraterrestrial charged particle precipitation events has been known for some time to contribute to ozone losses due to the formation of potential ozone destroying species like NO(sub x), and HO(sub x). These impacts have been measured and can be reproduced with chemistry models fairly well. In the recent past, however, even the impact of the largest solar proton events on the total amount of ozone has been small compared to the dynamical variability of ozone, and to the anthropogenic induced impacts like the Antarctic 'ozone hole'. This is due to the shielding effect of the magnetic field. However, there is evidence that the earth's magnetic field may approach a reversal. This could lead to a decrease of magnetic field strength to less than 25% of its usual value over a period of several centuries . We show that with realistic estimates of very large solar proton events, scenarios similar to the Antarctic ozone hole of the 1990s may occur during a magnetic polarity transition.

  2. NASA Now: Black Holes

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this NASA Now episode, Dr. Daniel Patnaude talks about how his team discovered a baby black hole, why this is important and how black holes create tidal forces. Throughout his discussion, Patnau...

  3. Black hole hair removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Nabamita; Mandal, Ipsita; Sen, Ashoke

    2009-07-01

    Macroscopic entropy of an extremal black hole is expected to be determined completely by its near horizon geometry. Thus two black holes with identical near horizon geometries should have identical macroscopic entropy, and the expected equality between macroscopic and microscopic entropies will then imply that they have identical degeneracies of microstates. An apparent counterexample is provided by the 4D-5D lift relating BMPV black hole to a four dimensional black hole. The two black holes have identical near horizon geometries but different microscopic spectrum. We suggest that this discrepancy can be accounted for by black hole hair — degrees of freedom living outside the horizon and contributing to the degeneracies. We identify these degrees of freedom for both the four and the five dimensional black holes and show that after their contributions are removed from the microscopic degeneracies of the respective systems, the result for the four and five dimensional black holes match exactly.

  4. Black Hole Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, Werner

    This chapter reviews the conceptual developments on black hole thermodynamics and the attempts to determine the origin of black hole entropy in terms of their horizon area. The brick wall model and an operational approach are discussed. An attempt to understand at the microlevel how the quantum black hole acquires its thermal properties is included. The chapter concludes with some remarks on the extension of these techniques to describing the dynamical process of black hole evaporation.

  5. 16 CFR 260.11 - Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... friendly to, the ozone layer or the atmosphere. Example 1: A product is labeled “ozone-friendly.” The claim... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. 260.11... THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.11 Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. It...

  6. 16 CFR 260.11 - Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... friendly to, the ozone layer or the atmosphere. Example 1: A product is labeled “ozone-friendly.” The claim... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. 260.11... THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.11 Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. It...

  7. The ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and ozone forcing

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, John; Armour, Kyle C.; Scott, Jeffery R.; Kostov, Yavor; Hausmann, Ute; Ferreira, David; Shepherd, Theodore G.; Bitz, Cecilia M.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the Arctic has been warming and sea ice disappearing. By contrast, the Southern Ocean around Antarctica has been (mainly) cooling and sea-ice extent growing. We argue here that interhemispheric asymmetries in the mean ocean circulation, with sinking in the northern North Atlantic and upwelling around Antarctica, strongly influence the sea-surface temperature (SST) response to anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing, accelerating warming in the Arctic while delaying it in the Antarctic. Furthermore, while the amplitude of GHG forcing has been similar at the poles, significant ozone depletion only occurs over Antarctica. We suggest that the initial response of SST around Antarctica to ozone depletion is one of cooling and only later adds to the GHG-induced warming trend as upwelling of sub-surface warm water associated with stronger surface westerlies impacts surface properties. We organize our discussion around ‘climate response functions’ (CRFs), i.e. the response of the climate to ‘step’ changes in anthropogenic forcing in which GHG and/or ozone-hole forcing is abruptly turned on and the transient response of the climate revealed and studied. Convolutions of known or postulated GHG and ozone-hole forcing functions with their respective CRFs then yield the transient forced SST response (implied by linear response theory), providing a context for discussion of the differing warming/cooling trends in the Arctic and Antarctic. We speculate that the period through which we are now passing may be one in which the delayed warming of SST associated with GHG forcing around Antarctica is largely cancelled by the cooling effects associated with the ozone hole. By mid-century, however, ozone-hole effects may instead be adding to GHG warming around Antarctica but with diminished amplitude as the ozone hole heals. The Arctic, meanwhile, responding to GHG forcing but in a manner amplified by ocean heat transport, may continue to warm at an

  8. The ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and ozone forcing.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John; Armour, Kyle C; Scott, Jeffery R; Kostov, Yavor; Hausmann, Ute; Ferreira, David; Shepherd, Theodore G; Bitz, Cecilia M

    2014-07-13

    In recent decades, the Arctic has been warming and sea ice disappearing. By contrast, the Southern Ocean around Antarctica has been (mainly) cooling and sea-ice extent growing. We argue here that interhemispheric asymmetries in the mean ocean circulation, with sinking in the northern North Atlantic and upwelling around Antarctica, strongly influence the sea-surface temperature (SST) response to anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing, accelerating warming in the Arctic while delaying it in the Antarctic. Furthermore, while the amplitude of GHG forcing has been similar at the poles, significant ozone depletion only occurs over Antarctica. We suggest that the initial response of SST around Antarctica to ozone depletion is one of cooling and only later adds to the GHG-induced warming trend as upwelling of sub-surface warm water associated with stronger surface westerlies impacts surface properties. We organize our discussion around 'climate response functions' (CRFs), i.e. the response of the climate to 'step' changes in anthropogenic forcing in which GHG and/or ozone-hole forcing is abruptly turned on and the transient response of the climate revealed and studied. Convolutions of known or postulated GHG and ozone-hole forcing functions with their respective CRFs then yield the transient forced SST response (implied by linear response theory), providing a context for discussion of the differing warming/cooling trends in the Arctic and Antarctic. We speculate that the period through which we are now passing may be one in which the delayed warming of SST associated with GHG forcing around Antarctica is largely cancelled by the cooling effects associated with the ozone hole. By mid-century, however, ozone-hole effects may instead be adding to GHG warming around Antarctica but with diminished amplitude as the ozone hole heals. The Arctic, meanwhile, responding to GHG forcing but in a manner amplified by ocean heat transport, may continue to warm at an accelerating rate.

  9. Precision ozone calibration system based on vapor pressures of ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1987-01-01

    A precision ozone calibration system for stratospheric research has been developed and evaluated. Vapor pressures above solid ozone are mixed with a carrier gas (N2) to produce stratospheric ozone mixing ratios at total pressures of 1 to cover 20 torr. The uncertainty in the ozone mixing ratios is approximately + or - 1.5 percent, the stability of ozone is + or - 0.3 percent. Experiments to be calibrated may sample the gas mixture over a wide range of flow rates; the maximum throughput of gas with corrections of less than 1 percent to ozone is about 200 torr 1/min. A mass spectrometer system continuously monitors the purity and stability of the N2-O3 gas mixture.

  10. Satellite Mapping of the Earth's Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin; Bhartia, P. K.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments are spatially-scanning UV spectrometers that have produced daily global images of total ozone over the last 21 years since the launch of the Nimbus 7 satellite. The instruments use a total ozone retrieval algorithm pioneered by J.V. Dave and C. L. Mateer for the Nimbus 4 Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) instrument, designed by D.F. Heath. The TOMS ozone maps have revealed the relations between total ozone and atmospheric dynamics, and shown the dramatic losses of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole and the Northern hemisphere. The accepted long-term trends in global, regional, and local ozone are derived from data from the Nimbus 7 TOMS and three successive TOMS flights on Russian, Japanese, and American satellites. The next TOMS flight will be launched in 2000. The contiguous mapping design and fortuitous choice of TOMS wavelengths bands also permitted imaging of a second atmospheric gas, sulfur dioxide, which is transient due to its short lifetime. The importance of this measurement was first realized after the eruption of El Chichon volcano in 1982. The extreme range of sizes of volcanic eruptions and the associated danger require observations from a distant observing platform. The first quantitative time series of the input of sulfur dioxide by explosive volcanic eruptions into the atmosphere thus was developed from the TOMS missions. Finally, the Rayleigh and aerosol scattering spectral characteristic and reflectivity complete the four dominant pieces of information in the near UV albedo of the Earth. The four parameters are derived with a linear algorithm, the absorption coefficients of the gases, and effective paths computed from radiative transfer tables. Absorbing aerosol clouds (smoke, dust, volcanic ash) are readily identified by their deviation from a Rayleigh signature. The greatest shortcoming of the TOMS dataset is the 24 hour time resolution that is produced by the polar orbit of the satellite

  11. Satellite Mapping of the Earth's Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Arlin; Bhartia, P. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments are spatially-scanning UV spectrometers that have produced daily global images of total ozone over the last 21 years since the launch of the Nimbus 7 satellite. The instruments use a total ozone retrieval algorithm pioneered by J.V. Dave and C. L. Mateer for the Nimbus 4 Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) instrument, designed by D.F. Heath. The TOMS ozone maps have revealed the relations between total ozone and atmospheric dynamics, and shown the dramatic losses of ozone in the Antarctic ozone hole and the Northern hemisphere. The accepted long-term trends in global, regional, and local ozone are derived from data from the Nimbus 7 TOMS and three successive TOMS flights on Russian, Japanese, and American satellites. The next TOMS flight will be launched in 2000. The contiguous mapping design and fortuitous choice of TOMS wavelengths bands also permitted imaging of a second atmospheric gas, sulfur dioxide, which is transient due to its short lifetime. The importance of this measurement was first realized after the eruption of El Chichon volcano in 1982. The extreme range of sizes of volcanic eruptions and the 'associated danger require observations from a distant observing platform. The first quantitative time series of the input of sulfur dioxide by explosive volcanic eruptions into the atmosphere thus was developed from the TOMS missions. Finally, the Rayleigh and aerosol scattering spectral characteristic and reflectivity complete the four dominant pieces of information in the near UV albedo of the Earth. The four parameters are derived with a linear algorithm, the absorption coefficients of the gases, and effective paths computed from radiative transfer tables. Absorbing aerosol clouds (smoke, dust, volcanic ash) are readily identified by their deviation from a Rayleigh signature. The greatest shortcoming of the TOMS dataset is the 24 hour time resolution that is produced by the polar orbit of the satellite

  12. Design of a vehicle based system to prevent ozone loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Sean R.; Bunker, Deborah; Hesbach, Thomas D., Jr.; Howerton, Everett B.; Hreinsson, G.; Mistr, E. Kirk; Palmer, Matthew E.; Rogers, Claiborne; Tischler, Dayna S.; Wrona, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    Reduced quantities of ozone in the atmosphere allow greater levels of ultraviolet light (UV) radiation to reach the earth's surface. This is known to cause skin cancer and mutations. Chlorine liberated from Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) and natural sources initiate the destruction of stratospheric ozone through a free radical chain reaction. The project goals are to understand the processes which contribute to stratospheric ozone loss, examine ways to prevent ozone loss, and design a vehicle-based system to carry out the prevention scheme. The 1992/1993 design objectives were to accomplish the first two goals and define the requirements for an implementation vehicle to be designed in detail starting next year. Many different ozone intervention schemes have been proposed though few have been researched and none have been tested. A scheme proposed by R.J. Cicerone, Scott Elliot and R.P.Turco late in 1991 was selected because of its research support and economic feasibility. This scheme uses hydrocarbon injected into the Antarctic ozone hole to form stable compounds with free chlorine, thus reducing ozone depletion. Because most polar ozone depletion takes place during a 3-4 week period each year, the hydrocarbon must be injected during this time window. A study of the hydrocarbon injection requirements determined that 100 aircraft traveling Mach 2.4 at a maximum altitude of 66,000 ft. would provide the most economic approach to preventing ozone loss. Each aircraft would require an 8,000 nm. range and be able to carry 35,000 lbs. of propane. The propane would be stored in a three-tank high pressure system. Missions would be based from airport regions located in South America and Australia. To best provide the requirements of mission analysis, an aircraft with L/D(sub cruise) = 10.5, SFC = 0.65 (the faculty advisor suggested that this number is too low) and a 250,000 lb TOGW was selected as a baseline. Modularity and multi-role functionality were selected to be key

  13. Black Hole Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Janna; D'Orazio, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Black holes are dark dead stars. Neutron stars are giant magnets. As the neutron star orbits the black hole, an electronic circuit forms that generates a blast of power just before the black hole absorbs the neutron star whole. The black hole battery conceivably would be observable at cosmological distances. Possible channels for luminosity include synchro-curvature radiation, a blazing fireball, or even an unstable, short-lived black hole pulsar. As suggested by Mingarelli, Levin, and Lazio, some fraction of the battery power could also be reprocessed into coherent radio emission to populate a subclass of fast radio bursts.

  14. Measurement of ozone production sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla Andrade, Maria Del Carmen

    The Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS) is a new ambient air monitor that measures directly the rate of ozone production in the atmosphere. The sensor consists of two environmental chambers made of UV-transmitting Teflon film continuously exposed to the solar radiation, a unit to convert NO2 to O3, and a modified ozone monitor. In the sample chamber, photolysis processes and radical chemistry produce ozone just as it happens in the atmosphere. In the second chamber, called the reference chamber, a UV-blocking film prevents radical formation in a way that only the photostationary state component of ozone formation is retained. High-efficiency conversion of NO2 to O3 accounts for differences in the NOx photostationary state between both chambers. An ozone monitor operating without its ozone scrubber detects the ozone differential between the sample and the reference chamber. By doing so, the photostationary state component of ozone formation is canceled out and the ozone produced via radical chemistry is detected. The ozone differential is divided by the exposure time of the air in the chambers to find the rate of ozone production. Radical abundance measurements, wall loss tests and radiometric measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The MOPS was deployed in a rural environment, on the campus of Penn State University (September 2008), and in an urban environment, in Houston during the Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors SHARP (15 Apr to 31 May, 2009). The MOPS retrieved the first experimental plots of ambient P(O 3) vs. NO in both locations. In addition, the sensitivity of ozone production in these two environments was studied by adding NOx mixtures to the ambient air and looking at the response in the production of ozone. The results presented in this work demonstrate how an extended use of the MOPS can contribute to the improvement of air quality regulations by quantifying ozone production and ozone transport at a regional

  15. Stratospheric ozone chemistry in the Antarctic: what controls the lowest values that can be reached and their recovery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooß, J.-U.; Brautzsch, K.; Pommrich, R.; Solomon, S.; Müller, R.

    2011-08-01

    Balloon-borne observations of ozone from Antarctic stations have been reported to reach ozone mixing ratios as low as about 10 ppbv at the 70 hPa level by late September. After reaching a minimum, ozone mixing ratios then increase to the ppmv level by late December. While the basic mechanisms causing the ozone hole have been known for more than 20 yr, the detailed chemical processes controlling how low the local concentration can fall, and how it recovers from the minimum have not been explored so far. Both of these aspects are investigated here by analysing results from the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS). We discuss the processes responsible for stopping of the catalytic ozone depletion. We show that an irreversible chlorine deactivation into HCl can occur either when ozone drops to very low values or by temperatures increasing above the PSC threshold in these simulations. As a consequence, the timing and mixing ratio of the minimum depends sensitively on model parameters including the ozone initialisation. The subsequent observed ozone increase between October and December is linked not only to transport, but also to photochemical ozone production, caused by oxygen photolysis and by the oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane.

  16. TOMS Ozone Anomalies and Ozone Retrieval Errors Over Cloudy Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Newchurch, M.; Kim, J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Loughman, R.

    2003-12-01

    This study characterizes TOMS Ozone Retrieval Errors (OREs) associated with incorrect Cloud-Top Pressures (CTPs) and with assuming opaque Lambertian clouds, investigates these errors' effects on tropospheric ozone derivation, and analyzes ozone anomalies over TOMS data. Large errors occurring in TOMS assumed CTPs and inaccurate CTP-caused OREs are most significantly from inappropriately added ozone below clouds. Because OREs are usually within the TOMS retrieval precision when Cloud Optical Depth (COD)>20, assuming Lambertian surface is good. Because of In-Cloud Ozone Absorption ENhancement (ICOAEN), assuming opaque clouds can introduce large positive OREs even for optically thick clouds. For a 2-12 km water cloud of COD 40 with 20.8 DU ozone inside the cloud, the ORE is 17.8 DU at nadir. The ICOAEN effect depends strongly on viewing geometry and inter-cloud ozone amount and distribution; it is typically 5-13 DU over the tropical Atlantic and Africa and 1-7 DU over the tropical Pacific for deep convective clouds. The negative errors from using the TOMS Partial Cloud Model (PCM) partly cancel other positive errors. At COD < 5, the TOMS algorithm retrieves approximately the correct total ozone because of compensating errors. With increasing COD up to 20-40, negative PCM effect decreases to almost zero, and the overall positive ORE increases and is dominated by ICOAEN effect. The ICOAEN effect can largely underestimate tropospheric ozone derived from cloudy/clear difference techniques. The convective cloud differential and cloud-clear pair methods use minimum ozone above clouds to cancel positive errors. A Positive or Negative Ozone Anomaly (POA/NOA) is defined to occur if the ozone/reflectivity correlation coefficient in a region is >0.5 or <-0.5. Average fractions of OA occurrence are 31.8% and 35.8% in Nimbus-7 and Earth-Probe TOMS data, respectively. Most tropical NOAs result from large cloud-height errors; corrections lead to 50-70% POAs in the tropics because of

  17. Ozonated olive oils and the troubles

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    One of the commonly used methods for ozone therapy is ozonated oils. Most prominent type of used oils is extra virgin olive oil. But still, each type of unsaturated oils may be used for ozonation. There are a lot of wrong knowledge on the internet about ozonated oils and its use as well. Just like other ozone therapy studies, also the studies about ozone oils are inadequate to avoid incorrect knowledge. Current data about ozone oil and its benefits are produced by supplier who oversees financial interests and make misinformation. Despite the rapidly increasing ozone oil sales through the internet, its quality and efficacy is still controversial. Dozens of companies and web sites may be easily found to buy ozonated oil. But, very few of these products are reliable, and contain sufficiently ozonated oil. This article aimed to introduce the troubles about ozonated oils and so to inform ozonated oil users. PMID:26401346

  18. Evolution of ozone depletion on Antarctic and sub-Antarctic regions (1979-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, S. B.; Paladini, A. A.; Deferrari, G. A.; Vrsalovic, J.

    2013-08-01

    At the middle eighties, strong stratospheric ozone depletion during spring was discovered over Antarctica. Since then, the scientific community has put large efforts in performing studies directed to evaluate the magnitude and consequences of this depletion and to take the necessary measures to revert the situation to the scenarios before 1970. In 1987, the Montreal Protocol established a list of ozone depleting products and faced out policies. As consequence of these restrictions on ozone depleting substances, the ozone layer should start to recover in the 21st century. In order to study the evolution of the Antarctic ozone depletion, we analyzed the ozone hole area and mass deficit and seasonal total ozone column (TOC) minimum. We also performed a seasonal and bi-monthly analysis for TOC time series (1979-2012), at twenty Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic stations. The number of days inside the vortex (TOC below 220DU) per season (September-December) and for September-October and November-December were analyzed, fitting the time series with a second degree polynomial According to this study, ozone hole area would have peaked between 2001 and 2002 (R=0.91, p<0.01), while the minimum TOC would have occurred between 2000 and 2001(R=0.91, p<0.01). Mass deficit is only provided since 2005 and it showed a decrease since then, although ot statistically significant as consequence of the short time series. From the 20 analyzed stations, 80% showed that the number of days per season inside the vortex peaked between 2000 and 2003 and for 55% of the stations the number of days inside the vortex for September-October peaked between 1999 and 2004.

  19. Ozone Risk Assessment Utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R. G.; Jusko, M. J.; Clemmons, M. A.

    1999-08-10

    ORAMUS is a user-friendly, menu-driven software system that calculates and displays user-selected risk estimates for health effects attributable to short-term exposure to tropospheric ozone. Inputs to the risk assessment are estimates of exposure to ozone and exposure-response relationships to produce overall risk estimates in the form of probability distributions. Three fundamental models are included: headcount risk, benchmark risk, and hospital admissions. Exposure-response relationships are based on results of controlled human exposure studies. Exposure estimates are based on the EPA''s probabilistic national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) exposure model, pNEM/Osub3, which simulates air quality associated with attainment of alternative NAAQS. Using ORAMUS, risk results for 27 air quality scenarios, air quality in 9 urban areas, 33 health endpoints, and 4 chronic health endpoints can be calculated.

  20. Secular variations of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrgian, A. Kh.

    1988-02-01

    The dependence of secular variations of tropospheric ozone on decreases of temperature and cloud growth in Central Europe is assessed on the basis of Vienna, Paris, and Athens data for 1853-1920. Decreases in ozone content occurring with a certain time lag after major volcanic eruptions (e.g., Krakatoa) are examined. The effect of the Tungusk-meteorite fall on ozone content is also discussed.

  1. Mars ozone: Mariner 9 revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy of the UV reflectance spectroscopy technique used by Mariner 9 to remotely measure ozone abundance at Mars is discussed. Due to temporal and spatial variability in cloud and dust amount, previously inferred ozone abundances could be underestimated by a factor of 3. Until the large uncertainty in cloud and dust scattering properties and opacities can be reduced, the ozone abundance inferred by the reflectance spectroscopy technique will always have significant uncertainty.

  2. Black Holes (With 16 figures)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Igor

    Astrophysics of Black Holes Introduction The Origin of Stellar Black Holes A Nonrotating Black Hole Introduction Schwarzschild Gravitational Field Motion of Photons Along the Radial Direction Radial Motion of Nonrelativistic Particles The Puzzle of the Gravitational Radius R and T Regions Two Types of T-Regions Gravitational Collapse and White Holes Eternal Black Hole? Black Hole Celestial Mechanics Circular Motion Around a Black Hole Gravitational Capture of Particles by a Black Hole Corrections for Gravitational Radiation A Rotating Black Hole Introduction Gravitational Field of a Rotating Black Hole Specific Reference Frames General Properties of the Spacetime of a Rotating Black Hole; - Spacetime Inside the Horizon Celestial Mechanics of a Rotating Black Hole Motion of Particle in the Equatorial Plane Motion of Particles off the Equatorial Plane Peculiarities of the Gravitational Capture of Bodies by a Rotating - Black Hole Electromagnetic Fields Near a Black Hole Introduction Maxwell's Equations in the Neighborhood of a Rotating Black Hole Stationary Electrodynamics Boundary Conditions at the Event Horizon Electromagnetic Fields in Vacuum Magnetosphere of a Black Hole Some Aspects of Physics of Black Holes, Wormholes, and Time Machines Observational Appearence of the Black Holes in the Universe Black Holes in the Interstellar Medium Disk Accretion Black Holes in Stellar Binary Systems Black Holes in Galactic Centers Dynamical Evidence for Black Holes in Galaxy Nuclei Primordial Black Holes Acknowledgements References

  3. Protecting beans from ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.

    1983-03-01

    A chemical treatment to protect navy beans from ozone damage increased yields by an average of more than 20% in 3 years of tests. An experimental antioxidant chemical, EDU, made by the DuPont company was tested as soil applications and sprays on several varieties and under a variety of soil and planting conditions. The average yield increases were between 16 and 24%. Chemical treatment also increased snap bean pod production by 12%.

  4. Protecting the ozone layer.

    PubMed

    Munasinghe, M; King, K

    1992-06-01

    Stratospheric ozone layer depletion has been recognized as a problem by the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the 1987 Montreal Protocol (MP). The ozone layer shields the earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV-B), which is more pronounced at the poles and around the equator. Industrialized countries have contributed significantly to the problem by releasing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons into the atmosphere. The effect of these chemicals, which were known for their inertness, nonflammability, and nontoxicity, was discovered in 1874. Action to deal with the effects of CFCs and halons was initiated in 1985 in a 49-nation UN meeting. 21 nations signed a protocol limiting ozone depleting substances (ODS): CFCs and halons. Schedules were set based on each country's use in 1986; the target phaseout was set for the year 2000. The MP restricts trade in ODSs and weights the impact of substances to reflect the extent of damage; i.e., halons are 10 times more damaging than CFCs. ODS requirements for developing countries were eased to accommodate scarce resources and the small fraction of ODS emissions. An Interim Multilateral Fund under the Montreal Protocol (IMFMP) was established to provide loans to finance the costs to developing countries in meeting global environmental requirements. The IMFMP is administered by the World Bank, the UN Environmental Program, and the UN Development Program. Financing is available to eligible countries who use .3 kg of ODS/person/year. Rapid phaseout in developed countries has occurred due to strong support from industry and a lower than expected cost. Although there are clear advantages to rapid phaseout, there were no incentives included in the MP for rapid phaseout. Some of the difficulties occur because the schedules set minimum targets at the lowest possible cost. Also, costs cannot be minimized by a country-specific and ODS-specific process. The ways to improve implementation in scheduling and

  5. Observations of deformation and mixing of the total ozone field in the Antaractic Polar Vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.P. ); Mangus, N.J. )

    1993-09-01

    Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) images of the springtime Southern Hemisphere commonly show concentric layers in the total ozone field outside the Antarctic polar vortex. The layering appears to result from horizontal folding and stretching of regions on the equatorward flank of the polar vortex near the midlatitude ozone maximum. This folding and stretching interleaves low and high ozone air from the subtropics and midlatitudes, respectively. Occasional large amplitude wave events can extract very low ozone air from the interior of the polar vortex (the Antarctic ozone hole), but the folding and stretching results in relatively rapid horizontal mixing of the atmosphere on the equatorward flank of the jet. This type of lagrangian behavior may be common in the atmosphere, but is only visible when local tracer gradients are large and observations with high spatial resolution are available. Also, experimentation has shown that gray-scale images of TOMS data show the details of the spatial distribution of ozone much more clearly than contour maps of false-color images. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. An Investigation of Polar Ozone Recovery in the 1997 Southern Hemisphere Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, J. M.; Douglass, A. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Newman, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    A chemical transport model is used to investigate the processes that control the depth and duration of the ozone 'hole' in the lower stratosphere through comparisons of model output with measurements from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE), both on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). This study extends previous model comparisons with observations into October and November and examine levels in (greater than 31 hPa) and above (less than 31 hPa) the chemical loss region. Averages of column ozone in the model decrease through mid-October below 31 hPa but begin to increase in mid-September above 31 hPa. An investigation of model-tracer data comparisons and other meteorological parameters indicate that the model presents a consistent picture of top-down recovery and tracer transport. An O03budget study at 500 K (below 31 hPa) and 840 K (above 31 hPa) is carried out to investigate the processes that control the timing of the transition of ozone from a chemical to dynamically driven regime. The model ozone decrease at 500 K is due to chemical loss in August and September but is due to upward motion in October. The ozone increase at 840 K is primarily due to photochemical production, with a smaller contribution from transport. These results show that chemistry and dynamics can play different roles in polar vortex ozone recovery at different levels.

  7. Lagrangian Simulations of polar ozone loss: from box model to 3-d CTM CLaMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooss, J.; Konopka, P.; Gunther, G.; Walter, R.; Müller, R.

    2005-12-01

    Since the discovery of the ozone hole in 1985, simulations of polar ozone loss improved persistently over the years. Especially using the Lagrangian view in which chemical processes are simulated for air parcels that move in location has been demonstrated to be a successful method. We describe the development of Lagrangian simulations of polar ozone loss starting with chemical box model simulations along particular trajectories up to the 3-dimensional version of the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS). Besides chemistry and Lagrangian advection CLaMS contains sophisticated modules for mixing and denitrification. We show CLaMS simulations for the Arctic winters 2002/03, 2004/05 and for the Antarctic winter 2003. The focus will be on chemical ozone loss and denitrification. The processes involved in denitrification, especially the nucleation of NAT particles are not fully understood. From comparisons of the simulated denitrification with observations we conclude that the sensitivity of denitrification on key assumptions is largest at the time of onset of the denitrification. Further we show that besides possible inconsistencies in the ozone loss rates in early winter the ozone depletion over the winter is simulated in agreement with the observations. Overall, CLaMS simulations reproduce the inhomogeneity of chemical ozone loss within the polar vortex well.

  8. A Review of Atmospheric Ozone and Current Thinking on the Antarctic Ozone Hole.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    October 1985 to 29 November 1985. .1 eV LIST OF TABLES TABLE 1. . . . Attenuation of solar radiation through the atmosphere. TABLE 2. . . . Natural events ...controls the thermal structure of the stratosphere thereby excercising a considerable control on the earth’s climate. Events in the last two decades have...On the other hand, the much stronger westerlies (deeper vortex) in the Antartic vortw account for the delay of any major or minor warming event to

  9. Ozone measurement systems improvements studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. W.; Guard, K.; Holland, A. C.; Spurling, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Results are summarized of an initial study of techniques for measuring atmospheric ozone, carried out as the first phase of a program to improve ozone measurement techniques. The study concentrated on two measurement systems, the electro chemical cell (ECC) ozonesonde and the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer, and consisted of two tasks. The first task consisted of error modeling and system error analysis of the two measurement systems. Under the second task a Monte-Carlo model of the Dobson ozone measurement technique was developed and programmed for computer operation.

  10. The Antarctic ozone depletion caused by Erebus volcano gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, V. V.; Zueva, N. E.; Savelieva, E. S.; Gerasimov, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneous chemical reactions releasing photochemically active molecular chlorine play a key role in Antarctic stratospheric ozone destruction, resulting in the Antarctic ozone hole. Hydrogen chloride (HCl) is one of the principal components in these reactions on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). PSCs form during polar nights at extremely low temperatures (lower than -78 °C) mainly on sulfuric acid (H2SO4) aerosols, acting as condensation nuclei and formed from sulfur dioxide (SO2). However, the cause of HCl and H2SO4 high concentrations in the Antarctic stratosphere, leading to considerable springtime ozone depletion, is still not clear. Based on the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data over the last 35 years and by using the NOAA HYSPLIT trajectory model, we show that Erebus volcano gas emissions (including HCl and SO2) can reach the Antarctic stratosphere via high-latitude cyclones with the annual average probability Pbarann. of at least ∼0.235 (23.5%). Depending on Erebus activity, this corresponds to additional annual stratospheric HCl mass of 1.0-14.3 kilotons (kt) and SO2 mass of 1.4-19.7 kt. Thus, Erebus volcano is the natural and powerful source of additional stratospheric HCl and SO2, and hence, the cause of the Antarctic ozone depletion, together with man-made chlorofluorocarbons.

  11. The world ozone dilemma; Research and results with remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtak, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that in order to study the chemically perturbed region of the Antarctic and the Arctic, NASA initiated airborne and satellite imaging of the ozone depletion through the specialized ER-2 plane (at {approximately}18 km) and the modified DC-8-72 aircraft (at {approximately}12.5 km) with remote sensing systems onboard. Instruments onboard the ER-2 and DC-8 NASA research aircraft surveyed the atmosphere from various altitudes and instruments on the Nimbus-7 satellite analyzed reflected sunlight. Measurements were designed to gauge not only the extent of ozone depletion over the Antarctic/Arctic, but other chemical changes in the stratosphere. Activities carried out within programs of remote sensing and in situ measurements by aircraft are compared to TOMS onboard the Nimbus-7, as well as Dobson network ground stations. Through these methods, scientists have been extremely successful in mapping the huge hole in the ozone layer that appeared over Antarctica, which is particularly extensive for about two months of each year and to confirm ozone loss in the Arctic area.

  12. Ultraviolet Radiation and Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R.

    2003-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun produces ozone in the stratosphere and it participates in the destruction of ozone. Absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone is the primary heating mechanism leading to the maximum in temperature at the stratopause. Variations of solar ultraviolet radiation on both the 27-day solar rotation period and the 11-year solar cycle affect ozone by several mechanisms. The temperature and ozone in the upper stratosphere respond to solar uv variations as a coupled system. An increase in uv leads to an increase in the production of ozone through the photolysis of molecular oxygen. An increase in uv leads to an increase in temperature through the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in temperature leads to a partially-offsetting decrease in ozone through temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficients. The ozone variation modulates the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in ozone at solar maximum enhances the uv heating. The processes are understood and supported by long-term data sets. Variation in the upper stratospheric temperatures will lead to a change in the behavior of waves propagating upward from the troposphere. Changes in the pattern of wave dissipation will lead to acceleration or deceleration of the mean flow and changes in the residual or transport circulation. This mechanism could lead to the propagation of the solar cycle uv variation from the upper stratosphere downward to the lower stratosphere. This process is not well-understood and has been the subject of an increasing number of model studies. I will review the data analyses for solar cycle and their comparison to model results.

  13. Uniformly accelerated black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letelier, Patricio S.; Oliveira, Samuel R.

    2001-09-01

    The static and stationary C metric are examined in a generic framework and their interpretations studied in some detail, especially those with two event horizons, one for the black hole and another for the acceleration. We find that (i) the spacetime of an accelerated static black hole is plagued by either conical singularities or a lack of smoothness and compactness of the black hole horizon, (ii) by using standard black hole thermodynamics we show that accelerated black holes have a higher Hawking temperature than Unruh temperature of the accelerated frame, and (iii) the usual upper bound on the product of the mass and acceleration parameters (<1/27) is just a coordinate artifact. The main results are extended to accelerated rotating black holes with no significant changes.

  14. CPT-hole closure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noce, T.E.; Holzer, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    The long-term stability of deep holes 1.75 inches. (4.4 cm) in diameter by 98.4 feet (30 m) created by cone penetration testing (CPT) was monitored at a site in California underlain by Holocene and Pleistocene age alluvial fan deposits. Portions of the holes remained open both below and above the 28.6-foot (8.7 m)-deep water table for approximately three years, when the experiment was terminated. Hole closure appears to be a very slow process that may take decades in the stiff soils studied here. Other experience suggests holes in softer soils may also remain open. Thus, despite their small diameter, CPT holes may remain open for years and provide paths for rapid migration of contaminants. The observations confirm the need to grout holes created by CPT soundings as well as other direct-push techniques in areas where protection of shallow ground water is important.

  15. Supermassive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeb, Abraham

    2007-04-01

    Recent data indicates that almost all galaxies possess a supermassive black hole at their center. When gas accretes onto the black hole it heats-up and shines, resulting in the appearance of a bright quasar. The earliest quasars are found to exist only a billion years after the big-bang. I will describe recent observations of both the nearest and the most distant supermassive black holes in the universe. The formation and evolution of the black hole population can be described in the context of popular models for galaxy formation. I will describe the key questions that drive current research on supermassive black holes and present theoretical work on the radiative and hydrodynamic effects that quasars have on their cosmic habitat. Within the coming decade it would be possible to test general relativity by monitoring over time, and possibly even imaging, the polarized emission from hot spots around the black hole in the center of our Galaxy (SgrA*).

  16. Simulation and causes of eastern Antarctica surface cooling related to ozone depletion during austral summer in FGOALS-s2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Bao, Qing; Ji, Duoying; Gong, Daoyi; Mao, Rui; Zhang, Ziyin; Kim, Seong-Joong

    2014-09-01

    Two parallel sets of numerical experiments (an ozone-hole simulation and a non-ozone-hole simulation) were performed to investigate the effect of ozone depletion on surface temperature change using the second spectral version of the Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System model (FGOALS-s2), focusing on the eastern Antarctica (EA) continent in austral summer. First, we evaluated the ability of the model to simulate the EA surface cooling, and found the model can successfully reproduce the cooling trend of the EA surface, as well as the circulation change circling the South Pole in the past 30 years. Second, we compared the two experiments and discovered that the ozone depletion causes the cooling trend and strengthens the circumpolar westerly flow. We further investigated the causes of the EA surface cooling associated with the ozone hole and found two major contributors. The first is the ozone-hole direct radiation effect (DRE) upon the surface that happens because the decrease of the downward longwave (LW) radiation overcomes the increase of the downward shortwave (SW) radiation under clear sky. The second is the cloud radiation effect (CRE) induced by ozone depletion, which happens because the decreased downward SW radiation overcomes the increased downward LW radiation in the case of increased cloud. Although the CRE is theoretically opposite to the DRE, their final net effect makes comparable contributions to the EA surface cooling. Compared with the surface radiation budget, the surface heat flux budgets have a much smaller contribution. We additionally note that the CRE is basically ascribed to the circulation change.

  17. The Nearest Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Garcia, M.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this program is to study black holes, both in our Galaxy and in nearby galaxies. We aim to study both 'stellar mass' x-ray binaries containing black holes (both in our Galaxy and in nearby galaxies), and super-massive black holes in nearby galaxies. This program facilitates this study by funding related travel, computer equipment, and partial salary for a post-doc.

  18. The Nearest Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, M.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this program is to study black holes, both in our Galaxy and in nearby galaxies. We aim to study both 'stellar mass' x-ray binaries containing black holes (both in our Galaxy and in nearby galaxies), and super-massive black holes in nearby galaxies. This program facilitate this study by funding related travel, computer equipment, and partial salary for a post-doc.

  19. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Serkiz, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  20. Simplified ozone detection by chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Rogowski, R. S.; Richards, R. R.

    1977-01-01

    Ozone is detected by film coated with solid, such as rubrene, that reacts with ozone to degree proportional to concentration in sample gas. Gas flow is stopped, and film is heated to produce light (chemiluminescence) in proportion to amount of reacted material on sensor.

  1. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    During the period December 1976 through February 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center, two special soundings were taken at Antigua, West Indies, and at the Churchill Research Range, monthly activities were initiated to establish stratospheric ozone climatology. This report presents the data results and flight profiles for the period covered.

  2. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-12-07

    A process and resulting product are provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  3. Plant responses to tropospheric ozone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropospheric ozone is the second most abundant air pollutant and an important component of the global climate change. Over five decades of research on the phytotoxicity of ozone in model plants systems, crop plants and forest trees have provided some insight into the physiological, biochemical and m...

  4. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    During the period March 1977 through May 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center and three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at the Churchill Research Range. One additional flight was conducted at Wallops Flight Center in support of Nimbus 4 SBUV. Data results and flight profiles for the period covered are presented.

  5. Asymptotic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Following earlier works on the KMY model of black-hole formation and evaporation, we construct the metric for a matter sphere in gravitational collapse, with the back-reaction of pre-Hawking radiation taken into consideration. The mass distribution and collapsing velocity of the matter sphere are allowed to have an arbitrary radial dependence. We find that a generic gravitational collapse asymptote to a universal configuration which resembles a black hole but without horizon. This approach clarifies several misunderstandings about black-hole formation and evaporation, and provides a new model for black-hole-like objects in the universe.

  6. Evidence for black holes.

    PubMed

    Begelman, Mitchell C

    2003-06-20

    Black holes are common objects in the universe. Each galaxy contains large numbers-perhaps millions-of stellar-mass black holes, each the remnant of a massive star. In addition, nearly every galaxy contains a supermassive black hole at its center, with a mass ranging from millions to billions of solar masses. This review discusses the demographics of black holes, the ways in which they interact with their environment, factors that may regulate their formation and growth, and progress toward determining whether these objects really warp spacetime as predicted by the general theory of relativity.

  7. Source attribution of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a harmful pollutant with adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. As well as these effects, tropospheric ozone is also a powerful greenhouse gas, with an anthropogenic radiative forcing one quarter of that of CO2. Along with methane and atmospheric aerosol, tropospheric ozone belongs to the so-called Short Lived Climate forcing Pollutants, or SLCP. Recent work has shown that efforts to reduce concentrations of SLCP in the atmosphere have the potential to slow the rate of near-term climate change, while simultaneously improving public health and reducing crop losses. Unlike many other SLCP, tropospehric ozone is not directly emitted, but is instead influenced by two distinct sources: transport of air from the ozone-rich stratosphere; and photochemical production in the troposphere from the emitted precursors NOx (oxides of nitrogen), CO (Carbon Monoxide), and VOC (volatile organic compounds, including methane). Better understanding of the relationship between ozone production and the emissions of its precursors is essential for the development of targeted emission reduction strategies. Several modeling methods have been employed to relate the production of tropospheric ozone to emissions of its precursors; emissions perturbation, tagging, and adjoint sensitivity methods all deliver complementary information about modelled ozone production. Most studies using tagging methods have focused on attribution of tropospheric ozone production to emissions of NOx, even though perturbation methods have suggested that tropospheric ozone is also sensitive to VOC, particularly methane. In this study we describe the implementation into a global chemistry-climate model of a scheme for tagging emissions of NOx and VOC with an arbitrary number of labels, which are followed through the chemical reactions of tropospheric ozone production in order to perform attribution of tropospehric ozone to its emitted precursors. Attribution is performed to both

  8. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  9. Global ozone observations from the UARS MLS: An overview of zonal-mean results

    SciTech Connect

    Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W.; Read, W.G.; Elson, L.S.; Flower, D.A.; Jarnot, R.F.

    1994-10-15

    Global ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are presented, in both vertically resolved and column abundance formats. The authors review the zonal-mean ozone variations measured over the two and a half years since launch in September 1991. Well-known features such as the annual and semiannual variations are ubiquitous. In the equatorial regions, longer-term changes are believed to be related to the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), with a strong semiannual signal above 20 hPa. Ozone values near 50 hPa exhibit an equatorial low from October 1991 to June 1992, after which the low ozone pattern splits into two subtropical lows (possibly in connection with residual circulation changes tied to the QBO) and returns to an equatorial low in September 1993. The ozone hole development at high southern latitudes is apparent in MLS column data integrated down to 100 hPa, with a pattern generally consistent with Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) measurements of total column; the MLS data reinforce current knowledge of this lower-stratospheric phenomenon by providing a height-dependent view of the variations. The region from 30{degrees}S to 30{degrees}N (an area equal to half the global area) shows very little change in the ozone column from year to year and within each year. Finally, residual ozone values extracted from TOMS-minus-MLS column data are briefly presented as a preliminary view into the potential usefulness of such studies, with information on tropospheric ozone as an ultimate goal. 99 refs., 13 figs.

  10. Unraveling the empirical relationship between Arctic stratospheric ozone loss and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hobe, Marc; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Müller, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Ever since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole it has been recognized that cold temperatures play a key role in fostering strong ozone depletion in the polar stratosphere. Compact negative correlations between total winter ozone loss and vortex area exposed to temperatures below certain threshold values have been demonstrated (e.g. Harris et al., 2010; Rex et al., 2006; Rex et al., 2004). The most commonly used threshold is the NAT equilibrium temperature, but other choices have been suggested, such as the temperature when the rate of chlorine activation on liquid aerosols exceeds a certain limit. Interestingly, both thresholds relate to critical temperatures in the context of heterogeneous chlorine activation, and Harris et al., 2010, stated that original activation (i.e. the activation in early winter) is the most important factor influencing ozone loss. But at least two other key processes - catalytic ozone loss and denitrification - depend directly on temperature, and temperature also controls the stability and therefore the persistence of the polar vortex. Here, we investigate such "vortex area" correlations for a number of different temperature thresholds, as well as direct correlations with vortex mean temperature and with the date of the final warming. We also carry out sensitivity studies using the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) to investigate the response of ozone loss to temperature modifications for particle formation and growth, surface reaction probabilities and gas phase reactivity separately. Rex et al., Arctic ozone loss and climate change, Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L04116, 2004. Rex et al., Arctic winter 2005: Implications for stratospheric ozone loss and climate change, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L23808, 2006. Harris et al., A closer look at Arctic ozone loss and polar stratospheric clouds, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 8499-8510, 2010.

  11. Copernicus atmospheric service for stratospheric ozone: validation and intercomparison of four near real-time analyses, 2009-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefever, K.; van der A, R.; Baier, F.; Christophe, Y.; Errera, Q.; Eskes, H.; Flemming, J.; Inness, A.; Jones, L.; Lambert, J.-C.; Langerock, B.; Schultz, M. G.; Stein, O.; Wagner, A.; Chabrillat, S.

    2014-05-01

    polar lower stratosphere during ozone depletion events. The assimilation of near real-time (NRT) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) profiles which only go down to 68 hPa is not able to correct for the deficiency of the underlying MOZART model, which may be related to the applied meteorological fields. Biases of BASCOE compared to ozonesonde or ACE-FTS ozone profiles do not exceed 10% over the entire vertical stratospheric range, thanks to the good performance of the model in ozone hole conditions and the assimilation of offline MLS profiles going down to 215 hPa. TM3DAM provides very realistic total ozone columns, but is not designed to provide information on the vertical distribution of ozone. Compared to ozonesondes and ACE-FTS satellite data, SACADA performs best in the Arctic, but shows large biases (>50%) for ozone in the lower stratosphere in the Tropics and in the Antarctic, especially during ozone hole conditions. This study shows that ozone analyses with realistic total ozone column densities do not necessarily yield good agreement with the observed ozone profiles. It also shows the large benefit obtained from the assimilation of a single limb-scanning instrument (Aura MLS) with a high density of observations. Hence even state-of-the-art models of stratospheric chemistry still require the assimilation of limb observations for a correct representation of the vertical distribution of ozone in the stratosphere.

  12. UV-ozone-treated ultra-thin NaF film as anode buffer layer on organic light emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Kao, Po-Ching; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2010-06-21

    An ultra-thin NaF film was thermally deposited between ITO and NPB as the buffer layer and then treated with the ultraviolet (UV) ozone, in the fabrication of organic light emitting diodes (ITO/NaF/NPB/Alq(3)/LiF/Al) to study its effect on hole-injection properties. The treatment drastically transforms the role of NaF film from hole-blocking to hole-injecting. This transformation is elucidated using hole-only devices, energy band measurement, surface energy, surface polarity, and X-ray photoelectron spectra. With the optimal thickness (3 nm) of the UV-ozone-treated NaF layer, the device performance is significantly improved, with a turn-on voltage, maximum luminance, and maximum current efficiency of 2.5 V, 15700 cd/m(2), and 4.9 cd/A, respectively. Results show that NaF film is not only a hole-blocking layer, but also a promising hole-injecting layer after UV-ozone treatment.

  13. Mechanisms of impact of greenhouse gases on the Earth's ozone layer in the Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadorozhny, Alexander; Dyominov, Igor

    the expected recovery of the ozone layer here. The difference in the impact of the greenhouse gases on the ozone layer at the southern and northern polar latitudes through PCS modification is determined by the difference in temperature regimes of the Polar Regions. The mechanism of the impact of the greenhouse gases on the polar ozone by means of modification of sulphate aerosol distribution in the atmosphere has been revealed and investigated, too. Numerical experiments show that enhancement of the surface area density of sulphate aerosol in the stratosphere caused by the growth of the greenhouse gases will reduce significantly the ozone depletion during the Antarctic ozone hole.

  14. Delayed climate change in the Southern Hemisphere induced by stratospheric ozone recovery, as projected by the CMIP5 models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polvani, L. M.; Barnes, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Stratospheric ozone is expected to recover in the second half of this century, due to the regulation of ozone depleting substances by the Montreal Protocol. Targeted modeling studies have suggested that the climate response to ozone recovery will greatly oppose the climate response to increasing greenhouse-gases (GHG); owever, the extent of this cancellation remains unclear, as few such studies are available. Here, we analyze the much larger set of models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5), all of which include stratospheric ozone depletion and recovery. We show that the closing of the ozone hole will cause a delay in summer-time (DJF) Southern Hemisphere climate change, between now and mid-century. Specifically, we find that the position of the jet stream, the width of the subtropical dry-zones, the seasonality of surface temperatures, and sea ice concentrations all exhibit significantly reduced summer-time trends over the first half of the 21st Century as a consequence of ozone recovery. Beyond mid-century, forcing from GHG emissions begins to dominate the climate response. We also compare the relative influences of future GHG emissions and historic ozone depletion, and find that the simulated DJF tropospheric circulation changes in the Southern Hemisphere between 1965-2005 -- driven primarily by ozone depletion -- are larger than the projected changes in any future scenario over the entire 21st Century.

  15. Options to accelerate ozone recovery: ozone and climate benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. S.; Fleming, E. L.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-08-01

    Hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) and N2O are evaluated in terms of effects on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC), globally-averaged total column ozone, and radiative forcing through 2100. Due to the established success of the Montreal Protocol, these actions can have only a fraction of the impact on ozone depletion that regulations already in force have had. If all anthropogenic ODS and N2O emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2% during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional restrictions. Direct radiative forcing by 2100 would be about 0.23 W/m2 lower from the elimination of anthropogenic N2O emissions and about 0.005 W/m2 lower from the destruction of the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) bank. Due to the potential impact of N2O on future ozone levels, we provide an approach to incorporate it into the EESC formulation, which is used extensively in ozone depletion analyses. The ability of EESC to describe total ozone changes arising from additional ODS and N2O controls is also quantified.

  16. Nitroaromatic hydrocarbon ozonation in water. 1: Single ozonation

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, F.J.; Encinar, J.M.; Alonso, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Single ozonation of two nitroaromatic hydrocarbons (nitrobenzene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene) under different experimental conditions (ozone feed rate, pH, temperature, hydroxyl radical scavengers) has been studied. The absence of hydroxyl radical scavengers, pHs 7--9, and temperatures below 30 C are optimum conditions for nitroaromatic removal. Due to the importance of hydroxyl radical reactions, removal rates in natural water are much lower than those observed in laboratory ultrapure water. Rate constants of the direct reaction between ozone and nitroaromatic hydrocarbons at 20 C have been found to be lower than 6 M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. More than 99% of nitroaromatic removal is due to hydroxyl radical oxidation. Single ozonation of nitroaromatics can then be classified as a real advanced oxidation technology. Nitrophenols, compounds very reactive toward ozone and hydroxyl radicals, and 2,6-dinitrobenzaldehyde, identified in the single ozonation of nitrobenzene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene, respectively, are some of the first intermediates of single ozonation.

  17. Global distribution of ozone for various seasons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koprova, L. I.

    1979-01-01

    A technique which was used to obtain a catalog of the seasonal global distribution of ozone is presented. The technique is based on the simultaneous use of 1964-1975 data on the total ozone content from a worldwide network of ozonometric stations and on the vertical ozone profile from ozone sounding stations.

  18. The evolution of ozone observed by UARS MLS in the 1992 late winter southern polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.; Elson, L. S.; Fishbein, E. F.; Zurek, R. W.; Harwood, R. S.; Lahoz, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of ozone (O3) observed by the Microwave Limb Sounder on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite is described for 14 Aug through 20 Sep 1992, in relation to the polar vortex. The development of an ozone hole is observed in column O3, and a corresponding decrease is seen in O3 mixing ratio in the polar lower stratosphere, consistent with chemical destruction. The observations also suggest that poleward transport associated with episodes of strong planetary wave activity is important in increasing O3 in the mid-stratosphere.

  19. How sensitive is the recovery of stratospheric ozone to changes in concentrations of very short-lived bromocarbons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Abraham, N. L.; Archibald, A. T.; Braesicke, P.; Keeble, J.; Telford, P. J.; Warwick, N. J.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    Naturally produced very short-lived substances (VSLS) account for almost a quarter of the current stratospheric inorganic bromine, Bry. Following VSLS oxidation, bromine radicals (Br and BrO) can catalytically destroy ozone. The extent to which possible increases in surface emissions or transport of these VSLS bromocarbons to the stratosphere could counteract the effect of halogen reductions under the Montreal Protocol is an important policy question. Here, by using a chemistry-climate model, UM-UKCA, we investigate the impact of a hypothetical doubling (an increase of 5 ppt Bry) of VSLS bromocarbons on ozone and how the resulting ozone changes depend on the background concentrations of chlorine and bromine. Our model experiments indicate that for the 5 ppt increase in Bry from VSLS, the ozone decrease in the lowermost stratosphere of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) may reach up to 10% in the annual mean; the ozone decrease in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is smaller (4-6%). The largest impact on the ozone column is found in the Antarctic spring. There is a significantly larger ozone decrease following the doubling of the VSLS burden under a high stratospheric chlorine background than under a low chlorine background, indicating the importance of the inter-halogen reactions. For example, the decline in the high-latitude, lower-stratospheric ozone concentration as a function of Bry is higher by about 30-40% when stratospheric Cly is ~ 3 ppb (present day), compared with Cly of ~ 0.8 ppb (a pre-industrial or projected future situation). Bromine will play an important role in the future ozone layer. However, even if bromine levels from natural VSLS were to increase significantly later this century, changes in the concentration of ozone will likely be dominated by the decrease in anthropogenic chlorine. Our calculation suggests that for a 5 ppt increase in Bry from VSLS, the Antarctic ozone hole recovery date could be delayed by approximately 6-8 years, depending on Cly

  20. Newborn Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists using NASA's Swift satellite say they have found newborn black holes, just seconds old, in a confused state of existence. The holes are consuming material falling into them while somehow propelling other material away at great speeds. "First comes a blast of gamma rays followed by intense pulses of x-rays. The energies involved are much…

  1. Effects of stratospheric ozone recovery on photochemistry and ozone air quality in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wu, S.; Huang, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2014-04-01

    There has been significant stratospheric ozone depletion since the late 1970s due to ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). With the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, stratospheric ozone is expected to recover towards its pre-1980 level in the coming decades. In this study, we examine the implications of stratospheric ozone recovery for the tropospheric chemistry and ozone air quality with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). With a full recovery of the stratospheric ozone, the projected increases in ozone column range from 1% over the low latitudes to more than 10% over the polar regions. The sensitivity factor of troposphere ozone photolysis rate, defined as the percentage changes in surface ozone photolysis rate for 1% increase in stratospheric ozone column, shows significant seasonal variation but is always negative with absolute value larger than one. The expected stratospheric ozone recovery is found to affect the tropospheric ozone destruction rates much more than the ozone production rates. Significant decreases in surface ozone photolysis rates due to stratospheric ozone recovery are simulated. The global average tropospheric OH decreases by 1.7%, and the global average lifetime of tropospheric ozone increases by 1.5%. The perturbations to tropospheric ozone and surface ozone show large seasonal and spatial variations. General increases in surface ozone are calculated for each season, with increases by up to 0.8 ppbv in the remote areas. Increases in ozone lifetime by up to 13% are found in the troposphere. The increased lifetimes of tropospheric ozone in response to stratospheric ozone recovery enhance the intercontinental transport of ozone and global pollution, in particular for the summertime. The global background ozone attributable to Asian emissions is calculated to increase by up to 15% or 0.3 ppbv in the Northern Hemisphere in response to the projected stratospheric ozone recovery.

  2. Black Hole Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This graphic shows the computer simulation of a black hole from start to finish. Plasma is falling slowly toward the black hole in a (at the upper left). The plasma has a magnetic field, shown by the white lines. It picks up speed as it falls toward the hole in b (at the upper right), c (lower left) and d (lower right). However, the rotating black hole twists up space itself (and the magnetic field lines) and ejects electromagnetic power along the north and south poles above the black hole. The red and white color shows the immense electromagnetic power output, which eventually will pick up particles and form squirting jets. This simulation was conducted using supercomputers at Japan's National Institute for Fusion Science.

  3. Observing Black Hole Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2015-08-01

    Black hole spin is important in both the fundamental physics and astrophysics realms. In fundamental terms, many extensions and alternatives to General Relativity (GR) reveal themselves through effects related to (or at least of the same order as) spin. Astrophysically, spin is a fossil record of how black holes have grown and may, in addition, be an important source of energy (e.g., powering relativistic jets from black hole systems). I shall review recent progress on observational studies of black hole spin, especially those made in the X-ray waveband. We now have multiple techniques that can be applied in our search for black hole spin; I shall discuss the concordance (or, sometimes, lack thereof) between these techniques. Finally, I shall discuss what we can expect in the next few years with the launch of new X-ray instrumentation as well as the deployment of the Event Horizon Telescope.

  4. Trends in ozone profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, H.; Aikin, A.; Barnes, R.; Chandra, S.; Cunnold, D.; Deluisi, J.; Gille, J. C.; Hudson, R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L.

    1989-01-01

    From an examination of the agreements and differences between different satellite instruments, it is difficult to believe that existing satellite instruments determine upper stratospheric ozone much better than 4 pct.; by extension, it probably would require at least a 4 pct. change to be reliably detected as a change. The best estimates of the vertical profiles of ozone change in the upper stratosphere between 1979 and 1986 are judged to be those given by the two SAGE satellite instruments. SAGE-2 minus SAGE-1 gives a much lower ozone reduction than that given by the archived Solar Backscatter UV data. The average SAGE profiles of ozone changes between 20 and 50 degs north and between 20 and 50 degs south are given. The SAGE-1 and SAGE-2 comparison gives an ozone reduction of about 4 pct. at 25 km over temperate latitudes. Five ground based Umkehr stations between 36 and 52 degs north, corrected for the effects of volcanic aerosols, report an ozone reduction between 1979 and 1987 at Umkehr layer 8 of 9 + or - 5 pct. The central estimate of upper stratospheric ozone reduction given by SAGE at 40 km is less than the central value estimated by the Umkehr method at layer 8.

  5. Total ozone trend over Cairo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, G. K. Y.

    1994-01-01

    A world wide interest in protecting ozone layer against manmade effects is now increasing. Assessment of the ozone depletion due to these activities depends on how successfully we can separate the natural variabilities from the data. The monthly mean values of total ozone over Cairo (30 05N) for the period 1968-1988, have been analyzed using the power spectral analysis technique. The technique used in this analysis does not depend on a pre-understanding of the natural fluctuations in the ozone data. The method depends on increasing the resolution of the spectral peaks in order to obtain the more accurate sinusoidal fluctuations with wavelength equal to or less than record length. Also it handles the possible sinusoidal fluctuations with wavelength equal to or less than record length. The results show that it is possible to detect some of the well known national fluctuations in the ozone record such as annual, semiannual, quasi-biennial and quasi-quadrennial oscillations. After separating the natural fluctuations from the ozone record, the trend analysis of total ozone over Cairo showed that a decrease of about -1.2% per decade has occurred since 1979.

  6. Ozone is mutagenic in Salmonella

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, D.; Combes, R.; McConville, M.; Zeiger, E. )

    1992-01-01

    Ozone is a highly reactive gas that has been tested for genotoxicity in a number of systems. Induced genetic damage resulting from ozone treatment may not be readily observed because of the high toxicity of the chemical and difficulties in generating and administering controlled concentrations. The mutagenicity of ozone was investigated in Salmonella typhimurium using a plate test protocol designed for reactive vapours and gases. Ozone, at two to three consecutive doses, induced weak, albeit statistically significant, mutagenic responses in tester strain TA102 with and without Aroclor-induced rat liver S9 (lowest effective mean concentration of 0.019 ppm; 35 min total exposure). However, dose-related responses were not always obtained. No mutagenicity was detected in strains TA98, TA100, or TA1535, with or without S9. In strain TA104, ozone induced a weak response only at a single dose with S9; this response was not reproducible. Mutagenicity was dependent on the ozone flow rate and total exposure time, with variations in the optimum dose-time regimen leading to toxicity or complete inactivity. The data show that ozone is a very weak bacterial mutagen and only when tested under narrowly prescribed, subtoxic dosing conditions.

  7. Design of a Vehicle-Based Intervention System to Prevent Ozone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, William H.; Kirchbaum, Nathan; Kay, Jacob; Benoliel, Alexander M.; Lynn, Sean R.; Bunker, Deborah; Hesbach, Thomas D., Jr.; Howerton, Everett B.; Hreinsson, Gudbjoern; Mistr, E. Kirk

    1993-01-01

    Reduced quantities of ozone in the atmosphere allow greater levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation to reach the earth's surface. The 1992/1993 project goals for the Virginia Tech Senior Design Team were to 1) understand the processes which contribute to stratospheric ozone loss, 2) examine ways to prevent ozone loss, and 3) define the requirements for an implementation vehicle to carry out the prevention scheme. A scheme proposed by R.J. Cicerone, el al late in 1991 was selected because of its supporting research and economic feasibility. This scheme uses hydrocarbon injected into the Antarctic ozone hole to form stable compounds with free chlorine, thus reducing ozone depletion. A study of the hydrocarbon injection requirements determined that 130 aircraft traveling Mach 2.4 at a maximum altitude of 66,000 ft. would provide the most economic approach to preventing ozone loss. Each aircraft would require an 8,000 nm. range and be able to carry 35,000 lbs. of propane. The propane would be stored in a three-tank high pressure system. Modularity and multi-role functionality were selected to be key design features. Missions originate from airports located in South America and Australia.

  8. Near-real-time TOMS, telecommunications and meteorological support for the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardanuy, P.; Victorine, J.; Sechrist, F.; Feiner, A.; Penn, L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment was to improve the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole. Total ozone data taken by the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) played a central role in the successful outcome of the experiment. During the experiment, the near-real-time TOMS total ozone observations were supplied within hours of real time to the operations center in Punta Arenas, Chile. The final report summarizes the role which Research and Data Systems (RDS) Corporation played in the support of the experiment. The RDS provided telecommunications to support the science and operations efforts for the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment, and supplied near real-time weather information to ensure flight and crew safety; designed and installed the telecommunications network to link NASA-GSFC, the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO), Palmer Station, the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to the operation at Punta Arenas; engineered and installed stations and other stand-alone systems to collect data from designated low-orbiting polar satellites and beacons; provided analyses of Nimbus-7 TOMS data and backup data products to Punta Arenas; and provided synoptic meteorological data analysis and reduction.

  9. Sensitivity Studies for Assimilated Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Winslow, Nathan; Wargan, Krzysztof; Rood, Richard; Pawson, Steven

    2002-01-01

    An ozone data assimilation system at the NASA/Goddard Data Assimilation Office (DAO) produces three-dimensional global ozone fields. They are obtained by assimilating ozone retrieved from the Solar Backscatter UltraViolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument and the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP TOMS) measurements into an off-line parameterized chemistry and transport model. In this talk we focus on the quality of lower stratospheric assimilated ozone profiles. Ozone in the lower stratosphere plays a key role in the forcing of climate. A biased ozone field in this region will adversely impact calculations of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange and, when used as a first guess in retrievals, the values determined from satellite observations. The SBUV/2 ozone data have a coarse vertical resolution with increased uncertainty below the ozone maximum, and TOMS provides only total ozone columns. Thus, the assimilated ozone profiles in the lower stratosphere are only weakly constrained by the incoming SBUV and TOMS data. Consequently, the assimilated ozone distribution should be sensitive to changes in inputs to the statistical analysis scheme. We investigate the sensitivity of assimilated ozone profiles to changes in a variety of system inputs: TOMS and SBUV/2 data selection, forecast and observations error covariance models, inclusion or omission of a parameterized chemistry model, and different versions of DAO assimilated wind fields used to drive the transport model. Comparisons of assimilated ozone fields with independent observations, primarily ozone sondes, are used to determine the impact of each of these changes.

  10. Ozone and Ozonated Oils in Skin Diseases: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Travagli, V.; Zanardi, I.; Valacchi, G.; Bocci, V.

    2010-01-01

    Although orthodox medicine has provided a variety of topical anti-infective agents, some of them have become scarcely effective owing to antibiotic- and chemotherapeutic-resistant pathogens. For more than a century, ozone has been known to be an excellent disinfectant that nevertheless had to be used with caution for its oxidizing properties. Only during the last decade it has been learned how to tame its great reactivity by precisely dosing its concentration and permanently incorporating the gas into triglycerides where gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated substrates leading to therapeutically active ozonated derivatives. Today the stability and efficacy of the ozonated oils have been already demonstrated, but owing to a plethora of commercial products, the present paper aims to analyze these derivatives suggesting the strategy to obtain products with the best characteristics. PMID:20671923

  11. Dobson spectrophotometer ozone measurements during international ozone rocketsonde intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the total ozone content of the atmosphere, made with seven ground based instruments at a site near Wallops Island, Virginia, are discussed in terms for serving as control values with which the rocketborne sensor data products can be compared. These products are profiles of O3 concentration with altitude. By integrating over the range of altitudes from the surface to the rocket apogee and by appropriately estimating the residual ozone amount from apogee to the top of the atmosphere, a total ozone amount can be computed from the profiles that can be directly compared with the ground based instrumentation results. Dobson spectrophotometers were used for two of the ground-based instruments. Preliminary data collected during the IORI from Dobson spectrophotometers 72 and 38 are presented. The agreement between the two and the variability of total ozone overburden through the experiment period are discussed.

  12. Ozone absorption coefficients' role in Dobson instrument ozone measurement accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basher, R. E.

    1982-11-01

    The differences of 10% or more between the laboratory measurements of UV absorption coefficients by different investigators indicate accuracies that are quite inadequate for current needs in the measurement of atmospheric ozone. The standard band-integrated set of coefficients now used with the Dobson instrument are mutually consistent to about 2%, but their absolute accuracy is still in question. The accurate calculation of band-integrated coefficients must take account of their dependence on source spectral irradiance, atmospheric spectral transmittance, mean ozone temperature, and instrument spectral transmittance. A careful examination shows that Komhyr's (1980) case for an error of about +5% in the standard Dobson AD ozone estimation is subject to large uncertainties and certain lacks of independence. The obvious solution to this accuracy problem lies in better laboratory measurements of ozone absorption.

  13. Ozone and ozonated oils in skin diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Travagli, V; Zanardi, I; Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    2010-01-01

    Although orthodox medicine has provided a variety of topical anti-infective agents, some of them have become scarcely effective owing to antibiotic- and chemotherapeutic-resistant pathogens. For more than a century, ozone has been known to be an excellent disinfectant that nevertheless had to be used with caution for its oxidizing properties. Only during the last decade it has been learned how to tame its great reactivity by precisely dosing its concentration and permanently incorporating the gas into triglycerides where gaseous ozone chemically reacts with unsaturated substrates leading to therapeutically active ozonated derivatives. Today the stability and efficacy of the ozonated oils have been already demonstrated, but owing to a plethora of commercial products, the present paper aims to analyze these derivatives suggesting the strategy to obtain products with the best characteristics.

  14. ULTRAMASSIVE BLACK HOLE COALESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Fazeel Mahmood; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Berczik, Peter E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2015-01-10

    Although supermassive black holes (SMBHs) correlate well with their host galaxies, there is an emerging view that outliers exist. Henize 2-10, NGC 4889, and NGC 1277 are examples of SMBHs at least an order of magnitude more massive than their host galaxy suggests. The dynamical effects of such ultramassive central black holes is unclear. Here, we perform direct N-body simulations of mergers of galactic nuclei where one black hole is ultramassive to study the evolution of the remnant and the black hole dynamics in this extreme regime. We find that the merger remnant is axisymmetric near the center, while near the large SMBH influence radius, the galaxy is triaxial. The SMBH separation shrinks rapidly due to dynamical friction, and quickly forms a binary black hole; if we scale our model to the most massive estimate for the NGC 1277 black hole, for example, the timescale for the SMBH separation to shrink from nearly a kiloparsec to less than a parsec is roughly 10 Myr. By the time the SMBHs form a hard binary, gravitational wave emission dominates, and the black holes coalesce in a mere few Myr. Curiously, these extremely massive binaries appear to nearly bypass the three-body scattering evolutionary phase. Our study suggests that in this extreme case, SMBH coalescence is governed by dynamical friction followed nearly directly by gravitational wave emission, resulting in a rapid and efficient SMBH coalescence timescale. We discuss the implications for gravitational wave event rates and hypervelocity star production.

  15. Entropy of quasiblack holes

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2010-03-15

    We trace the origin of the black hole entropy S, replacing a black hole by a quasiblack hole. Let the boundary of a static body approach its own gravitational radius, in such a way that a quasihorizon forms. We show that if the body is thermal with the temperature taking the Hawking value at the quasihorizon limit, it follows, in the nonextremal case, from the first law of thermodynamics that the entropy approaches the Bekenstein-Hawking value S=A/4. In this setup, the key role is played by the surface stresses on the quasihorizon and one finds that the entropy comes from the quasihorizon surface. Any distribution of matter inside the surface leads to the same universal value for the entropy in the quasihorizon limit. This can be of some help in the understanding of black hole entropy. Other similarities between black holes and quasiblack holes such as the mass formulas for both objects had been found previously. We also discuss the entropy for extremal quasiblack holes, a more subtle issue.

  16. Measuring Black Hole Spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, Gordon

    1999-09-01

    WE PROPOSE TO CARRY OUT A SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF EMISSION AND ABSORPTION SPECTRAL FEATURES THAT ARE OFTEN SEEN IN X-RAY SPECTRA OF BLACK HOLE BINARIES. THE EXCELLENT SENSITIVITY AND ENERGY RESOLUTION OF THE ACIS/HETG COMBINATION WILL NOT ONLY HELP RESOLVE AMBIGUITIES IN INTERPRETING THESE FEATURES, BUT MAY ALLOW MODELLING OF THE EMISSION LINE PROFILES IN DETAIL. THE PROFILES MAY CONTAIN INFORMATION ON SUCH FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES AS THE SPIN OF BLACK HOLES. THEREFORE, THIS STUDY COULD LEAD TO A MEASUREMENT OF BLACK HOLE SPIN FOR SELECTED SOURCES. THE RESULT CAN THEN BE DIRECTLY COMPARED WITH THOSE FROM PREVIOUS STUDIES BASED ON INDEPENDENT METHODS.

  17. Pathology and causes of death of stranded cetaceans in the Canary Islands (1999-2005).

    PubMed

    Arbelo, Manuel; Los Monteros, Antonio Espinosa de; Herráez, Pedro; Andrada, Marisa; Sierra, Eva; Rodríguez, Francisco; Jepson, Paul D; Fernández, Antonio

    2013-03-26

    Between 1999 and 2005, 233 stranded cetaceans (comprising 19 species) were reported in the waters of the Canary Islands. Of these, 138/233 (59.2%) were subjected to a complete or partial standardized necropsy, including 4 Balaenopteridae, 9 Physeteridae, 8 Kogiidae, 27 Ziphiidae and 90 Delphinidae. Of these, 46/138 (33.3%) cetaceans were diagnosed with anthropogenic pathological categories (i.e. the cause of death was anthropogenic). These included fishing interaction (bycatch) (19 individuals), 'atypical' mass stranding events linked to naval exercises (13), ship collisions (8) and other anthropogenic-related pathology (6). 'Natural' (i.e. non-anthropogenic) causes of death accounted for another 82/138 (59.4%) cases, including infectious and non-infectious diseases (63), neonatal pathology (8), intra- and interspecific interactions (6) and mass strandings (5). The cause(s) of death could not be determined in 10/138 (7.3%) necropsied animals. The most common causes of death were ship collisions in 6/9 (66.6%) Physeteridae, 'atypical' mass stranding linked to naval exercises in 13/27 (48.1%) Ziphiidae, and 'natural' infectious and non-infectious diseases in 55/90 (61.1%) Delphinidae. Interaction with fishing activities was established as cause of death in 15/90 (16.7%) Delphinidae. These data show that a range of anthropogenic and natural single and mass mortality events occur in multiple cetacean species stranded in the Canary Islands.

  18. Petrology and Mineralogy of Lava and Ash Erupted From Colima Volcano (Mexico) During 1999-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhr, J. F.; Navarro-Ochoa, C.; Savov, I.

    2005-12-01

    Lava (n=8) and bulk ash samples (n=6) erupted between July 1999 and June 2005 were investigated to extend time-series compositional and textural studies of the products erupted from Volcán Colima since 1869. In particular, we seek to evaluate the possibility that the current activity will culminate in a major explosive Plinian-style event similar to that in 1913 (VEI=4). Lava samples continue to show relatively heterogeneous whole-rock compositions with some significant mafic spikes (1999, 2001) as have prevailed since 1976. Groundmass SiO2 contents continue trends to lower levels that have prevailed since 1961, in the direction of the still lower groundmass SiO2 contents found in 1913 scoriae. Importantly, ash samples from investigated Vulcanian-style explosive eruptions in 2005 are devoid of particles with micro-vesiculated groundmass textures; such textures characterized the 1913 scoriae, signifying expansion of in-situ magmatic gas as the propellant of the 1913 eruption. All magmas erupted since 1913 appear to have arrived in the upper volcanic conduit system in a degassed state. The small to moderate Vulcanian-style explosive eruptions, which have been common since 1999, have blasted ash clouds as high as 11 km a.s.l. and sent pyroclastic flows out to distances of 5 km. These eruptions do not appear to be powered by expansion of in-situ magmatic gas. New small lava domes have been observed in the crater prior to many explosive eruptions. These plugs of degassed lava may temporarily seal the conduit and allow build-up of magmatic gases streaming upward from below ahead of rising and degassing magma. In this interpretation, when gas pressure exceeds the strength of the plug seal in the upper conduit, an explosive Vulcanian-style eruption occurs.

  19. Accuracy of distal limb fracture diagnosis at British racecourses 1999-2005.

    PubMed

    Reardon, R J M; Boden, L; Stirk, A J; Parkin, T D H

    2014-05-10

    Accurate diagnosis of racing injuries can be difficult. The objectives of this study were to describe the postmortem (PM) defined distribution of fatal distal limb fractures (DLF) affecting Thoroughbreds racing in Great Britain between February 1999 and August 2005 and then assess the accuracy of veterinary racecourse diagnoses and examine whether these improved following introduction of a computerised recording system. PM examinations were performed on limbs distal to radius or tibia from all cases of fatal DLF occurring on British racecourses during the study period. Results of these examinations were described and compared with the diagnoses made at the racecourses. Over the study period, fatal DLF prevalence in all race types was 0.63 per 1000 starts (344/545,335), with the lowest frequency (0.34 per 1000 starts) in flat racing on turf and the highest frequency (1.56 per 1000 starts) in national hunt flat races. The prevalence of fatal DLF in steeplechase racing had reduced from that reported previously: from 2.3 to 1 per 1000 starts. Racecourse veterinary identification of fracture presence was good (>93 per cent); however, identification of all fractured bones was poor (<55 per cent). Introduction of a computerised recording system did not significantly improve diagnostic accuracy. The prevalence of fatal DLF has not significantly altered since the 1970s. Techniques such as on course digital radiography to help improve racecourse fracture diagnoses could be introduced.

  20. Pesticides and nitrate in groundwater underlying citrus croplands, Lake Wales Ridge, central Florida, 1999-2005.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choquette, Anne F.

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes pesticide and nitrate (as nitrogen) results from quarterly sampling of 31 surficial-aquifer wells in the Lake Wales Ridge Monitoring Network during April 1999 through January 2005. The wells, located adjacent to citrus orchards and used for monitoring only, were generally screened (sampled) within 5 to 40 feet of the water table. Of the 44 citrus pesticides and pesticide degradates analyzed, 17 were detected in groundwater samples. Parent pesticides and degradates detected in quarterly groundwater samples, ordered by frequency of detection, included norflurazon, demethyl norflurazon, simazine, diuron, bromacil, aldicarb sulfone, aldicarb sulfoxide, deisopropylatrazine (DIA), imidacloprid, metalaxyl, thiazopyr monoacid, oxamyl, and aldicarb. Reconnaissance sampling of five Network wells yielded detection of four additional pesticide degradates (hydroxysimazine, didealkylatrazine, deisopropylhydroxyatrazine, and hydroxyatrazine). The highest median concentration values per well, based on samples collected during the 1999–2005 period (n=14 to 24 samples per well), included 3.05 µg/L (micrograms per liter) (simazine), 3.90 µg/L (diuron), 6.30 µg/L (aldicarb sulfone), 6.85 µg/L (aldicarb sulfoxide), 22.0 µg/L (demethyl norflurazon), 25.0 µg/ (norflurazon), 89 µg/ (bromacil), and 25.5 mg/L (milligrams per liter) (nitrate). Nitrate concentrations exceeded the 10 mg/L (as nitrogen) drinking water standard in one or more groundwater samples from 28 of the wells, and the median nitrate concentration among these wells was 14 mg/L. Sampled groundwater pesticide concentrations exceeded Florida’s health-guidance benchmarks for aldicarb sulfoxide and aldicarb sulfone (4 wells), the sum of aldicarb and its degradates (6 wells), simazine (2 wells), the sum of simazine and DIA (3 wells), diuron (2 wells), bromacil (1 well), and the sum of norflurazon and demethyl norflurazon (1 well). The magnitude of fluctuations in groundwater pesticide concentrations varied between wells and between pesticide compounds. Of the 10 pesticide compounds detected at sufficient frequency to assess temporal variability in quarterly sampling records, median values of the relative interquartile range (ratio of the interquartile range to the median) among wells typically ranged from about 100 to 150 percent. The relative interquartile range of pesticide concentrations at individual wells could be much higher, sometimes exceeding 200 to 500 percent. No distinct spatial patterns were apparent among median pesticide concentrations in sampled wells; nitrate concentrations tended to be greater in samples from wells in the northern part of the study area.

  1. Ecosystem Effects of Ozone Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ground level ozone is absorbed by the leaves of plants, where it can reduce photosynthesis, damage leaves and slow growth. It can also make sensitive plants more susceptible to certain diseases, insects, harsh weather and other pollutants.

  2. Ozone - Current Air Quality Index

    MedlinePlus

    Local Air Quality Conditions Zip Code: State : My Current Location Forecast Current AQI AQI Loop More Maps AQI: Good (0 - ... September 2016, Busan, South Korea. More more announcements Air Quality Basics Air Quality Index | Ozone | Particle Pollution | Smoke ...

  3. In situ Mars ozone detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee; Weinstock, Elliot M.

    1994-01-01

    We propose sending a balloon-borne UV photometer sensor package to measure atmospheric ozone on Mars, and this package could be a Discovery Program sensor candidate. Past measurements of ozone on Mars are highly uncertain, perhaps a factor of 3 or so uncertain, due primarily to interference and masking by cloud and dust. In-situ balloon measurements would avoid these problems, and would provide 'ground truth' which remote sensing techniques cannot. We have explored this approach to measure ozone abundance in the terrestrial stratosphere with a balloon-borne UV absorption photometer. Atmospheric pressures and temperatures and ozone concentrations near the surface of Mars are similar to those in the terrestrial stratosphere.

  4. Ozonation of cooling tower waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.; French, K. R.; Howe, R. D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Continuous ozone injection into water circulating between a cooling tower and heat exchanger with heavy scale deposits inhibits formation of further deposits, promotes flaking of existing deposits, inhibits chemical corrosion and controls algae and bacteria.

  5. Biological effects of ozone reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The effects of increased UV radiation on the biosphere are described with ongoing research, and research areas that should be investigated. Some mention is also made of the potential climatic effects of ozone reduction on agriculture and the biosphere.

  6. Ozone (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Videos Games Experiments For Teachers Home ... Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Ozone The Basics A single atom ...

  7. Corona Discharge Influences Ozone Concentrations Near Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Gaither, Kari A.; Anantatmula, Shantha M.; Mong, Gary M.; Sasser, Lyle B.; Lessor, Delbert L.

    2004-02-26

    Ozone is produced by corona discharge in air. Its production is enhanced near grounded water. Whether grounded animals behave like grounded water, producing more ozone was investigated. Rats were exposed to corona discharge in a plastic cage. The concentration of ozone in the gas phase was monitored. The ozone concentration exceeded ambient levels only in the presence of corona discharge and either rats or water. When water or rats were exposed to corona discharge, ozone levels were more than 10 times higher than controls. Ozone levels increased rapidly with applied voltage. There was also a correlation between the distance of the corona needle to the rats and the amount of ozone produced. As the distance increased, ozone production decreased. These results are discussed in relation to the potential exposure of mammals to ozone in the vicinity of corona discharge and electric fields.

  8. New challenges threatening the ozone layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, Babagana

    Since the beginning of the 1990's when the importation of fairly used Refrigerators, Airconditioners and propellants that can easily go broken containing chlorofluorocarbon substances that is capable of destroying the Ozone layer started in commercial quantity in Africa, the African refuse mountains began metamorphosing into mountains of dumped broken Refrigerators, Air-conditioners and Propellants which are collectively becoming a threat to the Ozone layer, because of the continuous discharging of the Chlorofluorocarbon gases by the refuse in to the atmosphere in each passing second.. Nobody can actually quantify the numbers of Refrigerators, Air-conditioners and Propellants imported and disposed in Africa over the last fifteen years, but the facts still remains that the numbers of metamorphosing mountains keeps on increasing in both size and numbers in each passing day. They have even become sources of raw materials for the local blacksmiths, children and refrigerators repairers who use parts of the dumped refrigerators, Air-conditioners and Propellants for their constructions, toys and repairs respectively. This explains the reason why despite the global efforts toward protecting the Ozone layer by the United Nations (UN), governments, International Organizations and climatologist among many others, but yet the hole in the Ozone layer keeps on expanding and the global temperature keeps on rising which resulted in the unusual phenomenon like the hurricanes "Katrina" and "Rita" the unusual floods in China, Thailand, Mozambique and to some extent even the Tsunami disaster that claims millions of lives in 2004.The Rapid rising in temperature of the Tropical world countries and increase in the cases of cancer patients among many other unusual happenings over the last eight years. It was in review of the above situation that this research work was conducted and came up with the under listed suggestions/Recommendations: 1. The UN should use its capacity to discourage

  9. NewChallengesThreateningtheOzoneLayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, B.

    2007-05-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990's when the importation of fairly used Refrigerators, Air-conditioners and propellants that can easily go broken containing chlorofluorocarbon substances that is capable of destroying the Ozone layer started in commercial quantity in Africa, the African refuse mountains began metamorphosing into mountains of dumped broken Refrigerators, Air-conditioners and Propellants which are collectively becoming a threat to the Ozone layer, because of the continuous discharging of the Chlorofluorocarbon gases by the refuse in to the atmosphere in each passing second.. Nobody can actually quantify the numbers of Refrigerators, Air-conditioners and Propellants imported and disposed in Africa over the last fifteen years, but the facts still remains that the numbers of metamorphosing mountains keeps on increasing in both size and numbers in each passing day. They have even become sources of raw materials for the local blacksmiths, children and refrigerators repairers who use parts of the dumped refrigerators, Air-conditioners and Propellants for their constructions, toys and repairs respectively. This explains the reason why despite the global efforts toward protecting the Ozone layer by the United Nations (UN), governments, International Organizations and climatologist among many others, but yet the hole in the Ozone layer keeps on expanding and the global temperature keeps on rising which resulted in the unusual phenomenon like the hurricanes "Katrina" and "Rita" the unusual floods in China, Thailand, Mozambique and to some extent even the Tsunami disaster that claims millions of lives in 2004.The Rapid rising in temperature of the Tropical world countries and increase in the cases of cancer patients among many other unusual happenings over the last eight years. It was in review of the above situation that this research work was conducted and came up with the under listed suggestions/Recommendations: 1. The UN should use its capacity to discourage

  10. Method of sterilization using ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Methods of using ozone have been developed which sterilize instruments and medical wastes, oxidize, organics found in wastewater, clean laundry, break down contaminants in soil into a form more readily digested by microbes, kill microorganisms present in food products, and destroy toxins present in food products. The preferred methods for killing microorganism and destroying toxins use pressurized, humidified, and concentrated ozone produced by an electrochemical cell.

  11. Ozone Treatment For Cooling Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwelder, Rick; Baldwin, Leroy V.; Feeney, Ellen S.

    1990-01-01

    Report presents results of study of cooling tower in which water treated with ozone instead of usual chemical agents. Bacteria and scale reduced without pollution and at low cost. Operating and maintenance costs with treatment about 30 percent of those of treatment by other chemicals. Corrosion rates no greater than with other chemicals. Advantage of ozone, even though poisonous, quickly detected by smell in very low concentrations.

  12. Ozonation of Common Textile Auxiliaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskender, Gulen; Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Koyunluoglu, Sebnem; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Germirli Babuna, Fatos

    2016-10-01

    The treatability of four different commonly applied textile auxiliary chemicals, namely two tannin formulations (Tannin 1: a condensation product of aryl sulphonate; Tannin 2: natural tannic acid) and two biocidal finishing agents (Biocide 1: 2,4,4’-trichloro-2’- hydroxydiphenyl ether; Biocide 2: a nonionic diphenyl alkane derivative) with ozone was investigated. Increasing the ozone dose yielded higher COD removals for the natural tannin. Optimum ozone doses of 485 and 662 mg/h were obtained at a pH of 3.5 for natural and synthetic tannin carrying textile bath discharges, respectively. When the reaction pH was increased from 3.5 to 7.0, a slight decrease in COD removal was observed for the natural tannin due to ozone selectivity towards its polyaromatic structure. The same increase in ozonation pH enhanced COD removals for the synthetic tannin as a result of enhanced ozone decomposition rendering free radical chain reactions dominant. Optimum ozone doses of 499 and 563 mg/h were established for Biocide 1 and 2, respectively. With the increase of ozonation, pH exhibited a positive influence on COD removals for both textile tannins. A substantial improvement in terms of TOC removals was observed as the reaction pH was increased from 3.5 to 7.0 for the synthetic tannin, and from 7 to 12 for both textile biocides. Higher AOX removals were evident at pH 7 than at pH 12 for Biocide 1 as a result of the higher selectivity of the dehalogenation reaction at neutral pH.

  13. Chlorine compounds and stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicerone, R. J.; Walters, S.; Stolarski, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    A report by Cicerone et al. (1974) concerned with the potential size of the atmospheric perturbation produced by man-made chlorofluoromethanes is considered, giving attention to a number of errors made in the first investigation and their correction. However, the corrections do not significantly change the results reported. It had been found that chlorine oxides which arise from chlorofluoromethane usage will within 10 or 15 years provide a sink for stratospheric ozone which will dominate the natural sinks for ozone.

  14. Effect of El Niæo observed over Indian continent from satellite-derived ozone data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ramesh P.; Sarkar, Sudipta; Singh, Ashbindu

    After the discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica, assessment of the long-term trend of ozone in different regions of the globe has become a frontline topic of Earth system sciences. Trends in total ozone column (TOC) have been estimated by various authors [McPeters et al., 1996; Hollandsworth et al., 1995] using the data obtained from the Dobson spectrophotometer, satellite-borne instruments, and balloon-borne ozonesondes.Most such studies are for mid- and highlatitude regions, whereas studies made with data from low-latitude regions are meager. No detailed sensor-based approach has been undertaken so far to understand the total ozone scenario from an Indian perspective, apart from a few observations [Chakrabarty et al., 1998] that were largely based on a ground-based Dobson spectrophotometer at major Indian cities.

  15. Overview for the reanalysis of Mariner 9 UV spectrometer data for ozone, cloud, and dust abundances, and their interaction over climate timescales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee

    1992-01-01

    Mariner 9 UV spectrometer data were reinverted for the ozone abundance, cloud abundance, dust abundance, and polar-cap albedo. The original reduction of the spectra ignored the presence of atmospheric dust and clouds, even though their abundance is substantial and can mask appreciable amounts of ozone if not accounted for (Lindner, 1988). The Mariner 9 ozone data has been used as a benchmark in all theoretical models of atmospheric composition, escape, and photochemistry. A second objective is to examine the data for the interrelationship of the ozone cycle, dust cycle, and cloud cycle, on an annual, inter-annual, and climatic basis, testing predictions by Lindner (1988). This also has implications for many terrestrial ozone studies, such as the ozone hole, acid rain, and ozone-smog. A third objective is to evaluate the efficacy of the reflectance spectroscopy technique at retrieving the ozone abundance on Mars. This would be useful for planning ozone observations on future Mars missions or the terrestrial troposphere.

  16. Ozone Conference II: Abstract Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Ozone Conference II: Pre- and Post-Harvest Applications Two Years After Gras, was held September 27-28, 1999 in Tulare, California. This conference, sponsored by EPRI's Agricultural Technology Alliance and Southern California Edison's AgTAC facility, was coordinated and organized by the on-site ATA-AgTAC Regional Center. Approximately 175 people attended the day-and-a-half conference at AgTAC. During the Conference twenty-two presentations were given on ozone food processing and agricultural applications. Included in the presentations were topics on: (1) Ozone fumigation; (2) Ozone generation techniques; (3) System and design applications; (4) Prewater treatment requirements; (5) Poultry water reuse; (6) Soil treatments with ozone gas; and (7) Post-harvest aqueous and gaseous ozone research results. A live videoconference between Tulare and Washington, D.C. was held to discuss the regulators' view from inside the beltway. Attendees participated in two Roundtable Question and Answer sessions and visited fifteen exhibits and demonstrations. The attendees included university and governmental researchers, regulators, consultants and industry experts, technology developers and providers, and corporate and individual end-users. This report is comprised of the Abstracts of each presentation, biographical sketches for each speaker and a registration/attendees list.

  17. Introducing the Black Hole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffini, Remo; Wheeler, John A.

    1971-01-01

    discusses the cosmology theory of a black hole, a region where an object loses its identity, but mass, charge, and momentum are conserved. Include are three possible formation processes, theorized properties, and three way they might eventually be detected. (DS)

  18. Straight hole driller

    SciTech Connect

    Samford, T.L.

    1981-08-25

    For use in a drilling string, the preferred and illustrated embodiment depicts a drill collar to be placed in the lower parts of the drill string for straightening the hole. The preferred embodiment utilizes a generally square drill collar with a thick or heavy wall. It is square in cross section along the greater portion of its length, the four corners being slightly rounded to a specified diameter on rotation, and the four lengthwise corners of the regular cross section are all reinforced with hardfacing material to a specified depth, typically tungsten carbide. The four edges abrade the bore hole as the drill string penetrates the earth. In addition, the lower end of the tubular body includes lengthwise flutes in the form known on a stabilizer to guide the hole straightening device into the hole to be reamed by operation of the device.

  19. Illuminating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Ian A.; Bull, Anne; O'Brien, Eileen; Drillsma-Milgrom, Katy A.; Milgrom, Lionel R.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional shadows formed by illuminating vortices are shown to be visually analogous to the gravitational action of black holes on light and surrounding matter. They could be useful teaching aids demonstrating some of the consequences of general relativity.

  20. New dynamic NNORSY ozone profile climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaifel, A. K.; Felder, M.; Declercq, C.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Climatological ozone profile data are widely used as a-priori information for total ozone using DOAS type retrievals as well as for ozone profile retrieval using optimal estimation, for data assimilation or evaluation of 3-D chemistry-transport models and a lot of other applications in atmospheric sciences and remote sensing. For most applications it is important that the climatology represents not only long term mean values but also the links between ozone and dynamic input parameters. These dynamic input parameters should be easily accessible from auxiliary datasets or easily measureable, and obviously should have a high correlation with ozone. For ozone profile these parameters are mainly total ozone column and temperature profile data. This was the outcome of a user consultation carried out in the framework of developing a new, dynamic ozone profile climatology. The new ozone profile climatology is based on the Neural Network Ozone Retrieval System (NNORSY) widely used for ozone profile retrieval from UV and IR satellite sounder data. NNORSY allows implicit modelling of any non-linear correspondence between input parameters (predictors) and ozone profile target vector. This paper presents the approach, setup and validation of a new family of ozone profile climatologies with static as well as dynamic input parameters (total ozone and temperature profile). The neural network training relies on ozone profile measurement data of well known quality provided by ground based (ozonesondes) and satellite based (SAGE II, HALOE, and POAM-III) measurements over the years 1995-2007. In total, four different combinations (modes) for input parameters (date, geolocation, total ozone column and temperature profile) are available. The geophysical validation spans from pole to pole using independent ozonesonde, lidar and satellite data (ACE-FTS, AURA-MLS) for individual and time series comparisons as well as for analysing the vertical and meridian structure of different modes of

  1. NOx Catalyzed Pathway of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion: A Coupled Cluster Investigation.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Achintya Kumar; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2012-06-12

    We report a theoretical investigation on the NOx catalyzed pathways of stratospheric ozone depletion using highly accurate coupled cluster methods. These catalytic reactions represent a great challenge to state-of-the-art ab initio methods, while their mechanisms remain unclear to both experimentalists and theoreticians. In this work, we have used the so-called "gold standard of quantum chemistry," the CCSD(T) method, to identify the saddle points on NOx-based reaction pathways of ozone hole formation. Energies of the saddle points are calculated using the multireference variants of coupled cluster methods. The calculated activation energies and rate constants show good agreement with available experimental results. Tropospheric precursors to stratospheric NOx radicals have been identified, and their potential importance in stratospheric chemistry has been discussed. Our calculations resolve previous conflicts between ab initio and experimental results for a trans nitro peroxide intermediate, in the NOx catalyzed pathway of ozone depletion.

  2. Black holes and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Samir D.

    2012-11-15

    The black hole information paradox forces us into a strange situation: we must find a way to break the semiclassical approximation in a domain where no quantum gravity effects would normally be expected. Traditional quantizations of gravity do not exhibit any such breakdown, and this forces us into a difficult corner: either we must give up quantum mechanics or we must accept the existence of troublesome 'remnants'. In string theory, however, the fundamental quanta are extended objects, and it turns out that the bound states of such objects acquire a size that grows with the number of quanta in the bound state. The interior of the black hole gets completely altered to a 'fuzzball' structure, and information is able to escape in radiation from the hole. The semiclassical approximation can break at macroscopic scales due to the large entropy of the hole: the measure in the path integral competes with the classical action, instead of giving a subleading correction. Putting this picture of black hole microstates together with ideas about entangled states leads to a natural set of conjectures on many long-standing questions in gravity: the significance of Rindler and de Sitter entropies, the notion of black hole complementarity, and the fate of an observer falling into a black hole. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The information paradox is a serious problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To solve it we need to find 'hair' on black holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In string theory we find 'hair' by the fuzzball construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuzzballs help to resolve many other issues in gravity.

  3. Life Inside Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokuchaev, Vyacheslav

    2013-11-01

    It is considered the test planet and photon orbits of the third kind inside the black hole (BH), which are stable, periodic and neither come out the BH nor terminate at the central singularity. Interiors of the supermassive BHs may be inhabited by advanced civilizations living on the planets with the third kind orbits. In principle, one can get information from the interiors of BHs by observing their white hole counterparts.

  4. Holes in Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang

    1990-05-01

    In this Brief Report we show that a recent model proposed by Shankar [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 203 (1989)], describing the motion of holes in quantum antiferromagnets is equivalent to the Schwinger model [Phys. Rev. 128, 2425 (1962)] in 1+1 dimensions. Some exact results are deduced. In addition to the superconducting long-range order found by Shankar, it is shown that there is a 2pF hole density wave existing with the superconducting pairing instability.

  5. Charged Galileon black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar E-mail: christos.charmousis@th.u-psud.fr

    2015-05-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory.

  6. Searching for Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, M.

    1998-01-01

    Our UV/VIS work concentrates on black hole X-ray nova. These objects consist of two stars in close orbit, one of which we believe is a black hole - our goal is to SHOW that one is a black hole. In order to reach this goal we carry out observations in the Optical, UV, IR and X-ray bands, and compare the observations to theoretical models. In the past year, our UV/VIS grant has provided partial support (mainly travel funds and page charges) for work we have done on X-ray nova containing black holes and neutron stars. We have been very successful in obtaining telescope time to support our project - we have completed approximately a dozen separate observing runs averaging 3 days each, using the MMT (5M), Lick 3M, KPNO 2.1M, CTIO 4M, CTIO 1.5M, and the SAO/WO 1.2M telescopes. These observations have allowed the identification of one new black hole (Nova Oph 1977), and allowed the mass of another to be measured (GS2000+25). Perhaps our most exciting new result is the evidence we have gathered for the existence of 'event horizons' in black hole X-ray nova.

  7. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion: 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Over the past few years, there have been highly significant advances in the understanding of the impact of human activities on the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer and the influence of changes in chemical composition of the radiative balance of the climate system. Specifically, since the last international scientific review (1989), there have been five major advances: (1) global ozone decreases; (2) polar ozone; (3) ozone and industrial halocarbons; (4) ozone and climate relations; and (5) ozone depletion potentials (ODP's) and global warming potentials (GWP's). These topics and others are discussed.

  8. Impact of downward-mixing ozone on surface ozone accumulation in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ho

    2008-04-01

    The ozone that initially presents in the previous day's afternoon mixing layer can remain in the nighttime atmosphere and then be carried over to the next morning. Finally, this ozone can be brought to the ground by downward mixing as mixing depth increases during the daytime, thereby increasing surface ozone concentrations. Variation of ozone concentration during each of these periods is investigated in this work. First, ozone concentrations existing in the daily early morning atmosphere at the altitude range of the daily maximum mixing depth (residual ozone concentrations) were measured using tethered ozonesondes on 52 experimental days during 2004-2005 in southern Taiwan. Daily downward-mixing ozone concentrations were calculated by a box model coupling the measured daily residual ozone concentrations and daily mixing depth variations. The ozone concentrations upwind in the previous day's afternoon mixing layer were estimated by the combination of back air trajectory analysis and known previous day's surface ozone distributions. Additionally, the relationship between daily downward-mixing ozone concentration and daily photochemically produced ozone concentration was examined. The latter was calculated by removing the former from daily surface maximum ozone concentration. The measured daily residual ozone concentrations distributed at 12-74 parts per billion (ppb) with an average of 42 +/- 17 ppb are well correlated with the previous upwind ozone concentration (R2 = 0.54-0.65). Approximately 60% of the previous upwind ozone was estimated to be carried over to the next morning and became the observed residual ozone. The daily downward-mixing ozone contributes 48 +/- 18% of the daily surface maximum ozone concentration, indicating that the downward-mixing ozone is as important as daily photochemically produced ozone to daily surface maximum ozone accumulation. The daily downward-mixing ozone is poorly correlated with the daily photochemically produced ozone and

  9. Correlation between mesospheric ozone and Energetic Particle Precipitation over Troll, Antarctica in the years 2008 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daae, M.; Espy, P. J.; Nesse Tyssøy, H.; Newnham, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The British Antarctic Survey radiometer stationed at Troll, Antarctica (72S, 2.5E, L=4.76) measured ozone in the lower mesosphere and upper stratosphere from February 2008 until February 2010. By looking at anomalies in the polar-winter nighttime ozone, we are able to quantify the influence of Energetic Particle Precipitation (EPP) on ozone during these two years. Time-lagged correlations between geomagnetic indices (AE, Kp and Dst) and ozone anomalies as a function of height have been calculated to quantify which of the indices best accounts for the variability in the ozone. In addition, the MEPED instruments aboard the NOAA satellites have been used to quantify the EPP flux precipitating over Troll. Since the solar activity in 2008 undergoes a strong periodicity, which is linked to rotating coronal holes, this periodicity is also manifested in the EPP and the geomagnetic indices. A correlation analysis between the ozone over Troll and the periodic solar activity that is reflected in the EPP is also carried out, resulting in a statistical quantification of the EPP effects on mesospheric ozone as measured over Troll, Antarctica.

  10. SPARC Data Initiative: A comparison of ozone climatologies from international satellite limb sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegtmeier, S.; Hegglin, M. I.; Anderson, J.; Bourassa, A.; Brohede, S.; Degenstein, D.; Froidevaux, L.; Fuller, R.; Funke, B.; Gille, J.; Jones, A.; Kasai, Y.; Krüger, K.; Kyrölä, E.; Lingenfelser, G.; Lumpe, J.; Nardi, B.; Neu, J.; Pendlebury, D.; Remsberg, E.; Rozanov, A.; Smith, L.; Toohey, M.; Urban, J.; Clarmann, T.; Walker, K. A.; Wang, R. H. J.

    2013-11-01

    comprehensive quality assessment of the ozone products from 18 limb-viewing satellite instruments is provided by means of a detailed intercomparison. The ozone climatologies in form of monthly zonal mean time series covering the upper troposphere to lower mesosphere are obtained from LIMS, SAGE I/II/III, UARS-MLS, HALOE, POAM II/III, SMR, OSIRIS, MIPAS, GOMOS, SCIAMACHY, ACE-FTS, ACE-MAESTRO, Aura-MLS, HIRDLS, and SMILES within 1978-2010. The intercomparisons focus on mean biases of annual zonal mean fields, interannual variability, and seasonal cycles. Additionally, the physical consistency of the data is tested through diagnostics of the quasi-biennial oscillation and Antarctic ozone hole. The comprehensive evaluations reveal that the uncertainty in our knowledge of the atmospheric ozone mean state is smallest in the tropical and midlatitude middle stratosphere with a 1σ multi-instrument spread of less than ±5%. While the overall agreement among the climatological data sets is very good for large parts of the stratosphere, individual discrepancies have been identified, including unrealistic month-to-month fluctuations, large biases in particular atmospheric regions, or inconsistencies in the seasonal cycle. Notable differences between the data sets exist in the tropical lower stratosphere (with a spread of ±30%) and at high latitudes (±15%). In particular, large relative differences are identified in the Antarctic during the time of the ozone hole, with a spread between the monthly zonal mean fields of ±50%. The evaluations provide guidance on what data sets are the most reliable for applications such as studies of ozone variability, model-measurement comparisons, detection of long-term trends, and data-merging activities.

  11. Distribution of total ozone and stratospheric ozone in the tropics - Implications for the distribution of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack; Larsen, Jack C.

    1987-01-01

    Climatologies of total columnar ozone and integrated stratospheric ozone amounts at low latitudes (15 deg N to 15 deg S), derived from satellite observations, are presented. A significant longitudinal variability in total ozone is present, with highest values generally located between 60 deg W and 60 deg E. The integrated stratospheric component of total ozone, on the other hand, does not exhibit a longitudinal preference for high values. Therefore it is hypothesized that the climatological longitudinal distribution of total ozone reflects the variability of the abundance of tropospheric ozone at low latitudes. Furthermore, it is speculated that in situ photochemical production of ozone resulting from biomass burning may be responsible for the observed enhancement of total ozone at these longitudes.

  12. Bioassaying for ozone with pollen systems.

    PubMed Central

    Feder, W A

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity to ozone of pollen germinating in vitro is closely correlated with ozone sensitivity of the pollen parent. Ozone-sensitive and tolerant pollen populations have been identified in tobacco, petunia, and tomato cultivars. The rate of tube elongation can be reversibly slowed or stopped by exposure to low concentrations of ozone. Tube growth rates in the presence of a range of ozone dosages, of pollen populations exhibiting differing ozone sensitivity can be measured and different growth rates can be correlated with ozone dosages. The performance of selected pollen populations can then be used to bioassay ozone in ambient air by introducing the air sample into a growth chamber where ozone-sensitive pollen in growing. Petunia and tobacco pollen are especially useful because they store well at ordinary freezer temperatures and do not require special preparation prior to storage. Modified Brewbacker's growth medium is suitable for growth of both these pollen types. Four useful cultivars are Bel W-3, ozone-sensitive and Bel B, ozone-tolerant tobacco, and White Bountiful, ozone-sensitive and Blue Lagoon, ozone-tolerant petunia. Observations can be made directly by using a TV scanner, or by time lapse or interval photography. Year-round pollen production can be achieved in the greenhouse. Harvested pollen can be tested, packaged, and transported to user facilities without loss of vigor. Pollen populations are inexpensive to produce, respond reliably, and are simple to use as a bioassay for air quality. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:7460876

  13. A Study on Generation Ice Containing Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Kenji; Koyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiromi

    Ozone has the capability of sterilization and deodorization due to high oxidation power. It is also effective for the conservation of perishable foods and purification of water. However, ozone has a disadvantage, that is, conservation of ozone is difficult because it changes back into oxygen. Recently, ice containing ozone is taken attention for the purpose of its conservation. The use of ice containing ozone seems to keep food fresher when we conserve and transport perishable foods due to effects of cooling and sterilization of ice containing ozone. In the present study, we investigated the influence of temperatures of water dissolving ozone on the timewise attenuations of ozone concentration in water. We also investigated the influence of cooling temperature, ice diameter, initial temperatures of water dissolving ozone and container internal pressure of the water dissolving ozone on ozone concentration in the ice. In addition, we investigated the influence of the ice diameter on the timewise attenuations of ozone concentration in the ice. It was confirmed that the solidification experimental data can be adjusted by a correlation between ozone concentration in the ice and solidification time.

  14. Global tropospheric ozone investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.

    1998-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is one of the most important trace gases in the troposphere, and it is responsible for influencing many critical chemical and radiative processes. Ozone contributes to the formation of the hydroxyl radical (OH), which is central to most chemical reactions in the lower atmosphere, and it absorbs UV, visible, and infrared radiation which affects the energy budget and atmospheric temperatures. In addition, O3 can be used as a tracer of atmospheric pollution and stratosphere troposphere exchange. At elevated concentrations, O3 can also produce detrimental biological and human health effects. The US National Research Council (NRC) Board on Sustainable Development reviewed the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) [NRC, 1995], and it identified tropospheric chemistry as one of the high priority areas for the USGCRP in the next decade. The NRC identified the following specific challenges in tropospheric chemistry. Although we understand the reason for the high levels of 03 over several regions of the world, we need to better establish the distribution of O3 in the troposphere in order to document and understand the changes in the abundance of global tropospheric O3. This information is needed to quantify the contribution of O3 to the Earth' s radiative balance and to understand potential impacts on the health of the biosphere. Having recognized the importance of particles in the chemistry of the stratosphere, we must determine how aerosols and clouds affect the chemical processes in the troposphere. This understanding is essential to predict the chemical composition of the atmosphere and to assess the resulting forcing effects in the climate system. We must determine if the self-cleansing chemistry of the atmosphere is changing as a result of human activities. This information is required to predict the rate at which pollutants are removed from the atmosphere. Over nearly two decades, airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) systems have been used in

  15. Observing Tropospheric Ozone From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    2000-01-01

    The importance of tropospheric ozone embraces a spectrum of relevant scientific issues ranging from local environmental concerns, such as damage to the biosphere and human health, to those that impact global change questions, Such is climate warming. From an observational perspective, the challenge is to determine the tropospheric ozone global distribution. Because its lifetime is short compared with other important greenhouse gases that have been monitored over the past several decades, the distribution of tropospheric ozone cannot be inferred from a relatively small set of monitoring stations. Therefore, the best way to obtain a true global picture is from the use of space-based instrumentation where important spatial gradients over vast ocean expanses and other uninhabited areas can be properly characterized. In this paper, the development of the capability to measure tropospheric ozone from space over the past 15 years is summarized. Research in the late 1980s successfully led to the determination of the climatology of tropospheric ozone as a function of season; more recently, the methodology has improved to the extent where regional air pollution episodes can be characterized. The most recent modifications now provide quasi-global (50 N) to 50 S) maps on a daily basis. Such a data set would allow for the study of long-range (intercontinental) transport of air pollution and the quantification of how regional emissions feed into the global tropospheric ozone budget. Future measurement capabilities within this decade promise to offer the ability to provide Concurrent maps of the precursors to the in situ formation of tropospheric ozone from which the scientific community will gain unprecedented insight into the processes that control global tropospheric chemistry

  16. Ozone, Air Quality, and Asthma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Ozone, Air Quality, and Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Ozone, Air Quality, ... can also affect lung function. continue How Poor Air Quality Affects People With Asthma Air pollution is a ...

  17. OZONE GENERATORS IN INDOOR AIR SETTINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives information on home/office ozone generators. It discusses their current uses as amelioratives for environmental tobacco smoke, biocontaminants, volatile organic compounds, and odors and details the advantages and disadvantages of each. Ozone appears to work well ...

  18. NASA satellite helps airliners avoid ozone concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Results from a test to determine the effectiveness of satellite data for helping airlines avoid heavy concentrations of ozone are reported. Information from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, aboard the Nimbus-7 was transmitted, for use in meteorological forecast activities. The results show: (1) Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer profile of total ozone in the atmosphere accurately represents upper air patterns and can be used to locate meteorological activity; (2) route forecasting of highly concentrated ozone is feasible; (3) five research aircraft flights were flown in jet stream regions located by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer to determine winds, temperatures, and air composition. It is shown that the jet stream is coincides with the area of highest total ozone gradient, and low total ozone amounts are found where tropospheric air has been carried along above the tropopause on the anticyclonic side of the subtropical jet stream.

  19. NODA for EPA's Updated Ozone Transport Modeling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find EPA's NODA for the Updated Ozone Transport Modeling Data for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) along with the ExitExtension of Public Comment Period on CSAPR for the 2008 NAAQS.

  20. Cryptosporidiosis associated with ozonated apple cider.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Brian G; Mazurek, Jacek M; Hlavsa, Michele; Park, Jean; Tillapaw, Matt; Parrish, MaryKay; Salehi, Ellen; Franks, William; Koch, Elizabeth; Smith, Forrest; Xiao, Lihua; Arrowood, Michael; Hill, Vince; da Silva, Alex; Johnston, Stephanie; Jones, Jeffrey L

    2006-04-01

    We linked an outbreak of cryptosporidiosis to ozonated apple cider by using molecular and epidemiologic methods. Because ozonation was insufficient in preventing this outbreak, its use in rendering apple cider safe for drinking is questioned.

  1. Ozone concentration in the cabin of a Gates Learjet measured simultaneously with atmospheric ozone concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Perkins, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    A Gates Learjet Model 23 was instrumented with monitors to measure simultaneously the atmospheric and the cabin concentrations of ozone at altitudes up to 13 kilometers. Six data flights were made in February 1978. Results indicated that only a small amount of the atmospheric ozone is destroyed in the cabin pressurization system. Ozone concentrations measured in the cabin near the conditioned-air outlets were only slightly lower than the atmospheric ozone concentration. For the two cabin configurations tested, the ozone retention in the cabin was 63 and 41 percent of the atmospheric ozone concentration. Maximum cabin ozone concentration measured during these flights was 410 parts per billion by volume.

  2. Total ozone, ozone vertical distributions, and stratospheric temperatures at South Pole, Antarctica, in 1986 and 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.; Reitelbach, P. J.; Franchois, P. R.; Kuester, S. E.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-six electrochemical cell (ECC) ozonesondes were flown at South Pole, Antarctica, during 1987 in a continuing program to document year-round changes in Antarctica ozone that are dynamically and photochemically induced. Dobson spectrophotometer total ozone observations were also made. For the twilight months of March and September when Dobson instrument observations cannot be made at South Pole, total ozone amounts were deduced from the ECC ozonesonde soundings. ECC sonde total ozone data obtained during the polar night (April to August), supplemented the sparse total ozone data obtained from Dobson instrument moon observations. Similar ozone profile and total ozone observations were made at South Pole in 1986.

  3. A Reevaluation of the Ozone Budget with HALOE UARS Data: No Evidence for the Ozone Deficit.

    PubMed

    Crutzen, P J; Grooß, J U; Brühl, C; Müller, R; Russell, J M

    1995-05-05

    Recently, additional ozone production mechanisms have been proposed to resolve the ozone deficit problem, which arises from greater ozone destruction than production in several photochemical models of the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. A detailed ozone model budget analysis was performed with simultaneous observations of O(3), HCl, H(2)O, CH(4), NO, and NO(2) from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) under conditions with the strongest photochemical control of ozone. The results indicate that an ozone deficit may not exist. On the contrary, the use of currently recommended photochemical parameters leads to insufficient ozone destruction in the model.

  4. Ozone monitoring instrument (OMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Johan; van den Oord, Gijsbertus H. J.; Hilsenrath, Ernest; te Plate, Maurice B.; Levelt, Pieternel F.; Dirksen, Ruud

    2002-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is an UV-Visible imaging spectrograph using two dimensional CCD detectors to register both the spectrum and the swath perpendicular to the flight direction. This allows having a wide swath (114 degrees) combined with a small ground pixel (nominally 13 x 24 km). The instrument is planned for launch on NASA's EOS-AURA satellite in June 2003. Currently the OMI Flight Model is being build. This shortly follows the Instrument Development Model (DM) which was built to, next to engineering purposes, verify the instrument performance. The paper presents measured results from this DM for optical parameters such as distortion, optical efficiency, stray light and polarization sensitivity. Distortion in the spatial direction is shown to be on sub-pixel level and the stray light levels are very low and almost free from ghost peaks. The polarization sensitivity is presently demonstrated to be below 10-3 but we aim to lower the detection limit by an order of magnitude to make sure that spectral residuals do not mix with trace gas absorption spectra. Critical detector parameters are presented such as the very high UV quantum efficiency (60 % at 270 nm), dark current behavior and the sensitivity to radiation.

  5. Tropospheric Ozone from the TOMS TDOT (TOMS-Direct-Ozone-in-Troposphere) Technique During SAFARI-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. B.; Thompson, A. M.; Frolov, A. D.; Hudson, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    There are a number of published residual-type methods for deriving tropospheric ozone from TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer). The basic concept of these methods is that within a zone of constant stratospheric ozone, the tropospheric ozone column can be computed by subtracting stratospheric ozone from the TOMS Level 2 total ozone column, We used the modified-residual method for retrieving tropospheric ozone during SAFARI-2000 and found disagreements with in-situ ozone data over Africa in September 2000. Using the newly developed TDOT (TOMS-Direct-Ozone-in-Troposphere) method that uses TOMS radiances and a modified lookup table based on actual profiles during high ozone pollution periods, new maps were prepared and found to compare better to soundings over Lusaka, Zambia (15.5 S, 28 E), Nairobi and several African cities where MOZAIC aircraft operated in September 2000. The TDOT technique and comparisons are described in detail.

  6. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, John

    2009-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  7. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2009-05-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest gravitational wave source for ground-based interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO600, as well as the space-based LISA. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they emit. And, when the black holes merge in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Since these mergers take place in regions of extreme gravity, we need to solve Einstein's equations of general relativity on a computer. For more than 30 years, scientists have tried to compute black hole mergers using the methods of numerical relativity. The resulting computer codes have been plagued by instabilities, causing them to crash well before the black holes in the binary could complete even a single orbit. Within the past few years, however, this situation has changed dramatically, with a series of remarkable breakthroughs. This talk will focus on new simulations that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas... manufacturing practice results in a maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas... manufacturing practice results in a maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone...

  10. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg... defined in § 170.3(o)(2) of this chapter. (c) The additive meets the specifications for ozone in the...

  11. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) may be safely used in the treatment, storage, and... specifications for ozone in the Food Chemicals Codex, 4th ed. (1996), p. 277, which is incorporated by...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs....1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas with a pungent... maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone per liter of bottled...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas... manufacturing practice results in a maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone...

  14. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) may be safely used in the treatment, storage, and... specifications for ozone in the Food Chemicals Codex, 4th ed. (1996), p. 277, which is incorporated by...

  15. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) may be safely used in the treatment, storage, and... specifications for ozone in the Food Chemicals Codex, 4th ed. (1996), p. 277, which is incorporated by...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1563 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ozone. 184.1563 Section 184.1563 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1563 Ozone. (a) Ozone (O3, CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) is an unstable blue gas... manufacturing practice results in a maximum residual level at the time of bottling of 0.4 milligram of ozone...

  17. 21 CFR 173.368 - Ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ozone. 173.368 Section 173.368 Food and Drugs FOOD... Additives § 173.368 Ozone. Ozone (CAS Reg. No. 10028-15-6) may be safely used in the treatment, storage, and... specifications for ozone in the Food Chemicals Codex, 4th ed. (1996), p. 277, which is incorporated by...

  18. Ozone-induced inactivation of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Ki; Mok Kim, Sang; Han, Sanghwa

    2003-10-01

    Ozone is an air pollutant that damages a variety of biomolecules. We investigated ozone-induced inactivation of three major antioxidant enzymes. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase was inactivated by ozone in a concentration-dependent manner. The concentration of ozone for 50% inactivation was approximately 45 microM when 10 microM Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase was incubated for 30 min in the presence of ozone. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) showed that the enzyme was randomly fragmented. Both ascorbate and glutathione were very effective in protecting Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase from ozone-induced inactivation. The other two enzymes, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, were much more resistant to ozone than Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase. The ozone concentrations for 50% inactivation of 10 microM catalase and glutathione peroxidase were 500 and 240 microM, respectively. SDS-PAGE demonstrated that ozone caused formation of high molecular weight aggregates in catalase and dimerization in glutathione peroxidase. Glutathione protected catalase and glutathione peroxidase from ozone but the effective concentrations were much higher than that for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase. Ascorbate was almost ineffective. The result suggests that, among the three antioxidant enzymes, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase is a major target for ozone-induced inactivation and both glutathione and ascorbate are very effective in protecting the enzyme from ozone.

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF BROMOHYDRINS IN OZONATED WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because ozonation is becoming a popular alternative to chlorination for disinfection of drinking water and because little is known about the potential adverse effects of ozonation disinfection by-products (DBPs), we have sought to identify ozone DBPs, particularly brominated orga...

  20. Ozone, Climate, and Global Atmospheric Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Joel S.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of global atmospheric problems relating to ozone depletion and global warming. Provides background information on the composition of the earth's atmosphere and origin of atmospheric ozone. Describes causes, effects, and evidence of ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect. A vignette provides a summary of a 1991 assessment of…

  1. A Chemiluminescence Detector for Ozone Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, H.; And Others

    An ozone detector was built and evaluated for its applicability in smog chamber studies. The detection method is based on reaction of ozone with ethylene and measurement of resultant chemiluminescence. In the first phase of evaluation, the detector's response to ozone was studied as a function of several instrument parameters, and optimum…

  2. Generation and delivery device for ozone gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Craig C. (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides an ozone generation and delivery system that lends itself to small scale applications and requires very low maintenance. The system preferably includes an anode reservoir and a cathode phase separator each having a hydrophobic membrane to allow phase separation of produced gases from water. The hydrogen gas, ozone gas and water containing ozone may be delivered under pressure.

  3. Attenuation by clouds of UV radiation for low stratospheric ozone conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orte, Facundo; Wolfram, Elian; Salvador, Jacobo; D'Elia, Raúl; Quiroga, Jonathan; Quel, Eduardo; Mizuno, Akira

    2017-02-01

    Stratospheric poor ozone air masses related to the polar ozone hole overpass subpolar regions in the Southern Hemisphere during spring and summer seasons, resulting in increases of surface Ultraviolet Index (UVI). The impact of these abnormal increases in the ultraviolet radiation could be overestimated if clouds are not taking into account. The aim of this work is to determine the percentage of cases in which cloudiness attenuates the high UV radiation that would reach the surface in low total ozone column situations and in clear sky hypothetical condition for Río Gallegos, Argentina. For this purpose, we analysed UVI data obtained from a multiband filter radiometer GUV-541 (Biospherical Inc.) installed in the Observatorio Atmosférico de la Patagonia Austral (OAPA-UNIDEF (MINDEF - CONICET)) (51 ° 33' S, 69 ° 19' W), Río Gallegos, since 2005. The database used covers the period 2005-2012 for spring seasons. Measured UVI values are compared with UVI calculated using a parametric UV model proposed by Madronich (2007), which is an approximation for the UVI for clear sky, unpolluted atmosphere and low surface albedo condition, using the total ozone column amount, obtained from the OMI database for our case, and the solar zenith angle. It is observed that ˜76% of the total low ozone amount cases, which would result in high and very high UVI categories for a hypothetical (modeled) clear sky condition, are attenuated by clouds, while 91% of hypothetical extremely high UVI category are also attenuated.

  4. A Re-examination of the Satellite Record of Ozone Over Antarctica Spanning 35 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P.

    2005-12-01

    Recently released total ozone data from Nimbus-4 BUV, which was launched in April 1970, and similar data from OMI that was launched on the Aura satellite last year, allows us to track the evolution of the spring-time decline in Antarctic ozone over the last 35 years. The decline of ozone and its subsequent recovery in late spring was well known before the discovery of the "ozone hole", and was attributed to the unique meteorology of the south polar region. Therefore, it was not immediately obvious, at least from the perspective of satellite mapping instruments, that similar spatial features seen in the mid 1980s, though stronger in intensity and depth, were being caused by a completely new mechanism. In this presentation we will focus on the time period preceding the publication of the famous Farman et al. paper in 1985 reporting the decline of ozone at the Halley Bay station in early spring, and examine it from the perspective of past and future satellite measurements of this unique phenomenon.

  5. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as future. space-based detectors. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For many years, numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued by a host of instabilities. However, recent breakthroughs have conquered these instabilities and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on.the resulting 'gold rush' of new results that is revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wave detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics

  6. Noncommutative black hole thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rabin; Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan; Samanta, Saurav

    2008-06-15

    We give a general derivation, for any static spherically symmetric metric, of the relation T{sub h}=(K/2{pi}) connecting the black hole temperature (T{sub h}) with the surface gravity (K), following the tunneling interpretation of Hawking radiation. This derivation is valid even beyond the semi-classical regime, i.e. when quantum effects are not negligible. The formalism is then applied to a spherically symmetric, stationary noncommutative Schwarzschild space-time. The effects of backreaction are also included. For such a black hole the Hawking temperature is computed in a closed form. A graphical analysis reveals interesting features regarding the variation of the Hawking temperature (including corrections due to noncommutativity and backreaction) with the small radius of the black hole. The entropy and tunneling rate valid for the leading order in the noncommutative parameter are calculated. We also show that the noncommutative Bekenstein-Hawking area law has the same functional form as the usual one.

  7. Turbulent black holes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  8. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The final merger of two black holes is expected to be the strongest source of gravitational waves for both ground-based detectors such as LIGO and VIRGO, as well as the space-based LISA. Since the merger takes place in the regime of strong dynamical gravity, computing the resulting gravitational waveforms requires solving the full Einstein equations of general relativity on a computer. For many years, numerical codes designed to simulate black hole mergers were plagued by a host of instabilities. However, recent breakthroughs have conquered these instabilities and opened up this field dramatically. This talk will focus on the resulting gold rush of new results that are revealing the dynamics and waveforms of binary black hole mergers, and their applications in gravitational wove detection, testing general relativity, and astrophysics.

  9. Janus black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Dongsu; Gutperle, Michael; Janik, Romuald A.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper Janus black holes in A dS 3 are considered. These are static solutions of an Einstein-scalar system with broken translation symmetry along the horizon. These solutions are dual to interface conformal field theories at finite temperature. An approximate solution is first constructed using perturbation theory around a planar BTZ blackhole. Numerical and exact solutions valid for all sets of parameters are then found and compared. Using the exact solution the thermodynamics of the system is analyzed. The entropy associated with the Janus black hole is calculated and it is found that the entropy of the black Janus is the sum of the undeformed black hole entropy and the entanglement entropy associated with the defect.

  10. Bringing Black Holes Home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmann, John M.

    2003-03-01

    Black holes are difficult to study because they emit no light. To overcome this obstacle, scientists are trying to recreate a black hole in the laboratory. The article gives an overview of the theories of Einstein and Hawking as they pertain to the construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) near Geneva, Switzerland, scheduled for completion in 2006. The LHC will create two beams of protons traveling in opposing directions that will collide and create a plethora of scattered elementary particles. Protons traveling in opposite directions at very high velocities may create particles that come close enough to each other to feel their compacted higher dimensions and create a mega force of gravity that can create tiny laboratory-sized black holes for fractions of a second. The experiments carried out with LHC will be used to test modern string theory and relativity.

  11. Black-hole astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, P.; Bloom, E.; Cominsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Black-hole astrophysics is not just the investigation of yet another, even if extremely remarkable type of celestial body, but a test of the correctness of the understanding of the very properties of space and time in very strong gravitational fields. Physicists` excitement at this new prospect for testing theories of fundamental processes is matched by that of astronomers at the possibility to discover and study a new and dramatically different kind of astronomical object. Here the authors review the currently known ways that black holes can be identified by their effects on their neighborhood--since, of course, the hole itself does not yield any direct evidence of its existence or information about its properties. The two most important empirical considerations are determination of masses, or lower limits thereof, of unseen companions in binary star systems, and measurement of luminosity fluctuations on very short time scales.

  12. Black Hole Paradoxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Pankaj S.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2016-10-01

    We propose here that the well-known black hole paradoxes such as the information loss and teleological nature of the event horizon are restricted to a particular idealized case, which is the homogeneous dust collapse model. In this case, the event horizon, which defines the boundary of the black hole, forms initially, and the singularity in the interior of the black hole at a later time. We show that, in contrast, gravitational collapse from physically more realistic initial conditions typically leads to the scenario in which the event horizon and space-time singularity form simultaneously. We point out that this apparently simple modification can mitigate the causality and teleological paradoxes, and also lends support to two recently suggested solutions to the information paradox, namely, the ‘firewall’ and ‘classical chaos’ proposals.

  13. Tropospheric Ozone and Photochemical Smog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillman, S.

    2003-12-01

    The question of air quality in polluted regions represents one of the issues of geochemistry with direct implications for human well-being. Human health and well-being, along with the well-being of plants, animals, and agricultural crops, are dependent on the quality of air we breathe. Since the start of the industrial era, air quality has become a matter of major importance, especially in large cities or urbanized regions with heavy automobile traffic and industrial activity.Concern over air quality existed as far back as the 1600s. Originally, polluted air in cities resulted from the burning of wood or coal, largely as a source of heat. The industrial revolution in England saw a great increase in the use of coal in rapidly growing cities, both for industrial use and domestic heating. London suffered from devastating pollution events during the late 1800s and early 1900s, with thousands of excess deaths attributed to air pollution (Brimblecombe, 1987). With increasing use of coal, other instances also occurred in continental Europe and the USA. These events were caused by directly emitted pollutants (primary pollutants), including sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulates. They were especially acute in cities with northerly locations during fall and winter when sunlight is at a minimum. These original pollution events gave rise to the term "smog" (a combination of smoke and fog). Events of this type have become much less severe since the 1950s in Western Europe and the US, as natural gas replaced coal as the primary source of home heating, industrial smokestacks were designed to emit at higher altitudes (where dispersion is more rapid), and industries were required to install pollution control equipment.Beginning in the 1950s, a new type of pollution, photochemical smog, became a major concern. Photochemical smog consists of ozone (O3) and other closely related species ("secondary pollutants") that are produced photochemically from directly

  14. Slowly balding black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2011-10-15

    The 'no-hair' theorem, a key result in general relativity, states that an isolated black hole is defined by only three parameters: mass, angular momentum, and electric charge; this asymptotic state is reached on a light-crossing time scale. We find that the no-hair theorem is not formally applicable for black holes formed from the collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively ''frozen in'' the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes N{sub B}=e{Phi}{sub {infinity}}/({pi}c({h_bar}/2{pi})), where {Phi}{sub {infinity}}{approx_equal}2{pi}{sup 2}B{sub NS}R{sub NS}{sup 3}/(P{sub NS}c) is the initial magnetic flux through the hemispheres of the progenitor and out to infinity. We test this theoretical result via 3-dimensional general relativistic plasma simulations of rotating black holes that start with a neutron star dipole magnetic field with no currents initially present outside the event horizon. The black hole's magnetosphere subsequently relaxes to the split-monopole magnetic field geometry with self-generated currents outside the event horizon. The dissipation of the resulting equatorial current sheet leads to a slow loss of the anchored flux tubes, a process that balds the black hole on long resistive time scales rather than the short light-crossing time scales expected from the vacuum no-hair theorem.

  15. Long term trends in Total Ozone derived from Dobson or ground based instrument data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Savita; Datta, Savita; Sharma, Ashok

    World ozone and ultraviolet data center (WOUDC) receives data from all over the world and after making necessary corrections, archives all ozone and ultraviolet data. An attempt has been made to study the long-term trends of ozone at each station. The total ozone data for the month of January of more than 50 stations across different continents of the world, which are having large temporal data sets since their beginning (in some cases as early as 1956) to 2006, have been analyzed. It is interesting to note that amidst worldwide ozone-decrease some of the stations in the Tropics (30° N -30° S) have shown positive trends while some others have shown negative trend. Very few stations have shown neutral trend. It can be further stated that the stations with positive trend generally lay between 15° N and 30° N . Very few stations in the South America and Europe have shown positive trend in comparison to a relatively larger number of stations in India, Japan and China. The number of stations with positive trend reduces further when we move to Southern tropical belt from the northern tropical belt. In mid-latitudes (30° N - 60° N and 30° S - 60° S) very few stations have shown positive trend that too in the northern hemisphere. None of the stations in the southern hemisphere has shown positive trend in mid latitudes. In higher latitudes, all stations have shown negative trend only. The study indicated that the worldwide ozone-decrease caused by Ozone hole and by chemical processes has not affected the world uniformly. In this paper, an attempt has been made to explain this trend by studying the general circulation and the regional chemistry of the atmosphere.

  16. The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss on Southern Hemisphere stratospheric circulation and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeble, J.; Braesicke, P.; Abraham, N. L.; Roscoe, H. K.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss resulting from chlorine activation on polar stratospheric clouds is examined using a pair of model integrations run with the fully coupled chemistry climate model UM-UKCA. Suppressing chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions is found to produce modelled ozone differences consistent with observed ozone differences between the present and pre-ozone hole period. Statistically significant high-latitude Southern Hemisphere (SH) ozone loss begins in August and peaks in October-November, with > 75% of ozone destroyed at 50 hPa. Associated with this ozone destruction is a > 12 K decrease of the lower polar stratospheric temperatures and an increase of > 6 K in the upper stratosphere. The heating components of this temperature change are diagnosed and it is found that the temperature dipole is the result of decreased short-wave heating in the lower stratosphere and increased dynamical heating in the upper stratosphere. The cooling of the polar lower stratosphere leads, through thermal wind balance, to an acceleration of the polar vortex and delays its breakdown by ~ 2 weeks. A link between lower stratospheric zonal wind speed, the vertical component of the Eliassen-Palm (EP) flux, Fz and the residual mean vertical circulation, w*, is identified. In November and December, increased westerly winds and a delay in the breakup of the polar vortex lead to increases in Fz, indicating increased wave activity entering the stratosphere and propagating to higher altitudes. The resulting increase in wave breaking, diagnosed by decreases to the EP flux divergence, drives enhanced downwelling over the polar cap. Many of the stratospheric signals modelled in this study propagate down to the troposphere, and lead to significant surface changes in December.

  17. The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss on Southern Hemisphere stratospheric circulation and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeble, J.; Braesicke, P.; Abraham, N. L.; Roscoe, H. K.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    The impact of polar stratospheric ozone loss resulting from chlorine activation on polar stratospheric clouds is examined using a pair of model integrations run with the fully coupled chemistry climate model UM-UKCA. Suppressing chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions is found to produce modelled ozone differences consistent with observed ozone differences between the present and pre-ozone hole period. Statistically significant high latitude Southern Hemisphere (SH) ozone loss begins in August and peaks in October-November, with >75% of ozone destroyed at 50 hPa. Associated with this ozone destruction is a >12 K decrease of the lower polar stratospheric temperatures and an increase of >6 K in the upper stratosphere. The heating components of this temperature change are diagnosed and it is found that the temperature dipole is the result of decreased shortwave heating in the lower stratosphere and increased dynamical heating in the upper stratosphere. The cooling of the polar lower stratosphere leads, through thermal wind balance, to an acceleration of the polar vortex and delays its breakdown by ~2 weeks. A link between lower stratospheric zonal wind speed, the vertical component of the EP flux, Fz, and the residual mean vertical circulation, w*, is identified. In December and January, increased westerly winds lead to increases in Fz, associated with an increase in tropopause height. The resulting increase in wavebreaking leads to enhanced downwelling/reduced upwelling over the polar cap. Many of the stratospheric signals modelled in this study propagate down to the troposphere, and lead to significant surface changes in December.

  18. Superfluid Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigar, Robie A.; Mann, Robert B.; Tjoa, Erickson

    2017-01-01

    We present what we believe is the first example of a "λ -line" phase transition in black hole thermodynamics. This is a line of (continuous) second order phase transitions which in the case of liquid 4He marks the onset of superfluidity. The phase transition occurs for a class of asymptotically anti-de Sitter hairy black holes in Lovelock gravity where a real scalar field is conformally coupled to gravity. We discuss the origin of this phase transition and outline the circumstances under which it (or generalizations of it) could occur.

  19. Magnonic Black Holes.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Molina, A; Nunez, Alvaro S; Duine, R A

    2017-02-10

    We show that the interaction between the spin-polarized current and the magnetization dynamics can be used to implement black-hole and white-hole horizons for magnons-the quanta of oscillations in the magnetization direction in magnets. We consider three different systems: easy-plane ferromagnetic metals, isotropic antiferromagnetic metals, and easy-plane magnetic insulators. Based on available experimental data, we estimate that the Hawking temperature can be as large as 1 K. We comment on the implications of magnonic horizons for spin-wave scattering and transport experiments, and for magnon entanglement.

  20. Superfluid Black Holes.

    PubMed

    Hennigar, Robie A; Mann, Robert B; Tjoa, Erickson

    2017-01-13

    We present what we believe is the first example of a "λ-line" phase transition in black hole thermodynamics. This is a line of (continuous) second order phase transitions which in the case of liquid ^{4}He marks the onset of superfluidity. The phase transition occurs for a class of asymptotically anti-de Sitter hairy black holes in Lovelock gravity where a real scalar field is conformally coupled to gravity. We discuss the origin of this phase transition and outline the circumstances under which it (or generalizations of it) could occur.

  1. Merging Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Baker, John G.; Kelly, Bernard J.; vanMeter, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Black-hole mergers take place in regions of very strong and dynamical gravitational fields, and are among the strongest sources of gravitational radiation. Probing these mergers requires solving the full set of Einstein's equations of general relativity numerically. For more than 40 years, progress towards this goal has been very slow, as numerical relativists encountered a host of difficult problems. Recently, several breakthroughs have led to dramatic progress, enabling stable and accurate calculations of black-hole mergers. This article presents an overview of this field, including impacts on astrophysics and applications in gravitational wave data analysis.

  2. Characterizing Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John; Boggs, William Darian; Kelly, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Binary black hole mergers are a promising source of gravitational waves for interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Recent advances in numerical relativity have revealed the predictions of General Relativity for the strong burst of radiation generated in the final moments of binary coalescence. We explore features in the merger radiation which characterize the final moments of merger and ringdown. Interpreting the waveforms in terms of an rotating implicit radiation source allows a unified phenomenological description of the system from inspiral through ringdown. Common features in the waveforms allow quantitative description of the merger signal which may provide insights for observations large-mass black hole binaries.

  3. Euclidean black hole vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowker, Fay; Gregory, Ruth; Traschen, Jennie

    1991-01-01

    We argue the existence of solutions of the Euclidean Einstein equations that correspond to a vortex sitting at the horizon of a black hole. We find the asymptotic behaviors, at the horizon and at infinity, of vortex solutions for the gauge and scalar fields in an abelian Higgs model on a Euclidean Schwarzschild background and interpolate between them by integrating the equations numerically. Calculating the backreaction shows that the effect of the vortex is to cut a slice out of the Schwarzschild geometry. Consequences of these solutions for black hole thermodynamics are discussed.

  4. Magnonic Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán-Molina, A.; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Duine, R. A.

    2017-02-01

    We show that the interaction between the spin-polarized current and the magnetization dynamics can be used to implement black-hole and white-hole horizons for magnons—the quanta of oscillations in the magnetization direction in magnets. We consider three different systems: easy-plane ferromagnetic metals, isotropic antiferromagnetic metals, and easy-plane magnetic insulators. Based on available experimental data, we estimate that the Hawking temperature can be as large as 1 K. We comment on the implications of magnonic horizons for spin-wave scattering and transport experiments, and for magnon entanglement.

  5. How sensitive is the recovery of stratospheric ozone to changes in concentrations of very short lived bromocarbons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Abraham, N. L.; Archibald, A. T.; Braesicke, P.; Keeble, J.; Telford, P.; Warwick, N. J.; Pyle, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Naturally produced very short-lived substances (VSLS), like bromocarbons, account for almost a quarter of the current stratospheric inorganic bromine, Bry. Following VSLS oxidation, bromine radicals (Br and BrO) can catalytically destroy ozone. The extent to which possible increases in surface emissions or transport of these VSLS bromocarbons to the stratosphere could counteract the effect of halogen reductions under the Montreal Protocol is an important policy question. Here by using a chemistry-climate model, UM-UKCA, we investigate the impact of a hypothetical increase in VSLS on ozone and how that impact depends on the background concentrations of chlorine and bromine. Our model experiments indicate that for a ~5 ppt increase in Bry from VSLS, the local ozone loss in the lowermost stratosphere of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) may reach up to 10% in the annual mean; the ozone loss in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is smaller (4-6%). There is more ozone loss following an increase in VSLS burden under a high stratospheric chlorine background than under a low chlorine background indicating the importance of the inter-halogen reactions. For example, the rate of decline of the stratospheric ozone concentration as a function of Bry is higher by about 30-40% when stratospheric Cly is ~3 ppb (present day) compared with Cly of ~0.8 ppb (apre-industrial or projected future situation). Although bromine plays an important role in destroying ozone, inorganic chlorine is the dominant halogen compound. Even if bromine levels from natural VSLS were to increase significantly later this century, changes in the concentration of ozone will be dominated by the recovery of anthropogenic chlorine. Our calculation suggests that for a 5 ppt increase in Bry from VSLS, the Antarctic ozone hole recover date could be delayed by approximately 7 years.

  6. Tropospheric ozone and vehicular emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M.

    1988-06-01

    The paper examines changes in the transportation system as a means of reducing tropospheric ozone in the South Coast Air Basin of California. It takes this issue as a paradigm for the broader national situation where there are environmental risks for which no plausible, politically or economically acceptable remedies exist. It summarizes the health risks of ozone, the current and prospective levels of control required to avoid them, the prospective contribution of transportation controls, and the information required to put the issue in a social benefits and costs framework for decision. 23 refs.

  7. CRISTA ozone measurements/validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, M.; Offermann, D.; Preusse, P.; Riese, M.; Claude, H.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    1997-05-01

    Seven days of global high resolution middle atmosphere ozone profiles have been measured by the CRyogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere (CRISTA) in November 1994. Measurements cover the altitude range from 10 to 80 km and latitudes from 59 degS to 64 degN. An example of a global ozone map is presented and demonstrates the ability of the instrument to detect medium and even small scale structures. Comparisons with ECC- and Brewer Mast balloon-sonde underflights are discussed. Reasonable agreement between CRISTA and balloon-sondes is found especially in the altitude interval between about 19km and 27km.

  8. Electron hole tracking PIC simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuteng; Hutchinson, Ian

    2016-10-01

    An electron hole is a coherent BGK mode solitary wave. Electron holes are observed to travel at high velocities relative to bulk plasmas. The kinematics of a 1-D electron hole is studied using a novel Particle-In-Cell simulation code with fully kinetic ions. A hole tracking technique enables us to follow the trajectory of a fast-moving solitary hole and study quantitatively hole acceleration and coupling to ions. The electron hole signal is detected and the simulation domain moves by a carefully designed feedback control law to follow its propagation. This approach has the advantage that the length of the simulation domain can be significantly reduced to several times the hole width, which makes high resolution simulations tractable. We observe a transient at the initial stage of hole formation when the hole accelerates to several times the cold-ion sound speed. Artificially imposing slow ion speed changes on a fully formed hole causes its velocity to change even when the ion stream speed in the hole frame greatly exceeds the ion thermal speed, so there are no reflected ions. The behavior that we observe in numerical simulations agrees very well with our analytic theory of hole momentum conservation and energization effects we call ``jetting''. The work was partially supported by the NSF/DOE Basic Plasma Science Partnership under Grant DE-SC0010491. Computer simulations were carried out on the MIT PSFC parallel AMD Opteron/Infiniband cluster Loki.

  9. Options to accelerate ozone recovery:ozone and climate benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. S.; Fleming, E. L.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-04-01

    Hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs), including N2O, are evaluated in terms of effects on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC), globally-averaged total column ozone, and radiative forcing through 2100. Due to the established success of the Montreal Protocol, these actions can have only a fraction of the impact that regulations already in force have had. If all anthropogenic ODS emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2{%} during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional ODS restrictions. Radiative forcing by 2100 would be about 0.23 W/m2 lower due to the elimination of N2O emissions and about 0.005 W/m2 lower due to destruction of the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) bank. The ability of EESC to be a suitable metric for total ozone is also quantified. Responding to the recent suggestion that N2O should be considered an ODS, we provide an approach to incorporate N2O into the EESC formulation.

  10. Ozone Control Strategies | Ground-level Ozone | New ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-04-10

    The Air Quality Planning Unit's primary goal is to protect your right to breathe clean air. Guided by the Clean Air Act, we work collaboratively with states, communities, and businesses to develop and implement strategies to reduce air pollution from a variety of sources that contribute to the ground-level ozone or smog problem.

  11. Options to Accelerate Ozone Recovery: Ozone and Climate Benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, E. L.; Daniel, J. S.; Portmann, R. W.; Velders, G. J. M.; Jackman, C. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    The humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone primarily originated from the chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine). Representatives from governments have met periodically over the years to establish international regulations starting with the Montreal Protocol in 1987, which greatly limited the release of these ozone-depleting substances (DDSs). Two global models have been used to investigate the impact of hypothetical reductions in future emissions of ODSs on total column ozone. The investigations primarily focused on chlorine- and bromine-containing gases, but some computations also included nitrous oxide (N2O). The Montreal Protocol with ODS controls have been so successful that further regulations of chlorine- and bromine-containing gases could have only a fraction of the impact that regulations already in force have had. if all anthropogenic ODS emissions were halted beginning in 2011, ozone is calculated to be higher by about 1-2% during the period 2030-2100 compared to a case of no additional ODS restrictions. Chlorine- and bromine-containing gases and nitrous oxide are also greenhouse gases and lead to warming of the troposphere. Elimination of N 20 emissions would result in a reduction of radiative forcing of 0.23 W/sq m in 2100 than presently computed and destruction of the CFC bank would produce a reduction in radiative forcing of 0.005 W/sq m in 2100. This paper provides a quantitative way to consider future regulations of the CFC bank and N 20 emissions

  12. Defense meteorological satellite measurements of total ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovill, J. E.; Ellis, J. S.; Luther, F. M.; Sullivan, T. J.; Weichel, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A multichannel filter radiometer (MFR) on Defense Meteorological Satellites (DMS) that measured total ozone on a global-scale from March 1977 - February 1980 is described. The total ozone data measured by the MFR were compared with total ozone data taken by surfaced-based Dobson spectrophotometers. When comparisons were made for five months, the Dobson spectrophotometer measured 2-5% more total ozone than the MFR. Comparisons between the Dobson spectrophotometer and the MFR showed a reduced RMS difference as the comparisons were made at closer proximity. A Northern Hemisphere total ozone distribution obtained from MFR data is presented.

  13. The Chemistry and Physics of Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, Randall R.

    Perhaps no other environmental issue has captured as much widespread public interest and concern as stratospheric ozone depletion due to man-made chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Increasing scientific understanding of the connections between CFCs and global-scale ozone changes, highlighted by observations of dramatic ozone loss in the Antarctic, has led to a landmark international treaty and subsequent treaty amendments. As outgrowths of these developments, stratospheric ozone depletion has found its way into science fiction fare and the term “ozone hole” has become part of the English lexicon.

  14. Black hole magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanail, Antonios; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-06-20

    We investigate the structure of the steady-state force-free magnetosphere around a Kerr black hole in various astrophysical settings. The solution Ψ(r, θ) depends on the distributions of the magnetic field line angular velocity ω(Ψ) and the poloidal electric current I(Ψ). These are obtained self-consistently as eigenfunctions that allow the solution to smoothly cross the two singular surfaces of the problem, the inner light surface inside the ergosphere, and the outer light surface, which is the generalization of the pulsar light cylinder. Magnetic field configurations that cross both singular surfaces (e.g., monopole, paraboloidal) are uniquely determined. Configurations that cross only one light surface (e.g., the artificial case of a rotating black hole embedded in a vertical magnetic field) are degenerate. We show that, similar to pulsars, black hole magnetospheres naturally develop an electric current sheet that potentially plays a very important role in the dissipation of black hole rotational energy and in the emission of high-energy radiation.

  15. When Black Holes Collide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  16. Measuring Small Leak Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. E.; Stephenson, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Hole sizes deduced from pressure measurements. Measuring apparatus consists of pitot tube attached to water-filled manometer. Compartment tested is pressurized with air. Pitot probe placed at known distance from leak. Dynamic pressure of jet measured at that point and static pressure measured in compartment. Useful in situations in which small leaks are tolerable but large leaks are not.

  17. Drilling Square Holes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Scott G.

    1993-01-01

    A Reuleaux triangle is constructed by drawing an arc connecting each pair of vertices of an equilateral triangle with radius equal to the side of the triangle. Investigates the application of drilling a square hole using a drill bit in the shape of a Reuleaux triangle. (MDH)

  18. Rotating black hole hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Ruth; Kubizňák, David; Wills, Danielle

    2013-06-01

    A Kerr black hole sporting cosmic string hair is studied in the context of the abelian Higgs model vortex. It is shown that such a system displays much richer phenomenology than its static Schwarzschild or Reissner-Nordstrom cousins, for example, the rotation generates a near horizon `electric' field. In the case of an extremal rotating black hole, two phases of the Higgs hair are possible: large black holes exhibit standard hair, with the vortex piercing the event horizon. Small black holes on the other hand, exhibit a flux-expelled solution, with the gauge and scalar field remaining identically in their false vacuum state on the event horizon. This solution however is extremely sensitive to confirm numerically, and we conjecture that it is unstable due to a supperradiant mechanism similar to the Kerr-adS instability. Finally, we compute the gravitational back reaction of the vortex, which turns out to be far more nuanced than a simple conical deficit. While the string produces a conical effect, it is conical with respect to a local co-rotating frame, not with respect to the static frame at infinity.

  19. Laser bottom hole assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  20. Octonionic black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossard, Guillaume

    2012-05-01

    Using algebraic tools inspired by the study of nilpotent orbits in simple Lie algebras, we obtain a large class of solutions describing interacting non-BPS black holes in {N} = 8 supergravity, which depend on 44 harmonic functions. For this purpose, we consider a truncation {E_{{{6}({6})}}}/S{p_{{c}}}( {8,{R}} ) subset {E_{{{8}({8})}}}/{{Spin}}_{{c}}^{ * }( {16} ) of the non-linear sigma model describing stationary solutions of the theory, which permits a reduction of algebraic computations to the multiplication of 27 by 27 matrices. The lift to {N} = 8 supergravity is then carried out without loss of information by using a pertinent representation of the moduli parametrizing E7(7)/SUc (8) in terms of complex valued Hermitian matrices over the split octonions, which generalise the projective coordinates of exceptional special K¨ahler manifolds. We extract the electromagnetic charges, mass and angular momenta of the solutions, and exhibit the duality invariance of the black holes distance separations. We discuss in particular a new type of interaction which appears when interacting non-BPS black holes are not aligned. Finally we will explain the possible generalisations toward the description of the most general stationary black hole solutions of {N} = 8 supergravity.

  1. Aspects of hairy black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru

    2015-03-26

    We review the existence of exact hairy black holes in asymptotically flat, anti-de Sitter and de Sitter space-times. We briefly discuss the issue of stability and the charging of the black holes with a Maxwell field.

  2. Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

    2009-02-01

    Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

  3. Stratospheric ozone change and related climate impacts over 1850-2100 as modelled by the ACCMIP ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Suarez, F.; Young, P. J.; Wild, O.

    2016-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone and associated climate impacts in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) simulations are evaluated in the recent past (1980-2000), and examined in the long-term (1850-2100) using the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) low- and high-emission scenarios (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively) for the period 2000-2100. ACCMIP multi-model mean total column ozone (TCO) trends compare favourably, within uncertainty estimates, against observations. Particularly good agreement is seen in the Antarctic austral spring (-11.9 % dec-1 compared to observed ˜ -13.9 ± 10.4 % dec-1), although larger deviations are found in the Arctic's boreal spring (-2.1 % dec-1 compared to observed ˜ -5.3 ± 3.3 % dec-1). The simulated ozone hole has cooled the lower stratosphere during austral spring in the last few decades (-2.2 K dec-1). This cooling results in Southern Hemisphere summertime tropospheric circulation changes captured by an increase in the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) index (1.3 hPa dec-1). In the future, the interplay between the ozone hole recovery and greenhouse gases (GHGs) concentrations may result in the SAM index returning to pre-ozone hole levels or even with a more positive phase from around the second half of the century (-0.4 and 0.3 hPa dec-1 for the RCP2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively). By 2100, stratospheric ozone sensitivity to GHG concentrations is greatest in the Arctic and Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes (37.7 and 16.1 DU difference between the RCP2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively), and smallest over the tropics and Antarctica continent (2.5 and 8.1 DU respectively). Future TCO changes in the tropics are mainly determined by the upper stratospheric ozone sensitivity to GHG concentrations, due to a large compensation between tropospheric and lower stratospheric column ozone changes in the two RCP scenarios. These results demonstrate how changes in stratospheric ozone are tightly linked to climate and show

  4. Natural hydrocarbons, urbanization, and urban ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, C. A.; Chameides, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    The combined effects of emission control and urbanization, with its concomitant intensification of the urban heat island, on urban ozone concentrations are studied. The effect of temperature on ozone is considered, and attention is given to the temperature effect on ozone photochemistry. Model calculations suggest that ozone concentration enhancements are caused by the effect of temperature on the atmospheric chemistry of peroxyacetyl nitrate, as well as the temperature dependence of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions. It is pointed out that, because of the sensitivity of urban ozone to local climatic conditions and the ability of trees to moderate summertime temperatures, the inadvertent removal of trees from urbanization can have an adverse effect on urban ozone concentration, while a temperature increase in the urban heat island caused by urbanization can essentially cancel out the ozone-reducing benefits obtained from a 50-percent reduction in anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions.

  5. Ozone Depletion, UVB and Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    The primary constituents of the Earth's atmosphere are molecular nitrogen and molecular oxygen. Ozone is created when ultraviolet light from the sun photodissociates molecular oxygen into two oxygen atoms. The oxygen atoms undergo many collisions but eventually combine with a molecular oxygen to form ozone (O3). The ozone molecules absorb ultraviolet solar radiation, primarily in the wavelength region between 200 and 300 nanometers, resulting in the dissociation of ozone back into atomic oxygen and molecular oxygen. The oxygen atom reattaches to an O2 molecule, reforming ozone which can then absorb another ultraviolet photon. This sequence goes back and forth between atomic oxygen and ozone, each time absorbing a uv photon, until the oxygen atom collides with and ozone molecule to reform two oxygen molecules.

  6. Trends in total column ozone measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, F. S.; Angell, J.; Attmannspacher, W.; Bloomfield, P.; Bojkov, R. D.; Harris, N.; Komhyr, W.; Mcfarland, M.; Mcpeters, R.; Stolarski, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    It is important to ensure the best available data are used in any determination of possible trends in total ozone in order to have the most accurate estimates of any trends and the associated uncertainties. Accordingly, the existing total ozone records were examined in considerable detail. Once the best data set has been produced, the statistical analysis must examine the data for any effects that might indicate changes in the behavior of global total ozone. The changes at any individual measuring station could be local in nature, and herein, particular attention was paid to the seasonal and latitudinal variations of total ozone, because two dimensional photochemical models indicate that any changes in total ozone would be most pronounced at high latitudes during the winter months. The conclusions derived from this detailed examination of available total ozone can be split into two categories, one concerning the quality and the other the statistical analysis of the total ozone record.

  7. Towards noncommutative quantum black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Dominguez, J. C.; Obregon, O.; Sabido, M.; Ramirez, C.

    2006-10-15

    In this paper we study noncommutative black holes. We use a diffeomorphism between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model, which is generalized to noncommutative minisuperspace. Through the use of the Feynman-Hibbs procedure we are able to study the thermodynamics of the black hole, in particular, we calculate the Hawking's temperature and entropy for the noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole.

  8. Ozone emissions from a "personal air purifier".

    PubMed

    Phillips, T J; Bloudoff, D P; Jenkins, P L; Stroud, K R

    1999-01-01

    Ozone emissions were measured above a "personal air purifier" (PAP) designed to be worn on a lapel, shirt pocket, or neck strap. The device is being marketed as a negative ion generator that purifies the air. However, it also produces ozone within the person's immediate breathing zone. In order to assess worst-case potential human exposure to ozone at the mouth and nose, we measured ozone concentrations in separate tests at 1, 3, 5, and 6 in. above each of two PAPs in a closed office. One PAP was new, and one had been used slightly for 3 months. Temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, room ozone concentration, and outdoor ozone concentration also were measured concurrently during the tests. Average ozone levels measured directly above the individual PAPs ranged from 65-71 ppb at 6 in. above the device to 268-389 ppb at 1 in. above the device. Ozone emission rates from the PAPs were estimated to be 1.7-1.9 microg/minute. When house dust was sprinkled on the top grid of the PAPs, one showed an initial peak of 522 ppb ozone at 1 in., and then returned to the 200-400 ppb range. Room ozone levels increased by only 0-5 ppb during the tests. Even when two PAPs were left operating over a weekend, room ozone levels did not noticeably increase beyond background room ozone levels. These results indicate that this "PAP," even without significant background ozone, can potentially elevate the user's exposures to ozone levels greater than the health-based air quality standards for outdoor air in California (0.09 ppm, 1-hour average) and the United States (0.08 ppm, 8-hour average).

  9. Ensuring Fully Soldered Through Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blow, Raymond K.

    1987-01-01

    Simple differential-pressure soldering method provides visual evidence that hidden joints are fully soldered. Intended for soldering connector pins in plated through holes in circuit boards. Molten solder flows into plated through holes, drawn by vacuum in manifold over circuit board. Differential-pressure process ensures solder wets entire through hole around connector pin.

  10. Ozone NAAQS Review: Policy Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone is one of the six major air pollutants for which EPA has issued air quality criteria and established national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) based on those criteria. The Clean Air Act (CAA) requires EPA to periodically review and revise, as appropriate, existing air...

  11. Ozone depletion, paradigms, and politics

    SciTech Connect

    Iman, R.L.

    1993-10-01

    The destruction of the Earth`s protective ozone layer is a prime environmental concern. Industry has responded to this environmental problem by: implementing conservation techniques to reduce the emission of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs); using alternative cleaning solvents that have lower ozone depletion potentials (ODPs); developing new, non-ozone-depleting solvents, such as terpenes; and developing low-residue soldering processes. This paper presents an overview of a joint testing program at Sandia and Motorola to evaluate a low-residue (no-clean) soldering process for printed wiring boards (PWBs). Such processes are in widespread use in commercial applications because they eliminate the cleaning operation. The goal of this testing program was to develop a data base that could be used to support changes in the mil-specs. In addition, a joint task force involving industry and the military has been formed to conduct a follow-up evaluation of low-residue processes that encompass the concerns of the tri-services. The goal of the task force is to gain final approval of the low-residue technology for use in military applications.

  12. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  13. Ozone: Does It Affect Me?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Karla G.

    This curriculum unit on the ozone is intended for high school students and contains sections on environmental science and chemistry. It has been structured according to a learning cycle model and contains numerous activities, some of which are in a cooperative learning format. Skills emphasized include laboratory procedures, experimental design,…

  14. Biomedical consequences of ozone depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    1994-07-01

    It is widely agreed that a portion of the earth's protective stratospheric ozone layer is being depleted. The major effect of this ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation (UV reaching the biosphere. This increase will be completely contained within the UVB (290nm - 320nm). It is imperative that assessments be made of the effects of this additional UVB on living organisms. This requires a detailed knowledge of the UVB photobiology of these life forms. One analytical technique to aid in the approximations is the construction of UV action spectra for such important biological end-points as human skin cancer, cataracts, immune suppression; plant photosynthesis and crop yields; and aquatic organism responses to UVB, especially the phytoplankton. Combining these action spectra with the known solar spectrum (and estimates for various ozone depletion scenarios) can give rise to a series of effectiveness spectra for these parameters. This manuscript gives a first approximation, rough estimate, for the effectiveness spectra for some of these bioresponses, and a series of crude temporary values for how a 10% ozone loss would affect the above end-points. These are not intended to masquerade as final answers, but rather, to serve as beginning attempts for a process which should be continually refined. It is hoped that these estimates will be of some limited use to agencies, such as government and industry, that have to plan now for changes in human activities that might alter future atmospheric chemistry in a beneficial manner.

  15. Exicimer lidar measurements of ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, T.; Uchino, O.; Maeda, M.

    1985-01-01

    The observation of the atmospheric ozone profile in an altitude range of 3 to 28 km by means of differential absorption lidar in combination with an XeCl laser (308 nm) and SRS pumped by a KrF laser (249 nm) is discussed.

  16. A new ozone standard - The vapor pressure of ozone at liquid argon temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Hanson, D.; Morton, J.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure of ozone has been measured at liquid argon temperatures. At the normal boiling point of argon (-185.9 C) an ozone pressure of 0.0405 torr was obtained with an accuracy of + or - 1.5 percent. Increases and decreases in liquid argon temperatures raised and lowered the ozone vapor pressure, respectively. During the vapor pressure measurements the purity of ozone was monitored with a mass spectrometer. The proposed ozone standard will considerably improve the calibration of experiments for atmospheric research, the determination of absorption cross sections and other laboratory ozone studies.

  17. CFC Destruction of Ozone - Major Cause of Recent Global Warming!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, R. A.

    2008-12-01

    been a cooling effect. Although the cooling at Vostok needs to be analyzed in more detail, because of the large ozone hole there, black body radiation from Vostok, some 11,400 feet above sea level, to outer space is most likely the cause. Especially, since this phenomenon occurred over the same period that stratospheric ozone destruction took place. Chlorofluorocarbon destruction of stratospheric ozone can be correlated nicely with both the cooling and warming temperature anomalies seen over the time span from 1966 to 1998 and compared to actual temperature measurements, the ozone signature for global warming is the closest of the five signature impacts developed by the IPCC. Further,the "greenhouse signature" is not seen at all. One can account for most, if not all, of the 0.48°C rise in earth's temperature from 1966 to 1998 with the additional UV light that hit the earth due to ozone destruction in the upper atmosphere.

  18. Devils Hole, Nevada: revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spötl, C.; Dublyansky, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Among the ever increasing number of caves visited and studied by paleoclimate scientists around the globe one site is special for a number of reasons. First described in the literature in 1988, Devils Hole is a geometrically simple cave developed along an extensional fracture in the Amargosa Desert of SW Nevada. The deeper portion of this cavity is phreatic and part of a regional aquifer whose lowest discharge point is Death Valley. Landmark studies by Ike Winograd's team examined thick calcite crusts present on the walls of this and a neighboring cave (termed Devils Hole #2) and retrieved one of the most remarkable (and thought-provoking) isotope proxy records covering the last half million of years (1992). More recently, Coplen (2007) scrutinized the stable isotope systematics at Devils Hole. His results suggest that this setting represents a rare example of inorganic calcite precipitation essentially at isotopic equilibrium. We obtained permission from the Death Valley National Park Service to study and sample Devils Hole #2. While previous studies were based on samples from the phreatic zone we cored the calcite crust just above the groundwater table in an attempt to extend the original record further back in time and to obtain direct paleowater isotope data. Stable isotope data obtained along one core show a very high degree of similarity with the published DH11 core and a first set of U-series dates confirms the stratigraphy down to 476 ka. Older calcite also shows glacial-interglacial oscillations in both carbon and oxygen isotopes. A tentative correlation with Antarctic and deep-sea isotope records suggests that the lower part of the calcite is ca. 800 ka old (i.e. MIS 20). The cores show petrographic evidence of falling groundwater levels during MIS 9, 7 and 5e, but there are no indications of major hiati. Interestingly, growth at our drill location ended shortly after 20 ka BP, i.e. much later than at the subaqueous site in Devils Hole proper where DH11

  19. Ozone in the Atmosphere: II. The Lower Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Paul; Pickering, Pam

    1991-01-01

    Described are the problems caused by the increased concentration of ozone in the lower atmosphere. Photochemical pollution, mechanisms of ozone production, ozone levels in the troposphere, effects of ozone on human health and vegetation, ozone standards, and control measures are discussed. (KR)

  20. Black Holes in String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; El-Showk, Sheer; Vercnocke, Bert

    These lectures notes provide a fast-track introduction to modern developments in black hole physics within string theory, including microscopic computations of the black hole entropy as well as construction and quantization of microstates using supergravity. These notes are largely self-contained and should be accessible to students at an early PhD or Masters level. Topics covered include the black holes in supergravity, D-branes, Strominger-Vafa's computation of the black hole entropy via D-branes, AdS-CFT and its applications to black hole phyisics, multicenter solutions, and the geometric quantization of the latter.

  1. Sterilization of Microorganisms by Ozone and Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnyj, V. V.; Klosovskij, A. V.; Panasko, T. A.; Shvets, O. M.; Semenova, O. T.; Taran, V. S.; Tereshin, V. I.

    2008-03-01

    The results of recent experimental methods of sterilization of microorganisms with the use of ozone and ultrasound are presented. The main aim was to optimize the process of sterilization in water solution taking into account the ozone concentration, the power of ultrasonic emitter and the temperature of water. In the present work, the ultrasonic cavitation with simultaneous ozone generation has been used. The high ozone concentration in water solution was achieved by two-barrier glow discharge generated at atmospheric pressure and a cooling thermo-electric module. Such a sterilizer consists of ozone generator in a shape of flat electrodes covered with dielectric material and a high-voltage pulsed power supply of 250 W. The sterilization camera was equipped with ultrasonic source operated at 100 W. The experiments on the inactivation of bacteria of the Bacillus Cereus type were carried out in the distilled water saturated by ozone. The ozone concentration in the aqueous solution was 10 mg/1, whereas the ozone concentration at the output of ozone generator was 30 mg/1. The complete inactivation of spores took 15 min. Selection of the temperature of water, the ozone concentrations and ultrasonic power allowed to determine the time necessary for destroying the row of microorganisms.

  2. Ozonized oils: a qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Guinesi, Adriana Simionatto; Andolfatto, Carolina; Bonetti Filho, Idomeo; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Passaretti Filho, Juliano; Farac, Roberta Vieira

    2011-01-01

    Most of the problems of endodontic origin have a bacterial etiological agent. Thus, there is a continued interest in seeking more effective chemical substances that can replace the camphorated paramonochiorophenol or antibiotics as intracanal medicaments. Among the possible substances, ozone has some interesting biological characteristics: bactericidal action, debriding effect, angiogenesis stimulation capacity and high oxidizing power. The purpose of this study was to chemically evaluate the presence of ozone in sunflower, castor, olive and almond oil, as well as in propylene glycol and byproducts of ozonation, such as formaldehyde. These compounds were ozonized, inserted into empty and sterile vials, and analyzed by testing the reaction between ozone and indigo, for determining the presence of ozone, and subjected to the chromotropic acid test for determining the presence of formaldehyde. It was observed complete absence of ozone in all samples tested and presence of formaldehyde. The bactericidal and healing action of ozonized oils could be attributed to products formed by the ozonation of mineral oils, such as formaldehyde, not to the ozone itself.

  3. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Vasco; Marinov, Daniil; Guaitella, Olivier; Rousseau, Antoine

    2012-10-01

    Ozone kinetics is quite well established at atmospheric pressure, due to the importance of ozone in atmospheric chemistry and to the development of industrial ozone reactors. However, as the pressure is decreased and the dominant three-body reactions lose importance, the main mechanisms involved in the creation and destruction of ozone are still surrounded by important uncertainties. In this work we develop a self-consistent model for a pulsed discharge and its afterglow operating in a Pyrex reactor with inner radius 1 cm, at pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents of 40-120 mA. The model couples the electron Boltzmann equation with a system of equations for the time evolution of the heavy particles. The calculations are compared with time-dependent measurements of ozone and atomic oxygen. Parametric studies are performed in order to clarify the role of vibrationally excited ozone in the overall kinetics and to establish the conditions where ozone production on the surface may become important. It is shown that vibrationally excited ozone does play a significant role, by increasing the time constants of ozone formation. Moreover, an upper limit for the ozone formation at the wall in these conditions is set at 10(-4).

  4. Black Holes and Firewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Our modern understanding of space, time, matter, and even reality itself arose from the three great revolutions of the early twentieth century: special relativity, general relativity, and quantum mechanics. But a century later, this work is unfinished. Many deep connections have been discovered, but the full form of a unified theory incorporating all three principles is not known. Thought experiments and paradoxes have often played a key role in figuring out how to fit theories together. For the unification of general relativity and quantum mechanics, black holes have been an important arena. I will talk about the quantum mechanics of black holes, the information paradox, and the latest version of this paradox, the firewall. The firewall points to a conflict between our current theories of spacetime and of quantum mechanics. It may lead to a new understanding of how these are connected, perhaps based on quantum entanglement.

  5. Prisons of light : black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Kitty

    What is a black hole? Could we survive a visit to one -- perhaps even venture inside? Have we yet discovered any real black holes? And what do black holes teach us about the mysteries of our Universe? These are just a few of the tantalizing questions examined in this tour-de-force, jargon-free review of one of the most fascinating topics in modern science. In search of the answers, we trace a star from its birth to its death throes, take a hypothetical journey to the border of a black hole and beyond, spend time with some of the world's leading theoretical physicists and astronomers, and take a whimsical look at some of the wild ideas black holes have inspired. Prisons of Light - Black Holes is comprehensive and detailed. Yet Kitty Ferguson's lightness of touch and down-to-earth analogies set this book apart from all others on black holes and make it a wonderfully stimulating and entertaining read.

  6. Perspectives: Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Joseph F.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    When asked to discuss Cyg XR-1, E. E. Salpeter once concluded, 'A black hole in Cyg X(R)-1 is the most conservative hypothesis.' Recent observations now make it likely that a black hole in Cyg XR-1 is the only hypothesis tenable. Chandrasekhar first showed that compact stars - those with the inward force of gravity on their outer layers balanced by the pressure generated by the Pauli exclusion principle acting on its electrons (in white dwarfs) or nucleons (in neutron stars) - have a maximum mass. Equilibrium is achieved at a minimum of the total energy of the star, which is the sum of the positive Fermi energy and the negative gravitational energy. The maximum mass attainable in equilibrium is found by setting E = 0: M(max) = 1.5 M(Sun). If the mass of the star is larger than this, then E can be decreased without bound by decreasing the star's radius and increasing its (negative) gravitational energy. No equilibrium value of the radius exist, and general relativity predicts that gravitational collapse to a point occurs. This point singularity is a black hole.

  7. Contribution to indoor ozone levels of an ozone generator. Final report, April 1990-December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Steiber, R.S.

    1993-09-01

    The report gives results of a study of a commonly used commercially available ozone generator, undertaken to determine its impact on indoor ozone levels. Experiments were conducted in a typical mechanically ventilated office and in a test house. The generated ozone and the in-room ozone concentrations were measured. The results showed that, when the unit was operated at the manufacturer's recommended setting, it generated little if any ozone. The indoor concentrations in the case were not significantly above natural background. When operated at the maximum setting, the generator produced large amounts of ozone: over 100 ppb in well ventilated spaces, and nearly 1 ppm in poorly ventilated spaces. When the ozone generator was turned off, ozone levels quickly returned to background. No measurements were made to determine the effect of the device on other aspects of indoor air quality, such as the elimination of volatile organic compounds.

  8. Determinants of ozone fluxes and metrics for ozone risk assessment in plants.

    PubMed

    Fares, Silvano; Goldstein, Allen; Loreto, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentration is increasing and represents a threat to single plants and whole ecosystems. The deleterious ozone effects mainly occur when (i) ozone concentration in the air builds up; (ii) the pollutant enters the leaf through stomatal uptake, and (iii) ozone-produced reactive oxygen species are not efficiently scavenged by leaf antioxidants and then oxidize leaf tissues. The sensitivity of plants to ozone is species-specific, and a correct risk assessment should be based on a metric that correctly takes into account the ambient concentration of ozone, the physiological control on stomatal apertures, and the efficiency of leaf antioxidant system. Current methodologies have been analysed to evaluate ozone risk assessment, and, by phasing-in and phasing out sources and sinks of ozone, elements of improvements for the current metrics have been suggested.

  9. Ozone dynamics and snow-atmosphere exchanges during ozone depletion events at Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Detlev; Boylan, Patrick; Johnson, Bryan; Oltmans, Sam; Fairall, Chris; Staebler, Ralf; Weinheimer, Andrew; Orlando, John; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; Flocke, Frank; Frieß, Udo; Sihler, Holger; Shepson, Paul B.

    2012-10-01

    The behavior of lower atmospheric ozone and ozone exchanges at the snow surface were studied using a suite of platforms during the Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snow (OASIS) Spring 2009 experiment at an inland, coastal site east of Barrow, Alaska. A major objective was to investigate if and how much chemistry at the snow surface at the site contributes to springtime ozone depletion events (ODEs). Between March 8 and April 16, seven ODEs, with atmospheric ozone dropping below 1.0 ppbv, were observed. The depth of the ozone-depleted layer was variable, extending from the surface to ˜200-800 m. ODEs most commonly occurred during low wind speed conditions with flow coming from the Arctic Ocean. Two high-sensitivity ozone chemiluminescence instruments were used to accurately define the remaining sub-ppbv ozone levels during ODEs. These measurements showed variable residual ODE ozone levels ranging between 0.010 and 0.100 ppbv. During the most extended ODE, when ozone remained below 1.0 ppbv for over 78 h, these measurements showed a modest ozone recovery or production in the early afternoon hours, resulting in increases in the ozone mixing ratio of 0.100 to 0.800 ppbv. The comparison between high-sensitivity ozone measurements and BrO measured by longpath differential absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) during ODEs indicated that at low ozone levels formation of BrO is controlled by the amount of available ozone. Measurements of ozone in air drawn from below the snow surface showed depleted ozone in the snowpack, with levels consistently remaining <6 ppbv independent of above-surface ambient air concentrations. The snowpack was always a sink of ozone. Ozone deposition velocities determined from ozone surface flux measurements by eddy covariance were on the order of 0.01 cm s-1, which is of similar magnitude as ozone uptake rates found over snow at other polar sites that are not subjected to ODEs. The results from these multiple platform measurements unequivocally show that snow

  10. Ab Initio Studies of Stratospheric Ozone Depletion Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the current understanding of ozone depletion chemistry, particularly with regards the formation of the so-called Antarctic ozone hole, will be presented together with an outline as to how ab initio quantum chemistry can be used to further our understanding of stratospheric chemistry. The ability of modern state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemical techniques to characterize reliably the gas-phase molecular structure, vibrational spectrum, electronic spectrum, and thermal stability of fluorine, chlorine, bromine and nitrogen oxide species will be demonstrated by presentation of some example studies. The ab initio results will be shown to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data, and where the experimental data are either not known or are inconclusive, the theoretical results are shown to fill in the gaps and to resolve experimental controversies. In addition, ab initio studies in which the electronic spectra and the characterization of excited electronic states of halogen oxide species will also be presented. Again where available, the ab initio results are compared to experimental observations, and are used to aid in the interpretation of experimental studies.

  11. Effects of solar ultraviolet radiation on antarctic phytoplankton during springtime ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Villafane, V.E.; Helbling, E.W.; Holm-Hansen, O.

    1994-12-31

    In recent years, much attention has been given to the formation of the seasonal ozone {open_quotes}hole{close_quotes} over Antarctica, with the concomitant increase in ultraviolet-B [UV-B, 280-320-nanometer (nm)] radiation levels. The enhanced UV-B radiation can be very damaging to biological systems and has been shown to cause a significant decrease in rates of primary production. This paper describes the impact of {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} ultraviolet radiation (UVR), as well as enhanced UV-B radiation, on natural assemblages of phytoplankton as well as on just the nanoplankton fraction cells less than 20 micrometers ({mu}m). The studies also included estimation of the impact of UVR as influenced by the taxonomic composition of the phytoplankton and the mitigating effect of cellular UV-absorbing compounds. All studies were carried out at Palmer Station (64.7{degrees}S 64.1{degrees}W) on Anvers Island from early October to the end of December 1993. This period provided excellent opportunities to document the impact of enhanced UV-B radiation on phytoplankton because the ozone hole was very well developed over Palmer Station in the month of October; column ozone concentrations ranged from 140 to 220 Dobson units (DU). 10 refs, 3 figs.

  12. The ocean's role in polar climate change: asymmetric Arctic and Antarctic responses to greenhouse gas and ozone forcing. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Ferreira, D.; Bitz, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    In recent decades the Arctic has been warming with sea ice disappearing. But the Antarctic has been (mainly) cooling and sea ice is growing. We argue here that inter-hemispheric asymmetries in the mean ocean circulation, with sinking in the northern north Atlantic and upwelling around Antarctica, strongly influences the surface response to GHG forcing, accelerating warming in the Arctic and delaying it in the Antarctic. Moreover, while GHG forcing has been qualitatively similar at the poles, ozone depletion only occurs in the Antarctic. The coupled atmosphere-ocean response to ozone depletion may further help to explain the Antarctic trends. A framework is presented to quantify the processes at work built around `Climate Response Functions' for GHG and Ozone-hole forcing.

  13. Report of the International Ozone Trends Panel 1988, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Chapters on the following topics are presented: spacecraft instrument calibration and stability; information content of ozone retrieval algorithms; trends in total column ozone measurements; and trends in ozone profile measurement.

  14. Ozone in the Atmosphere: I. The Upper Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Paul S.

    1990-01-01

    Research concerning the role of stratospheric ozone and the effect of chlorofluorocarbons on stratospheric ozone are discussed. The consequences of global ozone depletion are projected. The Montreal Protocol is reviewed. (CW)

  15. 40 CFR 52.975 - Redesignations and maintenance plans; ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; ozone. 52.975 Section 52.975 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... and maintenance plans; ozone. (a) Approval. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ... supplemental ozone redesignation requests and revised maintenance plans. These supplemental submittals...

  16. 40 CFR 52.975 - Redesignations and maintenance plans; ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; ozone. 52.975 Section 52.975 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... and maintenance plans; ozone. (a) Approval. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ... supplemental ozone redesignation requests and revised maintenance plans. These supplemental submittals...

  17. 40 CFR 52.975 - Redesignations and maintenance plans; ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; ozone. 52.975 Section 52.975 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... and maintenance plans; ozone. (a) Approval. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ... supplemental ozone redesignation requests and revised maintenance plans. These supplemental submittals...

  18. 40 CFR 52.975 - Redesignations and maintenance plans; ozone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; ozone. 52.975 Section 52.975 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... and maintenance plans; ozone. (a) Approval. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ... supplemental ozone redesignation requests and revised maintenance plans. These supplemental submittals...

  19. Bioassaying for ozone with pollen systems

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity to ozone of pollen germinating in vitro is closely correlated with ozone sensitivity of the pollen parent. Ozone-sensitive and tolerant pollen populations have been identified in tobacco, petunia, and tomato cultivars. The rate of tube elongation can be reversibly slowed or stopped by exposure to low concentrations of ozone. The performance of selected pollen populations can then be used to bioassay ozone in ambient air by introducing the air sample into a growth chamber where ozone-sensitive pollen in growing. Year-round pollen producion can be achieved in the greenhouse. Harvested pollen can be tested, packaged, and transported to user facilities without loss of vigor. Pollen populations are inexpensive to produce, respond reliably, and are simple to use as a bioassay for air quality.

  20. Ozonation of nonbiodegradable organics in tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dogruel, Serdar; Ates Genceli, Esra; Germirli Babuna, Fatos; Orhon, Derin

    2004-01-01

    The study explores the impact of ozonation on the fate of different soluble COD fractions in the tannery wastewater at different phases during the course of biological treatment, in order to identify the phase where ozonation is likely to generate the maximum beneficial effect on biological treatability. Samples from the biological treatment influent and from the mixed liquor at periods significant for the fate of COD fractions have been ozonated. Ozone treatment at the phase where the readily biodegradable COD component was biologically depleted is determined as the most promising alternative among others, since the highest COD removal efficiencies are achieved even with low feeding time of 5 min at the selected ozone flow-rate of 42.8 mg min. The merit of ozonation at this stage in the formation of simpler more biodegradable compounds deserves further attention.