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Sample records for pacific plate boundary

  1. Role of Transtension in Rifting at the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Transtensional plate motion can be accommodated either in a localized zone of transtensional rifting or over a broader region. Broader zones of deformation can be classified either as diffuse deformation or strain partitioning (one or more major strike-slip shear zones geographically offset from a region of a extensional faulting). The Pacific-North America plate boundary in southwestern North America was transtensional during much of its history and has exhibited the full range of these behaviors at different spatial scales and in different locations, as recorded by fault motions and paleomagnetic rotations. Here we focus on the northern Gulf of California part of the plate boundary (Upper and Lower Delfin basin segments), which has been in a zone of transtensional Pacific-North America plate boundary motion ever since the middle Miocene demise of adjacent Farallon-derived microplates. Prior to the middle Miocene, during the time of microplate activity, this sector of North America experienced basin-and-range normal faults (core complexes) in Sonora. However there is no evidence of continued extensional faulting nor of a Gulf-related topographic depression until after ca 12 Ma when a major ignimbrite (Tuff of San Felipe/ Ignimbrite of Hermosillo) was deposited across the entire region of the future Gulf of California rift in this sector. After 12 Ma, faults disrupted this marker bed in eastern Baja California and western Sonora, and some major NNW-striking right-lateral faults are inferred to have developed near the Sonoran coast causing offset of some of the volcanic facies. However, there are major tectonic rotations of the volcanic rocks in NE Baja California between 12 and 6 Ma, suggesting that the plate boundary motion was still occurring over a broad region. By contrast, after about 6 Ma, diminished rotations in latest Miocene and Pliocene volcanic rocks, as well as fault slip histories, show that plate boundary deformation became localized to a narrower

  2. Subcontinental-scale crustal velocity changes along the Pacific-North America plate boundary.

    PubMed

    Davis, J L; Wernicke, B P; Bisnath, S; Niemi, N A; Elósegui, P

    2006-06-29

    Transient tectonic deformation has long been noted within approximately 100 km of plate boundary fault zones and within active volcanic regions, but it is unknown whether transient motions also occur at larger scales within plates. Relatively localized transients are known to occur as both seismic and episodic aseismic events, and are generally ascribed to motions of magma bodies, aseismic creep on faults, or elastic or viscoelastic effects associated with earthquakes. However, triggering phenomena and systematic patterns of seismic strain release at subcontinental (approximately 1,000 km) scale along diffuse plate boundaries have long suggested that energy transfer occurs at larger scale. Such transfer appears to occur by the interaction of stresses induced by surface wave propagation and magma or groundwater in the crust, or from large-scale stress diffusion within the oceanic mantle in the decades following clusters of great earthquakes. Here we report geodetic evidence for a coherent, subcontinental-scale change in tectonic velocity along a diffuse approximately 1,000-km-wide deformation zone. Our observations are derived from continuous GPS (Global Positioning System) data collected over the past decade across the Basin and Range province, which absorbs approximately 25 per cent of Pacific-North America relative plate motion. The observed changes in site velocity define a sharp boundary near the centre of the province oriented roughly parallel to the north-northwest relative plate motion vector. We show that sites to the west of this boundary slowed relative to sites east of it by approximately 1 mm yr(-1) starting in late 1999.

  3. Deformation of the Pacific/North America plate boundary at Queen Charlotte Fault: The possible role of rheology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Miller, Nathaniel; Andrews, Brian; Brothers, Daniel; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2018-01-01

    The Pacific/North America (PA/NA) plate boundary between Vancouver Island and Alaska is similar to the PA/NA boundary in California in its kinematic history and the rate and azimuth of current relative motion, yet their deformation styles are distinct. The California plate boundary shows a broad zone of parallel strike slip and thrust faults and folds, whereas the 49‐mm/yr PA/NA relative plate motion in Canada and Alaska is centered on a single, narrow, continuous ~900‐km‐long fault, the Queen Charlotte Fault (QCF). Using gravity analysis, we propose that this plate boundary is centered on the continent/ocean boundary (COB), an unusual location for continental transform faults because plate boundaries typically localize within the continental lithosphere, which is weaker. Because the COB is a boundary between materials of contrasting elastic properties, once a fault is established there, it will probably remain stable. We propose that deformation progressively shifted to the COB in the wake of Yakutat terrane's northward motion along the margin. Minor convergence across the plate boundary is probably accommodated by fault reactivation on Pacific crust and by an eastward dipping QCF. Underthrusting of Pacific slab under Haida Gwaii occurs at convergence angles >14°–15° and may have been responsible for the emergence of the archipelago. The calculated slab entry dip (5°–8°) suggests that the slab probably does not extend into the asthenosphere. The PA/NA plate boundary at the QCF can serve as a structurally simple site to investigate the impact of rheology and composition on crustal deformation and the initiation of slab underthrusting.

  4. Origin of methane-rich natural gas at the West Pacific convergent plate boundary.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yuji; Kinoshita, Naoya; Kagoshima, Takanori; Takahata, Naoto; Sakata, Susumu; Toki, Tomohiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Waseda, Amane; Lan, Tefang; Wen, Hsinyi; Chen, Ai-Ti; Lee, Hsiaofen; Yang, Tsanyao F; Zheng, Guodong; Tomonaga, Yama; Roulleau, Emilie; Pinti, Daniele L

    2017-11-15

    Methane emission from the geosphere is generally characterized by a radiocarbon-free signature and might preserve information on the deep carbon cycle on Earth. Here we report a clear relationship between the origin of methane-rich natural gases and the geodynamic setting of the West Pacific convergent plate boundary. Natural gases in the frontal arc basin (South Kanto gas fields, Northeast Japan) show a typical microbial signature with light carbon isotopes, high CH 4 /C 2 H 6 and CH 4 / 3 He ratios. In the Akita-Niigata region - which corresponds to the slope stretching from the volcanic-arc to the back-arc -a thermogenic signature characterize the gases, with prevalence of heavy carbon isotopes, low CH 4 /C 2 H 6 and CH 4 / 3 He ratios. Natural gases from mud volcanoes in South Taiwan at the collision zone show heavy carbon isotopes, middle CH 4 /C 2 H 6 ratios and low CH 4 / 3 He ratios. On the other hand, those from the Tokara Islands situated on the volcanic front of Southwest Japan show the heaviest carbon isotopes, middle CH 4 /C 2 H 6 ratios and the lowest CH 4 / 3 He ratios. The observed geochemical signatures of natural gases are clearly explained by a mixing of microbial, thermogenic and abiotic methane. An increasing contribution of abiotic methane towards more tectonically active regions of the plate boundary is suggested.

  5. Pacific-North America plate boundary reorganization in response to a change in relative plate motion: Offshore Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohr, K. M. M.; Tryon, A. J.

    2010-06-01

    The transition from subduction in Cascadia to the transform Queen Charlotte fault along western Canada is often drawn as a subduction zone, yet recent studies of GPS and earthquake data from northern Vancouver Island are not consistent with that model. In this paper we synthesize seismic reflection and gravity interpretations with microseismicity data in order to test models of (1) microplate subduction and (2) reorganization of the preexisting strike-slip plate boundary. We focus on the critical region of outer Queen Charlotte Sound and the adjacent offshore. On much of the continental shelf, several million years of subsidence above thin crust are a counterindicator for subduction. An undated episode of compression uplifted the southernmost shelf, but subsidence patterns offshore show that recent subduction is unlikely to be responsible. Previously unremarked near-vertical faults and a mix of extensional and compressional faults offshore indicate that strike-slip faulting has been a significant mode of deformation. Seismicity in the last 18 years is dominantly strike-slip and shows large amounts of moment release on the Revere-Dellwood fault and its overlap with the Queen Charlotte fault. The relative plate motion between the Pacific and North American plates rotated clockwise ˜6 Ma and appears to have triggered formation of an evolving array of structures. We suggest that the paleo-Queen Charlotte fault which had defined this continental margin retreated northward as offshore distributed shear and the newly formed Revere Dellwood fault propagated to the northwest.

  6. The Baja California Borderland and the Neogene Evolution of the Pacific-North American Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, J. M.; Eakins, B. W.

    2001-12-01

    New observational data on Neogene faulting in the borderland of Baja California places important constraints on tectonic models for the evolution of the Pacific-North American (P-NA) plate boundary and rifting in the Gulf of California. Neogene faults in the borderland range from strike slip to normal slip and accommodate integrated transtension. Most have east-facing escarpments and likely reactivate the former east-dipping accretionary complex. Numerous lines of evidence indicate that Neogene faults are still active and accomplish a significant component ( ~1-5 mm/yr) of Pacific-North American shearing. Quaternary volcanoes are found offshore and along the Pacific coastal margin, Quaternary marine terraces are warped and uplifted as high as 200 masl. Many of the offshore faults have fresh escarpments and cut Holocene sediments. Extensive arrays of Quaternary fault scarps are found throughout the coastal region and in Bahia Magdalena they are clearly associated with major faults that bound recently uplifted islands. A prominent band of seismicity follows the coast and eight earthquakes (Ms>5.0) were teleseismically recorded between 1973 and 1998. This evidence for active shearing indicates that the Baja microplate has not yet been completely transferred to the Pacific plate. The best lithologic correlation that can be used to define the total Neogene slip across the borderland faults is the offset between the Magdalena submarine fan and its Baja source terrane. The distal facies of the fan drilled during DSDP leg 63 is dominated by mudstone and siltstone that contain reworked Paleogene cocoliths derived from strata correlative with the Tepetate formation found throughout the borderland and fine-grained sandstone derived from a source terrane of granitoid basement. The Middle Miocene La Calera formation of the Cabo trough is one of many granitoid-clast syn-rift alluvial deposits that could form the continental counterpart of the submarine fan near the mouth of the

  7. A Geodetic Strain Rate Model for the Pacific-North American Plate Boundary, western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, C.; Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Holland, A. A.; Bennett, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    We present a model of crustal strain rates derived from GPS measurements of horizontal station velocities in the Pacific-North American plate boundary in the western United States. The model reflects a best estimate of present-day deformation from the San Andreas fault system in the west to the Basin and Range province in the east. Of the total 2,846 GPS velocities used in the model, 1,197 are derived by ourselves, and 1,649 are taken from (mostly) published results. The velocities derived by ourselves (the "UNR solution") are estimated from GPS position time-series of continuous and semi-continuous stations for which data are publicly available. We estimated ITRF2005 positions from 2002-2011.5 using JPL's GIPSY-OASIS II software with ambiguity resolution applied using our custom Ambizap software. Only stations with time-series that span at least 2.25 years are considered. We removed from the time-series continental-scale common-mode errors using a spatially-varying filtering technique. Velocity uncertainties (typically 0.1-0.3 mm/yr) assume that the time-series contain flicker plus white noise. We used a subset of stations on the stable parts of the Pacific and North American plates to estimate the Pacific-North American pole of rotation. This pole is applied as a boundary condition to the model and the North American - ITRF2005 pole is used to rotate our velocities into a North America fixed reference frame. We do not include parts of the time-series that show curvature due to post-seismic deformation after major earthquakes and we also exclude stations whose time-series display a significant unexplained non-linearity or that are near volcanic centers. Transient effects longer than the observation period (i.e., slow viscoelastic relaxation) are left in the data. We added to the UNR solution velocities from 12 other studies. The velocities are transformed onto the UNR solution's reference frame by estimating and applying a translation and rotation that minimizes

  8. Identifying Fault Connections of the Southern Pacific-North American Plate Boundary Using Triggered Slip and Crustal Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnellan, A.; Grant Ludwig, L.; Rundle, J. B.; Parker, J. W.; Granat, R.; Heflin, M. B.; Pierce, M. E.; Wang, J.; Gunson, M.; Lyzenga, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    The 2010 M7.2 El Mayor - Cucapah earthquake caused extensive triggering of slip on faults proximal to the Salton Trough in southern California. Triggered slip and postseismic motions that have continued for over five years following the earthquake highlight connections between the El Mayor - Cucapah rupture and the network of faults that branch out along the southern Pacific - North American Plate Boundary. Coseismic triggering follows a network of conjugate faults from the northern end of the rupture to the Coachella segment of the southernmost San Andreas fault. Larger aftershocks and postseismic motions favor connections to the San Jacinto and Elsinore faults further west. The 2012 Brawley Swarm can be considered part of the branching on the Imperial Valley or east side of the plate boundary. Cluster analysis of long-term GPS velocities using Lloyds Algorithm, identifies bifurcation of the Pacific - North American plate boundary; The San Jacinto fault joins with the southern San Andreas fault, and the Salton Trough and Coachella segment of the San Andreas fault join with the Eastern California Shear Zone. The clustering analysis does not identify throughgoing deformation connecting the Coachella segment of the San Andreas fault with the rest of the San Andreas fault system through the San Gorgonio Pass. This observation is consistent with triggered slip from both the 1992 Landers and 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah earthquakes that follows the plate boundary bifurcation and with paleoseismic evidence of smaller earthquakes in the San Gorgonio Pass.

  9. How do long-offset oceanic transforms adapt to plate motion changes? The example of the Western Pacific-Antarctic plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodolo, Emanuele; Coren, Franco; Ben-Avraham, Zvi

    2013-03-01

    Oceanic transform faults respond to changes in the direction of relative plate motion. Studies have shown that short-offset transforms generally adjust with slight bends near the ridge axis, while long-offset ones have a remarkably different behavior. The western Pacific-Antarctic plate boundary highlights these differences. A set of previously unpublished seismic profiles, in combination with magnetic anomaly identifications, shows how across a former, ~1250 km long transform (the Emerald Fracture Zone), plate motion changes have produced a complex geometric readjustment. Three distinct sections are recognized along this plate boundary: an eastern section, characterized by parallel, multiple fault strand lineaments; a central section, shallower than the rest of the ridge system, overprinted by a mantle plume track; and a western section, organized in a cascade of short spreading axes/transform lineaments. This configuration was produced by changes that occurred since 30 Ma in the Australia-Pacific relative plate motion, combined with a gradual clockwise change in Pacific-Antarctic plate motion. These events caused extension along the former Emerald Fracture Zone, originally linking the Pacific-Antarctic spreading ridge system with the Southeast Indian ridge. Then an intra-transform propagating ridge started to develop in response to a ~6 Ma change in the Pacific-Antarctic spreading direction. The close proximity of the Euler poles of rotation amplified the effects of the geometric readjustments that occurred along the transform system. This analysis shows that when a long-offset transform older than 20 Ma is pulled apart by changes in spreading velocity vectors, it responds with the development of multiple discrete, parallel fault strands, whereas in younger lithosphere, locally modified by thermal anisotropies, tensional stresses generate an array of spreading axes offset by closely spaced transforms.

  10. North America-Pacific plate boundary, an elastic-plastic megashear - Evidence from very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Steven N.

    1988-01-01

    Data obtained by Mark III VLBI measurements of radio signals from permanent and mobile VLBI sites for 5.5 years of observations, starting in October 1982, were used to derive a picture of the earth crust deformation near the North America-Pacific plate boundary. The data, which included the vector positions of the VLBI sites and their rate of change, were used for comparison with a number of lithospheric deformation models based upon the concept that the motions of points near the North America-Pacific plate boundary are a linear combination of North America and Pacific velocities. The best of these models were found to fit 95 percent of the variance in 139 VLBI length and transverse velocity observations. Instantaneous shear deformation associated with plate tectonics is apparently developing in a zone 450 km wide paralleling the San Andreas Fault; some of this deformation will be recovered through elastic rebound, while the rest will be permanently set through plastic processes. Because the VLBI data have not been collected for a significant fraction of the earthquake cycle, they cannot discriminate between elastic and plastic behaviors.

  11. Rayleigh phase velocities in the upper mantle of the Pacific-North American plate boundary in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, L.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Kohler, M. D.

    2013-05-01

    The Pacific-North America plate boundary, located in Southern California, presents an opportunity to study a unique tectonic process that has been shaping the plate tectonic setting of the western North American and Mexican Pacific margin since the Miocene. This is one of the few locations where the interaction between a migrating oceanic spreading center and a subduction zone can be studied. The rapid subduction of the Farallon plate outpaced the spreading rate of the East Pacific Rise rift system causing it to be subducted beneath southern California and northern Mexico 30 Ma years ago. The details of microplate capture, reorganization, and lithospheric deformation on both the Pacific and North American side of this boundary is not well understood, but may have important implications for fault activity, stresses, and earthquake hazard analysis both onshore and offshore. We use Rayleigh waves recorded by an array of 34 ocean bottom seismometers deployed offshore southern California for a 12 month duration from August 2010 to 2011. Our array recorded teleseismic earthquakes at distances ranging from 30° to 120° with good signal-to-noise ratios for magnitudes Mw ≥ 5.9. The events exhibit good azimuthal distribution and enable us to solve simultaneously for Rayleigh wave phase velocities and azimuthal anisotropy. Fewer events occur at NE back-azimuths due to the lack of seismicity in central North America. We consider seismic periods between 18 - 90 seconds. The inversion technique considers non-great circle path propagation by representing the arriving wave field as two interfering plane waves. This takes advantage of statistical averaging of a large number of paths that travel offshore southern California and northern Mexico allowing for improved resolution and parameterization of lateral seismic velocity variations at lithospheric and sublithospheric depths. We present phase velocity results for periods sampling mantle structure down to 150 km depth along the

  12. Electromagnetic imaging the of the Pacific-North American plate boundary in central California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelock, B. D.; Constable, S.; Key, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    The continental margin of central California lies adjacent to a segment of the San Andreas fault (SAF) that exhibits a transition between locked behavior south of the town of Cholame, and freely slipping (creeping) behavior north of the town of Parkfield. Recent reports of non-volcanic tremor (NVT) near the town of Cholame represent the first observation of NVT in a strike-slip environment. Dense clusters of tremor episodes located at the northern limit of the locked section of the SAF were found to originate within the ductile lower crust at depths between 15 and 30~km, and have been interpreted as evidence of high pore fluid pressure. An excess of fluids in this region is likely given its history of subduction, which transports large quantities of water into the forearc crust and mantle. We present a study that uses deep electromagnetic imaging methods to estimate the abundance and distribution of pore fluids at depths associated with non-volcanic tremor. This study extends a previously collected terrestrial profile of magnetotelluric (MT) data (Becken et al. 2008, Geophysical Journal International) into the offshore environment. We deployed 21 seafloor instruments that collected controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) and MT data in a line extending from the coast near Morro Bay, across the continental shelf, and out onto the Pacific plate. The marine MT data results in apparent resistivity and phase estimates at periods between 1~s and 20,000~s, sufficient for probing the upper 100~km of regional conductivity. A significant coast effect, marked by asymptotic behavior in the TE mode of the MT responses, is observed at the deep water sites. This necessitates accurate bathymetry modeling when inverting. The CSEM transmitter was towed by all receivers broadcasting a compact broadband binary waveform with a 0.25~Hz fundamental frequency. The controlled-source signal is observed above the noisefloor at source-receiver offsets up to 6~km, which provides constraints

  13. Thermochronology, Uplift and Erosion at the Australian-Pacific Plate Boundary Alpine Fault restraining bend, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagar, M. W.; Seward, D.; Norton, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    The 650 km-long Australian-Pacific plate boundary Alpine Fault is remarkably straight at a regional scale, except for a prominent S-shaped bend in the northern South Island. This is a restraining bend and has been referred to as the `Big Bend' due to similarities with the Transverse Ranges section of the San Andreas Fault. The Alpine Fault is the main source of seismic hazard in the South Island, yet there are no constraints on slip rates at the Big Bend. Furthermore, the timing of Big Bend development is poorly constrained to the Miocene. To address these issues we are using the fission-track (FT) and 40Ar/39Ar thermochronometers, together with basin-averaged cosmogenic nuclide 10Be concentrations to constrain the onset and rate of Neogene-Quaternary exhumation of the Australian and Pacific plates at the Big Bend. Exhumation rates at the Big Bend are expected to be greater than those for adjoining sections of the Alpine Fault due to locally enhanced shortening. Apatite FT ages and modelled thermal histories indicate that exhumation of the Australian Plate had begun by 13 Ma and 3 km of exhumation has occurred since that time, requiring a minimum exhumation rate of 0.2 mm/year. In contrast, on the Pacific Plate, zircon FT cooling ages suggest ≥7 km of exhumation in the past 2-3 Ma, corresponding to a minimum exhumation rate of 2 mm/year. Preliminary assessment of stream channel gradients either side of the Big Bend suggests equilibrium between uplift and erosion. The implication of this is that Quaternary erosion rates estimated from 10Be concentrations will approximate uplift rates. These uplift rates will help to better constrain the dip-slip rate of the Alpine Fault, which will allow the National Seismic Hazard Model to be updated.

  14. Upper-Mantel Earthquakes in the Australia-Pacific Plate Boundary Zone and the Roots of the Alpine Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boese, C. M.; Warren-Smith, E.; Townend, J.; Stern, T. A.; Lamb, S. H.

    2016-12-01

    Seismicity in the upper mantle in continental collision zones is relatively rare, but observed around the world. Temporary seismometer deployments have repeatedly detected mantle earthquakes at depths of 40-100 km within the Australia-Pacific plate boundary zone beneath the South Island of New Zealand. Here, the transpressive Alpine Fault constitutes the primary plate boundary structure linking subduction zones of opposite polarity farther north and south. The Southern Alps Microearthquake Borehole Array (SAMBA) has been operating continuously since November 2008 along a 50 km-long section of the central Alpine Fault, where the rate of uplift of the Southern Alps is highest. To date it has detected more than 40 small to moderate-sized mantle events (1≤ML≤3.9). The Central Otago Seismic Array (COSA) has been in operation since late 2012 and detected 15 upper mantle events along the sub-vertical southern Alpine Fault. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the occurrence of upper mantle seismicity in the South Island, including intra-continental subduction (Reyners 1987, Geology); high shear-strain gradients due to depressed geotherms and viscous deformation of mantle lithosphere (Kohler and Eberhart-Phillips 2003, BSSA); high strain rates resulting from plate bending (Boese et al. 2013, EPSL), and underthrusting of the Australian plate (Lamb et al. 2015, G3). Focal mechanism analysis reveals a variety of mechanisms for the upper mantle events but predominantly strike-slip and reverse faulting. In this study, we apply spectral analysis to better constrain source parameters for these mantle events. These results are interpreted in conjunction with new information about crustal structure and low-frequency earthquakes near the Moho and in light of existing velocity, attenuation and resistivity models.

  15. Transients in Pacific/North American Plate Boundary Deformation: Synthesis and Modeling of GPS and Borehole Strain Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Frey, H. V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is the Final Technical Report on research conducted between 1 June 1997 and 14 September 2001 entitled "Transients in Pacific/North American plate boundary deformation: Synthesis and modeling of GPS and borehole strain observations." As the project title implies, our effort involved a geodetic study of strain transients, i.e., temporal variations in deformation rates, that occur within plate boundary zones and their relationship to earthquakes and plate motions. Important transients occur during and following large earthquakes, and there are also strain transients not apparently associated with earthquakes. A particularly intriguing class of transients, for which there is a modest but growing list of examples, are preseismic anomalies. Such earthquake precursors, if further documented and understood, would have obvious importance for earthquake hazard mitigation. Because the timescales for these diverse transients range over at least 6 orders of magnitude (minutes to years), no single geodetic technique is optimum. We therefore undertook a systematic synthesis of Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) and borehole strainmeter data in three areas in California where there are adequate numbers of both types of instruments (or their equivalent): the San Francisco Bay region (within the Bay Area Regional Deformation network), southern California (within the Southern California Integrated GPS Network), and Parkfield (where a two-color laser system provides a proxy for continuous GPS measurements). An integral component of our study was the elucidation of the physical mechanisms by which such transients occur and propagate. We therefore initiated the development of multiple forward models, using two independent approaches. In the first, we explored the response to specified earthquake slip in viscoelastic models that incorporated failure criteria and the geometry of major faults in California. In the second approach, we examined the dynamical response of a complex

  16. Tectonic Evolution of the Jurassic Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, M.; Ishihara, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the tectonic evolution of the Jurassic Pacific plate based on magnetic anomly lineations and abyssal hills. The Pacific plate is the largest oceanic plate on Earth. It was born as a microplate aroud the Izanagi-Farallon-Phoenix triple junction about 192 Ma, Early Jurassic [Nakanishi et al., 1992]. The size of the Pacific plate at 190 Ma was nearly half that of the present Easter or Juan Fernandez microplates in the East Pacific Rise [Martinez et at, 1991; Larson et al., 1992]. The plate boundary surrounding the Pacific plate from Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous involved the four triple junctions among Pacific, Izanagi, Farallon, and Phoenix plates. The major tectonic events as the formation of oceanic plateaus and microplates during the period occurred in the vicinity of the triple junctions [e.g., Nakanishi and Winterer, 1998; Nakanishi et al., 1999], implying that the study of the triple junctions is indispensable for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Pacific plate. Previous studies indicate instability of the configuration of the triple junctions from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (155-125 Ma). On the other hand, the age of the birth of the Pacific plate was determined assuming that all triple junctions had kept their configurations for about 30 m.y. [Nakanishi et al., 1992] because of insufficient information of the tectonic history of the Pacific plate before Late Jurassic.Increase in the bathymetric and geomagnetic data over the past two decades enables us to reveal the tectonic evolution of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction before Late Jurassic. Our detailed identication of magnetic anomaly lineations exposes magnetic bights before anomaly M25. We found the curved abyssal hills originated near the triple junction, which trend is parallel to magnetic anomaly lineations. These results imply that the configuration of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction had been RRR before Late Jurassic.

  17. Deformation across the Pacific-North America plate boundary near San Francisco, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prescott, W.H.; Savage, J.C.; Svarc, J.L.; Manaker, D.

    2001-01-01

    We have detected a narrow zone of compression between the Coast Ranges and the Great Valley, and we have estimated slip rates for the San Andreas, Rodgers Creek, and Green Valley faults just north of San Francisco. These results are based on an analysis of campaign and continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected between 1992 and 2000 in central California. The zone of compression between the Coast Ranges and the Great Valley is 25 km wide. The observations clearly show 3.8??1.5 mm yr-1 of shortening over this narrow zone. The strike slip components are best fit by a model with 20.8??1.9 mm yr-1 slip on the San Andreas fault, 10.3??2.6 mm yr-1 on the Rodgers Creek fault, and 8.1??2.1 mm yr-1 on the Green Valley fault. The Pacific-Sierra Nevada-Great Valley motion totals 39.2??3.8 mm yr-1 across a zone that is 120 km wide (at the latitude of San Francisco). Standard deviations are one ??. The geodetic results suggest a higher than geologic rate for the Green Valley fault. The geodetic results also suggest an inconsistency between geologic estimates of the San Andreas rate and seismologic estimates of the depth of locking on the San Andreas fault. The only convergence observed is in the narrow zone along the border between the Great Valley and the Coast Ranges.

  18. A revised estimate of Pacific-North America motion and implications for Western North America plate boundary zone tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Stein, Seth; Argus, Donald F.

    1987-01-01

    Marine magnetic profiles from the Gulf of Californa are studied in order to revise the estimate of Pacific-North America motion. It is found that since 3 Ma spreading has averaged 48 mm/yr, consistent with a new global plate motion model derived without any data. The present data suggest that strike-slip motion on faults west of the San Andreas is less than previously thought, reducing the San Andreas discrepancy with geodetic, seismological, and other geologic observations.

  19. New insights into North America-Pacific Plate boundary deformation from Lake Tahoe, Salton Sea and southern Baja California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, Daniel Stephen

    Five studies along the Pacific-North America (PA-NA) plate boundary offer new insights into continental margin processes, the development of the PA-NA tectonic margin and regional earthquake hazards. This research is based on the collection and analysis of several new marine geophysical and geological datasets. Two studies used seismic CHIRP surveys and sediment coring in Fallen Leaf Lake (FLL) and Lake Tahoe to constrain tectonic and geomorphic processes in the lakes, but also the slip-rate and earthquake history along the West Tahoe-Dollar Point Fault. CHIRP profiles image vertically offset and folded strata that record deformation associated with the most recent event (MRE). Radiocarbon dating of organic material extracted from piston cores constrain the age of the MRE to be between 4.1--4.5 k.y. B.P. Offset of Tioga aged glacial deposits yield a slip rate of 0.4--0.8 mm/yr. An ancillary study in FLL determined that submerged, in situ pine trees that date to between 900-1250 AD are related to a medieval megadrought in the Lake Tahoe Basin. The timing and severity of this event match medieval megadroughts observed in the western United States and in Europe. CHIRP profiles acquired in the Salton Sea, California provide new insights into the processes that control pull-apart basin development and earthquake hazards along the southernmost San Andreas Fault. Differential subsidence (>10 mm/yr) in the southern sea suggests the existence of northwest-dipping basin-bounding faults near the southern shoreline. In contrast to previous models, the rapid subsidence and fault architecture observed in the southern part of the sea are consistent with experimental models for pull-apart basins. Geophysical surveys imaged more than 15 ˜N15°E oriented faults, some of which have produced up to 10 events in the last 2-3 kyr. Potentially 2 of the last 5 events on the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF) were synchronous with rupture on offshore faults, but it appears that ruptures on

  20. The Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault Zone - The Knife-Edged Pacific-North American Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, H. G.; Barrie, J. V. J.; Brothers, D. S.; Nishenko, S. P.; Conway, K.; Enkin, R.; Conrad, J. E.; Maier, K. L.; Stacy, C.

    2016-12-01

    Recent investigations of the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather (QC-FW) Fault zone using multibeam echosounder bathymetric and 3.5-kHz sub-bottom profile data show that the fault zone is primarily represented by a single linear structure with small, localized pull-apart basins suggestive of transtension. Water column acoustical data imaged gas plumes concentrated along the fault zone with plume columns extending as much as 700 m above the crest of mud volcanoes. Piston cores indicate that the fault zone cuts hard-packed dense sands that have been dated as Pleistocene in age. The newly discovered fluids associated with the southern half of the fault zone and volcanic edifices with oceanic and continental plate petrologic affinities suggest that the QC-FW is a leaky transform system. Two independent investigations, one in the north part and one in the central part of the fault zone, using two different types of piercing points, found that the slip rate along at least a 200 km length was consistent at between 40-55 mm/yr. since about 14 ka, equivalent to the relative plate motion between the Pacific and North American plates in the NE Pacific region. We surmise that the QC-FW is accommodating most, if not all, of relative motion along a single primary strand without any detectable partitioning of motion onto other faults. This right-lateral strike-slip fault zone is expressed on the seafloor as a very straight feature that probably represents nearly pure strike-slip motion.

  1. Lithospheric strength in the active boundary between the Pacific Plate and Baja California microplate constrained from lower crustal and upper mantle xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzaras, Vasileios; van der Werf, Thomas; Kriegsman, Leo M.; Kronenberg, Andreas; Tikoff, Basil; Drury, Martyn R.

    2017-04-01

    The lower crust is the most poorly understood of the lithospheric layers in terms of its rheology, particularly at active plate boundaries. We studied naturally deformed lower crustal xenoliths within an active plate boundary, in order to link their microstructures and rheological parameters to the well-defined active tectonic context. The Baja California shear zone (BCSZ), located at the western boundary of the Baja California microplate, comprises the active boundary accommodating the relative motion between the Pacific plate and Baja California microplate. The basalts of the Holocene San Quintin volcanic field carry lower crustal and upper mantle xenoliths, which sample the Baja California microplate lithosphere in the vicinity of the BCSZ. The lower crustal xenoliths range from undeformed gabbros to granoblastic two-pyroxene granulites. Two-pyroxene geothermometry shows that the granulites equilibrated at temperatures of 690-920 oC. Phase equilibria (P-T pseudosections using Perple_X) indicate that symplectites with intergrown pyroxenes, plagioclase, olivine and spinel formed at 3.6-5.4 kbar, following decompression from pressures exceeding 6 kbar. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the water content of plagioclase varies among the analyzed xenoliths; plagioclase is relatively dry in two xenoliths while one xenolith contains hydrated plagioclase grains. Microstructural observations and analysis of the crystallographic texture provide evidence for deformation of plagioclase by a combination of dislocation creep and grain boundary sliding. To constrain the strength of the lower crust and upper mantle near the BCSZ we estimated the differential stress using plagioclase and olivine grain size paleopiezomtery, respectively. Differential stress estimates for plagioclase range from 10 to 32 MPa and for olivine are 30 MPa. Thus the active microplate boundary records elevated crustal temperatures, heterogeneous levels of hydration, and low strength in both the lower crust and

  2. Thermochronology of mid-Cretaceous dioritic granulites adjacent "Big Bend" in Australia-Pacific plate boundary, northern South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagar, M.; Seward, D.; Heizler, M. T.; Palin, J. M.; Toy, V. G.; Tulloch, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Western Fiordland Orthogneiss (WFO), situated south-east of the Australian-Pacific plate boundary (Alpine Fault), southern South Island, New Zealand is the largest suite of plutonic rocks intruded into the Pacific margin of Gondwana during the final stages of arc plutonism preceding break-up of the supercontinent in the Late Cretaceous. Dextral motion of c. 480 km along the Alpine Fault during the Cenozoic has offset originally contiguous Pacific Gondwana margin rocks in northern and southern South Island. The Glenroy Complex in northern South Island, west of the Alpine Fault is dominated by two-pyroxene+hornblende granulite facies monzodioritic gneisses. U-Pb zircon geochronological and geochemical data indicate the Glenroy Complex was emplaced between 128-122 Ma and is a correlative of the WFO. The Glenroy Complex forms the lower-most block bounded by an east-dipping set of imbricate thrusts that developed during the late Cenozoic to the west of the largest S-shaped restraining bend ("Big Bend") in the Alpine Fault. New 40Ar/39Ar and fission-track thermochronological data, combined with previous geological field-mapping, demonstrate that the Glenroy Complex cooled rapidly (c. 30° C/Ma) after emplacement and granulite facies metamorphism (c. 850°C) at c. 120 Ma, through c. 550 °C by c. 110-100 Ma. The average cooling rate during the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic was relatively slow, and initial exposure in the late Early Miocene (c. 16 Ma) was followed by reburial to c. 3-4 km (c. 80-100 °C) before final exhumation post-Pliocene. This thermal history is similar to the WFO, which cooled rapidly through c. 350 °C during mid-Cretaceous continental extension, followed by slow cooling during the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic until development of the Australian-Pacific boundary through New Zealand facilitated rapid, exhumation-related cooling from c. 240 °C at c. 20 Ma and final exhumation post-10 Ma (Davids, 1999). However, the Glenroy Complex cooled at a faster

  3. Diffuse Pacific-North American plate boundary: 1000 km of dextral shear inferred from modeling geodetic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.; Thatcher, W.

    2011-01-01

    Geodetic measurements tell us that the eastern part of the Basin and Range Province expands in an east-west direction relative to stable North America, whereas the western part of the province moves to the northwest. We develop three-dimensional finite element representations of the western United States lithosphere in an effort to understand the global positioning system (GPS) signal. The models are constrained by known bounding-block velocities and topography, and Basin and Range Province deformation is represented by simple plastic (thermal creep) rheology. We show that active Basin and Range spreading by gravity collapse is expected to have a strong southward component that does not match the GPS signal. We can reconcile the gravitational component of displacement with observed velocity vectors if the Pacific plate applies northwest-directed shear stress to the Basin and Range via the Sierra Nevada block. This effect reaches at least 1000 km east of the San Andreas fault in our models. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  4. Holocene subsidence at the transition between strike-slip and subduction on the Pacific-Australian plate boundary, Marlborough Sounds, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Bruce W.; Grenfell, Hugh R.; Sabaa, Ashwaq T.; Kay, Jon; Daymond-King, Rhiannon; Cochran, Ursula

    2010-03-01

    This paper provides the first solid evidence in support of a century-old hypothesis that the mountainous Marlborough Sounds region in central New Zealand is subsiding. More recent hypotheses suggest that this may be a result of southward migration of a slab of subducted Pacific Plate causing flexural downwarping of the overlying crust in the vicinity of the transition between subduction and strike-slip on the Pacific-Australian plate boundary. The proxy evidence for gradual Holocene subsidence comes from micropaleontological study of seven intertidal sediment cores from the inner Marlborough Sounds (at Havelock, Mahau Sound and Shakespeare Bay). Quantitative estimates (using Modern Analogue Technique) of former tidal elevations based on fossil foraminiferal faunas provide evidence of tectonic (not compaction-related) subsidence in all cores. Estimates of subsidence rates for individual cores vary within the range 0.2-2.4 m ka -1. The wide variation within subsidence rate estimates are related to a combination of the accuracy limits of radiocarbon dates, elevation estimates, and particularly our poor knowledge of the New Zealand Holocene sea-level curve. The most consistent subsidence rate at all three sites for the mid-late Holocene (last 6-7 ka) is ˜0.7-0.8 m ka -1. This rate is consistent with the average subsidence rate in the adjacent 4-km thick Wanganui sedimentary basin for the last 5 myr. Subsidence is inferred to have migrated southwards from the Wanganui Basin to impinge on the inner Marlborough Sounds in just the last 100-200 ka.

  5. An updated digital model of plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Peter

    2003-03-01

    A global set of present plate boundaries on the Earth is presented in digital form. Most come from sources in the literature. A few boundaries are newly interpreted from topography, volcanism, and/or seismicity, taking into account relative plate velocities from magnetic anomalies, moment tensor solutions, and/or geodesy. In addition to the 14 large plates whose motion was described by the NUVEL-1A poles (Africa, Antarctica, Arabia, Australia, Caribbean, Cocos, Eurasia, India, Juan de Fuca, Nazca, North America, Pacific, Philippine Sea, South America), model PB2002 includes 38 small plates (Okhotsk, Amur, Yangtze, Okinawa, Sunda, Burma, Molucca Sea, Banda Sea, Timor, Birds Head, Maoke, Caroline, Mariana, North Bismarck, Manus, South Bismarck, Solomon Sea, Woodlark, New Hebrides, Conway Reef, Balmoral Reef, Futuna, Niuafo'ou, Tonga, Kermadec, Rivera, Galapagos, Easter, Juan Fernandez, Panama, North Andes, Altiplano, Shetland, Scotia, Sandwich, Aegean Sea, Anatolia, Somalia), for a total of 52 plates. No attempt is made to divide the Alps-Persia-Tibet mountain belt, the Philippine Islands, the Peruvian Andes, the Sierras Pampeanas, or the California-Nevada zone of dextral transtension into plates; instead, they are designated as "orogens" in which this plate model is not expected to be accurate. The cumulative-number/area distribution for this model follows a power law for plates with areas between 0.002 and 1 steradian. Departure from this scaling at the small-plate end suggests that future work is very likely to define more very small plates within the orogens. The model is presented in four digital files: a set of plate boundary segments; a set of plate outlines; a set of outlines of the orogens; and a table of characteristics of each digitization step along plate boundaries, including estimated relative velocity vector and classification into one of 7 types (continental convergence zone, continental transform fault, continental rift, oceanic spreading ridge

  6. The seismotectonics of plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, J.; Brune, J. N.; Goodkind, J.; Wyatt, F.; Agnew, D. C.; Beaumont, C.

    1981-01-01

    Research on the seismotectonics of plate boundaries is summarized. Instrumental development and an observational program designed to study various aspects of the seismotectonics of southern California and the northern Gulf of California are described. A unique superconducting gravimeter was further developed and supported under this program for deployment and operation at several sites. Work on Earth tides is also discussed.

  7. Structural and Tectonic Map Along the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Northern Gulf of California, Sonora Desert and Valle de Mexicali, Mexico, from Seismic Reflection Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Escobar, M.; Suarez-Vidal, F.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.; Martin Barajas, A.; Pacheco-Romero, M.; Arregui-Estrada, S.; Gallardo-Mata, C.; Sanchez-Garcia, C.; Chanes-Martinez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) carried on an intense exploration program in the northern Gulf of California, the Sonora Desert and the southern part of the Mexicali Valley. This program was supported by a seismic reflection field operation. The collected seismic data was 2D, with travel time of 6 s recording, in 48 channels, and the source energy was: dynamite, vibroseis and air guns. Since 2007 to present time, the existing seismic data has been re-processing and ire-interpreting as part of a collaboration project between the PEMEX's Subdirección de Exploración (PEMEX) and CICESE. The study area is located along a large portion of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in the northern Gulf of California and the Southern part of the Salton Trough tectonic province (Mexicali Valley). We present the result of the processes reflection seismic lines. Many of the previous reported known faults were identify along with the first time described located within the study region. We identified regions with different degree of tectonic activity. In structural map it can see the location of many of these known active faults and their associated seismic activity, as well as other structures with no associated seismicity. Where some faults are mist placed they were deleted or relocated based on new information. We included historical seismicity for the region. We present six reflection lines that cross the aftershocks zone of the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of April 4, 2010 (Mw7.2). The epicenter of this earthquake and most of the aftershocks are located in a region where pervious to this earthquake no major earthquakes are been reported. A major result of this study is to demonstrate that there are many buried faults that increase the seismic hazard.

  8. Seismic link at plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramdani, Faical; Kettani, Omar; Tadili, Benaissa

    2015-06-01

    Seismic triggering at plate boundaries has a very complex nature that includes seismic events at varying distances. The spatial orientation of triggering cannot be reduced to sequences from the main shocks. Seismic waves propagate at all times in all directions, particularly in highly active zones. No direct evidence can be obtained regarding which earthquakes trigger the shocks. The first approach is to determine the potential linked zones where triggering may occur. The second step is to determine the causality between the events and their triggered shocks. The spatial orientation of the links between events is established from pre-ordered networks and the adapted dependence of the spatio-temporal occurrence of earthquakes. Based on a coefficient of synchronous seismic activity to grid couples, we derive a network link by each threshold. The links of high thresholds are tested using the coherence of time series to determine the causality and related orientation. The resulting link orientations at the plate boundary conditions indicate that causal triggering seems to be localized along a major fault, as a stress transfer between two major faults, and parallel to the geothermal area extension.

  9. Florida: A Jurassic transform plate boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klitgord, Kim D.; Popenoe, Peter; Schouten, Hans

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic, gravity, seismic, and deep drill hole data integrated with plate tectonic reconstructions substantiate the existence of a transform plate boundary across southern Florida during the Jurassic. On the basis of this integrated suite of data the pre-Cretaceous Florida-Bahamas region can be divided into the pre-Jurassic North American plate, Jurassic marginal rift basins, and a broad Jurassic transform zone including stranded blocks of pre-Mesozoic continental crust. Major tectonic units include the Suwannee basin in northern Florida containing Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, a central Florida basement complex of Paleozoic age crystalline rock, the west Florida platform composed of stranded blocks of continental crust, the south Georgia rift containing Triassic sedimentary rocks which overlie block-faulted Suwannee basin sedimentary rocks, the Late Triassic-Jurassic age Apalachicola rift basin, and the Jurassic age south Florida, Bahamas, and Blake Plateau marginal rift basins. The major tectonic units are bounded by basement hinge zones and fracture zones (FZ). The basement hinge zone represents the block-faulted edge of the North American plate, separating Paleozoic and older crustal rocks from Jurassic rifted crust beneath the marginal basins. Fracture zones separate Mesozoic marginal sedimentary basins and include the Blake Spur FZ, Jacksonville FZ, Bahamas FZ, and Cuba FZ, bounding the Blake Plateau, Bahamas, south Florida, and southeastern Gulf of Mexico basins. The Bahamas FZ is the most important of all these features because its northwest extension coincides with the Gulf basin marginal fault zone, forming the southern edge of the North American plate during the Jurassic. The limited space between the North American and the South American/African plates requires that the Jurassic transform zone, connecting the Central Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico spreading systems, was located between the Bahamas and Cuba FZ's in the region of southern Florida. Our

  10. Extending Alaska's plate boundary: tectonic tremor generated by Yakutat subduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wech, Aaron G.

    2016-01-01

    The tectonics of the eastern end of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone are complicated by the inclusion of the Yakutat microplate, which is colliding into and subducting beneath continental North America at near-Pacific-plate rates. The interaction among these plates at depth is not well understood, and further east, even less is known about the plate boundary or the source of Wrangell volcanism. The drop-off in Wadati-Benioff zone (WBZ) seismicity could signal the end of the plate boundary, the start of aseismic subduction, or a tear in the downgoing plate. Further compounding the issue is the possible presence of the Wrangell slab, which is faintly outlined by an anemic, eastward-dipping WBZ beneath the Wrangell volcanoes. In this study, I performed a search for tectonic tremor to map slow, plate-boundary slip in south-central Alaska. I identified ∼11,000 tremor epicenters, which continue 85 km east of the inferred Pacific plate edge marked by WBZ seismicity. The tremor zone coincides with the edges of the downgoing Yakutat terrane, and tremors transition from periodic to continuous behavior as they near the aseismic Wrangell slab. I interpret tremor to mark slow, semicontinuous slip occurring at the interface between the Yakutat and North America plates. The slow slip region lengthens the megathrust interface beyond the WBZ and may provide evidence for a connection between the Yakutat slab and the aseismic Wrangell slab.

  11. The Fairway-Aotea Basin and the New Caledonia Trough, witnesses of the Pacific-Australian plate boundary evolution : from mid-Cretaceous cessation of subduction to Eocene subduction renewal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collot, J.; Geli, L. B.; Lafoy, Y.; Sutherland, R.; Herzer, R. H.; Roest, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    The geodynamical history of the SW Pacific is controlled since the Mesozoic by the evolution of peri-Pacific subduction zones, in a trench retreat by slab roll-back process, which successively occurred along the Eastern Gondwana margin. In this context, most basins which formed after 45 Ma reached a stage of seafloor spreading, have recorded the inversions of the earth's magnetic field and present typical oceanic crust morphologies. By contrast, the New Caledonia and Fairway basins, which are narrower and present thick sedimentary covers have a less known and more controversial origin. Based on a regional geological synthesis and on interpretation of multichannel seismic reflection and refraction data, combined with drill hole data off New Zealand and a compilation of regional potential data, we distinguish 2 phases of the evolution of the Fairway-Aotea Basin (FAB) and the New Caledonia Trough (NCT), which reflect the evolution of the Gondwana-Pacific plate boundary: Phase 1: Mid Cretaceous formation of the FAB in a continental intra- or back- arc position of the Pacific-Gondwana subduction system. The formation of this shallow basin reflects the onset of continental breakup of the Eastern Gondwana margin during Cenomanian which was most probably caused by a dynamic change of the subduction zone through a « verticalization » of the slab. This event may be the result of the 99 Ma kinematic plate reorganization which probably led to subduction cessation along the Gondwana-Pacific plate boundary. A tectonic escape mechanism, in relation with the locking of the subduction zone by the Hikurangi Plateau, could also be responsible of the trench retreat leading to backarc extension. Phase 2: Regional Eocene-Oligocene uplift followed by rapid subsidence (3-4 km) of the system « Lord Howe Rise - FAB - Norfolk Ridge ». The structural style of this deformation leads us to suggest that detachment of the lower crust is the cause of subsidence. We therefore propose a model in

  12. Motion of the Rivera plate since 10 Ma relative to the Pacific and North American plates and the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, Charles; Traylen, Stephen

    2000-03-01

    To better understand the influence of Rivera plate kinematics on the geodynamic evolution of western Mexico, we use more than 1400 crossings of seafloor spreading magnetic lineations along the Pacific-Rivera rise and northern Mathematician ridge to solve for rotations of the Rivera plate relative to the underlying mantle and the Pacific and North American plates at 14 times since 9.9 Ma. Our comparison of magnetic anomaly crossings from the undeformed Pacific plate to their counterparts on the Rivera plate indicates that significant areas of the Rivera plate have deformed since 9.9 Ma. Dextral shear along the southern edge of the plate from 3.3-2.2 Ma during a regional plate boundary reorganization deformed the Rivera plate farther into its interior than previously recognized. In addition, seafloor located north of two rupture zones within the Rivera plate sutured to North America after 1.5 Ma. Anomaly crossings from these two deformed regions thus cannot be used to reconstruct motion of the Rivera plate. Finite rotations that best reconstruct Pacific plate anomaly crossings onto their undeformed counterparts on the Rivera plate yield stage spreading rates that decrease gradually by 10% between 10 and 3.6 Ma, decrease rapidly by 20% after ˜3.6 Ma, and recover after 1 Ma. The slowdown in Pacific-Rivera seafloor spreading at 3.6 Ma coincided with the onset of dextral shear across the then-incipient southern boundary of the Rivera plate with the Pacific plate. The available evidence indicates that the Rivera plate has been an independent microplate since at least 10 Ma, contrary to published assertions that it fragmented from the Cocos plate at ˜5 Ma. Motion of the Rivera plate relative to North America has changed significantly since 10 Ma, in concert with significant changes in Pacific-Rivera motion. A significant and robust feature of Rivera-North America motion not previously recognized is the cessation of margin-normal convergence and thus subduction from 2

  13. On the Enigmatic Birth of the Pacific Plate within the Panthalassa Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschman, L.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.

    2016-12-01

    The oceanic Pacific Plate started forming in Early Jurassic time within the vast Panthalassa Ocean that surrounded the supercontinent Pangea and contains the oldest lithosphere that can directly constrain the geodynamic history of the circum-Pangean Earth. Here, we show that the geometry of the oldest marine magnetic anomalies of the Pacific Plate attests of a unique plate kinematic event that sparked the plate's birth in virtually a point location, surrounded by the Izanagi, Farallon and Phoenix Plates. We reconstruct the unstable triple junction that caused the plate reorganization leading to the birth of the Pacific Plate and present a model of the plate tectonic configuration that preconditioned this event. We show that a stable, but migrating triple junction involving the gradual cessation of intra-oceanic Panthalassa subduction culminated in the formation of an unstable transform-transform-transform triple junction. The consequent plate boundary reorganization resulted in the formation of a stable triangular three-ridge system from which the nascent Pacific Plate expanded. We link the birth of the Pacific Plate to the regional termination of intra-Panthalassa subduction. Remnants thereof have been identified in the deep lower mantle of which the locations may provide paleolongitudinal control on the absolute location of the early Pacific Plate. Our results constitute an essential step in unraveling the plate tectonic evolution of `Thalassa Incognita' comprising the comprehensive Panthalassa Ocean surrounding Pangea.

  14. On the enigmatic birth of the Pacific Plate within the Panthalassa Ocean.

    PubMed

    Boschman, Lydian M; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J J

    2016-07-01

    The oceanic Pacific Plate started forming in Early Jurassic time within the vast Panthalassa Ocean that surrounded the supercontinent Pangea, and contains the oldest lithosphere that can directly constrain the geodynamic history of the circum-Pangean Earth. We show that the geometry of the oldest marine magnetic anomalies of the Pacific Plate attests to a unique plate kinematic event that sparked the plate's birth at virtually a point location, surrounded by the Izanagi, Farallon, and Phoenix Plates. We reconstruct the unstable triple junction that caused the plate reorganization, which led to the birth of the Pacific Plate, and present a model of the plate tectonic configuration that preconditioned this event. We show that a stable but migrating triple junction involving the gradual cessation of intraoceanic Panthalassa subduction culminated in the formation of an unstable transform-transform-transform triple junction. The consequent plate boundary reorganization resulted in the formation of a stable triangular three-ridge system from which the nascent Pacific Plate expanded. We link the birth of the Pacific Plate to the regional termination of intra-Panthalassa subduction. Remnants thereof have been identified in the deep lower mantle of which the locations may provide paleolongitudinal control on the absolute location of the early Pacific Plate. Our results constitute an essential step in unraveling the plate tectonic evolution of "Thalassa Incognita" that comprises the comprehensive Panthalassa Ocean surrounding Pangea.

  15. On the enigmatic birth of the Pacific Plate within the Panthalassa Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Boschman, Lydian M.; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2016-01-01

    The oceanic Pacific Plate started forming in Early Jurassic time within the vast Panthalassa Ocean that surrounded the supercontinent Pangea, and contains the oldest lithosphere that can directly constrain the geodynamic history of the circum-Pangean Earth. We show that the geometry of the oldest marine magnetic anomalies of the Pacific Plate attests to a unique plate kinematic event that sparked the plate’s birth at virtually a point location, surrounded by the Izanagi, Farallon, and Phoenix Plates. We reconstruct the unstable triple junction that caused the plate reorganization, which led to the birth of the Pacific Plate, and present a model of the plate tectonic configuration that preconditioned this event. We show that a stable but migrating triple junction involving the gradual cessation of intraoceanic Panthalassa subduction culminated in the formation of an unstable transform-transform-transform triple junction. The consequent plate boundary reorganization resulted in the formation of a stable triangular three-ridge system from which the nascent Pacific Plate expanded. We link the birth of the Pacific Plate to the regional termination of intra-Panthalassa subduction. Remnants thereof have been identified in the deep lower mantle of which the locations may provide paleolongitudinal control on the absolute location of the early Pacific Plate. Our results constitute an essential step in unraveling the plate tectonic evolution of “Thalassa Incognita” that comprises the comprehensive Panthalassa Ocean surrounding Pangea. PMID:29713683

  16. Relative motions of the Australian, Pacific and Antarctic plates estimated by the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Freymueller, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements spanning approximately 3 years have been used to determine velocities for 7 sites on the Australian, Pacific and Antarctic plates. The site velocities agree with both plate model predictions and other space geodetic techniques. We find no evidence for internal deformation of the interior of the Australian plate. Wellington, New Zealand, located in the Australian-Pacific plate boundary zone, moves 20 +/- 5 mm/yr west-southwest relative to the Australian plate. Its velocity lies midway between the predicted velocities of the two plates. Relative Euler vectors for the Australia-Antarctica and Pacific-Antarctica plates agree within one standard deviation with the NUVEL-1A predictions.

  17. How does the Pacific Plate die, and what dies with it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, J.

    2002-12-01

    Investigation continues into the demise of the Pacific Plate by the subduction, which has been its principal driving force for about 50 m.y.. Key unanswered questions in the inquiry include the following. What was the motive for subduction to start? Where is the geochemical boundary between the Pacific and Indian Plates, and what is the reason for that difference in the first place? Why do marginal basins initiate above the subducting Pacific Plate, spread for 5-10 m.y., and then stop? How much and which parts of the Pacific Plate survive to an afterlife in the continents versus descent to Hades? Most of these questions reduce to: Why are the two largest islands in the Pacific Ocean (Hawaii and Viti Levu, Fiji) so different?

  18. Repeating Earthquakes on the Queen Charlotte Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, T. W.; Bostock, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Queen Charlotte Fault (QCF) is a major plate boundary located off the northwest coast of North America that has produced large earthquakes in 1949 (M8.1) and more recently in October, 2012 (M7.8). The 2012 event was dominated by thrusting despite the fact that plate motions at the boundary are nearly transcurrent. It is now widely believed that the plate boundary comprises the QCF (i.e., a dextral strike-slip fault) as well as an element of subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the North American Plate. Repeating earthquakes and seismic tremor have been observed in the vicinity of the QCF; providing insight into the spatial and temporal characteristics of repeating earthquakes is the goal of this research. Due to poor station coverage and data quality, traditional methods of locating earthquakes are not applicable to these events. Instead, we have implemented an algorithm to locate local (i.e., < 100 km distance to epicenter) earthquakes using a single, three-component seismogram. This algorithm relies on the P-wave polarization and, through comparison with larger local events in the Geological Survey of Canada catalogue, is shown to yield epicentral locations accurate to within 5-10 km. A total of 24 unique families of repeating earthquakes has been identified, and 4 of these families have been located with high confidence. Their epicenters locate directly on the trace of the QCF and their depths are shallow (i.e., 5-15 km), consistent with the proposed depth of the QCF. Analysis of temporal recurrence leading up to the 2012 M7.8 event reveals a non-random pattern, with an approximately 15 day periodicity. Further analysis is planned to study whether this behaviour persists after the 2012 event and to gain insight into the effects of the 2012 event on the stress field and frictional properties of the plate boundary.

  19. The Malpelo Plate Hypothesis and Implications for Non-closure of the Cocos-Nazca-Pacific Plate Motion Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Gordon, R. G.; Mishra, J. K.; Wang, C.

    2017-12-01

    The non-closure of the Cocos-Nazca-Pacific plate motion circuit by 15.0 mm a-1± 3.8 mm a-1 (95% confidence limits throughout this abstract) [DeMets et al. 2010] represents a daunting challenge to the central tenet of plate tectonics—that the plates are rigid. This misfit is difficult to explain from known processes of intraplate deformation, such as horizontal thermal contraction [Collette, 1974; Kumar and Gordon, 2009; Kreemer and Gordon, 2014; Mishra and Gordon, 2016] or movement of plates over a non-spherical Earth [McKenzie, 1972; Turcotte and Oxburgh, 1973]. Possibly there are one or more unrecognized plate boundaries in the circuit, but no such boundary has been found to date. To make progress on this problem, we present three new Cocos-Nazca transform fault azimuths from multibeam data now available through Geomapapp's global multi-resolution topography [Ryan et al., 2009]. We determine a new Cocos-Nazca best-fitting angular velocity from the three new transform-fault azimuths combined with the spreading rates of DeMets et al. [2010]. The new direction of relative plate motion is 3.3° ±1.8° clockwise of prior estimates and is 4.9° ±2.7° clockwise of the azimuth of the Panama transform fault, demonstrating that the Panama transform fault does not parallel Nazca-Cocos plate motion. We infer that the plate east of the Panama transform fault is not the Nazca plate, but instead is a microplate that we term the Malpelo plate. We hypothesize that a diffuse plate boundary separates the Malpelo plate from the much larger Nazca plate. The Malpelo plate extends only as far north as ≈6°N where seismicity marks another boundary with a previously recognized microplate, the Coiba plate [Pennington, 1981, Adamek et al., 1988]. The Malpelo plate moves 5.9 mm a-1 relative to the Nazca plate along the Panama transform fault. When we sum the Cocos-Pacific and Pacific-Nazca best-fitting angular velocities of DeMets et al. [2010] with our new Nazca-Cocos best

  20. Viscoelastic deformation near active plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Model deformations near the active plate boundaries of Western North America using space-based geodetic measurements as constraints are discussed. The first six months of this project were spent gaining familarity with space-based measurements, accessing the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Computer, and building time independent deformation models. The initial goal was to see how well the simplest elastic models can reproduce very long base interferometry (VLBI) baseline data. From the Crustal Dynamics Data Information Service, a total of 18 VLBI baselines are available which have been surveyed on four or more occasions. These data were fed into weighted and unweighted inversions to obtain baseline closure rates. Four of the better quality lines are illustrated. The deformation model assumes that the observed baseline rates result from a combination of rigid plate tectonic motions plus a component resulting from elastic strain build up due to a failure of the plate boundary to slip at the full plate tectonic rate. The elastic deformation resulting from the locked plate boundary is meant to portray interseismic strain accumulation. During and shortly after a large interplate earthquake, these strains are largely released, and points near the fault which were previously retarded suddenly catch up to the positions predicted by rigid plate models. Researchers judge the quality of fit by the sum squares of weighted residuals, termed total variance. The observed baseline closures have a total variance of 99 (cm/y)squared. When the RM2 velocities are assumed to model the data, the total variance increases to 154 (cm/y)squared.

  1. Oceanic broad multifault transform plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligi, Marco; Bonatti, Enrico; Gasperini, Luca; Poliakov, Alexei N. B.

    2002-01-01

    Oceanic transform plate boundaries consist of a single, narrow (a few kilometers wide) strike-slip seismic zone offsetting two mid-ocean ridge segments. However, we define here a new class of oceanic transform boundaries, with broad complex multifault zones of deformation, similar to some continental strike-slip systems. Examples are the 750-km- long, 120-km-wide Andrew Bain transform on the Southwest Indian Ridge, and the Romanche transform, where the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is offset by a lens-shaped, ˜900-km- long, ˜100-km-wide sliver of deformed lithosphere bound by two major transform valleys. One of the valleys is seismically highly active and constitutes the present-day principal transform boundary. However, strike-slip seismic events also occur in the second valley and elsewhere in the deformed zone. Some of these events may be triggered by earthquakes from the principal boundary. Numerical modeling predicts the development of wide multiple transform boundaries when the age offset is above a threshold value of ˜30 m.y., i.e., in extra-long (>500 km) slow-slip transforms. Multiple boundaries develop so that strike-slip ruptures avoid very thick and strong lithosphere.

  2. Azimuthal anisotropy layering and plate motion in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed a three dimensional radially and azimuthally anisotropic model of the upper mantle in north America, using a combination of long-period 3-component surface and overtone waveforms, and SKS splitting measurements (Yuan and Romanowicz, 2010, Yuan et al., 2011). We showed that azimuthal anisotropy is a powerful tool to detect layering in the upper mantle, revealing two domains in the cratonic lithosphere, separated by a sharp laterally varying boundary in the depth range 100-150 km, which seems to coincide with the mid-lithospheric boundary (MLD) found in receiver function studies. Contrary to receiver functions, azimuthal anisotropy also detects the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) as manifested by a change in the fast axis direction, which becomes quasi-parallel to the absolute plate motion below ~250 km depth. A zone of stronger azimuthal anisotropy is found below the LAB both in the western US (peaking at depths of 100-150km) and in the craton (peaking at a depth of about 300 km). Here we show preliminary attempts at expanding our approach to the global scale, with a specific goal of determining whether such an anisotropic LAB can also be observed in the Pacific ocean. We started with our most recent global upper mantle radially anisotropic shear velocity model, determined using the Spectral Element Method (SEMum2; French et al., this meeting). We augment the corresponding global surface wave and overtone dataset (period range 60 to 400 s) with deep events and shorter period body waves, in order to ensure optimal deeper depth (>250km) anisotropy recovery due to the paucity of shear wave splitting measurements in the oceans. Our preliminary results, which do not yet incorporate SKS splitting measurements, look promising as they confirm the layering found previously in North America, using a different, global dataset and starting model. In the Pacific, our study confirms earlier azimuthal anisotropy results in the region (e.g. Smith et

  3. Trans-Pacific Bathymetry Survey crossing over the Pacific, Antarctic, and Nazca plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, N.; Fujiwara, T.

    2013-12-01

    Multibeam bathymetric data reveals seafloor fabrics, i.e. abyssal hills and fracture zones, distribution of seamounts and/or knolls and are usually smaller than the detectable size by global prediction derived from satellite altimetry. The seafloor depths combined with shipboard gravity data indicate the structure of oceanic lithosphere, thermal state, and mantle dynamics and become more accurate data set to estimate fine-scale crustal structures and subsurface mass distribution. We present the ~22000 km long survey line from the northeast Japan through to the equator at the mid-Pacific on to the southwest Chilean coast collected during the JAMSTEC R/V Mirai MR08-06 Leg-1 cruise in January-March 2009. The cruise was as a part of SORA2009 (Abe, 2009 Cruise report) for geological and geophysical studies in the southern Pacific, and was an unprecedented opportunity to collect data in the regions of the Pacific Ocean where it has been sparsely surveyed using state-of-the-art echo-sounding technology. Our multibeam bathymetric and shipboard gravity survey track crossed over the Pacific, the Antarctic, and the Nazca plates, and covered lithospheric ages varying from zero to 150 Ma. Strikes of lineated abyssal hills give critical evidences for future studies of the plate reconstruction and tectonic evolution of the old Pacific Plate because magnetic lineations are unconstrained on the seafloor in the Cretaceous magnetic quiet (125-80 Ma) zone. Consecutive trends of lineated abyssal hills and fracture zones indicate stable tectonic stress field originated from the Pacific Antarctic Ridge (PAR) and the Chile Ridge spreading systems. The seafloor fabric morphology revealed a clear boundary between the PAR and the Chile Ridge domains. The observed bathymetric boundary is probably a part of a trace of the Pacific-Antarctic-Farallon (Nazca) plate's triple junction. The result will be constraint for future studies of the plate reconstruction and tectonic evolution of the PAR

  4. Using Global, Quantitative Models of the Coupled Plates/Mantle System to Understand Late Neogene Dynamics of the Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotz, I.; Davies, R.; Iaffaldano, G.

    2016-12-01

    the evolving mantle buoyancy-field and plate-boundary forces on the Pacific plate motion. Our approach allows distinguishing between the top-down and bottom-up controls on the recent dynamics of the Pacific plate.

  5. Using global, quantitative models of the coupled plates/mantle system to understand Late Miocene dynamics of the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotz, Ingo; Iaffaldano, Giampiero; Rhodri Davies, D.

    2017-04-01

    the evolving mantle buoyancy-field and plate-boundary forces on the Pacific plate motion. Our approach allows linking geodynamical models and observations on the recent dynamics of the Pacific plate.

  6. The Malpelo Plate Hypothesis and implications for nonclosure of the Cocos-Nazca-Pacific plate motion circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tuo; Gordon, Richard G.; Mishra, Jay K.; Wang, Chengzu

    2017-08-01

    Using global multiresolution topography, we estimate new transform-fault azimuths along the Cocos-Nazca plate boundary and show that the direction of relative plate motion is 3.3° ± 1.8° (95% confidence limits) clockwise of prior estimates. The new direction of Cocos-Nazca plate motion is, moreover, 4.9° ± 2.7° (95% confidence limits) clockwise of the azimuth of the Panama transform fault. We infer that the plate east of the Panama transform fault is not the Nazca plate but instead is a microplate that we term the Malpelo plate. With the improved transform-fault data, the nonclosure of the Nazca-Cocos-Pacific plate motion circuit is reduced from 15.0 mm a-1 ± 3.8 mm a-1 to 11.6 mm a-1 ± 3.8 mm a-1 (95% confidence limits). The nonclosure seems too large to be due entirely to horizontal thermal contraction of oceanic lithosphere and suggests that one or more additional plate boundaries remain to be discovered.

  7. Hidden Earthquake Potential in Plate Boundary Transition Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, Kevin P.; Herman, Matthew; Govers, Rob

    2017-04-01

    Plate boundaries can exhibit spatially abrupt changes in their long-term tectonic deformation (and associated kinematics) at triple junctions and other sites of changes in plate boundary structure. How earthquake behavior responds to these abrupt tectonic changes is unclear. The situation may be additionally obscured by the effects of superimposed deformational signals - juxtaposed short-term (earthquake cycle) kinematics may combine to produce a net deformational signal that does not reflect intuition about the actual strain accumulation in the region. Two examples of this effect are in the vicinity of the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ) along the west coast of North America, and at the southern end of the Hikurangi subduction zone, New Zealand. In the region immediately north of the MTJ, GPS-based observed crustal displacements (relative to North America (NAm)) are intermediate between Pacific and Juan de Fuca (JdF) motions. With distance north, these displacements rotate to become more aligned with JdF - NAm displacements, i.e. to motions expected along a coupled subduction interface. The deviation of GPS motions from the coupled subduction interface signal near the MTJ has been previously interpreted to reflect clock-wise rotation of a coastal, crustal block and/or reduced coupling at the southern Cascadia margin. The geologic record of crustal deformation near the MTJ reflects the combined effects of northward crustal shortening (on geologic time scales) associated with the MTJ Crustal Conveyor (Furlong and Govers, 1999) overprinted onto the subduction earthquake cycle signal. With this interpretation, the Cascadia subduction margin appears to be well-coupled along its entire length, consistent with paleo-seismic records of large earthquake ruptures extending to its southern limit. At the Hikurangi to Alpine Fault transition in New Zealand, plate interactions switch from subduction to oblique translation as a consequence of changes in lithospheric structure of

  8. The Plate Boundary Observatory: Community Focused Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matykiewicz, J.; Anderson, G.; Lee, E.; Hoyt, B.; Hodgkinson, K.; Persson, E.; Wright, J.; Torrez, D.; Jackson, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three-dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, PBO will install 852 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters, as well as manage data for 209 previously existing continuous GPS stations. UNAVCO provides access to data products from these stations, as well as general information about the PBO project, via the PBO web site (http://pboweb.unavco.org). GPS and strainmeter data products can be found using a variety of channels, including map searches, text searches, and station specific data retrieval. In addition, the PBO construction status is available via multiple mapping interfaces, including custom web based map widgets and Google Earth. Additional construction details can be accessed from PBO operational pages and station specific home pages. The current state of health for the PBO network is available with the statistical snap-shot, full map interfaces, tabular web based reports, and automatic data mining and alerts. UNAVCO is currently working to enhance the community access to this information by developing a web service framework for the discovery of data products, interfacing with operational engineers, and exposing data services to third party participants. In addition, UNAVCO, through the PBO project, provides advanced data management and monitoring systems for use by the community in operating geodetic networks in the United States and beyond. We will demonstrate these systems during the AGU meeting, and we welcome inquiries from the community at any time.

  9. Block structure and geodynamics of the continental lithosphere on plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatinsky, Yu. G.; Prokhorova, T. V.; Romanyuk, T. V.; Vladova, G. L.

    2009-04-01

    Division of the Earth lithosphere on large plates must be considered only as the first and most general approximation in its structure hierarchy. Some transit zones or difuuse boundaries after other authors take place in lithosphere plate boundaries. The tectonic tension of plate interaction is transferred and relaxed within these zones, which consist of blocks limited by seismoactive faults. Vectors of block horizontal displacements often don't coincide with vectors of main plates and change together with changing block rigidity. As a rule the intensity the seismic energy at plate and transit zone boundaries decreases linearly with distancing from these boundaries and correlates with decreasing of velocities of block horizontal displacements. But sometimes the maximum of the energy manifestation takes place in inner parts of transit zones. Some relatively tight interblock zones established in central and east Asia are the most seismically active. They limited such blocks as Pamir, Tien Shan, Bayanhar, Shan, Japanese-Korean, as well as the north boundary of the Indian Plate. A seismic energy intensity of these zones can be compared with the energy of Pacific subduction zones. It is worthy to note that the majority catastrophic earthquakes took place in Central Asia just within interblock zones. A level of block displacement is situated mainly in the bottom or inside the Earth crust, more rare in the lithosphere mantle. Blocks with the most thick lithosphere roots (SE China, Amurian) are the most rigid and weakly deformed.

  10. Stress rotation across the Cascadia megathrust requires a weak subduction plate boundary at seismogenic depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo; McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Liu, Yajing; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2018-03-01

    The Mendocino Triple Junction region is the most seismically active part of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The northward moving Pacific plate collides with the subducting Gorda plate causing intense internal deformation within it. Here we show that the stress field rotates rapidly with depth across the thrust interface from a strike-slip regime within the subducting plate, reflecting the Pacific plate collision, to a thrust regime in the overriding plate. We utilize a dense focal mechanism dataset, including observations from the Cascadia Initiative ocean bottom seismograph experiment, to constrain the stress orientations. To quantify the implications of this rotation for the strength of the plate boundary, we designed an inversion that solves for the absolute stress tensors in a three-layer model subject to assumptions about the strength of the subducting mantle. Our results indicate that the shear stress on the plate boundary fault is likely no more than about ∼50 MPa at ∼20 km depth. Regardless of the assumed mantle strength, we infer a relatively weak megathrust fault with an effective friction coefficient of ∼0 to 0.2 at seismogenic depths. Such a low value for the effective friction coefficient requires a combination of high fluid pressures and/or fault-zone minerals with low inherent friction in the region where a great earthquake is expected in Cascadia.

  11. Stress rotation across the Cascadia megathrust requires a weak subduction plate boundary at seismogenic depths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Duo; McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Liu, Yajing; Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2018-01-01

    The Mendocino Triple Junction region is the most seismically active part of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The northward moving Pacific plate collides with the subducting Gorda plate causing intense internal deformation within it. Here we show that the stress field rotates rapidly with depth across the thrust interface from a strike-slip regime within the subducting plate, reflecting the Pacific plate collision, to a thrust regime in the overriding plate. We utilize a dense focal mechanism dataset, including observations from the Cascadia Initiative ocean bottom seismograph experiment, to constrain the stress orientations. To quantify the implications of this rotation for the strength of the plate boundary, we designed an inversion that solves for the absolute stress tensors in a three-layer model subject to assumptions about the strength of the subducting mantle. Our results indicate that the shear stress on the plate boundary fault is likely no more than about ∼50 MPa at ∼20 km depth. Regardless of the assumed mantle strength, we infer a relatively weak megathrust fault with an effective friction coefficient of ∼0 to 0.2 at seismogenic depths. Such a low value for the effective friction coefficient requires a combination of high fluid pressures and/or fault-zone minerals with low inherent friction in the region where a great earthquake is expected in Cascadia.

  12. Anomalous Late Jurassic motion of the Pacific Plate with implications for true polar wander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, R. R.; Kent, D.

    2017-12-01

    True polar wander, or TPW, is the rotation of the entire mantle-crust system that results in simultaneous change in latitude and orientation for all lithospheric plates. One of the most recent candidate TPW events consists of a 30˚ rotation during Late Jurassic time (160 - 145 Ma). However, existing paleomagnetic documentation of this event derives exclusively from continental studies. Because all major landmasses except China were connected directly or via spreading centers in the Late Jurassic, the velocities of these continents were mutually constrained and their motion as a group over the underlying mantle would be indistinguishable from TPW using only continental data. On the other hand, plates of the Pacific Basin constituted a kinematically independent domain, interfacing with continents at subduction zones and slip-strike boundaries. Coherent motion of both Pacific Basin and continental plates would therefore indicate uniform motion of virtually the entire lithosphere, providing a means to distinguish TPW from continental drift. We performed thermal demagnetization on remaining samples from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 801B, which were cored from the oldest sampled oceanic crust in the Western Pacific, to determine its change in paleolatitude during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous (167 - 134 Ma). We find that the Pacific Plate likely underwent a steady southward drift during this time period, consistent with previous results from magnetic anomalies, except for an episode of northward motion between Oxfordian and Tithonian time (161 - 147 Ma). Although the amplitude of this northward shift is subject to significant uncertainty due to the sparse recovery of core samples, the trajectory of the Pacific Plate is most simply explained by TPW in the 160 - 145 Ma interval as inferred from continental data. Furthermore, such an interpretation is consistent with the sense of shear inferred at the Farallon-North American Plate boundary, whereas uniform

  13. High-resolution reconstructions of Pacific-North America plate motion: 20 Ma to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.

    2016-11-01

    We present new rotations that describe the relative positions and velocities of the Pacific and North America plates at 22 times during the past 19.7 Myr, offering ≈1-Myr temporal resolution for studies of the geotectonic evolution of western North America and other plate boundary locations. Derived from ≈18 000 magnetic reversal, fracture zone and transform fault identifications from the Pacific-Antarctic-Nubia-North America plate circuit and the velocities of 935 GPS sites on the Pacific and North America plates, the new rotations and GPS-derived angular velocity indicate that the rate of motion between the two plates increased by ≈70 per cent from 19.7 to 9±1 Ma, but changed by less than 2 per cent since 8 Ma and even less since 4.2 Ma. The rotations further suggest that the relative plate direction has rotated clockwise for most of the past 20 Myr, with a possible hiatus from 9 to 5 Ma. This conflicts with previously reported evidence for a significant clockwise change in the plate direction at ≈8-6 Ma. Our new rotations indicate that Pacific plate motion became obliquely convergent with respect to the San Andreas Fault of central California at 5.2-4.2 Ma, in agreement with geological evidence for a Pliocene onset of folding and faulting in central California. Our reconstruction of the northern Gulf of California at 6.3 Ma differs by only 15-30 km from structurally derived reconstructions after including 3-4 km Myr-1 of geodetically measured slip between the Baja California Peninsula and Pacific plate. This implies an approximate 15-30 km upper bound for plate non-rigidity integrated around the global circuit at 6.3 Ma. A much larger 200±54 km discrepancy between our reconstruction of the northern Gulf of California at 12 Ma and that estimated from structural and marine geophysical observations suggests that faults in northwestern Mexico or possibly west of the Baja California Peninsula accommodated large amounts of obliquely divergent dextral shear

  14. Reconstruction of Northeast Asian Deformation Integrated with Western Pacific Plate Subduction since 200 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Gurnis, M.; Ma, P.; Zhang, B.

    2017-12-01

    The configuration and kinematics of continental deformation and its marginal plate tectonics on the Earth's surface are intrinsic manifestations of plate-mantle coupling. The complex interactions of plate boundary forces result in plate motions that are dominated by slab pull and ridge push forces and the effects of mantle drag; these interactions also result in continental deformation with a complex basin-mountain architecture and evolution. The kinematics and evolution of the western Pacific subduction and northeast Asian continental-margin deformation are a first-order tectonic process whose nature and chronology remains controversial. This paper implements a "deep-time" reconstruction of the western Pacific subduction, continental accretion or collision and basin-mountain deformation in northeast Asia since 200 Ma based on a newly revised global plate model. The results demonstrate a NW-SE-oriented shortening from 200-137 Ma, a NWW-SEE-oriented extension from 136-101 Ma, a nearly N-S-oriented extension and uplift with a short-term NWW-SEE-oriented compressional inversion in northeast China from 100-67 Ma, and a NW-SE- and nearly N-S-oriented extension from 66 Ma to the present day. The western Pacific oceanic plate subducted forward under East Asia along Mudanjiang-Honshu Island during the Jurassic, and the trenches retreated to the Sikhote-Alin, North Shimanto, and South Shimanto zones from ca. 137-128 Ma, ca. 130-90 Ma, and in ca. 60 Ma, respectively. Our time-dependent analysis of plate motion and continental deformation coupling suggests that the multi-plate convergent motion and ocean-continent convergent orogeny were induced by advance subduction during the Jurassic and earliest Cretaceous. Our analysis also indicates that the intra-continent rifting and back-arc extension were triggered by trench retreat during the Cretaceous and that the subduction of oceanic ridge and arc were triggered by trench retreat during the Cenozoic. Therefore, reconstructing

  15. Air flow in the boundary layer near a plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Hugh L

    1937-01-01

    The published data on the distribution of speed near a thin flat plate with sharp leading edge placed parallel to the flow (skin friction plate) are reviewed and the results of some additional measurements are described. The purpose of the experiments was to study the basic phenomena of boundary-layer flow under simple conditions.

  16. Pacific western boundary currents and their roles in climate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dunxin; Wu, Lixin; Cai, Wenju; Gupta, Alex Sen; Ganachaud, Alexandre; Qiu, Bo; Gordon, Arnold L; Lin, Xiaopei; Chen, Zhaohui; Hu, Shijian; Wang, Guojian; Wang, Qingye; Sprintall, Janet; Qu, Tangdong; Kashino, Yuji; Wang, Fan; Kessler, William S

    2015-06-18

    Pacific Ocean western boundary currents and the interlinked equatorial Pacific circulation system were among the first currents of these types to be explored by pioneering oceanographers. The widely accepted but poorly quantified importance of these currents-in processes such as the El Niño/Southern Oscillation, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the Indonesian Throughflow-has triggered renewed interest. Ongoing efforts are seeking to understand the heat and mass balances of the equatorial Pacific, and possible changes associated with greenhouse-gas-induced climate change. Only a concerted international effort will close the observational, theoretical and technical gaps currently limiting a robust answer to these elusive questions.

  17. Investigating the Subduction History of the Southwest Pacific using Coupled Plate Tectonic-Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, K. J.; Flament, N. E.; Williams, S.; Müller, D.; Gurnis, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Late Cretaceous to mid Eocene (~85-45 Ma) evolution of the southwest Pacific has been the subject of starkly contrasting plate reconstruction models, reflecting sparse and ambiguous data. Disparate models of (1) west-dipping subduction and back-arc basin opening to the east of the Lord Howe Rise, (2) east-dipping subduction and back-arc basin closure to the east of the Lord Howe Rise, and (3) tectonic quiescence with no subduction have all been proposed for this time frame. To help resolve this long-standing problem we test a new southwest Pacific reconstruction using global mantle flow models with imposed plate motions. The kinematic model incorporates east to northeast directed rollback of a west-dipping subduction zone between 85 and 55 Ma, accommodating opening of the South Loyalty back-arc basin to the east of New Caledonia. At 55 Ma there is a plate boundary reorganization in the region. West-dipping subduction and back-arc basin spreading end, and there is initiation of northeast dipping subduction within the back-arc basin. Consumption of South Loyalty Basin seafloor continues until 45 Ma, when obduction onto New Caledonia begins. West-dipping Tonga-Kermadec subduction initiates at this time at the relict Late Cretaceous-earliest Eocene subduction boundary. We use the 3D spherical mantle convection code CitcomS coupled to the plate reconstruction software GPlates, with plate motions and evolving plate boundaries imposed since 230 Ma. The predicted present-day mantle structure is compared to S- and P-wave seismic tomography models, which can be used to infer the presence of slab material in the mantle at locations where fast velocity anomalies are imaged. This workflow enables us to assess the forward-modeled subduction history of the region.

  18. The 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake related to a large velocity gradient within the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Makoto; Obara, Kazushige

    2015-04-01

    We conduct seismic tomography using arrival time data picked by the high sensitivity seismograph network (Hi-net) operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). We used earthquakes off the coast outside the seismic network around the source region of the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake with the centroid depth estimated from moment tensor inversion by NIED F-net (broadband seismograph network) as well as earthquakes within the seismic network determined by Hi-net. The target region, 20-48N and 120-148E, covers the Japanese Islands from Hokkaido to Okinawa. A total of manually picked 4,622,346 P-wave and 3,062,846 S-wave arrival times for 100,733 earthquakes recorded at 1,212 stations from October 2000 to August 2009 is available for use in the tomographic method. In the final iteration, we estimate the P-wave slowness at 458,234 nodes and the S-wave slowness at 347,037 nodes. The inversion reduces the root mean square of the P-wave traveltime residual from 0.455 s to 0.187 s and that of the S-wave data from 0.692 s to 0.228 s after eight iterations (Matsubara and Obara, 2011). Centroid depths are determined using a Green's function approach (Okada et al., 2004) such as in NIED F-net. For the events distant from the seismic network, the centroid depth is more reliable than that determined by NIED Hi-net, since there are no stations above the hypocenter. We determine the upper boundary of the Pacific plate based on the velocity structure and earthquake hypocentral distribution. The upper boundary of the low-velocity (low-V) oceanic crust corresponds to the plate boundary where thrust earthquakes are expected to occur. Where we do not observe low-V oceanic crust, we determine the upper boundary of the upper layer of the double seismic zone within high-V Pacific plate. We assume the depth at the Japan Trench as 7 km. We can investigate the velocity structure within the Pacific plate such as 10 km beneath the plate boundary since the

  19. A diffuse plate boundary model for Indian Ocean tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, D. A.; Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Stein, S.; Argus, D.

    1985-01-01

    It is suggested that motion along the virtually aseismic Owen fracture zone is negligible, so that Arabia and India are contained within a single Indo-Arabian plate divided from the Australian plate by a diffuse boundary. The boundary is a zone of concentrated seismicity and deformation commonly characterized as 'intraplate'. The rotation vector of Australia relative to Indo-Arabia is consistent with the seismologically observed 2 cm/yr of left-lateral strike-slip along the Ninetyeast Ridge, north-south compression in the Central Indian Ocean, and the north-south extension near Chagos.

  20. Lagrangian analysis of the laminar flat plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabr, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    The flow properties at the leading edge of a flat plate represent a singularity to the Blasius laminar boundary layer equations; by applying the Lagrangian approach, the leading edge velocity profiles of the laminar boundary layer over a flat plate are studied. Experimental observations as well as the theoretical analysis show an exact Gaussian distribution curve as the original starting profile of the laminar flow. Comparisons between the Blasius solution and the Gaussian curve solution are carried out providing a new insight into the physics of the laminar flow.

  1. Composite transform-convergent plate boundaries: description and discussion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, H.F.; Coleman, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    The leading edge of the overriding plate at an obliquely convergent boundary is commonly sliced by a system of strike-slip faults. This fault system is often structurally complex, and may show correspondingly uneven strain effects, with great vertical and translational shifts of the component blocks of the fault system. The stress pattern and strain effects vary along the length of the system and change through time. These margins are considered to be composite transform-convergent (CTC) plate boundaries. Examples are given of structures formed along three CTC boundaries: the Aleutian Ridge, the Solomon Islands, and the Philippines. The dynamism of the fault system along a CTC boundary can enhance vertical tectonism and basin formation. This concept provides a framework for the evaluation of petroleum resources related to basin formation, and mineral exploration related to igneous activity associated with transtensional processes. ?? 1992.

  2. Buckling transition and boundary layer in non-Euclidean plates.

    PubMed

    Efrati, Efi; Sharon, Eran; Kupferman, Raz

    2009-07-01

    Non-Euclidean plates are thin elastic bodies having no stress-free configuration, hence exhibiting residual stresses in the absence of external constraints. These bodies are endowed with a three-dimensional reference metric, which may not necessarily be immersible in physical space. Here, based on a recently developed theory for such bodies, we characterize the transition from flat to buckled equilibrium configurations at a critical value of the plate thickness. Depending on the reference metric, the buckling transition may be either continuous or discontinuous. In the infinitely thin plate limit, under the assumption that a limiting configuration exists, we show that the limit is a configuration that minimizes the bending content, among all configurations with zero stretching content (isometric immersions of the midsurface). For small but finite plate thickness, we show the formation of a boundary layer, whose size scales with the square root of the plate thickness and whose shape is determined by a balance between stretching and bending energies.

  3. Iberian plate kinematics: A jumping plate boundary between Eurasia and Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Srivastava, S.P.; Schouten, Hans; Roest, W.R.; Klitgord, Kim D.; Kovacs, L.C.; Verhoef, J.; Macnab, R.

    1990-01-01

    THE rotation of Iberia and its relation to the formation of the Pyrenees has been difficult to decipher because of the lack of detailed sea-floor spreading data, although several models have been proposed1-7. Here we use detailed aeromagnetic measurements from the sea floor offshore of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland to show that Iberia moved as part of the African plate from late Cretaceous to mid-Eocene time, with a plate boundary extending westward from the Bay of Biscay. When motion along this boundary ceased, a boundary linking extension in the King's Trough to compression along the Pyrenees came into existence. Finally, since the late Oligocene, Iberia has been part of the Eurasian plate, with the boundary between Eurasia and Africa situated along the Azores-Gibraltar fracture zone.

  4. Introduction to the special issue on the 2012 Haida Gwaii and 2013 Craig earthquakes at the Pacific–North America plate boundary (British Columbia and Alaska)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Thomas S.; Cassidy, John F.; Rogers, Garry C.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The 27 October 2012 Mw 7.8 Haida Gwaii thrust earthquake and the 5 January 2013 Mw 7.5 Craig strike‐slip earthquake are the focus of this special issue. They occurred along the transform boundary between the Pacific and North American plates (Fig. 1). The most identifiable feature of the plate boundary, the strike‐slip Queen Charlotte fault, might be viewed as typical of continent–ocean transform faults because it separates the continental crust of the North American plate from oceanic crust of the Pacific plate for most of its length. However, the current relative plate motion of about 5  cm/yr is highly oblique to the Queen Charlotte fault, causing a transpressive plate boundary in the region.

  5. Pacific plate motion change caused the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend

    PubMed Central

    Torsvik, Trond H.; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Gaina, Carmen; Spakman, Wim; Domeier, Mathew

    2017-01-01

    A conspicuous 60° bend of the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain in the north-western Pacific Ocean has variously been interpreted as the result of an abrupt Pacific plate motion change in the Eocene (∼47 Ma), a rapid southward drift of the Hawaiian hotspot before the formation of the bend, or a combination of these two causes. Palaeomagnetic data from the Emperor Seamounts prove ambiguous for constraining the Hawaiian hotspot drift, but mantle flow modelling suggests that the hotspot drifted 4–9° south between 80 and 47 Ma. Here we demonstrate that southward hotspot drift cannot be a sole or dominant mechanism for formation of the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend (HEB). While southward hotspot drift has resulted in more northerly positions of the Emperor Seamounts as they are observed today, formation of the HEB cannot be explained without invoking a prominent change in the direction of Pacific plate motion around 47 Ma. PMID:28580950

  6. Swath sonar mapping of Earth's submarine plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V. L.; Celnick, M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Ryan, W. B. F.

    2014-12-01

    The recent loss of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in an area of the Indian Ocean where less than 5% of the seafloor is mapped with depth sounding data (Smith and Marks, EOS 2014) highlights the striking lack of detailed knowledge of the topography of the seabed for much of the worlds' oceans. Advances in swath sonar mapping technology over the past 30 years have led to dramatic improvements in our capability to map the seabed. However, the oceans are vast and only an estimated 10% of the seafloor has been mapped with these systems. Furthermore, the available coverage is highly heterogeneous and focused within areas of national strategic priority and community scientific interest. The major plate boundaries that encircle the globe, most of which are located in the submarine environment, have been a significant focus of marine geoscience research since the advent of swath sonar mapping. While the location of these plate boundaries are well defined from satellite-derived bathymetry, significant regions remain unmapped at the high-resolutions provided by swath sonars and that are needed to study active volcanic and tectonic plate boundary processes. Within the plate interiors, some fossil plate boundary zones, major hotspot volcanoes, and other volcanic provinces have been the focus of dedicated research programs. Away from these major tectonic structures, swath mapping coverage is limited to sparse ocean transit lines which often reveal previously unknown deep-sea channels and other little studied sedimentary structures not resolvable in existing low-resolution global compilations, highlighting the value of these data even in the tectonically quiet plate interiors. Here, we give an overview of multibeam swath sonar mapping of the major plate boundaries of the globe as extracted from public archives. Significant quantities of swath sonar data acquired from deep-sea regions are in restricted-access international archives. Open access to more of these data sets would

  7. An EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M.; Anderson, G.; Blume, F.; Walls, C.; Coyle, B.; Feaux, K.; Friesen, B.; Phillips, D.; Hafner, K.; Johnson, W.; Mencin, D.; Pauk, B.; Dittmann, T.

    2007-12-01

    UNAVCO is building and operating the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project to understand the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the North American continent. When complete in October 2008, the 875 GPS, 103 strain and seismic, and 28 tiltmeters stations will comprise the largest integrated geodetic and seismic network in United States and the second largest in the world. Data from the PBO network will facilitate research into plate boundary deformation with unprecedented scope and detail. As of 1 September 2007, UNAVCO had completed 680 PBO GPS stations and had upgraded 89% of the planned PBO Nucleus stations. Highlights of the past year's work include the expansion of the Alaska subnetwork to 95 continuously-operating stations, including coverage of Akutan and Augustine volcanoes and reconnaissance for future installations on Unimak Island; the installation of nine new stations on Mt. St. Helens; and the arrival of 33 permits for station installations on BLM land in Nevada. The Augustine network provided critical data on magmatic and volcanic processes associated with the 2005-2006 volcanic crisis, and has expanded to a total of 11 stations. Please visit http://pboweb.unavco.org/?pageid=3 for further information on PBO GPS network construction activities. As of September 2007, 41 PBO borehole stations had been installed and three laser strainmeter stations were operating, with a total of 60 borehole stations and 4 laser strainmeters expected by October 2007. In response to direction from the EarthScope community, UNAVCO installed a dense network of six stations along the San Jacinto Fault near Anza, California; installed three of four planned borehole strainmeter stations on Mt. St. Helens; and has densified coverage of the Parkfield area. Please visit http://pboweb.unavco.org/?pageid=8 for more information on PBO strainmeter network construction progress. The combined PBO/Nucleus GPS network provides 350 GB of raw standard

  8. Inter-plate aseismic slip on the subducting plate boundaries estimated from repeating earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sequences of repeating earthquakes are caused by repeating slips of small patches surrounded by aseismic slip areas at plate boundary zones. Recently, they have been detected in many regions. In this study, I detected repeating earthquakes which occurred in Japan and the world by using seismograms observed in the Japanese seismic network, and investigated the space-time characteristics of inter-plate aseismic slip on the subducting plate boundaries. To extract repeating earthquakes, I calculate cross-correlation coefficients of band-pass filtering seismograms at each station following Igarashi [2010]. I used two data-set based on USGS catalog for about 25 years from May 1990 and JMA catalog for about 13 years from January 2002. As a result, I found many sequences of repeating earthquakes in the subducting plate boundaries of the Andaman-Sumatra-Java and Japan-Kuril-Kamchatka-Aleutian subduction zones. By applying the scaling relations among a seismic moment, recurrence interval and slip proposed by Nadeau and Johnson [1998], they indicate the space-time changes of inter-plate aseismic slips. Pairs of repeating earthquakes with the longest time interval occurred in the Solomon Islands area and the recurrence interval was about 18.5 years. The estimated slip-rate is about 46 mm/year, which correspond to about half of the relative plate motion in this area. Several sequences with fast slip-rates correspond to the post-seismic slips after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (M9.0), the 2006 Kuril earthquake (M8.3), the 2007 southern Sumatra earthquake (M8.5), and the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9.0). The database of global repeating earthquakes enables the comparison of the inter-plate aseismic slips of various plate boundary zones of the world. I believe that I am likely to detect more sequences by extending analysis periods in the area where they were not found in this analysis.

  9. The proximity of hotspots to convergent and divergent plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Stuart A.; Olson, Peter L.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of four different hotspot distributions, ranging from Morgan's (1972) original list of 19 to Vogt's (1981) list of 117 reveals that the hotspots are preferentially located near divergent plate boundaries. The probability of this proximity occurring by chance alone is quite remote, less than 0.01 for all four hotspot distributions. The same analysis also reveals that the hotspots are preferentially excluded from regions near convergent plate boundaries. The probability of this exclusion occurring by chance alone is 0.1 or less for three out of the four distributions examined. We interpret this behavior as being a consequence of the effects of large scale convective circulation on ascending mantle plumes. Mantle thermal plumes, the most probable source of hotspots, arise from instabilities in a basal thermal boundary layer. Plumes are suppressed from regions beneath convergent boundaries by descending flow and are entrained into the upwelling flow beneath spreading centers. Plate-scale convective circulation driven by subduction may also advect mantle thermal plumes toward spreading centers.

  10. Fast Paleogene Motion of the Pacific Hotspots from Revised Global Plate Circuit Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, C.; Stock, J.; Cande, S.

    2000-01-01

    Major improvements in late Cretaceous-early Tertiary Pacific-Antarctica plate reconstructions, and new East-West Antarctica rotations, allow a more definitive test of the relative motion between hotspots using global plate circuit reconstructions with quantitative uncertainties.

  11. Evidence of displacement-driven maturation along the San Cristobal Trough transform plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, James S.; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2018-03-01

    The San Cristobal Trough (SCT), formed by the tearing of the Australia plate as it subducts under the Pacific plate near the Solomon Islands, provides an opportunity to study the transform boundary development process. Recent seismicity (2013-2016) along the 280 km long SCT, known as a Subduction-Transform Edge Propagator (STEP) fault, highlights the tearing process and ongoing development of the plate boundary. The region's earthquakes reveal two key characteristics. First, earthquakes at the western terminus of the SCT, which we interpret to indicate the Australia plate tearing, display disparate fault geometries. These events demonstrate that plate tearing is accommodated via multiple intersecting planes rather than a single through-going fault. Second, the SCT hosts sequences of Mw ∼7 strike-slip earthquakes that migrate westward through a rapid succession of events. Sequences in 1993 and 2015 both began along the eastern SCT and propagated west, but neither progression ruptured into or nucleated a large earthquake within the region near the tear. Utilizing b-value and Coulomb Failure Stress analyses, we examine these along-strike variations in the SCT's seismicity. b-Values are highest along the youngest, western end of the SCT and decrease with increasing distance from the tear. This trend may reflect increasing strain localization with increasing displacement. Coulomb Failure Stress analyses indicate that the stress conditions were conducive to continued western propagation of the 1993 and 2015 sequences suggesting that the unruptured western SCT may have fault geometries or properties that inhibit continued rupture. Our results indicate a displacement-driven fault maturation process. The multi-plane Australia plate tearing likely creates a western SCT with diffuse strain accommodated along a network of disorganized faults. After ∼90 km of cumulative displacement (∼900,000 yr of plate motion), strain localizes and faults align, allowing the SCT to host

  12. Global plate boundary evolution and kinematics since the late Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Kara J.; Maloney, Kayla T.; Zahirovic, Sabin; Williams, Simon E.; Seton, Maria; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-11-01

    Many aspects of deep-time Earth System models, including mantle convection, paleoclimatology, paleobiogeography and the deep Earth carbon cycle, require high-resolution plate motion models that include the evolution of the mosaic of plate boundaries through time. We present the first continuous late Paleozoic to present-day global plate model with evolving plate boundaries, building on and extending two previously published models for the late Paleozoic (410-250 Ma) and Mesozoic-Cenozoic (230-0 Ma). We ensure continuity during the 250-230 Ma transition period between the two models, update the absolute reference frame of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic model and add a new Paleozoic reconstruction for the Baltica-derived Alexander Terrane, now accreted to western North America. This 410-0 Ma open access model provides a framework for deep-time whole Earth modelling and acts as a base for future extensions and refinement. We analyse the model in terms of the number of plates, predicted plate size distribution, plate and continental root mean square (RMS) speeds, plate velocities and trench migration through time. Overall model trends share many similarities to those for recent times, which we use as a first order benchmark against which to compare the model and identify targets for future model refinement. Except for during the period 260-160 Ma, the number of plates (16-46) and ratio of "large" plates (≥ 107.5 km2) to smaller plates ( 2.7-6.6) are fairly similar to present-day values (46 and 6.6, respectively), with lower values occurring during late Paleozoic assembly and growth of Pangea. This temporal pattern may also reflect difficulties in reconstructing small, now subducted oceanic plates further back in time, as well as whether a supercontinent is assembling or breaking up. During the 260-160 Ma timeframe the model reaches a minima in the number of plates, in contrast to what we would expect during initial Pangea breakup and thus highlighting the need for refinement

  13. Discovering the plates boundaries in the Mediterranean sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    During the 8th class the students learn geology. We analyze the earth's layers, the earthquakes, the volcanoes and other natural phenomena like subduction and orogeny. We start with a global study but our goal is to focus on the crust to discover the plates boundaries, particularly the boundary between Eurasian and African Plate in the Mediterranean sea. It's very simple for the students to discover all the information using the Internet or the science book, but I want to make with them an exploration of earth science with the help of the natural phenomena we studied during the year. We connect with Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia ( http://www.ingv.it/en/ ) where we can find a map with the earthquakes happened in the last years in Italy and in the Mediterranean sea and the list of the main volcanoes. In this way we can draw a map of the mediterranean plates and we can talk about the past and the future of the Mediterranean sea, Europe and Africa based on our maps and on the Alps orogeny. Using youtube we can have a confirm of our hypothesis about the future of the Mediterranean sea (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGcDed4xVD4 ). A good observation for the students is given by the fact that we live in Europe but actually we stay on the African plate. The boundary is 5 km north of our school and we can go and visit the place where it is possible to see the different height of the two plates.

  14. Intermittent Granular Dynamics at a Seismogenic Plate Boundary.

    PubMed

    Meroz, Yasmine; Meade, Brendan J

    2017-09-29

    Earthquakes at seismogenic plate boundaries are a response to the differential motions of tectonic blocks embedded within a geometrically complex network of branching and coalescing faults. Elastic strain is accumulated at a slow strain rate on the order of 10^{-15}  s^{-1}, and released intermittently at intervals >100  yr, in the form of rapid (seconds to minutes) coseismic ruptures. The development of macroscopic models of quasistatic planar tectonic dynamics at these plate boundaries has remained challenging due to uncertainty with regard to the spatial and kinematic complexity of fault system behaviors. The characteristic length scale of kinematically distinct tectonic structures is particularly poorly constrained. Here, we analyze fluctuations in Global Positioning System observations of interseismic motion from the southern California plate boundary, identifying heavy-tailed scaling behavior. Namely, we show that, consistent with findings for slowly sheared granular media, the distribution of velocity fluctuations deviates from a Gaussian, exhibiting broad tails, and the correlation function decays as a stretched exponential. This suggests that the plate boundary can be understood as a densely packed granular medium, predicting a characteristic tectonic length scale of 91±20  km, here representing the characteristic size of tectonic blocks in the southern California fault network, and relating the characteristic duration and recurrence interval of earthquakes, with the observed sheared strain rate, and the nanosecond value for the crack tip evolution time scale. Within a granular description, fault and blocks systems may rapidly rearrange the distribution of forces within them, driving a mixture of transient and intermittent fault slip behaviors over tectonic time scales.

  15. Intermittent Granular Dynamics at a Seismogenic Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meroz, Yasmine; Meade, Brendan J.

    2017-09-01

    Earthquakes at seismogenic plate boundaries are a response to the differential motions of tectonic blocks embedded within a geometrically complex network of branching and coalescing faults. Elastic strain is accumulated at a slow strain rate on the order of 10-15 s-1 , and released intermittently at intervals >100 yr , in the form of rapid (seconds to minutes) coseismic ruptures. The development of macroscopic models of quasistatic planar tectonic dynamics at these plate boundaries has remained challenging due to uncertainty with regard to the spatial and kinematic complexity of fault system behaviors. The characteristic length scale of kinematically distinct tectonic structures is particularly poorly constrained. Here, we analyze fluctuations in Global Positioning System observations of interseismic motion from the southern California plate boundary, identifying heavy-tailed scaling behavior. Namely, we show that, consistent with findings for slowly sheared granular media, the distribution of velocity fluctuations deviates from a Gaussian, exhibiting broad tails, and the correlation function decays as a stretched exponential. This suggests that the plate boundary can be understood as a densely packed granular medium, predicting a characteristic tectonic length scale of 91 ±20 km , here representing the characteristic size of tectonic blocks in the southern California fault network, and relating the characteristic duration and recurrence interval of earthquakes, with the observed sheared strain rate, and the nanosecond value for the crack tip evolution time scale. Within a granular description, fault and blocks systems may rapidly rearrange the distribution of forces within them, driving a mixture of transient and intermittent fault slip behaviors over tectonic time scales.

  16. Tectonics of the Nazca-Antarctic plate boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson-Fontana, Sandra; Larson, Roger L.; Engeln, Joseph F.; Lundgren, Paul; Stein, Seth

    1987-01-01

    A new bathymetric chart of part of the Chile transform system is constructed, based mainly on an R/V Endeavor survey from 100 deg W to its intersection with the East Ridge of the Juan Fernandez microplate. A generally continuous lineated trend can be followed through the entire region, with the transform valley being relatively narrow and well-defined from 109 deg W to approximately 104 deg 30 min W. The fracture zone then widens to the east, with at least two probable en echelon offsets to the south at 104 deg and 102 deg W. Six new strike-slip mechanisms along the Chile Transform and one normal fault mechanism near the northern end of the Chile Rise, inverted together with other plate-motion data from the eastern portion of the boundary, produce a new best-fit Euler pole for the Nazca-Antarctic plate pair, providing tighter constraints on the relative plate motions.

  17. Owen Fracture Zone: The Arabia-India plate boundary unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Rodriguez, M.; Huchon, P.; Petit, C.; Beslier, M. O.; Zaragosi, S.

    2011-02-01

    We surveyed the Owen Fracture Zone at the boundary between the Arabia and India plates in the NW Indian Ocean using a high-resolution multibeam echo-sounder (Owen cruise, 2009) for search of active faults. Bathymetric data reveal a previously unrecognized submarine fault scarp system running for over 800 km between the Sheba Ridge in the Gulf of Aden and the Makran subduction zone. The primary plate boundary structure is not the bathymetrically high Owen Ridge, but is instead a series of clearly delineated strike-slip fault segments separated by several releasing and restraining bends. Despite an abundant sedimentary supply by the Indus River flowing from the Himalaya, fault scarps are not obscured by recent deposits and can be followed over hundreds of kilometres, pointing to very active tectonics. The total strike-slip displacement of the fault system is 10-12 km, indicating that it has been active for the past ~ 3 to 6 Ma if its current rate of motion of 3 ± 1 mm yr- 1 has remained stable. We describe the geometry of this recent fault system, including a major pull-apart basin at the latitude 20°N, and we show that it closely follows an arc of small circle centred on the Arabia-India pole of rotation, as expected for a transform plate boundary.

  18. Circum-arctic plate accretion - Isolating part of a pacific plate to form the nucleus of the Arctic Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churkin, M.; Trexler, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    A mosaic of large lithospheric plates rims the Arctic Ocean Basin, and foldbelts between these plates contain numerous allochthonous microplates. A new model for continental drift and microplate accretion proposes that prior to the late Mesozoic the Kula plate extended from the Pacific into the Arctic. By a process of circumpolar drift and microplate accretion, fragments of the Pacific basin, including parts of the Kula plate, were cut off and isolated in the Arctic Ocean, the Yukon-Koyukuk basin in Alaska, and the Bering Sea. ?? 1980.

  19. Heterogeneous subduction structure within the Pacific plate beneath the Izu-Bonin arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wei; Xing, Junhui; Jiang, Xiaodian

    2018-05-01

    The Izu-Bonin subduction zone is a subduction system formed in early Eocene. The structure of the subduction zone becomes complicated with the evolution of the surrounding plate motion, and many aspects are still unkown or ambiguous. The geodynamic implications are further investigated in related to published seismic observations and geochemical characters of the Izu-Bonin subduction zone. As indicated by seismic tomography and epicentral distributions, the dip angle of the plate beneath the segment to the south of 29°-30°N (the southern Izu-Bonin) is much steeper than the northern one (the northern Izu-Bonin). Deep focus events in the southern segment extend to the depth of ∼600 km, whereas in the northern section deep events just terminate at 420-450 km. Particularly, tomographic images show an obvious boundary between the northern and southern Izu-Bonin at depths of 150-600 km neglected in the previous studies. The northern and southern segments are even separated by a wide range of low-velocity anomaly in P and S wave tomography at 380 km and 450 km depths. In this depth range, three events near 30°N are characterized by strike-slip mechanisms with slab parallel σ1 and horizontally north-south trending σ3, which differ with the typical down-dip compression mechanisms for neighboring events. These events could be attributed to an abrupt change of the morphology and movement of the slab in the transition segment between the northern and southern Izu-Bonin. Indicated by the focal mechanisms, the northern and southern Izu-Bonin exhibits an inhomogeneous stress field, which is closely related to age differences of the downgoing slab. Because of the reheating process, the thermal age of the Pacific plate entering the Izu-Bonin trench in the past 10 Ma, is only 60-90 ± 20 Ma, along with the younger plate subducting in the northern segment. The seismic anisotropy implies that mantle wedge flow orientation is between the motion direction of the Pacific plate and

  20. Dynamic behaviour of thin composite plates for different boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprintu, Iuliana, E-mail: sprintui@yahoo.com, E-mail: rotaruconstantin@yahoo.com; Rotaru, Constantin, E-mail: sprintui@yahoo.com, E-mail: rotaruconstantin@yahoo.com

    2014-12-10

    In the context of composite materials technology, which is increasingly present in industry, this article covers a topic of great interest and theoretical and practical importance. Given the complex design of fiber-reinforced materials and their heterogeneous nature, mathematical modeling of the mechanical response under different external stresses is very difficult to address in the absence of simplifying assumptions. In most structural applications, composite structures can be idealized as beams, plates, or shells. The analysis is reduced from a three-dimensional elasticity problem to a oneor two-dimensional problem, based on certain simplifying assumptions that can be made because the structure is thin.more » This paper aims to validate a mathematical model illustrating how thin rectangular orthotropic plates respond to the actual load. Thus, from the theory of thin plates, new analytical solutions are proposed corresponding to orthotropic rectangular plates having different boundary conditions. The proposed analytical solutions are considered both for solving equation orthotropic rectangular plates and for modal analysis.« less

  1. Formation of plate boundaries: The role of mantle volatilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seno, Tetsuzo; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2014-02-01

    In the early Earth, convection occurred with the accumulation of thick crust over a weak boundary layer downwelling into the mantle (Davies, G.F., 1992. On the emergence of plate tectonics. Geology 20, 963-966.). This would have transitioned to stagnant-lid convection as the mantle cooled (Solomatov, V.S., Moresi, L.-N., 1997. Three regimes of mantle convection with non-Newtonian viscosity and stagnant lid convection on the terrestrial planets. Geophys. Res. Lett. 24, 1907-1910.) or back to a magma ocean as the mantle heated (Sleep, N., 2000. Evolution of the mode of convection within terrestrial planets. J. Geophys. Res. 105(E7): 17563-17578). Because plate tectonics began operating on the Earth, subduction must have been initiated, thus avoiding these shifts. Based on an analogy with the continental crust subducted beneath Hindu Kush and Burma, we propose that the lithosphere was hydrated and/or carbonated by H2O-CO2 vapors released from magmas generated in upwelling plumes and subsequently volatilized during underthrusting, resulting in lubrication of the thrust above, and subduction of the lithosphere along with the overlying thick crust. Once subduction had been initiated, serpentinized forearc mantle may have formed in a wedge-shaped body above a dehydrating slab. In relict arcs, suture zones, or rifted margins, any agent that warms and dehydrates the wedge would weaken the region surrounding it, and form various types of plate boundaries depending on the operating tectonic stress. Thus, once subduction is initiated, formation of plate boundaries might be facilitated by a major fundamental process: weakening due to the release of pressurized water from the warming serpentinized forearc mantle.

  2. 50-Ma Initiation of Hawaiian-Emperor Bend Records Major Change in Pacific Plate Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Warren D.; Clague, David A.

    2006-09-01

    The Hawaiian-Emperor bend has played a prominent yet controversial role in deciphering past Pacific plate motions and the tempo of plate motion change. New ages for volcanoes of the central and southern Emperor chain define large changes in volcanic migration rate with little associated change in the chain's trend, which suggests that the bend did not form by slowing of the Hawaiian hot spot. Initiation of the bend near Kimmei seamount about 50 million years ago (MA) was coincident with realignment of Pacific spreading centers and early magmatism in western Pacific arcs, consistent with formation of the bend by changed Pacific plate motion.

  3. Crustal deformation and volcanism at active plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsson, Halldor

    Most of Earth's volcanoes are located near active tectonic plate boundaries, where the tectonic plates move relative to each other resulting in deformation. Likewise, subsurface magma movement and pressure changes in magmatic systems can cause measurable deformation of the Earth's surface. The study of the shape of Earth and therefore studies of surface deformation is called geodesy. Modern geodetic techniques allow precise measurements (˜1 mm accuracy) of deformation of tectonic and magmatic systems. Because of the spatial correlation between tectonic boundaries and volcanism, the tectonic and volcanic deformation signals can become intertwined. Thus it is often important to study both tectonic and volcanic deformation processes simultaneously, when one is trying to study one of the systems individually. In this thesis, I present research on crustal deformation and magmatic processes at active plate boundaries. The study areas cover divergent and transform plate boundaries in south Iceland and convergent and transform plate boundaries in Central America, specifically Nicaragua and El Salvador. The study is composed of four main chapters: two of the chapters focus on the magma plumbing system of Hekla volcano, Iceland and the plate boundary in south Iceland; one chapter focuses on shallow controls of explosive volcanism at Telica volcano, Nicaragua; and the fourth chapter focuses on co- and post-seismic deformation from a Mw = 7.3 earthquake which occurred offshore El Salvador in 2012. Hekla volcano is located at the intersection of a transform zone and a rift zone in Iceland and thus is affected by a combination of shear and extensional strains, in addition to co-seismic and co-rifting deformation. The inter-eruptive deformation signal from Hekla is subtle, as observed by a decade (2000-2010) of GPS data in south Iceland. A simultaneous inversion of this data for parameters describing the geometry and source characteristics of the magma chamber at Hekla, and

  4. New observations on mid-plate volcanism and the tectonic history of the Pacific plate, Tahiti to Easter microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, R. C.; Francheteau, J.; Cornaglia, B.

    1995-04-01

    -echelon features. The Austral Fracture Zone is the only major fracture zone crossed in our transit, and here is characterised by four fossil transform strands. Its marked position on the AAPG and GEBCO maps is found to be in error. Finally, we found that the expected change from NNW- to NNE-trending spreading fabric at chron 6C did not occur in a clear-cut way, as predicted by earlier tectonic histories of the Pacific. Instead, the post-chron 6C fabric oscillates in a confused way between NNE and NNW, suggesting to us that this area has been characterised by an unstable plate boundary, probably associated with a succession of propagating rifts or microplates from chron 6C to the present.

  5. Core-Mantle Boundary Complexities beneath the Mid-Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Helmberger, D. V.; Jackson, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The detailed core-mantle boundary (CMB) structures beneath the Mid-Pacific are important to map the boundary of Large Low Shear Velocity Province (LLSVP) and the location of ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ) related to the LLSVP and the D" layer, which are crucial for answering the key questions regarding to the mantle dynamics. Seismic data from deep earthquakes in the Fiji-Tonga region recorded by stations of USArray provide great sampling of the CMB beneath the Mid-Pacific. Here we explore the USArray data with different seismic phases to study the CMB complexities beneath the Mid-Pacific. First, we examined the differential travel time and amplitude between ScS and S for data at western US and confirm the northeastern boundary of the mid-Pacific LLSVP. The delayed ScS-S travel times and smaller amplitude of ScS require the existence of ULVZ locally. Secondly, the Sdiff data recorded by stations at central US shows variation in multi-pathing, that is, the presence of secondary arrivals following the S phase at diffracted distances (Sdiff) which suggests that the waveform complexity is due to structures at the eastern edge of the mid-Pacific LLSVP. This study reinforces previous studies that indicate late arrivals occurring after the primary Sdiff arrivals. A tapered wedge structure with low shear velocity allows for wave energy trapping, producing the observed waveform complexity and delayed arrivals at large distances. The location of the low velocity anomaly agrees with that inferred from the ScS-S measurements. We also observed advanced SV arrivals, which can be explained by the emerging of the D" discontinuity to the east of the boundary of the LLSVP to produce a "pseudo anisotropy". Thirdly, the arrivals of the SPdKS phase support the presence of an ULVZ within a two-humped LLSVP. A sharp 10 secs jump of the differential travel time between S and SKS (TS-SKS) across distance range of 5° is observed. The associated SKS waveform distortions suggest that the

  6. Plate boundary deformation at the latitude of the Salton Trough - northern Gulf of California (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Along the Pacific-North America plate boundary zone, the segment including the southern San Andreas fault to Salton Trough and northern Gulf of California basins has been transtensional throughout its evolution, based on Pacific-North America displacement vectors calculated from the global plate circuit (900 × 20 km at N54°W since 20 Ma; 460 × 20 km at N48°W since 11 Ma). Nevertheless, active seismicity and focal mechanisms show a broad zone of plate boundary deformation within which the inferred stress regime varies locally (Yang & Hauksson 2013 GJI), and fault patterns in some regions suggest ongoing tectonic rotation. Similar behavior is inferred to have occurred in this zone over most of its history. Crustal structure in this region is constrained by surface geology, geophysical experiments (e.g., the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), USGS Imperial Valley 1979, PACE), and interdisciplinary marine and onland studies in Mexico (e.g., NARS-Baja, Cortes, and surveys by PEMEX). Magnetic data (e.g., EMAG-2) aids in the recognition of large-scale crustal provinces and fault boundaries in regions lacking detailed geophysical surveys. Consideration of existing constraints on crustal thickness and architecture, and fault and basin evolution suggests that to reconcile geological deformation with plate motion history, the following additional factors need to be taken into account. 1) Plate boundary displacement via interacting systems of rotating blocks, coeval with slip on steep strike slip faults, and possibly related to slip on low angle extensional faults (e.g, Axen & Fletcher 1998 IGR) may be typical prior to the onset of seafloor spreading. This fault style may have accommodated up to 150 km of plate motion in the Mexican Continental Borderland and north of the Vizcaino Peninsula, likely between 12 and 15 Ma, as well as explaining younger rotations adjacent to the Gulf of California and current deformation southwest of the Salton Sea. 2) Geophysical

  7. Prototypical Concepts and Misconceptions of Plate Tectonic Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, D. F.; Patino, L. C.

    2003-12-01

    Students of geology encounter many prototypical/exemplar concepts* that include representative, but not necessarily defining, features and characteristics. This study of students' prototypical representations of plate tectonic boundaries indicates that their representations are rich sources of information about their misconceptions about plate tectonics. After lectures in plate tectonics and mountain building, 353 students in a general education geology class were asked to draw a continent-continent convergent boundary. For this study, a correct answer is defined as having the major features in correct proportions as depicted in the plate boundary diagrams on the USGS web. Fifty-two percent of the drawings were either incorrect or incomplete such that they could not be interpreted. Only 48% were readily interpretable, and of these 22% drew the boundary correctly, showing a thickening of crust where two continents collide. Thirty-three percent drew the boundary showing concave slabs of continental crust as one might imagine two pieces of firm rubber pushed together on a rigid surface and 45% depicted mountains as one might imagine inverted ice cream cones on a rigid plank. Twenty-one senior class geology majors and graduate students were given the same assignment. Forty-eight percent rendered a correct drawing, whereas 38% drew the same ice cream cone on a plank type picture that 45% of the general education students drew. In a second class of 12 geology majors, only 1 student drew a cross section of a continent-ocean boundary similar to standard representation. Four of 12 drew mountains on the top of continental crust over a subduction zone but did not draw a compensating mass within the crust or lithosphere. Prototypical drawings provide more information about students' concepts than do most multiple-choice questions. For example, sixty-two percent of theses students who drew mountains similar to foam rubber pads pushed together on a desk or ice cream cones on a

  8. Earthquakes along the Azores-Iberia plate boundary revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlló, Josep; Matos, Catarina; Torres, Ricardo; Cruz, Jorge; Custódio, Susana

    2017-04-01

    The plate boundary that separates the Eurasian and African plates between the Azores triple junction and Gibraltar has unleashed some of the highest magnitude earthquakes in Europe in the historical and instrumental periods, including the 1755 great Lisbon earthquake with an estimated magnitude of M8.5-8.7, a M8.3 earthquake in 1941 in a transform oceanic fault, a M8.1 fault in 1975 in an oceanic intraplate domain, and a M7.9 earthquake in 1969 offshore SW Portugal. The plate boundary evolves from a divergent boundary in the east - the Azores domain - through a strike-slip domain at the center - the Gloria fault domain - to an oblique convergence domain in the west - west Iberia and its oceanic margin. A proper mapping of the seismicity along this plate boundary is key to better understanding it. Prior to the early eighties, many earthquakes with epicentre in the Atlantic and even in mainland Portugal were undetected or not located instrumentally. However knowledge of the occurrence and location of earthquakes prior to this period is critical to understanding the seismicity of the region and for the assessment of seismic hazard and risk. The relocation of events recorded instrumentally until 1960 is particularly difficult due to the poor sensitivity of the seismographs, few available stations, incompleteness of the reports and lack of accuracy of station chronometers. Thus, different catalogues often provide different locations for the same event, with no information about how they were obtained. On the other hand, there are also conspicuous gaps in the instrumental records of some Portuguese stations. For many earthquakes of the studied period records rely solely on felt effects. In general, a good control on the accuracy or quality of epicenters lacks. Here we present a review of the locations of instrumental earthquakes of the Azores-west Iberia region in the period 1900-1960. In total, we reviewed around 350 earthquakes. More than 160 additional events have

  9. Seismic Velocity and Elastic Properties of Plate Boundary Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppson, Tamara N.

    The elastic properties of fault zone rock at depth play a key role in rupture nucleation, propagation, and the magnitude of fault slip. Materials that lie within major plate boundary fault zones often have very different material properties than standard crustal rock values. In order to understand the mechanics of faulting at plate boundaries, we need to both measure these properties and understand how they govern the behavior of different types of faults. Mature fault zones tend to be identified in large-scale geophysical field studies as zones with low seismic velocity and/or electrical resistivity. These anomalous properties are related to two important mechanisms: (1) mechanical or diagenetic alteration of the rock materials and/or (2) pore fluid pressure and stress effects. However, in remotely-sensed and large-length-scale data it is difficult to determine which of these mechanisms are affecting the measured properties. The objective of this dissertation research is to characterize the seismic velocity and elastic properties of fault zone rocks at a range of scales, with a focus on understanding why the fault zone properties are different from those of the surrounding rock and the potential effects on earthquake rupture and fault slip. To do this I performed ultrasonic velocity experiments under elevated pressure conditions on drill core and outcrops samples from three plate boundary fault zones: the San Andreas Fault, California, USA; the Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand; and the Japan Trench megathrust, Japan. Additionally, I compared laboratory measurements to sonic log and large-scale seismic data to examine the scale-dependence of the measured properties. The results of this study provide the most comprehensive characterization of the seismic velocities and elastic properties of fault zone rocks currently available. My work shows that fault zone rocks at mature plate boundary faults tend to be significantly more compliant than surrounding crustal

  10. Plate tectonics of the northern part of the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verzhbitsky, E. V.; Kononov, M. V.; Kotelkin, V. D.

    2007-10-01

    Geophysical data on the northern part of the Pacific Ocean were systematized to compile a map of geomagnetic and geothermal studies of the Bering Sea. The absence of reliable data about the formation time of the Bering Sea structures of oceanic and continental origins is noted; this hampered the assessment of the geodynamical processes in the North Pacific. Based on the geophysical data, we estimated the age of the structures of the Bering Sea floor such as the Commander Basin (21 My), the Shirshov Ridge (95 and 33 My in the northern and southern parts, respectively), the Aleutian Basin (70 My), the Vitus Arch (44 My), the Bowers Ridge (30 My), and the Bowers Basin (40 My). These values are confirmed by the geological, geophysical, and kinematic data. A numerical modeling of the formation of extensive regional structures (Emperor Fracture Zone, Chinook Trough, and others) in the Northern Pacific is carried out. A conclusion was made on the basis of the geological and geothermal analysis that the northern and southern parts of the Shirshov Ridge have different geological ages and different tectonic structures. The northern part of the ridge is characterized by an upthrust-nappe terrain origin, while the southern part has originated from a torn-away island arc similar to the origin of the Bowers Ridge. The sea floor of the Aleutian Basin represents a detached part of the Upper Cretaceous Kula plate, on which spreading processes took place in the Vitus Arch area in the Eocene. The final activity phase in the Bering Sea began 21 My B.P. by spreading of the ancient oceanic floor of the Commander Basin. Based on the age estimations of the structures of the Bering Sea floor, the results of the modeling of the process of formation of regional fracture zones and of the geomagnetic, geothermal, tectonic, geological, and structural data, we calculated and compiled a kinematic model (with respect to a hot spot reference system) of the northern part of the Pacific Ocean for 21

  11. A Plate Tectonic Model for the Neoproterozoic with Evolving Plate Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merdith, Andrew; Collins, Alan; Williams, Simon; Pisarevsky, Sergei; Müller, Dietmar

    2017-04-01

    The Neoproterozoic was dominated by the formation of the supercontinent Rodinia, its break-up and the subsequent amalgamation of Gondwana, during which, the planet experienced large climatic variations and the emergence of complex life. Here we present a topological plate model of the Neoproterozoic based on a synthesis of available geological and palaeomagnetic data. Subduction zones, which are well preserved in the geological record, are used as a proxy for convergent margins; evidence for mid-ocean ridges and transform motion is less clearly preserved, though passive margins are used as a proxy for spreading centres, and evidence for strike-slip motions are used to model transform boundaries. We find that the model presented here only predicts 70% of the total length of subduction active today, though it models similar lengths of both transform and divergent boundaries, suggesting that we have produced a conservative model and are probably underestimating the amount of subduction. Where evidence for convergent, divergent or transform motion is not preserved, we interpret the locations of plate boundaries based on the relative motions of cratonic crust as suggested through either palaeomagnetic data or the geological record. Using GPlates, we tie these boundaries together to generate a plate model that depicts the motion of tectonic plates through the Neoproterozoic. We omit India and South China from Rodinia completely, due to long-lived subduction preserved on margins of India and conflicting palaeomagnetic data for the Cryogenian, but tie them together due to similar Tonian aged accretionary patterns along their respective (present-day) north-western and northern margins, such that these two cratons act as a "lonely wanderer" for much of the Neoproterozoic, and form their own tectonic plate. We also introduce a Tonian-Cryogenian aged rotation of the Congo-São Francisco Craton relative to Rodinia to better fit palaeomagnetic data and account for thick passive

  12. Features on Venus generated by plate boundary processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Dan; Ford, Peter G.; Johnson, Catherine; Parsons, Barry; Sandwell, David; Saunders, Stephen; Solomon, Sean C.

    1992-01-01

    Various observations suggest that there are processes on Venus that produce features similar to those associated with plate boundaries on earth. Synthetic aperture radar images of Venus, taken with a radar whose wavelength is 12.6 cm, are compared with GLORIA images of active plate boundaries, obtained with a sound source whose wavelength is 23 cm. Features similar to transform faults and to abyssal hills on slow and fast spreading ridges can be recognized within the Artemis region of Venus but are not clearly visible elsewhere. The composition of the basalts measured by the Venera 13 and 14 and the Vega 2 spacecraft corresponds to that expected from adiabatic decompression, like that which occurs beneath spreading ridges on earth. Structures that resemble trenches are widespread on Venus and show the same curvature and asymmetry as they do on earth. These observations suggest that the same simple geophysical models that have been so successfully used to understand the tectonics of earth can also be applied to Venus.

  13. Plate tectonics beyond plate boundaries: the role of ancient structures in intraplate orogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip; Pysklywec, Russell; Stephenson, Randell

    2015-04-01

    The development of orogens that occur at a distance from plate boundaries (i.e., `intraplate' deformation) cannot be adequately explained through conventional plate tectonic theory. Intraplate deformation infers a more complex argument for lithospheric and mantle interaction than plate tectonic theory allows. As a result, the origins of intraplate orogenesis are enigmatic. One hypothesis is the amalgamation of continental material (i.e., micro-plates) leaves inherent scars on the crust and mantle lithosphere. Previous studies into continent-continent collisions identify a number of scenarios from accretionary tectonics that affect the crust and mantle (namely, the development of a Rayleigh-Taylor instability, lithospheric underplating, lithospheric delamination, and lithospheric subduction). Any of these processes may weaken the lithosphere allowing episodic reactivation of faults within continental interiors. Hence, continental convergence (i.e., shortening) at a time after continental collision may cause the already weakened crust and mantle lithosphere to produce intraplate deformation. In order to better understand the processes involved in deformation away from plate boundaries, we present suites of continental shortening models (using the high-resolution thermal-mechanical modelling code SOPALE) to identify the preferred style of deformation. We model ancient structures by applying weak subduction scarring, changing the rheological conditions, and modifying the thermal structure within the lithosphere. To highlight the role of surface processes on plate and lithosphere deformation, the effect of climate-driven erosion and deposition on the tectonic structure of intraplate deformation is also addressed. We explore the relevance of the models to previously studied regions of intraplate orogenesis, including the Pyrenees in Europe, the Laramide orogen in North America, Tien Shan orogen in Central Asia, and Central Australia. The findings of the simulations with

  14. Convergent Plate Boundary Processes in the Archean: Evidence from Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, A.

    2014-12-01

    The structural, magmatic and metamorphic characteristics of Archean greenstone belts and associated TTG (tonalite, trondhjemite and granodiorite) gneisses in southern West Greenland are comparable to those of Phanerozoic convergent plate margins, suggesting that Archean continents grew mainly at subduction zones. These greenstone belts are composed mainly of tectonically juxtaposed fragments of oceanic crust including mafic to ultramafic rocks, with minor sedimentary rocks. Volcanic rocks in the greenstone belts are characterized mainly by island arc tholeiitic basalts, picrites, and boninites. The style of deformation and geometry of folds in 10 cm to 5 m wide shear zones are comparable to those occur on 1 to 50 km scale in the greenstone belts and TTG gneisses, suggesting that compressional tectonic processes operating at convergent plate boundaries were the driving force of Archean crustal accretion and growth. Field observations and trace element data suggest that Archean continental crust grew through accretion of mainly island arcs and melting of metamorphosed mafic rocks (amphibolites) in thickened arcs during multiple tectonothermal events. Fold patterns on cm to km scale are consistent with at least three phases of deformation and multiple melting events generating TTG melts that intruded mainly along shear zones in accretionary prism and magmatic arcs. It is suggested that Archean TTGs were produced by three main processes: (1) melting of thickened oceanic island arcs; (2) melting of subducted oceanic crust; and (3) differentiation of basaltic melts originating from metasomatized sub-arc mantle wedge peridotites.

  15. Geophysical surveys of the Queen Charlotte Fault plate boundary off SE Alaska: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Brink, U. S.; Brothers, D. S.; Andrews, B. D.; Kluesner, J.; Haeussler, P. J.; Miller, N. C.; Watt, J. T.; Dartnell, P.; East, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Recent multibeam sonar and high-resolution seismic surveys covering the northern 400-km-long segment of Queen Charlotte Fault off SE Alaska, indicate that the entire 50 mm/yr right-lateral Pacific-North America plate motion is currently accommodated by a single fault trace. The trace is remarkably straight rarely interrupted by step-overs, and is often <100 m wide. It runs along the shelf edge dropping into the slope only in the southern end of the mapped area. The straight and narrow surficial fault expression and its location with respect to the shelf may be due to high sedimentation rate during the collapse of the SE Alaska ice cap 17,000 yr ago, which obliterated the previous surficial deformation. Gravity data suggests that the fault may separate the 15-20 Ma oceanic crust of the Pacific plate from continental forearc and arc terrains of a former subduction zone. This unusual setting for a transform plate boundary might have resulted from the northward passage of the thick crust of the Yakutat Terrane during the Late Cenozoic. A step-over at the mouth of Chatham Strait has formed a 20-km-long 1.6-km-wide pull-apart basin composed of 3 sub-basins. Internal basin stratigraphy indicates possible southward migration of the step-over with time. Slight outward curving of the southern strand may suggest the presence of a deeper barrier there, which could have terminated the northward super-shear rupture of the 2013 M7.5 Craig Earthquake. Whether this possible barrier is related to the intersection of the Aja Fracture Zone with the plate boundary is unclear. No other surficial impediments to rupture were observed along the 315 km trace between this fault step-over and a 20° bend near Icy Point, where the fault extends onshore and becomes highly transpressional. An enigmatic oval depression, 1.5-2 km wide and 500 m deep, south of the step-over and a possible mud volcano north of the step-over, may attest to possible vigorous gas and fluid upwelling along the fault

  16. Seismotectonics and recent evolution of the Eurasia-North America Plate Boundary in Northeastern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaev, V. S.; Imaeva, L. P.; Kozmin, B. M.; Fujita, K. T.; Mackey, K. G.

    2009-04-01

    In contrast to oceanic plate boundaries which are usually well defined by earthquake locations and magnetic anomalies, the present and past kinematics of plate boundaries in the continents remains problematic in many settings. One particularly vexing such boundary is the one that separates Eurasia from North America in Northeast Russia. In the earliest plate models it was evident that the mid-Atlantic spreading ridge continues in the Arctic as the Gakkel ridge which then runs almost perpendicularly into the continental shelf of Russia in the Laptev sea. On the shelf, and further south on land, the narrow belt of seismicity that is found along the Gakkel ridge broadens into a diffuse swath of earthquakes which is in places more than 800 km wide and extends along the Chersky Range towards the coast of the Okhotsk sea and northern Kamchatka The fact that the Okhotsk sea is aseismic but is surrounded by seismic belts has to lead the interpretation that it is an independent microplate that lies between the Eurasian, North American, Pacific and Amur plates (Cook et al., 1986).Unravelling the kinematics of the Eurasia-Okhotsk-North America Plate boundaries has proven difficult. This is in part due to the paucity of geological and geophysical data from this remote region, and to the fact that the Eurasia-North America pole of rotation lies in close vicinity to the plate boundary itself. Cook et al. (1986), using earthquake slip vectors, placed the current pole of rotation near the Lena river delta, that is, in the area where Eurasia-North America plate boundary comes on shore ). As a consequence, spreading along the Gakkel ridge north of the pole of rotation, should change into convergence or strike-slip to the south depending on the orientation of the boundary. Making specific predictions for fault kinematics in the area has been hampered by the fact that different geophysical and geodetic data-sets have yielded different locations for the Eurasia-North America pole of

  17. Imaging megathrust zone and Yakutat/Pacific plate interface in Alaska subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Abers, G. A.; Li, J.; Christensen, D. H.; Calkins, J. A.

    2013-05-01

    We image the subducted slab underneath a 450 km long transect of the Alaska subduction zone. Dense stations in southern Alaska are set up to investigate (1) the geometry and velocity structure of the downgoing plate and their relation to slab seismicity, and (2) the interplate coupled zone where the great 1964 (magnitude 9.3) had greatest rupture. The joint teleseismic migration of two array datasets (MOOS, Multidisciplinary Observations of Onshore Subduction, and BEAAR, Broadband Experiment Across the Alaska Range) based on teleseismic receiver functions (RFs) using the MOOS data reveal a shallow-dipping prominent low-velocity layer at ~25-30 km depth in southern Alaska. Modeling of these RF amplitudes shows a thin (<6.5 km) low-velocity layer (shear wave velocity of ~3 km/s), which is ~20-30% slower than normal oceanic crustal velocities, between the subducted slab and the overriding North American plate. The observed low-velocity megathrust layer (with P-to-S velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) exceeding 2.0) may be due to a thick sediment input from the trench in combination of elevated pore fluid pressure in the channel. The subducted crust below the low-velocity channel has gabbroic velocities with a thickness of 11-12 km. Both velocities and thickness of the low-velocity channel abruptly increase as the slab bends in central Alaska, which agrees with previously published RF results. Our image also includes an unusually thick low-velocity crust subducting with a ~20 degree dip down to 130 km depth at approximately 200 km inland beneath central Alaska. The unusual nature of this subducted segment has been suggested to be due to the subduction of the Yakutat terrane. We also show a clear image of the Yakutat and Pacific plate subduction beneath the Kenai Peninsula, and the along-strike boundary between them at megathrust depths. Our imaged western edge of the Yakutat terrane, at 25-30 km depth in the central Kenai along the megathrust, aligns with the western end of the

  18. Imaging megathrust zone and Yakutat/Pacific plate interface in Alaska subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Abers, G. A.; Li, J.; Christensen, D. H.; Calkins, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    We image the subducted slab underneath a 450 km long transect of the Alaska subduction zone. Dense stations in southern Alaska are set up to investigate (1) the geometry and velocity structure of the downgoing plate and their relation to slab seismicity, and (2) the interplate coupled zone where the great 1964 (magnitude 9.3) had greatest rupture. The joint teleseismic migration of two array datasets (MOOS, Multidisciplinary Observations of Onshore Subduction, and BEAAR, Broadband Experiment Across the Alaska Range) based on teleseismic receiver functions (RFs) using the MOOS data reveal a shallow-dipping prominent low-velocity layer at ~25-30 km depth in southern Alaska. Modeling of these RF amplitudes shows a thin (3-6.5 km) low-velocity layer (shear wave velocity less than 3 km/s), which is ~20-30% slower than normal oceanic crustal velocities, between the subducted slab and the overriding North America plate. The observed low-velocity megathrust layer (with Vp/Vs ratio exceeding 2.0) may be due to a thick sediment input from the trench in combination of elevated pore fluid pressure in the channel. The subducted crust below the low-velocity channel has gabbroic velocities with a thickness of 11-15 km. Both velocities and thickness of the low-velocity channel abruptly increase as the slab bends in central Alaska, which agrees with previously published RF results. Our image also includes an unusually thick low-velocity crust subducting with a ~20 degree dip down to 130 km depth at approximately 200 km inland beneath central Alaska. The unusual nature of this subducted segment has been suggested to be due to the subduction of the Yakutat terrane. Subduction of this buoyant crust could explain the shallow dip of the thrust zone beneath southern Alaska. We also show a clear image of the Yakutat and Pacific plate subduction beneath the Kenai Peninsula, and the along-strike boundary between them at megathrust depths. Our imaged western edge of the Yakutat terrane, at

  19. Cenozoic lithospheric deformation in Northeast Asia and the rapidly-aging Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ting; Moresi, Louis; Zhao, Dapeng; Sandiford, Dan; Whittaker, Joanne

    2018-06-01

    Northeast Asia underwent widespread rifting and magmatic events during the Cenozoic. The geodynamic origins of these tectonic events are often linked to Pacific plate subduction beneath Northeast Asia. However, the Japan Sea did not open until the late Oligocene, tens of millions of years after Pacific Plate subduction initiation in the Paleocene. Moreover, it is still not clear why the Baikal Rift Zone extension rate increased significantly after the late Miocene, while the Japan Sea opening ceased at the same time. Geodynamic models suggest these enigmatic events are related to the rapidly-aging Pacific Plate at the trench after Izanagi-Pacific spreading ridge subduction. Subduction of the young Pacific Plate delayed the Japan Sea opening during the Eocene while advection of the old Pacific Plate towards the trench increases seafloor age rapidly, allowing the Japan Sea to open after the early Miocene. The Japan Sea opening promotes fast trench retreat and slab stagnation, with subduction-induced wedge zone convection gradually increasing its extent during this process. The active rifting center associated with wedge zone convection upwelling also shifts inland-ward during slab stagnation, preventing further Japan Sea spreading while promoting the Baikal Rift Zone extension. Our geodynamic model provides a good explanation for the temporal-spatial patterns of the Cenozoic tectonic and magmatic events in Northeast Asia.

  20. Kinematics of the New Zealand plate boundary: Relative motion by GPS across networks of 1000 km and 50 km spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meertens, Charles M.; Rocken, Christian; Perin, Barbara; Walcott, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The NASA/DOSE 'Kinematics of the New Zealand Plate Boundary' experiment is a four-year cooperative Global Positioning System (GPS) experiment involving 6 universities and institutions in New Zealand and the United States. The investigation covers two scales, the first on the scale of plates (approximately 1000 km) and the second is on the scale of the plate boundary zone (approximately 50 km). In the first portion of the experiment, phase A, the objective is to make direct measurements of tectonic plate motion between the Australian and Pacific plates using GPS in order to determine the Euler vector of this plate pair. The phase A portion of this experiment was initiated in December 1992 with the first-epoch baseline measurements on the large scale network. The network will be resurveyed two years later to obtain velocities. The stations which were observed for phase A are shown and listed. Additional regional stations which will be used for this study are listed and are part of either CIGNET or other global tracking networks. The phase A portion of the experiment is primarily the responsibility of the UNAVCO investigators. Therefore, this report concentrates on phase A. The first year of NASA funding for phase A included only support for the field work. Processing and analysis will take place with the second year of funding. The second part of the experiemnt measured relative motion between the Australian and Pacific plates across the pate boundary zone between Hokitika and Christchurch on the South Island of New Zealand. The extent and rate of deformation will be determined by comparisons with historical, conventional surveys and by repeated GPS measurements to be made in two years. This activity was the emphasis of the LDGO portion of the study. An ancillary experiment, phase C, concentrated on plate boundary deformation in the vicinity of Wellington and was done as part of training during the early portion of the field campaign. Details of the objectives of the

  1. Seismic anisotropy of 70 Ma Pacific-plate upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, H. F.; Lizarralde, D.; Collins, J. A.; Miller, N. C.; Hirth, G.; Gaherty, J. B.; Evans, R. L.

    2017-12-01

    We present a new measurement of seismic anisotropy and velocity gradients in the Pacific-plate upper mantle based on data from the NoMelt experiment. The seismic velocity structure of oceanic lithosphere reflects the processes involved in its formation at mid-ocean ridges and subsequent evolution off-axis. Increasing mantle depletion with depth due to melt extraction predicts negative velocity gradients, as does cooling with age. Alignment of olivine by corner flow predicts azimuthal anisotropy. Some models predict the strength of anisotropy should decrease with depth. Measurements of uppermost mantle velocities have not fully verified these predictions. Observations of direct Pn phases demonstrate that positive velocity gradients exist; and anisotropy measurements, while consistent with strain-induced olivine alignment, vary widely and generally suggest weaker fabric development than is observed in ophiolite samples. These discrepancies raise questions about the extent to which mantle structure evolves through time due to processes such as cracking and alteration, and hinder the use of seismic measurements to make more detailed inferences on aspects of lithospheric formation processes. We have measured anisotropy and vertical velocity gradients to 10 km below the Moho on 70 Ma lithosphere between the Clarion and Clipperton fracture zones. The lithosphere at the study site has not been obviously affected by tectonic or magmatic events since its formation. We find 6.2% anisotropy at the Moho with a mean velocity of 8.14 km/s and the fast direction parallel to paleospreading. Velocity gradients are estimated at 0.02 km/s/km in the fast direction and near 0 km/s/km in the slow direction. The gradient estimates can be explained by aligned microcracks oriented perpendicular to spreading that close with depth. Cracks are expected to close by 10 km below the Moho. At that depth the strength of anisotropy increases to 9%, close to the strength estimated from ophiolite

  2. Aerosol Properties Observed in the Subtropical North Pacific Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royalty, T. M.; Phillips, B. N.; Dawson, K. W.; Reed, R.; Meskhidze, N.; Petters, M. D.

    2017-09-01

    The impact of anthropogenic aerosol on climate forcing remains uncertain largely due to inadequate representation of natural aerosols in climate models. The marine boundary layer (MBL) might serve as a model location to study natural aerosol processes. Yet source and sink mechanisms controlling the MBL aerosol number, size distribution, chemical composition, and hygroscopic properties remain poorly constrained. Here aerosol size distribution and water uptake measurements were made aboard the R/V Hi'ialakai from 27 June to 3 July 2016 in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Size distributions were predominantly bimodal with an average integrated number concentration of 197 ± 98 cm-3. Hygroscopic growth factors were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer technique for dry 48, 96, and 144 nm particles. Mode kappa values for these were 0.57 ± 0.12, 0.51 ± 0.09, and 0.52 ± 0.08, respectively. To better understand remote MBL aerosol sources, a new algorithm was developed which decomposes hygroscopicity distributions into three classes: carbon-containing particles, sulfate-like particles, and sodium-containing particles. Results from this algorithm showed low and steady sodium-containing particle concentrations while the sulfate-like and carbon-containing particle concentrations varied during the cruise. According to the classification scheme, carbon-containing particles contributed at least 3-7%, sulfate-like particles contributed at most 77-88% and sodium-containing particles at least contributed 9-16% to the total aerosol number concentration. Size distribution and hygroscopicity data, in conjunction with air mass back trajectory analysis, suggested that the aerosol budget in the subtropical North Pacific MBL may be controlled by aerosol entrainment from the free troposphere.

  3. Changes in Pacific Absolute Plate Motion and Formation of Oceanic Flood Basalt Plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroenke, L. W.; Wessel, P.

    2006-12-01

    The origin of the large oceanic flood basalt plateaus that are prominent features of the central western Pacific Basin remains unclear. Major changes in Pacific Absolute Plate Motion (APM) have been identified as occurring at 145, 125, 96, and 47 Ma. Formation of the Shatsky Rise (~145 Ma), the Ontong Java Plateau (122+ Ma), the Southern Hess Rise (95±5 Ma), and the Louisiade Plateau (~48 Ma) appear to coincide with these changes. A smaller, but still prominent change in Pacific APM also occurred at 110 Ma when the Northern Hess Rise formed. Although these concurrent events may simply be chance occurrences, initiation of plate tectonic reorganizations upon arrival of mantle plume heads also was proposed by Ratcliff et al. (1998), who suggested that the mantle plume head delivery of hot material to produce flood basalts also had the potential to trigger reorganizations of plate motions. It should be noted, however, that Pacific Rim subduction zone development also coincides with these APM changes, and that the actual cause and effect of each change in APM has yet to be clearly established. Here we present a modified Pacific APM model that uses several older seamount chains (Musicians, Ratak-Gilbert-Ellice, the Wake trails, and the Liliuokalani trails) to constrain the oldest Pacific plate motion using the hybrid technique of Wessel et al (2006).

  4. Subduction of the Pacific Plate Beneath the Kamchatka: Volcanism and Tectonic Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, E. I.

    2008-12-01

    The results of studying subduction process of the Pacific plate beneath the Kamchatka and related processes are described. The focal mechanism solutions estimated from Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) catalog and sequence of the largest earthquakes occurred in Kamchatka were used to asses velocity of subducted slab. The boundary of contact for subducted slab is determined at a depth of 30-70 km, and is considered as a plane at azimuth 217° and with a dip angle of 25°. The rate of subduction estimated from CMT mechanisms yields V=0.9 cm/yr for southern zone (south of Shipunsky Cape), and V=1.4 cm/yr for central zone (from Shipunsky Cape to Kronotsky Cape). The largest coupled consistent earthquakes recorded from 1737 were used for analysis. The results show, that for the southern area V=6.6 - 7.1 cm yr (two couples), and for the central part V=6.6 cm yr. The estimated value of velocity for the creep part of subducted slab is about 5 to 15 per cent of the bulk velocity. The Pacific plate subducts at a rate of 8 cm yr. Series of GPS observations conducted from 1997 up to 2007 were used to estimate the rate at which Kamchatka is deformed under the effect of the subducted slab (along-slab direction). The average values of rate and velocity variations versus the average rate were estimated response to permanent GPS station PETR. It was shown that the motion at BKI (Bering) regardless KlU (Klyuchi) is uneven: variations of velocity reach up to 30 per cent (at average running window of 1 year). There are about 28 active volcanoes in Kamchatka that provide intensive volcanic activity in this region. The volcanoes produce about 16-17% of magmatic rocks erupted by all volcanoes in the Earth. Over the past 5 years, eruptions of Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Karymsky, and Mutnovsky volcanoes have occurred. Although many of these volcanoes are in sparsely populated areas, they lie adjacent to the heavily North Pacific air routes between North America, Europe and Asia. The

  5. Data Access and Web Services at the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matykiewicz, J.; Anderson, G.; Henderson, D.; Hodgkinson, K.; Hoyt, B.; Lee, E.; Persson, E.; Torrez, D.; Smith, J.; Wright, J.; Jackson, M.

    2007-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) at UNAVCO, Inc., part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three-dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, PBO will install 880 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, and five laser strainmeters, as well as manage data for 209 previously existing continuous GPS stations and one previously existing laser strainmeter. UNAVCO provides access to data products from these stations, as well as general information about the PBO project, via the PBO web site (http://pboweb.unavco.org). GPS and strainmeter data products can be found using a variety of access methods, incuding map searches, text searches, and station specific data retrieval. In addition, the PBO construction status is available via multiple mapping interfaces, including custom web based map widgets and Google Earth. Additional construction details can be accessed from PBO operational pages and station specific home pages. The current state of health for the PBO network is available with the statistical snap-shot, full map interfaces, tabular web based reports, and automatic data mining and alerts. UNAVCO is currently working to enhance the community access to this information by developing a web service framework for the discovery of data products, interfacing with operational engineers, and exposing data services to third party participants. In addition, UNAVCO, through the PBO project, provides advanced data management and monitoring systems for use by the community in operating geodetic networks in the United States and beyond. We will demonstrate these systems during the AGU meeting, and we welcome inquiries from the community at any time.

  6. Logistical Support for the Installation of the Plate Boundary Observatory GPS and Borehole Strainmeter Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnik, C.; Austin, K.; Coyle, B.; Dittmann, T.; Feaux, K.; Friesen, B.; Johnson, W.; Mencin, D.; Pauk, B.; Walls, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, is designed to study the three- dimensional strain field resulting from deformation across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American plates in the western United States. To meet these goals, UNAVCO will install 880 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters by October 2008. Such a broad network presents significant logisitical challenges, including moving supplies, equipment, and personnel around 6 million square kilometers, and this requires accurate tracking and careful planning. The PBO logistics chain includes the PBO headquarters at UNAVCO in Boulder, Colorado and five regional offices in the continental United States and Alaska, served by dozens of suppliers spread across the globe. These offices are responsible for building and maintaining sites in their region. Most equipment and supplies first arrive in Boulder, where they are tagged and entered into a UNAVCO-wide equipment database, assembled and quality checked as necessary, and sent on to the appropriate regional office. Larger items which are costly to store and ship from Boulder, such as batteries or long sections of stainless steel pipe and bar required for monuments, are shipped directly from the supplier to each region as needed. These supplies and equipment are also tracked through the ordering, delivery, installation, and maintenance cycle via Earned Value Management techniques which allow us to meet NSF and other Federal procurement rules. Early prototypes and assembly configurations aid the development of material and supply budgets. A thorough understanding of Federal procurement rules at project start up is critical as the project moves forward.

  7. Eikonal Tomography of the Southern California Plate Boundary Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, H.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Zigone, D.; Lin, F. C.

    2016-12-01

    We use eikonal tomography to derive directionally-dependent phase velocities of surface waves for the plate boundary region in southern CA sensitive to the approximate depth range 1-20 km. Seismic noise data recorded by 346 stations in the area provide a spatial coverage with 5-25 km typical station spacing and period range of 1-20 s. Noise cross-correlations are calculated for vertical component data recorded in year 2014. Rayleigh wave group and phase travel times between 2 and 13 sec period are derived for each station pair using frequency-time analysis. For each common station, all available phase travel time measurements with sufficient signal to noise ratio and envelope peak amplitude are used to construct a travel time map for a virtual source at the common station location. By solving the eikonal equation, both phase velocity and propagation direction are evaluated at each location for each virtual source. Isotropic phase velocities and 2-psi azimuthal anisotropy and their uncertainties are determined statistically using measurements from different virtual sources. Following the method of Barmin et al. (2001), group velocities are also inverted using all the group travel times that pass quality criteria. The obtained group and phase dispersions of Rayleigh waves are then inverted on a 6 x 6 km2 grid for local 1D piecewise shear wave velocity structures using the procedure of Herrmann (2013). The results agree well with previous observations of Zigone et al. (2015) in the overlapping area. Clear velocity contrasts and low velocity zones are seen for the San Andreas, San Jacinto, Elsinore and Garlock faults. We also find 2-psi azimuthal anisotropy with fast directions parallel to geometrically-simple fault sections. Details and updated results will be presented in the meeting.

  8. Crustal motion studies in the southwest Pacific: Geodetic measurements of plate convergence in Tonga, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David A.

    The southwest Pacific is one of the most tectonically dynamic regions on Earth. This research focused on crustal motion studies in three regions of active Pacific-Australia plate convergence in the southwest Pacific: Tonga, the New Hebrides (Vanuatu) and the Solomons Islands. In Tonga, new and refined velocity estimates based on more than a decade of Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements and advanced analysis techniques are much more accurate than previously reported values. Convergence rates of 80 to 165 mm/yr at the Tonga trench represent the fastest plate motions observed on Earth. For the first time, rotation of the Fiji platform relative to the Australian plate is observed, and anomalous deformation of the Tonga ridge was also detected. In the New Hebrides, a combined GPS dataset with a total time series of more than ten years led to new and refined velocity estimates throughout the island arc. Impingement of large bathymetric features has led to arc fragmentation, and four distinct tectonic segments are identified. The central New Hebrides arc segment is being shoved eastward relative to the rest of the arc as convergence is partitioned between the forearc (Australian plate) and the backarc (North Fiji Basin) boundaries due to impingement of the d'Entrecasteaux Ridge and associated Bougainville seamount. The southern New Hebrides arc converges with the Australian plate more rapidly than predicted due to backarc extension. The first measurements of convergence in the northern and southernmost arc segments were also made. In the Solomon Islands, a four-year GPS time series was used to generate the first geodetic estimates of crustal velocity in the New Georgia Group, with 57--84 mm/yr of Australia-Solomon motion and 19--39 mm/yr of Pacific-Solomon motion being observed. These velocities are 20--40% lower than predicted Australia-Pacific velocities. Two-dimensional dislocation models suggest that most of this discrepancy can be attributed to locking of

  9. EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Data in the College Classroom (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Olds, S. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is the geodetic component of the EarthScope project, designed to study the 3-D strain field across the active boundary zone between the Pacific and North American tectonics plates in the western United States. All PBO data are freely available to scientific and educational communities and have been incorporated into a variety of activities for college and university classrooms. UNAVCO Education and Outreach program staff have worked closely with faculty users, scientific researchers, and facility staff to create materials that are scientifically and technically accurate as well as useful to the classroom user. Availability of processed GPS data is not new to the geoscience community. However, PBO data staff have worked with education staff to deliver data that are readily accessible to educators. The UNAVCO Data for Educators webpage, incorporating an embedded Google Map with PBO GPS locations and providing current GPS time series plots and downloadable data, extends and updates the datasets available to our community. Google Earth allows the visualization GPS data with other types of datasets, e.g. LiDAR, while maintaining the self-contained and easy-to-use interface of UNAVCO’s Jules Verne Voyager map tools, which have multiple sets of geological and geophysical data. Curricular materials provide scaffolds for using EarthScope data in a variety of forms for different learning goals. Simple visualization of earthquake epicenters and locations of volcanoes can be used with velocity vectors to make simple deductions of plate boundary behaviors. Readily available time series plots provide opportunities for additional science skills, and there are web and paper-based support materials for downloading data, manipulating tables, and using plotting programs for processed GPS data. Scientists have provided contextual materials to explore the importance of these data in interpreting the structure and dynamics of the Earth. These data

  10. Analysis of turbulent free-convection boundary layer on flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Jackson, Thomas W

    1950-01-01

    A calculation was made for the flow and heat transfer in the turbulent free-convection boundary layer on a vertical flat plate. Formulas for the heat-transfer coefficient, boundary layer thickness, and the maximum velocity in the boundary layer were obtained.

  11. Tectonic implications of post-30 Ma Pacific and North American relative plate motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohannon, R.G.; Parsons, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Pacific plate moved northwest relative to North America since 42 Ma. The rapid half rate of Pacific-Farallon spreading allowed the ridge to approach the continent at about 29 Ma. Extinct spreading ridges that occur offshore along 65% of the margin document that fragments of the subducted Farallon slab became captured by the Pacific plate and assumed its motion proper to the actual subduction of the spreading ridge. This plate-capture process can be used to explain much of the post-29 Ma Cordilleran North America extension, strike slip, and the inland jump of oceanic spreading in the Gulf of California. Much of the post-29 Ma continental tectonism is the result of the strong traction imposed on the deep part of the continental crust by the gently inclined slab of subducted oceanic lithosphere as it moved to the northwest relative to the overlying continent. -from Authors

  12. Late Miocene Pacific plate kinematic change explained with coupled global models of mantle and lithosphere dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotz, I. L.; Iaffaldano, G.; Davies, D. R.

    2017-07-01

    The timing and magnitude of a Pacific plate motion change within the past 10 Ma remains enigmatic, due to the noise associated with finite-rotation data. Nonetheless, it has been hypothesized that this change was driven by the arrival of the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) at the Melanesian arc and the consequent subduction polarity reversal. The uncertainties associated with the timing of this event, however, make it difficult to quantitatively demonstrate a dynamical association. Here, we first reconstruct the Pacific plate's absolute motion since the mid-Miocene (15 Ma), at high-temporal resolution, building on previous efforts to mitigate the impact of finite-rotation data noise. We find that the largest change in Pacific plate-motion direction occurred between 10 and 5 Ma, with the plate rotating clockwise. We subsequently develop and use coupled global numerical models of the mantle/lithosphere system to test hypotheses on the dynamics driving this change. These indicate that the arrival of the OJP at the Melanesian arc, between 10 and 5 Ma, followed by a subduction polarity reversal that marked the initiation of subduction of the Australian plate underneath the Pacific realm, were the key drivers of this kinematic change.

  13. Preparing the Plate Boundary Observatory GNSS Network for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, K. E.; Walls, C. P.; Dittman, T.; Mann, D.; Boyce, E. S.; Basset, A.; Woolace, A. C.; Turner, R.; Lawrence, S.; Rhoades, S.; Pyatt, C.; Willoughby, H.; Feaux, K.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) GNSS network, funded by the NSF and operated by UNAVCO, is comprised of 1100 permanent GPS and GNSS stations spanning three principal tectonic regimes and is administered by distinct management. The GPS-only network was initially designed for daily data file downloads primarily for tectonic analysis. This low data volume requirement and circa-2004 IP-based cellular/VSat modems provided significant freedom for station placement and enabled science-targeted installation of stations in some of the most remote and geologically interesting areas. Community requests for high-rate data downloads for GNSS seismology, airborne LiDAR surveys, meteorological/GNSS/seismic real-time data flow and other demands, however, require significantly increased bandwidth beyond the 5-20 kB/s transfer rates that were needed as part of the original design. Since the close of construction in September 2008, PBO enhancements have been implemented through additional funding by the NSF (ARRA/Cascadia), NOAA, and NASA and in collaboration with stakeholders such as Caltrans, ODOT, Scripps, and the USGS. Today, only 18 of the original cell modems remain, with 601 upgraded cell modems providing 3G/4G/LTE data communications that support transfer rates ranging from 80-400 kB/s. Radio network expansion and upgrades continue to harden communications using both 2.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz radios. 78 VSAT and 5 manual download sites remain. PBO-wide the network capabilities for 1 Hz & 5 Hz downloads or low latency 1 Hz streaming are 85%, 80% and 65% of PBO stations, respectively, with 708 active 1 Hz streams. Vaisala meteorological instruments are located at 140 sites most of which stream GPS/Met data in real time. GPS-only receivers are being replaced with GNSS receivers and antennas. Today, there are 279 stations in the PBO network with either GLONASS enabled Trimble NetR9 or full GNSS constellation Septentrio PolaRx5 receivers. Just as the scale and

  14. Apparent Polar Wander of the Pacific Plate Since the Cretaeous and Implications for True Polar Wander and for the Plate Motion Circuit Through Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.; Woodworth, D.

    2017-12-01

    In this presentation we review prior work on Pacific plate apparent polar wander and its implications (1) for true polar wander since ≈125 Ma and (2) for testing the global plate motion circuit through Antarctica. We furthermore update prior analyses using our recently improved and expanded apparent polar wander path for the Pacific plate [Woodworth et al., this meeting]. Three episodes of rapid motion of Pacific hotspots relative to the spin axis have occurred in the past ≈125 Ma: a ≈15° shift near 85 Ma [Gordon, 1983; Sager and Koppers, 2000], an ≈8° shift near the age of the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend [Petronotis et al., 1994; Woodworth et al., this meeting], and a 3°-°4 shift since 12 Ma [Woodworth et al., this meeting]. These shifts are in general agreement with the shifts of Indo-Atlantic hotspots relative to the spin axis. It has long been recognized that paleomagnetic poles from the continents, when rotated into the Pacific plate reference frame through plate motion circuits through Antarctica, are inconsistent with indigenous Pacific plate paleomagnetic poles and paleolatitudes [Suárez and Molnar, 1980; Gordon and Cox, 1980; Acton and Gordon, 1994]. We update such tests using our new and improved Pacific apparent polar wander path and show that the plate motion circuit through Antarctica still fails such paleomagnetic tests of consistency. Implications for global plate reconstructions and the hotspot reference frame will be discussed.

  15. Zoogeography of the San Andreas Fault system: Great Pacific Fracture Zones correspond with spatially concordant phylogeographic boundaries in western North America.

    PubMed

    Gottscho, Andrew D

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an ultimate tectonic explanation for several well-studied zoogeographic boundaries along the west coast of North America, specifically, along the boundary of the North American and Pacific plates (the San Andreas Fault system). By reviewing 177 references from the plate tectonics and zoogeography literature, I demonstrate that four Great Pacific Fracture Zones (GPFZs) in the Pacific plate correspond with distributional limits and spatially concordant phylogeographic breaks for a wide variety of marine and terrestrial animals, including invertebrates, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. These boundaries are: (1) Cape Mendocino and the North Coast Divide, (2) Point Conception and the Transverse Ranges, (3) Punta Eugenia and the Vizcaíno Desert, and (4) Cabo Corrientes and the Sierra Transvolcanica. However, discussion of the GPFZs is mostly absent from the zoogeography and phylogeography literature likely due to a disconnect between biologists and geologists. I argue that the four zoogeographic boundaries reviewed here ultimately originated via the same geological process (triple junction evolution). Finally, I suggest how a comparative phylogeographic approach can be used to test the hypothesis presented here. © 2014 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  16. Anatomy of a Plate Boundary at Shallow Crustal Levels: a Composite Section from the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, N. C.; Toy, V. G.; Boulton, C. J.; Carpenter, B. M.

    2010-12-01

    New Zealand's Alpine Fault is mostly a moderately SE-dipping dextral reverse plate boundary structure, but at its southern end, strike-slip-normal motion is indicated by offset of recent surfaces, juxtaposition of sediments, and both brittle and ductile shear sense indicators. At the location of uplift polarity reversal fault rocks exhumed from both the hangingwall Pacific and footwall Australian Plates are juxtaposed, offering a remarkably complete cross section of the plate boundary at shallow crustal levels. We describe Alpine Fault damage zone and fault core structures overprinted on Pacific and Australian plate mylonites of a variety of compositions, in a fault-strike perpendicular composite section spanning the reversal in dip-slip polarity. The damage zone is asymmetric; on the Australian Plate 160m of quartzose paragneiss-derived mylonites are overprinted by brittle faults and fractures that increase in density towards the principal slip surface (PSS). This damage zone fabric consists of 1-10m-spaced, moderately to steeply-dipping, 1-20cm-thick gouge-filled faults, overprinted on and sub-parallel to a mylonitic foliation sub-parallel to the PSS. On the Pacific Plate, only 40m of the 330m section of volcaniclastic-derived mylonites have brittle damage in the form of unhealed fractures and faults, as well as a pervasive greenschist facies hydrothermal alteration absent in the footwall. These damage-related structures comprise a network of small-offset faults and fractures with increasing density and intensity towards the PSS. The active Pacific Plate fault core is composed of ~1m of cataclasite grading into folded protocataclasite that is less folded and fractured with increasing distance from the PSS. The active Australian Plate fault core is <1.5m wide and consists of 3 distinct foliated clay gouges, as well as a 4cm thick brittle ultracataclasite immediately adjacent to the active PSS. The Australian Plate foliated clay gouge contains stringers of quartz

  17. Cenozoic forearc tectonics in northeastern Japan: Relationships between outer forearc subsidence and plate boundary kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regalla, Christine

    Here we investigate the relationships between outer forearc subsidence, the timing and kinematics of upper plate deformation and plate convergence rate in Northeast Japan to evaluate the role of plate boundary dynamics in driving forearc subsidence. The Northeastern Japan margin is one of the first non-accretionary subduction zones where regional forearc subsidence was argued to reflect tectonic erosion of large volumes of upper crustal rocks. However, we propose that a significant component of forearc subsidence could be the result of dynamic changes in plate boundary geometry. We provide new constraints on the timing and kinematics of deformation along inner forearc faults, new analyses of the evolution of outer forearc tectonic subsidence, and updated calculations of plate convergence rate. These data collectively reveal a temporal correlation between the onset of regional forearc subsidence, the initiation of upper plate extension, and an acceleration in local plate convergence rate. A similar analysis of the kinematic evolution of the Tonga, Izu-Bonin, and Mariana subduction zones indicates that the temporal correlations observed in Japan are also characteristic of these three non-accretionary margins. Comparison of these data with published geodynamic models suggests that forearc subsidence is the result of temporal variability in slab geometry due to changes in slab buoyancy and plate convergence rate. These observations suggest that a significant component of forearc subsidence at these four margins is not the product of tectonic erosion, but instead reflects changes in plate boundary dynamics driven by variable plate kinematics.

  18. Boundary scavenging in the Pacific Ocean - A comparison of Be-10 and Pa-231

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. F.; Lao, Y.; Broecker, W. S.; Trumbore, S. E.; Hofmann, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of U, Th, Pa-231, and Be-10 concentrations were conducted in Holocene sediments from several sites representing open-ocean and ocean-margin environments in the Pacific Ocean. The results show that boundary scavenging plays a major role in the removal of Be-10 from the Pacific. Deposition of Be-10 is more than an order of magnitude greater at margin sites than at deep central Pacific sites, while Pa-231 is 4- to 5-fold greater at margin sites. The factors controling boundary scavenging of Pa and Be are discussed.

  19. Structural acoustic control of plates with variable boundary conditions: design methodology.

    PubMed

    Sprofera, Joseph D; Cabell, Randolph H; Gibbs, Gary P; Clark, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    A method for optimizing a structural acoustic control system subject to variations in plate boundary conditions is provided. The assumed modes method is used to build a plate model with varying levels of rotational boundary stiffness to simulate the dynamics of a plate with uncertain edge conditions. A transducer placement scoring process, involving Hankel singular values, is combined with a genetic optimization routine to find spatial locations robust to boundary condition variation. Predicted frequency response characteristics are examined, and theoretically optimized results are discussed in relation to the range of boundary conditions investigated. Modeled results indicate that it is possible to minimize the impact of uncertain boundary conditions in active structural acoustic control by optimizing the placement of transducers with respect to those uncertainties.

  20. Radiocarbon evidence for extensive plate-boundary rupture about 300 years ago at the Cascadia subduction zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, A.R.; Atwater, B.F.; Bobrowsky, P.T.; Bradley, L.A.; Clague, J.J.; Carver, G.A.; Darienzo, M.E.; Grant, W.C.; Krueger, H.W.; Sparks, R.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Stuiver, M.

    1995-01-01

    THE Cascadia subduction zone, a region of converging tectonic plates along the Pacific coast of North America, has a geological history of very large plate-boundary earthquakes1,2, but no such earthquakes have struck this region since Euro-American settlement about 150 years ago. Geophysical estimates of the moment magnitudes (Mw) of the largest such earthquakes range from 8 (ref. 3).to 91/2 (ref. 4). Radiocarbon dating of earthquake-killed vegetation can set upper bounds on earthquake size by constraining the length of plate boundary that ruptured in individual earthquakes. Such dating has shown that the most recent rupture, or series of ruptures, extended at least 55 km along the Washington coast within a period of a few decades about 300 years ago5. Here we report 85 new 14C ages, which suggest that this most recent rupture (or series) extended at least 900 km between southern British Columbia and northern California. By comparing the 14C ages with written records of the past 150 years, we conclude that a single magnitude 9 earthquake, or a series of lesser earthquakes, ruptured most of the length of the Cascadia subduction zone between the late 1600s and early 1800s, and probably in the early 1700s.

  1. Geological process of the slow earthquakes -A hypothesis from an ancient plate boundary fault rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Y.; Kimura, G.; Kawabata, K.

    2012-12-01

    We present an integrated model of the deformation along the subduction plate boundary from the trench to the seismogenic zone. Over years of field based research in the Shimanto Belt accretionary complex, southwest Japan, yielded breaking-through discoveries on plate boundary processes, for example, the first finding of pseudotachylyte in the accretionary prism (Ikesawa et al., 2003). Our aim here is to unveil the geological aspects of slow earthquakes and the related plate boundary processes. Studied tectonic mélanges in the Shimanto Belt are regarded as fossils of plate boundary fault zone in subduction zone. We traced material from different depths along subduction channel using samples from on-land outcrops and ocean drilling cores. As a result, a series of progressive deformation down to the down-dip limit of the seismogenic zone was revealed. Detailed geological survey and structural analyses enabled us to separate superimposed deformation events during subduction. Material involved in the plate boundary deformation is mainly an alternation of sand and mud. As they have different competency and are suffered by simple shear stress field, sandstones break apart in flowing mudstones. We distinguished several stages of these deformations in sandstones and recognized progress in the intensity of deformation with increment of underthrusting. It is also known that the studied Mugi mélange bears pseudotachylyte in its upper bounding fault. Our conclusion illustrates that the subduction channel around the depth of the seismogenic zone forms a thick plate boundary fault zone, where there is a clear segregation in deformation style: a fast and episodic slip at the upper boundary fault and a slow and continuous deformation within the zone. The former fast deformation corresponds to the plate boundary earthquakes and the latter to the slow earthquakes. We further examined numerically whether this plate boundary fault rock is capable of releasing seismic moment enough to

  2. Crustal gravitational potential energy change at the convergent plate boundary near Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C.; Hsu, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Taiwan orogen has formed due to the convergence between the Philippine Sea plate and Eurasian plate. Numerous earthquakes are occurring along the active convergent plate boundary in eastern Taiwan. To the northeast, the Philippine Sea plates is subducting northwards beneath the Ryukyu Arc. To the south, the Eurasian plate is subducting eastwards beneath the Luzon Arc. The plate interaction has caused crustal deformation and produced earthquakes. The earthquakes have caused radial permanent displacement of the crust and have altered the crustal gravitational potential energy. Here we use the earthquake source mechanisms, determined by the Broadband Array in Taiwan for Seismology (BATs) from 1995 to 2003, to calculate the crustal gravitational potential energy (GPE) change and discuss their tectonic implication along the convergent plate boundary. In Ilan Plain, the westernmost Okinawa Trough, it shows a crustal GPE loss. It is related to the crustal subsidence because of the backarc extension of the Okinawa Trough. In contrast, due to the Philippine Sea plate subucting northwards beneath Eurasian Plate, the Ryukyu convergent boundary shows systematic crustal GPE gain. Near Taiwan, the crustal GPE change is gained, indicating the collisional convergence of the Luzon Arc. To the south of Taiwan, along the Luzon Arc the crustal GPE is also gain, representing the initial uplifting of the Taiwan mountain belt.

  3. Constraints from Seamounts on Pacific Plate or Plume Motion Prior to 80 Ma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konter, J. G.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jackson, M. G.; Finlayson, V.; Konrad, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Hawaii-Emperor and Louisville hotspot tracks have long dominated the data set constraining absolute plate motion models. However, prior to ~80 Ma, multiple shorter, discontinuous hotspot trails and oceanic plateaus have been used to constrain absolute plate motion. Based on this earlier work, a clear Hawaii-Emperor style bend seems apparent around 100 Ma in the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP). More importantly, the ongoing debate on a plate versus plume motion origin for the Hawaii-Emperor Bend is applicable here, as the ~100 Ma bend may correspond to a global plate reorganization (Matthews et al., EPSL, 2012). Data for a comparison of bends comes from three groups with similar geographic patterns: 1) Mid-Pacific Mountains, Line Islands; 2) Shatsky Rise, Hess Rise, Musician and Wentworth Seamounts; and 3) Wake Seamounts, Marshall Islands, Magellan Seamounts. Both groups 1 and 2 feature a large igneous province (LIP) at their oldest end: Shatsky Rise and the Mid-Pacific Mountains. According to plate reconstructions these LIPs were constructed near all-ridge triple junctions, thus potential plume-ridge interactions need to be clarified before these LIPs can be used to define an absolute mantle reference frame. In contrast, the volcanoes of the third group (Wake, Marshall, Magellan) did erupt truly intra-plate and we therefore argue that this group provides a constraint on plate motion beyond 80 Ma that is independent of plume-ridge interactions. Since the volcanoes in this group are part of the WPSP, which is densely populated with seamounts, a combination of 40Ar/39Ar ages and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes is needed to distinguish different hotspot tracks in this region. Backtracking each volcano through its age to its original eruptive location and using compositional color-coding, reveals groupings and patterns that vary by plate motion model, while the temporal patterns of backtracked locations inform us about potential plume motions.

  4. Geographic boundary of the “Pacific Anomaly” near the Earth’s core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Wen, L.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic tomography have revealed a broad, seismically low velocity anomaly in the Earth’s lower mantle beneath the Pacific (we term it the “Pacific Anomaly”), surrounded by the circum-Pacific high velocity zone. Here, we determine geographical boundary and average shear velocity structure of the Pacific Anomaly near the core-mantle boundary based on travel time analysis of ScSH-SH and ScS2-SS phases. We further constrain the detailed structure of the transition from the base of the Pacific Anomaly to the northern high velocity zone along two perpendicular cross sections on the basis of forward waveform modeling of the seismic data. Two cross-sections include one great arc across the Anomaly from New Zealand to Alaska and another from Solomon Islands to North America. Our seismic data are collected from those recorded in the China National Digital Seismographic Network, and many permanent and temporal arrays from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology. The observed ScS-SH and ScS2-SS differential travel time residuals allow the entire geographic boundary of the anomaly to be clearly defined. The seismic data suggest that the average shear velocity reduction inside the anomaly reaches -5% in the lowermost 300 km of the mantle. Waveform analysis of the seismic data sampling the edge of the anomaly further validates the model of the boundary previously deduced by differential-travel-time-residual data, and suggests that the northern boundary is characterized by a shear velocity model with the low-velocity region accompanied by a high velocity structure.

  5. Simulating faults and plate boundaries with a transversely isotropic plasticity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharples, W.; Moresi, L. N.; Velic, M.; Jadamec, M. A.; May, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    In mantle convection simulations, dynamically evolving plate boundaries have, for the most part, been represented using an visco-plastic flow law. These systems develop fine-scale, localized, weak shear band structures which are reminiscent of faults but it is a significant challenge to resolve the large- and the emergent, small-scale-behavior. We address this issue of resolution by taking into account the observation that a rock element with embedded, planar, failure surfaces responds as a non-linear, transversely isotropic material with a weak orientation defined by the plane of the failure surface. This approach partly accounts for the large-scale behavior of fine-scale systems of shear bands which we are not in a position to resolve explicitly. We evaluate the capacity of this continuum approach to model plate boundaries, specifically in the context of subduction models where the plate boundary interface has often been represented as a planar discontinuity. We show that the inclusion of the transversely isotropic plasticity model for the plate boundary promotes asymmetric subduction from initiation. A realistic evolution of the plate boundary interface and associated stresses is crucial to understanding inter-plate coupling, convergent margin driven topography, and earthquakes.

  6. 3-D subduction dynamics in the western Pacific: Mantle pressure, plate kinematics, and dynamic topography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, A. F.; Royden, L.; Becker, T. W.; Faccenna, C.

    2017-12-01

    While it is well established that the slab pull of negatively buoyant oceanic plates is the primary driving force of plate tectonics, the dynamic "details" of subduction have proved difficult to pin down. We use the Philippine Sea Plate region of the western Pacific as a site to explore links between kinematic observables (e.g. topography and plate motions) and the dynamics of the subduction system (e.g. mantle flow, mantle pressure). To first order, the Philippine Sea Plate can be considered to be the central plate of a double slab system containing two slabs that dip in the same direction, to the west. This subduction configuration presents the opportunity to explore subduction dynamics in a setting where two closely spaced slabs interact via subduction-induced mantle flow and stresses transmitted through the intervening plate. We use a 3-D numerical approach (e.g. Holt et al., 2017), augmented by semi-analytical models (e.g. Jagoutz et al., 2017), to develop relationships between dynamic processes and kinematic properties, including plate velocities, lithospheric stress state, slab dip angles, and topography. When combined with subduction zone observables, this allows us to isolate the first order dynamic processes that are in operation in the Philippine Sea Plate region. Our results suggest that positive pressure build-up occurs in the asthenosphere between the two slabs (Izu-Bonin-Mariana and Ryukyu-Nankai), and that this is responsible for producing much of the observed kinematic variability in the region, including the steep dip of the Pacific slab at the Izu-Bonin-Mariana trench, as compared to the flat dip of the Pacific slab north of Japan. We then extend our understanding of the role of asthenospheric pressure to examine the forces responsible for the plate kinematics and dynamic topography of the entire Western Pacific subduction margin(s). References:Holt, A. F., Royden, L. H., Becker, T. W., 2017. Geophys. J. Int., 209, 250-265Jagoutz, O., Royden, L

  7. On approximating guided waves in plates with thin anisotropic coatings by means of effective boundary conditions

    PubMed

    Niklasson; Datta; Dunn

    2000-09-01

    In this paper, effective boundary conditions for elastic wave propagation in plates with thin coatings are derived. These effective boundary conditions are used to obtain an approximate dispersion relation for guided waves in an isotropic plate with thin anisotropic coating layers. The accuracy of the effective boundary conditions is investigated numerically by comparison with exact solutions for two different material systems. The systems considered consist of a metallic core with thin superconducting coatings. It is shown that for wavelengths long compared to the coating thickness there is excellent agreement between the approximate and exact solutions for both systems. Furthermore, numerical results presented might be used to characterize coating properties by ultrasonic techniques.

  8. Faunal breaks and species composition of Indo-Pacific corals: the role of plate tectonics, environment and habitat distribution.

    PubMed

    Keith, S A; Baird, A H; Hughes, T P; Madin, J S; Connolly, S R

    2013-07-22

    Species richness gradients are ubiquitous in nature, but the mechanisms that generate and maintain these patterns at macroecological scales remain unresolved. We use a new approach that focuses on overlapping geographical ranges of species to reveal that Indo-Pacific corals are assembled within 11 distinct faunal provinces. Province limits are characterized by co-occurrence of multiple species range boundaries. Unexpectedly, these faunal breaks are poorly predicted by contemporary environmental conditions and the present-day distribution of habitat. Instead, faunal breaks show striking concordance with geological features (tectonic plates and mantle plume tracks). The depth range over which a species occurs, its larval development rate and genus age are important determinants of the likelihood that species will straddle faunal breaks. Our findings indicate that historical processes, habitat heterogeneity and species colonization ability account for more of the present-day biogeographical patterns of corals than explanations based on the contemporary distribution of reefs or environmental conditions.

  9. Faunal breaks and species composition of Indo-Pacific corals: the role of plate tectonics, environment and habitat distribution

    PubMed Central

    Keith, S. A.; Baird, A. H.; Hughes, T. P.; Madin, J. S.; Connolly, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Species richness gradients are ubiquitous in nature, but the mechanisms that generate and maintain these patterns at macroecological scales remain unresolved. We use a new approach that focuses on overlapping geographical ranges of species to reveal that Indo-Pacific corals are assembled within 11 distinct faunal provinces. Province limits are characterized by co-occurrence of multiple species range boundaries. Unexpectedly, these faunal breaks are poorly predicted by contemporary environmental conditions and the present-day distribution of habitat. Instead, faunal breaks show striking concordance with geological features (tectonic plates and mantle plume tracks). The depth range over which a species occurs, its larval development rate and genus age are important determinants of the likelihood that species will straddle faunal breaks. Our findings indicate that historical processes, habitat heterogeneity and species colonization ability account for more of the present-day biogeographical patterns of corals than explanations based on the contemporary distribution of reefs or environmental conditions. PMID:23698011

  10. Flat Plate Boundary Layer Stimulation Using Trip Wires and Hama Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peguero, Charles; Henoch, Charles; Hrubes, James; Fredette, Albert; Roberts, Raymond; Huyer, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    Water tunnel experiments on a flat plate at zero angle of attack were performed to investigate the effect of single roughness elements, i.e., trip wires and Hama strips, on the transition to turbulence. Boundary layer trips are traditionally used in scale model testing to force a boundary layer to transition from laminar to turbulent flow at a single location to aid in scaling of flow characteristics. Several investigations of trip wire effects exist in the literature, but there is a dearth of information regarding the influence of Hama strips on the flat plate boundary layer. The intent of this investigation is to better understand the effects of boundary layer trips, particularly Hama strips, and to investigate the pressure-induced drag of both styles of boundary layer trips. Untripped and tripped boundary layers along a flat plate at a range of flow speeds were characterized with multiple diagnostic measurements in the NUWC/Newport 12-inch water tunnel. A wide range of Hama strip and wire trip thicknesses were used. Measurements included dye flow visualization, direct skin friction and parasitic drag force, boundary layer profiles using LDV, wall shear stress fluctuations using hot film anemometry, and streamwise pressure gradients. Test results will be compared to the CFD and boundary layer model results as well as the existing body of work. Conclusions, resulting in guidance for application of Hama strips in model scale experiments and non-dimensional predictions of pressure drag will be presented.

  11. Velocity Distribution in the Boundary Layer of a Submerged Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, M

    1930-01-01

    This report deals with the measurement of the velocity distribution of the air in the velocity of a plate placed parallel to the air flow. The measurements took place in a small wind tunnel where the diameter of the entrance cone is 30 cm and the length of the free jet between the entrance and exit cones is about 2.5 m. The measurements were made in the free jet where the static pressure was constant, which was essential for the method of measurement used.

  12. Mantle dynamics and generation of a geochemical mantle boundary along the East Pacific Rise - Pacific/Antarctic ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Liang; Chen, Li-Hui; Li, Shi-Zhen

    2013-12-01

    A large-scale mantle compositional discontinuity was identified along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge (PAR) with an inferred transition located at the EPR 23°S-32°S. Because of the EPR-Easter hotspot interactions in this area, the nature of this geochemical discontinuity remains unclear. IODP Sites U1367 and U1368 drilled into the ocean crust that was accreted at ∼33.5 Ma and ∼13.5 Ma, respectively, between 28°S and 30°S on the EPR. We use lavas from Sites U1367 and U1368 to track this mantle discontinuity away from the EPR. The mantle sources for basalts at Sites U1367 and U1368 represent, respectively, northern and southern Pacific mantle sub-domains in terms of Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes. The significant isotopic differences between the two IODP sites are consistent with addition of ancient subduction-processed ocean crust to the south Pacific mantle sub-domain. Our modeling result shows that a trace element pattern similar to that of U1368 E-MORB can be formed by melting a subduction-processed typical N-MORB. The trace element and isotope compositions for Site U1368 MORBs can be formed by mixing a HIMU mantle end-member with Site U1367 MORBs. Comparison of our data with those from the EPR-PAR shows a geochemical mantle boundary near the Easter microplate that separates the Pacific upper mantle into northern and southern sub-domains. On the basis of reconstruction of initial locations of the ocean crust at the two sites, we find that the mantle boundary has moved northward to the Easter microplate since before 33.5 Ma. A model, in which along-axis asthenospheric flow to where asthenosphere consumption is strongest, explains the movement of the apparent mantle boundary.

  13. Current Plate Motion Across the Southwest Indian Ridge: Implications for the Diffuse Oceanic Plate Boundary Between Nubia and Somalia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner-Johnson, B. C.; Cowles, S. M.; Gordon, R. G.; Argus, D. F.

    2001-12-01

    Prior studies of plate motion data along the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) have produced results that conflict in detail. Chu & Gordon [1999], from an analysis of 59 spreading rates averaged over 3 Myr and of the azimuths of active transform faults, found that the data are most consistent with a diffuse Nubia-Somalia plate boundary where it intersects the SWIR. When they solve for the best-fitting hypothetical narrow boundary, they find that it lies near 37° E, east of the Prince Edward fracture zone. They find a Nubia-Somalia pole of rotation near the east coast of South Africa. In contrast, Lemaux, Gordon, and Royer [2001], from an analysis of 237 crossings of marine magnetic anomaly 5 (11 Ma), find that most of the motion is accommodated in a narrow zone, most likely along the ``inactive'' trace of the Andrew Bain fracture zone complex (ABFZC), which intersects the SWIR near 32° E. They find a pole well to the west of, and probably to the southwest of, the pole of rotation found by Chu & Gordon. Their pole indicates mainly strike-slip motion along the ``inactive'' ABFZC. To resolve these conflicting results, we determined a new greatly expanded and spatially much denser set of 243 spreading rates and analyzed available bathymetric data of active transform faults along the SWIR. The data show that the African oceanic lithosphere spreading away from the SWIR cannot simply be two plates divided by a single narrow boundary. Our interpretation of the data is as follows. Near the SWIR, there is a diffuse boundary with a western limit near the ABFZC and an eastern limit near 63.5° E. Slip is partitioned in this wide boundary. Somewhere near the ABFZC (most likely the ABFZC itself) is a concentrated locus of right-lateral shearing parallel to the ABFZC whereas contraction perpendicular to the ABFZC is accommodated east of the ABFZC, perhaps over a very broad zone.

  14. Constraints on Pacific plate kinematics and dynamics with global positioning system measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, T. H.; Golombek, M. P.; Thornton, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    A measurement program designed to investigate kinematic and dynamic aspects of plate tectonics in the Pacific region by means of satellite observations is proposed. Accuracy studies are summarized showing that for short baselines (less than 100 km), the measuring accuracy of global positioning system (GPS) receivers can be in the centimeter range. For longer baselines, uncertainty in the orbital ephemerides of the GPS satellites could be a major source of error. Simultaneous observations at widely (about 300 km) separated fiducial stations over the Pacific region, should permit an accuracy in the centimeter range for baselines of up to several thousand kilometers. The optimum performance level is based on the assumption of that fiducial baselines are known a priori to the centimeter range. An example fiducial network for a GPS study of the South Pacific region is described.

  15. Weak incident shock interactions with Mach 8 laminar boundary layers. [of flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, L. G., II; Johnson, C. B.

    1974-01-01

    Weak shock-wave interactions with boundary layers on a flat plate were investigated experimentally in Mach 8 variable-density tunnel for plate-length Reynolds numbers. The undisturbed boundary layers were laminar over the entire plate length. Pressure and heat-transfer distributions were obtained for wedge-generated incident shock waves that resulted in pressure rises ranging from 1.36 to 4.46 (both nonseparated and separated boundary-layer flows). The resulting heat-transfer amplifications ranged from 1.45 to 14. The distributions followed established trends for nonseparated flows, for incipient separation, and for laminar free-interaction pressure rises. The experimental results corroborated established trends for the extent of the pressure rise and for certain peak heat-transfer correlations.

  16. Global isostatic geoid anomalies for plate and boundary layer models of the lithosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, B. H.

    1981-01-01

    Commonly used one dimensional geoid models predict that the isostatic geoid anomaly over old ocean basins for the boundary layer thermal model of the lithosphere is a factor of two greater than that for the plate model. Calculations presented, using the spherical analogues of the plate and boundary layer thermal models, show that for the actual global distribution of plate ages, one dimensional models are not accurate and a spherical, fully three dimensional treatment is necessary. The maximum difference in geoid heights predicted for the two models is only about two meters. The thermal structure of old lithosphere is unlikely to be resolvable using global geoid anomalies. Stripping the effects of plate aging and a hypothetical uniform, 35 km, isostatically-compensated continental crust from the observed geoid emphasizes that the largest-amplitude geoid anomaly is the geoid low of almost 120 m over West Antarctica, a factor of two greater than the low of 60 m over Ceylon.

  17. Propagation of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcano chain by Pacific plate cooling stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.D.; Foulger, G.R.; Barall, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lithosphere crack model, the main alternative to the mantle plume model for age-progressive magma emplacement along the Hawaiian-Emperor volcano chain, requires the maximum horizontal tensile stress to be normal to the volcano chain. However, published stress fields calculated from Pacific lithosphere tractions and body forces (e.g., subduction pull, basal drag, lithosphere density) are not optimal for southeast propagation of a stress-free, vertical tensile crack coincident with the Hawaiian segment of the Hawaiian-Emperor chain. Here we calculate the thermoelastic stress rate for present-day cooling of the Pacific plate using a spherical shell finite element representation of the plate geometry. We use observed seafloor isochrons and a standard model for lithosphere cooling to specify the time dependence of vertical temperature profiles. The calculated stress rate multiplied by a time increment (e.g., 1 m.y.) then gives a thermoelastic stress increment for the evolving Pacific plate. Near the Hawaiian chain position, the calculated stress increment in the lower part of the shell is tensional, with maximum tension normal to the chain direction. Near the projection of the chain trend to the southeast beyond Hawaii, the stress increment is compressive. This incremental stress field has the form necessary to maintain and propagate a tensile crack or similar lithosphere flaw and is thus consistent with the crack model for the Hawaiian volcano chain.?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  18. Receptivity of Flat-Plate Boundary Layer in a Non-Uniform Free Stream (Vorticity Normal to the Plate)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, M. N.; Ustinov, M. V.

    1997-01-01

    Work is devoted to study of free-stream vorticity normal to leading edge interaction with boundary layer over plate and resulting flow distortion influence on laminar-turbulent transition. In experiments made the wake behind the vertically stretched wire was used as a source of vortical disturbances and its effect on the boundary layer over the horizontally mounted plate with various leading edge shapes was investigated. The purpose of experiments was to check the predictions of theoretical works of M.E. Goldstein, et. al. This theory shows that small free-stream inhomogeneity interacting with leading edge produces considerable distortion of boundary layer flow. In general, results obtained confirms predictions of Goldstein's theory, i.e., the amplification of steady vortical disturbances in boundary layer caused by vortex lines stretching was observed. Experimental results fully coincide with predictions of theory for large Reynolds number, relatively sharp leading edge and small disturbances. For large enough disturbances the flow distortion caused by symmetric wake unexpectedly becomes antisymmetric in spanwise direction. If the leading edge is too blunt the maximal distortion takes place immediately at the nose and no further amplification was observed. All these conditions and results are beyond the scope of Goldstein's theory.

  19. Spatio-temporal mapping of plate boundary faults in California using geodetic imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnellan, Andrea; Arrowsmith, Ramon; DeLong, Stephen B.

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific–North American plate boundary in California is composed of a 400-km-wide network of faults and zones of distributed deformation. Earthquakes, even large ones, can occur along individual or combinations of faults within the larger plate boundary system. While research often focuses on the primary and secondary faults, holistic study of the plate boundary is required to answer several fundamental questions. How do plate boundary motions partition across California faults? How do faults within the plate boundary interact during earthquakes? What fraction of strain accumulation is relieved aseismically and does this provide limits on fault rupture propagation? Geodetic imaging, broadly defined as measurement of crustal deformation and topography of the Earth’s surface, enables assessment of topographic characteristics and the spatio-temporal behavior of the Earth’s crust. We focus here on crustal deformation observed with continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) data and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) from NASA’s airborne UAVSAR platform, and on high-resolution topography acquired from lidar and Structure from Motion (SfM) methods. Combined, these measurements are used to identify active structures, past ruptures, transient motions, and distribution of deformation. The observations inform estimates of the mechanical and geometric properties of faults. We discuss five areas in California as examples of different fault behavior, fault maturity and times within the earthquake cycle: the M6.0 2014 South Napa earthquake rupture, the San Jacinto fault, the creeping and locked Carrizo sections of the San Andreas fault, the Landers rupture in the Eastern California Shear Zone, and the convergence of the Eastern California Shear Zone and San Andreas fault in southern California. These examples indicate that distribution of crustal deformation can be measured using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), Global Navigation

  20. Plate-tectonic boundary formation by grain-damage and pinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, David

    2015-04-01

    Shear weakening in the lithosphere is an essential ingredient for understanding how and why plate tectonics is generated from mantle convection on terrestrial planets. I present continued work on a theoretical model for lithospheric shear-localization and plate generation through damage, grain evolution and Zener pinning in two-phase (polycrystalline) lithospheric rocks. Grain size evolves through the competition between coarsening, which drives grain-growth, with damage, which drives grain reduction. The interface between phases controls Zener pinning, which impedes grain growth. Damage to the interface enhances the Zener pinning effect, which then reduces grain-size, forcing the rheology into the grain-size-dependent diffusion creep regime. This process thus allows damage and rheological weakening to co-exist, providing a necessary shear-localizing feedback. Moreover, because pinning inhibits grain-growth it promotes shear-zone longevity and plate-boundary inheritance. This theory has been applied recently to the emergence of plate tectonics in the Archean by transient subduction and accumulation of plate boundaries over 1Gyr, as well as to rapid slab detachment and abrupt tectonic changes. New work explores the saturation of interface damage at low interface curvature (e.g., because it is associated with larger grains that take up more of the damage, and/or because interface area is reduced). This effect allows three possible equilibrium grain-sizes for a given stress; a small-grain-size high-shear state in diffusion creep, a large grain-size low shear state in dislocation creep, and an intermediate state (often near the deformation map phase-boundary). The low and high grain-size states are stable, while the intermediate one is unstable. This implies that a material deformed at a given stress can acquire two stable deformation regimes, a low- and high- shear state; these are indicative of plate-like flows, i.e, the coexistence of both slowly deforming plates

  1. Boundary-layer transition on a plate subjected to simultaneous spanwise and chordwise pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Brinich, P. F.

    1974-01-01

    The boundary-layer transition on a short plate was studied by means of the china-clay visual technique. The plate model was mounted in a wind tunnel so that it was subjected to small simultaneous spanwise and chordwise pressure gradients. Results of the experimental study, which was performed at three subsonic velocities, indicated that the transition pattern was appreciably curved in the spanwise direction but quite smooth and well behaved. Reasonable comparisons between predictions of transition and experiment were obtained from two finite-difference two-dimensional boundary-layer calculation methods which incorporated transition models based on the concept of a transition intermittency factor.

  2. Petrologic Aspects of Seamount and Guyot Volcanism on the Ancestral Mesozoic Pacific Plate: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natland, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    Hundreds of large seamounts and guyots are widely scattered almost in a "shotgun-blast" arrangement in an area about the size of the United States west of the Mississippi River on the Mesozoic Pacific plate between the Mariana Trench and the Gilbert Islands. Most of these formed between ~160-100 Ma while the Pacific plate was surrounded by spreading ridges and growing outward in all directions. There is little to no indication that the seamounts and guyots formed along linear seamount chains; existing radiometric-age data show no age progressions. The volcanoes appear to have formed in response to a uniform stress configuration across the plate, which was either not moving or moving very slowly at the time (1, 2), much like the modern Antarctic plate. When the growing plate started to encounter subduction systems in the western Pacific at ~90 Ma, consistent stress patterns began to develop, and the broad linear Gilbert and Line volcanic ridge systems began to form. Even then, however, considerable overlapping of volcanism occurred, and only the most general age progressions are evident in existing data. Petrologic data from samples obtained from dozens of volcanic summits by dredging and beneath several carbonate platforms by drilling reveal considerable diversity in development of differentiated alkalic magmatic lineages rooted in diverse parental basaltic rocks. These include transitional, alkalic and basanitic compositions, with differentiates of hawaiite, mugearite, trachyte and one phonolite. Many of the basaltic rocks are partly to significantly transformed by alteration under oxidative conditions (dredged rocks) and both oxidative and non-oxidative conditions (drilled rocks). This can make estimations of mantle geochemical provenance difficult. Nevertheless, the province has been linked by backtracking techniques to the modern SOPITA region of the South Pacific (3), and its rocks show enrichments in trace elements and isotopic characteristics similar to

  3. Tsunamis from Tectonic Sources along Caribbean Plate Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, A. M.; Chacon, S.; Zamora, N.; Audemard, F. A.; Dondin, F. J. Y.; Clouard, V.; Løvholt, F.; Harbitz, C. B.; Vanacore, E. A.; Huerfano Moreno, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Working Group 2 (WG2) of the Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and Other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (ICG/CARIBE-EWS) in charge of Tsunami Hazards Assessment, has generated a list of tsunami sources for the Caribbean region. Simulating these worst-case, most credible scenarios would provide an estimate of the resulting effects on coastal areas within the Caribbean. In the past few years, several publications have addressed this issue resulting in a collection of potential tsunami sources and scenarios. These publications come from a wide variety of sources; from government agencies to academic institutions. Although these provide the scientific community with a list of sources and scenarios, it was the interest of the WG2 to evaluate what has been proposed and develop a comprehensive list of sources, therefore leaving aside proposed scenarios. The seismo-tectonics experts of the Caribbean within the WG2 members were tasked to evaluate comprehensively which published sources are credible, worst-cases, and consider other sources that have been omitted from available reports. Among these published sources are the GEM Faulted Earth Subduction Characterization Project, and the LANTEX/Caribe Wave annual exercise publications (2009-2015). Caribbean tectonic features capable of generating tsunamis from seismic dislocation are located along the Northeastern Caribbean, the Lesser Antilles Trench, and the Panamá and Southern Caribbean Deformed Belts. The proposed sources have been evaluated based on historical and instrumental seismicity as well as geological and geophysical studies. This paper presents the sources and their justification as most-probable tsunami sources based on the context of crustal deformation due to Caribbean plate interacting with neighboring North and South America plates. Simulations of these sources is part of a subsequent phase in which effects of these tectonically induced tsunamis

  4. Tectonics of the Scotia-Antarctica plate boundary constrained from seismic and seismological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civile, D.; Lodolo, E.; Vuan, A.; Loreto, M. F.

    2012-07-01

    The plate boundary between the Scotia and Antarctic plates runs along the broadly E-W trending South Scotia Ridge. It is a mainly transcurrent margin that juxtaposes thinned continental and transitional crust elements with restricted oceanic basins and deep troughs. Seismic profiles and regional-scale seismological constraints are used to define the peculiarities of the crustal structures in and around the southern Scotia Sea, and focal solutions from recent earthquakes help to understand the present-day geodynamic setting. The northern edge of the western South Scotia Ridge is marked by a sub-vertical, left-lateral master fault. Locally, a narrow wedge of accreted sediments is present at the base of the slope. This segment represents the boundary between the Scotia plate and the independent South Shetland continental block. Along the northern margin of the South Orkney microcontinent, the largest fragment of the South Scotia Ridge, an accretionary prism is present at the base of the slope, which was possibly created by the eastward drift of the South Orkney microcontinent and the consequent subduction of the transitional crust present to the north. East of the South Orkney microcontinent, the physiography and structure of the plate boundary are less constrained. Here the tectonic regime exhibits mainly strike-slip behavior with some grade of extensional component, and the plate boundary is segmented by a series of NNW-SSE trending release zones which favored the fragmentation and dispersion of the crustal blocks. Seismic data have also identified, along the north-western edge of the South Scotia Ridge, an elevated region - the Ona Platform - which can be considered, along with the Terror Rise, as the conjugate margin of the Tierra del Fuego, before the Drake Passage opening. We propose here an evolutionary sketch for the plate boundary (from the Late Oligocene to the present) encompassing the segment from the Elephant Island platform to the Herdman Bank.

  5. Plate Boundary Observatory GPS Network Status in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, C. P.; Austin, K. E.; Dittman, T.; Mann, D.; Basset, A.; Turner, R.; Lawrence, S.; Woolace, A. C.; Kasmer, D.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Feaux, K.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    The EarthScope PBO GPS network, funded by the NSF and operated by UNAVCO, is comprised of 599 permanent GPS stations spanning three principal tectonic regimes and is administered by separate management regions (Subduction - Pacific Northwest [91 sites], Extension - East [41 sites], Transform - Southwest [467 sites]). Since the close of construction in September 2008 various enhancements have been implemented through additional funding by the NSF, NOAA, and NASA and in collaboration with stakeholders such as Caltrans, Scripps, and the USGS. Initially, the majority of stations used first generation IP based cellular modems and radios capable of ~10KB/s data rates. The bandwidth limitation was a challenge for regional high-rate data downloads for GPS-seismology and airborne LiDAR surveys, and real-time data flow. Today, only 13 of the original cell modems remain with 297 upgraded cell modems providing 3G/4G/LTE data communications with transfer rates ranging from 80-400 KB/s. Ongoing radio network expansion and upgrades continue to harden communications. 32 VSAT and one manual download site remain. In CA, the network capabilities for 1Hz and 5Hz downloads or real-time streaming are ~95%, ~80% and ~65%, respectively. During the past year, uptime ranged from 94-99% with data return for 15 s data exceeding 99%. Real-time (1 Hz) data from 204 sites are distributed in BINEX and RTCM 2.3/3.1 formats with an average latency of 0.5 s and completion of 86%. A variety of geophysical sensors are co-located with the GPS stations and include: 21 MEMS accelerometers, 31 strong motion and broadband seismometers, 9 borehole strainmeters and 1 long baseline strainmeter. Vaisala meteorological instruments are located at 60 sites of which 38 stream GPS/Met data. In an effort to modernize the network, Trimble NetRS receivers are gradually being replaced with GNSS-capable/enabled receivers and antennas. Today, 11 stations are GLONASS enabled and 84 are GNSS capable.

  6. Anomalous Late Jurassic motion of the Pacific Plate with implications for true polar wander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Roger R.; Kent, Dennis V.

    2018-05-01

    True polar wander, or TPW, is the rotation of the entire mantle-crust system about an equatorial axis that results in a coherent velocity contribution for all lithospheric plates. One of the most recent candidate TPW events consists of a ∼30° rotation during Late Jurassic time (160-145 Ma). However, existing paleomagnetic documentation of this event derives exclusively from continents, which compose less than 50% of the Earth's surface area and may not reflect motion of the entire mantle-crust system. Additional paleopositional information from the Pacific Basin would significantly enhance coverage of the Earth's surface and allow more rigorous testing for the occurrence of TPW. We perform paleomagnetic analyses on core samples from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 801B, which were taken from the oldest available Pacific crust, to determine its paleolatitude during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous (167-133 Ma). We find that the Pacific Plate underwent a steady southward drift of 0.49°-0.74° My-1 except for an interval between Kimmeridgian and Tithonian time (157-147 Ma), during which it underwent northward motion at 1.45° ± 0.76° My-1 (1σ). This trajectory indicates that the plates of the Pacific Basin participated in the same large-amplitude (∼30°) rotation as continental lithosphere in the 160-145 Ma interval. Such coherent motion of a large majority of the Earth's surface strongly supports the occurrence of TPW, suggesting that a combination of subducting slabs and rising mantle plumes was sufficient to significantly perturb the Earth's inertia tensor in the Late Jurassic.

  7. Revised Pacific-Antarctic plate motions and geophysics of the Menard Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croon, Marcel B.; Cande, Steven C.; Stock, Joann M.

    2008-07-01

    A reconnaissance survey of multibeam bathymetry and magnetic anomaly data of the Menard Fracture Zone allows for significant refinement of plate motion history of the South Pacific over the last 44 million years. The right-stepping Menard Fracture Zone developed at the northern end of the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge within a propagating rift system that generated the Hudson microplate and formed the conjugate Henry and Hudson Troughs as a response to a major plate reorganization ˜45 million years ago. Two splays, originally about 30 to 35 km apart, narrowed gradually to a corridor of 5 to 10 km width, while lineation azimuths experienced an 8° counterclockwise reorientation owing to changes in spreading direction between chrons C13o and C6C (33 to 24 million years ago). We use the improved Pacific-Antarctic plate motions to analyze the development of the southwest end of the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge. Owing to a 45° counterclockwise reorientation between chrons C27 and C20 (61 to 44 million years ago) this section of the ridge became a long transform fault connected to the Macquarie Triple Junction. Following a clockwise change starting around chron C13o (33 million years ago), the transform fault opened. A counterclockwise change starting around chron C10y (28 millions years ago) again led to a long transform fault between chrons C6C and C5y (24 to 10 million years ago). A second period of clockwise reorientation starting around chron C5y (10 million years ago) put the transform fault into extension, forming an array of 15 en echelon transform faults and short linking spreading centers.

  8. Crustal stress across the northern Arabian plate and the relationship with the plate boundary forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassminh, Rayan

    The region encompassing the collision of northern Arabia with Eurasia is a tectonically heterogeneous region of distributed deformation. The northern Arabia plate is bounded to the west by the subducting Sinai plate and the left-lateral Dead Sea transform. This complexity suggests that there are multiple competing processes that may influence regional tectonics in northern Arabia and adjacent areas. Earthquake mechanisms provide insight into crustal kinematics and stress; however, reliable determination of earthquake source parameters can be challenging in a complex geological region, such as the continental collision zone between the Arabian and Eurasian plates. The goal of this study is to investigate spatial patterns of the crustal stress in the northern Arabian plate and surrounding area. The focal mechanisms used in this study are based on (1) first-motion polarities for earthquakes recorded by Syrian earthquake center during 2000-2011, and (2) regional moment tensors from broadband seismic data, from Turkey and Iraq. First motion focal mechanisms were assigned quality classifications based on the variation of both nodal planes. Regional moment tensor analysis can be significantly influenced by seismic velocity structure; thus, we have divided the study area into regions based on tectonic units. For each region, the velocity model is described using a waveform-modeling technique prior to the regional moment tensor inversion. The resulting focal mechanisms, combined with other previously published focal mechanisms for the study area, provide a basis for stress inversion analysis. The resulting deviatoric stress tensors show the spatial distribution of the maximum horizontal stress varies from NW-SE along the Dead Sea Fault to the N-S toward the east. We interpret this to reflect the eastward change from the transform to collision processes in northern Arabia. Along the Dead Sea Fault, transposition of the sigma-1 and sigma-2 to vertical and horizontal

  9. Localized double-array stacking analysis of PcP: D″ and ULVZ structure beneath the Cocos plate, Mexico, central Pacific, and north Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutko, Alexander R.; Lay, Thorne; Revenaugh, Justin

    2009-01-01

    A large, high quality P-wave data set comprising short-period and broadband signals sampling four separate regions in the lowermost mantle beneath the Cocos plate, Mexico, the central Pacific, and the north Pacific is analyzed using regional one-dimensional double-array stacking and modelling with reflectivity synthetics. A data-screening criterion retains only events with stable PcP energy in the final data stacks used for modelling and interpretation. This significantly improves the signal stacks relative to including unscreened observations, allows confident alignment on the PcP arrival and allows tight bounds to be placed on P-wave velocity structure above the core–mantle boundary (CMB). The PcP reflections under the Cocos plate are well modelled without any ultra-low velocity zone from 5 to 20°N. At latitudes from 15 to 20°N, we find evidence for two P-wave velocity discontinuities in the D″ region. The first is ∼182 km above the CMB with a δln Vp of +1.5%, near the same depth as a weaker discontinuity (<+0.5%) observed from 5 to 15°N in prior work. The other reflector is ∼454 km above the CMB, with a δln Vp of +0.4%; this appears to be a shallower continuation of the joint P- and S-wave discontinuity previously detected south of 15° N, which is presumed to be the perovskite to post-perovskite phase transition. The data stacks for paths bottoming below Mexico have PcP images that are well matched with the simple IASP91 structure, contradicting previous inferences of ULVZ presence in this region. These particular data are not very sensitive to any D″ discontinuities, and simply bound them to be <∼2%, if present. Data sampling the lowermost mantle beneath the central Pacific confirm the presence of a ∼15-km thick ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ) just above the CMB, with δln Vp and δln Vs of around −3 to −4% and −4 to −8%, respectively. The ULVZ models predict previous S-wave data stacks well. The data for this region

  10. a Lattice Boltzmann Study of the 2d Boundary Layer Created by AN Oscillating Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappietti, L.; Chopard, B.

    We study the applicability of the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) to simulate the 2D laminar boundary layer induced by an oscillating flat plate. We also investigate the transition to the disturbed laminar regime that occurs with a rough oscillating plate. The simulations were performed in two cases: first with a fluid otherwise at rest and second in presence of superimposed current. The generation of coherent vortex structures and their evolution are commented. The accuracy of the method was checked by comparisons with the exact analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for the so-called Stokes' Second Problem. The comparisons show that LBM reproduces this time varying flow with first order accuracy. In the case of the wavy-plate, the results show that a mechanism of vortex-jet formations, low speed-streak and shear instability sustain a systems of stationary vortices outside the boundary layer. The vortex-jet takes place at the end of the decelerating phase whereas the boundary layer turns out to be laminar when the plate accelerates. In the presence of the superimposed current, the vortex-jet mechanism is still effective but the vortices outside the boundary layer are only present during part of the oscillating period. During the remaining part, the flow turns out to be laminar although a wave perturbation in the velocity field is present.

  11. An Evaluation of the Fixed Hotspot Hypothesis for the Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, P.; Kroenke, L. W.

    2008-12-01

    Using geometry and ages from 12 Pacific seamount chains, we recently constructed two new Pacific absolute plate motion models that extend our self-consistent and high-resolution models back to 145 Ma. The WK08-A model maps the full uncertainty in the age progressions into uncertainties in rotation opening angles, yielding a relatively smooth plate motion model. The WK08-G model relaxes the mapping of age uncertainties in order to better isolate secondary geometry changes seen along many co-registered chains. Both models have been used to assess the viability of the fixed hotspot hypothesis in the Pacific. In constructing these models, we found that only a small group of age samples had to be discarded on the grounds that they were discordant with the dominant trends. We were able to connect plate motions for pre- and post-Emperor age intervals by including the Ratak-Gilbert-Ellice, Liliuokalani and Musicians trails in our analysis. However, as no active hotspot locations exist for the older chains their inclusion adds additional model parameters. Both age and geometry misfits increase with age, reflecting the observed increase in age uncertainties and the broader and less distinct nature of the older trails. Paleomagnetic observations from the Emperor seamount chain have been interpreted to suggest that these seamounts must have formed at latitudes significantly more northerly than the present location of the Hawaii hotspot, implying a drifting mantle plume. At the same time, new estimates of the age of the Hawaii- Emperor bend places bend formation at a time of global plate reorganization. We will present a complete analysis of inter-chain distances between coeval radiometric samples from Pacific chains and compare these distances to the inter-hotspot distances at the present time. Significant departures from the current hotspot separations would be direct and unequivocal evidence of motion between the Pacific hotspot reference frame and the spin axis and as such

  12. The Hawaii-Emperor Bend: Clearly a Record of Pacific Plate Motion Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, P.; Harada, Y.; Kroenke, L. W.; Sterling, A.

    2003-12-01

    As most introductory textbooks will point out, the conventional explanation for the ˜120° change in the trends of the Hawaiian and Emperor chains is a ˜60° change in plate motion over a fixed plume in the mantle. Recently, however, new paleomagnetic and radiometric age data from the Emperor Seamounts have led some scientists to reject the conventional view of the origin of the Hawaii-Emperor bend in favor of a mobile plume. Yet, at the brink of being explained away as the mere consequence of a drifting plume, the fixed hotspot hypothesis now gains support from newly reported radiometric dates of rock samples from seamounts at the bend which reveal an age much older than expected. Unlike the previous younger age ( ˜43 Ma), the older age ( ˜47 Ma) allows the bend to be directly correlated with a period of pronounced, global tectonic reorganizations around Chron 21. Here we present a new Pacific absolute plate motion model, derived from 15 hotspot chains, which does not require hotspot drift in order to satisfy geometric and chronological constraints. By considering this absolute plate motion model with available Pacific paleomagnetic poles we find support for the notion that the spin axis was closer to the Hawaiian hotspot during the formation of the Emperor chain, and this interpretation (polar wander, not hotspot drift) also explains the paleomagnetic latitudes from the Emperor seamounts as well as the lack of coral reefs materials in the drill holes north of Koko Guyot. However, this interpretation is not unique, and drift cannot be summarily ruled out. Yet, if Pacific plumes are drifting then they appear to be moving in unison. Careful examination of the Pacific seafloor reveals additional Pacific trails with bends that appear to be contemporaneous with the Hawaii-Emperor Bend, although conclusive radiometric age data are lacking. Our plate motion model predicts hotspot tracks that fit these bends. Considering all these lines of evidence the fixed hotspot

  13. Crustal structure of a transform plate boundary: San Francisco Bay and the central California continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holbrook, W.S.; Brocher, T.M.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Hole, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    lower-crustal velocity of Pacific oceanic crust suggest that it was underplated by magmatism associated with the nearby Pioneer seamount. The Salinian Block consists of a 15-km-thick layer of velocity 6.0-6.2 km/s overlying a 5-km-thick, high-velocity (7.0 km/s) lower crust that may be oceanic crust, Cretaceous arc-derived lower crust, or a magmatically underplated layer. The strong structural variability across the margin attests to the activity of strike-slip faulting prior to and during development of the transcurrent Pacific/North American plate boundary around 29 Ma. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Tracking the India-Arabia Transform Plate Boundary during Paleogene Times.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Huchon, P.; Chamot-Rooke, N. R. A.; Fournier, M.; Delescluse, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Zagros and Himalaya mountain belts are the most prominent reliefs built by continental collision. They respectively result from Arabia and India collision with Eurasia. Convergence motions at mountain belts induced most of plate reorganization events in the Indian Ocean during the Cenozoic. Although critical for paleogeographic reconstructions, the way relative motion between Arabia and India was accommodated prior to the formation of the Sheba ridge in the Gulf of Aden remains poorly understood. The India-Arabia plate-boundary belongs to the category of long-lived (~90-Ma) oceanic transform faults, thus providing a good case study to investigate the role of major kinematic events over the structural evolution of a long-lived transform system. A seismic dataset crossing the Owen Fracture Zone, the Owen Basin, and the Oman Margin was acquired to track the past locations of the India-Arabia plate boundary. We highlight the composite age of the Owen Basin basement, made of Paleocene oceanic crust drilled on its eastern part, and composed of pre-Maastrichtian continental crust overlaid by Early Paleocene ophiolites on its western side. A major transform fault system crossing the Owen Basin juxtaposed these two slivers of lithosphere of different ages, and controlled the uplift of marginal ridges along the Oman Margin. This transform system deactivated ~40 Ma ago, coeval with the onset of ultra-slow spreading at the Carlsberg Ridge. The transform boundary then jumped to the edge of the present-day Owen Ridge during the Late Eocene-Oligocene period, before seafloor spreading began at the Sheba Ridge. This migration of the plate boundary involved the transfer of a part of the Indian oceanic lithosphere accreted at the Carlsberg Ridge to the Arabian plate. The episode of plate transfer at the India-Arabia plate boundary during the Late Eocene-Oligocene interval is synchronous with a global plate reorganization event corresponding to geological events at the Zagros and

  15. Simulating wave-turbulence on thin elastic plates with arbitrary boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Mahadevan, L.

    2016-11-01

    The statistical characteristics of interacting waves are described by the theory of wave turbulence, with the study of deep water gravity wave turbulence serving as a paradigmatic physical example. Here we consider the elastic analog of this problem in the context of flexural waves arising from vibrations of a thin elastic plate. Such flexural waves generate the unique sounds of so-called thunder machines used in orchestras - thin metal plates that make a thunder-like sound when forcefully shaken. Wave turbulence in elastic plates is typically investigated numerically using spectral simulations with periodic boundary conditions, which are not very realistic. We will present the results of numerical simulations of the dynamics of thin elastic plates in physical space, with arbitrary shapes, boundary conditions, anisotropy and inhomogeneity, and show first results on wave turbulence beyond the conventionally studied rectangular plates. Finally, motivated by a possible method to measure ice-sheet thicknesses in the open ocean, we will further discuss the behavior of a vibrating plate when floating on an inviscid fluid.

  16. Numerical modeling of the transitional boundary layer over a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dimitry; Chorny, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    Our example is connected with fundamental research on understanding how an initially laminar boundary layer becomes turbulent. We have chosen the flow over a flat plate as a prototype for boundary-layer flows around bodies. Special attention was paid to the near-wall region in order to capture all levels of the boundary layer. In this study, the numerical software package OpenFOAM has been used in order to solve the flow field. The results were used in a comparative study with data obtained from Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The composite SGS-wall model is presently incorporated into a computer code suitable for the LES of developing flat-plate boundary layers. Presently this model is extended to the LES of the zero-pressure gradient, flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. In current study the time discretization is based on a second order Crank-Nicolson/Adams-Bashforth method. LES solver using Smagorinsky and the one-equation LES turbulence models. The transition models significantly improve the prediction of the onset location compared to the fully turbulent models.LES methods appear to be the most promising new tool for the design and analysis of flow devices including transition regions of the turbulent flow.

  17. Using Remote Sensing Data to Constrain Models of Fault Interactions and Plate Boundary Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasscoe, M. T.; Donnellan, A.; Lyzenga, G. A.; Parker, J. W.; Milliner, C. W. D.

    2016-12-01

    Determining the distribution of slip and behavior of fault interactions at plate boundaries is a complex problem. Field and remotely sensed data often lack the necessary coverage to fully resolve fault behavior. However, realistic physical models may be used to more accurately characterize the complex behavior of faults constrained with observed data, such as GPS, InSAR, and SfM. These results will improve the utility of using combined models and data to estimate earthquake potential and characterize plate boundary behavior. Plate boundary faults exhibit complex behavior, with partitioned slip and distributed deformation. To investigate what fraction of slip becomes distributed deformation off major faults, we examine a model fault embedded within a damage zone of reduced elastic rigidity that narrows with depth and forward model the slip and resulting surface deformation. The fault segments and slip distributions are modeled using the JPL GeoFEST software. GeoFEST (Geophysical Finite Element Simulation Tool) is a two- and three-dimensional finite element software package for modeling solid stress and strain in geophysical and other continuum domain applications [Lyzenga, et al., 2000; Glasscoe, et al., 2004; Parker, et al., 2008, 2010]. New methods to advance geohazards research using computer simulations and remotely sensed observations for model validation are required to understand fault slip, the complex nature of fault interaction and plate boundary deformation. These models help enhance our understanding of the underlying processes, such as transient deformation and fault creep, and can aid in developing observation strategies for sUAV, airborne, and upcoming satellite missions seeking to determine how faults behave and interact and assess their associated hazard. Models will also help to characterize this behavior, which will enable improvements in hazard estimation. Validating the model results against remotely sensed observations will allow us to better

  18. Actively dewatering fluid-rich zones along the Costa Rica plate boundary fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangs, N. L.; McIntosh, K. D.; Silver, E. A.; Kluesner, J. W.; Ranero, C. R.; von Huene, R.

    2012-12-01

    New 3D seismic reflection data reveal distinct evidence for active dewatering above a 12 km wide segment of the plate boundary fault within the Costa Rica subduction zone NW of the Osa Peninsula. In the spring of 2011 we acquired a 11 x 55 km 3D seismic reflection data set on the R/V Langseth using four 6,000 m streamers and two 3,300 in3 airgun arrays to examine the structure of the Costa Rica margin from the trench into the seismogenic zone. We can trace the plate-boundary interface from the trench across our entire survey to where the plate-boundary thrust lies > 10 km beneath the margin shelf. Approximately 20 km landward of the trench beneath the mid slope and at the updip edge of the seismogenic zone, a 12 km wide zone of the plate-boundary interface has a distinctly higher-amplitude seismic reflection than deeper or shallower segments of the fault. Directly above and potentially directly connected with this zone are high-amplitude, reversed-polarity fault-plane reflections that extend through the margin wedge and into overlying slope sediment cover. Within the slope cover, high-amplitude reversed-polarity reflections are common within the network of closely-spaced nearly vertical normal faults and several broadly spaced, more gently dipping thrust faults. These faults appear to be directing fluids vertically toward the seafloor, where numerous seafloor fluid flow indicators, such as pockmarks, mounds and ridges, and slope failure features, are distinct in multibeam and backscatter images. There are distinctly fewer seafloor and subsurface fluid flow indicators both updip and downdip of this zone. We believe these fluids come from a 12 km wide fluid-rich segment of the plate-boundary interface that is likely overpressured and has relatively low shear stress.

  19. Measurements of strain at plate boundaries using space based geodetic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robaudo, Stefano; Harrison, Christopher G. A.

    1993-01-01

    We have used the space based geodetic techniques of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and VLBI to study strain along subduction and transform plate boundaries and have interpreted the results using a simple elastic dislocation model. Six stations located behind island arcs were analyzed as representative of subduction zones while 13 sites located on either side of the San Andreas fault were used for the transcurrent zones. The length deformation scale was then calculated for both tectonic margins by fitting the relative strain to an exponentially decreasing function of distance from the plate boundary. Results show that space-based data for the transcurrent boundary along the San Andreas fault help to define better the deformation length scale in the area while fitting nicely the elastic half-space earth model. For subduction type bonndaries the analysis indicates that there is no single scale length which uniquely describes the deformation. This is mainly due to the difference in subduction characteristics for the different areas.

  20. The Plate Boundary Observatory Cascadia Network: Development and Installation of a Large Scale Real-time GPS Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, K. E.; Blume, F.; Berglund, H. T.; Feaux, K.; Gallaher, W. W.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Mattioli, G. S.; Mencin, D.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), through a NSF-ARRA supplement, has enhanced the geophysical infrastructure in in the Pacific Northwest by upgrading a total of 282 Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations to allow the collection and distribution of high-rate (1 Hz), low-latency (<1 s) data streams (RT-GPS). These upgraded stations supplemented the original 100 RT-GPS stations in the PBO GPS network. The addition of the new RT-GPS sites in Cascadia should spur new volcano and earthquake research opportunities in an area of great scientific interest and high geophysical hazard. Streaming RT-GPS data will enable researchers to detect and investigate strong ground motion during large geophysical events, including a possible plate-interface earthquake, which has implications for earthquake hazard mitigation. A Mw 6.9 earthquake occurred on March 10, 2014, off the coast of northern California. As a response, UNAVCO downloaded high-rate GPS data from Plate Boundary Observatory stations within 500 km of the epicenter of the event, providing a good test of network performance.In addition to the 282 stations upgraded to real-time, 22 new meteorological instruments were added to existing PBO stations. Extensive testing of BGAN satellite communications systems has been conducted to support the Cascadia RT-GPS upgrades and the installation of three BGAN satellite fail over systems along the Cascadia margin will allow for the continuation of data flow in the event of a loss of primary communications during in a large geophysical event or other interruptions in commercial cellular networks. In summary, with these additional upgrades in the Cascadia region, the PBO RT-GPS network will increase to 420 stations. Upgrades to the UNAVCO data infrastructure included evaluation and purchase of the Trimble Pivot Platform, servers, and additional hardware for archiving the high rate data, as well as testing and implementation of GLONASS and Trimble RTX positioning on the

  1. NOAA Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas 2016: Pacific Plate, Mariana Trench, and Mariana Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, P. B.; Glickson, D.; Kelley, C.; Drazen, J.; Stern, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Legs 1 and 3 of NOAA Okeanos Explorer EX1605 made 18 (ROV) dives exploring the following: 7 Cretaceous-age, Pacific Plate guyots east of the Trench; 1 small volcano on a Pacific Plate fracture; 3 areas of the inner trench slope; 2 forearc serpentinite mud volcanoes; and 5 forearc fault blocks. The Pacific Plate guyots are heavily manganese encrusted. Part of the rationale for those dives was to make baseline characterization of biota and habitats before potential mining. These guyots had striking diversity and abundance of fauna. Dives on 2 guyots examined high-relief scarps, formed when both down-going plate and edifices fractured outboard of the trench. The scarp on one had Cretaceous reef sequences, whereas the other exposed layers of volcanics. The dive on a small (1 km diameter, 141 m high) volcano on a plate fracture near the trench affirmed that it was relatively young, maybe like Petit-Spot volcanoes east of the Japan Trench. A dive in a canyon west of Guam transitioned from a steep slope of volcanic talus to a gentle sediment-covered slope. The inner trench slope opposite the subducting guyot that exposes reef deposits, revealed similar sequences, suggesting that the guyot is being incorporated into the Mariana forearc. The other inner slope dive traversed talus with fragments of serpentinized peridotite and lies near a chain of forearc serpentinite mud volcanoes. The 2 serpentinite mud volcanoes explored have sedimented, apparently inactive, surfaces, though we recovered a serpentinized peridotite sample from one of them. Dives on the forearc fault blocks attest to dynamic vertical tectonism. Three in the northern forearc show sediment sequences of varying types and textures, all dipping trenchward. Spectacular mid-forearc fault scarps strike east-west, stair-stepping down southward and were traversed on 2 dives. We saw many sequences of indurated sediments. Mapping on Legs 2 and 3 of the expedition showed that these fault scarps are mirrored to the south

  2. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    During our participation in the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project under NASA contract NAS-27339 and grant NAG5-814 for the period 1982-1991, we published or submitted for publication 30 research papers and 52 abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. In addition, five M.I.T. Ph.D. students (Eric Bergman, Steven Bratt, Dan Davis, Jeanne Sauber, Anne Sheehan) were supported wholly or in part by this project during their thesis research. Highlights of our research progress during this period include the following: application of geodetic data to determine rates of strain in the Mojave block and in central California and to clarify the relation of such strain to the San Andreas fault and Pacific-North American plate motions; application of geodetic data to infer post seismic deformation associated with large earthquakes in the Imperial Valley, Hebgen Lake, Argentina, and Chile; determination of the state of stress in oceanic lithosphere from a systematic study of the centroid depths and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes; development of models for the state of stress in young oceanic regions arising from the differential cooling of the lithosphere; determination of the depth extent and rupture characteristics of oceanic transform earthquakes; improved determination of earthquake slip vectors in the Gulf of California, an important data set for the estimation of Pacific-North American plate motions; development of models for the state of stress and mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges; development of procedures to invert geoid height, residual bathymetry, and differential body wave travel time residuals for lateral variations in the characteristic temperature and bulk composition of the oceanic upper mantle; and initial GPS measurements of crustal deformation associated with the Imperial-Cerro Prieto fault system in southern California and northern Mexico. Full descriptions of the research conducted on these topics may be

  3. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1991-01-01

    During our participation in the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project under NASA contract NAS-27339 and grant NAG5-814 for the period 1982-1991, we published or submitted for publication 30 research papers and 52 abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. In addition, five M.I.T. Ph.D. students (Eric Bergman, Steven Bratt, Dan Davis, Jeanne Sauber, Anne Sheehan) were supported wholly or in part by this project during their thesis research. Highlights of our research progress during this period include the following: application of geodetic data to determine rates of strain in the Mojave block and in central California and to clarify the relation of such strain to the San Andreas fault and Pacific-North American plate motions; application of geodetic data to infer post seismic deformation associated with large earthquakes in the Imperial Valley, Hebgen Lake, Argentina, and Chile; determination of the state of stress in oceanic lithosphere from a systematic study of the centroid depths and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes; development of models for the state of stress in young oceanic regions arising from the differential cooling of the lithosphere; determination of the depth extent and rupture characteristics of oceanic transform earthquakes; improved determination of earthquake slip vectors in the Gulf of California, an important data set for the estimation of Pacific-North American plate motions; development of models for the state of stress and mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges; development of procedures to invert geoid height, residual bathymetry, and differential body wave travel time residuals for lateral variations in the characteristic temperature and bulk composition of the oceanic upper mantle; and initial GPS measurements of crustal deformation associated with the Imperial-Cerro Prieto fault system in southern California and northern Mexico. Full descriptions of the research conducted on these topics may be

  4. Receptivity of flat-plate boundary layer in a non-uniform free stream (vorticity normal to the plate)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, M. N.

    1994-01-01

    Recent progress in both the linear and nonlinear aspects of stability theory has highlighted the importance of the receptivity problem. One of the most unclear aspects of receptivity study is the receptivity of boundary-layer flow normal to vortical disturbances. Some experimental and theoretical results permit the proposition that quasi-steady outer-flow vortical disturbances may trigger by-pass transition. In present work such interaction is investigated for vorticity normal to a leading edge. The interest in these types of vortical disturbances arise from theoretical work, where it was shown that small sinusoidal variations of upstream velocity along the spanwise direction can produce significant variations in the boundary-layer profile. In the experimental part of this work, such non-uniform flow was created and the laminar-turbulent transition in this flow was investigated. The experiment was carried out in a low-turbulence direct-flow wind tunnel T-361 at the Central Aerohydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI). The non-uniform flow was produced by laminar or turbulent wakes behind a wire placed normal to the plate upstream of the leading edge. The theoretical part of the work is devoted to studying the unstable disturbance evolution in a boundary layer with strongly non-uniform velocity profiles similar to that produced by outer-flow vorticity. Specifically, the Tollmien-Schlichting wave development in the boundary layer flow with spanwise variations of velocity is investigated.

  5. Using Global Plate Velocity Boundary Conditions for Embedded Regional Geodynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taramon Gomez, Jorge; Morgan, Jason; Perez-Gussinye, Marta

    2015-04-01

    The treatment of far-field boundary conditions is one of the most poorly resolved issues for regional modeling of geodynamic processes. In viscous flow, the choice of far-field boundary conditions often strongly shapes the large-scale structure of a geosimulation. The mantle velocity field along the sidewalls and base of a modeling region is typically much more poorly known than the geometry of past global motions of the surface plates as constrained by global plate motion reconstructions. For regional rifting models it has become routine to apply highly simplified 'plate spreading' or 'uniform rifting' boundary conditions to a 3-D model that limits its ability to simulate the geodynamic evolution of a specific rifted margin. One way researchers are exploring the sensitivity of regional models to uncertain boundary conditions is to use a nested modeling approach in which a global model is used to determine a large-scale flow pattern that is imposed as a constraint along the boundaries of the region to be modeled. Here we explore the utility of a different approach that takes advantage of the ability of finite element models to use unstructured meshes than can embed much higher resolution sub-regions within a spherical global mesh. In our initial project to validate this approach, we create a global spherical mesh in which a higher resolution sub-region is created around the nascent South Atlantic Rifting Margin. Global Plate motion BCs and plate boundaries are applied for the time of the onset of rifting, continuing through several 10s of Ma of rifting. Thermal, compositional, and melt-related buoyancy forces are only non-zero within the high-resolution subregion, elsewhere, motions are constrained by surface plate-motion constraints. The total number of unknowns needed to solve an embedded regional model with this approach is less than 1/3 larger than that needed for a structured-mesh solution on a Cartesian or spherical cap sub-regional mesh. Here we illustrate

  6. Lower plate deformation structures along the Costa Rica erosive plate boundary - results from IODP Expedition 344 (CRISP 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstätter, Jennifer; Kurz, Walter; Micheuz, Peter; Krenn, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    1414 is located ~1 km seaward of the deformation front offshore the Osa Peninsula and Caño Island. Primary science goals at Site U1414 included characterization of the alteration state of the magmatic basement. Brittle structures within the incoming plate (sites U1380, U1414) are mineralized extensional fractures and shear fractures. The shear fractures mainly show a normal component of shear. Within the sedimentary sequence both types of fractures dip steeply (vertical to subvertical) and strike NNE-SSW. Deformation bands trend roughly ENE-WSW, sub-parallel to the trend of the Cocos ridge. Structures in the Cocos Ridge basalt mainly comprise mineralized veins at various orientations. A preferred orientation of strike directions was not observed. Some veins show straight boundaries, others are characterized by an irregular geometry characterized by brecciated wall rock clasts embedded within vein precipitates. The vein mineralization was analysed in detail by RAMAN spectroscopy. Precipitation conditions and fluid chemistry were analysed by fluid inclusions entrapped within vein minerals. Vein mineralizations mainly consist of carbonate (fibrous aragonite, calcite), chalcedony, and quartz. Vein mineralization is mainly characterized by zoned antitaxial growth of carbonate fibres including a suture along the central vein domains. Quartz is often characterized by fibre growth of crystals perpendicular to the vein boundaries, too. These zoned veins additinally have wall rock alteration seams consisting of clay minerals. The precipitation sequence basically indicates that fluid chemistry evolved from an CO2-rich towards a SiO2- rich fluid.

  7. Structure and lithology of the Japan Trench subduction plate boundary fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, James D.; Rowe, Christie D.; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Moore, J. Casey; Regalla, Christine; Remitti, Francesca; Toy, Virginia; Wolfson-Schwehr, Monica; Kameda, Jun; Bose, Santanu; Chester, Frederick M.

    2015-01-01

    The 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake ruptured to the trench with maximum coseismic slip located on the shallow portion of the plate boundary fault. To investigate the conditions and physical processes that promoted slip to the trench, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 343/343T sailed 1 year after the earthquake and drilled into the plate boundary ˜7 km landward of the trench, in the region of maximum slip. Core analyses show that the plate boundary décollement is localized onto an interval of smectite-rich, pelagic clay. Subsidiary structures are present in both the upper and lower plates, which define a fault zone ˜5-15m thick. Fault rocks recovered from within the clay-rich interval contain a pervasive scaly fabric defined by anastomosing, polished, and lineated surfaces with two predominant orientations. The scaly fabric is crosscut in several places by discrete contacts across which the scaly fabric is truncated and rotated, or different rocks are juxtaposed. These contacts are inferred to be faults. The plate boundary décollement therefore contains structures resulting from both distributed and localized deformation. We infer that the formation of both of these types of structures is controlled by the frictional properties of the clay: the distributed scaly fabric formed at low strain rates associated with velocity-strengthening frictional behavior, and the localized faults formed at high strain rates characterized by velocity-weakening behavior. The presence of multiple discrete faults resulting from seismic slip within the décollement suggests that rupture to the trench may be characteristic of this margin.

  8. In-Flight Boundary-Layer Transition of a Large Flat Plate at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, D. W.; Frederick, M. A.; Tracy, R. R.; Matisheck, J. R.; Vanecek, N. D.

    2012-01-01

    A flight experiment was conducted to investigate the pressure distribution, local-flow conditions, and boundary-layer transition characteristics on a large flat plate in flight at supersonic speeds up to Mach 2.00. The tests used a NASA testbed aircraft with a bottom centerline mounted test fixture. The primary objective of the test was to characterize the local flow field in preparation for future tests of a high Reynolds number natural laminar flow test article. A second objective was to determine the boundary-layer transition characteristics on the flat plate and the effectiveness of using a simplified surface coating. Boundary-layer transition was captured in both analog and digital formats using an onboard infrared imaging system. Surface pressures were measured on the surface of the flat plate. Flow field measurements near the leading edge of the test fixture revealed the local flow characteristics including downwash, sidewash, and local Mach number. Results also indicated that the simplified surface coating did not provide sufficient insulation from the metallic structure, which likely had a substantial effect on boundary-layer transition compared with that of an adiabatic surface. Cold wall conditions were predominant during the acceleration to maximum Mach number, and warm wall conditions were evident during the subsequent deceleration.

  9. Effects of the Yakutat terrane collision with North America on the neighboring Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, R.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G. L.; Barth, G. A.; van Avendonk, H.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution bathymetry data show a 30 km N-S trending ridge within the deep-sea Surveyor Fan between the mouths of the Yakutat Sea Valley and Bering Trough in the Gulf of Alaska. The ridge originates in the north, perpendicular to and at the base of the continental slope, coincident with the Transition Fault, the strike-slip boundary between the Yakutat terrane (YAK) and the Pacific plate (PAC). The ridge exhibits greatest relief adjacent to the Transition Fault, and becomes less distinct farther from the shelf edge. Seismic reflection data reveal a sharp basement high beneath the ridge (1.1 sec of relief above "normal" basement in two-way travel time) as well as multiple similarly oriented strike-slip fault segments. The ridge, basement high, and faults are aligned and co-located with an intraplate earthquake swarm on the PAC, which includes four events > 6.5 Mw that occurred from 1987-1992. The swarm is defined by right-lateral strike-slip events, and is collectively called the Gulf of Alaska Shear Zone (GASZ). Based on the extent of historic seismicity, the GASZ extends at least 230 km into the PAC, seemingly ending at the Kodiak-Bowie Seamount Chain. Farther southwest, between the Kodiak-Bowie and Patton-Murray Seamount Chains, there is a large regional bathymetric low with an axis centered along the Aja Fracture Zone, perpendicular to the GASZ and Aleutian Trench. Basement and overlying sediment in the low are irregularly, but pervasively faulted. The GASZ and faulted bathymetric low could represent PAC deformation due to PAC-YAK coupling whereby YAK resistance to subduction is expressed as deformation in the thinner (weaker) PAC crust. The YAK is an allochthonous, basaltic terrane coupled to the PAC that began subducting at a low angle beneath North America (NA) ~25-40 Ma. Due to its 15-25 km thickness, the YAK is resistant to subduction compared to the normal oceanic crust of the PAC. As a result the plates developed differential motion along the

  10. Pressure-Driven Poiseuille Flow: A Major Component of the Torque-Balance Governing Pacific Plate Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotz, I. L.; Iaffaldano, G.; Davies, D. R.

    2018-01-01

    The Pacific Plate is thought to be driven mainly by slab pull, associated with subduction along the Aleutians-Japan, Marianas-Izu-Bonin, and Tonga-Kermadec trenches. This implies that viscous flow within the sub-Pacific asthenosphere is mainly generated by overlying plate motion (i.e., Couette flow) and that the associated shear stresses at the lithosphere's base are resisting such motion. Recent studies on glacial isostatic adjustment and lithosphere dynamics provide tighter constraints on the viscosity and thickness of Earth's asthenosphere and, therefore, on the amount of shear stress that asthenosphere and lithosphere mutually exchange, by virtue of Newton's third law of motion. In light of these constraints, the notion that subduction is the main driver of present-day Pacific Plate motion becomes somewhat unviable, as the pulling force that would be required by slabs exceeds the maximum available from their negative buoyancy. Here we use coupled global models of mantle and lithosphere dynamics to show that the sub-Pacific asthenosphere features a significant component of pressure-driven (i.e., Poiseuille) flow and that this has driven at least 50% of the Pacific Plate motion since, at least, 15 Ma. A corollary of our models is that a sublithospheric pressure difference as high as ±50 MPa is required across the Pacific domain.

  11. A preliminary investigation of boundary-layer transition along a flat plate with adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Doenhoff, Albert E

    1938-01-01

    Boundary-layer surveys were made throughout the transition region along a smooth flat plate placed in an airstream of practically zero turbulence and with an adverse pressure gradient. The boundary-layer Reynolds number at the laminar separation point was varied from 1,800 to 2,600. The test data, when considered in the light of certain theoretical deductions, indicated that transition probably began with separation of the laminar boundary layer. The extent of the transition region, defined as the distance from a calculated laminar separation point to the position of the first fully developed turbulent boundary-layer profile, could be expressed as a constant Reynolds number run of approximately 70,000. Some speculations are presented concerning the application of the foregoing concepts, after certain assumptions have been made, to the problem of the connection between transition on the upper surface of an airfoil at high angles of attack and the maximum lift.

  12. Generalized wall function and its application to compressible turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Wu, S. P.

    2017-04-01

    Wall function boundary conditions including the effects of compressibility and heat transfer are improved for compressible turbulent boundary flows. Generalized wall function formulation at zero-pressure gradient is proposed based on coupled velocity and temperature profiles in the entire near-wall region. The parameters in the generalized wall function are well revised. The proposed boundary conditions are integrated into Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code that includes the shear stress transport turbulence model. Numerical results are presented for a compressible boundary layer over a flat plate at zero-pressure gradient. Compared with experimental data, the computational results show that the generalized wall function reduces the first grid spacing in the directed normal to the wall and proves the feasibility and effectivity of the generalized wall function method.

  13. MHD Free Convective Boundary Layer Flow of a Nanofluid past a Flat Vertical Plate with Newtonian Heating Boundary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed J.; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, Ahmed I.

    2012-01-01

    Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement. PMID:23166688

  14. Repeating Deep Very Low Frequency Earthquakes: An Evidence of Transition Zone between Brittle and Ductile Zone along Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.; Arai, R.

    2017-12-01

    Recently slow or low frequency seismic and geodetic events are focused under recognition of important role in tectonic process. The most western region of Ryukyu trench, Yaeyama Islands, is very active area of these type events. It has semiannual-like slow slip (Heki et.al., 2008; Nishimura et.al.,2014) and very frequent shallow very low frequency earthquakes near trench zone (Ando et.al.,2012; Nakamura et.al.,2014). Arai et.al.(2016) identified clear reverse phase discontinuity along plate boundary by air-gun survey, suggesting existence of low velocity layer including fluid. The subducting fluid layer is considered to control slip characteristics. On the other hand, deep low frequency earthquake and tremor observed at south-western Honshu and Shikoku of Japan are not identified well due to lack of high-quality seismic network. A broadband seismic station(ISG/PS) of Pacific21 network is operating in last 20 years that locates on occurrence potential area of low frequency earthquake. We tried to review continuous broadband record, searching low frequency earthquakes. In pilot survey, we found three very low frequency seismic events which are dominant in less than 0.1Hz component and are not listed in earthquake catalogue. Source locates about 50km depth and at transition area between slow slip event and active area of general earthquake along plate boundary. To detect small and/or hidden very low frequency earthquake, we applied matched filter analysis to continuous three components waveform data using pre-reviewed seismogram as template signal. 12 events with high correlation are picked up in last 10 years. Most events have very similar waveform, which means characteristics of repeating deep very low frequency earthquake. The event history of very low frequency earthquake is not related with one of slow slip event in this region. In Yaeyama region, low frequency earthquake, general earthquake and slow slip event occur dividing in space and have apparent

  15. Experimental Results from a Flat Plate, Turbulent Boundary Layer Modified for the Purpose of Drag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbing, Brian R.

    2006-11-01

    Recent experiments on a flat plate, turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers (>10^7) were performed to investigate various methods of reducing skin friction drag. The methods used involved injecting either air or a polymer solution into the boundary layer through a slot injector. Two slot injectors were mounted on the model with one located 1.4 meters downstream of the nose and the second located 3.75 meters downstream. This allowed for some synergetic experiments to be performed by varying the injections from each slot and comparing the skin friction along the plate. Skin friction measurements were made with 6 shear stress sensors flush mounted along the stream-wise direction of the model.

  16. A seismic gap along an accreting plate boundary : Example of the Djibouti Ridge, Afar, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruegg, Jean-Claude; Lépine, Jean-Claude

    1983-05-01

    A segment of the Gulf of Tadjoura (Djibouti, East-Africa) accreting plate boundary, shows a period of quiescence in the seismic activity since 1974. This segment corresponds to the extension area of the aftershock activity that has occured after a cluster of magnitude 5.5 earthquakes in April 1973. From this example we propose that the seismic gap concept can be extended to moderate earthquakes occuring at extensional plate boundaries. The magnitude of the largest earthquakes at the spreading axis is limited by the size of the rupture length and by the strength of the brittle lithosphere. In the case of the Djibouti ridge recurrence time of 10-20 years are found for earthquakes of about M =6.

  17. Near Continuum Velocity and Temperature Coupled Compressible Boundary Layer Flow over a Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Cai, Chunpei

    2017-04-01

    The problem of a compressible gas flows over a flat plate with the velocity-slip and temperature-jump boundary conditions are being studied. The standard single- shooting method is applied to obtain the exact solutions for velocity and temperature profiles when the momentum and energy equations are weakly coupled. A double-shooting method is applied if these two equations are closely coupled. If the temperature affects the velocity directly, more significant velocity slip happens at locations closer to the plate's leading edge, and inflections on the velocity profiles appear, indicating flows may become unstable. As a consequence, the temperature-jump and velocity-slip boundary conditions may trigger earlier flow transitions from a laminar to a turbulent flow state.

  18. Paleocene Pacific Plate reorganization mirrored in formation of the Suvarov Trough, Manihiki Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietsch, Ricarda; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele

    2016-10-01

    The Suvarov Trough is a graben structure that deviates from the Danger Islands Troughs within the Manihiki Plateau, a Large Igneous Province (LIP) located in the Central Pacific. New high-resolution seismic reflection data provide evidence that the graben formed in two phases during the Paleocene (65-45 Ma). In a first phase extension occurred in southwestward direction, pulling apart the northern part of the Suvarov Trough and a parallel trending unnamed trough. In a second phase a change of extensional force direction occurred from southwest to west-northwest, forming the southern part of the Suvarov Trough that extends onto the High Plateau. The formation of the Suvarov Trough is accompanied by a series of normal fault systems that apparently formed simultaneously. Comparing the seismic results to existing Pacific paleo strain reconstructions, the timing of increased strain and local deformation direction fits well to our findings. We thus suggest that the multiple strike directions of the Suvarov Trough represent an extensional structure that was caused by the major, stepwise Pacific Plate reorganization during the Paleocene.

  19. Slab dragging and the recent geodynamic evolution of the western Mediterranean plate boundary region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakman, Wim; Chertova, Maria V.; van den Berg, Arie P.; Thieulot, Cedric; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2016-04-01

    The Tortonian-Present geodynamic evolution of the plate boundary between North Africa and Iberia is characterized by first-order enigmas. This concerns, e.g., the diffuse tectonic activity of the plate boundary; the crustal thickening below the Rif; the closing of the northern Moroccan marine gateways prior to the Messinian Salinity Crisis; crustal extension of the central to eastern Betics; the origin and sense of motion of the large left-lateral Trans Alboran Shear Zone (TASZ) and Eastern Betic Shear Zone (EBSZ); and lithosphere delamination of the North African continental edge. Many explanations have been given for each of these seemingly disparate tectonic features, which invariably have been addressed in the plate tectonic context of the NW-SE relative plate convergence between the major plates since the Tortonian, mostly independently from each other. Usually there is no clear role for the subducted slab underlying the region, except for presumed rollback, either to SW or to the W, depending on the type of observations that require explanation. Here we integrate the dynamic role of the slab with the NW-SE relative plate convergence by 3-D numerical modelling of the slab evolution constrained by absolute plate motions (Chertova et al., JGR,2014 & Gcubed 2014). By combining observations and predictions from seismology, geology, and geodesy, with our numerical 3-D slab-mantle dynamics modelling, we developed a new and promising geodynamic framework that provides explanations of all noted tectonic enigmas in a coherent and connected way. From the Tortonian until today, we propose that mantle-resisted slab dragging combines with the NW-SE plate convergence across the (largely) unbroken plate boundary to drive the crustal deformation of the region. Slab dragging is the lateral transport, pushing or pulling, of slab through the mantle by the absolute motion of the subducting plate (Chertova et al., Gcubed, 2014). Because the slab is connected to both the Iberian

  20. Gradual unlocking of plate boundary controlled initiation of the 2014 Iquique earthquake.

    PubMed

    Schurr, Bernd; Asch, Günter; Hainzl, Sebastian; Bedford, Jonathan; Hoechner, Andreas; Palo, Mauro; Wang, Rongjiang; Moreno, Marcos; Bartsch, Mitja; Zhang, Yong; Oncken, Onno; Tilmann, Frederik; Dahm, Torsten; Victor, Pia; Barrientos, Sergio; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre

    2014-08-21

    On 1 April 2014, Northern Chile was struck by a magnitude 8.1 earthquake following a protracted series of foreshocks. The Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile monitored the entire sequence of events, providing unprecedented resolution of the build-up to the main event and its rupture evolution. Here we show that the Iquique earthquake broke a central fraction of the so-called northern Chile seismic gap, the last major segment of the South American plate boundary that had not ruptured in the past century. Since July 2013 three seismic clusters, each lasting a few weeks, hit this part of the plate boundary with earthquakes of increasing peak magnitudes. Starting with the second cluster, geodetic observations show surface displacements that can be associated with slip on the plate interface. These seismic clusters and their slip transients occupied a part of the plate interface that was transitional between a fully locked and a creeping portion. Leading up to this earthquake, the b value of the foreshocks gradually decreased during the years before the earthquake, reversing its trend a few days before the Iquique earthquake. The mainshock finally nucleated at the northern end of the foreshock area, which skirted a locked patch, and ruptured mainly downdip towards higher locking. Peak slip was attained immediately downdip of the foreshock region and at the margin of the locked patch. We conclude that gradual weakening of the central part of the seismic gap accentuated by the foreshock activity in a zone of intermediate seismic coupling was instrumental in causing final failure, distinguishing the Iquique earthquake from most great earthquakes. Finally, only one-third of the gap was broken and the remaining locked segments now pose a significant, increased seismic hazard with the potential to host an earthquake with a magnitude of >8.5.

  1. Unsteady Boundary-Layer Flow over Jerked Plate Moving in a Free Stream of Viscoelastic Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Ahmer; Ali, Asif; Saleem, Najma

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the unsteady boundary-layer flow of a viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluid over a flat surface. The plate is suddenly jerked to move with uniform velocity in a uniform stream of non-Newtonian fluid. Purely analytic solution to governing nonlinear equation is obtained. The solution is highly accurate and valid for all values of the dimensionless time 0 ≤ τ < ∞. Flow properties of the viscoelastic fluid are discussed through graphs. PMID:24892060

  2. Plane wave diffraction by a finite plate with impedance boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Rab; Ayub, Muhammad; Javaid, Akmal

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have examined a plane wave diffraction problem by a finite plate having different impedance boundaries. The Fourier transforms were used to reduce the governing problem into simultaneous Wiener-Hopf equations which are then solved using the standard Wiener-Hopf procedure. Afterwards the separated and interacted fields were developed asymptotically by using inverse Fourier transform and the modified stationary phase method. Detailed graphical analysis was also made for various physical parameters we were interested in.

  3. Paleomagnetic Quantification of Neogene Block Rotations within an Active Transtensional Plate Boundary, Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J.; Umhoefer, P. J.; Pérez Venzor, J. A.; Bachtadse, V.

    2009-12-01

    Compared to oceanic plate boundaries which are generally narrow zones of deformation, continental plate boundaries appear as widespread areas with complex and poorly understood kinematics. Motion of crustal blocks within these “diffuse plate boundaries” causes rather small-scale lithospheric deformation within the boundary zone, while the main plates behave more rigid. Complex deformation patterns of interacting terranes separated by a variety of active faults are the consequence. To study the dynamic implications of boundary zone deformation, the southern part of the Baja California peninsula, Mexico (Baja) has been chosen as target for a detailed paleomagnetic study. In combination with geodetic measurements it is tried to characterize rigid block rotations and temporal changes in rotation rates. Up to now, little paleomagnetic work directed toward vertical axis rotations has been done in Baja California, despite its location in a major active transtensional zone. To address this problem, a total of 501 cores from 63 sites in the southern part of Baja - including sites on San José Island, San Francisco Island and Cerralvo Island - has been taken from volcanic and sedimentary rocks covering the last 25 million years in time. The analysis of paleomagnetic declinations and comparison to coeval data from North America and stable areas of Baja California allow evaluating the long-term kinematics of the region and the effects of oblique-rifting in the Gulf of California to the east. Nearly all sampled sites indicate vertical axis rotation up to 30-40 degrees with an average of about 20-25 degrees. Depending on the location these rotations have been either clockwise or counter-clockwise and are correlated with the opening of the Gulf of California and the translation of the Baja California peninsula to the North. Results of the paleomagnetic investigation are compared to geodetic data of the last few years in order to address the problem how strain is partitioned

  4. Control of boundary layer transition location and plate vibration in the presence of an external acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Grosveld, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The experiment is aimed at controlling the boundary layer transition location and the plate vibration when excited by a flow and an upstream sound source. Sound has been found to affect the flow at the leading edge and the response of a flexible plate in a boundary layer. Because the sound induces early transition, the panel vibration is acoustically coupled to the turbulent boundary layer by the upstream radiation. Localized surface heating at the leading edge delays the transition location downstream of the flexible plate. The response of the plate excited by a turbulent boundary layer (without sound) shows that the plate is forced to vibrate at different frequencies and with different amplitudes as the flow velocity changes indicating that the plate is driven by the convective waves of the boundary layer. The acoustic disturbances induced by the upstream sound dominate the response of the plate when the boundary layer is either turbulent or laminar. Active vibration control was used to reduce the sound induced displacement amplitude of the plate.

  5. Locking, mass flux and topographic response at convergent plate boundaries - the Chilean case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    On the long term, convergent plate boundaries have been shown to be controlled by either accretion/underplating or by subduction erosion. Vertical surface motion is coupled to convergence rate - typically with an uplift rate of the coastal area ranging from 0 to +50% of convergence rate in accretive systems, and -20 to +30% in erosive systems. Vertical kinematics, however, are not necessarily linked to horizontal strain mode, i.e. upper plate shortening or extension, in a simple way. This range of kinematic behaviors - as well as their acceleration where forearcs collide with oceanic ridges/plateau - is well expressed along the Chilean plate margin. Towards the short end of the time scale, deformation appears to exhibit a close correlation with the frictional properties and geodetic locking at the plate interface. Corroborating analogue experiments of strain accumulation during multiple earthquake cycles, forearc deformation and uplift focus above the downdip and updip end of seismic coupling and slip and are each related to a particular stage of the seismic cycle, but with opposite trends for both domains. Similarly, barriers separating locked domains along strike appear to accumulate most upper plate faulting interseismically. Hence, locking patters are reflected in topography. From the long-term memory contained in the forearc topography the relief of the Chilean forearc seems to reflect long term stability of the observed heterogeneity of locking at the plate interface. This has fundamental implications for spatial and temporal distribution of seismic hazard. Finally, the nature of locking at the plate interface controlling the above kinematic behavior appears to be strongly controlled by the degree of fluid overpressuring at the plate interface suggesting that the hydraulic system at the interface takes a key role for the forearc response.

  6. Plate boundary reorganization in the active Banda Arc-continent collision: Insights from new GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugroho, Hendro; Harris, Ron; Lestariya, Amin W.; Maruf, Bilal

    2009-12-01

    New GPS measurements reveal that large sections of the SE Asian Plate are progressively accreting to the edge of the Australian continent by distribution of strain away from the deformation front to forearc and backarc plate boundary segments. The study was designed to investigate relative motions across suspected plate boundary segments in the transition from subduction to collision. The oblique nature of the collision provides a way to quantify the spatial and temporal distribution of strain from the deformation front to the back arc. The 12 sites we measured from Bali to Timor included some from an earlier study and 7 additional stations, which extended the epoch of observation to ten years at many sites. The resulting GPS velocity field delineates at least three Sunda Arc-forearc regions around 500 km in strike-length that shows different amounts of coupling to the Australian Plate. Movement of these regions relative to SE Asia increases from 21% to 41% to 63% eastward toward the most advanced stages of collision. The regions are bounded by the deformation front to the south, the Flores-Wetar backarc thrust system to the north, and poorly defined structures on the sides. The suture zone between the NW Australian continental margin and the Sunda-Banda Arcs is still evolving with more than 20 mm/yr of movement measured across the Timor Trough deformation front between Timor and Australia.

  7. Effect of plate permeability on nonlinear stability of the asymptotic suction boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Wedin, Håkan; Cherubini, Stefania; Bottaro, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    The nonlinear stability of the asymptotic suction boundary layer is studied numerically, searching for finite-amplitude solutions that bifurcate from the laminar flow state. By changing the boundary conditions for disturbances at the plate from the classical no-slip condition to more physically sound ones, the stability characteristics of the flow may change radically, both for the linearized as well as the nonlinear problem. The wall boundary condition takes into account the permeability K̂ of the plate; for very low permeability, it is acceptable to impose the classical boundary condition (K̂=0). This leads to a Reynolds number of approximately Re(c)=54400 for the onset of linearly unstable waves, and close to Re(g)=3200 for the emergence of nonlinear solutions [F. A. Milinazzo and P. G. Saffman, J. Fluid Mech. 160, 281 (1985); J. H. M. Fransson, Ph.D. thesis, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Sweden, 2003]. However, for larger values of the plate's permeability, the lower limit for the existence of linear and nonlinear solutions shifts to significantly lower Reynolds numbers. For the largest permeability studied here, the limit values of the Reynolds numbers reduce down to Re(c)=796 and Re(g)=294. For all cases studied, the solutions bifurcate subcritically toward lower Re, and this leads to the conjecture that they may be involved in the very first stages of a transition scenario similar to the classical route of the Blasius boundary layer initiated by Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves. The stability of these nonlinear solutions is also investigated, showing a low-frequency main unstable mode whose growth rate decreases with increasing permeability and with the Reynolds number, following a power law Re(-ρ), where the value of ρ depends on the permeability coefficient K̂. The nonlinear dynamics of the flow in the vicinity of the computed finite-amplitude solutions is finally investigated by direct numerical simulations, providing a viable scenario for

  8. In-Flight Boundary-Layer Transition on a Large Flat Plate at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Fredericks, Michael Alan; Tracy, Richard R.; Matisheck, Jason R.; Vanecek, Neal D.

    2012-01-01

    A flight experiment was conducted to investigate the pressure distribution, local flow conditions, and boundary-layer transition characteristics on a large flat plate in flight at supersonic speeds up to Mach 2.0. The primary objective of the test was to characterize the local flow field in preparation for future tests of a high Reynolds number natural laminar flow test article. The tests used a F-15B testbed aircraft with a bottom centerline mounted test fixture. A second objective was to determine the boundary-layer transition characteristics on the flat plate and the effectiveness of using a simplified surface coating for future laminar flow flight tests employing infrared thermography. Boundary-layer transition was captured using an onboard infrared imaging system. The infrared imagery was captured in both analog and digital formats. Surface pressures were measured with electronically scanned pressure modules connected to 60 surface-mounted pressure orifices. The local flow field was measured with five 5-hole conical probes mounted near the leading edge of the test fixture. Flow field measurements revealed the local flow characteristics including downwash, sidewash, and local Mach number. Results also indicated that the simplified surface coating did not provide sufficient insulation from the metallic structure, which likely had a substantial effect on boundary-layer transition compared with that of an adiabatic surface. Cold wall conditions were predominant during the acceleration to maximum Mach number, and warm wall conditions were evident during the subsequent deceleration. The infrared imaging system was able to capture shock wave impingement on the surface of the flat plate in addition to indicating laminar-to-turbulent boundary-layer transition.

  9. Seismicity and Structure of the Incoming Pacific Plate Subducting into the Japan Trench off Miyagi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, K.; Fujie, G.; Kodaira, S.; Takahashi, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sato, T.; Yamashita, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Miura, S.

    2015-12-01

    Stresses within the oceanic plate in trench axis and outer-rise region have been characterized by shallow extension and deep compression due to the bending of the plate subducting into the trench. The stress state within the incoming/subducting oceanic plate is an important factor not only for the occurrence of shallow intraplate normal-faulting earthquakes in the trench-outer rise region but also the hydration of the oceanic plate through the shallow normal faults cutting the oceanic lithosphere. We investigate seismic velocity structure and stress state within the incoming/subducting Pacific Plate in the Japan Trench based on the OBS aftershock observations for the December 2012 intraplate doublet, which consists of a deep reverse faulting (Mw 7.2) and a shallow normal faulting (Mw 7.2) earthquake, in the Japan Trench off Miyagi. Hypocenter locations and seismic velocity structures were estimated from the arrival time data of about 3000 earthquakes by using double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003). Also, focal mechanisms were estimated from first motion polarities by using the program HASH by Hardebeck and Shearer (2002). The results show that the earthquakes occurred mainly within the oceanic crust and the uppermost mantle. The deepest event was located at a depth of about 60 km. Focal mechanisms of the earthquakes shallower than a depth of 40 km indicate normal-faulting with T-axis normal to the trench. On the other hand, first motion polarities of the events at depths between 50 and 60 km can be explained a reverse faulting. The results suggest that the neutral plane of the stress between shallow extension and deep compression locates at 40 to 50 km deep. Seismic velocity structures indicate velocity decrease in the oceanic mantle toward the trench. Although the velocity decrease varies with locations, the results suggest the bending-related structure change could extend to at least about 15 km below the oceanic Moho in some locations.

  10. Attractors for non-dissipative irrotational von Karman plates with boundary damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bociu, Lorena; Toundykov, Daniel

    Long-time behavior of solutions to a von Karman plate equation is considered. The system has an unrestricted first-order perturbation and a nonlinear damping acting through free boundary conditions only. This model differs from those previously considered (e.g. in the extensive treatise (Chueshov and Lasiecka, 2010 [11])) because the semi-flow may be of a non-gradient type: the unique continuation property is not known to hold, and there is no strict Lyapunov function on the natural finite-energy space. Consequently, global bounds on the energy, let alone the existence of an absorbing ball, cannot be a priori inferred. Moreover, the free boundary conditions are not recognized by weak solutions and some helpful estimates available for clamped, hinged or simply-supported plates cannot be invoked. It is shown that this non-monotone flow can converge to a global compact attractor with the help of viscous boundary damping and appropriately structured restoring forces acting only on the boundary or its collar.

  11. Transitional and turbulent flat-plate boundary layers with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz

    2010-11-01

    We report on our direct numerical simulation of two incompressible, nominally zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate boundary layers from momentum thickness Reynolds number 80 to 1950. Heat transfer between the constant-temperature solid surface and the free-stream is also simulated with molecular Prandtl number=1. Throughout the entire flat-plate, the ratio of Stanton number and skin-friction St/Cfdeviates from the exact Reynolds analogy value of 0.5 by less than 1.5%. Turbulent Prandtl number t peaks at the wall. Preponderance of hairpin vortices is observed in both the transitional and turbulent regions of the boundary layers. In particular, the internal structure of merged turbulent spots is hairpin forest; the internal structure of infant turbulent spots is hairpin packet. Numerous hairpin vortices are readily detected in both the near-wall and outer regions of the boundary layers up to momentum thickness Reynolds number 1950. This suggests that the hairpin vortices in the turbulent region are not simply the aged hairpin forests convected from the upstream transitional region. Temperature iso-surfaces in the companion thermal boundary layers are found to be a useful tracer in identifying hairpin vortex structures.

  12. On gravity from SST, geoid from Seasat, and plate age and fracture zones in the Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Marsh, J. G.; Williamson, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    A composite map produced by combining 90 passes of SST data show good agreement with conventional GEM models. The SEASAT altimeter data were deduced and found to agree with both the SST and GEM fields. The maps are dominated (especially in the east) by a pattern of roughly east-west anomalies with a transverse wavelength of about 2000 km. Comparison with regional bathymetric data shows a remarkedly close correlation with plate age. Most anomalies in the east half of the Pacific could be partly caused by regional differences in plate age. The amplitude of these geoid or gravity anomalies caused by age differences should decrease with absolute plate age, and large anomalies (approximately 3 m) over old, smooth sea floor may indicate a further deeper source within or perhaps below the lithosphere. The possible plume size and ascent velocity necessary to supply deep mantle material to the upper mantle without complete thermal equilibration was considered. A plume emanating from a buoyant layer 100 km thick and 10,000 times less viscous than the surrounding mantle should have a diameter of about 400 km and must ascend at about 10 cm/yr to arrive still anomalously hot in the uppermost mantle.

  13. Boundary layer flow of air over water on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, John; Alving, Amy E.; Joseph, Daniel D.

    1993-01-01

    A non-similar boundary layer theory for air blowing over a water layer on a flat plate is formulated and studied as a two-fluid problem in which the position of the interface is unknown. The problem is considered at large Reynolds number (based on x), away from the leading edge. A simple non-similar analytic solution of the problem is derived for which the interface height is proportional to x(sub 1/4) and the water and air flow satisfy the Blasius boundary layer equations, with a linear profile in the water and a Blasius profile in the air. Numerical studies of the initial value problem suggests that this asymptotic, non-similar air-water boundary layer solution is a global attractor for all initial conditions.

  14. Polynomial decay rate of a thermoelastic Mindlin-Timoshenko plate model with Dirichlet boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen, Marié

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we are concerned with the polynomial stabilization of a two-dimensional thermoelastic Mindlin-Timoshenko plate model with no mechanical damping. The model is subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on the elastic as well as the thermal variables. The work complements our earlier work in Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen (Z Angew Math Phys 64:1305-1325, 2013) on the polynomial stabilization of a Mindlin-Timoshenko model in a radially symmetric domain under Dirichlet boundary conditions on the displacement and thermal variables and free boundary conditions on the shear angle variables. In particular, our aim is to investigate the effect of the Dirichlet boundary conditions on all the variables on the polynomial decay rate of the model. By once more applying a frequency domain method in which we make critical use of an inequality for the trace of Sobolev functions on the boundary of a bounded, open connected set we show that the decay is slower than in the model considered in the cited work. A comparison of our result with our polynomial decay result for a magnetoelastic Mindlin-Timoshenko model subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on the elastic variables in Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen (Z Angew Math Phys 63:1047-1065, 2012) also indicates a correlation between the robustness of the coupling between parabolic and hyperbolic dynamics and the polynomial decay rate in the two models.

  15. Tectonics of the Easter plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engeln, J. F.; Stein, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new model for the Easter plate is presented in which rift propagation has resulted in the formation of a rigid plate between the propagating and dying ridges. The distribution of earthquakes, eleven new focal mechanisms, and existing bathymetric and magnetic data are used to describe the tectonics of this area. Both the Easter-Nazca and Easter-Pacific Euler poles are sufficiently close to the Easter plate to cause rapid changes in rates and directions of motion along the boundaries. The east and west boundaries are propagating and dying ridges; the southwest boundary is a slow-spreading ridge and the northern boundary is a complex zone of convergent and transform motion. The Easter plate may reflect the tectonics of rift propagation on a large scale, where rigid plate tectonics requires boundary reorientation. Simple schematic models to illustrate the general features and processes which occur at plates resulting from large-scale rift propagation are used.

  16. Images for the base of the Pacific lithospheric plate beneath Wellington, New Zealand, from 500 kg dynamite shots recorded on a 100 km-long, 1000 seismometer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, T. A.; Henrys, S. A.; Sato, H.; Okaya, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic P and S-wave reflections are recorded from a west-dipping horizon at depth of 105 km beneath Wellington, New Zealand. From the depth and dip of this horizon we interpret this horizon to be the bottom of the subducting Pacific plate. In May 2011 the Seismic Array on Hikurangi margin Experiment (SAHKE) recorded reflections on a ~100 km-long high-resolution seismic line across the lower North Island of New Zealand. The main goal of this experiment was to provide a detailed image of the west dipping subducted Pacific plate beneath the Wellington city region. The seismic line had ~1000 seismographs spaced between 50-100 m apart and the 500 kg shots were in 50 m-deep, drill holes. An exceptionally high-resolution image for the top of the subducting Pacific Plate at a depth of 20-25 km beneath the Wellington region is seen. In addition, on most of the shots are a pair of 10-14 Hz reflections between 27 and 29 s two-way-travel-time (twtt) at zero offset. The quality of this reflection pair varies from shot to shot. When converted to depth and ray-traced the best solution for these deep events is a west-dipping ( ~ 15 degrees) horizon at a depth of about 105 km. This is consistent with the dip of the upper surface of the plate beneath Wellington, and therefore we argue that the deep (~105 km) reflector is the base of the Pacific plate. On two of the shots another pair 5-8 Hz reflections can also be seen between 47 and 52 s, and the move-out of these events is consistent with them being S-wave reflections from the same 105 km deep, west-dipping, boundary for a Vp/Vs ~ 1.74. Both the P-and S-wave reflections occur in pairs of twtt-thickness of 2 and 5 s, respectively and appear to define a ~ 6-8 km thick channel at the base of the plate if the Vp/Vs ratio~ 5/2 or 2.5. Such a high value of Vp/Vs is consistent with the channel containing fluids or partial melt of an unknown percent. Although we can't rule out the double reflections in both P and S as being multiples

  17. Seismotectonics of the Lwandle-Nubia plate boundary between South Africa and the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnady, Chris; Okal, Emile; Calais, Eric; Stamps, Sarah; Saria, Elifuraha

    2013-04-01

    The Lwandle (LW) plate shares a boundary with the Nubia (NU) plate, extending from a diffuse triple junction with the Rovuma plate in Southern Mozambique to a triple junction with the Antarctic plate along a segment of the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR). The LW-NU boundary terminates in the ~750 km-long, complex transform of the Andrew Bain Fracture Zone (ABFZ), but its exact locus is still unclear. Recent works locate it along the eastern boundary of the submarine Mozambique Ridge, parallel to the pre-existing, oceanic transform-fault fabric. However, an early concept of the LW block ('ambiguous region' of Hartnady, 1990, Fig. 2) indicates a more westerly trajectory in the north that includes parts of South Africa, with a southerly extension across old oceanic crust of the submarine Natal Valley and Transkei Basin. This proposed boundary is marked by several, aligned epicentres of moderate to strong earthquakes (1941, 1942, 1956, 1969, 1972, 1975, 1981 and 1989). Our re-examination of seismographic records from the 1975 'intraplate' earthquake (-37.62°N, 30.98°E, mb5.0), in the oceanic crust of the distal Transkei Basin, shows a thrust-faulting focal mechanism along a nodal plane striking N272°E. The largest (ML4.2) of a series of three small earthquakes in the Natal Valley in 2009, close to a zone of recent seafloor deformation mapped in 1992, has similar first-motion patterns at Southern African seismograph stations. When the 1975 slip-vector result (N173°E) is combined with a normal-faulting slip vector (N078°E) from a 1986 onland earthquake (-30.53°N, 28.84°E, mb5.0) near the Lesotho-KZN border, and both are incorporated into the wider data-set previously used to solve for East African Rift kinematics, they produce a LW-NU rotation pole that is located south of Africa, near the Agulhas Plateau, and approximately 950 km from the Natal Valley deformation zone. The modeled low rate of right-lateral, LW-NU slip (~0.50-0.75 mm/yr) across this LW-NU boundary

  18. Plate Boundary Observatory Strainmeter Recordings of The M6.0 August 24, 2014 South Napa Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, Kathleen; Mencin, David; Phillips, David; Mattioli, Glen; Meertens, Charles

    2015-04-01

    The 2014 Mw6.0 South Napa earthquake nucleated at 11 km depth near the West Napa fault, one of a complex system of sub-parallel major right lateral faults north of San Francisco that together accommodate much of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American tectonic plates. The South Napa event was the largest to have shaken the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) in almost 25 years. A major goal of the NSF-funded EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), installed and maintained by UNAVCO, was to enable researchers to study the interaction between the faults that form a plate boundary zone, and in particular, to investigate the role that aseismic transients contribute to strain accumulation and release. To realize this goal, PBO includes borehole tensor strainmeters (BSMs) installed in several targeted regions, including on to the north and east of San Francisco. Two PBO BSMs have been operating in the SFBA since 2008: B057, north of San Francisco and 30 km from the epicenter, and B054, 3 km from the Hayward Fault and 40 km from the epicenter. We find the coseismic strains recorded by B057 are close to those predicted using elastic half-space dislocation theory and the seismically determined focal mechanism, while a more complicated variable slip model may be required for observations from B054. Months after the event, B057 continued to record a significant postseismic signal. In this presentation we document the coseismic signals recorded by the PBO BSMs and characterize the temporal behavior of the postseismic signal at B057. The PBO network includes over 1100 GPS, 75 BSMs, 79 seismometers and arrays of tiltmeters, pore pressure sensors and meteorological instrumentation. UNAVCO generates an Earthscope Level 2 processed strain time-series combined into areal and shear strains for the PBO BSM network; the raw data are available from the IRIS DMC in mSEED format. For events of interest, such as the South Napa earthquake, UNAVCO generates a 1-sps

  19. How does the 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah Earthquake Rupture Connect to the Southern California Plate Boundary Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnellan, A.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Pacific - North American plate boundary in southern California is marked by several major strike slip faults. The 2010 M7.2 El Mayor - Cucapah earthquake ruptured 120 km of upper crust in Baja California to the US-Mexico border. The earthquake triggered slip along an extensive network of faults in the Salton Trough from the Mexican border to the southern end of the San Andreas fault. Earthquakes >M5 were triggered in the gap between the Laguna Salada and Elsinore faults at Ocotillo and on the Coyote Creek segment of the San Jacinto fault 20 km northwest of Borrego Springs. UAVSAR observations, collected since October of 2009, measure slip associated with the M5.7 Ocotillo aftershock with deformation continuing into 2014. The Elsinore fault has been remarkably quiet, however, with only M5.0 and M5.2 earthquakes occurring on the Coyote Mountains segment of the fault in 1940 and 1968 respectively. In contrast, the Imperial Valley has been quite active historically with numerous moderate events occurring since 1935. Moderate event activity is increasing along the San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ), especially the trifurcation area, where 6 of 12 historic earthquakes in this 20 km long fault zone have occurred since 2000. However, no recent deformation has been detected using UAVSAR measurements in this area, including the recent M5.2 June 2016 Borrego earthquake. Does the El Mayor - Cucapah rupture connect to and transfer stress primarily to a single southern California fault or several? What is its role relative to the background plate motion? UAVSAR observations indicate that the southward extension of the Elsinore fault has recently experienced the most localized deformation. Seismicity suggests that the San Jacinto fault is more active than neighboring major faults, and geologic evidence suggests that the Southern San Andreas fault has been the major plate boundary fault in southern California. Topographic data with 3-4 cm resolution using structure from motion from

  20. The boundary between the Indian and Asian tectonic plates below Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junmeng; Yuan, Xiaohui; Liu, Hongbing; Kumar, Prakash; Pei, Shunping; Kind, Rainer; Zhang, Zhongjie; Teng, Jiwen; Ding, Lin; Gao, Xing; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The fate of the colliding Indian and Asian tectonic plates below the Tibetan high plateau may be visualized by, in addition to seismic tomography, mapping the deep seismic discontinuities, like the crust-mantle boundary (Moho), the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), or the discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depth. We herein present observations of seismic discontinuities with the P and S receiver function techniques beneath central and western Tibet along two new profiles and discuss the results in connection with results from earlier profiles, which did observe the LAB. The LAB of the Indian and Asian plates is well-imaged by several profiles and suggests a changing mode of India-Asia collision in the east-west direction. From eastern Himalayan syntaxis to the western edge of the Tarim Basin, the Indian lithosphere is underthrusting Tibet at an increasingly shallower angle and reaching progressively further to the north. A particular lithospheric region was formed in northern and eastern Tibet as a crush zone between the two colliding plates, the existence of which is marked by high temperature, low mantle seismic wavespeed (correlating with late arriving signals from the 410 discontinuity), poor Sn propagation, east and southeast oriented global positioning system displacements, and strikingly larger seismic (SKS) anisotropy. PMID:20534567

  1. The boundary between the Indian and Asian tectonic plates below Tibet.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junmeng; Yuan, Xiaohui; Liu, Hongbing; Kumar, Prakash; Pei, Shunping; Kind, Rainer; Zhang, Zhongjie; Teng, Jiwen; Ding, Lin; Gao, Xing; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Wei

    2010-06-22

    The fate of the colliding Indian and Asian tectonic plates below the Tibetan high plateau may be visualized by, in addition to seismic tomography, mapping the deep seismic discontinuities, like the crust-mantle boundary (Moho), the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), or the discontinuities at 410 and 660 km depth. We herein present observations of seismic discontinuities with the P and S receiver function techniques beneath central and western Tibet along two new profiles and discuss the results in connection with results from earlier profiles, which did observe the LAB. The LAB of the Indian and Asian plates is well-imaged by several profiles and suggests a changing mode of India-Asia collision in the east-west direction. From eastern Himalayan syntaxis to the western edge of the Tarim Basin, the Indian lithosphere is underthrusting Tibet at an increasingly shallower angle and reaching progressively further to the north. A particular lithospheric region was formed in northern and eastern Tibet as a crush zone between the two colliding plates, the existence of which is marked by high temperature, low mantle seismic wavespeed (correlating with late arriving signals from the 410 discontinuity), poor Sn propagation, east and southeast oriented global positioning system displacements, and strikingly larger seismic (SKS) anisotropy.

  2. Stress Rotation Across the Cascadia Megathrust Requires a Weak Subduction Plate Boundary at Seismogenic Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; McGuire, J. J.; Liu, Y.; Hardebeck, J.

    2017-12-01

    Despite the great effort spent investigating subduction zones, there are very limited constraints on the stress state on the plate boundary fault at the depth of megathrust earthquakes. Here we utilize a focal mechanism dataset, including observations from the Cascadia Initiative ocean bottom seismograph experiment, to constrain the stress orientations. We present a high-resolution inversion for the principal stress orientations both above and below the thrust interface in the southern Cascadia Subduction zone. The distinctive stresses above and below the interface require a significant stress rotation within 10 km of the plate boundary. To quantify the implications of this rotation for the strength of the plate boundary, we designed an inversion that solves for the absolute stress tensors in a three-layer model subject to assumptions about the strength of the subducting mantle. Our approach utilizes the continuous traction boundary conditions between layers as well as the observed principal stress orientations and the relative magnitude ratios in the crust and subducting mantle as constraints. Our results indicate that the shear stress on the plate boundary fault is likely no more than about 50 MPa at 20 km depth. Regardless of the assumed upper mantle strength, we infer a relatively weak megathrust fault with an effective friction coefficient of 0 to 0.2 at seismogenic depths. The central question for the Cascadia subduction zone is why it remains seismically quiet despite the 300+ years of stress accumulation since the last megathrust earthquake. For example, we also document that no thrust earthquakes were recorded by the 2-year Cascadia Initiative expedition down to magnitude 2.0, despite the stress perturbation generated by a nearby Mw5.7 earthquake on Jan 28th, 2015, on the Mendocino Transform fault. To help answer that question, we provide a new and fundamental constraint on the absolute level of stress accumulation to date in the current seismic cycle. Our

  3. Spatial variations in the nature of the oceanic plate in the northwestern Pacific margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujie, G.; Kodaira, S.; Shirai, T.; Dannowski, A.; Thorwart, M.; Grevemeyer, I.; Morgan, J. P.; Miura, S.

    2016-12-01

    formed, indicating that the oceanic plate in the NW Pacific margin, the input to the northeastern Japanese island arc, is more complicated here than we previously thought.In this presentation, we will show an overview of the Vp model along the whole profile and detailed seismic structure beneath the petit-spot area derived by the P-to-S converted waves.

  4. Relaxation of an unsteady turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurta, R. N.; Trimpi, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the relaxation of a turbulent boundary layer on a semi-infinite flat plate after passage of a shock wave and a trailing driver gas-driven gas interface. The problem has special application to expansion-tube flows. The flow-governing equations have been transformed into the Crocco variables, and a time-similar solution is presented in terms of the dimensionless distance-time variable alpha and the dimensionless velocity variable beta. An eddy-viscosity model, similar to that of time-steady boundary layers, is applied to the inner and outer regions of the boundary layer. A turbulent Prandtl number equal to the molecular Prandtl number is used to relate the turbulent heat flux to the eddy viscosity. The numerical results, obtained by using the Gauss-Seidel line-relaxation method, indicate that a fully turbulent boundary layer relaxes faster to the final steady-state values of heat transfer and skin friction than a laminar boundary layer. The results also give a fairly good estimate of the local skin friction and heat transfer for near steady-flow conditions.

  5. Deleterious localized stress fields: the effects of boundaries and stiffness tailoring in anisotropic laminated plates

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The safe design of primary load-bearing structures requires accurate prediction of stresses, especially in the vicinity of geometric discontinuities where deleterious three-dimensional stress fields can be induced. Even for thin-walled structures significant through-thickness stresses arise at edges and boundaries, and this is especially precarious for laminates of advanced fibre-reinforced composites because through-thickness stresses are the predominant drivers in delamination failure. Here, we use a higher-order equivalent single-layer model derived from the Hellinger–Reissner mixed variational principle to examine boundary layer effects in laminated plates comprising constant-stiffness and variable-stiffness laminae and deforming statically in cylindrical bending. The results show that zigzag deformations, which arise due to layerwise differences in the transverse shear moduli, drive boundary layers towards clamped edges and are therefore critically important in quantifying localized stress gradients. The relative significance of the boundary layer scales with the degree of layerwise anisotropy and the thickness to characteristic length ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that the phenomenon of alternating positive and negative transverse shearing deformation through the thickness of composite laminates, previously only observed at clamped boundaries, can also occur at other locations as a result of smoothly varying the material properties over the in-plane dimensions of the laminate. PMID:27843401

  6. Initiation of the Pyrenean plate boundary fault and its effect on the near- and far-field deformation of the European plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dielforder, Armin; Frasca, Gianluca; Ford, Mary

    2017-04-01

    The European plate was affected by contractional deformation events in Late Cretaceous time. This is recorded by inception of thrusting and foreland basin subsidence in the Pyrenean realm, and inversion of Mesozoic rift systems in the interior of the European plate. It is widely accepted that the plate-wide deformation resulted from the onset of NE-directed convergence of Africa-Iberia relative to Europe, and a strong mechanical coupling of the plates, which allowed the transfer of stresses far into Europe. Geological data from both the Pyrenean orogen and the interior of the European plate indicate, however, that these conditions persisted only for 15-20 Myr and that Europe experienced a plate-wide stress relaxation during Paleocene time. Although a slow down in plate convergence between Africa and Europe and North Atlantic continental rifting were proposed as potential causes for the stress relaxation, the subject has remained controversial. In particular, none of the mechanisms seem to be suitable to explain the required changes in the mechanical coupling of Iberian and European plates and the associated stress transfer. Here we propose a new model for the Upper Cretaceous to Paleocene tectonic evolution of the European plate, which takes the temporal evolution of the Pyrenean plate boundary fault into account. Based on plate reconstructions, geological field-data, and restored cross-sections we argue that the plate boundary fault initiated during the Upper Cretaceous within the exhumed mantle domain situated between the rifted margins of the Iberian and European plates. At the transition from the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene, the mantle domain was closed and the rifted margins collided. This evolution was associated with a substantial change in the fault rheology leading to an overall decrease in the plate coupling force. During Paleocene time, the plate coupling force was efficiently balanced by the gravitational push of the European plate, leading to a near

  7. Extensive deposits on the Pacific plate from Late Pleistocene North American glacial lake outbursts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; Reid, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    One of the major unresolved issues of the Late Pleistocene catastrophic-flood events in the northwestern United States (e.g., from glacial Lake Missoula) has been what happened when the flood discharge reached the ocean. This study compiles available 3.5-kHz high-resolution and airgun seismic reflection data, long-range sidescan sonar images, and sediment core data to define the distribution of flood sediment in deepwater areas of the Pacific Ocean. Upon reaching the ocean at the mouth of the Columbia River near the present-day upper continental slope, sediment from the catastrophic floods continued flowing downslope as hyperpycnally generated turbidity currents. The turbidity currents resulting from the Lake Missoula and other latest Pleistocene floods followed the Cascadia Channel into and through the Blanco Fracture Zone and then flowed west to the Tufts Abyssal Plain. A small part of the flood sediment, which was stripped off the main flow at a bend in the Cascadia Channel at its exit point from the Blanco Fracture Zone, continued flowing more than 400 km to the south and reached the Escanaba Trough, a rift valley of the southern Gorda Ridge. Understanding the development of the pathway for the Late Pleistocene flood sediment reaching Escanaba Trough provides insight for understanding the extent of catastrophic flood deposits on the Pacific plate.

  8. Secular and annual hydrologic effects from the Plate Boundary Observatory GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meertens, C. M.; Wahr, J. M.; Borsa, A. A.; Jackson, M. E.; Herring, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) GPS network is providing accurate and spatially coherent vertical signals that can be interpreted in terms of hydrological loading and poroelastic effects from both natural and anthropogenic changes in water storage. Data used for this analysis are the precise coordinate time series produced on a daily basis by PBO Analysis Centers at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and at Central Washington University and combined by the Analysis Center Coordinator at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. These products, as well as derived velocity solutions, are made freely available from the UNAVCO Data Center in Boulder. Analysis of secular trends and annual variations in the time series was made using the analysis software of Langbein, 2008. Spatial variations in the amplitude and phase of the annual vertical component of motion allow for identification of anthropogenic effects due to water pumping, irrigation, and reservoir lake variations, and of outliers due to instrumental or other local site effects. Vertical annual signals of 8-10 mm peak-to-peak amplitude are evident at stations in the mountains of northern and central California and the Pacific Northwest. The peak annual uplift is in October and is correlated to hydrological loading effects. Mountainous areas appear to be responding elastically to the load of the water contained in surface soil, fractures, and snow. Vertical signals are highest when the water load is at a minimum. The vertical elastic hydrologic loading signal was modeled using the 0.25 degree community NOAH land-surface model (LSM) and generally fits the observed GPS signal. Addition comparisons will be made using the Mosaic LSM and the NOAA “Leaky Bucket” hydrologic model. In contrast to mountain stations that are installed principally in bedrock, stations in the valleys of California are installed in sediments. Observations from these stations show greater spatial variability ranging from

  9. DSMC simulations of leading edge flat-plate boundary layer flows at high Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2017-04-01

    The flow over a 2D leading-edge flat plate is studied at Mach number Ma =(Uinf / \\setmn √{kBTinf / m}) in the range plate boundary layer at high Mach number. Here, LT is the characteristic dimension, Uinfand Tinfare the free stream velocity and temperature, rhoinf is the free stream density, m is the molecular mass, muinf is the molecular viscosity based on the free stream temperature Tinf , and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The variation of streamwise velocity, temperature, number-density, and mean free path along the wall normal direction away from the plate surface is studied. The qualitative nature of the streamwise velocity at high Mach number is similar to those in the incompressible limit (parabolic profile). However, there are important differences. The amplitudes of the streamwise velocity increase as the Mach number increases and turned into a more flatter profile near the wall. There is significant velocity and temperature slip at the surface of the plate, and the slip increases as the Mach number is increased. It is interesting to note that for the highest Mach numbers considered here, the streamwise velocity at the wall exceeds the sound speed, and the flow is supersonic throughout the flow domain.

  10. DSMC simulations of leading edge flat-plate boundary layer flows at high Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2016-11-01

    The flow over a 2D leading-edge flat plate is studied at Mach number Ma = (Uinf /√{kBTinf / m }) in the range plate boundary layer at high Mach number. Here, LT is the characteristic dimension, Uinf and Tinf are the free stream velocity and temperature, ρinf is the free stream density, mis the molecular mass, μinf is the molecular viscosity based on the free stream temperature Tinf, and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The variation of streamwise velocity, temperature, number-density, and mean free path along the wall normal direction away from the plate surface is studied. The qualitative nature of the streamwise velocity at high Mach number is similar to those in the incompressible limit (parabolic profile). However, there are important differences. The amplitudes of the streamwise velocity increase as the Mach number increases and turned into a more flatter profile near the wall. There is significant velocity and temperature slip at the surface of the plate, and the slip increases as the Mach number is increased. It is interesting to note that for the highest Mach numbers considered here, the streamwise velocity at the wall exceeds the sound speed, and the flow is supersonic throughout the flow domain.

  11. DSMC simulations of leading edge flat-plate boundary layer flows at high Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    2017-01-01

    The flow over a 2D leading-edge flat plate is studied at Mach number Ma = (Uinf /√{kBTinf / m }) in the range plate boundary layer at high Mach number. Here, LT is the characteristic dimension, Uinf and Tinf are the free stream velocity and temperature, rhoinf is the free stream density, m is the molecular mass, muinf is the molecular viscosity based on the free stream temperature Tinf , and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The variation of streamwise velocity, temperature, number-density, and mean free path along the wall normal direction away from the plate surface is studied. The qualitative nature of the streamwise velocity at high Mach number is similar to those in the incompressible limit (parabolic profile). However, there are important differences. The amplitudes of the streamwise velocity increase as the Mach number increases and turned into a more flatter profile near the wall. There is significant velocity and temperature slip at the surface of the plate, and the slip increases as the Mach number is increased. It is interesting to note that for the highest Mach numbers considered here, the streamwise velocity at the wall exceeds the sound speed, and the flow is supersonic throughout the flow domain.

  12. DSMC simulations of leading edge flat-plate boundary layer flows at high Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev

    2016-10-01

    The flow over a 2D leading-edge flat plate is studied at Mach number Ma = (Uinf / {kBTinf /m}) in the range plate boundary layer at high Mach number. Here, LT is the characteristic dimension, Uinf and Tinf are the free stream velocity and temperature, rhoinf is the free stream density, m is the molecular mass, muinf is the molecular viscosity based on the free stream temperature Tinf , and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The variation of streamwise velocity, temperature, number-density, and mean free path along the wall normal direction away from the plate surface is studied. The qualitative nature of the streamwise velocity at high Mach number is similar to those in the incompressible limit (parabolic profile). However, there are important differences. The amplitudes of the streamwise velocity increase as the Mach number increases and turned into a more flatter profile near the wall. There is significant velocity and temperature slip at the surface of the plate, and the slip increases as the Mach number is increased. It is interesting to note that for the highest Mach numbers considered here, the streamwise velocity at the wall exceeds the sound speed, and the flow is supersonic throughout the flow domain.

  13. DSMC simulations of leading edge flat-plate boundary layer flows at high Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev, , Dr.

    The flow over a 2D leading-edge flat plate is studied at Mach number Ma = (Uinf / ∖ sqrt{kBTinf / m})in the range plate boundary layer at high Mach number. Here, LTis the characteristic dimension, Uinfand Tinfare the free stream velocity and temperature, rhoinf is the free stream density, mis the molecular mass, muinf is the molecular viscosity based on the free stream temperature Tinf , and kBis the Boltzmann constant. The variation of streamwise velocity, temperature, number-density, and mean free path along the wall normal direction away from the plate surface is studied. The qualitative nature of the streamwise velocity at high Mach number is similar to those in the incompressible limit (parabolic profile). However, there are important differences. The amplitudes of the streamwise velocity increase as the Mach number increases and turned into a more flatter profile near the wall. There is significant velocity and temperature slip at the surface of the plate, and the slip increases as the Mach number is increased. It is interesting to note that for the highest Mach numbers considered here, the streamwise velocity at the wall exceeds the sound speed, and the flow is supersonic throughout the flow domain. Indian Institute of Science Bangalore-560 012, India.

  14. Gliders Measure Western Boundary Current Transport from the South Pacific to the Equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. E.; Kessler, W. S.; Sherman, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2007, the Consortium on the Ocean's Role in Climate (CORC) has used repeated glider transects across the southern Solomon Sea to measure the previously nearly unsampled mass and heat transport from the South Pacific to the equatorial zone. Mean transport is dominated by the New Guinea Coastal Undercurrent (NGCUC). This low-latitude western boundary current is a major element of the shallow meridional overturning circulation, returning water from the subtropical South Pacific to the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) where it upwells. We find the mean NGCUC to be a jet less than 100 km wide, centered near 300 m depth, with equatorward velocities reaching 35 cm/s and salinity anomalies on isopycnals up to 0.05. Weaker poleward flow is found near the surface in the eastern basin. Equatorward transport above 700 m is typically 20 Sv, but nearly vanished during two La Niñas and reached 25 Sv during an El Niño. Within these events the seasonal cycle cannot yet be defined. Transport variability is strongest outside the boundary current and appears to consist of two independently moving layers with a boundary near 250 m. ENSO variability is predominantly in the upper layer. The relation of Solomon Sea mass and heat transport with ENSO indicators will be discussed The ability to initiate and maintain measurements that support such quantitative analyses with a small effort in a remote site far from research institutions demonstrates that gliders can be a productive part of the global ocean observing system.

  15. Prehistoric earthquakes on the Caribbean-South American plate boundary, central Range Fault, Trinidad

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Weber, John C.; Ragona, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Recent geodetic studies suggest that the Central Range fault is the principal plate-boundary structure accommodating strike-slip motion between the Caribbean and South American plates. Our study shows that the fault forms a topographically prominent lineament in central Trinidad. Results from a paleoseismic investigation at a site where Holocene sediments have been deposited across the Central Range fault indicate that it ruptured the ground surface most recently between 2710 and 550 yr B.P. If the geodetic slip rate of 9–15 mm/yr is representative of Holocene slip rates, our paleoseismic data suggest that at least 4.9 m of potential slip may have accumulated on the fault and could be released during a future large earthquake (M > 7).

  16. Prehistoric earthquakes on the Caribbean-South American plate boundary, central range fault, Trinidad

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, C.S.; Weber, J.C.; Crosby, C.J.; Ragona, D.

    2010-01-01

    Recent geodetic studies suggest that the Central Range fault is the principal plate-boundary structure accommodating strike-slip motion between the Caribbean and South American plates. Our study shows that the fault forms a topographically prominent lineament in central Trinidad. Results from a paleoseismic investigation at a site where Holocene sediments have been deposited across the Central Range fault indicate that it ruptured the ground surface most recently between 2710 and 550 yr B.P. If the geodetic slip rate of 9-15 mm/yr is representative of Holocene slip rates, our paleoseismic data suggest that at least 4.9 m of potential slip may have accumulated on the fault and could be released during a future large earthquake (M > 7). ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  17. Laminar-Boundary-Layer Oscillations and Transition on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubauer, G B; Skramstad, H K

    1948-01-01

    This is an account of an investigation in which oscillations were discovered in the laminar boundary layer along a flat plate. These oscillations were found during the course of an experiment in which transition from laminar to turbulent flow was being studied on the plate as the turbulence in the wind stream was being reduced to unusually low values by means of damping screens. The first part of the paper deals with experimental methods and apparatus, measurements of turbulence and sound, and studies of transition. A description is then given of the manner in which oscillations were discovered and how they were found to be related to transition, and then how controlled oscillations were produced and studied in detail.

  18. Low Ozone in the Marine Boundary Layer of the Tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Gregory, G. L.; Andesrson, B.; Browell, E.; Sachse, G. W.; Davis, D. D.; Crawford, J.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Talbot, R.; Blake, D. R.; hide

    1994-01-01

    Aircraft measurements of ozone, its key precursors, and a variety of chemical tracers were made in the troposphere of the western and central Pacific in October 1991. These data are presented and analyzed to examine the occurrence of low ozone concentrations in the remote marine boundary layer of the tropical and equatorial Pacific Ocean. The data from these flights out of Guam, covering an area extending from the equator to 20 N and from south of the Philippines to Hawaii, show average O3 concentrations as low as 8-9 ppb (ppb=10(exp-9)v/v) at altitudes of 0.3-0.5 km in the boundary layer. Individual measurements as low as 2-5 ppb were recorded. Low O3 concentrations do not always persist in space and time. High O3, generally associated with the transport of upper tropospheric air, was also encountered in the boundary layer. In practically all cases, O3 increased to values as large as 25-30 ppb within 2 km above the boundary layer top. Steady state model computations are used to suggest that these low O3 concentrations are a result of net photochemical O3 destruction in a low NO environment, sea-surface deposition, and extremely low net entrainment rates (1-2 mm per second) from the free troposphere. Day/night measurements of ethane, propane, gaseous and aerosol Cl suggest that daytime (morning) Cl atom concentrations in the vicinity of 10(exp 5) molecules per cubic centimeter may be present in the marine boundary layer. This Cl atom abundance can be rationalized only if sea salt aerosols can release free chlorine (Cl2) to the gas phase in the presence of sun light (and possibly O3). These Cl atom concentrations, however, are still insufficient and Cl (or Br) chemistry is not likely to be an important cause of the observed low O3.

  19. Movies of Finite Deformation within Western North American Plate Boundary Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, W. E.; Birkes, B.; Richard, G. A.

    2004-12-01

    Animations of finite strain within deforming continental zones can be an important tool for both education and research. We present finite strain models for western North America. We have found that these moving images, which portray plate motions, landform uplift, and subsidence, are highly useful for enabling students to conceptualize the dramatic changes that can occur within plate boundary zones over geologic time. These models use instantaneous rates of strain inferred from both space geodetic observations and Quaternary fault slip rates. Geodetic velocities and Quaternary strain rates are interpolated to define a continuous, instantaneous velocity field for western North America. This velocity field is then used to track topography points and fault locations through time (both backward and forward in time), using small time steps, to produce a 6 million year image. The strain rate solution is updated at each time step, accounting for changes in boundary conditions of plate motion, and changes in fault orientation. Assuming zero volume change, Airy isostasy, and a ratio of erosion rate to tectonic uplift rate, the topography is also calculated as a function of time. The animations provide interesting moving images of the transform boundary, highlighting ongoing extension and subsidence, convergence and uplift, and large translations taking place within the strike-slip regime. Moving images of the strain components, uplift volume through time, and inferred erosion volume through time, have also been produced. These animations are an excellent demonstration for education purposes and also hold potential as an important tool for research enabling the quantification of finite rotations of fault blocks, potential erosion volume, uplift volume, and the influence of climate on these parameters. The models, however, point to numerous shortcomings of taking constraints from instantaneous calculations to provide insight into time evolution and reconstruction models

  20. Inherited segmentation of the Iberian-African margins and tectonic reconstruction of a diffuse plate boundary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernàndez, Manel; Torne, Montserrat; Vergés, Jaume; Casciello, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse plate-boundary regions are characterized by non-well defined contacts between tectonic plates thus making difficult their reconstruction through time. The Western Mediterranean is one of these regions, where the convergence between the African and Iberian plates since Late Cretaceous resulted in the Betic-Rif arcuate orogen, the Gulf of Cadiz imbricate wedge, and the Alboran back-arc basin. Whereas the Iberia-Africa plate boundary is well defined west to the Gorringe Bank and along the Gloria Fault, it becomes much more diffuse eastwards with seismicity spreading over both the south-Iberian and north-African margins. Gravity data, when filtered for short wavelengths, show conspicuous positive Bouguer anomalies associated with the Gorringe Bank, the Gulf of Cadiz High and the Ronda/Beni-Bousera peridotitic massifs reflecting an inherited Jurassic margin segmentation. The subsequent Alpine convergence between Africa and Iberia reactivated these domains, producing crustal-scale thrusting in the Atlantic segments and eventually subduction in the proto-Mediterranean segments. The Jurassic segmentation of the Iberia-Africa margins substantiates the double-polarity subduction model proposed for the region characterized by a change from SE-dipping polarity in the Gorringe, Gulf of Cadiz and Betic-Rif domains, to NW-dipping polarity in the proto-Algerian domain. Therefore, the Algerian and Tyrrhenian basins in the east and the Alboran basin in the west are the result of SSE-E and NW-W retreating slabs of oceanic and/or hyper-extended Tethyan domains, respectively.

  1. Relaxation of the accelerating-gas boundary layer to the test-gas boundary layer on a flat plate in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Trimpi, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    An analytic investigation of the relaxation of the accelerating-gas boundary layer to the test-gas boundary layer over a flat plate mounted in an expansion tube has been conducted. In this treatment, nitrogen has been considered as the test gas and helium as the accelerating gas. The problem is analyzed in two conically similar limits: (1) when the time lag between the arrival of the shock and the interface at the leading edge of the plate is very large, and (2) when this time lag is negligible. The transient laminar boundary-layer equations of a perfect binary-gas mixture are taken as the flow governing equations. These coupled equations have been solved numerically by Gauss-Seidel line-relaxation method. The results predict the transient behavior as well as the time required for an all-helium accelerating-gas boundary layer to relax to an all-nitrogen boundary layer.

  2. Crustal Deformation at the Arabian Plate-Boundary observed by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, S.; Cavalié, O.; Akoglu, A. M.; Wang, T.; Xu, W.; Feng, G.; Dutta, R.; Abdullin, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Arabian plate is bounded by a variety of active plate boundaries, with extension in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden to the south, compression in Turkey and Iran to the north, and transform faults to the west and to the east. Internally, however, the Arabian plate has been shown to be tectonically rather stable, despite evidence of recent volcanism and earthquake faulting. We use InSAR observations to study recent tectonic and volcanic activity at several locations at the Arabian plate boundary as well within the plate itself. The region near the triple junction between the Arabian, Eurasian, and Anatolian plates has often been the focus of studies on continental deformation behavior and interseismic deformation. Here we use large-scale InSAR data processing to map the deformation near the triple junction and find the deformation to be focused on major faults with little intra-plate deformation. The eastern part of the East Anatolian Fault appears to have a very shallow locking depth with limited fault-normal deformation. Several major earthquakes that have occurred in recent years on the Arabian plate boundary, including the 2011 magnitude 7.1 Van earthquake in eastern Turkey. It occurred as a result of convergence of the Arabian plate towards Eurasia and caused significant surface deformation that we have analyzed with multiple coseismic InSAR, GPS, and coastal uplift observations. We use high-resolution Cosmo-Skymed and TerraSAR-X data to derive 3D coseismic displacements from offsets alone, as some of the interferograms are almost completely incoherent. By identifying point-like targets within the images, we were able to derive accurate pixel offsets between SAR sub-images containing such targets, which we used to estimate the 3D coseismic displacements. The derived 3D displacement field helped in constraining the causative northward dipping thrust-fault. The Qadimah fault is a recently discovered fault located on the Red Sea coast north of Jeddah and under the

  3. Paleomagnetism of Midway Atoll lavas and northward movement of the Pacific plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gromme, S.; Vine, F.J.

    1972-01-01

    Two deep drill holes through the reef limestones of Midway Atoll penetrated 120 m and 19 m of basaltic lavas that were dated by the KAr method at 18 my. Inclinations of natural remanent magnetization have been measured in 173 specimens cut from 57 core samples from 13 of the lava flows. The mean paleomagnetic inclination is 27.6?? ?? 6.8??, corresponding to a paleolatitude of 14.7?? ?? 4.2??. The present latitude of Midway is 28??, suggesting a northward component of motion of the Pacific plate of approximately 13?? or 1400 km in the last 18 my. The paleolatitude of Midway is thus not significantly different from the present latitude (19??) of the active volcanic island of Hawaii. The paleomagnetic data from the Midway basalts thus support the hypothesis of Wilson and Morgan that volcanic heat sources are fixed with respect to the Earth's mantle below the asthenosphere and their apparent migration with time is due to plate motion. ?? 1972.

  4. Architectural Blueprint for Plate Boundary Observatories based on interoperable Data Management Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschke, D. I.; Häner, R.; Schurr, B.; Oncken, O.; Wächter, J.

    2014-12-01

    Interoperable data management platforms play an increasing role in the advancement of knowledge and technology in many scientific disciplines. Through high quality services they support the establishment of efficient and innovative research environments. Well-designed research environments can facilitate the sustainable utilization, exchange, and re-use of scientific data and functionality by using standardized community models. Together with innovative 3D/4D visualization, these concepts provide added value in improving scientific knowledge-gain, even across the boundaries of disciplines. A project benefiting from the added value is the Integrated Plate boundary Observatory in Chile (IPOC). IPOC is a European-South American network to study earthquakes and deformation at the Chilean continental margin and to monitor the plate boundary system for capturing an anticipated great earthquake in a seismic gap. In contrast to conventional observatories that monitor individual signals only, IPOC captures a large range of different processes through various observation methods (e.g., seismographs, GPS, magneto-telluric sensors, creep-meter, accelerometer, InSAR). For IPOC a conceptual design has been devised that comprises an architectural blueprint for a data management platform based on common and standardized data models, protocols, and encodings as well as on an exclusive use of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) including visualization components. Following the principles of event-driven service-oriented architectures, the design enables novel processes by sharing and re-using functionality and information on the basis of innovative data mining and data fusion technologies. This platform can help to improve the understanding of the physical processes underlying plate deformations as well as the natural hazards induced by them. Through the use of standards, this blueprint can not only be facilitated for other plate observing systems (e.g., the European Plate

  5. Calculation of oblique-shock-wave laminar-boundary-layer interaction on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, U.; Reshotko, E.

    1980-01-01

    A finite difference solution to the problem of the interaction between an impinging oblique shock wave and the laminar boundary layer on a flat plate is presented. The boundary layer equations coupled with the Prandtl-Meyer relation for the external flow are used to calculate the flow field. A method for the calculation of the separated flow region is presented and discussed. Comparisons between this theory and the experimental results of other investigators show fairly good agreement. Results are presented for the case of a cooled wall with an oncoming flow at Mach number 2.0 without and with suction. The results show that a small amount of suction greatly reduces the extent of the separated region in the vicinity of the shock impingement location.

  6. Skin friction drag reduction on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer using synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanger, Randy; Boom, Pieter D.; Hanson, Ronald E.; Lavoie, Philippe; Zingg, David W.

    2017-11-01

    In these studies, we investigate the effect of mild synthetic jet actuation on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer with the goal of interacting with the large scales in the log region of the boundary layer and manipulating the overall skin friction. Results will be presented from both large eddy simulations (LES) and wind tunnel experiments. In the experiments, a large parameter space of synthetic jet frequency and amplitude was studied with hot film sensors at select locations behind a pair of synthetic jets to identify the parameters that produce the greatest changes in the skin friction. The LES simulations were performed for a selected set of parameters and provide a more complete evaluation of the interaction between the boundary layer and synthetic jets. Five boundary layer thicknesses downstream, the skin friction between the actuators is generally found to increase, while regions of reduced skin friction persist downstream of the actuators. This pattern is reversed for forcing at low frequency. Overall, the spanwise-averaged skin friction is increased by the forcing, except when forcing at high frequency and low amplitude, for which a net skin friction reduction persists downstream. The physical interpretation of these results will be discussed. The financial support of Airbus is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Flowfield measurements in a separated and reattached flat plate turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, William P.

    1987-01-01

    The separation and reattachment of a large-scale, two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at low subsonic speed on a flat plate has been studied experimentally. The separation bubble was 55 cm long and had a maximum bubble thickness, measured to the height of the mean dividing streamline, of 17 cm, which was twice the thickness of the inlet boundary layer. A combination of laser velocimetry, hot-wire anemometry, pneumatic probing techniques, and flow visualization were used as diagnostics. Principal findings were that an outer inviscid rotational flow was defined which essentially convected over the blockage associated with the inner, viscously dominated bubble recirculation region. A strong backflow region in which the flow moved upstream 100 percent of the time was measured near the test surface over the central 35 percent of the bubble. A laminar backflow boundary layer having pseudo-turbulent characteristics including a log-linear velocity profile was generated under the highly turbulent backflow. Velocity profile shapes in the reversed flow region matched a previously developed universal backflow profile at the upstream edge of the separation region but not in the steady backflow region downstream. A smoke flow visualization movie and hot-film measurements revealed low frequency nonperiodic flapping at reattachment. However, forward flow fraction data at reattachment and mean velocity profiles in the redeveloping boundary layer downstream of reattachment correlated with backward-facing step data when the axial dimension was scaled by the distance from the maximum bubble thickness to reattachment.

  8. The memory of the accreting plate boundary and the continuity of fracture zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed aeromagnetic anomaly map of the Mesozoic seafloor-spreading lineations southwest of Bermuda reveals the dominant magnetic grain of the oceanic crust and the character of the accreting boundary at the time of crustal formation. The magnetic anomaly pattern is that of a series of elongate lobes perpendicular to the fracture zone (flowline) trends. The linear sets of magnetic anomaly peaks and troughs have narrow regions of reduced amplitude anomalies associated with the fracture zones. During the period of Mesozoic geomagnetic polarity reversals (when 1200 km of central North Atlantic seafloor formed), the Atlantic accreting boundary consisted of stationary, elongate, spreading center cells that maintained their independence even though sometimes only minor spatial offsets existed between cells. Normal oceanic crustal structure was formed in the spreading center cells, but structural anomalies and discontinuities characteristic of fracture zones were formed at their boundaries, which parallel flowlines of Mesozoic relative plate motion in the central North Atlantic. We suggest that the memory for a stationary pattern of independent spreading center cells resides in the young brittle lithosphere at the accreting boundary where the lithosphere is weakest; here, each spreading center cell independently goes through its cylce of stress buildup, stress release, and crustal accretion, after which its memory is refreshed. The temporal offset between the peaks of the accretionary activity that takes place within each cell may provide the mechanism for maintaining the independence of adjacent spreading center cells through times when no spatial offset between the cells exists.

  9. Direct simulation of flat-plate boundary layer with mild free-stream turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz

    2014-11-01

    Spatially evolving direct numerical simulation of the flat-plate boundary layer has been performed. The momentum thickness Reynolds number develops from 80 to 3000 with a free-stream turbulence intensity decaying from 3 percent to 0.8 percent. Predicted skin-friction is in agreement with the Blasius solution prior to breakdown, follows the well-known T3A bypass transition data during transition, and agrees with the Erm and Joubert Melbourne wind-tunnel data after the completion of transition. We introduce the concept of bypass transition in the narrow sense. Streaks, although present, do not appear to be dynamically important during the present bypass transition as they occur downstream of infant turbulent spots. For the turbulent boundary layer, viscous scaling collapses the rate of dissipation profiles in the logarithmic region at different Reynolds numbers. The ratio of Taylor microscale and the Kolmogorov length scale is nearly constant over a large portion of the outer layer. The ratio of large-eddy characteristic length and the boundary layer thickness scales very well with Reynolds number. The turbulent boundary layer is also statistically analyzed using frequency spectra, conditional-sampling, and two-point correlations. Near momentum thickness Reynolds number of 2900, three layers of coherent vortices are observed: the upper and lower layers are distinct hairpin forests of large and small sizes respectively; the middle layer consists of mostly fragmented hairpin elements.

  10. 3D Thermal/Mechanical Evolution Of The Plate Boundary Corner In SE Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A.; Koons, P.; Upton, P.; Pavlis, T.; Chapman, J.

    2007-12-01

    The St Elias orogen of southeast Alaska forms part of an actively deforming plate boundary corner. The corner accommodates the transition from a strike-slip lateral boundary to a convergent normal boundary. Oblique convergence of the Yakutat microplate into the corner generates early stage tectonic characteristics associated with other corner systems (e.g. Himalayan Eastern Syntaxis). In combination with the high relief, the extreme erosive processes of the region redistribute crustal material, partition tectonic strain, and influence the advection of deep crustal material. The evolution of the convergent corner is investigated using 3D numerical models and sandbox analog models. Preliminary model results indicate the deformation partitions into a narrow two-sided orogen along the lateral boundary. The pattern transitions into a wider zone of shortening bounded by inboard and outboard directed thrusts along the frontal boundary. The inclusion of erosion boundary conditions leads to nascent tectonic aneurysm behavior, involving increased strain localization and focused vertical advection of deep crustal material. Thermal models, using the 3D velocity field from these mechanical solutions, show a vertical deflection (towards the surface) of isotherms beneath the eroding region. Sensitivity of the aneurysm behavior is related to the efficiency of the imposed erosion rate (i.e. greater erosion rates led to greater bedrock uplift rates). Higher erosion rates are localized within zones containing major glacier systems in SE Alaska: Bering Glacier, Bagley Icefield, Malaspina Glacier, and Seward Glacier. Combined thermal/mechanical solutions identify the glacier valleys as rheological weakspots, defined by localized strain and differential advection of deep crustal material.

  11. The P-wave boundary of the Large-Low Shear Velocity Province beneath the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Daniel A.; Rost, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    The Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) in the lower mantle represent volumetrically significant thermal or chemical or thermo-chemical heterogeneities. Their structure and boundaries have been widely studied, mainly using S-waves, but much less is known about their signature in the P-wavefield. We use an extensive dataset recorded at USArray to create, for the first time, a high-resolution map of the location, shape, sharpness, and extent of the boundary of the Pacific LLSVP using P (Pdiff)-waves. We find that the northern edge of the Pacific LLSVP is shallow dipping (26° relative to the horizontal) and diffuse (∼120 km wide transition zone) whereas the eastern edge is steeper dipping (70°) and apparently sharp (∼40 km wide). We trace the LLSVP boundary up to ∼500 km above the CMB in most areas, and 700 km between 120° and 90°W at the eastern extent of the boundary. Apparent P-wave velocity drops are ∼1-3% relative to PREM, indicating a strong influence of LLSVPs on P-wave velocity, at least in the high-frequency wavefield, in contrast to previous studies. A localised patch with a greater velocity drop of ∼15-25% is detected, defined by large magnitude gradients of the travel-time residuals. We identify this as a likely location of an Ultra-Low Velocity Zone (ULVZ), matching the location of a previously detected ULVZ in this area. The boundary of a separate low velocity anomaly, of a similar height to the LLSVP, is detected in the north-west Pacific, matching tomographic images. This outlier appears to be connected to the main LLSVP through a narrow channel close to the CMB and may be in the process of joining or splitting from the main LLSVP. We also see strong velocity increases in the lower mantle to the east of the LLSVP, likely detecting subducted material beneath central America. The LLSVP P-wave boundary is similar to that determined in high-resolution S-wave studies and follows the -0.4% ΔVS iso-velocity contour in the S40RTS

  12. An analytical study of the free and forced vibration response of a ribbed plate with free boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tian Ran; Zhang, Kai

    2018-05-01

    An analytical study to predict the vibration response of a ribbed plate with free boundary conditions is presented. The analytical solution was derived using a double cosine integral transform technique and then utilized to study the free and forced vibration of the ribbed plate, as well as the effect of the rib on the modal response of the uniform plate. It is shown that in addition to the three zero-frequency rigid body modes of the plate, the vibration modes of the uniform plate can be classified into four mode groups according to the symmetric properties of the plate with respect to the two orthogonal middle lines parallel to the plate edges. The four mode groups correspond to a double symmetric group, a double anti-symmetric group and two symmetric/anti-symmetric groups. Whilst the inclusion of the rib to the plate is shown to cause distortion to the distribution of vibration modes, most modes can still be traced back to the original modes of the uniform plate. Both the mass and stiffness of the rib are shown to affect the modal vibration of the uniform plate, whereby a dominant effect from the rib mass leads to a decrease in the modal frequency of the plate, whereas a dominant effect from the rib stiffness leads to an increase in plate modal frequency. When the stiffened rib behaves as an effective boundary to the plate vibration, an original plate mode becomes a pair of degenerate modes, whereby one mode has a higher frequency and the other mode has a lower frequency than that of the original mode.

  13. Fluid flow and heat transfer of carbon nanotubes along a flat plate with Navier slip boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, W. A.; Khan, Z. H.; Rahi, M.

    2014-06-01

    Homogeneous flow model is used to study the flow and heat transfer of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) along a flat plate subjected to Navier slip and uniform heat flux boundary conditions. This is the first paper on the flow and heat transfer of CNTs along a flat plate. Two types of CNTs, namely, single- and multi-wall CNTs are used with water, kerosene or engine oil as base fluids. The empirical correlations are used for the thermophysical properties of CNTs in terms of the solid volume fraction of CNTs. For the effective thermal conductivity of CNTs, Xue (Phys B Condens Matter 368:302-307, 2005) model has been used and the results are compared with the existing theoretical models. The governing partial differential equations and boundary conditions are converted into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using suitable similarity transformations. These equations are solved numerically using a very efficient finite difference method with shooting scheme. The effects of the governing parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction, and Nusselt numbers are investigated and presented in graphical and tabular forms. The numerical results of skin friction and Nusselt numbers are compared with the available data for special cases and are found in good agreement.

  14. The behavior of a convergent plate boundary - Crustal deformation in the South Kanto district, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, C. H.; Kato, T.

    1978-01-01

    The northwesternmost part of the Sagami trough, a part of the Philippine Sea-Eurasian plate boundary, was ruptured during the great South Kanto earthquake in 1923. Very extensive and frequent geodetic measurements of crustal deformation have been made in the South Kanto district since the 1890's, and these constitute the most complete data set on crustal movements in the world. These data were reanalyzed and interpreted and according to our interpretation indicate the following sequence of events. The coseismic movements were due to oblique thrust and right lateral slip of about 8 m on a fault outcropping at the base of the Sagami trough. This was followed by postseismic deformation resulting from reversed afterslip of 20-60 cm that occurred at an exponentially decaying rate in time. The interseismic deformation is produced by steady subduction at a rate of about 1.8 cm/yr. During subduction the top 10-15 km of the plate boundary is apparently locked, while deeper parts slip aseismically at an irregular rate. No significant precursory deformation was observed. The recurrence time for 1923 type earthquakes is 200-300 years. The Boso and Miura peninsulas are broken into a series of fault-bound blocks that move semi-independently of the surrounding region. The subduction zone itself, where it is exposed on land, is shown to be a wide zone encompassing several faults that are active at different times.

  15. Divergent plate boundaries and crustal spreading on Venus: Evidence from Aphrodite Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumpler, L. S.; Head, James W.

    1989-01-01

    The modes of lithospheric heat transfer and the tectonic styles may differ between Earth and Venus, depending on how the high surface temperature (700 K = 430 C), dense and opaque atmosphere (approx. 10 MPa = 100 bars), lack of water oceans, and the other known ways in which Venus differs from Earth, influence basic lithospheric processes, thermal gradient, upper mantle temperature, thermal and chemical evolution, and convection. A fundamental question is whether the lithosphere of Venus is horizontally stable, like the other terrestrial planets, or is mobile like that on Earth. The variety of characteristics, their integrated relationships, and their predictable behavior throughout Western Aphrodite Terra are similar to those features known to occur in association with the terrestrial seafloor at spreading centers and divergent plate boundaries. It is concluded that Western Aphrodite Terra represents the site of crustal spreading centers and divergent plate boundaries. The extent of similar characteristics and processes elsewhere on Venus outside of the 13,000 km long Western and Eastern Aphrodite Terra rise is unknown at the present, but their presence in other areas of the equatorial highlands, suggested from recent analysis, may be tested with forthcoming Magellan data.

  16. Tectono-magmatic relationships along an obliquely convergent plate boundary: Sumatra, Indonesia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acocella, Valerio; Bellier, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The tectono-magmatic relationships along divergent and orthogonally convergent plate boundaries have been defined in several aspects. However, much less is known along obliquely convergent plate boundaries, where the strain partitioning promotes strike-slip structures along the volcanic arc. Here it is unclear if and, in case, how strike-slip structures may control arc volcanism, in terms of processes, distribution and size. To better define these features, we review the available tectonic, structural and volcanological data on Sumatra (Indonesia), which provides the ideal case study. The Sumatra volcanic arc consists of 48 major active volcanoes. Of these, 46% lie within 10 km from the dextral Great Sumatra Fault (GSF), which carries most of the strike-slip displacement on the overriding plate, whereas 27% of the volcanoes lie at >20 km from the GSF. Considering the volcanoes lying within 10 km from GSF, 76% show some possible structural relation to the GSF, whereas only 28% (7 volcanoes) show a clear structural relation to the GSF, being located in pull-apart or releasing bends between dextral segments. However, these localized areas of extension do not seem to promote the development of magmatic segments, similarly to orthogonally convergent plate boundaries. Many volcanoes lie to the west of the GSF, largely following the shallower portions of the slab, which reaches its average partial melting depth (130±30 km) more westward. There is a preferred volcano alignment and elongation along the N30-N40°E trend, almost parallel to the convergence vector; this trend coincides with the direction of the extensional structures found along the arc. Other volcanoes are elongated parallel to the GSF, possibly resulting from the co- and post-seismic across-arc extension, as observed during the 2004 mega-earthquake. Finally, there is no relationship between the slip rate along GSF and the erupted volumes along the arc: the highest productivity of Toba caldera may be

  17. Exhumation History of an Oblique Plate Boundary: Investigating Kaikoura Mountain-building within the Marlborough Fault System, NE South Island New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, C.; Duvall, A. R.; Flowers, R. M.; Tucker, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Kaikoura Mountains stand high as topographic anomalies in the oblique Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone known as the Marlborough Fault System (MFS), NE South Island New Zealand. The base of both the Inland and Seaward Kaikoura Ranges are bound on the SE by major, steeply NW-dipping, right lateral, active strike-slips (Clarence and Hope faults of the MFS, respectively). Previous geologic mapping, observations of predominantly horizontal fault slip at the surface from GPS and offset Quaternary deposits, and uplift of marine terraces, provide evidence for shortening and mountain-building via distributed deformation off of the main MFS strike-slip faults. However, quantitative estimates of the magnitude and spatial patterns of exhumation and of the timing of mountain-building in the Kaikouras are needed to understand more fully the nature of oblique deformation in the MFS. We present new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He ages from opposite sides of the Hope and Clarence faults, spanning over 2 km of relief within the Kaikoura Mountains to identify spatial and temporal changes in exhumation rates in relation to the adjacent faults. Young (~3 Ma) apatite He ages and rapid (potentially > 1 mm/yr) exhumation rates from opposite sides of the faults are consistent with previously mentioned evidence of recent, regional, distributed deformation off of the main MFS faults. Moreover, early Miocene zircon He ages imply that parts of this region experienced an earlier phase of fault-related exhumation. Large changes in zircon He ages across the faults from ~20 Ma to > 100 Ma support hypotheses that portions of the Marlborough Faults may be re-activated, early Miocene thrusts. The zircon data are also consistent with the hypothesis of an early Miocene initiation of the oblique Pacific-Australian plate boundary in this region. Evidence for this comes from a change in sedimentation during this time from fine marine sediments to coarse, terrigenous conglomerates. Observing more

  18. Earthquake-induced gravitational potential energy change at convergent plate boundary near Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C.; Hsu, S.

    2004-12-01

    The coseismic displacement induced by earthquakes will change the gravitational potential energy (GPE). Okamoto and Tanimoto (2002) have shown that the gain of {Δ GPE} corresponds to the compressional stress regime while the loss of {Δ GPE} corresponds to the extensional stress regime. Here we show an example at a convergent plate boundary near Taiwan. The Philippine Sea Plate is converging against the Eurasian Plate with a velocity of 7-8 cm/yr near Taiwan, which has caused the active Taiwan orogeny and induced abundant earthquakes. We have examined the corresponding change of gravitational potential energy by using 757 earthquakes from the earthquake catalogue of the Broadband Array in Taiwan for Seismology (BATS) from July 1995 to December 2003. The results show that the variation of the crustal Δ GPE strongly correlates with the different stage of the orogenesis. Except for the western Okinawa Trough and the southern Taiwan, most of the Taiwan convergent region exhibits a gain of crustal Δ GPE. In contrast, the lithospheric Δ GPE in the Taiwan region exhibits a reverse pattern. For the whole Taiwan region, the earthquake-induced crustal Δ GPE and the lithospheric Δ GPE during the observation period are 1.03×1017 joules and -1.15×1017 joules, respectively. The average rate of the whole Δ GPE in the Taiwan region is very intense and equal to -2.07×1010 watts, corresponding to about one percent of the global Δ GPE loss induced by earthquakes.

  19. Large-Eddy Simulation of the Flat-plate Turbulent Boundary Layer at High Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Michio

    The near-wall, subgrid-scale (SGS) model [Chung and Pullin, "Large-eddy simulation and wall-modeling of turbulent channel flow'', J. Fluid Mech. 631, 281--309 (2009)] is used to perform large-eddy simulations (LES) of the incompressible developing, smooth-wall, flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. In this model, the stretched-vortex, SGS closure is utilized in conjunction with a tailored, near-wall model designed to incorporate anisotropic vorticity scales in the presence of the wall. The composite SGS-wall model is presently incorporated into a computer code suitable for the LES of developing flat-plate boundary layers. This is then used to study several aspects of zero- and adverse-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers. First, LES of the zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer are performed at Reynolds numbers Retheta based on the free-stream velocity and the momentum thickness in the range Retheta = 103-1012. Results include the inverse skin friction coefficient, 2/Cf , velocity profiles, the shape factor H, the Karman "constant", and the Coles wake factor as functions of Re theta. Comparisons with some direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiment are made, including turbulent intensity data from atmospheric-layer measurements at Retheta = O (106). At extremely large Retheta , the empirical Coles-Fernholz relation for skin-friction coefficient provides a reasonable representation of the LES predictions. While the present LES methodology cannot of itself probe the structure of the near-wall region, the present results show turbulence intensities that scale on the wall-friction velocity and on the Clauser length scale over almost all of the outer boundary layer. It is argued that the LES is suggestive of the asymptotic, infinite Reynolds-number limit for the smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer and different ways in which this limit can be approached are discussed. The maximum Retheta of the present simulations appears to be limited by machine

  20. Experimental study of boundary layer transition with elevated freestream turbulence on a heated flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Ki-Hyeon; Reshotko, Eli

    1991-01-01

    A detailed investigation to document momentum and thermal development of boundary layers undergoing natural transition on a heated flat plate was performed. Experimental results of both overall and conditionally sampled characteristics of laminar, transitional, and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers are presented. Measurements were acquired in a low-speed, closed-loop wind tunnel with a freestream velocity of 100 ft/s and zero pressure gradient over a range of freestream turbulence intensities (TI) from 0.4 to 6 percent. The distributions of skin friction, heat transfer rate and Reynolds shear stress were all consistent with previously published data. Reynolds analogy factors for R(sub theta) is less than 2300 were found to be well predicted by laminar and turbulent correlations which accounted for an unheated starting length. The measured laminar value of Reynolds analogy factor was as much as 53 percent higher than the Pr(sup -2/3). A small dependence of turbulent results on TI was observed. Conditional sampling performed in the transitional boundary layer indicated the existence of a near-wall drop in intermittency, pronounced at certain low intermittencies, which is consistent with the cross-sectional shape of turbulent spots observed by others. Non-turbulent intervals were observed to possess large magnitudes of near-wall unsteadiness and turbulent intervals had peak values as much as 50 percent higher than were measured at fully turbulent stations. Non-turbulent and turbulent profiles in transitional boundary layers cannot be simply treated as Blasius and fully turbulent profiles, respectively. The boundary layer spectra indicate predicted selective amplification of T-S waves for TI is approximately 0.4 percent. However, for TI is approximately 0.8 and 1.1 percent, T-S waves are localized very near the wall and do not play a dominant role in transition process.

  1. Thermochronology and tectonics of the Leeward Antilles: Evolution of the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard A.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Kounov, Alexandre; Cosca, Michael; Chew, David; Villagomez, Diego

    2010-01-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of the Caribbean Plate are severely hampered by a paucity of geochronologic and exhumation constraints from anastomosed basement blocks along its southern margin. New U/Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission track, and apatite (U-Th)/He data constrain quantitative thermal and exhumation histories, which have been used to propose a model for the tectonic evolution of the emergent parts of the Bonaire Block and the southern Caribbean Plate boundary zone. An east facing arc system intruded through an oceanic plateau during ~90 to ~87 Ma and crops out on Aruba. Subsequent structural displacements resulted in >80°C of cooling on Aruba during 70–60 Ma. In contrast, exhumation of the island arc sequence exposed on Bonaire occurred at 85–80 Ma and 55–45 Ma. Santonian exhumation on Bonaire occurred immediately subsequent to burial metamorphism and may have been driven by the collision of a west facing island arc with the Caribbean Plate. Island arc rocks intruded oceanic plateau rocks on Gran Roque at ~65 Ma and exhumed rapidly at 55–45 Ma. We attribute Maastrichtian-Danian exhumation on Aruba and early Eocene exhumation on Bonaire and Gran Roque to sequential diachronous accretion of their basement units to the South American Plate. Widespread unconformities indicate late Eocene subaerial exposure. Late Oligocene–early Miocene dextral transtension within the Bonaire Block drove subsidence and burial of crystalline basement rocks of the Leeward Antilles to ≤1 km. Late Miocene–recent transpression caused inversion and ≤1 km of exhumation, possibly as a result of the northward escape of the Maracaibo Block.

  2. DSMC simulations of leading edge flat-plate boundary layer flows at high Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sahadev

    2016-09-01

    The flow over a 2D leading-edge flat plate is studied at Mach number Ma = (Uinf /√{kBTinf / m }) in the range plate boundary layer at high Mach number. Here, LT is the characteristic dimension, Uinf and Tinf are the free stream velocity and temperature, rhoinf is the free stream density, m is the molecular mass, muinfis the molecular viscosity based on the free stream temperature Tinf , and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The variation of streamwise velocity, temperature, number-density, and mean free path along the wall normal direction away from the plate surface is studied. The qualitative nature of the streamwise velocity at high Mach number is similar to those in the incompressible limit (parabolic profile). However, there are important differences. The amplitudes of the streamwise velocity increase as the Mach number increases and turned into a more flatter profile near the wall. There is significant velocity and temperature slip ((Pradhan and Kumaran, J. Fluid Mech-2011); (Kumaran and Pradhan, J. Fluid Mech-2014)) at the surface of the plate, and the slip increases as the Mach number is increased. It is interesting to note that for the highest Mach numbers considered here, the streamwise velocity at the wall exceeds the sound speed, and the flow is supersonic throughout the flow domain.

  3. Numerical investigation of hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer transition mechanism induced by different roughness shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yunlong; Zhao, Yunfei; Xu, Dan; Chai, Zhenxia; Liu, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The roughness-induced laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition is significant for high-speed aerospace applications. The transition mechanism is closely related to the roughness shape. In this paper, high-order numerical method is used to investigate the effect of roughness shape on the flat-plate laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition. Computations are performed in both the supersonic and hypersonic regimes (free-stream Mach number from 3.37 up to 6.63) for the square, cylinder, diamond and hemisphere roughness elements. It is observed that the square and diamond roughness elements are more effective in inducing transition compared with the cylinder and hemisphere ones. The square roughness element has the longest separated region in which strong unsteadiness exists and the absolute instability is formed, thus resulting in the earliest transition. The diamond roughness element has a maximum width of the separated region leading to the widest turbulent wake region far downstream. Furthermore, transition location moves backward as the Mach number increases, which indicates that the compressibility significantly suppresses the roughness-induced boundary layer transition.

  4. Extension and transtension in the plate boundary zone of the northeastern Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, R.C.; Larue, D.K.

    1991-03-01

    The authors propose that the Caribbean (Ca)-North American (NA) plate boundary zone (pbz) from the Puerto Rico Trench to the Venezuelan Basin from Mona Canyon east has been in left-transtension over the last 15-20 ma. A boundary-normal component of extension occurs throughout the pbz and is a principal cause of the Puerto Rico Trench. Such extension is due to WNW velocity of NA-Ca and the northward pullaway of NA from its S-dipping slab, which is below Puerto Rico. Strike slip motion may be taken up among terranes in the pbz by rigid CCW rotation and by oblique slip at theirmore » boundaries. Rotation of the largest terrane, Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands (PRVI), has caused such major structures as the Muertos thrust and Anegada Passage. The model implies NA-Ca velocity estimated from Cayman transforms is more accurate than that from slip vectors from seisms in the NA slab.« less

  5. The effect of energy accumulation and boundary slip on laminar flow between rotating plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenpeng; Zeng, Liangcai; Chen, Keying; Jin, Xiaohong; Wu, Shiqian

    2018-02-01

    The poor operating conditions of fluid lubrication equipment during the start-up process are due to the resistance of the high-viscosity lubricating liquid. Moreover, the excessive reduction in fluid viscosity due to the elevated temperature resulting from power consumption during prolonged operation is not conducive to the generation of dynamic pressure. In this study, we examine the effect of energy accumulation and boundary slip on the laminar flow of a liquid between a pair of rotating plates. The experiments are conducted using a rotary rheometer, with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as the thermal insulation material and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as the slip drag reduction material, and a three-dimensional simulation model is established. This model is derived by combining the energy equation including the slip length and the heat conduction equation. Thus, the temperature changes over time are predicted by this model, and the model accuracy is verified by experiments. The results reveal the following points: 1) boundary slips function as a drag reduction mechanism for short-time continuous operation; 2) under prolonged operation, the slip reduces the extent of the oil viscosity decrease and clear control of the elevated temperature by the boundary slip is observed.

  6. The roof plate boundary is a bi-directional organiser of dorsal neural tube and choroid plexus development

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Emma R.; Gilthorpe, Jonathan D.; Butts, Thomas; Campo-Paysaa, Florent; Wingate, Richard J. T.

    2012-01-01

    The roof plate is a signalling centre positioned at the dorsal midline of the central nervous system and generates dorsalising morphogenic signals along the length of the neuraxis. Within cranial ventricles, the roof plate gives rise to choroid plexus, which regulates the internal environment of the developing and adult brain and spinal cord via the secretion of cerebrospinal fluid. Using the fourth ventricle as our model, we show that the organiser properties of the roof plate are determined by its boundaries with the adjacent neuroepithelium. Through a combination of in ovo transplantation, co-culture and electroporation techniques in chick embryos between embryonic days 3 and 6, we demonstrate that organiser properties are maintained by interactions between the non-neural roof plate and the neural rhombic lip. At the molecular level, this interaction is mediated by Delta-Notch signalling and upregulation of the chick homologue of Hes1: chairy2. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that cdelta1 is both necessary and sufficient for organiser function. Our results also demonstrate that while chairy2 is specifically required for the maintenance of the organiser, its ectopic expression is not sufficient to recapitulate organiser properties. Expression of atonal1 in the rhombic lip adjacent at the roof plate boundary is acutely dependent on both boundary cell interactions and Delta-Notch signalling. Correspondingly, the roof plate boundary organiser also signals to the roof plate itself to specify the expression of early choroid plexus markers. Thus, the roof plate boundary organiser signals bi-directionally to acutely coordinate the development of adjacent neural and non-neural tissues. PMID:23052907

  7. The roof plate boundary is a bi-directional organiser of dorsal neural tube and choroid plexus development.

    PubMed

    Broom, Emma R; Gilthorpe, Jonathan D; Butts, Thomas; Campo-Paysaa, Florent; Wingate, Richard J T

    2012-11-01

    The roof plate is a signalling centre positioned at the dorsal midline of the central nervous system and generates dorsalising morphogenic signals along the length of the neuraxis. Within cranial ventricles, the roof plate gives rise to choroid plexus, which regulates the internal environment of the developing and adult brain and spinal cord via the secretion of cerebrospinal fluid. Using the fourth ventricle as our model, we show that the organiser properties of the roof plate are determined by its boundaries with the adjacent neuroepithelium. Through a combination of in ovo transplantation, co-culture and electroporation techniques in chick embryos between embryonic days 3 and 6, we demonstrate that organiser properties are maintained by interactions between the non-neural roof plate and the neural rhombic lip. At the molecular level, this interaction is mediated by Delta-Notch signalling and upregulation of the chick homologue of Hes1: chairy2. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that cdelta1 is both necessary and sufficient for organiser function. Our results also demonstrate that while chairy2 is specifically required for the maintenance of the organiser, its ectopic expression is not sufficient to recapitulate organiser properties. Expression of atonal1 in the rhombic lip adjacent at the roof plate boundary is acutely dependent on both boundary cell interactions and Delta-Notch signalling. Correspondingly, the roof plate boundary organiser also signals to the roof plate itself to specify the expression of early choroid plexus markers. Thus, the roof plate boundary organiser signals bi-directionally to acutely coordinate the development of adjacent neural and non-neural tissues.

  8. Slip Behavior of the Queen Charlotte Plate Boundary Before and After the 2012, MW 7.8 Haida Gwaii Earthquake: Evidence From Repeating Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Tim W.; Bostock, Michael G.

    2017-11-01

    The Queen Charlotte plate boundary, near Haida Gwaii, B.C., includes the dextral, strike-slip, Queen Charlotte Fault (QCF) and the subduction interface between the downgoing Pacific and overriding North American plates. In this study, we present a comprehensive repeating earthquake catalog that represents an effective slip meter for both structures. The catalog comprises 712 individual earthquakes (0.3≤MW≤3.5) arranged into 224 repeating earthquake families on the basis of waveform similarity and source separation estimates from coda wave interferometry. We employ and extend existing relationships for repeating earthquake magnitudes and slips to provide cumulative slip histories for the QCF and subduction interface in six adjacent zones within the study area between 52.3°N and 53.8°N. We find evidence for creep on both faults; however, creep rates are significantly less than plate motion rates, which suggests partial locking of both faults. The QCF exhibits the highest degrees of locking south of 52.8°N, which indicates that the seismic hazard for a major strike-slip earthquake is highest in the southern part of the study area. The 28 October 2012, MW 7.8 Haida Gwaii thrust earthquake occurred in our study area and altered the slip dynamics of the plate boundary. The QCF is observed to undergo accelerated, right-lateral slip for 1-2 months following the earthquake. The subduction interface exhibits afterslip thrust motion that persists for the duration of the study period (i.e., 3 years and 2 months after the Haida Gwaii earthquake). Afterslip is greatest (5.7-8.4 cm/yr) on the periphery of the main rupture zone of the Haida Gwaii event.

  9. On gravity from SST, geoid from SEASAT, and plate age and fracture zones in the Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Marsh, J. G.; Williamson, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    Data from an additional 50 satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) passes were combined with earlier measurements of the high degree and order (n, m, 12) gravity in the central Pacific. A composite map was produced which shows good agreement with conventional GEM models. Data from the SEASAT altimeter was reduced and found to agree well with both the SST and the GEM fields. The maps are dominated especially in the east, by a pattern of roughly east-west anomalies with a transverse wavelength of about 2000 km. Further comparison with regional bathymetric data shows a remarkably close correlation with plate age. Each anomaly band is framed by those major fracture zones having large offsets. The regular spacing of these fractures seems to account for the fabric in the gravity fields. Other anomalies are accounted for by hot spots. The source of part of these anomalies is in the lithosphere itself. The possible plume size and ascent velocity necessary to supply deep mantle material to the upper mantel without complete thermal equilibration is considered.

  10. Mantle compositions below petit-spot volcanoes of the NW Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, N.

    2017-12-01

    Monogenetic petit-spot volcanoes of a few kilometers in diameter and <300 m in height form volcanic clusters on the subducting NW Pacific plate offshore from NE Japan. Three of these petit-spot provinces form clusters with extents of 1,000-10,000 km2, containing between 15 to 90 monogenetic volcanoes, respectively (Hirano et al., 2008). The magmas that form these volcanoes originate below the lithosphere and ascend along the concavely flexed zone of the outer-rise prior to plate subduction at the trench (Hirano et al., 2006). This forms a unique opportunity to geochemically examine the mantle beneath the oceanic crust in a region outside of the well-examined but spatially restricted areas of mid-oceanic ridges and hotspots, indicating that these petit-spot lavas and associated xenoliths can directly provide the information on the asthenospheric and lithospheric material within and beneath old and subducting plates. Recent research into the geochemistry of petit-spot lavas and the petrography of xenoliths within these lavas indicates that the conventional subducting lithospheric theories require some revision in terms of the nature of subducting lithospheric and asthenospheric materials (e.g., heterogeneous asthenosphere and the presence of a higher geothermal gradient than the conventional GDH1 model; Machida et al., 2015; Yamamoto et al., 2014). The fact that the majority of the petit-spot lava samples do not contain olivine phenocrysts and have differentiated compositions (45-52 wt% SiO2, Mg# values of 50-65) indicates that these magmas have undergone differentiation in a magma chamber. However, geobarometry indicates that the deepest-sourced associated peridotitic xenoliths were derived from a depth of 42 km (Yamamoto et al., 2014). This indicates that melt fractionation must have occurred at depths greater than the middle lithosphere, a situation where the depth of fractionation could correlate with the rotation of the σ3 stress axis from the extensionally

  11. Life and death of the resurrection plate: Evidence for its existence and subduction in the northeastern Pacific in Paleocene-Eocene time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haeussler, P.J.; Bradley, D.C.; Wells, R.E.; Miller, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    Onshore evidence suggests that a plate is missing from published reconstructions of the northeastern Pacific Ooean in Paleocene- Eocene time. The Resurrection plate, named for the Resurrection Peninsula ophiolite near Seward, Alaska, was located east of the Kula plate and north of the Farallon plate. We interpret coeval near-trench magmatism in southern Alaska and the Cascadia margin as evidence for two slab windows associated with trench-ridge-trench (TRT) triple junctions, which formed the western and southern boundaries of the Resurrection plate. In Alaska, the Sanak-Baranof belt of near-trench intrusions records a west-to-east migration, from 61 to 50 Ma, of the northern TRT triple junction along a 2100-km-long section of coastline. In Oregon, Washington, and southern Vancouver Island, voluminous basaltic volcanism of the Siletz River Volcanics, Crescent Formation, and Metchosin Volcanics occurred between ca. 66 and 48 Ma. Lack of a clear age progression of magmatism along the Cascadia margin suggests that this southern triple junction did not migrate significantly. Synchronous near-trench magmatism from southeastern Alaska to Puget Sound at ca. 50 Ma documents the middle Eocene subduction of a spreading center, the crest of which was subparallel to the margin. We interpret this ca. 50 Ma event as recording the subduction-zone consumption of the last of the Resurrection plate. The existence and subsequent subduction of the Resurrection plate explains (1) northward terrane transport along the southeastern Alaska-British Columbia margin between 70 and 50 Ma, synchronous with an eastward-migrating triple junction in southern Alaska; (2) rapid uplift and voluminous magmatism in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia prior to 50 Ma related to subduction of buoyant, young oceanic crust of the Resurrection plate; (3) cessation of Coast Mountains magmatism at ca. 50 Ma due to cessation of subduction, (4) primitive mafic magmatism in the Coast Mountains and Cascade

  12. Tectonic lineaments in the cenozoic volcanics of southern Guatemala: Evidence for a broad continental plate boundary zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltuck, M.; Dixon, T. H.

    1984-01-01

    The northern Caribbean plate boundary has been undergoing left lateral strike slip motion since middle Tertiary time. The western part of the boundary occurs in a complex tectonic zone in the continental crust of Guatemala and southernmost Mexico, along the Chixoy-Polochic, Motogua and possibly Jocotan-Chamelecon faults. Prominent lineaments visible in radar imagery in the Neogene volcanic belt of southern Guatemala and western El Salvador were mapped and interpreted to suggest southwest extensions of this already broad plate boundary zone. Because these extensions can be traced beneath Quaternary volcanic cover, it is thought that this newly mapped fault zone is active and is accommodating some of the strain related to motion between the North American and Caribbean plates. Onshore exposures of the Motoqua-Polochic fault systems are characterized by abundant, tectonically emplaced ultramafic rocks. A similar mode of emplacement for these off shore ultramafics, is suggested.

  13. Seismicity and Seismic Hazard along the Western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Fontiela, João; Ferrão, Celia; Borges, José Fernando; Caldeira, Bento; Dib, Assia; Ousadou, Farida

    2016-04-01

    The seismic phenomenon is the most damaging natural hazard known in the Mediterranean area. The western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary extends from the Azores to the Mediterranean region. The oceanic part of the plate boundary is well delimited from the Azores Islands, along the Azores-Gibraltar fault to approximately 12°W (west of the Strait of Gibraltar). From 12°W to 3.5°E, including the Iberia-Nubia region and extending to the western part of Algeria, the boundary is more diffuse and forms a wider area of deformation. The boundary between the Iberia and Nubia plates is the most complex part of the margin. This region corresponds to the transition from an oceanic boundary to a continental boundary, where Iberia and Nubia collide. Although most earthquakes along this plate boundary are shallow and generally have magnitudes less than 5.5, there have been several high-magnitude events. Many devastating earthquakes, some of them tsunami-triggering, inflicted heavy loss and considerable economic damage to the region. From 1920 to present, three earthquakes with magnitudes of about 8.0 (Mw 8.2, 25 November 1941; Ms 8.0, 25 February 1969; and Mw 7.9, 26 May 1975) occurred in the oceanic region, and four earthquakes with magnitudes of about 7.0 (Mw 7.1, 8 May 1939, Santa Maria Island and Mw 7.1, January 1980, Terceira and Graciosa Islands, both in the Azores; Ms 7.1, 20 May 1931, Azores-Gibraltar fracture zone; and Mw 7.3, 10 October 1980, El Asnam, Algeria) occurred along the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary. In general, large earthquakes (M ≥7) occur within the oceanic region, with the exception of the El Asnam (Algeria) earthquakes. Some of these events caused extensive damage. The 1755 Lisbon earthquake (˜Mw 9) on the Portugal Atlantic margin, about 200 km W-SW of Cape St. Vincent, was followed by a tsunami and fires that caused the near-total destruction of Lisbon and adjacent areas. Estimates of the death toll in Lisbon alone (~70

  14. Free Vibration Study of Anti-Symmetric Angle-Ply Laminated Plates under Clamped Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, K. K.; Karthik, K.; Sanyasiraju, Y. V. S. S.; Aziz, Z. A.

    2016-11-01

    Two type of numerical approach namely, Radial Basis Function and Spline approximation, used to analyse the free vibration of anti-symmetric angle-ply laminated plates under clamped boundary conditions. The equations of motion are derived using YNS theory under first order shear deformation. By assuming the solution in separable form, coupled differential equations obtained in term of mid-plane displacement and rotational functions. The coupled differential is then approximated using Spline function and radial basis function to obtain the generalize eigenvalue problem and parametric studies are made to investigate the effect of aspect ratio, length-to-thickness ratio, number of layers, fibre orientation and material properties with respect to the frequency parameter. Some results are compared with the existing literature and other new results are given in tables and graphs.

  15. Comments on the Parameters and Processes that Affect the Preservation Potential and Style of Oblique-Divergent Plate Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umhoefer, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Oblique-divergent or transtensional zones present particular challenges in ancient belts because of the poor preservation potential of the thinned continental crust and young oceanic crust. Many oblique belts will preferentially preserve their boundary zones that lie within continents rather than the main plate boundary zone, which will be at a much lower elevation and composed of denser crust. Zones of tectonic escape or strike-slip overprinting of arcs or plateaus deform continental crust and may be better preserved. Here I highlight parameters and processes that have major effects on oblique divergent belts. Strain partitioning is common, but not ubiquitous, along and across oblique boundaries; the causes of partitioning are not always clear and make this especially vexing for work in ancient belts. Partitioning causes complexity in the patterns of structures at all scales. Inherited structures commonly determine the orientation and style of structures along oblique boundaries and can control the pattern of faults across transtensional belts. Regionally, inherited trends of arcs or other 1000-km-scale features can control boundary structures. Experiments and natural examples suggest that oblique boundary zones contain less of a record of strike-slip faulting and more extensional structures. The obliquity of divergence produces predictable families of structures that typify (i) strike-slip dominated zones (obliquity <~20°), (ii) mixed zones (~20° - ~35°), and (iii) extension dominated zones (>~35°). The combination of partitioning and mixed structures in oblique zones means that the boundaries of belts with large-magnitude strike-slip faulting will commonly preserve little of no record of that faulting history. Plate boundaries localize strain onto the main plate boundary structures from the broader plate boundary and therefore the boundary zones commonly preserve the earlier structures more than later structures, a major problem in interpreting ancient belts

  16. Experimental constraints and theoretical bases for microstructural damage in plate boundary shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skemer, P. A.; Cross, A. J.; Bercovici, D.

    2016-12-01

    (Ultra)mylonites from plate boundary shear zones are characterized by severe grain-size reduction and well-mixed mineral phases. The evolution from relatively undeformed tectonite protoliths to highly deformed (ultra)mylonites via the formation of new grain and phase boundaries is described as microstructural `damage.' Microstructural damage is important for two reasons: grain-size reduction is thought to result in significant rheological weakening, while phase mixing inhibits mechanical recovery and preserves the zone of weakness to be reactivated repeatedly throughout the tectonic cycle. Grain-size reduction by dynamic recrystallization has been studied extensively in both geologic and engineered materials, yet the progressive mixing of mineral phases during high pressure/temperature shear - the other essential element of damage or mylonitization - is not well understood. In this contribution we present new experimental results and theory related to two distinct phase mixing processes. First, we describe high strain torsion experiments on calcite and anhydrite mixtures and a simple geometric mixing model related to the stretching and thinning of monophase domains. Second, we describe a grain-switching mechanism that is driven by the surface-tension driven migration of newly formed interphase triple junctions. Unlike dynamic recrystallization, which occurs at relatively small strains, both phase mixing mechanisms described here appear to require extremely large strains, a prediction that is consistent with geologic observations. These data suggest that ductile shear zones experience long, transient intervals of microstructural evolution during which rheology is not at steady state. Microstructural damage may be interpreted as the product of several interconnected physical processes, which are collectively essential to the preservation of long-lived, Earth-like plate tectonics.

  17. Tectonic activity evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic Plate boundary from mass transport deposit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Bohoyo, Fernando; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Casas, David; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruano, Patricia; Maldonado, Andrés.

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution and temporal occurrence of mass transport deposits (MTDs) in the sedimentary infill of basins and submerged banks near the Scotia-Antarctic plate boundary allowed us to decode the evolution of the tectonic activity of the relevant structures in the region from the Oligocene to present day. The 1020 MTDs identified in the available data set of multichannel seismic reflection profiles in the region are subdivided according to the geographic and chronological distributions of these features. Their spatial distribution reveals a preferential location along the eastern margins of the eastern basins. This reflects local deformation due to the evolution of the Scotia-Antarctic transcurrent plate boundary and the impact of oceanic spreading along the East Scotia Ridge (ESR). The vertical distribution of the MTDs in the sedimentary record evidences intensified regional tectonic deformation from the middle Miocene to Quaternary. Intensified deformation started at about 15 Ma, when the ESR progressively replaces the West Scotia Ridge (WSR) as the main oceanic spreading center in the Scotia Sea. Coevally with the WSR demise at about 6.5 Ma, increased spreading rates of the ESR and numerous MTDs were formed. The high frequency of MTDs during the Pliocene, mainly along the western basins, is also related to greater tectonic activity due to uplift of the Shackleton Fracture Zone by tectonic inversion and extinction of the Antarctic-Phoenix Ridge and involved changes at late Pliocene. The presence of MTDs in the southern Scotia Sea basins is a relevant indicator of the interplay between sedimentary instability and regional tectonics.

  18. Links Between Clay Dehydration and Plate Boundary Earthquakes Along the Costa Rica Subduction Megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, R. M.; Saffer, D. M.; Harris, R. N.

    2016-12-01

    The transformation of smectite to illite is one leading hypothesis to explain the upper transition from stable aseismic slip to seismogenesis along subduction megathrusts, through its influence on both fluid pressure and fault zone frictional properties. Here, we document a well-defined spatial correlation between plate boundary seismicity and smectite transformation at the Costa Rican subduction zone, consistent with the idea that clay transformation and associated silica deposition condition the fault for locking and stick-slip behavior. Previous efforts to explore this relationship have been impeded by a lack of studies that precisely locate seismicity at margins where the thermal structure is well-constrained. We take advantage of new results from Costa Rica that together provide a clear view of both seismicity and thermal conditions on the Middle-America megathrust. These results allow a thorough evaluation of the links between smectite dehydration and fault-slip behavior. We simulate smectite transformation using a kinetic model to assess reaction progress and quantify fluid production at the plate boundary, along 16-transects that span a 500-km length along strike. We find that large (Mw≥7.0) earthquakes are located down-dip of peak fluid production and in regions where the reaction is >50% complete. The earthquake ruptures, however, extend up-dip into the zone of peak reaction. We suggest that silica cementation that accompanies the reaction promotes lithification, embrittlement, and slip-weakening behavior that together enable the initiation of unstable slip, which can then propagate updip into fluid-rich and weak regions of the megathrust that coincide with the peak dehydration window.

  19. Interaction between central volcanoes and regional tectonics along divergent plate boundaries: Askja, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippanera, Daniele; Ruch, Joël; Acocella, Valerio; Thordarson, Thor; Urbani, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    Activity within magmatic divergent plate boundaries (MDPB) focuses along both regional fissure swarms and central volcanoes. An ideal place to investigate their mutual relationship is the Askja central volcano in Iceland. Askja consists of three nested calderas (namely Kollur, Askja and Öskjuvatn) located within a hyaloclastite massif along the NNE-SSW trending Icelandic MDPB. We performed an extensive field-based structural analysis supported by a remote sensing study of tectonic and volcanic features of Askja's calderas and of the eastern flank of the hyaloclastite massif. In the massif, volcano-tectonic structures trend N 10° E to N 40° E, but they vary around the Askja caldera being both parallel to the caldera rim and cross-cutting on the Western side. Structural trends around the Öskjuvatn caldera are typically rim parallel. Volcanic vents and dikes are preferentially distributed along the caldera ring faults; however, they follow the NNE-SSW regional structures when located outside the calderas. Our results highlight that the Askja volcano displays a balanced amount of regional (fissure-swarm related) and local (shallow-magma-chamber related) tectonic structures along with a mutual interaction among these. This is different from Krafla volcano (to the north of Askja) dominated by regional structures and Grímsvötn (to the South) dominated by local structures. Therefore, Askja represents an intermediate tectono-magmatic setting for volcanoes located in a slow divergent plate boundary. This is also likely in accordance with a northward increase in the spreading rate along the Icelandic MDPB.

  20. Irregular earthquake recurrence patterns and slip variability on a plate-boundary Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wechsler, N.; Rockwell, T. K.; Klinger, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Dead Sea fault in the Levant represents a simple, segmented plate boundary from the Gulf of Aqaba northward to the Sea of Galilee, where it changes its character into a complex plate boundary with multiple sub-parallel faults in northern Israel, Lebanon and Syria. The studied Jordan Gorge (JG) segment is the northernmost part of the simple section, before the fault becomes more complex. Seven fault-crossing buried paleo-channels, offset by the Dead Sea fault, were investigated using paleoseismic and geophysical methods. The mapped offsets capture the long-term rupture history and slip-rate behavior on the JG fault segment for the past 4000 years. The ~20 km long JG segment appears to be more active (in term of number of earthquakes) than its neighboring segments to the south and north. The rate of movement on this segment varies considerably over the studied period: the long-term slip-rate for the entire 4000 years is similar to previously observed rates (~4 mm/yr), yet over shorter time periods the rate varies from 3-8 mm/yr. Paleoseismic data on both timing and displacement indicate a high COV >1 (clustered) with displacement per event varying by nearly an order of magnitude. The rate of earthquake production does not produce a time predictable pattern over a period of 2 kyr. We postulate that the seismic behavior of the JG fault is influenced by stress interactions with its neighboring faults to the north and south. Coulomb stress modelling demonstrates that an earthquake on any neighboring fault will increase the Coulomb stress on the JG fault and thus promote rupture. We conclude that deriving on-fault slip-rates and earthquake recurrence patterns from a single site and/or over a short time period can produce misleading results. The definition of an adequately long time period to resolve slip-rate is a question that needs to be addressed and requires further work.

  1. Recording Plate Boundary Deformation Processes Around The San Jacinto Fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, K.; Mencin, D.; Borsa, A.; Fox, O.; Walls, C.; Van Boskirk, E.

    2012-04-01

    The San Jacinto Fault is one of the major faults which form the San Andreas Fault System in southern California. The fault, which lies to the west of the San Andreas, is one of the most active in the region. While strain rates are higher along the San Andreas, 23-37 mm/yr compared to 12-22 mm/yr along the San Jacinto, there have been 11 earthquakes of M6 and greater along the San Jacinto in the past 150 years while there have been none of this magnitude on the San Andreas in this region. UNAVCO has installed an array of geodetic and seismic instruments along the San Jacinto as part of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The network includes 25 GPS stations within 20 km of the surface trace with a concentration of borehole instrumentation in the Anza region where there are nine boreholes sites. Most of the borehole sites contain a GTSM21 4-component strainmeter, a Sonde-2 seismometer, a MEMS accelerometer and a pore pressure sensor. Thus, the array has the capability to capture plate boundary deformation processes with periods of milliseconds (seismic) to decades (GPS). On July 7th 2010 a M5.4 earthquake occurred on the Coyote Creek segment of the fault. The event was preceded by a M4.9 earthquake in the same area four weeks earlier and four earthquakes of M5 and greater within a 20 km radius of the epicenter in the past 50 years. In this study we will present the signals recorded by the different instrument types for the July 7th 2010 event and will compare the coseismic displacements recorded by the GPS and strainmeters with the displacement field predicted by Okada [1992]. All data recorded as part of the PBO observatory are publically available from the UNAVCO, the IRIS Data Management Center and the Northern California Earthquake Data Center.

  2. Source and sink of fluid in pelagic siliceous sediments along a cold subduction plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Asuka; Hina, Shoko; Hamada, Yohei; Kameda, Jun; Hamahashi, Mari; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Shimizu, Mayuko; Kimura, Gaku

    2016-08-01

    Subduction zones where old oceanic plate underthrusting occurs are characterized by thick pelagic sediments originating from planktonic ooze as well as cold thermal conditions. For a better understanding of dehydration from pelagic sediments and fluid behavior, which would play a key role in controlling the dynamics in the shallow portion of the subduction zone, as observed in the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, we investigate cherts in a Jurassic accretionary complex in Japan. The microstructure and microchemistry of these cherts indicate dissolution of SiO2 from a pressure solution seam and precipitation of SiO2 to the ;white chert layer,; which would act as a fluid conduit. The amount of water necessary to precipitate SiO2 in the white chert is 102 times larger than that produced by compaction and silica/clay diagenesis. Other fluid sources, such as hydrated oceanic crust or oceanic mantle, are necessary to account for this discrepancy in the fluid budget. A large amount of external fluid likely contributed to rising pore pressure along cold plate boundaries.

  3. Extinct mid-ocean ridges and insights on the influence of hotspots at divergent plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Sarah; Dietmar Müller, R.; Williams, Simon; Matthews, Kara

    2016-04-01

    We review all global examples of confirmed or suspected extinct mid-ocean ridges that are preserved in present-day ocean basins. Data on their spreading rate prior to extinction, time of cessation, length of activity, bathymetric and gravity signature are analysed. This analysis identifies some differences between subgroups of extinct ridges, including microplate spreading ridges, back-arc basin ridges and large-scale mid-ocean ridges. Crustal structure of extinct ridges is evaluated using gravity inversion to seek to resolve a long-standing debate on whether the final stages of spreading leads to development of thinned or thickened crust. Most of the ridges we assess have thinner crust at their axes than their flanks, yet a small number are found to have a single segment that is overprinted by an anomalous feature such as a seamount or volcanic ridge. A more complex cessation mechanism is necessary in these cases. The location of spreading centres at their time of cessation relative to hotspots was also evaluated using a global plate reconstruction. This review provides strong evidence for the long-term interaction of spreading centres with hotspots and plate boundaries have been frequently modified within the radius of a hotspot zone of influence.

  4. Plate-boundary kinematics in the Alps: Motion in the Arosa suture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Uwe; Ratschbacher, Lothar; Frisch, Wolfgang

    1988-08-01

    The Arosa zone forms a melange complex along the Penninic/Austroalpine boundary and belongs to the main Alpine suture zone. Accretion and plate collision occurred during Cretaceous and lower Tertiary time. A mixture of ophiolitic rocks and pelagic sediments is imbricated with flysch and blocks of Austroalpine (continental) derivation. We present a description of deformation structures, an analysis of strain, and a kinematic interpretation based on structural work. Deformation histories of imbricates show a translation path that was west-directed between ca. 110 and 50 Ma and north-directed thereafter. The kinematics of the Arosa zone agrees with the recently deduced displacement history of the Austroalpine units in the Eastern Alps during the Cretaceous orogeny. This calls for a predominantly top-to-the-west imbrication of Austroalpine and Penninic units and is in contradiction to what is inferred in most models of the Eastern Alps. A direct relation between the deformation along the Austroalpine margin and relative plate motion existed.

  5. Does permanent extensional deformation in lower forearc slopes indicate shallow plate-boundary rupture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geersen, J.; Ranero, C. R.; Kopp, H.; Behrmann, J. H.; Lange, D.; Klaucke, I.; Barrientos, S.; Diaz-Naveas, J.; Barckhausen, U.; Reichert, C.

    2018-05-01

    Seismic rupture of the shallow plate-boundary can result in large tsunamis with tragic socio-economic consequences, as exemplified by the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. To better understand the processes involved in shallow earthquake rupture in seismic gaps (where megathrust earthquakes are expected), and investigate the tsunami hazard, it is important to assess whether the region experienced shallow earthquake rupture in the past. However, there are currently no established methods to elucidate whether a margin segment has repeatedly experienced shallow earthquake rupture, with the exception of mechanical studies on subducted fault-rocks. Here we combine new swath bathymetric data, unpublished seismic reflection images, and inter-seismic seismicity to evaluate if the pattern of permanent deformation in the marine forearc of the Northern Chile seismic gap allows inferences on past earthquake behavior. While the tectonic configuration of the middle and upper slope remains similar over hundreds of kilometers along the North Chilean margin, we document permanent extensional deformation of the lower slope localized to the region 20.8°S-22°S. Critical taper analyses, the comparison of permanent deformation to inter-seismic seismicity and plate-coupling models, as well as recent observations from other subduction-zones, including the area that ruptured during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, suggest that the normal faults at the lower slope may have resulted from shallow, possibly near-trench breaking earthquake ruptures in the past. In the adjacent margin segments, the 1995 Antofagasta, 2007 Tocopilla, and 2014 Iquique earthquakes were limited to the middle and upper-slope and the terrestrial forearc, and so are upper-plate normal faults. Our findings suggest a seismo-tectonic segmentation of the North Chilean margin that seems to be stable over multiple earthquake cycles. If our interpretations are correct, they indicate a high tsunami hazard posed by the yet un

  6. Prediction and measurement of heat transfer rates for the shock-induced unsteady laminar boundary layer on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The unsteady laminar boundary layer induced by the flow-initiating shock wave passing over a flat plate mounted in a shock tube was theoretically and experimentally studied in terms of heat transfer rates to the plate for shock speeds ranging from 1.695 to 7.34 km/sec. The theory presented by Cook and Chapman for the shock-induced unsteady boundary layer on a plate is reviewed with emphasis on unsteady heat transfer. A method of measuring time-dependent heat-transfer rates using thin-film heat-flux gages and an associated data reduction technique are outlined in detail. Particular consideration is given to heat-flux measurement in short-duration ionized shocktube flows. Experimental unsteady plate heat transfer rates obtained in both air and nitrogen using thin-film heat-flux gages generally agree well with theoretical predictions. The experimental results indicate that the theory continues to predict the unsteady boundary layer behavior after the shock wave leaves the trailing edge of the plate even though the theory is strictly applicable only for the time interval in which the shock remains on the plate.

  7. Heterogeneous distribution of pelagic sediments incoming the Japan Trench possibly controlling slip propagation on shallow plate boundary fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Fukuchi, R.; Kurano, H.; Ikehara, K.; Kanamatsu, T.; Arai, K.; Usami, K.; Ashi, J.

    2017-12-01

    Catastrophic tsunami of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake was triggered by large coseismic slip reached to the Japan Trench axis (e.g. Fujiwara et al., 2011, Science; Kodaira et al., 2012, Nature Geoscience). Results of the IODP Expedition 343 (JFAST) suggest that small friction of smectite-rich pelagic clay caused slip propagation on shallow plate boundary fault (Ujiie et al., 2013, Science; Kameda et al., 2015, Geology; Moore et al., 2015, Geosphere). On the other hand, JAMSTEC high-resolution seismic profiles show that incoming sediments have large heterogeneities in thicknesses, and two areas of extremely thin sediments on the Pacific Plate (thickness less than 100 m) were found at around 39°N (Nakamura et al., AGU 2017, this session). To reconcile whether the smectite-rich pelagic clay even exists in these areas, we sampled surface sediments during the R/V Shinsei Maru KS-15-3 cruise. Seven piston cores were retrieved from seaward trench slope, horst, graben, and graben edge. Core lithologies are mainly diatomaceous ooze/clay including tephra layers, not resemble to pelagic clays discovered in JFAST. Ages of tephra layers were estimated by correlating mineral assemblages and refractive indices of volcanic glasses to Japanese widespread tephras. Averaged sedimentation rates of seaward trench slope, horst, graben, and graben edge are estimated to be 25-30, 6.5-20, 45, 0.9 cm/kyr, respectively. These sedimentation rates imply that sediments on seaward trench slope and horst have been deposited in the last 160-500 kyr, suggesting that entire pelagic sediments, including smectite-rich pelagic clay, have been removed by some reasons in the last 0.5 million years. Possible reason for such modification of sediment is near-trench igneous activity known as petit-spot volcanism (Hirano et al., 2006, Science). The lack of smectite-rich pelagic clay near 39°N of the Japan Trench is consistent with results of tsunami inversions proposing shallow large coseismic slip propagated

  8. Intraplate shearing and basin deformation in the Pacific Plate as a result of the Yakutat Block collision with North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, R.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G. L.; Worthington, L. L.

    2009-12-01

    The Yakutat Block (YAK), an allochthonous terrane coupled to the Pacific Plate (PAC), collided with the North American plate ~10Ma and began subducting at the Aleutian Trench. Due to its thickness, the YAK is resistant to subduction compared to the PAC. As a result, the YAK is undergoing flat-slab subduction and now has developed its own vector relative to the PAC. High-resolution bathymetry data shows a 30km N-S trending ridge within the Surveyor Fan between the mouths of the Yakutat Sea Valley and Bering Trough. The ridge originates in the north at the base of the continental slope, which is coincident with the Transition Fault, the strike-slip boundary between the YAK and the PAC. The ridge exhibits greatest relief adjacent to the Transition Fault, and becomes less distinct farther from the shelf edge. As the highest relief feature in this part of the basin, the ridge has completely redefined sediment distribution patterns within the Surveyor Fan. Seismic reflection data reveal a sharp basement high beneath the ridge (1.1 sec of relief above “normal” basement in two-way travel time) as well as multiple strike-slip fault systems that are also N-S oriented. The ridge, basement high, and faults are aligned and co-located with an intraplate earthquake swarm on the PAC, which includes four events > 6.5 Mw that occurred from 1987-1992. This earthquake swarm is defined by mostly right-lateral strike-slip events, and is known as the Gulf of Alaska Shear Zone (GASZ). Based on the extent of seismicity, the GASZ extends 230km into the PAC. Tearing of oceanic crust on this scale is rare. A recent wide-angle seismic study shows the YAK to be a 20-25km thick mafic body while the 30 Myr old Pacific crust in the northern Gulf of Alaska is of normal thickness. Intraplate deformation occurring within the PAC could be the result of PAC-YAK coupling whereby YAK resistance to subduction is expressed as deformation in the thinner (weaker) PAC crust. Although a large tear in

  9. Crustal and upper mantle investigations of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezada, Maximiliano J.

    The evolution of the Caribbean --- South America plate boundary has been a matter of vigorous debate for decades and many questions remain unresolved. In this work, and in the framework of the BOLIVAR project, we shed light on some aspects of the present state and the tectonic history of the margin by using different types of geophysical data sets and techniques. An analysis of controlled-source traveltime data collected along a boundary-normal profile at ˜65°W was used to build a 2D P-wave velocity model. The model shows that the Caribbean Large Igenous Province is present offshore eastern Venezuela and confirms the uniformity of the velocity structure along the Leeward Antilles volcanic belt. In contrast with neighboring profiles, at this longitude we see no change in velocity structure or crustal thickness across the San Sebastian - El Pilar fault system. A 2D gravity modeling methodology that uses seismically derived initial density models was developed as part of this research. The application of this new method to four of the BOLIVAR boundary-normal profiles suggests that the uppermost mantle is denser under the South American continental crust and the island arc terranes than under the Caribbean oceanic crust. Crustal rocks of the island arc and extended island arc terranes of the Leeward Antilles have a relatively low density, given their P-wave velocity. This may be caused by low iron content, relative to average magmatic arc rocks. Finally, an analysis of teleseismic traveltimes with frequency-dependent kernels produced a 3D P-wave velocity perturbation model. The model shows the structure of the mantle lithosphere under the study area and clearly images the subduction of the Atlantic slab and associated partial removal of the lower lithosphere under northern South America. We also image the subduction of a section of the Caribbean plate under South America with an east-southeast direction. Both the Atlantic and Caribbean subducting slabs penetrate the

  10. Imaging the ascent path of fluids and partial melts at convergent plate boundaries by geophysical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luehr, B. G.; Koulakov, I.; Kopp, H.; Rabbel, W.; Zschau, J.

    2011-12-01

    During the last decades many investigations were carried out at active continental margins to understand the link between the subduction of the fluid saturated oceanic plate and the process of ascent of fluids and partial melts forming a magmatic system that leads to volcanism at the earth surface. For this purpose structural information are needed about the slap itself, the part above it, the ascent paths as well as the storage of fluids and partial melts in the mantle and the crust above the down going slap up to the volcanoes on the surface. If we consider statistically the distance between the trench and the volcanic chain as well as the inclination angle of the down going plate, then the mean value of the depth distance down to the Wadati Benioff zone results of approximately 100 kilometers. Surprisingly, this depth range shows pronounced seismicity at most of all subduction zones. Additionally, mineralogical investigations in the lab have shown that the diving plate is maximal dehydrated around 100 km depth because of temperature and pressure conditions at this depth range. However, assuming a vertical fluid ascent there are exceptions. For instance at the Sunda Arc beneath Central Java the vertical distance results in approximately 150 km. But, in this case seismic investigations have shown that the fluids do not ascend vertically, but inclined even from a source area at around the 100 km depth. The ascent of the fluids and the appearance of partial melts as well as the distribution of these materials in the crust can be proved by seismic and seismological methods. With the seismic tomography these areas are imaged by lowered seismic velocities, high Vp/Vs ratios, as well as increased attenuation of seismic shear waves. But, to explore plate boundaries large and complex amphibious experiments are required, in which active and passive seismic investigations should be combined. They have to recover a range from before the trench to far behind the volcanic

  11. The Magellan seamount trail: implications for Cretaceous hotspot volcanism and absolute Pacific plate motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Staudigel, Hubert; Wijbrans, Jan R.; Pringle, Malcolm S.

    1998-11-01

    The Magellan Seamount Trail (MST) delineates a northwest trending chain of four Cretaceous guyots in the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP). Seamount morphology, 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology and Sr-Nd-Pb geochemistry of the MST provides evidence for a hotspot origin between the Samoa, Rarotonga and Society hotspots of the South Pacific Isotopic and Thermal Anomaly (SOPITA). The MST yields an excellent linear age progression of 47.6±1.6 mm/yr ( r2=1.000; MSWD = 0.23; 1 σ SE) including Vlinder guyot (95.1±0.5 Ma, n=5; 2 σ SD), Pako guyot (91.3±0.3 Ma, n=3) and Ioah guyot (87.1±0.3 Ma, n=2). The MST also exhibits a small range in Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions indicating enriched mantle sources with an affinity of EMI. Nevertheless, three volcanic events are found out of sequence with linear MST hotspot volcanism: (1) an independent volcanic pedestal was formed 4-7 Myr before shield-volcanism started at Vlinder guyot, (2) a post-erosional volcanic cone was formed at least 20-30 Myr after drowning of Vlinder guyot, and (3) Ita Mai Tai guyot (118.1±0.5 Ma, n=3) was formed 34-36 Myr before the MST hotspot arrived at the predicted location of this guyot. By identifying and ruling out discordant volcanic events, we can use the age progression in MST to test the fixity of its hotspot. When presuming the fixed hotspot hypothesis, the local age progressions of the MST (47.6±1.6 mm/yr) and the copolar Musicians seamount trail (55.8±6.4 mm/yr) are not compatible with their 100-80 Ma Euler pole. We investigate two options: (1) acceptance of a `forced' Euler pole obeying the hotspot hypothesis by using both the age progressions and the azimuths of the studied seamount trails, or (2) acceptance of a `best-fit' Euler pole by using the azimuths of the studied seamount trail exclusively. In the first option, the angular speed of the Pacific plate during the 100-80 Ma stage pole is calculated at 0.502±0.017°/Myr. In the second option, the `best-fit' Euler pole is found

  12. Advances and Limitations of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observations with GPS Occultation over Southeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, F.; Wu, D. L.; Ao, C. O.; Mannucci, A. J.; Kursinski, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    The typical atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over the southeast (SE) Pacific Ocean is featured with a strong temperature inversion and a sharp moisture gradient across the ABL top. The strong moisture and temperature gradients result in a sharp refractivity gradient that can be precisely detected by the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) measurements. In this paper, the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere & Climate (COSMIC) GPS RO soundings, radiosondes and the high-resolution ECMWF analysis over the SE Pacific are analyzed. COSMIC RO is able to detect a wide range of ABL height variations (1-2 kilometer) as observed from the radiosondes. However, the ECMWF analysis systematically underestimates the ABL heights. The sharp refractivity gradient at the ABL top frequently exceeds the critical refraction (e.g., -157 N-unit per kilometer) and becomes the so-called ducting condition, which results in a systematic RO refractivity bias (or called N-bias) inside the ABL. Simulation study based on radiosonde profiles reveals the magnitudes of the N-biases are vertical resolution dependent. The N-bias is also the primary cause of the systematically smaller refractivity gradient (rarely exceeding -110 N-unit per kilometer) at the ABL top from RO measurement. However, the N-bias seems not affect the ABL height detection. Instead, the very large RO bending angle and the sharp refractivity gradient due to ducting allow reliable detection of the ABL height from GPS RO. The seasonal mean climatology of ABL heights derived from a nine-month composite of COSMIC RO soundings over the SE Pacific reveals significant differences from the ECMWF analysis. Both show an increase of ABL height from the shallow stratocumulus near the coast to a much higher trade wind inversion further off the coast. However, COSMIC RO shows an overall deeper ABL and reveals different locations of the minimum and maximum ABL heights as compared to the ECMWF analysis

  13. Playing jigsaw with Large Igneous Provinces—A plate tectonic reconstruction of Ontong Java Nui, West Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochmuth, Katharina; Gohl, Karsten; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele

    2015-11-01

    The three largest Large Igneous Provinces (LIP) of the western Pacific—Ontong Java, Manihiki, and Hikurangi Plateaus—were emplaced during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron and show strong similarities in their geochemistry and petrology. The plate tectonic relationship between those LIPs, herein referred to as Ontong Java Nui, is uncertain, but a joined emplacement was proposed by Taylor (2006). Since this hypothesis is still highly debated and struggles to explain features such as the strong differences in crustal thickness between the different plateaus, we revisited the joined emplacement of Ontong Java Nui in light of new data from the Manihiki Plateau. By evaluating seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection data along with seismic reflection records of the margins of the proposed "Super"-LIP, a detailed scenario for the emplacement and the initial phase of breakup has been developed. The LIP is a result of an interaction of the arriving plume head with the Phoenix-Pacific spreading ridge in the Early Cretaceous. The breakup of the LIP shows a complicated interplay between multiple microplates and tectonic forces such as rifting, shearing, and rotation. Our plate kinematic model of the western Pacific incorporates new evidence from the breakup margins of the LIPs, the tectonic fabric of the seafloor, as well as previously published tectonic concepts such as the rotation of the LIPs. The updated rotation poles of the western Pacific allow a detailed plate tectonic reconstruction of the region during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron and highlight the important role of LIPs in the plate tectonic framework.

  14. An eddy-viscosity treatment of the unsteady turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Trimpi, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the relaxation of a turbulent boundary layer on a semiinfinite flat plate after passage of a shock wave and a trailing driver gas-driven gas interface. The problem has special application to expansion tube flows. The flow-governing equations have been transformed into the Lamcrocco variables. The numerical results indicate that a fully turbulent boundary layer relaxes faster to the final steady-state values of heat transfer and skin-friction than a fully laminar boundary layer.

  15. Water Release from Cold Serpentinized Forearc Mantle During Subduction Associated with Changes in Incoming Oceanic Plate Thermal Structure and Plate Boundary Kinematics: New Insights into Serpentinite Belts and Plate-Boundary Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Kirby, Wang, and Brocher (Earth Planets and Space, 2014) recently showed how the change in kinematics of the California margin from subduction motion to continental transform motion with the birth and growth of the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) beginning at about 33 Ma BP likely led to a warming of the former forearc mantle and the release of water from serpentinized mantle by dehydration and a likely increase in fluid pressures along the SAFS. Such a mantle source of pressurized water gives insights into both the low sliding resistance for the SAFS and the mobilization and ascent of some serpentinized mantle peridotites through the crust. Thermal modeling by others has also shown that changes in the incoming plate age and subduction rate can also lead to warming of the forearc mantle during subduction. This development gives insights into the Mesozoic and Paleogene ages of emplacement of some, but not all, California serpentinites. Recent mineralogical and geochemical observations of serpentinite blocks in serpentinize mélange bodies in the San Francisco Bay Area (Uno and Kirby, 2014 AGU Meeting and Lewis and Kirby, 2015 AGU Meeting) suggest that these rocks sustained multiple stages of serpentinization that are broadly consistent with the model of Kirby et al. (2014). A new development comes from interpretation of investigations in the literature of localized late-stage silica-carbonate-water alteration of serpentinite bodies in California that this alteration occurred largely in Neogene time when the highest rates of water release from the former forearc mantle probably occurred. This presentation also suggests that the occurrence of serpentinite belts emplaced in Cenozoic time during changing plate-boundary kinematics, such as the Cenozoic closing of the Tethys Ocean bordering Eurasia by subduction and collision and arc reversal and decreasing convergence rates under the Greater Antilles and Colombia and New Guinea, may give insights into the serpentinite

  16. The Iceland Plate Boundary Zone: Propagating Rifts, Migrating Transforms, and Rift-Parallel Strike-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J. A.

    2017-11-01

    Unlike most of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the North America/Eurasia plate boundary in Iceland lies above sea level where magmatic and tectonic processes can be directly investigated in subaerial exposures. Accordingly, geologic processes in Iceland have long been recognized as possible analogs for seafloor spreading in the submerged parts of the mid-ocean ridge system. Combining existing and new data from across Iceland provides an integrated view of this active, mostly subaerial plate boundary. The broad Iceland plate boundary zone includes segmented rift zones linked by transform fault zones. Rift propagation and transform fault migration away from the Iceland hotspot rearrange the plate boundary configuration resulting in widespread deformation of older crust and reactivation of spreading-related structures. Rift propagation results in block rotations that are accommodated by widespread, rift-parallel, strike-slip faulting. The geometry and kinematics of faulting in Iceland may have implications for spreading processes elsewhere on the mid-ocean ridge system where rift propagation and transform migration occur.

  17. Unsteady laminar boundary-layer calculations on oscillating configurations including backflow. Part 1: Flat plate, oscillating in its own plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geissler, W.

    1983-01-01

    A finite difference method has been developed to calculate the unsteady boundary layer over an oscillating flat plate. Low- and high frequency approximations were used for comparison with numerical results. Special emphasis was placed on the behavior of the flow and on the numerical calculation procedure as soon as reversed flow has occurred over part of the oscillation cycle. The numerical method displayed neither problems nor singular behavior at the beginning of or within the reversed flow region. Calculations, however, came to a limit where the back-flow region reached the plate's leading edge in the case of high oscillation amplitudes. It is assumed that this limit is caused by the special behavior of the flow at the plate's leading edge where the boundary layer equations are not valid.

  18. The Quest for the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary West of the Strait of Gibraltar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitellini, N.

    2009-04-01

    A new swath bathymetry compilation of the Gulf of Cadiz Area and SW Iberia is presented. The new map is the result of a collaborative research performed after year 2000 by teams from 7 European countries and 14 research institutions. This new dataset allow for the first time to present and to discuss the missing link in the plate boundary between Eurasia and Africa in the Central Atlantic. A set of almost linear and sub parallel dextral strike-slip faults, the SWIM Faults (SWIM is the acronym of the ESF EuroMargins project "Earthquake and Tsunami hazards of active faults at the South West Iberian Margin: deep structure, high-resolution imaging and paleoseismic signature") was mapped using a the new swath bathymetry compilation available in the area. The SWIM Faults form a narrow band of deformation over a length of 600 km coincident with a small circle centred on the pole of rotation of Africa with respect to Eurasia, This narrow band of deformation connects the Gloria Fault to the Rif-Tell Fault Zone, two segments of the plate boundary between Africa and Eurasia. In addition, the SWIM faults cuts across the Gulf of Cadiz, in the Atlantic Ocean, where the 1755 Great Lisbon earthquake, M~8.5-8.7, and tsunami were generated, providing a new insights on its source location. SWIM Team: E. Gràcia (2), L. Matias (3), P. Terrinha (4), M.A. Abreu (5), G. DeAlteriis(6), J.P. Henriet (7), J.J. Dañobeitia (2), D.G. Masson (8), T. Mulder (9), R. Ramella (10), L. Somoza (11) and S. Diez (2) (2) Unitat de Tecnologia Marina (CSIC), Centre Mediterrani d'Investigacions Marines i Ambientals, Barcelona, Spain (3) Centro Geofísica da Universidade de Lisboa (CGUL, IDL), Lisboa, Portugal (4) National Institute for Engineering, Technology and Innovation (INETI, LATTEX), Departamento de Geologia Marinha, Amadora, Portugal (5) Estrutura de Missão para a Extensão da Plataforma Continental, Lisboa, Portugal (6) Geomare Sud IAMC, CNR, Napoli, Italy (7) Renard Centre of Marine Geology

  19. Coexisting shortening and extension along the "Africa-Eurasia" plate boundary in southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuffaro, M.; Riguzzi, F.; Scrocca, D.; Doglioni, C.

    2009-04-01

    We performed geodetic strain rate field analyses along the "Africa (Sicily microplate)"-"Eurasia (Tyrrhenian microplate)" plate boundary in Sicily (southern Italy), using new GPS velocities from a data set spanning maximum ten years (1998-2007). Data from GPS permanent stations maintained from different institutions and the recent RING network, settled in Italy in the last five years by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, were included into the analysis. Two dimensional strain and rotation rate fields were estimated by the distance weighted approach on a regularly spaced grid (30*30km), estimating the strain using all stations, but data from each station are weighted by their distance from the grid node by a constant a=70km that specifies how the effect of a station decays with distance from the node grid interpolation. Results show that most of the shortening of the Africa-Eurasia relative motion is distributed in the northwestern side offshore Sicily, whereas the extension becomes comparable with shortening on the western border of the Capo d'Orlando basin, and grater in the northeastern side, offshore Sicily, as directly provided by GPS velocities which show a larger E-ward component of sites located in Calabria with respect to those located either in northern Sicily or in the Ustica-Aeolian islands. Moreover, where shortening and extension have mostly a similar order of magnitude, two rotation rate fields can be detected, CCW in the northwestern side of Sicily, and CW in the northeastern one respectively. Also, 2-D dilatation field records a similar pattern, with negative values (shortening) in the northwestern area of Sicily close to the Ustica island, and positive values (extension) in the northeastern and southeastern ones, respectively. Principal shortening and extension rate axes are consistent with long-term geological features: seismic reflection profiles acquired in the southern Tyrrhenian seismogenic belt show active extensional faults

  20. Lithospheric structure beneath the Caribbean- South American plate boundary from S receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masy, J.; Levander, A.; Niu, F.

    2010-12-01

    We have analyzed teleseismic S-wave data recorded by the permanent national seismic network of Venezuela and the BOLIVAR broadband array (Broadband Onshore-offshore Lithospheric Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) deployed from 2003 to 2005. A total of 28 events with Mw > 5.7 occurring at epicentral distances from 55° to 85° were used. We made Sp receiver functions to estimate the rapid variations of lithospheric structure in the southern Caribbean plate boundary region to try to better understand the complicated tectonic history of the region. Estimated Moho depth ranges from ~20 km beneath the Caribbean Large Igneous Provinces to ~50 km beneath the Mérida Andes in western Venezuela and the Sierra del Interior in northeastern Venezuela. These results are consistent with previous receiver functions studies (Niu et al., 2007) and active source profiles (Schmitz et al., 2001; Bezada et al., 2007; Clark et al., 2008; Guedez, 2008; Magnani et al., 2009). Beneath the Maracaibo Block we observe a signal at a depth of 100 km dipping ~24° towards the continent, which we interpret as the top of the oceanic Caribbean slab that is subducting beneath South America from the west. The deeper part of the slab was previously imaged using P-wave tomography (Bezada et al, 2010), and the upper part inferred from intermediate depth seismicity (Malavé and Suarez, 1995). These studies indicate flat slab subduction beneath northern Colombia and northwestern Venezuela with the slab dipping between 20° - 30° beneath Lake Maracaibo. Like others we attribute the flat slab subduction to the uplift of the Mérida Andes (for example Kellogg and Bonini, 1982). In eastern Venezuela beneath the Sierra del Interior we also observe a deep signal that we interpret as deep South American lithosphere that is detaching from the overriding plate as the Atlantic subducts and tears away from SA (Bezada et al., 2010; Clark et al, 2008). The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB

  1. Receiver Functions Imaging of the Moho and LAB in the Southern Caribbean plate boundary and Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masy, J.; Levander, A.; Niu, F.

    2011-12-01

    We have made teleseismic Ps and Sp receiver functions from data recorded from 2003 to 2009 by the permanent national seismic network of Venezuela, the BOLIVAR (Broadband Onshore-offshore Lithospheric Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) and WAVE (Western Array for Venezuela) experiments. The receiver functions show rapid variations in Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) depths both across and along the southern Caribbean plate boundary region. We used a total of 69 events with Mw > 6 occurring at epicentral distances from 30° to 90° for the Ps receiver functions, and 43 events with Mw > 5.7 from 55° to 85° to make Sp receiver functions. For CCP stacking we constructed a 3D velocity model from numerous active source profiles (Schmitz et al., 2001; Bezada et al., 2007; Clark et al., 2008; Guedez, 2008; Magnani et al., 2009), from finite-frequency P wave upper mantle tomography model of Bezada et al., (2010) and the Rayleigh wave tomography model of Miller et al., (2009). The Moho ranges in depth from ~25 km beneath the Caribbean Large Igneous Provinces to ~55 km beneath the Mérida Andes in western Venezuela. These results are consistent with previous receiver functions studies (Niu et al., 2007) and the available active source profiles. Beneath the Maracaibo Block in northwestern Venezuela, we observe a strong positive signal at 40 to 60 km depth dipping ~6° towards the continent. We interpret this as the Moho of the Caribbean slab subducting beneath northernmost South America from the west. Beneath northern Colombia and northwestern Venezuela the top of this slab has been previously inferred from intermediate depth seismicity (Malavé and Suarez, 1995), which indicates a slab dipping between 20° - 30° beneath Lake Maracaibo. Our results could indicate that the slab is tearing beneath Lake Maracaibo as suggested previously by Masy et al. (2011). The deeper (> 100 km depth) part of the slab has been imaged using P

  2. The International Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) in the northern Chile seismic gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, B.; Asch, A.; Sodoudi, F.; Manzanares, A.; Ritter, O.; Klotz, J.; Chong-Diaz, G.; Barrientos, S.; Villotte, J.-P.; Oncken, O.

    2009-04-01

    Fast convergence between the oceanic Nazca and the continental South American plate is accommodated by recurrent rupture of large segments of the two plates' interface. The resulting earthquakes are among the largest and, for their sizes, most frequent on Earth. Along the Chilean and southern Peruvian margin, all segments have ruptured at least once in the past 150 years for which there exist historic and/or instrumental records. The one segment that is most mature for re-rupture stretches for more than 500 km along the northernmost Chilean coast between roughly -23° and -18° latitude. It last broke in 1877 in a magnitude ~8.8 earthquake, triggering a major Tsunami. From the historical record, it has been known to have a recurrence cycle of approximately 110 years. The adjoining segments to the north and south broke rather recently in 1995 and 2001 in M>8 earthquakes and an M 7.7 earthquake encroached the southern part of the gap in 2007. The IPOC project intends to investigate this segment of the Nazca-South American plate boundary, on which a strong to devastating earthquake is expected to occur within the next years, by monitoring at a variety of time-scales deformation, seismicity, and magnetotelluric fields in the subduction zone at the closing stages of the interseismic cycle before and possibly during occurrence of a big earthquake. For that purpose, installation of long-term observatories in Northern Chile started in 2006 in a close cooperation of the Universidad de Chile (Santiago, Chile), the Universidad Catolica del Norte (Antofagasta, Chile), the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (Paris, France), and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ, Potsdam, Germany). Currently we are operating 14 modern seismological stations equipped with STS-2 broadband seismometers and accelerometers (EPI sensor). At least two more stations will be installed in the near future. To cope with the high resolution and dynamic of the sensors and data acquisition

  3. Plate tectonics and offshore boundary delimitation: Tunisia-Libya case at the International Court of Justice

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, D.J.

    1983-03-01

    Advances in the technology for exploiting resources of the oceans, particularly recovery of hydrocarbons and minerals in deep water, is benefiting a growing number of nations. At the same time, however, economic and political pressures have induced concern and there is now a much increased emphasis on jurisdiction to divide the offshore areas between the 132 coastal nations. Negotiations affect research operations at sea and, in consequence, marine scientists have been made aware of offshore problems as highlighted by the Law of the Sea Treaty (UNCLOS III) and complications arising from the legal versus scientific definitions of continental shelves andmore » margins. The first major offshore boundary case of international scope where plate tectonics has constituted a significant argument is the one recently brought before the International Court of Justice by Libya and Tunisia concerning the delimitation of their continental shelves. Of the two parties, Libya placed the greatest emphasis on this concept as a means to determine natural prolongation of its land territory into and under the sea. Tunisia contested Libya's use of the whole of the African continental landmass as a reference unit; in Tunisia's view, considerations of geography, geomorphology, and bathymetry are at least as relevant as are those of geology. In its landmark judgment (February 1982) - which almost certainly will have far-reaching consequences in future such boundary delimitation cases - the court pronounced that It is the outcome, not the evolution in the long-distant past, which is of importance, and that it is the present-day configuration of the coasts and sea bed which are the main factors to be considered, not geology.« less

  4. Estimation of the marine boundary layer height over the central North Pacific using GPS radio occultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winning, Thomas E.; Chen, Yi-Leng; Xie, Feiqin

    2017-01-01

    Global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) refractivity data obtained from the first Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) for the years 2007 to 2012 were used to estimate an overall climatology for the height of the marine boundary layer (MBL) over the central North Pacific Ocean including the Hawaiian Island region (10°N-45°N; 125°W-175°W). The trade wind days are identified based on the six-year National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) global analysis for the same period. About 87% of the RO soundings in summer (June-July-August, JJA) and 47% in winter (December-January-February, DJF) are under trade wind conditions. The MBL height climatology under trade wind conditions is derived and compared to the overall climatology. In general, MBL heights are lowest adjacent to the southern coast of California and gradually increase to the south and west. During the summer (JJA) when the northeasterly trade winds are the dominant surface flow, the median MBL height decreases from 2.0 km over Kauai to 1.9 km over the Big Island with an approximate 2 km maximum that progresses from southwest to northeast throughout the year. If the surface flow is restricted to trade winds only, the maximum MBL heights are located over the same areas, but they increase to a median height of 1.8 km during DJF and 2.1 km during JJA. For the first time, the GPS RO technique allows the depiction of the spatial variations of the MBL height climatology over the central North Pacific.

  5. Constraints on the rheology of the lower crust in a strike-slip plate boundary: evidence from the San Quintín xenoliths, Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Werf, Thomas; Chatzaras, Vasileios; Marcel Kriegsman, Leo; Kronenberg, Andreas; Tikoff, Basil; Drury, Martyn R.

    2017-12-01

    The rheology of lower crust and its transient behavior in active strike-slip plate boundaries remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we analyzed a suite of granulite and lherzolite xenoliths from the upper Pleistocene-Holocene San Quintín volcanic field of northern Baja California, Mexico. The San Quintín volcanic field is located 20 km east of the Baja California shear zone, which accommodates the relative movement between the Pacific plate and Baja California microplate. The development of a strong foliation in both the mafic granulites and lherzolites, suggests that a lithospheric-scale shear zone exists beneath the San Quintín volcanic field. Combining microstructural observations, geothermometry, and phase equilibria modeling, we estimated that crystal-plastic deformation took place at temperatures of 750-890 °C and pressures of 400-560 MPa, corresponding to 15-22 km depth. A hot crustal geotherm of 40 ° C km-1 is required to explain the estimated deformation conditions. Infrared spectroscopy shows that plagioclase in the mafic granulites is relatively dry. Microstructures are interpreted to show that deformation in both the uppermost lower crust and upper mantle was accommodated by a combination of dislocation creep and grain-size-sensitive creep. Recrystallized grain size paleopiezometry yields low differential stresses of 12-33 and 17 MPa for plagioclase and olivine, respectively. The lower range of stresses (12-17 MPa) in the mafic granulite and lherzolite xenoliths is interpreted to be associated with transient deformation under decreasing stress conditions, following an event of stress increase. Using flow laws for dry plagioclase, we estimated a low viscosity of 1.1-1.3×1020 Pa ṡ s for the high temperature conditions (890 °C) in the lower crust. Significantly lower viscosities in the range of 1016-1019 Pa ṡ s, were estimated using flow laws for wet plagioclase. The shallow upper mantle has a low viscosity of 5.7×1019 Pa ṡ s

  6. Surface cracks as a long-term record of Andean plate boundary segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, J. P.; Allmendinger, R. W.; Pritchard, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    Meter-scale surface cracks throughout the northern Chilean and southern Peruvian forearcs provide a long-term record of seismic segmentation along the Andean plate boundary. The cracks, mapped on high-resolution satellite imagery, show strong preferred orientations over large regions and the mean strikes of cracks vary systematically as a function of position along the margin. The spatial scale of this variation suggests that stress fields operating with similar dimensions, namely those produced by strong subduction zone earthquakes, are primarily responsible for crack evolution. The orientations of cracks are consistent with the static and dynamic coseismic stress fields calculated for several recent and historical earthquakes on distinct segments of the subduction interface. Field observations indicate that the cracks have experienced multiple episodes of opening and proximal age evidence suggests that they represent deformation as old as several hundred thousand years. We invert the crack orientation data to solve for plausible slip distributions on the Iquique, Chile segment of the margin (19°--23° S), which last ruptured in a M~8--9 event in 1877. We find that concentrations of coseismic slip resolved by the inversion coincide spatially with negative gravity anomalies, consistent with recent studies correlating subduction zone earthquake slip with forearc structure. These results suggest that distinct seismic segments or asperities on the subduction interface define characteristic earthquakes with rupture dimensions and magnitudes that are similar over many seismic cycles.

  7. Surface cracks as a long-term record of Andean plate boundary segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, J. P.; Allmendinger, R. W.; Pritchard, M. E.

    2004-12-01

    Meter-scale surface cracks throughout the northern Chilean and southern Peruvian forearcs provide a long-term record of seismic segmentation along the Andean plate boundary. The cracks, mapped on high-resolution satellite imagery, show strong preferred orientations over large regions and the mean strikes of cracks vary systematically as a function of position along the margin. The spatial scale of this variation suggests that stress fields operating with similar dimensions, namely those produced by strong subduction zone earthquakes, are primarily responsible for crack evolution. The orientations of cracks are consistent with the static and dynamic coseismic stress fields calculated for several recent and historical earthquakes on distinct segments of the subduction interface. Field observations indicate that the cracks have experienced multiple episodes of opening and proximal age evidence suggests that they represent deformation as old as several hundred thousand years. We invert the crack orientation data to solve for plausible slip distributions on the Iquique, Chile segment of the margin (19°--23° S), which last ruptured in a M~8--9 event in 1877. We find that concentrations of coseismic slip resolved by the inversion coincide spatially with negative gravity anomalies, consistent with recent studies correlating subduction zone earthquake slip with forearc structure. These results suggest that distinct seismic segments or asperities on the subduction interface define characteristic earthquakes with rupture dimensions and magnitudes that are similar over many seismic cycles.

  8. Tidal calibration of Plate Boundary Observatory borehole strainmeters: Roles of vertical and shear coupling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roeloffs, Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    A multicomponent borehole strainmeter directly measures changes in the diameter of its cylindrical housing at several azimuths. To transform these measurements to formation strains requires a calibration matrix, which must be estimated by analyzing the installed strainmeter's response to known strains. Typically, theoretical calculations of Earth tidal strains serve as the known strains. This paper carries out such an analysis for 12 Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) borehole strainmeters, postulating that each of the strainmeters' four gauges responds ("couples") to all three horizontal components of the formation strain tensor, as well as to vertical strain. Orientation corrections are also estimated. The fourth extensometer in each PBO strainmeter provides redundant information used to reduce the chance that coupling coefficients could be misleadingly fit to inappropriate theoretical tides. Satisfactory fits between observed and theoretically calculated tides were obtained for three PBO strainmeters in California, where the calculated tides are corroborated by other instrumentation, as well as for six strainmeters in Oregon and Washington, where no other instruments have ever recorded Earth tidal strain. Several strainmeters have unexpectedly large coupling coefficients for vertical strain, which increases the strainmeter's response to atmospheric pressure. Vertical coupling diminishes, or even changes the sign of, the apparent response to areal strain caused by Earth tides or deep Earth processes because near the free surface, vertical strains are opposite in sign to areal strain. Vertical coupling does not impair the shear strain response, however. PBO borehole strainmeters can provide calibrated shear strain time series of transient strain associated with tectonic or magmatic processes.

  9. Chlorine isotope geochemistry of Icelandic thermal fluids: Implications for geothermal system behavior at divergent plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Barnes, Jaime D.

    2016-09-01

    The chlorine isotope composition of thermal fluids from Iceland were measured in order to evaluate the source of chlorine and possible chlorine isotope fractionation in geothermal systems at divergent plate boundaries. The geothermal systems studied have a wide range of reservoir temperatures from 40 to 437 °C and in-situ pH of 6.15 to 7.15. Chlorine concentrations range from 5.2 to 171 ppm and δ37 Cl values are -0.3 to + 2.1 ‰ (n = 38). The δ37 Cl values of the thermal fluids are interpreted to reflect the source of the chlorine in the fluids. Geothermal processes such as secondary mineral formation, aqueous and vapor speciation and boiling were found to have minimal effects on the δ37 Cl values. However, further work is needed on incorporation of Cl into secondary minerals and its effect on Cl isotope fractionation. Results of isotope geochemical modeling demonstrate that the range of δ37 Cl values documented in the natural thermal fluids can be explained by leaching of the basaltic rocks by meteoric source water under geothermal conditions. Magmatic gas partitioning may also contribute to the source of Cl in some cases. The range of δ37 Cl values of the fluids result mainly from the large range of δ37 Cl values observed for Icelandic basalts, which range from -0.6 to + 1.2 ‰.

  10. PBO H2O: Plate Boundary Observatory Studies of the Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, K. M.; Small, E. E.; Chew, C. C.; Nievinski, F. G.; Pratt, J.; McCreight, J. L.; Braun, J.; Boniface, K.; Evans, S. G.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory was built to measure the deformation of the North American continent. PBO stations can also be used to measure ground displacements at much higher frequencies (5-Hz) for studies of fault slip during large earthquakes and for warnings of volcanic eruptions. There is also a long history of using atmospheric delays on the GPS signals to estimate precipitable water vapor (for weather and climate studies) and total electron content (space weather studies). Recently the PBO H2O research group has demonstrated that GPS signals that reflect from the nearby environment can be used for water cycle research. These GPS reflections measure how much water is in the top layer of the soil, how much snow is on its surface, and water content of nearby vegetation. Observing and monitoring spatial and temporal changes in the water cycle is critical for both understanding and predicting Earth's climate. Since GPS reflections encompass an area of ~1000 m^2, they provide a spatial footprint that complements satellite systems which sense much larger areas and in situ systems that sense regions < 1 m^2. Water cycle products are produced from PBO data each day and updated on the PBO H2O website.

  11. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1987-01-01

    The nature and dynamics of time-dependent deformation along major seismic zones including the influence of irregularities in fault geometry on the earthquake cycle, and the processes contributing to the state of stress and rates of strain in plate interior regions were studied. The principle findings of the research are discussed.

  12. Central Tropical Pacific Variability And ENSO Response To Changing Climate Boundary Conditions: Evidence From Individual Line Island Foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustic, G. T.; Polissar, P. J.; Ravelo, A. C.; White, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) plays a dominant role in Earth's climate variability. Paleoceanographic evidence suggests that ENSO has changed in the past, and these changes have been linked to large-scale climatic shifts. While a close relationship between ENSO evolution and climate boundary conditions has been predicted, testing these predictions remains challenging. These climate boundary conditions, including insolation, the mean surface temperature gradient of the tropical Pacific, global ice volume, and tropical thermocline depth, often co-vary and may work together to suppress or enhance the ocean-atmosphere feedbacks that drive ENSO variability. Furthermore, suitable paleo-archives spanning multiple climate states are sparse. We have aimed to test ENSO response to changing climate boundary conditions by generating new reconstructions of mixed-layer variability from sedimentary archives spanning the last three glacial-interglacial cycles from the Central Tropical Pacific Line Islands, where El Niño is strongly expressed. We analyzed Mg/Ca ratios from individual foraminifera to reconstruct mixed-layer variability at discrete time intervals representing combinations of climatic boundary conditions from the middle Holocene to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 8. We observe changes in the mixed-layer temperature variability during MIS 5 and during the previous interglacial (MIS 7) showing significant reductions in ENSO amplitude. Differences in variability during glacial and interglacial intervals are also observed. Additionally, we reconstructed mixed-layer and thermocline conditions using multi-species Mg/Ca and stable isotope measurements to more fully characterize the state of the Central Tropical Pacific during these intervals. These reconstructions provide us with a unique view of Central Tropical Pacific variability and water-column structure at discrete intervals under varying boundary climate conditions with which to assess factors that shape ENSO

  13. Strength and Deformation Rate of Plate Boundaries: The Rheological Effects of Grain Size Reduction, Structure, and Serpentinization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesi, L.; Gueydan, F.

    2016-12-01

    Global strain rate maps reveal 1000-fold contrasts between plate interiors, oceanic or continental diffuse plate boundaries and narrow plate boundaries. Here, we show that rheological models based on the concepts of shear zone localization and the evolution of rock structure upon strain can explain these strain rate contrasts. Ductile shear zones constitute a mechanical paradox in the lithosphere. As every plastic deformation mechanism is strain-rate-hardening, ductile rocks are expected to deform at low strain rate and low stress (broad zone of deformation). Localized ductile shear zones require either a localized forcing (locally high stress) or a thermal or structural anomaly in the shear zone; either can be inherited or develop progressively as rocks deform. We previously identified the most effective process at each depth level of the lithosphere. In the upper crust and middle crust, rocks fabric controls localization. Grain size reduction is the most efficient mechanism in the uppermost mantle. This analysis can be generalized to consider a complete lithospheric section. We assume strain rate does not vary with depth and that the depth-integrated strength of the lithospheric does not change over time, as the total force is controlled by external process such as mantle convection and plate and slab buoyancy. Reducing grain size from a coarse value typical of undeformed peridotite to a value in agreement with the stress level (piezometer) while letting that stress vary from depth to depth (the integrated stress remains the same) increases the lithospheric strain rate by about a factor of 1000. This can explain the development of diffuse plate boundaries. The slightly higher strain rate of continental plate boundary may reflect development of a layered rock fabric in the middle crust. Narrow plate boundaries require additional weakening process. The high heat flux near mid-ocean ridge implies a thin lithosphere, which enhances stress (for constant integrated

  14. Shear wave velocity structure in the lithosphere and asthenosphere across the Southern California continent and Pacific plate margin using inversion of Rayleigh wave data from the ALBACORE project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A. C.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Kohler, M. D.; Rathnayaka, S.; Escobar, L., Sr.

    2015-12-01

    The North American and Pacific plate boundary is a unique example of past subduction of an oceanic spreading center which has involved oceanic plate capture and inception of a continental transform boundary that juxtaposes continental and oceanic lithosphere on a single plate. The amphibious ALBACORE seismic project (Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment) deployed 34 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) on 15-35 Ma seafloor and offers a unique opportunity to compare the LAB in continental and oceanic lithosphere in one seismic study. Rayleigh waves were recorded simultaneously by our offshore array and 82 CISN network land stations from 2010-2011. Here we predict phase velocities for a starting shear wave velocity model for each of 5 regions in our study area and compare to observed phase velocities from our array in a least-squares sense that produces the best fit 1-D shear wave velocity structure for each region. Preliminary results for the deep ocean (seafloor 25-32 Ma) indicates high velocities reaching 4.5 km/s at depths of 50 km associated with the lithosphere for seafloor 25-32 Ma. A negative velocity gradient is observed below this which reaches a minimum of 4.0 km/s at 160 km depth. The mid-ocean region (age 13-25 Ma) indicates a slightly lower magnitude and shallower LVZ. The Inner Borderland displays the highest lithospheric velocities offshore reaching 4.8 km/s at 40 km depth indicating underplating. The base of the LVZ in the Borderland increases sharply from 4.0 km/s to 4.5 km/s at 80-150 km depth indicating partial melt and compositional changes. The LVZ displays a very gradual positive velocity gradient in all other regions such as the deep seafloor and continent reaching 4.5 km/s at 300 km depth. The deep ocean, Borderlands, and continental region each have unique lithospheric velocities, LAB depths, and LVZ character that indicate stark differences in mantle structure that occur on a

  15. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    1987-01-01

    The focus of the research was in two broad areas during the most recent 6 month period: the nature and dynamics of time-dependent deformation along major seismic zones, including the influence of irregularities in fault geometry on the earthquake cycles, and the processes contributing to the state of stress and rates of strain in plate interior regions. The principal findings of the research to date are described.

  16. Rain Reevaporation, Boundary Layer Convection Interactions, and Pacific Rainfall Patterns in an AGCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacmeister, Julio T.; Suarez, Max J.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2004-01-01

    Sensitivity experiments with an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) show that parameterized rain re-evaporation has a large impact on simulated precipitation patterns in the tropical Pacific, especially on the configuration of the model s intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). Weak re-evaporation leads t o the formation of a "double ITCZ" during the northern warm season. The double ITCZ is accompanied by strong coupling between precipitation and high-frequency vertical motion in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Strong reevaporation leads to a better overall agreement of simulated precipitation with observations. The model s double ITCZ bias is reduced. At the same time, correlation between high-frequency vertical motion in the PBL and precipitation is reduced. Experiments with modified physics suggest that evaporative cooling by rain near the PBL top weakens the coupling between precipitation and vertical motion. This may reduce the model s tendency to form double ITCZs. The strength of high-frequency vertical motions in the PBL was also reduced directly through the introduction of a diffusive cumulus momentum transport (DCMT) parameterization. The DCMT had a visible impact on simulated precipitation in the tropics, but did not reduce the model s double bias in all cases.

  17. Finite-Difference Solutions for Compressible Laminar Boundary-Layer Flows of a Dusty Gas over a Semi-Infinite Flat Plate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    AD-A174 952 FINITE - DIFFERENCE SOLUTIONS FOR CONPRESSIBLE LANINAR 1/2 BOUNDARY-LAYER FLOUS (U) TORONTO UNIV DOWNSVIEW (ONTARIO) INST FOR AEROSPACE...dilute dusty gas over a semi-infinite flat plate. Details are given of the impliit finite , difference schemes as well as the boundary conditions... FINITE - DIFFERENCE SOLUTIONS FOR COMPRESSIBLE LAMINAR BOUNDARY-LAYER FLOWS OF A DUSTY GAS OVER A SEMI-INFINITE FLAT PLATE by B. Y. Wang and I. I

  18. P-wave tomography of Northeast Asia: Constraints on the western Pacific plate subduction and mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jincheng; Tian, You; Liu, Cai; Zhao, Dapeng; Feng, Xuan; Zhu, Hongxiang

    2018-01-01

    A high-resolution model of 3-D P-wave velocity structure beneath Northeast Asia and adjacent regions is determined by using 244,180 arrival times of 14,163 local and regional earthquakes and 319,857 relative travel-time residuals of 9988 teleseismic events recorded at ∼2100 seismic stations in the study region. Our tomographic results reveal the subducting Pacific slab clearly as a prominent high-velocity anomaly from the Japan Trench to the North-South Gravity lineament (NSGL) in East China. The NSGL is roughly coincident with the western edge of the stagnant Pacific slab in the mantle transition zone (MTZ). The subducting Pacific slab has partly sunk into the lower mantle beneath Northeast China, but under the Sino-Korean Craton the slab lies horizontally in the MTZ. The NSGL, as an important tectonic line in Mainland China, is marked by sharp differences in the surface topography, gravity anomaly, crustal and lithospheric thickness and mantle seismic velocity from the east to the west. These features of the NSGL and large-scale hot and wet upwelling in the big mantle wedge (BMW) in the east of the NSGL are all related to the subduction processes of the Western Pacific plate. The Changbai intraplate volcanic group is underlain by a striking low-velocity anomaly from the upper MTZ and the BMW up to the surface, and deep earthquakes (410-650 km depths) occur actively in the subducting Pacific slab to the east of the Changbai volcano. We propose that the Changbai volcanic group is caused by upwelling of hot and wet asthenospheric materials and active convection in the BMW. The formation of other volcanic groups in the east of the NSGL is also associated with the subduction-driven corner flow in the BMW.

  19. Weak tectono-magmatic relationships along an obliquely convergent plate boundary: Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acocella, Valerio; Bellier, Olivier; Sandri, Laura; Sébrier, Michel; Pramumijoyo, Subagyo

    2018-02-01

    The tectono-magmatic relationships along obliquely convergent plate boundaries, where strain partitioning promotes strike-slip structures along the volcanic arc, are poorly known. Here it is unclear if and, in case, how the strike-slip structures control volcanic processes, distribution and size. To better define the possible tectono-magmatic relationships along strike-slip arcs, we merge available information on the case study of Sumatra (Indonesia) with field structural data. The Sumatra arc (entire volcanic belt) consists of 48 active volcanoes. Of these, 46% lie within 10 km from the dextral Great Sumatra Fault (GSF), which carries most horizontal displacement on the overriding plate, whereas 27% lie at >20 km from the GSF. Among the volcanoes at <10 km from GSF, 48% show a possible structural relation to the GSF, whereas only 28% show a clear structural relation, lying in pull-aparts or releasing bends; these localized areas of transtension (local extensional zone) do not develop magmatic segments. There is no relation between the GSF along-strike slip rate variations and the volcanic productivity. The preferred N30°-N40°E volcano alignment and elongation are subparallel to the convergence vector or to the GSF. The structural field data, collected in the central and southern GSF, show, in addition to the dextral motions along NW-SE to N-S striking faults, also normal motions (extending WNW-ESE or NE-SW), suggesting local reactivations of the GSF. Overall, the collected data suggest a limited tectonic control on arc volcanism. The tectonic control is mostly expressed by the mean depth of the slab surface below the volcanoes (130±20 km) and, subordinately, local extension along the GSF. The latter, when WNW-ESE oriented (more common), may be associated with the overall tectonic convergence, as suggested by the structural data; conversely, when NE-SW oriented (less common), the extension may result from co- and post-seismic arc normal extension, as supported

  20. BOLIVAR: the Caribbean-South America plate boundary between 60W and 71W as imaged by seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnani, M.; Mann, P.; Clark, S. A.; Escalona, A.; Zelt, C. A.; Christeson, G. L.; Levander, A.

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of ~6000km of marine multi-channel seismic (MCS) reflection data collected offshore Venezuela as part of the Broadband Ocean Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region project (BOLIVAR). The imaged area spans almost 12 degrees of longitude and 5 degrees of latitude and encompasses the diffuse plate boundary between South America (SA) and the SE Caribbean plate (CAR). This plate boundary has been evolving for at least the past 55My when the volcanic island arc that borders the CAR plate started colliding obliquely with the SA continent: the collision front has migrated from west to east. BOLIVAR MCS data show that the crustal architecture of the present plate boundary is dominated by the eastward motion of the Caribbean plate with respect to SA and is characterized by a complex combination of convergent and strike-slip tectonics. To the north, the reflection data image the South Caribbean Deformed Belt (SCDB) and the structures related to the thrusting of the CAR plate under the Leeward Antilles volcanic arc region. The data show that the CAR underthrusting continues as far east as the southern edge of the Aves ridge and detailed stratigraphic dating of the Venezuela basin and trench deposits suggests that the collision began in the Paleogene. The amount of shortening along the SCDB decreases toward the east, in part due to the geometry of plate motion vectors and in part as a result of the NNE escape of the Maracaibo block in western Venezuela. South of the SCDB the MCS profiles cross the Leeward Antilles island arc and Cenozoic sedimentary basins, revealing a complex history of Paleogene-Neogene multiphase extension, compression, and tectonic inversion, as well as the influence of the tectonic activity along the right-lateral El Pilar - San Sebastian fault system. East of the Bonaire basin the MCS data image the southern end of the Aves Ridge abandoned volcanic island arc and the southwestern termination of the Grenada basin

  1. Global Plate Velocities from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Philipsen, Steven

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed 204 days of Global Positioning System (GPS) data from the global GPS network spanning January 1991 through March 1996. On the basis of these GPS coordinate solutions, we have estimated velocities for 38 sites, mostly located on the interiors of the Africa, Antarctica, Australia, Eurasia, Nazca, North America, Pacific, and South America plates. The uncertainties of the horizontal velocity components range from 1.2 to 5.0 mm/yr. With the exception of sites on the Pacific and Nazca plates, the GPS velocities agree with absolute plate model predictions within 95% confidence. For most of the sites in North America, Antarctica, and Eurasia, the agreement is better than 2 mm/yr. We find no persuasive evidence for significant vertical motions (less than 3 standard deviations), except at four sites. Three of these four were sites constrained to geodetic reference frame velocities. The GPS velocities were then used to estimate angular velocities for eight tectonic plates. Absolute angular velocities derived from the GPS data agree with the no net rotation (NNR) NUVEL-1A model within 95% confidence except for the Pacific plate. Our pole of rotation for the Pacific plate lies 11.5 deg west of the NNR NUVEL-1A pole, with an angular speed 10% faster. Our relative angular velocities agree with NUVEL-1A except for some involving the Pacific plate. While our Pacific-North America angular velocity differs significantly from NUVEL-1A, our model and NUVEL-1A predict very small differences in relative motion along the Pacific-North America plate boundary itself. Our Pacific-Australia and Pacific- Eurasia angular velocities are significantly faster than NUVEL-1A, predicting more rapid convergence at these two plate boundaries. Along the East Pacific Pise, our Pacific-Nazca angular velocity agrees in both rate and azimuth with NUVFL-1A.

  2. An intraslab earthquake (M7.1) along a buried hydrated fault in the Pacific plate, triggered by the 2011 M9 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, J.; Hasegawa, A.; Kita, S.

    2011-12-01

    A M9.0 megathrust earthquake, the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake, occurred on 11 March 2011 on the plate boundary east off northeastern (NE) Japan. After this great earthquake, seismicity has been activated in the Pacific plate as well as along its upper surface, and a large earthquake (M7.1) occurred on April 7 in the Pacific slab at a depth of 66 km, located near the down-dip limit of the large interplate slip of the M9 event. Here we perform travel-time tomography to reveal heterogeneous seismic velocity structures around the focal area of the 2011 M7.1 intraslab event, and discuss the occurrence of the 2011 M7.1 event in terms of dehydration embrittlement hypothesis. We applied the double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) to large number of arrival-time data obtained at a nation-wide seismograph network in Japan. Arrival-time data were produced from 8911 earthquakes and 188 stations, and comprised 247,504 P waves and 196,057 S waves, with differential data of 1,608,230 for P waves and 1,114,068 for S waves. Grid intervals were set at 10-20 km in the along-arc direction, 5-10 km perpendicular to the arc, and 5-10 km in the vertical direction The final results were obtained after eight iterations, which reduced the travel-time residual from 0.17 s to 0.11 s for P waves, and from 0.33 s to 0.19 s for S waves. The results show a low-velocity zone around the focal area of the M7.1 event, and that the aftershock activity is limited to the upper 15 km of the oceanic mantle. The lateral extent of the low-velocity zone is comparable to the distribution of aftershocks, suggesting a concentration of fluids in the aftershock area. The angle between the aftershock alignment and the dip of the slab surface is estimated to be ~60°, which is consistent with the dip of an oceanward-dipping normal fault observed at the outer-trench slope. These observations suggest that the M7.1 intraslab event occurred as a result of reactivation of a

  3. Rheological structure of the lithosphere in plate boundary strike-slip fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzaras, Vasileios; Tikoff, Basil; Kruckenberg, Seth C.; Newman, Julie; Titus, Sarah J.; Withers, Anthony C.; Drury, Martyn R.

    2016-04-01

    How well constrained is the rheological structure of the lithosphere in plate boundary strike-slip fault systems? Further, how do lithospheric layers, with rheologically distinct behaviors, interact within the strike-slip fault zones? To address these questions, we present rheological observations from the mantle sections of two lithospheric-scale, strike-slip fault zones. Xenoliths from ˜40 km depth (970-1100 ° C) beneath the San Andreas fault system (SAF) provide critical constraints on the mechanical stratification of the lithosphere in this continental transform fault. Samples from the Bogota Peninsula shear zone (BPSZ, New Caledonia), which is an exhumed oceanic transform fault, provide insights on lateral variations in mantle strength and viscosity across the fault zone at a depth corresponding to deformation temperatures of ˜900 ° C. Olivine recrystallized grain size piezometry suggests that the shear stress in the SAF upper mantle is 5-9 MPa and in the BPSZ is 4-10 MPa. Thus, the mantle strength in both fault zones is comparable to the crustal strength (˜10 MPa) of seismogenic strike-slip faults in the SAF system. Across the BPSZ, shear stress increases from 4 MPa in the surrounding rocks to 10 MPa in the mylonites, which comprise the core of the shear zone. Further, the BPSZ is characterized by at least one order of magnitude difference in the viscosity between the mylonites (1018 Paṡs) and the surrounding rocks (1019 Paṡs). Mantle viscosity in both the BPSZ mylonites and the SAF (7.0ṡ1018-3.1ṡ1020 Paṡs) is relatively low. To explain our observations from these two strike-slip fault zones, we propose the "lithospheric feedback" model in which the upper crust and lithospheric mantle act together as an integrated system. Mantle flow controls displacement and the upper crust controls the stress magnitude in the system. Our stress data combined with data that are now available for the middle and lower crustal sections of other transcurrent fault

  4. The Future of the Plate Boundary Observatory in the GAGE Facility and beyond 2018

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, G. S.; Bendick, R. O.; Foster, J. H.; Freymueller, J. T.; La Femina, P. C.; Miller, M. M.; Rowan, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and Earthscope (GAGE) Facility, which operates the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), builds on UNAVCO's strong record of facilitating research and education in the geosciences and geodesy-related engineering fields. Precise positions and velocities for the PBO's ~1100 continuous GPS stations and other PBO data products are used to address a wide range of scientific and technical issues across North America. A large US and international community of scientists, surveyors, and civil engineers access PBO data streams, software, and other on-line resources daily. In a global society that is increasingly technology-dependent, consistently risk-averse, and often natural resource-limited, communities require geodetic research, education, and infrastructure to make informed decisions about living on a dynamic planet. The western U.S. and Alaska, where over 95% of the PBO sensor assets are located, have recorded significant geophysical events like earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunami. UNAVCO community science provides first-order constraints on geophysical processes to support hazards mapping and zoning, and form the basis for earthquake and tsunami early warning applications currently under development. The future of PBO was discussed at a NSF-sponsored three-day workshop held in September 2014 in Breckenridge, CO. Over 40 invited participants and community members, including representatives from interested stakeholder groups, UNAVCO staff, and members of the PBO Working Group and Geodetic Infrastructure Advisory Committee participated in workshop, which included retrospective and prospective plenary presentations and breakout sessions focusing on specific scientific themes. We will present some of the findings of that workshop in order to continue a dialogue about policies and resources for long-term earth observing networks. How PBO fits into the recently released U.S. National Plan for Civil Earth Observations will also be

  5. Crustal Structure and Evolution of the Eastern Himalayan Plate Boundary System, Northeast India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Priestley, K. F.; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Gaur, V. K.

    2018-01-01

    We use data from 24 broadband seismographs located south of the Eastern Himalayan plate boundary system to investigate the crustal structure beneath Northeast India. P wave receiver function analysis reveals felsic continental crust beneath the Brahmaputra Valley, Shillong Plateau and Mikir Hills, and mafic thinned passive margin transitional crust (basement layer) beneath the Bengal Basin. Within the continental crust, the central Shillong Plateau and Mikir Hills have the thinnest crust (30 ± 2 km) with similar velocity structure, suggesting a unified origin and uplift history. North of the plateau and Mikir Hills the crustal thickness increases sharply by 8-10 km and is modeled by ˜30∘ north dipping Moho flexure. South of the plateau, across the ˜1 km topographic relief of the Dawki Fault, the crustal thickness increases abruptly by 12-13 km and is modeled by downfaulting of the plateau crust, overlain by 13-14 km thick sedimentary layer/rocks of the Bengal Basin. Farther south, beneath central Bengal Basin, the basement layer is thinner (20-22 km) and has higher Vs (˜4.1 km s-1) indicating a transitional crystalline crust, overlain by the thickest sedimentary layer/rocks (18-20 km). Our models suggest that the uplift of the Shillong Plateau occurred by thrust faulting on the reactivated Dawki Fault, a continent margin paleorift fault, and subsequent back thrusting on the south dipping Oldham Fault, in response to flexural loading of the Eastern Himalaya. Our estimated Dawki Fault offset combined with timing of surface uplift of the plateau reveals a reasonable match between long-term uplift and convergence rate across the Dawki Fault with present-day GPS velocities.

  6. The Plate Boundary Observatory Student Field Assistant Program in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seider, E. L.

    2007-12-01

    Each summer, UNAVCO hires students as part of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) Student Field Assistant Program. PBO, the geodetic component of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, involves the reconnaissance, permitting, installation, documentation, and maintenance of 880 permanent GPS stations in five years. During the summer 2007, nine students from around the US and Puerto Rico were hired to assist PBO engineers during the busy summer field season. From June to September, students worked closely with PBO field engineers to install and maintain permanent GPS stations in all regions of PBO, including Alaska. The PBO Student Field Assistant Program provides students with professional hands-on field experience as well as continuing education in the geosciences. It also gives students a glimpse into the increasing technologies available to the science community, the scope of geophysical research utilizing these technologies, and the field techniques necessary to complete this research. Students in the PBO Field Assistant Program are involved in all aspects of GPS support, including in-warehouse preparation and in-field installations and maintenance. Students are taught practical skills such as drilling, wiring, welding, hardware configuration, documentation, and proper field safety procedures needed to construct permanent GPS stations. These real world experiences provide the students with technical and professional skills that are not always available to them in a classroom, and will benefit them greatly in their future studies and careers. The 2007 summer field season in Southern California consisted of over 35 GPS permanent station installations. To date, the Southern California region of PBO has installed over 190 GPS stations. This poster presentation will highlight the experiences gained by the Southern California student field assistants, while supporting PBO- Southern California GPS installations in the Mohave Desert and the Inyo National Forest.

  7. Complex Faulting Across the Los Angeles Portion of the Pacific-North American Plate Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay; Granat, Robert; Glasscae, Maggi; Lyzenga, Greg; Grant Ludwig, Lisa; Rundle, John

    2011-01-01

    We propose to observe seismically and tectonically active regions in northern and southern California using UAVSAR to support EarthScope activities. We will test the earthquake forecasting methodology developed by Rundle through NASA's QuakeSim project by observing regions indicated as having high probability for earthquakes in the near future (5-10 years). The UAVSAR flights will serve as a baseline for pre-earthquake activity. Should an earthquake occur during the course of this project, we will also be able to observe postseismic motions associated with the earthquakes.

  8. Monitoring the northern Chile megathrust with the Integrated Plate boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, Bernd; Asch, Günter; Cailleau, Beatrice; Diaz, Guillermo Chong; Barrientos, Sergio; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Oncken, Onno

    2010-05-01

    thousand aftershocks during the following week using waveform cross-correlation and the double-difference algorithm. Aftershocks reveal that rupture during this earthquake was confined to the deeper part (35 - 55 km depth) of the seismogenic coupling zone, except near the Mejillones peninsula that marks rupture termination in the south. Here earthquake activity reaches to depths of 20 km and even shallower, possibly indicating upper plate activation. The sequence also features an M 6.8 earthquake that broke the oceanic slab on an almost vertical plane at the down-dip end of the megathrust rupture. Confrontation with the aftershock distribution of the 1995 M 8.0 Antofagasta earthquake on the adjoining southern segment reveals an intriguing mirror symmetry with an axis crossing the Mejillones peninsula, emphasizing the penisula's significance as a segment boundary. Since then activity inside the remaining seismic gap to the north picked up with three earthquakes exceeding magnitude 6, maybe heralding the next great rupture.

  9. Receptivity of Flat-Plate Boundary Layer in a Non-Uniform Free Stream (Vorticity Normal to the Plate)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, M. N.; Shumilkin, V. G.; Ustinov, M. V.; Zhigulev, S. V.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of low speed leading edge boundary layer receptivity to free-stream vorticity produced by upstream wires normal to the leading edge are discussed. Data include parametric variations in leading edge configuration and details of the incident disturbance field including single and multiple wakes. The induced disturbance amplitude increases with increases in the leading edge diameter and wake interactions. Measurements agree with the theory of M. E. Goldstein.

  10. Structure and composition of the plate-boundary slip zone for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake.

    PubMed

    Chester, Frederick M; Rowe, Christie; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Kirkpatrick, James; Regalla, Christine; Remitti, Francesca; Moore, J Casey; Toy, Virginia; Wolfson-Schwehr, Monica; Bose, Santanu; Kameda, Jun; Mori, James J; Brodsky, Emily E; Eguchi, Nobuhisa; Toczko, Sean

    2013-12-06

    The mechanics of great subduction earthquakes are influenced by the frictional properties, structure, and composition of the plate-boundary fault. We present observations of the structure and composition of the shallow source fault of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake and tsunami from boreholes drilled by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 343 and 343T. Logging-while-drilling and core-sample observations show a single major plate-boundary fault accommodated the large slip of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake rupture, as well as nearly all the cumulative interplate motion at the drill site. The localization of deformation onto a limited thickness (less than 5 meters) of pelagic clay is the defining characteristic of the shallow earthquake fault, suggesting that the pelagic clay may be a regionally important control on tsunamigenic earthquakes.

  11. Plate convergence, transcurrent faults and internal deformation adjacent to Southeast Asia and the western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitch, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    A model for oblique convergence between plates of lithosphere is proposed in which at least a fraction of slip parallel to the plate margin results in transcurrent movements on a nearly vertical fault which is located on the continental side of a zone of plate consumption. In an extreme case of complete decoupling only the component of slip normal to the plate margin can be inferred from underthrusting. Recent movements in the western Sunda region provide the most convincing evidence for decoupling of slip, which in this region is thought to be oblique to the plate margin. A speculative model for convergence along the margins of the Philippine Sea is constructed from an inferred direction of oblique slip in the Philippine region. This model requires that the triple point formed by the junction of the Japanese and Izu-Bonin trenches and the Nankai trough migrate along the Sagami trough.

  12. Unsteady heat-flux measurements of second-mode instability waves in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the application of the atomic layer thermopile (ALTP) heat-flux sensor to the measurement of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a hypersonic flat-plate boundary layer. The centerline of the flat-plate model was instrumented with a streamwise array of ALTP sensors, and the flat-plate model was exposed to a Mach 6 freestream over a range of unit Reynolds numbers. Here, we observed an unstable band of frequencies that are associated with second-mode instability waves in the laminar boundary layer that forms on the flat-plate surface. The measured frequencies, group velocities, phase speeds, and wavelengths of these instability waves are consistent with data previously reported in the literature. Heat flux time series, and the Morlet wavelet transforms of them, revealed the wave-packet nature of the second-mode instability waves. In addition, a laser-based radiative heating system was used to measure the frequency response functions (FRF) of the ALTP sensors used in the wind tunnel test. These measurements were used to assess the stability of the sensor FRFs over time and to correct spectral estimates for any attenuation caused by the finite sensor bandwidth.

  13. An unrecognized major collision of the Okhotomorsk Block with East Asia during the Late Cretaceous, constraints on the plate reorganization of the Northwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong-Tai

    2013-11-01

    Interactions at plate boundaries induce stresses that constitute critical controls on the structural evolution of intraplate regions. However, the traditional tectonic model for the East Asian margin during the Mesozoic, invoking successive episodes of paleo-Pacific oceanic subduction, does not provide an adequate context for important Late Cretaceous dynamics across East Asia, including: continental-scale orogenic processes, significant sinistral strike-slip faulting, and several others. The integration of numerous documented field relations requires a new tectonic model, as proposed here. The Okhotomorsk continental block, currently residing below the Okhotsk Sea in Northeast Asia, was located in the interior of the Izanagi Plate before the Late Cretaceous. It moved northwestward with the Izanagi Plate and collided with the South China Block at about 100 Ma. The indentation of the Okhotomorsk Block within East Asia resulted in the formation of a sinistral strike-slip fault system in South China, formation of a dextral strike-slip fault system in North China, and regional northwest-southeast shortening and orogenic uplift in East Asia. Northeast-striking mountain belts over 500 km wide extended from Southeast China to Southwest Japan and South Korea. The peak metamorphism at about 89 Ma of the Sanbagawa high-pressure metamorphic belt in Southwest Japan was probably related to the continental subduction of the Okhotomorsk Block beneath the East Asian margin. Subsequently, the north-northwestward change of motion direction of the Izanagi Plate led to the northward movement of the Okhotomorsk Block along the East Asian margin, forming a significant sinistral continental transform boundary similar to the San Andreas fault system in California. Sanbagawa metamorphic rocks in Southwest Japan were rapidly exhumed through the several-kilometer wide ductile shear zone at the lower crust and upper mantle level. Accretionary complexes successively accumulated along the East

  14. Compilation of Surface Creep on California Faults and Comparison of WGCEP 2007 Deformation Model to Pacific-North American Plate Motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wisely, Beth A.; Schmidt, David A.; Weldon, Ray J.

    2008-01-01

    expressed as earthquakes large enough to model. Because the ratio of the rate of creep relative to the total slip rate is often used to infer the average depth of creep, the ?depth? of creep can be calculated and used to reduce the surface area of a fault that generates earthquakes in our model. This reduction of surface area of rupture is described by an ?aseismicity factor,? assigned to each creeping fault in Appendix A. An aseismicity factor of less than 1 is only assigned to faults that are inferred to creep during the entire interseismic period. A single aseismicity factor was chosen for each section of the fault that creeps by expert opinion from the observations documented here. Uncertainties were not determined for the aseismicity factor, and thus it represents an unmodeled (and difficult to model) source of error. This Appendix simply provides the documentation of known creep, the type and precision of its measurement, and attempts to characterize the creep as interseismic, afterslip, transient or triggered. Parts 2 and 3 of this Appendix compare the WG-07 deformation model and the seismic source model it generates to the strain generated by the Pacific - North American plate motion. The concept is that plate motion generates essentially all of the elastic strain in the vicinity of the plate boundary that can be released as earthquakes. Adding up the slip rates on faults and all others sources of deformation (such as C-zones and distributed ?background? seismicity) should approximately yield the plate motion. This addition is usually accomplished by one of four approaches: 1) line integrals that sum deformation along discrete paths through the deforming zone between the two plates, 2) seismic moment tensors that add up seismic moment of a representative set of earthquakes generated by a crustal volume spanning the plate boundary, 3) strain tensors generated by adding up the strain associated with all of the faults in a crustal volume spanning the plate

  15. Lower Boundary Forcing related to the Occurrence of Rain in the Tropical Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Carbone, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Global weather and climate models have a long and somewhat tortured history with respect to simulation and prediction of tropical rainfall in the relative absence of balanced flow in the geostrophic sense. An important correlate with tropical rainfall is sea surface temperature (SST). The introduction of SST information to convective rainfall parameterization in global models has improved model climatologies of tropical oceanic rainfall. Nevertheless, large systematic errors have persisted, several of which are common to most atmospheric models. Models have evolved to the point where increased spatial resolution demands representation of the SST field at compatible temporal and spatial scales, leading to common usage of monthly SST fields at scales of 10-100 km. While large systematic errors persist, significant skill has been realized from various atmospheric and coupled ocean models, including assimilation of weekly or even daily SST fields, as tested by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting. A few investigators have explored the role of SST gradients in relation to the occurrence of precipitation. Some of this research has focused on large scale gradients, mainly associated with surface ocean-atmosphere climatology. These studies conclude that lower boundary atmospheric convergence, under some conditions, could be substantially enhanced over SST gradients, destabilizing the atmosphere, and thereby enabling moist convection. While the concept has a firm theoretical foundation, it has not gained a sizeable following far beyond the realm of western boundary currents. Li and Carbone 2012 examined the role of transient mesoscale (~ 100 km) SST gradients in the western Pacific warm pool by means of GHRSST and CMORPH rainfall data. They found that excitation of deep moist convection was strongly associated with the Laplacian of SST (LSST). Specifically, -LSST is associated with rainfall onset in 75% of 10,000 events over 4 years, whereas the

  16. Abbot Ice Shelf, the Amundsen Sea Continental Margin and the Southern Boundary of the Bellingshausen Plate Seaward of West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, J. R.; Tinto, K. J.; Bell, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Abbot Ice Shelf extends 450 km along the coast of West Antarctica between 103°W and 89°W and straddles the boundary between the Bellingshausen Sea continental margin, which overlies a former subduction zone, and Amundsen Sea rifted continental margin. Inversion of NASA Operation IceBridge airborne gravity data for sub-ice bathymetry shows that the western part of the ice shelf, as well as Cosgrove Ice Shelf to the south, are underlain by a series of east-west trending rift basins. The eastern boundary of the rifted terrain coincides with the eastern boundary of rifting between Antarctica and Zealandia and the rifts formed during the early stages of this rifting. Extension in these rifts is minor as rifting quickly jumped north of Thurston Island. The southern boundary of the Cosgrove Rift is aligned with the southern boundary of a sedimentary basin under the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf to the west, also formed by Antarctica-Zealandia rifting. The shelf basin has an extension factor, β, of 1.5 - 1.7 with 80 -100 km of extension occurring in an area now ~250 km wide. Following this extension early in the rifting process, rifting centered to the north of the present shelf edge and proceeded to continental rupture. Since then, the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf has been tectonically quiescent and has primarily been shaped though subsidence, sedimentation and the passage of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet back and forth across it. The former Bellingshausen Plate was located seaward of the Amundsen Sea margin prior to its incorporation into the Antarctic Plate at ~62 Ma. During the latter part of its existence, Bellingshausen plate motion had a clockwise rotational component relative to Antarctica producing convergence between the Bellingshausen and Antarctic plates east of 102°W. Seismic reflection and gravity data show that this convergence is expressed by an area of intensely deformed sediments beneath the continental slope from 102°W to 95°W and

  17. Unsteady boundary layer flow and heat transfer of a Casson fluid past an oscillating vertical plate with Newtonian heating.

    PubMed

    Hussanan, Abid; Zuki Salleh, Mohd; Tahar, Razman Mat; Khan, Ilyas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the heat transfer effect on the unsteady boundary layer flow of a Casson fluid past an infinite oscillating vertical plate with Newtonian heating is investigated. The governing equations are transformed to a systems of linear partial differential equations using appropriate non-dimensional variables. The resulting equations are solved analytically by using the Laplace transform method and the expressions for velocity and temperature are obtained. They satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and reduce to some well-known solutions for Newtonian fluids. Numerical results for velocity, temperature, skin friction and Nusselt number are shown in various graphs and discussed for embedded flow parameters. It is found that velocity decreases as Casson parameters increases and thermal boundary layer thickness increases with increasing Newtonian heating parameter.

  18. The turbulent boundary layer on a porous plate: An experimental study of the heat transfer behavior with adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, B. F.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the heat transfer behavior of the near equilibrium transpired turbulent boundary layer with adverse pressure gradient has been carried out. Stanton numbers were measured by an energy balance on electrically heated plates that form the bottom wall of the wind tunnel. Two adverse pressure gradients were studied. Two types of transpiration boundary conditions were investigated. The concept of an equilibrium thermal boundary layer was introduced. It was found that Stanton number as a function of enthalpy thickness Reynolds number is essentially unaffected by adverse pressure gradient with no transpiration. Shear stress, heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number profiles were computed from mean temperature and velocity profiles. It was concluded that the turbulent Prandtl number is greater than unity in near the wall and decreases continuously to approximately 0.5 at the free stream.

  19. Seismo-electromagnetic phenomena in the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves da Silva, Hugo; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Biagi, Pier; Namorado Rosa, Rui; Salgueiro da Silva, Manuel; Caldeira, Bento; Heitor Reis, Artur; Borges, José Fernando; Tlemçani, Mouhaydine; Manso, Marco

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a future research plan that aims to monitor Seismo-electromagnetic (SEM) phenomena in the western part of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary (WENP). This region has a significant tectonic activity [1] combined with relatively low electromagnetic noise levels and for that reason presents the possibility to perform high quality SEM measurements. Further, it is known that low-frequency [ultra (ULF), very (VLF), and low-frequencies (LF)] electromagnetic (EM) waves produce more convincing earthquake precursors (compared to higher frequencies) because of less contamination, large skin depth, and low attenuation [2]. Thus, two SEM effects will be considered: ULF electromagnetic field emissions [3], and VLF/LF radio broadcastings [4]. With respect to the ULF measurements, as a start, three ULF sensors are planned to be installed in the South of Iberian Peninsula supported by the existing networks of seismic research stations. Subsequent development of this initial plan could result in the implementation of a lager ULF monitoring network not only in the Iberian Peninsula, but also in the rest of Europe. Possible integration in the SEGMA array is now under consideration. Another perspective is to use a portable station to track seismic events. Regarding the VLF/LF radio broadcastings, a receiver is planned to be mounted in University of Évora. Radio signals from up to 10 transmitters (in these bands) of interest to study the seismic activity in the WENP region will be monitored. Actually, the radio path from the transmitter to the receiver should cross the epicentral area, therefore two possible transmitters are the ones installed in Monaco (France) and Sicily (Italy). Furthermore, the system will integrate the INFREP network and in this context it will not be restricted to WENP region. With the development of these research plans we aim to collect novel SEM data emerging from the seismic activity in the WENP region. We expect to address the time

  20. Morphotectonics of Sea of Marmara: A Basin on North Anatolian Continental Transform Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çaǧatay, M. Namık; Uçarkuş, Gülsen; Eriş, K. Kadir; Henry, Pierre; Geli, Louis; Gasperini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    The Sea of Marmara is located the North Anatolian Fault (NAF), a continental transform plate boundary between the Eurasian and Anatolian-Aegean plates. The area is also under the influence of the N-S extensional Aegean regime. The 100 km-wide NAF zone in the Marmara region accommodates about 25 mm/yr dextral motion, with 70-80% of this displacement taking place along the northern branch of the NAF, the Main Marmara Fault in the Sea of Marmara. The main morphological elements of the Sea of Marmara consists of less than 100 m deep shelf areas, 1250 m three deep sub-basins (Tekirdaǧ, Central and Çınarcık) and two NE-trending pressure highs (Western and Central) separating the deep subbasins. The other elements are 800 m deep Kumburgaz Basin on the Central High, 400 m deep İmralı Basin in the south, and 100-200 m deep, E-W oriented gulfs or bays. The slopes connecting the shelf to the deep basins have slope angles ranging between 6° and 29°, and are incised by submarine canyons and marked by landslides scars. The basins have accumulated up to 6 km thick sediments. They are subsiding at a rate 5-6 mm/year and accumulating sediments at rates of 1-3 mm/yr over the last 15 ka, with the rates for the glacial periods being the 2-3 times that for interglacials. The sedimentation rates over the highs range between 0.2 and 0.4 mm/yr over the last 70 ka. The morphology of the Sea of Marmara is controlled by the NAF activity that was in turn guided a complex basement structure in the region. The basement of the Sea of Marmara region consists of various micro-continents (Istanbul Zone and Rhodope-Pontide and Sakarya continents), ophiolitic suture zones and the hydrocarbon bearing Eocene-Middle Miocene Thrace Basin on the southern margin of Rhodope-Pontide continent. After closure of the Intra-Pontide Ocean and the collision of the Sakarya and Rhodope-Pontide continents during the Oligocene-Early Miocene, the region was uplifted, and subjected to peneplanation during the

  1. MHD Forced Convective Laminar Boundary Layer Flow from a Convectively Heated Moving Vertical Plate with Radiation and Transpiration Effect

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jashim; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, A. I. Md.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to where is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory. PMID:23741295

  2. The Plate Boundary Observatory: Current status and plans for the next five years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, G. S.; Feaux, K.; Meertens, C. M.; Mencin, D.; Miller, M.

    2013-12-01

    UNAVCO currently operates and maintains the NSF-funded Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), which is the geodetic facility of EarthScope. PBO was designed and built from 2003 to 2008 with $100M investment from the NSF Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (MREFC) Program. UNAVCO operated and maintained PBO under a Cooperative Agreement (CA) with NSF from 2008 to 2013 and will continue PBO O&M for the next five years as part of the new Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) Facility. PBO is largest continuous GPS and borehole geophysical network in the Americas, with 1100 continuous Global Positioning System (cGPS) sites, including several with multiple monuments, 79 boreholes, with 75 tensor strainmeters, 78 short-period, 3-component seismometers, and pore pressure sensors at 23 sites. PBO also includes 26 tiltmeters deployed at volcanoes in Alaska, Mt St Helens, and Yellowstone caldera and 6 long-baseline laser strainmeters. Surface meteorological sensors are collocated at 154 GPS sites. UNAVCO provides high-rate (1 Hz), low-latency (<1 s) GPS data streams (RT-GPS) from 382 stations in PBO. UNAVCO has delivered over 62 Tb of geodetic data to the EarthScope community since its PBO's inception in 2004. Over the past year, data return for the cGPS component of PBO is 98%, well above the data return metric of 85% set by the NSF, a result of efforts to upgrade power systems and communications infrastructure. In addition, PBO has set the standard for the design, construction, and operation of other multi-hazard networks across the Americas, including COCONet in the Caribbean region and TLALOCNet in Mexico. Funding to support ongoing PBO O&M has declined from FY2012 CA levels under the new GAGE Facility. The implications for data return and data quality metrics as well as replacement of aging PBO GPS instruments with GNSS-compatible systems are as yet unknown. A process to assess the cost of specific PBO components, data rates, enhanced

  3. Studying the active deformation of distributed plate boundaries by integration of GNSS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Nicola; Avallone, Antonio; Cecere, Gianpaolo; D'Anastasio, Elisabetta

    2013-04-01

    In the last decade GNSS networks installed for different purposes have proliferated in Italy and now provide a large amount of data available to geophysical studies. In addition to the existing regional and nation-wide scientific GNSS networks developed by ASI (http://geodaf.mt.asi.it), INGV (http://ring.gm.ingv.it) and OGS (http://crs.inogs.it/frednet), a large number (> 400) of continuously-operating GPS stations have been installed in the framework of regional and national networks, both publicly-operated and commercial, developed to provide real-time positioning capability to surveyors. Although the quality of the data and metadata associated to these stations is generally lower with respect to the "scientific" CGPS stations, the increased density and redundancy in crustal motion information, resulting in more than 500 stations with more than 2.5 years of observations, significantly increase the knowledge of the active deformation of the Italian territory and provides a unique image of the crustal deformation field. The obtained GPS velocity field is analysed and various features ranging from the definition of strain distribution and microplate kinematics within the plate boundary, to the evaluation of tectonic strain accumulation on active faults are presented in this work. Undeforming, aseismic regions (Sardinia, Southern Apulia) provide test sites to evaluate the lower bound on the accuracy achievable to measure tectonic deformation. Integration of GNSS networks significantly improves the resolution of the strain rate field in Central Italy showing that active deformation is concentrated in a narrow belt along the crest of the Apennines, consistently with the distribution of the largest historical and recent earthquakes. Products derived from dense GPS velocity and strain rate fields include map of earthquake potential developed under the assumption that the rate of seismic moment accumulation measured from geodesy distributes into earthquake sizes that

  4. Lithospheric strength variations as a control on new plate boundaries: examples from the northern Red Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckler, Michael S.; ten Brink, Uri S.

    1986-08-01

    The complex plate boundary between Arabia and Africa at the northern end of the Red Sea includes the Gulf of Suez rift and the Gulf of Aqaba—Dead Sea transform. Geologic evidence indicates that during the earliest phase of rifting the Red Sea propagated NNW towards the Mediterranean Sea creating the Gulf of Suez. Subsequently, the majority of the relative movement between the plates shifted eastward to the Dead Sea transform. We propose that an increase in the strength of the lithosphere across the Mediterranean continental margin acted as a barrier to the propagation of the rift. A new plate boundary, the Dead Sea transform formed along a zone of minimum strength. We present an analysis of lithospheric strength variations across the Mediterranean continental margin. The main factors controlling these variations are the geotherm, crustal thickness and composition, and sediment thickness. The analysis predicts a characteristic strength profile at continental margins which consists of a marked increase in strength seaward of the hinge zone and a strength minimum landward of the hinge zone. This strength profile also favors the creation of thin continental slivers such as the Levant west of the Dead Sea transform and the continental promontory containing Socotra Island at the mouth of the Gulf of Aden. Calculations of strength variations based on changes of crustal thickness, geotherm and sediment thickness can be extended to other geologic settings as well. They can explain the location of rerifting events at intracratonic basins, of backarc basins and of major continental strike-slip zones.

  5. Tectonic Structure of the Middle America Pacific Margin and Incoming Cocos Plate From Costa Rica to Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranero, C. R.; Weinrebe, W.; Grevemeyer, I.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Vannucchi, P.; von Huene, R.

    2003-12-01

    A new multibeam bathymetry and magnetic survey with R/V SONNE in summer 2003 has mapped the continental margin and incoming plate of NW Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala, extending existing coverage from offshore Costa Rica and part of Nicaragua to a full coverage map of about 1200 km long by 100 km wide area along the plate boundary. The incoming plate along Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala is of similar age and was formed at superfast spreading rates; however, its morphology changes drastically along strike. The seafloor-spreading inherited morphology is very smooth along Nicaragua, but with ridges up to 800 m high in Guatemala, with a transition across El Salvador. The development and dimensions of the dominant inherited fabric seems to be related to discontinuities at the paleospreading center. A series of troughs oblique to the main fabric may indicate the location of pseudofaults and correspond to areas where the seafloor fabric is most prominent. Bending of the oceanic plate into the trench reactivates the inherited fabric forming a well pervasive faulting system along the oceanic trench slope. The continental slope displays three morphotectonic units that roughly correspond to the upper, middle and lower slope, although the across slope width of each unit is fairly variable. Small canyons and gullies that form at the sudden dip change across the shelf break carve the upper slope. The canyons coalesce and become shallower as the dip decreases downslope. Locally some large canyons continue into the slope toe. The middle slope is a rough terrain variable in width and dip sculptured by pervasive normal faulting and locally by mass wasting processes. The lower slope is formed by en echelon terraces striking similar to the rough terrain of the incoming plate and mimicking the half graben morphology of the underthusting plate. The three morphotectonic slope domains represent differences in tectonic activity, with more stable upper slope, a middle slope

  6. Impact of Ship Emissions on Marine Boundary Layer NO(x) and SO2 Distributions over the Pacific Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. D.; Grodzinsky, G.; Kasibhatla, P.; Crawford, J.; Chen, G.; Liu, S.; Bandy, A.; Thornton, D.; Guan, H.; Sandholm, S.

    2001-01-01

    The impact of ship emissions on marine boundary layer (MBL) NO(x) and SO2 levels over the Pacific Ocean has been explored by comparing predictions (with and without ships) from a global chemical transport model (GCTM) against compiled airborne observations of MBL NO(x) and SO2. For latitudes above 15 N, which define that part of the Pacific having the heaviest shipping, this analysis revealed significant model over prediction for NOx and a modest under prediction for SO2 when ship emissions were considered. Possible reasons for the difference in NO(x) and SO2 were explored using a full-chemistry box model. These results revealed that for an actual plume setting the NO(x) lifetime could be greatly shortened by chemical processes promoted by ship plume emissions themselves. Similar chemical behavior was not found for SO2.

  7. Plate boundary and major fault system in the overriding plate within the Shumagin gap at the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becel, A.; Shillington, D. J.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Keranen, K. M.; Li, J.; Webb, S. C.; Kuehn, H.

    2013-12-01

    Structure in the overriding plate is one of the parameters that may increase the tsunamigenic potential of a subduction zone but also influence the seismogenic behavior and segmentation of great earthquake rupture. The Alaska-Aleutian margin is characterized by along-strike changes in plate interface coupling over relatively small distances. Here, we present trench normal multichannel seismic (MCS) profiles acquired across the Shumagin gap that has not broken in many decades and appears to be weakly coupled. The high fold, deep penetration (636 channel, 8-km long streamer, 6600 cu.in airgun source) MCS data were acquired as part of the ALEUT project. This dataset gives us critical new constraints on the interplate boundary that can be traced over ~100 km distance beneath the forearc with high variation in its reflection response with depth. These profiles also reveal the detailed upper plate fault structure and forearc morphology. Clear reflections in the overriding plate appear to delineate one or more large faults that cross the shelf and the upper slope. These faults are observed 75 km back from the trench and seem to branch at depth and connect to the plate interface within this gap at ~11 s twtt. We compare the reflective structure of these faults to that of the plate boundary and examine where it intersects the megathrust with respect of the expected downdip limit of coupling. We also compare this major structure with the seismicity recorded in this sector. The imaged fault system is associated with a large deep basin (~6s twt) that is an inherited structure formed during the pre-Aleutian period. Basins faults appear to have accommodated primarily normal motion, although folding of sediments near the fault and complicated fault geometries in the shallow section may indicate that this fault has accommodated other types of motion during its history that may reflect the stress-state at the megathrust over time. The deformation within the youngest sediment also

  8. Post-rift Tectonic History of the Songliao Basin, NE China: Cooling Events and Post-rift Unconformities Driven by Orogenic Pulses From Plate Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ying; Stepashko, Andrei; Liu, Keyu; He, Qingkun; Shen, Chuanbo; Shi, Bingjie; Ren, Jianye

    2018-03-01

    The classic lithosphere-stretching model predicts that the post-rift evolution of extensional basin should be exclusively controlled by decaying thermal subsidence. However, the stratigraphy of the Songliao Basin in northeastern China shows that the post-rift evolution was punctuated by multiple episodes of uplift and exhumation events, commonly attributed to the response to regional tectonic events, including the far-field compression from plate margins. Three prominent tectonostratigraphic post-rift unconformities are recognized in the Late Cretaceous strata of the basin: T11, T03, and T02. The subsequent Cenozoic history is less constrained due to the incomplete record of younger deposits. In this paper, we utilize detrital apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology to unravel the enigmatic timing and origin of post-rift unconformities. Relating the AFT results to the unconformities and other geological data, we conclude that in the post-rift stage, the basin experienced a multiepisodic tectonic evolution with four distinct cooling and exhumation events. The thermal history and age pattern document the timing of the unconformities in the Cretaceous succession: the T11 unconformity at 88-86 Ma, the T03 unconformity at 79-75 Ma, and the T02 unconformity at 65-50 Ma. A previously unrecognized Oligocene unconformity is also defined by a 32-24 Ma cooling event. Tectonically, all the cooling episodes were regional, controlled by plate boundary stresses. We propose that Pacific dynamics influenced the wider part of eastern Asia during the Late Cretaceous until Cenozoic, whereas the far-field effects of the Neo-Tethys subduction and collision processes became another tectonic driver in the later Cenozoic.

  9. Structural variation of the oceanic Moho in the Pacific plate revealed by active-source seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Akane; Kodaira, Shuichi; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Fujie, Gou; Arai, Ryuta; Miura, Seiichi

    2017-10-01

    The characteristics of the oceanic Moho are known to depend on various factors, such as seafloor spreading rate, crustal age, and accretionary processes at a ridge. However, the effect of local magmatic activities on the seismic signature of the Moho is poorly understood. Here an active-source reflection and refraction survey is used to investigate crustal structure and Moho characteristics along a >1000-km-long profile southeast of the Shatsky Rise in a Pacific Ocean basin formed from the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous and spanning the onset of Shatsky Rise volcanism. Although the seismic velocity structure estimated from the refraction data showed typical characteristics of the oceanic crust of the old Pacific plate, the appearance of the Moho reflections was spatially variable. We observed clear Moho reflections such as those to be expected where the spreading rate is fast to intermediate only at the southwestern end of the profile, whereas Moho reflections were diffuse, weak, or absent along other parts of the profile. The poor Moho reflections can be explained by the presence of a thick crust-mantle transition layer, which is temporally coincident with the formation of the Shatsky Rise. We inferred that the crust-mantle transition layer was formed by changes in on-axis accretion process or modification of the primary Moho by off-axis magmatism, induced by magmatic activity of the Shatsky Rise.

  10. Nitrate in the atmospheric boundary layer of the tropical South Pacific - Implications regarding sources and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savoie, Dennis L.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Merrill, John T.; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    1989-01-01

    Weekly bulk aerosol samples collected at three sites in the tropical South Pacific from 1983 to 1987 are analyzed. The mean nitrate concentrations obtained for the sites range from 0.107 to 0.117 microg/cu m. The results suggest that the region is minimally affected by the transport of soil material and pollutants from the continents. Measurements from sites in the tropical North Pacific show mean nitrate concentrations that are about three times higher than those in the South Pacific, showing that the North Pacific is significantly impacted by the transport of material from Asia and North America. The relationships between the nitrate concentrations to other constituents at American Samoa are discussed, including nonseasalt sulfate, Pb-210, and Be-7.

  11. Plate Boundary Observatory Infrastructure and Data Products in Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Barbour, K.; Lee, E.

    2005-12-01

    As one of three major components of NSF's EarthScope program, the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) encourages the integration of research and education. Informing various communities about the current work of PBO and the scientific discoveries related to the use of this instrumentation has contributed to the success of PBO during the first two years of the EarthScope project. UNAVCO(PBO), IRIS (USArray), and the EarthScope project office work together to integrate Education and Outreach (E&O) opportunities into a program that is greater than the sum of its parts and yet maintains the identity of each organization. Building and maintaining the PBO website, documenting and archiving activities of PBO, providing short courses for professional development of scientists using EarthScope data, and developing higher level data products with an appropriate educational framework are a few of the activities that provide both challenges and opportunities. The internet, particularly the World Wide Web, has become the primary tool for disseminating information to various audiences. The primary goals of the PBO website are to provide current information on the progress of GPS and Strainmeter facility construction; to provide access to different levels of data products; and to facilitate networking with and among scientists. Challenges for the PBO website include publishing current stories on installation projects while coordinating with field engineers on a regular basis; providing near to real time updates and maintaining quality assurance processes; and defining personnel requirements for a maintaining a dynamic website. Currently, archived photographs, web diaries, and numerous web highlights document PBO's success and provide a visual record of PBO's accomplishments and behind-the-scene activities over the last two years. The community charged PBO with increasing the number of scientists using its data. UNAVCO does this by providing short courses for professional development

  12. EarthScope: Cyberinfrastructure to access Plate Boundary Observatory data products and services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.; Miller, M.; Boler, F. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Mencin, D.; Phillips, D. A.; Snett, L.

    2013-12-01

    The wealth of data from geodetic observing systems, especially the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), presents major data management challenges. The challenges are driven by ingenious new uses of Global Positioning System (GPS) data, demands for higher-rate, lower latency data, the need for continued access and long term preservation of archival data, the expansion of data users into other science, engineering and commercial arenas, and the growth of enhanced products that expand the utility of the data. To meet these challenges, UNAVCO has established a comprehensive suite of data services encompassing sensor network data operations, data product generation (through the activities of partners at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Central Washington University, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, and the University of California, San Diego - UCSD), data management, access and archiving, and advanced cyberinfrastructure. PBO sensor systems include 1,100 continuously operating GPS stations, 79 borehole geophysical sites (with a combination of strainmeters, tiltmeters, seismometers, pore pressure gauges, and meteorological sensors), and 6 long baseline strainmeters. Imaging data acquired for EarthScope include large volumes of satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and airborne LiDAR data. Core data products such as daily GPS position time series and derived crustal motion velocities have been augmented with real-time data streams and positions calculated every second from 367 PBO stations. Higher rate (5 Hz) data files are available for applications such as GPS seismology. Efforts are underway with UCSD to integrate GPS and accelerometers at a subset of PBO sites to increase the reliability and capability of the observations. These observations have utility for research and hazards mitigation. Ingenious methods of GPS data analysis, developed by the University of Colorado and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, measure snow depth

  13. Locating seismicity on the Arctic plate boundary using multiple-event techniques and empirical signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, S. J.; Harris, D. B.; Dahl-Jensen, T.; Kværna, T.; Larsen, T. B.; Paulsen, B.; Voss, P. H.

    2017-12-01

    The oceanic boundary separating the Eurasian and North American plates between 70° and 84° north hosts large earthquakes which are well recorded teleseismically, and many more seismic events at far lower magnitudes that are well recorded only at regional distances. Existing seismic bulletins have considerable spread and bias resulting from limited station coverage and deficiencies in the velocity models applied. This is particularly acute for the lower magnitude events which may only be constrained by a small number of Pn and Sn arrivals. Over the past two decades there has been a significant improvement in the seismic network in the Arctic: a difficult region to instrument due to the harsh climate, a sparsity of accessible sites (particularly at significant distances from the sea), and the expense and difficult logistics of deploying and maintaining stations. New deployments and upgrades to stations on Greenland, Svalbard, Jan Mayen, Hopen, and Bjørnøya have resulted in a sparse but stable regional seismic network which results in events down to magnitudes below 3 generating high-quality Pn and Sn signals on multiple stations. A catalogue of several hundred events in the region since 1998 has been generated using many new phase readings on stations on both sides of the spreading ridge in addition to teleseismic P phases. A Bayesian multiple event relocation has resulted in a significant reduction in the spread of hypocentre estimates for both large and small events. Whereas single event location algorithms minimize vectors of time residuals on an event-by-event basis, the Bayesloc program finds a joint probability distribution of origins, hypocentres, and corrections to traveltime predictions for large numbers of events. The solutions obtained favour those event hypotheses resulting in time residuals which are most consistent over a given source region. The relocations have been performed with different 1-D velocity models applicable to the Arctic region and

  14. PBO Nucleus Project Status: Integration of 209 Existing GPS Stations into the Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, F.; Meertens, C.; Anderson, G.; Eriksson, S.; Boyce, E.

    2007-12-01

    Tectonic and earthquake research in the US has experienced a quiet revolution over the last decade precipitated by the recognition that slow-motion faulting events can both trigger and be triggered by regular earthquakes. Transient motion has now been found in essentially all tectonic environments, and the detection and analysis of such events is the first-order science target of the EarthScope Project. Because of this and a host of other fundamental tectonics questions that can be answered only with long-duration geodetic time series, the incipient 1100-station EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) network has been designed to leverage 445 existing continuous GPS stations whose measurements extend back over a decade. The irreplaceable recording history of these stations will accelerate EarthScope scientific return by providing the highest possible resolution. This resolution will be used to detect and understand transients, to determine the three-dimensional velocity field (particularly vertical motion), and to improve measurement precision by understanding the complex noise sources inherent in GPS. The PBO Nucleus project supports the operation, maintenance and hardware upgrades of a subset of the six western U.S. geodetic networks until they are subsumed by PBO. Uninterrupted data flow from these stations will effectively double the time-series length of PBO over the expected life of EarthScope, and has created, for the first time, a single GPS-based geodetic network in the US. The other existing sites remain in operation under support from non-NSF sources (e.g. the USGS), and EarthScope continues to benefit from their continued operation On the grounds of relevance to EarthScope science goals, geographic distribution and data quality, 209 of the 432 existing stations were selected as the nucleus upon which to build PBO. Conversion of these stations to a PBO-compatible mode of operation was begun under previous funding, and as a result data now flow

  15. PBO Nucleus Project Status: Integration of 209 Existing GPS Stations into the Plate Boundary Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, F.; Prescott, W.; Anderson, G.; Eriksson, S.; Feldl, N.

    2006-12-01

    Tectonic and earthquake research in the US has experienced a quiet revolution over the last decade precipitated by the recognition that slow-motion faulting events can both trigger and be triggered by regular earthquakes. Transient motion has now been found in essentially all tectonic environments, and the detection and analysis of such events is the first-order science target of the EarthScope Project. Because of this and a host of other fundamental tectonics questions that can be answered only with long-duration geodetic time series, the incipient 1400-station EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) network has been designed to leverage 432 existing continuous GPS stations whose measurements extend back over a decade. The irreplaceable recording history of these stations is accelerating EarthScope scientific return by providing the highest possible resolution. This resolution will be used to detect and understand transients, to determine the three-dimensional velocity field (particularly vertical motion), and to improve measurement precision by understanding the complex noise sources inherent in GPS. The PBO Nucleus project supports the operation, maintenance and hardware upgrades of a subset of the six western U.S. geodetic networks until they are subsumed by PBO. Uninterrupted data flow from these stations will effectively double the time-series length of PBO over the expected life of EarthScope, and has created, for the first time, a single GPS-based geodetic network in the US. The other existing sites remain in operation under support from non-NSF sources (e.g. the USGS), and EarthScope continues to benefit from their continued operation. On the grounds of relevance to EarthScope science goals, geographic distribution and data quality, 209 of the 432 existing stations were selected as the nucleus upon which to build PBO. Conversion of these stations to a PBO-compatible mode of operation was begun under previous funding, and as a result data now flow

  16. The Dauki Thrust Fault and the Shillong Anticline: An incipient plate boundary in NE India?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, E. K.; Seeber, L.; Steckler, M. S.; Akhter, S. H.; Mondal, D.; Lenhart, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Shillong Massif is a regional contractional structure developing across the Assam sliver of the Indian plate near the Eastern Syntaxis between the Himalaya and Burma arcs. Faulting associated with the Shillong Massif is a major source of earthquake hazard. The massif is a composite basement-cored asymmetric anticline and is 100km wide, >350km long and 1.8km high. The high relief southern limb preserves a Cretaceous-Paleocene passive margin sequence despite extreme rainfall while the gentler northern limb is devoid of sedimentary cover. This asymmetry suggests southward growth of the structure. The Dauki fault along the south limb builds this relief. From the south-verging structure, we infer a regional deeply-rooted north-dipping blind thrust fault. It strikes E-W and obliquely intersects the NE-SW margin of India, thus displaying three segments: Western, within continental India; Central, along the former passive margin; and Eastern, overridden by the west-verging Burma accretion system. We present findings from recent geologic fieldwork on the western and central segments. The broadly warped erosional surface of the massif defines a single anticline in the central segment, east of the intersection with the hinge zone of the continental margin buried by the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta. The south limb of the anticline forms a steep topographic front, but is even steeper structurally as defined by the Cretaceous-Eocene cover. Below it, Sylhet Trap Basalts intrude and cover Precambrian basement. Dikes, presumably parallel to the rifted margin, are also parallel to the front, suggesting thrust reactivation of rift-related faults. Less competent Neogene clastics are preserved only near the base of the mountain front. Drag folds in these rocks suggest north-vergence and a roof thrust above a blind thrust wedge floored by the Dauki thrust fault. West of the hinge zone, the contractional structure penetrates the Indian continent and bifurcates. After branching into the

  17. The Caribbean-South American plate boundary at 65°W: Results from wide-angle seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezada, M. J.; Magnani, M. B.; Zelt, C. A.; Schmitz, M.; Levander, A.

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of the analysis of new wide-angle seismic data across the Caribbean-South American plate boundary in eastern Venezuela at about 65°W. The ˜500 km long profile crosses the boundary in one of the few regions dominated by extensional structures, as most of the southeastern Caribbean margin is characterized by the presence of fold and thrust belts. A combination of first-arrival traveltime inversion and simultaneous inversion of PmP and Pn arrivals was used to develop a P wave velocity model of the crust and the uppermost mantle. At the main strike-slip fault system, we image the Cariaco Trough, a major pull-apart basin along the plate boundary. The crust under the Southern Caribbean Deformed Belt exhibits a thickness of ˜15 km, suggesting that the Caribbean Large Igneous Province extends to this part of the Caribbean plate. The velocity structures of basement highs and offshore sedimentary basins imaged by the profile are comparable to those of features found in other parts of the margin, suggesting similarities in their tectonic history. We do not image an abrupt change in Moho depth or velocity structure across the main strike-slip system, as has been observed elsewhere along the margin. It is possible that a terrane of Caribbean island arc origin was accreted to South America at this site and was subsequently bisected by the strike-slip fault system. The crust under the continental portion of the profile is thinner than observed elsewhere along the margin, possibly as a result of thinning during Jurassic rifting.

  18. Consolidation patterns during initiation and evolution of a plate-boundary decollement zone: Northern Barbados accretionary prism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.C.; Klaus, A.; Bangs, N.L.; Bekins, B.; Bucker, C.J.; Bruckmann, W.; Erickson, S.N.; Hansen, O.; Horton, T.; Ireland, P.; Major, C.O.; Moore, Gregory F.; Peacock, S.; Saito, S.; Screaton, E.J.; Shimeld, J.W.; Stauffer, P.H.; Taymaz, T.; Teas, P.A.; Tokunaga, T.

    1998-01-01

    Borehole logs from the northern Barbados accretionary prism show that the plate-boundary decollement initiates in a low-density radiolarian claystone. With continued thrusting, the decollement zone consolidates, but in a patchy manner. The logs calibrate a three-dimensional seismic reflection image of the decollement zone and indicate which portions are of low density and enriched in fluid, and which portions have consolidated. The seismic image demonstrates that an underconsolidated patch of the decollement zone connects to a fluid-rich conduit extending down the decollement surface. Fluid migration up this conduit probably supports the open pore structure in the underconsolidated patch.

  19. Distribution and migration of aftershocks of the 2010 Mw 7.4 Ogasawara Islands intraplate normal-faulting earthquake related to a fracture zone in the Pacific plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; No, Tetsuo; Kaiho, Yuka; Kodaira, Shuichi; Yamashita, Mikiya; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    describe the aftershocks of a Mw 7.4 intraplate normal-faulting earthquake that occurred 150 km east Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands, Japan, on 21 December 2010. It occurred beneath the outer trench slope of the Izu-Ogasawara trench, where the Pacific plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Aftershock observations using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) began soon after the earthquake and multichannel seismic reflection surveys were conducted across the aftershock area. Aftershocks were distributed in a NW-SE belt 140 km long, oblique to the N-S trench axis. They formed three subparallel lineations along a fracture zone in the Pacific plate. The OBS observations combined with data from stations on Chichi-jima and Haha-jima Islands revealed a migration of the aftershock activity. The first hour, which likely outlines the main shock rupture, was limited to an 80 km long area in the central part of the subsequent aftershock area. The first hour activity occurred mainly around, and appears to have been influenced by, nearby large seamounts and oceanic plateau, such as the Ogasawara Plateau and the Uyeda Ridge. Over the following days, the aftershocks expanded beyond or into these seamounts and plateau. The aftershock distribution and migration suggest that crustal heterogeneities related to a fracture zone and large seamounts and oceanic plateau in the incoming Pacific plate affected the rupture of the main shock. Such preexisting structures may influence intraplate normal-faulting earthquakes in other regions of plate flexure prior to subduction.

  20. Structure of the tsunamigenic plate boundary and low-frequency earthquakes in the southern Ryukyu Trench

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaiho, Yuka; Nakanishi, Ayako; Fujie, Gou; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Ishihara, Yasushi; Miura, Seiichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that even weakly coupled subduction zones may cause large interplate earthquakes leading to destructive tsunamis. The Ryukyu Trench is one of the best fields to study this phenomenon, since various slow earthquakes and tsunamis have occurred; yet the fault structure and seismic activity there are poorly constrained. Here we present seismological evidence from marine observation for megathrust faults and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). On the basis of passive observation we find LFEs occur at 15–18 km depths along the plate interface and their distribution seems to bridge the gap between the shallow tsunamigenic zone and the deep slow slip region. This suggests that the southern Ryukyu Trench is dominated by slow earthquakes at any depths and lacks a typical locked zone. The plate interface is overlaid by a low-velocity wedge and is accompanied by polarity reversals of seismic reflections, indicating fluids exist at various depths along the plate interface. PMID:27447546

  1. Composite and Component Plates, Plate Non-rigidity, and the Steadiness of Plate Motion From Marine Geophysical and Space Geodetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.; Argus, D. F.; DeMets, C.

    2017-12-01

    Plate tectonic theory has evolved since its birth 50 years ago. In particular, we now recognize that some of the originally proposed plates such as the Indo-Australia plate, the Africa plate, and the America plate are what we term "composite" plates—entities that contain no traditionally defined narrow plate boundaries, but are composed of multiple approximately rigid regions, which we term "component" plates, separated by diffuse plate boundaries. The best example of a composite plate is the Indo-Australia composite plate, which consists of the India, Capricorn, Australia, and Macquarie component plates and multiple intervening diffuse oceanic plate boundaries. The poles of relative rotation between component plates tend to lie in their mutual diffuse plate boundary. Outside of diffuse boundaries, plate rigidity has proven to be an excellent approximation, but the non-closure of some plate circuits indicates that stable plate interiors have a small but significant non-rigidity that may add up to 1 to 2 mm/a across any individual plate and may be partly due to horizontal thermal contraction of oceanic lithosphere. The greatest observational challenge to plate rigidity is posed by the Pacific-Cocos-Nazca plate circuit, which fails closure by 15 ±4 mm/a. The most rapid deformation of the plates observed with space geodesy is generated by solid Earth's viscous response to unloading of the late Pleistocene ice sheets. Differences between different realizations of global plate velocities from space geodesy appear in some cases to be due to differing assumptions about the motion of the geocenter, which affects estimated plate relative angular velocities and estimated vertical motion at geodetic sites. Comparison of space geodetic and marine geophysical plate motion rates and directions has demonstrated that plate motion is nearly steady, which allows plate boundary conditions to be applied to inter-seismic strain accumulation due to locking of specific faults. In

  2. Possibility of existence of serpentinized material at the Izu-Bonin subduction plate boundary around 31N using Q structure by FDM-simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, A.; Kasahara, J.

    2003-12-01

    At the Izu-Bonin subduction zone (IBSZ), there is a chain of serpentine seamounts at the forearc slope of trench axis, and few large earthquakes occurred at shallow depth (<100km) in spite of many large ones at greater depth (>400km). To elucidate these characteristics we carried out a seismic refraction-reflection study at the forearc slope of the IBSZ around 31N using 22 OBSs and chemical explosives and airguns as seismic sources in 1998. As the results of forward and travel-time inversion modeling of the study, P-wave velocity structures were obtained along E-W and N-S survey lines which is perpendicular to and parallel to the trench axis, respectively (Kamimura et al., 2002). The result of E-W line (transect a summit of serpentine seamount) suggests presence of a low velocity zone just above the subducting Pacific plate, and this zone connects to the Torishima Serpentine Forearc Seamount. The interpretation of the result was: dehydration of hydrated oceanic crust supplies water to the mantle wedge, and peridotites of the mantle wedge were serpentinized. The serpentinized peridotites have moved between the oceanic slab and the overriding island arc crust and were diapiring into the serpentine seamount. The serpentine on the plate boundary might act as a lubricant and decrease seismic activity along the subduction zone, and this can explain the characteristics of seismicity of IBSZ. In order to evaluate Q structures of the above low velocity zone on the subducting slab, we calculated synthetic waveforms using FDM (Finite Difference Method) with elastodynamic formulation (E3D code, developed by Dr. Shawn Larsen) and the P-wave velocity 2D structure of Kamimura et al. (2002). The E3D uses staggered grid, and 2nd order and 4th order approximation in time and space, respectively. Grid spacing of the calculation is 30 m in x and z, and 1.5 msec in time. Five-Hz and 0-phase Ricker wavelet_@pressure source was used. Several structure models are used for comparison. One

  3. Stress Transfer Processes during Great Plate Boundary Thrusting Events: A Study from the Andaman and Nicobar Segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, V.; Rajendran, K.

    2010-12-01

    The response of subduction zones to large earthquakes varies along their strike, both during the interseismic and post-seismic periods. The December 26, 2004 earthquake nucleated at 3° N latitude and its rupture propagated northward, along the Andaman-Sumatra subduction zone, terminating at 15°N. Rupture speed was estimated at about 2.0 km per second in the northern part under the Andaman region and 2.5 - 2.7 km per second under southern Nicobar and North Sumatra. We have examined the pre and post-2004 seismicity to understand the stress transfer processes within the subducting plate, in the Andaman (10° - 15° N ) and Nicobar (5° - 10° N) segments. The seismicity pattern in these segments shows distinctive characteristics associated with the outer rise, accretionary prism and the spreading ridge, all of which are relatively better developed in the Andaman segment. The Ninety East ridge and the Sumatra Fault System are significant tectonic features in the Nicobar segment. The pre-2004 seismicity in both these segments conform to the steady-state conditions wherein large earthquakes are fewer and compressive stresses dominate along the plate interface. Among the pre-2004 great earthquakes are the 1881 Nicobar and 1941 Andaman events. The former is considered to be a shallow thrust event that generated a small tsunami. Studies in other subduction zones suggest that large outer-rise tensional events follow great plate boundary breaking earthquakes due to the the up-dip transfer of stresses within the subducting plate. The seismicity of the Andaman segment (1977-2004) concurs with the steady-state stress conditions where earthquakes occur dominantly by thrust faulting. The post-2004 seismicity shows up-dip migration along the plate interface, with dominance of shallow normal faulting, including a few outer rise events and some deeper (> 100 km) strike-slip faulting events within the subducting plate. The September 13, 2002, Mw 6.5 thrust faulting earthquake at

  4. Late Mesozoic- Cenozoic plate boundaries in the North Atlantic – Arctic: Quantitative reconstructions using Hellinger criterion in GPlates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Carmen; Watson, Robin; Cirbus, Juraj

    2015-04-01

    uncertainties are combined with a regional model and used to infer the plate boundaries during the formation of Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. Challenges for establishing the continuation of these plate boundaries the Arctic domain are also discussed. References Chang, T. (1988), Estimating the relative rotation of two tectonic plates from boundary crossings, J. Am. Stat. Assoc., 83, 1178-1183. Hellinger, S. J. (1981), The uncertainties of finite rotations in plate tectonics, J Geophys Res, 86, 9312-9318. Hanna, M.S and T. Chang (1990), On graphically representing the confidence region for an unknown rotation in three dimensions. Computers & Geosciences 16 (2), 163-194. Royer, J. Y., and T. Chang (1991), Evidence for Relative Motions between the Indian and Australian Plates during the Last 20 My from Plate Tectonic Reconstructions - Implications for the Deformation of the Indo-Australian Plate, J Geophys Res, 96(B7), 11779-11802.

  5. Seismicity of the Indo-Australian/Solomon Sea Plate boundary in the Southeast Papua region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripper, I. D.

    1982-08-01

    Seismicity and earthquake focal mechanism plots of the Southeast Papua and Woodlark Basin region for the period January 1960 to May 1979 show that: (a) the West Woodlark Basin spreading centre extends from the deep West Woodlark Basin, through Dawson Strait into Goodenough Bay, Southeast Papua; (b) a southeast seismic trend in the West Woodlark Basin is associated with a left-lateral transform fault, but a gap exists between this zone and the seismic East Woodlark Basin spreading centre; (c) Southeast Papua Seismicity divides into a shallow earthquake zone in which the earthquakes occur mainly in the northeast side of the Owen Stanley Range, and an intermediate depth southwest dipping Benioff zone which extends almost from Mt. Lamington to Goroka. The Benioff zone indicates the presence of a southwest dipping slab of Solomon Sea Plate beneath the Indo-Australian Plate in the Southeast Papua and Ramu-Markham Valley region. This subduction zone has collided with the New Britain subduction zone of the Solomon Sea Plate along the Ramu-Markham Valley. The Solomon Sea Plate is now hanging suspended in the form of an arch beneath Ramu-Markham Valley, inhibiting further subduction beneath Southeast Papua.

  6. Discovering Plate Boundaries in Data-Integrated Environments: Preservice Teachers' Conceptualization and Implementation of Scientific Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezen-Barrie, Asli; Moore, Joel; Roig, Cara E.

    2015-01-01

    Drawn from the norms and rules of their fields, scientists use variety of practices, such as asking questions and arguing based on evidence, to engage in research that will contribute to our understanding of Earth and beyond. In this study, we explore how preservice teachers' learn to teach scientific practices while teaching plate tectonic…

  7. A New Estimate for Total Offset on the Southern San Andreas Fault: Implications for Cumulative Plate Boundary Shear in the Northern Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darin, M. H.; Dorsey, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Development of a consistent and balanced tectonic reconstruction for the late Cenozoic San Andreas fault (SAF) in southern California has been hindered for decades by incompatible estimates of total dextral offset based on different geologic cross-fault markers. The older estimate of 240-270 km is based on offset fluvial conglomerates of the middle Miocene Mint Canyon and Caliente Formations west of the SAF from their presumed source area in the northern Chocolate Mountains NE of the SAF (Ehlig et al., 1975; Ehlert, 2003). The second widely cited offset marker is a distinctive Triassic megaporphyritic monzogranite that has been offset 160 ± 10 km between Liebre Mountain west of the SAF and the San Bernadino Mountains (Matti and Morton, 1993). In this analysis we use existing paleocurrent data and late Miocene clockwise rotation in the eastern Transverse Ranges (ETR) to re-assess the orientation of the piercing line used in the 240 km-correlation, and present a palinspastic reconstruction that satisfies all existing geologic constraints. Our reconstruction of the Mint Canyon piercing line reduces the original estimate of 240-270 km to 195 ± 15 km of cumulative right-lateral slip on the southern SAF (sensu stricto), which is consistent with other published estimates of 185 ± 20 km based on correlative basement terranes in the Salton Trough region. Our estimate of ~195 km is consistent with the lower estimate of ~160 km on the Mojave segment because transform-parallel extension along the southwestern boundary of the ETR during transrotation produces ~25-40 km of displacement that does not affect offset markers of the Liebre/San Bernadino correlation located northwest of the ETR rotating domain. Reconciliation of these disparate estimates places an important new constraint on the total plate boundary shear that is likely accommodated in the adjacent northern Gulf of California. Global plate circuit models require ~650 km of cumulative Pacific-North America (PAC

  8. Geodetic Constraints on the Rigidity and Eastern Boundary of the Sierra Nevada Micro-Plate, from Mohawk Valley to Southern Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, C. W.; Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.

    2009-12-01

    The Sierra Nevada - Great Valley (SNGV) micro-plate has long been recognized as a tectonically rigid, though mobile, entity within the Pacific - North America plate boundary zone. The motion of the SNGV relative to stable North America (and the Colorado Plateau) provides the kinematic boundary condition for, and perhaps drives, the deformation in the Basin and Range Province (BRP) and Walker Lane. In the north the motion of the SNGV is aligned with the Mohawk Valley fault zone, which could have a slip rate of over a few mm/yr. The crest of the Sierras marks the SNGV’s eastern edge, but the obliquity between orientation of this boundary and the block’s motion implies an expected increase in rangefront-normal extension from the northern to southern Walker Lane. We use new GPS data from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) and our own semi-continuous MAGNET network to revisit the following questions: 1) Do the data still support rigidity of the SNGV?; 2) How far east does the rigidity extend and how does this relate to SNGV lithology?; 3) How does the direction of SNGV motion relate to the strike of its eastern margin and observed strain partitioning (and its along strike variation) in the Walker Lane?; and 4) How is SNGV-BRP motion accommodated between the Walker Lane and the Cascadia forearc? We analyze data from all the available continuous GPS sites in the greater SNGV region, including new data from PBO, as well as data from MAGNET. All data are processed with the GIPSY-OASIS II precise point positioning software using recently reprocessed orbits from JPL's IGS Analysis Center. The processing includes satellite and station antenna calibrations and all data have the phase ambiguities fixed using the Ambizap algorithm. Positions are estimated in our custom-made North America reference frame in which continental-scale common-mode errors are removed. Velocities and uncertainties are estimated using the CATS software in which we assuming an error model

  9. The impacts of summer monsoons on the ozone budget of the atmospheric boundary layer of the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xuewei; Zhu, Bin; Fei, Dongdong; Wang, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    The seasonal and inter-annual variations of ozone (O3) in the atmospheric boundary layer of the Asia-Pacific Ocean were investigated using model simulations (2001-2007) from the Model of Ozone and Related chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4). The simulated O3 and diagnostic precipitation are in good agreement with the observations. Model results suggest that the Asia-Pacific monsoon significantly influences the seasonal and inter-annual variations of ozone. The differences of anthropogenic emissions and zonal winds in meridional directions cause a pollutants' transition zone at approximately 20°-30°N. The onset of summer monsoons with a northward migration of the rain belt leads the transition zone to drift north, eventually causing a summer minimum of ozone to the north of 30°N. In years with an early onset of summer monsoons, strong inflows of clean oceanic air lead to low ozone at polluted oceanic sites near the continent, while strong outflows from the continent exist, resulting in high levels of O3 over remote portions of the Asia-Pacific Ocean. The reverse is true in years when the summer monsoon onset is late. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Exact Calculation of Laminar Boundary Layer in Longitudinal Flow over a Flat Plate with Homogeneous Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglisch, Rudolf

    1949-01-01

    Lately it has been proposed to reduce the friction drag of a body in a flow for the technically important large Reynolds numbers by the following expedient: the boundary layer, normally turbulent, is artificially kept laminar up to high Reynolds numbers by suction. The reduction in friction drag thus obtained is of the order of magnitude of 60 to 80 percent of the turbulent friction drag, since the latter, for large Reynolds numbers, is several times the laminar friction drag. In considering the idea mentioned one has first to consider whether suction is a possible means of keeping the boundary layer laminar. This question can be answered by a theoretical investigation of the stability of the laminar boundary layer with suction. A knowledge, as accurate as possible, of the velocity distribution in the laminar boundary layer with suction forms the starting point for the stability investigation. E. Schlichting recently gave a survey of the present state of calculation of the laminar boundary layer with suction.

  11. Reconstructing the Cenozoic evolution of the mantle: Implications for mantle plume dynamics under the Pacific and Indian plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glišović, Petar; Forte, Alessandro M.

    2014-03-01

    The lack of knowledge of the initial thermal state of the mantle in the geological past is an outstanding problem in mantle convection. The resolution of this problem also requires the modelling of 3-D mantle evolution that yields maximum consistency with a wide suite of geophysical constraints. Quantifying the robustness of the reconstructed thermal evolution is another major concern. To solve and estimate the robustness of the time-reversed (inverse) problem of mantle convection, we analyse two different numerical techniques: the quasi-reversible (QRV) and the backward advection (BAD) methods. Our investigation extends over the 65 Myr interval encompassing the Cenozoic era using a pseudo-spectral solution for compressible-flow thermal convection in 3-D spherical geometry. We find that the two dominant issues for solving the inverse problem of mantle convection are the choice of horizontally-averaged temperature (i.e., geotherm) and mechanical surface boundary conditions. We find, in particular, that the inclusion of thermal boundary layers that yield Earth-like heat flux at the top and bottom of the mantle has a critical impact on the reconstruction of mantle evolution. We have developed a new regularisation scheme for the QRV method using a time-dependent regularisation function. This revised implementation of the QRV method delivers time-dependent reconstructions of mantle heterogeneity that reveal: (1) the stability of Pacific and African ‘large low shear velocity provinces’ (LLSVP) over the last 65 Myr; (2) strong upward deflections of the CMB topography at 65 Ma beneath: the North Atlantic, the south-central Pacific, the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and the eastern Antarctica; (3) an anchored deep-mantle plume ascending directly under the EPR (Easter and Pitcairn hotspots) throughout the Cenozoic era; and (4) the appearance of the transient Reunion plume head beneath the western edge of the Deccan Plateau at 65 Ma. Our reconstructions of Cenozoic mantle

  12. Crustal deformation evidences for viscous coupling and fragmented lithosphere at the Nubia-Iberia plate boundary (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Mimmo; González, Pablo J.; Fernández, José

    2016-04-01

    A spatially dense crustal velocity field, based on up to 15 years of GNSS observations at more than 380 sites and extensively covering the Iberian Peninsula and Northern Africa, allow us to provide new insights into two main tectonic processes currently occurring in this area. We detected a slow large-scale clockwise rotation of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to a local pole located closely to the northwestern sector of the Pyrenean mountain range (Palano et al., 2015). Although this crustal deformation pattern could suggest a rigid rotating lithosphere block, this model would predict significant shortening along the Western (off-shore Lisbon) and North Iberian margin which cannot totally ruled out but currently is not clearly observed. Conversely, we favour the interpretation that this pattern reflects the quasi-continuous straining of the ductile lithosphere in some sectors of South and Western Iberia in response to viscous coupling of the NW Nubia and Iberian plate boundary in the Gulf of Cádiz. Furthermore, the western Mediterranean basin appears fragmented into independent crustal tectonic blocks, which delimited by inherited lithospheric shear structures and trapped within the Nubia-Eurasia collision, are currently accommodating most of the plate convergence rate. Among these blocks, an (oceanic-like western) Algerian one is currently transferring a significant fraction of the Nubia-Eurasia convergence rate into the Eastern Betics (SE Iberia) and likely causing the eastward motion of the Baleares Promontory. Most of the observed crustal ground deformation can be attributed to processes driven by spatially variable lithospheric plate forces imposed along the Nubia-Eurasia convergence boundary. Nevertheless, the observed deformation field infers a very low convergence rates as observed also at the eastern side of the western Mediterranean, along the Calabro Peloritan Arc, by space geodesy (e.g. Palano, 2015). References Palano M. (2015). On the present

  13. The Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Rough, Porous Plate: Experimental Heat Transfer with Uniform Blowing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-05-01

    consists of 24 porous plates I!i i forming an eight foot long test section. The individual plates were fabricated by brazing together 50- mil OFlC rcopper...1141 0,444 22 8, V .00071 8244 76941 14,,4614? 1𔃽i1434 U.0041 t.14U 41.8: 77. 11.4)14 U 4 ,,$ d3 901 oU - U111 81019 O227 1 S5330 1, 1589e,6 0,.0 04 1...4i(.HNII:. .4. 10 N. L) MIL DL ’ 1 .414 11 v(JL .1 I-’L? .. / -Ul * H.01 ’ 4 ..llII . 41** ’M Iul’ 4.1 9’MrLHIi’(u.. * IF. , AlIt,, o~i.44I 1OLL.4 1 II

  14. 49 CFR 71.9 - Boundary line between mountain and Pacific zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Salmon River; thence westerly along the main channel of the Salmon River to the Idaho-Oregon... City of West Wendover, Nevada. Then westward along the northern, western, and southern boundaries of the City of West Wendover back to the Utah-Nevada boundary. Then southerly along the Utah-Nevada...

  15. Plume versus plate origin for the Shatsky Rise oceanic plateau (NW Pacific): Insights from Nd, Pb and Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydolph, Ken; Murphy, David T.; Geldmacher, Jörg; Romanova, Irina V.; Greene, Andrew; Hoernle, Kaj; Weis, Dominique; Mahoney, John

    2014-07-01

    Shatsky Rise, an early Cretaceous igneous oceanic plateau in the NW Pacific, comprises characteristics that could be attributed to either formation by shallow, plate tectonic-controlled processes or to an origin by a mantle plume (head). The plateau was drilled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 324. Complementary to a recent trace element study (Sano et al., 2012) this work presents Nd, Pb and Hf isotope data of recovered lava samples cored from the three major volcanic edifices of the Shatsky Rise. Whereas lavas from the oldest edifice yield fairly uniform compositions, a wider isotopic spread is found for lavas erupted on the younger parts of the plateau, suggesting that the Shatsky magma source became more heterogeneous with time. At least three isotopically distinct components can be identified in the magma source: 1) a volumetrically and spatially most common, moderately depleted component of similar composition to modern East Pacific Ridge basalt but with low 3He/4He, 2) an isotopically very depleted component which could represent local, early Cretaceous (entrained) depleted upper mantle, and 3) an isotopically enriched component, indicating the presence of (recycled) continental material in the magma source. The majority of analyzed Shatsky lavas, however, possess Nd-Hf-Pb isotope compositions consistent with a derivation from an early depleted, non-chondritic reservoir. By comparing these results with petrological and trace element data of mafic volcanic rock samples from all three massifs (Tamu, Ori, Shirshov), we discuss the origin of Shatsky Rise magmatism and evaluate the possible involvement of a mantle plume (head).

  16. What controls interplate coupling? Implications from abrupt change in coupling on the Pacific plate across a border between two overlying plates in the southernmost extent of the NE Japan subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, N.; Hasegawa, A.; Nakajima, J.; Matsuzawa, T.

    2008-12-01

    In the southernmost extent of the NE Japan subduction zone, the Pacific plate (PA) is subducting beneath two different tectonic plates - the North American plate (NA) to the north and the Philippine Sea plate (PH) to the south. The change of overlying plate for the PA provides a good opportunity to test the influence of the overlying plate on interplate coupling. In the present study, detailed location of the border between the PH and NA overlying the PA is estimated from slip vectors of the interplate events. Then we compared the interplate coupling coefficients between the two regions overlain by the two plates based on the small repeating earthquake data. Analysis of slip vectors of interplate events shows that the slip vectors abruptly change their slip angles off Kanto. This suggests that the location of the border between the two overlying plates is extending northwestward from the triple junction. The distribution of interplate coupling coefficient estimated from the cumulative slip of small repeating earthquakes reveals a distinct change from south (ca. 0.3) to north (ca. 0.7) across this border. This border corresponds to the southern limit of M > 7 earthquakes and intense seismicity along the Japan Trench, again indicating the stronger coupling to the north. We also investigated the structure of the overlying plates from seismic tomography using a large number of travel-time data obtained from the nationwide seismograph network. The results reveal a distinct low-velocity zone just above the PA in the region overlain by the PH, whereas there is no low-velocity zone in the region overlain by the NA. These observations imply that the overlying plate controls large-scale coupling at the plate interface. Acknowledgement: We used waveforms from the seismic networks of University of Tokyo in addition to the data from Tohoku University. Arrival time data for seismic tomography and earthquake relocation are provided by the Japan Metrological Agency.

  17. Turbulent Friction in the Boundary Layer of a Flat Plate in a Two-Dimensional Compressible Flow at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankl, F.; Voishel, V.

    1943-01-01

    In the present report an investigation is made on a flat plate in a two-dimensional compressible flow of the effect of compressibility and heating on the turbulent frictional drag coefficient in the boundary layer of an airfoil or wing radiator. The analysis is based on the Prandtl-Karman theory of the turbulent boundary later and the Stodola-Crocco, theorem on the linear relation between the total energy of the flow and its velocity. Formulas are obtained for the velocity distribution and the frictional drag law in a turbulent boundary later with the compressibility effect and heat transfer taken into account. It is found that with increase of compressibility and temperature at full retardation of the flow (the temperature when the velocity of the flow at a given point is reduced to zero in case of an adiabatic process in the gas) at a constant R (sub x), the frictional drag coefficient C (sub f) decreased, both of these factors acting in the same sense.

  18. "Discovering Plate Boundaries in Data-Rich Environments": Supporting Pre-service Teachers involvement in Unique Practices of Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, A. S.; Moore, J.

    2012-12-01

    plate tectonics using key scientific practices. As a result of the educational activities developed in this project, we will try help teachers to overcome their challenges and develop the pedagogical skills that novice teachers need to use to teach plate tectonics by focusing on key scientific practices with the help of previously-developed educational resources. Learning about the processes that occur at plate boundaries will help future teachers (and their students) understand natural disasters such as earthquakes and volcanoes. Furthermore, the study will have a significant, and broader, impact by 'teaching the teachers' and empowering novice teachers to overcome the challenges of reading maps and using argumentation in science classrooms.

  19. Hypersonic Laminar Boundary Layer Velocimetry with Discrete Roughness on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Watkins, A. Neal; Jones, Stephen B.; Lipford, William E.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Ivey, Christopher B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Laminar boundary layer velocity measurements are made on a 10-degree half-angle wedge in a Mach 10 flow. Two types of discrete boundary layer trips were used to perturb the boundary layer gas. The first was a 2-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylindrical trip. The second was a scaled version of the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Detailed Test Objective (DTO) trip. Both 1-mm and 2.5-mm tall BLT DTO trips were tested. Additionally, side-view and plan-view axial boundary layer velocity measurements were made in the absence of these tripping devices. The free-stream unit Reynolds numbers tested for the cylindrical trips were 1.7x10(exp 6)/m and 3.3x10(exp 6)/m. The free-stream unit Reynolds number tested for the BLT DTO trips was 1.7x10(exp 6)/m. The angle of attack was kept at approximately 5-degrees for most of the tests resulting in a Mach number of approximately 8.3. These combinations of unit Reynolds numbers and angle of attack resulted in laminar flowfields. To study the precision of the measurement technique, the angle of attack was varied during one run. Nitric-oxide (NO) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) was used to obtain averaged axial velocity values and associated uncertainties. These uncertainties are as low as 20 m/s. An interline, progressive scan CCD camera was used to obtain separate images of the initial reference and shifted NO molecules that had been tagged by the laser. The CCD configuration allowed for sub-microsecond sequential acquisition of both images. The maximum planar spatial resolution achieved for the side-view velocity measurements was 0.07-mm in the wall-normal direction by 1.45-mm in the streamwise direction with a spatial depth of 0.5-mm. For the plan-view measurements, the maximum planar spatial resolution in the spanwise and streamwise directions was 0.69-mm by 1.28-mm, respectively, with a spatial depth of 0.5-mm. Temperature sensitive paint (TSP) measurements are provided to compliment the velocity data and to provide further

  20. True Polar Wander and Hotspot Fixity: A Paleomagnetic Investigation of the Skewness of Magnetic Anomaly 12r (32 Ma B.P.) on the Pacific Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.; Horner-Johnson, B. C.

    2010-12-01

    Prior studies have shown that Pacific hotspots and Indo-Atlantic hotspots have moved in approximate unison relative to the spin axis since 65 Ma B.P. [Morgan, 1981; Gordon and Cape, 1981; Gordon, 1982] and since 56 Ma B.P. [Petronotis et al., 1994], which is most simply interpreted as true polar wander. In contrast, Pacific hotspots and Indo-Atlantic hotspots give conflicting results for 72 Ma B.P. and for 81 Ma B.P., which may indicate motion between Pacific hotspots and Indo-Atlantic hotspots [Tarduno and Cottrell, 1997; Petronotis et al., 1999; Tarduno et al., 2003]. Thus it is important to estimate Pacific plate apparent polar wander (APW) for more time intervals. From such estimates the APW of Pacific hotspots can be inferred and compared with that of Indo-Atlantic hotspots [e.g., Besse and Courtillot 2002]. Here we present a study of the skewness of anomaly 12r between the Galapagos and Clipperton and between the Clipperton and Clarion fracture zones. We chose this region for several reasons: First, numerical experiments, like those conducted by Acton and Gordon [1991], indicate that magnetic profiles between the Galapagos and Clarion fracture zones should contain the most information about the Pacific plate paleomagnetic pole for chron C12r (32 Ma B.P.). Second, in these two spreading rate corridors, spreading half rates range from 72 to 86 mm/a and therefore have negligible anomalous skewness, given that they exceed ≈50 mm/a [Roest et al., 1992; Dyment et al. 1994]. Third, vector aeromagnetic profiles are available for analysis. One of the challenges to interpreting magnetic anomalies in low latitudes where the anomalies strike nearly north-south is the very low amplitude of the signal relative to the noise, the latter of which can be especially intense near the present magnetic equator due to the amplification of diurnal variation by the equatorial electrojet. Previously we showed that vector aeromagnetic profiles record low-latitude Pacific plate

  1. Earthquake-driven fluid flow rates inferred from borehole temperature measurements within the Japan Trench plate boundary fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, P. M.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2016-12-01

    Using borehole sub-seafloor temperature measurements, we have recently identified signatures suggestive of earthquake-driven fluid pulses within the Japan Trench plate boundary fault zone during a major aftershock sequence. Here we use numerical models to show that these signatures are consistent with time-varying fluid flow rates out of permeable zones within the formation into the borehole annulus. In addition, we also identify an apparent time-varying sensitivity of whether suspected fluid pulses occur in response to earthquakes of a given magnitude and distance. The results suggest a damage and healing process and therefore provides a mechanism to allow for a disproportionate amount of heat and chemical transport in the short time frame after an earthquake. Our observations come from an observatory installed across the main plate boundary fault as part of IODP's Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST) following the March 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake. It operated from July 2012 - April 2013 during which a Mw 7.3 earthquake and numerous aftershocks occurred. High-resolution temperature time series data reveal spatially correlated transients in response to earthquakes with distinct patterns interpreted to reflect advection by transient pulses of fluid flow from permeable zones into the borehole annulus. Typical transients involve perturbations over 12 m with increases of 10 mK that build over 0.1 days at shallower depths and decreases at deeper depths. They are consistently centered around 792.5 m below seafloor (mbsf) where a secondary fault and permeable zone have been independently identified within the damage zone above the main plate boundary fault at 820 mbsf . Model simulations suggest transient flow rates of up to 10-3m/s from the formation that quickly decrease. Comparison of characteristics of earthquakes identified in nearby ocean bottom pressure measurements suggest there is not a clear relationship between fluid pulses and static strain. There

  2. Laminar-Boundary-Layer Oscillations and Transition on a Flat Plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-04-01

    ft) \\ axp <— b) Tha solution with the positiv « exponent must bo Ignored as it is Infinite at y • ». As the outor boundary con- dition, then, 0...34’.»*•* *’"**’ "• .F *- ^’•--i»-v 40 When quantitative work was attempted, It became ap- parent that the complicated sound field In the tunnel wae a decided...gradients decreased ampllfica damping) of .the oscillations while pos creased amplification. A quantitative this effect was therefore undertaken w

  3. Boundary Layer Flow of Air Over Water on a Flat Plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    similar (or coupled self -similar) solution appears to be a global attractor for all initial conditions. 2 Governing Equations A water film of height y...assumptions are self -consistent. The reader may verify that the solution (13) with c(x) given by (16) is self -similar (satisfies (24) without the the...attractor for all solutions of this non-similar family. Self similar boundary layers depend only on q and not on 4. The ý derivatives of u, v and y* may

  4. Fluctuating pressures measured beneath a high-temperature, turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate at Mach number of 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.; Albertson, Cindy W.

    1989-01-01

    Fluctuating pressures were measured beneath a Mach 5, turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with an array of piezoresistive sensors. The data were obtained with a digital signal acquisition system during a test run of 4 seconds. Data sampling rate was such that frequency analysis up to 62.5 kHz could be performed. To assess in situ frequency response of the sensors, a specially designed waveguide calibration system was employed to measure transfer functions of all sensors and related instrumentation. Pressure time histories were approximated well by a Gaussian prohibiting distribution. Pressure spectra were very repeatable over the array span of 76 mm. Total rms pressures ranged from 0.0017 to 0.0046 of the freestream dynamic pressure. Streamwise, space-time correlations exhibited expected decaying behavior of a turbulence generated pressure field. Average convection speed was 0.87 of freestream velocity. The trendless behavior with sensor separation indicated possible systematic errors.

  5. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a moving vertical flat plate in an external fluid flow with viscous dissipation effect.

    PubMed

    Bachok, Norfifah; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2013-01-01

    The steady boundary layer flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid over a moving vertical flat plate in an external moving fluid with viscous dissipation is theoretically investigated. Using appropriate similarity variables, the governing system of partial differential equations is transformed into a system of ordinary (similarity) differential equations, which is then solved numerically using a Maple software. Results for the skin friction or shear stress coefficient, local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles are presented for different values of the governing parameters. It is found that the set of the similarity equations has unique solutions, dual solutions or no solutions, depending on the values of the mixed convection parameter, the velocity ratio parameter and the Eckert number. The Eckert number significantly affects the surface shear stress as well as the heat transfer rate at the surface.

  6. Double diffusive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convective slip flow along a radiating moving vertical flat plate with convective boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Mohammad M; Kavyani, Neda; Abelman, Shirley; Uddin, Mohammed J; Freidoonimehr, Navid

    2014-01-01

    In this study combined heat and mass transfer by mixed convective flow along a moving vertical flat plate with hydrodynamic slip and thermal convective boundary condition is investigated. Using similarity variables, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are then solved using a semi-numerical/analytical method called the differential transform method and results are compared with numerical results. Close agreement is found between the present method and the numerical method. Effects of the controlling parameters, including convective heat transfer, magnetic field, buoyancy ratio, hydrodynamic slip, mixed convective, Prandtl number and Schmidt number are investigated on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. In addition effects of different parameters on the skin friction factor, [Formula: see text], local Nusselt number, [Formula: see text], and local Sherwood number [Formula: see text] are shown and explained through tables.

  7. Double Diffusive Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Mixed Convective Slip Flow along a Radiating Moving Vertical Flat Plate with Convective Boundary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi, Mohammad M.; Kavyani, Neda; Abelman, Shirley; Uddin, Mohammed J.; Freidoonimehr, Navid

    2014-01-01

    In this study combined heat and mass transfer by mixed convective flow along a moving vertical flat plate with hydrodynamic slip and thermal convective boundary condition is investigated. Using similarity variables, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are then solved using a semi-numerical/analytical method called the differential transform method and results are compared with numerical results. Close agreement is found between the present method and the numerical method. Effects of the controlling parameters, including convective heat transfer, magnetic field, buoyancy ratio, hydrodynamic slip, mixed convective, Prandtl number and Schmidt number are investigated on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. In addition effects of different parameters on the skin friction factor, , local Nusselt number, , and local Sherwood number are shown and explained through tables. PMID:25343360

  8. Stress Drops of Earthquakes on the Subducting Pacific Plate in the South-East off Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yamada, T.

    2013-12-01

    Large earthquakes have been occurring repeatedly in the South-East of Hokkaido, Japan, where the Pacific Plate subducts beneath the Okhotsk Plate in the north-west direction. For example, the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (Mw8.3 determined by USGS) took place in the region on September 26, 2003. Yamanaka and Kikuchi (2003) analyzed the slip distribution of the earthquake and concluded that the 2003 earthquake had ruptured the deeper half of the fault plane of the 1952 Tokachi-oki earthquake. Miyazaki et al. (2004) reported that a notable afterslip was observed at adjacent areas to the coseismic rupture zone of the 2003 earthquake, which suggests that there would be significant heterogeneities of strength, stress and frictional properties on the surface of the Pacific Plate in the region. In addition, some previous studies suggest that the region with a large slip in large earthquakes permanently have large difference of strength and the dynamic frictional stress level and that it would be able to predict the spatial pattern of slip in the next large earthquake by analyzing the stress drop of small earthquakes (e.g. Allmann and Shearer, 2007 and Yamada et al., 2010). We estimated stress drops of 150 earthquakes (4.2 ≤ M ≤ 5.0), using S-coda waves, or the waveforms from 4.00 to 9.11 seconds after the S wave arrivals, of Hi-net data. The 150 earthquakes were the ones that occurred from June, 2002 to December, 2010 in south-east of Hokkaido, Japan, from 40.5N to 43.5N and from 141.0E to 146.5E. First we selected waveforms of the closest earthquakes with magnitudes between 3.0 and 3.2 to individual 150 earthquakes as empirical Green's functions. We then calculated source spectral ratios of the 150 pairs of interested earthquakes and EGFs by deconvolving the individual S-coda waves. We finally estimated corner frequencies of earthquakes from the spectral ratios by assuming the omega-squared model of Boatwright (1978) and calculated stress drops of the earthquakes by

  9. Discovering Plate Boundaries in Data-integrated Environments: Preservice Teachers' Conceptualization and Implementation of Scientific Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen-Barrie, Asli; Moore, Joel; Roig, Cara E.

    2015-08-01

    Drawn from the norms and rules of their fields, scientists use variety of practices, such as asking questions and arguing based on evidence, to engage in research that will contribute to our understanding of Earth and beyond. In this study, we explore how preservice teachers' learn to teach scientific practices while teaching plate tectonic theory. In particular, our aim is to observe which scientific practices preservice teachers use while teaching an earth science unit, how do they integrate these practices into their lessons, and what challenges do they face during their first time teaching of an earth science content area integrated with scientific practices. The study is designed as a qualitative, exploratory case study of seven preservice teachers while they were learning to teach plate tectonic theory to a group of middle school students. The data were driven from the video records and artifacts of the preservice teachers' learning and teaching processes as well as written reflections on the teaching. Intertextual discourse analysis was used to understand what scientific practices preservice teachers choose to integrate into their teaching experience. Our results showed that preservice teachers chose to focus on four aspects of scientific practices: (1) employing historical understanding of how the theory emerged, (2) encouraging the use of evidence to build up a theory, (3) observation and interpretation of data maps, and (4) collaborative practices in making up the theory. For each of these practices, we also looked at the common challenges faced by preservice teachers by using constant comparative analysis. We observed the practices that preservice teachers decided to use and the challenges they faced, which were determined by what might have come as in their personal history as learners. Therefore, in order to strengthen preservice teachers' background, college courses should be arranged to teach important scientific ideas through scientific practices

  10. From Subduction to a Compressional transform system: Diffuse Deformation Processes at the Southeastern Boundary of the Caribbean Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deville, E.; Padron, C.; Huyghe, P.; Callec, Y.; Lallemant, S.; Lebrun, J.; Mascle, A.; Mascle, G.; Noble, M.

    2006-12-01

    Geophysical data acquired in the southeastern Caribbean marine area (CARAMBA survey of the French O/V Atalante) provide new information about the deformation processes occurring in this subduction-to-strike-slip transitions zone. The 65 000 km2 of multibeam data and 5600 km of seismic reflection and 3.5 kHz profiles which have been collected evidence that the connection between the Barbados accretionary prism and the south Caribbean transform system is partitioned between a wide variety of recently active tectonic superficial features (complex folding, diffuse faulting, and mud volcanism), which accommodate the relative displacement between the Caribbean and the South America plates. The active deformation within the sedimentary pile is mostly aseismic (creeping) and this deformation is relatively diffuse over a large diffuse plate boundary. There is no direct fault connection between the front of the Barbados prism and the strike-slip system of northern Venezuela. The toe thrust system at the southern edge of the Barbados prism, exhibits clear en-echelon geometry. The geometry of the syntectonic deposits evidence the diachronism of the deformation processes. Notably, it is well evidenced that early folds have been sealed by the recent turbidite deposits, whereas, some of the fold and thrust structures were active recently. Within this active compressional region, extension growth faults develop on the platform and on the slope of the Orinoco delta along a WNW-ESE trending en-echelon fault system that we called the Orinoco Delta Fault Zone (ODFZ). This fault system is clearly oblique with respect to the present-day Orinoco delta slope. These faults are not simply related to a passive gravitary collapse of the sediments accumulated on the Orinoco platform. Though there a decoupling between the shallow deformation processes in the sediments and the deep deformation characterized by earthquake activity, the ODFZ is inferred to be partly controlled by deep structures

  11. Most-Critical Transient Disturbances in an Incompressible Flat-Plate Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monschke, Jason; White, Edward

    2015-11-01

    Transient growth is a linear disturbance growth mechanism that plays a key role in roughness-induced boundary-layer transition. It occurs when superposed stable, non-orthogonal continuous spectrum modes experience algebraic disturbance growth followed by exponential decay. Algebraic disturbance growth can modify the basic state making it susceptible to secondary instabilities rapidly leading to transition. Optimal disturbance theory was developed to model the most-dangerous disturbances. However, evidence suggests roughness-induced transient growth is sub-optimal yet leads to transition earlier than optimal theory suggests. This research computes initial disturbances most unstable to secondary instabilities to further develop the applicability of transient growth theory to surface roughness. The main approach is using nonlinear adjoint optimization with solutions of the parabolized Navier-Stokes and BiGlobal stability equations. Two objective functions were considered: disturbance kinetic energy growth and sinuous instability growth rate. The first objective function was used as validation of the optimization method. Counter-rotating streamwise vortices located low in the boundary layer maximize the sinuous instability growth rate. The authors would like to acknowledge NASA and the AFOSR for funding this work through AFOSR Grant FA9550-09-1-0341.

  12. Oblique collision and accretion of the Netherlands Leeward Antilles island arc: A structural analysis of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Amanda Gail

    2007-12-01

    The Netherlands Leeward Antilles volcanic island arc is an ideal natural laboratory to study the evolution of the Caribbean-South American plate boundary. The Leeward Antilles islands (Aruba, Curacao, and Bonaire) are located offshore western Venezuela, within the obliquely convergent diffuse plate boundary zone. Outcrop analysis, microthermometry, and 2D marine seismic reflection data provide evidence of three generations of regional deformation since the Late Cretaceous. Outcrop analysis of structural features, including faults, joints, and veins, characterizes the kinematic history of the islands. Fluid inclusion analysis of quartz and calcite veins coupled with apatite fission-track dating provides the island exhumation history. Finally, marine reflection seismic data processing and interpretation of newly acquired data elucidates offshore structures to integrate with our onshore results. The oldest regional deformation, resulting in both ductile (D1) and brittle (F 1) structures, is attributed to displacement partitioning along the arcuate Caribbean plate boundary. Associated crustal thinning initiated island exhumation, at a rate of 0.18 km/my, from a maximum burial depth of 6 km in the Late Cretaceous (˜89 Ma). Coeval with D1/F1 deformation and exhumation, stretching of the island arc resulted in extensive basin rifting that separated the island blocks. At ˜55 Ma, a change in the relative motion of the Caribbean plate altered plate boundary dynamics. Displacement along the right-lateral Caribbean transform fault and Oca - San Sebastian - El Pilar strike-slip fault system created a wrench tectonic regime within the diffuse plate boundary zone. A second generation of brittle structures (F2) developed while the islands were at a maximum burial depth of 2 km during the Paleocene/Eocene. Since ˜45 Ma, continued motion along the strike-slip fault systems and oblique plate convergence resulted in the youngest generation of structural features (F3). Regional

  13. A 2006 earthquakes series at the Colima rift and its relationship to the Rivera-Cocos plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, J.; Jimenez, Z.

    2013-12-01

    From July 31 through 13 August 2006 a series of fourteen earthquakes (M 3.9 to 6.1) occurred in the western end of the Central Mexican Volcanic Belt (CMVB) in twenty five days period. The most prominent earthquake (Mw 6.1) occurred on 11 August 2006 at 14:30 UTC (9:30 local time) approximately at 18.37° N, 101.25° W and 81 km depth. The epicenter was less than 40 km from Huetamo, Michoacan a 41,250-inhabitant city and 60 km from the El Infiernillo dam embayment the third largest hydroelectric plant in Mexico. This earthquake was widely felt through out the region with minor to moderate reported damage. In Mexico City 250 km away from the epicenter the earthquake, produced alarm among the population and several buildings evacuated. The earthquake series developed into two activity clusters one centered in the coast and separated about 300 km from a second inland cluster. The initial coastal cluster consisted of a nearly linear activity distribution which includes two shallow-depth earthquakes and reverse faulting mechanism with a slight left lateral strike-slip component and a possible fault planes trending roughly east-west. Two normal faulting earthquakes located at the extremes of the graben system, and fault planes oriented in a nearly north-south direction followed. The earthquakes are located approximately between the trench and the coast along the El Gordo-Colima graben system, which has been proposed as the continuation of the diffuse boundary between the Rivera and Cocos plates. The reverse faulting earthquakes are congruent either, with the expected subduction of the Rivera or Cocos plate under the North America plate and the normal faulting earthquake that can be associated to motions in the graben.

  14. A Sharp Cadherin-6 Gene Expression Boundary in the Developing Mouse Cortical Plate Demarcates the Future Functional Areal Border

    PubMed Central

    Terakawa, Youhei W.; Inoue, Yukiko U.; Asami, Junko; Hoshino, Mikio; Inoue, Takayoshi

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex can be tangentially subdivided into tens of functional areas with distinct cyto-architectures and neural circuitries; however, it remains elusive how these areal borders are genetically elaborated during development. Here we establish original bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mouse lines that specifically recapitulate cadherin-6 (Cdh6) mRNA expression profiles in the layer IV of the somatosensory cortex and by detailing their cortical development, we show that a sharp Cdh6 gene expression boundary is formed at a mediolateral coordinate along the cortical layer IV as early as the postnatal day 5 (P5). By further applying mouse genetics that allows rigid cell fate tracing with CreERT2 expression, it is demonstrated that the Cdh6 gene expression boundary set at around P4 eventually demarcates the areal border between the somatosensory barrel and limb field at P20. In the P6 cortical cell pellet culture system, neurons with Cdh6 expression preferentially form aggregates in a manner dependent on Ca2+ and electroporation-based Cdh6 overexpression limited to the postnatal stages perturbs area-specific cell organization in the barrel field. These results suggest that Cdh6 expression in the nascent cortical plate may serve solidification of the protomap for cortical functional areas. PMID:22875867

  15. Focal Mechanisms at the convergent plate boundary in Southern Aegean, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshou, Alexandra; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Drakatos, George; Evangelidis, Christos; Karakostas, Vasilios; Vallianatos, Filippos; Makropoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-05-01

    Greece is characterized by high seismicity, mainly due to the collision between the European and the African lithospheric plates and the dextral strike slip motion along the North Anatolia Fault zone and North Aegean Trough. The subduction of the Eastern Mediterranean oceanic plate along the Hellenic Arc under the Aegean microplate along with the accompanied roll back of the descending slab is considered the main tectonic feature of the region (Papazachos and Comninakis 1971; Makropoulos and Burton 1984; Papazachos et al. 2000a, b). The divergent motion between the Aegean block and mainland Europe is indicated by an extension zone in the northern Aegean, with Crete and Aegean diverging from mainland Europe at a rate of about 3.5 cm yr-1 with Africa moving northward relative to Europe at a rate of about 1 cm yr-1 (Dewey et al., 1989; Papazachos et al., 1998; Mc-Clusky et al., 2000; Reilinger et al., 2006). In this tectonically complicated area diverge types of deformation are manifested, in addition to the dominant subduction processes. Aiming to shed more light in the seismotectonic properties and faulting seismological data from the Hellenic Unified Seismological Network (HUSN) were selected and analyzed for determining focal mechanisms using the method of moment tensor inversion, additional to the ones being available from the routine moment tensor solutions and several publications. Thus, 31 new fault plane solutions for events with magnitude M>4.0, are presented in this study, by using the software of Ammon (Randall et al., 1995). For this scope the data from at least 4 stations were used with an adequate azimuthal coverage and with an epicentral distance not more than 350 km. The preparation of the data includes the deconvolution of instruments response, then the velocity was integrated to displacement and finally the horizontal components were rotated to radial and transverse. Following, the signal was inverted using the reflectivity method of Kennett (1983

  16. High-velocity basal sediment package atop oceanic crust, offshore Cascadia: Impacts on plate boundary processes and fluid migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. E.; Keranen, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    Differences in fluid pressure and mechanical properties at megathrust boundaries in subduction zones have been proposed to create varying seismogenic behavior. In Cascadia, where large ruptures are possible but little seismicity occurs presently, new seismic transects across the deformation front (COAST cruise; Holbrook et al., 2012) image an unusually high-wavespeed sedimentary unit directly overlying oceanic crust. Wavespeed increases before sediments reach the deformation front, and the well-laminated unit, consistently of 1 km thickness, can be traced for 50 km beneath the accretionary prism before imaging quality declines. Wavespeed is modeled via iterative prestack time migration (PSTM) imaging and increases from 3.5 km/sec on the seaward end of the profile to >5.0 km/s near the deformation front. Landward of the deformation front, wavespeed is low along seaward-dipping thrust faults in the Quaternary accretionary prism, indicative of rapid dewatering along faults. The observed wavespeed of 5.5 km/sec just above subducting crust is consistent with porosity <5% (Erickson and Jarrard, 1998), possibly reflecting enhanced consolidation, cementation, and diagenesis as the sediments encounter the deformation front. Beneath the sediment, the compressional wavespeed of uppermost oceanic crust is 3-4 km/sec, likely reduced by alteration and/or fluids, lowest within a propagator wake. The propagator wake intersects the plate boundary at an oblique angle and changes the degree of hydration of the oceanic plate as it subducts within our area. Fluid flow out of oceanic crust is likely impeded by the low-porosity basal sediment package except along the focused thrust faults. Decollements are present at the top of oceanic basement, at the top of the high-wavespeed basal unit, and within sedimentary strata at higher levels; the decollement at the top of oceanic crust is active at the toe of the deformation front. The basal sedimentary unit appears to be mechanically strong

  17. Magmatism at the Eurasian–North American modern plate boundary: Constraints from alkaline volcanism in the Chersky Belt (Yakutia)

    PubMed Central

    Tschegg, Cornelius; Bizimis, Michael; Schneider, David; Akinin, Vyacheslav V.; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2011-01-01

    The Chersky seismic belt (NE-Russia) forms the modern plate boundary of the Eurasian−North American continental plate. The geodynamic evolution of this continent−continent setting is highly complex and remains a matter of debate, as the extent and influence of the Mid-Arctic Ocean spreading center on the North Asian continent since the Eocene remains unclear. The progression from a tensional stress regime to a modern day transpressional one in the Chersky seismic belt, makes the understanding even more complicated. The alkaline volcanism that has erupted along the Chersky range from Eocene through to the Recent can provide constraints on the geodynamic evolution of this continental boundary, however, the source and petrogenetic evolution of these volcanic rocks and their initiating mechanisms are poorly understood. We studied basanites of the central Chersky belt, which are thought to represent the first alkaline volcanic activity in the area, after initial opening of the Arctic Ocean basin. We present mineral and bulk rock geochemical data as well as Sr–Nd–Pb–Hf isotopes of the alkaline suite of rocks combined with new precise K–Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating, and discuss an integrated tectono-magmatic model for the Chersky belt. Our findings show that the basanites were generated from a homogeneous asthenospheric mantle reservoir with an EM-1 isotopic flavor, under relatively ‘dry’ conditions at segregation depths around 110 km and temperatures of ~ 1500 °C. Trace element and isotope systematics combined with mantle potential temperature estimates offer no confirmation of magmatism related to subduction or plume activity. Mineral geochemical and petrographical observations together with bulk geochemical evidence indicate a rapid ascent of melts and high cooling rates after emplacement in the continental crust. Our preferred model is that volcanism was triggered by extension and thinning of the lithosphere combined with adiabatic upwelling of the

  18. Magmatism at the Eurasian-North American modern plate boundary: Constraints from alkaline volcanism in the Chersky Belt (Yakutia).

    PubMed

    Tschegg, Cornelius; Bizimis, Michael; Schneider, David; Akinin, Vyacheslav V; Ntaflos, Theodoros

    2011-07-01

    The Chersky seismic belt (NE-Russia) forms the modern plate boundary of the Eurasian-North American continental plate. The geodynamic evolution of this continent-continent setting is highly complex and remains a matter of debate, as the extent and influence of the Mid-Arctic Ocean spreading center on the North Asian continent since the Eocene remains unclear. The progression from a tensional stress regime to a modern day transpressional one in the Chersky seismic belt, makes the understanding even more complicated. The alkaline volcanism that has erupted along the Chersky range from Eocene through to the Recent can provide constraints on the geodynamic evolution of this continental boundary, however, the source and petrogenetic evolution of these volcanic rocks and their initiating mechanisms are poorly understood. We studied basanites of the central Chersky belt, which are thought to represent the first alkaline volcanic activity in the area, after initial opening of the Arctic Ocean basin. We present mineral and bulk rock geochemical data as well as Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes of the alkaline suite of rocks combined with new precise K-Ar and 40 Ar/ 39 Ar dating, and discuss an integrated tectono-magmatic model for the Chersky belt. Our findings show that the basanites were generated from a homogeneous asthenospheric mantle reservoir with an EM-1 isotopic flavor, under relatively 'dry' conditions at segregation depths around 110 km and temperatures of ~ 1500 °C. Trace element and isotope systematics combined with mantle potential temperature estimates offer no confirmation of magmatism related to subduction or plume activity. Mineral geochemical and petrographical observations together with bulk geochemical evidence indicate a rapid ascent of melts and high cooling rates after emplacement in the continental crust. Our preferred model is that volcanism was triggered by extension and thinning of the lithosphere combined with adiabatic upwelling of the underlying mantle

  19. Effects of Periodic Unsteady Wake Flow and Pressure Gradient on Boundary Layer Transition Along the Concave Surface of a Curved Plate. Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, M. T.; Radke, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Boundary layer transition and development on a turbomachinery blade is subjected to highly periodic unsteady turbulent flow, pressure gradient in longitudinal as well as lateral direction, and surface curvature. To study the effects of periodic unsteady wakes on the concave surface of a turbine blade, a curved plate was utilized. On the concave surface of this plate, detailed experimental investigations were carried out under zero and negative pressure gradient. The measurements were performed in an unsteady flow research facility using a rotating cascade of rods positioned upstream of the curved plate. Boundary layer measurements using a hot-wire probe were analyzed by the ensemble-averaging technique. The results presented in the temporal-spatial domain display the transition and further development of the boundary layer, specifically the ensemble-averaged velocity and turbulence intensity. As the results show, the turbulent patches generated by the wakes have different leading and trailing edge velocities and merge with the boundary layer resulting in a strong deformation and generation of a high turbulence intensity core. After the turbulent patch has totally penetrated into the boundary layer, pronounced becalmed regions were formed behind the turbulent patch and were extended far beyond the point they would occur in the corresponding undisturbed steady boundary layer.

  20. Delineating the boundary and structure of higher trophic level assemblages in the western North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Takehiro; Kiyota, Masashi; Yonezaki, Shiroh; Murakami, Chisato; Kato, Yoshiki; Sakai, Mitsuo; Wakabayashi, Toshie; Okazaki, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the community structure of oceanic higher trophic level (HTL) organisms (e.g., sharks, tunas, salmons, and squids) is fundamental to management of marine resources in a way that ensures their sustainable use and maintains marine ecosystem functionality and biodiversity. We analyzed the spatial structure of HTL assemblages in the western North Pacific Ocean using driftnet survey data collected at latitudes of 35-46 °N along transect lines at 144 °E, 155 °E, and 175.5 °E longitude in July and August 2011. We proposed a new dissimilarity metric segmentation procedure (Dissimilarity Segmentation) based on the differences of mean Bray-Curtis dissimilarity indices between two individual driftnet hauls within the same subarea or among different subareas. Dissimilarity Segmentation allowed us to divide the western North Pacific Ocean into three subareas: a northern subarea (>41 °N including 41 °N on the 175.5 °E transect), a transition subarea (37-41 °N), and a southern subarea (<37 °N). The HTL biomass in the northern subarea was high, and the species diversity was low; dominant and common species accounted for most of the biomass. The HTL assemblage in the southern subarea was composed of many species that were uncommon or rare; the biomass was lower, and the species diversity was higher than in the northern subarea. In the transition subarea, neon flying squid accounted for most of the biomass, and although the biomass was intermediate, species diversity was highest among the three subareas. Canonical correspondence analysis with oceanic environmental variables, principally chlorophyll a, sea surface salinity, and sea surface height, as the explanatory variables accounted for 43.6% of the variance of the HTL pelagic species composition. This result suggests that the HTL pelagic community in the western North Pacific is influenced largely by productivity and oceanic physical structure. These results suggest that an analytical approach based on

  1. Aerosol concentrations and composition in the North Pacific marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongjoo; Rhee, Tae Siek; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Park, Taehyun; Park, Seung-Myung; Seo, Beom-Keun; Park, Gyutae; Park, Keyhong; Lee, Taehyoung

    2017-12-01

    Ship-borne measurements of inorganic and organic aerosols, including methanesulfonic acid (MSA), were conducted over the Northern Pacific using a High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). This study, conducted aboard the Korean ice breaker R/V Araon, was part of the SHIP-borne Pole-to-Pole Observations (SHIPPO) project. Based on air mass source region, the cruise track could be divided into five sections. Overall, the South Asia and Northern Japan ship transects showed higher aerosol concentrations due to continental pollution and biomass burning sources, respectively. In all five regions, the average mass concentrations of sulfate and organic aerosols (OA) were much higher than concentrations of nitrate and ammonium. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis distinguished two organic aerosol factors as hydrocarbon-like and oxidized OA (HOA and OOA). HOA peaked in South Asia under the influence of anthropogenic pollution source areas, such as China and Korea, and generally decreased with increasing latitude across the full study region. OOA concentrations peaked in Northern Japan near the Tsugaru Strait and appear to reflect fine particle contributions from biomass burning. The mean HOA concentration in the clean marine area (Aleutian Island to Siberia) was 0.06 μg/m3 and comprised approximately 8% of the OA mass fraction. The highest MSA concentrations peaked in the Aleutian Islands at nearly 15 μg/m3, suggesting influence from higher dimethyl sulfide (DMS) emissions resulting from biological nutrient uptake during summer. The MSA/sulfate ratio, an indicator of the relative fine particle contributions of DMS and anthropogenic sources, revealed a sharp gradient as the ship approached the clean marine areas where the dominance of DMS increased. The patterns in OOA, HOA, and MSA concentrations found in this study provide a better understanding of the characteristics of inorganic and organic aerosols in the Northern Pacific Ocean.

  2. Global Plate Motions Relative to the Hotspots since 48 Ma B.P. from Simultaneous Inversion of Hotspot Tracks in the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans Constrained to Consistency with Known Relative Plate Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, R. G.; Koivisto, E. A. L.

    2016-12-01

    A fundamental problem of global tectonics and paleomagnetism is determining what part of apparent polar wander is due to plate motion and what part is due to true polar wander. One approach for separating these is available if global hotspots can be used as a reference frame approximately fixed with respect to the deep mantle. Some other workers have used a hotspot reference based only on tracks in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, and some have used reference frames with moving hotspots and many adjustable parameters. In sharp contrast to the assumptions made in these other works, our recent results demonstrate that there is no significant motion between the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hotspots since 48 Ma B.P. (lower bound of zero and upper bound of 8-13 mm/yr [Koivisto et al., 2014]). Corrected methodologies combined with cumulative improvements in the age progression along the hotspot tracks, the geomagnetic reversal time scale, and relative plate reconstructions lead to significantly lower rates of motion between hotspots than found in prior studies. Building on our prior results, here we present a globally self-consistent estimate of plate motions relative to the hotspots for the past 48 million years from inversions to fit simultaneously the tracks of the Hawaiian, Louisville, Tristan da Cunha, Réunion, and Iceland hotspots constrained to consistency with known relative plate motions. Each finite rotation is estimated for an age corresponding to a key magnetic anomaly used in plate reconstructions. The new set of plate reconstructions presented here provides a firm basis for estimating absolute plate motions for the past 48 million years and, in particular, can be used to separate paleomagnetically determined apparent polar wander into the part due to plate motion and the part due to true polar wander. Implications for true polar wander since the age of the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend will be discussed.

  3. Rapid Grain Size Reduction in the Upper Mantle at a Plate Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidder, S. B.; Scott, J.; Prior, D. J.; Lubicich, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    process was very rapid (<10,000 yrs). In either case we interpret that semi-brittle deformation was a key process responsible for rapid localization in this initiating plate-scale mantle shear zone.

  4. Fracture analysis near the mid-ocean plate boundary, Reykjavik-Hvalfjördur area, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferis, Robert G.; Voight, Barry

    1981-07-01

    The geometry and thermal history of fractures have been determined at 59 stations from Reykjavik to Hvalfjördur in southwestern Iceland. The data provide information on crustal stress regimes in the vicinity of mid-ocean ridges. Two major, generalized fracture orientations are present (1) a northeast system, trend 010°-030°, except on Akranes where the orientation is 040°-060° (2) a broad east—west system containing one or more sets with strike between 070°-130°. Thermal history of the host rock and fractures was determined from secondary minerals in vugs and fractures. The thermal history indicates that the northeast fracture set opened while the area was within the relatively hot axial zone of active volcanism and rifting. Some of the east—west trending fractures also opened at this time but many formed later, after the area had begun to cool and drift from the active zone. The northeast fracture set is essentially parallel to the trend of dikes and normal faults in southwestern Iceland. They have been interpreted as extension fractures (resulting in about 0.4% maximum extension) forming generally from the same stress field associated with normal faulting and dike injection in the active zone. Fracturing in an east-west direction (estimated 0.1% maximum extension), mainly near the edge and outside the active zone, indicates a reorientation of this stress field. The dominant mechanism related to the origin of the east—west fractures may be thermoelastic stresses arising from axial and basal accretion and cooling of lithospheric plates. Both fracture systems are inferred to have formed, in the Griffiths idealization, under nearly biaxial effective compressive loading on the order of 200 bar. The discrepancy between this value and the kilobar-order strengths of short-time laboratory tests reflects such factors as high temperature stress corrosion and fatigue. Fracture propagation is assumed to have been stable, but governed primarily by lateral load

  5. Aerosol and cloud microphysics covariability in the northeast Pacific boundary layer estimated with ship-based and satellite remote sensing observations: NE Pacific Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Painemal, David; Chiu, J. -Y. Christine; Minnis, Patrick

    Ship measurements collected over the northeast Pacific along transects between the port of Los Angeles (33.7°N, 118.2°W) and Honolulu (21.3°N, 157.8°W) during May to August 2013 were utilized to investigate the covariability between marine low cloud microphysical and aerosol properties. Ship-based retrievals of cloud optical depth (τ) from a Sun photometer and liquid water path (LWP) from a microwave radiometer were combined to derive cloud droplet number concentration Nd and compute a cloud-aerosol interaction (ACI) metric defined as ACICCN = ∂ ln(Nd)/∂ ln(CCN), with CCN denoting the cloud condensation nuclei concentration measured at 0.4% (CCN0.4) and 0.3% (CCN0.3) supersaturation. Analysismore » of CCN0.4, accumulation mode aerosol concentration (Na), and extinction coefficient (σext) indicates that Na and σext can be used as CCN0.4 proxies for estimating ACI. ACICCN derived from 10 min averaged Nd and CCN0.4 and CCN0.3, and CCN0.4 regressions using Na and σext, produce high ACICCN: near 1.0, that is, a fractional change in aerosols is associated with an equivalent fractional change in Nd. ACICCN computed in deep boundary layers was small (ACICCN = 0.60), indicating that surface aerosol measurements inadequately represent the aerosol variability below clouds. Satellite cloud retrievals from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and GOES-15 data were compared against ship-based retrievals and further analyzed to compute a satellite-based ACICCN. Satellite data correlated well with their ship-based counterparts with linear correlation coefficients equal to or greater than 0.78. Combined satellite Nd and ship-based CCN0.4 and Na yielded a maximum ACICCN = 0.88–0.92, a value slightly less than the ship-based ACICCN, but still consistent with aircraft-based studies in the eastern Pacific.« less

  6. Integration of the Plate Boundary Observatory and Existing GPS Networks in Southern California: A Multi Use Geodetic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, C.; Blume, F.; Meertens, C.; Arnitz, E.; Lawrence, S.; Miller, S.; Bradley, W.; Jackson, M.; Feaux, K.

    2007-12-01

    The ultra-stable GPS monument design developed by Southern California Geodetic Network (SCIGN) in the late 1990s demonstrates sub-millimeter errors on long time series where there are a high percentage of observations and low multipath. Following SCIGN, other networks such as PANGA and BARGEN have adopted the monument design for both deep drilled braced monuments (DDBM = 5 legs grouted 10.7 meters into bedrock/stratigraphy) and short drilled braced monuments (SDBM = 4 legs epoxied 2 meters into bedrock). A Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) GPS station consists of a "SCIGN" style monument and state of the art NetRS receiver and IP based communications. Between the years 2003-2008 875 permanent PBO GPS stations are being built throughout the United States. Concomitant with construction of the PBO the majority of pre-existing GPS stations that meet stability specifications are being upgraded with Trimble NetRS and IP based communications to PBO standards under the EarthScope PBO Nucleus project. In 2008, with completed construction of the Plate Boundary Observatory, more than 1100 GPS stations will share common design specifications and have identical receivers with common communications making it the most homogenous geodetic network in the World. Of the 875 total Plate Boundary Observatory GPS stations, 211 proposed sites are distributed throughout the Southern California region. As of August 2007 the production status is: 174 stations built (81 short braced monuments, 93 deep drilled braced monuments), 181 permits signed, 211 permits submitted and 211 station reconnaissance reports. The balance of 37 stations (19 SDBM and 18 DDBM) will be built over the next year from Long Valley to the Mexico border in order of priority as recommended by the PBO Transform, Extension and Magmatic working groups. Fifteen second data is archived for each station and 1 Hz as well as 5 Hz data is buffered to be triggered for download in the event of an earthquake. Communications

  7. Present-Day Kinematics of the Central Mediterranean Plate Boundary Region from Large GPS Network Analysis Using the Ambizap Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anastasio, E.; D'Agostino, N.; Avallone, A.; Blewitt, G.

    2008-12-01

    The large, recent increase of continuous GPS (CGPS) stations in the Central Mediterranean plate boundary zone offers the opportunity to study in detail the present-day kinematics of this actively deforming region. CGPS data from scientific and commercial networks in the Italian region is now available from more than 350 stations, including more than 130 from the RING network deployed by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. The RING stations all have high quality GPS monuments and are co- located with broadband or very broadband seismometers and strong motion sensors. The analysis presented here also uses far-field data to provide reference frame control, bringing the total to over 580 CGPS stations. GPS ambiguity resolution of such a large amount of data presents a serious challenge in terms of processing time. Many scientific GPS data processing software packages address this problem by dividing the network into several clusters. In contrast, this analysis uses the new Ambizap GPS processing algorithm (Blewitt, 2008) to obtain unique, self-consistent daily ambiguity-fixed solutions for the entire network. Ambizap allows for a rapid and multiple reanalysis of large regional networks such the one presented in this work. Tests show that Ambizap reproduces solutions from time-prohibitive full-network ambiguity resolution to much less than 1 mm. Single station GPS data are first processed with the GIPSY-OASIS II software by the precise point positioning (PPP) strategy (Zumberge et al., 1997) using JPL products from ftp://sideshow.jpl.nasa.gov. Integer ambiguity resolution is then applied using Ambizap. The resulting daily solutions are aligned to the ITRF2005 reference frame. Then, using the CATS software (Williams, 2007), time series are cleaned to remove outliers and are analyzed for their noise properties, linear velocities, periodic signals and antenna jumps. Stable plate reference frames are realized by minimizing the horizontal velocities at more

  8. Reconstructing Plate Boundaries in the Jurassic Neo-Tethys From the East and West Vardar Ophiolites (Greece and Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.

    2018-03-01

    Jurassic subduction initiation in the Neo-Tethys Ocean eventually led to the collision of the Adria-Africa and Eurasia continents and the formation of an 6,000 km long Alpine orogen spanning from Iberia to Iran. Reconstructing the location and geometry of the plate boundaries of the now disappeared Neo-Tethys during the initial moments of its closure is instrumental to perform more realistic plate reconstructions of this region, of ancient ocean basins in general, and on the process of subduction initiation. Neo-Tethyan relics are preserved in an ophiolite belt distributed above the Dinaric-Hellenic fold-thrust belt. Here we provide the first quantitative constraints on the geometry of the spreading ridges and trenches active in the Jurassic Neo-Tethys using a paleomagnetically based net tectonic rotation analysis of sheeted dykes and dykes from the West and East Vardar Ophiolites of Serbia (Maljen and Ibar) and Greece (Othris, Pindos, Vourinos, and Guevgueli). Based on our results and existing geological evidence, we show that initial Middle Jurassic ( 175 Ma) closure of the western Neo-Tethys was accommodated at a N-S trending, west dipping subduction zone initiated near and parallel to the spreading ridge. The West Vardar Ophiolites formed in the forearc parallel to this new trench. Simultaneously, the East Vardar Ophiolites formed above a second N-S to NW-SE trending subduction zone located close to the European passive margin. We tentatively propose that this second subduction zone had been active since at least the Middle Triassic, simultaneously accommodating the closure of the Paleo-Tethys and the back-arc opening of Neo-Tethys.

  9. Shallow very-low-frequency earthquakes accompanied with slow slip event along the plate boundary of the Nankai trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, M.; Hori, T.; Araki, E.; Kodaira, S.; Ide, S.

    2017-12-01

    Recent improvements of seismic and geodetic observations have revealed the existence of a new family of slow earthquakes occurring along or close to the plate boundary worldwide. In the viewpoint of the characteristic time scales, the slow earthquakes can be classified into several groups as low-frequency tremor or tectonic tremor (LFT) dominated in several hertz, very-low-frequency earthquake (VLFE) dominated in 10 to 100 s, and short- and long-term slow-slip event (SSE) with durations of days to years. In many cases, these slow earthquakes are accompanied with other types of slow events. However, the events occurring offshore, especially beneath the toe of accretionary prism, are poorly understood because of the difficulty to detect signals. Utilizing the data captured from oceanfloor observation networks which many efforts have recently been taken to develop is necessary to improve our understandings for these events. Here, we investigated CMT analysis of shallow VLFEs using data obtained from DONET oceanfloor observation networks along the Nankai trough, southwest of Japan. We found that shallow VLFEs have almost identical history of moment release with that of synchronous SSE which occurred at the same region recently found by Araki et al. (2017). VLFE sources show updip migrations during the activity, coincident with the migration of SSE source. From these findings we conclude that these slow events share the same fault slip, and VLFE represent high-frequency fluctuations of slip during SSE. This result imply that shallow SSE along the plate interface would have occurred in the background during the shallow VLFE activities repeatedly observed along the Nankai trough, but the SSE was not reported because of difficult detections.

  10. Origin of the oceanic basalt basement of the Solomon Islands arc and its relationship to the Ontong Java Plateau-insights from Cenozoic plate motion models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cenozoic global plate motion models based on a hotspot reference frame may provide a useful framework for analyzing the tectonic evolution of the Solomon Islands convergent margin. A postulated late Miocene collision of the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) with a NE-facing arc is consistent with the predicted path of the OJP across the Pacific Basin and its Miocene arrival at the trench. Late-stage igneous activity (65-30 Ma) predicted for the OJP as it rode over the Samoan hotspot occurred in correlative stratigraphic sections on Malaita, the supposed accreted flake of OJP in the Solomon Islands arc. Convergence similar to the present velocities between Australia and the Pacific plates was characteristic of the last 43 million years. Prior to 43 Ma Pacific-Australia plate motions were divergent, seemingly at odds with geologic evidence for early Tertiary convergence, particularly in Papua New Guinea. A postulated South Pacific plate may have existed between Australia and the Pacific plate and would have allowed implied northward subduction along the northeastern Australia plate boundary that lasted into the early Eocene. Subsequent reorganization of plate motions in the middle Eocene correlates with middle Eocene marginal basin formation along ridges oblique to the main plate boundary. Cessation of spreading on the Pacific-South Pacific Ridge and its subsequent subduction beneath Asia followed the change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma. A trapped remnant of the extinct, NW-trending ridge may still lie beneath the western Philippine Sea. The terminal deformation, metamorphism and ophiolite obduction in the Eocene orogen of the southwest Pacific also correlates with the major change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma and the subsequent compression of the dying Eocene arc against outlying continental and oceanic crustal blocks of the Australian plate. The Solomon Islands oceanic basement may represent juxtaposition of oceanic plateaus of the Australian plate beneath

  11. A plate boundary earthquake record from a wetland adjacent to the Alpine fault in New Zealand refines hazard estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, U. A.; Clark, K. J.; Howarth, J. D.; Biasi, G. P.; Langridge, R. M.; Villamor, P.; Berryman, K. R.; Vandergoes, M. J.

    2017-04-01

    Discovery and investigation of millennial-scale geological records of past large earthquakes improve understanding of earthquake frequency, recurrence behaviour, and likelihood of future rupture of major active faults. Here we present a ∼2000 year-long, seven-event earthquake record from John O'Groats wetland adjacent to the Alpine fault in New Zealand, one of the most active strike-slip faults in the world. We linked this record with the 7000 year-long, 22-event earthquake record from Hokuri Creek (20 km along strike to the north) to refine estimates of earthquake frequency and recurrence behaviour for the South Westland section of the plate boundary fault. Eight cores from John O'Groats wetland revealed a sequence that alternated between organic-dominated and clastic-dominated sediment packages. Transitions from a thick organic unit to a thick clastic unit that were sharp, involved a significant change in depositional environment, and were basin-wide, were interpreted as evidence of past surface-rupturing earthquakes. Radiocarbon dates of short-lived organic fractions either side of these transitions were modelled to provide estimates for earthquake ages. Of the seven events recognised at the John O'Groats site, three post-date the most recent event at Hokuri Creek, two match events at Hokuri Creek, and two events at John O'Groats occurred in a long interval during which the Hokuri Creek site may not have been recording earthquakes clearly. The preferred John O'Groats-Hokuri Creek earthquake record consists of 27 events since ∼6000 BC for which we calculate a mean recurrence interval of 291 ± 23 years, shorter than previously estimated for the South Westland section of the fault and shorter than the current interseismic period. The revised 50-year conditional probability of a surface-rupturing earthquake on this fault section is 29%. The coefficient of variation is estimated at 0.41. We suggest the low recurrence variability is likely to be a feature of

  12. Frictional power dissipation on plate boundary faults: Implications for coseismic slip propagation at near-surface depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, M.; Kopf, A.; Saffer, D. M.; Marone, C.; Carpenter, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    The general lack of earthquake slip at shallow (< ~4 km) depths on plate-boundary faults suggests that they creep stably, a behavior associated with laboratory observations that disaggregated fault gouges commonly strengthen with increasing sliding velocity (i.e. velocity-strengthening friction), which precludes strain energy release via stress drops. However, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake demonstrated that coseismic rupture and slip can sometimes propagate to the surface in subduction zones. Surface rupture is also known to occur on other plate boundary faults, such as the Alpine Fault in New Zealand. It is uncertain how the extent of coseismic slip propagation from depth is controlled by the frictional properties of the near-surface portion of major faults. In these situations, it is common for slip to localize within gouge having a significant component of clay minerals, which laboratory experiments have shown are generally weak and velocity strengthening. However, low overall fault strength should facilitate coseismic slip, while velocity-strengthening behavior would resist it. In order to investigate how frictional properties may control the extent of coseismic slip propagation at shallow depths, we compare frictional strength and velocity-dependence measurements using samples from three subduction zones known for hosting large magnitude earthquakes. We focus on samples recovered during scientific drilling projects from the Nankai Trough, Japan, the Japan Trench in the region of the Tohoku earthquake, and the Middle America Trench, offshore Costa Rica; however we also include comparisons with other major fault zones sampled by drilling. In order to incorporate the combined effects of overall frictional strength and friction velocity-dependence, we estimate shear strength as a function of slip velocity (at constant effective normal stress), and integrate this function to obtain the areal power density, or frictional power dissipation capability of the fault zone

  13. Seismic velocity structure of the incoming Pacific Plate subducting into the central part of the Japan Trench revealed by traveltime tomography using OBS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, K.; Fujie, G.; Kodaira, S.; Takahashi, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Miura, S.; Shinohara, M.

    2016-12-01

    Subduction of oceanic plates plays an important role in the water transportation from the earth surface into the deep mantle. Recent active seismic survey studies succeed to image that the seismic velocities within the oceanic crust and the uppermost mantle in the outer rise region decreases toward the trench axis. These velocity changes are considered as an indication of the hydration and alteration of the incoming oceanic plates prior to the subduction. However, the area with sufficient resolution of the active seismic studies is often limited at depths corresponding to the oceanic crust and several km beneath the oceanic Moho. In this study, we have examined the seismic velocity structure of the incoming/subducting Pacific Plate beneath the trench axis and outer trench-slope of the central part of the Japan Trench. The seismicity in the Pacific Plate, including several M7-class intra-plate earthquakes, has been active since the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake in the study area. These activities were observed by the ocean bottom seismographs (OBS) deployed repeatedly. The data obtained from these OBS observations allow us to resolve the seismic velocity structures at greater depths compared to the active seismic surveys. We conducted 3-D traveltime tomography by using double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003). The results show that the seismic velocities within the oceanic mantle decreased toward the trench axis. The velocity reduction begins at about 80 km seaward of the trench axis and extended to a depth of at least 30 km beneath the trench axis area. If the observed P-wave velocity reduction from 8.4 km/s to 7.7 km/s at a depth of 15 km below the oceanic Moho is caused by the serpentinization of the oceanic mantle (Carlson and Miller, 2003), roughly 2.5 weight per cent of water is expected in the low velocity anomalies in the oceanic mantle.

  14. Near-surface Density Currents Observed in the Southeast Pacific Stratocumulus-topped Marine Boundary Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbanks, Matt C.; Yuter, S. E.; de Szoeke, S.

    2015-09-01

    Density currents (i.e. cold pools or outflows) beneath marine stratocumulus clouds are characterized using a 30-d data set of ship-based observations obtained during the 2008 Variability of American Monsoon Systems (VAMOS) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) in the southeast Pacific. An objective method identifies 71 density current fronts using an air density criterion and isolates each density current’s core (peak density) and tail (dissipating) zone. Compared to front and core zones, most density current tails exhibited weaker density gradients and wind anomalies elongated about the axis of the mean wind. The mean cloud-level advection relative to the surface layer windmore » (1.9 m s-1) nearly matches the mean density current propagation speed (1.8 m s-1). The similarity in speeds allows drizzle cells to deposit tails in their wakes. Based on high-resolution scanning Doppler lidar data, prefrontal updrafts had a mean intensity of 0.91 m s-1, reached an average altitude of 800 m, and were often surmounted by low-lying shelf clouds not connected to the overlying stratocumulus cloud. Nearly 90% of density currents were identified when C-band radar estimated 30-km diameter areal average rain rates exceeded 1 mm d-1. Rather than peaking when rain rates are highest overnight, density current occurrence peaks between 0600 and 0800 local solar time when enhanced local drizzle co-occurs with shallow subcloud dry and stable layers. The dry layers may contribute to density current formation by enhancing subcloud evaporation of drizzle. Density currents preferentially occur in regions of open cells but also occur in regions of closed cells.« less

  15. Coda Q and its Frequency Dependence in the Eastern Himalayan and Indo-Burman Plate Boundary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Kumar, A.

    2015-12-01

    We use broadband waveform data for 305 local earthquakes from the Eastern Himalayan and Indo-Burman plate boundary systems, to model the seismic attenuation in NE India. We measure the decay in amplitude of coda waves at discreet frequencies (between 1 and 12Hz) to evaluate the quality factor (Qc) as a function of frequency. We combine these measurements to evaluate the frequency dependence of Qc of the form Qc(f)=Qof η, where Qo is the quality factor at 1Hz and η is the frequency dependence. Computed Qo values range from 80-360 and η ranges from 0.85-1.45. To study the lateral variation in Qo and η, we regionalise the Qc by combining all source-receiver measurements using a back-projection algorithm. For a single back scatter model, the coda waves sample an elliptical area with the epicenter and receiver at the two foci. We parameterize the region using square grids. The algorithm calculates the overlap in area and distributes Qc in the sampled grids using the average Qc as the boundary value. This is done in an iterative manner, by minimising the misfit between the observed and computed Qc within each grid. This process is repeated for all frequencies and η is computed for each grid by combining Qc for all frequencies. Our results reveal strong variation in Qo and η across NE India. The highest Qo are in the Bengal Basin (210-280) and the Indo-Burman subduction zone (300-360). The Shillong Plateau and Mikir Hills have intermediate Qo (~160) and the lowest Qo (~80) is observed in the Naga fold thrust belt. This variation in Qo demarcates the boundary between the continental crust beneath the Shillong Plateau and Mikir Hills and the transitional to oceanic crust beneath the Bengal Basin and Indo-Burman subduction zone. Thick pile of sedimentary strata in the Naga fold thrust belt results in the low Qo. Frequency dependence (η) of Qc across NE India is observed to be very high, with regions of high Qo being associated with relatively higher η.

  16. Jet-boundary and Plan-form Corrections for Partial-Span Models with Reflection-Plane, End-Plate, or No End-Plate in a Closed Circular Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivells, James C; Deters, Owen J

    1946-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the jet-boundary and plan-form corrections necessary for application to test data for a partial-span model with a reflection plane, an end plate, or no end plate in a closed circular wind tunnel. Examples are worked out for a partial-span model with each of the three end conditions in the Langley 19-foot pressure tunnel and the corrections are applied to measured values of lift, drag, pitching-moment, rolling-moment, and yawing-moment coefficients.

  17. Circum-Pacific diatomite deposits

    SciTech Connect

    North, F.K.

    1986-07-01

    Deformed diatomites of assured identification are all Oligocene or younger. They are not to be interpreted with oceanic diatom oozes as analogs, nor with California's Monterey Formation as prototype. All examples, apart from the unique Monterey, are deposits of relatively shallow waters at convergent plate or microplate boundaries: in arc-trench gaps or (less importantly) in immediate back-arc belts. Tethyan examples, along a collision boundary, are now slivers in the late stages of external flysch along the fronts of Alpine thrust belts. Circum-Pacific examples, at ocean-continent subduction boundaries, are preserved only on mountainous islands or peninsulas, the uplift (not folding) ofmore » which has protected the diatomites and their overlying evaporites from subduction. The control is tectonic and volcanic, not by water temperature or eustatism. Preserved deposits appear to be restricted to particular segments of the Pacific boundary delineated by Benioff zones having some significant minimum dip. The unique Monterey Formation owes its spectacular development and preservation to the conversion of an arc-trench boundary to a transform boundary, at a triple junction, before the diatomite was deposited. The Monterey's importance as an oil source sediment does not stem from its true diatomite component. Other Circum-Pacific diatomites are of negligible significance to the petroleum geologist, but are potentially minable for other uses in Japan, the Philippines, and Peru, and possibly in Chile.« less

  18. Project NEPTUNE: an innovative, powered, fibre-optic cabled deep ocean observatory spanning the Juan de Fuca plate, NE Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C.; Delaney, J.

    2003-04-01

    NEPTUNE is an innovative facility, a deep-water cabled observatory, that will transform marine science. MARS and VENUS are deep and shallow-water test bed facilities for NEPTUNE located in Monterey Canyon, California and in southern British Columbia, respectively; both were funded in 2002. NEPTUNE will be a network of over 30 subsea observatories covering the 200,000 sq. km Juan de Fuca tectonic plate, Northeast Pacific. It will draw power via two shore stations and receive and exchange data with scientists through 3000 km of submarine fiber-optic cables. Each observatory, and cabled extensions, will host and power many scientific instruments on the surrounding seafloor, in seafloor boreholes and buoyed through the water column. Remotely operated and autonomous vehicles will reside at depth, recharge at observatories, and respond to distant labs. Continuous near-real-time multidisciplinary measurement series will extend over 30 years. Free from the limitations of battery life, ship schedules/ accommodations, bad weather and delayed access to data, scientists will monitor remotely their deep-sea experiments in real time on the Internet, and routinely command instruments to respond to storms, plankton blooms, earthquakes, eruptions, slope slides and other events. Scientists will be able to pose entirely new sets of questions and experiments to understand complex, interacting Earth System processes such as the structure and seismic behavior of the ocean crust; dynamics of hot and cold fluids and gas hydrates in the upper ocean crust and overlying sediments; ocean climate change and its effect on the ocean biota at all depths; and the barely known deep-sea ecosystem dynamics and biodiversity. NEPTUNE is a US/Canada (70/30) partnership to design, test, build and operate the network on behalf of a wide scientific community. The total cost of the project is estimated at about U.S. 250 million from concept to operation. Over U.S. 50 million has already been funded for

  19. Long-lived melting of ancient lower crust of the North China Craton in response to paleo-Pacific plate subduction, recorded by adakitic rhyolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Song, Shuguang; Niu, Yaoling; Allen, Mark B.; Su, Li; Wei, Chunjing; Zhang, Guibin; Fu, Bin

    2017-11-01

    Magmatism in eastern China in response to paleo-Pacific plate subduction during the Mesozoic was complex, and it is unclear how and when exactly the magmas formed via thinning and partial destruction of the continental lithosphere. To better understand this magmatism, we report the results of a geochronological and geochemical study of Early Cretaceous adakitic rhyolite (erupted at 125.4 ± 2.2 Ma) in the Xintaimen area within the eastern North China Craton (NCC). In situ zircon U-Pb dating shows that this adakitic rhyolite records a long ( 70 Myrs) and complicated period of magmatism with concordant 206Pb/238U ages from 193 Ma to 117 Ma. The enriched bulk rock Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the Xintaimen adakitic rhyolite, as well as the enriched zircon Hf and O isotopic compositions, indicate that the magmas parental to the adakitic rhyolite were derived from partial melting of the Paleoproterozoic mafic lower crust, heated by mafic melts derived from the mantle during the paleo-Pacific plate subduction. A minor older basement component is indicated by the presence of captured Neoarchean to Early Paleoproterozoic zircons. The Mesozoic zircons have restricted Hf and O isotopic compositions irrespective of their ages, suggesting that they formed from similar sources at similar melting conditions. The Xintaimen adakitic rhyolite offers an independent line of evidence that the ancient lower crust of eastern China underwent a long period ( 70 Myrs) of destruction, melting or remelting, from 193 to 120 Ma, related to the subduction of the paleo-Pacific plate beneath eastern China.

  20. An analysis of the relaxation of laminar boundary layer on a flat plate after passage of an interface with application to expansion-tube flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    The relaxation of the accelerating-gas boundary layer to the test-gas boundary layer over a flat plate in an expansion tube is analyzed. Several combinations of test gas and acceleration gas are considered. The problem is treated in two conically similar limits: (1) when the time lag between the arrival of the shock and the interface at the leading edge of the plate is very large, and (2) when this lag is negligible. The time-dependent laminar-boundary-layer equations of a binary mixture of perfect gases are taken as the flow-governing equations. This coupled set of differential equations, written in terms of the Lam-Crocco variables, has been solved by a line-relaxation finite-difference techniques. The results presented include the Stanton number and the local skin-friction coefficient as functions of shock Mach number and the nondimensional distance-time variable. The results indicate that more than 95 percent of the test-gas boundary layer exists over a length, measured from the leading edge of the plate, equal to about three-tenths of the distance traversed by the interface in the free stream.

  1. An integral wall model for Large Eddy Simulation (iWMLES) and applications to developing boundary layers over smooth and rough plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiang; Sadique, Jasim; Mittal, Rajat; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-11-01

    A new wall model for Large-Eddy-Simulations is proposed. It is based on an integral boundary layer method that assumes a functional form for the local mean velocity profile. The method, iWMLES, evaluates required unsteady and advective terms in the vertically integrated boundary layer equations analytically. The assumed profile contains a viscous or roughness sublayer, and a logarithmic layer with an additional linear term accounting for inertial and pressure gradient effects. The iWMLES method is tested in the context of a finite difference LES code. Test cases include developing turbulent boundary layers on a smooth flat plate at various Reynolds numbers, over flat plates with unresolved roughness, and a sample application to boundary layer flow over a plate that includes resolved roughness elements. The elements are truncated cones acting as idealized barnacle-like roughness elements that often occur in biofouling of marine surfaces. Comparisons with data show that iWMLES provides accurate predictions of near-wall velocity profiles in LES while, similarly to equilibrium wall models, its cost remains independent of Reynolds number and is thus significantly lower compared to standard zonal or hybrid wall models. This work is funded by ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0582 (Dr. R. Joslin, program manager).

  2. Present-day stress tensors along the southern Caribbean plate boundary zone from inversion of focal mechanism solutions: A successful trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard M., Franck A.; Castilla, Raymi

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a compilation of 16 present-day stress tensors along the southern Caribbean plate boundary zone (PBZ), and particularly in western and along northern Venezuela. As a trial, these new stress tensors along PBZ have been calculated from inversion of 125 focal mechanism solutions (FMS) by applying the Angelier & Mechler's dihedral method, which were originally gathered by the first author and published in 2005. These new tensors are compared to those 59 tensors inverted from fault-slip data measured only in Plio-Quaternary sedimentary rocks, compiled in Audemard et al. (2005), which were originally calculated by several researchers through the inversion methods developed by Angelier and Mechler or Etchecopar et al. The two sets of stress tensors, one derived from geological data and the other one from seismological data, compare very well throughout the PBZ in terms of both stress orientation and shape of the stress tensor. This region is characterized by a compressive strike-slip (transpressional senso lato), occasionally compressional, regime from the southern Mérida Andes on the southwest to the gulf of Paria in the east. Significant changes in direction of the maximum horizontal stress (σH = σ1) can be established along it though. The σ1 direction varies progressively from nearly east-west in the southern Andes (SW Venezuela) to between NW-SE and NNW-SSE in northwestern Venezuela; this direction remaining constant across northern Venezuela, from Colombia to Trinidad. In addition, the σV defined by inversion of focal mechanisms or by the shape of the stress ellipsoid derived from the Etchecopar et al.'s method better characterize whether the stress regime is transpressional or compressional, or even very rarely trantensional at local scale. The orientation and space variation of this regional stress field in western Venezuela results from the addition of the two major neighbouring interplate maximum horizontal stress orientations (

  3. GPS and seismological constraints on active tectonics and arc-continent collision in Papua New Guinea: Implications for mechanics of microplate rotations in a plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Laura M.; Stevens, Colleen; Silver, Eli; McCaffrey, Rob; Loratung, Wesley; Hasiata, Suvenia; Stanaway, Richard; Curley, Robert; Rosa, Robert; Taugaloidi, Jones

    2004-05-01

    The island of New Guinea is located within the deforming zone between the Pacific and Australian plates that converge obliquely at ˜110 mm/yr. New Guinea has been fragmented into a complex array of microplates, some of which rotate rapidly about nearby vertical axes. We present velocities from a network of 38 Global Positioning System (GPS) sites spanning much of the nation of Papua New Guinea (PNG). The GPS-derived velocities are used to explain the kinematics of major tectonic blocks in the region and the nature of strain accumulation on major faults in PNG. We simultaneously invert GPS velocities, earthquake slip vectors on faults, and transform orientations in the Woodlark Basin for the poles of rotation of the tectonic blocks and the degree of elastic strain accumulation on faults in the region. The data are best explained by six distinct tectonic blocks: the Australian, Pacific, South Bismarck, North Bismarck, and Woodlark plates and a previously unrecognized New Guinea Highlands Block. Significant portions of the Ramu-Markham Fault appear to be locked, which has implications for seismic hazard determination in the Markham Valley region. We also propose that rapid clockwise rotation of the South Bismarck plate is controlled by edge forces initiated by the collision between the Finisterre arc and the New Guinea Highlands.

  4. Using Global Plate Velocity Boundary Conditions for Embedded Regional Geodynamic Models: Application to 3-D Modeling of the Early Rifting of the South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taramón, Jorge M.; Morgan, Jason P.; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of far-field boundary conditions is one of the most poorly resolved issues for regional modeling of geodynamic processes. In viscous flow, the choice of far-field boundary conditions often strongly shapes the large-scale structure of a geosimulation. The mantle velocity field along the sidewalls and base of a modeling region is typically much more poorly known than the geometry of past global motions of the surface plates as constrained by global plate motion reconstructions. For regional rifting models it has become routine to apply highly simplified 'plate spreading' or 'uniform rifting' boundary conditions to a 3-D model that limits its ability to simulate the geodynamic evolution of a specific rifted margin. One way researchers are exploring the sensitivity of regional models to uncertain boundary conditions is to use a nested modeling approach in which a global model is used to determine a large-scale flow pattern that is imposed as a constraint along the boundaries of the region to be modeled. Here we explore the utility of a different approach that takes advantage of the ability of finite element models to use unstructured meshes than can embed much higher resolution sub-regions. Here we demonstrate the workflow and code tools that we created to generate this unstructured mesh: solver based on springs, guide-mesh and routines to improve the quality, e.g., closeness to a regular tetrahedron, of the tetrahedral elements of the mesh. Note that the same routines are used to generate a new mesh in the remeshing of a distorted Lagrangian mesh. In our initial project to validate this approach, we create a global spherical shell mesh in which a higher resolution sub-region is created around the nascent South Atlantic Rifting Margin. Global Plate motion BCs and plate boundaries are applied for the time of the onset of rifting, continuing through several 10s of Ma of rifting. Thermal, compositional, and melt-related buoyancy forces are only non

  5. Authigenic Nd isotope record of North Pacific Intermediate Water formation and boundary exchange on the Bering Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Kwangchul; Huh, Youngsook; Han, Yeongcheol

    2017-01-01

    The Bering Sea is a potential location for the formation of the North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW), which drives the global ocean circulation as a counterpart to the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). To evaluate the NPIW-NADW seesaw hypothesis, we reconstructed the long-term variation of the bottom water Nd isotopic composition at site U1345 on the Bering Slope by extracting authigenic Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide from bulk sediments. We examined six different extractions in order to ensure that authentic seawater composition is recovered. For Bering Slope sediments whose typical carbonate content is less than 5% (average 2%), the most reliable results are obtained if the decarbonation step is omitted and a low reagent-to-sediment ratio is adopted. The reconstructed authigenic εNd record for the last 520 kyr exhibits large temporal variations depending on whether the NPIW formation or the boundary exchange process is dominant. Periods of radiogenic εNd can be attributed to NPIW formation triggered by brine rejection, as evidenced by the difference in δ18O of benthic foraminifera between sites (Δδ18Obf), high % sea-ice related diatoms, and low abundance of Bulimina aff. Exilis (low-oxygen deep fauna). Diminished supply of unradiogenic Nd from boundary exchange seems to intensify these radiogenic peaks. On the other hand, the unradiogenic εNd intervals can be attributed to stagnant bottom water conditions, as can be deduced from the Δδ18Obf values, low % sea-ice related diatoms, abundant B. aff. Exilis, and laminations. When there is no NPIW formation, the continental margin sediments are exposed to boundary exchange for a longer period of time, leading to release of unradiogenic Nd. The mid-MIS 6 and mid-MIS 5 are exceptions in that NPIW formation occurred yet the εNd compositions are unradiogenic. NPIW formation and cold climate (closed Bering Strait) are not always correlated. Comparison against εNd records of the South Atlantic suggests only an ambiguous

  6. Gradual unlocking of a plate boundary controlled the April 2014 M8.1 Iquique, Northern Chile megathrust earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, B.; Hainzl, S.; Bedford, J. R.; Hoechner, A.; Wang, R.; Zhang, Y.; Oncken, O.; Palo, M.; Bartsch, M.; Moreno, M.; Tilmann, F. J.; Dahm, T.; Victor, P.; Barrientos, S. E.; Vilotte, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    On April 1st, 2014, Northern Chile, was struck by a magnitude 8.1 earthquake near the city of Iquique following a protracted series of foreshocks. The earthquake occurred within a seismic gap left behind by two great earthquakes devastating the northern Chilean and southern Peruvian coast about 140 years ago in 1868 and 1877. This segment, about 500 km long, was the only one along the Chilean subduction zone that has not ruptured within the last century. The Integrated Plate boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) monitored the entire sequence of events, providing unprecedented resolution of the build-up to the main event and its rupture evolution. We analyzed the entire seismicity in this section of the subduction zone since 2007. The offshore rupture region of the Iquique event has been more or less continuously seismically active within our observation period. This is in contrast to the segments to the north and south, which are still unruptured and seismically quiet. Starting in July 2013, three foreshock clusters with increasingly larger magnitudes occurred within the future rupture area. The largest Mw 6.7 foreshock, two weeks before the mainshock, had a source mechanism distinctively different from the mainshock and with a centroid depth of only 9 km probably occurred in the upper plate. The Iquique mainshock initiated then at the northern end of the foreshock zone, inside a region of intermediate interseismic locking. Comparing the foreshock distribution to the long term deformation history of the margin, we find that the area exhibits a high gradient of locking from weakly locked updip to fully locked downdip. Mapping the b-value of the foreshocks indicates significantly lower b-values in the source area compared to all other regions where the b-value can be resolved. Importantly, a gradual drop of the b-value from about 0.75 to below 0.6 is observed in the source region within the three years before the Iquique earthquake. This has only been reversed within the

  7. Subduction history of the Paleo-Pacific plate beneath the Eurasian continent: Evidence from Mesozoic igneous rocks and accretionary complex in NE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Mesozoic magmatisms in NE China can be subdivided into seven stages, i.e., Late Triassic, Early Jurassic, Middle Jurassic, Late Jurassic, early Early Cretaceous, late Early Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous. Late Triassic magmatisms consist of calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the Erguna Massif, and bimodal igneous rocks in eastern margin of Eurasian continent. The former reveals southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate, the latter reveals an extensional environment (Xu et al., 2013). Early Jurassic magmatisms are composed of calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent and the Erguna Massif, revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate and southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate (Tang et al., 2015), respectively. Middle Jurassic magmatism only occur in the Great Xing'an Range and the northern margin of the NCC, and consists of adakitic rocks that formed in crustal thickening, reflecting the closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk ocean (Li et al., 2015). Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous magmatisms only occur to the west of the Songliao Basin, and consist of trackyandesite and A-type of rhyolites, revealing an extensional environment related to delamination of thickened crust. The late Early Cretaceous magmatisms are widespread in NE China, and consist of calc-alkaline volcanics in eastern margin and bimodal volcanics in intracontinent, revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate. Late Cretaceous magmatisms mainly occur to the east of the Songliao Basin, and consist of calc-alkaline volcanics in eastern margin and alkaline basalts in intracontinent (Xu et al., 2013), revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate. The Heilongjiang complex with Early Jurassic deformation, together with Jurassic Khabarovsk complex in Russia Far East and Mino-Tamba complex in Japan, reveal Early Jurassic accretionary history. Additionally, the Raohe complex with the age of ca. 169 Ma was

  8. Multi-type Tectonic Responses to Plate Motion Changes of Mega-Offset Transform Faults at the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Lin, J.; Yang, H.; Zhou, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Magmatic and tectonic responses of a mid-ocean ridge system to plate motion changes can provide important constraints on the mechanisms of ridge-transform interaction and lithospheric properties. Here we present new analysis of multi-type responses of the mega-offset transform faults at the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge (PAR) system to plate motion changes in the last 12 Ma. Detailed analysis of the Heezen, Tharp, and Udintsev transform faults showed that the extensional stresses induced by plate motion changes could have been released through a combination of magmatic and tectonic processes: (1) For a number of ridge segments with abundant magma supply, plate motion changes might have caused the lateral transport of magma along the ridge axis and into the abutting transform valley, forming curved "hook" ridges at the ridge-transform intersection. (2) Plate motion changes might also have caused vertical deformation on steeply-dipping transtensional faults that were developed along the Heezen, Tharp, and Udintsev transform faults. (3) Distinct zones of intensive tectonic deformation, resembling belts of "rift zones", were found to be sub-parallel to the investigated transform faults. These rift-like deformation zones were hypothesized to have developed when the stresses required to drive the vertical deformation on the steeply-dipping transtensional faults along the transform faults becomes excessive, and thus deformation on off-transform "rift zones" became favored. (4) However, to explain the observed large offsets on the steeply-dipping transtensional faults, the transform faults must be relatively weak with low apparent friction coefficient comparing to the adjacent lithospheric plates.

  9. A direct numerical method for predicting concentration profiles in a turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A numerical solution of the turbulent mass transport equation utilizing the concept of eddy diffusivity is presented as an efficient method of investigating turbulent mass transport in boundary layer type flows. A FORTRAN computer program is used to study the two-dimensional diffusion of ammonia, from a line source on the surface, into a turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate. The results of the numerical solution are compared with experimental data to verify the results of the solution. Several other solutions to diffusion problems are presented to illustrate the versatility of the computer program and to provide some insight into the problem of mass diffusion as a whole.

  10. Slip rate and earthquake recurrence along the central Septentrional fault, North American-Caribbean plate boundary, Dominican Republic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, C.S.; Mann, P.; Pena, L.R.; Burr, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Septentrional fault zone (SFZ) is the major North American-Caribbean, strike-slip, plate boundary fault at the longitude of eastern Hispaniola. The SFZ traverses the densely populated Cibao Valley of the Dominican Republic, forming a prominent scarp in alluvium. Our studies at four sites along the central SFZ are aimed at quantifying the late Quaternary behavior of this structure to better understand the seismic hazard it represents for the northeastern Caribbean. Our investigations of excavations at sites near Rio Cenovi show that the most recent ground-rupturing earthquake along this fault in the north central Dominican Republic occurred between A.D. 1040 and A.D. 1230, and involved a minimum of ???4 m of left-lateral slip and 2.3 m of normal dip slip at that site. Our studies of offset stream terraces at two locations, Rio Juan Lopez and Rio Licey, provide late Holocene slip rate estimates of 6-9 mm/yr and a maximum of 11-12 mm/yr, respectively, across the Septentrional fault. Combining these results gives a best estimate of 6-12 mm/yr for the slip rate across the SFZ. Three excavations, two near Tenares and one at the Rio Licey site, yielded evidence for the occurrence of earlier prehistoric earthquakes. Dates of strata associated with the penultimate event suggest that it occurred post-A.D. 30, giving a recurrence interval of 800-1200 years. These studies indicate that the SFZ has likely accumulated elastic strain sufficient to generate a major earthquake during the more than 800 years since it last slipped and should be considered likely to produce a destructive future earthquake.

  11. The Ionian and Alfeo-Etna fault zones: New segments of an evolving plate boundary in the central Mediterranean Sea?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonia, A.; Torelli, L.; Artoni, A.; Carlini, M.; Faccenna, C.; Ferranti, L.; Gasperini, L.; Govers, R.; Klaeschen, D.; Monaco, C.; Neri, G.; Nijholt, N.; Orecchio, B.; Wortel, R.

    2016-04-01

    The Calabrian Arc is a narrow subduction-rollback system resulting from Africa/Eurasia plate convergence. While crustal shortening is taken up in the accretionary wedge, transtensive deformation accounts for margin segmentation along transverse lithospheric faults. One of these structures is the NNW-SSE transtensive fault system connecting the Alfeo seamount and the Etna volcano (Alfeo-Etna Fault, AEF). A second, NW-SE crustal discontinuity, the Ionian Fault (IF), separates two lobes of the CA subduction complex (Western and Eastern Lobes) and impinges on the Sicilian coasts south of the Messina Straits. Analysis of multichannel seismic reflection profiles shows that: 1) the IF and the AEF are transfer crustal tectonic features bounding a complex deformation zone, which produces the downthrown of the Western lobe along a set of transtensive fault strands; 2) during Pleistocene times, transtensive faulting reactivated structural boundaries inherited from the Mesozoic Tethyan domain which acted as thrust faults during the Messinian and Pliocene; and 3) the IF and the AEF, and locally the Malta escarpment, accommodate a recent tectonic event coeval and possibly linked to the Mt. Etna formation. Regional geodynamic models show that, whereas AEF and IF are neighboring fault systems, their individual roles are different. Faulting primarily resulting from the ESE retreat of the Ionian slab is expressed in the northwestern part of the IF. The AEF, on the other hand, is part of the overall dextral shear deformation, resulting from differences in Africa-Eurasia motion between the western and eastern sectors of the Tyrrhenian margin of northern Sicily, and accommodating diverging motions in the adjacent compartments, which results in rifting processes within the Western Lobe of the Calabrian Arc accretionary wedge. As such, it is primarily associated with Africa-Eurasia relative motion.

  12. A catalog of coseismic uniform-slip models of geodetically unstudied earthquakes along the Sumatran plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, N. Z.; Feng, L.; Hill, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Sumatran plate boundary has experienced five Mw > 8 great earthquakes, a handful of Mw 7-8 earthquakes and numerous small to moderate events since the 2004 Mw 9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake. The geodetic studies of these moderate earthquakes have mostly been passed over in favour of larger events. We therefore in this study present a catalog of coseismic uniform-slip models of one Mw 7.2 earthquake and 17 Mw 5.9-6.9 events that have mostly gone geodetically unstudied. These events occurred close to various continuous stations within the Sumatran GPS Array (SuGAr), allowing the network to record their surface deformation. However, due to their relatively small magnitudes, most of these moderate earthquakes were recorded by only 1-4 GPS stations. With the limited observations per event, we first constrain most of the model parameters (e.g. location, slip, patch size, strike, dip, rake) using various external sources (e.g., the ANSS catalog, gCMT, Slab1.0, and empirical relationships). We then use grid-search forward models to explore a range of some of these parameters (geographic position for all events and additionally depth for some events). Our results indicate the gCMT centroid locations in the Sumatran subduction zone might be biased towards the west for smaller events, while ANSS epicentres might be biased towards the east. The more accurate locations of these events are potentially useful in understanding the nature of various structures along the megathrust, particularly the persistent rupture barriers.

  13. IODP Expedition 338: NanTroSEIZE Stage 3: NanTroSEIZE plate boundary deep riser 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, G. F.; Kanagawa, K.; Strasser, M.; Dugan, B.; Maeda, L.; Toczko, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) is designed to investigate fault mechanics and seismogenesis along a subduction megathrust, with objectives that include characterizing fault slip, strain accumulation, fault and wall rock composition, fault architecture, and state variables throughout an active plate boundary system. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 338 was planned to extend and case riser Hole C0002F from 856 to 3600 meters below the seafloor (m b.s.f.). Riser operations extended the hole to 2005.5 m b.s.f., collecting logging-while-drilling (LWD) and measurement-while-drilling, mud gas, and cuttings data. Results reveal two lithologic units within the inner wedge of the accretionary prism that are separated by a prominent fault zone at ~ 1640 m b.s.f. Due to damage to the riser during unfavorable winds and strong currents, riser operations were suspended, and Hole C0002F left for re-entry during future riser drilling operations. Contingency riserless operations included coring at the forearc basin site (C0002) and at two slope basin sites (C0021 and C0022), and LWD at one input site (C0012) and at three slope basin sites (C0018, C0021 and C0022). Cores and logs from these sites comprehensively characterize the alteration stage of the oceanic basement input to the subduction zone, the early stage of Kumano Basin evolution, gas hydrates in the forearc basin, and recent activity of the shallow megasplay fault zone system and associated submarine landslides.

  14. Low-latency high-rate GPS data streams from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G.; Borsa, A.; Jackson, M.; Stark, K.

    2008-0