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Sample records for p450-dependent toxic effects

  1. Effects of Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) on different fish species: liver cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase activities and FTIR spectra.

    PubMed

    Henczová, Mária; Deér, Aranka Kiss; Filla, Adrienn; Komlósi, Viktória; Mink, János

    2008-07-01

    The effects of Cu(2+)-sulfate and Pb(2+)-acetate on carp (Cyprinus carpio L.), silver carp (Hypopthalmichtys molitrix V.) and wels (Silurus glanis L.) were studied. The liver microsomal Cyt P450 content, the EROD, ECOD and APND monooxygenase activities were measured. In vivo treatment with 1 mg L(-1) Cu(2+) significantly elevated the activities of these enzymes and Cyt P450 content in silver carp livers. The high-dose Cu(2+) treatment (10 mg L(-1)) on silver carp caused two-fold higher induction in the P450 dependent monooxygenase isoensymes than in wels. Although the 2 mg kg(-1) treatment with Pb(2+) in carp elevated significantly the P450 content, the EROD isoenzyme activities were significantly decreased after 1 day, showing the destructive effect of metal ion on the enzyme system. In vitro, Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) decreased the Cyt P450 content in the carp liver microsomes and the absorption peak shifted to higher wavelength. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to detect the damaging effects of the heavy metals. According to the inhibitory potency to Cu(2+), the most sensitive isoenzyme was the EROD in wels, the least was the silver carp's isoenzyme. The investigated fish P450 isoenzymes showed, that the Cu(2+) was a stronger inhibitor than Pb(2+).

  2. The effect of propylene glycol on the P450-dependent metabolism of acetaminophen and other chemicals in subcellular fractions of mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Snawder, J.E.; Benson, R.W.; Leakey, J.E.A.; Roberts, D.W. )

    1993-01-01

    Propylene glycol (PG) decreases the hepatotoxicity of acetominophen (APAP). To elucidate the mechanism for this response, the authors measured the effect of PG on the in vitro metabolism of APAP by subcellular liver fractions from 6-10 week-old male B6C3F1 mice. The fractions were assayed for their ability to bioactivate APAP to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, which was trapped as APAP-glutathione conjugates or APAP-protein adducts, and for dimethyl-nitrosamine-N-demethylase (DMN), 4-nitrophenol hydroxylase (4-NPOH), and phenacetin-O-deethylase (PAD) activities. Activity in the crude mitochondrial-rich (10,000 [times] g pellet) fraction was low and PG had no effect. PG inhibited DMN and 4-NPOH, indicators of IIE1-dependent activity, and the formation of APAP-glutathione conjugates and APAP-protein adducts in both heavy (15,000 [times] g pellet) and light (100,000 [times] g pellet) microsomes. PAD, a measure of IA2-dependent activity, was not inhibited. These data demonstrate that PG selectively inhibits IIE1 activity, including the bioactivation of APAP, and implicates this as the mechanism for PG-mediated protection of APAP hepatotoxicity in mice. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Status of Resistance of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to Neonicotinoids in Iran and Detoxification by Cytochrome P450-Dependent Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Basij, M; Talebi, K; Ghadamyari, M; Hosseininaveh, V; Salami, S A

    2017-02-01

    Nine Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) populations were collected from different regions of Iran. In all nine populations, only one biotype (B biotype) was detected. Susceptibilities of these populations to imidacloprid and acetamiprid were assayed. The lethal concentration 50 values (LC50) for different populations showed a significant discrepancy in the susceptibility of B. tabaci to imidacloprid (3.76 to 772.06 mg l(-1)) and acetamiprid (4.96 to 865 mg l(-1)). The resistance ratio of the populations ranged from 9.72 to 205.20 for imidacloprid and 6.38 to 174.57 for acetamiprid. The synergistic effects of piperonylbutoxide (PBO) and S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate (DEF) were evaluated for the susceptible (RF) and resistant (JR) populations for the determination of the involvement of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase and carboxylesterase, respectively, in their resistance mechanisms. The results showed that PBO overcame the resistance of the JR population to both imidacloprid and acetamiprid, with synergistic ratios of 72.7 and 106.9, respectively. Carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferase and cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase were studied biochemically, for the purpose of measuring the activity of the metabolizing enzymes in order to determine which enzymes are directly involved in neonicotinoid resistance. There was an increase in the activity of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase up to 17-fold in the resistant JR population (RR = 205.20). The most plausible activity of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase correlated with the resistances of imidacloprid and acetamiprid, and this suggests that cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase is the only enzyme system responsible for neonicotinoid resistance in the nine populations of B. tabaci.

  4. Cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of caffeine in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Alexandra; Fraichard, Stephane; Le Goff, Gaëlle; Faure, Philippe; Artur, Yves; Ferveur, Jean-François; Heydel, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine), an alkaloid produced by plants, has antioxidant and insecticide properties that can affect metabolism and cognition. In vertebrates, the metabolites derived from caffeine have been identified, and their functions have been characterized. However, the metabolites of caffeine in insects remain unknown. Thus, using radiolabelled caffeine, we have identified some of the primary caffeine metabolites produced in the body of Drosophila melanogaster males, including theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline. In contrast to mammals, theobromine was the predominant metabolite (paraxanthine in humans; theophylline in monkeys; 1, 3, 7-trimethyluric acid in rodents). A transcriptomic screen of Drosophila flies exposed to caffeine revealed the coordinated variation of a large set of genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing proteins, including several cytochromes P450s (CYPs) that were highly overexpressed. Flies treated with metyrapone--an inhibitor of CYP enzymes--showed dramatically decreased caffeine metabolism, indicating that CYPs are involved in this process. Using interference RNA genetic silencing, we measured the metabolic and transcriptomic effect of three candidate CYPs. Silencing of CYP6d5 completely abolished theobromine synthesis, whereas CYP6a8 and CYP12d1 silencing induced different consequences on metabolism and gene expression. Therefore, we characterized several metabolic products and some enzymes potentially involved in the degradation of caffeine. In conclusion, this pioneer approach to caffeine metabolism in insects opens novel perspectives for the investigation of the physiological effects of caffeine metabolites. It also indicates that caffeine could be used as a biomarker to evaluate CYP phenotypes in Drosophila and other insects.

  5. Mechanism-based inactivation of cytochrome P-450 dependent benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase activity by acetylenic and olefinic polycyclic arylhydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    A series of aryl acetylenes and aryl olefins have been examined as substrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxygenases in liver microsomes from 5,6-benzoflavone or phenobarbital pretreated rats. 1-Ethynylpyrene (EP), 3-ethynylperylene (EPL), cis- and trans-1-(2-bromo-vinyl)pyrene (c-BVP and t-BVP), and 1-allylpyrene (AP) serve as mechanism-based irreversible inactivators (suicide inhibitors) of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) hydroxylase, while 1-vinyl-pyrene (VP) and phenyl 1-pyrenyl acetylene (PPA) do not cause a detectable suicide inhibition of the BP hydroxylase. The mechanism-based loss of BP hydroxylase activity caused by the aryl acetylenes is not accompanied by a corresponding loss of the P-450 content of the microsomes. In the presence of NADPH, /sup 3/H-labeled EP covalently attached to P-450 isozymes with a measured stoichiometry of one mole of EP per mole of the P-450 heme. The results of the effects of these aryl derivatives in the mammalian cell-mediated mutagenesis assay and toxicity assay show that none of the compounds examined nor any of the their metabolites produced in the incubation system are cytotoxic to V79 cells.

  6. Metabolic engineering of light-driven cytochrome P450 dependent pathways into Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Artur; Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Zulu, Nodumo Nokolunga; Mellor, Silas Busck; Luckner, Manja; Thøfner, Jens Frederik Bang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Mottawie, Mohammed Saddik; Burow, Meike; Pribil, Mathias; Feussner, Ivo; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    Solar energy provides the energy input for the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites in plants and other photosynthetic organisms. Some secondary metabolites are high value compounds, and typically their biosynthesis requires the involvement of cytochromes P450s. In this proof of concept work, we demonstrate that the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is an eminent heterologous host for expression of metabolically engineered cytochrome P450-dependent pathways exemplified by the dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor comprising two membrane bound cytochromes P450s (CYP79A1 and CYP71E1) and a soluble glycosyltransferase (UGT85B1). We show that it is possible to express multiple genes incorporated into a bacterial-like operon by using a self-replicating expression vector in cyanobacteria. We demonstrate that eukaryotic P450s that typically reside in the endoplasmic reticulum membranes can be inserted in the prokaryotic membranes without affecting thylakoid membrane integrity. Photosystem I and ferredoxin replaces the native P450 oxidoreductase enzyme as an efficient electron donor for the P450s both in vitro and in vivo. The engineered strains produced up to 66mg/L of p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime and 5mg/L of dhurrin in lab-scale cultures after 3 days of cultivation and 3mg/L of dhurrin in V-shaped photobioreactors under greenhouse conditions after 9 days cultivation. All the metabolites were found to be excreted to the growth media facilitating product isolation.

  7. Mammalian Cytochrome P450-Dependent Metabolism of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxins and Coplanar Polychlorinated Biphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Hideyuki; Itoh, Toshimasa; Yamamoto, Keiko; Ikushiro, Shin-Ichi; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) contribute to dioxin toxicity in humans and wildlife after bioaccumulation through the food chain from the environment. The authors examined human and rat cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent metabolism of PCDDs and PCBs. A number of human CYP isoforms belonging to the CYP1 and CYP2 families showed remarkable activities toward low-chlorinated PCDDs. In particular, human CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 showed high activities toward monoCDDs, diCDDs, and triCDDs but no detectable activity toward 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetraCDD). Large amino acids located at putative substrate-recognition sites and the F-G loop in rat CYP1A1 contributed to the successful metabolism of 2,3,7,8-tetraCDD. Rat, but not human, CYP1A1 metabolized 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (CB126) to two hydroxylated metabolites. These metabolites are probably less toxic than is CB126, due to their higher solubility. Homology models of human and rat CYP1A1s and CB126 docking studies indicated that two amino acid differences in the CB126-binding cavity were important for CB126 metabolism. In this review, the importance of CYPs in the metabolism of dioxins and PCBs in mammals and the species-based differences between humans and rats are described. In addition, the authors reveal the molecular mechanism behind the binding modes of dioxins and PCBs in the heme pocket of CYPs. PMID:25123135

  8. Interaction of azole antifungal antibiotics with cytochrome P-450-dependent 14 alpha-sterol demethylase purified from Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, C A; Dickinson, K; Brown, S B; Evans, E G; Adams, D J

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of azole antifungal antibiotics with purified Candida albicans cytochrome P-450-dependent 14 alpha-sterol demethylase (P-450DM) was measured spectrophotometrically and by inhibition of enzyme activity. Ketoconazole and ICI 153066 (a triazole derivative) formed low-spin complexes with the ferric cytochrome and induced type II difference spectra. These spectra are indicative of an interaction between the azole moiety and the sixth co-ordination position of P-450DM haem. Both azoles inhibited the binding of CO to the sodium dithionite-reduced ferrous cytochrome, and inhibited reconstituted P-450DM activity by binding to the cytochrome with a one-to-one stoichiometry. Similarly, total inhibition of enzyme activity occurred when equimolar amounts of clotrimazole, miconazole or fluconazole were added to reconstituted P-450DM. These results correlated with the inhibition of P-450DM in broken cell preparations, confirming that all five azoles are potent inhibitors of ergosterol biosynthesis in C. albicans. PMID:2180400

  9. Ethylbenzene exposure produces unique sex-related differences in cytochrome P-450 dependent activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, D.J.; Eyer, C.S.; Causey, K.M.; Backes, W.L. )

    1991-03-11

    Male and female Holtzman rats were given 3 daily i.p. injections of ethylbenzene (EB) and the effect on liver microsomal drug and hydrocarbon metabolism was examined. Hydrocarbon metabolism was examined using toluene as a substrate, since it can be metabolized by aliphatic hydroxylation to benzyl alcohol (BzOH) or aromatic hydroxylation to cresols. Formation of each of these products may be potentially sensitive to parameters such as sex and induction status. In untreated females BzOH was the major metabolite. Benzyl alcohol was also the major metabolite in untreated males, but was about five fold higher than in females. EB pretreatment increased the rate of BzOH formation in both sexes, producing a 3.8 fold increase in females compared to only a 1.8 fold increase in males. The only aromatic hydroxylation product found in untreated females was o-cresol (o-Cr). For male rats o-Cr formation was about twice that of females. Again, the females showed the greatest change in o-Cr formation following hydrocarbon exposure, with males exhibiting a 6 fold increase. P-cresol (p-Cr) was undetectable in untreated females but was produced at a rate of 0.07 nmol/min/mg protein in untreated males. Following EB pretreatment dramatic increases in p-Cr formation were found in both sexes. For females the rate increased to 0.5 nmol/min/mg protein. EB pretreatment caused an 18 fold increase in p-Cr formation in males.

  10. Induction and characterization of a cytochrome P-450-dependent camphor hydroxylase in tissue cultures of common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, C.; Croteau, R. )

    1993-04-01

    (+)-Camphor, a major monoterpene of the essential oil of common sage (Salvia officinalis), is catabolized in senescent tissue, and the pathway for the breakdown of this bicyclic ketone has been previously elucidated in sage cell-suspension cultures. In the initial step of catabolism, camphor is oxidized to 6-exo-hydroxycamphor, and the corresponding NADPH- and O[sub 2]-dependent hydroxylase activity was demonstrated in microsomal preparations of sage cells. Several well-established inhibitors of cytochrome P-450-dependent reactions, including cytochrome c, clotrimazole, and CO, inhibited the hydroxylation of camphor, and CO-dependent inhibition was partially reversed by blue light. Upon treatment of sage suspension cultures with 30 mM MnCl[sub 2], camphor-6-hydroxylase activity was induced up to 7-fold. A polypeptide with estimated molecular mass of 58 kD from sage microsomal membranes exhibited antigenic cross-reactivity in western blot experiments with two heterologous polyclonal antibodies raised against cytochrome P-450 camphor-5-exo-hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida and cytochrome P-450 limonene-6S-hydroxylase from spearmint (Mentha spicata). Dot blotting indicated that the concentration of this polypeptide increased with camphor hydroxylase activity in microsomes of Mn[sup 2+]-induced sage cells. These results suggest that camphor-6-exo-hydroxylase from sage is a microsomal cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase that may share common properties and epitopes with bacterial and other plant monoterpene hydroxylases. 44 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Induction and Characterization of a Cytochrome P-450-Dependent Camphor Hydroxylase in Tissue Cultures of Common Sage (Salvia officinalis).

    PubMed Central

    Funk, C.; Croteau, R.

    1993-01-01

    (+)-Camphor, a major monoterpene of the essential oil of common sage (Salvia officinalis), is catabolized in senescent tissue, and the pathway for the breakdown of this bicyclic ketone has been previously elucidated in sage cell-suspension cultures. In the initial step of catabolism, camphor is oxidized to 6-exo-hydroxycamphor, and the corresponding NADPH- and O2-dependent hydroxylase activity was demonstrated in microsomal preparations of sage cells. Several well-established inhibitors of cytochrome P-450-dependent reactions, including cytochrome c, clotrimazole, and CO, inhibited the hydroxylation of camphor, and CO-dependent inhibition was partially reversed by blue light. Upon treatment of sage suspension cultures with 30 mM MnCl2, camphor-6-hydroxylase activity was induced up to 7-fold. A polypeptide with estimated molecular mass of 58 kD from sage microsomal membranes exhibited antigenic cross-reactivity in western blot experiments with two heterologous polyclonal antibodies raised against cytochrome P-450 camphor-5-exo-hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida and cytochrome P-450 limonene-6S-hydroxylase from spearmint (Mentha spicata). Dot blotting indicated that the concentration of this polypeptide increased with camphor hydroxylase activity in microsomes of Mn2+-induced sage cells. These results suggest that camphor-6-exo-hydroxylase from sage is a microsomal cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase that may share common properties and epitopes with bacterial and other plant monoterpene hydroxylases. PMID:12231778

  12. Fate of a terminal olefin with Drosophila microsomes and its inhibitory effects on some P-450 dependent activities.

    PubMed

    Cuany, A; Helvig, C; Amichot, M; Pflieger, P; Mioskowski, C; Salaun, J P; Pauron, D; Larroque, C; Berge, J B

    1995-01-01

    In vitro bioassays were used to analyze the metabolism of the 11-dodecenoic acid (11-DDNA) by microsomes prepared from Drosophila melanogaster RalDDTR strain. 11-DDNA is metabolized to 11,12-epoxylauric acid (epoxyLA) in a NADPH-dependent way. The microsomal production of epoxyLA reaches a plateau very quickly, suggesting the occurrence of an enzyme inactivation process. After incubation of microsomes with (1-14C)11-DDNA, three proteins of Mr approximately 50 kDa were labeled. 11-DDNA inhibits the microsomal metabolism of lauric acid and 7-ethoxycoumarin in a time and NADPH-dependent process. An inhibition of metabolites generated from DDT and testosterone was also obtained but at higher concentrations. These results are discussed according to the fact that RalDDTR is an insecticide resistant strain characterized as a high metabolizer of the insecticide DDT and also of lauric acid, testosterone, and ethoxycoumarin.

  13. Formaldehyde production promoted by rat nasal cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases with nasal decongestants, essences, solvents, air pollutants, nicotine, and cocaine as substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, A.R.; Hadley, W.M.

    1983-02-01

    To identify compounds which might be metabolized to formaldehyde in the nasal cavity, 32 potential substrates for cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases were screened with rat nasal and, for comparison, liver microsomes. Tested substrates included 6 nasal decongestants, cocaine, nicotine, 9 essences, 3 potential air pollutants, and 12 solvents. Each test substrate, with the possible exception of the air pollutants, contained one or more N-methyl, O-methyl, or S-methyl groups. Eighteen of the tested materials were metabolized to produce formaldehyde by nasal microsomes. Five substrates, namely, the solvents HMPA and dimethylaniline, cocaine, and the essences dimethyl anthranilate and p-methoxyacetophenone, were metabolized to produce formaldehyde at rates exceeding 1000 pmol/mg microsomal protein/min by nasal microsomes. Eight substrates, including four nasal decongestants, nicotine, and an extract of diesel exhaust particles, were metabolized to produce formaldehyde at rates of 200 to 1000 pmol/mg microsomal protein/min. Five other substrates were metabolized to formaldehyde at detectable rates. The results indicate that a variety of materials which often come in contact with the nasal mucosa can be metabolized to formaldehyde by nasal enzymes. The released formaldehyde may influence the irritancy of inhaled compounds and has been suggested to play a role in the tumorigenicity of some compounds.

  14. Characterization of two methylenedioxy bridge-forming cytochrome P450-dependent enzymes of alkaloid formation in the Mexican prickly poppy Argemone mexicana.

    PubMed

    Díaz Chávez, Maria Luisa; Rolf, Megan; Gesell, Andreas; Kutchan, Toni M

    2011-03-01

    Formation of the methylenedioxy bridge is an integral step in the biosynthesis of benzo[c]phenanthridine and protoberberine alkaloids in the Papaveraceae family of plants. This reaction in plants is catalyzed by cytochrome P450-dependent enzymes. Two cDNAs that encode cytochrome P450 enzymes belonging to the CYP719 family were identified upon interrogation of an EST dataset prepared from 2-month-old plantlets of the Mexican prickly poppy Argemone mexicana that accumulated the benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid sanguinarine and the protoberberine alkaloid berberine. CYP719A13 and CYP719A14 are 58% identical to each other and 77% and 60% identical, respectively, to stylopine synthase CYP719A2 of benzo[c]phenanthridine biosynthesis in Eschscholzia californica. Functional heterologous expression of CYP719A14 and CYP719A13 in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells produced recombinant enzymes that catalyzed the formation of the methylenedioxy bridge of (S)-cheilanthifoline from (S)-scoulerine and of (S)-stylopine from (S)-cheilanthifoline, respectively. Twenty-seven potential substrates were tested with each enzyme. Whereas CYP719A14 transformed only (S)-scoulerine to (S)-cheilanthifoline (K(m) 1.9±0.3; k(cat)/K(m) 1.7), CYP719A13 converted (S)-tetrahydrocolumbamine to (S)-canadine (K(m) 2.7±1.3; k(cat)/K(m) 12.8), (S)-cheilanthifoline to (S)-stylopine (K(m) 5.2±3.0; k(cat)/K(m) 2.6) and (S)-scoulerine to (S)-nandinine (K(m) 8.1±1.9; k(cat)/K(m) 0.7). These results indicate that although CYP719A14 participates in only sanguinarine biosynthesis, CYP719A13 can be involved in both sanguinarine and berberine formation in A. mexicana.

  15. In vitro inhibition of methadone and oxycodone cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism: reversible inhibition by H2-receptor agonists and proton-pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Moody, David E; Liu, Fenyun; Fang, Wenfang B

    2013-10-01

    In vitro inhibition of oxycodone metabolism to noroxycodone and oxymorphone and R- and S-methadone metabolism to R- and S-2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) was measured for four H2-receptor antagonists and five proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) using human liver microsomes (HLM) and cDNA-expressed human cytochrome P450s (rCYPs). Inhibitors were first incubated with HLM at three concentrations with and without preincubation of inhibitor, enzyme source and reducing equivalents to also screen for time-dependent inhibition (TDI). Cimetidine and famotidine (10-1,000 µM) inhibited all the four pathways >50%. Nizatidine and ranitidine did not. All the five PPIs (1-200 µM) inhibited one or more pathways >50%. Half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were then determined using rCYPs. Cimetidine and famotidine both inhibited CYP3A4-mediated formation of noroxycodone and CYP2D6-mediated formation of oxymorphone, and famotidine inhibited CYP3A4-mediated formation of R- and S-EDDP, but IC50s were so high that only >10× therapeutic concentrations may have potential for reversible in vivo inhibition. The PPIs were more potent inhibitors; many have the potential for reversible in vivo inhibition at therapeutic concentrations. Omeprazole, esomeprazole and pantoprazole had greater effects on CYP3A4-mediated reactions, whereas lansoprazole was selective for CYP2D6-mediated formation of oxymorphone. Preincubation enhanced cimetidine inhibition of noroxycodone formation and rabeprazole inhibition of all pathways. Future studies will explore irreversible TDI.

  16. Monoclonal antibody-directed analysis of cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases and mutagen activation in the livers of DBA/2 and C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Hietanen, E; Malaveille, C; Friedman, F K; Park, S S; Béréziat, J C; Brun, G; Bartsch, H; Gelboin, H V

    1986-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb 1-7-1 and Mab 2-66-3) specific for cytochrome P-450 (cyt. P-450) isozymes inhibited the metabolism of carcinogens, other xenobiotics, and endogenous compounds in two strains of mice. Postmitochondrial liver supernatant (S9) was prepared from untreated, 3-methylcholanthrene-treated, phenobarbital-treated, and pregnenolone 16 alpha-carbonitrile-treated C57BL/6 (B6) and DBA/2 (D2) mice. The modifying effect of two types of MAb to a 3-methylcholanthrene-induced cyt. P-450 and a phenobarbital-induced cyt. P-450 was investigated for: (a) S9-mediated mutagenicity of aflatoxin B1, benzo(a)pyrene 7,8-dihydrodiol, 2-acetylaminofluorene, and N-nitrosomorpholine in Salmonella typhimurium strains; and (b) the activity of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase, ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, aminopyrine N-demethylase, and testosterone 6 beta-, 7 alpha-, and 16 beta-hydroxylases. With certain S9s, MAb-1-7-1 inhibited only those cytochrome P-450 isozymes involved predominantly in activity of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, and ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase and mutagenicity of 2-acetylaminofluorene and benzo(a)pyrene 7,8-dihydrodiol; MAb 2-66-3 inhibited only those involved in aminopyrine N-demethylase and testosterone 6 beta-, 7 alpha, and 16 beta-hydroxylase activity and aflatoxin B1 mutagenicity. Both Mab 1-7-1 and MAb 2-66-3 inhibited cytochrome P-450 isozyme(s) implicated predominantly in testosterone 7 alpha-hydroxylation in S9 from pregnenolone 16 alpha-carbonitrile-treated B6 mice. MAb 1-7-1 did not inhibit N-nitrosomorpholine mutagenicity and MAb 2-66-3 increased it by 2- to 6-fold depending on the source of S9. Using these MAbs, it is thus possible to identify the contribution of the epitope-defined single or class of cyt. P-450 to specific metabolic reactions in S9 from untreated and inducer-treated mice.

  17. Identification of a CYP84 family of cytochrome P450-dependent mono-oxygenase genes in Brassica napus and perturbation of their expression for engineering sinapine reduction in the seeds.

    PubMed

    Nair, R B; Joy, R W; Kurylo, E; Shi, X; Schnaider, J; Datla, R S; Keller, W A; Selvaraj, G

    2000-08-01

    CYP84 is a recently identified family of cytochrome P450-dependent mono-oxygenases defined by a putative ferulate-5-hydroxylase (F5H) from Arabidopsis. Until recently F5H has been thought to catalyze the hydroxylation of ferulate to 5-OH ferulate en route to sinapic acid. Sinapine, a sinapate-derived ester in the seeds, is antinutritional and a target for elimination in canola meal. We have isolated three F5H-like genes (BNF5H1-3) from a cultivated Brassica napus, whose amphidiploid progenitor is considered to have arisen from a fusion of the diploids Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea. Two cultivated varieties of the diploids were also found to contain BNF5H3 and additionally either BNF5H1 or BNF5H2, respectively. Whereas all three are >90% identical in their coding sequence, BNF5H1 and BNF5H2 are closer to each other than to BNF5H3. This and additional data suggest that the two groups of genes have diverged in an ancestor of the diploids. B. napus showed maximal F5H expression in the stems, least in the seeds, and subtle differences among the expression profiles of the three genes elsewhere. Transgenic B. napus with cauliflower mosaic virus 35S-antisense BNF5H contained up to 40% less sinapine, from 9.0 +/- 0.3 mg in the controls to 5.3 +/- 0.3 mg g(-1) seed. F5H from Arabidopsis and a similar enzyme from sweetgum (Liquidamber styraciflua) has recently been shown to have coniferaldehyde hydroxylase activity instead of F5H activity. Thus the supply of 5-OH coniferaldehyde or 5-OH ferulate has a bearing on sinapine accumulation in canola seeds.

  18. IMPROVING STRUCTURE-LINKED ACCESS TO PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CHEMICAL TOXICITY INFORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatotoxicity of the Herbicide Alachlor Associated with Glutathione Depletion, Oxidative Damage and Protein S-Cysteinyl Adduction.

    Toxicity of the herbicide alachlor (2-chloro-2',6'-diethtl-N-[methoxtmethtl]-acetanilide) has been attributed to cytochrome P450-dependent me...

  19. The Effect of Toxic Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-15

    personal characteristics.12 Therefore, toxic leaders create toxic climates by changing the content of the culture.13 The resulting damage to the...resilient and resistant to change ; however, in a favorable climate , toxic subcultures not only form, but also thrive. How do organizations become a...emphasize the symptoms of toxicity (individual characteristics, traits) and not the disease (culture, climate , outcomes). Although characteristics

  20. Effects of micronutrients on metal toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Peraza, M A; Ayala-Fierro, F; Barber, D S; Casarez, E; Rael, L T

    1998-01-01

    There is growing evidence that micronutrient intake has a significant effect on the toxicity and carcinogenesis caused by various chemicals. This paper examines the effect of micronutrient status on the toxicity of four nonessential metals: cadmium, lead, mercury, and arsenic. Unfortunately, few studies have directly examined the effect of dietary deficiency or supplementation on metal toxicity. More commonly, the effect of dietary alteration must be deduced from the results of mechanistic studies. We have chosen to separate the effect of micronutrients on toxic metals into three classes: interaction between essential micronutrients and toxic metals during uptake, binding, and excretion; influence of micronutrients on the metabolism of toxic metals; and effect of micronutrients on secondary toxic effects of metals. Based on data from mechanistic studies, the ability of micronutrients to modulate the toxicity of metals is indisputable. Micronutrients interact with toxic metals at several points in the body: absorption and excretion of toxic metals; transport of metals in the body; binding to target proteins; metabolism and sequestration of toxic metals; and finally, in secondary mechanisms of toxicity such as oxidative stress. Therefore, people eating a diet deficient in micronutrients will be predisposed to toxicity from nonessential metals. PMID:9539014

  1. Bridging environmental mixtures and toxic effects

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Sarah E.; Smith, Brian W.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    BRIDGES is a bioanalytical tool that combines passive sampling with the embryonic zebrafish developmental toxicity bioassay to provide a quantitative measure of the toxicity of bioavailable complex mixtures. Passive sampling devices (PSDs), which sequester and concentrate bioavailable organic contaminants from the environment, were deployed in the Willamette and Columbia Rivers within and outside of the Portland Harbor Superfund site in Portland, Oregon. Six sampling events were conducted in the summer and fall of 2009 and 2010. PSD extracts were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds and screened for 1201 chemicals of concern using deconvolution reporting software. The developmental toxicity of the extracts was analyzed using the embryonic zebrafish bioassay. BRIDGES provided site-specific, temporally resolved information about environmental contaminant mixtures and their toxicity. Multivariate modeling approaches were applied to paired chemical and toxic effects data sets to help unravel chemistry-toxicity associations. Modeling demonstrated a significant correlation between PAH concentrations and the toxicity of the samples and identified a subset of PAH analytes that were the most highly correlated with observed toxicity. Although this research highlights the complexity of discerning specific bioactive compounds in complex mixtures, it demonstrates methods for associating toxic effects with chemical characteristics of environmental samples. PMID:23001962

  2. Biological effects of magnetic fluids: toxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacava, Z. G. M.; Azevedo, R. B.; Martins, E. V.; Lacava, L. M.; Freitas, M. L. L.; Garcia, V. A. P.; Rébula, C. A.; Lemos, A. P. C.; Sousa, M. H.; Tourinho, F. A.; Da Silva, M. F.; Morais, P. C.

    1999-07-01

    Toxicity of ionic and citrate-based magnetic fluids administrated intraperitoneally to mice was investigated through cytogenetic analysis, evaluation of mitotic index and morphological and cytometric alterations. Both magnetic fluid samples cause severe inflammatory reactions, being very toxic and thus not biocompatible. Peritoneal cells and tissues studies may provide a useful strategy to investigate the in vivo biological effects of magnetic nanoparticles.

  3. Mercury toxicity and neurodegenerative effects.

    PubMed

    Carocci, Alessia; Rovito, Nicola; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Genchi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Mercury is among the most toxic heavy metals and has no known physiological role in humans. Three forms of mercury exist: elemental, inorganic and organic. Mercury has been used by man since ancient times. Among the earliest were the Chinese and Romans, who employed cinnabar (mercury sulfide) as a red dye in ink (Clarkson et al. 2007). Mercury has also been used to purify gold and silver minerals by forming amalgams. This is a hazardous practice, but is still widespread in Brazil's Amazon basin, in Laos and in Venezuela, where tens of thousands of miners are engaged in local mining activities to find and purify gold or silver. Mercury compounds were long used to treat syphilis and the element is still used as an antiseptic,as a medicinal preservative and as a fungicide. Dental amalgams, which contain about 50% mercury, have been used to repair dental caries in the U.S. since 1856.Mercury still exists in many common household products around the world.Examples are: thermometers, barometers, batteries, and light bulbs (Swain et al.2007). In small amounts, some organo mercury-compounds (e.g., ethylmercury tiosalicylate(thimerosal) and phenylmercury nitrate) are used as preservatives in some medicines and vaccines (Ballet al. 2001).Each mercury form has its own toxicity profile. Exposure to Hg0 vapor and MeHg produce symptoms in CNS, whereas, the kidney is the target organ when exposures to the mono- and di-valent salts of mercury (Hg+ and Hg++, respectively)occur. Chronic exposure to inorganic mercury produces stomatitis, erethism and tremors. Chronic MeHg exposure induced symptoms similar to those observed in ALS, such as the early onset of hind limb weakness (Johnson and Atchison 2009).Among the organic mercury compounds, MeHg is the most biologically available and toxic (Scheuhammer et a!. 2007). MeHg is neurotoxic, reaching high levels of accumulation in the CNS; it can impair physiological function by disrupting endocrine glands (Tan et a!. 2009).The most

  4. Linking Arsenic Metabolism and Toxic Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although arsenic has been long recognized as a toxicant and a carcinogen, the molecular basis for few of its adverse effects are well understood. Like other metalloids, arsenic undergoes extensive metabolism involving oxidation state changes and formation of methyl-arsenic bonds ...

  5. Thyroid toxicants: assessing reproductive health effects.

    PubMed Central

    Jahnke, Gloria D; Choksi, Neepa Y; Moore, John A; Shelby, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    A thyroid toxicant workshop sponsored by the National Toxicology Program Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction convened on 28-29 April 2003 in Alexandria, Virginia. The purpose of this workshop was to examine and discuss chemical-induced thyroid dysfunction in experimental animals and the relevance of reproductive and developmental effects observed for prediction of adverse effects in humans. Presentations highlighted and compared reproductive and developmental effects of thyroid hormones in humans and rodents. Rodent models of thyroid system dysfunction were presented. Animal testing protocols were reviewed, taking into account protocol designs that allow extrapolation to possible human health effects. Potential screening methods to assess toxicant-induced thyroid dysfunction were outlined, and postnatal bioassays of thyroid-related effects were discussed. PMID:14998754

  6. Persistent toxic substances: sources, fates and effects.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming H; Armour, Margaret-Ann; Naidu, Ravi; Man, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Persistent toxic substances (PTS) include the Stockholm persistent organic pollutants, like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxin/furan, etc., and organometallic compounds, like organomercury, organotin, and organolead, which all share the same characteristics of being persistent, toxic, bioaccumulative, and able to travel long distances through different media. The adverse health effects of some of the emerging chemicals like pentabromodiphenyl ether, bisphenol A, and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, which are widely used in daily appliances (e.g., TVs, computers, mobile phones, plastic baby bottles), have become a public health concern due to more evidence now available showing their adverse effects like disturbance of the endocrine system and cancer. This article is an attempt to review the current status of PTS in our environment, citing case studies in China and North America, and whether our existing drinking water treatment and wastewater treatment processes are adequate in removing them from water. Some management issues of these emerging chemicals of concern are also discussed.

  7. Human Health Effects Associated with Exposure to Toxic Cyanobacteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports of toxic cyanobacteria blooms are increasing worldwide. Warming and eutrophic surface water systems support the development of blooms. We examine the evidence for adverse human health effects associated with exposure to toxic blooms in drinking water, recreational water a...

  8. Environmental Mercury and Its Toxic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Kevin M.; Walker, Ernest M.; Wu, Miaozong; Gillette, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Mercury exists naturally and as a man-made contaminant. The release of processed mercury can lead to a progressive increase in the amount of atmospheric mercury, which enters the atmospheric-soil-water distribution cycles where it can remain in circulation for years. Mercury poisoning is the result of exposure to mercury or mercury compounds resulting in various toxic effects depend on its chemical form and route of exposure. The major route of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) is largely through eating contaminated fish, seafood, and wildlife which have been exposed to mercury through ingestion of contaminated lower organisms. MeHg toxicity is associated with nervous system damage in adults and impaired neurological development in infants and children. Ingested mercury may undergo bioaccumulation leading to progressive increases in body burdens. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of individual organ systems associated with mercury poisoning. Mercury has profound cellular, cardiovascular, hematological, pulmonary, renal, immunological, neurological, endocrine, reproductive, and embryonic toxicological effects. PMID:24744824

  9. Assessing the toxic effects of ethylene glycol ethers using Quantitative Structure Toxicity Relationship models

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, Patricia; Mumtaz, Moiz; Gombar, Vijay

    2011-07-15

    Experimental determination of toxicity profiles consumes a great deal of time, money, and other resources. Consequently, businesses, societies, and regulators strive for reliable alternatives such as Quantitative Structure Toxicity Relationship (QSTR) models to fill gaps in toxicity profiles of compounds of concern to human health. The use of glycol ethers and their health effects have recently attracted the attention of international organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO). The board members of Concise International Chemical Assessment Documents (CICAD) recently identified inadequate testing as well as gaps in toxicity profiles of ethylene glycol mono-n-alkyl ethers (EGEs). The CICAD board requested the ATSDR Computational Toxicology and Methods Development Laboratory to conduct QSTR assessments of certain specific toxicity endpoints for these chemicals. In order to evaluate the potential health effects of EGEs, CICAD proposed a critical QSTR analysis of the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and developmental effects of EGEs and other selected chemicals. We report here results of the application of QSTRs to assess rodent carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and developmental toxicity of four EGEs: 2-methoxyethanol, 2-ethoxyethanol, 2-propoxyethanol, and 2-butoxyethanol and their metabolites. Neither mutagenicity nor carcinogenicity is indicated for the parent compounds, but these compounds are predicted to be developmental toxicants. The predicted toxicity effects were subjected to reverse QSTR (rQSTR) analysis to identify structural attributes that may be the main drivers of the developmental toxicity potential of these compounds.

  10. Health Effects of Toxicants: Online Knowledge Support ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Research in toxicology generates vast quantities of data which reside on the Web and are subsequently appropriated and utilized to support further research. This data includes a broad spectrum of information about chemical, biological and radiological agents which can affect health, the nature of the effects, treatment, regulatory measures, and more. Online resources are created and housed by a variety of institutions, including libraries and government agencies. This paper focuses on three such institutions and the tools they offer to the public: the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and its Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Reference is also made to other relevant organizations. A review of online public data sources and data resources on health effects of toxicants offered by NLM, EPA and OECD..

  11. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. We investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by ???70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  12. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R.

    1998-11-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. The authors investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by {ge}70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  13. Modulation of P450-dependent ifosfamide pharmacokinetics: a better understanding of drug activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Brain, E G; Yu, L J; Gustafsson, K; Drewes, P; Waxman, D J

    1998-06-01

    The anti-cancer prodrug ifosfamide (IF) is metabolized by liver P450 enzymes by two alternative pathways. IF is activated to 4-hydroxy IF (4-OH-IF), which ultimately yields the alkylating mustard isophosphoramide, whereas IF N-dechlororethylation inactivates the drug and produces the neurotoxic metabolite chloroacetaldehyde (CA). Both reactions are catalysed by multiple liver P450 enzymes in vitro in isolated rat liver microsomes. The present pharmacokinetic study investigates the potential for modulation of these alternative pathways of IF metabolism in vivo using the adult male Fischer 344 rat model. Rats were treated with IF alone or in conjunction with various P450 inducers and inhibitors in an effort to improve the balance between drug activation and drug inactivation. Plasma concentrations, areas under the curve (AUC) and half-lives were calculated for 4-OH-IF and CA, allowing estimations of the extent of IF activation and deactivation/toxification. Induction of liver P450 2B enzymes by 4-day high-dose phenobarbital (PB) pretreatment significantly decreased the fraction of IF undergoing 4-hydroxylation (AUC(4-OH-IF)/AUC(4-OH-IF)+AUC(CA)), from 37% to 22% of total metabolism (P < 0.05), consistent with in vitro findings that the PB-inducible P450 enzyme 2B1 plays a major role in IF N-dechloroethylation. Pretreatment with the P450 3A inducer dexamethasone proportionally decreased the AUC for both IF metabolites, without any net impact on the fraction of IF undergoing metabolic activation. By contrast, the P450 2B1 inhibitor metyrapone preferentially increased the AUC for the 4-hydroxylation pathway in 3-day low-dose PB-induced rats, thereby increasing the total fraction of IF metabolized via the activation pathway from 36% to 54% (P < 0.05), whereas the P450 inhibitors orphenadrine and troleandomycin had no significant affect on AUC values. These findings demonstrate specific roles for P450 2B and 3A enzymes in catalysing these pathways of IF metabolism in vivo, and demonstrate the potential for modulation of IF's alternative metabolic pathways in a therapeutically useful manner. These studies also highlight several clinically relevant drug interactions that may occur during concomitant administration of IF with drugs and other compounds that modulate hepatic P450 enzyme levels.

  14. Toxic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids: Animal data.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The present article reviews the main toxic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids in animals. Toxic effects can be separated into acute and chronic classifications. Acute toxicity studies show that it is virtually impossible to die from acute administration of marijuana or tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychoactive component of cannabis. Chronic toxicity involves lesions of airway and lung tissues, as well as problems of neurotoxicity, tolerance and dependence, and dysregulations in the immune and hormonal systems. Animal toxicity data, however, are difficult to extrapolate to humans.

  15. Environmental occurrence, abundance, and potential toxicity of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners: considerations for a congener-specific analysis.

    PubMed

    McFarland, V A; Clarke, J U

    1989-05-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as environmental contaminants often cannot be adequately described by reference to Aroclors or to total PCBs. Although there are 209 possible PCB configurations (congeners), perhaps half that number account for nearly all of the environmental contamination attributable to PCBs. Still fewer congeners are both prevalent and either demonstrably or potentially toxic. If potential toxicity, environmental prevalence, and relative abundance in animal tissues are used as criteria, the number of environmentally threatening PCB congeners reduces to about thirty-six. Twenty-five of these account for 50 to 75% of total PCBs in tissue samples of fish, invertebrates, birds, and mammals. A few PCB congeners that are sterically similar to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) are directly toxic. Other PCB congeners, as well as those that are directly toxic, may also be involved in toxicity indirectly by stimulating the production of (inducing) bioactivating enzyme systems. The most consequential of these have the ability to induce aryl hydrocarbon metabolizing mixed-function oxidases (MFOs). A result can be an increased capacity for bioactivation of otherwise nontoxic foreign compounds such as certain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to cytotoxic or genotoxic metabolites. The effectiveness of specific PCB congeners as inducers of different types of cytochrome P-450-dependent MFO systems is determined by their stereochemistry. Although MFO induction is not a proximate cause, it is a strong correlate of certain kinds of toxicities. Structural patterns can thus be used to discriminate among PCB congeners on the basis of toxic potential, if not entirely on toxicity per se. Congeners that demonstrate 3-methylcholanthrene-type (3-MC-type) and mixed-type MFO induction have the greatest toxic potential. These congeners most closely resemble 2,3,7,8-TCDD in their structures and in their toxic effects. The larger group of phenobarbital

  16. Toxicity and Neuropharmacological Effects of Elenine

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Eduardo; Alonso, S. J.; Navarro, R.

    2011-01-01

    Elenine is the aglycone of elenoside, a cytotoxic arylnaphthalene lignan (NSC 644013-W/1) derived from Justicia hyssopifolia. (Family: Acanthaceae). Elenoside is a β-D-glucoside, with a similar chemical structure to etoposide, exhibiting central depressant activity. In the present study, elenine was given to mice and rats at doses of 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg. Acute toxicity (24 h) and general behaviour in mice was studied as well as its effects on muscular relaxant activity, locomotor activity (Varimex test), and the open-field test and were compared with 10 mg/kg of chlorpromazine. Elenine produced a reduction in the permanence time in muscular relaxant activity (traction test). Spontaneous activity was lower in the Varimex test. The ambulation and rearing were lower compared with the control group, and an increase in boluses was observed in the open-field test. Thus, it can be concluded that elenine has central sedative effects at lower doses than those used with elenoside and has a possible application in conditions of anxiety. PMID:21716687

  17. Sublethal toxicant effects with dynamic energy budget theory: model formulation.

    PubMed

    Muller, Erik B; Nisbet, Roger M; Berkley, Heather A

    2010-01-01

    We develop and test a general modeling framework to describe the sublethal effects of pollutants by adding toxicity modules to an established dynamic energy budget (DEB) model. The DEB model describes the rates of energy acquisition and expenditure by individual organisms; the toxicity modules describe how toxicants affect these rates by changing the value of one or more DEB parameters, notably the parameters quantifying the rates of feeding and maintenance. We investigate four toxicity modules that assume: (1) effects on feeding only; (2) effects on maintenance only; (3) effects on feeding and maintenance with similar values for the toxicity parameters; and (4) effects on feeding and maintenance with different values for the toxicity parameters. We test the toxicity modules by fitting each to published data on feeding, respiration, growth and reproduction. Among the pollutants tested are metals (mercury and copper) and various organic compounds (chlorophenols, toluene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, tetradifon and pyridine); organisms include mussels, oysters, earthworms, water fleas and zebrafish. In most cases, the data sets could be adequately described with any of the toxicity modules, and no single module gave superior fits to all data sets. We therefore propose that for many applications, it is reasonable to use the most general and parameter sparse module, i.e. module 3 that assumes similar effects on feeding and maintenance, as a default. For one example (water fleas), we use parameter estimates to calculate the impact of food availability and toxicant levels on the long term population growth rate.

  18. The Air Toxics Health Effects Database (ATHED).

    PubMed

    Woodall, George M; Smith, Roy L

    2008-11-15

    The Air Toxics Health Effects Database (ATHED) is currently used by the EPA's Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) to support risk assessments for the Residual Risk Program. An assessment of the residual risk is required to be performed at a specified time (typically 8 years) following the promulgation of a technology-based Maximum Achievable Control Technologies (MACT) standard. The goal of the Residual Risk Program is to assure that the risk that remains after MACT standards are implemented (i.e., the "residual risk") is acceptable, and if not, to propose additional regulations to mitigate those risks. ATHED maintains all available reference values for each chemical as separate data records, and includes values for all exposure durations (acute, short-term, subchronic and chronic). These values are used as benchmarks to determine acceptable exposure levels to the hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) listed in Section 112 of the Clean Air Act. ATHED also provides useful background information on the uncertainty and/or modifying factors that were applied in the derivation of each reference value, as well as the point of departure and the critical study/studies. To facilitate comparisons across durations for a specific chemical, ATHED data can be graphically presented.

  19. On toxic effects of scientific journals.

    PubMed

    Molinie, Antoinette; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2013-06-01

    The advent of online publishing greatly facilitates the dissemination of scientific results. This revolution might have led to the untimely death of many traditional publishing companies, since today’s scientists are perfectly capable of writing, formatting and uploading files to appropriate websites that can be consulted by colleagues and the general public alike. They also have the intellectual resources to criticize each other and organize an anonymous peer review system. The Open Access approach appears promising in this respect, but we cannot ignore that it is fraught with editorial and economic problems. A few powerful publishing companies not only managed to survive, but also rake up considerable profits. Moreover, they succeeded in becoming influential ‘trendsetters’ since they decide which papers deserve to be published. To make money, one must set novel trends, like Christian Dior or Levi’s in fashion, and open new markets, for example in Asia. In doing so, the publishers tend to supplant both national and transnational funding agencies in defining science policy. In many cases, these agencies tend simply to adopt the commercial criteria defined by the journals, forever eager to improve their impact factors. It is not obvious that the publishers of scientific journals, the editorial boards that they appoint, or the people who sift through the vast numbers of papers submitted to a handful of ‘top’ journals are endowed with sufficient insight to set the trends of future science. It seems even less obvious that funding agencies should blindly follow the fashion trends set by the publishers. The perverse relationships between private publishers and public funding agencies may have a toxic effect on science policy.

  20. Pb neurotoxicity: neuropsychological effects of lead toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mason, Lisa H; Harp, Jordan P; Han, Dong Y

    2014-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is a term used to describe neurophysiological changes caused by exposure to toxic agents. Such exposure can result in neurocognitive symptoms and/or psychiatric disturbances. Common toxic agents include heavy metals, drugs, organophosphates, bacterial, and animal neurotoxins. Among heavy metal exposures, lead exposure is one of the most common exposures that can lead to significant neuropsychological and functional decline in humans. In this review, neurotoxic lead exposure's pathophysiology, etiology, and epidemiology are explored. In addition, commonly associated neuropsychological difficulties in intelligence, memory, executive functioning, attention, processing speed, language, visuospatial skills, motor skills, and affect/mood are explored.

  1. Toxic effect of biosurfactant addition on the biodegradation of phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyung-Hee; Ahn, Yeonghee; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2005-11-01

    The effect of the biosurfactant rhamnolipid on phenanthrene biodegradation and cell growth of phenanthrene degraders was investigated. To compare the effect of rhamnolipid addition, two bacterial strains, 3Y and 4-3, which were isolated from a diesel-contaminated site in Korea, were selected. Without the biosurfactant, large amounts of phenanthrene were degraded with both strains at neutral pH, with higher rates of phenanthrene degradation when the cell growth was higher. Upon the addition of 240 mg/L rhamnolipid, the phenanthrene degradation and optical density were reduced, with this inhibitory effect similar for both 3Y and 4-3. To explain this inhibition, the cell growths of both strains were monitored with various concentrations of rhamnolipid, which showed significant toxic effects toward strain 3Y, but was nontoxic toward 4-3. Combining the inhibitory and toxicity results with regard to the biodegradation, different mechanisms can be suggested for each strain. In the biodegradation experiments, the toxicity of rhamnolipid itself mainly was responsible for the inhibitory effect in the case of 3Y, whereas the toxicity of solubilized phenanthrene or the increased toxicity of rhamnolipid in the presence of solubilized phenanthrene could have resulted in the inhibitory effect in the case of 4-3. This study demonstrated that the effectiveness of biosurfactant-enhanced biodegradation can be significantly different depending on the strain, and the toxicity of the biosurfactant should be considered as an important factor.

  2. Toxic effects of colloidal nanosilver in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Olasagasti, Maider; Gatti, Antonietta M; Capitani, Federico; Barranco, Alejandro; Pardo, Miguel Angel; Escuredo, Kepa; Rainieri, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    A variety of consumer products containing silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are currently marketed. However, their safety for humans and for the environment has not yet been established and no standard method to assess their toxicity is currently available. The objective of this work was to develop an effective method to test Ag NP toxicity and to evaluate the effects of ion release and Ag NP size on a vertebrate model. To this aim, the zebrafish animal model was exposed to a solution of commercial nanosilver. While the exposure of embryos still surrounded by the chorion did not allow a definite estimation of the toxic effects exerted by the compound, the exposure for 48 h of 3-day-old zebrafish hatched embryos afforded a reliable evaluation of the effects of Ag NPs. The effects of the exposure were detected especially at molecular level; in fact, some selected genes expressed differentially after the exposure. The Ag NP toxic performance was due to the combined effect of Ag(+) ion release and Ag NP size. However, the effect of NP size was particularly detectable at the lowest concentration of nanosilver tested (0.01 mg l(-1)) and depended on the solubilization media. The results obtained indicate that in vivo toxicity studies of nanosilver should be performed with ad hoc methods (in this case using hatched embryos) that might be different depending on the type of nanosilver. Moreover, the addition of this compound to commercial products should take into consideration the Ag NP solubilization media.

  3. Toxic effects on survival and reproduction, a process oriented approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bedaux, J.J.M.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    1995-12-31

    The authors present a new analysis of survival and reproduction data from toxicity tests. The analysis is based on the Dynamic Energy Budget theory for feeding, growth and reproduction, and a one-compartment kinetics for the toxic compound. The toxic effect size depends on the internal concentration. Effects on survival occur via the hazard rate, which is set equal to the killing rate times the internal concentration that exceeds a threshold value. Effects on reproduction depend on the mode of action of the toxicant: direct effects (mortality during oogenesis or energy costs per egg), or indirect effects (via growth, maintenance or assimilation). The effects on energetic parameters are quantified by the ratio between the internal concentration that exceeds a threshold value, and the tolerance concentration. The process-based models quantify effects as functions of exposure time and (external) concentration on a mechanistic basis. The parameters (no effect concentration, killing rate, tolerance concentration and elimination rate) are independent from the chosen exposure time of the toxicity test. The standard log-logistic models are purely descriptive, have more parameters and are sensitive to the chosen exposure time. The estimation of no-effect concentrations (NOEC`s as well as parametric NEC`S) in standard statistical analyses is problematic. Application to ring test data for chronic tests on Daphnia magna and other toxicity data reveals that these problems do not occur with the analysis, due to the absence of free gradient parameters. It is possible to obtain estimates for the standard model parameters from the new parameters, but not vice versa. The authors believe that the analysis provides a better basis for risk assessment and QSAR studies than the standard one.

  4. Toxicity and behavioral effects of dimethylsulfoxide in planaria.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Oné R; Rowlands, Amanda L; Urban, Kimberly R

    2006-10-30

    In this work, we describe aspects of the toxicity and behavioral effects of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in planaria. Planarian worms have traditionally been a favored animal model in developmental biology. More recently, this organism is being recognized as an animal model in neuropharmacology research. DMSO is often used in cell and tissue culture as a cryoprotectant agent and is also commonly used to enhance the solubility of hydrophobic drugs in aqueous solutions. This compound can elicit various physiological effects in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Many drugs and drug candidates are hydrophobic, needing solvents like DMSO to be able to reach their physiological targets. As planaria becomes increasingly popular in neuropharmacology research, a description of the DMSO effects in this organism is essential. We found that DMSO is toxic to planarians at concentrations above 5% (705 mM), with an LD(50) of 10% (1.4M) at exposure times above 5 min. At sub-toxic concentrations, DMSO decreases planarian exploratory behavior in a concentration-dependent manner. This reduction in locomotor behavior is reversible and preincubation-independent. DMSO at a concentration of 0.1% (14.1 mM), which is usually enough to solubilize hydrophobic substances in aqueous solutions, did not display any toxic or behavioral effects in planaria. Therefore, in this animal model, DMSO concentrations above 0.1% should be avoided in order to be able to reliably observe any behavioral or toxic effects of hydrophobic drugs.

  5. Antidotal Effects of Curcumin Against Agents-Induced Cardiovascular Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samarghandian, Saeed

    Curcumin, the major phenolic compound in turmeric, shows preventive effects in various diseases. Curcumin is commonly found in rhizome of the Curcuma species and traditionally used in herbal medicine. Numeros studies has indicated that curcumin posses protective effects against toxic agents in various systems including cardiovascular. This study found that curcumin may be effective in cardiovascular diseases induced by toxic agents including Streptozotocin, Doxorubicin, Cyclosporin A, Methotrexate, Isoproterenol, Cadmium, Diesel exhaust particle, Nicotine, Hydrogen peroxide, and tert- Butyl hydroperoxide. However, due to the lake of information on human, further studies are needed to determine the efficacy of curcumin as an antidote agent. The present study aimed to critically review the recent literature data from that regarding the protective effects of curcumin against agents-induced cardiovascular toxicity.

  6. Arsenic Toxicity: The Effects on Plant Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Finnegan, Patrick M.; Chen, Weihua

    2012-01-01

    The two forms of inorganic arsenic, arsenate (AsV) and arsenite (AsIII), are easily taken up by the cells of the plant root. Once in the cell, AsV can be readily converted to AsIII, the more toxic of the two forms. AsV and AsIII both disrupt plant metabolism, but through distinct mechanisms. AsV is a chemical analog of phosphate that can disrupt at least some phosphate-dependent aspects of metabolism. AsV can be translocated across cellular membranes by phosphate transport proteins, leading to imbalances in phosphate supply. It can compete with phosphate during phosphorylation reactions, leading to the formation of AsV adducts that are often unstable and short-lived. As an example, the formation and rapid autohydrolysis of AsV-ADP sets in place a futile cycle that uncouples photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation, decreasing the ability of cells to produce ATP and carry out normal metabolism. AsIII is a dithiol reactive compound that binds to and potentially inactivates enzymes containing closely spaced cysteine residues or dithiol co-factors. Arsenic exposure generally induces the production of reactive oxygen species that can lead to the production of antioxidant metabolites and numerous enzymes involved in antioxidant defense. Oxidative carbon metabolism, amino acid and protein relationships, and nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways are also impacted by As exposure. Readjustment of several metabolic pathways, such as glutathione production, has been shown to lead to increased arsenic tolerance in plants. Species- and cultivar-dependent variation in arsenic sensitivity and the remodeling of metabolite pools that occurs in response to As exposure gives hope that additional metabolic pathways associated with As tolerance will be identified. PMID:22685440

  7. Beneficial effect of sesame oil on heavy metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Victor Raj Mohan; Hsu, Dur-Zong; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2014-02-01

    Heavy metals become toxic when they are not metabolized by the body and accumulate in the soft tissue. Chelation therapy is mainly for the management of heavy metal-induced toxicity; however, it usually causes adverse effects or completely blocks the vital function of the particular metal chelated. Much attention has been paid to the development of chelating agents from natural sources to counteract lead- and iron-induced hepatic and renal damage. Sesame oil (a natural edible oil) and sesamol (an active antioxidant) are potently beneficial for treating lead- and iron-induced hepatic and renal toxicity and have no adverse effects. Sesame oil and sesamol significantly inhibit iron-induced lipid peroxidation by inhibiting the xanthine oxidase, nitric oxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radical generation. In addition, sesame oil is a potent inhibitor of proinflammatory mediators, and it attenuates lead-induced hepatic damage by inhibiting nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-1β levels. Because metal chelating therapy is associated with adverse effects, treating heavy metal toxicity in addition with sesame oil and sesamol may be better alternatives. This review deals with the possible use and beneficial effects of sesame oil and sesamol during heavy metal toxicity treatment.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and biologic effects of polybrominated naphthalenes.

    PubMed

    Robertson, L W; Thompson, K; Parkinson, A

    1984-07-01

    Although polybrominated naphthalenes (PBNs) are contaminants of the commercial fire retardant fireMaster BP-6, the individual PBN isomers have not been identified. In order to study PBNs possessing an analogous level of bromination to those found in fireMaster BP-6, three synthetic PBN mixtures, averaging 5.0, 5.3, and 5.6 bromines per naphthalene were synthetized and partially characterized. The PBN mixtures were administered to immature male Wistar rats and found to be potent inducers of cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases. At the lowest dose tested, 30 mumol X kg-1, each PBN mixture caused maximal induction of benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase activity. On the basis of enzyme activities, ligand-binding spectra and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the PBN mixtures were determined to be 3-methylcholanthrene-type inducers of cytochrome P-450 (P-448), resembling qualitatively the most toxic polyhalogenated biphenyls, dibenzofurans, and dioxins in this respect. Liver weights were significantly increased and thymus weights diminished by PBN treatment. Light microscopy revealed proliferation of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum in periportal hepatocytes as a consistent change; some rats also had mild fatty changes in centrilobular hepatocytes. Thymuses displayed mild to marked depletion of cortical lymphocytes. The PBN mixtures were much more potent than fireMaster BP-6 in causing these effects; raising the possibility that PBNs are among the minor components of fireMaster BP-6 that contribute significantly to the toxicity of this environmental contaminant.

  9. The toxic effects of chlorophenols and associated mechanisms in fish.

    PubMed

    Ge, Tingting; Han, Jiangyuan; Qi, Yongmei; Gu, Xueyan; Ma, Lin; Zhang, Chen; Naeem, Sajid; Huang, Dejun

    2017-03-01

    Chlorophenols (CPs) are ubiquitous contaminants in the environment primarily released from agricultural and industrial wastewater. These compounds are not readily degraded naturally, and easily accumulate in organs, tissues and cells via food chains, further leading to acute and chronic toxic effects on aquatic organisms. Herein, we review the available literature regarding CP toxicity in fish, with special emphasis on the potential toxic mechanisms. CPs cause oxidative stress via generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of lipid peroxidation and/or oxidative DNA damage along with inhibition of antioxidant systems. CPs affect immune system by altering the number of mature B cells and macrophages, while suppressing phagocytosis and down-regulating the expression of immune factors. CPs also disrupt endocrine function by affecting hormone levels, or inducing abnormal gene expression and interference with hormone receptors. CPs at relatively higher concentrations induce apoptosis via mitochondria-mediated pathway, cell death receptor-mediated pathway, and/or DNA damage-mediated pathway. CPs at relatively lower concentrations promote cell proliferation, and foster cancers-prone environment by increasing the rate of point mutations and oxidative DNA lesions. These toxic effects in fish are induced directly by CPs per se or indirectly by their metabolic products. In addition, recent studies on the alteration of DNA methylation by CPs through high-throughput DNA sequencing analysis provide new insights into our understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms underlying CPs toxicity.

  10. Toxicity, mechanism and health effects of some heavy metals

    PubMed Central

    Jaishankar, Monisha; Tseten, Tenzin; Anbalagan, Naresh; Beeregowda, Krishnamurthy N.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metal toxicity has proven to be a major threat and there are several health risks associated with it. The toxic effects of these metals, even though they do not have any biological role, remain present in some or the other form harmful for the human body and its proper functioning. They sometimes act as a pseudo element of the body while at certain times they may even interfere with metabolic processes. Few metals, such as aluminium, can be removed through elimination activities, while some metals get accumulated in the body and food chain, exhibiting a chronic nature. Various public health measures have been undertaken to control, prevent and treat metal toxicity occurring at various levels, such as occupational exposure, accidents and environmental factors. Metal toxicity depends upon the absorbed dose, the route of exposure and duration of exposure, i.e. acute or chronic. This can lead to various disorders and can also result in excessive damage due to oxidative stress induced by free radical formation. This review gives details about some heavy metals and their toxicity mechanisms, along with their health effects. PMID:26109881

  11. Toxicity, mechanism and health effects of some heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Jaishankar, Monisha; Tseten, Tenzin; Anbalagan, Naresh; Mathew, Blessy B; Beeregowda, Krishnamurthy N

    2014-06-01

    Heavy metal toxicity has proven to be a major threat and there are several health risks associated with it. The toxic effects of these metals, even though they do not have any biological role, remain present in some or the other form harmful for the human body and its proper functioning. They sometimes act as a pseudo element of the body while at certain times they may even interfere with metabolic processes. Few metals, such as aluminium, can be removed through elimination activities, while some metals get accumulated in the body and food chain, exhibiting a chronic nature. Various public health measures have been undertaken to control, prevent and treat metal toxicity occurring at various levels, such as occupational exposure, accidents and environmental factors. Metal toxicity depends upon the absorbed dose, the route of exposure and duration of exposure, i.e. acute or chronic. This can lead to various disorders and can also result in excessive damage due to oxidative stress induced by free radical formation. This review gives details about some heavy metals and their toxicity mechanisms, along with their health effects.

  12. Protective effects of diallyl sulfide on acetaminophen-induced toxicities.

    PubMed

    Hu, J J; Yoo, J S; Lin, M; Wang, E J; Yang, C S

    1996-10-01

    Diallyl sulfide (DAS), a major flavour component of garlic, is known to modulate drug metabolism and may protect animals from chemically induced toxicity and carcinogenesis. In this study the effects of DAS on the oxidative metabolism and hepatotoxicity induced by acetaminophen (APAP) in rats were investigated. In the hepatotoxicity evaluation of Fischer 344 rats there was a dose-dependent increase in the odds of mortality rate by APAP (P = 0.009); DAS treatment significantly protected rats from APAP-related mortality (P = 0.026). Liver toxicity determined by lactate dehydrogenase activity was significantly increased by APAP treatment (0.75 g/kg). Pretreatment with DAS protected animals from APAP-induced liver toxicity in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Treatment of DAS (50 mg/kg) 3 hr after APAP dosing significantly (P < 0.05) protected rats from APAP-induced liver toxicity. The metabolism of APAP (50 microM) in vitro was significantly inhibited by DAS (0.3-1 mM) in liver microsomes isolated from F344 rats. As the effect of DAS on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in vivo was observed only when DAS was administered before or shortly after (< 3 hr) APAP dosing, data suggested that the protective effect of DAS is mainly at the metabolic activation step of APAP. However, the possibility that DAS may also have effects on other drug metabolism systems, such as glutathione (GSH) and glutathione S-transferases, cannot be ruled out.

  13. Chlorpyrifos chronic toxicity in broilers and effect of vitamin C

    PubMed Central

    Kammon, A.M.; Brar, R.S.; Sodhi, S.; Banga, H.S.; Singh, J.; Nagra, N.S.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to study chlorpyrifos chronic toxicity in broilers and the protective effect of vitamin C. Oral administration of 0.8 mg/kg body weight (bw) (1/50 LD50) chlorpyrifos (Radar®), produced mild diarrhea and gross lesions comprised of paleness, flaccid consistency and slightly enlargement of liver. Histopathologically, chlorpyrifos produced degenerative changes in various organs. Oral administration of 100 mg/kg bw vitamin C partially ameliorated the degenerative changes in kidney and heart. There was insignificant alteration in biochemical and haematological profiles. It is concluded that supplementation of vitamin C reduced the severity of lesions induced by chronic chlorpyrifos toxicity in broilers. PMID:26623275

  14. [Toxic waste and health effects in Abidjan City, Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Bohand, X; Monpeurt, C; Bohand, S; Cazoulat, A

    2007-12-01

    Accidental chemical pollution can have serious effects on human health. In 2006, the tanker vessel Probo Koala discharged hundreds of tons of toxic waste at many sites in Abidjan City, Ivory Coast. In the following days and weeks, thousands of people presented signs of poisoning. Analysis of the waste demonstrated the presence of toxic chemicals such as mercaptans and hydrogen sulfide. The final toll was 8 dead, dozens hospitalized, and about 100,000 seeking medical advice. This event provides evidence that, like international immigration, exportation of industrial waste can result in serious public health hazards.

  15. Effects of sample homogenization on solid phase sediment toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.S.; Hunt, J.W.; Newman, J.W.; Tjeerdema, R.S.; Fairey, W.R.; Stephenson, M.D.; Puckett, H.M.; Taberski, K.M.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment toxicity is typically assessed using homogenized surficial sediment samples. It has been recognized that homogenization alters sediment integrity and may result in changes in chemical bioavailability through oxidation-reduction or other chemical processes. In this study, intact (unhomogenized) sediment cores were taken from a Van Veen grab sampler and tested concurrently with sediment homogenate from the same sample in order to investigate the effect of homogenization on toxicity. Two different solid-phase toxicity test protocols were used for these comparisons. Results of amphipod exposures to samples from San Francisco Bay indicated minimal difference between intact and homogenized samples. Mean amphipod survival in intact cores relative to homogenates was similar at two contaminated sites. Mean survival was 34 and 33% in intact and homogenized samples, respectively, at Castro Cove. Mean survival was 41% and 57%, respectively, in intact and homogenized samples from Islais Creek. Studies using the sea urchin development protocol, modified for testing at the sediment/water interface, indicated considerably more toxicity in intact samples relative to homogenized samples from San Diego Bay. Measures of metal flux into the overlying water demonstrated greater flux of metals from the intact samples. Zinc flux was five times greater, and copper flux was twice as great in some intact samples relative to homogenates. Future experiments will compare flux of metals and organic compounds in intact and homogenized sediments to further evaluate the efficacy of using intact cores for solid phase toxicity assessment.

  16. Synergistic Effects of Toxic Elements on Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mahmood, Qaisar; Irshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamshaid

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins show remarkable variations in their expression levels under a variety of toxic conditions. A research span expanded over five decades has revealed their molecular characterization, gene regulation, expression patterns, vast similarity in diverse groups, and broad range of functional capabilities. Their functions include protection and tolerance against cytotoxic conditions through their molecular chaperoning activity, maintaining cytoskeleton stability, and assisting in cell signaling. However, their role as biomarkers for monitoring the environmental risk assessment is controversial due to a number of conflicting, validating, and nonvalidating reports. The current knowledge regarding the interpretation of HSPs expression levels has been discussed in the present review. The candidature of heat shock proteins as biomarkers of toxicity is thus far unreliable due to synergistic effects of toxicants and other environmental factors. The adoption of heat shock proteins as “suit of biomarkers in a set of organisms” requires further investigation. PMID:25136596

  17. Synergistic effects of toxic elements on heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Jadoon, Saima; Mahmood, Qaisar; Irshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamshaid

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins show remarkable variations in their expression levels under a variety of toxic conditions. A research span expanded over five decades has revealed their molecular characterization, gene regulation, expression patterns, vast similarity in diverse groups, and broad range of functional capabilities. Their functions include protection and tolerance against cytotoxic conditions through their molecular chaperoning activity, maintaining cytoskeleton stability, and assisting in cell signaling. However, their role as biomarkers for monitoring the environmental risk assessment is controversial due to a number of conflicting, validating, and nonvalidating reports. The current knowledge regarding the interpretation of HSPs expression levels has been discussed in the present review. The candidature of heat shock proteins as biomarkers of toxicity is thus far unreliable due to synergistic effects of toxicants and other environmental factors. The adoption of heat shock proteins as "suit of biomarkers in a set of organisms" requires further investigation.

  18. Health effects of toxicants: Online knowledge support

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Richard; de Marcellus, Sally; de Knecht, Joop; Leinala, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    Research in toxicology generates vast quantities of data which reside on the Web and are subsequently appropriated and utilized to support further research. This data includes a broad spectrum of information about chemical, biological and radiological agents which can affect health, the nature of the effects, treatment, regulatory measures, and more. Information is structured in a variety of formats, including traditional databases, portals, prediction models, and decision making support tools. Online resources are created and housed by a variety of institutions, including libraries and government agencies. This paper focuses on three such institutions and the tools they offer to the public: the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and its Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Reference is also made to other relevant organizations. PMID:26506572

  19. Health effects of toxicants: Online knowledge support.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Philip; Judson, Richard; de Marcellus, Sally; de Knecht, Joop; Leinala, Eeva

    2016-01-15

    Research in toxicology generates vast quantities of data which reside on the Web and are subsequently appropriated and utilized to support further research. This data includes a broad spectrum of information about chemical, biological and radiological agents which can affect health, the nature of the effects, treatment, regulatory measures, and more. Information is structured in a variety of formats, including traditional databases, portals, prediction models, and decision making support tools. Online resources are created and housed by a variety of institutions, including libraries and government agencies. This paper focuses on three such institutions and the tools they offer to the public: the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and its Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Reference is also made to other relevant organizations.

  20. Barium toxicity effects in soybean plants.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Ryuichi; Jayachandran, Krish; Nguyen, Nguyen Tran; Boulenouar, Abdellah; Fujita, Kounosuke; Saneoka, Hirofumi

    2008-10-01

    Barium (Ba)-induced phytotoxicity at 100, 1000, or 5000 microM Ba in soybean plants (Glycine max) was investigated under hydroponic culture conditions. Soybean growth and leaf photosynthetic activity were significantly inhibited by all three levels of Ba treatments. In the case of photosynthetic activity, 5000 microM Ba treatment shutdown stomatal opening and perturbed carbon fixation metabolism and translocation. However, 100 and 1000 microM Ba treatments shut down stomatal opening and inhibited carbon fixation, but without perturbation of leaf carbon fixation-related metabolism. Potassium (K) absorption by soybean roots was also reduced in all three Ba treatments. This decreased K absorption reduced K localization at guard cells. Barium accumulation in guard cells also inhibited K transport from epidermal cells to guard cells. This lack of K in guard cells resulted in stomatal closure. As a result of inhibition of K transport into guard cells and stomatal shutdown, photosynthetic activity and plant productivity were inhibited. Our experiment indicates that Ba has phytotoxic effects on soybean plants by inhibiting photosynthesis.

  1. Toxic effect of lithium in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, P.K.; Smithberg, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of lithium ion on glucose oxidation in the cerebrum and cerebellum of mice was measured in vitro by the conversion of isotopic glucose into /sup 14/CO/sub 2//mg wet weight. Glucose utilization is unaffected by lowest lithium dosage but is inhibited by high lithium concentrations (197-295 mM). Chronic administration of lithium to adult mice decreased the DNA content of the cerebrum and cerebellum at concentrations of 80 and 108 mM. The DNA content of selected postnatal stages of cerebrum and cerebellum was measured starting on Day 1 or 2. This served as another parameter to evaluate glucose oxidation studies at these ages. On the basis of wet weight, both brain parts of neonates of ages 1 and 10 days were approximately one-half that of the adult counterparts. On the basis of DNA content, the cerebrum enhanced its glucose utilization twofold from Day 1 to Day 10 and tripled its utilization from Day 10 to Day 20. The glucose utilization by cerebrum at Day 20 is similar to adult values. In contrast, glucose oxidation in the cerebellum remained relatively constant throughout the postnatal growth. The relative susceptibility of the two brain parts is discussed.

  2. Factors influencing reproduction and genetic toxic effects on male gonads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I. P.; Dixon, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The objective of toxicological study of a target organ, such as the testis, is to elucidate the qualitative and quantitative toxic effects of a chemical on that organ. The ultimate objective is to assess the toxic effects of a chemical in laboratory animals and extrapolate the pertinent experimental data to man. To accomplish these objectives, one must consider the main factors which may influence and modulate the toxic effects of chemicals in the organ. In the male gonads, such modifying factors are the pharmacokinetic parameters governing the absorption, distribution, activation and detoxification of indirect carcinogens, covalent bindings to macromolecules, and DNA damage as well as DNA repair of damaged germ cells. All of these factors have been presently studied in our laboratory and are discussed in this paper with the exception of covalent bindings to macromolecules. The pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that the functional blood–testis barrier (BTB) closely resembles the blood-brain barrier in transport characteristics: the permeability of nonelectrolytes and the acidic drugs with pKa values depend upon their molecular size and their partition coefficients, respectively. Thus, the functional BTB, restricts the permeability of many foreign compounds to male germ cells. Studies of mixed function oxidases and cytochrome P-450 system in male gonads demonstrated that the presence of AHH, EH, and GSH-ST implicate activation and detoxification of polycyclic hydrocarbons. Thus, active electrophiles may exert significant toxic effects locally within both interstitial and germ cell compartments. The presence of an efficient DNA repair system in premeiotic spermatogenic cells (and not in spermiogenic cells) can further modify both toxic and mutagenic events in the subsequent differentiation of germ cells to mature spermatozoa. PMID:17539139

  3. Antifibrillatory, cardiovascular and toxic effects of sparteine, butylsparteine and pentylsparteine.

    PubMed

    Zetler, G; Strubelt, O

    1980-01-01

    The negative bathmo- ino and chronotropic effects of sparteine, butylsparteine and pentylsparteine were quantitatively determined in isolated rat atria. The antifibrillatory potency was studied in rats (aconitine arrhythmia), guinea pigs (digoxin arrhythmia) and in cats (spontaneous arrhythmia). In order to appraise the cardiovascular compatibility of these drugs, additional circulatory effects were studied in rats and cats. Acute toxicity following intravenous, intraperitoneal and oral administration was assessed in male and female mice. Pentylsparteine was more potent than sparteine and had a better therapeutic index.

  4. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Paro, Rita; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Buccione, Roberto; Rossi, Gianna; Cellini, Valerio; Canipari, Rita; Cecconi, Sandra

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNA and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant.

  5. Effect of malachite green toxicity on non target soil organisms.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, R; Kanhere, J; Banerjee, J

    2015-02-01

    Although malachite green (MG), is banned in Europe and US for its carcinogenic and teratogenic effect, the dye being cheap, is persistently used in various countries for fish farming, silk, dye, leather and textile industries. Current research, however, fails to elucidate adequate knowledge concerning the effects of MG in our ecosystem. In the present investigation, for the first time, an attempt has been made to study the effects of MG on soil biota by testing Bacillus subtilis, Azotobacter chroococcum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Penicillium roqueforti, Eisenia fetida and seeds of three crop plants of different families. Various tests were conducted for determining cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, acute toxicity, morphological and germination effect. Our data confirmed MG toxicity on fungi and bacteria (gram positive and gram negative organisms) showing elevated level of ROS. Genotoxicity caused in the microorganisms was detected by DNA polymorphism and fragmentation. Also, scanning electron microscopy data suggests that the inhibitory effect of MG to these beneficial microbes in the ecosystem might be due to pore formation in the cell and its eventual disruption. Filter paper and artificial soil test conducted on earthworms demonstrated a LC 50 of 2.6 mg cm(-2) and 1.45 mg kg(-1) respectively with severe morphological damage. However, seed germination of Mung bean, Wheat and Mustard was found to be unaffected in presence of MG up to 100 mL(-1) concentration. Thus, understanding MG toxicity in non target soil organisms and emphasis on its toxicological effects would potentially explicate its role as an environmental contaminant.

  6. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paro, Rita; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Buccione, Roberto; Rossi, Gianna; Cellini, Valerio; Canipari, Rita; Cecconi, Sandra

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNA and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant. Highlights: ► The fungicide mancozeb affects oocyte spindle morphology and fertilization rate. ► We investigated the toxic effects of mancozeb on mouse and human granulosa cells. ► Granulosa cells modify their morphology and expression level of p53. ► Mancozeb induces a premalignant-like status in exposed cells.

  7. Glutathione depletion by valproic acid in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes: Role of biotransformation and temporal relationship with onset of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kiang, Tony K.L.; Teng Xiaowei; Surendradoss, Jayakumar; Karagiozov, Stoyan; Abbott, Frank S.; Chang, Thomas K.H.

    2011-05-01

    The present study was conducted in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes to investigate the chemical basis of glutathione (GSH) depletion by valproic acid (VPA) and evaluate the role of GSH depletion in VPA toxicity. Among the synthetic metabolites of VPA investigated, 4-ene-VPA and (E)-2,4-diene-VPA decreased cellular levels of total GSH, but only (E)-2,4-diene-VPA was more effective and more potent than the parent drug. The in situ generated, cytochrome P450-dependent 4-ene-VPA did not contribute to GSH depletion by VPA, as suggested by the experiment with a cytochrome P450 inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole, to decrease the formation of this metabolite. In support of a role for metabolites, alpha-F-VPA and octanoic acid, which do not undergo biotransformation to form a 2,4-diene metabolite, CoA ester, or glucuronide, did not deplete GSH. A time course experiment showed that GSH depletion did not occur prior to the increase in 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (a marker of oxidative stress), the decrease in [2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] (WST-1) product formation (a marker of cell viability), or the increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release (a marker of necrosis) in VPA-treated hepatocytes. In conclusion, the cytochrome P450-mediated 4-ene-VPA pathway does not play a role in the in situ depletion of GSH by VPA, and GSH depletion is not an initiating event in VPA toxicity in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes.

  8. Toxic effects of polychlorinated biphenyls on cardiac development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Xuejie; Zhu, Jingai; Zhu, Shasha; Hu, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Chun; Guo, Xirong; Yu, Zhangbin; Han, Shuping

    2014-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants that may pose significant health-risks to various organisms including humans. Although the mixed PCB Aroclor 1254 is widespread in the environment, its potential toxic effect on heart development and the mechanism underlying its developmental toxicity have not been previously studied. Here, we used the zebrafish as a toxicogenomic model to examine the effects of Aroclor 1254 on heart development. We found that PCB exposure during zebrafish development induced heart abnormalities including pericardial edema and cardiac looping defects. Further malformations of the zebrafish embryo were observed and death of the larvae occurred in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Our mechanistic studies revealed that abnormalities in the arylhydrocarbon receptor, Wnt and retinoic acid signaling pathways may underlie the effects of PCBs on zebrafish heart development. Interestingly, co-administration of Aroclor 1254 and diethylaminobenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase, partially rescued the toxic effects of PCBs on zebrafish heart development. In conclusion, PCBs can induce developmental defects in the zebrafish heart, which may be mediated by abnormal RA signaling.

  9. Toxic effects of decomposing red algae on littoral organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eklund, Britta; Svensson, Andreas P.; Jonsson, Conny; Malm, Torleif

    2005-03-01

    Large masses of filamentous red algae of the genera Polysiphonia, Rhodomela, and Ceramium are regularly washed up on beaches of the central Baltic Sea. As the algal masses start to decay, red coloured effluents leak into the water, and this tinge may be traced several hundred meters off shore. In this study, possible toxic effects of these effluents were tested on littoral organisms from different trophic levels. Effects on fertilisation, germination and juvenile survival of the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus were investigated, and mortality tests were performed on the crustaceans Artemia salina and Idotea baltica, as well as on larvae and adults of the fish Pomatoschistus microps. Fucus vesiculosus was the most sensitive species of the tested organisms to the red algal extract. The survival of F. vesiculosus recruits was reduced with 50% (LC50) when exposed to a concentration corresponding to 1.7 g l -1 dw red algae. The lethal concentration for I. baltica, A. salina and P. microps were approximately ten times higher. The toxicity to A. salina was reduced if the algal extract was left to decompose during two weeks but the decline in toxicity was not affected by different light or temperature conditions. This study indicates that the filamentous red algae in the central Baltic Sea may produce and release compounds with negative effects on the littoral ecosystem. The effects may be particularly serious for the key species F. vesiculosus, which reproduce in autumn when filamentous red algal blooms are most severe.

  10. Bhopal tragedy's health effects: A review of methyl isocyanate toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, P.S. ); Mehta, A.S. ); Mehta, S.J. ); Makhijani, A.B. )

    1990-12-05

    Six years ago, on December 3, 1984, a toxic gas leak at a Union Carbide pesticide plant in Bhopal, India, released methyl isocyanate (MIC) and its reaction products. The number of persons exposed and injured remains uncertain. Official estimates from the Indian government place the dead at around 1,800. Others estimate mortality to have been between 2,500 and 5,000 and the number of injured to have been up to 200,000. Until the Bhopal incident, neither deaths nor cases of toxic effects from MIC exposure had been recorded in Index Medicus. The authors have extensively surveyed the medical literature concerning effects of MIC exposure on the victims of the disaster and laboratory studies in animals. A great deal has been learned, but many questions still remain unanswered.

  11. Effects of ethanol on methyl mercury toxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Tamashiro, H.; Arakaki, M.; Akagi, H.; Murao, K.; Hirayama, K.; Smolensky, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of different doses of ethanol on the morbidity, mortality, and distribution of mercury in the tissues of groups of rats treated orally once daily with methyl mercury chloride (MMC: 5 mg/kg d) for 10 consecutive days. Ethanol potentiated the toxicity of methyl mercury in terms of neurological manifestations (hindleg crossings and abnormal gait) and mortality. The magnitude of effect depended on the concentration of ethanol administered. The concentration of mercury in the kidney and brain also increased with the dose of ethanol given. These findings indicate that epidemiologic studies designed to evaluate methyl mercury toxicity must take into account the multiple environmental burdens that can affect the population cumulatively and simultaneously.

  12. Estimating the effects of toxicants on ecosystem services.

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, J; Niederlehner, B R

    1994-01-01

    Numerous functions of ecosystems are essential to the quality of human life, including the provision of food, the decomposition of sewage, the provision of portable water, and the replacement of breathable air. Although attributes of ecosystems directly of use to human societies are not the only ones worth protecting, emphasizing their services may be the most effective means of communicating risks of toxicants to the general public. However, although spatial and temporal scales of experiments to assess risk vary relatively little, actual spatial scales vary considerably, from local environments to global ecosystems. Generally, models are used to bridge these gaps in scale. In this paper, we examine ways in which toxicity test endpoints have been developed to describe effects of pollutants on essential ecosystem functions and the ways in which results are then extrapolated to scales that risk managers can use. Images p936-a PMID:9738207

  13. Effects of toxic substances on zooplankton populations: a Great Lakes perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.S.; McNaught, D.

    1988-01-01

    The chapter discusses how toxic substances can affect zooplankton, both at the species and community level, modifying factors affecting toxicity, the effects of various environmental pertubations, including toxic substances, on Great Lakes zooplankton, and the role of zooplankton in the transport, persistence, and biomagnification of toxic substances.

  14. Effects-Directed Analysis (EDA) and Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE): Complementary but Different Approaches for Diagnosing Causes of Environmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, two approaches are available for performing environmental diagnostics on samples like municipal and industrial effluents, interstitial waters and whole sediments in order to identify anthropogenic contaminants causing toxicological effects. One approach is Toxicity Id...

  15. Toxic effects of Karenia mikimotoi extracts on mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Yan, Tian; Yu, Rencheng; Zhou, Mingjiang

    2011-07-01

    Karenia is one of the most harmful and representative red tide genus in a temperate zone. Blooms caused by this genus have resulted in massive fish death in the South China Sea and the East China Sea. However, the potential effects of this dinoflagellate on human health through the transfer of toxins via marine food webs, and the mechanisms of toxicity, are still unknown. Therefore, we examined the toxic effects of a strain of K. mikimotoi (isolated from the South China Sea) on the proliferation and morphology of four mammalian cell lines (two normal cell lines and two cancer cell lines). In addition, we carried out a preliminary investigation on the mechanism of toxicity of the alga. The results show that the polar lipid-soluble component of K. mikimotoi significantly inhibited proliferation of the four cell lines, and resulted in the cells becoming spherical, swollen and damaged. The result of Annexin V and PI double-staining confirmed that cell membranes were disrupted. The malonaldehyde (MDA) contents in the medium of the four cell lines treated with the polar-lipid extracts all increased significantly, which indicates that the polar-lipid toxins produced by K. mikimotoi could adversely affect mammalian cells by inducing lipid peroxidation. We conclude that K. mikimotoi is a potential threat to human health, and the comprehensive effect of this dinoflagellate and its mechanisms should be investigated further.

  16. Toxic effects of imidacloprid on adult loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus).

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaohua; Xia, Xiaopei; Huo, Weiran; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Linxia; Chang, Zhongjie

    2016-07-01

    The present investigation was aimed to assess the effects of imidacloprid on the survival, genetic materials, hepatic transaminase activity and histopathology of loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus). The values of LC50 (24, 48, 72 and 96h) of imidacloprid were 167.7, 158.6, 147.9 and 145.8mg/L, respectively, and the safety concentration was 42.55mg/L. The erythrocyte micronuclei assays and the comet assay results showed that imidacloprid had genetic toxic effect on the loach erythrocytes. To assess the physiological and biochemical damage caused by imidacloprid, the activities of hepatic glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) were measured and their values declined in treatment groups. Histological examination of testis revealed that imidacloprid treatment resulted in disorganized lobules and cysts structures. In the present work, we also investigated the joint toxicity of pesticides commonly used in paddy fields (imidacloprid and lambda-cyhalothrin) on M. anguillicaudatus, and confirmed that a synergistic effect existing in the binary mixtures. The results of our study provide relevant and comparable toxicity information that are useful for safety application of pesticides.

  17. Toxicity of ivermectin on cladocerans: comparison of toxic effects on Daphnia and Ceriodaphnia species.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Christelle; Charles, Sandrine; Vollat, Bernard; Garric, Jeanne

    2009-10-01

    Interspecies differences in contaminant sensitivity are measured to assess environmental risk based on species sensitivity distribution. The present study was intended to demonstrate the importance of studying the effects of contaminants on the life-history traits of various species. To do this, we compared the effects of ivermectin on the survival, growth, and reproduction of two cladoceran species (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia) and two strains of D. magna (one Japanese and one European). Ivermectin is widely used against endo- and ectoparasites in livestock and pets and is known for its high toxicity. Local aquatic ecosystems can be contaminated due to direct excretion into surface waters, but few data are available about the chronic effects of ivermectin on aquatic organisms. Adult daphnids were exposed to concentrations from 0 to 1 ng/L. Our results show a significant effect on all the life-history traits measured and reveal inter- and intraspecies differences. The no-observed-effect concentration found for growth and reproduction is 0.0003 ng/L for D. magna versus 0.001 ng/L for C. dubia, and the lowest-observed-effect concentration is 0.001 ng/L for D. magna versus 0.01 ng/L for C. dubia. C. dubia is smaller than D. magna and appeared to be less sensitive to ivermectin. The European strain of D. magna exhibited less resistance than the Japanese strain. A bias in the sex ratio was observed for all strains tested.

  18. Aquatic toxicity of PAHs and PAH mixtures at saturation to benthic amphipods: linking toxic effects to chemical activity.

    PubMed

    Engraff, Maria; Solere, Clémentine; Smith, Kilian E C; Mayer, Philipp; Dahllöf, Ingela

    2011-04-01

    Organisms in marine sediments are usually exposed to mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), whereas risk assessment and management typically focus on the effects of single PAHs. This can lead to an underestimation of risk if the effects of single compounds are additive or synergistic. Because of the virtually infinite number of mixture-combinations, and the many different targeted organisms, it would be advantageous to have a model for the assessment of mixture effects. In this study we tested whether chemical activity, which drives the partitioning of PAHs into organisms, can be used to model the baseline toxicity of mixtures. Experiments were performed with two benthic amphipod species (Orchomonella pinguis and Corophium volutator), using passive dosing to control the external exposure of single PAHs and mixtures of three and four PAHs. The baseline toxicity of individual PAHs at water saturation generally increased with increasing chemical activity of the PAHs. For O. pinguis, the baseline toxicity of PAH mixtures was successfully described by the sum of chemical activities. Some compounds and mixtures showed a delayed expression of toxicity, highlighting the need to adjust the length of the experiment depending on the organism. On the other hand, some of the single compounds had a higher toxicity than expected, possibly due to the toxicity of PAH metabolites. We suggest that chemical activity of mixtures can, and should, be used in addition to toxicity data for single compounds in environmental risk assessment.

  19. Toxic effects of selenium and copper on the planarian, Dugesia dorotocephala

    SciTech Connect

    Rauscher, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Aquatic toxicologists have become increasingly concerned with the effects of sublethal concentrations of toxicants on aquatic organisms. Sublethal effects of toxicants on freshwater invertebrates were reviewed. Selenium (Se) and copper (Cu) are both essential trace elements and toxicants. Se has been reported to alter the toxicity of heavy metals. Planarians, Dugesia dorotocephala, were used as test animals. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) acute toxicity of Se on planarians and the effect of the number of planarians per test chamber, (2) interaction of the acute toxicity of Se and Cu on planarians, and (3) sublethal effects of Se and Cu on planarians.

  20. In vitro toxic effects of different types of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliullin, T. O.; Fatkhutdinova, L. M.; Zalyalov, R. R.; Kisin, E. R.; Murray, A. R.; Shvedova, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    We have carried out a comparative assessment of industrial single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs / MWCNTs) toxic effects in the cultures of macrophages (RAW 264.7) and bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were measured directly in the medium. Intracellular reduced glutathione levels (GSH) were determined in culture lysates. Cell viability was determined by fluorescence method. RAW 264.7 were much more sensitive to the effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs): MWCNT addition was not accompanied by a significant reduction in the viability of macrophages, but caused damage to cell membranes (release of LDH) with a dose and time-dependent oxidative stress. SWCNTs caused a significant decrease in viability and induction of oxidative stress. Improved darkfield microscopy revealed adsorption and accumulation of MWCNTs on the surface and inside the macrophages. Adding SWCNTs to BEAS-2B culture caused small statistically significant dose-and time-dependent decrease in viability and pronounced reduction in glutathione only at the highest concentration of nanoparticles. Bronchial epithelial cells BEAS- 2B appeared to be much less susceptible to MWCNTs. The findings suggest that there are differences in the toxic action of different CNTs and there is a need for thoughtful approach to the assessment of nanomaterials toxicity.

  1. Toxic effect of terbium ion on horseradish cell.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Na; Wang, Lihong; Lu, Tianhong; Huang, Xiaohua

    2011-12-01

    The toxic effect of terbium (III) ion on the horseradish cell was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, gas chromatography, and standard biochemical methods. It was found that the activity of horseradish peroxidase in the horseradish treated with 0.2 mM terbium (III) ion decreased and led to the excessive accumulation of free radicals compared with that in the control horseradish. The excessive free radicals could oxidize unsaturated fatty acids in the horseradish cell and then increase the cell membrane lipid peroxidation of horseradish. The increase in the lipid peroxidation could lead to the destruction of the structure and function of the cell membrane and then damage of the horseradish cell. We propose that this is a possible mechanism for the toxic action of terbium in the biological systems.

  2. Effect of hardness on acute toxicity of metal mixtures using Daphnia magna: prediction of acid mine drainage toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yim, Jin Hee; Kim, Kyoung W; Kim, Sang D

    2006-11-02

    In this study, the effect of hardness on the combined outcome of metal mixtures was investigated using Daphnia magna. The toxic unit (TU) was calculated using modified LC(50) values based on the hardness (i.e., LC(50-soft) and LC(50-hard)). From a bioassay test, the degree of sensitivity to hardness on the toxicity changes was in the order: Cdtoxicity tests, the difference in the test solution hardness was found to clearly cause different toxicities, as determined by the TU calculated by the LC(50-hard), using the toxicity of a standard culture medium as the reference. That is, approximately four to five times higher toxicity was observed in soft (i.e., 44+/-4 mg/L as CaCO(3)) rather than hard water (i.e., 150+/-10mg/L as CaCO(3)) test solutions. In the tests where the modified reference toxicity values (i.e., LC(50-soft) and LC(50-hard) for soft and hard test solution, respectively) obtained from the individual metal toxicity tests with different hardness were used to calculate the TU, the results showed very similar D. magna toxicities to those of the TU from the mixture of soft and hard test solutions, regardless of the hardness. According to the toxicity results of the mixture, the aquatic toxic effects of the acid mine drainage (AMD) collected from mine areas that contained metal mixtures were investigated using Daphnia magna and the modified LC(50) value of the TU hardness function calculated for varying solution hardness. The results of the biological WET test closely matched our overall prediction, with significant correlation, having a p-value of 0.513 in one way ANOVA test (n=19). Therefore, this study revealed that the predicted toxicity of the metal mixture agreed well with the biological toxicity test when the modified LC(50) value was employed as the basis of hardness in the TU calculation.

  3. Mechanistically Probing Lipid-siRNA Nanoparticle-associated Toxicities Identifies Jak Inhibitors Effective in Mitigating Multifaceted Toxic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weikang; Mao, Xianzhi; Davide, Joseph P; Ng, Bruce; Cai, Mingmei; Burke, Paul A; Sachs, Alan B; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura

    2011-01-01

    A major hurdle for harnessing small interfering RNA (siRNA) for therapeutic application is an effective and safe delivery of siRNA to target tissues and cells via systemic administration. While lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) composed of a cationic lipid, poly-(ethylene glycol) lipid and cholesterol, are effective in delivering siRNA to hepatocytes via systemic administration, they may induce multi-faceted toxicities in a dose-dependent manner, independently of target silencing. To understand the underlying mechanism of toxicities, pharmacological probes including anti-inflammation drugs and specific inhibitors blocking different pathways of innate immunity were evaluated for their abilities to mitigate LNP-siRNA-induced toxicities in rodents. Three categories of rescue effects were observed: (i) pretreatment with a Janus kinase (Jak) inhibitor or dexamethasone abrogated LNP-siRNA-mediated lethality and toxicities including cytokine induction, organ impairments, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy without affecting siRNA-mediated gene silencing; (ii) inhibitors of PI3K, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p38 and IκB kinase (IKK)1/2 exhibited a partial alleviative effect; (iii) FK506 and etoricoxib displayed no protection. Furthermore, knockout of Jak3, tumor necrosis factor receptors (Tnfr)p55/p75, interleukin 6 (IL-6) or interferon (IFN)-γ alone was insufficient to alleviate LNP-siRNA-associated toxicities in mice. These indicate that activation of innate immune response is a primary trigger of systemic toxicities and that multiple innate immune pathways and cytokines can mediate toxic responses. Jak inhibitors are effective in mitigating LNP-siRNA-induced toxicities. PMID:21179008

  4. Mechanistically probing lipid-siRNA nanoparticle-associated toxicities identifies Jak inhibitors effective in mitigating multifaceted toxic responses.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weikang; Mao, Xianzhi; Davide, Joseph P; Ng, Bruce; Cai, Mingmei; Burke, Paul A; Sachs, Alan B; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura

    2011-03-01

    A major hurdle for harnessing small interfering RNA (siRNA) for therapeutic application is an effective and safe delivery of siRNA to target tissues and cells via systemic administration. While lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) composed of a cationic lipid, poly-(ethylene glycol) lipid and cholesterol, are effective in delivering siRNA to hepatocytes via systemic administration, they may induce multi-faceted toxicities in a dose-dependent manner, independently of target silencing. To understand the underlying mechanism of toxicities, pharmacological probes including anti-inflammation drugs and specific inhibitors blocking different pathways of innate immunity were evaluated for their abilities to mitigate LNP-siRNA-induced toxicities in rodents. Three categories of rescue effects were observed: (i) pretreatment with a Janus kinase (Jak) inhibitor or dexamethasone abrogated LNP-siRNA-mediated lethality and toxicities including cytokine induction, organ impairments, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy without affecting siRNA-mediated gene silencing; (ii) inhibitors of PI3K, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p38 and IκB kinase (IKK)1/2 exhibited a partial alleviative effect; (iii) FK506 and etoricoxib displayed no protection. Furthermore, knockout of Jak3, tumor necrosis factor receptors (Tnfr)p55/p75, interleukin 6 (IL-6) or interferon (IFN)-γ alone was insufficient to alleviate LNP-siRNA-associated toxicities in mice. These indicate that activation of innate immune response is a primary trigger of systemic toxicities and that multiple innate immune pathways and cytokines can mediate toxic responses. Jak inhibitors are effective in mitigating LNP-siRNA-induced toxicities.

  5. Oxidation of tolualdehydes to toluic acids catalyzed by cytochrome P450-dependent aldehyde oxygenase in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Matsunaga, T; Yamamoto, I; Yashimura, H

    1995-02-01

    Mouse hepatic microsomal enzymes catalyzed the oxidation of o-, m-, and p-tolualdehydes, intermediate metabolites of xylene, to the corresponding toluic acids. Cofactor requirement for the catalytic activity indicates that the microsomes contain NAD- and NADPH-dependent enzymes for this reaction. GC/MS analyses of the carboxylic acids formed by incubation under oxygen-18 gas indicate that the mechanism for this oxidation is an oxygenation and a dehydrogenation for the NADPH- and NAD-dependent reaction. Vmax/Km (nmol/min/mg protein) ratios indicate that the NADPH-dependent activity is more pronounced than the NAD-dependent activity. These results suggest that the NADPH-dependent reaction is mainly responsible for the microsomal oxidation of tolualdehydes. The NADPH-dependent activity was significantly inhibited by SKF 525-A, disulfiram and menadione, inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (P450), suggesting the involvement of P450 in the reaction. In a reconstituted system, P450 MUT-2 (CYP2C29) purified from mouse hepatic microsomes catalyzed the oxidation of o-, m-, and p-tolualdehydes to the carboxylic acids, and the specific activities (nmol/min/nmol P450) were 1.44, 2.81, and 2.32, respectively. Rabbit antibody raised against P450 MUT-2 significantly inhibited the NADPH-dependent oxidation of tolualdehydes to toluic acids by 88% (o-), 63% (m-), and 62% (p-) using mouse hepatic microsomes. The present study demonstrated that a mouse hepatic microsomal aldehyde oxygenase, P450 MUT-2, catalyzed the most of oxidative activity of tolualdehydes to toluic acids in the microsomes.

  6. Cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of midazolam in hepatic microsomes from chickens, turkeys, pheasant and bobwhite quail.

    PubMed

    Cortright, K A; Craigmill, A L

    2006-12-01

    In vitro putative cytochrome P450 3A mediated activity, and inhibition thereof, were measured in four avian species using midazolam (MDZ) as a substrate and ketoconazole as an inhibitor. All species produced 1-hydroxymidazolam (1-OH MDZ) to a much greater extent than 4-hydroxymidazolam (4-OH MDZ). Calculated Vmaxapparent values for formation of 1-OH MDZ were 117+/-17, 239+/-108, 437+/-168, and 201+/-55 pmol/mg protein*min and Kmapparent values were 2.1+/-0.8, 2.4+/-1.6, 6.7+/-5.1 and 3.2+/-2.1 microm for chicken, turkey, pheasant and bobwhite quail, respectively. For the formation of 4-OH MDZ the Vmaxapparent values were 21+/-10, 94+/-46, 144+/-112, and 68+/-30 pmol/mg protein*min and Kmapparent values for 4-OH MDZ formation were 12.4+/-10.1, 18.0+/-10.8, 38.6+/-34.7 and 29.1+/-10.1 microm for chicken, turkey, pheasant and bobwhite quail, respectively. In all four species, ketoconazole inhibited the production of both major metabolites of MDZ, with 4-OH MDZ formation more sensitive to inhibition than 1-OH MDZ. Pheasant and bobwhite quail appeared most sensitive to ketoconazole inhibition.

  7. Effect of solcoseryl on antitumour action and acute toxicity of some antineoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Danysz, A; Sołtysiak-Pawluczuk, D; Czyzewska-Szafran, H; Jedrych, A; Jastrzebski, Z

    1991-01-01

    The in vivo effect of Solcoseryl on the antitumour activity and acute toxicity of some antineoplastic drugs was examined. It was found that Solcoseryl does not inhibit the antineoplastic effectiveness of the drugs against transplantable P 388 leukaemia in mice. Studies of the effect of Solcoseryl on acute toxicity of selected antineoplastic drugs in mice revealed that the biostimulator could exert a modifying influence. The prior administration of Solcoseryl significantly decreases the acute toxicity of methotrexate but has no effect on acute toxicity of 5-fluorouracil, increases the acute toxicity of bleomycin and vinblastine and has no effect on acute toxicity of methotrexate and mitoxantron. On the other hand, Solcoseryl administered simultaneously with the antineoplastic drugs increases acute toxicity of 5-fluorouracil, bleomycin and mitoxantron. The protective effect of the biostimulator noted exclusively against acute toxicity of 5-fluorouracil was also observed after multiple administration of this anticancer drug.

  8. Toxic effects of gold nanoparticles on Salmonella typhimurium bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuguang; Lawson, Rasheeda; Ray, Paresh C; Yu, Hongtao

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer-sized gold, due to its beautiful and bountiful color and unique optical properties, is a versatile material for many industrial and societal applications. We have studied the effect of gold nanoparticles on Salmonella typhimurium strain TA 102. The gold nanoparticles in solution prepared using the citrate reduction method is found not to be toxic or mutagenic but photomutagenic to the bacteria; however, careful control experiments indicate that the photomutagenicity is due to the co-existing citrate and Au3+ ions, not due to the gold nanoparticle itself. Au3+ is also found to be photomutagenic to the bacteria at concentrations lower than 1 µM, but toxic at higher concentrations. The toxicity of Au3+ is enhanced by light irradiation. The photomutagenicity of both citrate and Au3+ is likely due to the formation of free radicals, as a result of light-induced citrate decarboxylation or Au3+ oxidation of co-existing molecules. Both processes can generate free radicals that may cause DNA damage and mutation. Studies of the interaction of gold nanoparticles with the bacteria indicate that gold nanoparticles can be absorbed onto the bacteria surface but not able to penetrate the bacteria wall to enter the bacteria. PMID:21415096

  9. Biochemical basis for the toxic effects of triethyl lead

    PubMed Central

    Galzigna, L.; Ferraro, M. V.; Manani, G.; Viola, A.

    1973-01-01

    Galzigna, L., Ferraro, M. V., Manani, G., and Viola, A. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 129-133. Biochemical basis for the toxic effects of triethyl lead. The effects of triethyl lead (PbEt3) have been studied in vitro on the cholinesterase activity of rat diaphragm and in vivo on serum cholinesterase in the dog. PbEt3 dramatically increases the duration of succinylcholine-induced myoneural block and pyridine-2-aldoxime methiodide (PAM) is able to counteract both cholinesterase inhibition and the effects on neuromuscular transmission. On the other hand, PbEt3 catalyses the rearrangement of catecholamines to aminochromes in vitro and inhibits catecholamine effect on smooth muscle contraction. The toxicity of PbEt3 and particularly its action on the central nervous system can be explained by a combination of effects which might result from an upset of cholinergic and adrenergic central pathways due to the formation of endogenous psychotogenic complexes. Images PMID:4349924

  10. Immunomodulatory effects of metal salts at sub-toxic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, Carmen; Diegel, Christoph; Garcia-Käufer, Manuel; Gründemann, Carsten; Huber, Roman

    2016-10-07

    Because different metals are used in complementary medicine for the treatment of diseases related to a dysfunction of the immune system, this study aimed at determining the immunomodulatory potential of Pb(NO3 )2 , AuCl3 , Cu(NO3 )2 , HgCl2 , AgNO3 , SnCl2 , AsCl3 and SbCl3 at sub-toxic concentrations and at assessing possible toxic side effects of low-concentrated metal preparations. The influence of the metal salts on primary human mononuclear cells was analyzed by measuring cell viability using the water-soluble tetrazolium salt assay, apoptosis and necrosis induction by annexin V/propidium iodide staining and proliferation by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester staining and flow cytometry. Effects on T-cell activation were assessed with CD69 and CD25 expression using flow cytometry whereas CD83, CD86 and CD14 expression was measured to evaluate the influence on dendritic cell maturation. Alterations of interleukin-2 and interferon-γ secretion were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and genotoxic effects were analyzed using the comet assay. At sub-toxic concentrations retardation of T-cell proliferation was caused by Pb(NO3 )2 , AuCl3 and Cu(NO3 )2 and inhibitory effects on interleukin-2 secretion were measured after incubation with Pb(NO3 )2 , AuCl3 , Cu(NO3 )2 , HgCl2 and AsCl3. Cu(NO3 )2 had immunosuppressive activity at dosages within the serum reference range for copper. All other metal salts showed effects at dosages above upper serum limits of normal. Therefore, only low-concentrated copper preparations are promising to have immunomodulatory potential. Toxic side effects of metal preparations used in complementary medicine are improbable because upper limits of metals set in the drinking water ordinance are either not exceeded or the duration of their application is limited. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Protective effects of hydrogen sulfide anions against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Isao; Kamata, Shotaro; Hagiya, Yoshifumi; Abiko, Yumi; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2015-12-01

    The key mechanism for hepatotoxicity resulting from acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is cytochrome P450-dependent formation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), a potent electrophilic metabolite that forms protein adducts. The fundamental roles of glutathione in the effective conjugation/clearance of NAPQI have been established, giving a molecular basis for the clinical use of N-acetylcysteine as a sole antidote. Recent evidence from in vitro experiments suggested that sulfide anions (S(2-)) to yield hydrogen sulfide anions (HS(-)) under physiological pH could effectively react with NAPQI. This study evaluated the protective roles of HS(-) against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. We utilized cystathionine γ-lyase-deficient (Cth(-/-)) mice that are highly sensitive to acetaminophen toxicity. Intraperitoneal injection of acetaminophen (150 mg/kg) into Cth(-/-) mice resulted in highly elevated levels of serum alanine/aspartate aminotransferases and lactate dehydrogenase associated with marked increases in oncotic hepatocytes; all of which were significantly inhibited by intraperitoneal preadministration of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). NaHS preadministration significantly suppressed APAP-induced serum malondialdehyde level increases without abrogating APAP-induced rapid depletion of hepatic glutathione. These results suggest that exogenous HS(-) protects hepatocytes by directly scavenging reactive NAPQI rather than by increasing cystine uptake and thereby elevating intracellular glutathione levels, which provides a novel therapeutic approach against acute APAP poisoning.

  12. Fish embryo toxicity test: identification of compounds with weak toxicity and analysis of behavioral effects to improve prediction of acute toxicity for neurotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Nils; König, Maria; Ortmann, Julia; Massei, Riccardo; Paschke, Albrecht; Kühne, Ralph; Scholz, Stefan

    2015-06-02

    The fish embryo toxicity test has been proposed as an alternative for the acute fish toxicity test, but concerns have been raised for its predictivity given that a few compounds have been shown to exhibit a weak acute toxicity in the fish embryo. In order to better define the applicability domain and improve the predictive capacity of the fish embryo test, we performed a systematic analysis of existing fish embryo and acute fish toxicity data. A correlation analysis of a total of 153 compounds identified 28 compounds with a weaker or no toxicity in the fish embryo test. Eleven of these compounds exhibited a neurotoxic mode of action. We selected a subset of eight compounds with weaker or no embryo toxicity (cyanazine, picloram, aldicarb, azinphos-methyl, dieldrin, diquat dibromide, endosulfan, and esfenvalerate) to study toxicokinetics and a neurotoxic mode of action as potential reasons for the deviating fish embryo toxicity. Published fish embryo LC50 values were confirmed by experimental analysis of zebrafish embryo LC50 according to OECD guideline 236. Except for diquat dibromide, internal concentration analysis did not indicate a potential relation of the low sensitivity of fish embryos to a limited uptake of the compounds. Analysis of locomotor activity of diquat dibromide and the neurotoxic compounds in 98 hpf embryos (exposed for 96 h) indicated a specific effect on behavior (embryonic movement) for the neurotoxic compounds. The EC50s of behavior for neurotoxic compounds were close to the acute fish toxicity LC50. Our data provided the first evidence that the applicability domain of the fish embryo test (LC50s determination) may exclude neurotoxic compounds. However, neurotoxic compounds could be identified by changes in embryonic locomotion. Although a quantitative prediction of acute fish toxicity LC50 using behavioral assays in fish embryos may not yet be possible, the identification of neurotoxicity could trigger the conduction of a conventional fish

  13. Toxic Effects of Silica Nanoparticles on Zebrafish Embryos and Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Huiqin; Tian, Linwei; Guo, Caixia; Huang, Peili; Zhou, Xianqing; Peng, Shuangqing; Sun, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been widely used in biomedical and biotechnological applications. Environmental exposure to nanomaterials is inevitable as they become part of our daily life. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the possible toxic effects of SiNPs exposure. In this study, zebrafish embryos were treated with SiNPs (25, 50, 100, 200 µg/mL) during 4–96 hours post fertilization (hpf). Mortality, hatching rate, malformation and whole-embryo cellular death were detected. We also measured the larval behavior to analyze whether SiNPs had adverse effects on larvae locomotor activity. The results showed that as the exposure dosages increasing, the hatching rate of zebrafish embryos was decreased while the mortality and cell death were increased. Exposure to SiNPs caused embryonic malformations, including pericardial edema, yolk sac edema, tail and head malformation. The larval behavior testing showed that the total swimming distance was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The lower dose (25 and 50 µg/mL SiNPs) produced substantial hyperactivity while the higher doses (100 and 200 µg/mL SiNPs) elicited remarkably hypoactivity in dark periods. In summary, our data indicated that SiNPs caused embryonic developmental toxicity, resulted in persistent effects on larval behavior. PMID:24058598

  14. Toxicity effect of silver nanoparticles in brine shrimp Artemia.

    PubMed

    Arulvasu, Chinnasamy; Jennifer, Samou Michael; Prabhu, Durai; Chandhirasekar, Devakumar

    2014-01-01

    The present study revealed the toxic effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in Artemia nauplii and evaluated the mortality rate, hatching percentage, and genotoxic effect in Artemia nauplii/cysts. The AgNPs were commercially purchased and characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Nanoparticles were spherical in nature and with size range of 30-40 nm. Artemia cysts were collected from salt pan, processed, and hatched in sea water. Artemia nauplii (II instar) were treated using silver nanoparticles of various nanomolar concentrations and LC50 value (10 nM) and mortality rate (24 and 48 hours) was evaluated. Hatching percentage of decapsulated cysts treated with AgNPs was examined. Aggregation of AgNPs in the gut region of nauplii was studied using phase contrast microscope and apoptotic cells in nauplii stained with acridine orange were observed using fluorescence microscope. DNA damage of single cell of nauplii was determined by comet assay. This study showed that as the concentration of AgNPs increased, the mortality rate, aggregation in gut region, apoptotic cells, and DNA damage increased in nauplii, whereas the percentage of hatching in Artemia cysts decreased. Thus this study revealed that the nanomolar concentrations of AgNPs have toxic effect on both Artemia nauplii and cysts.

  15. Preventive effect of selenium on T-2 toxin membrane toxicity.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, S A; Memarbashi, A; Balali, M

    2001-01-01

    T-2 toxin, one of the major toxic trichothecene mycotoxines, has been shown to cause effects such as inhibition of protein synthesis and impairement of mitochondrial function. The use of T-2 toxin as chemical warfare in south east Asia and Iran has been reported . It has been suggested that T-2 toxin may mediate its toxic effect via the cell membrane, but mechanism of action is poorly understood. In cytotoxicity studies, erythrocytes are an excellent model system. In the present study different doses of sodium selenite were injected into male albino mice for 6 days every 48 h. Blood samples were taken from experimental and control groups (normal saline). The red cells were counted in isotonic phosphate buffer containing different doses of T-2 toxin. The mixture was incubated at 37 degrees C for 4 h. The results indicate that selenium is able to prevent erythrocyte membrane damage induced by T-2 toxin. The protective effect of selenium may be due to its membrane stabilizing properties, although inhibition of lipid peroxidation is likely, too.

  16. Physiological effects of toxic substances on wildlife species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haseltine, S.D.; Kacmar, Peter; Legath, J.

    1983-01-01

    Study of the physiological effects of contaminants on wildlife species has expanded as more sophisticated medical techniques are adapted to wildlife and as the mode of action of new classes of pesticides increase the number of organ systems which may be sublethally or lethally impacted. This paper summarizes some of the latest data published on toxicant affects on organ systems of warm-blooded vertebrates. Reporting on effects with enzyme systems concentrates on cholinesterase in blood and plasma after sublethal and lethal exposure to organophosphate end carbamate pesticides, but also covers, recent work with Na+, k+-ATPases, AST, AAT, and AL.AD. A discussion of recent work on hormones, biogenlc amines, and other compounds which indicate alteration of specific organ systems, is followed by examples of histopathological lesions associated both pathognomically and non-specifically with widely-used and/or severely toxic contaminants. All these specific effects and lesions are then discussed in terms of their potential for use diagnostically in field problems and their practical and possible impact on wildlife populations.

  17. Contaminated marine sediments: Water column and interstitial toxic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, R.M.; Schweitzer, K.A.; McKinney, R.A.; Phelps, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    The toxicity that contaminated sediments may introduce into the water column has not been measured extensively. In order to quantify this potential toxicity, the seawater overlying two uncontaminated and three contaminated marine sediments was evaluated in the laboratory with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata fertilization test. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and copper, as representative contaminants, were also measured. To characterize sources of toxicity, samples were chemically manipulated using reversed-phase chromatography, cation exchange, and chelation. Water column toxicity and contaminant concentrations were higher in the suspended exposures than in bedded exposures. Interstitial water toxicity and contaminant concentrations were generally greater than either bedded or suspended exposures. Chemical manipulation indicated that the observed toxicity in water column exposures was probably caused by metallic and/or nonionic organic contaminants. Conversely, manipulation of interstitial waters did not result in significantly reduced toxicity, suggesting that other toxicants such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide may be active.

  18. Contaminated marine sediments: Water column and interstitial toxic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, R.M.; McKinney, R.A. ); Schweitzer, K.A. ); Phelps, D.K. )

    1993-01-01

    The toxicity that contaminated sediments may introduce into the water column has not been measured extensively. In order to quantify this potential toxicity, the seawater overlying two uncontaminated and three contaminated marine sediments was evaluated in the laboratory with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata fertilization test. Concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and copper, as representative contaminants, were also measured. To characterize sources of toxicity, samples were chemically manipulated using reversed-phase chromatography, cation exchange, and chelation. Water column toxicity and contaminant concentrations were higher in the suspended exposures than in bedded exposures. Interstitial water toxicity and contaminant concentrations were generally greater than either bedded or suspended exposures. Chemical manipulation indicated that the observed toxicity in water column exposures was probably caused by metallic and/or nonionic organic contaminants. Conversely, manipulation of interstitial water did not result in significantly reduced toxicity, suggesting that other toxicants such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide may be active.

  19. Thymoquinone therapy abrogates toxic effect of cadmium on rat testes.

    PubMed

    Fouad, A A; Jresat, I

    2015-05-01

    The protective effect of thymoquinone was investigated against cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in rats. Testicular toxicity was induced by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cadmium chloride (2 mg kg(-1) ). Thymoquinone treatment (10 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) , i.p.) was applied for five consecutive days, starting 3 days before cadmium administration. Thymoquinone significantly attenuated the cadmium-induced decreases in serum testosterone, and testicular reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity and significantly decreased the elevations of testicular malondialdehyde, nitric oxide and cadmium ion levels resulted from cadmium chloride administration. Also, thymoquinone ameliorated the cadmium-induced testicular tissue injury observed by histopathological examination. In addition, thymoquinone significantly decreased the cadmium-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumour necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor-κB and caspase-3 in testicular tissue. It was concluded that thymoquinone, through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, may represent a potential candidate to protect the testes against the detrimental effect of cadmium exposure.

  20. Selenium toxicity: cause and effects in aquatic birds.

    PubMed

    Spallholz, Julian E; Hoffman, David J

    2002-04-01

    There are several manners in which selenium may express its toxicity: (1) an important mechanism appears to involve the formation of CH(3)Se(minus sign) which either enters a redox cycle and generates superoxide and oxidative stress, or forms free radicals that bind to and inhibit important enzymes and proteins. (2) Excess selenium as selenocysteine results in inhibition of selenium methylation metabolism. As a consequence, concentrations of hydrogen selenide, an intermediate metabolite, accumulate in animals and are hepatotoxic, possibly causing other selenium-related adverse effects. (3) It is also possible that the presence of excess selenium analogs of sulfur-containing enzymes and structural proteins play a role in avian teratogenesis. L-selenomethionine is the most likely major dietary form of selenium encountered by aquatic birds, with lesser amounts of L-selenocysteine ingested from aquatic animal foods. The literature is suggestive that L-selenomethionine is not any more toxic to adult birds than other animals. L-Selenomethionine accumulates in tissue protein of adult birds and in the protein of egg white as would be expected to occur in animals. There is no suggestion from the literature that the levels of L-selenomethionine that would be expected to accumulate in eggs in the absence of environmental concentration of selenium pose harm to the developing embryo. For several species of aquatic birds, levels of Se as selenomethionine in the egg above 3 ppm on a wet weight basis result in reduced hatchability and deformed embryos. The toxicity of L-selenomethionine injected directly into eggs is greater than that found from the entry of L-selenomethionine into the egg from the normal adult diet. This suggests that there is unusual if not abnormal metabolism of L-selenomethionine in the embryo not seen when L-selenomethionine is present in egg white protein where it likely serves as a source of selenium for glutathione peroxidase synthesis in the developing

  1. Selenium toxicity: cause and effects in aquatic birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spallholz, J.E.; Hoffman, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    There are several manners in which selenium may express its toxicity: (1) an important mechanism appears to involve the formation of CH3Se- which either enters a redox cycle and generates superoxide and oxidative stress, or forms free radicals that bind to and inhibit important enzymes and proteins. (2) Excess selenium as selenocysteine results in inhibition of selenium methylation metabolism. As a consequence, concentrations of hydrogen selenide, an intermediate metabolite, accumulate in animals and are hepatotoxic, possibly causing other selenium-related adverse effects. (3) It is also possible that the presence of excess selenium analogs of sulfur-containing enzymes and structural proteins play a role in avian teratogenesis. l-selenomethionine is the most likely major dietary form of selenium encountered by aquatic birds, with lesser amounts of l-selenocysteine ingested from aquatic animal foods. The literature is suggestive that l-selenomethionine is not any more toxic to adult birds than other animals. l-Selenomethionine accumulates in tissue protein of adult birds and in the protein of egg white as would be expected to occur in animals. There is no suggestion from the literature that the levels of l-selenomethionine that would be expected to accumulate in eggs in the absence of environmental concentration of selenium pose harm to the developing embryo. For several species of aquatic birds, levels of Se as selenomethionine in the egg above 3 ppm on a wet weight basis result in reduced hatchability and deformed embryos. The toxicity of l-selenomethionine injected directly into eggs is greater than that found from the entry of l-selenomethionine into the egg from the normal adult diet. This suggests that there is unusual if not abnormal metabolism of l-selenomethionine in the embryo not seen when l-selenomethionine is present in egg white protein where it likely serves as a source of selenium for glutathione peroxidase synthesis in the developing aquatic chick.

  2. Effect of hypoxia on sodium and ammonium acetate toxicity for Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Podosynovickova, N P; Schaefer, T V; Rejniuk, V L; Ivnitsky, Ju Ju

    2010-11-01

    Exposure of Daphnia in degassed (boiled) culturing water (hypoxia simulation) led to solitary lethal outcomes after more than 24 h. Before this term, hypoxia had no appreciable effect on the toxicity of sodium or ammonium acetate salts. The sensitivity of daphnias to the lethal effects of the tested chemicals did not change under conditions of normal oxygenation and increased sharply (by two orders of magnitude) under conditions of hypoxia, loosing the linear relationship with toxicant concentration. Ammonium acetate toxicity more markedly increased under conditions of hypoxia than sodium acetate toxicity. These data should be taken into consideration when predicting the results of combined effects of toxicants on water ecosystems and on human organism.

  3. A cost/effective screening method for assessing the toxicity of nutrient rich effluents to algae.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, G; Fernández, C; Tarazona, J V

    2010-07-01

    Screening whole effluent toxicity tests are cost/effective methods for detecting the presence of toxic concentrations of unknown pollutants, but the application must solve the problem associated with the effect of high and variable concentrations of nutrients in the effluent on the results of algal toxicity tests. This work proposes a cost/effective test, based on three dilution levels measured at a single point time and a discriminant model for establishing if this kind of complex samples, with difficult interpretation of dilution-response curves, should be considered toxic to algae. This procedure identified properly around 85% of the samples considered toxic by expert judgement.

  4. Toxic effects of acrylamide in a freshwater fish, Heteropneustes fossilis

    SciTech Connect

    Shanker, R.; Seth, P.K.

    1986-08-01

    It has been shown that acrylamide is a cumulative neurotoxic agent and can conjugate with glutathione enzymically and nonenzymically. The enzymic conjugation is catalyzed by a cytosolic enzyme, glutathione S-transferase. Laboratory animals exposed to acrylamide exhibited a decrease in glutathione level and in the activity of glutathione-S-transferase of brain and liver. The inhibition of glutathione-S-transferase by acrylamide, which catalyzes its conjugation with glutathione, may lead to the accumulation of the monomer and its enhanced neurotoxicity. At present little is known about the toxic effects of acrylamide in fishes. The present study deals with the determination of median lethal concentration (LC50) of acrylamide and its effect on the hepatic glutathione and glutathione-S-transferase levels of the fresh water fish, Heteropneustes fossilis.

  5. Toxic effects of phenol on grey mullet, Mugil auratus Risso

    SciTech Connect

    Krajnovic-Ozretic, M.; Ozretic, B.

    1988-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are frequently found as contaminants in surface waters, including marine coastal waters. Phenols are generally classified as nonspecific metabolic inhibitors, and the main toxic effects are manifested on the nervous system due to the dissolution of lipids, whereas in the circulatory system phenols act as hemolysing agents of the erythrocytes. Data about sublethal effects of phenol, particularly to marine organisms are rather scarce. In several fresh water fish species exposed to phenol, the number of erythrocytes and the amount of serum proteins were decreased while lesion of gill filaments with edema and blood infiltration with degenerative changes in liver were also observed. These investigations concerned the identification of some physiological and biochemical changes in mullet blood as a consequence of exposure to phenol and some observations about the behavior and gross pathology of poisoned fish were also made.

  6. Serum withdrawal potentiates the toxic effects of methamphetamine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cadet, J L; Ordonez, S

    2000-09-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) has been shown to cause neurotoxic damage both in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms of action are thought to involve the production of pathophysiologic concentration of free radicals. The present study was undertaken to assess the toxic effects of METH caused dose-dependent increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death. Cell death caused by METH was characterized by cytoplasmic vacuolar formation, shrinkage of cytoplasm and nuclear dissolution. Flow cytometric evaluation also revealed that this toxin causes changes similar to those observed in cells undergoing apoptosis. When taken together these observations suggest the METH can cause these cells to die via apoptosis. Further experiments indicated that growth of these cells in low (1%) serum or in the absence of serum markedly enhanced the apoptotic effects of METH. These data provide further support for the ideas that METH can cause ROS-mediated apoptosis.

  7. Evaluation of MWNT toxic effects on daphnia and zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasagasti, Maider; Alvarez, Noelia; Vera, Carolina; Rainieri, Sandra

    2009-05-01

    Organisms of daphnia (Daphnia magna) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to a range of different concentrations of COOH-functionalized MWCNT suspended in an aqueous solution of Tween 20. Immobilization of daphnia and growth retardation, inhibition and malformation of zebrafish embryos were the endpoints tested after 24 and 48 hours. Immobilization of daphnia could be observed from 3 to 16 ppm and an increasing mortality of zebrafish embryo was detected at all the concentration tested. To identify more subtle toxic effects, we took advantage of the extensive information available on the zebrafish genome and monitored by RT-PCR the expression patterns of different zebrafish genes that could act as toxicity bio-markers. At some of the concentrations tested, changes in the expression profiles of the genes examined were detected. Our results suggest that MWCNT could potentially represent a risk to human health and environment, therefore a wider range of concentrations and further testing of this molecules should be carried out to define possible limitations in their use.

  8. Enrichment and ecosystem stability: effect of toxic food.

    PubMed

    Roy, Shovonlal; Chattopadhyay, J

    2007-01-01

    Enrichment in resource availability theoretically destabilizes predator-prey dynamics (the paradox of enrichment). However, a minor change in the resource stoichiometry may make a prey toxic for the predator, and the presence of toxic prey affects the dynamics significantly. Here, theoretically we explore how, at increased carrying capacity, a toxic prey affects the oscillation or destabilization of predator-prey dynamics, and how its presence influences the growth of the predator as well as that of a palatable prey. Mathematical analysis determines the bounds on the food toxicity that allow the coexistence of a predator along with a palatable and a toxic prey. The overall results demonstrate that toxic food counteracts oscillation (destabilization) arising from enrichment of resource availability. Moreover, our results show that, at increased resource availability, toxic food that acts as a source of extra mortality may increase the abundance of the predator as well as that of the palatable prey.

  9. Critical evaluation of toxic versus beneficial effects of methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, D; Chaudhuri, B S; Ray, M; Ray, S

    2009-10-01

    In various organisms, an array of enzymes is involved in the synthesis and breakdown of methylglyoxal. Through these enzymes, it is intimately linked to several other physiologically important metabolites, suggesting that methylglyoxal has some important role to play in the host organism. Several in vitro and in vivo studies showed that methylglyoxal acts specifically against different types of malignant cells. These studies culminated in a recent investigation to evaluate a methylglyoxal-based formulation in treating a small group of cancer patients, and the results were promising. Methylglyoxal acts against a number of pathogenic microorganisms. However, recent literature abounds with the toxic effects of methylglyoxal, which are supposed to be mediated through methylglyoxal-derived advanced glycation end products (AGE). Many diseases such as diabetes, cataract formation, hypertension, and uremia are proposed to be intimately linked with methylglyoxal-derived AGE. However methylglyoxal-derived AGE formation and subsequent pathogenesis might be a very minor event because AGE are nonspecific reaction products that are derived through the reactions of carbonyl groups of reducing sugars with amino groups present in the side chains of lysine and arginine and in terminal amino groups of proteins. Moreover, the results of some in vitro experiments with methylglyoxal under non-physiological conditions were extrapolated to the in vivo situation. Some experiments even showed contradictory results and were differently interpreted. For this reason conclusions about the potential beneficial effects of methylglyoxal have often been neglected, thus hindering the advancement of medical science and causing some confusion in fundamental understanding. Overall, the potential beneficial effects of methylglyoxal far outweigh its possible toxic role in vivo, and it should be utilized for the benefit of suffering humanity.

  10. Lead toxicity: from overt to subclinical to subtle health effects.

    PubMed Central

    Goyer, R A

    1990-01-01

    Although the toxicity of lead was recognized centuries ago, concern was restricted to overt symptoms: colic, encephalopathy, anemia, or renal disease. Two major reasons for lack of progress in restricting toxicity were that interest was limited to occupational exposures and there was lack of awareness of specific biochemical or metabolic effects. Identification of subclinical effects has been possible the last 15 or 20 years because of the development of sensitive measures to detect cognitive and behavioral changes that are not apparent clinically and because of methods to measure the reduced activity of heme enzymes. This progress was driven by basic and clinical research that resulted in a better understanding of cellular toxicology. The new awareness prompted the lowering of acceptable occupational exposures, as measured by blood lead from 80 to 40 to 60 micrograms/dL range, and the establishment of maximum recommended exposures in children to a blood lead level of 25 micrograms/dL. Lowering the lead content in gasoline has been accomplished by a nearly 50% decrease in average blood levels of persons in the United States (NHANES II data). Current research implicates lead as a contributing etiologic factor in a number of common diseases affecting large portions of the population such as subtle cognitive and neurological deficits, hypertension, congenital malformations, immunotoxicity, and deficits in growth and development. For each of these disorders there may be multiple etiologic factors; the scientific challenge is to develop sensitive methodology to detect the specific role of lead. Other potential subtle health effects include the influence of small amounts of lead on cell proliferation and lead as a cofactor in carcinogenesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images FIGURE 1. PMID:2205487

  11. Effect of trifluoperazine on toxicity, HIF-1α induction and hepatocyte regeneration in acetaminophen toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S; Hennings, Leah; Brown, Aliza T; Li, Shun-Hwa; Simpson, Pippa M; Hinson, Jack A; James, Laura P

    2012-10-15

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are important mechanisms in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity. The MPT inhibitor trifluoperazine (TFP) reduced MPT, oxidative stress, and toxicity in freshly isolated hepatocytes treated with APAP. Since hypoxia inducible factor-one alpha (HIF-1α) is induced very early in APAP toxicity, a role for oxidative stress in the induction has been postulated. In the present study, the effect of TFP on toxicity and HIF-1α induction in B6C3F1 male mice treated with APAP was examined. Mice received TFP (10mg/kg, oral gavage) prior to APAP (200mg/kg IP) and at 7 and 36h after APAP. Measures of metabolism (hepatic glutathione and APAP protein adducts) were comparable in the two groups of mice. Toxicity was decreased in the APAP/TFP mice at 2, 4, and 8h, compared to the APAP mice. At 24 and 48h, there were no significant differences in toxicity between the two groups. TFP lowered HIF-1α induction but also reduced the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of hepatocyte regeneration. TFP can also inhibit phospholipase A(2), and cytosolic and secretory PLA(2) activity levels were reduced in the APAP/TFP mice compared to the APAP mice. TFP also lowered prostaglandin E(2) expression, a known mechanism of cytoprotection. In summary, the MPT inhibitor TFP delayed the onset of toxicity and lowered HIF-1α induction in APAP treated mice. TFP also reduced PGE(2) expression and hepatocyte regeneration, likely through a mechanism involving PLA(2).

  12. Discrimination of excess toxicity from baseline level for ionizable compounds: Effect of pH.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin J; Zhang, Xu J; Wang, Xiao H; Wang, Shuo; Yu, Yang; Qin, Wei C; Su, Li M; Zhao, Yuan H

    2016-03-01

    The toxic effect can be affected by pH in water through affecting the degree of ionization of ionizable compounds. Wrong classification of mode of action can be made from the apparent toxicities. In this paper, the toxicity data of 61 compounds to Daphnia magna determined at three pH values were used to investigate the effect of pH on the discrimination of excess toxicity. The results show that the apparent toxicities are significantly less than the baseline level. Analysis on the effect of pH on bioconcentration factor (BCF) shows that the log BCF values are significantly over-estimated for the strongly ionizable compounds, leading to the apparent toxicities greatly less than the baseline toxicities and the toxic ratios greatly less than zero. A theoretical equation between the apparent toxicities and pH has been developed basing on the critical body residue (CBR). The apparent toxicities are non-linearly related to pH, but linearly to fraction of unionized form. The determined apparent toxicities are well fitted with the toxicities predicted by the equation. The toxicities in the unionized form calculated from the equation are close to, or greater than the baseline level for almost all the strongly ionizable compounds, which are very different from the apparent toxicities. The studied ionizable compounds can be either classified as baseline, less inert or reactive compounds in D. magna toxicity. Some ionizable compounds do not exhibit excess toxicity at a certain pH, due not to their poor reactivity with target molecules, but because of the ionization in water.

  13. Toxicity of ad lib. overfeeding: effects on cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Faine, L A; Diniz, Y S; Almeida, J A; Novelli, E L B; Ribas, B O

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of ad lib. overfeeding and of dietary restriction (DR) on oxidative stress in cardiac tissue. Lipoperoxide concentrations were decreased and antioxidant enzymes were increased in moderate-DR-fed rats. Severe-DR induced increased lipoperoxide concentrations. Overfeeding increased lipoperoxide levels in cardiac tissue. Total superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD) activities were decreased in cardiac tissue at 35 days of overfeeding. As no changes in glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were observed in overfed rats, while SOD and Cu-Zn SOD activities were decreased in these animals, it is assumed that superoxide anion is an important intermediate in the toxicity of ad lib. overfeeding. Overfeeding induced alterations in markers of oxidative stress in cardiac tissue.

  14. Synergistic effect of piperonyl butoxide on acute toxicity of pyrethrins to Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Jeffrey; Gagne, James; Sharp, Janice

    2016-08-01

    A series of acute toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca was performed to quantify the synergistic effect of piperonyl butoxide (PBO) on pyrethrin toxicity. Concentrations of PBO <4 µg/L caused no toxicity enhancement, whereas toxicity increased with PBO concentrations between 4 µg/L and 15 µg/L. Additive toxicity calculations showed that true synergism accounted for an increase in pyrethrin toxicity (decrease in median lethal concentration) of 1.4-fold to 1.6-fold and varied only slightly between 4 µg/L and 15 µg/L PBO, whereas direct toxicity of PBO accounted for an additional increase in mixture toxicity (up to 3.2-fold) that was proportional to PBO concentration. The results can be used to assess the risk of measured or predicted co-occurring concentrations of PBO and pyrethrins in surface waters. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2111-2116. © 2016 SETAC.

  15. Effect of species on relative toxicity of pyrolysis products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Marcussen, W. H.; Furst, A.; Leon, H. A.

    1976-01-01

    One of the principal factors in animal toxicity studies is the choice of animal species. A limited study of the relative toxicity of the pyrolysis products from cotton and wool indicated that values of concentrations and doses required to produce death in 50% of the test animals obtained with Swiss albino mice were approximately one-half the values obtained with Sprague-Dawley rats. The toxicity of cotton relative to that of wool was the same using Swiss albino mice or Sprague-Dawley rats. Rankings of relative toxicity appear to be more sensitive to differences in apparatus and procedure than to interspecies differences.

  16. The Toxic Effect of ALLN on Primary Rat Retinal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Shang, Lei; Wang, Shu-Chao; Liao, Lv-Shuang; Chen, Dan; Huang, Ju-Fang; Xiong, Kun

    2016-10-01

    N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN), an inhibitor of proteasomes and calpain, is widely used to reduce proteasomes or calpain-mediated cell death in rodents. However, ALLN is toxic to retinal neurons to some extent. At the concentration of 10 μM, ALLN is non-toxic to cortical neurons, but induces cell death of retinal neurons in vitro. The tolerance concentration of ALLN for retinal neurons is unclear, and the precise mechanism of cell death induced by ALLN remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the toxic effect of ALLN on primary retinal neurons. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed no significant changes of cell viability at 1 μM but decreased cell viability after treatment of ALLN at 2.5, 5, and 7.5 μM. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was highly elevated and propidium iodide (PI)-positive cells were significantly increased at 2.5, 5, and 7.5 μM after all treatment times. Moreover, the protein levels of caspase-3 were up-regulated at 5 and 7.5 μM after 12 and 24 h of ALLN treatment. The ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 was raised and Annexin V-positive cells were increased at 5 and 7.5 μM after 12 and 24 h of ALLN treatment. However, there were no significant changes in either the ratio of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) II/LC3 I or monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Our data clearly show that at the concentrations equal to and higher than 2.5 μM, ALLN may induce cell death of primary retinal neurons by necrosis and apoptosis, but not autophagy. These suggest that primary retinal neurons are more susceptible to ALLN treatment and provide a possible mechanism for the cell death of ALLN-sensitive cells in ALLN injury.

  17. Individual and combined toxic effects of herbicide atrazine and three insecticides on the earthworm, Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; An, Xuehua; Shen, Weifeng; Chen, Liezhong; Jiang, Jinhua; Wang, Qiang; Cai, Leiming

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the individual and combined toxic effects of herbicide atrazine and three insecticides (chlorpyrifos, lambda-cyhalothrin and imidacloprid) on the earthworm, Eisenia fetida. Results from 48-h filter paper test indicated that imidacloprid had the highest toxicity to E. fetida with an LC50 of 0.05 (0.041-0.058) μg a.i. cm(-2), followed by lambda-cyhalothrin and atrazine with LC50 values ranging from 4.89 (3.52-6.38) to 4.93 (3.76-6.35) μg a.i. cm(-2), while chlorpyrifos had the least toxicity to the worms with an LC50 of 31.18 (16.22-52.85) μg a.i. cm(-2). Results from 14-days soil toxicity test showed a different pattern of toxicity except that imidacloprid was the most toxic even under the soil toxicity bioassay system. The acute toxicity of atrazine was significantly higher than that of chlorpyrifos. In contrast, lambda-cyhalothrin was the least toxic to the animals under the soil toxicity bioassay system. The binary mixture of atrazine-lambda-cyhalothrin and ternary mixture of atrazine-chlorpyrifos-lambda-cyhalothrin displayed a significant synergistic effect on the earthworms under the soil toxicity bioassay. Our findings would help regulatory authorities understand the complexity of effects from pesticide mixtures on non-target organisms and provide useful information of the interaction of various pesticide classes detected in natural environment.

  18. A brief study of toxic effects of some medicinal herbs on kidney

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Increased use of complementary and alternative herbal medicines in the treatment of various diseases.Some herbal therapies may be causes of potential toxicity that may be renal toxicity caused by the ingestion of herbs. The goal of this study is the toxic and beneficial effects of medicinal herbs on renal health by which evidence for benefit or toxicity has been found. Included are nephrotoxicity from aristolochic acid and other components within herbs, herb-drug interactions, heavy metal toxicity in herbs and adulterants during careless preparation of herbal medicine, resulting in adverse renal effects and renal toxicity from contaminants within the extracts. The review aims to provide knowledge and guide to encourage future toxicity studies on the kidney by medicinal herbs. PMID:23326775

  19. Effect of Surface Coating on the Toxicity of Silver Nanomaterials on Human Skin Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wentong; Senapati, Dulal; Wang, Shuguang; Tovmachenko, Oleg; Singh, Anant Kumar; Yu, Hongtao; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2010-02-25

    As nanotechnology field continues to develop, assessing nanoparticle toxicity is very important for advancing nanoparticles for daily life application. In this Letter, we report the effect of surface coating on cyto, geno and photo-toxicity of silver nanomaterials of different shapes on human skin HaCaT keratinocytes. We found that the citrate coated colloidal silver nanoparticles at 100 µg/mL level are not geno-, cyto- and phtotoxic. On the other hand, citrate coated powder form of the silver nanoparticles are toxic. We have demonstrated that coating of the silver nanoparticles with a biodegradable polymer prevents the toxicity of the powder. Toxicity mechanism has been discussed.

  20. Effect of surface coating on the toxicity of silver nanomaterials on human skin keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wentong; Senapati, Dulal; Wang, Shuguang; Tovmachenko, Oleg; Singh, Anant Kumar; Yu, Hongtao; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2010-02-01

    As nanotechnology field continues to develop, assessing nanoparticle toxicity is very important for advancing nanoparticles for daily life application. In this Letter, we report the effect of surface coating on cyto, geno and photo-toxicity of silver nanomaterials of different shapes on human skin HaCaT keratinocytes. We found that the citrate coated colloidal silver nanoparticles at 100 μg/mL level are not geno-, cyto- and phtotoxic. On the other hand, citrate coated powder form of the silver nanoparticles are toxic. We have demonstrated that coating of the silver nanoparticles with a biodegradable polymer prevents the toxicity of the powder. Toxicity mechanism has been discussed.

  1. Toxic effects of butyl elastomers on aerobic methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, Helge; Steinle, Lea I.; Blees, Jan H.; Krause, Stefan; Bussmann, Ingeborg; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Treude, Tina

    2013-04-01

    Large quantities of the potent greenhouse gas methane are liberated into the water column of marine and lacustrine environments where it may be consumed by aerobic methane oxidising bacteria before reaching the atmosphere.The reliable quantification of aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) rates is consequently of paramount importance for estimating methane budgets and to understand the controls on water column methane cycling. A widely used set of methods for measuring MOx rates is based on the incubation of water samples during which the consumption of methane is monitored, for instance with radio-tracer assays. Typically, incubation vessels are sealed with butyl rubber stoppers because these elastomers are essentially impermeable for gases at the relevant time scales. We tested the effect of different stopper materials (unmodified- and halogenated butyl rubber) on MOx activity in environmental samples and in cultures of methane oxidising bacteria. MOx rates in samples sealed with unmodified butyl rubber were > 75% lower compared to parallel incubations with halogenated butyl rubber seals, suggesting inhibiting/toxic effects associated with the use of unmodified butyl elastomers. To further explore the cause of these effects, we analysed aqueous extracts of the different stoppers. Halogenated butyl rubber stoppers appeared to bleed off comparably little amounts of organics. In stark contrast, extracts of unmodified butyl rubber were contaminated with various organic compounds including potential bactericides such as benzyltoluenes, phenylalkanes and benzuothiazoles. We also found tetramethylthiourea, a scavenger of active oxygen species, which may inhibit the MOx pathway.

  2. Photosynthetic efficiency predicts toxic effects of metal nanomaterials in phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert J; Muller, Erik B; Cole, Bryan; Martin, Tyronne; Nisbet, Roger; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K; Jarvis, Tayler A; Keller, Arturo A; Cherr, Gary; Lenihan, Hunter S

    2017-02-01

    High Throughput Screening (HTS) using in vitro assessments at the subcellular level has great promise for screening new chemicals and emerging contaminants to identify high-risk candidates, but their linkage to ecological impacts has seldom been evaluated. We tested whether a battery of subcellular HTS tests could be used to accurately predict population-level effects of engineered metal nanoparticles (ENPs) on marine phytoplankton, important primary producers that support oceanic food webs. To overcome well-known difficulties of estimating ecologically meaningful toxicity parameters, we used novel Dynamic Energy Budget and Toxicodynamic (DEBtox) modeling techniques to evaluate impacts of ENPs on population growth rates. Our results show that population growth was negatively impacted by all four ENPs tested, but the HTS tests assessing many cell/physiological functions lacked predictive power at the population level. However, declining photosynthetic efficiency, a traditional physiological endpoint for photoautotrophs, was a good predictor of population level effects in phytoplankton. DEBtox techniques provided robust estimates of EC10 for population growth rates in exponentially growing batch cultures of phytoplankton, and should be widely useful for ecotoxicological testing. Adoption of HTS approaches for ecotoxicological assessment should carefully evaluate the predictive power of specific assays to minimize the risk that effects at higher levels of biological organization may go undetected.

  3. Protective effect of crocin on liver toxicity induced by morphine

    PubMed Central

    Salahshoor, Mohammad Reza; khashiadeh, Mojtaba; Roshankhah, Shiva; Kakabaraei, Seyran; Jalili, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Crocin, a bioactive molecule of saffron can be purely isolated from the saffron extract. It has different pharmacological effects such as antioxidant and anticancer activities. Morphine is an opioid analgesic drug. It is mainly metabolized in liver and causes devastating effects. It can increase the generation of free radicals. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of crocin against morphine-induced toxicity in the mouse liver. In this study, various doses of crocin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) and crocin plus morphine were administered interaperitoneally once daily to 48 male mice for 20 consecutive days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups of 6 each. The liver weight and histology, aspartate amino transferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and serum nitric oxide levels were studied. The results indicated that morphine administration significantly decreased liver weight and increased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein diameters, liver enzyme levels, and blood serum nitric oxide level compared to saline group (P<0.05). However, crocin administration significantly boosted liver weight and decreased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes and nitric oxide levels in all groups compared to the group received morphine alone (P<0.05). It seems that crocin administration could protect the liver damage induced by morphine. The antioxidant effect of crocin may be a major reason for its positive impact on liver parameters. PMID:27168751

  4. Impact of effects of acid precipitation on toxicity of metals.

    PubMed Central

    Nordberg, G F; Goyer, R A; Clarkson, T W

    1985-01-01

    Acid precipitation may increase human exposure to several potentially toxic metals by increasing metal concentrations in major pathways to man, particularly food and water, and in some instances by enhancing the conversion of metal species to more toxic forms. Human exposures to methylmercury are almost entirely by way of consumption of fish and seafood. In some countries, intakes by this route may approach the levels that can give rise to adverse health effects for population groups with a high consumption of these food items. A possible increase in methylmercury concentrations in fish from lakes affected by acid precipitation may thus be of concern to selected population groups. Human exposures to lead reach levels that are near those associated with adverse health effects in certain sensitive segments of the general population in several countries. The possibility exists that increased exposures to lead may be caused by acid precipitation through a mobilization of lead from soils into crops. A route of exposure to lead that may possibly be influenced by acid precipitation is an increased deterioration of surface materials containing lead and a subsequent ingestion by small children. A similar situation with regard to uptake from food exists for cadmium (at least in some countries). Human metal exposures via drinking water may be increased by acid precipitation. Decreasing pH increases corrosiveness of water enhancing the mobilization of metal salts from soil; metallic compounds may be mobilized from minerals, which may eventually reach drinking water. Also, the dissolution of metals (Pb, Cd, Cu) from piping systems for drinking water by soft acidic waters of high corrosivity may increase metal concentrations in drinking water. Exposures have occasionally reached concentrations which are in the range where adverse health effects may be expected in otherwise healthy persons. Dissolution from piping systems can be prevented by neutralizing the water before

  5. Toxic effects of palladium compounds on the isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Perić, Tanja; Jakovljević, Vladimir Lj; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Krkeljic, Jelena; Petrović, Zorica D; Simijonović, Dusica; Novokmet, Slobodan; Djuric, Dragan M; Janković, Slobodan M

    2012-01-01

    Taken into consideration limited data about effects of palladium on cardiovascular system, the aim of our study was to compare toxicity of inorganic and organic palladium compounds on the isolated rat heart. The hearts (total number n=30, 6 for each experimental group) excised from Wistar albino rats, male sex, age 8 weeks, and body mass 180-200 g, were retrogradely perfused according to the Langendorff technique at constant perfusion pressure (70 cm H2O). After the insertion of sensor in the left ventricle, the parameters of heart function: maximum rate of left ventricular pressure development (dP/dt max), systolic left ventricular pressure (SLVP), diastolic left ventricular pressure (DLVP), mean blood pressure (MBP) and heart rate (HR)), were continuously registered. The experiments were performed during control conditions, and in the presence of perfusion with incresing concentration of the following: (triethanolamine (TEA), triethanolamine acetate (TEAA), palladium(II)chloride (PdCl2), and trans-dichlorobis(triethanolamine-N)palladium(II) complex (trans-[PdCl2(TEA)2])) started every 30 minutes (30, 60, 90, 120 minute). dP/dt max was not affected significantly by either TEAA, TEA, PdCl2 or Pd complex. SLVP was, also, not affected significantly by either TEAA, TEA, PdCl2, or Pd complex. DLVP was significantly decreased by both TEAA and PdCl2, while TEA and Pd complex did not show significant effect. MBP was significantly decreased only by PdCl2, while TEAA, TEA and Pd complex did not show significant effect. HR was significantly decreased by all compounds- PdCl2, TEAA, TEA and Pd complex. In our study, inorganic palladium compound (PdCl2) induced clear depression of the isolated rat heart contractility, manifested as drop in diastolic and mean blood pressure , and as decrease of the heart rate. On the other hand, it seems that palladium, when bound in an organic compound (linked to TEA in Pd complex), does not contribute significantly to cardio-toxicity in our

  6. Effects of handling, temperature and storage time on sediment and pore-water chemistry and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Jackson, B.P.

    1994-12-31

    Effects of sediment disturbance, storage temperature (230 C and 40 C) and storage time on chemistry and toxicity of sediment and pore water were evaluated using two sediments (sandy freshwater and organic estuarine) contaminated with metals. Solid-phase (10 d with water renewal) and pore-water (96-h static) toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca were conducted upon collection and at two week intervals for 8--10 weeks. Chemistries (redox, pH, conductivity, alkalinity, ammonia, trace metals, major cations and anions) were measured at each toxicity testing interval. Following extraction, pore-water chemistry changed significantly during the initial 96 h due to oxidation reactions and CO{sub 2} equilibration. Pore water collected in situ was slightly less toxic and had major differences in water chemistry compared to pore water extracted from homogenized sediment. Storage temperature and time significantly influenced pore-water toxicity and chemistry, but had minimal effect on solid-phase toxicity. After four weeks, the highly-toxic sandy sediment became slightly less toxic in solid-phase tests and Significantly less toxic in pore-water tests, coinciding with changes in trace-metal concentrations, activities, and speciation. The estuarine sediment became slightly more toxic in both solid-phase and pore-water tests after four weeks, but returned to original levels after six and eight weeks. Sediment disturbance, storage temperature, and storage time significantly influenced toxicity and pore-water chemistry.

  7. Fructose: Toxic effect on cardiorenal risk factors and redox state

    PubMed Central

    Francisqueti, Fabiane V; Santos, Klinsmann C; Ferron, Artur JT; Lo, Angelo TC; Minatel, Igor O; Campos, Dijon HS; Ferreira, Ana Lucia A; Corrêa, Camila R

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of fructose consumption on the antioxidant capacity in heart and kidney, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and evaluation of these variables after its removal. Methods: Male Wistar rats (n = 36) were divided into control group (n = 12): standard chow + water or F group: standard chow + fructose in drinking water (30%) for 15 weeks. After, F group was divided to continue receiving standard chow + fructose in drinking water (30%) (n = 12) or standard chow + water (Ex group, n = 12) for 9 weeks. Water, chow and caloric diaries intake, final body weight, adiposity index, plasma glucose and triacylglycerol, systolic blood pressure, and cardiac and renal hydrophilic antioxidant capacity were analyzed. Results: Control and Ex groups consumed less chow and water compared to F group. Caloric intake was higher in control group. There was no difference in final body weight and adiposity index. Systolic blood pressure and cardiac and renal hydrophilic antioxidant capacity were worst in F group. Conclusion: Prolonged exposure to fructose induces oxidative stress, systolic blood pressure, and increase in triacylglycerol. When stopped fructose consumption, Ex group presented improvement in these variables, suggesting the toxicity effect of fructose when consumed in high amounts and prolonged exposure. PMID:28348741

  8. [Toxic effects of high concentrations of ammonia on Euglena gracilis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Shi, Xiao-Rong; Cui, Yi-Bin; Li, Mei

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia is among the common contaminants in aquatic environments. The present study aimed at evaluation of the toxicity of ammonia at high concentration by detecting its effects on the growth, pigment contents, antioxidant enzyme activities, and DNA damage (comet assay) of a unicellular microalga, Euglena gracilis. Ammonia restrained the growth of E. gracilis, while at higher concentrations, ammonia showed notable inhibition effect, the growth at 2 000 mg x L(-1) was restrained to 55.7% compared with that of the control; The contents of photosynthetic pigments and protein went up with increasing ammonia dosage and decreased when the ammonia concentration was above 1000 mg x L(-1); In addition, there was an obvious increase in SOD and POD activities, at higher concentration (2 000 mg x L(-1)), activities of SOD and POD increased by 30.7% and 49.4% compared with those of the control, indicating that ammonia could promote activities of antioxidant enzymes in E. gracilis; The degree of DNA damage observed in the comet assay increased with increasing ammonia concentration, which suggested that high dose of ammonia may have potential mutagenicity on E. gracilis.

  9. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  10. Effects of storage time on the toxicity of sediments to freshwater benthic invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    DeFoe, D.L.; Ankley, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study was to define the effects of storage time on the toxicity of a series of freshwater sediments. Sixteen sediments with varying types of contaminants (metals, pesticides, PCBs, ammonia) were collected, held at 4 C, and periodically tested for toxicity to the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus tentans for storage times ranging from 8.5 to 25 months. The sediments ranged from nontoxic to extremely toxic (100% mortality) in 10-d assays with both species, with the majority of samples displaying an intermediate degree of toxicity (e.g., partial kills, reduced growth). Toxicity of sediments causing total mortality of organisms in 10-d was quantified through the determination of LT50 (lethal time to 50% mortality) assays, in addition to the standard 10-d tests. Toxicity of nearly all the samples did not vary significantly with storage time; in those instances when toxicity did change, the same relative conclusions concerning sample toxicity generally would have been made regardless of when they were tested (e.g., toxic samples did not become non-toxic). This data suggests that current guidelines concerning sediment storage times (e.g., 0--8 weeks) may be overly restrictive, at least with respect to toxicity testing. The results also suggested that some test variability inherent in whole sediment assays can actually be reduced by short term storage. That is, among replicates, variability appeared to decrease with increasing storage time.

  11. Toxic effects of the easily avoidable phthalates and parabens.

    PubMed

    Crinnion, Walter J

    2010-09-01

    Some environmental toxins like DDT and other chlorinated compounds accumulate in the body because of their fat-soluble nature. Other compounds do not stay long in the body, but still cause toxic effects during the time they are present. For serious health problems to arise, exposure to these rapidly-clearing compounds must occur on a daily basis. Two such classes of compounds are the phthalate plasticizers and parabens, both of which are used in many personal care products, some medications, and even foods and food preservation. The phthalates are commonly found in foods and household dust. Even though they have relatively short half-lives in humans, phthalates have been associated with a number of serious health problems, including infertility, testicular dysgenesis, obesity, asthma, and allergies, as well as leiomyomas and breast cancer. Parabens, which can be dermally absorbed, are present in many cosmetic products, including antiperspirants. Their estrogenicity and tissue presence are a cause for concern regarding breast cancer. Fortunately, these compounds are relatively easy to avoid and such steps can result in dramatic reductions of urinary levels of these compounds.

  12. A Biological Model of the Effects of Toxic Substances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-29

    testing the system’s response to different classes of toxic chemicals. 14. SUBJECT TIRMS IS. NUMBER Of PAGES Bioassay, Environmental toxins , Detoxification...Painful. Irritant and Toxic Stimuli. Neurons were found to be reactive to bradykinin (Fig. 12), capsaicin (Fig. 13: a classical pain-producing substance...the same concentration of bradykinin. 41 49..9 -40.0 40. 9.9 ... ............... ......... -2.3 FIGURE 13. Stimulation with capsaicin . Stimulation is

  13. Effects of chronic toxicity on threshold food concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchine, G.A.; Snell, T.W.

    1995-12-31

    Food shortage and toxicant stress have been proposed separately as structuring factors for zooplankton communities. How these factors interact to affect zooplankton remains poorly understood. The amount of food ingested by filter feeders depends upon food concentration, and a threshold concentration exists below which population growth is zero. A standard 2-d population growth test was used to determine whether toxicant stress altered the food threshold of the freshwater rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus. Threshold toxicant concentrations resulting in zero population growth rate and the NOEC were also compared at starving and abundant food conditions. Nutritional requirements were related to toxic exposure. For example, the threshold concentration of sodium pentachlorophenate (PCP) was 1.5 times lower at low food concentrations (0.3 million Nannochloris cells per milliliter) than at high food concentrations (3 million cells/ml). These results indicate that both factors must be considered in the validation of standard toxicity tests and their extrapolation to field conditions for ecologically meaningful predictions of toxicity.

  14. Toxic substances: Effects on fish. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the biochemical and physiological effects of toxic substances on fish populations. Particular emphasis is placed upon using fish as an indicator of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Toxicity effects of mercury, zinc, calcium chloride, sodium chloride, lead, cadmium, copper, and aluminum in freshwater and seawater fish are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Effects of a Community Toxic Release on the Psychological Status of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greve, Kevin W.; Bianchini, Kevin J.; Stickle, Timothy R.; Love, Jeffrey M.; Doane, Bridget M.; Thompson, Matthew D.

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to determine the emotional effects of a major community toxic release on children in the exposed community while controlling for the potential effects of response bias. Controlling for the response bias inherent in litigated contexts is an advance over previous studies of toxic exposure in children. A randomly selected…

  16. Effect of heating rate on toxicity of pyrolysis gases from some synthetic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Soriano, J. A.; Kosola, K. L.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of heating rate on the toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from some synthetic polymers was investigate, using a screening test method. The synthetic polymers were polyethylene, polystyrene, polymethyl methacrylate, polycarbonate, ABS, polyaryl sulfone, polyether sulfone, and polyphenylene sulfide. The toxicants from the sulfur-containing polymers appeared to act more rapidly than the toxicants from the other polymers. It is not known whether this effect is due primarily to differences in concentration or in the nature of the toxicants. The carbon monoxide concentrations found do not account for the observed results.

  17. Interacting effects of toxicants and organic matter on the midge Chironomus riparius in polluted river water.

    PubMed

    Stuijfzand, S C; Helms, M; Kraak, M H; Admiraal, W

    2000-07-01

    Toxicants and organic matter in river water have contrasting impacts on macrofauna. Through manipulations of both factors, their interactive effects on organisms were evaluated. This way, an attempt was made to clarify the presence or absence of pollution-"tolerant" and -"sensitive" species in rivers affected by mixed sources of pollution. Under controlled conditions, larval growth of the "tolerant" midge Chironomus riparius was measured in different types of river water containing varying levels of particles (obtained by selective filtration) and toxicants (either complex mixtures or metals). Exposure of first-instar larvae to water from the polluted rivers Meuse and Dommel revealed that growth was less inhibited by toxicant levels in river water than expected based on laboratory toxicity tests. Factors present in polluted river water stimulated growth of midges to such an extent that inhibiting effects of high toxicant concentrations were neutralized, and at low toxicant levels, were overcompensated for. It was found that particulate matter has great potential to reduce inhibiting effects of toxicants on C. riparius, not (only) by reducing the bioavailability of toxicants, but by serving as a supplementary, superior food source. The success of the "pollution-tolerant" midge was not explained by tolerance of this species to toxicants, but by its ability to take advantage of coinciding organic enrichment. It is hypothesized that the extent to which beneficial effects of organic compounds on organisms occur is species specific.

  18. Effects-driven chemical fractionation of heavy fuel oil to isolate compounds toxic to trout embryos.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Jason M; Adams, Julie; Hollebone, Bruce; King, Thomas; Hodson, Peter V; Brown, R Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) spills account for approximately 60% of ship-source oil spills and are up to 50 times more toxic than medium and light crude oils. Heavy fuel oils contain elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkyl-PAHs, known to be toxic to fish; however, little direct characterization of HFO toxicity has been reported. An effects-driven chemical fractionation was conducted on HFO 7102 to separate compounds with similar chemical and physical properties, including toxicity, to isolate the groups of compounds most toxic to trout embryos. After each separation, toxicity tests directed the next phase of fractionation, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis correlated composition with toxicity, with a focus on PAHs. Low-temperature vacuum distillation permitted the separation of HFO into 3 fractions based on boiling point ranges. The most toxic of these fractions underwent wax precipitation to remove long-chain n-alkanes. The remaining PAH-rich extract was further separated using open column chromatography, which provided distinct fractions that were grouped according to increasing aromatic ring count. The most toxic of these fractions was richest in PAHs and alkyl-PAHs. The results of the present study were consistent with previous crude oil studies that identified PAH-rich fractions as the most toxic.

  19. Effects of storage time on the toxicity of sediments to freshwater benthic invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    DeFoe, D.L.; Ankley, G.T.

    1994-12-31

    Current guidance concerning recommended storage times for sediments to be subjected to toxicity tests has been based largely on limited studies with a small number of samples. The objective of this study was to better define the effects of storage time on the toxicity of a series of freshwater sediments. Eighteen sediments with varying types of contaminants (metals, pesticides, PCBs, ammonia) were collected, held at 4 C, and periodically tested for toxicity to the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus tentans for storage times ranging from 4 to 16 months. The sediments ranged from non-toxic to, extremely toxic (100% mortality) in 10-d assays with both species, with the majority of samples displaying an intermediate degree of toxicity. Toxicity of most of the samples did not vary significantly with storage time; in those instances when toxicity did change, the same relative conclusions concerning sample toxicity generally would have been made regardless of when they were tested. Their data suggest that current guidelines concerning sediment storage times may be overly restrictive, at least with respect toxicity testing.

  20. Environmental toxicants and effects on female reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Hutz, R J; Carvan, M J; Baldridge, M G; Conley, L K; Heiden, T King

    2006-01-01

    One of the most toxic substances known to humans, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or dioxin), is also highly pervasive in the environment. It is created naturally in volcanic eruptions and forest fires, and anthropogenically in waste incineration, chlorination processes and certain plastics manufacture. From reports of large industrial and other accidents, or from experimental studies, dioxin exposure has been correlated in animal models and/or humans with chloracne of the skin, organ cancers, hepatotoxicity, gonadal and immune changes, pulmonary and other diseases such as diabetes, skewing of the sex ratio, and infertility. We have demonstrated that the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) that binds dioxin in tissues is localized in zebrafish, rat and rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) ovaries and in rat and human luteinizing granulosa cells (GC) (among other tissues), that labeled dioxin is specifically localized to granulosa cells of the ovarian follicle as observed by autoradiography, and that incubations of GC or ovarian fragments with environmentally relevant concentrations (fM to nM) of dioxin inhibit estradiol secretion significantly. Our experiments show that in human, non-human primate, rat, trout, and zebrafish ovarian tissues, dioxin inhibits estrogen synthesis at some level of the steroid biosynthetic pathway, most likely by inhibiting transcription of mRNAs for or activity of side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1 gene) and/or aromatase (Cyp19a1 gene) enzymes, or conceivably other steroidogenic enzymes/factors. Such an untoward effect on estrogen synthesis in females exposed to dioxin environmentally may predispose them to defects in aspects of their fertility.

  1. Toxicity assessment in marine sediment for the Terra Nova environmental effects monitoring program (1997-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteway, Sandra A.; Paine, Michael D.; Wells, Trudy A.; DeBlois, Elisabeth M.; Kilgour, Bruce W.; Tracy, Ellen; Crowley, Roger D.; Williams, Urban P.; Janes, G. Gregory

    2014-12-01

    This paper discusses toxicity test results on sediments from the Terra Nova offshore oil development. The Terra Nova Field is located on the Grand Banks approximately 350 km southeast of Newfoundland (Canada). The amphipod (Rhepoxynius abronius) survival and solid phase luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, or Microtox) assays were conducted on sediment samples collected from approximately 50 stations per program year around Terra Nova during baseline (1997), prior to drilling, and in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2010 after drilling began. The frequency of toxic responses in the amphipod toxicity test was low. Of the ten stations that were toxic in environmental effects monitoring (EEM) years, only one (station 30(FE)) was toxic in more than one year and could be directly attributed to Terra Nova project activities. In contrast, 65 (18%) of 364 EEM samples were toxic to Microtox. Microtox toxicity in EEM years was not related to distance from Terra Nova drill centres or concentrations of >C10-C21 hydrocarbons or barium, the primary constituents of the synthetic-based drill muds used at Terra Nova. Of the variables tested, fines and strontium levels showed the strongest (positive) correlations with toxicity. Neither fines nor strontium levels were affected by drill cuttings discharge at Terra Nova, except at station 30(FE) (and that station was not toxic to Microtox). Benthic macro-invertebrate abundance, richness and diversity were greater in toxic than in non-toxic sediments. Therefore, Microtox responses indicating toxicity were associated with positive biological responses in the field. This result may have been an indirect function of the increased abundance of most invertebrate taxa in less sandy sediments with higher gravel content, where fines and strontium levels and, consequently, toxicity to Microtox were high; or chemical substances released by biodegradation of organic matter, where invertebrates are abundant, may be toxic to Microtox. Given

  2. Considerations for Incorporating Bioavailability in Effect-Directed Analysis and Toxicity Identification Evaluation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to avoid a bias toward highly toxic but poorly bioavailable compounds in the effect-directed analysis (EDA) of soils and sediments, approaches are discussed to consider bioavailability in EDA procedures. In parallel, complimentary approaches for making toxicity identific...

  3. Effects of food and water quality on culturing and toxicity testing of Ceriodaphnia dubia: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, J.D.; DeGraeve, G.M.; Moore, E.L.; Palmer, W.D.; Pollock, T.L.

    1988-05-01

    Effects of Food and Water Quality on Culturing and Toxicity Testing of Ceriodaphnia dubia. Tests of eight diets for culturing Ceriodaphnia have identified two foods that support high and consistent survival and reproduction. Use of these foods can contribute to the precision of EPA recommended effluent toxicity tests.

  4. Effect of hepatic irradiation on the toxicity and pharmacokinetics of adriamycin in children

    SciTech Connect

    Holcenberg, J.S.; Kun, L.E.; Ring, B.J.; Evans, W.E.

    1981-07-01

    The effect of hepatic irradiation on adriamycin toxicity and pharmacokinetics was studied in 10 children who received adriamycin with concurrent abdominal irradiation for Wilms' tumor. Hepatic irradiation to 2400 to 2700 rad at 100 to 150 rad per fraction did not alter the clinical toxicity or plasma pharmacokinetics of adriamycin.

  5. How might selenium moderate the toxic effects of mercury in stream fish of the Western USA?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of selenium (Se) to moderate mercury (Hg) toxicity is well established in the literature. Mercury exposures that might otherwise produce toxic effects are counteracted by Se, particularly when Se:Hg molar ratios approach or exceed 1. We analyzed whole body Se and Hg c...

  6. POREWATER CHEMISTRY: EFFECTS OF SAMPLING, STORAGE, HANDLING, AND TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a general principle, it is nearly impossible to remove a porewater sample from sediment, use it in a toxicity testing vessel with test organisms, and prevent changes in the chemistry of the natural and anthropogenic organic and inorganic constituents. The degree of change in t...

  7. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment.

  8. [Toxicity effects of Rac- and S-metolachlor on two algaes].

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei-Dan; Liu, Hui-Jun; Fang, Zhi-Guo

    2012-02-01

    The enantioselective toxicity of the chiral herbicides Rac- and S-metolachlor to Scenedesmus obliquus and Chlorella vulgaris was determined, and the effect of humic acid was studied by using acute toxicity testing method. The results indicated that the toxicity of Rac- and S-metolachlor increased with increasing concentration and exposure time. The EC(50, 96 h) ratio of Rac-metolachlor to S-metolachlor was 2.25 for C. vulgaris and 1.81 for S. obliquus, indicating that S-metolachlor had higher effect on two algaes, and S. obliquus was more sensitive to Rac- and S-metolachlor. Linear correlation between toxicity on S. obliquus and C. vulgaris was observed. The toxicity of Rac- and S-metolachlor changed with humic acid, with more significant change was observed in S-metolachlor (P<0.05).

  9. Effects of calcium, magnesium, and sodium on alleviating cadmium toxicity to Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, B.P.; Lasier, P.J.; Miller, W.P.; Winger, P.V.

    2000-01-01

    Toxicity of trace metal ions to aquatic organisms, arising through either anthropogenic inputs or acidification of surface waters, continues to be both a regulatory and environmental problem. It is generally accepted that the free metal ion is the major toxic species (Florence et a1.,1992) and that inorganic or organic complexation renders the metal ion non-bioavailable (Meador, 1991, Galvez and Wood, 1997). However, water chemistry parameters such as alkalinity, hardness, dissolved organic carbon and pH influence metal ion toxicity either directly by lowering free metal ion concentration or indirectly through synergistic or antagonistic effects. Alkalinity and salinity can affect the speciation of metal ions by increasing ion-pair formation, thus decreasing free metal ion concentration. For example, Cu was found to be less toxic to rainbow trout in waters of high alkalinity (Miller and Mackay, 1980), due to formation of CuCO3 ion pair, and corresponding reduction in free Cu2+ concentration. The influence of salinity on the toxicity of cadmium to various organisms has been demonstrated in a number of studies (Bervoets et al., 1995, Hall et al., 1995, Lin and Dunson, 1993, Blust et al., 1992). In all these studies the apparent toxicity of cadmium was lowered as salinity was increased due to increased formation of CdC1+ and CDCl2 aqueous complexes that are non-toxic or of much lower toxicity than the free Cd2+ ion. Changes in pH exert both a biological and chemical effect on metal ion toxicity (Campbell and Stokes, 1985). Low pH favors greater metal ion solubility, and, in the absence of complexing ions, reduced speciation of the metal ion, which tends to increase toxicity compared to higher pH. However, Iow pH also enhances competition between H+ and metal ion for cell surface binding sites, which tends to decrease metal ion toxicity.

  10. Periphyton photosynthesis as an indicator of effluent toxicity: Relationship to effects on animal test species

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of freshwater and marine plants in effluent toxicity evaluations is uncommon despite the presence of test methods and recommendations for their use. It has been assumed that aquatic plants are less sensitive than animal test species and consequently, results from toxicity tests with invertebrates and fish have been used often as a surrogate data base. The study evaluated the ability of these animal toxicity tests to provide safe concentrations for in-stream periphyton. The toxicity of several samples of a treated municipal effluent were determined during a five-month period by monitoring short-term changes in periphyton photosynthesis (carbon-14 uptake) and by observing the effects on young production and survival of cultured daphnids and the fathead minnow. The effect levels from the various tests were compared. The effluent was seldom acutely toxic to Daphnia magna and the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) but it was consistently acutely and chronically toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia. Chronic effect levels ranged between 17 and 71% effluent. Significant inhibition and stimulation of periphyton photosynthesis occurred at concentrations of 6 to 39% effluent. Periphyton photosynthesis was a more sensitive effect parameter than animal survival and in some cases than Ceriodaphnia reproductive performance. The results indicate that effluent toxicity tests conducted routinely with daphnids and fish may not be sufficient to predict effects on indigenous flora in receiving waters.

  11. Methods for estimating cleaning effectiveness, dispersion, and toxicity of shoreline cleaning agents at oil spills

    SciTech Connect

    Stransky, B.C.; Clayton, J.R. Jr.; Schwartz, M.J.; Snyder, B.J.; Lees, D.C.; Adkins, A.C.; Reilly, T.J.; Michel, J.

    1995-12-31

    Chemical shoreline cleaning agents (SCAs) are designed to enhance removal of stranded oil from shoreline surfaces. However, difficulties associated with estimating cleaning effectiveness and toxicity of SCAs for site-specific conditions make it desirable to perform measurements in the field with onsite oil, substrates, and resident or otherwise appropriate test organisms. Information for onsite testing should address the following questions: (1) does use of an SCA promote removal of oil from substate surfaces; (2) does use of an SCA increase the amount of dispersed oil in the water column; (3) does toxicity for resident organisms indicate a likelihood for adverse effects; (4) does toxicity with a portable test organism indicate a likelihood for adverse effects? Methodologies are described for use in a portable kit to estimate quantitative and qualitative information for cleaning effectiveness, dispersion of oil, and toxicity of SCAs in the field. Toxicity methodologies for resident organisms include echinoderm fertilization, byssal thread attachment for mussels, and righting/water-escaping ability for periwinkle snails. Microtox{trademark} is used for toxicity measurements as a portable test organism/assay. Use of portable methodologies for assessing cleaning effectiveness, dispersion of oil, and toxicity of SCAs in the field can assist onsite evaluations for cleaning performance and relative risk to biological resources, which are important for supporting use-no use decisions for SCAs.

  12. Toxic effects of various solvents against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Reghu; Juliet, Sanis; Kumar, K G Ajith; Sunil, A R; Nair, Suresh N; Amithamol, K K; Rawat, Ajay Kumar Singh; Ghosh, Srikanta

    2011-09-01

    The current need of identification of a new acaricidal agent which is acceptable to public as environmentally safe is a daring task. Use of herbal acaricides is such an alternative. Most of the herbal extracts or fractions are dissolved in polar or non-polar solvents or detergents before tested for acaricidal activity. The solvent or detergent to be used for dissolving the herbal extract should be of little acaricidal activity. In the present study, experimentations were carried out on adult engorged female ticks to detect the toxicity of different solvents, viz. hexane, petroleum ether, n-butanol, isopropyl alcohol, chloroform, glycerol, ethyl acetate, acetone, ethanol, and methanol. The study revealed that methanol was the least toxic solvent against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus.

  13. Effects of toxicants on community metabolism in pools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitworth, Walter R.; Lane, Thomas H.

    1969-01-01

    Estimates of community metabolism of simulated natural environments were dcrivcd by diel oxygen techniques over a period of nine months. During this time, toxicants were added to some of the pools. "Natural" environmental factors and toxicants that did not affect the communities (0.02 mg/liter p,p' DDT; 0.1 mg/liter antimycin A; and 9.2 mg/liter KMnO,I) usually resulted in simultaneous changes, up or down, in both community photosynthesis and respiration. Concentrations (mg/liter) of 0.9 and 2.6 formalin, 10.0 nigrosine black, 10.0 and 2.0 malachite green, 0.1 Diquat, and 0,.5 and 5.0 CUSO.~ usually tlcprcsscd community oxygen production and increased community respiration for periods of 1 to 20 weeks.

  14. Methods for nanoparticle labeling of ricin and effect on toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, Alastair W.; Yu, Jun; Lindsay, Christopher D.; Nativo, Paola; Graham, Duncan

    2009-09-01

    The unique optical properties associated with nanostructured materials that support the excitation of surface plasmons offer many new opportunities for the enhanced optical investigation of biological materials that pose a security threat. In particular, ricin is considered a significant bioterrorism risk due to its high toxicity combined with its ready availability as a byproduct in castor oil production. Therefore, the development of optical techniques capable of rapid on-site toxin detection with high molecular specificity and sensitivity continues to be of significant importance. Furthermore, understanding of the ricin cell entry and intracellular pathways remains poor due to a lack of suitable bioanalytical techniques. Initial work aimed at simultaneously tackling both these issues is described where different approaches for the nanoparticle labeling of ricin are investigated along with changes in ricin toxicity associated with the labeling process.

  15. A model to predict threshold concentrations for toxic effects of chlorinated benzenes in sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchsman, P.C.; Duda, D.J.; Barber, T.R.

    1999-09-01

    A probabilistic model was developed to predict effects threshold concentrations for chlorinated benzenes in sediment. Based on published quantitative structure-activity relationships relating the toxicity of chlorinated benzenes to the degree of chlorination, congeners with the same number of chlorine substitutions were considered toxicologically equivalent. Hexachlorobenzene was excluded from the assessment based on a lack of aquatic toxicity at the water solubility limit. The equilibrium partitioning approach was applied in a probabilistic analysis to derive predicted effects thresholds (PETs) for each chlorinated benzene group, with model input distributions defined by published log K{sub ow} values and aquatic toxicity data extracted from the published literature. The probabilistic distributions of PETs generally increased with chlorination, with 20th percentile values ranging from 3.2 mg/kg{sub 1{degree}OC} for chlorobenzene to 67 mg/kg{sub 1%OC} for tetrachlorobenzene congeners. The toxicity of total chlorinated benzenes in sediment can be assessed by applying the PETs in a toxic index model, based on the assumption that multiple chlorinated benzene congeners will show approximately additive toxicity, as characteristic of nonpolar narcotic toxicants. The 20th percentile PET values are one to two orders of magnitude higher than published screening-level guidelines, suggesting that the screening-level guidelines will provide overly conservative assessments in most cases. Relevant spiked sediment toxicity data are very limited but seem consistent with the probabilistic model; additional testing could be conducted to confirm the model's predictions.

  16. Effects of storage on sediment toxicity, bioaccumulation potential, and chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tatem, H.E.; Brandon, D.L.; Lee, C.R.; Jarvis, A.S.; Rhett, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    Current guidance on storage of sediments for bioassay/bioaccumulation tests requires that samples be held at 4 C and used within 2 weeks of collection. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of sediment storage for 40 weeks on sediment toxicity, bioaccumulation potential, and chemical analyses. Toxicity and bioaccumulation tests were conducted five times during 40 weeks of storage. Chemical analyses were performed three times during this period. The data indicate that sediments can be held for longer than 2 to 4 weeks, in many cases, without significant effect on test results. However, results of the study also show that tests performed at different times can produce different results. This study showed that a sediment that was toxic to mysids remained toxic during 16 weeks of sediment storage. Two sediments that were toxic initially continued to show significant toxicity after 8 and 16 weeks of sediment storage. One sediment, not toxic initially or at 4 weeks, changed during storage, becoming significantly toxic compared to the Atlantic Ocean (Ref) sediment. The bioaccumulation results showed that certain sediment contaminants (lead, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, and some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs), generally do not reveal a statistical change in bioaccumulation, relative to Ref animals, during 16 weeks of sediment storage. Other PAHs, including phenanthrene, anthracene, benzo (a) anthracene, and chrysene, did change in bioaccumulation potential during storage.

  17. Effects of water temperature on the toxicity of chemicals to aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, F.; Brecken-Folse, J.; Howe, G.; Linton, T.

    1995-12-31

    Water temperatures fluctuate regularly in aquatic environments, producing physiological and ecological changes in resident biota. Temperature has been recognized as a critical factor affecting the toxicity of chemicals by altering the physiological condition of the biota and the interactions between organisms and toxicants. Temperature significantly affects respiration rates, chemical absorption, and chemical detoxification and excretion. Acute toxicity of most chemicals to aquatic organisms is positively correlated with temperature; however, the toxicity of some chemicals is negatively correlated with or not affected by temperature. Regression slopes of toxicity appear consistent among species within a chemical for temperature, indicating chemical rather than biological differences in toxicity. Temperature may not affect acute toxicity per se, but does affect bioavailability and, therefore, exposure. Octanol/water partition coefficients are altered by temperature and could replace some biological testing since the partition coefficient-acute toxicity relationship has been well established. Temperature may only alter the rate of intoxication in chronic exposures no-effect concentrations do not appear to be affected by temperature; only the time required to attain the same no-effect concentration varies.

  18. Toxic effect of metal cation binary mixtures to the seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Stevani, Cassius Vinicius; Zambotti-Villela, Leonardo; Yokoya, Nair Sumie; Colepicolo, Pio

    2014-01-01

    The macroalga Gracilaria domingensis is an important resource for the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and biotechnology industries. G. domingensis is at a part of the food web foundation, providing nutrients and microelements to upper levels. As seaweed storage metals in the vacuoles, they are considered the main vectors to magnify these toxic elements. This work describes the evaluation of the toxicity of binary mixtures of available metal cations based on the growth rates of G. domingensis over a 48-h exposure. The interactive effects of each binary mixture were determined using a toxic unit (TU) concept that was the sum of the relative contribution of each toxicant and calculated using the ratio between the toxicant concentration and its endpoint. Mixtures of Cd(II)/Cu(II) and Zn(II)/Ca(II) demonstrated to be additive; Cu(II)/Zn(II), Cu(II)/Mg(II), Cu(II)/Ca(II), Zn(II)/Mg(II), and Ca(II)/Mg(II) mixtures were synergistic, and all interactions studied with Cd(II) were antagonistic. Hypotheses that explain the toxicity of binary mixtures at the molecular level are also suggested. These results represent the first effort to characterize the combined effect of available metal cations, based on the TU concept on seaweed in a total controlled medium. The results presented here are invaluable to the understanding of seaweed metal cation toxicity in the marine environment, the mechanism of toxicity action and how the tolerance of the organism.

  19. Toxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles - the effect of nanoparticle properties.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yu Hang; Yung, Mana M N; Ng, Alan M C; Ma, Angel P Y; Wong, Stella W Y; Chan, Charis M N; Ng, Yip Hang; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Guo, Muyao; Wong, Mabel Ting; Leung, Frederick C C; Chan, Wai Kin; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Lee, Hung Kay

    2015-04-01

    Conflicting reports on the toxicity of CeO2 nanomaterials have been published in recent years, with some studies finding CeO2 nanoparticles to be toxic, while others found it to have protective effects against oxidative stress. To investigate the possible reasons for this, we have performed a comprehensive study on the physical and chemical properties of nanosized CeO2 from three different suppliers as well as CeO2 synthesized by us, and tested their toxicity. For toxicity tests, we have studied the effects of CeO2 nanoparticles on a Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli in the dark, under ambient and UV illuminations. We have also performed toxicity tests on the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum under ambient and UV illuminations. We found that the CeO2 nanoparticle samples exhibited significantly different toxicity, which could likely be attributed to the differences in interactions with cells, and possibly to differences in nanoparticle compositions. Our results also suggest that toxicity tests on bacteria may not be suitable for predicting the ecotoxicity of nanomaterials. The relationship between the toxicity and physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles is explicitly discussed in the light of the current results.

  20. Development of Novel Models for Describing Multiple Toxicity Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-12

    The data set used was one involving exposure of rats to two liver carcinogens - LAS (an aflatoxin ) and CYCA (a food contaminant) reported by NCI...assumptions regarding mixture toxicity. Essentially , many individuals, as well as current regulatory practice, believe that although mixture interactive... Aflatoxin B I in Rats Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 53, 2 453-458 (1974). compounds studied: Cyclopropenoid, Aflatoxin B, Diethylnitrosamine

  1. Toxic effects of the administration of Mikania glomerata Sprengel during the gestational period of hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Fulanetti, F.B.; Camargo, G.G.R.; Ferro, M.C.; Randazzo-Moura, P.

    2016-01-01

    Herbal medicine is an ancient practice that has been gaining acceptance of the medical class through scientific studies that prove its effectiveness. However, its use should still be cautious. Medicinal plants have potential toxic effects not yet discovered, and may have unproven interactions with other medications. The use of drugs during pregnancy is still very dangerous and vigorously studied; however, there are few studies of herbal medicines in pregnant women. Existing studies prioritize on teratogenic or abortifacient effects. The aim of this study was to analyze the toxic effects of Mikania glomerata Sprengel administration, popularly known as “guaco” during the gestational period of hypertensive rats. For this experimental groups consisting of pregnant Wistar rats received treatments with guaco extract (1 to 2 mL). In order to analyze the possible toxic effects of guaco during pregnancy, weight gain of rats was assessed during pregnancy; reproductive performance of rats, morphological parameters, and fetal placental histology were compared. Although some parameters presented significant differences, we can conclude that changes prioritized by literature, such as toxicity, vasodilation and hypotension, have not been caused by guaco. The only fetal changes observed were due to the maternal hypertension. Some studies have reported vasodilator and hypotensive effects of guaco. However, only a few studies exist, and its actual effects remain unknown. Specific studies should be developed with higher doses of guaco for a definitive conclusion of its toxic and non-toxic effects. PMID:26894037

  2. Toxicity and health effects of vehicle emissions in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shun-Hua; Zhou, Wei; Song, Jian; Peng, Bao-Cheng; Yuan, Dong; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Qi, Ping-Ping

    In China, the number of vehicles is increasing rapidly with the continuous development of economy, and vehicle emission pollution in major cities is more serious than ever. In this article, we summarized the results of a series of short-term assays, animal experiments and epidemiology investigations on the genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, respiratory toxicity and health effects of vehicle emissions in Shanghai, including gasoline exhausts (gas condensate and particles), diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and scooter exhaust particles (SEP). The results showed that: (1) Both gases and particulate phases of the exhausts of different kinds of vehicles showed strong mutagenicity in Ames test (TA98 and TA100 strains), rat hepatocyte unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay, and mouse micronucleus assay, and vehicle emissions could induce the transformation of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. DEP and SEP could induce the transformation of human diploid cell strain (KMB-13) cells, immunohistochemistry assay showed that c-myc and p21 proteins were highly expressed in the transformed cells. DEP and SEP could also inhibit the gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) of BALB/C3T3 cells (2) Vehicle emissions could decrease the number of macrophages in the lung (bronchial alveolar lavage fluid) (BALF) of male SD rats. Vehicle emissions could also increase the proportion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), the content of cetyneuraminic acid (NA), the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkali phosphate (AKP), acid phosphate (ACP) in the lung BALF of the animals. (3) In epidemiology investigation, the proportion of those who have respiratory symptoms and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) in the workers who were exposed to DEP ( n=806) were much higher than those of the controls ( n=413). The OR (odd ratio) values of angina, nasal obstruction, phlegm, short of breath and COPD were 2.27, 3.08, 3.00, 3.19 and 2.32, respectively, and the proportion of those who

  3. Cardiovascular and Hepatic Toxicity of Cocaine: Potential Beneficial Effects of Modulators of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Manuela; Antonilli, Letizia; Togna, Anna Rita; Grassi, Maria Caterina; Badiani, Aldo; Saso, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is thought to play an important role in the pharmacological and toxic effects of various drugs of abuse. Herein we review the literature on the mechanisms responsible for the cardiovascular and hepatic toxicity of cocaine with special focus on OS-related mechanisms. We also review the preclinical and clinical literature concerning the putative therapeutic effects of OS modulators (such as N-acetylcysteine, superoxide dismutase mimetics, nitroxides and nitrones, NADPH oxidase inhibitors, xanthine oxidase inhibitors, and mitochondriotropic antioxidants) for the treatment of cocaine toxicity. We conclude that available OS modulators do not appear to have clinical efficacy. PMID:26823954

  4. Webinar Presentation: Vitamins, Minerals and Metals: Do Healthy Diets Counteract Health Effects of Toxicants?

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Vitamins, Minerals and Metals: Do Healthy Diets Counteract Health Effects of Toxicants?, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Food and Children's Health held on Dec. 9, 2015.

  5. TOXICITY APPROACHES TO ASSESSING MINING IMPACTS AND MINE WASTE TREATMENT EFFECTIVENESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA Office of Research and Development's National Exposure Research Laboratory and National Risk Management Research Laboratory have been evaluating the impact of mining sites on receiving streams and the effectiveness of waste treatment technologies in removing toxicity fo...

  6. Webinar Presentation: Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Neurodevelopment.

  7. Effects of Environmental Toxicants on Metabolic Activity of Natural Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Carole L. H.; Vestal, J. Robie

    1983-01-01

    Two methods of measuring microbial activity were used to study the effects of toxicants on natural microbial communities. The methods were compared for suitability for toxicity testing, sensitivity, and adaptability to field applications. This study included measurements of the incorporation of 14C-labeled acetate into microbial lipids and microbial glucosidase activity. Activities were measured per unit biomass, determined as lipid phosphate. The effects of various organic and inorganic toxicants on various natural microbial communities were studied. Both methods were useful in detecting toxicity, and their comparative sensitivities varied with the system studied. In one system, the methods showed approximately the same sensitivities in testing the effects of metals, but the acetate incorporation method was more sensitive in detecting the toxicity of organic compounds. The incorporation method was used to study the effects of a point source of pollution on the microbiota of a receiving stream. Toxic doses were found to be two orders of magnitude higher in sediments than in water taken from the same site, indicating chelation or adsorption of the toxicant by the sediment. The microbiota taken from below a point source outfall was 2 to 100 times more resistant to the toxicants tested than was that taken from above the outfall. Downstream filtrates in most cases had an inhibitory effect on the natural microbiota taken from above the pollution source. The microbial methods were compared with commonly used bioassay methods, using higher organisms, and were found to be similar in ability to detect comparative toxicities of compounds, but were less sensitive than methods which use standard media because of the influences of environmental factors. PMID:16346432

  8. Effects of sediment bioturbation by Chironomus tentans on toxicity of heavy metals to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, M.S.; Clements, W.H.

    1994-12-31

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine the toxicological significance of bioturbation by Chironomus tentans (Diptera: Chironomidae) exposed to mixtures of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) in sediment. Overlying water was collected from beakers with and without chironomids. Overlying water samples from beakers with chironomids showed significantly higher levels of total zinc (p = 0.0088), copper (p < 0.0001) and lead (p = 0.0485) compared to beakers without chironomids. Ceriodaphnia dubia chronic toxicity tests were used to evaluate toxicity of the overlying water. Overlying water from beakers without chironomids was not toxic to C. dubia. In contrast, overlying water from beakers with chironomids was acutely toxic to C. dubia at dilutions > 50%. Dilutions of 6.25%, 12.5% and 25% had a reproductive effect on C. dubia. Results of this laboratory experiment indicate that benthic invertebrates may be responsible for increased toxicity of overlying waters.

  9. Use of passive samplers for improving oil toxicity and spill effects assessment.

    PubMed

    Letinski, Daniel; Parkerton, Thomas; Redman, Aaron; Manning, Ryan; Bragin, Gail; Febbo, Eric; Palandro, David; Nedwed, Tim

    2014-09-15

    Methods that quantify dissolved hydrocarbons are needed to link oil exposures to toxicity. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers can serve this purpose. If fibers are equilibrated with oiled water, dissolved hydrocarbons partition to and are concentrated on the fiber. The absorbed concentration (Cpolymer) can be quantified by thermal desorption using GC/FID. Further, given that the site of toxic action is hypothesized as biota lipid and partitioning of hydrocarbons to lipid and fibers is well correlated, Cpolymer is hypothesized to be a surrogate for toxicity prediction. To test this method, toxicity data for physically and chemically dispersed oils were generated for shrimp, Americamysis bahia, and compared to test exposures characterized by Cpolymer. Results indicated that Cpolymer reliably predicted toxicity across oils and dispersions. To illustrate field application, SPME results are reported for oil spills at the Ohmsett facility. SPME fibers provide a practical tool to improve characterization of oil exposures and predict effects in future lab and field studies.

  10. Potential toxic effects of glyphosate and its commercial formulations below regulatory limits.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, R; Defarge, N; Spiroux de Vendômois, J; Séralini, G E

    2015-10-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GlyBH), including Roundup, are the most widely used pesticides worldwide. Their uses have increased exponentially since their introduction on the market. Residue levels in food or water, as well as human exposures, are escalating. We have reviewed the toxic effects of GlyBH measured below regulatory limits by evaluating the published literature and regulatory reports. We reveal a coherent body of evidence indicating that GlyBH could be toxic below the regulatory lowest observed adverse effect level for chronic toxic effects. It includes teratogenic, tumorigenic and hepatorenal effects. They could be explained by endocrine disruption and oxidative stress, causing metabolic alterations, depending on dose and exposure time. Some effects were detected in the range of the recommended acceptable daily intake. Toxic effects of commercial formulations can also be explained by GlyBH adjuvants, which have their own toxicity, but also enhance glyphosate toxicity. These challenge the assumption of safety of GlyBH at the levels at which they contaminate food and the environment, albeit these levels may fall below regulatory thresholds. Neurodevelopmental, reproductive, and transgenerational effects of GlyBH must be revisited, since a growing body of knowledge suggests the predominance of endocrine disrupting mechanisms caused by environmentally relevant levels of exposure.

  11. Toxic substances: Effects on fish. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the biochemical and physiological effects of toxic substances on fish populations. Particular emphasis is placed upon using fish as an indicator of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Toxicity effects of mercury, zinc, calcium chloride, sodium chloride, lead, cadmium, copper, and aluminum in freshwater and seawater fish are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  12. [Effects of stress duration and non-toxic ions on heavy metals toxicity to Arabidopsis seed germination and seedling growth].

    PubMed

    Li, Weiqiang; Mao, Renzhao; Liu, Xiaojing

    2005-10-01

    The study on the toxicity of heavy metals Hg2+, Cd+, Cu2+ and Pb2+ to Arabidopsis se d germination and seedling growth showed that the test heavy metals had a stronger toxicity on seedling growth than on seed germination. The toxicity on seedlings was in order of Cu2+ > Hg2+ > Cd2+ /Pb2+, while on seeds was Hg2+ > Cd2+ > Pb2+/Cu2+. Seed germination rate was decreased with increasing stress duration, and different heavy metals showed different toxicity at different stress duration. For example, Hg2+ displayed a stronger toxicity at 12 - 24 h stress, while Cd2+ was at 0 - 12 h stress. It seemed that seed coat played an important role in seed tolerance to heavy metals. The interaction between non-toxic ions and heavy metal ions on seed germination showed that Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+ at 5 mmol x L(-1) could enhance the toxicity of Hg2+, but did not affect Cd2+ toxicity. For seedling growth, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+ might enhance the toxicity of Hg2+, Ca2+ might alleviate the toxicity of Cd2+ but enhance the toxicity of Cu2+ , and K+ might alleviate Pb2+ toxicity. The mechanism of heavy metals injury was discussed in the paper.

  13. Effect of the test media and toxicity of LAS on the growth of Isochrysis galbana.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Perez, M C; Perales-VargasMachuca, J A; Nebot-Sanz, E; Sales-Márquez, D

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, the toxicity of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) was evaluated in the marine microalga Isochrysis galbana using data of growth inhibition toxicity tests at 96-h exposure time. Toxicity was examined in standard conditions and by means of the modification of two variables of the test media: (1) the dilution water and (2) the content of nutrients in the test medium. For this purpose, a total of 10 toxicity test were designed: five dilution waters, four natural marine waters and one synthetic seawater; each in two different nutritive conditions, saturated nutrient concentration (SC) by the addition of modified f/2 nutritive medium, and natural nutrient concentration (NC), i.e., without the addition of f/2. At threshold toxicity levels, the dilution waters used in the test and the nutrient concentrations did not affect the toxicity of LAS. At IC50 concentrations, the toxicity of LAS is influenced by both variables: under SC conditions, the toxic effect of LAS diminishes, obtaining in all the tests IC50 > 10 mg/L LAS. Under NC conditions, IC50 concentrations ranging between 3.15 and 9.26 mg/L LAS have been obtained.

  14. The effects of characteristics of substituents on toxicity of the nitroaromatics: HiT QSAR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, Victor E.; Muratov, Eugene N.; Artemenko, Anatoly G.; Gorb, Leonid; Qasim, Mohammad; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2008-10-01

    The present study applies the Hierarchical Technology for Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (HiT QSAR) for (i) evaluation of the influence of the characteristics of 28 nitroaromatic compounds (some of which belong to a widely known class of explosives) as to their toxicity; (ii) prediction of toxicity for new nitroaromatic derivatives; (iii) analysis of the effects of substituents in nitroaromatic compounds on their toxicity in vivo. The 50% lethal dose concentration for rats (LD50) was used to develop the QSAR models based on simplex representation of molecular structure. The preliminary 1D QSAR results show that even the information on the composition of molecules reveals the main tendencies of changes in toxicity. The statistic characteristics for partial least squares 2D QSAR models are quite satisfactory ( R 2 = 0.96-0.98; Q 2 = 0.91-0.93; R 2 test = 0.89-0.92), which allows us to carry out the prediction of activity for 41 novel compounds designed by the application of new combinations of substituents represented in the training set. The comprehensive analysis of toxicity changes as a function of substituent position and nature was carried out. Molecular fragments that promote and interfere with toxicity were defined on the basis of the obtained models. It was shown that the mutual influence of substituents in the benzene ring plays a crucial role regarding toxicity. The influence of different substituents on toxicity can be mediated via different C-H fragments of the aromatic ring.

  15. Glioprotective Effects of Ashwagandha Leaf Extract against Lead Induced Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Praveen; Singh, Raghavendra; Nazmi, Arshed; Lakhanpal, Dinesh; Kataria, Hardeep; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), also known as Indian Ginseng, is a well-known Indian medicinal plant due to its antioxidative, antistress, antigenotoxic, and immunomodulatory properties. The present study was designed to assess and establish the cytoprotective potential of Ashwagandha leaf aqueous extract against lead induced toxicity. Pretreatment of C6 cells with 0.1% Ashwagandha extract showed cytoprotection against 25 μM to 400 μM concentration of lead nitrate. Further pretreatment with Ashwagandha extract to lead nitrate exposed cells (200 μM) resulted in normalization of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression as well as heat shock protein (HSP70), mortalin, and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) expression. Further, the cytoprotective efficacy of Ashwagandha extract was studied in vivo. Administration of Ashwagandha extract provided significant protection to lead induced altered antioxidant defense that may significantly compromise normal cellular function. Ashwagandha also provided a significant protection to lipid peroxidation (LPx) levels, catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) but not reduced glutathione (GSH) contents in brain tissue as well as peripheral organs, liver and kidney, suggesting its ability to act as a free radical scavenger protecting cells against toxic insult. These results, thus, suggest that Ashwagandha water extract may have the potential therapeutic implication against lead poisoning. PMID:24987671

  16. Effect of circadian rhythm on CNS oxygen toxicity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, D. G.; Dexter, J. D.; Mengel, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    The circadian rhythm in susceptibility to oxygen toxicity seizures was investigated by using six groups of 20 male Sprague-Dawley rats (101-196 gm.). The animals were given standard chow, exposed to standard diurnal conditions of light (0700-1900 hr) and dark (1900-0700 hr), and fasted for 15-16 hr prior to exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. The animals were placed in a previously oxygen flushed chamber and raised to 60 psi (gauge) oxygen at a rate of 3 psi/min. Time of exposure started with attainment of 60 psi. End point was first convulsion. The animals' weights were equally distributed within the groups, and the groups were defined by hour of exposure. Time of exposure in minutes prior to seizure was significantly longer in those exposed at 0700-0800 hr and 1000-1100 hr than in four other groups. There was no relationship between animals' weights and time of exposure to seizures. All R values were negative, and the highest R value was -035. These data suggest a definite circadian rhythm in susceptibility to oxygen toxicity seizures.

  17. Effects of gamma radiation on cork wastewater: Antioxidant activity and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Joana; Pimenta, Andreia I; Popescu, Larisa; Besleaga, Alexandra; Dias, Maria Inês; Santos, Pedro M P; Melo, Rita; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Margaça, Fernanda M A

    2017-02-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the toxicity and antioxidant activity of cork boiling wastewater and the effects of gamma radiation on these parameters was performed. Antioxidant activity was evaluated using different methodologies as DPPH radical scavenging activity, reducing power and inhibition of β-carotene bleaching. The results have shown that gamma radiation can induce an increase on the antioxidant activity of cork boiling wastewater. Toxicity tests were performed to access the potential added value of the irradiated wastewaters and/or minimization of the impact for discharge in the environment. Two different methods for toxicity evaluation were followed, bacterial growth inhibition test and cytotoxicity assay, in order to predict the behavior of different cells (prokaryotic and eukaryotic) in the presence of cork wastewater. Non-treated cork boiling wastewater seemed to be non-toxic for prokaryotic cells (Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis) but toxic for eukaryotic cells (A549 human cells and RAW264.7 mouse cells). The gamma radiation treatment at doses of 100 kGy appeared to increase the toxicity of cork compounds for all tested cells, which could be related to a toxic effect of radiolytic products of cork compounds in the wastewaters.

  18. The effect of seasonality and body size on the sensitivity of marine amphipods to toxicants.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Landa, Víctor; Belzunce, María Jesús; Franco, Javier

    2008-12-01

    Two factors, seasonality and body size, were studied to determine their influence on the sensitivity of the amphipods Corophium urdaibaiense and Corophium multisetosum to toxicants. Seasonality was studied by comparing LC50 values for cadmium and ammonia toxicity to both species over a year. Body size effect was studied by comparing LC50 values of ammonia in three size categories of C. urdaibaiense. Except for the case of C. urdaibaiense with ammonia as a toxicant, the sensitivity was maximum during summer and minimum during winter. Furthermore, differences in sensitivities were found among the three body size groups studied.

  19. Radiolysis of selected antibiotics and their toxic effects on various aquatic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Y.; Yu, Seung H.; Lee, Myun J.; Kim, Tae H.; Kim, Sang D.

    2009-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the decomposition of three γ-irradiated antibiotics (e.g., tetracycline, sulfamethazine, and lincomycin) and to compare the toxic effects on Daphnia magna, Vibrio fischeri, and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The median cell growth inhibition concentrations (IC 50) of tetracycline, lincomycin, and sulfamethazine for P. subcapitata dramatically increased (e.g., toxicity decreased) after radiolysis. The results demonstrated that γ-radiation treatment was efficient to decompose antibiotics and thereby their toxicity on P. subcaptitata remarkably decreased due to reduced parent compounds.

  20. Tungsten toxicity.

    PubMed

    Witten, Mark L; Sheppard, Paul R; Witten, Brandon L

    2012-04-05

    There is emerging evidence that tungsten has toxic health effects. We summarize the recent tungsten toxicity research in this short review. Tungsten is widely used in many commercial and military applications because it has the second highest melting temperature of any element. Consequently, it is important to elucidate the potential health effects of tungsten.

  1. Selection of cryoprotectants based on their toxic effects on oyster gametes and embryos.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Iracema A; Leite, Maria Bernadete N L; Sampaio de Araújo, Milena Maria; Sansone, Giovanni; Pereira, Solange A; do Espírito Santo, E Maristela

    2005-08-01

    Cryopreservation is a valuable tool for aquaculture by providing continuous seed production, regardless of the spawning seasons. This study aimed to select the least toxic among the cryoprotectants dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO), propylene glycol (PG), and methanol (MET) based on their toxicological effects on Crassostrea rhizophorae gametes and trochophores. They were exposed for 10, 20, and 30 min to a range of concentrations of those cryoprotectants. The endpoint was EC15-24 h (effective concentration which causes abnormalities in 15% of the population exposed to the cryoprotectants for 24 h), recently determined as the chronic value (the concentration at which chronic effects are first observed) for C. rhizophorae embryonic phases. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) among the exposure times in Me2SO toxic effects to either gametes or trochophores. For MET, the increase in exposure time resulted in higher toxicity for gametes, but not for trochophores, while for PG there was a significant (p>0.05) increase in toxicity with the increase of exposure for trochophores and spermatozoa, but not for oocytes. For gametes, MET was the most toxic among the cryoprotectants, while PG was the most toxic for trochophores.

  2. A Predictive Model for Toxicity Effects Assessment of Biotransformed Hepatic Drugs Using Iterative Sampling Method

    PubMed Central

    Tharwat, Alaa; Moemen, Yasmine S.; Hassanien, Aboul Ella

    2016-01-01

    Measuring toxicity is one of the main steps in drug development. Hence, there is a high demand for computational models to predict the toxicity effects of the potential drugs. In this study, we used a dataset, which consists of four toxicity effects:mutagenic, tumorigenic, irritant and reproductive effects. The proposed model consists of three phases. In the first phase, rough set-based methods are used to select the most discriminative features for reducing the classification time and improving the classification performance. Due to the imbalanced class distribution, in the second phase, different sampling methods such as Random Under-Sampling, Random Over-Sampling and Synthetic Minority Oversampling Technique are used to solve the problem of imbalanced datasets. ITerative Sampling (ITS) method is proposed to avoid the limitations of those methods. ITS method has two steps. The first step (sampling step) iteratively modifies the prior distribution of the minority and majority classes. In the second step, a data cleaning method is used to remove the overlapping that is produced from the first step. In the third phase, Bagging classifier is used to classify an unknown drug into toxic or non-toxic. The experimental results proved that the proposed model performed well in classifying the unknown samples according to all toxic effects in the imbalanced datasets. PMID:27934950

  3. Spatial dynamics of a nutrient-phytoplankton system with toxic effect on phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Subhendu; Tiwari, P K; Misra, A K; Chattopadhyay, J

    2015-06-01

    The production of toxins by some species of phytoplankton is known to have several economic, ecological, and human health impacts. However, the role of toxins on the spatial distribution of phytoplankton is not well understood. In the present study, the spatial dynamics of a nutrient-phytoplankton system with toxic effect on phytoplankton is investigated. We analyze the linear stability of the system and obtain the condition for Turing instability. In the presence of toxic effect, we find that the distribution of nutrient and phytoplankton becomes inhomogeneous in space and results in different patterns, like stripes, spots, and the mixture of them depending on the toxicity level. We also observe that the distribution of nutrient and phytoplankton shows spatiotemporal oscillation for certain toxicity level.

  4. Characterization of cholinesterases in Chironomus riparius and the effects of three herbicides on chlorpyrifos toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Joanne; Monteiro, Marta S; Quintaneiro, Carla; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2013-11-15

    In this study, the toxicities of four pesticides (the herbicides atrazine, terbuthylazine, metolachlor and the insecticide chlorpyrifos) previously detected in the Alqueva reservoir/dam (south of Portugal) were evaluated individually and in binary combinations of the herbicides and the insecticide using fourth-instar larvae of the aquatic midge Chironomus riparius. Chlorpyrifos induced toxicity to midges in all the 48 h toxicity bioassays performed. The swimming behaviour of the larvae was impaired, with EC50 values ranging from 0.15 to 0.17 μg/L. However, neither s-triazine (atrazine and terbuthylazine) herbicides nor metolachlor alone at concentrations up to 200 μg/L caused significant toxicity to C. riparius. When combined with both s-triazine herbicides, chlorpyrifos toxicity was enhanced by approximately 2-fold when tested in a binary mixture experimental setup, at the 50% effective concentration levels. To evaluate how chlorpyrifos toxicity was being increased, the cholinesterases (ChE) were characterized biochemically using different substrates and selective inhibitors. The results obtained suggested that the main enzyme present in this species is acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and therefore it was assayed upon C. riparius exposures to all pesticides individually and as binary mixtures. Although atrazine and terbuthylazine are not effective inhibitors of AChE, the potentiation of chlorpyrifos toxicity by the two s-triazine herbicides was associated with a potentiation in the inhibition of AChE in midges; both s-triazine herbicides at 200 μg/L increased the inhibition of the AChE activity by 7 and 8-fold, respectively. A strong correlation was observed between swimming behaviour disturbances of larvae and the inhibition of the AChE activity. In contrast, metolachlor did not affect chlorpyrifos toxicity at any of the concentrations tested. Therefore, the herbicides atrazine and terbuthylazine can act as synergists in the presence of chlorpyrifos, increasing

  5. Paraquat toxicity and effect of hydrogen peroxide on thermophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Allgood, G S; Perry, J J

    1985-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ++) increased cyanide-resistant univalent respiration in cell suspensions of five strains of obligately thermophilic bacteria. PQ++ was reduced by an NADH: or NADPH:paraquat diaphorase and selectivity for NADH, NADPH, or both electron donors varied among the thermophiles. Superoxide anion production that was dependent on the presence of PQ++ was shown by following the superoxide dismutase-inhibitable reduction of cytochrome c. In addition, the PQ++-dependent formation of hydrogen peroxide from superoxide anion was evident in two of the thermophilic strains. Catalase synthesis was induced by adding hydrogen peroxide to the growth medium of the thermophiles. The induction of catalase to eliminate hydrogen peroxide appears to be an important response of these thermophilic bacteria to oxygen toxicity.

  6. The lifelong effects of early childhood adversity and toxic stress.

    PubMed

    Shonkoff, Jack P; Garner, Andrew S

    2012-01-01

    Advances in fields of inquiry as diverse as neuroscience, molecular biology, genomics, developmental psychology, epidemiology, sociology, and economics are catalyzing an important paradigm shift in our understanding of health and disease across the lifespan. This converging, multidisciplinary science of human development has profound implications for our ability to enhance the life prospects of children and to strengthen the social and economic fabric of society. Drawing on these multiple streams of investigation, this report presents an ecobiodevelopmental framework that illustrates how early experiences and environmental influences can leave a lasting signature on the genetic predispositions that affect emerging brain architecture and long-term health. The report also examines extensive evidence of the disruptive impacts of toxic stress, offering intriguing insights into causal mechanisms that link early adversity to later impairments in learning, behavior, and both physical and mental well-being. The implications of this framework for the practice of medicine, in general, and pediatrics, specifically, are potentially transformational. They suggest that many adult diseases should be viewed as developmental disorders that begin early in life and that persistent health disparities associated with poverty, discrimination, or maltreatment could be reduced by the alleviation of toxic stress in childhood. An ecobiodevelopmental framework also underscores the need for new thinking about the focus and boundaries of pediatric practice. It calls for pediatricians to serve as both front-line guardians of healthy child development and strategically positioned, community leaders to inform new science-based strategies that build strong foundations for educational achievement, economic productivity, responsible citizenship, and lifelong health.

  7. Interactive effects of temperature and drought on cassava growth and toxicity: implications for food security?

    PubMed

    Brown, Alicia L; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Gleadow, Ros; Miller, Rebecca E

    2016-10-01

    Cassava is an important dietary component for over 1 billion people, and its ability to yield under drought has led to it being promoted as an important crop for food security under climate change. Despite its known photosynthetic plasticity in response to temperature, little is known about how temperature affects plant toxicity or about interactions between temperature and drought, which is important because cassava tissues contain high levels of toxic cyanogenic glucosides, a major health and food safety concern. In a controlled glasshouse experiment, plants were grown at 2 daytime temperatures (23 °C and 34 °C), and either well-watered or subject to a 1 month drought prior to harvest at 6 months. The objective was to determine the separate and interactive effects of temperature and drought on growth and toxicity. Both temperature and drought affected cassava physiology and chemistry. While temperature alone drove differences in plant height and above-ground biomass, drought and temperature × drought interactions most affected tuber yield, as well as foliar and tuber chemistry, including C : N, nitrogen and cyanide potential (CNp; total cyanide released from cyanogenic glucosides). Conditions that most stimulated growth and yield (well-watered × high temperature) effected a reduction in tuber toxicity, whereas drought inhibited growth and yield, and was associated with increased foliar and tuber toxicity. The magnitude of drought effects on tuber yield and toxicity were greater at high temperature; thus, increases in tuber CNp were not merely a consequence of reduced tuber biomass. Findings confirm that cassava is adaptable to forecast temperature increases, particularly in areas of adequate or increasing rainfall; however, in regions forecast for increased incidence of drought, the effects of drought on both food quality (tuber toxicity) and yield are a greater threat to future food security and indicate an increasing necessity for processing of

  8. Enhancement of toxicity and enzyme-repressing activity of p-dioxane by chlorination: stereoselective effects.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y T; Neuburger, B J; Arcos, J C; Argus, M F; Nishiyama, K; Griffin, G W

    1980-01-01

    The acute toxicity of p-dioxane may be enhanced up to 1000-fold by chlorination of the compound. The effect was stereoselective. Of the stereoisomers tested, tetrachloro-p-dioxane, isomer I (2r, 3t, 5t, 6c) was over 80 times more toxic than isomer II (2r, 3c, 5t, 6t). The latter compound was also a potent repressor of hepatic dimethylnitrosamine-demethylase I (DMN-d) and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH).

  9. Effect of cytochrome P450 inhibitors and anticonvulsants on the acute toxicity of acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Benz, Frederick W; Nerland, Donald E

    2005-10-01

    Some of the more striking expressions of toxicity are the tremors and seizures observed approximately 100 min after exposure of rats to an acutely toxic dose of acrylonitrile (AN). These early events are followed by a second wave of severe clonic convulsions that occur just prior to death at about 3-4 h. For AN, at least two chemical entities could produce these toxic effects, namely the parent AN molecule, the metabolically-released cyanide, or both. Which of these two agents is responsible for each of the symptoms of acute intoxication is not known. To help dissect the toxicity, it was anticipated that an effective inhibitor of the oxidative metabolism of AN to cyanide could help us to understand which toxic symptoms might be associated with each agent. Three inhibitors of oxidative metabolism were tested, namely SKF-525A, 1-benzylimidazole and metyrapone and one alternative substrate, ethanol. As compared to SKF-525A and metyrapone, both 1-benzylimidazole and ethanol were highly effective in reducing blood cyanide levels to insignificant levels in rats treated with an LD90 dose of AN. In addition, both agents abolished the early seizure activity, suggesting that this first phase of seizures is due to cyanide and not the parent molecule. 1-Benzylimidazole did not prevent the severe clonic convulsive phase preceding death, suggesting that these terminal convulsions are due to the toxic effects of the parent AN molecule. The CNS depressant ethanol was only partially effective in attenuating the terminal convulsions. None of these agents affected the incidence of AN-induced mortality, clearly establishing that, even in the absence of cyanide, the parent AN molecule is acutely toxic. The partial effectiveness of ethanol suggested that anticonvulsants might be of benefit. Both phenobarbital and phenytoin protected rats from both the early and terminal convulsions, while valproic acid was ineffective. These effects were not related to a reduction in blood cyanide

  10. The combined toxic effects of nonpolar narcotic chemicals to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shih-Hung; Tsai, Kuo-Pei; Chen, Chung-Yuan

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents the toxicity data of 10 nonpolar narcotic chemicals on Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (green algae) assessed by a new algal toxicity testing technique conducted under air-tight environment. Based on DO production, median effective concentration (EC50) varies from 1.73 mg/L (1-octanol) to 8,040 mg/L (2-propanol). The endpoint of algal growth rate reveals similar sensitivity as that from DO production. Compared to literature data, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Nitrosomonas are apparently more sensitive to nonpolar narcotics than other organisms such as minnow, daphnia, and Tetrahymena pyriformis. Furthermore, good correlations between toxic effects observed from Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and other aquatic organisms were found. Hence, algal toxicity test can be considered as a surrogate test for estimating the toxicity of nonpolar chemicals to fathead minnow, Microtox, activated sludge, Daphina magna, and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The combined effects of 13 binary mixtures of nonpolar chemicals were investigated using both additive-index method and isobologram analysis. Overall speaking, the joint actions between these chemicals are strictly additive. Model analyses indicate that these compounds act on identical reaction sites or receptors, which verify that these chemicals are of the same toxicity mechanism (narcosis).

  11. Effects of pH and hardness on chronic toxicity of ammonia to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.G.; Crunkilton, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    Ammonia is one of the most common toxicants encountered in municipal and industrial discharges. There is limited information on how changes in water chemistry affect toxicity of ammonia to invertebrates. This study assessed effects of pH and hardness on chronic toxicity of unionized ammonia to Ceriodaphnia dubia. Three-brood life cycle tests were run at four pH levels in combination with three hardness levels to determine effects on reproduction. Hardness levels ranged from 40 mg/L CaCO{sub 3} to 180 mg/L CaCO{sub 3}, while pH levels ranged from 6.5 to 9.0. Hardness and pH in combination yielded the lowest toxicity at pH 9.0 in hard water, with a LOEC of 1.31 mg/L unionized ammonia-nitrogen (UIA-N). The highest toxicity was at pH 6.5 in medium water, with a LOEC of 0.04 mg/L UIA-N. Toxicity of unionized ammonia (UIA) generally decreased as hardness increased. Average LOECs ranged from 0.33 mg/L UIA-N in soft water to 0.77 mg/L UIA-N in hard water. Unionized ammonia was least toxic in hard water at pH 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0. At pH 6.5 UIA was least toxic in soft water. Toxicity of UIA generally decreased as pH increased. Average LOECs ranged from 0.08 mg/L UIA-N at pH 6.5 to 0.77 mg/L UIA-N at pH 9.0. Unionized ammonia was most toxic at pH 6.5 at all hardness levels. In both soft and hard water UIA was least toxic at pH 9.0, while in medium water it was least toxic at pH 8.0.

  12. Toxic effects of individual and combined effects of BTEX on Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Lee, Jong-Wha; Sichani, Homa Teimouri; Ng, Jack C

    2015-03-02

    BTEX is a group of volatile organic compounds consisting of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes. Environmental contamination of BTEX can occur in the groundwater with their effects on the aquatic organisms and ecosystem being sparsely studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxic effects of individual and mixed BTEX on Euglena gracilis (E. gracilis). We examined the growth rate, morphological changes and chlorophyll contents in E. gracilis Z and its mutant SMZ cells treated with single and mixture of BTEX. BTEX induced morphological change, formation of lipofuscin, and decreased chlorophyll content of E. gracilis Z in a dose response manner. The toxicity of individual BTEX on cell growth and chlorophyll inhibition is in the order of xylenes>ethylbenzene>toluene>benzene. SMZ was found more sensitive to BTEX than Z at much lower concentrations between 0.005 and 5 μM. The combined effect of mixed BTEX on chlorophyll contents was shown to be concentration addition (CA). Results from this study suggested that E. gracilis could be a suitable model for monitoring BTEX in the groundwater and predicting the combined effects on aqueous ecosystem.

  13. Effects of protein-calorie malnutrition and refeeding on fluorouracil toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gamelli, R.L.; Foster, R.S. Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Mice were used to study the effects of protein-calorie malnutrition and its reversal on granulocyte-macrophage production and fluorouracil's toxic effect on bone marrow. An in vitro quantitative clonal culture technique for bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) was used. Animals on a protein-free but otherwise complete diet for ten days had a significant contraction in total marrow cellularity and GM-CFC numbers paralleling the animal's weight loss. The acute toxic effect of fluorouracil on bone marrow was not increased in protein-deprived animals. On refeeding, there was a biphasic response in the degree of toxic effect on marrow. Animals refed for one day had significantly increased fluorouracil-related marrow abnormalities. However, animals refed for four days, when marrows were repleted, were partially protected from the drug's cytotoxic effects. The increased sensitivity in mice refed for one day was related to more GM-CFC in active DNA synthesis.

  14. Effect of pH on the toxicity and bioconcentration of sulfadiazine on Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Anskjær, Gitte Gotholdt; Rendal, Cecilie; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2013-05-01

    The antimicrobial sulfonamide sulfadiazine has in the last decades been detected in environmental water bodies, both surface and ground water. Since pH in the environment may vary considerably, this study examined the toxicity of the amphoter sulfadiazine towards Daphnia magna at pH levels of 6.0, 7.5 and 8.5, thus taking the impact of speciation into consideration, contrary to earlier eco-toxicity studies conducted at standard conditions. Toxicity tests were performed using the standard ISO 6341 test procedure modified to accommodate the three pH levels and the toxicity was expressed as EC50. After 48 h the EC50 was determined to be 27.2, 188 and 310 mg L(-1) at pH 6.0, 7.5 and 8.5, respectively, thus demonstrating a significant effect of pH on the toxicity of sulfadiazine. Furthermore, the bioconcentration factor (dry weight) was determined to be 50 and 36 at pH 6.0 and 8.5, respectively. The higher toxicity at the lower pHs was assumed to be caused by the higher fraction of un-ionized sulfadiazine at the lower pHs. However, the one and a half fold higher bioconcentration at pH 6.0 relative to pH 8.5 does not match the more than ten times higher toxicity at pH 6.0. When comparing the fraction of neutral compound to toxicity and bioconcentration results neither toxicity nor bioconcentration can be ascribed solely to the unionized fraction of sulfadiazine.

  15. Toxicity of parathion to captive European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)-absence of seasonal effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Grue, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of season on the toxicity of the prototypic organophosphorus insecticide parathion was evaluated using adult European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) housed in outdoor pens. Groups of birds received oral doses of parathion in the fall, winter, spring and summer. Median lethal dosage, and brain and plasma cholinesterase inhibition, were found to be quite similar among seasons. Parathion may have been more toxic during hot weather (winter vs. summer LD50 estimate: 160 vs. 118 mg/kg; p < 0.1). In view of previous reports in which ambient temperature extremes and harsh weather have enhanced organophosphorus insecticide toxicity to birds, it is concluded that circannual toxicity studies should include measures of sensitivity (acute oral exposure) and vulnerability (dietary exposure) to better predict responses of free-ranging birds.

  16. Effect of steam activation of biochar produced from a giant Miscanthus on copper sorption and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shim, Taeyong; Yoo, Jisu; Ryu, Changkook; Park, Yong-Kwon; Jung, Jinho

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the physiochemical properties, sorption characteristics, and toxicity effects of biochar (BC) produced from Miscanthus sacchariflorus via slow pyrolysis at 500°C and its steam activation product (ABC). Although BC has a much lower surface area than ABC (181 and 322m(2)g(-1), respectively), the Cu sorption capacities of BC and ABC are not significantly different (p>0.05). A two-compartment model successfully explains the sorption of BC and ABC as being dominated by fast and slow sorption processes, respectively. In addition, both BC and ABC efficiently eliminate the toxicity of Cu towards Daphnia magna. However, ABC itself induced acute toxicity to D. magna, which is possibly due to increased aromaticity upon steam activation. These findings suggest that activation of BC produced from M. sacchariflorus at a pyrolytic temperature of 500°C may not be appropriate in terms of Cu sorption and toxicity reduction.

  17. Toxic Effects of Domoic Acid in the Seabream Sparus aurata

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Isabel; Lobo-da-Cunha, Alexandre; Afonso, António; Rivera, Socorro; Azevedo, Joana; Monteiro, Rogério; Cervantes, Rosa; Gago-Martinez, Ana; Vasconcelos, Vítor

    2010-01-01

    Neurotoxicity induced in fish by domoic acid (DA) was assessed with respect to occurrence of neurotoxic signs, lethality, and histopathology by light microscopy. Sparus aurata were exposed to a single dose of DA by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 0, 0.45, 0.9, and 9.0 mg DA kg−1 bw. Mortality (66.67 ± 16.67%) was only observed in dose of 9.0 mg kg−1 bw. Signs of neurological toxicity were detected for the doses of 0.9 and 9.0 mg DA kg−1 bw. Furthermore, the mean concentrations (±SD) of DA detected by HPLC-UV in extracts of brain after exposure to 9.0 mg DA kg−1 bw were 0.61 ± 0.01, 0.96 ± 0.00, and 0.36 ± 0.01 mg DA kg−1 tissue at 1, 2, and 4 hours. The lack of major permanent brain damage in S. aurata, and reversibility of neurotoxic signs, suggest that lower susceptibility to DA or neuronal recovery occurs in affected individuals. PMID:21116416

  18. COMBINED AND INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND TOXICANTS ON POPULATIONS AND COMMUNITIES

    PubMed Central

    Moe, S Jannicke; De Schamphelaere, Karel; Clements, William H; Sorensen, Mary T; Van den Brink, Paul J; Liess, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Increased temperature and other environmental effects of global climate change (GCC) have documented impacts on many species (e.g., polar bears, amphibians, coral reefs) as well as on ecosystem processes and species interactions (e.g., the timing of predator–prey interactions). A challenge for ecotoxicologists is to predict how joint effects of climatic stress and toxicants measured at the individual level (e.g., reduced survival and reproduction) will be manifested at the population level (e.g., population growth rate, extinction risk) and community level (e.g., species richness, food-web structure). The authors discuss how population- and community-level responses to toxicants under GCC are likely to be influenced by various ecological mechanisms. Stress due to GCC may reduce the potential for resistance to and recovery from toxicant exposure. Long-term toxicant exposure can result in acquired tolerance to this stressor at the population or community level, but an associated cost of tolerance may be the reduced potential for tolerance to subsequent climatic stress (or vice versa). Moreover, GCC can induce large-scale shifts in community composition, which may affect the vulnerability of communities to other stressors. Ecological modeling based on species traits (representing life-history traits, population vulnerability, sensitivity to toxicants, and sensitivity to climate change) can be a promising approach for predicting combined impacts of GCC and toxicants on populations and communities. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2013;32:49–61. © 2012 SETAC PMID:23147390

  19. Combined and interactive effects of global climate change and toxicants on populations and communities.

    PubMed

    Moe, S Jannicke; De Schamphelaere, Karel; Clements, William H; Sorensen, Mary T; Van den Brink, Paul J; Liess, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Increased temperature and other environmental effects of global climate change (GCC) have documented impacts on many species (e.g., polar bears, amphibians, coral reefs) as well as on ecosystem processes and species interactions (e.g., the timing of predator-prey interactions). A challenge for ecotoxicologists is to predict how joint effects of climatic stress and toxicants measured at the individual level (e.g., reduced survival and reproduction) will be manifested at the population level (e.g., population growth rate, extinction risk) and community level (e.g., species richness, food-web structure). The authors discuss how population- and community-level responses to toxicants under GCC are likely to be influenced by various ecological mechanisms. Stress due to GCC may reduce the potential for resistance to and recovery from toxicant exposure. Long-term toxicant exposure can result in acquired tolerance to this stressor at the population or community level, but an associated cost of tolerance may be the reduced potential for tolerance to subsequent climatic stress (or vice versa). Moreover, GCC can induce large-scale shifts in community composition, which may affect the vulnerability of communities to other stressors. Ecological modeling based on species traits (representing life-history traits, population vulnerability, sensitivity to toxicants, and sensitivity to climate change) can be a promising approach for predicting combined impacts of GCC and toxicants on populations and communities.

  20. Effects of storage on the toxicity of sediments spiked with fluoranthene to the amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, F.A.; Boese, B.L.; Swartz, R.C.; Lamberson, J.O.; DeWitt, T.H.

    2000-03-01

    To determine the effect of storage on contaminant bioavailability and toxicity, two sediment types, a fine sand and a silty sand, were spiked with nine concentrations of fluoranthene, then stored at 4 C for up to 170 d. Toxicity of the stored sediment was determined eight times during this storage interval using standard 10-d toxicity tests with the marine infaunal amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius. The concentrations of fluoranthene in the sediment and interstitial water were determined on samples taken on each test date. The toxicity of fluoranthene in the silty sand was similar for all storage times with LC50s ranging from 5.3 to 6.6 mg/g organic carbon (OC). The LC50 in the fine sand was 7.4 mg/g OC after 13 d of storage, ranged from 10.2 to 11.8 mg/g OC during 27 to 83 d of storage, and increased to 24.2 and 27.6 mg/g OC after 121 and 170 d of storage, respectively. These data indicate that the toxicity of both the fine and the silty sand remained essentially constant during storage from days 27 to 83. Toxicity tests conducted before or after that period may give misleading results because of disequilibrium or unknown storage effects.

  1. Toxic effects of pesticide mixtures at a molecular level: their relevance to human health.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Antonio F; Parrón, Tesifón; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Requena, Mar; Alarcón, Raquel; López-Guarnido, Olga

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides almost always occur in mixtures with other ones. The toxicological effects of low-dose pesticide mixtures on the human health are largely unknown, although there are growing concerns about their safety. The combined toxicological effects of two or more components of a pesticide mixture can take one of three forms: independent, dose addition or interaction. Not all mixtures of pesticides with similar chemical structures produce additive effects; thus, if they act on multiple sites their mixtures may produce different toxic effects. The additive approach also fails when evaluating mixtures that involve a secondary chemical that changes the toxicokinetics of the pesticide as a result of its increased activation or decreased detoxification, which is followed by an enhanced or reduced toxicity, respectively. This review addresses a number of toxicological interactions of pesticide mixtures at a molecular level. Examples of such interactions include the postulated mechanisms for the potentiation of pyrethroid, carbaryl and triazine herbicides toxicity by organophosphates; how the toxicity of some organophosphates can be potentiated by other organophosphates or by previous exposure to organochlorines; the synergism between pyrethroid and carbamate compounds and the antagonism between triazine herbicides and prochloraz. Particular interactions are also addressed, such as those of pesticides acting as endocrine disruptors, the cumulative toxicity of organophosphates and organochlorines resulting in estrogenic effects and the promotion of organophosphate-induced delayed polyneuropathy.

  2. Toxic and inhibitory effects of trichloroethylene aerobic co-metabolism on phenol-grown aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Tay, JooHwa

    2015-04-09

    Aerobic granule, a form of microbial aggregate, exhibits good potential in degrading toxic and recalcitrant substances. In this study, the inhibitory and toxic effects of trichloroethylene (TCE), a model compound for aerobic co-metabolism, on phenol-grown aerobic granules were systematically studied, using respiratory activities after exposure to TCE as indicators. High TCE concentration did not exert positive or negative effects on the subsequent endogenous respiration rate or phenol dependent specific oxygen utilization rate (SOUR), indicating the absence of solvent stress and induction effect on phenol-hydroxylase. Phenol-grown aerobic granules exhibited a unique response to TCE transformation product toxicity, that small amount of TCE transformation enhanced the subsequent phenol SOUR. Granules that had transformed between 1.3 and 3.7 mg TCE gSS(-1) showed at most 53% increase in the subsequent phenol SOUR, and only when the transformation exceeded 6.6 mg TCE gSS(-1) did the SOUR dropped below that of the control. This enhancing effect was found to sustain throughout several phenol dosages, and TCE transformation below the toxicity threshold also lessened the granules' sensitivity to higher phenol concentration. The unique toxic effect was possibly caused by the granule's compact structure as a protection barrier against the diffusive transformation product(s) of TCE co-metabolism.

  3. Uptake and toxic effects of surface modified nanomaterials in freshwater aquatic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seda, Brandon Casey

    Nanomaterials are a class of materials with unique properties due to their size, and the association of these properties with the toxicity of nanomaterials is poorly understood. The present study assessed the toxic effects of stable aqueous colloidal suspensions of three distinctly different classes of nanomaterials in aquatic organisms. The fullerene, C70, was stabilized through non-covalent surface modification with gallic acid. Toxicity of C70-gallic acid was confirmed to exhibit similar toxic effects as C60-fullerene, including changes in antioxidative processes in Daphnia magna. Daphnia magna fecundity was significantly reduced in 21d bioassays at C70-gallic concentrations below quantifiable limits (0.03 mg/L C70). Antioxidant enzyme activities of glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase as well as lipid peroxidation suggested that exposed organisms experienced oxidative stress. Carbon dots are a class of nanomaterials proposed for use as nontoxic alternatives to semiconductor quantum dots for photoluminescent applications, because of the difference in toxicity of their core components: carbon as opposed to heavy metals. In vivo analysis of treated organisms by confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed carbon dots were absorbed and systemically distributed regardless of particle size. The present study did not find any evidence of acute toxicity at concentrations up to 10mg/L carbon dots. These concentrations also failed to produce negative effects in Ceriodaphnia dubia bioassays to predict chronic toxicity. Carbon dots also failed to elicit developmental toxic effects in zebrafish. The toxic effects of semiconductor quantum dots have been partially attributed to the release of heavy metals with their degradation, particularly cadmium. Laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry was used to compare the uptake of cadmium, selenium and zinc in Daphnia magna treated to CdSe/ZnS quantum dots or CdCl2. These quantum dots were observed to accumulate

  4. The toxic effect of oxytetracycline and trimethoprim in the aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Boris; Arnuš, Lovro; Jeretin, Bogdana; Gutmaher, Aleš; Drobne, Damjana; Durjava, Mojca Kos

    2014-11-01

    The objective of our study was the investigation of the toxic properties of two antimicrobial drugs: oxytetracycline (OTC) and trimethoprim (TMP) in the aquatic environment. The toxic effects were tested according to the OECD guidelines for the testing of chemicals, on the cyanobacteria Anabaena flos-aque, on the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, on the daphnid Daphnia magna as well as on the activated sludge. We discussed the short term and long term results of tests on cyanobacteria and microalgae. Both experiments were concluded in 72h allowing direct comparison of sensitivity of the two tested species. The results of our study showed toxic effect in the same range for both groups. In the test on the toxicity of OTC to P. subcapitata we obtained the 72hErC50 of 1.04mgL(-1) (72hErC10 0.47mgL(-1)) which are lower in comparison to the results on the toxicity to A. flos-aque of ErC50 of 2.7mgL(-1) (72hErC101.5mgL(-1)). TMP is less toxic to both photosynthetic plankton species. Similar to the test results on OTC, the P. subcapitata is more sensitive to TMP (ErC50129mgL(-1); ErC1065mgL(-1)) than A. flos-aque (72hErC50253mgL(-1); 72hErC1026mgL(-1)). OTC is toxic to the activated sludge (3hEC50 17.9mgL(-1)), while the calculated 3hEC50 value for TMP exceeded solubility for the compound. In comparison to other species, both tested antimicrobials showed low toxicity to daphnids.

  5. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on luminous marine bacteria: radiation hormesis and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kudryasheva, N S; Rozhko, T V

    2015-04-01

    The paper summarizes studies of effects of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides (americium-241, uranium-235+238, and tritium) on marine microorganisms under conditions of chronic low-dose irradiation in aqueous media. Luminous marine bacteria were chosen as an example of these microorganisms; bioluminescent intensity was used as a tested physiological parameter. Non-linear dose-effect dependence was demonstrated. Three successive stages in the bioluminescent response to americium-241 and tritium were found: 1--absence of effects (stress recognition), 2--activation (adaptive response), and 3--inhibition (suppression of physiological function, i.e. radiation toxicity). The effects were attributed to radiation hormesis phenomenon. Biological role of reactive oxygen species, secondary products of the radioactive decay, is discussed. The study suggests an approach to evaluation of non-toxic and toxic stages under conditions of chronic radioactive exposure.

  6. Early life stage and genetic toxicity of stannous chloride on zebrafish embryos and adults: toxic effects of tin on zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Şişman, Turgay

    2011-06-01

    Humans are exposed to stannous chloride (SnCl(2)), known as tin chloride, present in packaged food, soft drinks, biocides, dentifrices, etc. Health effects in children exposed to tin and tin compounds have not been investigated yet. Therefore, we evaluated the possible teratogenic effects and genotoxic of SnCl(2) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) adults and their embryos. In the embryo-larval study, SnCl(2) showed embryo toxicity and developmental delay after exposure to the various concentrations of 10-250 μM for 120 h. Teratogenic effects including morphological malformations of the embryos and larvae were observed. The embryos exposed to 100 μM displayed tail deformation at 28 hpf and the larvae exposed to 50 μM showed reduced body growth, smaller head and eyes, bent trunk, mild pericardial edema, and smaller caudal fin at 96 hpf. The results of the teratological study show that SnCl(2) induced a significant decrease in the number of living embryos and larvae. Regarding the chromosome analysis, SnCl(2) induced a dose-dependent increase in the micronucleus (MN) frequency in peripheral erythrocytes of adult zebrafish. In blood cells, the 25 μM dose of SnCl(2) caused a nonsignificant increase in the total chromosomal aberrations, but the high doses significantly increased the total number of chromosomal aberrations compared with the control groups. Overall, the results clearly indicate that SnCl(2) is teratogenic and genotoxic to zebrafish.

  7. Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

    1994-02-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

  8. Effects of excess dietary selenite on lead toxicity in sheep.

    PubMed

    Mayland, H F; Doyle, J J; Sharma, R P

    1986-07-01

    The hypothesis that excess dietary selenite ameliorates lead (Pb) toxicosis in domestic sheep was tested. Twenty 6-8-yr-old ewes fed alfalfa pellets were assigned to the following treatments: (1) control; (2) 9.8 mg Pb/kg body weight (b.w.)/d as PbCO3; (3) 3 mg Se/animal/d as Na2SeO3·5H2O; or (4) a combination of treatments 2 and 3. The gelatin-encapsulated salts were given orally. The study was terminated on d 104, by which time three animals in the Pb group and all five animals in the Pb+Se group had died. All remaining animals were slaughtered on d 104. Lead and Se concentrations were determined in six biweekly-collected blood samples and in soft tissues and bone. Sheep on the control and Se treatments had similar feed intakes, body weights, and tissue Pb levels. Those in the Pb+Se group had lower feed intake, but higher blood Pb values compared with the Pb group. Feeding either element increased (P<0.05) the concentration of that element in blood, kidney, liver, spleen, and bone. Muscle-Pb concentrations were not affected (P<0.05) by treatment. Selenium concentrations in kidney, liver, and muscle were greater (P<0.05), whereas those in heart were less (P<0.05) for the Pb+Se group than for the Se Group. Clinical signs associated with Pb toxicosis noted in other animals were not observed in the poisoned sheep in this study. Selenite did not protect sheep against Pb toxicity and likely served as a synergistic factor.

  9. Interaction of ethanol and the organophosphorus insecticide parathion.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, J A; Sultatos, L G

    1995-11-27

    Phosphorothioate insecticides such as parathion (O,O-diethyl-O-p-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate) undergo P450-dependent oxidative desulfuration, leading to both activation and detoxification of these compounds. Consequently, alterations in P450-dependent oxidative desulfuration may affect the acute toxicities of these insecticides. In the present study, pretreatment of mice with 15% ethanol in the drinking water for 6 days antagonized the acute toxicity of parathion, but not its toxic metabolite paraoxon (O,O-diethyl-O-p-nitrophenyl phosphate), suggesting that ethanol affected the oxidative desulfuration of this insecticide. The presence of ethanol within hepatic microsomal incubations did not alter the P450-dependent formation of paraoxon (activation) and p-nitrophenol (detoxification), although p-nitrophenol levels were increased in the presence of ethanol as a result of inhibition of its biotransformation to 4-nitrocatechol by CYP2E1. Ethanol exposure reduced hepatic pyruvate levels, but had no effect on levels of lactate, isocitrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, and malate. Calculation of cytosolic NAD+/NADH and cytosolic NADP+/NADPH redox ratios did not reveal any detectable difference in redox state between control and ethanol-treated mice. Since ethanol did not alter directly the P450-dependent activation or detoxification of parathion, and did not decrease NADPH levels, ethanol's antagonism of the acute toxicity of parathion may result from reduced availability of O2.

  10. Trophic status of a community can alter the bioavailability and toxic effects of contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.; Bartell, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Binding of hydrophobic organic and metal contaminants to particulate and dissolved organic matter (POM and DOM) in aquatic systems affects the availability of contaminants and their subsequent dose to biota. Eutrophic systems that contain high levels of organic sorbents will have lower concentrations of freely dissolved, readily available toxicant, thus reducing the exposure of the biota. In more oligotrophic systems with lower levels of sorbents, toxic exposure may be greater. These interactions suggest a relationship between the trophic state of an ecosystem and its susceptibility to toxic effects. Studies on the binding of organic contaminants to POM and DOM and its effects on toxicant accumulation are reviewed. The role of system productivity on adverse effects is explored by computer simulations, using a combined fate and effects model to evaluate the impacts of naphthalene on the production dynamics and contaminant body burden in different model populations when the concentration of POM varied from 0 to 10 mg C/L. Higher levels of POM decreased body burdens and moderated the reduction in productivity resulting from the exposure to naphthalene. Any interpretation of functional tests used to evaluate hazardous substances should consider the interaction between the trophic state of the system and the potential dose of toxicant available to biota.

  11. Surfactants present complex joint effects on the toxicities of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dali; Lin, Zhifen; Yao, Zhifeng; Yu, Hongxia

    2014-08-01

    The potential toxicities of nanoparticles (NPs) have been intensively discussed over the past decade. In addition to their single toxicities, NPs can interact with other environmental chemicals and thereby exert joint effects on biological systems and the environment. The present study investigated the combined toxicities of NPs and surfactants, which are among the chemicals that most likely coexist with NPs. Photobacterium phosphoreum was employed as the model organism. The results indicate that surfactants with different ion types can alter the properties of NPs (i.e., particle size and surface charge) in different ways and present complex joint effects on NP toxicities. Mixtures of different NPs and surfactants exhibited antagonistic, synergistic, and additive effects. In particular, the toxicity of ZnO was observed to result from its dissolved Zn(2+); thus, the joint effects of the ZnO NPs and surfactants can be explained by the interactions between the Zn ions and the surfactants. Our study suggests that the potential hazards caused by mixtures of NPs and surfactants are different from those caused by single NPs. Because surfactants are extensively used in the field of nanotechnology and are likely to coexist with NPs in natural waters, the ecological risk assessments of NPs should consider the impacts of surfactants.

  12. No-observed-effect concentrations in batch and continuous algal toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, M.R.; Chen, C.Y.

    2000-06-01

    In this study, the authors compare the no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) of Cd, Ni, Zn, Cu, and Pb based on different response parameters, using batch and continuous algal toxicity tests. For both batch and continuous tests, parameters based on total cell volume (TCV) were found to be less sensitive than those related to cell densities. The above observation mainly occurred because, under the stresses from metal toxicants evaluated in this and a previous study, the mean cell volume (MCV) of algae increased considerably. The increase of MCV compensates for the effects brought about by the reduction in cell density and eventually results in less variation in TCVs. This study shows that parameters based on cell density are quite sensitive and ideal for the estimation of NOECs. In addition, comparison of the NOEC values derived from different culture techniques shows that the continuous methods generally yields lower NOEC values than that obtained by the batch tests. The results of this study also indicate that the NOEC provides more protection to the test organism than the effective concentration at 10% growth reduction (EC10). For toxicity test methods that produce small variations among replicates, the NOEC is still a good indicator of low toxic effect. Furthermore, for the continuous algal toxicity test, a relatively simple approach is proposed to determine the NOEC values based on the algal culture's control charts. The proposed method produced identical results as those based on conventional hypothesis-testing methods.

  13. Uptake and Accumulation of Polystyrene Microplastics in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Toxic Effects in Liver.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yifeng; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Yongfeng; Jiang, Wei; Zhao, Yanping; Geng, Jinju; Ding, Lili; Ren, Hongqiang

    2016-04-05

    Microplastics have become emerging contaminants, causing widespread concern about their potential toxic effects. In this study, the uptake and tissue accumulation of polystyrene microplastics (PS-MPs) in zebrafish were detected, and the toxic effects in liver were investigated. The results showed that after 7 days of exposure, 5 μm diameter MPs accumulated in fish gills, liver, and gut, while 20 μm diameter MPs accumulated only in fish gills and gut. Histopathological analysis showed that both 5 μm and 70 nm PS-MPs caused inflammation and lipid accumulation in fish liver. PS-MPs also induced significantly increased activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, indicating that oxidative stress was induced after treatment with MPs. In addition, metabolomic analysis suggested that exposure to MPs induced alterations of metabolic profiles in fish liver and disturbed the lipid and energy metabolism. These findings provide new insights into the toxic effects of MPs on fish.

  14. Boron Toxicity Causes Multiple Effects on Malus domestica Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Kefeng; Zhang, Weiwei; Xing, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Liu; Cao, Qingqin; Qin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Boron is an important micronutrient for plants. However, boron is also toxic to cells at high concentrations, although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of boron toxicity on Malus domestica pollen tube growth and its possible regulatory pathway. Our results showed that a high concentration of boron inhibited pollen germination and tube growth and led to the morphological abnormality of pollen tubes. Fluorescent labeling coupled with a scanning ion-selective electrode technique detected that boron toxicity could decrease [Ca2+]c and induce the disappearance of the [Ca2+]c gradient, which are critical for pollen tube polar growth. Actin filaments were therefore altered by boron toxicity. Immuno-localization and fluorescence labeling, together with fourier-transform infrared analysis, suggested that boron toxicity influenced the accumulation and distribution of callose, de-esterified pectins, esterified pectins, and arabinogalactan proteins in pollen tubes. All of the above results provide new insights into the regulatory role of boron in pollen tube development. In summary, boron likely plays a structural and regulatory role in relation to [Ca2+]c, actin cytoskeleton and cell wall components and thus regulates Malus domestica pollen germination and tube polar growth. PMID:26955377

  15. Acute toxicity of diphacinone in Northern bobwhite: Effects on survival and blood clotting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, Barnett A.; Horak, Katherine E.; Warner, Sarah E.; Johnston, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The anticoagulant rodenticide diphacinone was slightly toxic (acute oral LD50 2014 mg/kg) to Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) in a 14-day acute toxicity trial. Precise and sensitive assays of blood clotting (prothrombin time, Russell?s Viper venom time, and thrombin clotting time) were adapted for use in quail, and this combination of assays is recommended to measure the effects of anticoagulant rodenticides. A single oral sublethal dose of diphacinone (434 mg/kg body weight) prolonged clotting time at 48 h post-dose compared to controls. At 783 mg/kg (approximate LD02), clotting time was prolonged at both 24 and 48 h post-dose. Prolongation of in vitro clotting time reflects impaired coagulation complex activity, and was detected before overt signs of toxicity were apparent at the greatest dosages (2868 and 3666 mg/kg) in the acute toxicity trial. These clotting time assays and toxicity data will assist in the development of a pharmacodynamic model to predict toxicity, and also facilitate rodenticide hazard and risk assessments in avian species.

  16. Dispersant and salinity effects on weathering and acute toxicity of South Louisiana crude oil.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, Adam J; Nyman, J Andrew; Kaller, Michael D; Green, Christopher C

    2013-11-01

    Chemical dispersants are an important technology in the remediation of oil spills in the aquatic environment, facilitating degradation of crude oil and salinity is an important factor in dispersant effectiveness. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of salinity on the degradation chemistry of crude oil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and acute toxicity of the water accommodated fraction (WAF) of the dispersant COREXIT 9500A and chemically dispersed crude oil on a common estuarine fish. Laboratory microcosms were designed at salinities of 4 parts per thousand (ppt), 12 ppt, or 18 ppt and spiked with crude oil, COREXIT 9500A, or a combined exposure to crude oil and COREXIT and allowed to biodegrade for 1 wk, 4 wk, and 16 wk. The WAF was harvested for analytical PAH analysis and acute toxicity testing in juvenile Fundulus grandis. Compared with undispersed oil, COREXIT exponentially increased the PAH concentrations in the WAF for up to 16 wk; hopane-normalized concentrations indicated that biodegradation was slowed for the first 4 wk. Dispersed crude oil and COREXIT were acutely toxic following 1 wk of biodegradation with no correlation between PAH concentrations and crude oil WAF mortality. Both dispersant and dispersant oil mixtures remained toxic for at least 4 wk at the lowest salinity tested, suggesting increased sensitivity or reduced biodegradation of toxic components in low-saline environments. At the lowest salinity, oil dispersed with COREXIT was more toxic than either the COREXIT alone or oil alone, even after 16 wk of biodegradation.

  17. Cobalt toxicity: chemical and radiological combined effects on HaCaT keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Gault, N; Sandre, C; Poncy, J-L; Moulin, C; Lefaix, J-L; Bresson, C

    2010-02-01

    Cobalt (Co) is an essential trace element well known as a constituent of vitamin B(12), but different compounds of Co are also described as highly toxic and/or radiotoxic for individuals or the environment. In nuclear power plants, (58)Co and (60)Co are radioactive isotopes of cobalt present as activation products of stable Co and Ni used in alloys. Skin exposure is a current occupational risk in the hard metal and nuclear industries. As biochemical and molecular cobalt-induced toxicological mechanisms are not fully identified, we investigated cobalt toxicity in a model human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. In this study, we propose a model to determine the in vitro chemical impact on cell viability of a soluble form of cobalt (CoCl(2)) with or without gamma-ray doses to mimic contamination by (60)Co, to elucidate the mechanisms of cobalt intracellular chemical and radiological toxicity. Intracellular cobalt concentration was determined after HaCaT cell contamination and chemical toxicity was evaluated in terms of cellular viability and clonogenic survival. We investigated damage to DNA in HaCaT cells by combined treatment with chemical cobalt and a moderate gamma-ray dose. Additive effects of cobalt and irradiation were demonstrated. The underlying mechanism of cobalt toxicity is not clearly established, but our results seem to indicate that the toxicity of Co(II) and of irradiation arises from production of reactive oxygen species.

  18. Effects of soil properties on copper toxicity to earthworm Eisenia fetida in 15 Chinese soils.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiongwei; Xu, Meng; Zhou, Youya; Yan, Zengguang; Du, Yanli; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Chaoyan; Bai, Liping; Nie, Jing; Chen, Guikui; Li, Fasheng

    2016-02-01

    The bioavailability and toxicity of metals in soil are influenced by a variety of soil properties, and this principle should be recognized in establishing soil environmental quality criteria. In the present study, the uptake and toxicity of Cu to the earthworm Eisenia fetida in 15 Chinese soils with various soil properties were investigated, and regression models for predicting Cu toxicity across soils were developed. The results showed that earthworm survival and body weight change were less sensitive to Cu than earthworm cocoon production. The soil Cu-based median effective concentrations (EC50s) for earthworm cocoon production varied from 27.7 to 383.7 mg kg(-1) among 15 Chinese soils, representing approximately 14-fold variation. Soil cation exchange capacity and organic carbon content were identified as key factors controlling Cu toxicity to earthworm cocoon production, and simple and multiple regression models were developed for predicting Cu toxicity across soils. Tissue Cu-based EC50s for earthworm cocoon production were also calculated and varied from 15.5 to 62.5 mg kg(-1) (4-fold variation). Compared to the soil Cu-based EC50s for cocoon production, the tissue Cu-based EC50s had less variation among soils, indicating that metals in tissue were more relevant to toxicity than metals in soil and hence represented better measurements of bioavailability.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of creatine administration against NMDA and malonate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Malcon, C; Kaddurah-Daouk, R; Beal, M F

    2000-03-31

    We examined whether creatine administration could exert neuroprotective effects against excitotoxicity mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainic acid. Oral administration of 1% creatine significantly attenuated striatal excitotoxic lesions produced by NMDA, but had no effect on lesions produced by AMPA or kainic acid. Both creatine and nicotinamide can exert significant protective effects against malonate-induced striatal lesions. We, therefore, examined whether nicotinamide could exert additive neuroprotective effects with creatine against malonate-induced lesions. Nicotinamide with creatine produced significantly better neuroprotection than creatine alone against malonate-induced lesions. Creatine can, therefore, produce significant neuroprotective effects against NMDA mediated excitotoxic lesions in vivo and the combination of nicotinamide with creatine exerts additive neuroprotective effects.

  20. Implementing Lecane quadridentata acute toxicity tests to assess the toxic effects of selected metals (Al, Fe and Zn).

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Félix Torres; González, Francisco Javier Avelar; Martínez, Roberto Rico

    2010-03-01

    An environmental study revealed that three metals (Al, Fe and Zn) are common in the San Pedro River (SPR) (Aguascalientes, Mexico). Regrettably, in many samples the concentrations of these metals exceeded the maximum allowed toxicant concentrations levels as defined in by Mexican legislation. The highest concentrations of the three metals were found during the 2005 dry season, with elevated Al concentrations present along the entire river. Not surprisingly, the highest concentrations for all three metals came from locations adjacent to industrial areas. Estimates of the contribution of these metals to total toxicity revealed that these three metals are important contaminants of the river and responsible for most of the lethal toxicity found in environmental samples. To assess the importance of these reports, we conducted acute toxicity tests to determine LC50 for Al, Fe and Zn on the freshwater rotifer Lecane quadridentata. This permitted us to estimate the contribution of these metals to total toxicity during 2005-2006. Based on LC50 values, all three metals should be considered very toxic, with the zinc LC50 value (0.12 mg L(-1)) making it the most toxic metal for L. quadridentata. This approach can be applied to other sites with similar concentrations of these metals.

  1. Selecting a sensitive battery of bioassays to detect toxic effects of metals in effluents.

    PubMed

    de Paiva Magalhães, Danielly; da Costa Marques, Mônica Regina; Fernandes Baptista, Darcilio; Forsin Buss, Daniel

    2014-09-07

    The use of bioassay batteries is necessary to evaluate toxic effects at various biological levels. The selection of bioassays without prior testing and determination of the most sensitive/suitable groups for each impact may allow the discharge of effluents that pose a threat to the environment. The present study tested and selected a battery of sensitive ecotoxicological bioassays for detecting toxic effects of metals. The sensitivities of six organisms were evaluated (algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlorella vulgaris, Cladocera Daphnia similis and Ceriodaphnia dubia, and fish Poecilia reticulata and Danio rerio) after exposure to 10 individual metal species deemed toxic to the aquatic environment (Ag(+), Cd(2+), Cu(+), Cu(2+), Cr(3+), Cr(6+), Pb(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), and Hg(2+)) and to real (steel-mill) and laboratory simulated effluents. In the bioassays, fish were the least sensitive; D. rerio showed no sensitivity to any of the effluents tested. P. subcapitata was a good bioindicator of Cr(3+) toxicity, and D. similis was the most sensitive organism to Hg(2+); but the toxic effect of effluents with higher levels of Hg(2+) was better detected by C. dubia. The most sensitive battery of bioassays to detect low concentrations of dissolved metals in effluents was the 72-h chronic test with C. vulgaris and the 48-h acute test with C. dubia.

  2. Lightsticks content toxicity: effects of the water soluble fraction on the oyster embryonic development.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Milena Maria Sampaio; Menezes Filho, Adalberto; Nascimento, Iracema Andrade; Pereira, Pedro Afonso P

    2015-11-01

    Lightsticks are artifacts used as attractors in a type of commercial fishery, known as surface longline gear. Despite the excessive use, the contamination risks of these devices have not yet been properly investigated. This research aimed to fill up this gap by determining the chemical composition and the toxicity of lightsticks recently activated, compared to those one year after activation and to the ones collected on the beaches. The analyzes were carried out by Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Additionally, the variations in composition and the toxicity of their sea Water Soluble Fractions (WSF) were evaluated based on the WSF-effects of Crassostrea rhizophorae embryonic development. The GC-MS analysis made possible the identification of nineteen substances in the water soluble fraction of the lightsticks, such as dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and dimethyl phthalate (DMP). The value of the WSF-effective concentration (EC50) was in an average of 0.35%. After one year of the lightsticks activation, the toxicity was even higher (0.65%). Furthermore, other substances, also present in the lightsticks-WSF caused persistent toxicity even more dangerous to the environment than DBP and DMP. This essay discusses their toxicity effects and possible environment damages.

  3. Effects of diet on seven-day Ceriodaphnia dubia toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cerda, B.; Olive, J.H. )

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of four diets on the results of seven-day Ceriodaphnia dubia toxicity tests. Survival and reproduction were used as indices to detect the sensitivity of this species to acute and chronic copper stress. All toxicity tests were conducted using the moderately hard reconstituted water recommended in 1989 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Diet differentially affected the acute and chronic toxicity of copper. Daphnids fed Selenastrum capricornutum (alga) showed the greatest sensitivity, followed by those fed the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardti, then by animals fed a Yeast-Cerophyll[sup TM]-Trout Food (YCTF) mixture plus Selenastrum, and finally by animals fed YCTF alone. These differences may result from the poor nutritional adequacy of Selenastrum when fed alone, the different caloric contents of the diets, the increased toxicant uptake by the organisms through ingestion of copper-laden algal cells, and/or copper ions sequestered by fats and insoluble substances in YCTF. The authors recognize that diet is an important variable in seven-day toxicity tests, and that the selection of a diet should not be based only on its effects on long-term culturing of C. dubia, but also on its possible effects on test results.

  4. Combined effects of dissolved organic material and water hardness on toxicity of cadmium to Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Penttinen, S.; Kostamo, A.; Kukkonen, J.V.K.

    1998-12-01

    The interaction between dissolved organic material (DOM) and water hardness and their effects on the acute toxicity of cadmium (Cd) to Daphnia magna was studied. At an original hardness of humic lake water, Cd was significantly less toxic in the humic than in the reference water. Furthermore, after dilution down to 10%, the humic water still decreased the lethality significantly. The results suggest that the reduced toxicity of Cd in the lake water is due to complexation with DOC. An increase in water hardness decreased the measured binding coefficient of Cd to DOM. In addition, the acute toxicity of Cd decreased, and the difference between the reference and humic water disappeared. As a conclusion, DOM in the soft lake water had a protective effect against Cd toxicity. In hard water, obviously, the added hardness cations, especially Ca{sup 2+}, effectively competed with Cd{sup 2+} for available binding sites in DOM. Simultaneously, CA{sup 2+} ions interfered also with the uptake of Cd{sup 2+} either by competing in transport through cell membranes or by reducing membrane permeability.

  5. Laboratory evaluation of Ethiopian local plant Phytolacca dodecandra extract for its toxicity effectiveness against aquatic macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Karunamoorthi, K; Bishaw, D; Mulat, T

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the toxicity effectiveness of berries crude extract of Endod [vernacular name (local native language, Amharic); Phytolacca dodecandra] against aquatic macroinvertebrates Baetidae (Mayflies) and Hydropsychidae (Caddisflies), under laboratory conditions. In Ethiopia, toxic plant, berries of Phytolacca dodecandra are being commonly used for washing clothes and to control fresh water snails. Macroinvertebrates are useful biological indicators of change in the aquatic ecosystems. The present study clearly revealed that the LC50 and LC90 values for berries crude extract of Phytolacca dodecandra against Baetidae were 181.94 and 525.78 mg/l and lethal doses (LC50 and LC90) required for Hydropsychidae were 1060.69 and 4120.4 mg/l respectively. The present investigation demonstrated that Baetidae was more susceptible than Hydropsychidae, even at shorter exposure period of 2 h. From our preliminary investigation the toxicity effectiveness of crude extracts of Phytolacca dodecandra has been clearly shown. In addition, it requires further explorations which address both the toxicity activity and the active principles that are responsible for its toxicity effectiveness. Ultimately, the release/introduction of Phytolacca dodecandra plant berries extracts into the river/streams leads to disruption of food chain in the aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, at this moment preserving the aquatic ecosystem is extremely essential and inevitable.

  6. Effects of nanoplastics and microplastics on toxicity, bioaccumulation, and environmental fate of phenanthrene in fresh water.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yini; Huang, Anna; Cao, Siqi; Sun, Feifei; Wang, Lianhong; Guo, Hongyan; Ji, Rong

    2016-12-01

    Contamination of fine plastic particles (FPs), including micrometer to millimeter plastics (MPs) and nanometer plastics (NPs), in the environment has caught great concerns. FPs are strong adsorbents for hydrophobic toxic pollutants and may affect their fate and toxicity in the environment; however, such information is still rare. We studied joint toxicity of FPs with phenanthrene to Daphnia magna and effects of FPs on the environmental fate and bioaccumulation of (14)C-phenanthrene in fresh water. Within the five sizes particles we tested (from 50 nm to 10 μm), 50-nm NPs showed significant toxicity and physical damage to D. magna. The joint toxicity of 50-nm NPs and phenanthrene to D. magna showed an additive effect. During a 14-days incubation, the presence of NPs significantly enhanced bioaccumulation of phenanthrene-derived residues in daphnid body and inhibited the dissipation and transformation of phenanthrene in the medium, while 10-μm MPs did not show significant effects on the bioaccumulation, dissipation, and transformation of phenanthrene. The differences may be attributed to higher adsorption of phenanthrene on 50-nm NPs than 10-μm MPs. Our findings underlined the high potential ecological risks of FPs, and suggested that NPs should be given more concerns, in terms of their interaction with hydrophobic pollutants in the environment.

  7. Metabolomics reveals the mechanisms for the cardiotoxicity of Pinelliae Rhizoma and the toxicity-reducing effect of processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Tao; Tan, Yong; Tsui, Man-Shan; Yi, Hua; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Li, Ting; Chan, Chi Leung; Guo, Hui; Li, Ya-Xi; Zhu, Pei-Li; Tse, Anfernee Kai Wing; Cao, Hui; Lu, Ai-Ping; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2016-10-01

    Pinelliae Rhizoma (PR) is a commonly used Chinese medicinal herb, but it has been frequently reported about its toxicity. According to the traditional Chinese medicine theory, processing can reduce the toxicity of the herbs. Here, we aim to determine if processing reduces the toxicity of raw PR, and to explore the underlying mechanisms of raw PR-induced toxicities and the toxicity-reducing effect of processing. Biochemical and histopathological approaches were used to evaluate the toxicities of raw and processed PR. Rat serum metabolites were analyzed by LC-TOF-MS. Ingenuity pathway analysis of the metabolomics data highlighted the biological pathways and network functions involved in raw PR-induced toxicities and the toxicity-reducing effect of processing, which were verified by molecular approaches. Results showed that raw PR caused cardiotoxicity, and processing reduced the toxicity. Inhibition of mTOR signaling and activation of the TGF-β pathway contributed to raw PR-induced cardiotoxicity, and free radical scavenging might be responsible for the toxicity-reducing effect of processing. Our data shed new light on the mechanisms of raw PR-induced cardiotoxicity and the toxicity-reducing effect of processing. This study provides scientific justifications for the traditional processing theory of PR, and should help in optimizing the processing protocol and clinical combinational application of PR.

  8. Metabolomics reveals the mechanisms for the cardiotoxicity of Pinelliae Rhizoma and the toxicity-reducing effect of processing

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tao; Tan, Yong; Tsui, Man-Shan; Yi, Hua; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Li, Ting; Chan, Chi Leung; Guo, Hui; Li, Ya-Xi; Zhu, Pei-Li; Tse, Anfernee Kai Wing; Cao, Hui; Lu, Ai-Ping; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Pinelliae Rhizoma (PR) is a commonly used Chinese medicinal herb, but it has been frequently reported about its toxicity. According to the traditional Chinese medicine theory, processing can reduce the toxicity of the herbs. Here, we aim to determine if processing reduces the toxicity of raw PR, and to explore the underlying mechanisms of raw PR-induced toxicities and the toxicity-reducing effect of processing. Biochemical and histopathological approaches were used to evaluate the toxicities of raw and processed PR. Rat serum metabolites were analyzed by LC-TOF-MS. Ingenuity pathway analysis of the metabolomics data highlighted the biological pathways and network functions involved in raw PR-induced toxicities and the toxicity-reducing effect of processing, which were verified by molecular approaches. Results showed that raw PR caused cardiotoxicity, and processing reduced the toxicity. Inhibition of mTOR signaling and activation of the TGF-β pathway contributed to raw PR-induced cardiotoxicity, and free radical scavenging might be responsible for the toxicity-reducing effect of processing. Our data shed new light on the mechanisms of raw PR-induced cardiotoxicity and the toxicity-reducing effect of processing. This study provides scientific justifications for the traditional processing theory of PR, and should help in optimizing the processing protocol and clinical combinational application of PR. PMID:27698376

  9. Differential effects of the ascorbyl and tocopheryl derivative on the methamphetamine-induced toxic behavior and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shinobu; Mori, Tomohisa; Kanazawa, Hideko; Sawaguchi, Toshiko

    2007-10-30

    A previous study showed that high doses of methamphetamine induce self-injurious behavior (SIB) in rodents. Furthermore, the combination of methamphetamine and morphine increased lethality in mice. We recently surmised that the rise in SIB and mortality induced by methamphetamine and/or morphine may be related to oxidative stress. The present study was designed to determine whether an antioxidant could inhibit SIB or mortality directly induced by methamphetamine and/or morphine. The SIB induced by 20mg/kg of methamphetamine was abolished by the administration of Na L-ascorbyl-2-phosphate (APS: 300 mg/kg), but not Na DL-alpha-tocopheryl phosphate (TPNa: 200mg/kg). In contrast, APS (300 mg/kg) and TPNa (200mg/kg) each significantly attenuated the lethality induced by methamphetamine and morphine. The present study showed that the signal intensity of superoxide adduct was increased by 20mg/kg of methamphetamine in the heart and lungs, and methamphetamine plus morphine tended to increase superoxide adduct in all of the tissues measured by ESR spin trap methods. Adduct signal induced in brain by methamphetamine administration increased in significance, but in mouse administrated methamphetamine plus morphine. There are differential effects of administration of methamphetamine and coadministration of methamphetamine plus morphine on adduct signal. These results suggest that APS and TPNa are effective for reducing methamphetamine-induced toxicity and/or toxicological behavior. While APS and TPNa each affected methamphetamine- and/or morphine-induced toxicology and/or toxicological behavior, indicating that both drugs have antioxidative effects, their effects differed.

  10. Assessment the toxic effects of dimethoate to rotifer using swimming behavior.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruixin; Ren, Xinkun; Ren, Hongqiang

    2012-09-01

    The toxic effects of the common organophosphorus pesticide dimethoate on freshwater zooplankton Brachionus calyciflorus (rotifer) were tested. Because of the advantages of behavioral response in environmental monitoring, swimming behavior was used as the endpoint in this research. After exposure 6 h at five dimethoate concentrations (0.18, 0.53, 0.88, 1.23 and 1.59 mg·L(-1)), the pesticide disrupted the balance in rotifer swimming direction and caused an obvious direction preference. It also inhibited significantly the swimming angular and linear speed. Our results showed that dimethoate has a sublethal toxic effect on this aquatic invertebrate.

  11. Reproductive toxicity of 2,4-toluenediamine in the rat. 1. Effect on male fertility

    SciTech Connect

    Thysen, B.; Varma, S.K.; Bloch, E.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of 2,4-toluenediamine (TDA) on reproduction in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were evaluated. Diets containing 0, 0.01 and 0.03% TDA were fed ad libitum to experimental animals for 10 wk. No signs of toxicity were found. Exposure to the high dose resulted in decreased mating frequency and an increase in infertile matings. Light-microscopic examination of the testes revealed reduced numbers of sperm in the seminiferous tubules and cauda epididymides. These results indicate that TDA is capable of reducing fertility and of exerting an inhibitory or toxic effect on spermatogenesis in the rat.

  12. Toxic and genotoxic effects of hexavalent chromium in environment and its bioremediation strategies.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sandhya; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Chromium is one of the major inorganic environmental pollutants, which is added in the environment through various natural and anthropogenic activities and exists mainly in two forms: Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Cr(VI) is considered to be more toxic than Cr(III) due to its high solubility and mobility. It is a well-reported occupational carcinogen associated with lung, nasal, and sinus cancers. Thus, this review article provides the detailed information on the occurrence, sources of chromium contamination in the environment and their toxicological effects in human, animal, plants as well as in microorganisms, and bioremediation strategies to minimize the toxic effects.

  13. Automated swimming activity monitor for examining temporal patterns of toxicant effects on individual Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bahrndorff, Simon; Michaelsen, Thomas Yssing; Jensen, Anne; Marcussen, Laurits Faarup; Nielsen, Majken Elley; Roslev, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic pollutants are often biologically active at low concentrations and impact on biota in combination with other abiotic stressors. Traditional toxicity tests may not detect these effects, and there is a need for sensitive high-throughput methods for detecting sublethal effects. We have evaluated an automated infra-red (IR) light-based monitor for recording the swimming activity of Daphnia magna to establish temporal patterns of toxicant effects on an individual level. Activity was recorded for 48 h and the sensitivity of the monitor was evaluated by exposing D. magna to the reference chemicals K2 Cr2 O7 at 15, 20 and 25 °C and 2,4-dichlorophenol at 20 °C. Significant effects (P < 0.001) of toxicant concentrations, exposure time and incubation temperatures were observed. At 15 °C, the swimming activity remained unchanged for 48 h at sublethal concentrations of K2 Cr2 O7 whereas activity at 20 and 25 °C was more biphasic with decreases in activity occurring after 12-18 h. A similar biphasic pattern was observed after 2,4-dichlorophenol exposure at 20 °C. EC50 values for 2,4-dichlorophenol and K2 Cr2 O7 determined from automated recording of swimming activity showed increasing toxicity with time corresponding to decreases in EC50 of 0.03-0.07 mg l(-1) h(-1) . EC50 values determined after 48 h were comparable or lower than EC50 values based on visual inspection according to ISO 6341. The results demonstrated that the swimming activity monitor is capable of detecting sublethal behavioural effects that are toxicant and temperature dependent. The method allows EC values to be established at different time points and can serve as a high-throughput screening tool in toxicity testing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of the effect of reactive sulfide on the acute toxicity of silver (I) to Daphnia magna. Part 2: toxicity results.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Adalto; Bowles, Karl C; Brauner, Colin J; Gorsuch, Joseph W; Kramer, James R; Wood, Chris M

    2002-06-01

    The protective effect of reactive sulfide against AgNO3 toxicity to Daphnia magna neonates was studied. Acute (48-h) toxicity tests were performed in the absence (<5 nM) and presence of low (approximately 25 nM) and high (approximately 250 nM) concentrations of zinc sulfide clusters under oxic conditions. In both the presence and the absence of sulfide, lower mean lethal concentration (LC50) values were observed when measured as opposed to nominal silver concentrations were used in calculations. This reflected the fact that measured total silver concentrations were lower than nominal concentrations due to losses of silver from solution observed during the experiment. High concentration (approximately 250 nM) of sulfide completely protected against toxicity up to the highest silver concentration tested (2 microg/L [19 nM]) with measured silver data. In the presence of environmentally realistic levels of sulfide (approximately 25 nM) in receiving waters, acute silver toxicity was reduced by about 5.5-fold. However, when filtered (0.45 microm) silver concentrations alone were considered, toxicity (48-h LC50) was similar in the absence (0.22 microg/L) and presence (0.28 microg/L) of sulfide. The difference between measured total and filtered silver was attributed to chemisorption of the metal sulfide onto the membrane filter and provides evidence that the toxic fraction of silver is that which is unbound to sulfide. Accumulation of silver was greater in daphnids exposed to silver in the presence of sulfide than in its absence, even though a toxic effect was not observed under these conditions. In this case, silver appears to be incorporated by daphnids rather than merely adsorbed on the surface. Our results point out the need to incorporate sulfide into the acute biotic ligand model and to assess its potentially large role in preventing chronic toxicity.

  15. Variable toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Daphnia magna: effects of algal particles and animal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Conine, Andrea L; Frost, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Aquatic environments vary widely in aspects other than their physicochemical properties that could alter the toxicity of novel contaminants. One factor that could affect chemical toxicity to aquatic consumers is their nutritional environment as it can strongly affect their physiology and life history. Nutrition has the potential to alter an organism's response to the toxin or how the toxin interacts with the consumer through its food. Here we determined how growth and survival responses of Daphnia to an emerging contaminant, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), are affected by the presence of food and its stoichiometric food quality. We used a series of survival tests, each slightly modified, to determine whether variable toxicity in different nutritional environments resulted from algal sequestration of AgNPs in a nontoxic form or from changes to the nutritional status of the test animals. We found that the presence of algae, of good or poor quality, reduced the toxicity of AgNPs on animal growth and survival. However, the decrease in AgNP toxicity was greater for animals consuming P-rich compared to P-poor food. We found evidence that this effect of food quality was due to greater algal uptake of AgNPs by P-rich than by P-stressed algae. However, we also found animal nutrition, in the absence of algal AgNP binding, could affect toxicity with P-nourished animals surviving slightly better when exposed to AgNPs compared to their P-stressed counterparts. Our results show an important role for algal particles and their P content in determining the toxicity of AgNPs in natural waters primarily due to their binding and uptake abilities and, less so, to their effects on animal nutrition.

  16. Effect-directed analysis of Elizabeth River porewater: developmental toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingliang; Getzinger, Gordon J; Cooper, Ellen M; Clark, Bryan W; Garner, Lindsey V T; Di Giulio, Richard T; Ferguson, P Lee; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, effect-directed analysis was used to identify teratogenic compounds in porewater collected from a Superfund site along the Elizabeth River estuary (VA, USA). Zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to the porewater displayed acute developmental toxicity and cardiac teratogenesis, presumably because of elevated sediment levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from historical creosote use. Pretreatment of porewater with several physical and chemical particle removal methods revealed that colloid-bound chemicals constituted the bulk of the observed toxicity. Size-exclusive chromatography and normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography were used to fractionate Elizabeth River porewater. Acute toxicity of porewater extracts and extract fractions was assessed as the pericardial area in embryonic zebrafish. The most toxic fraction contained several known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists (e.g., 1,2-benzofluorene and 1,2-benzanthracene) and cytochrome P450 A1 (CPY1A) inhibitors (e.g., dibenzothiophene and fluoranthene). The second most toxic fraction contained known AhR agonists (e.g., benzo[a]pyrene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene). Addition of a CYP1A inhibitor, fluoranthene, increased toxicity in all active porewater fractions, suggesting synergism between several contaminants present in porewaters. The results indicate that the observed acute toxicity associated with Elizabeth River porewater results from high concentrations of AhR agonistic PAHs and mixture effects related to interactions between compounds co-occurring at the Elizabeth River site. However, even after extensive fractionation and chemical characterization, it remains plausible that some active compounds in Elizabeth River porewater remain unidentified.

  17. Size effect of SnO2 nanoparticles on bacteria toxicity and their membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Calderón, Adriana; Paraguay-Delgado, Francisco; Orrantia-Borunda, Erasmo; Luna-Velasco, Antonia

    2016-12-01

    Semiconductor SnO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are being exploited for various applications, including those in the environmental context. However, toxicity studies of SnO2 NPs are very limited. This study evaluated the toxic effect of two sizes of spherical SnO2 NPs (2 and 40 nm) and one size of flower-like SnO2 NPs (800 nm) towards the environmental bacteria E. coli and B. subtilis. SnO2 NPs were synthesized using a hydrothermal or calcination method and they were well characterized prior to toxicity assessment. To evaluate toxicity, cell viability and membrane damage were determined in cells (1 × 10(9) CFU mL(-1)) exposed to up to 1000 mg L(-1) of NPs, using the plate counting method and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Spherical NPs of smaller primary size (E2) had the lowest hydrodynamic size (226 ± 96 nm) and highest negative charge (-30.3 ± 10.1 mV). Smaller spherical NPs also showed greatest effect on viability (IC50 > 500 mg L(-1)) and membrane damage of B. subtilis, whereas E. coli was unaffected. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the membrane damage of exposed B. subtilis and also exhibited the attachment of E2 NPs to the cell surface, as well as the elongation of cells. It was also apparent that toxicity was caused solely by NPs, as released Sn(4+) was not toxic to B. subtilis. Thus, surface charge interaction between negatively charged SnO2 NPs and positively charged molecules on the membrane of the Gram positive B. subtilis was indicated as the key mechanism related to toxicity of NPs.

  18. EFFECT-DIRECTED ANALYSIS OF ELIZABETH RIVER POREWATER: DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY IN ZEBRAFISH (DANIO RERIO)

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingliang; Getzinger, Gordon J.; Cooper, Ellen M.; Clark, Bryan W.; Garner, Lindsey V.T.; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Ferguson, P. Lee; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, effect-directed analysis was used to identify teratogenic compounds in porewater collected from a Superfund site along the Elizabeth River estuary (VA, USA). Zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to the porewater displayed acute developmental toxicity and cardiac teratogenesis, presumably because of elevated sediment levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from historical creosote use. Pretreatment of porewater with several physical and chemical particle removal methods revealed that colloid-bound chemicals constituted the bulk of the observed toxicity. Size-exclusive chromatography and normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography were used to fractionate Elizabeth River porewater. Acute toxicity of porewater extracts and extract fractions was assessed as the pericardial area in embryonic zebrafish. The most toxic fraction contained several known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists (e.g., 1,2-benzofluorene and 1,2-benzanthracene) and cytochrome P450 A1 (CPY1A) inhibitors (e.g., dibenzothiophene and fluoranthene). The second most toxic fraction contained known AhR agonists (e.g., benzo[a]pyrene and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene). Addition of a CYP1A inhibitor, fluoranthene, increased toxicity in all active porewater fractions, suggesting synergism between several contaminants present in porewaters. The results indicate that the observed acute toxicity associated with Elizabeth River porewater results from high concentrations of AhR agonistic PAHs and mixture effects related to interactions between compounds co-occurring at the Elizabeth River site. However, even after extensive fractionation and chemical characterization, it remains plausible that some active compounds in Elizabeth River porewater remain unidentified. PMID:25196082

  19. The Effect of Toxic Cyanobacteria on Human and Animal Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study of environmental health typically focuses on human populations. However, companion animals, livestock and wildlife also experience adverse health effects from environmental pollutants. Animals may experience direct exposure to pollutants unlike people in most ambient ex...

  20. Geometry of carbon nanotubes and mechanisms of phagocytosis and toxic effects.

    PubMed

    Harik, Vasyl Michael

    2017-03-22

    A review of in vivo and in vitro toxicological studies of the potential toxic effects of carbon nanotubes is presented along with the analysis of experimental data and a hypothesis about the nanotube-asbestos similarity. Developments of the structure-activity paradigm have been reviewed along with the size effects and the classification of carbon nanotubes into eleven distinct classes (e.g., the high aspect ratio nanotubes, thick multi-wall nanotubes and short nanotubes). Scaling analysis of similarities between different classes of carbon nanotubes and asbestos fibers in the context of their potential toxicity and the efficiency of phagocytosis has been reviewed. The potential toxic effects of carbon nanotubes have been characterized by their normalized length, their aspect ratio and other parameters related to their inhalability, engulfment by macrophages and the effectiveness of phagocytosis. Geometric scaling parameters and the classification of carbon nanotubes are used to develop an updated parametric map for the extrapolation of the potential toxic effects resulting from the inhalation of long and short carbon nanotubes. An updated parametric map has been applied to the evaluation of the efficiency of phagocytosis involving distinct classes of carbon nanotubes. A critical value of an important nondimensional parameter characterizing the efficiency of phagocytosis for different nanotubes is presented along with its macrophage-based normalization. The present evaluation of the potential toxicological effects of the high aspect ratio carbon nanotubes is found to be in the agreement with other available studies and earlier scaling analyses.

  1. The repellent and persistent toxic effects of essential oils against the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    Nechita, I S; Poirel, M T; Cozma, V; Zenner, L

    2015-12-15

    The economic impact of the poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, the lack of new acaricides, the occurrence of resistance and tighter legislation have all led to the need to find new ways to control this pest. One promising alternative method of control focuses on employing repellent and/or toxic effects of selected plant essential oils against D. gallinae. Ten essential oils (basil, thyme, coriander, eucalyptus, lavender, lemon, fir tree, oregano, mint, and juniper) were tested for the persistence of toxic and repellent effects. In filter-paper toxicity bioassays against D. gallinae, the best results were observed for lavender (more than 97% mortality after 48 and 72 h) and thyme (84% at 72 h) at a dose of 0.12 mg/cm(2). In addition, two oils showed significant persistent toxic effects 15 and 30 days post application to filter papers. Thyme was the most effective (100% mortality at 72 h), followed by lavender (nearly 80% mortality after 72 h). Out of the ten oils tested for their repellent effect, thyme was the strongest, with nearly 80% of the tested area avoided by mites; oregano caused a 60% avoidance and lavender exhibited an effect close to 40%. All other oils exhibited a repellent effect of less than 30%. None of the experiments showed a repellent effect for HM (commercial alimentary oil) or negative controls. We found that the thyme and lavender essential oils exhibited promising results when tested in vitro for toxic and repellent effects against D. gallinae; thus, we suggest that future experiments focus on in vivo tests using these oils in farm units.

  2. Toxic and teratogenic effects of chemical class fractions of a coal-gasification electrostatic precipitator tar.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T W; Dumont, J N; Buchanan, M V

    1983-12-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide slurries of a coal gasifier electrostatic precipitator tar and its chemical class fractions were assayed for their toxicity and teratogenicity using early embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis. Of the 5 tar fractions the ether-soluble base and polyaromatic were found to be the most teratogenic and the ether-soluble acid and ether-soluble base were the most toxic. The teratogenic effects of the raw tar suggest synergism. The toxic effects to newly metamorphosed froglets is 1-2 orders of magnitude less than those observed for embryos. Chemical analysis shows dihydroxybenzenes and organonitrogen compounds to be the major components of the acid and base fractions, respectively. The neutral fractions contain mainly alkyl-substituted two-ring hydrocarbons.

  3. Acute toxicity of endosulfan to crab: effect on transport property of haemocyanin

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumari, P.; Reddy, D.C.; Ramamurthi, R.

    1987-05-01

    It is well known that organochlorine insecticides interfere with axonic transmission causing nervous dysfunction. The toxic effects of endosulfan (Thiodan (R) 6,7,8,9,10-hexachloro 1,5,5a,6,9a-hexahydro-6, 9-methano-2,4,3-benzodioxathiepine-3 oxide) -an organochlorine insecticide used extensively for crop protection in this part of India - to various fish species have been documented. However the toxicity of endosulfan to a freshwater field crab, Oziotelphusa senex senex - another nontarget organism of aquatic ecosystem - has not been fully evaluated. In view of this it would be interesting to examine the toxic effects of endosulfan on the transport property of crab haemocyanin since the respiratory pigments provide a prime example of a link between molecular and whole organ biology.

  4. Bioaccumulation kinetics and toxic effects of Cr, Ni and Zn on Eichhornia crassipes.

    PubMed

    Hadad, H R; Maine, M A; Mufarrege, M M; Del Sastre, M V; Di Luca, G A

    2011-06-15

    The aim of this work was to assess the uptake efficiencies, the uptake and bioaccumulation kinetics and the toxic effects of Cr, Ni and Zn on Eichhornia crassipes. Plants were exposed to 1 mg L(-1) of each metal and sampled during 30 days. E. crassipes removed 81%, 95% and 70% of Cr, Ni and Zn, respectively. Metal removal from water involved a fast and a slow component. Metals were accumulated fundamentally by roots. Cr was scarcely translocated to aerial parts. In these tissues, Ni showed the highest accumulation amount while Zn presented the highest accumulation rate. Metal toxicity on the biomass was different among treatments. However, biomass did not decrease in any case. All the studied metals produced chlorophyll decrease. The root cross-sectional area (CSA) and vessel number increased and the root length decreased when plants were exposed to Zn. Despite the toxic effects, E. crassipes accumulated Cr, Ni and Zn efficiently.

  5. Effect of different carbon nanotubes on cadmium toxicity to Daphnia magna: The role of catalyst impurities and adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinghao; Qu, Ruijuan; Liu, Jiaoqin; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Liansheng; Yang, Shaogui; Huang, Qingguo; Wang, Zunyao

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of four different carbon nanotubes single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) and hydroxylated and carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNTs and COOH-MWCNTs) on Cd toxicity to the aquatic organism Daphnia magna. The acute toxicity results indicated that all CNTs could enhance the toxicity of Cd to D. magna. Furthermore, the filtrate toxicity and adsorption tests showed that the toxicity-increasing effect of SWCNTs and MWCNTs in the overall system was mainly caused by catalysts impurities from the pristine CNTs, whereas the greater adsorption of Cd onto OH-MWCNTs (30.52 mg/g) and COOH-MWCNTs (24.93 mg/g) was the key factor contributing to the enhanced toxicity. This result raised a concern that the metal catalyst impurities, adsorption capacities, and accumulation of waterborne CNTs were responsible for the toxicity of Cd to aquatic organism.

  6. The effect of natural organic matter on bioaccumulation and toxicity of chlorobenzenes to green algae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Lin, Daohui; Wu, Fengchang

    2016-07-05

    The effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on toxicity and bioavailability of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) to aquatic organisms has been investigated with conflicting results and undefined mechanisms, and few studies have been conducted on volatile HOCs. In this study, six volatile chlorobenzenes (CBs) with 1-6 chlorine substitutions were investigated for their bioaccumulation in an acute toxicity to a green alga (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) in the presence/absence of Suwannee River NOM (SRNOM). The fluorescence quenching efficiency of SRNOM increased as the number of chlorine substitutions of CBs increased. SRNOM increased the cell-surface hydrophobicity of algae and decreased the release rates of algae-accumulated CBs, thus increasing the concentration factor (CF) and accumulation of the CBs in the algae. SRNOM increased the toxicity of monochlorobenzene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene, decreased the toxicity of pentachlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene, and had no significant effect on the toxicity of 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene and 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorobenzene. Relationships between the 96 h CF/IC50 (i.e., the CB concentration leading to a 50% algal growth reduction compared with the control) and physicochemical properties of CBs with/without SRNOM were established, providing reasonable explanations for the experimental results. These findings will help with the accurate assessment of ecological risks of organic pollutants in the presence of NOM.

  7. Evaluation on the Toxic Effects of NanoAg to Catalase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zhai, Wenxin; Liu, Rutao; Yu, Zehua; Shen, Hengmei; Hu, Xinxin

    2015-02-01

    Protein is the functional actor of life. Research on protein damage induced by nanomaterials may give insight into the toxicity mechanisms of nanoparticles. Studying nano silver over the impact of the structure and function of catalase (CAT) at the molecular level, is of great significance for a comprehensive evaluation of their toxic effects. The toxic effects of nanoAg on catalase were thoroughly investigated using steady state and time resolved fluorescence quenching measurements, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering spectroscopy (RLS), circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). NanoAg could decrease the amount of alpha-helix and increase the beta sheet structure, leading to loose the skeleton structure of catalase. The characteristic fluorescence of catalase was obviously quenched, which showed the exposal of internal hydrophobic amino acids enhanced, and its quenching type is dynamic quenching. The result of RLS and TEM showed that the distribution and size of nanoAg become more uniform and smaller after their interaction, resulting in a decrease of RLS intensity. NanoAg could make the activity of catalase rise. By changing the structure of catalase, nanoAg increases its enzymatic activity to a certain extent, breaking down its balance in vivo, thereby affecting the normal physiological activities. NanoAg has obvious toxic effects on catalase. This paper provided a new perspective and method for the toxic effects of nanoAg to biological macromolecules; provided basic data and reference gist for the hygienics and toxicology studies of nanoAg. It is conducive to the toxicity prevention and control work of nanoAg, promoting nano-technology applied to human production and living better.

  8. Toxic effects of chemical dispersant Corexit 9500 on water flea Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; McNabb, Nicole A; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; Iguchi, Taisen; Kohno, Satomi

    2017-02-01

    In 2010, approximately 2.1 million gallons of chemical dispersants, mainly Corexit 9500, were applied in the Gulf of Mexico to prevent the oil slick from reaching shorelines and to accelerate biodegradation of oil during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Recent studies have revealed toxic effects of Corexit 9500 on marine microzooplankton that play important roles in food chains in marine ecosystems. However, there is still little known about the toxic effects of Corexit 9500 on freshwater zooplankton, even though oil spills do occur in freshwater and chemical dispersants may be used in response to these spills. The cladoceran crustacean, water flea Daphnia magna, is a well-established model species for various toxicological tests, including detection of juvenile hormone-like activity in test compounds. In this study, we conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the acute and chronic toxicity of Corexit 9500 using D. magna. The acute toxicity test was conducted according to OECD TG202 and the 48 h EC50 was 1.31 ppm (CIs 0.99-1.64 ppm). The reproductive chronic toxicity test was performed following OECD TG211 ANNEX 7 and 21 days LOEC and NOEC values were 4.0 and 2.0 ppm, respectively. These results indicate that Corexit 9500 has toxic effects on daphnids, particularly during the neonatal developmental stage, which is consistent with marine zooplankton results, whereas juvenile hormone-like activity was not identified. Therefore, our findings of the adverse effects of Corexit 9500 on daphnids suggest that application of this type of chemical dispersant may have catastrophic impacts on freshwater ecosystems by disrupting the key food chain network. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Acute toxicity and effects analysis of endosulfan sulfate to freshwater fish species.

    PubMed

    Carriger, John F; Hoang, Tham C; Rand, Gary M; Gardinali, Piero R; Castro, Joffre

    2011-02-01

    Endosulfan sulfate is a persistent environmental metabolite of endosulfan, an organochlorine insecticide-acaricide presently registered by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. There is, however, limited acute fish toxicity data for endosulfan sulfate. This study determines the acute toxicity (LC₅₀s and LC₁₀s) of endosulfan sulfate to three inland Florida native fish species (mosquitofish [Gambusia affinis]; least killifish [Heterandria formosa]; and sailfin mollies [Poecilia latipinna]) as well as fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Ninety-six-h acute toxicity tests were conducted with each fish species under flow-through conditions. For all of the above-mentioned fish species, 96-h LC₅₀ estimates ranged from 2.1 to 3.5 μg/L endosulfan sulfate. The 96-h LC₁₀ estimates ranged from 0.8 to 2.1 μg/L endosulfan sulfate. Of all of the fish tested, the least killifish appeared to be the most sensitive to endosulfan sulfate exposure. The above-mentioned data were combined with previous acute toxicity data for endosulfan sulfate and freshwater fish for an effects analysis. The effects analysis estimated hazardous concentrations expected to exceed 5, 10, and 50% of the fish species' acute LC₅₀ or LC₁₀ values (HC₅, HC₁₀, and HC₅₀). The endosulfan sulfate freshwater-fish acute tests were also compared with the available freshwater-fish acute toxicity data for technical endosulfan. Technical endosulfan is a mixture of α- and β-endosulfan. The LC₅₀s had a wider range for technical endosulfan, and their distribution produced a lower HC₁₀ than for endosulfan sulfate. The number of freshwater-fish LC₅₀s for endosulfan sulfate is much smaller than the number available for technical endosulfan, reflecting priorities in examining the toxicity of the parent compounds of pesticides. The toxicity test results and effects analyses provided acute effect values for endosulfan sulfate and freshwater fish that might be applied

  10. [Effects of berberine on the recovery of rat liver xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes after partial hepatectomy].

    PubMed

    Zverinsky, I V; Zverinskaya, H G; Sutsko, I P; Telegin, P G; Shlyahtun, A G

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the effect of berberine on the recovery processes of liver xenobiotic-metabolizing function during its compensatory growth after 70% partial hepatectomy. It was found the hepatic ability to metabolize foreign substances are not restored up to day 8. Administration of berberine (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) for 6 days led to normalization of both cytochrome P450-dependent and flavin-containing monooxygenases. It is suggested that in the biotransformation of berberine involved not only cytochrome P450, but also flavin-containing monooxygenases.

  11. Neuroprotective effect of thalidomide on MPTP-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Palencia, Guadalupe; Garcia, Esperanza; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Trejo-Solís, Cristina; Escamilla-Ramírez, Angel; Sotelo, Julio

    2015-03-01

    Thalidomide is a sedative with unique pharmacological properties; studies on epilepsy and brain ischemia have shown intense neuroprotective effects. We analyzed the effect of thalidomide treatment on the neurotoxicity caused by the administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahidropyridine (MPTP) in mice. Thalidomide was administered at two times; before and after the exposure to MPTP. In both circumstances thalidomide improved the neurotoxicity induced by MPTP as seen by a significant raise of the striatal contents of dopamine and simultaneous decrease of monoamine-oxidase-B (MAO-B). These results indicate that in the experimental model of Parkinson's disease the administration of thalidomide improves the functional damage on the nigrostriatal cell substratum as seen by the production of dopamine. This neuroprotective effect seems to be mediated by inhibition of excitotoxicity. Our results suggest that thalidomide could be investigated as potential adjuvant therapy for Parkinson's disease.

  12. Studies with the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method - Effect of air flow and effect of fabric dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Lopez, M. T.

    1976-01-01

    One sample each of commercial polyurethane and polychloroprene flexible foams were evaluated using the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method. Air flow rates of 0, 0.16, 16, and 48 ml/sec were used to determine the effect of air flow on relative toxicity. Time to first sign of incapacitation and time to death were substantially reduced with both polyurethane and polychloroprene flexible foams by the introduction of 16 to 48 ml/sec air flow. The relative toxicity rankings of these materials were not altered by changes in air flow. Under these test conditions, the polyurethane foam consistently appeared more toxic than the polychloroprene foam. Samples of six different colors from the same fabric were evaluated separately, using the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method, to determine the effect of fabric dye, if any. The material was an upholstery fabric, consisting of 46 percent cotton, 33 percent wool, and 21 percent nylon. There appeared to be no significant effect of fabric dye on relative toxicity, for this material under these test conditions.

  13. [Effect of zinc on reproductive toxicity in rats].

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing; Fan, Ruiquan; Yang, Xingfen; Chen, Tiejiang

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of zinc on reproductive function in rats. The results revealed that the sperm count, sperm motility and reproductive function appeared to be enhanced in male rats by 60 days successive administration of low dose zinc (12 mg/kg) or medium dose zinc (120 mg/kg), whereas reproductive system damages characterized by lowering of reproductive function would be resulted by high dose zinc(240 mg/kg). However, no effect on the growth and development of the second generation was shown, suggesting that the injury was just limited to certain extent.

  14. Toxic Gas Removal by Dielectric Discharge with Corona Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, H.; Pacheco, M.; Mercado, A.; Cruz, A.; Pacheco, J.; Yousfi, M.; Eichwald, O.; Benhenni, M.

    2006-12-04

    In this work, a theoretical and experimental study on SO2 and NOx removal by non-thermal plasma technology, more specifically a dielectric barrier (DBD) discharge combined with the Corona effect, is presented. Results obtained from a theoretical study describe the chemical kinetic model of SO2 and NOx removal processes; the effect of OH radicals in removal of both gases is noteworthy. Experimental results of de-SO2 process are reported. Also, optical emission spectroscopy study was applied on some atomic helium lines to obtain temperature of electrons in the non-thermal plasma.

  15. Toxicity of lithium to three freshwater organisms and the antagonistic effect of sodium.

    PubMed

    Kszos, Lynn Adams; Beauchamp, John J; Stewart, Arthur J

    2003-10-01

    Lithium (Li) is the lightest metal and occurs primarily in stable minerals and salts. Concentrations of Li in surface water are typically <0.04 mg l(-1) but can be elevated in contaminated streams. Because of the general lack of information concerning the toxicity of Li to common toxicity test organisms, we evaluated the toxicity of Li to Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow), Ceriodaphnia dubia, and a freshwater snail (Elimia clavaeformis). In the laboratory, the concentration of Li that inhibited P. promelas growth or C. dubia reproduction by 25% (IC25) was dependant upon the dilution water. In laboratory control water containing little sodium (approximately 2.8 mg l(-1)), the IC25s were 0.38 and 0.32 mg Li l(-1) and in ambient stream water containing approximately 17 mg Na l(-1), the IC25s were 1.99 and 3.33, respectively. A Li concentration of 0.15 mg l(-1) inhibited the feeding of E. clavaeformis in laboratory tests. Toxicity tests conducted to evaluate the effect of sodium on the toxicity of Li were conducted with fathead minnows and C. dubia. The presence of sodium greatly affected the toxicity of Li. Fathead minnows and Ceriodaphnia, for example, tolerated concentrations of Li as great as 6 mg l(-1) when sufficient Na was present. The interaction of Li and Na on the reproduction of Ceriodaphnia was investigated in depth and can be described using an exponential model. The model predicts that C. dubia reproduction would not be affected when animals are exposed to combinations of lithium and sodium with a log ratio of mmol Na to mmol Li equal to at least 1.63. The results of this study indicate that for most natural waters, the presence of sodium is sufficient to prevent Li toxicity. However, in areas of historical disposal or heavy processing or use, an evaluation of Li from a water quality perspective would be warranted.

  16. Effect of Ambient Temperature on the Toxicity of Palmitoyl Glycerol.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-25

    consumed or its rate of absorption. Similarly, there were no differences between those fed the palmitoyl glycerol diet with or without safflower oil...level. circulating neurotensin in mice fed the palmitoyl glycerol diet wit" or with safflower oil by radioimmunoassay. We found no differe between...involvement, we injected prostaglandin E2 intracisternally into mice fed palmitoyl glycerol with or without safflower oil. This hormone had no effect on

  17. Carcinogenesis: a late effect of irreversible toxic damage during development

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Jerry M.

    1976-01-01

    Intrauterine and early postnatal life are periods of exceptionally high susceptibility to certain kinds of chemical carcinogens. The most potent known transplacental carcinogens are direct acting alkylating agents. Most nonreactive compounds, which require enzymes for metabolic conversion into chemically reactive “proximate carcinogens,” are less effective because the required enzymes are present at low levels in the fetus, and many proximate carcinogens are too reactive to reach the fetus when formed in maternal tissues. Despite this, many carcinogens which require metabolic activation are very active transplancentally, as the intrinsic susceptibility of rapidly dividing fetal cells compensates effectively for comparatively low tissue levels of reactive metabolites. Transplacental carcinogens of all kinds are most effective late in gestation, generally after organogenesis has begun and after the period of greatest susceptibility to teratogens. Only a small number of known carcinogens have been tested for transplacental carcinogenic activity. The great majority of tumors induced transplacentally in the well-studied rodent and lagomorph species (mouse, rat, Syrian hamster, and rabbit) have morphologic features of adult, rather than embryonal, tissues. A given agent tends to induce in a given species largely the same types of tumor when given transplacentally as when administered directly to postweaning animals, unless its carcinogenic effect in the latter is ascribable to some peculiarity of distribution, metabolism, or physiology. In a second species, the spectrum of tumors induced either before of after birth may be quite different. For bioassay of suspected carcinogens, the significance of perinatal carcinogenesis lies in the facts that the fetal and preweaning rodent is an extremely sensitive indicator of carcinogenic activity, and that the facile adaptibility of fetal cells to tissue culture and their rapid expression in vitro of properties of neoplastic

  18. Early dioxin exposure causes toxic effects in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tracie R; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    2013-09-01

    The acute effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure have been well documented in many vertebrate species. However, less is known about the consequences in adulthood from sublethal exposure during development. To address this, we exposed zebrafish to sublethal levels of TCDD (1h; 50 pg/ml), either in early embryogenesis (day 0) or during sexual determination (3 and 7 weeks), and assessed the effects later in adulthood. We found that exposure during embryogenesis produced few effects on the adults themselves but did affect the offspring of these fish: Malformations and increased mortality were observed in the subsequent generation. Zebrafish exposed during sexual development showed defects in the cranial and axial skeleton as adults. This was most clearly manifested as scoliosis caused by malformation of individual vertebrae. These fish also showed defects in reproduction, producing fewer eggs with lower fertilization success. Both males and females were affected, with males contributing to the decrease in egg release from the females and exposed females contributing to fertilization failure. TCDD exposure at 3 and 7 weeks produced feminization of the population. Surprisingly, part of this was due to the appearance of fish with clearly female bodies, yet carrying testes in place of ovaries. Our results show that exposures that produce little if any impact during development can cause severe consequences during adulthood and present a model for studying this process.

  19. Effects of temperature on in situ toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, C.D.; Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    With increasing concern over the impacts and perturbations to receiving waters as a result of storm water runoff and contaminated sediments, many investigators have turned towards in situ testing for direct response data. In situ testing has been shown to be an effective assessment tool. In order to further evaluate the limitations of this method, temperature effects were evaluated. There is concern that laboratory to stream transfer of test organisms may induce significant stress if water temperatures are too cool. This study was designed to specifically address the issue of temperature tolerance and attenuation of Hyalella azteca, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas in in situ conditions. Temperature tolerance is of importance in areas where receiving waters are subject to low or fluctuating temperatures as well as areas of more temperate climates. In this study, the organisms where exposed to temperatures as low as 2 C for variable lengths of time, removed and allowed to come to ambient laboratory temperatures then monitored for acute or chronic responses. No effects on survival were observed after 48 h. at 5 C; however lower temperatures increased mortality.

  20. EFFECTS ON BIRTH WEIGHT AND ADULT HEALTH IN RATS PRENATALLY EXPOSED TO TOXICANTS OR UNDERNUTRITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low fetal weight is a sensitive indicator of developmental toxicity in animal studies. While low birth weight may be permanent or transitory, the long-term effects of low birth weight on adult health have not been elucidated. Previous research has shown in humans an inverse rela...

  1. The Use of Paramecium to Observe the Toxic Effect of Cigarette Smoke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardell, David

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which Paramecium caudatum was used to demonstrate the toxic effect of cigarette smoke on the cilia of epithelium cells lining the trachea and bronchi of smokers. Provides background information and explains the procedure, including how to make a simple mechanical smoking device. (TW)

  2. Evaluation of antitumor and toxic side effects of mitomycin C-estradiol conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ishiki, Nobuyuki; Onishi, Hiraku; Machida, Yoshiharu

    2004-07-26

    The antitumor and toxic side effects of mitomycin C-estradiol conjugates (EB-glu-MMC and E-glu-MMC) were evaluated in detail for solutions in propylene glycol and suspensions in 10% (v/v) propylene glycol. Tumor growth, body weight and number of leukocytes were examined after i.p. administration to sarcoma 180 solid tumor-bearing mice. Body weight and number of leukocytes were also examined in normal mice after i.p. administration of the solution. In solution dosage forms, the two conjugates had almost the same suppressive effect on tumor growth at 30 mg MMC eq./kg as MMC at 5 mg/kg, did not lower body weight significantly, but reduced the number of leukocytes at 30 mg MMC eq./kg. MMC, lethally toxic at 10 mg, significantly lowered the body weight and leukocyte number. In the suspension dosage forms, these conjugates had a greater suppressive effect on tumor growth at 50 mg MMC eq./kg than MMC at 5 mg/kg, and reduced the body weight and leukocyte number, with E-glu-MMC more toxic than EB-glu-MMC. The presence of the tumor itself influenced the body weight and leukocyte number. However, toxic side effects could be evaluated from the body weight and leukocyte number to almost the same extent between tumor-bearing and normal mice.

  3. Is Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Responsible for the Toxic Effects of Okadaic Acid in Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Rex

    2013-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and its derivatives, which are produced by dinoflagellates of the genera Prorocentrum and Dinophysis, are responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning in humans. In laboratory animals, these toxins cause epithelial damage and fluid accumulation in the gastrointestinal tract, and at high doses, they cause death. These substances have also been shown to be tumour promoters, and when injected into the brains of rodents, OA induces neuronal damage reminiscent of that seen in Alzheimer’s disease. OA and certain of its derivatives are potent inhibitors of protein phosphatases, which play many roles in cellular metabolism. In 1990, it was suggested that inhibition of these enzymes was responsible for the diarrhetic effect of these toxins. It is now repeatedly stated in the literature that protein phosphatase inhibition is not only responsible for the intestinal effects of OA and derivatives, but also for their acute toxic effects, their tumour promoting activity and their neuronal toxicity. In the present review, the evidence for the involvement of protein phosphatase inhibition in the induction of the toxic effects of OA and its derivatives is examined, with the conclusion that the mechanism of toxicity of these substances requires re-evaluation. PMID:23381142

  4. Modelling combined effects of nutrients and toxicants in a branch of the Rhine Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.R.G.; Nijs, A.C.M. de; Aldenberg, T.

    1995-12-31

    A model is presented in which fate and effects of both nutrients and toxicants are combined at the level of phytoplankton and zooplankton in a river system including its sedimentation area. Within water quality modelling emphasis has been on either eutrophication or on toxic fates. Eutrophication research mainly focuses on the relationship between nutrients and water quality parameters. Ecotoxicological studies on the other hand aim either at describing fate of toxic substances or estimating biological effects on or below organism level on the basis of dose-effect experiments. However, an integrated approach linking fate and effects of nutrients and toxic substances on the ecosystem level is demanded to understand the behavior of natural systems exposed to a mix of compounds. The model describes a branch of the river Rhine, the river IJssel, with its sedimentation areas, lake Ketelmeer and lake IJsselmeer, which have suffered severely from high inputs of both nutrients and heavy metals in the past. Only from the seventies onward international sanitation programs have significantly improved the situation. Despite the improvements further actions are required because the problems of high chlorophyll levels as well as high loading of metals remain. It is shown that nutrients may induce an increase in phytoplankton biomass due to less efficient zooplankton grazing. Model results show that in order to change the present state of eutrophication also the input of xenobiotic substances affecting the zooplankton must be decreased.

  5. Arsenic Toxicity to Juvenile Fish: Effects of Exposure Route, Arsenic Speciation, and Fish Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic toxicity to juvenile rainbow trout and fathead minnows was evaluated in 28-day tests using both dietborne and waterborne exposures, both inorganic and organic arsenic species, and both a live diet and an arsenic-spiked pellet diet. Effects of inorganic arsenic on rainbow...

  6. Assessment of toxic effects of triclosan on the terrestrial snail (Achatina fulica).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaonan; Liu, Zhengtao; Wang, Wanhua; Yan, Zhenguang; Zhang, Cong; Wang, Weili; Chen, Lihong

    2014-08-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent used in personal care products, and as a result, is widespread in the environment. Toxicity tests of TCS on aquatic organisms have been reported, but limited toxicity data on terrestrial species are available. In this study, the 28-d chronic toxicity of TCS on the biomass, shell diameter growth, and total food intake of the terrestrial snail Achatina fulica were tested. Moreover, biochemical responses, including changes in the activity of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA), were examined after 14-d and 28-d exposure. Results showed that TCS had toxic effects on the biomass, shell diameter growth, and total food intake of A. fulica with no observed effect concentration (NOEC) values of 24 mg kg(-1). As for the antioxidant enzymes, TCS caused significant oxidative stress even at the low concentration of 24 mg kg(-1). The CAT and POD activities at the high concentrations of 200 and 340 mg kg(-1), respectively, were significantly inhibited. The SOD and CAT activity in treatments below 118 mg kg(-1) and the MDA content in all treatments showed dose-effect relationships. This study demonstrated that TCS caused adverse effects on terrestrial invertebrates, and provided valuable information for the risk assessment imposed by TCS in the terrestrial environment.

  7. Contribution of Therapeutic Monitoring in the Assessment of Toxic Adverse Effects of Mitotane: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jebabli, Nadia; Gaïes, Emna; Eljebari, Hanen; Charfi, Rim; Lakhal, Mohamed; Klouz, Anis; Salouage, Issam; Trabelsi, Sameh

    2015-01-01

    Mitotane provided serious side effects and low doses seemed to be tolerated. Determination of mitotane concentration in plasma is recommended. We report the case of toxic plasma levels with low doses of mitotane in a 47-year-old man with adrenocortical cancer.

  8. Dietary Arsenic Toxicity in Subadult Rainbow Trout: Growth Effects, Nutrient Absorption, and Tissue Bioaccumulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary arsenic toxicity in subadult (~200 g.) rainbow trout was evaluated in a 70 day test using arsenic-spiked pellet diets containing 50, 104 and 162 ppm arsenite. All organisms in all treatments survived the exposure. Dose dependent effects on percent weight gain, with comm...

  9. Effects of vegetation in mitigating the toxicity of pesticide mixtures in sediments of a wetland mesocosm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study assessed effects of a mixture of two pesticides, diazinon and permethrin, on 48-h sediment toxicity to Hyalella azteca in a constructed wetland mesocosm containing non-vegetated and vegetated sections. Sediment samples were collected at inflow, middle, and back points within each sectio...

  10. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on toxicity of gases from a polyethylene polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Kosola, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    A polyethylene polymer was evaluated for time of toxic effect to occur as the result of exposure to gases generated by pyrolysis at various temperatures, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Times to various animal responses decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperature over the range from 400 C to 800 C. Responses at a pyrolysis temperature of 350 C were more rapid than would be expected from the other data, and may indicate the predominance of different pyrolysis reactions in this particular temperature region.

  11. Strengths and limitations of using repeat-dose toxicity studies to predict effects on fertility.

    PubMed

    Dent, M P

    2007-08-01

    The upcoming European chemicals legislation REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authorisation of Chemicals) will require the risk assessment of many thousands of chemicals. It is therefore necessary to develop intelligent testing strategies to ensure that chemicals of concern are identified whilst minimising the testing of chemicals using animals. Xenobiotics may perturb the reproductive cycle, and for this reason several reproductive studies are recommended under REACH. One of the endpoints assessed in this battery of tests is mating performance and fertility. Animal tests that address this endpoint use a relatively large number of animals and are also costly in terms of resource, time, and money. If it can be shown that data from non-reproductive studies such as in-vitro or repeat-dose toxicity tests are capable of generating reliable alerts for effects on fertility then some animal testing may be avoided. Available rat sub-chronic and fertility data for 44 chemicals that have been classified by the European Union as toxic to fertility were therefore analysed for concordance of effects. Because it was considered appropriate to read across data for some chemicals these data sets were considered relevant for 73 of the 102 chemicals currently classified as toxic to reproduction (fertility) under this system. For all but 5 of these chemicals it was considered that a well-performed sub-chronic toxicity study would have detected pathology in the male, and in some cases, the female reproductive tract. Three showed evidence of direct interaction with oestrogen or androgen receptors (linuron, nonylphenol, and fenarimol). The remaining chemicals (quinomethionate and azafenidin) act by modes of action that do not require direct interaction with steroid receptors. However, both these materials caused in-utero deaths in pre-natal developmental toxicity studies, and the relatively low NOAELs and the nature of the hazard identified in the sub-chronic tests provides an alert

  12. Effect of heating rate on toxicity of pyrolysis gases from some elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Kosola, K. L.; Solis, A. N.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of heating rate on the toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated, using a screening test method. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acrylonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions, and carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.

  13. [Antivaccine misinformation about rate of adverse effects and toxicity of vaccines].

    PubMed

    Mats, A N; Gol'dshteĭn, A V

    2010-01-01

    Two widely known antivaccine inventions are discussed: "vaccination is accompanied by adverse effects, which exceeded complications of respective infections on frequency and severity" and "vaccines represent appalling conglomerate of toxic substances, which is unnaturally to administer to children". Informational and psychological nature of dissemination of these inventions is analyzed. On the basis of recent literature data conclusion was made about the absence of real toxicity (including neurotoxicity), carcinogenicity, allergenicity and autopathogenicity of phenol, folmaldehyde, aluminium hydroxide, Twin 80, squalen (MF59) and ethylmercury in concentrations found in vaccines of national immunization schedule.

  14. Effect of electrochemical oxidation on biodegradability and toxicity of batik industry wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Devagi; Halim, Azhar A.

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the increase in biodegradability and reduction in toxicity level in the batik wastewater treatment. Basically, the wastewater treatment from batik industry contained chemicals especially dyes which are not biodegradable and contains higher toxicity level because of the chemical compartment which comes out during the wastewater discharge and this could lead high risk in health wise to humans and all the aquatic living organisms. Thus, this research was carried to enhance the effectiveness of the electrochemical oxidation method by using the batik wastewater. Optimal parameters such as pH, time, distance between graphite electrodes and sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration as it activates as the electrolyte was done to obtain the removal of BOD, COD and color in the batik wastewater. The research study found that the removal of COD and color was high in the acidic conditions which are pH 5 with the removal of COD, 89.71% and color 93.89%. The ratio of BOD5/ COD successfully increased from 0.015 to 0.271 which mean it increase by 94.46% and the toxicity level using Toxtrax method (10017) also successfully reduced from 1.195% to 0.129% which means the samples which were slightly toxic were reduced to non-toxic level.

  15. Toxic effect of commercial detergents on organisms from different trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Sobrino-Figueroa, A

    2016-10-18

    The toxic effects of four powder detergents: two laundry detergents (A and B), one household detergent (C), one dishwashing detergent (D), and the surfactant alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) were analyzed in this study on organisms from different trophic levels (microalgae, cladocerans, ostracods, amphipods, macrophytes, and fish). LC50 and EC50 values obtained in the toxicity bioassays varied between 0.019 and 116.9 mg L(-1). The sensitivity of the organisms to the detergents was (from most sensitive to least sensitive) Ostracods > microalgae > amphipods > cladocerans > fishes > macrophytes. The toxicity of the commercial products (from most toxic to least toxic) was LAS > D (dishwashing detergent) > A (laundry detergent) > B (laundry detergent) > C (household detergent). When comparing the sensitivity of organisms that inhabit temperate zones (T = 18 °C) to those that are found in tropical zones (T > 25 °C), it was clear that the species that inhabit the tropics are more sensitive to detergents.

  16. Toxic effects of several phthalate esters on the embryos and larvae of abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Xiangjing; Cai, Zhonghua

    2009-05-01

    As the most widely used plasticizers in the world, phthalate esters (PAEs) are potential endocrine disruption compounds (EDCs). In the present study, the toxicity of dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) on embryogenesis and larvae development of the marine univalve Haliotis diversicolor supertexta was examined in laboratory. The results show that the malformation of embryos appeared during the experiment, such as embryos died or lysed, small transparent flocculent rings studded on the periphery of the embryo, and the larvae could failed to hatch. In embryo toxic test, embryos incubated at the highest concentration of DMP, DEP and DBP solutions showed significantly high abnormal rate compared with the control, while DEHP solutions displayed no significant difference. In larval toxic test, in all concentrations of DMP, DEP and DBP solutions, larval settlement rates were low significantly than that of the control. Similarly, DEHP solutions show nearly no effect on the larval settlement. The order of toxicity on embryos and larvae is DBP>DEP>DMP>DEHP. Being a simple and easy stimulation to indoor spawn, sensitive to environmental factors, and short culture time, the embryos of H. diversicolor supertexta can be used to indicate toxicity of the PAEs.

  17. Lead toxicity in rice: effects, mechanisms, and mitigation strategies--a mini review.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Umair; Kanu, Adam Sheka; Mo, Zhaowen; Hussain, Saddam; Anjum, Shakeel Ahmad; Khan, Imran; Abbas, Rana Nadeem; Tang, Xiangru

    2015-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is a major environmental pollutant that affects plant morpho-physiological and biochemical attributes. Its higher levels in the environment are not only toxic to human beings but also harmful for plants and soil microbes. We have reviewed the uptake, translocation, and accumulation mechanisms of Pb and its toxic effects on germination, growth, yield, nutrient relation, photosynthesis, respiration, oxidative damage, and antioxidant defense system of rice. Lead toxicity hampers rice germination, root/shoot length, growth, and final yield. It reduces nutrient uptake through roots, disrupts chloroplastic ultrastructure and cell membrane permeability, induces alterations in leaves respiratory activities, produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), and triggers some enzyme and non-enzymatic antioxidants (as defense to oxidative damage). In the end, biochar amendments and phytoremediation technologies have been proposed as soil remediation approaches for Pb tainted soils.

  18. Toxic effects of some alcohol and ethylene glycol derivatives on Cladosporium resinae.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K H; Wong, H A

    1979-01-01

    Eleven commercially available alcohol and ethylene glycol derivatives were tested for their toxicity toward a problem organism in jet fuel, Cladosporium resinae. In the presence of glucose, 20% (vol/vol) ethylene glycol monomethyl ether prevented spore germination and mycelial growth, and 10% (vol/vol) 2-ethoxybutanol, 10% 2-isopropoxyethanol, 10% 3-methoxybutanol, 5% 2-butyloxyethanol, 5% ethylene glycol dibutyl ether, and 5% diethylene glycol monobutyl ether were found to have similar effects. In a biphasic kerosene-water system, 3-methoxybutanol, 2-butyloxyethanol, and diethylene glycol monobutyl ether were again found to be more toxic than ethylene glycol monomethyl ether. Considerable potassium efflux, protein leakage, and inhibition of endogenous respiration were observed in the presence of the more toxic compounds. 2-Butyloxyethanol also caused loss of sterols from cells. PMID:573588

  19. [Nickel - role in human organism and toxic effects].

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Popowicz, Ewa; Winiarski, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to familiarize the Role of nickel in the Environment and in living organisms. This metal is widely used in many fields such as electrical engineering, medicine, Jewellery or Automotive Industry. Furthermore, it's an important part of our food. As the central atom of bacterial enzymes it participates in degradation of urea.. Nickel is also an micronutritient essential for proper functioning of the human body, as it increases hormonal activity and is involved in lipid metabolism. This metal makes it's way to the human body through respiratory tract, digestive system and skin. Large doses of nickel or prolonged contact with it could cause a variety of side effects. Harmfull effects of Nickel are genotoxicity haematotoxicity, teratogenicity, immunotoxicity and carcinogenicity. The population of people allergic to nickel is growing, it occcurs much more often to the women and it can appear in many way. Hypersensitivity to nickel can also be occupational. Due to the increasing prevalence of allergies to nickel. European regulations have been introduced to reduce the content of this metal in products of everyday usage. In countries which have fulfilled the above-mentioned law, the plunge of hypersensitivities has been observed.

  20. Biological effects of inorganic phosphate: potential signal of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Park, Sung-Jin; Lee, Somin; Kim, Sanghwa; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) plays crucial roles in several biological processes and signaling pathways. Pi uptake is regulated by sodium-dependent phosphate (Na/Pi) transporters (NPTs). Moreover, Pi is used as a food additive in food items such as sausages, crackers, dairy products, and beverages. However, the high serum concentration of phosphate (> 5.5 mg/dL) can cause adverse renal effects, cardiovascular effects including vascular or valvular calcification, and stimulate bone resorption. In addition, Pi can also alter vital cellular signaling, related to cell growth and cap-dependent protein translation. Moreover, intake of dietary Pi, whether high (1.0%) or low (0.1%), affects organs in developing mice, and is related to tumorigenesis in mice. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of Pi is the daily dietary intake required to maintain levels above the lower limit of the range of normal serum Pi concentration (2.7 mg/dL) for most individuals (97-98%). Thus, adequate intake of Pi (RDA; 700 mg/day) and maintenance of normal Pi concentration (2.7-4.5 mg/dL) are important for health and prevention of diseases caused by inadequate Pi intake.

  1. Triclosan: A Widespread Environmental Toxicant with Many Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yueh, Mei-Fei; Tukey, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent that has been added to personal care products, including hand soaps and cosmetics, and impregnated in numerous different materials ranging from athletic clothing to food packaging. The constant disposal of TCS into the sewage system is creating a major environmental and public health hazard. Owing to its chemical properties of bioaccumulation and resistance to degradation, TCS is widely detected in various environmental compartments in concentrations ranging from nanograms to micrograms per liter. Epidemiology studies indicate that significant levels of TCS are detected in body fluids in all human age groups. We document here the emerging evidence—from in vitro and in vivo animal studies and environmental toxicology studies—demonstrating that TCS exerts adverse effects on different biological systems through various modes of action. Considering the fact that humans are simultaneously exposed to TCS and many TCS-like chemicals, we speculate that TCS-induced adverse effects may be relevant to human health. PMID:26738475

  2. Sublethal landrin toxicity: Behavioral and physiological effects on captive vultures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forthman-Quick, D.L.; Hill, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    Use of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) has been proposed to reduce consumption of California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) eggs by ravens (Corvus corax). Although landrin has induced aversions in ravens and other birds, no data were available on behavioral and physiological effects of landrin on condors, non-target birds that might consume treated eggs. Because condors are endangered, we selected taxonomically related surrogates to approximate the effects on condors of acute oral doses of landrin. Seven black vultures (Coragyps atratus), 2 turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), and 2 king vultures (Sarcoramphus papa) received landrin and placebo treatments 1 week apart. Plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity was monitored at zero, 3, and 24 hours posttreatment, and behavioral observations were made for 2 hours posttreatment. The doses tested were nonlethal, and ChE levels approached normal within 24 hours after treatment. Only the frequency of vomiting differed statistically between the placebo and landrin treatment. We conclude that with appropriate precautions, landrin can be used in applications of CTA to discourage consumption of condor eggs by ravens, while posing no apparent risk to reintroduced condors.

  3. Effect of lead acetate toxicity on experimental male albino rat

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nabil M; Eweis, Esam A; El-Beltagi, Hossam S; Abdel-Mobdy, Yasmin E

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of different doses of lead acetate (1/20, 1/40 and 1/60 of LD50) on body weight gain, blood picture, plasma protein profile and the function of liver, kidney and thyroid gland. Methods Male albino rats were divided into four groups, the first group represented the health control animals, while the second, third and fourth groups were ingested orally with sub lethal doses of lead acetate (1/20, 1/40 and 1/60) of the oral LD50, respectively. One dose was ingested every two days during the experimental period (14 weeks) including the adaptation time. Blood was collected and used for all analysis. Results The results showed that, the ingestion of Pb2+ induced significant stimulation in glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (ALT) and glutamic-oxalacetic transaminease (AST) activity. Also, total soluble protein and albumin contents of plasma were significantly decreased, while the content of globulin was changed by the Pb2+ treatments. The cholinesterase activity was inhibited, but the activities of alkaline and acid phosphates and lactate dehydrogenase were stimulated, while plasma glucose level was elevated as a result of lead acetate intoxication. In case of blood picture, Pb2+ ingestion reduced the contents of hemoglobin and RBCs count of intoxicated rat's blood and the plasma levels of T3, T4 and blood WBCs count were decreased. Conclusions It can be concluded that lead acetate has harmful effect on experimental male albino rats. Therefore, the present work advises people to prevent exposure to the lead compound to avoid injurious hazard risk. PMID:23569832

  4. Antidotal effect of dihydroxyacetone against cyanide toxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Niknahad, H; O'Brien, P J

    1996-05-01

    Potassium cyanide (CN) intoxication in mice was found to be effectively antagonized by dihydroxyacetone (DHA), particularly if administered in combination with another CN antidote, sodium thiosulfate. Cyanide-induced convulsions were also prevented by DHA treatment, either alone or in combination with thiosulfate. Injection (i.p.) of DHA (2 g/kg) 2 min after or 10 min before CN (s.c.) increased LD50 values of CN(8.7 mg/kg) by factors of 2.1 and 3.0, respectively. Treatment with a combination of DHA and thiosulfate after CN increased the LD50 by a factor of 2.4. Pretreatment with a combination of DHA and thiosulfate (1 g/kg) increased the LD50 of CN to 83 mg/kg. Administration of alpha-ketoglutarate (2.0 g/kg), but not pyruvate, 2 min after CN increased the LD50 of CN by a factor of 1.6. Brain, heart and liver cytochrome oxidase activities were also measured following in vivo CN treatment with and without DHA. Pretreatment with DHA prevented the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase activity by CN and treatment with DHA after CN accelerated the recovery of cytochrome oxidase activity, especially in brain and heart homogenates. DHA is a physiological agent and, therefore, could prove to be a safe and effective antidote for CN, particularly in cases of fire smoke inhalation in which a combination of CN and carbon monoxide is present. In these cases the normally used antidote, sodium nitrite, to induce methemoglobin so as to trap the CN, is contraindicated because some of the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood will have already been diminished by carbon monoxide.

  5. Alleviative effects of quercetin and onion on male reproductive toxicity induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Hiromi; Kohara, Machiko; Aizawa, Koichi; Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Inakuma, Takahiro; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Sagai, Masaru

    2008-05-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are particulate matter from diesel exhaust that contain many toxic compounds, such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Some toxicities of PAH are thought to be expressed via aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AhRs). The male reproductive toxicity of DEPs might depend on AhR activation induced by PAHs. We hypothesized that AhR antagonists protect against the male reproductive toxicity of DEPs. Quercetin is a flavonoid and a well-known AhR antagonist, while onion contains many flavonoids, including quercetin. Hence, we examined whether quercetin and onion have alleviative effects against the male reproductive toxicity induced by DEPs. BALB/c male mice were fed quercetin- or onion-containing diets and received 10 injections of DEP suspension or vehicle into the dorsal subcutaneous layer over 5 weeks. The mice were euthanized at 2 weeks, after the last treatment, and their organs were collected. Daily sperm production and total incidence of sperm abnormalities were significantly affected in the DEP groups as compared with the vehicle group, but the total incidence of sperm abnormalities in the quercetin + DEP-treated mice was significantly reduced as compared with the DEP-treated mice. The numbers of Sertoli cells were significantly decreased in DEP-treated mice as compared with the vehicle-treated mice, but, the numbers of Sertoli cells were significantly increased in the quercetin and the onion + DEP-treated mice as compared with the DEP-treated mice. These results clearly indicate alleviative effects of quercetin and onion against the male reproductive toxicity induced by DEP.

  6. Elemental selenium at nano size possesses lower toxicity without compromising the fundamental effect on selenoenzymes: comparison with selenomethionine in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huali; Zhang, Jinsong; Yu, Hanqing

    2007-05-15

    Glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase are major selenoenzymes through which selenium exerts powerful antioxidant effects. Selenium also elicits pro-oxidant effects at toxic levels. The antioxidant and pro-oxidant effects, or bioavailability and toxicity, of selenium depend on its chemical form. Selenomethionine is considered to be the most appropriate supplemental form due to its excellent bioavailability and lower toxicity compared to various selenium compounds. The present studies reveal that, compared with selenomethionine, elemental selenium at nano size (Nano-Se) possesses equal efficacy in increasing the activities of glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase but has much lower toxicity as indicated by median lethal dose, acute liver injury, and short-term toxicity. Our results suggest that Nano-Se can serve as an antioxidant with reduced risk of selenium toxicity.

  7. Identifying contact-mediated, localized toxic effects of MWCNT aggregates on epithelial monolayers: a single-cell monitoring toxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Rotoli, Bianca M; Gatti, Rita; Movia, Dania; Bianchi, Massimiliano G; Di Cristo, Luisana; Fenoglio, Ivana; Sonvico, Fabio; Bergamaschi, Enrico; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Bussolati, Ovidio

    2015-03-01

    Aggregates of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) impair the barrier properties of human airway cell monolayers. To resolve the mechanism of the barrier alteration, monolayers of Calu-3 human airway epithelial cells were exposed to aggregated MWCNT. At the cell-population level, trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was used as an indicator of barrier competence, caspase activity was assessed with standard biochemical assays, and cell viability was investigated by biochemical techniques and high-throughput screening (HTS) technique based on automated epifluorescence microscopy. At cell level, the response to MWCNT was investigated with confocal microscopy, by evaluating cell death (calcein/propidium iodide (PI)), proliferation (Ki-67), and apoptosis (caspase activity). At the cell-population level, exposure to aggregated MWCNT caused a decrease in TEER, which was not associated with a decrease in cell viability or onset of apoptosis even after an 8-d exposure. In contrast, confocal imaging demonstrated contact with MWCNT aggregates triggered cell death after 24 h of exposure. In the presence of a natural surfactant, both TEER decrease and contact-mediated toxicity were mitigated. With confocal imaging, increased proliferation and apoptosis were detected in Calu-3 cells next to the aggregates. Contact-mediated cytotoxicity was recorded in two additional cell lines (BEAS-2B and A549) derived from human airways. Similar results were confirmed by adopting two additional MWCNT preparations with different physico-chemical features. This indicates MWCNT caused localized damage to airway epithelial monolayers in vitro and altered the apoptotic and proliferative rate of epithelial cells in close proximity to the aggregates. These findings provide evidence on the pathway by which MWCNT aggregates impair airway barrier function, and support the use of imaging techniques as a possible regulatory-decision supporting tool to identify effects of aggregated nanomaterials

  8. Toxic effects of 4-methylthio-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (Raphasatin) in the rat urinary bladder without genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Isamu; Cho, Young-Man; Hirata, Tadashi; Toyoda, Takeshi; Akagi, Jun-Ichi; Nakamura, Yasushi; Sasaki, Azusa; Nakamura, Takako; Okamoto, Shigehisa; Shirota, Koji; Suetome, Noboru; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2017-04-01

    We recently reported that 4-methylthio-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC) exerts chemopreventive effects on the rat esophageal carcinogenesis model at a low dose of 80 ppm in a diet. In contrast, some isothiocyanates (ITCs) have been reported to cause toxic effects, promotion activity, and/or carcinogenic potential in the urinary bladder of rats. In the present study, we investigated whether MTBITC had toxic effects in the urinary bladder similar to other ITCs, such as phenethyl ITC (PEITC). First, to examine the early toxicity of MTBITC, rats were fed a diet supplemented with 100, 300 or 1000 ppm MTBITC for 14 days. Treatment with 1000 ppm MTBITC caused increased organ weights and histopathological changes in the urinary bladder, producing lesions similar to those of 1000 ppm PEITC. In contrast, rats treated with 100 or 300 ppm MTBITC showed no signs of toxicity. Additionally, we performed in vivo genotoxicity studies to clarify whether MTBITC may exhibit a carcinogenic potential through a genotoxic mechanism in rats. Rats were treated with MTBITC for 3 days at doses of 10, 30 or 90 mg kg(-1) body weight by gavage, and comet assays in the urinary bladder and micronucleus assays in the bone marrow were performed. No genotoxic changes were observed after treatment with MTBITC at all doses. Overall, these results suggested that the effects of MTBITC in the rat urinary bladder are less than those of PEITC, but that MTBITC could have toxic effects through a nongenotoxic mechanism in the urinary bladder of rats at high doses. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Effect of chloride on the dissolution rate of silver nanoparticles and toxicity to E. coli.

    PubMed

    Levard, Clément; Mitra, Sumit; Yang, Tiffany; Jew, Adam D; Badireddy, Appala Raju; Lowry, Gregory V; Brown, Gordon E

    2013-06-04

    Pristine silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are not chemically stable in the environment and react strongly with inorganic ligands such as sulfide and chloride once the silver is oxidized. Understanding the environmental transformations of AgNPs in the presence of specific inorganic ligands is crucial to determining their fate and toxicity in the environment. Chloride (Cl(-)) is a ubiquitous ligand with a strong affinity for oxidized silver and is often present in natural waters and in bacterial growth media. Though chloride can strongly affect toxicity results for AgNPs, their interaction is rarely considered and is challenging to study because of the numerous soluble and solid Ag-Cl species that can form depending on the Cl/Ag ratio. Consequently, little is known about the stability and dissolution kinetics of AgNPs in the presence of chloride ions. Our study focuses on the dissolution behavior of AgNPs in chloride-containing systems and also investigates the effect of chloride on the growth inhibition of E.coli (ATCC strain 33876) caused by Ag toxicity. Our results suggest that the kinetics of dissolution are strongly dependent on the Cl/Ag ratio and can be interpreted using the thermodynamically expected speciation of Ag in the presence of chloride. We also show that the toxicity of AgNPs to E.coli at various Cl(-) concentrations is governed by the amount of dissolved AgCl(x)((x-1)-) species suggesting an ion effect rather than a nanoparticle effect.

  10. Effect of soil moisture on pesticide toxicity to an enchytraeid worm, Enchytraeus sp.

    PubMed

    Puurtinen, H M; Martikainen, E A

    1997-07-01

    The aim of the study was to find out whether soil moisture affects toxicity of organic pesticides to an enchytraeid worm. Laboratory experiments were carried out with dimethoate and benomyl, using a small Enchytraeus sp. as the test species. Substrate was natural agricultural field soil cultivated without pesticides for several years. Experimental design consisted of three soil moistures (40, 55, and 70% of water holding capacity) and five pesticide concentrations, plus controls. Measured parameters were survival, size of the parent worms and number and size of juveniles produced. Dimethoate was relatively non-toxic to this species. Dimethoate did not decrease survival, but sublethal effects on adult size and number of juveniles were observed. Adverse conditions in dry soil masked these effects; dimethoate appeared to be less toxic in dry soil than in moist soil. Benomyl caused significant mortality and the effects were very abrupt. Toxicity of benomyl decreased with increasing soil moisture content; in moist soil the worms survived at higher benomyl concentrations than in drier soils.

  11. Toxic effects of perfluorinated compounds at human cellular level and on a model vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Rainieri, Sandra; Conlledo, Nadia; Langerholc, Tomaž; Madorran, Eneko; Sala, Martin; Barranco, Alejandro

    2017-03-09

    This work aims at deepening the understanding of the mode of action of some of the most prominent perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) by detecting in a realistic way their effects. To this end, after adjusting the exposure media taking into account the biological model employed and the physico-chemical properties of PFCs, we evaluated the toxic effects of PFOA, PFOS and PFNA in a human macrophage cell line (TLT cells) and in zebrafish embryos. We performed such evaluation on individual compounds and mixtures. Acute toxicity was greater for PFOS in zebrafish; however, it was greater for PFNA in TLT cells. PFNA was also the compound producing the greatest levels of oxidative stress, both in zebrafish and TLT cells. Additionally, in both biological systems, it showed a much stronger effect on mixtures in comparison to the others PFCs tested in this work. Mixture studies in zebrafish showed that acute toxicity depended on the concentration and that the mixture was far more toxic than the individual compounds. This study highlights the importance of studying PFCs in realistic conditions on various biological models.

  12. Evaluation of Toxicity Effects of Asafetida on Biochemical, Hematological, and Histological Parameters in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Seyyed Majid; Yadegari, Maryam; Mirjalily, Aghdas; Rezvani, Mohammd Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Asafetida is traditionally used in folklore medicine for the treatment of various ailments. To validate its use in traditional medicine, it is important to evaluate its toxicity in the animal system. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the toxicological effects of asafetida in Wistar albino rats. Materials and Methods: Acute toxicity tests were conducted by the oral administration of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg/kg body weight of the animal. In chronic study, animals were administered with various doses of asafetida (25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg body weight) for a period of 6 weeks. At end of experiment, the effects of asafetida on hematological, renal, and hepatic markers and histological parameters were analyzed. Results: In acute toxicity study, no mortality was seen up to 72 h of the administration of asafetida. No signs of neurological and behavioral changes were noticed within 24 h. In the chronic study, the asafetida intake has changed the hematological parameters such as red blood cell (RBC), white blood cell (WBC), hematocrit (HCT), and platelets. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were significantly increased in treated animals. The plasma level of urea and creatinine were not altered by the administration of asafetida throughout the study. Histopathology study indicates hepatotoxicity, but no signs of prominent pathological changes in kidney. Conclusions: Asafetida did not show any acute toxicity, but chronic administration could have undesirable effects on hepatocytes and hematological factors. PMID:26862262

  13. The effect of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on amyloid aggregation and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Iannuzzi, Clara; Irace, Gaetano; Sirangelo, Ivana

    2015-02-02

    Amyloidosis is a protein folding disorder in which normally soluble proteins are deposited extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, impairing tissue structure and function. Charged polyelectrolytes such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are frequently found associated with the proteinaceous deposits in tissues of patients affected by amyloid diseases. Experimental evidence indicate that they can play an active role in favoring amyloid fibril formation and stabilization. Binding of GAGs to amyloid fibrils occurs mainly through electrostatic interactions involving the negative polyelectrolyte charges and positively charged side chains residues of aggregating protein. Similarly to catalyst for reactions, GAGs favor aggregation, nucleation and amyloid fibril formation functioning as a structural templates for the self-assembly of highly cytotoxic oligomeric precursors, rich in β-sheets, into harmless amyloid fibrils. Moreover, the GAGs amyloid promoting activity can be facilitated through specific interactions via consensus binding sites between amyloid polypeptide and GAGs molecules. We review the effect of GAGs on amyloid deposition as well as proteins not strictly related to diseases. In addition, we consider the potential of the GAGs therapy in amyloidosis.

  14. Cardioprotective effect of cannabidiol in rats exposed to doxorubicin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Amr A; Albuali, Waleed H; Al-Mulhim, Abdulruhman S; Jresat, Iyad

    2013-09-01

    The potential protective effect of cannabidiol, the major non-psychotropic Cannabis constituent, was investigated against doxorubicin cardiotoxicity in rats. Cardiotoxicity was induced by six equal doses of doxorubicin (2.5mgkg(-1) i.p., each) given at 48h intervals over two weeks to achieve a total dose of 15mgkg(-1). Cannabidiol treatment (5mgkg(-1)/day, i.p.) was started on the same day of doxorubicin administration and continued for four weeks. Cannabidiol significantly reduced the elevations of serum creatine kinase-MB and troponin T, and cardiac malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide and calcium ion levels, and attenuated the decreases in cardiac reduced glutathione, selenium and zinc ions. Histopathological examination showed that cannabidiol ameliorated doxorubicin-induced cardiac injury. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that cannabidiol significantly reduced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor-κB, Fas ligand and caspase-3, and increased the expression of survivin in cardiac tissue of doxorubicin-treated rats. These results indicate that cannabidiol represents a potential protective agent against doxorubicin cardiac injury.

  15. Predicting toxic effects of copper on aquatic biota in mineralized areas by using the Biotic Ligand Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathleen S.; Ranville, James F.; Adams, M.; Choate, LaDonna M.; Church, Stanley E.; Fey, David L.; Wanty, Richard B.; Crock, James G.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical speciation of metals influences their biological effects. The Biotic Ligand Model (BLM) is a computational approach to predict chemical speciation and acute toxicological effects of metals on aquatic biota. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency incorporated the BLM into their regulatory water-quality criteria for copper. Results from three different laboratory copper toxicity tests were compared with BLM predictions for simulated test-waters. This was done to evaluate the ability of the BLM to accurately predict the effects of hardness and concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and iron on aquatic toxicity. In addition, we evaluated whether the BLM and the three toxicity tests provide consistent results. Comparison of BLM predictions with two types of Ceriodaphnia dubia toxicity tests shows that there is fairly good agreement between predicted LC50 values computed by the BLM and LC50 values determined from the two toxicity tests. Specifically, the effect of increasing calcium concentration (and hardness) on copper toxicity appears to be minimal. Also, there is fairly good agreement between the BLM and the two toxicity tests for test solutions containing elevated DOC, for which the LC50 is 3-to-5 times greater (less toxic) than the LC50 for the lower-DOC test water. This illustrates the protective effects of DOC on copper toxicity and demonstrates the ability of the BLM to predict these protective effects. In contrast, for test solutions with added iron there is a decrease in LC50 values (increase in toxicity) in results from the two C. dubia toxicity tests, and the agreement between BLM LC50 predictions and results from these toxicity tests is poor. The inability of the BLM to account for competitive iron binding to DOC or DOC fractionation may be a significant shortcoming of the BLM for predicting site- specific water-quality criteria in streams affected by iron-rich acidic drainage in mined and mineralized areas.

  16. Hepatoprotective effect of sitagliptin against methotrexate induced liver toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Abo-Haded, Hany M.; Elkablawy, Mohamed A.; Al-johani, Zeyad; Al-ahmadi, Osama; El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2017-01-01

    Sitagliptin is selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (DPP4-I), used clinically as a new oral anti-diabetic agent. This study explored the underlying mechanisms of the hepatoprotective role of sitagliptin pretreatment against methotrexate (MTX) induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Forty mice were divided into four groups (10 mice each); control, MTX, and two sitagliptin groups (pretreated with sitagliptin 10 and 20 mg/kg/day, respectively) for five consecutive days prior to MTX injection. Results showed that MTX induced marked hepatic injury in the form of cloudy swelling, hydropic degeneration, apoptosis and focal necrosis in all hepatic zones. Biochemical analysis revealed significant increase in the serum transaminases, alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase in MTX group. Oxidative stress and depressed antioxidant system of the hepatic tissues were evident in MTX group. MTX down-regulated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression and reduced its binding capacity. Additionally, MTX increased the activation and the expression of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and downstream inflammatory mediators. MTX induced the activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and increased nitrite/nitrate level. Finally, hepatic cellular apoptosis was clearly obvious in MTX-intoxicated animals using TUNEL staining. Also, there was increase in the immunoexpression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, increase in Bax and caspase-3 levels and decrease in the level of anti-apoptotic Bcl2 in liver. On the other hand, sitagliptin pretreatment significantly ameliorated all of the above mentioned biochemical, histopathological, immunohistochemical changes induced by MTX. These results provide new evidences that the hepatoprotective effect of sitagliptin is possibly mediated through modulation of Nrf2 and NF-κB signaling pathways with subsequent suppression of inflammatory and apoptotic processes. PMID:28334048

  17. Effects of chemical speciation in growth media on the toxicity of mercury(II).

    PubMed

    Farrell, R E; Germida, J J; Huang, P M

    1993-05-01

    The toxicity of metals, including mercury, is expressed differently in different media, and the addition of soluble organics to the growth medium can have a significant impact on bioassay results. Although the effect of medium composition on metal toxicity is generally attributed to its effect on metal speciation (i.e., the chemical form in which the metal occurs), the importance of individual metal-ligand species remains largely unclear. Here, we report the results of a study that investigated, both experimentally and from a modeling perspective, the effects of complex soluble organic supplements on the acute toxicity (i.e., 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50]) of mercury to a Pseudomonas fluorescens isolate in chemically well-defined synthetic growth media (M-IIX). The media consisted of a basal inorganic salts medium supplemented with glycerol (0.1%, vol/vol) and a variety of common protein hydrolysates (0.1%, vol/vol), i.e., Difco beef extract (X = B), Casamino Acids (X = C), peptone (X = P), soytone (X = S), tryptone (X = T), and yeast extract (X = Y). These were analyzed to obtain cation, anion, and amino acid profiles and the results were used to compute the aqueous speciation of Hg(II) in the media. Respirometric bioassays were performed and IC50s were calculated. Medium components varied significantly in their effects on the acute toxicity of Hg(II) to the P. fluorescens isolate. IC50s ranged from 1.48 to 14.54 micrograms of Hg ml-1, and the acute toxicity of Hg(II) in the different media decreased in the order M-IIC > M-IIP > M-IIB > M-IIT > M-IIS > M-IIY.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Effects of chemical speciation in growth media on the toxicity of mercury(II).

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, R E; Germida, J J; Huang, P M

    1993-01-01

    The toxicity of metals, including mercury, is expressed differently in different media, and the addition of soluble organics to the growth medium can have a significant impact on bioassay results. Although the effect of medium composition on metal toxicity is generally attributed to its effect on metal speciation (i.e., the chemical form in which the metal occurs), the importance of individual metal-ligand species remains largely unclear. Here, we report the results of a study that investigated, both experimentally and from a modeling perspective, the effects of complex soluble organic supplements on the acute toxicity (i.e., 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50]) of mercury to a Pseudomonas fluorescens isolate in chemically well-defined synthetic growth media (M-IIX). The media consisted of a basal inorganic salts medium supplemented with glycerol (0.1%, vol/vol) and a variety of common protein hydrolysates (0.1%, vol/vol), i.e., Difco beef extract (X = B), Casamino Acids (X = C), peptone (X = P), soytone (X = S), tryptone (X = T), and yeast extract (X = Y). These were analyzed to obtain cation, anion, and amino acid profiles and the results were used to compute the aqueous speciation of Hg(II) in the media. Respirometric bioassays were performed and IC50s were calculated. Medium components varied significantly in their effects on the acute toxicity of Hg(II) to the P. fluorescens isolate. IC50s ranged from 1.48 to 14.54 micrograms of Hg ml-1, and the acute toxicity of Hg(II) in the different media decreased in the order M-IIC >> M-IIP > M-IIB >> M-IIT > M-IIS >>> M-IIY.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8517745

  19. Characterization of Combinatorial Effects of Toxic Substances by Cell Cultivation in Micro Segmented Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.; Kürsten, D.; Funfak, A.; Schneider, S.; Köhler, J. M.

    This chapter reviews the application of micro segmented flow for the screening of toxic effects on bacteria, eukaryotic microorganisms, human cells and multicellular systems. Besides, the determination of complete dose/response functions of toxic substances with a minimum of cells and chemicals, it is reviewed how two- and multi-dimensional concentration spaces can be screened in order to evaluate combinatorial effects of chemicals on cells. The challenge for the development of new and miniaturized methods is derived from the increase of the number of different used substances in technique, agriculture and medicine, from the increasing release of new substances and nanomaterials into our environment and from the improvement of the insight of toxicity of natural substances and the interferences between different substances resulting in toxic effects on different organisms, cells and tissues. The application of two-dimensional toxicological screenings on selected examples of effector combinations is described. Examples for the detection of an independent, an additive and a synergistic interference between two substances are given. In addition, it is shown that the screening for toxicological effects in complete two-dimensional concentration spaces allows the detection of complex response behaviour—for example, the formation of tolerances and stimulation peaks—which thereby can be characterized. The characterization of interference of toxic organic substances with silver nanoparticles is reported as an example for the potential of micro segmented-flow technique for evaluating the toxicological impact of new materials. Finally, it is demonstrated that the technique can be applied for different organisms like simple bacteria, single cell alga such as Chlorella vulgaris and multicellular systems up to the development of complete organisms beginning from eggs.

  20. Transfer of the cytochrome P450-dependent dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor into Nicotiana tabacum chloroplasts for light-driven synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Karcher, Daniel; Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Martens, Helle Juel; Ruf, Stephanie; Kroop, Xenia; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawie, Mohammed Saddik; Pribil, Mathias; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Bock, Ralph; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    Plant chloroplasts are light-driven cell factories that have great potential to act as a chassis for metabolic engineering applications. Using plant chloroplasts, we demonstrate how photosynthetic reducing power can drive a metabolic pathway to synthesise a bio-active natural product. For this purpose, we stably engineered the dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor into the chloroplasts of Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Dhurrin is a cyanogenic glucoside and its synthesis from the amino acid tyrosine is catalysed by two membrane-bound cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP79A1 and CYP71E1) and a soluble glucosyltransferase (UGT85B1), and is dependent on electron transfer from a P450 oxidoreductase. The entire pathway was introduced into the chloroplast by integrating CYP79A1, CYP71E1, and UGT85B1 into a neutral site of the N. tabacum chloroplast genome. The two P450s and the UGT85B1 were functional when expressed in the chloroplasts and converted endogenous tyrosine into dhurrin using electrons derived directly from the photosynthetic electron transport chain, without the need for the presence of an NADPH-dependent P450 oxidoreductase. The dhurrin produced in the engineered plants amounted to 0.1–0.2% of leaf dry weight compared to 6% in sorghum. The results obtained pave the way for plant P450s involved in the synthesis of economically important compounds to be engineered into the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts, and demonstrate that their full catalytic cycle can be driven directly by photosynthesis-derived electrons. PMID:26969746

  1. 12(R)-hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid: a cytochrome P450-dependent arachidonate metabolite that inhibits Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase in the cornea

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, M.L.; Balazy, M.; Masferrer, J.; Abraham, N.G.; McGiff, J.C.; Murphy, R.C.

    1987-11-01

    When corneal microsomes were incubated with arachidonic acid in the presence of an NADPH-generating system, four polar metabolites (compounds A-D) were formed. Synthesis of these metabolites could be inhibited by carbon monoxide, SKF 525A, and anti-cytochrome c reductase antibodies. One of the metabolites, compound C, was found to inhibit partially purified Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase from the corneal epithelium in a dose-dependent manner. After compound C was purified by TLC and HPLC, it was found to have a UV absorption spectrum with a maximum absorbance at 236 nm suggesting the presence of a conjugated diene. Mass spectrometric analysis using positive- and negative-ionization modes was carried out on derivatized compound C. Abundant fragment ions were consistent with compound C being a monooxygenated derivative of arachidonic acid with a hydroxyl substituent at carbon-12 of the icosanoid backbone; all deuterium atoms from (/sup 2/H/sub 8/)arachidonate were retained in the structure. Compound C was characterized as a 12-hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid. However, only 12(R) isomer was found to be an inhibitor of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase from the corneal epithelium, suggesting that the biologically active compound C was 12(R)-hydroxyy-5,8,10,14-icosatetraenoic acid. Such an inhibitor of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase synthesized in the cornea may have an important role in regulating ocular transparency and aqueous human secretion.

  2. Disentangling the effects of polymer coatings on silver nanoparticle agglomeration, dissolution, and toxicity to determine mechanisms of nanotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zook, Justin M.; Halter, Melissa D.; Cleveland, Danielle; Long, Stephen E.

    2012-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are frequently coated with a variety of polymers, which may affect various interdependent mechanisms of toxicity or antimicrobial action, including agglomeration and dissolution rates. Here, we systematically measure how citrate, dextran, 5 and 20 kDa poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) coatings affect AgNP agglomeration, dissolution, and toxicity. In addition, to disentangle the coatings' effects on agglomeration from their other effects, we produce multiple stable agglomerate sizes of several of the coated 23 nm AgNPs ranging from singly-dispersed to mean agglomerate sizes of several hundred nanometers. These dispersions allow us to independently study the effects of agglomeration and polymer coating on dissolution rate and hemolytic toxicity. We find that both hemolytic toxicity and dissolution rate are highest for the 5 kDa PEG coating, and toxicity and dissolution rate decrease significantly with increasing agglomerate size independent of coating. This correlation between toxicity and dissolution rate suggests that both polymer coating and agglomeration may affect hemolytic toxicity largely through their effects on dissolution. Because both the AgNP dissolution rate and hemolysis decrease only moderately compared to the large increases in agglomerate size, AgNPs' hemolytic toxicity may be caused by their large surface area and consequently high dissolution rate, rather than from other size-specific effects. At the silver concentrations used in this work, silver dissolved from AgNPs is expected to be primarily in the form of AgCl NPs, which are therefore more likely than Ag+ ions to be the primary drivers of hemolytic toxicity. In addition, all AgNPs we tested are much more toxic to horse red blood cells than sheep red blood cells, highlighting the complexity of toxic responses and the need to test toxicity in multiple biological systems.

  3. Effect of kinetics of complexation by humic acid on toxicity of copper to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Kim, S.D.; Cha, D.K.; Allen, H.E.

    1999-05-01

    The rate of reaction of trace metal ions is an important consideration when studying the chemistry of trace metals in natural waters. The application of speciation models to natural water systems requires knowledge of kinetics if reactions are slow. Most bioassay and toxicity tests conducted in static and flow-through systems have not taken reaction kinetics into account. Therefore, results from these studies may overestimate the toxicity in the receiving waters. In the present study, the kinetics of the interaction of Cu(II) with humic acid (HA) and its influence on the toxicity of copper to Ceriodaphnia dubia were investigated by both chemical kinetic studies using a copper ion selective electrode and bioassay tests using a continuous flow-through bioassay system. A two-ligand site, with fist-order rate constants, model gave a very good description of experimental kinetic data of the change of free Cu{sup 2+} concentration. Average k{sub 1} was 1.85/h and average k{sub 2} was 0.094/h. Bioassay tests indicated that different reaction times of copper with HA solution produced different toxic effects to organisms. The authors determined the hydrodynamic characteristics of the bioassay chambers to better describe the exposure of the organisms to free Cu{sup 2+}. The bioassays supported the free ion activity model that the bioavailability and therefore toxicity of copper was directly correlated to the free Cu{sup 2+} concentration rather than to the total copper concentration. It was further shown that conventional chemical kinetics can be used to predict the toxicity of copper in these bioassays. This study supports the importance of considering reaction kinetics when studying the chemistry of trace metals in natural waters.

  4. Intracellular haemolytic agents of Heterocapsa circularisquama exhibit toxic effects on H. circularisquama cells themselves and suppress both cell-mediated haemolytic activity and toxicity to rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis).

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Cho, Kichul; Yasutomi, Masumi; Ueno, Mikinori; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Basti, Leila; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Takeshita, Satoshi; Kim, Daekyung; Oda, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    A harmful dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa circularisquama, is highly toxic to shellfish and the zooplankton rotifer Brachionus plicatilis. A previous study found that H. circularisquama has both light-dependent and -independent haemolytic agents, which might be responsible for its toxicity. Detailed analysis of the haemolytic activity of H. circularisquama suggested that light-independent haemolytic activity was mediated mainly through intact cells, whereas light-dependent haemolytic activity was mediated by intracellular agents which can be discharged from ruptured cells. Because H. circularisquama showed similar toxicity to rotifers regardless of the light conditions, and because ultrasonic ruptured H. circularisquama cells showed no significant toxicity to rotifers, it was suggested that live cell-mediated light-independent haemolytic activity is a major factor responsible for the observed toxicity to rotifers. Interestingly, the ultrasonic-ruptured cells of H. circularisquama suppressed their own lethal effect on the rotifers. Analysis of samples of the cell contents (supernatant) and cell fragments (precipitate) prepared from the ruptured H. circularisquama cells indicated that the cell contents contain inhibitors for the light-independent cell-mediated haemolytic activity, toxins affecting H. circularisquama cells themselves, as well as light-dependent haemolytic agents. Ethanol extract prepared from H. circularisquama, which is supposed to contain a porphyrin derivative that displays photosensitising haemolytic activity, showed potent toxicity to Chattonella marina, Chattonella antiqua, and Karenia mikimotoi, as well as to H. circularisquama at the concentration range at which no significant toxicity to rotifers was observed. Analysis on a column of Sephadex LH-20 revealed that light-dependent haemolytic activity and inhibitory activity on cell-mediated light-independent haemolytic activity existed in two separate fractions (f-2 and f-3), suggesting that both

  5. [Protective effect of diclofenac towards the oxidative stress induced by paracetamol toxicity in rats].

    PubMed

    Aouacheri, W; Saka, S; Djafer, R; Lefranc, G

    2009-01-01

    Association of paracetamol (PARA) and diclofenac (DiCF) is the aim of our study. 60 male rats "Albinos wistar" were treated by oral gavage (per os) during seven days. A control group was treated by mineral water (0+0) mg/kg and a second group was treated with only a toxic dose of 100 mg/kg of PARA (100+0). Remaining lots were treated with a combination of different toxic doses of PARA and a therapeutic dose of DiCF (15+3, 100+3, 200+3 and 400+3) mg/kg. Plasma concentration of amiotransferases (ASAT, ALAT), alkalines phosphatase (ALP), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione (GSH), glucose, cholesterol, creatinin, direct and total bilirubin, significantly varied in the treated rats regarding to the witness's rats. The toxicity of PARA revealed by a dose dependant blood increases of ASAT, ALAT, ALP, GPx, GR, glucose, creatinin, bilirubin, and by decreases of cholesterol concentration and tissue GSH in comparisons to controls. The depletion of GSH and the increase of the oxidative stress enzymes (GPx and GR) suggest a detoxification function of the glutathione system. The association (PARA + DiCF) revealed a protective effect, resulting in the increase of the concentrations of ASAT, ALAT, ALP, GPx, GR, bilirubin and the increase of GSH. Regarding to all these results, it has been suggested that DiCF has a protective action towards the toxic effects of PARA.

  6. Toxic effects of pentachlorophenol, azinphos-methyl and chlorpyrifos on the development of Paracentrotus lividus embryos.

    PubMed

    Buono, Silvia; Manzo, Sonia; Maria, Giovanna; Sansone, Giovanni

    2012-04-01

    The application of many current-use pesticides has increased after the disuse of persistent, bioaccumulative or toxic ones as DDT or chlordane. Many of the used pesticides are considered less dangerous towards the environment for their physico-chemical properties. This study investigated the toxic effects of three current-use pesticides, pentachlorophenol (PCP), azinphos-methyl (AZM), and chlorpyrifos, on Mediterranean sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus early development and offspring quality. The experimental results showed that the most toxic pesticides were PCP and AZM at EC50 level. Nevertheless at low concentration PCP resulted the less toxic compound and showed EC1 value more protective than NOEC. PCP at high concentration seemed to modify cytoskeleton assembly, while at low concentrations, it could alter the deposition of the larval skeleton. OPs at low concentrations until 300 μg/l showed a similar toxicological behaviour with a trend corresponding to the pesticide concentrations. At high concentration (500 μg/l) the effect mainly observed was the embryos pre-larval arrest. This investigation highlighted the relevance to evaluate, in coastal seawaters, the levels of the used pesticides to understand the real impact on benthic populations mainly in sites characterized by intensive agriculture or floriculture activities, such as the coastal areas of the Mediterranean Sea.

  7. Continuous ozonation treatment of ofloxacin: transformation products, water matrix effect and aquatic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Carbajo, Jose B; Petre, Alice L; Rosal, Roberto; Herrera, Sonia; Letón, Pedro; García-Calvo, Eloy; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R; Perdigón-Melón, Jose A

    2015-07-15

    The continuous ozonation of the antibiotic ofloxacin (OFX) has been performed using a synthetic water matrix and in a sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent. The aim was to study the effect of the water matrix on the ozonation with particular emphasis on the aquatic toxicity of treated water. OFX was completely removed in both water matrices, although the amount of ozone consumed for its depletion was strongly matrix-dependent. The extent of mineralization was limited and a number of intermediate transformation products (TPs) appeared, twelve of which could be identified. OFX reaction pathway includes the degradation of piperazinyl and quinolone moieties. The further oxidation of TPs gave rise to the formation and accumulation of carboxylic acids, aldehydes, nitrogen-containing organic compounds and inorganic ions. Aquatic toxicity of treated mixtures was assessed using four standard species: the bacteria Vibrio fischeri and Pseudomonas putida as target organisms and the algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila as non-target organisms. OFX was toxic for the bacteria and the microalgae at the spiked concentration in untreated water. However, the continuous ozonation at the upper operational limit removed its toxic effects. T. thermophila was not affected by OFX, but was sensitive to STP effluent.

  8. Effect of copper status on acute toxicity of cocaine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.C.; Reddy, P.P.; Seung, S.K.; Combs, G.F.; Dulin, A.M.; Danford, D.E. )

    1989-02-09

    Both copper (Cu) nutriture and cocaine (Coc) ingestion have been shown to affect cardiovascular integrity. Therefore, the purpose of these studies was to determine if Cu status affects the acute toxicity of Coc. 20 weanling male rats (45 {plus minus} 5 g) were randomly assigned to 2 groups, 1 fed a copper deficient (CuD) (<1ppmCu) and the other a copper supplemented (CuS) diet (ca.6ppm, Cu). After 7 wks, the rats, paired for Cu status, were injected (ip) with Coc-HCl at reported LD{sub 50} doses ranging from 80-90 mg/kg bw. The CuD was established by cardiac hypertrophy, depressed hematocrit, lowered serum, liver and heart Cu compared to the CuS controls. The acute toxicity resulted in tachycardia and hyperactivity followed by ataxia with isolated muscle twitchings and violent grand-mal type seizures. For those animals that died, death was apparently due to respiratory arrest followed by ventricular fibrillation; animals that survived were killed by exsanguination. The severity of toxicity was greater for the CuD rats as evidenced by 100% exhibiting seizures compared to 80% for the CuS group. In addition, the incidence of death was 60% for the CuD group compared to 20% for the CuS rats. Although these results suggest that CuD exacerbates the toxic effects of Coc, it is not established that the effects are specific for this essential nutrient.

  9. Combined toxic effect of airborne heavy metals on human lung cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeowool; Park, Kihong; Kim, Injeong; Kim, Sang D

    2016-11-25

    Many studies have demonstrated that heavy metals existing as a mixture in the atmospheric environment cause adverse effects on human health and are important key factors of cytotoxicity; however, little investigation has been conducted on a toxicological study of a metal mixture from atmospheric fine particulate matter. The objective of this study was to predict the combined effects of heavy metals in aerosol by using in vitro human cells and obtain a suitable mixture toxicity model. Arsenic, nickel, and lead were selected for mixtures exposed to A549 human lung cancer cells. Cell proliferation (WST-1), glutathione (GSH), and interleukin (IL)-8 inhibition were observed and applied to the prediction models of mixture toxicity, concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA). The total mixture concentrations were set by an IC10-fixed ratio of individual toxicity to be more realistic for mortality and enzyme inhibition tests. The results showed that the IA model was statistically closer to the observed results than the CA model in mortality, indicating dissimilar modes of action. For the GSH inhibition, the results predicted by the IA and CA models were highly overestimated relative to mortality. Meanwhile, the IL-8 results were stable with no significant change in immune reaction related to inflammation. In conclusion, the IA model is a rapid prediction model in heavy metals mixtures; mortality, as a total outcome of cell response, is a good tool for demonstrating the combined toxicity rather than other biochemical responses.

  10. Investigating Epigenetic Effects of Prenatal Exposure to Toxic Metals in Newborns: Challenges and Benefits.

    PubMed

    Nye, Monica D; Fry, Rebecca C; Hoyo, Cathrine; Murphy, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggest that epigenetic alterations can greatly impact human health, and that epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs) may be particularly relevant in responding to environmental toxicant exposure early in life. The epigenome plays a vital role in embryonic development, tissue differentiation and disease development by controlling gene expression. In this review we discuss what is currently known about epigenetic alterations in response to prenatal exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) and lead (Pb), focusing specifically on their effects on DNA methylation. We then describe how epigenetic alterations are being studied in newborns as potential biomarkers of in utero environmental toxicant exposure, and the benefits and challenges of this approach. In summary, the studies highlighted herein indicate how epigenetic mechanisms are impacted by early life exposure to iAs and Pb, and the research that is being done to move towards understanding the relationships between toxicant-induced epigenetic alterations and disease development. Although much remains unknown, several groups are working to understand the correlative and causal effects of early life toxic metal exposure on epigenetic changes and how these changes may result in later development of disease.

  11. Contamination and toxic effects of persistent endocrine disrupters in marine mammals and birds.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, several species of marine mammals and birds have been affected by uncommon diseases and unusual mortalities. While several possible causative factors have been attributed for these events, a prominent suspect is exposure to man-made toxic contaminants. Particularly, some of these man-made chemicals can disrupt normal endocrine physiology in animals. At CMES, our studies focus on exposure and toxic effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals, particularly organochlorines, in higher trophic level wildlife. Endocrine disrupting chemicals, such as organochlorine insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, organotins etc. are found in tissues of a wide variety of wildlife. Extremely high concentrations have been found in animals afflicted with diseases and/or victims of mass mortalities. Elevated contamination by organochlorines has been found in open sea animals such as cetaceans and albatrosses, which seemed to be attributable to their low capacity to metabolize toxic persistent contaminants. Significant correlations between biochemical parameters (serum hormone concentrations and cytochrome P450 enzyme activities) and residues of endocrine disrupting chemicals were found in some species of marine animals, which indicates that these chemicals may impose toxic effects in animals even at the current levels of exposure. In general, water birds and marine mammals accumulated the dioxin-like compounds with much higher concentrations than humans, implying higher risk from exposure in wildlife. The future issues of endocrine disrupting chemicals in humans and wildlife will have to be focused in developing countries.

  12. Effects of Humic and Fulvic Acids on Silver Nanoparticle Stability, Dissolution, and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Mousavi, Maral P. S.; Hussein, Kadir; Bühlmann, Philippe; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    The colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in natural aquatic environments influences their transport and environmental persistence, while their dissolution to Ag+ influences their toxicity to organisms. Here, we characterize the colloidal stability, dissolution behavior, and toxicity of two industrially relevant classes of AgNPs (i.e., AgNPs stabilized by citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone) after exposure to natural organic matter (NOM, i.e., Suwannee River Humic and Fulvic Acid Standards and Pony Lake Fulvic Acid Reference). We show that NOM interaction with the nanoparticle surface depends on (i) the NOM’s chemical composition, where sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM more significantly increases colloidal stability, and (ii) the affinity of the capping agent for the AgNP surface, where nanoparticles with loosely bound capping agents are more effectively stabilized by NOM. Adsorption of NOM is shown to have little effect on AgNP dissolution under most experimental conditions, the exception being when the NOM is rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Similarly, the toxicity of AgNPs to a bacterial model (Shewanella oneidensis MR-1) decreases most significantly in the presence of sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM. Our data suggest that the rate of AgNP aggregation and dissolution in aquatic environments containing NOM will depend on the chemical composition of the NOM, and that the toxicity of AgNPs to aquatic microorganisms is controlled primarily by the extent of nanoparticle dissolution. PMID:26047330

  13. Analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and toxic effects of andrographolide derivatives in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Suebsasana, Supawadee; Pongnaratorn, Panicha; Sattayasai, Jintana; Arkaravichien, Tarinee; Tiamkao, Siriporn; Aromdee, Chantana

    2009-09-01

    Andrographolide (1) and 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (2) are active constituents of Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.), family Acanthaceae. A. paniculata extracts are reported to have antiviral, antipyretic, immunostimulant and anticancer activities. In this study, 1 and its 14-acetyl- (4) and 3,19-isopropylidenyl- (3) derivatives, as well as 2 and its 3,19-dipalmitoyl-derivative (5), were intraperitoneally tested for their analgesic, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and acute toxicity effects in animal models. Analgesic effects were tested in mice using hot plate and writhing tests to distinguish the central and peripheral effects, respectively. The results showed that, at 4 mg/kg, all tested substances have significant analgesic effects, and the highest potency was seen with 3, 4 and 5. Increasing the dose of 3 and 5 to 8 mg/kg did not increase the analgesic effect. In the writhing test, 3 and 5, but not 1, showed significant results. In a baker's yeast-induced fever model, 3 and 5 significantly reduced rats' rectal temperature (p < 0.05). In a carrageenan-induced inflammation model, 1, 3 and 5 significantly reduced rats' paw volume. Doses of 3 and 5 up to 100 mg/kg did not show any serious toxic effects. From this study, 3 and 5 are the most interesting derivatives, showing much greater potency than their parent compounds. These could be further developed as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory agents, without any serious toxicity.

  14. Toxic effects of microplastic on marine microalgae Skeletonema costatum: Interactions between microplastic and algae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai; Chen, Xiaohua; Wang, Jiangtao; Tan, Liju

    2017-01-01

    To investigate toxic effects of microplastic on marine microalgae Skeletonema costatum, both algal growth inhibition test and non-contact shading test were carried out, and algal photosynthesis parameters were also determined. The SEM images were used to observe interactions between microplastic and algae. It was found that microplastic (mPVC, average diameter 1 μm) had obvious inhibition on growth of microalgae and the maximum growth inhibition ratio (IR) reached up to 39.7% after 96 h exposure. However, plastic debris (bPVC, average diameter 1 mm) had no effects on growth of microalgae. High concentration (50 mg/L) mPVC also had negative effects on algal photosynthesis since both chlorophyll content and photosynthetic efficiency (ΦPSⅡ) decreased under mPVC treatments. Shading effect was not one reason for toxicity of microplastic on algae in this study. Compared with non-contact shading effect, interactions between microplastic and microalage such as adsorption and aggregation were more reasonable explanations for toxic effects of microplastic on marine microalgae. The SEM images provided a more direct and reasonable method to observe the behaviors of microplastic.

  15. Modified Whole Effluent Toxicity Test to Assess and Decouple Wastewater Effects from Environmental Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Sauco, Sebastián; Gómez, Julio; Barboza, Francisco R.; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Environmental gradients and wastewater discharges produce aggregated effects on marine populations, obscuring the detection of human impact. Classical assessment methods do not include environmental effects in toxicity tests designs, which could lead to incorrect conclusions. We proposed a modified Whole Effluent Toxicity test (mWET) that includes environmental gradients in addition to effluent dilutions, together with the application of Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM) to assess and decouple those effects. We tested this approach, analyzing the lethal effects of wastewater on a marine sandy beach bivalve affected by an artificial canal freshwater discharge used for rice crops irrigation. To this end, we compared bivalve mortality between canal water dilutions (CWd) and salinity controls (SC: without canal water). CWd were prepared by diluting the water effluent (sampled during the pesticide application period) with artificial marine water. The salinity gradient was included in the design by achieving the same final salinities in both CWd and SC, allowing us to account for the effects of salinity by including this variable as a random factor in the GLMM. Our approach detected significantly higher mortalities in CWd, indicating potential toxic effects of the effluent discharge. mWET represents an improvement over the internationally standardized WET tests, since it considers environmental variability and uses appropriate statistical analyses. PMID:23755304

  16. Toxic effects of organic solvents on the growth of chlorella vulgaris and Selenastrum capicornutum

    SciTech Connect

    El Jay, A.

    1996-10-01

    Organic solvents can make their way into the environment as industrial wastes and components of pesticide formulations. In laboratory bioassays, the use of organic solvents is unavoidable since many pesticides and organic pollutants have low water solubilities and need to be dissolved in organic solvents prior to addition into experimental systems. So, one area of concern with laboratory bioassays is the stress imposed on test organisms by organic solvents. Most reports on the comparative toxicity of solvents towards test organisms deals with the effects of solvents on fish and aquatic invertebrates with some data available for blue-green algae and green algae. The US Environmental Protection Agency recommends maximum allowable limits of 0.05% solvent for acute tests and 0.01% for chronic tests but, in the literature, the nature of the solvent and the final concentration used vary among the different authors and are often higher than EPA limits due to problems associated with the use of small test volumes and toxicant solubility. Organic solvents can cause toxic effects on their own, but it has been also reported that they can interact with pesticides to alter toxicity. The first step in choosing a solvent for use in bioassays should be a detailed screening to identify solvents with inherently low toxicity to the test organism, followed by an interaction study (pesticide and solvent interactions) to choose the best concentration to use. The purpose of this study is to compare the inhibitory effects of our solvents used in pesticide bioassays towards the growth of two green algae. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tabs.

  17. [Effects of single and co-exposure of Cu and chlorpyrifos on the toxicity of earthworm].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-mei; Wang, Yan-hua; Wang, Nan; Rao, Gui-wei

    2015-01-01

    Combined pollution of heavy metal and pesticide had posed a serious threat to soil ecology and human living environment. As two common types of pollutants in soil environment, the environmental effects of combined pollution of Cu and chlorpyrifos are worth for attention. The acute lethal effects and avoiding behavior of single and co-exposure of Cu and chlorpyrifos on earthworms were analyzed by using the methods of standard OECD filter paper test and artificial soil test. Results showed that the LC(50,48 h) and LC(50,14 d) of the acute toxicity of Cu on earthworm in filter paper test and in artificial soil test were 2.23 microg x cm(-2) and 496.05 mg x kg(-1), respectively. The LC(50,48 h) and LC(50,14 d) of the acute toxicity of chlorpyrifos on earthworm in filter paper test and in artificial soil test were 5.94 microg x cm(-2) and 186.07 mg x kg(-1), respectively. In filter paper test and artificial soil test, the joint acute toxicity of Cu and chlorpyrifos showed an additive effect while the concentration was 1:1. The type of combined effects of co-exposure of Cu and chlorpyrifos was synergistic effect and antagonistic effect in filter paper test and artificial soil test, respectively, while the toxicity was 1:1. The results of avoidance behavior test showed that the joint effect of Cu and chlorpyrifos on the avoidance behavior of earthworms was antagonistic.

  18. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  19. Toxic effects of maternal zearalenone exposure on uterine capacity and fetal development in gestation rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jia, Zhiqiang; Yin, Shutong; Shan, Anshan; Gao, Rui; Qu, Zhe; Liu, Min; Nie, Shaoping

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of high-dose and early gestational exposure to zearalenone (ZEN) in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, to correlate the maternal uterus with the fetus, and to explore the development and malformation of fetuses. Pregnant female SD rats were fed diets containing 0.3, 48.5, 97.6, or 146.0 mg/kg ZEN on gestational days (GDs) 0 through 7. All the females survived until GD 20, at which point a cesarean section was performed to harvest the organs, blood, and fetuses. The results indicated that exposure to ZEN during early gestation can impact the maternal reproductive capability. Delayed fetal development was directly linked to maternal toxicity. The toxic effects of ZEN caused early deaths more frequently than late deaths, and the deleterious effects lasted through the end of pregnancy.

  20. Linking in Vitro Effects and Detected Organic Micropollutants in Surface Water Using Mixture-Toxicity Modeling.

    PubMed

    Neale, Peta A; Ait-Aissa, Selim; Brack, Werner; Creusot, Nicolas; Denison, Michael S; Deutschmann, Björn; Hilscherová, Klára; Hollert, Henner; Krauss, Martin; Novák, Jiří; Schulze, Tobias; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Serra, Helene; Shao, Ying; Escher, Beate I

    2015-12-15

    Surface water can contain countless organic micropollutants, and targeted chemical analysis alone may only detect a small fraction of the chemicals present. Consequently, bioanalytical tools can be applied complementary to chemical analysis to detect the effects of complex chemical mixtures. In this study, bioassays indicative of activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), activation of the estrogen receptor (ER), adaptive stress responses to oxidative stress (Nrf2), genotoxicity (p53) and inflammation (NF-κB) and the fish embryo toxicity test were applied along with chemical analysis to water extracts from the Danube River. Mixture-toxicity modeling was applied to determine the contribution of detected chemicals to the biological effect. Effect concentrations for between 0 to 13 detected chemicals could be found in the literature for the different bioassays. Detected chemicals explained less than 0.2% of the biological effect in the PXR activation, adaptive stress response, and fish embryo toxicity assays, while five chemicals explained up to 80% of ER activation, and three chemicals explained up to 71% of AhR activation. This study highlights the importance of fingerprinting the effects of detected chemicals.

  1. Confirmation of Stormwater Bioretention Treatment Effectiveness Using Molecular Indicators of Cardiovascular Toxicity in Developing Fish.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Jenifer K; Edmunds, Richard C; Redig, Maria G; Mudrock, Emma M; Davis, Jay W; Incardona, John P; Stark, John D; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2016-02-02

    Urban stormwater runoff is a globally significant threat to the ecological integrity of aquatic habitats. Green stormwater infrastructure methods such as bioretention are increasingly used to improve water quality by filtering chemical contaminants that may be harmful to fish and other species. Ubiquitous examples of toxics in runoff from highways and other impervious surfaces include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Certain PAHs are known to cause functional and structural defects in developing fish hearts. Therefore, abnormal heart development in fish can be a sensitive measure of clean water technology effectiveness. Here we use the zebrafish experimental model to assess the effects of untreated runoff on the expression of genes that are classically responsive to contaminant exposures, as well as heart-related genes that may underpin the familiar cardiotoxicity phenotype. Further, we assess the effectiveness of soil bioretention for treating runoff, as measured by prevention of both visible cardiac toxicity and corresponding gene regulation. We find that contaminants in the dissolved phase of runoff (e.g., PAHs) are cardiotoxic and that soil bioretention protects against these harmful effects. Molecular markers were more sensitive than visible toxicity indicators, and several cardiac-related genes show promise as novel tools for evaluating the effectiveness of evolving stormwater mitigation strategies.

  2. Phytochemical Characteristics of Seeds and Its Effects on the Intestinal Motility and Toxicity of Joannesia princeps.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Adriano Cressoni; Guiguer, Élen Landgraf; Barbalho, Sandra Maria; Bueno, Patrícia C S; Lopes, Juliana Agostinho; da Silva, Bruna Ferreira; Girotto, Letícia Cabrini; de Paula, Marina Guirro; Zeber, Paulo Vitor; de Alvares Goulart, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Joannesia princeps is a plant commonly used in folk medicine as laxative for menstrual discomfort and as antihelminthic and antimicrobial to reduce edema and improve tissue healing. The seeds are used in many regions of Brazil as laxative; however, studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness and safety. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of using seeds of this plant on intestinal motility of Wistar rats, evaluate the effects and acute toxicity of its management, as well as determine its phytochemical profile. The evaluation of the effect on the intestinal motility was performed according to the model described by Michelin and Salgado (2004) with modifications. For the evaluation of acute toxicity, we used the model described by Craveiro et al. (2008) and Goloni et al. (2005), and for the analysis of the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, anthraquinones, steroids, and other components, we used the method described by Carvalho et al. (2006). The results showed that J. princeps exhibits laxative effects similar to those of Senna species such as Cassia angustifolia and the phytochemical analysis of ethanol and aqueous extracts showed the presence of alkaloids, triterpenes, and/or steroids compounds. Acute toxicity showed in the first 12 h: piloerection, contortion, decreased respiratory rate, diarrhea, and weight loss. After this period, these changes were no longer observed. It was concluded that the seeds of this plant have potential laxative activity, confirming the popular use and that the dose of 5 g/kg can be considered safe for consumption.

  3. Sublethal toxicant effects with dynamic energy budget theory: application to mussel outplants.

    PubMed

    Muller, Erik B; Osenberg, Craig W; Schmitt, Russell J; Holbrook, Sally J; Nisbet, Roger M

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effectiveness of a sublethal toxic effect model embedded in Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory for the analysis of field data. We analyze the performance of two species of mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis and M. californianus, near a diffuser discharging produced water in the Southern California Bight, California. Produced water is a byproduct of oil production consisting of fossil water together with compounds added during the extraction process, and generally contains highly elevated levels of pollutants relative to sea water. Produced water negatively affects the production of somatic and reproductive biomass in both mussel species; we show that these negative effects can be quantified with our DEB-based modeling framework through the estimation of toxic effect scaling parameters. Our analyses reveal that the toxic impact of produced water on growth and reproduction of M. californianus is substantially higher than for M. galloprovincialis. Projections of the expected lifetime production of gonad biomass indicate that the environmental impact of produced water can be as large as 100%, whereas short-term assessment without the use of DEB theory projects a maximum effect of only 30%.

  4. Subacute toxic effects of zinc on various tissues and organs of rats.

    PubMed

    Piao, Fengyuan; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Ma, Ning; Yamauchi, Toru

    2003-11-01

    In order to expand our knowledge of zinc toxicity and to assess further the toxicities of zinc systematically, we observed the toxic effects of zinc on the functions of various tissues and organs in rats. The rats were randomly divided into four groups (14 in each group), viz. one normal control group (received saline), two zinc groups (Znlow: 4 mg/kg of zinc acetate; Znhigh: 8 mg/kg of zinc acetate), and one cyclophosphamide group (50 mg/kg, as positive control of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MPCEs)). Saline and zinc acetate were administered intraperitoneally to the rats once every 2 days, seven times in total. Cyclophosphamide was given intraperitoneally to the rats once. The concentration of blood zinc was determined and accumulation of zinc was not observed in the experimental groups. The frequencies of basophilic stippled erythrocyte (BSE) and MPCEs in the Znhigh group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). The levels of serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) and serum triiodothyronine (T3) in the Znhigh groups decreased significantly, compared with the control group (P<0.01 or 0.05). Moreover, we also observed that the level of serum cortisol, another adrenal corticoid hormone in rats, was increased by zinc acetate in a dose-dependent manner. According to the literature and our findings, exposure to zinc, especially at higher doses, may produce toxic effects on various tissues and organs including the hematopoietic system, cytogenetics, biochemistry and endocrine system function. Therefore, it is suggested that zinc should be used carefully, especially by high risk groups such as children and pregnant women despite its use as a food additive or in self-medication. At the same time, it is necessary to investigate and research further these toxicities of zinc with long-term administration of low dosage.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of imidazenil against chemical warfare nerve agent soman toxicity in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Oguntayo, Samuel; Wei, Yanling; Wood, Elisa; Brown, Ammon; Jensen, Neil; Auta, James; Guiodotti, Alessandro; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2012-03-01

    The chemical warfare nerve agent, soman irreversibly inhibits acetylcholinesterase (AChE) leading to hypercholinergy and seizures which trigger glutamate toxicity and status epilepticus ultimately resulting in neuropathology and neurobehavioral deficits. The standard emergency treatment comprising of anticholinergic, AChE reactivator and anticonvulsant does not completely protect against soman toxicity. We have evaluated imidazenil, a new anticonvulsant imidazo benzodiazepine with high affinity and intrinsic efficacy at α5-, α2-, and α3- but low intrinsic efficacy at α1-containing GABA(A) receptors and is devoid of cardiorespiratory depression, sedative/hypnoitc and amnestic actions and does not elicit tolerance and dependence liabilities unlike diazepam, for protection against soman toxicity. Guinea pigs implanted with bipotential radiotelemetry probes for recording EEG and ECG were administered with 26 μg/kg pyridostigmine bromide 30 min prior to 2× LD(50) soman exposure and 1 min later treated with a combination of 2mg/kg atropine sulfate and 25mg/kg 2-pralidoxime and various doses of imidazenil. Intramuscular administration of imidazenil, dose-dependently protected against 2× LD(50) of soman toxicity up to 1mg/kg. Further increase in the dose of imidazenil to 2.5mg/kg was less effective than 1mg/kg probably due to non-specific actions at sites other than GABA(A) receptors. Compared to vehicle group, 1mg/kg imidazenil treatment showed optimal increase in survival rate, reduction in behavioral manifestations and high power of EEG spectrum as well as neuronal necrosis. These data suggest that imidazenil is an effective anticonvulsant for medical countermeasure against soman-induced toxicity.

  6. Study of the Effects of ATP Suppliers and Thiol Reductants on Toxicity of Pioglitazone in Isolated Rat Liver Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Rezaiean Mehrabadi, Abbas; Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Rashedinia, Marzieh; Niknahad, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Pioglitazone (PG) is one of thiazolidinediones used for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. Some reports of its hepatotoxicity exist, but the mechanism of its hepatotoxicity is not well known. In the present study, the protective effect of some ATP suppliers are investigated against mitochondrial toxicity of PG in isolated rat mitochondria. Mitochondrial viability was investigated by MTT assay. The effects of PG on superoxide dismutase activity, ATP production, mitochondrial swelling and oxidative stress were also investigated. PG reduced mitochondrial viability with an LC50 of 880±32 µM. It reduced ATP production and superoxide dismutase activity in mitochondria and increased mitochondrial swelling, but no oxidant effect was present as measured by TBARS formation. Fructose, dihydroxyacetone, dithioteritol, and N-acetylcysteine reduced mitochondrial toxicity of PG. Therefore, PG toxicity may be due to its mitochondrial toxicity and energy depletion, and ATP suppliers could be effective in preventing its toxicity. PMID:26330870

  7. The effects of acrylamide polyelectrolytes on aquatic organisms: relating toxicity to chain architecture.

    PubMed

    Costa, R; Pereira, J L; Gomes, J; Gonçalves, F; Hunkeler, D; Rasteiro, M G

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the inherent toxicity of water-soluble synthetic polyelectrolytes is critical for adequate risk management as well as enhancing product design when biological activity is a key performance index (e.g. for application in biofouling bivalves' control). The toxicity of two cationic acrylamide copolymers with different chain branching degree was evaluated. Standard ecotoxicity tests were conducted with microalgae and daphnids. The susceptibility of Corbicula fluminea, as a biofouling bivalve, was also evaluated. The effect of polyelectrolyte on the test media viscosity and the polymer chain size distributions under the experimental conditions were also examined. The susceptibility of the microalgae to both polymers was similar. As the complexity and size of the test organisms increased, differences in toxicity due to different chain architecture were noticeable. The more branched polymer was significantly less toxic to both daphnids and the bivalves, which could be linked to the distinctive features of its bimodal size chain distribution. This architecture resulted in both more compact globular molecules and the formation of aggregates, which reduce the polymer interaction with the biological surfaces. The results of this study promote the incorporation of environmental considerations in polyelectrolyte development and contribute to the design of improved solutions for controlling biofouling bivalves.

  8. Toxic effects of carvacrol, caryophyllene oxide, and ascaridole from essential oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides on mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Monzote, Lianet; Stamberg, Werner; Staniek, Katrin; Gille, Lars

    2009-11-01

    Chenopodium ambrosioides have been used for centuries in the Americas as a popular remedy for parasitic diseases. The essential oil of this plant possesses anthelmintic activity and is still used in some regions to treat parasitosis and leishmaniasis. However, the Chenopodium oil caused also some fatalities, leading to its commercial disuse. In this work, we studied the mechanism of toxicity of the essential oil and its major pure ingredients (carvacrol, caryophyllene oxide, and ascaridole, which was synthesized from alpha-terpinene) with respect to mammalian cells and mitochondria. We observed that all products, but especially caryophyllene oxide, inhibited the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This effect for carvacrol and caryophyllene oxide was mediated via direct complex I inhibition. Without Fe{sup 2+}, ascaridole was less toxic to mammalian mitochondria than other major ingredients. However, evidence on the formation of carbon-centered radicals in the presence of Fe{sup 2+} was obtained by ESR spin-trapping. Furthermore, it was shown that Fe{sup 2+} potentiated the toxicity of ascaridole on oxidative phosphorylation of rat liver mitochondria. The increase of the alpha-tocopherol quinone/alpha-tocopherol ratio under these conditions indicated the initiation of lipid peroxidation by Fe{sup 2+}-mediated ascaridole cleavage. Further ESR spin-trapping experiments demonstrated that in addition to Fe{sup 2+}, reduced hemin, but not mitochondrial cytochrome c can activate ascaridole, explaining why ascaridole in peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice exhibited a higher toxicity than in isolated mitochondria.

  9. Toxic effects of carvacrol, caryophyllene oxide, and ascaridole from essential oil of Chenopodium ambrosioides on mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Monzote, Lianet; Stamberg, Werner; Staniek, Katrin; Gille, Lars

    2009-11-01

    Chenopodium ambrosioides have been used for centuries in the Americas as a popular remedy for parasitic diseases. The essential oil of this plant possesses anthelmintic activity and is still used in some regions to treat parasitosis and leishmaniasis. However, the Chenopodium oil caused also some fatalities, leading to its commercial disuse. In this work, we studied the mechanism of toxicity of the essential oil and its major pure ingredients (carvacrol, caryophyllene oxide, and ascaridole, which was synthesized from alpha-terpinene) with respect to mammalian cells and mitochondria. We observed that all products, but especially caryophyllene oxide, inhibited the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This effect for carvacrol and caryophyllene oxide was mediated via direct complex I inhibition. Without Fe2+, ascaridole was less toxic to mammalian mitochondria than other major ingredients. However, evidence on the formation of carbon-centered radicals in the presence of Fe2+ was obtained by ESR spin-trapping. Furthermore, it was shown that Fe2+ potentiated the toxicity of ascaridole on oxidative phosphorylation of rat liver mitochondria. The increase of the alpha-tocopherol quinone/alpha-tocopherol ratio under these conditions indicated the initiation of lipid peroxidation by Fe2+-mediated ascaridole cleavage. Further ESR spin-trapping experiments demonstrated that in addition to Fe2+, reduced hemin, but not mitochondrial cytochrome c can activate ascaridole, explaining why ascaridole in peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice exhibited a higher toxicity than in isolated mitochondria.

  10. Lack of preventive effects of dietary fibers or chlorophyllin against acrylamide toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Shibutani, Makoto; Kuroiwa, Keiko; Lee, Kyoung-Youl; Takahashi, Miwa; Inoue, Kaoru; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Hirose, Masao

    2007-08-01

    Dietary fibers and chlorophyllin have shown to exert anti-carcinogenic effects against co-administered carcinogens. To test the possibility of chemoprevention by such dietary supplements on subacutely induced acrylamide (ACR) toxicity, Sprague-Dawley male rats were administered 2.5% sodium alginate, 5% glucomannan, 5% digestion resistant maltodextrin, 2.5% chitin or 1% chlorophyllin in the diet, and starting one week later, co-administered 0.02% ACR in the drinking water for 4 weeks. For comparison, untreated control animals given basal diet and tap water were also included. Neurotoxicity was examined with reference to gait abnormalities and by quantitative assessment of histopathological changes in the sciatic and trigeminal nerves, as well as aberrant dot-like immunoreactivity for synaptophysin in the cerebellar molecular layer. Testicular toxicity was assessed by quantitation of seminiferous tubules with exfoliation of germ cells into the lumen and cell debris in the ducts of the epididymides. Development of testicular toxicity as well as neurotoxicity was evident with ACR-treatment, but was not suppressed by dietary addition of fibers or chlorophyllin, suggesting no apparent beneficial influence of these dietary supplements on experimentally induced subacute ACR toxicity.

  11. The effect of modified citrus pectin on urinary excretion of toxic elements.

    PubMed

    Eliaz, Isaac; Hotchkiss, Arland T; Fishman, Marshall L; Rode, Dorena

    2006-10-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of modified citrus pectin (MCP) on the urinary excretion of toxic elements in healthy individuals. MCP is a reduced molecular weight pectin (weight-average molar mass = 15,400) that is mostly linear homogalacturonan with a 3.8% degree of esterification and approximately 10% rhamnogalacturonan II based on the presence of 2-keto-3-deoxy-octonic acid. Subjects ingested 15 g of MCP (PectaSol, EcoNugenics Inc., Santa Rosa, California 95407) each day for 5 days and 20 g on day 6. Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected on day 1 and day 6 for comparison with baseline. The urine samples were analysed for toxic and essential elements. In the first 24 h of MCP administration the urinary excretion of arsenic increased significantly (130%, p < 0.05). On day 6, urinary excretion was increased significantly for cadmium (150%, p < 0.05). In addition, lead showed a dramatic increase in excretion (560%, p < 0.08). This pilot trial provides the first evidence that oral administration of MCP increases significantly the urinary excretion of toxic metals in subjects with a 'normal' body load of metals. It is suggested that systemic chelation of toxic metals by MCP may in part be attributable to the presence of rhamnogalacturonan II, which has been shown previously to chelate metals.

  12. Mineral oil and aliphatic alcohols: toxicity and analysis of synergistic effects on German cockroaches (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae).

    PubMed

    Sims, S R; O'Brien, T E

    2011-10-01

    Two mineral oils and 12 linear primary alcohols were studied, alone and in combination, to determine their contact toxicity to adult German cockroaches, Blattella germanica (L.) (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae). The more toxic oil, PD23 (LD50 = 1.45 mg per cockroach) was used for combination studies. Alcohols with carbon chain lengths of C3 and C8 through C12 were the most toxic, with LD50 values ranging from 0.3 to 0.6 mg. C1 (methanol) and C14 (1-tetradecanol) were least toxic, with LD50 values of 2.35 and 1.75 mg, respectively. Eight of the 12 combinations of a nonlethal dose of PD23 oil with an LD10 dose of alcohol produced significantly greater mortality than predicted under the assumption of additive effects. A sample of five synergistic oil + alcohol combinations, covering most of the alcohol carbon chain length range over which synergy occurred, was further studied by calculating LD50 values for three fixed mixture ratios (80:20, 50:50, and 20:80) of each combination. Results were analyzed using both graphical techniques (isobole analysis) and by nonlinear regression. At least one, but not necessarily all, of the three fixed ratio combinations of each oil + alcohol pairing indicated synergy. The conclusions drawn from the isobole and regression analyses were consistent.

  13. Effects of salinity and pre-exposure on acute cadmium toxicity to seabass, Lates calcarifer

    SciTech Connect

    Shazili, N.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years in Malaysia, aquaculture activities have expanded into coastal areas. One of the species gaining importance is the seabass, Lates caclarifer. It is a marine fish tolerant to a wide range of salinities down to almost freshwater, although they are normally cultured in floating cages in estuaries with a salinity range of 10 to 25 ppt. The adults spawn in the sea, and upon hatching, the young move into mangrove areas and upstream where the salinity regime fluctuates. The seabass is commonly reared in floating cages in estuaries where the salinity may approach freshwater. However, there is increasing concern for heavy metal pollution in estuaries and coastal areas in Malaysia. The toxicity of heavy metals to marine organisms increases with decreasing salinity; probably due to an increase in free ion concentration and, hence, metal accumulation. There is then the possibility that seabass cultured in estuaries where low salinities are frequently encountered, especially during rainy seasons, would be more susceptible to the effects of metal pollution. There is also a paucity of data on toxicity studies with the seabass. Due to these reasons, an investigation was carried out to establish the toxicity of cadmium to the seabass at two stages of development and the influence of salinity n its toxicity. 20 refs., 5 tabs.

  14. Effect of molecular weight of dissolved organic matter on toxicity and bioavailability of copper to lettuce.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xudong; Chen, Xianni; Liu, Shuai; Ge, Xizu

    2010-01-01

    To clarify the effects of molecular weight of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the toxicity and bioavailability of copper (Cu) to plants, DOM extracted from chicken manure was ultra-filtered into four fractions according to their molecular weights by means of sequential-stage ultrafiltration technique. Lettuce seeds were germinated by being exposed to the solutions containing Cu2+ with or without different fractions of DOM. The concentration of copper in roots, leaves, sprouts and the length of roots were investigated. The results showed that not all fractions of DOM could improve copper availability or toxicity. The fraction of DOM with larger molecular weight more than 1 kDa had higher complexation stability with Cu2+ and caused lower concentration of free Cu2+ ion in the solution of copper plus the fraction, resulting in lower availability and toxicity of copper to lettuce, but the fraction with molecular weight less than 1 kDa had the opposite function. Therefore, the molecular weight of 1 kDa may be the division point to determine DOM to increase or decrease copper availability and toxicity.

  15. Protective Effect of the Plant Extracts of Erythroxylum sp. against Toxic Effects Induced by the Venom of Lachesis muta Snake.

    PubMed

    Coriolano de Oliveira, Eduardo; Alves Soares Cruz, Rodrigo; de Mello Amorim, Nayanna; Guerra Santos, Marcelo; Carlos Simas Pereira Junior, Luiz; Flores Sanchez, Eladio Oswaldo; Pinho Fernandes, Caio; Garrett, Rafael; Machado Rocha, Leandro; Lopes Fuly, André

    2016-10-11

    Snake venoms are composed of a complex mixture of active proteins that induce toxic effects, such as edema, hemorrhage, and death. Lachesis muta has the highest lethality indices in Brazil. In most cases, antivenom fails to neutralize local effects, leading to disabilities in victims. Thus, alternative treatments are under investigation, and plant extracts are promising candidates. The objective of this work was to investigate the ability of crude extracts, fractions, or isolated products of Erythroxylum ovalifolium and Erythroxylum subsessile to neutralize some toxic effects of L. muta venom. All samples were mixed with L. muta venom, then in vivo (hemorrhage and edema) and in vitro (proteolysis, coagulation, and hemolysis) assays were performed. Overall, crude extracts or fractions of Erythroxylum spp. inhibited (20%-100%) toxic effects of the venom, but products achieved an inhibition of 4%-30%. However, when venom was injected into mice before the plant extracts, hemorrhage and edema were not inhibited by the samples. On the other hand, an inhibition of 5%-40% was obtained when extracts or products were given before venom injection. These results indicate that the extracts or products of Erythroxylum spp. could be a promising source of molecules able to treat local toxic effects of envenomation by L. muta venom, aiding in the development of new strategies for antivenom treatment.

  16. Toxic effects on and structure-toxicity relationships of phenylpropanoids, terpenes, and related compounds in Aedes aegypti larvae.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sandra R L; Silva, Viviane B; Melo, Manuela A; Barbosa, Juliana D F; Santos, Roseli L C; de Sousa, Damião P; Cavalcanti, Sócrates C H

    2010-12-01

    In the search for toxic compounds against Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae, a collection of commercially available aromatic and aliphatic diversely substituted compounds were selected and evaluated. p-Cymene exhibited the highest larvicidal potency LC₅₀ = 51 ppm, whereas 1,8-cineole exhibited the lowest activity value LC₅₀ = 1419 ppm. To aid future work on the search for larvicidal compounds, the structure-toxicity relationships of this collection have been evaluated. The presence of lipophilic groups results in an overall increase in potency. In general, the presence of hydroxyl groups resulted in less potent compounds. However, methylation of such hydroxyls led to an overall increase in potency. The most potent compounds showed comparably good larvicidal activity in A. aegypti larvae as other terpenes, which we assume to be the result of the increased lipophilicity.

  17. Curcumin reduces the toxic effects of iron loading in rat liver epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Messner, Donald J.; Sivam, Gowsala; Kowdley, Kris V.

    2008-01-01

    Background/aims Iron overload can cause liver toxicity and increase the risk of liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma in humans. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a component of the food spice turmeric, has antioxidant, iron binding, and hepatoprotective properties. The aim of this study was to quantify its effects on iron overload and resulting downstream toxic effects in cultured T51B rat liver epithelial cells. Methods T51B cells were loaded with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) with or without the iron delivery agent 8-hydroxyquinoline. Cytotoxicity was measured by MTT assay. Iron uptake and iron bioavailability were documented by chemical assay, quench of calcein fluorescence, and ferritin induction. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by fluorescence assay using 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Oxidative stress signaling to jnk, c-jun, and p38 was measured by western blot with phospho-specific antibodies. Results Curcumin bound iron, but did not block iron uptake or bioavailability in T51B cells given FAC. However, it reduced cytotoxicity, blocked generation of ROS, and eliminated signaling to cellular stress pathways caused by iron. Inhibition was observed over a wide range of FAC concentrations (50 – 500 μM), with an apparent IC50 in all cases between 5 and 10 μM curcumin. In contrast, desferoxamine blocked both iron uptake and toxic effects of iron at concentrations that depended on the FAC concentration. Effects of curcumin also differed from those of α-tocopherol, which did not bind iron and was less effective at blocking iron-stimulated ROS generation. Conclusions Curcumin reduced iron-dependent oxidative stress and iron toxicity in T51B cells without blocking iron uptake. PMID:18492020

  18. Toxic effects of endrin and toxaphene on the southern leopard frog Rana sphenocephala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.J.; Swineford, D.

    1980-01-01

    Eggs, larvae and sub-adults of the southern leopard frog Rana sphenocephala were exposed to endrin and toxaphene. Exposure was in water by a continuous-flow technique, following standards that have been used successfully in the study of fish and invertebrates. R. sphenocephala is more sensitive to both pesticides than are higher vertebrates but is slightly less sensitive than fish. Eggs seem to be resistant to the effects of both pesticides and are probably poor indicators of environmental hazard. The toxic level of endrin is about equal in larvae and transformed frogs (LC50, 0?005-0?015 ppm). Toxaphene is less toxic to sub-adults (LC50, 0?37-0?790 ppm) than to larvae (LC50, 0?032-0?054 ppm). Delayed mortality, behavioural aberrations and effects on growth have been seen in toxaphene-dosed larvae observed over 30-day periods. Behavioural effects are more severe than those reported in other groups of animals. Effects on growth resulting from a 96-h exposure begin in the 0?013-0?018 ppm range. The maximum accumulation of residues observed for each chemical represented bioconcentration factors of about 100. Endrin residues are apparently lost more readily than toxaphene residues; relative depuration rates correlate well with the time course of toxic action in each chemical. Although less sensitive to these pesticides than fish, amphibians may not be protected in their natural habitats. Future studies of the effects of toxicants on amphibians should employ larvae if only one stage can be tested, should expose subjects for at least 96 h and should continue observations for a total of at least 30 days.

  19. Antimony Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients) and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically. PMID:21318007

  20. Reproductive toxicity of methomyl insecticide in male rats and protective effect of folic acid.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, M A; El Zorba, H Y; Ziada, Reem M

    2010-11-01

    The acute toxicity (LD(50)) of insecticide methomyl and its effects on male reproduction in rats were carried out. Methomyl was given orally to male rats daily for 65 successive days at two doses (0.5 and 1.0 mg kg(-1) b.wt., corresponding to 1/40 and 1/20 LD(50)) alone and in combination with folic acid (1.1 mg kg(-1) b.wt., corresponding to acceptable daily intake, ADI). Fertility index, weight of sexual organs, semen picture, serum testosterone level and histopathology of testes were the parameters used to evaluate the reproductive efficiency of treated rats. The reversibility of methomyl effects was also studied after 65 days post-administration. The oral LD(50) of methomyl was 20.0 mg kg(-1) b.wt. in male rats. Methomyl significantly decreased the fertility index, weight of testes and accessory male sexual glands, serum testosterone level and sperm motility and count, but increased sperm cell abnormality. It induced testicular lesions characterized by moderate to severe degenerative changes of seminiferous tubules and incomplete arrest of spermatogenesis. These toxic effects were not persistent (reversible). Coadministration of folic acid with methomyl decreased its reproductive toxicity. A great attention should be taken during field application of methomyl to avoid its deleterious effects in farm animals and occupationally exposed humans.

  1. Chronic toxicity of nonylphenol and ethinylestradiol: haematological and histopathological effects in juvenile Common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, J; Spieser, O H; Bauer, C; Ferling, H; Mallow, U; Kalbfus, W; Negele, R D

    2000-11-01

    In recent ecotoxicological research, there is an increasing concern about alkylphenolic industrial chemicals, such as nonylphenol (NP), because of their estrogenic properties. Data on the general fish toxicity of these wide spread aquatic pollutants are scarce. In order to evaluate sublethal toxic effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of NP, juvenile Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were exposed to NP concentrations ranging from 1 to 15 microg NP/l over a 70-day period. Classical toxicological endpoints, such as various haematological parameters and histopathological alterations were investigated. In a comprehensive protocol, besides NP-induced effects also alterations due to a treatment with the synthetic estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE2) were evaluated. After both the NP-exposure as well as the EE2-treatment, the predominant haematological finding was a severe anaemia. Histopathological alterations in the kidney, the liver and the spleen occurred exclusively after treatment with EE2, whereas NP-exposed fish did not show any tissue lesions. Depending on the haematological parameter examined, a NOEC between 1 and 5 microg NP/l could be established. From the present findings, it is assumed, that under field conditions, the NP-induced, general toxic effects, might outbalance the relatively weak estrogenic effects of this compound and possibly might disturb ecologically relevant processes such as fish reproduction.

  2. The Combined Toxic and Genotoxic Effects of Cd and As to Plant Bioindicator Trifolium repens L

    PubMed Central

    Ghiani, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Pietro; Nguyen Van, Tho; Gentili, Rodolfo; Citterio, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate combined toxic and genotoxic effects of cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) on white clover, a pollutant sensitive plant frequently used as environmental bioindicator. Plants were exposed to soil spiked with increasing concentrations of cadmium sulfate (20, 40 and 60 mg Kg−1) or sodium arsenite (5, 10 and 20 mg Kg−1) as well as with their combinations. Metal(loid) bioavailability was assessed after soil contamination, whereas plant growth, metal(loid) concentration in plant organs and DNA damage were measured at the end of plant exposition. Results showed that individual and joint toxicity and genotoxicity were related to the concentration of Cd and As measured in plant organs, and that As concentration was the most relevant variable. Joint effects on plant growth were additive or synergistic, whereas joint genotoxic effects were additive or antagonistic. The interaction between Cd and As occurred at both soil and plant level. In soil the presence of As limited the bioavailability of Cd, whereas the presence of Cd increased the bioavailability of As. Nevertheless only As biovailability determined the amount of As absorbed by plants. The amount of Cd absorbed by plant was not linearly correlated with the fraction of bioavailable Cd in soil suggesting the involvement of additional factors, such as plant uptake mechanisms. These results reveal that the simultaneous presence in soil of Cd and As, although producing an additive or synergistic toxic effect on Trifolium repens L. growth, generates a lower DNA damage. PMID:24914541

  3. Silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and toxic effects toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Peetsch, Alexander; Greulich, Christina; Braun, Dieter; Stroetges, Christian; Rehage, Heinz; Siebers, Bettina; Köller, Manfred; Epple, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Spherical silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized in a co-precipitation route from calcium nitrate/silver nitrate and ammonium phosphate in a continuous process and colloidally stabilized by carboxymethyl cellulose. Nanoparticles with 0.39 wt% silver content and a diameter of about 50-60 nm were obtained. The toxic effects toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells were determined by viability tests and determination of the minimal inhibitory and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC). Three mammalian cells lines, i.e. human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and blood peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC, monocytes and T-lymphocytes), and two prokaryotic strains, i.e. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were used. Silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles and silver acetate showed similar effect toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells with toxic silver concentrations in the range of 1-3 μg mL(-1).

  4. Toxicity testing of dispersed oil requires adherence to standardized protocols to assess potential real world effects.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Gina; Clark, James; Aurand, Don

    2013-06-01

    Recently, several researchers have attempted to address Deepwater Horizon incident environmental fate and effects issues using laboratory testing and extrapolation procedures that are not fully reliable measures for environmental assessments. The 2013 Rico-Martínez et al. publication utilized laboratory testing approaches that severely limit our ability to reliably extrapolate such results to meaningful real-world assessments. The authors did not adopt key methodological elements of oil and dispersed oil toxicity standards. Further, they drew real-world conclusions from static exposure tests without reporting actual exposure concentrations. Without this information, it is not possible to compare their results to other research or real spill events that measured and reported exposure concentrations. The 1990s' Chemical Response to Oil Spills: Ecological Effects Research Forum program was established to standardize and conduct exposure characterization in oil and dispersed oil aquatic toxicity testing (Aurand and Coelho, 2005). This commentary raises awareness regarding the necessity of standardized test protocols.

  5. Health effects and toxicity mechanisms of rare earth elements-Knowledge gaps and research prospects.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Giovanni; Guida, Marco; Tommasi, Franca; Oral, Rahime

    2015-05-01

    In the recent decades, rare earth elements (REE) have undergone a steady spread in several industrial and medical applications, and in agriculture. Relatively scarce information has been acquired to date on REE-associated biological effects, from studies of bioaccumulation and of bioassays on animal, plant and models; a few case reports have focused on human health effects following occupational REE exposures, in the present lack of epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed groups. The literature is mostly confined to reports on few REE, namely cerium and lanthanum, whereas substantial information gaps persist on the health effects of other REE. An established action mechanism in REE-associated health effects relates to modulating oxidative stress, analogous to the recognized redox mechanisms observed for other transition elements. Adverse outcomes of REE exposures include a number of endpoints, such as growth inhibition, cytogenetic effects, and organ-specific toxicity. An apparent controversy regarding REE-associated health effects relates to opposed data pointing to either favorable or adverse effects of REE exposures. Several studies have demonstrated that REE, like a number of other xenobiotics, follow hormetic concentration-related trends, implying stimulatory or protective effects at low levels, then adverse effects at higher concentrations. Another major role for REE-associated effects should be focused on pH-dependent REE speciation and hence toxicity. Few reports have demonstrated that environmental acidification enhances REE toxicity; these data may assume particular relevance in REE-polluted acidic soils and in REE mining areas characterized by concomitant REE and acid pollution. The likely environmental threats arising from REE exposures deserve a new line of research efforts.

  6. Relative toxicity of pyrolysis gases from materials - Effects of chemical composition and test conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    Relative toxicity test data on 270 materials are presented, based on test procedures developed at the University of San Francisco. The effects of chemical composition, using data on 13 types of synthetic polymers and eight types of fabrics, are discussed. Selected materials were evaluated using nine test conditions with the USF method, and using methods developed at the FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute, Douglas Aircraft Company and San Jose State University.

  7. Toxic Effects of Man-Made Mineral Fibers with Particular Reference to Ceramic Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    Mineral Wool , Rock Wool, Sarcoma, Slag Wool. BEST AVAILABLE COPY PREFACE This document presents information on the toxic effects of man-made mineral fibers...Naturally Synthetic Occurring Asbestos Others Man-Made OthersMineral Fibers Chrysotile Others Fibrous Ceramic Glass Crocidolite Mineral Wool Rock Slag...In recent years both ceramic fiber and mineral wool have been used to replace asbestos on board many U.S. Navy ships. In particular, material

  8. Effect of irradiance spectra on the photoinduced toxicity of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.A.; Mount, D.R.; Burkhard, L.P.; Ankley, G.T.; Makynen, E.A.; Leonard, E.N.

    2000-05-01

    Photoinduced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is dependent on the concentration of compounds present and the dose of light received. Of the light present, only those wavelengths absorbed by the compound have the potential to initiate the photochemical events underlying phototoxicity. This suggests that variation in light spectra present in natural waters, arising from variation in dissolved organic carbon composition, is an important determinant of phototoxicity risk in specific, PAH-contaminated waterbodies. To quantify the effect of environmentally realistic variation in light spectra on toxicity, brine shrimp (Artemia salina) assays were conducted under various light spectra and with three PAHs (pyrene, fluoranthene, and anthracene) of known phototoxicity potential. In these spectral assays, the total ultraviolet light present was equivalent; only the spectral characteristics varied. Based on the absorbance spectra of these PAHs, it was predicted that toxicity, quantified using immobilization as the endpoint, would vary significantly among light spectra in pyrene assays, but not in anthracene assays, and that variation in toxicity in fluoranthene assays would be intermediate. The results supported these assumptions. In the pyrene exposures, the glass filter time to 50% population immobilization (IT50) (39.5 min) was 117% longer than the KCr filter IT50 (18.2 min). In the fluoranthene exposures, the glass filter IT50 (49.5 min) was 27% longer than the KCr filter IT50 (39.1 min). In the anthracene exposures, the glass filter IT50 (62.2 min) was not statistically different from the KCr filter IT50 (63.8 min). Comparison of these results with the results of assays conducted under neutral-density filters (that change intensity but not spectral distribution) demonstrate that multiplying spectral intensity by wavelength-specific absorbance accurately predicts relative photoinduced toxicity among the experimental treatments. These results indicate

  9. Hair Coat and Ear Implant Effects on Physiological Measurements of Steers Grazing Toxic Tall Fescue During the Summer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has shown cattle grazing toxic tall fescue have reduced weight gain, rough hair coats, and exhibit symptoms of heat stress during the summer. Sixty steers were grazed on toxic tall fescue to determine the effects of hair coats and steroidal ear implants on physiological measurements. Stee...

  10. The biotic ligand model approach for addressing effects of exposure water chemistry on aquatic toxicity of metals: Genesis and challenges

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major uncertainty in many aquatic risk assessments for toxic chemicals is the aggregate effect of the physicochemical characteristics of exposure media on toxicity, and how this affects extrapolation of laboratory test results to natural systems. A notable example of this is h...

  11. How might selenium moderate the toxic effects of mercury in stream fish of the Western USA? - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of selenium (Se) to moderate mercury (Hg) toxicity is well established in the literature. Mercury exposures that might otherwise produce toxic effects are counteracted by Se, particularly when Se:Hg molar ratios approach or exceed 1. We analyzed whole body Se and Hg c...

  12. Effect of test conditions on relative toxicity rankings of fifteen materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen materials were evaluated for relative toxicity of pyrolysis effluents, using different test conditions in the USF methodology. Wool fabrics were consistently among the most toxic materials, and polystyrene and polychloroprene flexible foam were consistently among the least toxic materials.

  13. Protection of A549 cells against the toxic effects of sulphur mustard by hexamethylenetetramine.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, C D; Hambrook, J L

    1997-02-01

    The A549 cell line was used as a model of the deep lung to study the toxicity and mechanism of action of sulphur mustard (HD), using the neutral red (NR) dye retention and gentian violet (GV) assays as indices of cell viability. It was found that exposure to concentrations in excess of 40 microM HD resulted in a rapid onset of toxicity. Exposure to 1000 microM HD reduced viability in A549 cell cultures to 61% after 2 h (control cultures = 100%), whereas exposure to 40 microM HD did not result in deleterious effects until 26 h at which point viability fell to only 84% (NR assay). Agarose gel electrophoresis of cell cultures exposed to 40 and 1000 microM HD and harvested at 4.5, 19 and 43 h after exposure to HD, indicated that cell death was due to necrosis, despite the observation that at the higher concentration of HD cells displayed many of the features common to cells undergoing apoptotic death. The ability of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) to protect A549 cells against the effects of an LC50 challenge dose of HD was assessed using the GV and NR assays. It was found that HMT (15 mM) could protect cells against the effects of HD though HMT had to be present at the time of HD challenge. Cultures treated with HD only were 49% viable at 48 h after HD challenge, compared to 101% for protected cultures (NR assay) and 58% and 91% for unprotected and protected cultures respectively using the GV assay. Morphological observations of GV and NR stained cultures confirmed these findings. HMT concentrations of 2.5 to 25 mM were used. Maximal protection against the toxic effects of HD (LC50) was found at 10 to 25 mM HMT. Over this concentration range, HMT did not exert any toxic effects on A549 cells. Pretreatment of A549 cultures with HMT followed by its removal prior to HD challenge had no protective effect. Similarly, treating cultures with HD followed by addition of HMT did not increase the viability of the cultures, even if the HMT was added immediately after HD exposure

  14. The ameliorative effect of propolis against methoxychlor induced ovarian toxicity in rat.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Eman E; Kames, Amany O G; Sayed, S M; Nisr, Neveen A E L; Wahba, Nahed M; Elsherif, Walaa M; Nafady, Allam M; Abdel-Hafeez, M M; Aamer, A A

    2014-12-01

    A study was designed to evaluate ameliorative effect of propolis against methoxychlor (MXC) induced ovarian toxicity in rat. The organochlorine pesticide (MXC) is a known endocrine disruptor with estrogenic, anti-estrogenic, and anti-androgenic properties. To investigate whether chronic exposure to MXC could cause ovarian dysfunction, two groups of Sprague-Dawley adult female rats were exposed to MXC alone in a dose of 200mg/kg, twice/weekly, orally or MXC dose as previous plus propolis in a dose of 200mg/l/day, in drinking water for 10 months. Another two groups of rat were given corn oil (control) or propolis. Multiple reproductive parameters, ovarian weight, serum hormone levels, ovarian oxidative status and ovarian morphology were examined. In MXC-exposed group, there is a significant decrease in body and ovarian weight vs. control. MXC decreases serum estradiol and progesterone levels. A significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation was obtained while a significant decrease of the total antioxidant was recorded. Ovarian histopathology showed primary, secondary and vesicular follicles displaying an atretic morphology. Increase in the ovarian surface epithelium height accompanied with vacuolated, pyknotic oocytes were obtained. The previous toxic effects were neutralized by the administration of propolis in MXC+propolis group. The present results suggest that propolis may be effective in decreasing of MXC-induced ovarian toxicity in rat.

  15. Toxic effects of zinc on anaerobic microbiota from Zimapán Reservoir (Mexico).

    PubMed

    Vega-López, Armando; Amora-Lazcano, Enriqueta; López-López, Eugenia; Terrón, Oscar; Proal-Nájera, José B

    2007-04-01

    The toxic effects of heavy metals have been extensively documented in different organisms. Nevertheless, a lack of information exists with regard to this topic in the case of autochthonous microorganism communities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxic effects of zinc on the anaerobic microorganisms present in the sediment and anoxic water of Zimapán Reservoir (Mexico), with particular focus on dissimilatory sulphate reducing bacteria. In the laboratory, a system of enrichment microcosms was set up with sediment and water from the reservoir. ATP, protein, carbohydrates and lactate and alcohol dehydrogenase activity were determined. The physicochemical parameters of the reservoir were evaluated over the course of one year. Sulphate reduction occurred in the reservoir throughout the year, but was most pronounced at the end of the wet season and during winter. In the field, increases in the rate of sulphate reduction coincided with the lowest levels of total phosphorus and hydrosoluble organic carbon. Zinc enrichment was observed to modify protein and carbohydrate content as well as to affect lactate and alcohol dehydrogenase activity. All responses followed a zinc concentration-response relationship and were dependent on reservoir physicochemical parameters. ATP content was used as a biomarker to evaluate the sublethal toxic effects of zinc. The acceptable threshold concentration of zinc in the aquatic and sediment enrichment microcosms was determined to be 0.06mgZn/L and 711.1mgZn/kg, respectively.

  16. Toxicity of palytoxin after repeated oral exposure in mice and in vitro effects on cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Del Favero, Giorgia; Beltramo, Dario; Sciancalepore, Marina; Lorenzon, Paola; Coslovich, Tamara; Poli, Mark; Testai, Emanuela; Sosa, Silvio; Tubaro, Aurelia

    2013-12-01

    Palytoxin (PLTX) is a highly toxic hydrophilic polyether detected in several edible marine organisms from intra-tropical areas, where seafood poisoning were reported. Symptoms usually start with gastro-intestinal malaise, often accompanied by myalgia, muscular cramps, dyspnea and, sometimes, arrhythmias. Monitoring programs in the Mediterranean Sea have detected PLTX-like molecules in edible mollusks and echinoderms. Despite the potential exposure of the human population and its high toxic potential, the toxicological profile of the molecule is still an issue. Thus, the effects of repeated oral administration of PLTX in mice were investigated. Seven days of PLTX administration caused lethality and toxic effects at doses ≥ 30 μg/kg/day. A NOAEL was estimated equal to 3 μg/kg/day, indicating a quite steep dose-response curve. This value, due to the limited number of animal tested, is provisional, although represents a sound basis for further testing. Macroscopic alterations at gastrointestinal level (gastric ulcers and intestinal fluid accumulation) were observed in mice dead during the treatment period. Histological analysis highlighted severe inflammation, locally associated with necrosis, at pulmonary level, as well as hyper-eosinophilia and fiber separation in myocardium. A cardiac damage was supported by the in vitro effect of the toxin on cardiomyocytes, indicating a severe and irreversible impairment of their electrical properties: electrophysiological recordings detected a progressive cell depolarization, arrest of action potentials and beating.

  17. Evaluation of the effect of water type on the toxicity of nitrate to aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Baker, Josh A; Gilron, Guy; Chalmers, Ben A; Elphick, James R

    2017-02-01

    A suite of acute and chronic toxicity tests were conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of freshwater organisms to nitrate (as sodium nitrate). Acute exposures with rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) and amphipods (Hyalella azteca), as well as chronic exposures with H. azteca (14-d survival and growth), midges (Chironomus dilutus; 10-d survival and growth), daphnids (Ceriodaphnia dubia; 7-d survival and reproduction), and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; 7-d survival and growth) were used to determine sublethal and lethal effect concentrations. Modification of nitrate toxicity was investigated across a range of ionic strengths, created through the use of very soft water, and standard preparations of synthetic soft, moderately-hard and hard dilution waters. The most sensitive species tested were C. dubia and H. azteca, in soft water, with reproduction and growth IC25 values of 13.8 and 12.2 mg/L NO3-N, respectively. All of the organisms exposed to nitrate demonstrated significantly reduced effects with increasing ionic strength associated with changes in water type. Possible mechanisms responsible for the modifying effect of increasing major ion concentrations on nitrate toxicity are discussed.

  18. Protective effects of Syzygium cumini seed extract against methylmercury-induced sistemic toxicity in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, F H; Bellé, L P; Bitencourt, P E R; De Bona, K S; Zanette, R A; Boligon, A A; Athayde, M L; Pigatto, A S; Moretto, M B

    2011-04-01

    Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (Sc) belongs to the medicinal plants with an important source of phenolic compounds. Sc has been shown to possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Methylmercury (MeHg), a highly toxic environmental pollutant, induces oxidative stress and dysfunction in many cell types. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of aqueous seed extract of Sc (ASc) on MeHg-induced toxicity in rats. Two-day-old rats (P2) received a single dose of MeHg (10 mg/kg) and two doses of ASc (0.9 mg/kg) per os. After two days, the effects of the treatment were investigated in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, kidney, liver and urine samples. Our results demonstrated that N-acetyl-β-D: -glucosaminidase (NAG) activity in the kidney and urine, the lipid peroxidation levels in the liver and kidney samples, as well as the adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity in the hippocampus, kidney and liver were higher in MeHg-group when compared to the control group. The administration of ASc reverted the toxic effects of MeHg. It is noteworthy to observe that the main compounds present in the ASc, as gallic acid (the major component), chlorogenic acid and rutin, might be the responsible for such benefit, since they were found to display antioxidant properties.

  19. Occurrence, bioavailability and toxic effects of trace metals and organic contaminants in mangrove ecosystems: a review.

    PubMed

    Bayen, Stéphane

    2012-11-01

    Although their ecological and socioeconomic importance has received recent attention, mangrove ecosystems are one of the most threatened tropical environments. Besides direct clearance, hydrological alterations, climatic changes or insect infestations, chemical pollution could be a significant contributor of mangrove degradation. The present paper reviews the current knowledge on the occurrence, bioavailability and toxic effects of trace contaminants in mangrove ecosystems. The literature confirmed that trace metals, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) and Endocrine Disrupters Compounds (EDCs) have been detected in various mangrove compartments (water, sediments and biota). In some cases, these chemicals have associated toxic effects on mangrove ecosystem species, with potential impact on populations and biodiversity in the field. However, nearly all studies about the bioavailability and toxic effects of contaminants in mangrove ecosystems focus on selected trace metals, PAHs or some "conventional" POPs, and virtually no data exist for other contaminant groups. The specificities of mangrove ecosystems (e.g. biology, physico-chemistry and hydrology) support the need for specific ecotoxicological tools. This review highlights the major data and methodological gaps which should be addressed to refine the risk assessment of trace pollutants in mangrove ecosystems.

  20. Stages and Conformations of the Tau Repeat Domain during Aggregation and Its Effect on Neuronal Toxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Tepper, Katharina; Kaniyappan, Senthilvelrajan; Biernat, Jacek; Wegmann, Susanne; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Müller, Daniel J.; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the aggregation and posttranslational modifications of Tau protein. Its “repeat domain” (TauRD) is mainly responsible for the aggregation properties, and oligomeric forms are thought to dominate the toxic effects of Tau. Here we investigated the conformational transitions of this domain during oligomerization and aggregation in different states of β-propensity and pseudo-phosphorylation, using several complementary imaging and spectroscopic methods. Although the repeat domain generally aggregates more readily than full-length Tau, its aggregation was greatly slowed down by phosphorylation or pseudo-phosphorylation at the KXGS motifs, concomitant with an extended phase of oligomerization. Analogous effects were observed with pro-aggregant variants of TauRD. Oligomers became most evident in the case of the pro-aggregant mutant TauRDΔK280, as monitored by atomic force microscopy, and the fluorescence lifetime of Alexa-labeled Tau (time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC)), consistent with its pronounced toxicity in mouse models. In cell models or primary neurons, neither oligomers nor fibrils of TauRD or TauRDΔK280 had a toxic effect, as seen by assays with lactate dehydrogenase and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, respectively. However, oligomers of pro-aggregant TauRDΔK280 specifically caused a loss of spine density in differentiated neurons, indicating a locally restricted impairment of function. PMID:24825901

  1. [The birth of nanobiotechnologies: new nanomaterials, potential uses, toxic effects and implications for public health].

    PubMed

    Petrinca, Anna Rita; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Argentin, Gabriella; Cicchetti, Rosadele; Donia, Domenica; Gabrieli, Rosanna; Vignoli, Isabella; Magrini, Andrea; Divizia, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnologies hold considerable promise of advances in many sectors especially the biomedical field, since the materials used are of the appropriate dimensions to interact with important biological matter such as proteins, DNA and viruses. In this field the use of nanotechnologies will probably be second in importance only to biotechnologies. However many characteristics of nanomaterials that make them so promising from a technological point of view may also lead to negative effects on the environment and human health. It is important therefore that the environmental and work-related exposure effects to these materials be evaluated. In this article the potential uses, toxic effects and public health implications of nanobiotechnologies are discussed.

  2. Potential toxic effect on aquatic fauna by the dwarf shrub Empetrum hermaphroditum.

    PubMed

    Brännäs, Eva; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; Nilsson, Linda; Gallet, Christiane; Brännäs, Kurt; Berglind, Rune; Eriksson, Lars-Ove; Leffler, Per-Erik; Zackrisson, Olle

    2004-01-01

    The common evergreen dwarf shrub Empetrum hermaphroditum has influence on the functioning of boreal terrestrial ecosystems in northern Sweden. The negative effects of E. hermaphroditum are partly attributed to the production of the dihydrostilbene, batatasin-III, which is released from leaves and litter by rain and snowmelt. In this study, we investigated whether batatasin-III is carried by runoff into streams and lakes during the snowmelt period and whether it is also potentially hazardous to aquatic fauna. Sampling of water from streams and a lake for which the surrounding terrestrial vegetation is dominated by E. hermaphroditum was done during the snowmelt period in May 1993 and in 1998, and analyzed for batatasin-III. Using 24- and 48-hr standard toxicity tests, we analyzed toxicity to brown trout (Salmo trutta) alevins and juvenile water fleas (Daphnia magna). Toxicity (proportion of dead individuals) to trout was tested at pH 6.5 and compared with that of a phenol within a range of concentrations. In the toxicity (proportion of immobilized individuals) test on D. magna, the interactive effect of pH (pH 5.5-7.0) was included. Concentration of batatasin-III was generally higher in 1998 than in 1993 and showed peak levels during snowmelt. Concentration in ephemeral runnels > the lake > streams running through clear-cuts dominated by E. hermaphroditum > control streams lacking adjacent E. hermaphroditum vegetation. The maximum concentration of batatasin-III found was 1.06 mg l(-1). The proportion of dead yolk sac alevins increased significantly (P < 0.001) with increasing concentrations of batatasin-III and time of exposure. After 24 hr, EC50 was 10 mg l(-1). It was 2 mg l(-1) after 48 hr. The effect of phenol was negligible, indicating a specific phytotoxic effect of the bibenzyl structure of batatasin-III. The proportion of mobile D. magna became significantly smaller (P < 0.001) with increasing concentrations of batatasin-III, with decreasing pH, and with

  3. Similarity, independence, or interaction for binary mixture effects of nerve toxicants for the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Claus; Siang, Pia; Lister, Lindsay J; Rice, Annabel; Spurgeon, David J

    2010-05-01

    Intensive agriculture can require the simultaneous use of more than one pesticide, resulting in the presence of mixtures in soils and waters. To assess mixture effects, concentration addition (CA) for similar acting chemicals and independent action (IA) for dissimilar acting chemicals are the most frequently used models. While the mechanistic basis for the selection of CA and IA for a given mixture appears appealing (similar vs dissimilar action), it has not yet been established how similar chemicals need to be in their effect before CA should be viewed as the most appropriate model. Here this is investigated in studies of the toxicity of binary mixtures of five different pesticides from three classes that have the same putative mode of action (neuroexcitation) but different molecular mechanisms in binary mixture tests with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Effects of exposure on nematode survival were limited at the concentrations tested. Data analysis, therefore, focused on reproductive toxicity. Both CA and IA were found to be valid models for prediction of the toxicity of the 10 mixtures, although for seven CA provided a mathematically better fit. Both models could describe the toxicity for four mixtures; however, evidence for interaction was found in the remaining six cases. Where interactions occurred, these could be explained by information on the potential mechanisms of compound toxicokinetics-particularly when mixtures comprised a metabolically activated and a metabolically deactivated chemical and/or cases where the relative potencies of the two tested chemicals differed greatly. It is concluded, therefore, that detailed analysis of toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics can aid further understanding of interactions in mixtures.

  4. Effects of reduced mitochondrial DNA content on secondary mitochondrial toxicant exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is intimately linked to cellular and organismal health, as demonstrated by the fact that mutations in and depletion of mtDNA result in severe mitochondrial disease in humans. However, cells contain hundreds to thousands of copies of mtDNA, which provides genetic redundancy, and creates a threshold effect in which a large percentage of mtDNA must be lost prior to clinical pathogenesis. As certain pharmaceuticals and genetic mutations can result in depletion of mtDNA, and as many environmental toxicants target mitochondria, it is important to understand whether reduced mtDNA will sensitize an individual to toxicant exposure. Here, using ethidium bromide (EtBr), which preferentially inhibits mtDNA replication, we reduced mtDNA 35-55% in the in vivo model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Chronic, lifelong, low-dose EtBr exposure did not disrupt nematode development or lifespan, and induced only mild alterations in mitochondrial respiration, while having no effect on steady-state ATP levels. Next, we exposed nematodes with reduced mtDNA to the known and suspected mitochondrial toxicants aflatoxin B1, arsenite, paraquat, rotenone or ultraviolet C radiation (UVC). EtBr pre-exposure resulted in mild sensitization of nematodes to UVC and arsenite, had no effect on AfB1 and paraquat, and provided some protection from rotenone toxicity. These mixed results provide a first line of evidence suggesting that reduced mtDNA content may sensitize an individual to certain environmental exposures.

  5. Biodegradation and toxicity of vegetable oils in contaminated aquatic environments: Effect of antioxidants and oil composition.

    PubMed

    Salam, Darine A; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2016-03-15

    Antioxidants may affect the oxidative rate of vegetable oils determining their fate and impact in contaminated aquatic media. In previous studies, we demonstrated the effectiveness of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), one of the most used antioxidants in edible oils, in enhancing the biodegradation of glyceryl trilinoleate, a pure triacylglycerol of cis,cis-9,12-octadecadienoic acid (C18:2 delta), through retarding its oxidative polymerization relatively to the oil with no added antioxidant. In this study, the effect of BHT on the biodegradation and toxicity of purified canola oil, a mixed-acid triacylglycerol with high C18:1 content, was investigated in respirometric microcosms and by use of the Microtox® assay. Investigations were carried out in the absence and presence (200 mg kg(-1)) of the antioxidant, and at an oil loading of 0.31 L m(-2) (333 gal acre(-1)). Substantial oil mineralization was achieved after 16 weeks of incubation (>77%) and was not significantly different (p>0.05) between the two BHT treatments, demonstrating an important role of the oil fatty acid composition in determining the potency of antioxidants and, consequently, the fate of spilled vegetable oils. Furthermore, for both treatments, toxicity was measured at early stages of the experiments and disappeared at a later stage of incubation. The observed transient toxicity was associated with the combined effect of toxic biodegradation intermediates and autoxidation products. These results were supported by the gradual disappearance of BHT in the microcosms initially supplemented with the antioxidant, reaching negligible amounts after only 2 weeks of incubation.

  6. Evaluation of ameliorative effect of curcumin on imidacloprid-induced male reproductive toxicity in wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lonare, Milindmitra; Kumar, Manoj; Raut, Sachin; More, Amar; Doltade, Sagar; Badgujar, Prarabdh; Telang, Avinash

    2016-10-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the toxic effects of imidacloprid (IM) on male reproductive system and ameliorative effect of curcumin (CMN) in male Wistar rats. For this purpose, IM (45 and 90 mg/kg, body weight) and CMN (100 mg/kg, body weight) were administered orally to the rats either alone or in combinations for a period of 28 days. At the end of experiment, male reproductive toxicity parameters (total sperm count and sperm abnormalities), testosterone level, steroidal enzymatic activity [3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and 17β-HSD], and oxidative stress indicators were estimated in testis and plasma. IM treatments resulted in significant decrease (p < 0.05) in total epididymal sperm count, sperm motility, live sperm count, and increase (p < 0.05) in sperm abnormalities. Activities of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, lactate dehydrogenase-x, and sorbitol dehydrogenase were significantly increased (p < 0.05), while, 3β-HSD and 17β-HSD enzymatic activity along with testosterone concentration in testis and plasma were decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in IM-treated rats. IM exposure resulted in significant increase (p < 0.05) in LPO and decrease (p < 0.05) in GSH level along with decreased activities of CAT, SOD, GPx, and GST. IM-treated rats showed histopathological alterations in testis and epididymis. However, the reproductive toxicity parameters, oxidative stress indicators, and histopathological changes were minimized and functional restorations were noticed by co-administration of CMN in IM-treated rats. The results of this study suggest that IM-induced male reproductive toxic effects could be ameliorated by CMN supplementation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1250-1263, 2016.

  7. Effects of simulated weathering on the toxicity of selected crude oils and their components to sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Rial, Diego; Radović, Jagoš R; Bayona, Josep M; Macrae, Kenneth; Thomas, Kevin V; Beiras, Ricardo

    2013-09-15

    Artificial weathering of Angolan crude and a Heavy Fuel Oil (HFO) was performed by evaporation and photooxidation. The aliphatic, aromatic, polar and asphaltene fractions of the fresh and weathered oils were isolated. The toxicity of the water accommodated fraction or an oil/fraction dissolved in DMSO was assessed using the sea urchin embryo test. Photooxidation was observed to decrease the aromatics content and increase polar compounds. A slight reduction in the toxicity of Angolan crude was observed following weathering for the water-accommodated fraction and the extract in DMSO, but no effect was seen for the Heavy Fuel Oil. For aliphatic compounds, the toxicity decreased in the order fresh>evaporated>photooxidated for both Angolan crude and HFO. Weathering slightly increased the toxicity of the aromatic and polar fractions of the oil. The aromatic fractions were responsible for most of the toxicity and the polar compounds were the second most important toxic components, despite having less or similar abundance than the aliphatic fraction. The toxic contribution of the aromatic compounds was higher for the HFO than for the Angolan crude. A decrease in the toxicity of Angolan crude following weathering correlated with a reduction in the toxicity of the aliphatic fraction.

  8. Effect of sulfate concentration on acute toxicity of selenite and selenate to invertebrates and fish. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.O.; McCauley, D.J.; McCool, P.; Winkler, N.; DeGraeve, M.

    1998-12-01

    The effect of sulfate concentration on the acute toxicity of selenite (Se IV) and selenate (Se VI) to freshwater organisms was evaluated using toxicity test data generated from this study and toxicity data obtained from the open literature. The acute toxicity of Se IV and Se VI to fathead minnows and two amphipod species, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus and Hyalella azteca, were determined in four different sulfate concentrations. The newly generated toxicity data combined with the data obtained from the literature were evaluated using analysis of covariance to determine if there was a significant relationship between acute toxicity and sulfate concentration. The analysis of the Se IV data indicated that there was not a significant relationship between the acute toxicity of Se IV and sulfate concentration. A significant relationship was found between the acute toxicity of Se VI to freshwater organisms and sulfate concentration. Statistically significant slopes describing the relationship between Se VI toxicity and sulfate concentration were determined for individual species and for the combined data. A sulfate-based equation was constructed using the pooled slope to modify the criterion maximum concentration (CMC) for selenate: CMC = e{sup [0.4259(ln[sulfate]) + 4.6305]}.

  9. Sodium fluoride (NaF) causes toxic effects on splenic development in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ping; Deng, Huidan; Cui, Hengmin; Chen, Lian; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Zhao, Ling

    2017-01-17

    At present, very limited studies focus on the toxic effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) on splenic development of human and animals in vivo. This study was firstly designed to evaluate the toxic effects of NaF on the splenic development of mice in vivo by observing histopathological lesions, changes of splenic growth index (GI), T and B cells, immunoglobulin A (IgA), immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) contents, cytokine protein expression levels, and cell cycle and cyclins/cdks protein expression levels using the methods of pathology, flow cytometry (FCM), western blot (WB), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A total of 240 ICR mice were equally allocated into four groups with intragastric administration of distilled water in the control group and 12, 24, 48 mg/kg NaF solution in the experimental groups for 42 days. The results showed that NaF in 12 mg/kg and over caused the toxic effects on splenic development, which was characterized by reducing growth index and lymphocytes in the white and red pulp histopathologically, increasing cell percentages of the G0/G1 phase and decreasing cell percentages of the S phase, and reducing T cells and B cells as well as IgA, IgG, and IgM contents when compared with those in the control group. Concurrently, cytokines including interleukin-2 (IL-2), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and cyclin (E/D and CDK2/4) protein expression levels were markedly decreased (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) protein expression levels were significantly increased (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01) in the three NaF-treated groups. Toxic effects finally impaired the splenic cellular immunity and humoral immunity due to the reduction of T and B cell population and activity. Cell cycle arrest is the molecular basis of NaF-caused toxic effects on the splenic development.

  10. Effect of diet quality on chronic toxicity of aqueous lead to the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Ivey, Chris D.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated the chronic toxicity of aqueous Pb to the amphipod Hyalella azteca (Hyalella) in 42-d tests using 2 different diets: 1) the yeastþcereal leafþtrout pellet (YCT) diet, fed at the uniform low ration used in standard methods for sediment toxicity tests; and 2) a new diet of diatomsþTetraMin flakes (DT), fed at increasing rations over time, that has been optimized for use in Hyalella water-only tests. Test endpoints included survival, weight, biomass, fecundity, and total young. Lethal effects of Pb were similar for the DT and YCT tests (20% lethal concentration [LC20]¼13 mg/L and 15mg/L, respectively, as filterable Pb). In contrast, weight and fecundity endpoints were not significantly affected in the DT test at Pb concentrations up to 63 mg/L, but these endpoints were significantly reduced by Pb in the YCT test—and in a 2005 test in the same laboratory with a diet of conditioned Rabbit Chow (RC-2005). The fecundity and total young endpoints from the YCT and RC-2005 tests were considered unreliable because fecundity in controls did not meet test acceptability criteria, but both of these tests still produced lower Pb effect concentrations (for weight or biomass) than the test with the DT diet. The lowest biotic ligand model–normalized effect concentrations for the 3 tests ranged from 3.7mg/L (weight 20% effect concentration [EC20] for the RC-2005 test) to 8.2 mg/L (total young EC20 for the DT test), values that would rank Hyalella as the second or third most sensitive of 13 genera in a species sensitivity distribution for chronic Pb toxicity. These results demonstrate that toxicity tests with Hyalella fed optimal diets can meet more stringent test acceptability criteria for control performance, but suggest that results of these tests may underestimate sublethal toxic effects of Pb to Hyalella under suboptimal feeding regimes.

  11. Effect of diet quality on chronic toxicity of aqueous lead to the amphipod Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Besser, John M; Ivey, Chris D; Brumbaugh, William G; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2016-07-01

    The authors investigated the chronic toxicity of aqueous Pb to the amphipod Hyalella azteca (Hyalella) in 42-d tests using 2 different diets: 1) the yeast + cereal leaf + trout pellet (YCT) diet, fed at the uniform low ration used in standard methods for sediment toxicity tests; and 2) a new diet of diatoms + TetraMin flakes (DT), fed at increasing rations over time, that has been optimized for use in Hyalella water-only tests. Test endpoints included survival, weight, biomass, fecundity, and total young. Lethal effects of Pb were similar for the DT and YCT tests (20% lethal concentration [LC20] = 13 μg/L and 15 μg/L, respectively, as filterable Pb). In contrast, weight and fecundity endpoints were not significantly affected in the DT test at Pb concentrations up to 63 µg/L, but these endpoints were significantly reduced by Pb in the YCT test-and in a 2005 test in the same laboratory with a diet of conditioned Rabbit Chow (RC-2005). The fecundity and total young endpoints from the YCT and RC-2005 tests were considered unreliable because fecundity in controls did not meet test acceptability criteria, but both of these tests still produced lower Pb effect concentrations (for weight or biomass) than the test with the DT diet. The lowest biotic ligand model-normalized effect concentrations for the 3 tests ranged from 3.7 μg/L (weight 20% effect concentration [EC20] for the RC-2005 test) to 8.2 μg/L (total young EC20 for the DT test), values that would rank Hyalella as the second or third most sensitive of 13 genera in a species sensitivity distribution for chronic Pb toxicity. These results demonstrate that toxicity tests with Hyalella fed optimal diets can meet more stringent test acceptability criteria for control performance, but suggest that results of these tests may underestimate sublethal toxic effects of Pb to Hyalella under suboptimal feeding regimes. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1825-1834. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc

  12. Detrimental effects of chemotherapeutics and other drugs on the endothelium: A call for endothelial toxicity profiling.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Tomasz; Szczesny, Ewa; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    The vascular endothelium is a real "maestro of circulation", and endothelial dysfunction leads to atherothrombosis, its cardiovascular complications, as well as to many other diseases. It is surprising that quite a large number of drugs seem to hamper the vasoprotective mechanisms of the endothelium, possibly promoting the development of cardiovascular diseases in patients initially treated for non-cardiological conditions. Toxicity profiling (including cardiac and liver toxicity assessment) is a routine procedure performed during pre-clinical drug development. Unfortunately, endothelium-dependent side effects are not taken into account in standard toxicity profiling protocols, as the "endothelial safety" of drugs is not required in order to enter the clinical phase of drug development. Presumably, this might be one of the reasons why several efficient therapeutics, including rofecoxib (COX-2 inhibitor), torcetrapib (CETP-inhibitor), and bardoxolone (Nrf2 activator), have unexpectedly displayed clinically significant cardiovascular hazard, resulting in their withdrawal from the market or alarming comments, respectively. In this review, we will briefly characterize the endothelial activity profiles of chemotherapeutics, antidepressants and antipsychotics-all drugs prescribed for severe, life-threatening and/or life-long diseases-and will show that at least some of them may display clinically relevant detrimental effects on endothelial function.

  13. Ammonia toxicity to the freshwater planarian Polycelis felina: contrasting effects of continuous versus discontinuous exposures.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Álvaro; Camargo, Julio A

    2015-05-01

    Aquatic animals can be exposed to fluctuating concentrations of toxicants. In fact, for some toxicants (i.e., pesticides, ammonia), discontinuous exposure is more environmentally relevant than constant exposure. Responses of aquatic animals to each type of exposure may be different. However, despite the high ecological relevance of behaviour, there is still scarce information on the effects of discontinuous exposure on behaviour. Our study focused on the assessment of unionized ammonia toxicity on the behaviour of a freshwater planarian under continuous exposure (3 days of exposure and 18 days of recovery) versus discontinuous exposure (3 pulses of 1 day with 6 days of recovery between pulses = total 3 days of exposure and 18 days of recovery). Behaviour was assessed as locomotion activity. Bioassays with continuous and discontinuous exposure were performed with one control and five unionized ammonia concentrations (0.14-0.35 mg N-NH3/L). Unionized ammonia in continuous exposure caused less impact on behaviour than equivalent concentrations provided in a discontinuous exposure. By contrast, continuous exposures caused more impact on survival. The discontinuous exposure may allow detoxification during recovery periods, thus increasing the probability of survival in the next pulse. Under continuous exposure, the mortality threshold could be exceeded, and animals could die in greater proportion during exposure as well as the recovery period. We conclude that behavioural activity was a sensitive endpoint to assess the contrasting effects of continuous versus discontinuous exposure and that the response of planarians to discontinuous exposure is different to its response to continuous exposure.

  14. Toxic effects and specific chromium acquired resistance in selected strains of Dyctiosphaerium chlorelloides.

    PubMed

    D'ors, A; Pereira, M; Bartolomé, M C; López-Rodas, V; Costas, E; Sánchez-Fortún, S

    2010-09-01

    Due to its various uses, chromium contamination has become widespread in a diverse array of environments. The present study was carried out to investigate the toxic effect of chromium exposures on sensitive and resistant strains of the green algae Dyctiosphaerium chlorelloides, and to determine the nature and mechanism of chromium-resistant cells that arise. The toxic effect on the photosynthetic performance of chromium exposures in both cell populations, and the sensitive differences due to chromium oxidation state, were estimated, and the results indicate that although the photosynthetic performance in both strains were inhibited, there are not significant differences among IC(50(72)) values obtained in toxicity assays with both chromium oxidation states in wild-type cells, and however these differences are very significant when the assays were performed with Cr(VI) resistant cells. The 72-h 50% inhibitory concentration values obtained with Cr(III) exposures were similar for both strains. Additionally, by means of the SEM/EDX and TEM microscopic techniques, the occurrence of rapid morphological evolution in the microalgal cells and the possible detoxificant mechanisms was observed after exposure of the wild strain to chromium hexavalent. Moreover, the different response in photosynthetic activity observed between sensitive and resistant cells of D. chlorelloides in the presence of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) could be used to obtain a chromium-specific eukaryotic microalgal biosensor.

  15. Toxic effects of nickel oxide bulk and nanoparticles on the aquatic plant Lemna gibba L.

    PubMed

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; Barhoumi, Lotfi; Samadani, Mahshid; Dewez, David

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic plant Lemna gibba L. was used to investigate and compare the toxicity induced by 30 nm nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) and nickel(II) oxide as bulk (NiO-Bulk). Plants were exposed during 24 h to 0-1000 mg/L of NiO-NPs or NiO-Bulk. Analysis of physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles in solution indicated agglomerations of NiO-NPs in culture medium and a wide size distribution was observed. Both NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk caused a strong increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, especially at high concentration (1000 mg/L). These results showed a strong evidence of a cellular oxidative stress induction caused by the exposure to NiO. Under this condition, NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk induced a strong inhibitory effect on the PSII quantum yield, indicating an alteration of the photosynthetic electron transport performance. Under the experimental conditions used, it is clear that the observed toxicity impact was mainly due to NiO particles effect. Therefore, results of this study permitted determining the use of ROS production as an early biomarker of NiO exposure on the aquatic plant model L. gibba used in toxicity testing.

  16. Enantioselective bioaccumulation of hexaconazole and its toxic effects in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Xu, Li; Li, Dongzhi; Teng, Miaomiao; Zhang, Renke; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Wentao

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about the bioaccumulation and toxicity of hexaconazole (HEX) in spite of the fact that they are indispensable parts for a comprehensive assessment of its environmental behavior and toxic effects in organisms of freshwater ecosystems. In this study, adult zebrafish were used to study the enantioselective bioaccumulation of HEX and its effect endpoints in liver, including oxidative stress and the regulation of apoptosis-related gene expression. Significant enantioselective bioaccumulation was demonstrated when exposed to HEX of 100 and 200 μg L(-)(1), finding that the (-)-enantiomer tended to accumulate in zebrafish more easily than (+)-enantiomer. Activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT and GPx) and GSH content were all significantly decreased when zebrafish were exposed to 50 and 200 μg L(-1) HEX for 21 d. A series of genes of the apoptosis pathway were examined in groups treated with 50 and 200 μg L(-)(1) HEX for 21 d using real-time PCR. Significant up-regulation of p53, Puma, Apaf-1, caspase-3 and caspase-9 expression and down-regulation of Bcl-2/Bax expression ratio were proved. The overall results indicated that waterborne HEX was able to produce oxidative stress and induce apoptosis through the involvement of caspases in adult zebrafish. The above information will play a vital role in the integrated environmental risk assessment of HEX and make its toxic mechanism in fish clear.

  17. A multispecies study to assess the toxic and genotoxic effect of pharmaceuticals: furosemide and its photoproduct.

    PubMed

    Isidori, Marina; Nardelli, Angela; Parrella, Alfredo; Pascarella, Luigia; Previtera, Lucio

    2006-05-01

    Pharmaceutical products for humans and animals, as well as their related metabolites end up in the aquatic environment after use. Recent investigations show that concentrations of pharmaceuticals are detectable in the order of ng/l-mug/l in municipal wastewater, groundwater and also drinking water. Little is known about the effects, and the hazard of long-term exposure to low concentrations of pharmaceuticals for non-target aquatic organisms. This study was designed to assess the ecotoxicity of furosemide, a potent diuretic agent, and its photoproduct in the aquatic environment. Bioassays were performed on bacteria, algae, rotifers and microcrustaceans to assess acute and chronic toxicity, while the SOS Chromotest and the Ames test were utilized to detect the genotoxic potential of the investigated compounds. A first approach to risk characterization was to calculate the environmental impact of furosemide by measured environmental concentration and predicted no effect concentration ratio (MEC/PNEC). To do so we used occurrence data reported in the literature and our toxicity results. The results showed that acute toxicity was in the order of mg/l for the crustaceans and absent for bacteria and rotifers. Chronic exposure to these compounds caused inhibition of growth population on the consumers, while the algae did not seem to be affected. A mutagenic potential was found for the photoproduct compared to the parental compound suggesting that byproducts ought to be considered in the environmental assessment of drugs. The risk calculated for furosemide suggested its harmlessness on the aquatic compartment.

  18. Effects of photoinduced toxicity of fluoranthene on amphibian embryos and larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, A.C.; Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1998-09-01

    Embryos and newly hatched larvae of three amphibian species, the spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum), the northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens), and the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), were exposed to fluoranthene and ultraviolet (UV) light in two scenarios. Embryos were exposed in a laboratory setting from an early developmental stage through hatching under artificial UV light, and newly hatched larvae were exposed outdoors in varying sunlight intensity levels. Outdoor exposures indicated greater sensitivity in the toxic response than did laboratory exposures. In the laboratory, mortality and malformation of X. laevis were the most sensitive indicators of exposure. Xenopus laevis was also the most sensitive species tested to the effects of UV light alone. Hatching success of R. pipiens was monitored outdoors and was not a useful predictive endpoint in the determination of photoinduced toxicity; however, newly hatched larvae were sensitive to the effects of photoinduced toxicity. Amybstoma maculatum and X. laevis larvae were affected by low ({micro}g/L) concentrations of fluoranthene in sunlight. These findings suggest that low levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons could be acting synergistically with environmental factors such as UV light to place young amphibians at risk.

  19. Protective Effect of Selenium on Aflatoxin B1-Induced Testicular Toxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zheng; Shao, Bing; Xu, Feibo; Liu, Yunfeng; Li, Yanfei; Zhu, Yanzhu

    2017-03-27

    Aflatoxins have been considered as one of the major risk factors of male infertility, and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most highly toxic and prevalent member of the aflatoxins family. Selenium (Se), an essential nutritional trace mineral for normal testicular development and male fertility, has received extensive intensive on protective effects of male reproductive system due to its potential antioxidant and activating testosterone synthesis. To investigate the protective effect of Se on AFB1-induced testicular toxicity, the mice were orally administered with AFB1 (0.75 mg/kg) and Se (0.2 mg/kg or 0.4 mg/kg) for 45 days. We found that that Se elevated testes index, sperm functional parameters (concentration, malformation, and motility), and the level of serum testosterone in AFB1-exposed mice. Moreover, our results showed that Se attenuated the AFB1-induced oxidative stress and the reduction of testicular testosterone synthesis enzyme protein expression such as steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), P450 side-chain cleavage (P450scc), and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) in AFB1-exposed mice. These results demonstrated that Se conferred protection against AFB1-induced testicular toxicity and can be attributed to its antioxidant and increased testosterone level by stimulating protein expression of StAR and testosterone synthetic enzymes.

  20. The Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Mancozeb-Induced Toxicity in Rat Thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, V; Cekic, S; Kamenov, B; Ciric, M; Krtinic, D

    2015-01-01

    Mancozeb, as a dithiocarbamate fungicide, has been found to exhibit toxicological manifestations in different cells, mainly by generation of free radicals which may alter antioxidant defence systems in cells. The effect of mancozeb on the cells of a primary lymphoid organ has not been studied. In the present study, the effects of mancozeb (0.2, 2 and 5 μg/ml) or mancozeb+ascorbic acid (100 μg/ml), or ascorbic acid alone or control medium alone on the levels of cell viability, apoptosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species production (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP levels in rat thymocytes were examined in vitro. Cells treated with mancozeb displayed a concentration-dependent increase of hypodiploid cells and ROS production followed by markedly decreased viability of the cells, MMP and ATP levels. Application of ascorbic acid significantly reduced cytotoxicity in cell cultures treated with 0.2 and 2 μg/ml of mancozeb, together with significantly decreased ROS levels and increased MMP and ATP levels. In cells treated with 5 μg/ml of mancozeb, ascorbic acid failed to reduce toxicity while simultaneously increasing the apoptosis rate of thymocytes. These results suggest that ROS plays a significant role in mancozeb-induced toxicity, through alteration of mitochondrial function. Ascorbic acid administration reduced the toxicity rate in cells treated with lower mancozeb concentrations, while it may have the ability to shift cells from necrosis to apoptosis in the presence of highest mancozeb concentrations.

  1. Anesthesia Related Toxic Effects on In Vitro Fertilization Outcome: Burden of Proof

    PubMed Central

    Matsota, Paraskevi; Kaminioti, Eva; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Management of pain and anxiety during oocyte retrieval makes anesthesia an important part of the in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures. There are many studies investigating the influence of anesthesia on IVF success. This review article provides an overview of published data regarding the potential toxic effects of different anesthetic techniques (Loco-regional, general anesthesia (GA), and monitored anesthesia care (MAC)), different anesthetic agents, and alternative medicine approach (principally acupuncture) on the IVF outcome. From our analysis, evidence of serious toxicity in humans is not well established. Trials regarding different anesthetic techniques ended up without clear conclusions. Studies about GA came up with conflicting results. A few trials relate GA with lower pregnancy rates, although some others failed to prove this conclusion. Furthermore, detectable amounts of some anesthetic agents are measurable in the follicular fluid but these findings are not strongly associated with toxicity. MAC and Loco-regional anesthesia appear as safe alternative choices and there is evidence of improved outcome. Whereas acupuncture may provide assistance increasing IVF success according to some trials, some others could not obtain these effects. Questions about the appropriate time of application and the underlying mechanism of action are not answered yet, so further investigation should be done. PMID:26161404

  2. Influence of suspended solids on acute toxicity of carbofuran to Daphnia magna: I. Interactive effects.

    PubMed

    Herbrandson, Carl; Bradbury, Steven P; Swackhamer, Deborah L

    2003-05-29

    This study explored the effects on Daphnia magna from exposure to the pesticide carbofuran in combination with stress from suspended solids exposure. Our objective was to assess whether suspended solids affects the toxicodynamic response of D. magna to carbofuran. A series of laboratory experiments was performed where animals were exposed to carbofuran concentrations ranging from 0 to 160 microg/l in combination with suspended solids concentrations ranging from 0 to 10000 mg/l. In the absence of suspended solids, effects of carbofuran were dose dependent and resulted in an EC(50) of 92 microg/l. Exposure to suspended solids, up to extreme levels that may be encountered in the environment and in the absence of carbofuran, showed no measurable toxicity. When D. magna were exposed to a constant carbofuran concentration, the numbers of affected organisms increased with increasing suspended solids concentrations. At a suspended solids concentration of 1000 mg/l, the EC(50) for carbofuran was reduced by half to 45 microg/l. The relationship between the toxicity of carbofuran (microg/l) and the concentration of suspended solids (mg/l) can be described with the following equation: carbofuran EC(50)=72 exp(-0.00014 [suspended solids]). An analysis of the data indicates that this relationship is consistent with a potentiated toxicity mechanism rather than an additive model.

  3. Effects of vitamin C on pathology and caspase-3 activity of kidneys with subacute endosulfan toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, O; Mor, F

    2015-01-01

    Endosulfan is an insecticide that is composed of two stereoisomers: α- and β- endosulfan in an approximate ratio of 70:30. Owing to its widespread use, poisoning of both humans and animals is possible. We examined the toxic effects of endosulfan on New Zealand white rabbit kidneys. Rabbit kidneys were examined histopathologically and caspase-3 activity was detected using immunohistochemistry. Animals were divided into four groups: Group 1 was given a sublethal dose of endosulfan in corn oil by oral gavage daily for 6 weeks, Group 2 was given endosulfan + vitamin C during the same period, Group 3 was given corn oil daily and vitamin C on alternate days, Group 4 was given only corn oil daily throughout the experiment. By the end of experimental period, the concentration of α-endosulfan was greater than the β-endosulfan concentration in the kidneys of both of endosulfan treated groups (Groups 1 and 2). Decreased accumulation of α- and β-endosulfan was observed in Group 2, possibly because of the antioxidant effect of the vitamin C. Histopathological examination revealed hemorrhages, tubule cell necrosis, glomerular infiltration, glomerulosclerosis and proteinaceous material in the tubules, and Bowman spaces in the kidneys of Group 1. Caspase-3 reaction was stronger in Group 1 than in the other groups. Apoptotic activity was most frequent in proximal tubule cells. Endosulfan is toxic to rabbit kidneys. Vitamin C treatment reduced the accumulation of endosulfan in kidneys and reduced its toxicity.

  4. Effect of Morphology of ZnO Nanostructures on Their Toxicity to Marine Algae

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, X.; Wong, S.; Palma, S.; Fisher, N.S.

    2011-04-01

    The influence of ZnO nanoparticle morphology on its toxicity for marine diatoms was evaluated. Four ZnO nanoparticle motifs, possessing distinctive sizes and shapes, were synthesized without adding surfactants. Diameters of ZnO spheres ranged from 6.3 nm to 15.7 nm, and lengths of rod-shaped particles were 242 nm to 862 nm. Their effects on the growth of the marine diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Chaetoceros gracilis, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, were determined in laboratory cultures. Between 4.1 and 4.9% of the Zn from all types of nanoparticles dissolved within 72 h and was neither concentration dependent nor morphology dependent. Addition of all nanoparticles at all concentrations tested stopped growth of T. pseudonana and C. gracilis, whereas P. tricornutum was the least sensitive, with its growth rate inversely proportional to nanoparticle concentration. Bioaccumulation of Zn released from nanoparticles in T. pseudonana was sufficient to kill this diatom. The toxicity of rod-shaped particles to P. triocornutum was noted to be greater than that of the spheres. The overall results suggest that toxicity studies assessing the effects of nanoparticles on aquatic organisms need to consider both the dissolution of these particles and the cellular interaction of nanoparticle aggregates.

  5. Toxic effects of traditional Ethiopian fish poisoning plant Milletia ferruginea (Hochst) seed extract on aquatic macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Karunamoorthi, K; Bishaw, D; Mulat, T

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the toxic effects of traditional Ethiopian fish poisoning plant Birbira [vernacular name (local native language, Amharic); Milletia ferruginea] seed extract on aquatic macroinvertebrates, Baetidae (Mayflies) and Hydropsychidae (Caddisflies), under laboratory conditions. In Ethiopia, toxic plant; Milletia ferruginea pulverized seeds have been used for fish poisoning since time immemorial. Macroinvertebrates are important biological indicators of alteration in the natural water sources. Milletia ferruginea seed extract was applied at concentrations of 125, 250, 500 1000 and 2000 ppm on Hydropsychididae whereas Baetidae were exposed at various concentrations viz., 31.25, 62.5, 125, 250 & 500 ppm. Milletia ferruginea seeds crude extract of lethal doses (LCso and LC90) required for Baetidae 49.29 mg/l and 172.52 mg/l were respectively and the respective doses (LC50 and LC90) against Hydropsychidae were 679.64 mg/l and 2383.93 mg/l. The present investigation end result demonstrated that Milletia ferruginea seed extracts were extremely toxic to Baetidae than Hydropsychididae. As a result, application of Milletia ferruginea seed extracts into the rivers/streams for fish poisoning possibly leads to contamination and disruption of food chain in the aquatic ecosystem. Therefore, the concerned authorities should launch appropriate awareness campaign among the local inhabitants and fisherman about adverse effect of Birbira seed extracts. Furthermore, providing alternative ecofriendly techniques for fish harvesting may possibly bring constructive out come in the near future.

  6. Toxic effects of mercury on the cell nucleus of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Boatti, Lara; Rapallo, Fabio; Viarengo, Aldo; Marsano, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    Governmental agencies (www.epa.gov/mercury) and the scientific community have reported on the high toxicity due to mercury. Indeed, exposure to mercury can cause severe injury to the central nervous system and kidney in humans. Beyond its recognized toxicity, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in the actions of this heavy metal. Mercury has been also observed to form insoluble fibrous protein aggregates in the cell nucleus. We used D. discoideum to evaluate micronuclei formation and, since mercury is able to induce oxidative stress that could bring to protein aggregation, we assessed nuclear protein carbonylation by Western Blot. We observed a significant increase in micronuclei formation and 14 carbonylated proteins were identified. Moreover, we used isotope-coded protein label (ICPL) and mass spectrometry analysis of proteins obtained by lysis of purified nuclei, before of tryptic digestion to quantify nuclear proteins affected by mercury. In particular, we examined the effects of mercury that associate a classical genotoxic assay to proteomic effects into the nucleus. The data present direct evidences for mercury genotoxicity, nuclear protein carbonylation, quantitative change in core histones, and the involvement of pseudouridine synthase in mercury toxicity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 417-425, 2017.

  7. Effect of stress at dosing on organophosphate and heavy metal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jortner, Bernard S.

    2008-11-15

    This paper reviews recent studies assessing the effect of well-defined, severe, transient stress at dosing on two classical models of toxicity. These are the acute (anticholinesterase) toxicity seen following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos, and the nephrotoxicity elicited by the heavy metal depleted uranium, in rats. Stress was induced by periods of restraint and forced swimming in days to weeks preceding toxicant exposure. Forced swimming was far more stressful, as measured by marked, if transient, elevation of plasma corticosterone. This form of stress was administered immediately prior to administration of chlorpyrifos or depleted uranium. Chlorpyrifos (single 60 mg/kg subcutaneously) elicited marked inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase 4-day post-dosing. Depleted uranium (single intramuscular doses of 0.1, 0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg uranium) elicited dose-dependent increase in kidney concentration of the metal, with associated injury to proximal tubular epithelium and increases in serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine during the 30-day post-dosing period. Stress at dosing had no effect on these toxicologic endpoints.

  8. Effects of ionization on the toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoung-Cheun; Kim, Jungkon; Cho, Jae-Gu; Lee, Jae-Woo; Duong, Cuong N; Bae, Eunjoo; Yi, Jongheop; Eom, Ig-Chun; Choi, Kyunghee; Kim, Pilje; Yoon, Junheon

    2014-01-01

    Increase in the use of manufactured nanomaterials (NMs) has led to concerns about the environmental impacts. Especially, hazard of metal-based NMs is more severe due to ions released from surface by water quality parameters and physicochemical properties after entering into the water environment. However, little is known about the effects of ionization on the toxicity of metal-based NMs in the water environment. To address this question, we prepared the suspensions of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) at 25 μg L(-1) containing different concentrations of Ag(+) (5, 10, 20, 45, and 75% Ag(+) to total Ag), and evaluated their toxicity to Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos. Higher Ag(+) ratios in the AgNP suspension, suggesting the lower number of particles, led to the higher adverse effects on embryos and sac-fries. In addition, histopathology analysis revealed that AgNPs penetrated through chorion of eggs and skin membrane, and were distributed into the tissues. The results imply that the ionization could decrease the toxicity of metal-based NMs in the water environment.

  9. Kinetic characteristics and toxic effects of benzalkonium chloride following intravascular and oral administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yuying; Hieda, Yoko; Kimura, Kojiro; Takayama, Koji; Fujihara, Junko; Tsujino, Yoshio

    2004-11-05

    Kinetic characteristics and toxic effects of benzalkonium chloride (BZK) following injection via jugular vein (JV), femoral artery (FA) and oral administration (PO) were experimentally investigated using rats. The BZK concentrations in blood and tissues (lung, liver and kidney) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with solid phase extraction. Toxic doses of 15 and 250 mg/kg of BZK were used for intravascular (JV and FA) and PO administration, respectively. The fatal effects appeared soon after the dose in JV-rats, while delayed in FA- or PO-rats. The blood BZK concentrations and the elimination half-lives were similar between JV- and FA-rats, while the distribution of BZK in tissues was slightly different. In PO administration, the rats that aspirated BZK into their lungs had some symptoms, while the rats that did not aspirate BZK appeared to be normal. The BZK concentrations in blood and tissues were significantly higher in the aspirated PO-rats. The toxic degree of BZK was correlated with the BZK concentration in orally dosed rats. Lung and kidney had higher BZK concentrations compared to blood or liver, and they could be the target organs of BZK.Keyword: Benzalkonium chloride

  10. Toxic Effects of Nickel Oxide Bulk and Nanoparticles on the Aquatic Plant Lemna gibba L.

    PubMed Central

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; Barhoumi, Lotfi; Samadani, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic plant Lemna gibba L. was used to investigate and compare the toxicity induced by 30 nm nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) and nickel(II) oxide as bulk (NiO-Bulk). Plants were exposed during 24 h to 0–1000 mg/L of NiO-NPs or NiO-Bulk. Analysis of physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles in solution indicated agglomerations of NiO-NPs in culture medium and a wide size distribution was observed. Both NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk caused a strong increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, especially at high concentration (1000 mg/L). These results showed a strong evidence of a cellular oxidative stress induction caused by the exposure to NiO. Under this condition, NiO-NPs and NiO-Bulk induced a strong inhibitory effect on the PSII quantum yield, indicating an alteration of the photosynthetic electron transport performance. Under the experimental conditions used, it is clear that the observed toxicity impact was mainly due to NiO particles effect. Therefore, results of this study permitted determining the use of ROS production as an early biomarker of NiO exposure on the aquatic plant model L. gibba used in toxicity testing. PMID:26075242

  11. Toxicity effects of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate to Eisenia fetida at enzyme, cellular and genetic levels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li’ke; Wu, Longhua; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Haibo; Luo, Yongming

    2017-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a dominant phthalic acid ester (PAE) that has aroused public concern due to its resistance to degradation and its toxicity as an endocrine-disrupting compound. Effects of different concentrations of DEHP on Eisenia fetida in spiked natural soil have been studied in the body of the earthworm by means of soil cultivation tests 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after exposure. The results indicated that, in general, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, metallothionein (MT) content, the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) and all the tested geno-toxicity parameters are promoted as time elapses and with increasing concentration of DEHP. However, peroxidase (POD) activity, neutral red retention time (NRRT) and mitochondrial membrane potential difference values were found to decrease even at a low concentration of DEHP of 1 mg kg-1 soil (p<0.05). Clear toxic effects of DEHP on E. fetida have been generally recognized by means of the disturbance of antioxidant enzyme activity/content and critical proteins, cell membrane and organelle disorder and DNA damage estimated by length of tail, tail DNA ratio, and tail moment parameters. A concentration of DEHP of 3 mg kg-1 may be recommended as a precaution against the potential risk of PAEs in soils and for indicating suitable threshold values for other soil animals and soil micro-organisms. PMID:28319143

  12. The Steroidal Glycoalkaloids from Solanaceae: Toxic Effect, Antitumour Activity and Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Sucha, Lenka; Tomsik, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids present in Solanaceae are toxic compounds biosynthesised for the protection of the plants. However, many health benefits of these compounds have been reported so far. One of their promising targets might be cancer, as demonstrated in a large number of studies. However, the main mechanism of action seems to be unclear. It could include the induction of apoptosis or trigger a necrosis with a subsequent inflammatory response. The relatively high systemic toxicity of steroidal compounds is another effect that must be taken into account in anticancer research. The main aim of this work was to summarise the recent progress in the investigation of the mechanisms of their antitumour action and to discuss their potential.

  13. Adjusting for mortality effects in chronic toxicity testing: Mixture model approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.C.D.; Smith, E.P.

    2000-01-01

    Chronic toxicity tests, such as the Ceriodaphnia dubia 7-d test are typically analyzed using standard statistical methods such as analysis of variance or regression. Recent research has emphasized the use of Poisson regression or more generalized regression for the analysis of the fecundity data from these studies. A possible problem in using standard statistical techniques is that mortality may occur from toxicant effects as well as reduced fecundity. A mixture model that accounts for fecundity and mortality is proposed for the analysis of data arising from these studies. Inferences about key parameters in the model are discussed. A joint estimate of the inhibition concentration is proposed based on the model. Confidence interval estimations via the bootstrap method is discussed. An example is given for a study involving copper and mercury.

  14. Effects of physiological and toxic metals on the contraction of glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Both, A.B.; Wofford, H.W.

    1995-07-01

    The effects of three physiological metals (Fe, Zn, and Cu) and three toxic metals (Pb, Cd, and Hg) on the contraction of glycerinated psoas muscle of rabbit were examined. Four different dilutions of each metal solution were added to glycerinated psoas muscle fibers of rabbit. A solution containing 0.25 % ATP plus 0.05 M KCl plus 0.001 M M{sub g}Cl{sub 2} was applied. The lengths of the muscle fibers before and after the addition of the ATP and salt solution were measured. All six metals inhibited muscle contraction in a dose-dependent manner, regardless of whether they were considered physiological or toxic. A possible explanation for the results involving a metal-ATP complex is given.

  15. Some effects of polyphenols on aquatic plants: toxicity of phenols in aquatic plants

    SciTech Connect

    Stom, D.I.; Roth R.

    1981-09-01

    Physiological parameters such as cytoplasmic streaming and motility are used to analyze the effects of chemically different phenolic compounds. Test organisms included: Cyclotella cryptica, Dunaliella salina, Chlamydomonas reinhardii strain 137, Lemna minor and Euglena graclis. It was found that phytotoxicity of phenols, meta-isomers, and methylated phenols is lower than that of ortho- and para-diphenols. Comparing ortho- and para-isomers of the same substance, the results were not uniform, as there were organisms for which para-isomers are more toxic, and others, for which ortho-isomers were more toxic. These results suggest that most compounds tested affect unspecific cell proteins, structural proteins in cell organelles as well as cytoplasmic proteins involved in cell motility and cytoplasmic streaming. (JMT)

  16. Mammalian Toxicity of Munitions Compounds. Phase II. Effects of Multiple Doses Part II. 2,4-Dinitrotoluene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    II: Effects of Multiple Doses Part !I: 2,4-T)initrotoiuene I Progres Report No. 3 oNovember 1978 by 3I Cheng-Chun Lee U Hirty V. Ellis, III Jo.,n J...Sciences Division November 1978 vii :. •I~~~~AMMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITIONS COMPOUNDS ... ... PHASE IIz Effects of Multiple Doses m . ............... PART...161 xi MAMOMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITION COMPOUNDS PHASE II: Effects of Multiple Dones PART II: 2,4

  17. Electroencephalographic and behavioral effects of intracerebroventricular or intraperitoneal injections of toxic honey extract in adult Wistar rats and GAERS.

    PubMed

    Kuru, Pinar; Torun, Merve; Halac, Hande Melike; Temiz, Gozde; Iskender, Ece; Karamahmutoglu, Tugba; Idrizoglu, Medine Gulcebi; Onat, Filiz Yilmaz

    2014-12-01

    Toxic honey, containing grayanotoxin, is obtained from nectar and polen of rhododendron. Consumed in excess it produces seizures and convulsions. In order to investigate whether the toxic honey extract can be used as a seizure model, we examined the electroencephalographic (EEG) and motor effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) or intraperitoneal (ip) injection of toxic honey extract in Wistar rats or in genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS). Male Wistar rats or GAERS were stereotaxically implanted with bilateral cortical recording electrodes in all ip groups and cannula in the icv groups. Based on the previous study, an extract was obtained from the non-toxic and toxic honey. After the injection of the non-toxic or toxic honey extract, seizure stages and changes in EEG were evaluated from 9 am to noon. The icv administration of toxic honey extract produced stage 4 seizures and bilateral cortical spikes within 30-60 min and these effects disappeared after 120 min in Wistar rats or GAERS. The mean of bilateral cortical spike acitivity in EEG of Wistar rats was 804.2 ± 261.0 s in the 3-h period. After the icv administration of toxic honey extract to GAERS, the mean duration of spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs) in GAERS significantly decreased during the first 60 min and then returned to baseline level. Ip injection of toxic honey extract caused no seizure and no change in EEG in either GAERS or Wistars. These results suggest that the icv administration of toxic honey extract can be used as a seizure model.

  18. Ratios between acute aquatic toxicity and effects on population growth rates in relation to toxicant mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Roex, E.W.M.; Gestel, C.A.M. Van; Wezel, A.P. Van; Straalen, N.M. Van

    2000-03-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is mostly based on the results of standardized toxicity tests. To obtain environmental quality criteria, extrapolation factors are used that depend on the amount and quality of available data. These extrapolation factors do not, however, take into account the mode of action of the compound tested or the life history of the test organism. In this study, the authors analyzed the variability in acute-to-chronic ratios (ACRs) for various chemicals in relation to their mode of action. Chemicals were classified as nonpolar narcotics, polar narcotics, specifically acting compounds, and heavy metals. As an acute endpoint, the LC50 was used; as a chronic endpoint, the lowest test concentration at which the natural rate of population increase (r) is affected, or LOEC(r), was used. Data were derived from the on-line literature. Nonpolar narcotic chemicals demonstrate the smallest variation in ACRs, and acute tests can be used to derive chronic endpoints for this class. For the other classes, the variation in ACRs is larger. Fish species especially show a relatively large ACR. For heavy metals, differences in the mode of action may play an important role in explaining differences in ACRs. For the other three classes, however, it is less reliable to predict chronic toxicity using the results of acute tests. In general, differences in species sensitivity rather than in mode of action for the chemical seem to determine differences in ACRs.

  19. Protective effect of berberine on doxorubicin‑induced acute hepatorenal toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueyan; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Zhongning; Liu, Huanlong; Guo, Huicai; Xiong, Chen; Xie, Kerang; Zhang, Xiaofei; Su, Suwen

    2016-05-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX), a potent broad‑spectrum chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of several types of cancer, is largely limited due to its serious side effects on non‑target organs. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate whether berberine (Ber), an isoquinoline alkaloid, could reduce DOX‑induced acute hepatorenal toxicity in rats. Fifty rats were randomly divided into five groups: i) Control group, ii) DOX group, iii) DOX+Ber (5 mg kg) group; iv) DOX+Ber (10 mg kg), and v) DOX+Ber (20 mg kg) group. In the tests, body weight, organ index, general condition and mortality were observed. In addition, the serum levels of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total cholesterol (TCHO) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were determined to evaluate hepatorenal function. Hepatorenal toxicity was further assessed using hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. Furthermore, the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in rat serum or tissue homogenate were also assessed to determine the mechanisms of action. Results suggested that pretreatment with Ber ameliorated the DOX‑induced liver and kidney injury by lowering the serum ALT, AST, TCHO and BUN levels, and the damage observed histologically, such as hemorrhage and focal necrosis of liver and kidney tissues induced by DOX were also attenuated by Ber. Furthermore, Ber also exerted certain antioxidative properties through reversing the changes in the levels of MDA, SOD, GSH and MDA induced by DOX. These findings indicate that Ber has protective effects against DOX‑induced acute hepatorenal toxicity in rats. Combination of Ber with DOX is a novel strategy that has the potential for protecting against DOX‑induced hepatorenal toxicity in clinical practice.

  20. The effect of the cation alkyl chain branching on mutual solubilities with water and toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Kurnia, Kiki A.; Sintra, Tânia E.; Neves, Catarina M. S. S.; Shimizu, Karina; Lopes, José N. Canongia; Gonçalves, Fernando; Ventura, Sónia P. M.; Freire, Mara G.; Santos, Luís M. N. B. F.; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2014-01-01

    The design of ionic liquids has been focused on the cation-anion combinations but other more subtle approaches can be used. In this work the effect of the branching of the cation alkyl chain on the design of ionic liquids (ILs) is evaluated. The mutual solubilities with water and toxicities of a series of bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-based ILs, combined with imidazolium, pyridinium, pyrrolidinium, and piperidinium cations with linear or branched alkyl chains, are reported. The mutual solubility measurements were carried out in the temperature range from (288.15 to 323.15) K. From the obtained experimental data, the thermodynamic properties of the solution (in the water-rich phase) were determined and discussed. The COnductor like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS) was used to predict the liquid-liquid equilibrium. Furthermore, molecular dynamic simulations were also carried out aiming to get a deeper understanding of these fluids at the molecular level. The results show that the increase in the number of atoms at the cation ring (from five to six) leads to a decrease in the mutual solubilities with water while increasing their toxicity, and as expected from the well-established relationship between toxicities and hydrophobicities of ILs. The branching of the alkyl chain was observed to decrease the water solubility in ILs, while increasing the ILs solubility in water. The inability of COSMO-RS to correctly predict the effect of branching alkyl chains toward water solubility on them was confirmed using molecular dynamic simulations to be due to the formation of nano-segregated structures of the ILs that are not taken into account by the COSMO-RS model. In addition, the impact of branched alkyl chains on the toxicity is shown to be not trivial and to depend on the aromatic nature of the ILs. PMID:25119425

  1. Beryllium metal I. experimental results on acute oral toxicity, local skin and eye effects, and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  2. Beryllium Metal I. Experimental Results on Acute Oral Toxicity, Local Skin and Eye Effects, and Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Strupp, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of soluble metal compounds is often different from that of the parent metal. Since no reliable data on acute toxicity, local effects, and mutagenicity of beryllium metal have ever been generated, beryllium metal powder was tested according to the respective Organisation for Economical Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. Acute oral toxicity of beryllium metal was investigated in rats and local effects on skin and eye in rabbits. Skin-sensitizing properties were investigated in guinea pigs (maximization method). Basic knowledge about systemic bioavailability is important for the design of genotoxicity tests on poorly soluble substances. Therefore, it was necessary to experimentally compare the capacities of beryllium chloride and beryllium metal to form ions under simulated human lung conditions. Solubility of beryllium metal in artificial lung fluid was low, while solubility in artificial lysosomal fluid was moderate. Beryllium chloride dissolution kinetics were largely different, and thus, metal extracts were used in the in vitro genotoxicity tests. Genotoxicity was investigated in vitro in a bacterial reverse mutagenicity assay, a mammalian cell gene mutation assay, a mammalian cell chromosome aberration assay, and an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. In addition, cell transformation was tested in a Syrian hamster embryo cell assay, and potential inhibition of DNA repair was tested by modification of the UDS assay. Beryllium metal was found not to be mutagenic or clastogenic based on the experimental in vitro results. Furthermore, treatment with beryllium metal extracts did not induce DNA repair synthesis, indicative of no DNA-damaging potential of beryllium metal. A cell-transforming potential and a tendency to inhibit DNA repair when the cell is severely damaged by an external stimulus were observed. Beryllium metal was also found not to be a skin or eye irritant, not to be a skin sensitizer, and not to have relevant acute oral

  3. Toxic effects of extracellular histones and their neutralization by vitreous in retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Hiroki; Ito, Takashi; Yamada, Shingo; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakamura, Makoto; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2014-05-01

    Histones are DNA-binding proteins and are involved in chromatin remodeling and regulation of gene expression. Histones can be released after tissue injuries, and the extracellular histones cause cellular damage and organ dysfunction. Regardless of their clinical significance, the role and relevance of histones in ocular diseases are unknown. We studied the role of histones in eyes with retinal detachment (RD). Vitreous samples were collected during vitrectomy, and the concentration of histone H3 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The location of the histones and related molecules was examined in a rat RD model. The release of histones and their effects on rat retinal progenitor cells R28 and ARPE-19 were evaluated in vitro. In addition, the protective role of the vitreous body against histones was tested. The intravitreal concentration of histones was higher in eyes with RD (mean, 30.9 ± 9.8 ng/ml) than in control eyes (below the limit of detection, P<0.05). In the rat RD model, histone H3 was observed on the outer side of the detached retina and was associated with photoreceptor death. Histone H3 was released from cultured R28 by oxidative stress. Histones at a concentration 10 μg/ml induced the production of interleukin-8 in ARPE-19 cells (2.5-fold increase, P<0.05) that was mediated through the ERK1/2- and p38 MAPK-dependent pathways and Toll-like receptor 4. Histones were toxic to cells at concentrations of ≥ 20 μg/ml. Vitreous body or hyaluronan decreased toxicity of histones by inhibiting diffusion of histones. These results indicate that histones are released from retinas with RD and may modulate the subretinal microenvironment by functioning as damage-associated molecular pattern molecules, thereby inducing proinflammatory cytokines or cell toxicity. In addition, the important role of the vitreous body and hyaluronan in protecting the retina from these toxic effects is suggested.

  4. Effect of PaCO2 and PaO2 on lidocaine and articaine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Barcelos, K C; Furtado, D P; Ramacciato, J C; Cabral, A M; Haas, D A

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in arterial PaCO₂ can influence local anesthetic toxicity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of stress-induced changes in PaCO₂ and PaO₂ on the seizure threshold of lidocaine and articaine. Lidocaine (2% with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine) or articaine (4% with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine) was administered intravenously under rest or stress conditions to 36 rats separated into 4 groups. Propranolol and prazosin were administered preoperatively to minimize cardiovascular effects of epinephrine. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and arterial pH, PaCO₂, and PaO₂ were measured. Results showed no differences in MAP, HR, or pH. Stress significantly increased the latency period for the first tonic-clonic seizure induced by a toxic dose of both lidocaine and articaine (P < .05). Seizures were brought on more rapidly by articaine. No significant difference between toxic doses of lidocaine and articaine was noted. Stress raised the seizure threshold dose for both drugs and significantly (P < .01) increased arterial PaO₂ from 94.0 ± 1.90 mm Hg to 113.0 ± 2.20 mm Hg, and reduced PaCO₂ from 36.0 ± 0.77 mm Hg to 27.0 ± 0.98 mm Hg. In conclusion, reduction in PaCO₂ and/or increase in PaO₂ raised the seizure threshold of lidocaine and articaine. This study also confirmed that lidocaine and articaine have equipotent central nervous system toxicity.

  5. Effect of PaCO2 and PaO2 on Lidocaine and Articaine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Barcelos, K.C; Furtado, D.P; Ramacciato, J.C; Cabral, A.M; Haas, D.A

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in arterial PaCO2 can influence local anesthetic toxicity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of stress-induced changes in PaCO2 and PaO2 on the seizure threshold of lidocaine and articaine. Lidocaine (2% with 1 ∶ 100,000 epinephrine) or articaine (4% with 1 ∶ 100,000 epinephrine) was administered intravenously under rest or stress conditions to 36 rats separated into 4 groups. Propranolol and prazosin were administered preoperatively to minimize cardiovascular effects of epinephrine. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and arterial pH, PaCO2, and PaO2 were measured. Results showed no differences in MAP, HR, or pH. Stress significantly increased the latency period for the first tonic-clonic seizure induced by a toxic dose of both lidocaine and articaine (P < .05). Seizures were brought on more rapidly by articaine. No significant difference between toxic doses of lidocaine and articaine was noted. Stress raised the seizure threshold dose for both drugs and significantly (P < .01) increased arterial PaO2 from 94.0 ± 1.90 mm Hg to 113.0 ± 2.20 mm Hg, and reduced PaCO2 from 36.0 ± 0.77 mm Hg to 27.0 ± 0.98 mm Hg. In conclusion, reduction in PaCO2 and/or increase in PaO2 raised the seizure threshold of lidocaine and articaine. This study also confirmed that lidocaine and articaine have equipotent central nervous system toxicity. PMID:20843225

  6. Plasma Membrane Surface Potential: Dual Effects upon Ion Uptake and Toxicity1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Kinraide, Thomas B.; Zhou, Dongmei; Kopittke, Peter M.; Peijnenburg, Willie J.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Electrical properties of plasma membranes (PMs), partially controlled by the ionic composition of the exposure medium, play significant roles in the distribution of ions at the exterior surface of PMs and in the transport of ions across PMs. The effects of coexisting cations (commonly Al3+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H+, and Na+) on the uptake and toxicity of these and other ions (such as Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, and H2AsO4−) to plants were studied in terms of the electrical properties of PMs. Increased concentrations of cations or decreased pH in rooting media, whether in solution culture or in soils, reduced the negativity of the electrical potential at the PM exterior surface (ψ0o). This reduction decreased the activities of metal cations at the PM surface and increased the activities of anions such as H2AsO4−. Furthermore, the reduced ψ0o negativity increased the surface-to-surface transmembrane potential difference, thus increasing the electrical driving force for cation uptake and decreasing the driving force for anion uptake across PMs. Analysis of measured uptake and toxicity of ions using electrostatic models provides evidence that uptake and toxicity are functions of the dual effects of ψ0o (i.e. altered PM surface ion activity and surface-to-surface transmembrane potential difference gradient). This study provides novel insights into the mechanisms of plant-ion interactions and extends current theory to evaluate ion bioavailability and toxicity, indicating its potential utility in risk assessment of metal(loid)s in natural waters and soils. PMID:21119046

  7. Modulating effect of aqueous extract of Telfairia occidentalis on induced cyanide toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, O M; Olabode, O O

    2011-12-20

    The effect of lyophilised aqueous extract of Telfairia occidentalis (TO) on induced cyanide toxicity in rats was investigated. Twenty 3-week old male wistar albino rats were randomly distributed into one control and three treatment groups of five rats each: control group (group1), group treated with 3mg/kg body wt of cyanide only (group2), group treated with 3mg/kg body wt. each of cyanide and extract (group3), and a group treated with 3mg/kg Body wt of extract only (group4) were used for the investigation. Cyanide toxicity reduced both food and water intake (p<0.05), while the food intake was improved in group3, this effect of the extract on food was not observed on water intake. Cyanide reduced average body weight of rats significantly (p<0.05). The reduction effect of cyanide on body weight was countered by Telfairia occidentalis extract. The extract did not have an observable effect on rats' body weight. Ocular lesion was observed in 67% of rats in group2 . This ocular effect of cyanide was mitigated significantly by Telfairia occidentalis as only 17% of the rats in group3 had ocular lesion. Cyanide toxicity produced nasal discharge in 39% of the rat population in group2 while there was a partial but considerable reduction (21%) in the severity of nasal discharge in group 3. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the organ/body wt.ratio between the treatments and the control groups for all the organs examined in the study. Biochemical analysis of liver enzymes showed that cyanide (group2) damaged the liver as there was significantly elevated presence (p<0.05) of Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and Alanine aminotransferase (ALP) above those of the control group. The damaging effect of cyanide on the liver was ameliorated by Telfairia occidentalis considerably.Histopathological effect of cyanide toxicity on the organs examined included multifocal degeneration and necrosis of the liver, mild kidney congestion and congestion of the brain. These effects

  8. Assessing aquatic terrestrial toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, W.S.; Mirenda, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    it is recognized that the toxic effects of environmental samples cannot be predicted based on chemical concentration data alone. The EPA recommends an integrated approach that uses both chemical specific and whole effluent toxicity testing methods to control effluent toxicity. Toxicity tests allow for the consideration of site-specific factors that may increase or decrease the toxicity of a chemical in a given medium.

  9. Effects of storage temperature and duration on toxicity of sediments assessed by Crassostrea gigas oyster embryo bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Beiras, R.; His, E.; Seaman, M.N.L.

    1998-10-01

    The effects of temperature and duration of storage on the toxicity of estuarine sediments were investigated with the Crassostrea gigas oyster embryo bioassay. Sediments ranging from unpolluted (controls) to extremely polluted with heavy metals (>100 ppm Hg, Cu, Zn, and Pb) and total hydrocarbons (>1,000 ppm) were collected from sites in southwest France and northern Spain, Control sediments were toxic only at the highest concentrations tested and after freezing in liquid nitrogen ({minus}196 C). Polluted sediments significantly reduced the success of oyster embryogenesis. Analysis of variance showed that the effect of storage temperature on toxicity increased with the prolongation of storage. Prolonged storage of fresh (4 C) sediments resulted in a loss of toxicity, which was more rapid in the less-polluted sediments. Deep-frozen sediments ({minus}196 C) were highly toxic regardless of origin and storage time, and because deep-freezing causes spurious toxicity in the control samples, it cannot be recommended for toxicological studies. In the context of the assessment of sediment toxicity by embryo-larval bioassays, fresh (4 C) storage is recommended when sediments need to be stored for no longer than a few days. The advisable duration of fresh storage to avoid false-negative results is directly related to the degree of toxicity. Should the sediments require prolonged storage, freezing at {minus}20 C appears to be the best choice.

  10. Biodegradability and aquatic toxicity of quaternary ammonium-based gemini surfactants: Effect of the spacer on their ecological properties.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M Teresa; Kaczerewska, Olga; Ribosa, Isabel; Brycki, Bogumił; Materna, Paulina; Drgas, Małgorzata

    2016-07-01

    Aerobic biodegradability and aquatic toxicity of five types of quaternary ammonium-based gemini surfactants have been examined. The effect of the spacer structure and the head group polarity on the ecological properties of a series of dimeric dodecyl ammonium surfactants has been investigated. Standard tests for ready biodegradability assessment (OECD 310) were conducted for C12 alkyl chain gemini surfactants containing oxygen, nitrogen or a benzene ring in the spacer linkage and/or a hydroxyethyl group attached to the nitrogen atom of the head groups. According to the results obtained, the gemini surfactants examined cannot be considered as readily biodegradable compounds. The negligible biotransformation of the gemini surfactants under the standard biodegradation test conditions was found to be due to their toxic effects on the microbial population responsible for aerobic biodegradation. Aquatic toxicity of gemini surfactants was evaluated against Daphnia magna. The acute toxicity values to Daphnia magna, IC50 at 48 h exposure, ranged from 0.6 to 1 mg/L. On the basis of these values, the gemini surfactants tested should be classified as toxic or very toxic to the aquatic environment. However, the dimeric quaternary ammonium-based surfactants examined result to be less toxic than their corresponding monomeric analogs. Nevertheless the aquatic toxicity of these gemini surfactants can be reduced by increasing the molecule hydrophilicity by adding a heteroatom to the spacer or a hydroxyethyl group to the polar head groups.

  11. Joint toxicity of tetracycline with copper(II) and cadmium(II) to Vibrio fischeri: effect of complexation reaction.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fei; Zhao, Yanping; Gu, Xueyuan; Gu, Cheng; Lee, Charles C C

    2015-03-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotic and heavy metals commonly occurs in the environment. Tetracycline (TC), a common antibiotic, can behave as an efficient organic ligand to complex with cations. In this paper, the joint toxicity of TC with two commonly existing metals, copper(II) and cadmium(II), towards a luminescent bacteria, Vibrio fischeri, are investigated. Results showed that coexistence of TC and Cu(II) showed a significant antagonistic effect, while TC and Cd(II) showed a synergistic effect. The aqueous speciation of TC with two metal cations was calculated using a chemical equilibrium software Visual MINTEQ and results indicated that a strong complexation exist between TC and Cu(II), while much weaker interaction between TC and Cd(II). Traditional joint toxicity prediction model based on independent action failed to predict the combined toxicity of TC with metals. A new method based on speciation calculation was used to evaluate the joint toxicity of ligands and cations. It is assumed that the metal-ligand complexes are non-toxic to V. fischeri and the joint toxicity is determined by the sum of toxic unit of free metal-ions and free organic ligands. It explained the joint toxicity of the mixed systems reasonably well. Meanwhile, citric acid (CA) and fulvic acid (FA) were also introduced in this study to provide a benchmark comparison with TC. Results showed it is also valid for mixed systems of CA and FA with metals except for the Cd-CA mixture.

  12. Toxicity reference values for protecting aquatic birds in China from the effects of polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Su, Hailei; Wu, Fengchang; Zhang, Ruiqing; Zhao, Xiaoli; Mu, Yunsong; Feng, Chenglian; Giesy, John P

    2014-01-01

    PCBs are typical of persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic compounds (PBTs) that are widely distributed in the environment and can biomagnify through aquatic food webs, because of their stability and lipophilic properties. Fish-eating birds are top predators in the aquatic food chain and may suffer adverse effects from exposure to PCB concentrations. In this review, we address the toxicity of PCBs to birds and have derived tissue residue guidelines (TRGs) and toxic reference values (TRVs) for PCBs for protecting birds in China. In deriving these protective indices, we utilized available data and three approaches, to wit: species sensitivity distribution (SSD), critical study approach (CSA) and toxicity percentile rank method (TPRM). The TRGs and TRVs arrived at by using these methods were 42.3, I 0. 7, 4.3 pg TEQs/g diet wm and 16.7, 15.5, and 5.5 pg TEQs/g tissue wm for the CSA SSD and TPRM approaches, respectively. These criteria values were analyzed and compared with those derived by others. The following TRG and TRY, derived by SSD, were recommended as avian criteria for protecting avian species in China: 10.7 pg TEQs/g diet wm and 15.5 pg TEQs/g tissue wm, respectively. The hazard of PCBs to birds was assessed by comparing the TRVs and TRGs derived in this study with actual PCB concentrations detected in birds or fish. The criteria values derived in this study can be used to evaluate the risk of PCBs to birds in China, and to provide indices that are more reasonable for protecting Chinese avian species. However, several sources of uncertainty exists when deriving TRGs and TRVs for the PCBs in birds, such as lack of adequate toxicity data for birds and need to use uncertainty factors. Clearly, relevant work on PCBs and birds in China are needed in the future. For example, PCB toxicity data for resident avian species in China are needed. In addition, studies are needed on the actual PCB levels in birds and fish in China. Such information is needed to serve as a

  13. Reirradiation for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Delicate Balance Between Effectiveness and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hoebers, Frank; Heemsbergen, Wilma

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effectiveness and toxicity of reirradiation (re-RT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective data analysis was performed of 58 patients who underwent re-RT with curative intent. Re-RT was given as definitive treatment in 53% of patients, whereas salvage surgery preceded reirradiation in 47%. The median cumulative RT dose was 119 Gy (range, 76-140). Concurrent chemotherapy was administered with re-RT (CRT) in 57% of patients. Event-free survival was defined as survival without recurrence and without serious toxicity ({>=}Grade 3). Results: Median follow-up was 57 months (range, 9-140). Locoregional (LR) control was 50% at 2 and 5 years. The 2-year and 5-year overall survival (OS) was 42% and 34%. The following factors were associated with improved OS: postoperative re-RT (vs. primary re-RT), treatment with RT only (vs. CRT) and interval >3 years between previous RT and re-RT. For patients treated with postoperative re-RT and definitive re-RT, the 5-year OS was 49% and 20%, respectively. Patients treated with CRT had a 5-year OS of 13%. Serious (late) toxicity {>=}Grade 3 was observed in 20 of 47 evaluable patients (43%). Three cases of treatment-related death were recorded. The 2- and 5-year serious toxicity-free interval was 59% and 55%, respectively. Associated with increased risk of serious toxicity were CRT and higher re-RT dose. The event-free survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 34% and 31%, respectively. Conclusions: Re-RT in head-and-neck cancer is associated with poor survival rates of 13-20% in patients with inoperable disease treated with primary (chemo-) re-RT. For this subgroup, however, no other curative options are available. Long-term disease control and survival can be achieved in patients who receive re-RT as an adjunct to surgical resection. The rates of serious toxicity after re-RT are high, with an incidence of approximately 45% at 5 years. Approximately 1 in 3 patients survived re-RT without

  14. Toxic megacolon

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease - toxic megacolon; Crohn disease - toxic megacolon; Ulcerative colitis - toxic megacolon ... people with an inflamed colon due to: Ulcerative colitis , or Crohn disease that is not well controlled ...

  15. Experimental Dissection of Metalloproteinase Inhibition-Mediated and Toxic Effects of Phenanthroline on Zebrafish Development

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Tonya R.; Crawford, Bryan D.

    2016-01-01

    Metalloproteinases are zinc-dependent endopeptidases that function as primary effectors of tissue remodeling, cell-signaling, and many other roles. Their regulation is ferociously complex, and is exquisitely sensitive to their molecular milieu, making in vivo studies challenging. Phenanthroline (PhN) is an inexpensive, broad-spectrum inhibitor of metalloproteinases that functions by chelating the catalytic zinc ion, however its use in vivo has been limited due to suspected off-target effects. PhN is very similar in structure to phenanthrene (PhE), a well-studied poly aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) known to cause toxicity in aquatic animals by activating the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We show that zebrafish are more sensitive to PhN than PhE, and that PhN causes a superset of the effects caused by PhE. Morpholino knock-down of the AhR rescues the effects of PhN that are shared with PhE, suggesting these are due to PAH toxicity. The effects of PhN that are not shared with PhE (specifically disruption of neural crest development and angiogenesis) involve processes known to depend on metalloproteinase activity. Furthermore these PhN-specific effects are not rescued by AhR knock-down, suggesting that these are bona fide effects of metalloproteinase inhibition, and that PhN can be used as a broad spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor for studies with zebrafish in vivo. PMID:27618022

  16. Protective effect of ginger against toxicity induced by chromate in rats.

    PubMed

    Krim, Meriem; Messaadia, Amira; Maidi, Imen; Aouacheri, Ouassila; Saka, Saad

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of the effect of ginger on the modulation of toxic effects induced by chromate is the objective of our study. 50 male rats Albinos Wistar were divided to five groups as follow: group I (T) is served as control, received a mineral water by gavage (per os); group II (G) received an experimental diet with 2% of ginger; group III (Cr) received an oral dose of potassium dichromate (15 mg/kg) and normal diet; group IV (CrG): received an oral dose of potassium dichromate (15 mg/kg) and an experimental diet containing 2% ginger; and group V (Cr(+)G) received an oral dose of potassium dichromate (25 mg/kg) and an experimental diet with 2% of ginger. The results of this study indicate that the chromate provoked a haematoxic effect (anemia), nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, and also a perturbation in lipids profile. In addition, chromate has a pro-oxidant effect, which was indicated by decrease of reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in different tissues. However, the administration of ginger revealed a reduction of the intensity of oxidative stress induced by the chromate resulting in the decrease of the majority of the previous parameters concentrations. In conclusion we demonstrated that ginger has potent antioxidants activity, revealed by the amelioration of chromate's toxic effects. We can say that ginger has a protective effect towards damages induced by the chromate.

  17. The acute toxicity of the death camas (Zigadenus species) alkaloid zygacine in mice, including the effect of methyllycaconitine coadministration on zygacine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Welch, K D; Panter, K E; Gardner, D R; Stegelmeier, B L; Green, B T; Pfister, J A; Cook, D

    2011-05-01

    Death camas (Zigadenus spp.) is a common poisonous plant on foothill rangelands in western North America. The steroidal alkaloid zygacine is believed to be the primary toxic component in death camas. Poisonings on rangelands generally occur in the spring when death camas is abundant, whereas other more desirable forage species are limited in availability. In most cases where livestock are poisoned by plants in a range setting, there is more than one potential poisonous plant in that area. One common poisonous plant that is often found growing simultaneously in the same area as death camas is low larkspur (Delphinium nuttallianum). Consequently, the objectives of this study were to conduct acute toxicity studies in mice and to determine if coadministration of low larkspur will exacerbate the toxicity of death camas. We first characterized the acute toxicity of zygacine in mice. The LD(50) of zygacine administered intravenously (i.v.) and orally was 2.0 ± 0.2 and 132 ± 21 mg/kg, respectively. The rate of elimination of zygacine from whole blood was determined to be 0.06 ± 0.01/min, which corresponds to an elimination half-life of 13.0 ± 2.7 min. The i.v. LD(50) of total alkaloid extracts from a Utah and a Nevada collection were 2.8 ± 0.8 and 2.2 ± 0.3 mg/kg, respectively. The i.v. LD(50) of methyllycaconitine (MLA), a major toxic alkaloid in low larkspur, was 4.6 ± 0.5 mg/kg, whereas the i.v. LD(50) of a 1:1 mixture of MLA and zygacine was 2.9 ± 0.7 mg/kg. The clinical signs in mice treated with this mixture were very similar to those of mice treated with zygacine alone, including the time of onset and death. These results suggest that there is an additive effect of coadministering these 2 alkaloids i.v. in mice. The results from this study increase knowledge and understanding regarding the acute toxicity of death camas. As combined intoxications are most likely common, this information will be useful in further developing management recommendations for

  18. Pharmacokinetics and toxicodynamics of pralidoxime effects on paraoxon-induced respiratory toxicity.

    PubMed

    Houzé, Pascal; Mager, Donald E; Risède, Patricia; Baud, Frédéric J

    2010-08-01

    Empirical studies suggest that the antidotal effect of pralidoxime depends on plasma concentrations with therapeutic effects associated with concentrations above 4 mg/l. The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic-toxicodynamic (PK-TD) relationships for the antidotal effect of pralidoxime on paraoxon-induced toxicity in rats. Diethylparaoxon inactivation of whole-blood cholinesterase activity was studied both in vitro and in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Toxin-induced respiratory effects were measured via whole-body plethysmography in control and pralidoxime-treated animals (50 mg/kg im injection). In the in vitro analysis, cholinesterase reactivation by pralidoxime in blood-poisoned diethylparaoxon (10nM) was proportional to the logarithm of drug concentrations. A mechanism-based TD model was developed, which well described the inhibition of cholinesterases by diethylparaoxon and reactivation with pralidoxime. The in vitro pralidoxime EC(50) was estimated to be 4.67 mg/l. Animals exposed to diethylparaoxon exhibited a decrease in respiratory rate and an increase in expiratory time, and pralidoxime treatment resulted in a rapid complete but transient (< 30 min) correction in respiratory toxicity. In contrast, there was a fast and total reactivation of blood cholinesterase activity over the 210-min study period. The in vitro TD model was extended to capture the time-course of in vivo pralidoxime antidotal effects, which explained the complex relationship between drug exposure and pharmacological response profile. This study provides insights into the role of oxime-rescue of paraoxon-induced toxicity, and the final PK-TD model might prove useful in optimizing the design and development of such therapy.

  19. The toxicity and invasive effects of QDs on mung bean development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Peng; Wang, Xiaomei; Wang, Ruhua; Huang, Xuan; Feng, Gang; Lin, Guimiao; Chen, Qiang; Xu, Gaixia; Chen, Danni

    2014-09-01

    Objective: Nowadays, the nanomaterials have been applied in every aspects of our life, including cosmetics, fresh-keeping, antisepsis and medicines. However, we know little about the toxic effects of nanoparticles towards plants. In this thesis, we synthesized quantum dots (QDs), and then toxicity and invasive effects of QDs for mung beans were investigated. Methods: We synthesised red CdTe QDs in water sphase with L-Cystein stabilizers, then prepared different concentration of QDs solution to cultivate mung bean plant, the radical length of mung beans was measured after four days every day, after 7 days, the distribution of QDs in mung bean plant was recorded under the microscopic. Results: The result showed the QDs inhibited the growth of mung beans, the higher the concentration of QDs was, the greater the inhibition effect was. After 7 days, the radicle average lengths of mung beans in different concentrations of QDs solution - blank 0.1μmol/L 0.2μmol/L 0.5 μmol/L 1 μmol/L - were 19.350+/- 0.427, 14.050+/- 0.879, 10.525+/- 0.554, 7.250+/- 0.522, 7.650+/- 0.229. The QDs mostly adhered onto the root surface and hairs. Conclusion: In conclusion, the QDs synthesized with L-cystein have effects on the growth of mung beans. However, it is necessary to do more experiments to confirm the mechanism of the toxicity effect of QDs on plants.

  20. Cytoprotective Effects of Organosulfur Compounds against Methimazole Induced Toxicity in Isolated Rat Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Reza; Babaei, Hossein; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Methimazole is a drug widely used in hyperthyroidism. However, life threatening hepatotoxicity has been associated with its clinical use. No protective agent has been found to be effective against methimazole induced hepatotoxicity yet. Hence, the capacity of organosulfur compounds to protect rat hepatocytes against cytotoxic effects of methimazole and its proposed toxic metabolite, N-methylthiourea was evaluated. Methods: Hepatocytes were prepared by the method of collagenase enzyme perfusion via portal vein. Cells were treated with different concentrations of methimazole, N methylthiourea, and organosulfur chemicals. Cell death, protein carbonylation, reactive oxygen species formation, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial depolarization were assessed as toxicity markers and the role of organosulfurs administration on them was investigated. Results: Methimazole caused a decrease in cellular glutathione content, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) collapse, and protein carbonylation. In addition, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation was observed. Treating hepatocytes with N methylthiourea caused a reduction in hepatocytes glutathione reservoirs and an elevation in carbonylated proteins, but no significant ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, or mitochondrial depolarization was observed. N-acetyl cysteine, allylmercaptan, and diallyldisulfide attenuated cell death and prevented ROS formation and lipid peroxidation caused by methimazole. Furthermore, organosulfur compounds diminished methimazole induced mitochondrial damage and reduced the carbonylated proteins. In addition, these chemicals showed protective effects against cell death and protein carbonylation induced by methimazole metabolite. Conclusion: Organosulfur chemicals extend their protective effects against methimazole-induced toxicity by attenuating oxidative stress caused by this drug and preventing the adverse effects of methimazole and/or its

  1. Toxicity of high salinity tannery wastewater and effects on constructed wetland plants.

    PubMed

    Calheiros, Cristina S C; Silva, Gabriela; Quitério, Paula V B; Crispim, Luís F C; Brix, Hans; Moura, Sandra C; Castro, Paula M L

    2012-08-01

    The toxicity of high salinity tannery wastewater produced after an activated sludge secondary treatment on the germination and seedling growth of Trifolium pratense, a species used as indicator in toxicity tests, was evaluated. Growth was inhibited by wastewater concentrations >25% and undiluted effluent caused a complete germination inhibition. Constructed wetlands (CWs) with Arundo donax or Sarcocornia fruticosa were envisaged to further polish this wastewater. Selection of plant species to use in CWs for industrial wastewater treatment is an important issue, since for a successful establishment they have to tolerate the often harsh wastewater composition. For that, the effects of this wastewater on the growth of Arundo and Sarcocornia were assessed in pot assays. Plants were subject to different wastewater contents (0/50/100%), and both were resilient to the imposed conditions. Arundo had higher growth rates and biomass than Sarcocornia and may therefore be the preferred species for use in CWs treating tannery wastewater. CWs planted with the above mentioned plants significantly decreased the toxicity of the wastewater, as effluent from the CWs outlet stimulated the growth of Trifolium at concentrations <50%, and seed germination and growth even occurred in undiluted effluent.

  2. Effects of ammonia on juvenile unionid mussels (Lampsilis cardium) in laboratory sediment toxicity tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, Teresa J.; Allran, John W.; O'Donnell, Jonathan A.; Bartsch, Michelle; Richardson, William B.

    2003-01-01

    Ammonia is a relatively toxic compound generated in water and sediments by heterotrophic bacteria and accumulates in sediments and pore water. Recent data suggest that unionid mussels are sensitive to un-ionized ammonia (NH3) relative to other organisms. Existing sediment exposure systems are not suitable for ammonia toxicity studies with juvenile unionids; thus, we modified a system to expose juveniles to ammonia that was continuously infused into sediments. This system maintained consistent concentrations of ammonia in pore water up to 10 d. Juvenile Lampsilis cardium mussels were exposed to NH3 in pore water in replicate 96-h and 10-d sediment toxicity tests. The 96-h median lethal concentrations (LC50s) were 127 and 165 μg NH3-N/L, and the 10-d LC50s were 93 and 140 μg NH3-N/L. The median effective concentrations (EC50s) (based on the proportion affected, including dead and inactive mussels) were 73 and 119 μg NH3-N/L in the 96-h tests and 71 and 99 μg NH3-N/L in the 10-d tests. Growth rate was substantially reduced at concentrations between 31 and 76 μg NH3-N/L. The lethality results (when expressed as total ammonia) are about one-half the acute national water quality criteria for total ammonia, suggesting that existing criteria may not protect juvenile unionids.

  3. Toxic effects of several types of antifouling paints in human and rat hepatic or epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, G; Delescluse, C; Pralavorio, M; Perichaud, M; Avon, M; Lafaurie, M; Rahmani, R

    1998-08-01

    Fouling is the successive development of marine organisms on immersed surfaces, a process which has heavy negative economic impacts. Several antifouling technologies, generally based on the leaching of biocides from painted surfaces, have been developed, but these biocides are toxic to the environment. Hence, we compared the toxicity of several currently used paint lixiviats in rat hepatocytes, human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. Acute toxicity was assessed by the Neutral Red and MTT assays. Chronic effect was tested using induction of the 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity as a marker. Large variations were observed among the various cell types or the antifouling formulations, both in terms of IC50 values (from approximately 0.5 to approximately 10%, v/v) and EROD induction (from approximately 1 to 10-fold over control). These differences appear to be related to variable biocide (copper compounds, organotins, etc...) concentrations in the different paint formulations, or to the specific metabolic capabilities of the cell system used.

  4. Fluoride toxicity effects in onion (Allium cepa L.) grown in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Jha, S K; Nayak, A K; Sharma, Y K

    2009-07-01

    A pot experiment was carried out under controlled condition to investigate the accumulation, uptake and toxicity effects of fluoride (F) in onion (Allium cepa L.) grown on the soil contaminated by inorganic fluoride (NaF). Six different levels of soil contamination were used by adding 0, 100, 200, 400, 600 and 800 mg NaFkg(-1) to the soil. The F concentration in shoot, bulb and root varied between 16.3 and 109.1mg Fkg(-1), 15.8 and 54.3mg Fkg(-1) and 18.6 and 151.6 mg Fkg(-1), respectively. The visible symptoms of F toxicity in terms of tip burning and death of the plant was noticed in highly contaminated soils (>400mg NaFkg(-1) soil). The phyto-toxic threshold limit (LC(50)) in onion shoot was found to be 55 mg Fkg(-1), beyond which the biomass yield decreased by 50%. It was also inferred from the study that there is a partitioning of F in onion, with more accumulation in roots and shoots than in bulbs. The order of retention of fluoride in onion found to be roots>shoot>bulb.

  5. Acute toxic effects of three pesticides on Pseudomonas putida monitored by microcalorimeter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Lun; Yao, Jun; Wang, Fei; Bramanti, Emilia; Maskow, Thomas; Zaray, Gyula

    2009-02-01

    A series of calorimetric experiments were performed to investigate the toxic effects of beta-cypermethrin (BCP), bensulfuron-methyl (BSM) and prometryne (PM) on Pseudomonas putida (P. putida). The metabolic action of P. putida on the three pesticides was studied by obtaining power-time curves. The growth of P. putida was inhibited completely in each case when the concentrations of pesticides were up to 80 micro g mL(- 1). The relationships between the inhibitory ratio (k) and doses of contaminants were approximately linear for the three pesticides. The total heat dissipated per milliliter (Q(total)) for the pesticides decreased during the course of the experiment. The OD(600) of P. putida growth in the absence and presence of pesticides was also obtained. The power-time curves of P. putida growth coincided with its turbidity curves. This elucidates that microcalorimetric method agrees well with the routine microbiological method. Among these three pesticides, BSM was found to be the most toxic with an IC(50) of 19.24 micro g mL(- 1) against P. putida. PM exhibited moderate virulence with an IC(50) of 27.86 micro g mL(- 1) and BCP had the lowest toxicity with an IC(50) of 39.64 micro g mL(- 1).

  6. Chronic toxicity of ibuprofen to Daphnia magna: Effects on life history traits and population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Callaghan, Amanda; Hooper, Helen L; Connon, Richard; Hutchinson, Thomas H; Maund, Steve J; Sibly, Richard M

    2007-08-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ibuprofen (IB) is a widely used pharmaceutical that can be found in several freshwater ecosystems. Acute toxicity studies with Daphnia magna suggest that the 48h EC(50) (immobilisation) is 10-100 mgIBl(-1). However, there are currently no chronic IB toxicity data on arthropod populations, and the aquatic life impacts of such analgesic drugs are still undefined. We performed a 14-day exposure of D. magna to IB as a model compound (concentration range: 0, 20, 40 and 80 mgIBl(-1)) measuring chronic effects on life history traits and population performance. Population growth rate was significantly reduced at all IB concentrations, although survival was only affected at 80 mgIBl(-1). Reproduction, however, was affected at lower concentrations of IB (14-day EC(50) of 13.4 mgIBl(-1)), and was completely inhibited at the highest test concentration. The results from this study indicate that the long-term crustacean population consequences of a chronic IB exposure at environmentally realistic concentrations (ngl(-1) to microgl(-1)) would most likely be of minor importance. We discuss our results in relation to recent genomic studies, which suggest that the potential mechanism of toxicity in Daphnia is similar to the mode of action in mammals, where IB inhibits eicosanoid biosynthesis.

  7. Effect of antioxidants on vanadate-induced toxicity towards isolated perfused rat livers.

    PubMed

    Younes, M; Kayser, E; Strubelt, O

    1991-01-01

    The effect of trolox C, a water soluble vitamin E analogue, propyl gallate and ascorbate on vanadate hepatotoxicity was investigated in vitro. In isolated perfused livers from fasted rats, sodium orthovanadate (2 mmol/l) led to toxic responses including reduction of oxygen consumption, release of cytosolic (glutamate-pyruvate-transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)) and mitochondrial (glutamate-dehydrogenase (GLDH)) enzymes, intracellular accumulation of calcium, a marked depletion of glutathione (GSH) and an enhanced formation and release of thiobarbituric acid- (TBA) reactive material. Trolox C and propyl gallate inhibited the release of GPT and LDH partially and that of GLDH totally, but had no influence on vanadate-induced calcium accumulation or on the reduction of oxygen consumption. Both agents suppressed vanadate-induced lipid peroxidation (LPO) and partially prevented GSH depletion. Ascorbate failed to provide any protection probably due to the interference of its pro-oxidant potential with its antioxidant activity. The protection, mainly of mitochondria, afforded by those agents which also inhibited LPO substantiates our previous findings that the pro-oxidant activity of vanadate is mainly responsible for its direct hepatotoxic actions [2]. Besides, reduction of organ perfusion rate due to vasoconstriction also contributes to vanadate toxicity, but oxidative stress is not involved in this indirect toxic activity.

  8. Edaravone ameliorates the adverse effects of valproic acid toxicity in small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oktay, S; Alev, B; Tunali, S; Emekli-Alturfan, E; Tunali-Akbay, T; Koc-Ozturk, L; Yanardag, R; Yarat, A

    2015-06-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a drug used for the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Previous studies have reported an increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the toxic mechanism of VPA. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger for clinical use, can quench free radical reaction by trapping a variety of free radical species. In this study, effect of edaravone on some small intestine biochemical parameters in VPA-induced toxicity was investigated. Thirty seven Sprague Dawley female rats were randomly divided into four groups. The groups include control group, edaravone (30 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA (0.5 g(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA + edaravone (in same dose) given group. Edaravone and VPA were given intraperitoneally for 7 days. Biochemical parameters such as malondialdehyde, as an index of lipid peroxidation(LPO), sialic acid (SA), glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tissue factor (TF) activities were determined in small intestine samples by colorimetric methods. Decreased small intestine antioxidant enzyme activities, increased LPO and SA levels, and increased activities of ALP and TF were detected in the VPA group. Based on our results edaravone may be suggested to reverse the oxidative stress and inflammation due to VPA-induced small intestine toxicity.

  9. Toxic effects of chrysoidine on human serum albumin: isothermal titration calorimetry and spectroscopic investigations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haoyu; Liu, Yingxue; Li, Meng; Han, Songlin; Yang, Xudan; Liu, Rutao

    2016-03-01

    Chrysoidine is widely used in industry as a type of azo dye, and is sometimes used illegally as a food additive despite its potential toxicity. Human serum albumin (HSA) is one of the most important proteins in blood plasma and possesses major physiological functions. In the present study, the conformational and functional effects of chrysoidine on HSA were investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), multiple spectroscopic methods, a molecular docking study and an esterase activity assay. Based on the ITC results, the binding stoichiometry of chrysoidine to HSA was estimated to be 1.5:1, and was a spontaneous process via a single hydrogen bond. The binding of chrysoidine to HSA induced dynamic quenching in fluorescence, and changes in secondary structure and in the microenvironment of the Trp-214 residue. In addition, the hydrogen bond (1.80 Å) formed between the chrysoidine molecule and the Gln-211 residue. The esterase activity of HSA decreased following the addition chrysoidine due to the change in protein structure. This study details the direct interaction between chrysoidine and HSA at the molecular level and the mechanism for toxicity as a result of the functional changes induced by HSA structural variation upon binding to chrysoidine in vitro. This study provides useful information towards detailing the transportation mechanism and toxicity of chrysoidine in vivo.

  10. GLOBOX: A spatially differentiated global fate, intake and effect model for toxicity assessment in LCA.

    PubMed

    Wegener Sleeswijk, Anneke; Heijungs, Reinout

    2010-06-15

    GLOBOX is a model for the calculation of spatially differentiated LCA toxicity characterisation factors on a global scale. It can also be used for human and environmental risk assessment. The GLOBOX model contains equations for the calculation of fate, intake and effect factors, and equations for the calculation of LCA characterisation factors for human toxicity and ecotoxicity. The model is differentiated on the level of 239 countries/territories and 50 seas/oceans. Each region has its own set of homogeneous compartments, and the regions are interconnected by atmospheric and aquatic flows. Multimedia transport and degradation calculations are largely based on the EUSES 2.0 multimedia model, and are supplemented by specific equations to account for the advective air and water transport between different countries and/or seas. Metal-specific equations are added to account for speciation in fresh and marine surface water. Distribution parameters for multimedia transport equations are differentiated per country or sea with respect to geographic features, hydrology, and climate. The model has been tested with nitrobenzene as a test chemical, for emissions to all countries in the world. Spatially differentiated characterisation factors turn out to show wide ranges of variation between countries, especially for releases to inland water and soil compartments. Geographic position, distribution of lakes and rivers and variations in environmental temperature and rain rate are decisive parameters for a number of different characterisation factors. Population density and dietary intake play central roles in the variation of characterisation factors for human toxicity. Among the countries that show substantial deviations from average values of the characterisation factors are not only small and remote islands, but also countries with a significant economic production rate, as indicated by their GDPs. It is concluded that spatial differentiation between countries is an important

  11. An empirical comparison of effective concentration estimators for evaluating aquatic toxicity test responses

    SciTech Connect

    Bailer, A.J.; Hughes, M.R.; Denton, D.L.; Oris, J.T.

    2000-01-01

    Aquatic toxicity tests are statistically evaluated by either hypothesis testing procedures to derive a no-observed-effect concentration or by inverting regression models to calculate the concentration associated with a specific reduction from the control response. These latter methods can be described as potency estimation methods. Standard US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) potency estimation methods are based on two different techniques. For continuous or count response data, a nominally nonparametric method that assumes monotonic decreasing responses and piecewise linear patterns between successive concentration groups is used. For quantal responses, a probit regression model with a linear dose term is fit. These techniques were compared with a recently developed parametric regression-based estimator, the relative inhibition estimator, RIp. This method is based on fitting generalized linear models, followed by estimation of the concentration associated with a particular decrement relative to control responses. These estimators, with levels of inhibition (p) of 25 and 50%, were applied to a series of chronic toxicity tests in a US EPA region 9 database of reference toxicity tests. Biological responses evaluated in these toxicity tests included the number of young produced in three broods by the water flea (Ceriodaphnia dubia) and germination success and tube length data from the giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera). The greatest discrepancy between the RIp and standard US EPA estimators was observed for C. dubia. The concentration-response pattern for this biological endpoint exhibited nonmonotonicity more frequently than for any of the other endpoint. Future work should consider optimal experimental designs to estimate these quantities, methods for constructing confidence intervals, and simulation studies to explore the behavior of these estimators under known conditions.

  12. Estradiol uptake, toxicity, metabolism, and adverse effects on cadmium-treated amphibian embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Osvaldo; Corró, Lucrecia; Herkovits, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    The exposure of Bufo arenarum embryos to 25 micromol/L 17beta-estradiol (E2) resulted in 100% lethality within 48 hr, whereas 10 micromol//L E2 was the no observed effect concentration value for short-term chronic (7 days) exposure. The toxicity profile curves show that lethal effects were proportional to the E2 concentration and the time of exposure. The E2 uptake resulted in 20.1 ng E2/mg embryo at 8 hr posttreatment, but 67.3% of this value was achieved during the first 30 min of incubation with this estrogen. Regarding metabolism, the embryos synthesize estrone (E1) from E2 by means of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Simultaneous treatments of Bufo arenarum embryos with 1 mg/L Cd2+ and 0.1, 1, or 10 micromol/L E2 enhanced the lethality exerted by cadmium in 76.7, 80, and 83.3% of embryos, respectively. The results indicate that estrogenic endocrine disruptors could have an adverse effect on amphibian embryos and enhance the toxic effect of Cd on amphibian embryos. This study points to the possibility of using the AMPHITOX test as a screening method for potential endocrine disruption as well as the combined effects of chemical mixtures. PMID:15175173

  13. Evaluation of toxic effects of several carboxylic acids on bacterial growth by toxicodynamic modelling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effects of organic acids on microbial fermentation are commonly tested in investigations about metabolic behaviour of bacteria. However, they typically provide only descriptive information without modelling the influence of acid concentrations on bacterial kinetics. Results We developed and applied a mathematical model (secondary model) to capture the toxicological effects of those chemicals on kinetic parameters that define the growth of bacteria in batch cultures. Thus, dose-response kinetics were performed with different bacteria (Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Carnobacterium pisicola, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Listonella anguillarum) exposed at increasing concentrations of individual carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, butyric and lactic). In all bioassays the acids affected the maximum bacterial load (Xm) and the maximum growth rate (vm) but only in specific cases the lag phase (λ) was modified. Significance of the parameters was always high and in all fermentations the toxicodynamic equation was statistically consistent and had good predictability. The differences between D and L-lactic acid effects were significant for the growth of E. coli, L. mesenteroides and C. piscicola. In addition, a global parameter (EC50,τ) was used to compare toxic effects and provided a realistic characterization of antimicrobial agents using a single value. Conclusions The effect of several organic acids on the growth of different bacteria was accurately studied and perfectly characterized by a bivariate equation which combines the basis of dose-response theory with microbial growth kinetics (secondary model). The toxicity of carboxylic acids was lower with the increase of the molecular weight of these chemicals. PMID:22118421

  14. Sulfated Galactan from Palisada flagellifera Inhibits Toxic Effects of Lachesis muta Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Ana Cláudia Rodrigues; Ferreira, Luciana Garcia; Duarte, Maria Eugênia Rabello; Noseda, Miguel Daniel; Sanchez, Eladio Flores; Fuly, André Lopes

    2015-01-01

    In Brazil, snakebites are a public health problem and accidents caused by Lachesis muta have the highest mortality index. Envenomation by L. muta is characterized by systemic (hypotension, bleeding and renal failure) and local effects (necrosis, pain and edema). The treatment to reverse the evolution of all the toxic effects is performed by injection of antivenom. However, such therapy does not effectively neutralize tissue damage or any other local effect, since in most cases victims delay seeking appropriate medical care. In this way, alternative therapies are in demand, and molecules from natural sources have been exhaustively tested. In this paper, we analyzed the inhibitory effect of a sulfated galactan obtained from the red seaweed Palisada flagellifera against some toxic activities of L. muta venom. Incubation of sulfated galactan with venom resulted in inhibition of hemolysis, coagulation, proteolysis, edema and hemorrhage. Neutralization of hemorrhage was also observed when the galactan was administered after or before the venom injection; thus mimicking a real in vivo situation. Moreover, the galactan blocked the edema caused by a phospholipase A2 isolated from the same venom. Therefore, the galactan from P. flagellifera may represent a promising tool to treat envenomation by L. muta as a coadjuvant for the conventional antivenom. PMID:26110897

  15. The footprint of pesticide stress in communities--species traits reveal community effects of toxicants.

    PubMed

    Liess, Matthias; Schäfer, Ralf B; Schriever, Carola A

    2008-12-01

    The predictive power of the current risk-assessment framework for pesticides remains uncertain. This is because any extrapolation towards landscape-level effects encounters considerable uncertainties: (i) when proceeding from the level of individual single-species tests to populations and communities, biological interactions are not considered; (ii) from mesocosms to field communities, environmental factors and stressors that determine the effects of pesticides in the field are not considered; and (iii) most monitoring investigations are restricted spatially and do not consider recolonisation, and lack an adequate means of distinguishing confounding factors from natural variation. We advocate using species traits as community descriptors, to determine quantitative links between pesticide toxicity and community alterations. Recently, a trait-based indicator system was developed to identify SPEcies At Risk (SPEAR) of being affected by pesticides, with reference to life-history and physiological traits. This SPEAR system has now been successfully employed to link pesticide exposure and effects in Finland, France and Germany. The effect of pesticides on the structure of communities described with SPEAR was independent of the biogeographical region. We then extrapolated and visualised the anticipated risk for aquatic communities in small agricultural streams within Europe in a risk map. With this information we identified a potential risk from pesticide runoff in a high proportion of streams. By focusing on the ecological effect of selected environmental factors, trait-based approaches offer an increased realism for risk assessment of toxicants on the ecosystem level.

  16. Efficacious rat model displays non-toxic effect with Korean beechwood creosote: a possible antibiotic substitute.

    PubMed

    Quynh, Anh Nguyen Thai; Sharma, Neelesh; Cho, Kwang Keun; Yeo, Tae Jong; Kim, Ki Beom; Jeong, Chul Yon; Min, Tae Sun; Young, Kim Jae; Kim, Jin Nam; Jeong, Dong-Kee

    2014-05-04

    Wood creosote, an herbal anti-diarrheal and a mixture of major volatile compounds, was tested for its non-toxicological effects, using a rat model, with the objective to use the creosote as an antibiotic substitute. A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats were studied to form five groups with 6 rats each. Korea beechwood creosote was supplemented into three test groups with 0.03 g/kg, 0.07 g/kg and 0.1 g/kg body weight/day without antibiotic support, along with a positive control of Apramycin sulphate (at 0.5% of the daily feed) and a negative control. Korean beechwood creosote supplementation showed no negative effect on the body weight gain in comparison to the negative and the positive control groups and the feed conversion ratio was also comparable with that of the control groups. The clinical pathology parameters studied were also under the umbrella of normal range, including liver specific enzymes, blood glucose, total protein, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), which indicated no toxic effect of creosote at the given doses. The non-hepatotoxic effect was also confirmed using hepatic damage specific molecular markers like Tim-p1, Tim-p2 and Tgf-β1. The results suggested that Korean beechwood may be used as antibiotic substitute in weanling pigs feed without any toxic effect on the body. Although the antimicrobial properties of creosote were not absolutely similar to those of apramycin sulphate, they were comparable.

  17. Toxic effects of nine polycyclic aromatic compounds on Enchytraeus crypticus in artificial soil in relation to their properties.

    PubMed

    Kobetičová, Klára; Simek, Zdeněk; Brezovský, Jan; Hofman, Jakub

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the toxic effects of selected two- and three-ringed PAHs (naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene) and their N-heterocyclic analogs with one (quinoline, acridine, and phenanthridine) or two (quinoxaline, phenazine, and 1,10-phenanthroline) nitrogen atoms on the survival and reproduction of Enchytraeus crypticus in artificial soil. Toxicity of compounds was recalculated to soil pore-water concentrations using the data of chemical analyses of 0.01 M CaCl(2) extracts of spiked soils. When toxicity was based on molar concentrations in pore water (μmol/L), it significantly increased with increasing K(ow) value. This relationship indicates nonpolar narcosis as the general toxicity mechanism of the tested compounds. In addition, significant correlation between the toxicity of PACs and their ionization potential has been identified by multidimensional QSAR models.

  18. The Effect of Temperature on the Toxicity of Insecticides against Musca domestica L.: Implications for the Effective Management of Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali; Akram, Waseem

    2014-01-01

    Background Diarrhea is an important cause of childhood mortality in developing countries like Pakistan because of unhygienic conditions, lack of awareness, and unwise use of preventive measures. Mechanical transmission of diarrheal pathogens by house flies, Musca domestica, is believed as the most effective route of diarrhea transmission. Although the use of insecticides as a preventive measure is common worldwide for the management of house flies, success of the measure could be compromised by the prevailing environmental temperature since it significantly affects toxicity of insecticides and thus their efficacy. Peaks of the house fly density and diarrheal cases are usually coincided and season specific, yet little is known about the season specific use of insecticides. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the temperature-toxicity relationship in house flies, the effect of post-bioassays temperature (range, 20–34°C) on the toxicity of seven insecticides from organophosphate (chlorpyrifos, profenofos), pyrethroid (cypermethrin, deltamethrin) and new chemical (emamectin benzoate, fipronil, spinosad) classes was evaluated by using a feeding bioassay method. From 20–34°C, the toxicities of chlorpyrifos, profenofos, emamectin and fipronil increased 2.10, 2.93, 2.40 and 3.82 fold (i.e. positive temperature coefficient), respectively. Whereas, the toxicities of cypermethrin, deltamethrin and spinosad decreased 2.21, 2.42 and 3.16 fold (i.e. negative temperature coefficient), respectively. Conclusion/Significance These findings suggest that for the reduction in diarrheal cases, house flies should be controlled with insecticides according to the prevailing environmental temperature. Insecticides with a positive temperature coefficient may serve as potential candidates in controlling house flies and diarrhea epidemics in hot season and vice versa. PMID:24743188

  19. Toxicology of the nasal passages

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this work include: Comparative Anatomy and Function of the Nasal Passages; Light Microscopic Examination of the Rat Nasal Passages: Preparation and Morphologic Features; Histopathology of Acute and Subacute Nasal Toxicity; Pathology of Chronic Nasal Toxic Responses Including Cancer; Responses of the Nasal Mucociliary Apparatus to Airborne Irritants; Effects of Chemical Exposure on Olfaction in Humans, Possible Consequences of Cytochrome P-450-Dependent Monooxygenases in Nasal Tissues.

  20. Toxic effects of prolonged administration of leaves of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) to goats.

    PubMed

    Soto-Blanco, Benito; Górniak, Silvana Lima

    2010-07-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a major source of dietary energy for humans and domestic animals in many tropical countries. However, consumption of cassava is limited by its characteristic content of cyanogenic glycosides. The present work aimed to evaluate the toxic effects of ingestion of cassava leaves by goats for 30 consecutive days, and to compare the results with the toxic effects of cyanide in goats, which have been described previously. Eight Alpine cross-bred female goats were divided into two equal groups, and were treated with ground frozen cassava leaves at a target dose of 6.0mg hydrogen cyanide (HCN)/kg/day (treated animals), or with ground hay and water only (control group) by gavage for 30 consecutive days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 7, 15, 21, and 30 for biochemical panel and cyanide determination. At the end of the experiment, fragments of pancreas, thyroid gland, liver, kidney, lungs, heart, spleen, and the whole central nervous system were collected for histopathological examination. Clinical signs were observed in all goats treated with cassava on the first day of the experiment. From the second day the dose of cassava leaves was reduced to 4.5mgHCN/kg/day. No changes were found in the blood chemical panel. A mild increase in the number of resorption vacuoles in the thyroid follicular colloid, slight vacuolation of periportal hepatocytes, and spongiosis of the mesencephalon were found in goats treated with cassava. The pattern of lesions seen in the present goats was similar to what has been described previously in cyanide-dosed goats. Thus, the toxic effects of the ingestion of cassava leaves by goats can be attributed to the action of cyanide released from cyanogenic glycosides, and none of the effects was promoted by these glycosides directly.

  1. A new index to assess chemicals increasing the greenhouse effect based on their toxicity to algae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Tian, Dayong; Gao, Ya; Lin, Zhifen; Liu, Ying; Kong, Lingyun

    2015-11-01

    CO2, as the typical greenhouse gas causing the greenhouse effect, is a major global environmental problem and has attracted increasing attention from governments. Using algae to eliminate CO2, which has been proposed as an effective way to reduce the greenhouse effect in the past decades, can be disturbed by a growing number of artificial chemicals. Thus, seven types of chemicals and Selenastrum capricornutum (algae) were examined in this study, and the good consistency between the toxicity of artificial chemicals to algae and the disturbance of carbon fixation by the chemicals was revealed. This consistency showed that the disturbance of an increasing number of artificial chemicals to the carbon fixation of algae might be a "malware" worsening the global greenhouse effect. Therefore, this study proposes an original, promising index to assess the risk of deepening the greenhouse effect by artificial chemicals before they are produced and marketed.

  2. Toxic substances: Effects on fish. January 1978-July 1989 (Citations from Pollution Abstracts). Report for January 1978-July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the biochemical and physiological effects of toxic substances on fish populations. Particular emphasis is placed on using fish as an indicator of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Toxicity effects of mercury, zinc, calcium chloride, sodium chloride, lead, cadmium, copper, and aluminum in freshwater and seawater fish are included. (This updated bibliography contains 330 citations, 66 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  3. Toxic substances: Effects on fish. January 1978-July 1989 (A Bibliography from Pollution Abstracts). Report for January 1978-July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the biochemical and physiological effects of toxic substances on fish populations. Particular emphasis is placed on using fish as an indicator of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Toxicity effects of mercury, zinc, calcium chloride, sodium chloride, lead, cadmium, copper, and aluminum in freshwater and seawater fish are included. (This updated bibliography contains 356 citations, 26 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  4. Toxic substances: effects on fish. January 1970-July 1988 (Citations from Pollution Abstracts). Report for January 1970-July 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the biochemical and physiological effects of toxic substances on fish populations. Particular emphasis is placed on using fish as an indicator of pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Toxicity effects of mercury, zinc, calcium chloride, sodium chloride, lead, cadmium, copper, and aluminum in freshwater and seawater fish are included. (This updated bibliography contains 264 citations, 24 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  5. Effects of organic amendments on the toxicity and bioavailability of cadmium and copper in spiked formulated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; May, T.W.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the partitioning and toxicity of cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) spiked into formulated sediments containing two types of organic matter (OM), i.e., cellulose and humus. Amendments of cellulose up to 12.5% total organic carbon (TOC) did not affect partitioning of Cd or Cu between sediment and pore water and did not significantly affect the toxicity of spiked sediments in acute toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca. In contrast, amendments of natural humus shifted the partitioning of both Cd and Cu toward greater concentrations in sediment and lesser concentrations in pore water and significantly reduced toxic effects of both metals. Thresholds for toxicity, based on measured metal concentrations in whole sediment, were greater for both Cd and Cu in sediments amended with a low level of humus (2.9% TOC) than in sediments without added OM. Amendments with a high level of humus (8.9% TOC) eliminated toxicity at the highest spike concentrations of both metals (sediment concentrations of 12.4 ??g Cd/g and 493 ??g Cu/g). Concentrations of Cd in pore water associated with acute toxicity were similar between sediments with and without humus amendments, suggesting that toxicity of Cd was reduced primarily by sorption to sediment OM. However, toxic effects of Cu in humus treatments were associated with greater pore-water concentrations than in controls, suggesting that toxicity of Cu was reduced both by sorption and by complexation with soluble ligands. Both sorption and complexation by OM tend to make proposed sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) based on total metal concentrations more protective for high-OM sediments. Our results suggest that the predictive ability of SQGs could be improved by models of metal interactions with natural OM in sediment and pore water.

  6. Toxic Synovitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Toxic Synovitis KidsHealth > For Parents > Toxic Synovitis A A A ... and causes no long-term problems. About Toxic Synovitis Toxic synovitis (also known as transient synovitis ) is ...

  7. Guarana (Paullinia cupana): toxic behavioral effects in laboratory animals and antioxidants activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mattei, R; Dias, R F; Espínola, E B; Carlini, E A; Barros, S B

    1998-03-01

    The effects on toxic and behavioral levels of guarana (Paullinia cupana) were assessed in rats and mice subsequent to acute and chronic administrations and were compared to those produced by Ginseng (Panax ginseng). Experimental parameters included tests for antioxidant capacity in vitro and measured in vivo, toxicological screening, progress in weight, motor activity, death rate, and histopathological examination of the viscera. Guarana showed an antioxidant effect because, even at low concentrations (1.2 microg/ml), it inhibited the process of lipid peroxidation. In high doses of 1000-2000 mg/kg (i.p. and p.o.) it did not induce significant alterations in parameters for toxicological screening. No effects on motor activity were observed, neither did guarana alter the hypnotic effect of pentobarbital. Ginseng (250-1000 mg/kg i.p.), however, elicited reductions in motor activity, eyelid ptosis and bristling fur. Consumption of liquids containing guarana or ginseng and progress in weight of the animals remained at levels similar to the controls, even after prolonged administration. The percentage mortality was equivalent in control and in treated groups. The absence of toxicity of guarana was also demonstrated by histopathological examination, with no alteration being detected in heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, liver, pancreas, kidneys, bladder and spleen.

  8. Cytoprotective effects of taurine against toxicity induced by isoniazid and hydrazine in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Reza; Babaei, Hossein; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2013-06-01

    Isoniazid is one of the most commonly used drugs to treat tuberculosis. Its administration is associated with a high incidence of hepatotoxicity. The aim of this study was to establish the protective effects of taurine against cytotoxicity induced by isoniazid and its suspected toxic metabolite hydrazine in isolated rat hepatocytes by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial depolarisation, reduced glutathione (GSH), and oxidised glutathione (GSSG). Isoniazid caused no significant ROS formation in normal hepatocytes, but in glutathione-depleted cells it was considerable. Hydrazine caused ROS formation and lipid peroxidation in both intact and glutathione-depleted cells. Both isoniazid and hydrazine caused mitochondrial membrane depolarisation. Hydrazine lowered cellular GSH reserve and increased GSSG. Taurine (200 μmol L(-1)) and N-acetylcysteine (200 μmol L(-1)) effectively countered the toxic effects of isoniazid and/or hydrazine by decreasing ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial damage. Taurine prevented depletion of GSH and lowered GSSG levels in hydrazine-treated cells. This study suggests that the protective effects of taurine against isoniazid and its intermediary metabolite hydrazine cytotoxicity in rat hepatocytes could be attributed to antioxidative action.

  9. Modifying effects of vitamin E on chlorpyrifos toxicity in atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Berntssen, Marc H G; Søfteland, Liv

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate how vitamin E (alpha tocopherol) may ameliorate the toxicity of the pesticide chlorpyrifos in Atlantic salmon. Freshly isolated hepatocytes were exposed to vitamin E, chlorpyrifos or a combination of vitamin E and chlorpyrifos (all 100 μM). Transcriptomics (RNA-seq) and metabolomics were used to screen for effects of vitamin E and chlorpyrifos. By introducing vitamin E, the number of upregulated transcripts induced by chlorpyrifos exposure was reduced from 941 to 626, while the number of downregulated transcripts was reduced from 901 to 742 compared to the control. Adding only vitamin E had no effect on the transcriptome. Jak-STAT signaling was the most significantly affected pathway by chlorpyrifos treatment according to the transcriptomics data. The metabolomics data showed that accumulation of multiple long chain fatty acids and dipeptides and amino acids in chlorpyrifos treated cells was partially alleviated by vitamin E treatment. Significant interaction effects between chlorpyrifos and vitamin E were seen for 15 metabolites, including 12 dipeptides. The antioxidant had relatively modest effects on chlorpyrifos-induced oxidative stress. By combining the two data sets, the study suggests that vitamin E supplementation prevents uptake and accumulation of fatty acids, and counteracts inhibited carbohydrate metabolism. Overall, this study shows that vitamin E only to a moderate degree modifies chlorpyrifos toxicity in Atlantic salmon liver cells.

  10. The Toxic Effect of Manganese on the Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Rat Brains

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi Babadi, Vahid; Sadeghi, Leila; Shirani, Kobra; Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Rezaei, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a naturally occurring element and an essential nutrient for humans and animals. However, exposure to high levels of Mn may cause neurotoxic effects. Accumulation of manganese damages central nervous system and causes Parkinson's disease-like syndrome called manganism. Mn neurotoxicity has been suggested to involve an imbalance between the DAergic and cholinergic systems. The pathological mechanisms associated with Mn neurotoxicity are poorly understood, but several reports have established it is mediated by changing of AChE activity that resulted in oxidative stress. Therefore we focused the effect of Mn in AChE activity in the rat's brain by MnCl2 injection intraperitoneally and analyzed their brains after time intervals. This study used different acute doses in short time course and different chronic doses at different exposing time to investigate which of them (exposing dose or time) is more important in Mn toxic effect. Results showed toxic effect of Mn is highly dose dependent and AChE activity in presence of chronic dose in 8 weeks reaches acute dose in only 2 days. PMID:25246936

  11. Toxic effects of the interaction of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with chemicals or physical factors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kui; Lin, Xialu; Zhao, Jinshun

    2013-01-01

    Due to their chemical stability and nonallergic, nonirritant, and ultraviolet protective properties, titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely used in industries such as electronics, optics, and material sciences, as well as architecture, medicine, and pharmacology. However, increasing concerns have been raised in regards to its ecotoxicity and toxicity on the aquatic environment as well as to humans. Although insights have been gained into the effects of TiO2 NPs on susceptible biological systems, there is still much ground to be covered, particularly in respect of our knowledge of the effects of the interaction of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors. Studies suggest that interactions of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors may result in an increase in toxicity or adverse effects. This review highlights recent progress in the study of the interactive effects of TiO2 NPs with other chemicals or physical factors. PMID:23901269

  12. Effect of synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) on the toxicity of some essential oils against mosquito larvae.

    PubMed

    Yadav, S; Mittal, P K; Saxena, P N; Singh, R K

    2008-12-01

    Effect of a known synergist piperonyl butoxide on the toxicity of steam distillate essential oils of Jamarosa (Cymbopogan nardus), Pacholli (Pogostemon pacholli), Basil (Ocimum basilicum), and Peppermint (Mentha pipreta) plant species against Anopheles stephensi larvae were evaluated. The purpose of the present study was to identify the insecticidal potential of these oils against mosquito larvae. The Piperonyl Butoxide (PBO) was used to enhance the activity of these oils with the aim of developing essential oil based formulations. The bioassays of these oils with and without PBO were performed against late 3rd instar larvae of An. stephensi. The LC50 values against An. stephensi were 44.19 ppm for Ocimum basilicum oil, followed by, Mentha pipreta, Cymbopogan nardus, and Pogostemon pacholli oil which gave LC50 values above 250 ppm. Thus in the present study the Ocimum basilicum oil was found to be most effective, whereas Pogostemon pacholli oil was found to least effective against mosquitoes for larvicidal action. The effect of synergist PBO led to the enhancement of toxicity of oils, the LC50 value for Ocimum basilicum were reduced from 44.19 ppm to 23.87 ppm. Similarly the oil of Pogostemon pacholli showed most significant results where the LC50 value was >250 ppm it was reduced to 50 ppm with PBO.

  13. Effect of synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) on the toxicity of some essential oils against mosquito larvae.

    PubMed

    Yadav, S; Mittal, P K; Saxena, P N; Singh, R K

    2009-03-01

    Effect of a known synergist piperonyl butoxide on the toxicity of steam distillate essential oils of Jamarosa (Cymbopogan nardus), Pacholli (Pogostemon pacholli), Basil (Ocimum basilicum), and Peppermint (Mentha pipreta) plant species against Anopheles stephensi larvae were evaluated. The purpose of the present study was to identify the insecticidal potential of these oils against mosquito larvae. The Piperonyl Butoxide (PBO) was used to enhance the activity of these oils with the aim of developing essential oil based formulations. The bioassays of these oils with and without PBO were performed against late 3rd instar larvae of An. stephensi. The LC50 values against An. stephensi were 44.19 ppm for Ocimum basilicum oil, followed by, Mentha pipreta, Cymbopogan nardus, and Pogostemon pacholli oil which gave LC50 values above 250 ppm. Thus in the present study the Ocimum basilicum oil was found to be most effective, whereas Pogostemon pacholli oil was found to least effective against mosquitoes for larvicidal action. The effect of synergist PBO led to the enhancement of toxicity of oils, the LC50 value for Ocimum basilicum were reduced from 44.19 ppm to 23.87 ppm. Similarly the oil of Pogostemon pacholli showed most significant results where the LC50 value was > 250 ppm it was reduced to 50 ppm with PBO.

  14. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng Cao, Zhifei

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Dehydroeffusol markedly inhibits gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry. • Dehydroeffusol suppresses the expression of vasculogenic mimicry key gene VE-cadherin. • Dehydroeffusol decreases the MMP2 expression and activity in gastric cancer cells. • Dehydroeffusol is a potential anti-cancer drug candidate with very low toxicity.

  15. The protective effects of methyl jasmonate against adriamycin--induced hepatic and renal toxicities.

    PubMed

    Kosoko, A M; Molokwu, C J; Farombi, E O; Ademowo, O G

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the protective effect of methyl jasmonate (MJ) in adriamycin (ADR) induced hepatic and renal toxicities. 36 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into control, ADR (20 mg/kg), MJ (50 mg/kg) only, MJ (100 mg/kg) only, MJ (50 mg/ kg) + ADR, MJ (100 mg/kg) + ADR groups (n = 6). The 2 doses of MJ was administered for 7 days in MJ only groups, ADR was administered intraperitoneally on the 8th day after pretreatment with the 2 different doses of MJ while ADR was administered on the 8th day only for the ADR only group. The malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), H2O2 generation, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), urea and creatinine in the liver, kidneys and serum samples as applicable were estimated. Tissue MDA, H2O2 generation, and GST activity were markedly elevated while GSH content, CAT and SOD activities were significantly reduced in the tissues when compared to the control (p < 0.05). Pretreatment with MJ ameliorated ADR toxicities, with a significant reduction in serum urea concentration, ALT activity, MDA level, H2O2 generation, GST activity and a significant elevation in GSH content, CAT and SOD activities in the organ tissues. MJ induced significant reduction in MDA level and increase of GSH content in liver and kidney tissues. This study suggests that MJ may play an overall protective effect on ADR-induced toxicities in liver and kidneys and the inhibition of tissue peroxidative damage might contribute to this beneficial effect.

  16. Protective effects of selenium on cadmium toxicity in rats: Role of altered toxicokinetics and metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Wahba, Z.Z.; Coogan, T.P.; Rhodes, S.W.; Waalkes, M.P. )

    1993-02-01

    Selenium prevents the toxicity of the carcinogenic metal cadmium through undefined mechanisms. In this study, the authors determined the effects of selenium on cadmium toxicokinetics and on the ability of cadmium to induce metallothionein, a metal-binding protein that is thought to confer tolerance to cadmium toxicity. To assess the acute protective effects of selenium, male Wistar (WF/NCr) rats were given selenium (as SeO[sub 2]; 10 [mu]mol/kg, sc) at [minus]24, 0, and +24 h relative to cadmium (as CdCl[sub 2]; 45 [mu]mol/kg, sc). Over a 14-d period this dose of cadmium killed 6 out of 10 rats, while 100% of the cadmium-treated rats given concurrent selenium treatments survived. The acute increases in testicular weight that were seen with cadmium, indicative of edematous damage, were also prevented by concurrent selenium treatments. Further studies assessed the distribution and excretion of cadmium and its ability to induce metallothionein in rats given 40 [mu]mol Cd/kg, sc, at time 0 and selenium (10 [mu]mol/kg, sc) at [minus]24 and 0 h. Selenium treatments enhanced cadmium accumulation at 24 h in the liver (23%), testes (145%), and epididymis (35%) but reduced renal accumulation by more than half. Urine samples, collected at 0-3, 3-6, and 6-24 h following cadmium administration, indicted a markedly reduced excretion of cadmium in selenium treated rats during all time periods. The synthesis of metallothionein was stimulated to a much lesser extent by cadmium in selenium-treated rat kidney (41% decrease) but was unaffected in liver. The levels of cadmium-binding proteins within the testes were markedly reduced by cadmium treatment, an effect unmodified by selenium treatments. These results suggest selenium prevents acute cadmium toxicity through a mechanism that does not involve induction of metallothionein and in spite of a markedly enhanced retention of cadmium. 50 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Effect of species, life stage, and water temperature on the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rach, J.J.; Schreier, T.M.; Howe, G.E.; Redman, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a drug of low regulatory priority status that is effective in treating fish and fish eggs infected by fungi. However, only limited information is available to guide fish culturists in administering hydrogen peroxide to diseased fish. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine (1) the sensitivity of brown trout Salmo trutta, lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, walleye Stizostedion vitreum, channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, and bluegill Lepomis, machrochirus to hydrogen peroxide treatments; (2) the sensitivity of various life stages of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to hydrogen peroxide treatments; and (3) the effect of water temperature on the acute toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to three fish species. Fish were exposed to hydrogen peroxide concentrations ranging from 100 to 5,000 mu L/L (ppm) for 15-min or 45-min treatments every other day for four consecutive treatments to determine the sensitivity of various species and life stages of fish. Except for walleye, most species of fish tested (less than or equal to 2 g) tolerated hydrogen peroxide of 1,000 mu L/L or greater. Walleyes were sensitive to hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 100 mu L/L. A correlation was found between the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide and the life stages of rainbow trout; larger fish were more sensitive. Generally, the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide increased for all species as water temperature increased. The results of these experiments demonstrate that it is important to consider the effects of species, life stage, and water temperature when conducting hydrogen peroxide treatments.

  18. Effects of nitrogen and helium on CNS oxygen toxicity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Arieli, R; Ertracht, O; Oster, I; Vitenstein, A; Adir, Y

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of inert gases to the risk of central nervous system (CNS) oxygen toxicity is a matter of controversy. Therefore, diving regulations apply strict rules regarding permissible oxygen pressures (Po(2)). We studied the effects of nitrogen and helium (0, 15, 25, 40, 50, and 60%) and different levels of Po(2) (507, 557, 608, and 658 kPa) on the latency to the first electrical discharge (FED) in the EEG in rats, with repeated measurements in each animal. Latency as a function of the nitrogen pressure was not homogeneous for each rat. The prolongation of latency observed in some rats at certain nitrogen pressures, mostly in the range 100 to 500 kPa, was superimposed on the general trend for a reduction in latency as nitrogen pressure increased. This pattern was an individual trait. In contrast with nitrogen, no prolongation of latency to CNS oxygen toxicity was observed with helium, where an increase in helium pressure caused a reduction in latency. This bimodal response and the variation in the response between rats, together with a possible effect of ambient temperature on metabolic rate, may explain the conflicting findings reported in the literature. The difference between the two inert gases may be related to the difference in the narcotic effect of nitrogen. Proof through further research of a correlation between individual sensitivity to nitrogen narcosis and protection by N(2) against CNS oxygen toxicity in rat may lead to a personal O(2) limit in mixed-gas diving based on the diver sensitivity to N(2) narcosis.

  19. Toxic effect of the glycoalkaloids solanine and tomatine on cultured neonatal rat heart cells.

    PubMed

    Bergers, W W; Alink, G M

    1980-06-01

    The toxic effects of the glycoalkaloids, alpha-solanine and tomatine, were studied in beating heart cell cultures from 1--2-day-old rats. After addition of alpha-solanine (80 microgram/ml) and tomatine (40 microgram/ml) to the culture medium, the cells ceased beating within a few minutes. At a concentration of 40 microgram/ml alpha-solanine and 20 microgram/ml tomatine, both compounds caused a pronounced increase of the contraction frequency, lasting for at least 2h. K-strophantin, a reference heart glycoside, caused arrhythmic beating at 20 microgram/ml and complete cessation of contractions at 160 microgram/ml.

  20. PIXE analysis for the study of toxic effects of aluminium in vines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B. R.; Le Roux, E.; Renan, M. J.; Peisach, M.

    1984-04-01

    Elemental concentrations of Mg, A1, Si, P, S, Cl, K and Ca were determined by PIXE in various parts of grape vines grown in a Hoagland water culture with and without added aluminium. The presence of Al enhanced the uptake of P, S and K in leaves and stems, but depressed Mg and Ca. In the roots the Al concentration was very high, while that of Mg was reduced compared to the control samples. The toxic effects of aluminium produced symptoms reminiscent of calcium deficiency.