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Sample records for pack cementation diffusion

  1. Pack cementation diffusion coatings for iron-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    With the aid of computer-assisted calculations of the equilibrium vapor pressures in halide-activated cementation packs, processing conditions have been identified and experimentally verified for the codeposition of two or more alloying elements in a diffusion coating on a variety of steels. The Cr-Si ferrite layers have proven to be very resistant to high temperature cyclic oxidation and to pitting in aqueous solutions. The process has been patented, and is being transferred for industrial application, e.g. for water walls of utility boilers, etc. In the proposed extension of this project, the use of mixed pure metal powders in the pack will be extended to achieve similar ferrite Fe-Cr-Al coatings with excellent oxidation resistance, with the eventual transfer of the technology to industry. In other recent studies, Ni-base alloy rods were aluminized by the halide-activated pack cementation process to bring their average composition to that for the ORNL-developed Ni{sub 3}Al, for use as a welding rod. A similar effort to develop a welding rod for the ORNL Fe{sub 3}Al alloy did not yield reproducible coating compositions or growth kinetics. The continued effort to produce Duriron-type (Fe-18Si-5Cr) coatings on steels was not successful. Literature for the intrinsic diffusion coefficients suggests that this task cannot be achieved.

  2. Pack cementation diffusion coatings for Fe-base and refractory alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, R.A.

    1998-03-10

    With the aid of computer-assisted calculations of the equilibrium vapor pressures in halide-activated cementation packs, processing conditions have been identified and experimentally verified for the codeposition of two or more alloying elements in a diffusion coating on a variety of steels and refractory metal alloys. A new comprehensive theory to treat the multi-component thermodynamic equilibria in the gas phase for several coexisting solid phases was developed and used. Many different processes to deposit various types of coatings on several types of steels were developed: Cr-Si codeposition for low- or medium-carbon steels, Cr-Al codeposition on low-carbon steels to yield either a Kanthal-type composition (Fe-25Cr-4Al in wt.%) or else a (Fe, Cr){sub 3}Al surface composition. An Fe{sub 3}Al substrate was aluminized to achieve an FeAl surface composition, and boron was also added to ductilize the coating. The developmental Cr-lean ORNL alloys with exceptional creep resistance were Cr-Al coated to achieve excellent oxidation resistance. Alloy wires of Ni-base were aluminized to provide an average composition of Ni{sub 3}Al for use as welding rods. Several different refractory metal alloys based on Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb have been silicided, also with germanium additions, to provide excellent oxidation resistance. A couple of developmental Cr-Zr alloys were similarly coated and tested.

  3. Codeposition of Elements in Diffusion Coatings by the Halide-Activated Pack Cementation Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    codeposition of two or more elements in a halide-activated cementation pack is inherently difficult because of large differences in the thermodynamic ...are inherently graded in composition so that sharp differences in physical properties such as coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) are minimized. The...intention of this paper is to demonstrate the possibility to codeposit two or more elements into alloy substrates despite an inherent thermodynamic

  4. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  5. Diffusion in Jammed Particle Packs.

    PubMed

    Bolintineanu, Dan S; Grest, Gary S; Lechman, Jeremy B; Silbert, Leonardo E

    2015-08-21

    Using random walk simulations we explore diffusive transport through monodisperse sphere packings over a range of packing fractions ϕ in the vicinity of the jamming transition at ϕ(c). Various diffusion properties are computed over several orders of magnitude in both time and packing pressure. Two well-separated regimes of normal "Fickian" diffusion, where the mean squared displacement is linear in time, are observed. The first corresponds to diffusion inside individual spheres, while the latter is the long-time bulk diffusion. The intermediate anomalous diffusion regime and the long-time value of the diffusion coefficient are both shown to be controlled by particle contacts, which in turn depend on proximity to ϕ(c). The time required to recover normal diffusion t* scales as (ϕ-ϕ(c))(-0.5) and the long-time diffusivity D(∞)∼(ϕ-ϕ(c))0.5, or D(∞)∼1/t*. It is shown that the distribution of mean first passage times associated with the escape of random walkers between neighboring particles controls both t* and D(∞) in the limit ϕ→ϕ(c).

  6. Diffusion in jammed particle packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Silbert, Leonardo E.; Grest, Gary S.; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusive transport in jammed particle packs is of interest for a number of applications, as well as being a potential indicator of structural properties near the jamming point. To this end, we report stochastic simulations of equilibrium diffusion through monodisperse sphere packs near the jamming point in the limit of a perfectly insulating surrounding medium. The time dependence of various diffusion properties is resolved over several orders of magnitude. Two time regimes of expected Fickian diffusion are observed, separated by an intermediate regime of anomalous diffusion. This intermediate regime grows as the particle volume fraction approaches the critical jamming transition. The diffusion behavior is fully controlled by the extent of the contacts between neighboring particles, which in turn depend on proximity to the jamming point. In particular, the mean first passage time associated with the escape of random walkers between neighboring particles is shown to control both the time to recover Fickian diffusion and the long time diffusivity. Scaling laws are established that relate these quantities to the difference between the actual and critical jamming volume fractions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE- AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Volatile species in halide-activated-diffusion coating packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Robert; Rapp, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer was used to identify the vapor species generated in a halide-activated cementation pack. Pack powder mixtures containing a Cr-Al binary masteralloy powder, an NH4Cl activator salt, and either ZrO2 or Y2O3 (or neither) were analyzed at 1000 C. Both the equilibrium calculations for the pack and mass spectrometer results indicated that volatile AlCl(x) and CrCl(y) species were generated by the pack powder mixture; in packs containing the reactive element oxide, volatile ZrCl(z) and YCl(w) species were formed by the conversion of their oxide sources.

  8. Pack cementation Cr-Al coating of steels and Ge-doped silicide coating of Cr-Nb alloy

    SciTech Connect

    He, Y.R.; Zheng, M.H.; Rapp, R.A.

    1995-08-01

    Carbon steels or low-alloy steels used in utility boilers, heat exchangers, petrochemical plants and coal gasification systems are subjected to high temperature corrosion attack such as oxidation, sulfidation and hot corrosion. The pack cementation coating process has proven to be an economical and effective method to enhance the corrosion resistance by modifying the surface composition of steels. With the aid of a computer program, STEPSOL, pack cementation conditions to produce a ferrite Cr-Al diffusion coating on carbon-containing steels by using elemental Cr and Al powders have been calculated and experimentally verified. The cyclic oxidation kinetics for the Cr-Al coated steels are presented. Chromium silicide can maintain high oxidation resistance up to 1100{degrees}C by forming a SiO{sub 2} protective scale. Previous studies at Ohio State University have shown that the cyclic oxidation resistance of MOSi{sub 2} and TiSi{sub 2} can be further improved by Ge addition introduced during coating growth. The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating in a single processing step for the ORNL-developed Cr-Nb advanced intermetallic alloy. The oxidation behavior of the silicide-coated Cr-Nb alloy was excellent: weight gain of about 1 mg/cm{sup 2} upon oxidation at 1100{degrees}C in air for 100 hours.

  9. Analytical method to estimate resin cement diffusion into dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Ferraz, Larissa Cristina; Ubaldini, Adriana Lemos Mori; de Oliveira, Bruna Medeiros Bertol; Neto, Antonio Medina; Sato, Fracielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2016-05-01

    This study analyzed the diffusion of two resin luting agents (resin cements) into dentin, with the aim of presenting an analytical method for estimating the thickness of the diffusion zone. Class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars (n=9). Indirect composite inlays were luted into the cavities with either a self-adhesive or a self-etch resin cement. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and the cement-dentin interface was analyzed by using micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) and scanning electron microscopy. Evolution of peak intensities of the Raman bands, collected from the functional groups corresponding to the resin monomer (C-O-C, 1113 cm-1) present in the cements, and the mineral content (P-O, 961 cm-1) in dentin were sigmoid shaped functions. A Boltzmann function (BF) was then fitted to the peaks encountered at 1113 cm-1 to estimate the resin cement diffusion into dentin. The BF identified a resin cement-dentin diffusion zone of 1.8±0.4 μm for the self-adhesive cement and 2.5±0.3 μm for the self-etch cement. This analysis allowed the authors to estimate the diffusion of the resin cements into the dentin. Fitting the MRS data to the BF contributed to and is relevant for future studies of the adhesive interface.

  10. Thermal diffusivity of glass ionomer cement systems.

    PubMed

    Brantley, W A; Kerby, R E

    1993-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity has been measured for 10 glass ionomer and resin-based materials: three conventional (water-hardened) glass ionomer cements, two silver-reinforced glass ionomers, an experimental stainless steel-reinforced glass ionomer, three visible light-cured (VLC) glass ionomer-resin hybrid materials, and a VLC resin-based product developed for the same clinical uses as the hybrid materials. Cube-shaped specimens, c. 10 x 10 x 10 mm, initially at room temperature were immersed in mercury surrounded by an ice-water bath. From the experimental cooling curve a semi-log plot of relative temperature decrease vs. time yielded a straight line whose slope is proportional to the thermal diffusivity. The values ranged from 1.74-5.16 x 10(-3) cm2 s-1, and all of the materials tested would have adequate insulating properties provided normal clinical thickness levels for lining materials are maintained. It was found that the thermal diffusivities for the three metal-reinforced glass ionomers, where composition information is available, do not follow a rule of mixtures applied to the individual components.

  11. High-temperature coating for titanium aluminides using the pack-cementation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Sicheng )

    1990-10-01

    The practical application of titanium aluminide metal-matrix composites (MMCs) at high temperatures requires suitable surface coatings to provide the needed oxidation resistance. Without a coating, the titanium aluminide alloys suffered from rapid oxidation attack at elevated temperatures, particularly under thermal cyclic conditions. The pack-cementation coating process was utilized to aluminize the surface region of a Ti{sub 3}Al-base alloy to TiAl{sub 3}, the most oxidation-resistant phase. With the existence of an adherent conversion coating, a thin protective alumina scale formed on the outer surface, and a significant improvement in the corrosion resistance was observed. Excellent coating efficiency and geometric flexibility were demonstrated in this study by the pack-cementation technique. Further development of the cementation process will focus on the elimination of surface cracking in the coating.

  12. The influence of Cr and Al pack cementation on low carbon steel to improve oxidation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetya, Didik; Sugiarti, Eni; Destyorini, Fredina; Thosin, Kemas Ahmad Zaini

    2012-06-01

    Pack chromizing and aluminizing has been widely used for many years to improve hot temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance of metals. The coating process involves packing the steel in a powder mixture which contain aluminum and chromium source, and inert filler (usually alumina), and halide activator NH4Cl. Al and Cr were deposited onto carbon steel by pack cementation process using elemental Al and Cr powder as Al and Cr source, whereas NiCo alloys codeposited by electrodeposition. The position of Al and Cr could be under or over Ni-Co alloys deposited. Pack cementation was heated on dry inert gas at temperature 800 °C about 5 hours and 20 minute for Cr and Al respectively. Al and Cr was successfully deposited. Laying down effect of Al and Cr onto carbon steel whether up and down toward NiCo alloys coating have affected to oxidation resistance. The pack aluminizing as top layer given best resitance to restrain excessive oxide scale, in contrast pack chromizing reveal bad oxidation resistance, moreover occured spallation on layer.

  13. Silver-cemented frit formation for the stabilization of the packing structure in the microchannel of electrochromatographic microchips.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongman; Oh, Hyejin; Jeon, In-Sun

    2011-10-28

    A simple but effective frit formation technique was developed to stabilize the packing structure inside the microchannel of capillary electrochromatographic microchips, utilizing the electroless plating technique. A Ag(NH(3))(2)(+) solution was allowed to diffuse through the colloidal silica packing in the microchannel from the reservoir of the microchip for a limited amount of time, and then it was reduced by an excess amount of formaldehyde solution. A frit structure of ~70 μm in length was formed at the entrance of the microchannel without clogging when treated with 1mM Ag(NH(3))(2)(+) ion and formaldehyde for 30s and 150 s, respectively. The formation of the frit structure was confirmed by a scanning electron microscopy. The stability of the packing structure was tested rigorously and then confirmed by applying alternating electroosmotic flows back and forth with pulsed potential steps on both sides of the frit structure. The effect of the treatment on the electrochromatograms was evaluated after the microchips were repeatedly used and stored for a long period of time. The results indicated that the silver-cemented frit structure extended the lifetime of the fully packed CEC microchips distinctly.

  14. New manufacturing method for Fe-Si magnetic powders using modified pack-cementation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Ji Young; Kim, Jang Won; Han, Jeong Whan; Jang, Pyungwoo

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a new method for making Fe-Si magnetic powders using a pack-cementation process. It was found that Fe-Si alloy powders were formed by a reaction of the pack mixture of Fe, Si, NaF, and Al2O3 powders at 900 °C for 24 h under a hydrogen atmosphere. Separation of the Fe-Si alloy powders was dependent on the particle size of the Fe powders in the pack. For small Fe powders, magnetic separation in a medium of strong alkali solution was recommended. But, for relatively larger Fe powders, the Fe-Si alloy powders were easily separated from Al2O3 powders using a magnet in air atmosphere. The Si content in the Fe-Si magnetic powders were easily controlled by changing the weight ratio of Si to (Si+Fe) in the pack.

  15. Diffusive wave spectroscopy of a random close packing of spheres.

    PubMed

    Crassous, J

    2007-06-01

    We are interested in the propagation of light in a random packing of dielectric spheres within the geometrical optics approximation. Numerical simulations are performed using a ray tracing algorithm. The effective refractive indexes and the transport mean free path are computed for different refractive indexes of spheres and intersticial media. The variations of the optical path length under small deformations of the spheres assembly are also computed and compared to the results of Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we propose a measure of the transport mean free path and a Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy experiment on a packing of glass spheres. The results of those experiments agree with the predictions of this ray tracing approach.

  16. Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy of a random close packing of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crassous, J.

    2007-06-01

    We are interested in the propagation of light in a random packing of dielectric spheres within the geometrical optics approximation. Numerical simulations are performed using a ray tracing algorithm. The effective refractive indexes and the transport mean free path are computed for different refractive indexes of spheres and intersticial media. The variations of the optical path length under small deformations of the spheres assembly are also computed and compared to the results of Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we propose a measure of the transport mean free path and a Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy experiment on a packing of glass spheres. The results of those experiments agree with the predictions of this ray tracing approach.

  17. The deposition of aluminide and silicide coatings on {gamma}-TiAl using the halide-activated pack cementation method

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, T.C; Gleeson, B.

    1996-12-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation method (HAPC) was utilized to deposit aluminide and silicide coatings on nominally stoichiometric {gamma}-TiAl. The deposition temperature was 1,000 C and deposition times ranged from 2 to 12 hours. The growth rates of the coatings were diffusion controlled, with the rate of aluminide growth being about a factor of 2 greater than that of silicide growth. The aluminide coating was inward growing and consisted of a thick, uniform outer layer of TiAl{sub 3} and a thin inner layer of TiAl{sub 2}, with the rate-controlling step being the diffusion of aluminum from the pack into the substrate. Annealing experiments at 1,100 C showed that the interdiffusion between the aluminide coating and the {gamma}-TiAl substrate was rapid. In contrast to the aluminide coating, the silicide coating was nonuniform and porous, consisting primarily of TiSi{sub 2}, TiSi, and Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 4}, with the rate-controlling step for the coating growth believed to be the diffusion of aluminum into the {gamma}-TiAl ahead of the silicide/{gamma}-TiAl interface. The microstructural evolution of the aluminide and silicide coating structures is discussed qualitatively.

  18. Boundary conditions for diffusion in the pack-aluminizing of nickel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivakumar, R.; Seigle, L. L.; Menon, N. B.

    1973-01-01

    The surface compositions of nickel specimens coated for various lengths of time in aluminizing packs at 2000 F were studied, in order to obtain information about the kinetics of the pack-cementation process in the formation of aluminide coatings. The results obtained indicate that the surface compositions of the coated nickel specimens are independent of time, at least for time between 0.5 and 20 hrs. Another important observation is that the specimens gained weight during the coating process.

  19. Creep behavior of pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic martensitic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Zhang, Ying; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    The creep behavior of various pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel was investigated at 650 C in laboratory air. The coatings were fabricated in two temperature regimes, i.e., 650 or 700 C (low temperature) and 1050 C(high temperature), and consisted of a range of Al levels and thicknesses. For comparison, uncoated specimens heat-treated at 1050 C to simulate the high temperature coating cycle also were included in the creep test. All coated specimens showed a reduction in creep resistance, with 16 51% decrease in rupture life compared to the as-received bare substrate alloy. However, the specimens heat-treated at 1050 C exhibited the lowest creep resistance among all tested samples, with a surprisingly short rupture time of < 25 h, much shorter than the specimen coated at 1050 C. Factors responsible for the reduction in creep resistance of both coated and heat-treated specimens were discussed.

  20. Oxidation behaviors of the aluminide coated TZM alloy via pack cementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Kim, J. M.; Lee, S.; Park, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    TZM is a traditional alloy for high temperature applications, in which (Ti, Zr)C particles are dispersed in a Mo matrix. However, due to easy formation of an oxide layer on the TZM alloy under ambient atmosphere, an oxidation protective coating is needed for any high temperature structural applications of TZM. In this study, aluminium pack cementation coatings have been carried out on TZM alloys, resulting in the formation of Al8Mo3 layer on the surface of TZM alloys. In order to examine the oxidation stability, the TZM alloy was exposed in an aerobic atmosphere. For the aluminide coated TZM alloys, an alumina layer was produced at the outer surface layer. The alminide coated TZM alloys showed excellent oxidation resistance. The coating layer kinetics and the corresponding oxidation stability are also discussed in terms of microstructural observations.

  1. Experimental and thermodynamic considerations of Mg2Si coatings deposited by pack cementation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stathokostopoulos, D.; Tsipas, S. A.; Chaliampalias, D.; Pavlidou, E.; Hatzikraniotis, E.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.; Vourlias, G.

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium disilicide is a narrow gap semiconductor which can be used in several applications such as thermoelectric materials, optoelectronic devices and batteries. It has attracted special attraction because of its low cost and non-toxicity. In the herein examination the formation of this compound is investigated by a simple, one-stage process which is pack cementation. Particularly, the effect of deposition time, activator and donor material concentration was examined. Mg2Si was formed in every case without the presence of other compounds as referred to be present when formed with other coating procedures which have higher cost and are very sophisticated. The examined parameters were found to have effect only on the coating thickness up to a certain value. Moreover, the experimental results confirmed the theoretical thermodynamic calculations performed for this case.

  2. The codeposition of chromium and aluminum on nickel-based alloys by pack cementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinner, Charles Paul

    Several variables of the pack cementation process were studied to determine their effect on the codeposition of chromium and aluminum on Ni270 and PWA1484. Specifically, the amount and composition of the master alloy (95Cr 5Al and 90Cr 10Al) and activator (NHsb4Cl and CrClsb2) were varied to determine their effect on the composition of the coatings produced. It was found that for coatings on Ni270, three deposition regimes exist, aluminizing, chromizing, and codepositing, which are produced by specific combinations of these variables. The conditions used to produce these coatings are summarized in the form of deposition maps. Corresponding coatings were also produced using PWA1484 as the substrate. In order to elucidate the effect of the amount of master alloy and the composition of the activator, several pack compositions were studied as a function of time. The pack composition as a function of coating time and pack position relative to the sample surface was studied by vacuum impregnating the pack and sample in epoxy resin and analyzing individual particles by microprobe analysis. It was found that decreasing the amount of master alloy increases the overall rate of depletion of aluminum from the pack, which leads to an increase in chromium deposition. An aluminum depletion zone was formed adjacent to the sample at short times for all conditions studied, and was thus not a function of the pack variables studied. Use of CrClsb2 as the activator led to a decrease in the depletion of aluminum relative to NHsb4Cl activated packs containing the same amount of master alloy, which was found to be due to the condensed nature of the CrClsb2 activator. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations were used to support the claims of this study. Three types of coatings on PWA1484, an aluminide, chromide, and codeposited, were developed and evaluated for oxidation and corrosion resistance. Two industrial coatings, PWA73 and PWA70/73, were also evaluated for comparison. The conditions

  3. Cs diffusion in local Taiwan laterite with different solution concentration, pH and packing density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Li, Ming-Hsu; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2008-09-01

    In this work we used an "in-diffusion" method to study the effects of pH, solution concentration and packing density on Cs diffusion by packing local Taiwan laterite (LTL) into modified capillary columns with 5mm diameter. These packed columns were first pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater (GW) for 3 weeks. The diffusion experiments were then carried out at ambient condition for 2 weeks. Our experimental results showed that the Cs diffusion profile fits Fick's second law very well in given experimental conditions, indicating the validity of modified capillary column method. Generally speaking, Cs diffusion in LTL decreases as the pH increases and as Cs concentration decreases. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D(a)) increases from 5.52 x 10(-12) (10(-7)M) to 2.18 x 10(-11) (10(-3)M)m(2)/s, while the effective diffusion coefficient (D(e)) shows slight variation as the Cs concentration changes. Both the derived D(a) and D(e) values decrease as the pH increases, implying that the diffusion mechanisms of Cs nuclide in alkaline and acid environment are different. In addition, our results show that Cs diffusion is unaffected by the given packing density, indicating the interlaminary space is not the major determinant of Cs adsorption and diffusion in LTL.

  4. Oxidation-resistant coating for gamma titanium aluminides by pack cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Mabuchi, H.; Tsuda, H.; Kawakami, T.; Nakamatsu, S.; Matsui, T.; Morii, K.

    1999-08-06

    Gamma titanium aluminides ({gamma}-TiAl alloys), having an L1{sub 0}-type structure, are candidate materials for use in future gas turbine aero-engines and automotive engines because of their low density, high specific strength and high stiffness. In air, however, it is well known that titanium aluminide oxidizes at a more rapid rate at temperatures above 1,123 K; therefore, the oxidation resistance becomes a critical factor for TiAl alloys to be used at high temperatures (perhaps above 1,073 K). Coatings for the TiAl alloy are essential to high temperature oxidation resistance. The Al-Ti-Cr ternary phase diagram at 1,423 K indicates that the L1{sub 2} phase field is in equilibrium with the TiAl(L1{sub 0}) phase field. Furthermore, the L1{sub 0}- and L1{sub 2}-alloys in this ternary system resemble each other very closely in crystal structure and lattice parameter (TiAl(L1{sub 0}); a = 0.4005, c = 0.4070 nm (27), Ti-67Al-8Cr(L1{sub 2}); a = 0.3960nm (25)). Therefore, the L1{sub 2}-(Al,Cr){sub 3}Ti alloy can be considered applicable to L1{sub 0}-TiAl alloys as an optimum material for coatings. The purpose of this study is to apply L1{sub 2} alloy coatings to the TiAl alloys by pack cementation techniques, and to evaluate the oxidation resistance of the coated alloys.

  5. Chloride diffusivity in hardened cement paste from microscale analyses and accounting for binding effects.

    PubMed

    Carrara, P; De Lorenzis, L; Bentz, D P

    2016-08-01

    The diffusion of chloride ions in hardened cement paste (HCP) under steady-state conditions and accounting for the highly heterogeneous nature of the material is investigated. The HCP microstructures are obtained through segmentation of X-ray images of real samples as well as from simulations using the cement hydration model CEMHYD3D. Moreover, the physical and chemical interactions between chloride ions and HCP phases (binding), along with their effects on the diffusive process, are explicitly taken into account. The homogenized diffusivity of the HCP is then derived through a least square homogenization technique. Comparisons between numerical results and experimental data from the literature are presented.

  6. Chloride diffusivity in hardened cement paste from microscale analyses and accounting for binding effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, P.; De Lorenzis, L.; Bentz, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    The diffusion of chloride ions in hardened cement paste (HCP) under steady-state conditions and accounting for the highly heterogeneous nature of the material is investigated. The three-dimensional HCP microstructures are obtained through segmentation of x-ray images of real samples as well as from simulations using the cement hydration model CEMHYD3D. Moreover, the physical and chemical interactions between chloride ions and HCP phases (binding), along with their effects on the diffusive process, are explicitly taken into account. The homogenized diffusivity of the HCP is then derived through a least square homogenization technique. Comparisons between numerical results and experimental data from the literature are presented.

  7. Open photoacoustic cell for thermal diffusivity measurements of a fast hardening cement used in dental restoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrath, F. B. G.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C.; Moraes, J. C. S.; Santos, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity and conductivity of dental cements have been studied using open photoacoustic cell (OPC). The samples consisted of fast hardening cement named CER, developed to be a root-end filling material. Thermal characterization was performed in samples with different gel/powder ratio and particle sizes and the results were compared to the ones from commercial cements. Complementary measurements of specific heat and mass density were also performed. The results showed that the thermal diffusivity of CER tends to increase smoothly with gel volume and rapidly against particle size. This behavior was linked to the pores size and their distribution in the samples. The OPC method was shown to be a valuable way in deriving thermal properties of porous material.

  8. Preparation and Oxidation Performance of Y and Ce-Modified Cr Coating on open-cell Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy Foam by the Pack Cementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Q.; Hu, Z. L.; Wu, G. H.

    2016-12-01

    Metallic foams with a high fraction of porosity, low density and high-energy absorption capacity are a rapidly emerging class of novel ultralight weight materials for various engineering applications. In this study, Y-Cr and Ce-Cr-coated Ni-Cr-Fe alloy foams were prepared via the pack cementation method, and the effects of Y and Ce addition on the coating microstructure and oxidation performance were analyzed in order to improve the oxidation resistance of open-cell nickel-based alloy foams. The results show that the Ce-Cr coating is relatively more uniform and has a denser distribution on the surface of the nickel-based alloy foam. The surface grains of the Ce-Cr-coated alloy foam are finer compared to those of the Y-Cr-coated alloy foam. An obvious Ce peak appears on the interface between the coating and the alloy foam strut, which gives rise to a "site-blocking" effect for the short-circuit transport of the cation in the substrate. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the Y-Cr-coated alloy foam mainly consists of Cr, (Fe, Ni) and (Ni, Cr) phases in the surface layer. The Ce-Cr-coated alloy foam is mainly composed of Cr and (Ni, Cr) phases. Furthermore, the addition of Y and Ce clearly lead to an improvement in the oxidation resistance of the coated alloy foams in the temperature range of 900-1000 °C. The addition of Ce is especially effective in enhancing the diffusion of chromium to the oxidation front, thus, accelerating the formation of a Cr2O3 layer.

  9. Synthesis of aluminum-rich coatings on new high-temperature cast austenitic steel CF8C-Plus by a pack cementation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Alex Keith

    2011-12-01

    In this research, a pack cementation process is developed for coating the newly developed cast austenitic steel CF8C-Plus. The developed coating process is capable of producing pack particle free coatings on large fatigue test specimens in a horizontal laboratory tube furnace as well as smaller oxidation and creep test samples. Several methods for the production of the pack powder free Al-rich coating are presented and evaluated for samples of both sizes. The developed coating is intended to compete with coatings of a similar quality produced with chemical vapor deposition and slurry coating methods. Additionally, because CF8C-Plus has only recently become available there is currently no available data on the effect of the fabrication of an Al-rich coating on the substrates properties. This research used advanced characterization methods to evaluate the coating surface and cross-sectional features. These methods include scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. This is the first time that this information has been made available to the scientific community. Also, the oxidation performance of the coating will be tested and compared to other coatings developed with CVD and slurry coating methods and the preliminary results of the effect of the coating on the alloys fatigue performance will be presented.

  10. Small-particle-size cement

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Almond, S.W.; Blerhaus, W.M. II )

    1991-05-01

    Successful remedial cementing has historically been difficult in wells with large-interval, multizone, gravel-packed completions. The reason is the inability of conventional oilfield cements to penetrate gravel packs adequately. Small-particle-size cement (SPSC) was developed to penetrate gravel packs and to provide the zonal isolation required. This paper details the laboratory work, job design, and field implementation of this new cement.

  11. Determination of Diffusion Profiles in Altered Wellbore Cement Using X-ray Computed Tomography Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Walsh, Stuart D. C.; DuFrane, Wyatt L.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-06-17

    The development of accurate, predictive models for use in determining wellbore integrity requires detailed information about the chemical and mechanical changes occurring in hardened Portland cements. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) provides a method that can nondestructively probe these changes in three dimensions. Here, we describe a method for extracting subvoxel mineralogical and chemical information from synchrotron XRCT images by combining advanced image segmentation with geochemical models of cement alteration. The method relies on determining “effective linear activity coefficients” (ELAC) for the white light source to generate calibration curves that relate the image grayscales to material composition. The resulting data set supports the modeling of cement alteration by CO2-rich brine with discrete increases in calcium concentration at reaction boundaries. The results of these XRCT analyses can be used to further improve coupled geochemical and mechanical models of cement alteration in the wellbore environment.

  12. Effects of Y2O3 on the microstructures and wear resistance of Si-Al-Y co-deposition coatings prepared on Ti-Al alloy by pack cementation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongquan; Xie, Faqin; Wu, Xiangqing; Li, Xuan

    2013-12-01

    Si-Al-Y co-deposition coatings were prepared on a Ti-Al alloy by pack cementation process at 1050 for 4 h. The effects of pack Y2O3 content (from 0 to 5 wt%) on the microstructure and constituent phases of the co-deposition coatings were studied, the wear resistance of the substrate and the coated specimens were also compared at 600 °C in air. The results showed that the pack Y2O3 content imposed strong influences on both coating structures and phase constituents. The coatings prepared with the pack mixtures containing 1 and 2 wt% Y2O3 were composed of an TiSi2 out layer, an (Ti, X)5Si4 and (Ti, X)5Si3(X represents Nb and Cr)middle layer, an TiAl2 inner layer and an Al-rich interdiffusion zone. However, the constituent phases changed into TiSi2,(Ti, X)5Si4 and (Ti, X)5Si3 in the out layer of the coating prepared with the pack mixture containing 3 wt% Y2O3. Moreover, (Ti, X)5Si4 and (Ti, X)5Si3 phases were observed in the outer layers of the coatings prepared with the pack mixtures containing 0 and 5 wt% Y2O3. The coating growth could be catalyzed obviously when the content of Y2O3 in the pack mixtures increased from 1 to 2 wt%, but this phenomenon was not observed when further increased the pack Y2O3 content to 3 or 5 wt%. Si-Al-Y co-deposition treatment improved the surface hardness and wears resistance of the Ti-Al alloy significantly. The wear resistance of the tested samples could be sorted in the following sequence: 1% Y2O3-coating > no RE-coating > bare Ti-Al alloy.

  13. Comparison of Tortuosity Values for MnCl2 and Bacterial Diffusion in a Packed Column Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, M. S.; Smith, J. A.; Ford, R. M.; Fernandez, E. J.

    2002-12-01

    Diffusion through porous media is dependent on the tortuous path of the solute and can be described using a path tortuosity, τ . In this study, we use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to analyze the diffusion of a conservative tracer and of bacteria through a packed column to compare predictions for porous-media tortuosity. MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique for visualizing changes in concentration in a packed column as a function of time. Manganese chloride, MnCl2, is a contrasting agent readily detected using MRI. Paramagnetic magnetite particles are attached to the surface of Pseudomonas putida F1 cells using an antibody, thereby enabling us to measure changes in bacterial density within the packed column. In separate experiments, MnCl2 and bacterial distributions within a column of glass-coated polystyrene beads are imaged using MRI, with a spatial resolution of 300 μm. MnCl2 or bacteria labeled with magnetite are introduced into one half of a specially designed chromatography column packed with glass-coated polystyrene beads. Impinging flow is used to create an initial step change in concentration and diffusion is monitored over time using MRI. One-dimensional MnCl2 diffusion and bacterial random motility in porous media have the same mathematical form, with terms for tortuosity and diffusion or motility, respectively. Dbulk is the bulk aqueous diffusion coefficient for MnCl2, 1.24x10-5 cm2/sec, and μ bulk is the bulk motility coefficient for P. putida F1, 3.20x10-5 cm2/sec. Both sets of diffusion data are analyzed by fitting numerical simulations of model equations to experimental data and determining the column tortuosity, τ . We have found that the column tortuosity observed using MnCl2 diffusion data is an order of magnitude smaller than that observed using bacterial diffusion data. This discrepancy suggests that bacteria swimming through porous media may experience a more tortuous path than other diffusing solutes. We believe that at small pore

  14. Computational investigation of longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, and trans-particle mass transfer in bulk, random packings of core-shell particles with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Daneyko, Anton; Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Baranau, Vasili; Khirevich, Siarhei; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2015-08-14

    In recent years, chromatographic columns packed with core-shell particles have been widely used for efficient and fast separations at comparatively low operating pressure. However, the influence of the porous shell properties on the mass transfer kinetics in core-shell packings is still not fully understood. We report on results obtained with a modeling approach to simulate three-dimensional advective-diffusive transport in bulk random packings of monosized core-shell particles, covering a range of reduced mobile phase flow velocities from 0.5 up to 1000. The impact of the effective diffusivity of analyte molecules in the porous shell and the shell thickness on the resulting plate height was investigated. An extension of Giddings' theory of coupled eddy dispersion to account for retention of analyte molecules due to stagnant regions in porous shells with zero mobile phase flow velocity is presented. The plate height equation involving a modified eddy dispersion term excellently describes simulated data obtained for particle-packings with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient. It is confirmed that the model of trans-particle mass transfer resistance of core-shell particles by Kaczmarski and Guiochon [42] is applicable up to a constant factor. We analyze individual contributions to the plate height from different mass transfer mechanisms in dependence of the shell parameters. The simulations demonstrate that a reduction of plate height in packings of core-shell relative to fully porous particles arises mainly due to reduced trans-particle mass transfer resistance and transchannel eddy dispersion.

  15. Designing gravel pack for uranium ISL wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ber, A. A.; Minaev, K. M.; Ber, L. M.; Isaev, Ye D.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes the improvement of gravel packing technique applied for the production wells. The authors have suggested new design of gravel pack for gravel packing of productive formations. The issue is currently topical because gravel packing at drillhole ISL is less time- and money-consuming. The subject of the research is gravel pack design and content. The purpose defined by the authors is to design the gravel pack and to suggest the composition of gravel cement agent. As a result of the research, the authors have described different designs of the gravel pack, its optimal shape, as well as a choice and justification of cement agents, a hold cover of the gravel pack, and suggested the methods of experimental research.

  16. Pre-packing of cost effective antibiotic cement beads for the treatment of traumatic osteomyelitis in the developing world - an in-vitro study based in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Noor, S; Gilson, A; Kennedy, K; Swanson, A; Vanny, V; Mony, K; Chaudhry, T; Gollogly, J

    2016-04-01

    The developing world often lacks the resources to effectively treat the most serious injuries including osteomyelitis following open fractures or surgical fracture treatment. Antibiotic cement beads are a widely accepted method of delivering antibiotics locally to the infected area following trauma. This study is based in Cambodia, a low income country struggling to recover from a recent genocide. The study aims to test the effectiveness of locally made antibiotic beads and analyse their effectiveness after being gas sterilised, packaged and kept in storage Different antibiotic beads were manufactured locally using bone cement and tested against MRSA bacteria grown from a case of osteomyelitis. Each antibiotic was tested before and after a process of gas sterilisation as well as later being tested after storage in packaging up to 42 days. The gentamicin, vancomycin, amikacin and ceftriaxone beads all inhibited growth of the MRSA on the TSB and agar plates, both before and after gas sterilisation. All four antibiotics continued to show similar zones of inhibition after 42 days of storage. The results show significant promise to produce beads with locally obtainable ingredients in an austere environment and improve cost effectiveness by storing them in a sterilised condition.

  17. Cement hydration from hours to centuries controlled by diffusion through barrier shells of C-S-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi-Aghdam, Saeed; Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Abdolhosseini Qomi, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    Although a few good models for cement hydration exist, they have some limitations. Some do not take into account the complete range of variation of pore relative humidity and temperature, and apply over durations limited from up a few months to up to about a year. The ones that are applicable for long durations are either computationally too intensive for use in finite element programs or predict the hydration to terminate after few months. However, recent tests of autogenous shrinkage and swelling in water imply that the hydration may continue, at decaying rate, for decades, provided that a not too low relative pore humidity (above 0.7) persists for a long time, as expected for the cores of thick concrete structural members. Therefore, and because design lifetimes of over hundred years are required for large concrete structures, a new hydration model for a hundred year lifespan and beyond is developed. The new model considers that, after the first day of hydration, the remnants of anhydrous cement grains, gradually consumed by hydration, are enveloped by contiguous, gradually thickening, spherical barrier shells of calcium-silicate hydrate (C-S-H). The hydration progress is controlled by transport of water from capillary pores through the barrier shells toward the interface with anhydrous cement. The transport is driven by a difference of humidity, defined by equivalence with the difference in chemical potential of water. Although, during the period of 4-24 h, the C-S-H forms discontinuous nano-globules around the cement grain, an equivalent barrier shell control was formulated for this period, too, for ease and effectiveness of calculation. The entire model is calibrated and validated by published test data on the evolution of hydration degree for various cement types, particle size distributions, water-cement ratios and temperatures. Computationally, this model is sufficiently effective for calculating the evolution of hydration degree (or aging) at every

  18. Migration and head penetration of Vitamin-E diffused cemented polyethylene cup compared to standard cemented cup in total hip arthroplasty: study protocol for a randomised, double-blind, controlled trial (E1 HIP)

    PubMed Central

    Sköldenberg, Olof; Rysinska, Agata; Chammout, Ghazi; Salemyr, Mats; Muren, Olle; Bodén, Henrik; Eisler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In vitro, Vitamin-E-diffused, highly cross-linked polyethylene (PE) has been shown to have superior wear resistance and improved mechanical properties when compared to those of standard highly cross-linked PE liners used in total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim of the study is to evaluate the safety of a new cemented acetabular cup with Vitamin-E-doped PE regarding migration, head penetration and clinical results. Methods and analysis In this single-centre, double-blinded, randomised controlled trial, we will include 50 patients with primary hip osteoarthritis scheduled for THA and randomise them in a 1:1 ratio to a cemented cup with either argon gas-sterilised PE (control group) or Vitamin-E-diffused PE (vitamin-e group). All patients and the assessor of the primary outcome will be blinded and the same uncemented stem will be used for all participants. The primary end point will be proximal migration of the cup at 2 years after surgery measured with radiostereometry. Secondary end points include proximal migration at other follow-ups, total migration, femoral head penetration, clinical outcome scores and hip-related complications. Patients will be followed up at 3 months and at 1, 2, 5 and 10 years postoperatively. Results Results will be analysed using 95% CIs for the effect size. A regression model will also be used to adjust for stratification factors. Ethics and dissemination The ethical committee at Karolinska Institutet has approved the study. The first results from the study will be disseminated to the medical community via presentations and publications in relevant medical journals when the last patient included has been followed up for 2 years. Trial registration number NCT02254980. PMID:27388352

  19. Kinetics of pack aluminization of nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seigle, L. L.; Gupta, B. K.; Shankar, R.; Sarkhel, A. K.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of pack aluminization of unalloyed nickel in packs of varying aluminum activity with various halide activators were studied. Surface compositions of the coatings as functions of time, temperature, and pack composition were obtained in order to establish the boundary conditions for diffusion in the system. The structure of the packs was also examined in order to clarify the mechanism of aluminum transport. The results indicate that the kinetics of pack aluminization are controlled jointly by gas diffusion in the pack and solid diffusion in the coating. Levine and Caves' model for gas diffusion was combined with calculations of rates of diffusion in the solid to formulate a more complete theory for the kinetics of pack aluminization.

  20. An electrical conductivity method for measuring the effects of additives on effective diffusivities in Portland cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kyi, A.A. ); Batchelor, B. . Civil Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Effective diffusivities are important in describing corrosion and leaching of contaminants in cementitious systems. An electrical conductivity procedure has been used to measure the effective diffusivities of compounds in cementitious systems containing the additives fly ash, silica fume, sodium silicate and bentonite. Silica fume was the most effective additive in reducing the effective diffusivity, but fly ash was the most cost effective. Diffusivities that have been measured with techniques that rely on flux of a compound through the solid were generally lower than those measured with the electrical conductivity procedure. Porosity and bulk density are not well correlated with effective diffusivity in systems containing additives.

  1. Expansive Cements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-10-01

    either burned simultaneously with a portland ce4nt or !r;terground with portland cement clinker ; Type M - a mixture of portland cement, calcium-aluminate... clinker that is interground with portland clinker or blended with portland cement or, alternately, it may be formed simul- taneously vrith the portland ... clinker compounds during the burning process. 3. Expansive cement, Type M is either a mixture of portland cement, calcium aluminate cement, and calcium

  2. Formation of Cr-modified silicide coatings on a Ti-Nb-Si based ultrahigh-temperature alloy by pack cementation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yanqiang; Guo, Xiping

    2010-10-01

    Cr-modified silicide coatings were prepared on a Ti-Nb-Si based ultrahigh temperature alloy by Si-Cr co-deposition at 1250 °C, 1350 °C and 1400 °C for 5-20 h respectively. It was found that both coating structure and phase constituents changed significantly with increase in the co-deposition temperature and holding time. The outer layers in all coatings prepared at 1250 °C for 5-20 h consisted of (Ti,X) 5Si 3 (X represents Nb, Cr and Hf elements). (Ti,X) 5Si 4 was found as the only phase constituent in the intermediate layers in both coatings prepared at 1250 °C for 5 and 10 h, but the intermediate layers in the coatings prepared at 1250 °C for 15 and 20 h were mainly composed of (Ti,X) 5Si 3 phase that was derived from the decomposition of (Ti,X) 5Si 4 phase. In the coating prepared at 1350 °C for 5 h, single (Ti,X) 5Si 3 phase was found in its outmost layer, the same as that in the outer layers in the coatings prepared at 1250 °C; but in the coatings prepared at 1350 °C for 10-20 h, (Nb 1.95Cr 1.05)Cr 2Si 3 ternary phase was found in the outmost layers besides (Ti,X) 5Si 3 phase. In the coatings prepared at 1400 °C for 5-20 h, (Nb 1.95Cr 1.05)Cr 2Si 3 ternary phase was the single phase constituent in their outmost layers. The phase transformation (Ti,X) 5Si 4 → (Ti,X) 5Si 3 + Si occurred in the intermediate layers of the coatings prepared at 1350 and 1400 °C with prolonging co-deposition time, similar to the situation in the coatings prepared at 1250 °C for 15 and 20 h, but this transformation has been speeded up by increase in the co-deposition temperature. The transitional layers were mainly composed of (Ti,X) 5Si 3 phase in all coatings. The influence of co-deposition temperature on the diffusion ability of Cr atoms was greater than that of Si atoms in the Si-Cr co-deposition processes investigated. The growth of coatings obeyed inverse logarithmic laws at all three co-deposition temperatures. The Si-Cr co-deposition coating prepared at 1350

  3. Determination of Diffusion Coefficients in Cement-Based Materials: An Inverse Problem for the Nernst-Planck and Poisson Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyszkiewicz-Warzecha, Krzysztof; Jasielec, Jerzy J.; Fausek, Janusz; Filipek, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Transport properties of ions have significant impact on the possibility of rebars corrosion thus the knowledge of a diffusion coefficient is important for reinforced concrete durability. Numerous tests for the determination of diffusion coefficients have been proposed but analysis of some of these tests show that they are too simplistic or even not valid. Hence, more rigorous models to calculate the coefficients should be employed. Here we propose the Nernst-Planck and Poisson equations, which take into account the concentration and electric potential field. Based on this model a special inverse method is presented for determination of a chloride diffusion coefficient. It requires the measurement of concentration profiles or flux on the boundary and solution of the NPP model to define the goal function. Finding the global minimum is equivalent to the determination of diffusion coefficients. Typical examples of the application of the presented method are given.

  4. Pattern formations and optimal packing.

    PubMed

    Mityushev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Patterns of different symmetries may arise after solution to reaction-diffusion equations. Hexagonal arrays, layers and their perturbations are observed in different models after numerical solution to the corresponding initial-boundary value problems. We demonstrate an intimate connection between pattern formations and optimal random packing on the plane. The main study is based on the following two points. First, the diffusive flux in reaction-diffusion systems is approximated by piecewise linear functions in the framework of structural approximations. This leads to a discrete network approximation of the considered continuous problem. Second, the discrete energy minimization yields optimal random packing of the domains (disks) in the representative cell. Therefore, the general problem of pattern formations based on the reaction-diffusion equations is reduced to the geometric problem of random packing. It is demonstrated that all random packings can be divided onto classes associated with classes of isomorphic graphs obtained from the Delaunay triangulation. The unique optimal solution is constructed in each class of the random packings. If the number of disks per representative cell is finite, the number of classes of isomorphic graphs, hence, the number of optimal packings is also finite.

  5. Bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface etc. PMID:26403875

  6. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. RESULTS: GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. CONCLUSION: It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation. PMID:28028417

  7. Does elevating silver content in zinc-based glass polyalkenoate cements increase their antibacterial efficacy against two common bacteria using the agar gel diffusion method?

    PubMed

    Coughlan, A; Breed, S M; Ashraf, C; Cardinale, J A; Hall, M M; Towler, M R

    2013-03-01

    The authors have previously shown that it is possible to incorporate silver into a soda-zinc-silicate glass and subsequently form a glass polyalkenoate cement from it. The objective of the research described herein is to determine if incremental increases in the silver content of these glass polyalkenoate cements will increase their antibacterial efficacy against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria using the accepted spread plate method. Four glass polyalkenoate cements were formulated; three contained increasing amounts of silver incorporated into them (cements A, B, and C, containing 0.33 mol%, 0.66 mol%, and 0.99 mol% silver, respectively) and a fourth contained no silver, which acted as a control (control cement). The handling properties of the glass polyalkenoate cements were evaluated, where working times were around 2 min and setting times ranged from 1 h 17 min to 2 h 41 min. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy was employed to determine silver ion release with cement maturation for up to 14 days. The majority of silver ions were released within the first 24 h, with up to 2 mg/L cumulative ion release recorded up to 14 days. The antibacterial properties of the coatings were evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. The silver-glass polyalkenoate cements exhibited antibacterial effect against both bacterial strains. The maximum inhibition zones recorded against S. aureus was 14.8 mm (SD ± 1.11) and against P. aeruginosa was 20.6 mm (SD ± 0.81). Cement B had a greater antibacterial effect compared to cement A, however, cements B and C had comparable antibacterial effects after 14 days even though cement C contained 0.33 mol% more silver than B. This indicates that by increasing the silver content in these cements, the antibacterial efficacy increases to a point, but there is a threshold where further silver ion release does not increase the antibacterial effect.

  8. Valve Packing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    "S Glass" yarn was originally developed by NASA for high temperature space and aeronautical applications. When John Crane, Inc. required material that would withstand temperatures higher than 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit, they contacted Owens-Corning, which had developed a number of applications for the material. John Crane combines the yarn with other components to make Style 287-I packing. The product can be used in chemical processing operations, nuclear power stations, petroleum products, etc. Advantages include increased service life and reduced maintenance costs.

  9. Packed Bed Reactor Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The purpose of the Packed Bed Reactor Experiment in low gravity is to determine how a mixture of gas and liquid flows through a packed bed in reduced gravity. A packed bed consists of a metal pipe ...

  10. Squeeze cementing

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Kundert, D.P.; Dahl, J.A.; Dalrymple, E.D.; Gerke, R.R.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes a method for terminating the flow of fluid from a portion of a subterranean formation into a wellbore. It comprises: placing within the wellbore adjacent the portion a volume of a slurry of hydraulic cement, permitting the volume to penetrate into the portion; and maintaining the slurry in the portion for a time sufficient to enable the slurry to form a rigid mass of cement in the portion.

  11. Cement Burns

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Munir; Moynagh, M.; Lawlor, C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Cement burns account for relatively few admissions to a burn unit; however, these burns deserve separate consideration because of special features of diagnosis and management. Cement burns, even though potentially disabling, have rarely been reported in literature. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all patients admitted with cement burns injuries to the national burns unit at the St James's Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, over a 10-year period for the years 1996–2005. Results: A total of 46 patients with cement burns were admitted. The majority of patients were aged 16–74 years (mean age = 32 years). Eighty-seven percent of injuries occurred in an industrial and 13% in a domestic setting. The upper and lower extremities were involved in all the patients, and the mean total body surface area affected was 6.5%. The mean length of hospital stay was 21 days with a range of 1–40 days. Thirty-eight (82%) were surgically managed involving debridement and split-thickness skin graft (SSG) and four (9%) were conservatively managed. A further four did not have data available. Conclusion: Widespread inexperience in dealing with this group of cement burns patients and delays in referral to burns unit highlights the potential for greater levels of general awareness and knowledge in both prevention and treatment of these burns. As well, early debridement and split-thickness skin grafting at diagnosis constitutes the best means of reducing the high socioeconomic costs and allows for early return to work. PMID:18091981

  12. Criteria for Remote Sensing Detection of Sulfate Cemented Soils on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Christopher D.; Mustard, John F.

    2000-01-01

    Spectral measurements of loose and cemented mixtures of palagonitic soil and sulfates were made to determine whether cemented soils could be identified on Mars. Cemented MgSO4 mixtures exhibit an enhanced 9 micron sulfate fundamental compared to gypsum mixtures due to more diffuse and pervasive cementing.

  13. Cell aggregation: Packing soft grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Karttunen, M.

    2006-06-01

    Cellular aggregates may be considered as collections of membrane enclosed units with a pressure difference between the internal and external liquid phases. Cells are kept together by membrane adhesion and/or confined space compression. Pattern formation and, in particular, intercellular spacing have important roles in controlling solvent diffusion within such aggregates. A physical approach is used to study generic aspects of cellular packings in a confined space. Average material properties are derived from the free energy. The appearance of penetrating intercellular void channels is found to be critically governed by the cell wall adhesion mechanisms during the formation of dense aggregates. A fully relaxed aggregate efficiently hinders solvent diffusion at high hydrostatic pressures, while a small fraction (˜0.1) of adhesion related packing frustration is sufficient for breaking such a blockage even at high a pressure.

  14. Thermodynamics and kinetics of pack aluminide coating formation on IN-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Caves, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of pack variables on the formation of aluminide coatings on nickel-base superalloy IN-100 was conducted. Also, the thermodynamics and kinetics of coating formation were analyzed. Observed coating weights were in good agreement with predictions made from the analysis. Pack temperature rather than pack aluminum activity controls the principal coating phase formed. In 1 weight percent aluminum packs, aluminum weight gains were related to the halide pack activator. Solid-state nickel diffusion controlled coating formation from sodium fluoride and chloride and ammonium fluoride activated packs. In other ammonium and sodium halide activated 1 weight percent aluminum packs, gaseous diffusion controlled coating formation.

  15. Optical evaluation on the setting of cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De León Martínez, H. A.; Bernal, J. J. Soto; González Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2015-01-01

    In the construction area, one of the most widely used cement is the CPC 30R, it is a hydraulic binder consisting of CaO, SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3, when mixed with water forms cement pastes and its four crystallographic phases start to hydrate. The diffuse reflection on cement paste can give an indication of the behaviour on optical properties on the hydration of the cement and early formation products. In this study, Portland cement (CPC) pastes were prepared with 0.45 a water to cement ratio (w/c). This work is aimed to evaluate the optical properties of cement pastes on the hydration reaction during the first 24 hours by measuring the intensity of diffuse reflection changes.

  16. Current cementing techniques in hip hemi-arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Scott, S; McCaskie, A W; Calder, S J; Wildin, C; Gregg, P J

    2001-07-01

    To assess the use of modern cementing techniques in hip hemi-arthroplasty a postal questionnaire was sent during 1998 to all British Orthopaedic Training Association (B.O.T.A.) members regarding use of cement, type of cement, bone preparation and cementing technique. The results of this survey were compared to a similar survey in 1994 to assess any change in practice. Two hundred and eighty-six trainees responded to the 1998 survey, 352 to the 1994 survey. The use of uncemented prostheses had decreased from 31.3 in 1994 to 21.7% in 1998. Normal viscosity Palacos cement remains the most common cement in use, 64.3% in 1998. The use of antibiotic loaded cement has increased from 53.7 in 1994 to 67.9% in 1998. For bone preparation 47.3% of trainees in 1998 used a modern technique (syringe irrigation/pulsed lavage, brushing, gauze packing) compared to 35.1% in 1994. Modern cement insertion (retrograde gun, cement restriction and sustained pressure) was carried out by 39.3% in 1998 compared to 28.5% in 1994. Overall 27.2% of trainees used modern cementing techniques in hip hemi-arthroplasty, compared to 19.4% in 1994. Modern cementing techniques are used by a minority of British orthopaedic trainees, but in comparison to 1994 their use has increased.

  17. Lunar cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  18. Cryogenics with cement microscopy redefines cement behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, S.; Jones, R. ); Caveny, B. )

    1994-10-03

    Cement microscopy (CM), cryogenics, environmental scanning microscopy (ESM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and other technologies are leading investigators to change their views on cement gelation, hydration, and retardation. Cement samples frozen in a nitrogen slush and viewed with an SEM present a more accurate picture of the setting process. Observations made through this technique have revolutionized ARCO Exploration and Production Technology's and Halliburton Energy Services' oil field cement procurement and slurry design. Findings from this joint study are expected to lead to: optimized waiting on cement (WOC) times; reduced planning and design time; optimized slurry retarder additions; optimized gel times to fit given situations; especially applicable to squeeze operations; improved cement selection (from vendors) for peak performance; and improved cement manufacture. The paper discusses the measuring methods and the findings on the following: cement voids, cement gelation, and retardation mechanisms. It also briefly discusses the impact these discoveries have on operations.

  19. Pack Artillery, A Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    Washington, DC: American Untv Soro, 1965. UC300 Parrino , Michael Francis. An Introduction to Pack P3 Transport and Pack Artillery; the Role of the Mule...Field for the Territorial Force," JORAj 37:15, 1910. " Parrino , Michael F. "Development of Pack Artillery and Its Signi- ficance in Modern Warfare

  20. Sculpting with Cement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    1983-01-01

    Cement offers many creative possibilities for school art programs. Instructions are given for sculpting with fiber-cement and sand-cement, as well as for finishing processes and the addition of color. Safety is stressed. (IS)

  1. Cementing multilateral wells with latex cement

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    A multilateral well is a well with one or more branches or lateral sections extending from its main wellbore. The laterals can be openhole or cased hole. When laterals are cased hole, the cement integrity for casing support and zonal isolation is very important. When cementing the lateral sections of multilateral wells, it is important to use a cement with high strength and durability to support the liner throughout the life of the well and to support the lateral section. The cement column is subjected to various stresses when the cemented inner stub is cut. High tensile strength, flexural strength, and crack resistance are required. These properties are necessary to make a clean cut through the cement sheath that does not induce cracks in the cement column. Latex cement is commonly used for its gas-migration-control property.

  2. Control of in vivo mineral bone cement degradation.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Britta; Geffers, Martha; Ignatius, Anita; Gbureck, Uwe

    2014-07-01

    The current study aimed to prevent the formation of hydroxyapatite reprecipitates in brushite-forming biocements by minimizing the availability of free Ca(2+) ions in the cement matrix. This was achieved by both maximizing the degree of cement setting to avoid unreacted, calcium-rich cement raw materials which can deliver Ca(2+) directly to the cement matrix after dissolution, and by a reduction in porosity to reduce Ca(2+) diffusion into the set cement matrix. In addition, a biocement based on the formation of the magnesium phosphate mineral struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) was tested, which should prevent the formation of low-solubility hydroxyapatite reprecipitates due to the high magnesium content. Different porosity levels were fabricated by altering the powder-to-liquid ratio at which the cements were mixed and the materials were implanted into mechanically unloaded femoral defects in sheep for up to 10 months. While the higher-porosity brushite cement quantitatively transformed into crystalline octacalcium phosphate after 10 months, slowing down cement resorption, a lower-porosity brushite cement modification was found to be chemically stable with the absence of reprecipitate formation and minor cement resorption from the implant surface. In contrast, struvite-forming cements were much more degradable due to the absence of mineral reprecipitates and a nearly quantitative cement degradation was found after 10 months of implantation.

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  4. Electronically configured battery pack

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, D.

    1997-03-01

    Battery packs for portable equipment must sometimes accommodate conflicting requirements to meet application needs. An electronically configurable battery pack was developed to support two highly different operating modes, one requiring very low power consumption at a low voltage and the other requiring high power consumption at a higher voltage. The configurable battery pack optimizes the lifetime and performance of the system by making the best use of all available energy thus enabling the system to meet its goals of operation, volume, and lifetime. This paper describes the cell chemistry chosen, the battery pack electronics, and tradeoffs made during the evolution of its design.

  5. Cement design based on cement mechanical response

    SciTech Connect

    Thiercelin, M.J.; Dargaud, B.; Baret, J.F.; Rodriquez, W.J.

    1998-12-01

    The disappearance of cement bond log response as a result of variations of downhole conditions has been observed in numerous wells. This observation has led to concern about the loss of proper zonal isolation. Stresses induced in the cement, through deformation of the cemented casing resulting from the variation of downhole conditions, are the cause of this damage. The authors present an analysis of the mechanical response of set cement in a cased wellbore to quantify this damage and determine the key controlling parameters. The results show that the thermo-elastic properties of the casing, cement, and formation play a significant role. The type of failure, either cement debonding or cement cracking, is a function of the nature of the downhole condition variations. This analysis allows one to propose appropriate cement mechanical properties to avoid cement failure and debonding. The authors show that the use of high compressive strength cement is not always the best solution and, in some cases, flexible cements are preferred.

  6. On the kinetics of the pack - Aluminization process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivakumar, R.; Seigle, L. L.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the aluminization of unalloyed Ni in fluoride-activated packs of varying Al activity. In packs of low Al activity, in which the ratio of Al to Ni was less than 50 at. pct, the specimen surface quickly came to equilibrium with the pack and remained close to equilibrium for the duration of normal coating runs. In these packs the kinetics of aluminization was controlled by diffusion in the solid. In packs of higher Al activity the surface of the specimen did not come to equilibrium with the pack and the kinetics of the process was governed by a combination of solid and gas diffusion rates. Under most conditions however, the surface composition was time-invariant and a steady-state appeared to exist at the pack-coating interface. By combining Levine and Caves' model for gaseous diffusion in pure-Al packs with calculations of solid diffusion rates some success has been achieved in explaining the results.

  7. Development of fluidized bed cement sintering technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Katsuji

    1994-12-31

    In the new system presented in this paper, the cement clinker is sintered, not in a rotary kiln, but in two different furnaces: a spouted bed kiln and a fluidized bed kiln. The heat generated in the process of cooling the cement clinker is recovered by a fluidized bed cooler and a packed bed cooler, which are more efficient than the conventional coolers. Compared with the rotary kiln system, the new technology significantly reduces NO{sub x} emissions, appreciably cuts energy consumption, and reduces CO{sub 2} emissions as well. Thus, the new system is an efficient cement sintering system that is friendly to the global environment. In this paper, we describe this new technology as one of the applied technologies at an industrial level that is being developed in the Clean Coal Technology Project, and we present the results from test operations at our pilot plant.

  8. TLC Pack Unpacked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberhofer, Margret; Colpaert, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    TLC Pack stands for Teaching Languages to Caregivers and is a course designed to support migrants working or hoping to work in the caregiving sector. The TLC Pack resources range from A2 to B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), and will be made available online in the six project languages: Dutch, English,…

  9. Flat Pack Toy Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutcheson, Brian

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author introduces the concept of flat pack toys. Flat pack toys are designed using a template on a single sheet of letter-sized card stock paper. Before being cut out and built into a three-dimensional toy, they are scanned into the computer and uploaded to a website. With the template accessible from the website, anyone with…

  10. Packed bed carburization of tantalum and tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Peter C.; Rodriguez, Patrick J.; Pereyra, Ramiro A.

    1999-01-01

    Packed bed carburization of a tantalum or tantalum alloy object. A method for producing corrosion-resistant tantalum or tantalum alloy objects is described. The method includes the steps of placing the object in contact with a carburizing pack, heating the packed object in vacuum furnace to a temperature whereby carbon from the pack diffuses into the object forming grains with tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries, and etching the surface of the carburized object. This latter step removes tantalum carbides from the surface of the carburized tantalum object while leaving the tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries.

  11. Packed bed carburization of tantalum and tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, P.C.; Rodriguez, P.J.; Pereyra, R.A.

    1999-06-29

    Packed bed carburization of a tantalum or tantalum alloy object is disclosed. A method for producing corrosion-resistant tantalum or tantalum alloy objects is described. The method includes the steps of placing the object in contact with a carburizing pack, heating the packed object in vacuum furnace to a temperature whereby carbon from the pack diffuses into the object forming grains with tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries, and etching the surface of the carburized object. This latter step removes tantalum carbides from the surface of the carburized tantalum object while leaving the tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries. 4 figs.

  12. Cement mixing with vibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.E.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a method of cementing a casing string in a bore hole of a well. It comprises introducing water and dry cement material into a mixing vessel; mixing the water and dry cement material in the mixing vessel to form a cement slurry, the slurry including lumps of the dry cement material, the mixing including steps of: agitating the slurry; and while agitating the slurry, transmitting vibrational energy into the slurry and thereby aiding disintegration and subsequent wetting of the lumps of the dry cement material in the slurry; and pumping the slurry into an annulus between the casing string and the bore hole.

  13. Morphology of the cement apparatus and the cement of the buoy barnacle Dosima fascicularis (Crustacea, Cirripedia, Thoracica, Lepadidae).

    PubMed

    Zheden, Vanessa; Von Byern, Janek; Kerbl, Alexandra; Leisch, Nikolaus; Staedler, Yannick; Grunwald, Ingo; Power, Anne Marie; Klepal, Waltraud

    2012-10-01

    Barnacles produce a proteinaceous adhesive called cement to attach permanently to rocks or to other hard substrata. The stalked barnacle Dosima fascicularis is of special interest as it produces a large amount of foam-like cement that can be used as a float. The morphology of the cement apparatus and of the polymerized cement of this species is almost unknown. The current study aims at filling these gaps in our knowledge using light and electron microscopy as well as x-ray microtomography. The shape of the cement gland cells changes from round to ovoid during barnacle development. The cytoplasm of the gland cells, unlike that of some other barnacles, does not have distinct secretory and storage regions. The cement canals, which transport the cement from the gland cells to the base of the stalk, end at different positions in juvenile and mature animals. With increasing size of the cement float, the exit of the cement canals shift from the centrally positioned attachment disk of the vestigial antennules to more lateral positions on the stalk. The bubbles enclosed in the foam-like float are most likely filled with CO(2) that diffuses from the hemolymph into the cement canal system and from there into the cement.

  14. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, Kurt Edward; Kolsun, George J.

    1997-01-01

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece. he packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  15. Graphitic packing removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1997-11-11

    Graphitic packing removal tools for removal of the seal rings in one piece are disclosed. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal. 5 figs.

  16. Graphitic packing removal tool

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  17. Asphalt cement poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  18. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  19. Nasal packing and stenting

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue. PMID:22073095

  20. Thermodynamics and kinetics of pack aluminide coating formation on IN-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Caves, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of pack variables on the formation of aluminide coatings on nickel-base superalloy IN-100 was conducted. Also, the thermodynamics and kinetics of coating formation were analyzed. Observed coating weights were in good agreement with predictions made from the analysis. Pack temperature rather than pack aluminum activity controls the principal coating phase formed. Solid-state nickel diffusion controlled coating formation from sodium fluoride and chloride and ammonium fluoride activated packs. In other ammonium and sodium halide activated 1 weight percent aluminum packs, gaseous diffusion controlled coating formation.

  1. Pack Cementation Aluminide Coatings on Superalloys: Codeposition of Cr and Reactive Elements (RE). Technical Report 1. Chromium and Reactive Element(RE)- Modified Aluminide Diffusion Coatings on Superalloys: Environmental Testing. Technical Report 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    Godlewska and K. Godlewski, Oxid. Met., 22 (1984) 117. 4. J.E. Restall, U.S. Patent #4,687,684 (1987). 5. P.N. Walsh, in Proceeding of the Fourth...McCarron, N.R. Lindblad, and D. Chatterji, Corrosion, 32 (1976) 476. 34 33. E. Godlewska and K. Godlewski, Oxid. Met., 22 (1984) 117. 34. B. Pieraggi

  2. Solidification of Portland Cement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Solidification of materials is introduced, and the constitution and hydration of portland cement is reviewed. Microstructural zones are introduced...100, 171, and 384 days age. Similar micrographs for tricalcium silicate pastes and commercial portland cement pastes are shown and discussed. The...hardening of portland cement is discussed as a solidification process. The potential flaws and stress concentrators within the cement paste are identified and their effect on mechanical properties is discussed. (Author)

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  4. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

  6. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-07-18

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

  7. [Release amount of heavy metals in cement product from co-processing waste in cement kiln].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Fei; Huang, Qi-Fei; Zhang, Xia; Yang, Yu; Wang, Qi

    2009-05-15

    Clinker was produced by Simulating cement calcination test, and concrete samples were also prepared according to national standard GB/T 17671-1999. Long-term cumulative release amount of heavy metals in cement product from co-processing waste in cement kiln was researched through leaching test which refers to EA NEN 7371 and EA NEN 7375, and one-dimensional diffusion model which is on the base of Fick diffusion law. The results show that availabilities of heavy metals are lower than the total amounts in concrete. The diffusion coefficients of heavy metals are different (Cr > As > Ni > Cd). During 30 years service, the cumulative release amounts of Cr, As, Ni and Cd are 4.43 mg/kg, 0.46 mg/kg, 1.50 mg/kg and 0.02 mg/kg, respectively, and the ratios of release which is the division of cumulative release amount and availability are 27.0%, 18.0%, 3.0% and 0.2%, respectively. The most important influence factor of cumulative release amount of heavy metal is the diffusion coefficient, and it is correlative to cumulative release amount. The diffusion coefficient of Cr and As should be controlled exactly in the processing of input the cement-kiln.

  8. The packing of particles

    SciTech Connect

    Cumberland, D.J.; Crawford, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The wide range of information currently available on the packing of particles is brought together in this monograph. The authors' interest in the subject was initially aroused by the question of whether there is an optimum particle size distribution which would maximise the packing density of particles - a question which has attracted the interest of scientists and engineers for centuries. The densification of a powder mass is of relevance in a great many industries, among them the pharmaceutical, ceramic, powder metallurgy and civil engineering industries. In addition, the packing of regular - or irregular - shaped particles is also of relevance to a surprisingly large number of other industries and subject areas, i.e. the foundry industry, nuclear engineering, chemical engineering, crystallography, geology, biology, telecommunications, and so on. Accordingly, this book is written for a wide audience.

  9. Spiral disk packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Yoshikazu; Sushida, Takamichi

    2017-04-01

    It is shown that van Iterson's metric for disk packings, proposed in 1907 in the study of a centric model of spiral phyllotaxis, defines a bounded distance function in the plane. This metric is also related to the bifurcation of Voronoi tilings for logarithmic spiral lattices, through the continued fraction expansion of the divergence angle. The phase diagrams of disk packings and Voronoi tilings for logarithmic spirals are dual graphs to each other. This gives a rigorous proof that van Iterson's diagram in the centric model is connected and simply connected. It is a nonlinear analog of the duality between the phase diagrams for disk packings and Voronoi tilings on the linear lattices, having the modular group symmetry.

  10. Battery Pack Thermal Design

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-14

    This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep the fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.

  11. Recycling of ladle slag in cement composites: Environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Serjun, Vesna Zalar; Mladenovič, Ana; Mirtič, Breda; Meden, Anton; Ščančar, Janez; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    In the present work compact and ground cement composites in which 30% of cement by mass was replaced by ladle slag were investigated for their chemical and physico-mechanical properties. To evaluate long-term environmental impacts, leachability test based on diffusion, which combined both, diffusion and dissolution of contaminants, was performed in water and saline water. Total element concentrations and Cr(VI) were determined in leachates over a time period of 180days. At the end of the experiment, the mineralogical composition and the physico-mechanical stability of cement composites was also assessed. The results revealed that Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were immobilized by the hydration products formed in the cement composites with the addition of ladle slag. Cr(VI) content originating from the cement was also appreciably reduced by Fe(II) from minerals present in the added ladle slag, which thus had significant positive environmental effects. Among metals, only Mo and Ba were leached in elevated concentrations, but solely in ground cement composites with the addition of ladle slag. Lower V concentrations were observed in leachates of ground than compact composite. It was demonstrated that the presence of ladle slag in cement composites can even contribute to improved mortar resistance. The investigated ladle slag can be successfully implemented in cement composites as supplementary cementitious material.

  12. Leaching of metals from cement under simulated environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huixia; Wei, Fang; Tang, Jingchun; Giesy, John P

    2016-03-15

    Leaching of metals from cement under various environmental conditions was measured to evaluate their environmental safety. A cement product containing clinker, which was produced from cement kiln co-processing of hazardous wastes, was solidified and leaching of metals was characterized using the 8-period test. Concentrations and speciation of metals in cements were determined. Effects of ambient environment and particle size on leachability of metals and mineralogical phases of cement mortars were evaluated by use of XRD and SEM. Results indicated that metals in cements were leachable in various media in descending order of: sea water, groundwater and acid rain. Cr, Ni, As, Co and V were leached by simulated sea water, while Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, Mn, Sb and Tl were not leached in simulated sea water, groundwater or acid rain. When exposed to simulated acid rain or groundwater, amounts of Cr, Ni, As and V leached was inversely proportional to particle size of cement mortar. According to the one-dimensional diffusion equation, Cr was most leachable and the cumulative leached mass was predicted to be 9.6 mg kg(-1) after 20 years. Results of this study are useful in predicting releases of metals from cement products containing ash and clinkers cement kiln co-processing of hazardous wastes, so that they can be safely applied in the environment.

  13. Sun Packs Double Punch

    NASA Video Gallery

    On August 3, the sun packed a double punch, emitting a M6.0-class flare at 9:43 am EDT. This video is of the second, slightly stronger M9.3-class flare at 11:41 pm EDT. Both flares had significant ...

  14. Nutrition Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sockut, Joanne; Stumpe, Stephanie

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, these instructional materials integrate elementary school-level nutrition education into other disciplines--biology, sociology, physiology, mathematics, and art. Contents include four units consisting of twelve activities. Unit 1, Why You Need Food, is a self-examination of what is needed for growth, health,…

  15. DIY Fraction Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  16. Economics Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald's Corp., Oak Brook, IL.

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, this learning package introduces intermediate grade students to basic economic concepts. The fourteen activities include the topics of consumption (4 activities), production (5), the market system (3), a pretest, and a posttest. Specific titles under consumption include The Wonderful Treasure Tree (introduction…

  17. Improvement of casing cementation of deep and ultradeep wells. Part 2: Oilfield cements and cement additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arens, K. H.; Akstinat, M.

    1982-07-01

    Oilfield cements and cement additives were investigated in order to improve the casing cementation of deep and ultradeep wells. Characterization and evaluation of the main oil field cements commercially available were studied. The testing was carried out according to American Petroleum Institute API standards and nonstandardized test methods (dynamic modulus of elasticity, expansion/shrinkage), especially the rheology, thickening time and the influence of pressure, temperature and water-cement ratio, were considered. The main emphasis in the field of cement additives was on the evaluation of cement retarders for high temperatures, accelerators, and additives for cement expansion. Furthermore oil field cements were tested, and their properties are described.

  18. Abyssal seep site cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, A.C.; Paull, C.K.; Commeau, R.; Commeau, J.

    1988-01-01

    The deepest submarine cements known so far occur along the 3,300-m deep base of the Florida escarpment and are associated with methane-bearing brine seeps, which emanate there. These deep Holocene carbonates, which occur as surficial and buried crusts, burrow fillings, and friable horizons, were sampled via ALVIN. The carbonates form irregular halos extending up to 20 m from seeps colonized by chemosynthetic fauna. Mussels, gastropods, and clams, the carbonate components of the community, produce a shell hash that is locally cemented by coarsely crystalline low-Mg calcite. Halos of palisade calcite are reminiscent of ancient examples of marine cements. Also present are carbonate hemipelagics cemented by micrite into crusts and burrow fillings. The degree of cementation varies from pervasive to light. Slabs of cemented crust up to 30 cm thick contrast with typical shallow crusts and exhibit irregular tops and smooth bottoms indicating different chemical gradients and pathways.

  19. Cementation of indirect restorations: an overview of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Stamatacos, Catherine; Simon, James F

    2013-01-01

    The process of ensuring proper retention, marginal seal, and durability of indirect restorations depends heavily on effective cementation. Careful consideration must be made when selecting an adhesive cement for a given application. This article provides information on resin cements that can guide clinicians in determining which type of cement is best suited to their clinical needs regarding cementation of indirect restorations. Emphasis is placed on successful cementation of all-ceramic restorations.

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  1. CT appearance of omental packs

    SciTech Connect

    Sefczek, R.J.; Lupetin, A.R.; Beckman, I.; Dash, N.

    1985-08-01

    Liver lacerations may be surgically treated by using the omentum as packing. A radiologist can differentiate potential postoperative complications, such as abscess, hematoma, and biloma, from these packs on computed tomographic scans by noting attenuation values.

  2. Prepacking perforations improves gravel packs

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.E.; Pace, J.R. )

    1990-05-21

    Productivity can be increased by prepacking perforations with gravel before a major gravel pack is pumped. The main gravel-pack treatment follows immediately after the prepack. This procedure can increase perforation permeability due to a more complete gravel fill of the perforation. The gravel pack prevents perforations from collapsing or filling with formation sand.

  3. Effects of grain size distribution on the packing fraction and shear strength of frictionless disk packings.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Using discrete element methods, the effects of the grain size distribution on the density and the shear strength of frictionless disk packings are analyzed. Specifically, two recent findings on the relationship between the system's grain size distribution and its rheology are revisited, and their validity is tested across a broader range of distributions than what has been used in previous studies. First, the effects of the distribution on the solid fraction are explored. It is found that the distribution that produces the densest packing is not the uniform distribution by volume fractions as suggested in a recent publication. In fact, the maximal packing fraction is obtained when the grading curve follows a power law with an exponent close to 0.5 as suggested by Fuller and Thompson in 1907 and 1919 [Trans Am. Soc. Civ. Eng. 59, 1 (1907) and A Treatise on Concrete, Plain and Reinforced (1919), respectively] while studying mixtures of cement and stone aggregates. Second, the effects of the distribution on the shear strength are analyzed. It is confirmed that these systems exhibit a small shear strength, even if composed of frictionless particles as has been shown recently in several works. It is also found that this shear strength is independent of the grain size distribution. This counterintuitive result has previously been shown for the uniform distribution by volume fractions. In this paper, it is shown that this observation keeps true for different shapes of the grain size distribution.

  4. Effects of grain size distribution on the packing fraction and shear strength of frictionless disk packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Using discrete element methods, the effects of the grain size distribution on the density and the shear strength of frictionless disk packings are analyzed. Specifically, two recent findings on the relationship between the system's grain size distribution and its rheology are revisited, and their validity is tested across a broader range of distributions than what has been used in previous studies. First, the effects of the distribution on the solid fraction are explored. It is found that the distribution that produces the densest packing is not the uniform distribution by volume fractions as suggested in a recent publication. In fact, the maximal packing fraction is obtained when the grading curve follows a power law with an exponent close to 0.5 as suggested by Fuller and Thompson in 1907 and 1919 [Trans Am. Soc. Civ. Eng. 59, 1 (1907) and A Treatise on Concrete, Plain and Reinforced (1919), respectively] while studying mixtures of cement and stone aggregates. Second, the effects of the distribution on the shear strength are analyzed. It is confirmed that these systems exhibit a small shear strength, even if composed of frictionless particles as has been shown recently in several works. It is also found that this shear strength is independent of the grain size distribution. This counterintuitive result has previously been shown for the uniform distribution by volume fractions. In this paper, it is shown that this observation keeps true for different shapes of the grain size distribution.

  5. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  6. Computational studies of two-phase cement-CO2-brine interaction in wellbore environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, James William; Lichtner, Peter C

    2009-01-01

    Wellbore integrity is essential to ensuring long-term isolation of buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} during geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. In this report, we summarize recent progress in numerical simulations of cement-brine-CO{sub 2} interactions with respect to migration of CO{sub 2} outside of casing. Using typical values for the hydrologic properties of cement, caprock (shale) and reservoir materials, we show that the capillary properties of good quality cement will prevent flow of CO{sub 2} into and through cement. Rather, CO{sub 2}, if present, is likely to be confined to the casing-cement or cement-formation interfaces. CO{sub 2} does react with the cement by diffusion from the interface into the cement, in which case it produces distinct carbonation fronts within the cement. This is consistent with observations of cement performance at the CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery SACROC Unit in West Texas (Carey et al. 2007). For poor quality cement, flow through cement may occur and would produce a pattern of uniform carbonation without reaction fronts. We also consider an alternative explanation for cement carbonation reactions as due to CO{sub 2} derived from caprock. We show that carbonation reactions in cement are limited to surficial reactions when CO{sub 2} pressure is low (< 10 bars) as might be expected in many caprock environments. For the case of caprock overlying natural CO{sub 2} reservoirs for millions of years, we consider Scherer and Huet's (2009) hypothesis of diffusive steady-state between CO{sub 2} in the reservoir and in the caprock. We find that in this case, the aqueous CO{sub 2} concentration would differ little from the reservoir and would be expected to produce carbonation reaction fronts in cements that are relatively uniform as a function of depth.

  7. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  8. Spectroscopic investigation of Ni speciation in hardened cement paste.

    PubMed

    Vespa, M; Dähn, R; Grolimund, D; Wieland, E; Scheidegger, A M

    2006-04-01

    Cement-based materials play an important role in multi-barrier concepts developed worldwide for the safe disposal of hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cement is used to condition and stabilize the waste materials and to construct the engineered barrier systems (container, backfill, and liner materials) of repositories for radioactive waste. In this study, Ni uptake by hardened cement paste has been investigated with the aim of improving our understanding of the immobilization process of heavy metals in cement on the molecular level. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) techniques were used to determine the local environment of Ni in cement systems. The Ni-doped samples were prepared at two different water/cement ratios (0.4, 1.3) and different hydration times (1 hour to 1 year) using a sulfate-resisting Portland cement. The metal loadings and the metal salts added to the system were varied (50 up to 5000 mg/kg; NO3(-), SO4(2-), Cl-). The XAS study showed that for all investigated systems Ni(ll) is predominantly immobilized in a layered double hydroxide (LDH) phase, which was corroborated by DRS measurements. Only a minor extent of Ni(ll) precipitates as Ni-hydroxides (alpha-Ni(OH)2 and beta-Ni(OH)2). This finding suggests that Ni-Al LDH, rather than Ni-hydroxides, is the solubility-limiting phase in the Ni-doped cement system.

  9. An Experimental Study to Determine the Role of Inferior Vena Cava Filter in Preventing Bone Cement Implantation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wangang; Zheng, Qiangsun; Li, Bingling; Shi, Xiaoqin; Xiang, Dingcheng; Wang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inferior vena cava filters (IVCF) are frequently used for preventing pulmonary embolism (PE) following deep venous thromboembolism. Objectives: The present study was designed to investigate whether IVCF could prevent or impede the occurrence of bone cement implantation syndrome (BCIS), since PE is considered as the central mechanism of BCIS. Materials and Methods: Fifteen sheep were divided into three groups: bone cement free (BCF) group, cement implantation (CI) group and IVCF group. In all the groups, an osteotomy proximal to the greater trochanter of left femur was carried out. In BCF group, the femoral canal was not reamed out or packed with any bone cement. In CI and IVCF groups, the left femoral canals were packed with bone cement, to simulate the cementing procedures carried out in hip replacement. An OptEase® filter was placed and released in inferior vena cava, prior to packing cement in the femoral canal in IVCF group, while the IVCF was not released in the CI group. The BCF group was considered as control. Results: Systolic blood pressure (SBP), saturation of oxygen (SaO2) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) declined significantly 10 min after the bone cement packing, in CI group, compared to those in BCF group. This was accompanied by a rise in the arterial pH. However, IVCF prevented those changes in the CI group. On ultrasonography, there were dotted echoes in right atrium in the CI group, after bone cement packing, while such echoes were hardly seen in the IVCF group. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that IVCF could prevent BCIS effectively, and, as a corollary, suggests that PE represents the leading cause of the constellation of BCIS symptoms. PMID:26557267

  10. Spheroidization of glass powders for glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y W; Yap, A U J; Cheang, P; Kumar, R

    2004-08-01

    Commercial angular glass powders were spheroidized using both the flame spraying and inductively coupled radio frequency plasma spraying techniques. Spherical powders with different particle size distributions were obtained after spheroidization. The effects of spherical glass powders on the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cements (GICs) were investigated. Results showed that the particle size distribution of the glass powders had a significant influence on the mechanical properties of GICs. Powders with a bimodal particle size distribution ensured a high packing density of glass ionomer cements, giving relatively high mechanical properties of GICs. GICs prepared by flame-spheroidized powders showed low strength values due to the loss of fine particles during flame spraying, leading to a low packing density and few metal ions reacting with polyacrylic acid to form cross-linking. GICs prepared by the nano-sized powders showed low strength because of the low bulk density of the nano-sized powders and hence low powder/liquid ratio of GICs.

  11. Timing of syntaxial cement

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.D.

    1985-02-01

    Echinodermal fragments are commonly overgrown in ancient limestones, with large single crystals growing in optical continuity over their skeletal hosts (i.e., syntaxial overgrowths). Such syntaxial cements are usually considered to have precipitated from meteoric pore waters associated with a later stage of subaerial exposure. Although several examples have been reported from ancient carbonates where petrographic relationships may indicate an early submarine formation of syntaxial cement, no occurrences have been noted in Holocene submarine-cemented rocks. Syntaxial cements of submarine origin have been found in Bermuda beachrock where isopachous high-magnesian calcite cements merge with large optically continuous crystals growing on echinodermal debris. Examination of other Holocene sediments cemented by magnesian calcite indicates that echinodermal fragments are not always overgrown syntaxially, but may be rimmed by microcrystalline calcite. The reason for this difference is not clear, although it may be a function of the spacing of nucleation sites and rates of crystal growth. A review of syntaxial cements from several localities in ancient carbonate sequences reveals that many are best interpreted as having formed in the submarine setting, whereas it is more clear that others formed from meteoric precipitation. These occurrences suggest that care should be exercised in inferring meteoric diagenesis from syntaxial overgrowths and that the possibility of submarine formation should be considered.

  12. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-07-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the eleventh quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in unacceptable erosion of the test specimens. In subsequent tests, a different expansion procedure was implemented and an alternate curing method for cements formulated with TXI Lightweight cement was employed to prevent sample failure caused by thermal shock. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but data for some compositions were still questionable. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement were implemented and testing is ongoing.

  13. Pack Aluminization Synthesis of Superalloy 3D Woven and 3D Braided Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdeniz, Dinc; Levinson, Amanda J.; Sharp, Keith W.; Rowenhorst, David J.; Fonda, Richard W.; Dunand, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Micro-architectured, precipitation-strengthened structures were created in a new process combining weaving, gas-phase alloying, diffusion, and precipitation. First, high-ductility Ni-20 wt pct Cr wires with 202 μm diameter were braided, or non-crimp orthogonal woven, into three-dimensional structures. Second, these structures were vapor-phase alloyed with Al at 1273 K (1000 °C) by pack cementation, creating uniform NiAl coatings on the wires when using a retort. Also, solid-state bonding was achieved at wire intersections, where two wires were sufficiently close to each other, as determined via optical and X-ray tomographic microscopy. Third, the NiAl-coated wires were fully homogenized and aged to form γ' precipitates distributed in a γ matrix phase, the same microstructure providing strength in nickel-based superalloys. The resulting structures—consisting of wires (i) woven in a controlled three-dimensional architecture, (ii) bonded at contact points and (iii) strengthened by γ' precipitates—are expected to show high strength at ambient and elevated temperatures, low density, and high permeability which is useful for active cooling.

  14. Cement and concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corley, Gene; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    To produce lunar cement, high-temperature processing will be required. It may be possible to make calcium-rich silicate and aluminate for cement by solar heating of lunar pyroxene and feldspar, or chemical treatment may be required to enrich the calcium and aluminum in lunar soil. The effects of magnesium and ferrous iron present in the starting materials and products would need to be evaluated. So would the problems of grinding to produce cement, mixing, forming in vacuo and low gravity, and minimizing water loss.

  15. Consolidatable gravel pack method

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R.H.; Surles, B.W.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described for forming a consolidated gravel pack in a washed-out cavity adjacent to a producing well penetrating a subterranean oil formation comprising the steps of: (a) forming a quantity of resin coated gravel comprising granular mineral particles including gravel, the gravel particles being coated with a resin fluid containing a polymerizable oligomer of furfuryl alcohol resin, a catalyst comprising an oil soluble, very slightly water soluble organic acid and an ester of a weak organic acid to consume water produced by the polymerization of resin, the polymer coated gravel comprising a sticky solid material; (b) preparing an aqueous saline carrier fluid comprising water which is from 70 to 100% saturated with sodium chloride; (c) suspending the resin-coated gravel in the carrier fluid, forming a fluid mixture of resin-coated gravel and carrier fluid; (d) introducing the fluid mixture comprising the resin coated gravel particles suspended in the aqueous saline carrier fluid into the washed-out cavity of the formation adjacent to the producing well and shutting in the well for sufficient period of time to allow polymerization of the resin, forming the permeable gravel pack in the washed-out cavity of the formation.

  16. ExactPack Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, Jr., Robert; Israel, Daniel M.; Doebling, Scott William; Woods, Charles Nathan; Kaul, Ann; Walter, Jr., John William; Rogers, Michael Lloyd

    2016-05-09

    For code verification, one compares the code output against known exact solutions. There are many standard test problems used in this capacity, such as the Noh and Sedov problems. ExactPack is a utility that integrates many of these exact solution codes into a common API (application program interface), and can be used as a stand-alone code or as a python package. ExactPack consists of python driver scripts that access a library of exact solutions written in Fortran or Python. The spatial profiles of the relevant physical quantities, such as the density, fluid velocity, sound speed, or internal energy, are returned at a time specified by the user. The solution profiles can be viewed and examined by a command line interface or a graphical user interface, and a number of analysis tools and unit tests are also provided. We have documented the physics of each problem in the solution library, and provided complete documentation on how to extend the library to include additional exact solutions. ExactPack’s code architecture makes it easy to extend the solution-code library to include additional exact solutions in a robust, reliable, and maintainable manner.

  17. Numerical simulation of gravel packing

    SciTech Connect

    Winterfeld, P.H.; Schroeder, D.E. Jr. )

    1992-08-01

    To obtain maximum productivity from unconsolidated formations where sand control is required, it is important to understand the mechanics of gravel packing. This paper describes a finite-element, numerical simulator that can predict gravel placement in the perforations and annulus of a wellbore. The equations for the simulator include mass and momentum conservation. Wellbore geometry, physical properties, and fluid and gravel-pack properties are simulator input. Experiments in a 100-ft full-scale wellbore model for three gravel-packing configurations have been successfully simulated. These configurations are a circulating pack with a washpipe, a squeeze pack, and a circulating/squeeze pack with a washpipe and a lower telltale screen. The low cost, speed, and extrapolation capabilities of the numerical simulator will greatly enhance our ability to predict gravel placement in a wellbore.

  18. Atomic packing and diffusion in Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 9}P{sub 4} amorphous alloy analyzed by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yaocen; Takeuchi, Akira; Makino, Akihiro; Liang, Yunye; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2015-05-07

    In the work reported in this paper, ab initio molecular dynamics simulation was performed on Fe{sub 85}Si{sub 2}B{sub 9}P{sub 4} amorphous alloy. Preferred atomic environment of the elements was analyzed with Voronoi polyhedrons. It showed that B and P atoms prefer less neighbors compared with Fe and Si, making them structurally incompatible with Fe rich structure and repulsive to the formation of α-Fe. However, due to the low bonding energy of B and P caused by low coordination number, the diffusion rates of them were considerably large, resulting in the requirement of fast annealing for achieving optimum nano-crystallization for its soft magnetic property. The simulation work also indicates that diffusion rate in amorphous alloy is largely determined by bonding energy rather than atomic size.

  19. Environmentally compatible spray cement

    SciTech Connect

    Loeschnig, P.

    1995-12-31

    Within the framework of a European research project, Heidelberger Zement developed a quickly setting and hardening binder for shotcrete, called Chronolith S, which avoids the application of setting accelerators. Density and strength of the shotcrete produced with this spray cement correspond to those of an unaccelerated shotcrete. An increased hazard for the heading team and for the environment, which may occur when applying setting accelerators, can be excluded here. Owing to the special setting properties of a spray cement, the process engineering for its manufacturing is of great importance. The treatment of a spray cement as a dry concrete with kiln-dried aggregates is possible without any problems. The use of a naturally damp pre-batched mixture is possible with Chronolith S but requires special process engineering; spray cement and damp aggregate are mixed with one another immediately before entering the spraying machinery.

  20. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  1. Intramedullary bone cementing for the treatment of Colles fracture in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuo; Osamura, Naoki; Hagiwara, Norio; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Tomita, Katsuro

    2004-01-01

    Eighteen patients with Colles fractures, mean age 70 years (range 55-91), were treated by intramedullary bone cementing. The best indication for this technique was an unstable extra-articular Colles fracture with osteoporosis. Bone cement was packed into the canal that was made by curettage of intramedullary cancellous bone from the dorsal fracture site. Intramedullary cementing caused little bleeding from the medullary canal and no irritation of the extensor tendons. Because of rigid fixation, patients could use the affected hand for light activities without any external orthosis the day after surgery. Cortical healing was seen in all cases within three months and there was no cement loosening or other complications during the mean 28 month (range 6-43) follow up period. Intramedullary bone cementing is one of the optimal treatments for Colles fractures in elderly patients.

  2. Granular Packings and Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Herrmann, H. J.; Timonen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The failure of a two-dimensional packing of elastic grains is analyzed using a numerical model. The packing fails through formation of shear bands or faults. During failure there is a separation of the system into two grain-packing states. In a shear band, local ``rotating bearings'' are spontaneously formed. The bearing state is favored in a shear band because it has a low stiffness against shearing. The ``seismic activity'' distribution in the packing has the same characteristics as that of the earthquake distribution in tectonic faults. The directions of the principal stresses in a bearing are reminiscent of those found at the San Andreas Fault.

  3. Cement-based materials' characterization using ultrasonic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punurai, Wonsiri

    The quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of cement-based materials is a critical area of research that is leading to advances in the health monitoring and condition assessment of the civil infrastructure. Ultrasonic NDE has been implemented with varying levels of success to characterize cement-based materials with complex microstructure and damage. A major issue with the application of ultrasonic techniques to characterize cement-based materials is their inherent inhomogeneity at multiple length scales. Ultrasonic waves propagating in these materials exhibit a high degree of attenuation losses, making quantitative interpretations difficult. Physically, these attenuation losses are a combination of internal friction in a viscoelastic material (ultrasonic absorption), and the scattering losses due to the material heterogeneity. The objective of this research is to use ultrasonic attenuation to characterize the microstructure of heterogeneous cement-based materials. The study considers a real, but simplified cement-based material, cement paste---a common bonding matrix of all cement-based composites. Cement paste consists of Portland cement and water but does not include aggregates. First, this research presents the findings of a theoretical study that uses a set of existing acoustics models to quantify the scattered ultrasonic wavefield from a known distribution of entrained air voids. These attenuation results are then coupled with experimental measurements to develop an inversion procedure that directly predicts the size and volume fraction of entrained air voids in a cement paste specimen. Optical studies verify the accuracy of the proposed inversion scheme. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of using attenuation to measure the average size, volume fraction of entrained air voids and the existence of additional larger entrapped air voids in hardened cement paste. Finally, coherent and diffuse ultrasonic waves are used to develop a direct

  4. Packing Products: Polystyrene vs. Cornstarch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Packing materials such as polystyrene take thousands of years to decompose, whereas packing peanuts made from cornstarch, which some companies are now using, can serve the same purpose, but dissolve in water. The author illustrates this point to her class one rainy day using the sculptures students made from polystyrene and with the cornstarch…

  5. Sorption of antimicrobial agents in blow-fill-seal packs.

    PubMed

    Amin, Aeshna; Chauhan, Sateesh; Dare, Manish; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The present work studies the interaction of methyl paraben (MPB) and propyl paraben (PPB), two widely used antimicrobial agents in multi-dose ophthalmic formulations, with 5 mL, low density polyethylene (LDPE) and polypropylene (PP) blow-fill-seal (BFS) packs, by subjecting the systems to accelerated stability conditions of 40°C/25% RH. The effect of pH, paraben concentration, and relative humidity (RH) on the sorption loss of both the parabens was studied. Additionally, the effects of buffer species and buffer strength on MPB sorption were studied. LDPE packs showed significantly higher loss compared to PP packs which showed < 5% loss in all cases. PPB showed a significantly higher loss (40-50%) than MPB (9-16%) in LDPE. pH (3.0, 5.0, 7.0) did not have a statistically significant effect on sorption. However, concentration, humidity and buffer at pH 7 affected paraben sorption. The application of the power law suggested that the MPB followed non-Fickian diffusion while PPB showed non-Fickian to Case II diffusion in LDPE packs. In conclusion, caution should be exercised while using parabens in LDPE BFS packs because substantial losses of the antimicrobial agent during the shelf-life can compromise the preservative effectiveness against 'in-use' contamination.

  6. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged according to approved and... that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in which they are packed, and...

  7. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged according to approved and... that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in which they are packed, and...

  8. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged according to approved and... that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in which they are packed, and...

  9. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  10. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-06-16

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the tenth quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in test specimen erosion that was unacceptable. A different expansion procedure is being evaluated. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The testing program initiated in November produced questionable initial results so the procedure was modified slightly and the testing was reinitiated. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but questionable data were obtained from several of the compositions. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement are being implemented and testing is ongoing.

  11. [Evaluation of capillary chromatographic columns packed by electrokinetic packing method].

    PubMed

    Li, Z; You, H; Hu, S; Wei, W; Luo, G

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a method for electrokinetic packing capillary columns is reported. A higher column effeciency was obtained by performing electrochromatography on electrokinetic packing columns. The highest column efficiency in number of theoretical plate per meter was more than 200000, corresponding to reduced plate height less than 2. The reproducibilities of the same column in different intervals and different columns prepared from the same or different batches were compared. The relative standard deviations of the number of theoretical plate and retention time were less than 10% and 8%, respectively. The results indicated that high column efficiency and good reproducibility can be obtained on these new capillary packed columns.

  12. Nasal packing after septoplasty: a randomized comparison of packing versus no packing in 88 patients.

    PubMed

    Awan, Mohammad Sohail; Iqbal, Moghira

    2008-11-01

    The once-common practice of packing the nose after septoplasty was based on a desire to prevent postoperative complications such as bleeding, septal hematoma, and adhesion formation. However, it was since found that not only is nasal packing ineffective in this regard, it can actually cause these complications. Although the consensus in the world literature is that packing should be avoided, to the best of our knowledge, no truly randomized study has been undertaken in Southwest Asia upon which to justify this recommendation here. Therefore, we conducted a prospective randomized comparison of the incidence of a variety of postoperative signs and symptoms in 88 patients, 15 years of age and older, who did (n = 44) and did not (n = 44) undergo nasal packing following septoplasty. We found that the patients who underwent packing experienced significantly more postoperative pain, headache, epiphora, dysphagia, and sleep disturbance on the night of surgery. Oral and nasal examinations 7 days postoperatively revealed no significant difference between the two groups in the incidence of bleeding, septal hematoma, adhesion formation, and local infection. Finally, the packing group reported a moderate to high level of pain during removal of the packing. Our findings confirm that nasal packing after septoplasty is not only unnecessary, it is actually a source of patient discomfort and other signs and symptoms.

  13. Intrusion Characteristics of Three Bone Cements for Tibial Component of Total Knee Arthroplasty in a Cadaveric Bone Model.

    PubMed

    Walden, Justin K; Chong, Alexander C M; Dinh, Nam L; Adrian, Scott; Cusick, Robert; Wooley, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the intrusion characteristics of Simplex-HV to Simplex-P and Palacos-R in cadaveric proximal tibial bone. Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaver proximal tibiae were examined with standard arthroplasty tibial cuts. Each tibia was randomly assigned to receive one of the three bone cements for use with finger packing technique. Sagittal sections were prepared and analyzed using digital photography and stereoscopic micrographs to evaluate cement intrusion characteristics. The cement penetration depth was measured from the tibial bone cut surface, which did not include the cement thickness under the tibial base plate. Significant differences were detected in the bone cement penetration between the three cements. Penetration was increased using the Simplex-HV (average, 2.7 mm; range, 2.0-3.0 mm) compared with Simplex-P (average, 2.2 mm) and Palacos-R (average, 1.8 mm). These depths approximate to 3.7, 3.2, and 2.8 mm of total cement penetration, respectively. The data suggest that high-viscosity bone cement may provide good fixation of the tibial component of a total knee arthroplasty when using the finger packing technique.

  14. Valve stem and packing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wordin, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents overtightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing.

  15. Valve stem and packing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Wordin, J.J.

    1991-09-03

    A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents over tightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing. 2 figures.

  16. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  17. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  18. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  19. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  20. Method for packing chromatographic beds

    DOEpatents

    Freeman, David H.; Angeles, Rosalie M.; Keller, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    Column chromatography beds are packed through the application of static force. A slurry of the chromatography bed material and a non-viscous liquid is filled into the column plugged at one end, and allowed to settle. The column is transferred to a centrifuge, and centrifuged for a brief period of time to achieve a predetermined packing level, at a range generally of 100-5,000 gravities. Thereafter, the plug is removed, other fixtures may be secured, and the liquid is allowed to flow out through the bed. This results in an evenly packed bed, with no channeling or preferential flow characteristics.

  1. Dog pack attack: hunting humans.

    PubMed

    Avis, S P

    1999-09-01

    Dog bite-related fatalities, although unusual, accounted for 304 deaths in the United States between 1979 and 1996 and 6 fatalities in Canada between 1994 and 1996. Fatal dog pack attacks and attacks involving human predation are less common. The following describes a dog pack attack on a family of four involving 2 fatalities with predation of the victims. Factors previously identified that contribute to pack attacks and predation, including prior group hunting, social feeding, territorial defense, lack of human interaction, and prey stimuli, are discussed.

  2. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  3. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  4. Physico-chemical studies of hardened cement paste structure with micro-reinforcing fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steshenko, Aleksei; Kudyakov, Aleksander; Konusheva, Viktoriya

    2016-01-01

    The results of physico-chemical studies of modified hardened cement paste with micro-reinforcing fibers are given in this article. The goal was to study the reasons of the increase of strength properties of modified hardened cement paste by the method of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. It is shown that the use of mineral fibers in the production of cement based material has positive effect on its properties. The study found out that the increase in the strength of the hardened cement paste with micro-reinforcing fibers is due to the increase of the rate of hydration of cement without a significant change in the phase composition in comparison with hardened cement paste without additive. The results of microstructure investigation (of control samples and samples of the reinforced hardened cement paste) have shown that introduction of mineral fibers in the amount of 0.1-2 % by weight of cement provides the structure of the homogeneous microporous material with uniform distribution of the crystalline phase provided by densely packed hydrates.

  5. Physico-chemical studies of hardened cement paste structure with micro-reinforcing fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Steshenko, Aleksei Kudyakov, Aleksander; Konusheva, Viktoriya

    2016-01-15

    The results of physico-chemical studies of modified hardened cement paste with micro-reinforcing fibers are given in this article. The goal was to study the reasons of the increase of strength properties of modified hardened cement paste by the method of X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. It is shown that the use of mineral fibers in the production of cement based material has positive effect on its properties. The study found out that the increase in the strength of the hardened cement paste with micro-reinforcing fibers is due to the increase of the rate of hydration of cement without a significant change in the phase composition in comparison with hardened cement paste without additive. The results of microstructure investigation (of control samples and samples of the reinforced hardened cement paste) have shown that introduction of mineral fibers in the amount of 0.1-2 % by weight of cement provides the structure of the homogeneous microporous material with uniform distribution of the crystalline phase provided by densely packed hydrates.

  6. Glycerol Salicylate-based Pulp-Capping Material Containing Portland Cement.

    PubMed

    Portella, Fernando Freitas; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo; Santos, Paula Dapper; Sartori, Cláudia; Wegner, Everton; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the water sorption, solubility, pH and ability to diffuse into dentin of a glycerol salicylate-based, pulp-capping cement in comparison to a conventional calcium hydroxide-based pulp capping material (Hydcal). An experimental cement was developed containing 60% glycerol salicylate resin, 10% methyl salicylate, 25% calcium hydroxide and 5% Portland cement. Water sorption and solubility were determined based on mass changes in the samples before and after the immersion in distilled water for 7 days. Material discs were stored in distilled water for 24 h, 7 days and 28 days, and a digital pHmeter was used to measure the pH of water. The cement's ability to diffuse into bovine dentin was assessed by Raman spectroscopy. The glycerol salicylate-based cement presented higher water sorption and lower solubility than Hydcal. The pH of water used to store the samples increased for both cements, reaching 12.59 ± 0.06 and 12.54 ± 0.05 after 7 days, for Hydcal and glycerol salicylate-based cements, respectively. Both cements were able to turn alkaline the medium at 24 h and sustain its alkalinity after 28 days. Hydcal exhibited an intense diffusion into dentin up to 40 µm deep, and the glycerol salicylate-based cement penetrated 20 µm. The experimental glycerol salicylate-based cement presents good sorption, solubility, ability to alkalize the surrounding tissues and diffusion into dentin to be used as pulp capping material.

  7. Arthroscopically Assisted Two-stage Cementation Technique for a Periarticular Knee Lesion.

    PubMed

    Christoforou, Dimitrios; Golant, Alexander; Ort, Paul J

    2010-03-01

    Managing skeletal metastatic disease can be a challenging task for the orthopedic surgeon. In patients who have poor survival prognoses or are poor candidates for extensive reconstructive procedures, management with intralesional curettage and stabilization with bone cement with or without internal fixation to prevent development or propagation of a pathologic fracture may be the best option. The use of bone cement is preferable over the use of bone graft, as it allows for immediate postoperative weight bearing on the affected extremity.This article describes a case where the combined use of arthroscopy and a 2-stage cementation technique may allow preservation of the articular surface and optimization of short-term functional outcome after curettage of a periarticular metastatic lesion in a patient with an end-stage malignancy. We used knee arthroscopy to identify any articular penetration or intra-articular loose bodies after curettage and initial cementation of the periarticular lesion of the distal femur. Arthroscopic evaluation was carried out again after the lesion was packed with cement to identify and remove any loose intra-articular debris. The applicability of this technique is broad, and it can be used in any procedure involving cement packing in a periarticular location. Performed with caution, this technique can be a useful adjunct to surgical management of both malignant and locally aggressive benign bone lesions in periarticular locations.

  8. Storing Chemicals in Packed Spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    Reactants released by crushing or puncturing. Agglomerated gas-filled spheres hexagonally close packed and sintered or glued together into rods strung together at ends. Rods fed into crushing machine to release material in spheres as needed.

  9. Cement composition and sulfate attack

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, Natalya; Zayed, Abla . E-mail: zayed@eng.usf.edu

    2007-04-15

    Four cements were used to address the effect of tricalcium silicate content of cement on external sulfate attack in sodium sulfate solution. The selected cements had similar fineness and Bogue-calculated tricalcium aluminate content but variable tricalcium silicates. Durability was assessed using linear expansion and compressive strength. Phases associated with deterioration were examined using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Mineralogical phase content of the as-received cements was studied by X-ray diffraction using two methods: internal standard and Rietveld analysis. The results indicate that phase content of cements determined by X-ray mineralogical analysis correlates better with the mortar performance in sulfate environment than Bogue content. Additionally, it was found that in cements containing triclacium aluminate only in the cubic form, the observed deterioration is affected by tricalcium silicate content. Morphological similarities between hydration products of high tricalcium aluminate and high tricalcium silicate cements exposed to sodium sulfate environment were also observed.

  10. New cement formulation helps solve deep cementing problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, L.E.; DeBlanc, F.X.

    1989-06-01

    Invert-emulsion muds are used in most deep, hot wells. The internal aqueous phase of these muds frequently contains high concentrations of salts. It is desirable to complete these wells with a cement slurry containing salt concentrations up to and including saturation to minimize compatibility problems between cement slurry and mud. Above their effective temperature range, however, saturated salt cements - though still considered desirable for their other properties - pose design difficulties regarding thickening time, fluid loss, and rheology. High salt concentrations tend to decrease the effectiveness of most common cement additives - e.g., retarders, fluid-loss additives, and dispersants. At high temperatures, concentrations of these additives can become unacceptably large, while the additives themselves are not as effective under these conditions. Development of and field experience with a new cementing formulation for deep, high-temperature, saturated-salt applications have helped resolve the cement design problems encountered in south Texas and southern and offshore Louisiana. A single synthetic-polymer additive provides cement retardation, fluid-loss control, and dispersant properties with normal design considerations as opposed to the lengthy design requirements of other cement systems. A particular benefit derived from use of the new cement system involves cementing of long liners. Such liners frequently require squeeze cementing at the liner top because the cement is designed for conditions at the bottom of the liner and is thus frequently over-retarded for the cooler temperatures encountered at the top of the liner. This over-retardation tendency is alleviated greatly by use of the new saturated-salt cement additive.

  11. Volatile Components from Packing Matrials, Rev. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. A.

    2006-03-01

    An outgassing study was conducted on five packing materials, comprising two experiments. These materials comprised 277-4 borated concrete, Borobond4 concrete, polyethylene bags, silica-filled silicone rubber seals, and silicone foam padding. The purpose was measure the volume of gases which diffuse from packaging materials when sealed in containers. Two heating profiles were used to study the offgassing quantities in a set of accelerated aging tests. It was determined that the concretes contain a large quantity of water. The plastic materials hold much less moisture, with the silicone materials even consuming water, possibly due to the presence of silica filler. Polyethylene tends to degrade as the temperature is elevated and the foam stiffens.

  12. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged.... 3 2 “Fairly tight” means that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in...

  13. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged.... 3 2 “Fairly tight” means that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in...

  14. 7 CFR 51.1311 - Packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 51.1311 Section 51.1311 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Winter Pears 1 Standard Pack § 51.1311 Packing. (a) Each package shall be packed so that...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1270 - Packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 51.1270 Section 51.1270 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Summer and Fall Pears 1 Standard Pack § 51.1270 Packing. (a) Each package shall be packed...

  16. 7 CFR 51.1217 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Peaches Standard Pack § 51.1217 Standard pack. (a) Each package shall be packed so that the peaches in the shown face shall be reasonably representative in size, color and quality of the contents of the package. (b) Peaches packed in U.S. Standard bushel baskets, or half-bushel baskets,...

  17. 7 CFR 51.1217 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Peaches Standard Pack § 51.1217 Standard pack. (a) Each package shall be packed so that the peaches in the shown face shall be reasonably representative in size, color and quality of the contents of the package. (b) Peaches packed in U.S. Standard bushel baskets, or half-bushel baskets,...

  18. 7 CFR 51.1217 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Peaches Standard Pack § 51.1217 Standard pack. (a) Each package shall be packed so that the peaches in the shown face shall be reasonably representative in size, color and quality of the contents of the package. (b) Peaches packed in U.S....

  19. 7 CFR 51.1217 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Peaches Standard Pack § 51.1217 Standard pack. (a) Each package shall be packed so that the peaches in the shown face shall be reasonably representative in size, color and quality of the contents of the package. (b) Peaches packed in U.S....

  20. 7 CFR 51.1527 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Standard Pack § 51.1527 Standard pack. (a) Packing. (1) All... plums or prunes in the top layer of any package shall be reasonably representative in quality and size of those in the remainder of the package. (3) “Well filled” means that the plums or prunes packed...

  1. 7 CFR 51.1527 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Standard Pack § 51.1527 Standard pack. (a) Packing. (1) All... plums or prunes in the top layer of any package shall be reasonably representative in quality and size of those in the remainder of the package. (3) “Well filled” means that the plums or prunes packed...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1527 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Standard Pack § 51.1527 Standard pack. (a) Packing. (1) All... plums or prunes in the top layer of any package shall be reasonably representative in quality and size of those in the remainder of the package. (3) “Well filled” means that the plums or prunes packed...

  3. 7 CFR 51.3055 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Florida Avocados Standard Pack § 51.3055 Standard pack. (a) The avocados shall be packed in accordance with good commercial practice and the pack shall be at... of the weight of the largest fruit in the container. Size of the avocados may be specified by...

  4. 7 CFR 966.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pack. 966.11 Section 966.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Handling Definitions § 966.11 Pack. Pack means any of the packs of tomatoes as defined and set forth in...

  5. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  6. Cement from magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Lilley, K J; Gbureck, U; Knowles, J C; Farrar, D F; Barralet, J E

    2005-05-01

    Brushite cement may be used as a bone graft material and is more soluble than apatite in physiological conditions. Consequently it is considerably more resorbable in vivo than apatite forming cements. Brushite cement formation has previously been reported by our group following the mixture of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and phosphoric acid. In this study, brushite cement was formed from the reaction of nanocrystalline magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite with phosphoric acid in an attempt to produce a magnesium substituted brushite cement. The presence of magnesium was shown to have a strong effect on cement composition and strength. Additionally the presence of magnesium in brushite cement was found to reduce the extent of brushite hydrolysis resulting in the formation of HA. By incorporating magnesium ions in the apatite reactant structure the concentration of magnesium ions in the liquid phase of the cement was controlled by the dissolution rate of the apatite. This approach may be used to supply other ions to cement systems during setting as a means to manipulate the clinical performance and characteristics of brushite cements.

  7. Bioactive bone cement: effects of phosphoric ester monomer on mechanical properties and osteoconductivity.

    PubMed

    Shinzato, S; Nakamura, T; Tamura, J; Kokubo, T; Kitamura, Y

    2001-09-15

    A new bioactive bone cement, designated GBC, has been developed. It consists of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as an organic matrix and bioactive glass beads as an inorganic filler. The bioactive beads, consisting of MgO--CaO--SiO(2)--P(2)O(5)--CaF(2) glass, have been newly designed, and a novel PMMA powder was selected. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects on mechanical properties and osteoconductivity of adding a phosphoric ester (PE) monomer to the cement as an adhesion-promoting agent. Four kinds of cements were prepared: GBC, GBC with PE (designated GBC/PE), a cement consisting of the same PMMA used in GBC with apatite- and wollastonite-containing glass-ceramic (AW-GC) powder (designated AWC), and AWC with PE (designated AWC/PE). Each filler was added to the cement at 70 wt %. Adding PE to either GBC or AWC resulted in increases in the bending strength and decreases in the Young's modulus compared with the unmodified cements. Cements were packed into the intramedullar canals of rat tibiae to evaluate osteoconductivity as determined by an affinity index. Rats were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks after operation. The affinity index (length of bone in direct contact with the cement expressed as a percentage of the total length of the cement surface) was calculated for each cement. Adding PE to either GBC or AWC resulted in significant increases in the affinity index compared with the unmodified cements. The affinity index for GBC was significantly higher than that of AWC, and that for GBC/PE was also significantly higher than that of AWC/PE. The affinity indices for each cement increased significantly with time up to 8 weeks. Our study revealed that the higher osteoconductivity of GBC/PE was due to the large alkyl group in the PE monomer, to the hydrophilicity of the phosphoric acid in the PE monomer, and to the higher bioactivity of the bioactive glass beads at the cement surface. GBC/PE shows promise as an alternative bone cement with

  8. Foamed well cementing compositions and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bour, D.L.; Childs, J.D.

    1992-07-28

    This patent describes a method of cementing a well penetrating a salt containing subterranean formation. It comprises: forming a foamed cement composition; placing the foamed cement composition in contact with the salt containing formation; and permitting the foamed cement composition to set in contact with the salt containing formation to form a hardened mass of cement.

  9. Valve packings conquer fugitive emissions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    In the early 1990s, when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA; Washington, D.C.) declared its intent to regulate fugitive emissions from valve-stem leakage, much of the chemical process industries (CPI) responded with fear and uncertainty. The biggest fear was that valve packing would not meet the required limits on leak rates and that expensive bellows seals may be required on many applications. The uncertainly was about how much it would cost. Today, for the most part, these concerns have been mitigated. It is estimated that about 80--90% of valves satisfy the emission requirements. The rest need some improvement in their packing systems to meet the regulations. Generally, these valves can be brought within compliance if the packing designers follow a few basic principles: Employ less-pliable outer rings and more-pliable inner rings; and don`t use excessive packing. While interest in valve packing remains high, mechanical seals continue to become more user-friendly. Many of those covered below are designed to run dry, and some can even tolerate high shaft-wobble without damage. Also look for improved flange gaskets and a host of seals to protect bearings. Twenty-one summaries are presented on new products and services.

  10. Sleeping distance in wild wolf packs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knick, S.T.; Mech, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    Sleeping distances were observed among members of 13 wild wolf (Canis lupus) packs and 11 pairs in northeastern Minnesota to determine if the distances correlated with pack size and composition. The study utilized aerial radio-tracking and observation during winter. Pack size and number of adults per pack were inversely related to pack average sleeping distance and variability. No correlation between sleeping distance and microclimate was observed. Possible relationships between social bonding and our results are discussed.

  11. Meal Module, Tray Pack 36-Persons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-27

    Velocity Airdrop ( LVAD ) of the Meal Module, Tray Pack, 36-Persons L3 E. External Air Transport (EAT) Procedures for the Meal Module, Tray Pack, 36-Persons...Pack, 36-Persons, Expandable Box -- 9 Tray Dinner 57 D-1 LVAD A-22 Honeycomb Confiquration for the Meal Module, Tray Pack, 36-Persons 65 D-2 LVAD A...Meal Module, Tray Pack, 36-Persons may have to be airdropped along with the KCLFF, airdrop rigging procedures for Low Velocity Airdrop ( LVAD ) and

  12. Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Seungmin Mondal, Paramita

    2014-06-01

    The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete. This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 °C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed. The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C–S–H nano-structure and shrinkage of C–S–H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste. - Highlights: • The thermal degradation of hydration products of cement is characterized at micro- and nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). • The interface between unhydrated cement particles and the paste matrix is considered the origin of micro-cracks. • When cement paste is exposed to temperatures above 300 ºC, the nano-structure of C-S-H becomes a more loosely packed globular structure, which could be indicative of C-S-H shrinkage.

  13. Cement evaluation tool: a new approach to cement evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, B.; Dumont, A.; Pittman, D.; Seeman, B.

    1982-08-01

    Cement bond logging achieves its greatest utility when it provides the production engineer with precise indications of cement strength and distribution around the casing. Zone isolation is of critical importance in production. Previous logging systems have yielded measures of cement bond that were circumferential averages of cement quality. These were difficult to interpret. Additionally, they were sensitive to the degree of shear coupling between pipe, cement, and formation and thus were affected by microannulus. The cement evaluation tool (CET) described here overcomes these difficulties. It provides a measurement of cement presence and strength, which is largely insensitive to microannulus. Its log output is interpreted easily. Tool design allows examination of the casing circumferentially at each depth. Impedance behind casing is measured. Laboratory calibration measurements allow this to be presented in terms of cement compressive strength. Cement channels are distinguished easily, and a zone isolation indicator can be presented. Additionally, casing internal diameter and distortion are displayed. European and North American field tests have been completed, and performance for a variety of well conditions is discussed. The ability of the tool to identify channels is confirmed. Sequential runs with and without excess pressure demonstrate immunity to microannulus in cases where CBL is affected but where microannulus is small enough to prohibit hydraulic communication. Geometrical measurements have been good indicators of casing deformation and have identified casing corrosion and wear.

  14. US cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Performance of Diffusion Aluminide Coatings Applied on Alloy CF8C-Plus at 800oC

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Deepak; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Zhang, Ying; Haynes, James A; Pint, Bruce A; Armstrong, Beth L; Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    High performance cast stainless steel, CF8C-Plus, is a low cost alloy with prospective applications ranging from covers and casings of small and medium size gas turbines to turbocharger housing and manifolds in internal combustion engines. Diffusion aluminide coatings were applied on this alloy as a potential strategy for improved oxidation resistance, particularly in wet air and steam. In this paper the performance of the aluminide coatings evaluated by cyclic oxidation experiments in air containing 10 vol.% H2O at 800 C and conventional tension-compression low-cycle-fatigue tests in air at 800 C with a strain range of 0.5% is presented. The results show that specimens coated by a chemical vapor deposition process provide better oxidation resistance than those coated by an Al-slurry coating process. The application of a coating by pack cementation reduced the fatigue life by 15%.

  16. Well cementing in permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.N.

    1980-01-01

    A process for cementing a string of pipe in the permafrost region of a borehole of a well wherein aqueous drilling fluid actually used in drilling the wellbore in the permafrost region of a wellbore is employed. The drilling fluid contains or is adjusted to contain from about 2 to about 16 volume percent solids. Mixing with the drilling fluid (1) an additive selected from the group consisting of ligno-sulfonate, lignite, tannin, and mixtures thereof, (2) sufficient base to raise the pH of the drilling fluid into the range of from about 9 to about 12, and (3) cementitious material which will harden in from about 30 to about 40 hours at 40/sup 0/F. The resulting mixture is pumped into the permafrost region of a wellbore to be cemented and allowed to harden in the wellbore. There is also provided a process for treating an aqueous drilling fluid after it has been used in drilling the wellbore in permafrost, and a cementitious composition for cementing in a permafrost region of a wellbore.

  17. Cylinder valve packing nut studies

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

  18. Mineral of the month: cement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic cement is a virtually ubiquitous construction material that, when mixed with water, serves as the binder in concrete and most mortars. Only about 13 percent of concrete by weight is cement (the rest being water and aggregates), but the cement contributes all of the concrete’s compressional strength. The term “hydraulic” refers to the cement’s ability to set and harden underwater through the hydration of the cement’s components.

  19. Variability in dust exposure in a cement factory in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mwaiselage, Julius; Bråtveit, Magne; Moen, Bente; Yost, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Dust exposure levels were studied in a cement factory in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, as part of an epidemiological study assessing chronic respiratory health effects. One hundred and twenty personal 'total' dust samples were collected from 80 randomly selected workers from eight a priori occupational groups (OGs) based on work areas using a 37 mm Millipore sampler. The between-group, within-group and within-worker variances were determined to assess the contrast in exposure level between the OGs and to estimate the attenuation and standard error of the theoretical exposure-response slope. Using mixed-effect model estimates, the probability of overexposure relative to the occupational exposure limit (OEL) was assessed for each OG. The geometric means of total dust exposure were higher in the cranes (38.64 mg m(-3)), packing (21.30 mg m(-3)) and crusher (13.48 mg m(-3)) than in the cement mill (3.23 mg m(-3)), kiln (2.87 mg m(-3)), raw mill (1.85 mg m(-3)), maintenance (1.16 mg m(-3)) and administration (0.29 mg m(-3)). The a priori grouping scheme seems to be an efficient scheme because of the high contrast in exposure level between the OGs (0.78) and minimal attenuation of the theoretical exposure-response slope (1.0%). When using the reduced mixed-effect model, the probabilities of overexposure () relative to the OEL of 10 mg m(-3) for total cement dust were higher in the crane (96%), packing (88%) and crusher (73%) than in the cement mill (16%), kiln (14%), raw mill (5%), maintenance (2%) and administration (0.01%).

  20. Cemented total hip prosthesis: Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Aliabadi, P.; Tumeh, S.S.; Weissman, B.N.; McNeil, B.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Conventional radiographs, technetium-99m bone scans, and gallium-67 scans were reviewed in 44 patients who had undergone cemented total hip joint replacement and were imaged because of suspicion of prosthesis loosening or infection. A complete radiolucent line of 2 mm or wider along the bone-cement interface or metal-cement lucency on conventional radiographs was used as the criterion for prosthetic loosening with or without infection and proved to be 54% sensitive and 96% specific. Scintigraphic criteria for prosthetic loosening were increased focal uptake of the radiopharmaceutical for the femoral component and increased focal or diffuse uptake for the acetabular component. For bone scintigraphy, sensitivity was 73% and specificity was 96%. Combining the results of conventional radiographs and bone scans increased sensitivity to 84% and decreased specificity to 92% for the diagnosis of loosening, infection, or both. The study also showed that Ga-67 scintigraphy has a low sensitivity for the detection of infection.

  1. Inspection program improves bulk cement system delivery

    SciTech Connect

    O'Bannion, T. ); Guidroz, B.; Morris, G. )

    1993-12-20

    A recently implemented survey of pneumatically operated bulk cement-handling equipment offshore has improved bulk cement deliverability on several Gulf of Mexico rigs. The 30-point survey helps ensure an adequate rate of bulk cement delivery throughout the cement job. The inspection survey was developed because the source of many cement job failures was a lack of adequate, steady delivery of bulk cement to the cementing unit during the job. The job failures caused by flow interruptions, plugging of tools by chunks of set cement, and erratic flow resulted in poor primary cement jobs, many of which required remedial cementing jobs. A better-controlled flow of cement may help prevent these types of failure, thereby reducing the number of remedial cement operations. The paper describes the inspection procedures.

  2. Wire and Packing Tape Sandwiches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitz, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can combine craft wire with clear packing tape to create a two-dimensional design that can be bent and twisted to create a three-dimensional form. Students sandwich wire designs between two layers of tape. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  3. Teflon-packed flexible joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belmont, G. E.

    1969-01-01

    Teflon-packed flexible joint separates the movement of the shaker from the liquid nitrogen hose during the ground testing of cryogenic zero-g equipment. The joint allows the hose to lie on the floor in a stationary position as the shaker moves back and forth, thus, the hose is not subject to violent motion.

  4. Ecology and Energy Action Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald's Corp., Oak Brook, IL.

    One of five McDonald's Action Packs, these elementary school-level instructional materials are for use as an introduction to existing units of study, supplements to a textbook, or a source of special projects for environmental education. Contents include these six units: Make Your Own Ecology Mini-spinner, Let's Look at a Food Chain, Drip the…

  5. Dense crystalline packings of ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Weiwei; Jiao, Yang; Liu, Lufeng; Yuan, Ye; Li, Shuixiang

    2017-03-01

    An ellipsoid, the simplest nonspherical shape, has been extensively used as a model for elongated building blocks for a wide spectrum of molecular, colloidal, and granular systems. Yet the densest packing of congruent hard ellipsoids, which is intimately related to the high-density phase of many condensed matter systems, is still an open problem. We discover an unusual family of dense crystalline packings of self-dual ellipsoids (ratios of the semiaxes α : √{α }:1 ), containing 24 particles with a quasi-square-triangular (SQ-TR) tiling arrangement in the fundamental cell. The associated packing density ϕ exceeds that of the densest known SM2 crystal [ A. Donev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 255506 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.255506] for aspect ratios α in (1.365, 1.5625), attaining a maximal ϕ ≈0.758 06 ... at α = 93 /64 . We show that the SQ-TR phase derived from these dense packings is thermodynamically stable at high densities over the aforementioned α range and report a phase diagram for self-dual ellipsoids. The discovery of the SQ-TR crystal suggests organizing principles for nonspherical particles and self-assembly of colloidal systems.

  6. Phosphate based oil well cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Ramkumar

    The main application of the cement in an oil well is to stabilize the steel casing in the borehole and protect it from corrosion. The cement is pumped through the borehole and is pushed upwards through the annulus between the casing and the formation. The cement will be exposed to temperature and pressure gradients of the borehole. Modified Portland cement that is being used presently has several shortcomings for borehole sealant. The setting of the Portland cement in permafrost regions is poor because the water in it will freeze even before the cement sets and because of high porosity and calcium oxide, a major ingredient it gets easily affected by the down hole gases such as carbon dioxide. The concept of phosphate bonded cements was born out of considerable work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on their use in stabilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Novel cements were synthesized by an acid base reaction between a metal oxide and acid phosphate solution. The major objective of this research is to develop phosphate based oil well cements. We have used thermodynamics along with solution chemistry principles to select calcined magnesium oxide as candidate metal oxide for temperatures up to 200°F (93.3°C) and alumina for temperatures greater than 200°F (93.3°C). Solution chemistry helped us in selecting mono potassium phosphate as the acid component for temperatures less than 200°F (93.3°C) and phosphoric acid solution greater than 200°F (93.3°C). These phosphate cements have performance superior to common Portland well cements in providing suitable thickening time, better mechanical and physical properties.

  7. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  8. Modified acrylic bone cement with high amounts of ethoxytriethyleneglycol methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Pascual, B; Gurruchaga, M; Ginebra, M P; Gil, F J; Planell, J A; Vázquez, B; San Román, J; Goñi, I

    1999-03-01

    One cause of arthroplasty failure is the brittle mechanical behavior of bone cements. However, the improvement of cement formulations must also be accompanied by the maintenance of a wide variety of characteristics. New bone cements were obtained by the substitution of high percentages, up to 60% (v/v), of methyl methacrylate (MMA) by a higher molecular weight and more hydrophilic monomer, ethoxytriethyleneglycol methacrylate (TEG). The essential advantages of these materials were the decrease of maximum temperature together with a decrease in the residual monomer content with respect to conventional cement formulations. The water absorption process obeyed diffusion laws and the equilibrium water content increased by the introduction of higher percentages of the hydrophilic component. This characteristic had an appreciable effect on the viscoelastic behavior analyzed by DMTA. These modified bone cements had reduced polymerization shrinkage and similar levels of porosity. Tensile test revealed that the introduction of TEGMA gave rise to an important modification of the mechanical behavior, with a noticeable increase in the fracture strain. This fact was also confirmed by means of the analysis of the fracture surfaces by SEM.

  9. Comparative evaluation of antimicrobial activity of three cements: new endodontic cement (NEC), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland.

    PubMed

    Hasan Zarrabi, Mohammad; Javidi, Maryam; Naderinasab, Mahboube; Gharechahi, Maryam

    2009-09-01

    Using the agar diffusion method, we conducted an in vitro study to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), new endodontic cement (NEC) and Portland cement at different concentrations against five different microorganisms. A base layer was made using Muller-Hinton agar for Escherichia coli (ATCC 10538) and Candida (ATCC 10231). For Actinomyces viscosus (ATCC 15987), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 10541) and Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 25175) blood agar medium was used. Wells were formed by removing the agar, and the materials were placed in the well immediately after manipulation. The plates were kept at room temperature for 2 h for prediffusion, and then incubated at 37 degrees C for 72 h. The inhibition zones were then measured. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey test to compare the differences among the three cements at different concentrations. The positive controls showed bacterial growth, while the negative controls showed no bacterial growth. All materials showed antimicrobial activity against the tested strains except for Enterococcus faecalis. NEC created larger inhibition zones than MTA and Portland cement. This difference was significant for Portland cement (P < 0.05), but not for MTA (P > 0.05). Among the examined microorganisms, the largest inhibition zone was observed for Actinomyces group (P < 0.05). The antimicrobial activity of the materials increased with time and concentration (P < 0.05). It was concluded that NEC is a potent inhibitor of microorganism growth.

  10. Radon resistant potential of concrete manufactured using Ordinary Portland Cement blended with rice husk ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Kumar, Amit

    2013-12-01

    The emission of radon from building materials and soil depends upon the radium content, porosity, moisture content and radon diffusion length of materials. Several techniques have been used to reduce the radon emission from the soil using different flooring materials. But the effectiveness of radon shielding depends upon the diffusion of radon through these materials. The present study proposes a method for producing a radon resistant material for decreasing radon diffusion through it. The method involves rice husk ash (RHA) in addition to cement for the preparation of concrete used for flooring and walls. The radon diffusion, exhalation and mechanical property of concrete prepared by rice husk ash blended cement were studied. The addition of RHA caused the reduction in radon diffusion coefficient, exhalation rates, porosity and enhanced the compressive strength of concrete. The bulk radon diffusion coefficient of cementitious concrete was reduced upto 69% by addition of rice husk ash as compare to that of control concrete.

  11. 7 CFR 984.15 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.15 Pack. Pack means to bleach, clean, grade, shell or otherwise prepare walnuts for market as inshell or shelled walnuts....

  12. 7 CFR 984.15 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.15 Pack. Pack means to bleach, clean, grade, shell or otherwise prepare walnuts for market as inshell or shelled walnuts....

  13. 7 CFR 984.15 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.15 Pack. Pack means to bleach, clean, grade, shell or otherwise prepare walnuts for market as inshell or shelled walnuts....

  14. 7 CFR 984.15 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.15 Pack. Pack means to bleach, clean, grade, shell or otherwise prepare walnuts for market as inshell or shelled walnuts....

  15. 7 CFR 984.15 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 984.15 Pack. Pack means to bleach, clean, grade, shell or otherwise prepare walnuts for market as inshell or shelled walnuts....

  16. Separating mixtures by exploiting molecular packing effects in microporous materials.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-01-07

    We examine mixture separations with microporous adsorbents such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), operating under conditions close to pore saturation. Pore saturation is realized, for example, when separating bulk liquid phase mixtures of polar compounds such as water, alcohols and ketones. For the operating conditions used in industrial practice, pore saturation is also attained in separations of hydrocarbon mixtures such as xylene isomers and hexane isomers. Separations under pore saturation conditions are strongly influenced by differences in the saturation capacities of the constituent species; the adsorption is often in favor of the component with the higher saturation capacity. Effective separations are achieved by exploiting differences in the efficiency with which molecules pack within the ordered crystalline porous materials. For mixtures of chain alcohols, the shorter alcohol can be preferentially adsorbed because of its higher saturation capacity. With hydrophilic adsorbents, water can be selectively adsorbed from water-alcohol mixtures. For separations of o-xylene-m-xylene-p-xylene mixtures, the pore dimensions of MOFs can be tailored in such a manner as to allow optimal packing of the isomer that needs to be adsorbed preferentially. Subtle configurational differences between linear and branched alkane isomers result in significantly different packing efficiencies within the pore topology of MFI, AFI, ATS, and CFI zeolites. A common characteristic feature of most separations that are reliant on molecular packing effects is that adsorption and intra-crystalline diffusion are synergistic; this enhances the separation efficiencies in fixed bed adsorbers.

  17. Strontium-loaded mineral bone cements as sustained release systems: Compositions, release properties, and effects on human osteoprogenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Tadier, Solène; Bareille, Reine; Siadous, Robin; Marsan, Olivier; Charvillat, Cédric; Cazalbou, Sophie; Amédée, Joelle; Rey, Christian; Combes, Christèle

    2012-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate in vitro the release properties and biological behavior of original compositions of strontium (Sr)-loaded bone mineral cements. Strontium was introduced into vaterite CaCO3 -dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cement via two routes: as SrCO3 in the solid phase (SrS cements), and as SrCl2 dissolved in the liquid phase (SrL cements), leading to different cement compositions after setting. Complementary analytical techniques implemented to thoroughly investigate the release/dissolution mechanism of Sr-loaded cements at pH 7.4 and 37°C during 3 weeks revealed a sustained release of Sr and a centripetal dissolution of the more soluble phase (vaterite) limited by a diffusion process. In all cases, the initial burst of the Ca and Sr release (highest for the SrL cements) that occurred over 48 h did not have a significant effect on the expression of bone markers (alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin), the levels of which remained overexpressed after 15 days of culture with human osteoprogenitor (HOP) cells. At the same time, proliferation of HOP cells was significantly higher on SrS cements. Interestingly, this study shows that we can optimize the sustained release of Sr(2+) , the cement biodegradation and biological activity by controlling the route of introduction of strontium in the cement paste.

  18. The effect of porosity on drug release kinetics from vancomycin microsphere/calcium phosphate cement composites.

    PubMed

    Schnieders, Julia; Gbureck, Uwe; Vorndran, Elke; Schossig, Michael; Kissel, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    The influence of porosity on release profiles of antibiotics from calcium phosphate composites was investigated to optimize the duration of treatment. We hypothesized, that by the encapsulation of vancomycin-HCl into biodegradable microspheres prior admixing to calcium phosphate bone cement, the influence of porosity of the cement matrix on vancomycin release could be reduced. Encapsulation of vancomycin into a biodegradable poly(lactic co-glycolic acid) copolymer (PLGA) was performed by spray drying; drug-loaded microparticles were added to calcium phosphate cement (CPC) at different powder to liquid ratios (P/L), resulting in different porosities of the cement composites. The effect of differences in P/L ratio on drug release kinetics was compared for both the direct addition of vancomycin-HCl to the cement liquid and for cement composites modified with vancomycin-HCl-loaded microspheres. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to visualize surface and cross section morphology of the different composites. Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller-plots (BET) was used to determine the specific surface area and pore size distribution of these matrices. It could be clearly shown, that variations in P/L ratio influenced both the porosity of cement and vancomycin release profiles. Antibiotic activity during release study was successfully measured using an agar diffusion assay. However, vancomycin-HCl encapsulation into PLGA polymer microspheres decreased porosity influence of cement on drug release while maintaining antibiotic activity of the embedded substance.

  19. Using artificial neural networks to predict the quality and performance of oilfield cements

    SciTech Connect

    Coveney, P.V.; Hughes, T.L.; Fletcher, P.

    1996-12-31

    Inherent batch to batch variability, ageing and contamination are major factors contributing to variability in oilfield cement slurry performance. Of particular concern are problems encountered when a slurry is formulated with one cement sample and used with a batch having different properties. Such variability imposes a heavy burden on performance testing and is often a major factor in operational failure. We describe methods which allow the identification, characterization and prediction of the variability of oilfield cements. Our approach involves predicting cement compositions, particle size distributions and thickening time curves from the diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrum of neat cement powders. Predictions make use of artificial neural networks. Slurry formulation thickening times can be predicted with uncertainties of less than {+-}10%. Composition and particle size distributions can be predicted with uncertainties a little greater than measurement error but general trends and differences between cements can be determined reliably. Our research shows that many key cement properties are captured within the Fourier transform infrared spectra of cement powders and can be predicted from these spectra using suitable neural network techniques. Several case studies are given to emphasize the use of these techniques which provide the basis for a valuable quality control tool now finding commercial use in the oilfield.

  20. Rate of CO2 attack on hydrated Class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions.

    PubMed

    Kutchko, Barbara G; Strazisar, Brian R; Lowry, Gregory V; Dzombak, David A; Thaulow, Niels

    2008-08-15

    Experiments were conducted to study the degradation of hardened cement paste due to exposure to CO2 and brine under geologic sequestration conditions (T = 50 degrees C and 30.3 MPa). The goal was to determine the rate of reaction of hydrated cement exposed to supercritical CO2 and to CO2-saturated brine to assess the potential impact of degradation in existing wells on CO2 storage integrity. Two different forms of chemical alteration were observed. The supercritical CO2 alteration of cement was similar in process to cement in contact with atmospheric CO2 (ordinary carbonation), while alteration of cement exposed to CO2-saturated brine was typical of acid attack on cement. Extrapolation of the hydrated cement alteration rate measured for 1 year indicates a penetration depth range of 1.00 +/- 0.07 mm for the CO2-saturated brine and 1.68 +/- 0.24 mm for the supercritical CO2 after 30 years. These penetration depths are consistent with observations of field samples from an enhanced oil recovery site after 30 years of exposure to CO2-saturated brine under similar temperature and pressure conditions. These results suggest that significant degradation due to matrix diffusion of CO2 in intact Class H neat hydrated cement is unlikely on time scales of decades.

  1. Carbon Sequestration in Olivine and Basalt Powder Packed Beds.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Wells, Rachel K; Giammar, Daniel E

    2017-02-21

    Fractures and pores in basalt could provide substantial pore volume and surface area of reactive minerals for carbonate mineral formation in geologic carbon sequestration. In many fractures solute transport will be limited to diffusion, and opposing chemical gradients that form as a result of concentration differences can lead to spatial distribution of silicate mineral dissolution and carbonate mineral precipitation. Glass tubes packed with grains of olivine or basalt with different grain sizes and compositions were used to explore the identity and spatial distribution of carbonate minerals that form in dead-end one-dimensional diffusion-limited zones that are connected to a larger reservoir of water in equilibrium with 100 bar CO2 at 100 °C. Magnesite formed in experiments with olivine, and Mg- and Ca-bearing siderite formed in experiments with flood basalt. The spatial distribution of carbonates varied between powder packed beds with different powder sizes. Packed beds of basalt powder with large specific surface areas sequestered more carbon per unit basalt mass than powder with low surface area. The spatial location and extent of carbonate mineral formation can influence the overall ability of fractured basalt to sequester carbon.

  2. 7 CFR 51.1527 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Standard Pack § 51... the approved and recognized methods. (2) The plums or prunes in the top layer of any package shall be...” means that the plums or prunes packed in loose or volume filled containers are packed within 1 inch...

  3. 7 CFR 51.1527 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Standard Pack § 51... the approved and recognized methods. (2) The plums or prunes in the top layer of any package shall be...” means that the plums or prunes packed in loose or volume filled containers are packed within 1 inch...

  4. 7 CFR 966.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.11 Pack. Pack means any of the packs of tomatoes as defined and set forth in the United States Standards for Fresh Tomatoes issued by the United States Department of Agriculture (§§...

  5. Characteristics of fluidized-packed beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabor, J. D.; Mecham, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    Study of fluidized-packed bed includes investigation of heat transfer, solids-gas mixing, and elutriation characteristics. A fluidized-packed bed is a system involving the fluidization of small particles in the voids of a packed bed of larger nonfluidized particles.

  6. Vibrational Collapse of Hexapod Packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Ding, Jingqiu; Barés, Jonathan; Dierichs, Karola; Behringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Columns made of convex noncohesive grains like sand collapse after being released from a confining container. However, structures built from concave grains can be stable without external support. Previous research show that the stability of the columns depends on column diameter and height, by observing column stability after carefully lifting their confinement tubes. Thinner and taller columns collapse with higher probability. While the column stability weakly depends on packing density, it strongly depends on inter-particle friction. Experiments that cause the column to collapse also reveal similar trends, as more effort (such as heavier loading or shearing) is required to destabilize columns that are intrinsically more stable. In the current experiments, we invesitage the effect of vibration on destructing a column. Short columns collapse following the relaxation dynamics of disorder systems, which coincides with similar experiments on staple packings. However, tall columns collapse faster at the beginning, in addition to the relaxation process coming after. Using high-speed imaging, we analyze column collapse data from different column geometries. Ongoing work is focusing on characterizing the stability of hexapod packings to vibration. We thanks NSF-DMR-1206351 and the William M. Keck Foundation.

  7. Characterizing Reactive Flow Paths in Fractured Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenning, Q. C.; Huerta, N. J.; Hesse, M. A.; Bryant, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration can be a viable method for reducing anthropogenic CO2 flux into the atmosphere. However, the technology must be economically feasible and pose acceptable risk to stakeholders. One key risk is CO2 leakage out of the storage reservoir. Potential driving forces for leakage are the overpressure due to CO2 injection and the buoyancy of free phase CO2. Potential hazards of leakage are contamination of Underground Sources of Drinking Water or the atmosphere and would be deemed an unacceptable risk. Wells potentially provide a fast path for leakage from the reservoir. While the well's cement casing is reactive with CO2 and CO2-saturated brine, the low cement matrix permeability and slow diffusion rate make it unlikely that CO2 will escape through a properly constructed wellbore. However, highly permeable fractures with micrometer scale apertures can occur in cement casings. Reactions that occur in the flow in these fractures can either be self-limiting or self-enhancing. Therefore, understanding the reactive flow is critical to understanding of leakage evolution through these fractures. The goal of our work is to characterize the modification of the flow paths in the fracture due to reaction with acidic brine. With this aim we have characterized both the initial flow path of un-reactive flow and the final flow path after introduction of low-pH acid along the same fracture. Class H cement cores 3-6 cm in length and 2.5 cm diameter are created and a single natural and unique fracture is produced in each core using the Brazilian method. Our experimental fluid is injected at a constant rate into the cement core housed in a Hassler Cell under confining pressure. A solution of red dye and deionized water is pumped through the fracture to stain the un-reactive flow paths. Deionized water is then pumped through the core to limit diffusion of the dye into non-flowing portions of the fracture. After staining the initial flow path, low pH water due to

  8. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  9. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  10. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  11. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  12. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  13. Percolation behavior of tritiated water into a soil packed bed

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, T.; Katayama, K.; Uehara, K.; Fukada, S.; Takeishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    A large amount of cooling water is used in a D-T fusion reactor. The cooling water will contain tritium with high concentration because tritium can permeate metal walls at high temperature easily. A development of tritium handling technology for confining tritiated water in the fusion facility is an important issue. In addition, it is also important to understand tritium behavior in environment assuming severe accidents. In this study, percolation experiments of tritiated water in soil packed bed were carried out and tritium behavior in soil was discussed. Six soil samples were collected in Hakozaki campus of Kyushu University. These particle densities were of the same degree as that of general soils and moisture contents were related to BET surface area. For two soil samples used in the percolation experiment of tritiated water, saturated hydraulic conductivity agreed well with the estimating value by Creager. Tritium retention ratio in the soil packed bed was larger than water retention. This is considered to be due to an effect of tritium sorption on the surface of soil particles. The isotope exchange capacity estimated by assuming that H/T ratio of supplied tritiated water and H/T ratio of surface water of soil particle was equal was comparable to that on cement paste and mortar which were obtained by exposure of tritiated water vapor. (authors)

  14. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    micro-scale fibers were used for comparison purposes at different volume fractions. Replicated mixes and tests were considered to provide the basis for statistically reliable inferences. Theoretical studies were conducted in order to develop insight into the reinforcement mechanisms of properly functionalized graphite nanomaterials. The results suggested that modified graphite nanomaterials improve the mechanical performance of cement-based matrices primarily through control of microcrack size and propagation, relying on their close spacing within matrix and dissipation of substantial energy by debonding and frictional pullout over their enormous surface areas. The gains in barrier qualities of cement-based materials with introduction of modified graphite nanomaterials could be attributed to the increased tortuosity of diffusion paths in the presence of closely spaced nanomaterials. Experimental investigations were designed and implemented towards identification of the optimum (nano- and micro-scale) reinforcement systems for high-performance concrete through RSA (Response Surface Analysis). A comprehensive experimental data base was developed on the mechanical, physical and durability characteristics as well as the structure and composition of high-performance cementitious nanocomposites reinforced with modified graphite nanomaterials and/ or different micro-fibers.

  15. Homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, W; Koch, E

    2002-11-01

    All homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry have been derived by studying the characteristic Wyckoff positions P -1 1a and P -1 2i of the two triclinic lattice complexes. These sphere packings belong to 30 different types. Only one type exists that has exclusively triclinic sphere packings and no higher-symmetry ones. The inherent symmetry of part of the sphere packings is triclinic for 18 types. Sphere packings of all but six of the 30 types may be realized as stackings of parallel planar nets.

  16. Formation and Oxidation Performance of Low-Temperature Pack Aluminide Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Ying; Pint, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    A pack cementation process was developed to coat commercial 9% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel T91 at temperatures below its normal tempering temperature to avoid any potential detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of the coated alloy. In order to prevent the formation of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} coatings, the Al activity in the pack cementation process was reduced by substituting the pure Al masteralloy with binary Cr-Al masteralloys containing either 15 or 25 wt.% Al. When the Cr-25Al masteralloy was used, a duplex coating was formed at 700 C, consisting of a thin Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} outer layer and an inner layer of FeAl. With the Cr-15Al masteralloy, an FeAl coating of {approx} 12 {micro}m thick was achieved at 700 C. The pack aluminide coatings fabricated at 700 C are being evaluated in air + 10 vol.% H{sub 2}O at 650 C and 700 C to determine their long-term oxidation performance.

  17. Variability in total dust exposure in a cement factory.

    PubMed

    Kakooei, Hossein; Kakouei, Ali Akbar; Poornajaf, Abdolhossein; Ferasaty, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Exposure assessment is a main component of epidemiologic studies and variability in exposure. This assessment is considered as a common approach for such phenomenon. A total of 129 dust samples were collected randomly from 197 personnel from a cement factory located in Ilam province, during 2009 in Iran. The between- and within-group components of variability were determined to assess the contrast in exposure level between the Similar Exposure Groups (SEGs) and to calculate the within-worker geometric standard deviation of the theoretical exposure-response slope. Results were analyzing by one-way random effects model. According to the mentioned model, the probability of long-term mean exposure exceeding to the occupational exposure limit (OEL) was assessed for each SEGs. The arithmetic means (AM) of total dust levels ranged from 0.04 to 39.37 mg/m(3). The geometric means (GM) of total dust were higher in the crusher (20.84 mg/m(3)), packing (17.29 mg/m(3)), kiln (16.78 mg/m(3)), cement mill (14.90 mg/m(3)), and raw mill (10.44 mg/m(3)). However, the figures for the maintenance and administration parts were 3.77 mg/m(3) and 1.01 mg/m(3), respectively. The random effects model data demonstrated that the F-value calculated was greater than the critical F-value approximately 59% of the variability in the exposure was due to differences between groups. Based on these finding, the order of probability of the long-term mean exposure exceeding (Z) to the OEL of 10 mg/m(3) for total dust which were in kiln (100%), packing (100%), cement mill (90%), crusher (73%), raw mill (60%) administration (2.3%) and the maintenance parts (0%).

  18. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium-doped ceramics has been described to modify brushite cements and improve their biological behavior. However, few studies have analyzed the efficiency of this approach to induce magnesium substitution in brushite crystals. Mg-doped ceramics composed of Mg-substituted β-TCP, stanfieldite and/or farringtonite were reacted with primary monocalcium phosphate (MCP) in the presence of water. The cement setting reaction has resulted in the formation of brushite and newberyite within the cement matrix. Interestingly, the combination of SAED and EDX analyses of single crystal has indicated the occurrence of magnesium substitution within brushite crystals. Moreover, the effect of magnesium ions on the structure, and mechanical and setting properties of the new cements was characterized as well as the release of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Further research would enhance the efficiency of the system to incorporate larger amounts of magnesium ions within brushite crystals.

  19. Graphite-reinforced bone cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chopped graphite fibers added to surgical bone cement form bonding agent with mechanical properties closely matched to those of bone. Curing reaction produces less heat, resulting in reduced traumatization of body tissues. Stiffness is increased without affecting flexural strength.

  20. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Eilers, L. H.

    1985-12-03

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight monoor copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  1. PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE FOR ANTARCTICA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    formulation of recommended procedures for batching, mixing, placing, and curing of portland cement concrete in Antarctica. The pertinent features of the mix and design and related procedures are given. (Author)

  2. Portland cement-blast furnace slag blends in oilwell cementing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, D.T.; DiLullo, G.; Hibbeler, J.

    1995-12-31

    Recent investigations of blast furnace slag cementing technologies. have been expanded to include Portland cement/blast furnace slag blends. Mixtures of Portland cement and blast furnace slag, while having a long history of use in the construction industry, have not been used extensively in oilwell cementing applications. Test results indicate that blending blast furnace slag with Portland cement produces a high quality well cementing material. Presented are the design guidelines and laboratory test data relative to mixtures of blast furnace slag and Portland cements. Case histories delineating the use of blast furnace slag - Portland cement blends infield applications are also included.

  3. Cement pulmonary embolism after vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Lamúa Riazuelo, José Ramón; Gallego Rivera, José Ignacio; Vázquez Díaz, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of vertebral cementing techniques for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty has spread for the treatment of pain associated with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. This is also associated with the increased incidence of complications related with these procedures, the most frequent being originated by leakage of cementation material. Cement can escape into the vertebral venous system and reach the pulmonary circulation through the azygous system and cava vein, producing a cement embolism. This is a frequent complication, occurring in up to 26% of patients undergoing vertebroplasty but, since most patients have no clinical or hemodynamical repercussion, this event usually goes unnoticed. However, some serious, and even fatal cases, have been reported. We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient who underwent vertebroplasty for persistent pain associated with osteoporotic L3 vertebral fracture and who developed a cement leak into the cava vein and right pulmonary artery during the procedure. Although he developed a pulmonary cement embolism, the patient remained asymptomatic and did not present complications during follow-up.

  4. Continuous monitoring of the zinc-phosphate acid-base cement setting reaction by proton nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apih, T.; Lebar, A.; Pawlig, O.; Trettin, R.

    2001-06-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic relaxation is a well-established technique for continuous and non destructive monitoring of hydration of conventional Portland building cements. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of the setting reaction of zinc-phosphate acid-base dental cements, which harden in minutes as compared to days, as in the case of Portland cements. We compare the setting of cement powder (mainly, zinc oxide) prepared with clinically used aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid solution with the setting of a model system where cement powder is mixed with pure orthophosphoric acid solution. In contrast to previously published NMR studies of setting Portland cements, where a decrease of spin-lattice relaxation time is attributed to enhanced relaxation at the growing internal surface, spin-lattice relaxation time T1 increases during the set of clinically used zinc-phosphate cement. Comparison of these results with a detailed study of diffusion, viscosity, and magnetic-field dispersion of T1 in pure and aluminum-modified orthophosphoric acid demonstrates that the increase of T1 in the setting cement is connected with the increase of molecular mobility in the residual phosphoric acid solution. Although not taken into account so far, such effects may also significantly influence the relaxation times in setting Portland cements, particularly when admixtures with an effect on water viscosity are used.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiee, S. M.; Moztarzadeh, F.; Solati-Hashjin, M.

    2010-04-01

    This study deals with synthesizing hydroxyapatite bone cement as a bone substitute for clinical applications. The powder part of the cement is using β-tricalcium phosphate, calcium carbonate, dicalcium phosphate and the liquid part contains NaH 2PO 4·2H 2O solution with different concentrations. The effects of liquid concentration on the setting times of the cement have been investigated. XRD analysis and FT-IR spectroscopy were used to study the phase composition of calcium phosphate cement. Morphology and chemical analysis of the synthesized cement was performed using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyser. In addition, the effect of soaking time of synthesized bone cement in simulated body fluid (SBF) on the final phase and strength has been studied. Soaking prepared cement in SBF solution for appropriate time resulted in transformation of the composition of the cement into hydroxyapatite and hence the strength of the cement has been increased.

  6. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    This research work aimed at characterising composition, hydration and physical properties of fluoride cement, by studying samples of the cement obtained from Malawi, and comparing them to ordinary Portland cement. By confirming the suitable characteristics of fluoride cement through this work, the results of the research work provide a good basis for the wider adoption of fluoride cement as an alternative to ordinary Portland cement, especially in developing economies. Numerous accounts have been cited regarding the production and use of fluoride cement. Since there have not been conclusive agreement as to its properties, this study was limited to the theories of successful incorporation of fluoride compounds in the manufacture of fluoride cement. Hence, the properties and characteristics reported in this study relate to the cement currently manufactured in Malawi, and, on a comparative basis only, to that manufactured in other parts of the world. Samples of the fluoride cement used in the study were obtained by synthetic manufacture of the cement using common raw materials for the manufacture of fluoride cement that is limestone, silica sand, and fluorspar. These samples were subjected to several comparative tests used to characterise cements including examination under x-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and tests for setting time and compressive strength. Under similar laboratory conditions, it was possible to prove that fluoride cement hardens more rapidly than ordinary Portland cement. Also observed during the experimental work is that fluoride cement develops higher compressive strengths than ordinary Portland cement. The hardening and setting times are significantly different between the two cements. Also the nature of the hydration products, that is the microstructural development is significantly different in the two cements. The differences brought about between the two cements are because of the presence of fluorine during the clinkering

  7. Cement evaluation; Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Pilkington, P.E. )

    1992-02-01

    Cement evaluation began with the calculation of cement tops. This calculation assumed gauge holes and no channeling of the cement through the mud. Calipers were not available at that time. In the mid-1930's, the use of temperature surveys to determine the top of cement (TOC) was documented in technical journals. Properly run temperature surveys can identify the TOC, but distribution of cement-e.g., vertical isolation through zones of interest-is difficult to ascertain. Radioactive tracer surveys were run in the late 1930's to determine cement tops. Carnotite was mixed in the lead slurry and cement tops were determined with a gamma ray log. Tracer surveys had the same limitations as temperature logs but were not time-sensitive. This paper reports on methods that have been and are currently being used for cement evaluation including temperature logs, radioactive traces, and cement bond tools.

  8. Oxidation behavior of niobium aluminide intermetallics protected by aluminide and silicide diffusion coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Soboyejo, W.; Rapp, R.A.

    1999-06-01

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of a new class of damage-tolerant niobium aluminide (Nb{sub 3}Al-xTi-yCr) intermetallics is studied between 650 C and 850 C. Protective diffusion coatings were deposited by pack cementation to achieve the siliciding or aluminizing of substrates with or without intervening Mo or Ni layers, respectively. The compositions and microstructures of the resulting coatings and oxidized surfaces were characterized. The isothermal and cyclic oxidation kinetics indicate that uncoated Nb-40Ti-15Al-based intermetallics may be used up to {approximately}750 C. Alloying with Cr improves the isothermal oxidation resistance between 650 C and 850 C. The most significant improvement in oxidation resistance is achieved by the aluminization of electroplated Ni interlayers. The results suggest that the high-temperature limit of niobium aluminide-based alloys may be increased to 800 C to 850 C by aluminide-based diffusion coatings on ductile Ni interlayers. Indentation fracture experiments also indicate that the ductile nickel interlayers are resistant to crack propagation in multilayered aluminide-based coatings.

  9. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Properties of Glass Ionomer Cements with and without Chlorhexidine Gluconate

    PubMed Central

    Jampanapalli, Sharada Reddy; Konda, Suhasini; Inguva, Hema Chandrika; Chimata, Vamsi Krishna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Chlorhexidine gluconate is a widely used antimicrobial agent. Adding chlorhexidine and quaternary ammonium compounds to filling materials, such as composite resins, acrylic resins, and glass ionomer cements increases the antibacterial property of restorative materials. This study includes antibacterial property of glass ionomer restorative cements with chlorhexidine gluconate. Aim: The primary objective of our study was to compare the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available glass ionomer cements with and without chlorhexidine gluconate on strains of mutans streptococci. Materials and methods: Two glass ionomers (Fuji II Conventional and Fuji IX) were used. Chlorhexidine gluconate was mixed with glass ionomer cements, and antimicrobial properties against mutans streptococci were assessed by agar diffusion. The tested bacterial strain was inhibited and the antimicrobial properties decreased with time. Results: The highest amount of antimicrobial activity with mean inhibitory zone was found in Fuji II with chlorhexidine gluconate followed by Fuji IX with chlorhexidine gluconate, Fuji II without chlorhexidine gluconate, and Fuji IX without chlorhexidine gluconate. Conclusion: The results of the study confirmed that the addition of 5% chlorhexidine gluconate to Fuji II and Fuji IX glass ionomer cements resulted in a restorative material that had increased antimicrobial properties over the conventional glass ionomer cements alone for Streptococcus mutans. How to cite this article: Yadiki JV, Jampanapalli SR , Konda S, Inguva HC, Chimata VK. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Properties of Glass Ionomer Cements with and without Chlorhexidine Gluconate. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):99-103. PMID:27365927

  10. The Packing of Granular Polymer Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ling-Nan; Cheng, Xiang; Rivers, Mark L.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    2009-10-01

    Rigid particles pack into structures, such as sand dunes on the beach, whose overall stability is determined by the average number of contacts between particles. However, when packing spatially extended objects with flexible shapes, additional concepts must be invoked to understand the stability of the resulting structure. Here, we examine the disordered packing of chains constructed out of flexibly connected hard spheres. Using x-ray tomography, we find that long chains pack into a low-density structure whose mechanical rigidity is mainly provided by the backbone. On compaction, randomly oriented, semi-rigid loops form along the chain, and the packing of chains can be understood as the jamming of these elements. Finally, we uncover close similarities between the packing of chains and the glass transition in polymers.

  11. 21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888... Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device...: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) Bone Cement.”...

  12. Evaluation of antibacterial and antifungal activity of new calcium-based cement (Biodentine) compared to MTA and glass ionomer cement

    PubMed Central

    Bhavana, Vankayala; Chaitanya, Krishna Popuri; Gandi, Padma; Patil, Jayaprakash; Dola, Binoy; Reddy, Rahul B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial and antifungal properties of calcium-based cement, Biodentine (Ca3SiO2), compared to commercial glass ionomer cements (GICs) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Materials and Methods: Pellets of GICs, ProRoot MTA, and Biodentine were prepared to test the influence of these cements on the growth of four oral microbial strains: Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans; using agar diffusion method. Wells were formed by removing the agar and the manipulated materials were immediately placed in the wells. The pellets were lodged in seeded plates and the growth inhibition diameter around the material was measured after 24-72 h incubation at 37°C. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test to compare the differences among the three cements at different concentrations. Results: Test indicates that the antimicrobial activity of Biodentine, on all the microorganisms tested, was very strong, showing a mean inhibition zone of 3.2 mm, which extends over time towards all the strains. For Biodentine, GIC, and MTA, the diameters of the inhibition zones for S. mutans were significantly larger than for E. faecalis, Candida, and E. coli (P < 0.05). Conclusion: All materials showed antimicrobial activity against the tested strains except for GIC on Candida. Largest inhibition zone was observed for Streptococcus group. Biodentine created larger inhibition zones than MTA and GIC. PMID:25657526

  13. Rotations in shear bands and polydisperse packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. J.; Astrøm, J. A.; Mahmoodi Baram, R.

    2004-12-01

    High resistance concrete or hard ceramics needs extremely dense granular packings which can only be realised when the size distribution of grains follows a powerlaw. We discuss the perfectly dense limit, namely Apollonian packings in three dimensions and show in particular the existence of space filling bearings rotating without slip and without torsion. When a dense packing like tectonic gouge is deformed, it glides internally on shear bands. The existence of rotations in shearbands is evidenced by molecular dynamics simulations of disks.

  14. Close-packing of growing discs

    SciTech Connect

    Bursill, L.A.; Xudong, F. . School of Physics)

    1988-12-01

    Spiral lattices are derived by allowing growing discs to aggregate under a close-packing rule. Both Fibonacci and Lucas numbers of visible spirals arise naturally, dependent only on the choice of growth centre. Both the rate of convergence towards an ideal spiral, and chirality, are determined by the initial placement of the first few discs (initial conditions). Thus the appearance of spiral packings is no more or less mysterious than the appearance of hexagonal packed arrays of equal discs.

  15. Oxidation Resistance of Low-Temperature Pack Aluminizing Coatings on Ni-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Bifei; Yu, Longwen; Lu, Guiwu

    A nickel-base superalloy has been used to deposit the aluminide coating by low-temperature pack cementation process. The high temperature oxidation tests on aluminized alloys and the uncoated specimens are carried out at 1000°C for 10h. It is observed that a dense and protective Al2O3 surface layer is produced on the aluminized alloy, and the aluminizing process has greatly enhanced the high temperature oxidation resistance of the Ni-base superalloy at 1000°C. As a contrast, the uncoated specimen begins to be failure when treated only for 6h at the same temperature.

  16. Random close packing of polydisperse jammed emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujic, Jasna

    2010-03-01

    Packing problems are everywhere, ranging from oil extraction through porous rocks to grain storage in silos and the compaction of pharmaceutical powders into tablets. At a given density, particulate systems pack into a mechanically stable and amorphous jammed state. Theoretical frameworks have proposed a connection between this jammed state and the glass transition, a thermodynamics of jamming, as well as geometric modeling of random packings. Nevertheless, a simple underlying mechanism for the random assembly of athermal particles, analogous to crystalline ordering, remains unknown. Here we use 3D measurements of polydisperse packings of emulsion droplets to build a simple statistical model in which the complexity of the global packing is distilled into a local stochastic process. From the perspective of a single particle the packing problem is reduced to the random formation of nearest neighbors, followed by a choice of contacts among them. The two key parameters in the model, the available space around a particle and the ratio of contacts to neighbors, are directly obtained from experiments. Remarkably, we demonstrate that this ``granocentric'' view captures the properties of the polydisperse emulsion packing, ranging from the microscopic distributions of nearest neighbors and contacts to local density fluctuations and all the way to the global packing density. Further applications to monodisperse and bidisperse systems quantitatively agree with previously measured trends in global density. This model therefore reveals a general principle of organization for random packing and lays the foundations for a theory of jammed matter.

  17. 7 CFR 982.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON... according to size, internal quality, and external appearance and condition of hazelnuts packed in...

  18. 7 CFR 982.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON... according to size, internal quality, and external appearance and condition of hazelnuts packed in...

  19. 7 CFR 982.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON... according to size, internal quality, and external appearance and condition of hazelnuts packed in...

  20. 7 CFR 982.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON... according to size, internal quality, and external appearance and condition of hazelnuts packed in...

  1. 7 CFR 982.11 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON... according to size, internal quality, and external appearance and condition of hazelnuts packed in...

  2. Dynamic Evolution of Cement Composition and Transport Properties under Conditions Relevant to Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Brunet, Jean-Patrick Leopold; Li, Li; Karpyn, Zuleima T; Strazisar, Brian; Grant, Bromhal

    2013-08-01

    Assessing the possibility of CO{sub 2} leakage is one of the major challenges for geological carbon sequestration. Injected CO{sub 2} can react with wellbore cement, which can potentially change cement composition and transport properties. In this work, we develop a reactive transport model based on experimental observations to understand and predict the property evolution of cement in direct contact with CO{sub 2}-saturated brine under diffusion-controlled conditions. The model reproduced the observed zones of portlandite depletion and calcite formation. Cement alteration is initially fast and slows down at later times. This work also quantified the role of initial cement properties, in particular the ratio of the initial portlandite content to porosity (defined here as φ), in determining the evolution of cement properties. Portlandite-rich cement with large φ values results in a localized “sharp” reactive diffusive front characterized by calcite precipitation, leading to significant porosity reduction, which eventually clogs the pore space and prevents further acid penetration. Severe degradation occurs at the cement–brine interface with large φ values. This alteration increases effective permeability by orders of magnitude for fluids that preferentially flow through the degraded zone. The significant porosity decrease in the calcite zone also leads to orders of magnitude decrease in effective permeability, where fluids flow through the low-permeability calcite zone. The developed reactive transport model provides a valuable tool to link cement–CO{sub 2} reactions with the evolution of porosity and permeability. It can be used to quantify and predict long-term wellbore cement behavior and can facilitate the risk assessment associated with geological CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  3. Release of cetyl pyridinium chloride from fatty acid chelate temporary dental cement

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Andrew; Coleman, Nichola J.; Tüzüner, Tamer; Bagis, Bora; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Nicholson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether the antimicrobial nature of a fatty acid chelate temporary dental cement can be enhanced by the addition of 5% cetyl pyridinium chloride (CPC). Materials and methods The temporary cement, Cavex Temporary was employed, and additions of CPC were made to either the base or the catalyst paste prior to mixing the cement. Release of CPC from set cement specimens was followed using reverse-phase HPLC for a period of up to 2 weeks following specimen preparation. Potential interactions between Cavex and CPC were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and antimicrobial effects were determined using zone of inhibition measurements after 24 h with disc-shaped specimens in cultured Streptococcus mutans. Results FTIR showed no interaction between CPC and the components of the cement. CPC release was found to follow a diffusion mechanism for the first 6 h or so, and to equilibrate after approximately 2 weeks, with no significant differences between release profiles when the additive was incorporated into the base or the catalyst paste. Diffusion was rapid, and had a diffusion coefficient of approximately 1 × 10−9 m2 s−1 in both cases. Total release was in the range 10–12% of the CPC loading. Zones of inhibition around discs containing CPC were significantly larger than those around the control discs of CPC-free cement. Conclusions The antimicrobial character of this temporary cement can be enhanced by the addition of CPC. Such enhancement is of potential clinical value, though further in vivo work is needed to confirm this. PMID:27335898

  4. Minimally packed phases in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2016-03-01

    We numerically construct asymptotically AdS black brane solutions of D = 4 Einstein-Maxwell theory coupled to a pseudoscalar. The solutions are holographically dual to d = 3 CFTs at finite chemical potential and in a constant magnetic field, which spontaneously break translation invariance leading to the spontaneous formation of abelian and momentum magnetisation currents flowing around the plaquettes of a periodic Bravais lattice. We analyse the three-dimensional moduli space of lattice solutions, which are generically oblique, and show, for a specific value of the magnetic field, that the free energy is minimised by the triangular lattice, associated with minimal packing of circles in the plane. We show that the average stress tensor for the thermodynamically preferred phase is that of a perfect fluid and that this result applies more generally to spontaneously generated periodic phases. The triangular structure persists at low temperatures indicating the existence of novel crystalline ground states.

  5. Degradable borate glass polyalkenoate cements.

    PubMed

    Shen, L; Coughlan, A; Towler, M; Hall, M

    2014-04-01

    Glass polyalkenoate cements (GPCs) containing aluminum-free borate glasses having the general composition Ag2O-Na2O-CaO-SrO-ZnO-TiO2-B2O3 were evaluated in this work. An initial screening study of sixteen compositions was used to identify regions of glass formation and cement compositions with promising rheological properties. The results of the screening study were used to develop four model borate glass compositions for further study. A second round of rheological experiments was used to identify a preferred GPC formulation for each model glass composition. The model borate glasses containing higher levels of TiO2 (7.5 mol %) tended to have longer working times and shorter setting times. Dissolution behavior of the four model GPC formulations was evaluated by measuring ion release profiles as a function of time. All four GPC formulations showed evidence of incongruent dissolution behavior when considering the relative release profiles of sodium and boron, although the exact dissolution profile of the glass was presumably obscured by the polymeric cement matrix. Compression testing was undertaken to evaluate cement strength over time during immersion in water. The cements containing the borate glass with 7.5 mol % TiO2 had the highest initial compressive strength, ranging between 20 and 30 MPa. No beneficial aging effect was observed-instead, the strength of all four model GPC formulations was found to degrade with time.

  6. Biodeterioration of the Cement Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luptáková, Alena; Eštoková, Adriana; Mačingová, Eva; Kovalčíková, Martina; Jenčárová, Jana

    2016-10-01

    The destruction of natural and synthetic materials is the spontaneous and irreversible process of the elements cycling in nature. It can by accelerated or decelerated by physical, chemical and biological influences. Biological influences are represented by the influence of the vegetation and microorganisms (MO). The destruction of cement composites by different MO through the diverse mechanisms is entitled as the concrete biodeterioration. Several sulphur compounds and species of MO are involved in this complex process. Heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic bacteria together with fungi have all been found in samples of corroding cement composites. The MO involved in the process metabolise the presented sulphur compounds (hydrogen sulphide, elemental sulphur etc.) to sulphuric acid reacting with concrete. When sulphuric acid reacts with a concrete matrix, the first step involves a reaction between the acid and the calcium hydroxide forming calcium sulphate. This is subsequently hydrated to form gypsum, the appearance of which on the surface of concrete pipes takes the form of a white, mushy substance which has no cohesive properties. In the continuing attack, the gypsum would react with the calcium aluminate hydrate to form ettringite, an expansive product. The use supplementary cementing composite materials have been reported to improve the resistance of concrete to biodeterioration. The aim of this work was the study of the cement composites biodeterioration by the bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Experimental works were focused on the comparison of special cement composites and its resistance affected by the activities of used sulphur-oxidising

  7. Confined disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Torquato, S.

    2015-12-01

    Disordered jammed packings under confinement have received considerably less attention than their bulk counterparts and yet arise in a variety of practical situations. In this work, we study binary sphere packings that are confined between two parallel hard planes and generalize the Torquato-Jiao (TJ) sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. E 82, 061302 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.061302] to obtain putative maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings that are exactly isostatic with high fidelity over a large range of plane separation distances H , small to large sphere radius ratio α , and small sphere relative concentration x . We find that packing characteristics can be substantially different from their bulk analogs, which is due to what we term "confinement frustration." Rattlers in confined packings are generally more prevalent than those in their bulk counterparts. We observe that packing fraction, rattler fraction, and degree of disorder of MRJ packings generally increase with H , though exceptions exist. Discontinuities in the packing characteristics as H varies in the vicinity of certain values of H are due to associated discontinuous transitions between different jammed states. When the plane separation distance is on the order of two large-sphere diameters or less, the packings exhibit salient two-dimensional features; when the plane separation distance exceeds about 30 large-sphere diameters, the packings approach three-dimensional bulk packings. As the size contrast increases (as α decreases), the rattler fraction dramatically increases due to what we call "size-disparity" frustration. We find that at intermediate α and when x is about 0.5 (50-50 mixture), the disorder of packings is maximized, as measured by an order metric ψ that is based on the number density fluctuations in the direction perpendicular to the hard walls. We also apply the local volume-fraction variance στ2(R ) to characterize confined packings and find that these

  8. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on gray Portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to... the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4281 (December 2011), entitled Gray Portland...

  9. Freezing resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. X.; Lu, L. C.; Wang, S. D.; Zhao, P. Q.; Gong, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of freeze-thaw cycle on the mechanical properties of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement was investigated in the present study. The visual examination was conducted to evaluate the surface damage. The deterioration considering the weight loss, modulus loss of relative dynamic elastic and strength loss of mortar were also investigated. The morphology of hydration products were analysed by SEM. Compared with ordinary Portland cement and sulphoaluminate cement, the frost resistance of high iron phosphoraluminate cement is better. Hydration products of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement contain sheet crystals, and a lot of gel form a dense three-dimensional network structure, which results in a lower porosity. Different from ordinary Portland cement, the hydration product of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement does not contain Ca(OH)2, and low alkalinity reduces its osmotic pressure. The lower porosity and osmotic pressure are the two main reasons which causes in the higher frost resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement.

  10. Antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing Galla chinensis extract

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LU-FEI; LUO, FENG; XUE, CHAO-RAN; DENG, MENG; CHEN, CHEN; WU, HAO

    2016-01-01

    Galla chinensis extract (GCE), a naturally-derived agent, has a significant inhibitory effect on cariogenic bacteria. The present study aims to evaluate the antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing GCE. A resin-modified glass ionomer cement incorporated GCE at five mass fractions (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8%) to prepare GCE-containing cement for analysis. For the agar diffusion test, cement specimens were placed on agar disk inoculated with Streptococcus mutans (strain ATCC 25175). Following 48 h incubation, the inhibition halo diameter was measured. To assess bacteria colonization susceptibility, S. mutans adhesion to cement specimens was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following 48 h incubation. To evaluate bond strength, a total of 50 metal brackets were bonded on premolar surfaces by using cement (10 teeth/group). Following immersion in an artificial saliva for 3 days, shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. The results demonstrated that GCE-containing samples exhibited a larger bacterial inhibition halo than control, and the inhibition zone increased as the GCE mass fraction increased. SEM analysis demonstrated that S. mutans presented a weaker adherent capacity to all GCE-containing cements compared with control, but the difference between each GCE-containing group was not significant. SBS values of each GCE-containing group exhibited no difference compared with the control. In conclusion, GCE-containing adhesive cement exhibits a promising inhibitory effect on S. mutans growth and adhesion. Without compromising bond strength, adding GCE in adhesive cement may be an attractive option for preventing white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment. PMID:27073642

  11. Cements containing syringic acid esters -- o-ethoxybenzoic acid and zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Brauer, G M; Stansbury, J W

    1984-02-01

    Fissure caries is reduced when syringic acid is incorporated into a cariogenic diet of rats. It was therefore of interest to synthesize n-hexyl and 2-ethylhexyl syringate and to evaluate the properties of cements with these compounds as ingredients. Liquids containing the esters dissolved in o-ethoxybenzoic acid (EBA) - when mixed with powders made up from zinc oxide, aluminum oxide, and hydrogenated rosin - hardened in from four to nine min. Properties of the cements were determined, when possible, according to ANSI/ADA specification tests. Depending on the powder-liquid ratio employed, we obtained compositions with varying physical properties desirable for different dental applications. The syringate cements, compared with the commonly used ZOE materials, have improved compressive and tensile strength, lower water solubility, do not inhibit polymerization, and are compatible with acrylic monomers. These cements pass, and mostly greatly exceed, the requirements for ZOE-type restorative materials. They also bond significantly to resins, composites, and non-precious metals. The bond strength is somewhat less than that of n-hexyl vanillate-EBA cement, but greatly exceeds the adhesion to various substrates of ZOE luting agents. Cements containing n-hexyl syringate were somewhat brittle. Best results were obtained with liquid compositions containing 5% 2-ethylhexyl syringate, 7% n-hexyl vanillate, and 88% EBA, which yielded non-brittle materials. These cements, because of the syringate ingredient, may possess caries-reducing properties. Thus, perhaps in conjunction with fluoride additives, they would be useful as insulating bases, pulp capping agents, root canal sealers, soft tissue packs, or intermediate restoratives.

  12. 76 FR 24519 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United States... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on gray portland cement and cement clinker...

  13. 76 FR 50252 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United... cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  14. Joule heating in packed capillaries used in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Anurag S; Reynolds, Kimberly J; Colón, Luis A

    2002-09-01

    Effective heat dissipation is critical for reproducible and efficient separations in electrically driven separation systems. Flow rate, retention kinetics, and analyte diffusion rates are some of the characteristics that are affected by variation in the temperature of the mobile phase inside the column. In this study, we examine the issue of Joule heating in packed capillary columns used in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). As almost all commonly used CEC packings are poor thermal conductors, it is assumed that the packing particles do not conduct heat and heat transfer is solely through the mobile phase flowing through the system. The electrical conductivity of various mobile phases was measured at different temperatures by a conductivity meter and the temperature coefficient for each mobile phase was calculated. This was followed by measurement of the electrical current at several applied voltages to calculate the conductivity of the solution within the column as a function of the applied voltage. An overall increase in the conductivity is attributed to Joule heating within the column, while a constant conductivity means good heat dissipation. A plot of conductivity versus applied voltage was used as the indicator of poor heat dissipation. Using theories that have been proposed earlier for modeling of Joule heating effects in capillary electrophoresis (CE), we estimated the temperature within CEC columns. Under mobile and stationary phase conditions typically used in CEC, heat dissipation was found to be not always efficient. Elevated temperatures within the columns in excess of 23 degrees C above ambient temperature were calculated for packed columns, and about 35 degrees C for an open column, under a given set of conditions. The results agree with recently published experimental findings with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) thermometry, and Raman spectroscopic measurements.

  15. High temperature well bore cement slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Nahm, J.J.W.; Vinegar, H.J.; Karanikas, J.M.; Wyant, R.E.

    1993-07-13

    A low density well bore cement slurry composition is described suitable for cementing well bores with high reservoir temperatures comprising: (a) a high alumina cement in an amount of about 40 pounds per barrel of slurry or greater: (b) graphite in an amount greater than about one quarter, by volume, of the solids in the cement slurry; and (c) and a carrier fluid comprising drilling mud.

  16. Ion beam analysis of diffusion in heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, A. S.; Jenneson, P. M.

    1998-04-01

    Ion-beam analysis has been applied to a variety of problems involving diffusion in heterogeneous materials. An energy loss technique has been used to study both the diffusion of water and the surface segregation of fluoropolymers in polymeric matrices. A scanning micro-beam technique has been developed to allow water concentrations in hydrophilic polymers and cements to be measured together with associated solute elements. It has also been applied to the diffusion of shampoo into hair.

  17. 7 CFR 51.1217 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... peaches within the packages when lidded. (c) Peaches packed in standard western boxes shall be reasonably... overfilled packages. The number of peaches in the box shall not vary more than 4 from the number indicated on the box. (d) Peaches packed in other type boxes such as wire-bound boxes and fiber-board boxes may...

  18. Pack Density Limitations of Hybrid Parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwicker, Matthew L.; Sinclair, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The development and testing of the Orion crew capsule parachute system has provided a unique opportunity to study dense parachute packing techniques and limits, in order to establish a new baseline for future programs. The density of parachute packs has a significant influence on vibration loads, retention system stresses, and parachute mortar performance. Material compositions and pack densities of existing designs for space capsule recovery were compared, using the pack density of the Apollo main parachutes as the current baseline. The composition of parachutes has changed since Apollo, incorporating new materials such as Kevlar , Vectran , Teflon and Spectra . These materials have different specific densities than Nylon, so the densities of hybrid parachute packs cannot be directly compared to Nylon parachutes for determination of feasibility or volume allocation. Six parachute packs were evaluated in terms of weighted average solid density in order to achieve a non-dimensional comparison of packing density. Means of mitigating damage due to packing pressure and mortar firing were examined in light of the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) and Apollo experience. Parachute design improvements including incorporation of modern materials and manufacturing processes serves to make CPAS the new knowledge base on which future spacecraft parachute systems will be built.

  19. 7 CFR 29.2289 - Packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 29.2289 Section 29.2289 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Packing. A lot of tobacco consisting of a number of packages submitted as one definite unit for...

  20. 7 CFR 29.1048 - Packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 29.1048 Section 29.1048 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1048 Packing. A lot of tobacco consisting of a number of packages submitted as...

  1. 7 CFR 29.6031 - Packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 29.6031 Section 29.6031 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6031 Packing. A lot of tobacco consisting of a number of...

  2. 7 CFR 29.2541 - Packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 29.2541 Section 29.2541 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2541 Packing. A lot of tobacco consisting...

  3. 7 CFR 29.3538 - Packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 29.3538 Section 29.3538 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3538 Packing. A lot of tobacco consisting of a number of packages submitted as...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3048 - Packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 29.3048 Section 29.3048 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Packing. A lot of tobacco consisting of a number of packages submitted as one definite unit for...

  5. Pack formation in cycling and orienteering.

    PubMed

    Ackland, G J; Butler, D

    2001-09-13

    In cycling and orienteering competitions, competitors can become bunched into packs, which may mask an individual's true ability. Here we model this process with a view to determining when competitors' times are determined more by others than by their own ability. Our results may prove useful in helping to stage events so that pack formation can be avoided.

  6. Cluster and constraint analysis in tetrahedron packings.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weiwei; Lu, Peng; Liu, Lufeng; Li, Shuixiang

    2015-04-01

    The disordered packings of tetrahedra often show no obvious macroscopic orientational or positional order for a wide range of packing densities, and it has been found that the local order in particle clusters is the main order form of tetrahedron packings. Therefore, a cluster analysis is carried out to investigate the local structures and properties of tetrahedron packings in this work. We obtain a cluster distribution of differently sized clusters, and peaks are observed at two special clusters, i.e., dimer and wagon wheel. We then calculate the amounts of dimers and wagon wheels, which are observed to have linear or approximate linear correlations with packing density. Following our previous work, the amount of particles participating in dimers is used as an order metric to evaluate the order degree of the hierarchical packing structure of tetrahedra, and an order map is consequently depicted. Furthermore, a constraint analysis is performed to determine the isostatic or hyperstatic region in the order map. We employ a Monte Carlo algorithm to test jamming and then suggest a new maximally random jammed packing of hard tetrahedra from the order map with a packing density of 0.6337.

  7. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  8. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  9. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  10. 7 CFR 51.2338 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... (c) Boxes, flats, lugs, or cartons: (1) Fruit packed in containers with cell compartments, cardboard fillers or molded trays shall be of proper size for the cells, fillers, or molds in which they are packed...” means the greatest dimension measured at right angles to a line from stem to blossom end. (f) In...

  11. 7 CFR 51.2338 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... packed in containers with cell compartments, cardboard fillers or molded trays shall be of proper size for the cells, fillers, or molds in which they are packed, and conform to the marked count. (2) In... angles to a line from stem to blossom end. (f) In order to allow for variations incident to proper...

  12. 7 CFR 51.2338 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... (c) Boxes, flats, lugs, or cartons: (1) Fruit packed in containers with cell compartments, cardboard fillers or molded trays shall be of proper size for the cells, fillers, or molds in which they are packed...” means the greatest dimension measured at right angles to a line from stem to blossom end. (f) In...

  13. 7 CFR 51.3152 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Nectarines packed in containers equipped with cell compartments, cardboard fillers or molded trays shall be of the proper size for the cells, fillers, or molds in which they are packed, and the number of... angles to a line from stem to blossom end of the fruit. (h) Tolerances. In order to allow for...

  14. 7 CFR 51.3152 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Nectarines packed in containers equipped with cell compartments, cardboard fillers or molded trays shall be of the proper size for the cells, fillers, or molds in which they are packed, and the number of... angles to a line from stem to blossom end of the fruit. (h) Tolerances. In order to allow for...

  15. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  16. 21 CFR 890.5700 - Cold pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cold pack. 890.5700 Section 890.5700 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5700 Cold pack. (a) Identification....

  17. Probe with integrated heater and thermocouple pack

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, R.W.; Dial, R.E.; Finnell, W.F.R.

    1988-02-16

    This patent describes a gamma thermometer probe for detecting heat produced within the thermometer probe. It comprises: an outer elongate thermometer sheath; an elongate rod; annular recesses; a longitudinal bore; and an integrated thermocouple pack. The thermocouple pack comprises: a first type wire, and second type wires. The second type wires comprises: an outer section; and an inner segment.

  18. Development of an effective valve packing program

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, K.A.

    1996-12-01

    Current data now shows that graphite valve packing installed within the guidance of a controlled program produces not only reliable stem sealing but predictable running loads. By utilizing recent technological developments in valve performance monitoring for both MOV`s and AOV`s, valve packing performance can be enhanced while reducing maintenance costs. Once known, values are established for acceptable valve packing loads, the measurement of actual valve running loads via the current MOV/AOV diagnostic techniques can provide indication of future valve stem sealing problems, improper valve packing installation or identify the opportunity for valve packing program improvements. At times the full benefit of these advances in material and predictive technology remain under utilized due to simple past misconceptions associated with valve packing. This paper will explore the basis for these misconceptions, provide general insight into the current understanding of valve packing and demonstrate how with this new understanding and current valve diagnostic equipment the key aspects required to develop an effective, quality valve packing program fit together. The cost and operational benefits provided by this approach can be significant impact by the: elimination of periodic valve repacking, reduction of maintenance costs, benefits of leak-free valve operation, justification for reduced Post Maintenance Test Requirements, reduced radiation exposure, improved plant appearance.

  19. Pack rats (Neotoma spp.): Keystone ecological engineers?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential role of two species of pack rats (Neotoma albigula and Neotoma micropus) as keystone ecological engineers was examined by estimating the species diversity of invertebrates living in the nest middens, and nitrogen mineralization rates in soils associated with the middens. Although pack-...

  20. 7 CFR 51.2338 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... packed in containers with cell compartments, cardboard fillers or molded trays shall be of proper size for the cells, fillers, or molds in which they are packed, and conform to the marked count. (2) In... angles to a line from stem to blossom end. (f) In order to allow for variations incident to proper...

  1. 7 CFR 51.2338 - Standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... packed in containers with cell compartments, cardboard fillers or molded trays shall be of proper size for the cells, fillers, or molds in which they are packed, and conform to the marked count. (2) In... angles to a line from stem to blossom end. (f) In order to allow for variations incident to proper...

  2. Slimhole frac pack tools overcome erosion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, G.; Matte, T.; Rogers, B.

    1997-04-01

    The application of frac pack technology for stimulation and sand control in the Gulf of Mexico`s unconsolidated formations has steadily increased during the past several years. In addition, re-entry drilling has been one of the fastest growing development techniques used by operators for optimizing reservoir productivity. As such, smaller casing sizes are becoming more common in oil and gas producing wells. Gravel pack tools were being used for frac packing in 7-in. casing sizes and larger, but no tools were available to frac pack in the smaller 5-in. and 5{1/2}-in. casing. The erosion problems operators were experiencing in 7-in. gravel pack tools heightened concerns about fracturing through 5-in. tools with even smaller flow areas. Flow cutting in the 7-in. tools was so severe that it caused fluid communication between the gravel pack ports and the return flow holes in the crossover tool. This allowed fluid and proppant to return to the annulus above the packer, which could cause possible early screen-out and sticking of the crossover tool. The flow cutting could also reduce the tool`s pressure and tensile ratings. Any one of these problems could jeopardize the success of the frac pack operation. Therefore, an erosion resistant crossover tool for slimhole casing was developed to address these problems and optimize frac pack success.

  3. Does post septoplasty nasal packing reduce complications?

    PubMed

    Naghibzadeh, Bijan; Peyvandi, Ali Asghar; Naghibzadeh, Ghazal

    2011-01-01

    The main issues in nasal surgery are to stabilize the nose in the good position after surgery and preserve the cartilages and bones in the favorable situation and reduce the risk of deviation recurrence. Also it is necessary to avoid the synechia formation, nasal valve narrowing, hematoma and bleeding. Due to the above mentioned problems and in order to solve and minimize them nasal packing, nasal splint and nasal mold have been advised. Patients for whom the nasal packing used may faced to some problems like naso-pulmonary reflex, intractable pain, sleep disorder, post operation infection and very dangerous complication like toxic shock syndrome. We have two groups of patients and three surgeons (one of the surgeons used post operative nasal packing in his patients and the two others surgeons did not).Complications and morbidities were compared in these two groups. Comparing the two groups showed that the rate of complication and morbidities between these two groups were same and the differences were not valuable, except the pain and discomfort post operatively and at the time of its removal. Nasal packing has several risks for the patients while its effects are not studied. Septoplasty can be safely performed without postoperative nasal packing. Nasal packing had no main findings that compensated its usage. Septal suture is one of the procedures that can be used as alternative method to nasal packing. Therefore the nasal packing after septoplasty should be reserved for the patients with increased risk of bleeding.

  4. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  9. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubbles shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.

  10. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; ...

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubblesmore » shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.« less

  11. Development of strength in cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matkovic, B.

    1981-04-01

    The production of doped belite (dicalcium silicate) clinkers as a prospective means for saving energy in Portland cement production is described. This is accomplished by small additions of either barium sulfate (BaSO4), calcium tribasic phosphate (Ca5(PO4)3OH), or vanadium oxide (V2O5) to belite (Ca2SiO4) clinker. In addition to conserving energy, doping the belite with barium sulfate imparts greater strength to the resulting modified belite. Reactants, additives, and factors contributing to the fabrication of Sorel cement are described.

  12. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further

  13. Skin ulceration due to cement.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, S M; Tachakra, S S

    1992-01-01

    Despite legislation that requires manufacturers to inform the public about the dangers of contact with cement, severe ulceration from cement contact still occurs. We present a retrospective study of seven patients presenting to this department over a 2-year period. All were male and employed in the building trade, their injuries being sustained whilst at work. The injuries were to the lower limb, often multiple and required a median of seven visits before healing was complete. One required hospital admission and skin grafting. PMID:1449582

  14. Electromechanics of packed granular beds

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.S.

    1982-01-01

    Strong, electrical, interparticle forces are induced by applied electric fields within packed beds of dielectric particles. Proposed applications utilizing electropacked beds (EPBs) or electrofluidized beds (EFBs) include air filtration and gas clean-up, fine particle separation, commercial drying and coating processes, heat and mass transfer, and bulk bed control. A new distributed circuit model of the electrical interparticle force is presented that identifies the role of surface roughness as determining the interparticle spacing. The dc steady state force is predicted to increase nearly linearly with the applied electric field and is theoretically independent of particle surface conductivity. The electric stress is found to vary nearly linearly with the applied electric field. Data are generally consistent with the theoretical contention that increased surface roughness decreases electromechanical effects. Surface conductivity variations of three to four times have no measurable effect on the dc steady state electric stress. The electric stress is insensitive to the dielectric properties of the interstitial gas eliminating Townsend discharge as a candidate for the nonlinear charge transport process thought to occur near interparticle contacts. The theoretical upper bound of the electric stress calculated using the distributed circuit model falls within the scatter of the data if a limit on the electric field in the interparticle gap which models nonlinear charge transport is in the range of 1 to 6 x 10/sup 7/ V/m. Estimates of the charge relaxation time using transient angle of repose experiments are somewhat smaller but comparable with theoretical values calculated by ignoring nonlinear charge transport.

  15. Method for gravel packing wells

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.G.

    1990-08-07

    This patent describes a method for gravel packing a well that penetrates an unconsolidated or poorly consolidated subterranean oil or gas reservoir. It comprises: providing a borehole casing through the reservoir; perforating the casing at preselected intervals therealong to form at least one set of longitudinal, perforation tunnels adjacent a substantial portion of the reservoir; locating a sand screen inside the casing and in juxtaposition with the perforation tunnels, an annulus being formed between the sand screen and the casing; positioning a conduit in juxtaposition with the sand screen extending substantially the length of the sand screen and having its upper extremity open to fluids; injecting a fluid slurry containing gravel down through the annulus and conduit whereby the fluid portion of the slurry is forced out of the annulus through the perforation tunnels into the reservoir and the gravel portion of the slurry deposited in the annulus and forced into the perforation tunnels into the formation; sizing the cross-sectional area of the conduit and the annulus so that if gravel forms a bridge in a portion of the annulus thereby blocking the flow of fluid slurry through the the annulus, fluid slurry containing gravel will continue to flow through the conduit and into the annulus around the gravel bridge; and terminating the injection of the slurry.

  16. Condensation in Nanoporous Packed Beds.

    PubMed

    Ally, Javed; Molla, Shahnawaz; Mostowfi, Farshid

    2016-05-10

    In materials with tiny, nanometer-scale pores, liquid condensation is shifted from the bulk saturation pressure observed at larger scales. This effect is called capillary condensation and can block pores, which has major consequences in hydrocarbon production, as well as in fuel cells, catalysis, and powder adhesion. In this study, high pressure nanofluidic condensation studies are performed using propane and carbon dioxide in a colloidal crystal packed bed. Direct visualization allows the extent of condensation to be observed, as well as inference of the pore geometry from Bragg diffraction. We show experimentally that capillary condensation depends on pore geometry and wettability because these factors determine the shape of the menisci that coalesce when pore filling occurs, contrary to the typical assumption that all pore structures can be modeled as cylindrical and perfectly wetting. We also observe capillary condensation at higher pressures than has been done previously, which is important because many applications involving this phenomenon occur well above atmospheric pressure, and there is little, if any, experimental validation of capillary condensation at such pressures, particularly with direct visualization.

  17. Considerations for proper selection of dental cements.

    PubMed

    Simon, James F; Darnell, Laura A

    2012-01-01

    Selecting the proper cement for sufficient bond strength has become progressively complicated as the number of different materials for indirect restorations has increased. The success of any restoration is highly dependent on the proper cement being chosen and used. The function of the cement is not only to seal the restoration on the tooth but also, in some cases, to support the retention of the restoration. This ability to strengthen retention varies by the cement chosen by the clinician; therefore, careful consideration must precede cement selection.

  18. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction on Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    William K. Terry; A. M. Ougouag; Farzad Rahnema; Michael Scott McKinley

    2003-04-01

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fision density distribution.

  19. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction of Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, W K; Ougouag, A M; Rahnema, F; Mckinley, M S

    2003-06-11

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fission density distribution.

  20. Stability of nickel-coated sand as gravel-pack material for thermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Sacuta, A.; Nguyen, D.M.; Kissel, G.A. )

    1988-11-01

    Laboratory flow tests have been carried out to study the stability of various nickel-coated sands under aqueous steam temperature and pH conditions that may exist in thermal recovery operations. Other gravel-pack materials tested include Ottawa sand, sintered bauxite, cement clinker, zirconium oxide, and nickel pellets. A comparison was made between the performances of these materials after exposure to identical thermal and hydrolytic conditions. Test results indicate that nickel-coated sands are highly resistant to dissolution at temperatures as high as 300/sup 0/C (570/sup 0/F) and to solution pH's from 4.75 to 11. Weight losses measured after a 72-hour period were less than 1%. In contrast, weight losses from sintered bauxite, zirconium oxide, and Ottawa sand dissolution tests were 30 to 70 times higher under the same conditions. Cement clinker losses were in the intermediate range under alkaline conditions. API standard crushing and acid-solubility tests for proppants also were performed on nickel-coated sands. These results were favorable in that they exceeded the recommended standards. This study of nickel-coated sand stability and mechanical strength has demonstrated its high potential for application as either a gravel-pack material or proppant in thermal recovery operations.

  1. Mesoscopic packing of disk-like building blocks in calcium silicate hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zechuan; Zhou, Ao; Lau, Denvid

    2016-01-01

    At 100-nanometer length scale, the mesoscopic structure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) plays a critical role in determining the macroscopic material properties, such as porosity. In order to explore the mesoscopic structure of C-S-H, we employ two effective techniques, nanoindentation test and molecular dynamics simulation. Grid nanoindentation tests find different porosity of C-S-H in cement paste specimens prepared at varied water-to-cement (w/c) ratios. The w/c-ratio-induced porosity difference can be ascribed to the aspect ratio (diameter-to-thickness ratio) of disk-like C-S-H building blocks. The molecular dynamics simulation, with a mesoscopic C-S-H model, reveals 3 typical packing patterns and relates the packing density to the aspect ratio. Illustrated with disk-like C-S-H building blocks, this study provides a description of C-S-H structures in complement to spherical-particle C-S-H models at the sub-micron scale. PMID:27845376

  2. Zinc polycarboxylate dental cement for the controlled release of an active organic substance: proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad Naseem; Edwards, Mark; Nicholson, John W

    2010-04-01

    The potential of employing zinc polycarboxylate dental cement as a controlled release material has been studied. Benzalkonium chloride was used as the active ingredient, and incorporated at concentrations of 1, 2 and 3% by mass within the cement. At these levels, there was no observable effect on the speed of setting. Release was followed using an ion-selective electrode to determine changes in chloride ion concentration with time. This technique showed that the additive was released when the cured cement was placed in water, with release occurring by a diffusion mechanism for the first 3 h, but continuing beyond that for up to 1 week. Diffusion coefficients were in the range 5.62 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) (for 1% concentration) to 10.90 x 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) (for 3% concentration). Up to 3% of the total loading of benzalkonium chloride was released from the zinc polycarboxylate after a week, which is similar to that found in previous studies with glass-ionomer cement. It is concluded that zinc polycarboxylate cement is capable of acting as a useful material for the controlled release of active organic compounds.

  3. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  4. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOEpatents

    Eilers, Louis H.

    1985-01-01

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  5. Automation design of cemented doublet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Galina; Ivanova, Tatiana; Korotkova, Natalia

    2015-09-01

    Algorithm and software for cemented doublet synthesis by Slusarev's methodology are presented. Slusarev's methodology is based on lookup tables that allow calculating doublet radii by given value of third-order coma, spherical aberration and chromatic aberration by specific algorithm. This calculation is automated in this work. The input parameters for algorithm are desired values of third-order coma, spherical aberration and chromatic aberration of cemented doublet. The software looks up few pairs of optical glasses corresponding to specified value of chromatic aberration and then calculates radii of surfaces for each pair of glasses corresponding to specified third-order coma and spherical aberration. The resulted third-order aberrations and real aberrations on the edge of the pupil are calculated for obtained radiuses. Several doublets can be analyzed in result table and the chosen one can be imported into Zemax. The calculated cemented doublet parameters can be analyzed and optimized in optical system design software. The software allows to make the first step of optical system design fast and simple. It allows to design not only the system which is free of the third-order spherical aberration, coma and axial color, but obtain necessary value of aberration for compensation of aberrations in another part of optical system. Possibility to look up optical glasses automatically, what affects the chromatic aberration correction and aberration correction in general, is especially important. Examples of automatic calculation of cemented doublet and compensation of aberrations in another part of optical system are presented in the paper.

  6. Internal packing of helical membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Eilers, Markus; Shekar, Srinivasan C.; Shieh, Ted; Smith, Steven O.; Fleming, Patrick J.

    2000-01-01

    Helix packing is important in the folding, stability, and association of membrane proteins. Packing analysis of the helical portions of 7 integral membrane proteins and 37 soluble proteins show that the helices in membrane proteins have higher packing values (0.431) than in soluble proteins (0.405). The highest packing values in integral membrane proteins originate from small hydrophobic (G and A) and small hydroxyl-containing (S and T) amino acids, whereas in soluble proteins large hydrophobic and aromatic residues have the highest packing values. The highest packing values for membrane proteins are found in the transmembrane helix–helix interfaces. Glycine and alanine have the highest occurrence among the buried amino acids in membrane proteins, whereas leucine and alanine are the most common buried residue in soluble proteins. These observations are consistent with a shorter axial separation between helices in membrane proteins. The tight helix packing revealed in this analysis contributes to membrane protein stability and likely compensates for the lack of the hydrophobic effect as a driving force for helix–helix association in membranes. PMID:10823938

  7. Effect of Al Enrichment by Pack Cementation of FeCr Coatings Deposited by HVOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, A.; Bellini, S.; Pileggi, R.; Stocchi, D.; Tuurna, S.

    2015-01-01

    A great contribution to CO2 emissions comes from coal fired power generation. Combination of carbon capture sequestering technologies with sustainable biomass conversion constitutes a decisive boost in limiting rise in global temperature. Co-firing alternative materials with pulverized coal and using oxy-fuel combustion conditions (oxy-fuel co-combustion) is a very attractive process for power industry. Materials with both high mechanical properties and high environmental resistance are required by such advanced combustion systems. One approach to improve high-temperature oxidation/corrosion resistance is to apply protective coatings. In the present work, low and high Cr content Fe-based alloys have been deposited in order to investigate the influence of Cr content on coating protective performance in oxy-fuel co-combustion conditions. Grade 91 steel has been assumed as reference substrate. Effect of Al enrichment on coating environmental resistance has also been analyzed. Activities have been performed within the framework of Macplus Project (Integrated Project co-founded by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Program in the Energy area).

  8. Thermodynamics of Simultaneous Chromizing-Aluminizing in Halide-Activated Cementation Packs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    and better than a two-step process, and the resulting concentration profiles would provide more effective oxidation/hot corrosion resistance. Restall ...22 (1984) 117. 2. J. E. Restall , U. S. Patent No. 4,687,684 (1987). 3. P. N. Walsh, Proc. of Fourth International Conference on Chemical Vapor

  9. pH and Antimicrobial Activity of Portland Cement Associated with Different Radiopacifying Agents.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Cornélio, Ana Lívia G; Andolfatto, Carolina; Salles, Loise P; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and pH changes induced by Portland cement (PC) alone and in association with radiopacifiers. Methods. The materials tested were pure PC, PC + bismuth oxide, PC + zirconium oxide, PC + calcium tungstate, and zinc oxide and eugenol cement (ZOE). Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by agar diffusion test using the following strains: Micrococcus luteus, Streptococcus mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. After 24 hours of incubation at 37°C, inhibition of bacterial growth was observed and measured. For pH analysis, material samples (n = 10) were placed in polyethylene tubes and immersed in 10 mL of distilled water. After 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours, the pH of the solutions was determined using a pH meter. Results. All microbial species were inhibited by the cements evaluated. All materials composed of PC with radiopacifying agents promoted pH increase similar to pure Portland cement. ZOE had the lowest pH values throughout all experimental periods. Conclusions. All Portland cement-based materials with the addition of different radiopacifiers (bismuth oxide, calcium tungstate, and zirconium oxide) presented antimicrobial activity and pH similar to pure Portland cement.

  10. Lightweight Cement Slurries based on vermiculite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, K.; Gorbenko, V.; Ulyanova, O.

    2014-08-01

    The main purpose of the research is to study the lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite and its parameters in accordance with GOST 1581-96 requirements as well as improvement of its formulation by polymer additives. Analysis of vermiculite-containing mixture providing the lowest density while maintaining other required parameters was conducted. As a cement base, cement PTscT-I-G-CC-1, cement PTscT - 100 and vermiculite M200 and M150 were used. Vermiculite content varied from 10 to 15 %; and water-to-cement-ratio ranged from 0.65 to 0.8. To sum up, despite the fact that lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite satisfies GOST 1581-96 requirements under laboratory conditions, field studies are necessary in order to make a conclusion about applicability of this slurry for well cementing.

  11. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings. II. Correlation functions and density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klatt, Michael A.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    In the first paper of this series, we introduced Voronoi correlation functions to characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings across length scales. In the present paper, we determine a variety of different correlation functions that arise in rigorous expressions for the effective physical properties of MRJ sphere packings and compare them to the corresponding statistical descriptors for overlapping spheres and equilibrium hard-sphere systems. Such structural descriptors arise in rigorous bounds and formulas for effective transport properties, diffusion and reactions constants, elastic moduli, and electromagnetic characteristics. First, we calculate the two-point, surface-void, and surface-surface correlation functions, for which we derive explicit analytical formulas for finite hard-sphere packings. We show analytically how the contact Dirac delta function contribution to the pair correlation function g2(r ) for MRJ packings translates into distinct functional behaviors of these two-point correlation functions that do not arise in the other two models examined here. Then we show how the spectral density distinguishes the MRJ packings from the other disordered systems in that the spectral density vanishes in the limit of infinite wavelengths; i.e., these packings are hyperuniform, which means that density fluctuations on large length scales are anomalously suppressed. Moreover, for all model systems, we study and compute exclusion probabilities and pore size distributions, as well as local density fluctuations. We conjecture that for general disordered hard-sphere packings, a central limit theorem holds for the number of points within an spherical observation window. Our analysis links problems of interest in material science, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. In the third paper of this series, we will evaluate bounds and estimates of a host of different physical properties of the MRJ sphere packings that are based on the

  12. Improved Taxation Rate for Bin Packing Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Walter; Qiu, Xian

    A cooperative bin packing game is a N-person game, where the player set N consists of k bins of capacity 1 each and n items of sizes a 1, ⋯ ,a n . The value of a coalition of players is defined to be the maximum total size of items in the coalition that can be packed into the bins of the coalition. We present an alternative proof for the non-emptiness of the 1/3-core for all bin packing games and show how to improve this bound ɛ= 1/3 (slightly). We conjecture that the true best possible value is ɛ= 1/7.

  13. Leadership in wolf, Canis lupus, packs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David

    2000-01-01

    I examine leadership in Wolf (Canis lupus) packs based on published observations and data gathered during summers from 1986 to 1998 studying a free-ranging pack of Wolves on Ellesmere Island that were habituated to my presence. The breeding male tended to initiate activities associated with foraging and travel, and the breeding female to initiate, and predominate in, pup care and protection. However, there was considerable overlap and interaction during these activities such that leadership could be considered a joint function. In packs with multiple breeders, quantitative information about leadership is needed.

  14. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G.; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C–S–H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C–S–H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C–S–H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C–S–H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C–S–H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  15. Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Irvin Allen

    Portland cement concrete, the most widely used manufactured material in the world, is made primarily from water, mineral aggregates, and portland cement. The production of portland cement is energy intensive, accounting for 2% of primary energy consumption and 5% of industrial energy consumption globally. Moreover, portland cement manufacturing contributes significantly to greenhouse gases and accounts for 5% of the global CO2 emissions resulting from human activity. The primary objective of this research was to explore methods of reducing the environmental impact of cement production while maintaining or improving current performance standards. Two approaches were taken, (1) incorporation of waste materials in portland cement synthesis, and (2) optimization of an alternative environmental friendly binder, calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement. These approaches can lead to less energy consumption, less emission of CO2, and more reuse of industrial waste materials for cement manufacturing. In the portland cement part of the research, portland cement clinkers conforming to the compositional specifications in ASTM C 150 for Type I cement were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals with 0% to 40% fly ash and 0% to 60% slag incorporation (with 10% intervals), 72.5% limestone with 27.5% fly ash, and 65% limestone with 35% slag. The synthesized portland cements had similar early-age hydration behavior to commercial portland cement. However, waste materials significantly affected cement phase formation. The C3S--C2S ratio decreased with increasing amounts of waste materials incorporated. These differences could have implications on proportioning of raw materials for cement production when using waste materials. In the calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement part of the research, three calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers with a range of phase compositions were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. The synthesized calcium sulfoaluminate

  16. Determining controls on element concentrations in cement kiln dust leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Duchesne, J.; Reardon, E.J.

    1998-12-31

    Cement kiln dust is a waste residue composed chiefly of oxidized, anhydrous, micron-sized particles generated as a by-product of the manufacture of Portland cement. When cement kiln dust is brought into contact with water, high concentrations of potassium, sulfate and caustic alkalinity are leached. Other constitutents are leached to a lesser extent. The objective of this study was to determine whether the concentration of a given chemical constituent in kiln dust leachate is controlled by the precipitation of a secondary mineral phase or whether its concentration depends on its initial availability to the leachate solution and its subsequent diffusive flux from hydrating particles with time. Differentiating between these two distinctive styles of leaching behavior is necessary to predict the chemical composition of kiln dust leachate under dynamic flow conditions in disposal environments. Evidence of solubility control was found for Si, Ca, Mg, Al, Zn, Ti, Sr, and Ba. The concentrations of Na, Cl, K, Mo, Cr and Se, however, were found to have no solubility control. Because of the observed lack of solubility control and the particularly high concentrations of Cr and Mo in kiln dust leachate, The authors tested two additives to reduce their concentrations: (1) aluminum oxide to promote the precipitation of calcium aluminosulfates and the proxying of chromate and molybdate for sulfate in their structures; and (2) iron metal to promote the reduction of chromate and molybdate to lower valent and less soluble forms. Neither treatment had any effect on the concentration levels of Cr and Mo in solution.

  17. A Versatile, Automatic Chromatographic Column Packing Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Eugene F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive apparatus for packing liquid and gas chromatographic columns of high efficiency. Consists of stainless steel support struts, an Automat Getriebmotor, and an associated three-pulley system capable of 10, 30, and 300 rpm. (MLH)

  18. Contact breaking in frictionless granular packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qikai; Bertrand, Thibault; O'Hern, Corey; Shattuck, Mark

    We numerically study the breaking of interparticle contact networks in static granular packings of frictionless bidisperse disks that are subjected to vibrations. The packings are created using an isotropic compression protocol at different values of the total potential energy per particle Ep. We first add displacements along a single vibrational mode i of the dynamical matrix to a given packing and calculate the minimum amplitude Ai of the perturbation at which the first interparticle contact breaks. We then identify the minimum amplitude Amin over all perturbations along each mode and study the distribution of Amin from an ensemble of packings at each Ep. We then study two-, three-, and multi-mode excitations and determine the dependence of Amin on the number of modes that are included in the perturbation. W. M. Keck Foundation Science and Engineering Grant.

  19. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1998-09-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

  20. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Holdren, Jr., George R.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

  1. Microstructure of TiC-Based Coatings on Cemented Carbide Derived by Sol-Gel Routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Guo, Zhixing; Qi, Kaifeng; Huang, Kun; Deng, Jianxiong; Liu, Jia

    2017-02-01

    TiC-based coating is prepared by depositing TiO2 sol on cemented carbide compact and liquid phase sintering. TiC forms due to carbothermal reduction reaction of TiO2 and then reacts with WC and transforms to TiC-based solid solution. Ti content changes the WC growth mechanism and results in the multi-stepped morphology. When sintered cemented carbide is used as substrate, WC keeps the equilibrium truncated triangle prism morphology due to the relatively weak diffusion among Ti, WC, and Co.

  2. Pullout strength of fixation screws from polymethylmethacrylate bone cement.

    PubMed

    Flahiff, C M; Gober, G A; Nicholas, R W

    1995-05-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement is often used to fill voids and increase the strength of osteoporotic and pathological bone. However, it is unclear as to which method of cement augmentation provides optimal screw fixation. This study was conducted to determine which of the current cement augmentation techniques provides the strongest construct when used in association with orthopaedic fixation screws. Pullout strength was determined for screws placed in sawbones with no cement, soft cement, doughy cement and hard cement after drilling and tapping. All cement-screw constructs were significantly stronger than the no cement group. Screws placed in doughy cement had a significantly higher pullout force than those placed in hard cement. Pullout strength of screws placed in soft cement was intermediate between the other cement techniques but not significantly different from either group.

  3. Granular packing as model glass formers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujie

    2017-01-01

    Static granular packings are model hard-sphere glass formers. The nature of glass transition has remained a hotly debated issue. We review recent experimental progresses in using granular materials to study glass transitions. We focus on the growth of glass order with five-fold symmetry in granular packings and relate the findings to both geometric frustration and random first-order phase transition theories.

  4. Software For Nearly Optimal Packing Of Cargo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennel, Theron R.; Daughtrey, Rodney S.; Schwaab, Doug G.

    1994-01-01

    PACKMAN computer program used to find nearly optimal arrangements of cargo items in storage containers, subject to such multiple packing objectives as utilization of volumes of containers, utilization of containers up to limits on weights, and other considerations. Automatic packing algorithm employed attempts to find best positioning of cargo items in container, such that volume and weight capacity of container both utilized to maximum extent possible. Written in Common LISP.

  5. Phyllotaxis, disk packing, and Fibonacci numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mughal, A.; Weaire, D.

    2017-02-01

    We consider the evolution of the packing of disks (representing the position of buds) that are introduced at the top of a surface which has the form of a growing stem. They migrate downwards, while conforming to three principles, applied locally: dense packing, homogeneity, and continuity. We show that spiral structures characterized by the widely observed Fibonacci sequence (1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, ...), as well as related structures, occur naturally under such rules. Typical results are presented in an animation.

  6. Phyllotaxis, disk packing, and Fibonacci numbers.

    PubMed

    Mughal, A; Weaire, D

    2017-02-01

    We consider the evolution of the packing of disks (representing the position of buds) that are introduced at the top of a surface which has the form of a growing stem. They migrate downwards, while conforming to three principles, applied locally: dense packing, homogeneity, and continuity. We show that spiral structures characterized by the widely observed Fibonacci sequence (1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, ...), as well as related structures, occur naturally under such rules. Typical results are presented in an animation.

  7. Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhu

    Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product

  8. Short-time diffusivity of dicolloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panczyk, Mark M.; Wagner, Norman J.; Furst, Eric M.

    2014-06-01

    The short-time diffusivity of dicolloid particles as a function of particle volume fraction ϕ from 0.01≤ϕ≤0.6 is measured using diffusing wave spectroscopy. The diffusivities of symmetric and asymmetric dicolloids are compared with similarly sized spheres. The short-time diffusivity is independent of salt concentration and decreases with increasing volume fraction for both spheres and asymmetric dicolloids. Symmetric dicolloids have a higher diffusivity than spheres at similar volume fractions. This difference is accounted for by rescaling the dicolloid volume fraction based on the ratio of the random close-packing volume fractions of spheres and dicolloids. Finally, a useful method is provided for calculating the diffusivity of symmetric dicolloid particles of arbitrary aspect ratio based on the calculated hydrodynamic resistance of Zabarankin [Proc. R. Soc. A 463, 2329 (2007), 10.1098/rspa.2007.1872].

  9. Performance evaluation of a slow-release packing material-embedded functional microorganisms for biofiltration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rencheng; Li, Shunyi; Wu, Zhenjun; Dumont, Éric

    2017-04-01

    A composite packing material (CM-5) was prepared in this study, mainly consisting of compost with functional microorganisms, calcium carbonate (CaCO3), perlite, cement and plant fiber. To get stronger compressive strength, mass ratios of these components were optimized based on single factor experiments, and finally adding amounts of perlite, cement, plant fiber, CaCO3, compost and binder at 18%, 18%, 7%, 13%, 17% and 27%, respectively. According to the optimum proportion, CM-5 was extruded in cylindrical shape (12 mm in diameter and 20 mm in length) with a bulk density of 470 kg m(-3), a moisture retention capacity of 49% and the microbial counts of × 10(5) CFU g(-1) of packing material. The cumulative release rates of total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) from CM-5 were 3.1% and 6.5%, respectively, after 19 times extraction in distilled water. To evaluate the H2S removal capacity, CM-5 was compared with an organic (corncob) and an inorganic (ceramsite) packing material in three biofilters. The results showed that CM-5 had higher H2S removal capacity compared with corncob and ceramsite. CM-5 could avoid the large fluctuation of pH value and pressure drop during the operation. The maximum H2S removal capacity of CM-5 was 12.9 g m(-3) h(-1) and the removal efficiency could maintain over 95.4% when the inlet H2S loading rate was lower than 11.3 g m(-3) h(-1) without any addition of nutrients and pH buffer substances. Besides, only 2-3 days were needed for the recovery of biofiltration performance after about two weeks of idle period.

  10. Packing of elastic wires in flexible shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, R.; Wittel, F. K.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    The packing problem of long thin filaments that are injected into confined spaces is of fundamental interest for physicists and biologists alike. How linear threads pack and coil is well known only for the ideal case of rigid containers, though. Here, we force long elastic rods into flexible spatial confinement borne by an elastic shell to examine under which conditions recently acquired knowledge on wire packing in rigid spheres breaks down. We find that unlike in rigid cavities, friction plays a key role by giving rise to the emergence of two distinct packing patterns. At low friction, the wire densely coils into an ordered toroidal bundle with semi-ellipsoidal cross-section, while at high friction, it packs into a highly disordered, hierarchic structure. These two morphologies are shown to be separated by a continuous phase transition. Our findings demonstrate the dramatic impact of friction and confinement elasticity on filamentous packing and might drive future research on such systems in physics, biology and even medical technology toward including these mutually interacting effects.

  11. Decontamination of pesticide packing using ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, C. L.; Mori, M. N.; Kodama, Yasko; Oikawa, H.; Sampa, M. H. O.

    2007-11-01

    The Brazilian agriculture activities have consumed about 288,000 tons of pesticides per year conditioned in about 107,000,000 packing with weight of approximately 23,000 tons. The discharge of empty plastic packing of pesticides can be an environmental concern causing problems to human health, animals, and plants if done without inspection and monitoring. The objective of this work is to study the ionizing radiation effect in the main pesticides used in Brazil for plastic packing decontamination. Among the commercial pesticides, chlorpyrifos has significant importance because of its wide distribution and extensive use and persistence. The radiation-induced degradation of chlorpyrifos in liquid samples and in polyethylene pack was studied by gamma radiolysis. Packing of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) three layer coextruded, named COEX, contaminated with chlorpyrifos, were irradiated using both a multipurpose Co-60 gamma irradiator and a gamma source with 5000 Ci total activity Gamma cell type. The chemical analysis of the chlorpyrifos was made using a gas chromatography associated to the Mass Spectrometry—GCMS from Shimadzu Model QP 5000. Gamma radiation was efficient for removing chlorpyrifos from the plastic packing, in all studied cases.

  12. Bidispersed Sphere Packing on Spherical Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Timothy; Mascioli, Andrew; Burke, Christopher

    Packing problems on spherical surfaces have a long history, originating in the classic Thompson problem of finding the ground state configuration of charges on a sphere. Such packings contain a minimal number of defects needed to accommodate the curvature; this is predictable using the Gauss-Bonnet theorem from knowledge of the topology of the surface and the local symmetry of the ordering. Famously, the packing of spherical particles on a sphere contains a 'scar' transition, where additional defects over those required by topology appear above a certain critical number of particles and self-organize into chains or scars. In this work, we study the packing of bidispersed packings on a sphere, and hence determine the interaction of bidispersity and curvature. The resultant configurations are nearly crystalline for low values of bidispersity and retain scar-like structures; these rapidly become disordered for intermediate values and approach a so-called Appollonian limit at the point where smaller particles can be entirely accommodated within the voids left by the larger particles. We connect our results with studies of bidispersed packings in the bulk and on flat surfaces from the literature on glassy systems and jamming. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  13. Packed storage extension for ScaLAPACK

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, E.F.; Dongarra, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe a new extension to ScaLAPACK for computing with symmetric (Hermitian) matrices stored in a packed form. The new code is built upon the ScaLAPACK routines for full dense storage for a high degree of software reuse. The original ScaLAPACK stores a symmetric matrix as a full matrix but accesses only the lower or upper triangular part. The new code enables more efficient use of memory by storing only the lower or upper triangular part of a symmetric (Hermitian) matrix. The packed storage scheme distributes the matrix by block column panels. Within each panel, the matrix is stored as a regular ScaLAPACK matrix. This storage arrangement simplifies the subroutine interface and code reuse. Routines PxPPTRF/PxPPTRS implement the Cholesky factorization and solution for symmetric (Hermitian) linear systems in packed storage. Routines PxSPEV/PxSPEVX (PxHPEV/PxHPEVX) implement the computation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors for symmetric (Hermitian) matrices in packed storage. Routines PxSPGVX (PxHPGVX) implement the expert driver for the generalized eigenvalue problem for symmetric (Hermitian) matrices in packed storage. Performance results on the Intel Paragon suggest that the packed storage scheme incurs only a small time overhead over the full storage scheme.

  14. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  15. Determination of Chlorinated Solvent Sorption by Porous Material—Application to Trichloroethene Vapor on Cement Mortar

    PubMed Central

    Musielak, Marion; Brusseau, Mark L.; Marcoux, Manuel; Morrison, Candice; Quintard, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to investigate the sorption of trichloroethene (TCE) vapor by concrete material or, more specifically, the cement mortar component. Gas-flow experiments were conducted using columns packed with small pieces of cement mortar obtained from the grinding of typical concrete material. Transport and retardation of TCE at high vapor concentrations (500 mg L−1) was compared to that of a non-reactive gas tracer (Sulfur Hexafluoride, SF6). The results show a large magnitude of retardation (retardation factor = 23) and sorption (sorption coefficient = 10.6 cm3 g−1) for TCE, compared to negligible sorption for SF6. This magnitude of sorption obtained with pollutant vapor is much bigger than the one obtained for aqueous-flow experiments conducted for water-saturated systems. The considerable sorption exhibited for TCE under vapor-flow conditions is attributed to some combination of accumulation at the air-water interface and vapor-phase adsorption, both of which are anticipated to be significant for this system given the large surface area associated with the cement mortar. Transport of both SF6 and TCE was simulated successfully with a two-region physical non-equilibrium model, consistent with the dual-medium structure of the crushed cement mortar. This work emphasizes the importance of taking into account sorption phenomena when modeling transport of volatile organic compounds through concrete material, especially in regard to assessing vapor intrusion. PMID:25530647

  16. Increase in the strength characteristics of Portland cement due to introduction of the compound mineral supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ina, Liliia; Gichko, Nikolai; Mukhina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    At the initial phase of hardening it is the limestone component that plays a major role in the hardening process, which acts as the substrate for the crystallization of hydrate tumors due to its chemical affinity with the products of Portland cement hydration. After 7 days, the diopside supplement influences the processes more significantly. Diopside has a high modulus of elasticity compared to the cement paste. As a result, stresses are redistributed within the cement paste and the whole composition is hardened. An increase in the quantity of diopside in the compound supplement to more than 66.7% does not provide a substantial increase in the strength of the cement paste. As the hardness of diopside is higher than the hardness of limestone, much more energy is required to grind it down to a usable component. Therefore, a further increase in the quantity of diopside in the compound supplement is not economically feasible. An evaluation of the optimum quantity of input compound mineral supplements can be made based on the ideas of close packing of spherical particles and the Pauling rules. The optimum content of the supplement is 8-8.5% provided that its dispersion and density are close to the dispersion and density of the binder. An increase in the dispersion of the supplement reduces its optimal quantity.

  17. Diffusion and transport coefficients in synthetic opals

    SciTech Connect

    Sofo, J. O.; Mahan, G. D.

    2000-07-15

    Opals are structures composed of close-packed spheres in the size range of nano to micrometers. They are sintered to create small necks at the points of contact. We have solved the diffusion problem in such structures. The relation between the diffusion coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivity is used to estimate the transport coefficients of opal structures as a function of the neck size and the mean free path of the carriers. The theory presented is also applicable to the diffusion problem in other periodic structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Lunar cement and lunar concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a study to investigate methods of producing cements from lunar materials are presented. A chemical process and a differential volatilization process to enrich lime content in selected lunar materials were identified. One new cement made from lime and anorthite developed compressive strengths of 39 Mpa (5500 psi) for 1 inch paste cubes. The second, a hypothetical composition based on differential volatilization of basalt, formed a mineral glass which was activated with an alkaline additive. The 1 inch paste cubes, cured at 100C and 100 percent humidity, developed compressive strengths in excess of 49 Mpa (7100 psi). Also discussed are tests made with Apollo 16 lunar soil and an ongoing investigation of a proposed dry mix/steam injection procedure for casting concrete on the Moon.

  19. Natural cement as the precursor of Portland cement: Methodology for its identification

    SciTech Connect

    Varas, M.J. . E-mail: mjvaras@geo.ucm.es; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2005-11-15

    When cements appeared in the 19th century, they took the place of traditional binding materials (lime, gypsum, and hydraulic lime) which had been used until that time. Early cements can be divided into two groups, natural and artificial (Portland) cements. Natural cements were introduced first, but their widespread usage was short-lived as they were quickly replaced by artificial cements (Portland), still the most important and predominant today. The main differences between natural and artificial cements arise during the manufacturing process. The final properties of the cements are greatly influenced by differences in the raw materials and burning temperatures employed. The aim of this paper is to assess the efficiency of traditional analytical techniques (petrographic microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) used to differentiate natural and artificial cements.

  20. New radiopaque acrylic bone cement. II. Acrylic bone cement with bromine-containing monomer.

    PubMed

    Rusu, M C; Ichim, I C; Popa, M; Rusu, M

    2008-07-01

    Bromine-containing methacrylate, 2-(2-bromopropionyloxy) ethyl methacrylate (BPEM), had been used in the formulation of acrylic radiopaque cements. The effect of this monomer incorporated into the liquid phase of acrylic bone cement, on the curing parameters, thermal properties, water absorption, density, compression tests and radiopacity was studied. A decrease of maximum temperature and an increase of the setting time were observed with the addition of the bromine-containing monomer in the radiolucent cement composition. Adding BPEM in radiolucent acrylic bone cements composition results in the decrease of glass transition temperature and increase of its thermal stability. Acrylic bone cements modified with bromine-containing comonomer are characterized by polymerization shrinkage lower than the radiolucent cement. Addition of bromine-containing comonomer in radiolucent acrylic bone cement composition determines the increase of compressive strength. Acrylic bone cements modified with bromine-containing comonomer proved to be radiopaque.

  1. Cement bond log evaluation of foam- and synthetic-cemented casings

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckdorfer, R.A.; Jacobs, W.R.; Masson, J.P.

    1984-11-01

    Cement bond log (CBL /SUP TM/ ) studies on foam- and synthetic-cemented wells were initiated to determine the feasibility of, as well as to develop technologies for, evaluating these novel cementing services. Early CBL's on these cementing systems showed little effect on the log amplitude curve. Hence, CBL evaluations were difficult to obtain and interpret. A special sonde with a 1.3-ft (0.4-m) transmitter-toreceiver spacing was developed for this study. Sonic signal amplitudes were determined by using cemented shortcasing test sections. Sonic attenuation rates were correlated to compressive strengths for a range of cement densities. Experimental details of the cementing operation and logging studies are discussed. Data relating attenuation rates to compressive strengths and cement densities also are presented. Field results are discussed.

  2. An ESEM investigation of latex film formation in cement pore solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gretz, M.; Plank, J.

    2011-02-15

    Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and complementary methods were employed to study the time dependent film formation of a latex dispersion in water and cement pore solution. First, a model carboxylated styrene/n-butyl acrylate latex dispersion possessing a minimum film forming temperature (MFFT) of 18 {sup o}C was synthesized in aqueous media via emulsion polymerization. Its film forming property was at a temperature of 40 {sup o}C, studied under an ESEM. The analysis revealed that upon removal of water, film formation occurs as a result of particle packing, particle deformation and finally particle coalescence. Film formation is significantly retarded when the latex dispersion is present in cement pore solution. This effect can be ascribed to adsorption of Ca{sup 2+} ions onto the surface of the anionic latex particles and to interfacial secondary phases. This layer of adsorbed Ca{sup 2+} ions hinders interdiffusion of the macromolecules and subsequent film formation of the latex polymer.

  3. Expansive Cements and Their Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-10-01

    made available from the Office, Chief of Research and Development, Army, f- operation of the Concrete Technology Inxormation Aalysis Center (CTIAC...Ths is CTIAC Report No. 8. This report was prepared by Mr. George C. Hoff, Chief Materials Properties V Section of the Concrete iabcraLory, U. S. Army...compensating expansive cement concrete is to minimize cracking in concrete pavements and structures caused by drying shrinkage. The paper reviews the

  4. Center for Cement Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-31

    pastes have shown that the matrix is microporous; mesopores are absent unless the material is allowed to dry out. This results in water adsorption at low...only to water. When subsequently dried a portion of3 the porosity is converted to larger mesopores . • Only about one third of the cement reacts in a...Frictional sliding, in this case was characterized by a decreasing slope in the loading curve followed by hysteresis in the unload/reloading curves

  5. Sustainable cement production-present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.; Romer, M.; Tschudin, M.; Bolio, H.

    2011-07-15

    Cement will remain the key material to satisfy global housing and modern infrastructure needs. As a consequence, the cement industry worldwide is facing growing challenges in conserving material and energy resources, as well as reducing its CO{sub 2} emissions. According to the International Energy Agency, the main levers for cement producers are the increase in energy efficiency and the use of alternative materials, be it as fuel or raw materials. Accordingly, the use of alternative fuels has already increased significantly in recent years, but potential for further increases still exists. In cement, the reduction of the clinker factor remains a key priority: tremendous progress has already been made. Nevertheless, appropriate materials are limited in their regional availability. New materials might be able to play a role as cement constituents in the future. It remains to be seen to what extent they could substitute Portland cement clinker to a significant degree.

  6. Cements for use in esthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Thiago A; da Silva, Nelson R F A; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2007-04-01

    Dental cements are designed to retain restorations, appliances, and post and cores in a stable and, presumably, long-lasting position in the oral environment. Conventional glass ionomer and zinc phosphate cements are among the most popular materials for luting metallic restorations and posts, whereas resin-based cements are preferred for esthetic applications. Successful cementation of esthetic restorations is largely dependent on the appropriate treatment and silane application to the internal surface of the restoration. Clinicians are frequently advised to use three-step total-etch or two-step self-etch adhesive for luting purposes to avoid problems of incompatibility between adhesives and chemical- or dual-cure cements. A reliable cementation procedure can only be achieved if the operator is aware of the mechanisms involved and the material limitations.

  7. How to obtain good primary cement jobs

    SciTech Connect

    Kundert, D.P. ); Vacca, H.L. ); Smink, D.E

    1990-04-01

    A review of 23 primary cementing jobs performed over an 11-year period in four states has shown improved success with attention having been directed to low- cost means of improving displacement of drilling muds by cement slurries. The most important factors appear to be placement of centralizers and scratchers, conditioning of the drilling mud and pipe movement (reciprocation) while conditioning mud and while placing cement. Confidence gained in the use of these methods has resulted in a job technique wherein the top cementing plug is pumped down with 10% acetic acid or other desired perforating fluid followed by 2% KCI water. This technique permits lower-cost completions. The theory and application of cement bond logging is reviewed with five example CBL-VDL logs presented and discussed. Several examples are shown under applied surface pressure conditions. An example of a CBL-VDL log for an offset well where the principles of primary cementing were not observed is shown for comparison.

  8. Measuring adsorption, diffusion and flow in chemical engineering: applications of magnetic resonance to porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladden, Lynn F.; Mitchell, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques are increasingly used to improve our understanding of the multi-component, multi-phase processes encountered in chemical engineering. This review brings together many of the MR techniques used, and often developed specifically, to study chemical engineering systems and, in particular, processes occurring within porous media. Pulse sequences for relaxometry, pulsed field gradient measurements of diffusion, imaging and velocimetry measurements are described. Recent applications of these MR pulse sequences to microporous, mesoporous and macroporous structures are then reviewed. Considering the microporous and mesoporous systems, we focus attention on studies of rock cores, manufactured materials such as cement and gypsum plaster, and catalysts. When considering macroporous structures, the transport through packed beds of particles typical of fixed-bed catalytic reactors is reviewed; a brief overview of the increasing research interest in gas-solid fluidized beds is also presented. We highlight the field of sparse k-space sampling as an area that is in its infancy and suggest that, combined with Bayesian methods, it will offer new opportunities in both extending the application of high-field MR techniques to chemical engineering and increasing the range of measurements that can be carried out using low-field hardware.

  9. Injectability, microstructure and release properties of sodium fusidate-loaded apatitic cement as a local drug-delivery system.

    PubMed

    Noukrati, Hassan; Cazalbou, Sophie; Demnati, Imane; Rey, Christian; Barroug, Allal; Combes, Christèle

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of an antibiotic, sodium fusidate (SF), into the liquid phase of calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate (CaCO3-CaP) bone cement was evaluated, considering the effect of the liquid to powder ratio (L/P) on the composition and microstructure of the set cement and the injectability of the paste. In all cases, we obtained set cements composed mainly of biomimetic carbonated apatite analogous to bone mineral. With this study, we evi-denced a synergistic effect of the L/P ratio and SF presence on the injectability (i.e., the filter-pressing pheno-menon was suppressed) and the setting time of the SF-loaded cement paste compared to reference cement (without SF). In addition, the in vitro study of SF release, according to the European Pharmacopoeia recommendations, showed that, regardless of the L/P ratio, the cement allowed a sustained release of the antibiotic over 1month in sodium chloride isotonic solution at 37°C and pH7.4; this release is discussed considering the microstructure characteristics of SF-loaded cements (i.e., porosity, pore-size distribution) before and after the release test. Finally, modelling antibiotic release kinetics with several models indicated that the SF release was controlled by a diffusion mechanism.

  10. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

    1980-06-01

    Low cost material is needed for grouting abandoned retorts. Experimental work has shown that a hydraulic cement can be produced from Lurgi spent shale by mixing it in a 1:1 weight ratio with limestone and heating one hour at 1000°C. With 5% added gypsum, strengths up to 25.8 MPa are obtained. This cement could make an economical addition up to about 10% to spent shale grout mixes, or be used in ordinary cement applications.

  11. Zirconia: cementation of prosthetic restorations. Literature review

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; GLORIA, F.; NAPOLI, E.; PUJIA, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Aim of the work Aim of the work was to execute a review of the international literature about the cementation of zirconia restorations, analyzing the properties of the cements most commonly used in clinical activities. Materials and methods It was performed, through PubMed, a bibliographic search on the international literature of the last 10 years using the following limits: studies in English, in vitro studies, randomized clinical trial, reviews, meta-analysis, guide-lines. Were excluded from the search: descriptive studies, case reports, discussion articles, opinion’s leader. Results From studies results that common surface treatments (silanization, acid etching) are ineffective on zirconia because it has an inert surface without glassy component (on which this surface treatments act primarily), instead the sandblasting at 1atm with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) results significantly effective for the resulting roughening that increase the surface energy and the wettability of the material. Furthermore it has been shown that zinc phosphate-based cements, Bis-GMA-based and glass-ionomer cements can’t guarantee a stable long-term adhesion, instead resin cements containing phosphate monomer 10-methacryloyloxyidecyl-dihyidrogenphosphate (MDP) have shown higher adhesion and stability values than the other cements. In particular, it has seen that bond strength of zirconia copings on dentin, using MDP-based cement, is about 6,9MPa; this value is comparable to that obtained with gold copings cementation. Conclusions Analyzed studies have led to the following conclusions: sandblasting with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) is the best surface treatment to improve adhesion between resin cements and zirconia; resin cements containing phosphate ester monomers 10-methacryloyloxyidecyl-dihyidrogenphosphate (MDP) have shown in the studies an higher bond strength and stability after ageing treatment; the best procedure for cementing zirconia restorations results the combination of

  12. Treating cement burns in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Summers, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Use of cement is widespread in the UK and warnings about burns caused by contact with the material are usually printed on bags and delivery dockets. Nevertheless, about 2 per cent of people admitted to burns units have injuries, many serious, caused by prolonged contact with wet cement. This article explores the pathophysiology of cement burns, and outlines the best forms of treatment and prevention.

  13. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  14. 46 CFR 160.043-6 - Marking and packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marking and packing. 160.043-6 Section 160.043-6... Marking and packing. (a) General. Jackknives specified by this subpart shall be stamped or otherwise... opener. (c) Packing. Each jackknife, complete with lanyard attached, shall be packed in a heat-sealed...

  15. 48 CFR 1846.672-6 - Packing list instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Packing list instructions... ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Material Inspection and Receiving Reports 1846.672-6 Packing list instructions. Copies of the MIRR may be used as a packing list. The packing list copies shall...

  16. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  17. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  18. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  19. 21 CFR 880.5760 - Chemical cold pack snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. 880.5760 Section... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5760 Chemical cold pack snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A chemical cold pack snakebit kit is a device consisting of a chemical cold pack and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment...

  20. 27 CFR 24.308 - Bottled or packed wine record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bottled or packed wine... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.308 Bottled or packed wine record. A proprietor who bottles, packs, or receives bottled or packed beverage wine in bond...

  1. 27 CFR 24.308 - Bottled or packed wine record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bottled or packed wine... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Records and Reports § 24.308 Bottled or packed wine record. A proprietor who bottles, packs, or receives bottled or packed beverage wine in bond...

  2. 27 CFR 24.308 - Bottled or packed wine record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bottled or packed wine... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Records and Reports § 24.308 Bottled or packed wine record. A proprietor who bottles, packs, or receives bottled or packed beverage wine in bond...

  3. 27 CFR 24.308 - Bottled or packed wine record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bottled or packed wine... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.308 Bottled or packed wine record. A proprietor who bottles, packs, or receives bottled or packed beverage wine in bond...

  4. 27 CFR 24.308 - Bottled or packed wine record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bottled or packed wine... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.308 Bottled or packed wine record. A proprietor who bottles, packs, or receives bottled or packed beverage wine in bond...

  5. Try-in Pastes Versus Resin Cements: A Color Comparison.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Edenize Cristina; Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Rodrigues Gonçalves de Oliveira, Maria Beatriz; Takano, Alfa Emília; de Carvalho Cardoso, Paula; de Torres, Érica Miranda; Gonzaga Lopes, Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the color of ceramic veneer restorations using different shades of try-in pastes and resin cement. Researchers found no differences between try-in pastes and resin cements after cementation.

  6. Acoustic evaluation of cementing quality using obliquely incident ultrasonic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wen-Xing; Qiao, Wen-Xiao; Che, Xiao-Hua; Xie, Hui

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonic cement bond logging is a widely used method for evaluating cementing quality. Conventional ultrasonic cement bond logging uses vertical incidence and cannot accurately evaluate lightweight cement bonding. Oblique incidence is a new technology for evaluating cement quality with improved accuracy for lightweight cements. In this study, we simulated models of acoustic impedance of cement and cementing quality using ultrasonic oblique incidence, and we obtained the relation between cementing quality, acoustic impedance of cement, and the acoustic attenuation coefficient of the A0-mode and S0-mode Lamb waves. Then, we simulated models of different cement thickness and we obtained the relation between cement thickness and the time difference of the arrival between the A0 and A0' modes.

  7. Squeeze cement method using coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Underdown, D.R.; Ashford, J.D.; Harrison, T.W.; Eastlack, J.K.; Blount, C.G.; Herring, G.D.

    1986-12-09

    A method is described of squeeze cementing a well wherein the well has a casing throughout the wellbore, casing cement between the casing and the wellbore of the well, perforations through the casing and the casing cement to establish fluid communication between the interior of the casing and a formation adjacent the perforations, channels in the casing cement in fluid communication with at least some of the perforations, a well tubing string in the casing extending from the surface to the proximity of the perforations, and a packer means for sealing between the tubing and the casing above the perforations. The method consists of: isolating the casing adjacent the perforations; lowering a coiled tubing down the well tubing string to a point adjacent the perforations; flowing uncontaminated squeeze cement through the coiled tubing and through the perforations into the channels; flowing a cement contaminating liquid down the coiled tubing to mix with the squeeze cement remaining in the casing; allowing the uncontaminated squeeze cement in the channels to harden; and removing the contaminated squeeze cement from the casing through the coiled tubing.

  8. Proper selection of contemporary dental cements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Zheng, Ming; Chen, Run; Cheng, Hui

    2014-03-01

    Today proper selection of dental cements is a key factor to achieve a successful restoration and will greatly increase the chances of long-term success of the restoration. In recent years, many newly formulated dental cements have been developed with the claim of better performance compared to the traditional materials. Unfortunately, selection of suitable dental cement for a specific clinical application has become increasingly complicated, even for the most experienced dentists. The purpose of this article is to review the currently existing dental cements and to help the dentists choose the most suitable materials for clinical applications.

  9. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn; Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 2013. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production, but the natural reversal of the process--carbonation--has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondary use of concrete waste to estimate regional and global CO2 uptake between 1930 and 2013 using an analytical model describing carbonation chemistry. We find that carbonation of cement materials over their life cycle represents a large and growing net sink of CO2, increasing from 0.10 GtC yr-1 in 1998 to 0.25 GtC yr-1 in 2013. In total, we estimate that a cumulative amount of 4.5 GtC has been sequestered in carbonating cement materials from 1930 to 2013, offsetting 43% of the CO2 emissions from production of cement over the same period, not including emissions associated with fossil use during cement production. We conclude that carbonation of cement products represents a substantial carbon sink that is not currently considered in emissions inventories.

  10. Quasistatic packings of droplets in flat microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadivar, Erfan

    2016-02-01

    As observed in recent experiments, monodisperse droplets self-assemble spontaneously in different ordered packings. In this work, we present a numerical study of the droplet packings in the flat rectangular microfluidic channels. Employing the boundary element method, we numerically solve the Stokes equation in two-dimension and investigate the appearance of droplet packing and transition between one and two-row packings of monodisperse emulsion droplets. By calculating packing force applied on the droplet interface, we investigate the effect of flow rate, droplet size, and surface tension on the packing configurations of droplets and transition between different topological packings.

  11. [Research progress on the management of no packing after septoplasty].

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheng; Zhang, Longcheng; Li, Jieen

    2016-01-01

    Packing the nose after septoplasty is common practice. The use of postoperative packing has been proposed to reduce the dead space between the subperichondrial flaps and minimize postoperative complications such as hemorrhage, septal hematoma, and formation of synechiae. Additionally, postoperative packing is thought to stabilize the remaining cartilaginous septum and minimize persistence or recurrence of septal deviation. Despite these theoretic advantages, evidence to support the use of postoperative packing is lacking. Additionally, nasal packing is not an innocuous procedure. The use of nasal packing actually cause these complications such as postop- erative pain, mucosal injury, bleeding, worsening of breathing due to sleep disorders, and postoperative infections. Routine use of anterior nasal packing after septoplasty should be challenged for not presenting proven benefit. As alternatives to traditional packing, septal suturing, septal stapler and fibrin glue have been used recently. The purpose of this article is to summarize the progress of traditional packing to no packing after septoplasty.

  12. Study of the Unequal Spheres Packing Problem:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. P.; Ng, Ka-Lok

    We employ the Monte Carlo method to study a constrained optimization problem — packing hard spheres with unequal radii (r2 > r1) into a 3D bounded region and discuss its connection with the Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment planning. Selection of the best fit solution is based on the Boltzmann factor, e-ΔE/T, which allows us to search for the global optimal solution. As an illustration we determined the least number (≤15) of packed spheres that will occupy the largest volume for three different hypothetical tumor sizes (4115, 10 000 and 36 000 voxels). For the bounded regions and the sizes of the packed spheres that we studied here, the optimal volume packing ratio ranges from 41.3 to 48.7%. From our study, using a lower r2/r1 ratio is more desirable due to the ≤15 radiation shots constraint. The optimal volume packing ratio can be obtained within a relative short CPU computing time and could provide a good starting point for the radiosurgery treatment planning.

  13. Coalescence preference in dense packing of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeseul; Gim, Bopil; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Coalescence preference is the tendency that a merged bubble from the contact of two original bubbles (parent) tends to be near to the bigger parent. Here, we show that the coalescence preference can be blocked by densely packing of neighbor bubbles. We use high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence phenomenon which occurs in micro scale seconds and inside dense packing of microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Previous theory and experimental evidence predict a power of -5 between the relative coalescence position and the parent size. However, our new observation for coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles shows a different power of -2. We believe that this result may be important to understand coalescence dynamics in dense packing of soft matter. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST and also was supported by Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (2009-0082580) and by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry and Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2012R1A6A3A04039257).

  14. Deterioration of organic packing materials commonly used in air biofiltration: effect of VOC-packing interactions.

    PubMed

    Lebrero, Raquel; Estrada, José M; Muñoz, Raúl; Quijano, Guillermo

    2014-05-01

    The abiotic deterioration of three conventional organic packing materials used in biofiltration (compost, wood bark and Macadamia nutshells) caused by their interaction with toluene (used as a model volatile organic compound) was here studied. The deterioration of the materials was evaluated in terms of structural damage, release of co-substrates and increase of the packing biodegradability. After 21 days of exposure to toluene, all packing materials released co-substrates able to support microbial growth, which were not released by the control materials not exposed to toluene. Likewise, the exposure to toluene increased the packing material biodegradability by 26% in wood bark, 20% in compost and 17% in Macadamia nutshells. Finally, scanning electron microscopy analysis confirmed the deterioration in the structure of the packing materials evaluated due to the exposure to toluene, Macadamia nutshells being the material with the highest resistance to volatile organic compound attack.

  15. Application of new packing material in endoscopic nasal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Haiying; Han, Fei; Cui, Zhaoyang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To show the efficacy and comfort of pneumatic bag packing after the endoscopic nasal surgery. Pneumatic bag packing may be recommendable in terms of comfort and efficacy after endoscopic nasal surgery. Significant findings: There were statistical significant differences between the pneumatic bag packing and the expansive sponge packing regarding subjective symptoms and objective findings after surgery. Conclusions: Pneumatic bag packing may be recommendable in terms of comfort and efficacy after endoscopic nasal surgery. PMID:25785173

  16. A study on provisional cements, cementation techniques, and their effects on bonding of porcelain laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Vinod Kumar, G; Soorya Poduval, T; Bipin Reddy; Shesha Reddy, P

    2014-03-01

    Minimal tooth preparation is required for porcelain laminate veneers, but interim restorations are a must to protect their teeth against thermal insult, chemical irritation, and to provide aesthetics. Cement remaining after the removal of the provisional restoration can impair the etching quality of the tooth surface and fit and final bonding of the porcelain laminate veneer. This in vitro study examined the tooth surface for remaining debris of cement after removal of a provisional restoration. Determine the presence of cement debris on prepared tooth surface subsequent to the removal of provisional restoration. Determine the cement with the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Determine the effect of smear layer on the amount of residual luting cement. Eighty-four extracted natural anterior teeth were prepared for porcelain laminate veneers. For half of the teeth, the smear layer was removed before luting provisional restorations. Veneer provisional restorations were fabricated and luted to teeth with six bonding methods: varnish combined with glass ionomer cement (GIC), varnish combined with resin modified GIC, varnish, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement, adhesive combined with GIC, adhesive combined with resin modified GIC, and adhesive, spot etching combined with dual-cure luting cement. After removal of provisional restorations 1 week later, the tooth surface was examined for residual luting material with SEM. Traces of cement debris were found on all the prepared teeth surfaces for all six groups which were cemented with different methods. Cement debris was seen on teeth subsequent to the removal of provisional's. Dual-cure cement had the least residue following the cleansing procedures. Presence of smear layer had no statistical significance in comparison with cement residue. With the use of adhesive the cement debris was always found to be more than with the use of varnish. GIC showed maximum residual cement followed by dual-cure.

  17. Method for packed column separations and purifications

    DOEpatents

    Holman, David A.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2006-08-15

    The invention encompasses a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber. A mixture of a fluid and a matrix material are introduced through a column chamber inlet so that the matrix material is packed within a column chamber to form a packed column. The column chamber having the column chamber inlet or first port for receiving the mixture further has an outlet port and an actuator port. The outlet port is partially closed for capturing the matrix material and permitting the fluid to flow therepast by rotating relative one to the other of a rod placed in the actuator port. Further rotation relative one to the other of the rod and the column chamber opens the outlet and permits the matrix material and the fluid to flow therethrough thereby unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber.

  18. Safety considerations for fabricating lithium battery packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, J. J.

    1986-09-01

    Lithium cell safety is a major issue with both manufacturers and end users. Most manufacturers have taken great strides to develop the safest cells possible while still maintaining performance characteristics. The combining of lithium cells for higher voltages, currents, and capacities requires the fabricator of lithium battery packs to be knowledgable about the specific electrochemical system being used. Relatively high rate, spirally wound (large surface area) sulfur oxychloride cells systems, such as Li/Thionyl or Sulfuryl chloride are considered. Prior to the start of a design of a battery pack, a review of the characterization studies for the cells should be conducted. The approach for fabricating a battery pack might vary with cell size.

  19. Safety considerations for fabricating lithium battery packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciesla, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Lithium cell safety is a major issue with both manufacturers and end users. Most manufacturers have taken great strides to develop the safest cells possible while still maintaining performance characteristics. The combining of lithium cells for higher voltages, currents, and capacities requires the fabricator of lithium battery packs to be knowledgable about the specific electrochemical system being used. Relatively high rate, spirally wound (large surface area) sulfur oxychloride cells systems, such as Li/Thionyl or Sulfuryl chloride are considered. Prior to the start of a design of a battery pack, a review of the characterization studies for the cells should be conducted. The approach for fabricating a battery pack might vary with cell size.

  20. Method for staged placement of gravel packs

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.E.

    1990-04-10

    This patent describes a process for gravel packing in a wellbore annulus including a well screen and perforations extending into a producing formation. It comprises: providing an initial gravel pack carrier fluid at below formation fracturing pressure and having a gravel loading of up to about five pounds gravel per gallon of carrier fluid within the wellbore annulus, providing additional amounts of carrier fluid at below fracturing pressure and having gravel loadings which are successively higher than a preceding and the initial gravel loading to the wellbore annulus and continually increasing the gravel loading in the carrier fluid to a range of ten to twenty pounds of gravel per gallon of carrier fluid until the gravel packing of the wellbore annulus is completed.

  1. Quartz cementation mechanisms between adjacent sandstone and shale in Middle Cambrian, West Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lingli; Friis, Henrik

    2013-04-01

    dissolution (chemical compaction) of quartz within the shales, or internal supply through chemical compaction within sandstones or along sandstone/shale interfaces; 2) Dissolution of detrital silicate grains, such as feldspars or lithic grains may locally play a role; 3) Shale diagenesis process that required addition of K2O and Al2O3, and resulted in loss of SiO2. Thin shales could act as an open system and export silica towards the intercalated sandstones. The main mechanism to move these dissolved silica is supposed to be compaction that resulted in the elongated grains and etched margines in shales and sandstones. Dissolved silica that was produced during dissolution may have been transported by diffusion into inter-stylolite regions or porous area with less pressure where the aqueous silica precipitates as quartz cement on quartz grains.

  2. The interaction of zinc oxide-based dental cements with aqueous solutions of potassium fluoride.

    PubMed

    Pawluk, K; Booth, S E; Coleman, N J; Nicholson, J W

    2008-09-01

    The ability of zinc oxide-based dental cements (zinc phosphate and zinc polycarboxylate) to take up fluoride from aqueous solution has been studied. Only zinc phosphate cement was found to take up any measurable fluoride after 5 h exposure to the solutions. The zinc oxide filler of the zinc phosphate also failed to take up fluoride from solution. The key interaction for this uptake was thus shown to involve the phosphate groups of the set cement. However, whether this took the form of phosphate/fluoride exchange, or the formation of oxyfluoro-phosphate groups was not clear. Fluoride uptake followed radicaltime kinetics for about 2 h in some cases, but was generally better modelled by the Elovich equation, dq(t)/dt = alpha exp(-betaq(t)). Values for alpha varied from 3.80 to 2.48 x 10(4), and for beta from 7.19 x 10(-3) to 0.1946, though only beta showed any sort of trend, becoming smaller with increasing fluoride concentration. Fluoride was released from the zinc phosphate cements in processes that were diffusion based up to M(t)/M(infinity) of about 0.4. No further release occurred when specimens were placed in fresh volumes of deionised water. Only a fraction of the fluoride taken up was re-released, demonstrating that most of the fluoride taken up becomes irreversibly bound within the cement.

  3. The formation and potential importance of cemented layers in inactive sulfide mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowes, David W.; Reardon, Eric J.; Jambor, John L.; Cherry, John A.

    1991-04-01

    Investigations of inactive sulfide-rich tailings impoundments at the Heath Steele (New Brunswick) and Waite Amulet (Quebec) minesites have revealed two distinct types of cemented layers or "hardpans." That at Heath Steele is 10-15 cm thick, occurs 20-30 cm below the depth of active oxidation, is continuous throughout the tailings impoundment, and is characterized by cementation of tailings by gypsum and Fe(II) solid phases, principally melanterite. Hardpan at the Waite Amulet site is only 1-5 cm thick, is laterally discontinuous (10-100 cm), occurs at the depth of active oxidation, and is characterized by cementation of tailings by Fe(III) minerals, principally goethite, lepidocrocite, ferrihydrite, and jarosite. At Heath Steele, an accumulation of gas-phase CO 2, of up to 60% of the pore gas, occurs below the hardpan. The calculated diffusivity of the hardpan layer is only about 1/100 that of the overlying, uncemented tailings. The pore-water chemistry at Heath Steele has changed little over a 10-year period, suggesting that the cemented layer restricts the movement of dissolved metals through the tailings and also acts as a zone of metal accumulation. Generation of a cemented layer therefore has significant environmental and economic implications. It is likely that, in sulfide-rich tailings impoundments, the addition of carbonate-rich buffering material during the late stages of tailings deposition would enhance the formation of hardpan layers.

  4. Diffusion with condensation and evaporation in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, L.; Plumb, O.A.; Ho, C.K.; Webb, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    Vapor phase transport in porous media is important in a number of environmental and industrial processes: soil moisture transport, vapor phase transport in the vadose zone, transport in the vicinity of buried nuclear waste, and industrial processes such as drying. The diffusion of water vapor in a packed bed containing residual liquid is examined experimentally. The objective is to quantify the effect of enhanced vapor diffusion resulting from evaporation/condensation in porous media subjected to a temperature gradient. Isothermal diffusion experiments in free-space were conducted to qualify the experimental apparatus and techniques. For these experiments measured diffusion coefficients are within 3.6% of those reported in the literature for the temperature range from 25 C to 40 C. Isothermal experiments in packed beds of glass beads were used to determine the tortuosity coefficient resulting in {tau} = 0.78 {+-} 0.028, which is also consistent with previously reported results. Nonisothermal experiments in packed beds in which condensation occurs were conducted to examine enhanced vapor diffusion. The interpretation of the results for these experiments is complicated by a gradual, but continuous, build-up of condensate in the packed beds during the course of the experiment. Results indicate diffusion coefficients which increase as a function of saturation resulting in enhancement of the vapor-phase transport by a factor of approximately four compared to a dry porous medium.

  5. A Study of Pack Aluminizing Process for NiCrAlY Coatings Using Response Surface Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Huang, Xiao; Liu, Rong; Yang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Aluminizing process is widely used to provide additional Al deposition onto superalloy surface for enhanced oxidation and corrosion resistance. In this research, an aluminizing process—pack cementation process, is used to deposit Al onto the surface of NiCrAlY coatings for increasing environmental protection. The experiment is designed using Box-Behnken approach, in which three parameters, the Al content, Ni content of the pack powder, and the temperature of the process, are selected as factors; and the thickness and Al/Ni ratio of the coatings are selected as responses. The effects of the factors on the responses are analyzed and modeled empirically. It is found that these empirical models correlate well with the results from additional sets of experiment. These models can be used to produce aluminized NiCrAlY coatings with specific thicknesses and Al/Ni ratios.

  6. Plankton filtration with compressible crumb rubber packs.

    PubMed

    Karanikola, Vasiliki; Ngo, Anh T; Valdes, Julio R

    2011-01-01

    The experiments described provide insight into the feasibility of using compressible particulate packs to filter live plankton. The pore constriction sizes are controlled by subjecting the filter pack to isotropic confinement, thereby allowing for: (1) enhanced filtration upon confinement and (2) enhanced unclogging upon relaxation. Results show that filtration efficiency increases with increasing confinement; however, complete plankton retention is difficult to attain due to the plankton's ability to pass through pore constrictions that are smaller than the plankton size. The results are anticipated to offer potential benefits to ballast treatment and aquatic filtration operations.

  7. Method of gravel packing a subterranean well

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-05

    This patent describes a method of gravel packing a well bore penetrating a subterranean formation. It comprises blocking a first group of apertures in a liner with an immobile gel; positioning the liner within the well bore thereby defining a first annulus between the liner and the well bore; transporting a slurry comprised of gravel suspended in a fluid into the first annulus, the fluid flowing through a second group of apertures in the liner while the gravel is deposited within the first annulus to form a gravel pack; and thereafter removing substantially all of the gel from the first group of apertures.

  8. Imaging of drug smuggling by body packing.

    PubMed

    Sica, Giacomo; Guida, Franco; Bocchini, Giorgio; Iaselli, Francesco; Iadevito, Isabella; Scaglione, Mariano

    2015-02-01

    Body packing, pushing, and stuffing are hazardous practices with complex medicolegal and social implications. A radiologist plays both a social and a medicolegal role in their assessment, and it should not be limited only to the identification of the packages but must also provide accurate information about their number and their exact location so as to prevent any package remains in the body packer. Radiologists must also be able to recognize the complications associated with these risky practices. Imaging assessment of body packing is performed essentially through plain abdominal X-ray and computed tomography scans. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, although with some advantages, actually have a limited use.

  9. Porosity reduction in bone cement at the cement-stem interface.

    PubMed

    Bishop, N E; Ferguson, S; Tepic, S

    1996-05-01

    The fatigue failure of bone cement, leading to loosening of the stem, is likely to be one mode of failure of cemented total hip replacements. There is strong evidence that cracks in the cement are initiated at voids which act as stress risers, particularly at the cement-stem interface. The preferential formation of voids at this site results from shrinkage during polymerisation and the initiation of this process at the warmer cement-bone interface, which causes bone cement to shrink away from the stem. A reversal of the direction of polymerisation would shrink the cement on to the stem and reduce or eliminate the formation of voids at this interface. We have investigated this by implanting hip prostheses, at room temperature or preheated to 44 degrees C, into human cadaver femora kept at 37 degrees C. Two types of bone cement were either hand-mixed or vacuum-mixed before implantation. We found that the area of porosity at the cement-stem interface was dramatically reduced by preheating the stem and that the preheating temperature of 44 degrees C determined by computer analysis of transient heat transfer was the minimum required to induce initial polymerisation at the cement-stem interface. Temperature measurements taken during these experiments in vitro showed that preheating of the stem caused a negligible increase in the temperature of the bone. Reduction of porosity at the cement-stem interface could significantly increase the life of hip arthroplasties.

  10. Composition for a lightweight cement slurry for cementing oil and gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Parcevaux, P.; Sault, P.

    1988-01-26

    A homogeneous lightweight cement slurry for cementing the annulus of an oil or gas well is described comprising: cement, an extender in the form of solid particles, a styrenebutadiene latex, and water, having a specific gravity lying substantially in the range from 1.2 to 1.6 and having a volume ratio of the liquid phase of the slurry to the total volume of the slurry of less than about 70%. A method of cementing the annulus of a wellbore by pumping an aqueous cement slurry through the wellbore and into the annulus the aqueous cement slurry comprising is described comprising cement, an extender in the form of solid particles, a styrenebutadiene latex and water, having a specific gravity lying substantially in the range from 1.2 to 1.6 and having a volume ratio of the liquid phase of the slurry to the total volume of the slurry of less than about 70%.

  11. Damage Detection in Concrete Using Diffuse Ultrasound Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroo, Frederik; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Sabra, Karim

    2010-02-01

    Heterogeneities in concrete caused by the random distribution of aggregate in the cement-paste matrix lead to strong scattering of ultrasonic waves at wavelengths on the order of the aggregate. Use of these high frequencies is necessary to detect damage at an early stage, something that is not possible with conventional ultrasonic methods. The ultrasound energy density in that regime can be described by the diffusion equation. The objective of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of the effects of additional scattering sources, such as small cracks in the cement-paste matrix, on the parameters of the diffusion equation; these parameters are the diffusion and the dissipation coefficients. Applying diffusion theory, the diffusivity and dissipation coefficients are experimentally determined as functions of frequency using ultrasonic waves. The cuboid shaped samples employed are made of a Portland cement-paste matrix and regular aggregate, such as gravel and sand. The results provide a basic understanding of repeatability and consistency of diffusion measurements, with an emphasis on the nondestructive evaluation of concrete.

  12. Tires fuel oil field cement manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Caveny, B.; Ashford, D.; Garcia, J.G.; Hammack, R.

    1998-08-31

    In a new process, waste automobile tires added to the fuel mix of gas, coal, and coke help fire kilns to produce API-quality oil field cement. Capital Cement uses this process in its cement-manufacturing plant in San Antonio, in which it also produces construction cement. The tires provide a lower-cost fuel and boost the temperature at a critical stage in the kiln burn process. Also, steel-belted tires add iron content to the mix. According to lab results, tire-burned cement slurries will perform the same as conventionally burned cement slurries. Actual field applications have proven that cement produced by burning tires performs no different than conventionally produced slurries. Capital`s plant uses both dry and wet processes, with separate kilns running both processes at the same time. Cement clinker is partially fired by waste tires in both kiln processes. The tires represent 12% of the fuel consumed by the plant, a number that is expected to increase. Capital burns about 200 tires/hr, or about 1.6 million tires/year.

  13. Basic Chemistry for the Cement Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Mason

    This combined student workbook and instructor's guide contains nine units for inplant classes on basic chemistry for employees in the cement industry. The nine units cover the following topics: chemical basics; measurement; history of cement; atoms; bonding and chemical formulas; solids, liquids, and gases; chemistry of Portland cement…

  14. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WESSON, CARL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO PRESENT A PRELIMINARY PICTURE OF OCCUPATIONAL CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT IN THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT AS A RESULT OF INTRODUCING AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT. ONE AUTOMATED AND SEVERAL CONVENTIONAL TYPE CEMENT PLANTS WERE STUDIED. ANALYSIS OF DATA OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTED DURING THE STUDY REVEALED THAT…

  15. A note on cement in asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilalbegović, G.

    2016-09-01

    Cement mineral tobermorite was formed in hydrothermal experiments on alternation of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Unidentified bands at 14 μm were measured for CAIs and the matrix of the Allende meteorite sample, as well as for Hektor and Agamemnon asteroids. The presence of cement nanoparticles may explain the feature at 14 μm.

  16. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  17. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  18. Rheological Characterization of Oil Cement Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abderrahmane, Mellak; Moh-Amokrane, Aitouche

    2015-04-01

    This study is a contribution to the study of the rheological behavior of cement suspensions. An oil well is drilled, cased, cemented and set completion. The well drilling is done in several phases then at various diameters to isolate the following problems like land fragile subsidence and poorly consolidated aquifer formations, loss of the movement in the porous and permeable formations. Therefore, it would go down a casing and cementing to work safely. The materials studied were chosen to satisfy the requirements and the problems encountered in real applications in the oil field (casing cementing wells). So it was used an oil hydraulic binder "G". This systematic study of rheological properties of cement Class "G" standardized API (American Petroleum Institute) deal with a formulation which is compatible with the surrounding environment taking account an optimal efficiency.

  19. A new technique for removing intramedullary cement.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Jason A; Vosburg, Caleb; Murtha, Yvonne M; Della Rocca, Gregory J; Crist, Brett D

    2011-12-01

    Treatment of infected long bone fractures or nonunions requires stability for bony union, yet retained implants can lead to persistent infection. Antibiotic cement intramedullary nails, in addition to external fixation, are commonly used to deliver intramedullary antibiotics in infected long bone fractures and provide temporary stability. However, the retrieval of these nails can result in debonding of antibiotic cement, which can require significant time and effort to remove. A variety of methods, including intramedullary hooks, reverse curettes, flexible osteotomes, and stacked guide rods, are commonly used to remove cement fragments. When these methods fail to allow access to the entire length of the canal, the Reamer Irrigator Aspirator system (Synthes, Paoli, PA) serves as an effective method for removing retained intramedullary cement. The surgical technique is described, and three cases illustrate the successful use of the Reamer Irrigator Aspirator system for removal of an antibiotic cement intramedullary nail.

  20. Depth microhardness of glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, V; Moya, F; Payan, J; Bartala, M

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the effect of different conditions of storage on the surface and in the depth of luting glass ionomer cement by measuring microhardness. The hardness of a glass ionomer cement was measured after storage in wet and dry conditions and in an atmosphere of 80% relative humidity, for times up to 1000 h. Storage in distilled water produced a softening effect, but the depth hardness increased progressively. The penetration of the water is a surface phenomenon and does not affect the depth of the cement. However, the cement is vulnerable to moisture to a depth of 600 microns and marginal gaps evolve in the range of 40 to 80 microns when the luting cement at the tooth crown margin is always destroyed.

  1. Current Status of Geothermal Well Cement Development

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a study made in 1976 indicated that the cements used for well completion deteriorate in the geothermal environments and that the life expectancy of a well, and therefore the economics of geothermal processes, could be improved significantly if better materials were developed. On the basis of this assessment, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) helped the Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy to organize a program to develop materials that meet the estimated design criteria for geothermal well cements. The BNL work involves research on polymer cements and full management of an integrated program involving contract research and industrial participation. The program consists of the following phases: (1) problem definition, (2) cement research and development, (3) property verification, (4) downhole testing, and (5) cementing of demonstration wells.

  2. Physico-chemical investigation of clayey/cement-based materials interaction in the context of geological waste disposal: Experimental approach and results

    SciTech Connect

    Dauzeres, A.; Le Bescop, P.; Sardini, P.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.

    2010-08-15

    Within the concepts under study for the geological disposal of intermediate-level long-lived waste, cement-based materials are considered as candidate materials. The clayey surrounding rock and the cement-based material being considered differ greatly in their porewater composition. Experiments are conducted on the diffusion of solutes constituting those porewaters in a confined clay/cement composite system using cells. The test temperature was set at 25 {sup o}C and 2, 6 and 12 months. Results supply new information: carbonation is low and not clog the interface. Such absence of carbonation allows for the diffusion of aqueous species and, thus, for the degradation of the cement paste and the illitisation of illite/smectite interstratifications. The cement material is subjected to a decalcification: portlandite dissolution and a CaO/SiO{sub 2} reduction in the calcium silicate hydrate. The sulphate in diffusion induces non-destructive ettringite precipitation in the largest pores. After 12 months, about 800 {mu}m of cement material is concerned by decalcification.

  3. Effects of inhomogeneous partial absorption and the geometry of the boundary on population evolution of molecules diffusing in general porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seungoh

    2009-08-01

    We consider aspects of the population dynamics, inside a bound domain, of diffusing agents carrying an attribute which is stochastically destroyed upon contact with the boundary. The normal mode analysis of the relevant Helmholtz equation under the partially absorbing, but uniform, boundary condition provides a starting framework in understanding detailed evolution dynamics of the attribute in the time domain. In particular, the boundary-localized depletion has been widely employed in practical applications that depend on geometry of various porous media such as rocks, cement, bones, and cheese. While direct relationship between the pore geometry and the diffusion-relaxation spectrum forms the basis for such applications and has been extensively studied, relatively less attention has been paid to the spatial variation in the boundary condition. In this work, we focus on the way the pore geometry and the inhomogeneous depletion strength of the boundary become intertwined and thus obscure the direct relationship between the spectrum and the geometry. It is often impossible to gauge experimentally the degree to which such interference occurs. We fill this gap by perturbatively incorporating classes of spatially varying boundary conditions and derive their consequences that are observable through numerical simulations or controlled experiments on glass bead packs and artificially fabricated porous media. We identify features of the spectrum that are most sensitive to the inhomogeneity, apply the method to the spherical pore with a simple hemispherical binary distribution of the depletion strength, and obtain bounds for the induced change in the slowest relaxation mode.

  4. MTBE adsorption on alternative adsorbents and packed bed adsorber performance.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Alfred; Knappe, Detlef R U

    2008-04-01

    Widespread use of the fuel additive methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) has led to frequent MTBE detections in North American and European drinking water sources. The overall objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a silicalite zeolite, a carbonaceous resin, and a coconut-shell-based granular activated carbon (GAC) for the removal of MTBE from water. Isotherm and short bed adsorber tests were conducted in ultrapure water and river water to obtain parameters describing MTBE adsorption equilibria and kinetics and to quantify the effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on MTBE adsorption. Both the silicalite zeolite and the carbonaceous resin exhibited larger MTBE adsorption uptakes than the tested GAC. Surface diffusion coefficients describing intraparticle MTBE mass transfer rates were largest for the GAC and smallest for the carbonaceous resin. Pilot tests were conducted to verify MTBE breakthrough curve predictions obtained with the homogeneous surface diffusion model and to evaluate the effect of NOM preloading on packed bed adsorber performance. Results showed that GAC was the most cost-competitive adsorbent when considering adsorbent usage rate only; however, the useful life of an adsorber containing silicalite zeolite was predicted to be approximately 5-6 times longer than that of an equally sized adsorber containing GAC. Pilot column results also showed that NOM preloading did not impair the MTBE removal efficiency of the silicalite zeolite. Thus, it may be possible to regenerate spent silicalite with less energy-intensive methods than those required to regenerate GAC.

  5. Pulmonary and hepatic granulomatous disorders due to the inhalation of cement and mica dusts.

    PubMed Central

    Cortex Pimentel, J; Peixoto Menezes, A

    1978-01-01

    Hepatic and pulmonary granulomas were recognised in two workers exposed respectively to Portland cement and to muscovite dusts. The pulmonary lesions in the patient exposed to cement consisted of histiocytic granulomas and irregular fibrohyaline scars, and in the patient exposed to mica of a diffuse thickening of all interalveolar septa due to new formation of reticulin and collagen fibres and proliferation of fibroblasts and histiocytes. In the liver the following pathological findings were observed: focal or diffuse swelling of sinusoidal lining cells, sarcoid-type granulomas, and, in the case of mica exposure, perisinusoidal and portal tract fibrosis. Abundant inclusions of the inhaled material were identified within the pulmonary and hepatic lesions by histochemical and x-ray diffraction techniques. Images PMID:663882

  6. Leaching of mercury-containing cement monoliths aged for one year.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Margareta; Allard, Bert

    2008-01-01

    A directive from the Swedish Government states that waste containing more than 1% of mercury shall be permanently deposited. The stabilization of mercury by conversion to a sparingly soluble compound like the sulphide is crucial to ensure long-term immobilization in a permanent storage. Immobilization by the solidification/stabilization (S/S) method and possible formation of HgS from mercury oxide or elemental mercury by reaction with a sulphur source (S or FeS) is investigated by a modified version of the NEN 7345 Dutch tank-leaching test. The diffusion of mercury during 11 months from 1-year-old mercury containing monoliths of Portland and slag cement is demonstrated. In a geologic repository under conditions representative of deep granitic bedrock (bicarbonate buffered to pH 8.6), a favourable monolith combination is slag cement with addition of the iron sulphide troilite. The apparent diffusion coefficient of mercury is estimated.

  7. Simple Cloud Chambers Using Gel Ice Packs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-01-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry…

  8. Stuffed Derivatives of Close-Packed Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Bodie E.

    2007-01-01

    Decades ago Buerger described and later Palmer reviewed stuffed silica crystal structures widely used by mineralogists. Many publications and books have discussed common crystal structures in terms of close-packing of one set of atoms or ions (P sites) with other atoms or ions in tetrahedral (T) or octahedral (O) sites. Douglas and Ho described…

  9. Porous bead packings for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Woeller, F. H.

    1979-01-01

    Porous polyaromatic packing beads have low polarity, high efficiency, short retention time, and may be synthesized in size range of 50 to 150 micrometers (100 to 270 mesh). Mechanically strong beads may be produced using various materials depending on elements and compounds to be identified.

  10. Random close packing in protein cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohern, Corey

    Shortly after the determination of the first protein x-ray crystal structures, researchers analyzed their cores and reported packing fractions ϕ ~ 0 . 75 , a value that is similar to close packing equal-sized spheres. A limitation of these analyses was the use of `extended atom' models, rather than the more physically accurate `explicit hydrogen' model. The validity of using the explicit hydrogen model is proved by its ability to predict the side chain dihedral angle distributions observed in proteins. We employ the explicit hydrogen model to calculate the packing fraction of the cores of over 200 high resolution protein structures. We find that these protein cores have ϕ ~ 0 . 55 , which is comparable to random close-packing of non-spherical particles. This result provides a deeper understanding of the physical basis of protein structure that will enable predictions of the effects of amino acid mutations and design of new functional proteins. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Institute for Biological, Physical, and Engineering Sciences, National Library of Medicine training grant T15LM00705628 (J.C.G.), and National Science Foundation DMR-1307712 (L.R.).

  11. Monkey Baker in bio-pack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    A squirrel monkey, Baker, in bio-pack couch being readied for Jupiter (AM-18 flight). Jupiter, AM-18 mission, also carried an American-born rhesus monkey, Able into suborbit. The flight was successful and both monkeys were recovered in good condition. AM-18 was launched on May 28, 1959.

  12. 7 CFR 989.9 - Packed raisins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Packed raisins. 989.9 Section 989.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  13. 7 CFR 989.9 - Packed raisins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Packed raisins. 989.9 Section 989.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  14. 7 CFR 989.9 - Packed raisins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packed raisins. 989.9 Section 989.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  15. 7 CFR 989.9 - Packed raisins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Packed raisins. 989.9 Section 989.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  16. 7 CFR 989.9 - Packed raisins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Packed raisins. 989.9 Section 989.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN...

  17. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  18. Random close packing in protein cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, Jennifer C.; Smith, W. Wendell; Regan, Lynne; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2016-03-01

    Shortly after the determination of the first protein x-ray crystal structures, researchers analyzed their cores and reported packing fractions ϕ ≈0.75 , a value that is similar to close packing of equal-sized spheres. A limitation of these analyses was the use of extended atom models, rather than the more physically accurate explicit hydrogen model. The validity of the explicit hydrogen model was proved in our previous studies by its ability to predict the side chain dihedral angle distributions observed in proteins. In contrast, the extended atom model is not able to recapitulate the side chain dihedral angle distributions, and gives rise to large atomic clashes at side chain dihedral angle combinations that are highly probable in protein crystal structures. Here, we employ the explicit hydrogen model to calculate the packing fraction of the cores of over 200 high-resolution protein structures. We find that these protein cores have ϕ ≈0.56 , which is similar to results obtained from simulations of random packings of individual amino acids. This result provides a deeper understanding of the physical basis of protein structure that will enable predictions of the effects of amino acid mutations to protein cores and interfaces of known structure.

  19. The General Heating Multi-Project Pack

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowking A.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes a multi-project pack on central heating systems, developed into an educational game, used for teaching a variety of subjects in high school. The students examine the basic decision to install a central heating system, for a particular house, and the economics involved. (GA)

  20. Radiological and practical aspects of body packing

    PubMed Central

    Reginelli, A; Pinto, F; Sica, G; Scaglione, M; Berger, F H; Romano, L; Brunese, L

    2014-01-01

    Body packing represents the concealment of illegal substances in a person's body with the aim of smuggling. “Body packers” either swallow drug-filled packets or introduce drug-filled packets into their bodies rectally or vaginally with the purpose of concealing them. The three main smuggled drugs are cocaine, heroin and cannabis products. Body packing represents a serious risk of acute narcotic toxicity from drug exposure, intestinal obstruction owing to pellet impaction and bowel perforation with consequent abdominal sepsis. A suspected body packer is generally admitted to hospital to perform imaging investigations and confirm the presence of drugs in his/her body. Radiological imaging methods are essential to diagnose body packing and to detect potential complications. Increasing sophistication of traffickers and improvements in packaging add to the detection difficulty. Radiologists should be aware of the appearance of drug packets in a range of imaging modalities. This article informs physicians about the challenging aspects of body packing, its background and medicolegal issues, what imaging methods can be used and what criteria are necessary to perform a correct diagnosis. PMID:24472727

  1. 7 CFR 51.1311 - Packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... size and quality of the contents of the package. (b) Pears packed in any container shall be...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1270 - Packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... representative in size and quality of the contents of the package. (b) Pears packed in any container shall...

  3. 7 CFR 917.13 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pack. 917.13 Section 917.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN...

  4. 7 CFR 917.13 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pack. 917.13 Section 917.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN...

  5. 7 CFR 917.13 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pack. 917.13 Section 917.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN...

  6. 7 CFR 917.13 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pack. 917.13 Section 917.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN...

  7. 7 CFR 917.13 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pack. 917.13 Section 917.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN...

  8. 7 CFR 920.13 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pack. 920.13 Section 920.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  9. 7 CFR 920.13 - Pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pack. 920.13 Section 920.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  10. The benefits of using customized procedure packs.

    PubMed

    Baines, R; Colquhoun, G; Jones, N; Bateman, R

    2001-01-01

    Discrete item purchasing is the traditional approach for hospitals to obtain consumable supplies for theatre procedures. Although most items are relatively low cost, the management and co-ordination of the supply chain, raising orders, controlling stock, picking and delivering to each operating theatre can be complex and costly. Customized procedure packs provide a solution.

  11. Cements with low Clinker Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lodeiro, I.; Fernández-Jiménez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2015-11-01

    Hybrid alkaline cements are multi-component systems containing a high percentage of mineral additions (fly ash, blast furnace slag), low proportions (<30%) of Portland clinker and scarce amounts of alkaline activators. The substantially lower amount of clinker needed to manufacture these binders in comparison to ordinary Portland cement is both economically and ecologically beneficial. Their enormous versatility in terms of the raw materials used has made them the object of considerable interest. The present study explored the mechanical strength of binary blends mixes; B1= 20% clinker (CK) + 80% fly ash (FA) and B2=20% clinker + 80% blast furnace slag (BFS), both hydrated in the presence and absence of an alkaline activator specifically designed for this purpose. The use of the activator enhanced the development of early age strength considerably. All the hydrated matrices were characterised with XRD, SEM/EDX and (29Si and 27Al) NMR. The use of the alkaline activator generated reaction products consisting primarily of a mix of gels ((N,C)-A-S-H and C-A-S-H) whose respective proportions were found to depend upon system composition and initial reactivity.

  12. Hydrothermal cement/metal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Baldwin, S.

    1996-01-01

    The authors investigated the adherence of two cementitious materials, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and silica flour-filled class G cement (CGC), to metal substrates, such as cold-rolled steel (CRS), stainless steel (SS), electroplated zinc-coated steel (EZS), and zinc phosphate-coated steel (ZPS) after autoclaving at 200 C. In CPC/metal joints, the {gamma}-AlOOH phase, which segregated from the hydroxyapatite phase of the CPC matrix, was preferentially precipitated on the CRS and SS surfaces and also mixed with the reaction products formed at the interfaces between CPC and EZS or ZPS. Precipitation of {gamma}-AlOOH caused the formation of a weak boundary layer at the interfacial transition zones, thereby resulting in a low shear-bond strength. Although CGC accelerated the rate of corrosion of CRS and SS surfaces, the growth of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} clusters, formed as the corrosion products of metals at interfaces, aided the anchoring effect of xonotlite crystals as the major phase of CGC matrix, thereby conferring a high shear-bond strength. The EZS and ZPS surfaces were susceptible to alkali dissolution caused by the attack of the high-pH interstitial fluid of CGC pastes to the Zn and zinc phosphate coatings. Thus, the bond strengths of the CGC/EZS and /ZPS joints were lower than those of the joints made with CRS and SS.

  13. Sustainable development of the cement industry and blended cements to meet ecological challenges.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Konstantin

    2003-05-05

    The world production of cement has greatly increased in the past 10 years. This trend is the most significant factor affecting technological development and the updating of manufacturing facilities in the cement industry. Existing technology for the production of cement clinker is ecologically damaging; it consumes much energy and natural resources and also emits pollutants. A new approach to the production of blended or high-volume mineral additive (HVMA) cement helps to improve its ecological compatibility. HVMA cement technology is based on the intergrinding of portland cement clinker, gypsum, mineral additives, and a special complex admixture. This new method increases the compressive strength of ordinary cement, improves durability of the cement-based materials, and--at the same time--uses inexpensive natural mineral additives or industrial by-products. This improvement leads to a reduction of energy consumption per unit of the cement produced. Higher strength, better durability, reduction of pollution at the clinker production stage, and decrease of landfill area occupied by industrial by-products, all provide ecological advantages for HVMA cement.

  14. Microscale Investigation of Arsenic Distribution and Species in Cement Product from Cement Kiln Coprocessing Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yufei; Xue, Jingchuan; Huang, Qifei

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As) in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O) were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, clinker was mixed water to prepare cement paste. EPMA results showed that As was generally distributed throughout the cement paste. As content in calcium silicate hydrates gel (C-S-H) was in low level, but higher than that in other cement mineral phases. This means that most of As is expected to form some compounds that disperse on the surfaces of cement mineral phases. Linear combination fitting (LCF) of the X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra revealed that As in the cement paste was predominantly As(V) and mainly existed as Mg3(AsO4)2, Ca3(AsO4)2, and Na2HAsO4. PMID:24223030

  15. Microscale investigation of arsenic distribution and species in cement product from cement kiln coprocessing wastes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufei; Xue, Jingchuan; Huang, Qifei

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As) in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O) were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, clinker was mixed water to prepare cement paste. EPMA results showed that As was generally distributed throughout the cement paste. As content in calcium silicate hydrates gel (C-S-H) was in low level, but higher than that in other cement mineral phases. This means that most of As is expected to form some compounds that disperse on the surfaces of cement mineral phases. Linear combination fitting (LCF) of the X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra revealed that As in the cement paste was predominantly As(V) and mainly existed as Mg3(AsO4)2, Ca3(AsO4)2, and Na2HAsO4.

  16. Extraoral Cementation Technique to Minimize Cement-Associated Peri-implant Marginal Bone Loss: Can a Thin Layer of Zinc Oxide Cement Provide Sufficient Retention?

    PubMed

    Frisch, Eberhard; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Weigl, Paul; Woelber, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the use of laboratory-fabricated crown intaglio replicas for extraorally prepared cementation of fixed restorations to implants. This technique minimizes excess cement and may therefore reduce the risk of cement-related marginal peri-implant bone loss. It is unclear whether the remaining thin layer of luting agent provides sufficient retention if low-adhesive zinc oxide (ZnO) cement is used. In 85 consecutive patients, 113 single crowns were cemented to implants using extraoral cementation technique (ECT) and ZnO cement. All patients were followed for 6 months and investigated for decementation. Seven events of decementation (incidence: 6.19%) were found in 7 patients (8.24%). ECT may represent a viable cementation technique for implant-supported single crowns, even using low-adhesion cements.

  17. Chloride-free set accelerated cement compositions and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, S.E.; Totten, P.L.; Childs, J.D.; Lindsey, D.W.

    1992-07-07

    This patent describes a method of cementing a conduit in a well bore penetrating a subterranean formation. It comprises introducing a cement composition into the space between the conduit and the walls of the well bore, the cement composition consisting essentially of hydraulic cement, water and a set tine accelerator.

  18. Hindered water motions in hardened cement pastes investigated over broad time and length scales.

    PubMed

    Bordallo, Heloisa N; Aldridge, Laurence P; Fouquet, Peter; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Unruh, Tobias; Wuttke, Joachim; Yokaichiya, Fabiano

    2009-10-01

    We investigated the dynamics of confined water in different hydrated cement pastes with minimized contributions of capillary water. It was found that the water motions are extremely reduced compared to those of bulk water. The onset of water mobility, which was modified by the local environment, was investigated with elastic temperature scans using the high-resolution neutron backscattering instrument SPHERES. Using a Cauchy-Lorenz distribution, the quasi-elastic signal observed in the spectra obtained by the backscattering spectrometer was analyzed, leading to the identification of rotational motions with relaxation times of 0.3 ns. Additionally, neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy was used to measure the water diffusion over the local network of pores. The motions observed in the NSE time scale were characterized by diffusion constants ranging from 0.6 to 1.1 x 10(-9) m(2) s(-1) most likely related to water molecules removed from the interface. In summary, our results indicate that the local diffusion observed in the gel pores of hardened cement pastes is on the order of that found in deeply supercooled water. Finally, the importance of the magnetic properties of cement pastes were discussed in relation to the observation of a quasi-elastic signal on the dried sample spectra measured using the time-of-flight spectrometer.

  19. Environmental Assessment of Different Cement Manufacturing ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Due to its high environmental impact and energy intensive production, the cement industry needs to adopt more energy efficient technologies to reduce its demand for fossil fuels and impact on the environment. Bearing in mind that cement is the most widely used material for housing and modern infrastructure, the aim of this paper is to analyse the Emergy and Ecological Footprint of different cement manufacturing processes for a particular cement plant. There are several mitigation measures that can be incorporated in the cement manufacturing process to reduce the demand for fossil fuels and consequently reduce the CO2 emissions. The mitigation measures considered in this paper were the use of alternative fuels and a more energy efficient kiln process. In order to estimate the sustainability effect of the aforementioned measures, Emergy and Ecological Footprint were calculated for four different scenarios. The results show that Emergy, due to the high input mass of raw material needed for clinker production, stays at about the same level. However, for the Ecological Footprint, the results show that by combining the use of alternative fuels together with a more energy efficient kiln process, the environmental impact of the cement manufacturing process can be lowered. The research paper presents an analysis of the sustainability of cement production , a major contributor to carbon emissions, with respect to using alternative fuels and a more efficient kiln. It show

  20. Dermatoses in cement workers in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y L; Wang, B J; Yeh, K C; Wang, J C; Kao, H H; Wang, M T; Shih, H C; Chen, C J

    1999-01-01

    Construction workers are known to have occupational dermatoses. The prevalence of such dermatoses was unknown in Taiwanese construction workers. The objective of this study was to determine the work exposure, prevalence of skin manifestations, and sensitivity to common contact allergens in cement workers of southern Taiwan. A total of 1147 current regular cement workers were telephone-interviewed about skin problems during the past 12 months, work exposure, and personal protection. Among those interviewed, 166 were examined and patch tested with common contact allergens. A high % of cement workers reported skin problems in the past 12 months. More men (13.9%) reported skin problems possibly related to work than women (5.4%). Prevalence was associated with lower use of gloves, duration of work as cement worker, and more time in jobs involving direct manual handling of cement, especially tiling. A high % of dermatitis was noted in the 166 workers examined, which correlated with reported skin problems. On patch testing, construction workers had a high frequency of sensitivity to chromate. Sensitivity to chromate or cobalt was associated with reported skin problems, or dorsal hand dermatitis on examination. These workers' dermatitis was under-diagnosed and inadequately managed. It is concluded that cement workers in southern Taiwan had a high prevalence of skin problems related to cement use. Protective measures, work practice, and physician education should be improved to prevent or manage such problems.

  1. Rebamipide Delivered by Brushite Cement Enhances Osteoblast and Macrophage Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pujari-Palmer, Michael; Pujari-Palmer, Shiuli; Engqvist, Håkan; Karlsson Ott, Marjam

    2015-01-01

    Many of the bioactive agents capable of stimulating osseous regeneration, such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), are limited by rapid degradation, a short bioactive half-life at the target site in vivo, or are prohibitively expensive to obtain in large quantities. Rebamipide, an amino acid modified hydroxylquinoline, can alter the expression of key mediators of bone anabolism, cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), BMP-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in diverse cell types such as mucosal and endothelial cells or chondrocytes. The present study investigates whether Rebamipide enhances proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts when delivered from brushite cement. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) quenching ability of Rebampide was tested in macrophages as a measure of bioactivity following drug release incubation times, up to 14 days. Rebamipide release from brushite occurrs via non-fickian diffusion, with a rapid linear release of 9.70% ±0.37% of drug per day for the first 5 days, and an average of 0.5%-1% per day thereafter for 30 days. Rebamipide slows the initial and final cement setting time by up to 3 and 1 minute, respectively, but does not significantly reduce the mechanical strength below 4% (weight percentage). Pre-osteoblast proliferation increases by 24% upon exposure to 0.4uM Rebamipide, and by up to 73% when Rebamipide is delivered via brushite cement. Low doses of Rebamipide do not adversely affect peak alkaline phosphatase activity in differentiating pre-osteoblasts. Rebamipide weakly stimulates proliferation in macrophages at low concentrations (118 ±7.4% at 1uM), and quenches ROS by 40-60%. This is the first investigation of Rebamipide in osteoblasts. PMID:26023912

  2. VIEW NORTHEAST, WEST FRONT OF PACKING SHED (BUILDING 20) AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW NORTHEAST, WEST FRONT OF PACKING SHED (BUILDING 20) AND BAMBOO STAND ALONG SOUTH FRONT - U.S. Plant Introduction Station, Packing Shed, 11601 Old Pond Road, Glenn Dale, Prince George's County, MD

  3. Most Americans Favor Larger Health Warnings on Cigarette Packs

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Most Americans Favor Larger Health Warnings on Cigarette Packs Even many smokers think these warnings should ... 31, 2017 FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette packs carry health warnings, but many Americans think ...

  4. Routine nasal packing follwoing nasal surgery-Is it necessary?

    PubMed

    Basha, S I; Gupta, D; Kaluskar, S K

    2005-01-01

    The practice of routine nasal packing after nasal surgery is usually customary and not evidence based. Post operative complications, while uncoumon, are sometimes pack related. A retrospective analysis of 110 patients who underwent a variety of nasal operations was performed to determine the incidence of complications when nasal packs were not routinely inserted 9 cases (8.2%) [6 out of these were revision surgeries] needed nasal packing for haemostasis at the end of surgery. 4 cases (3.6%) required to be packed in the immediate post operative period. One patient who required nasal packing developed a unilateral adhesion. No patient developed septal hematoma. The need for routine nasal packing is not supported. Packing should be indicated where there continuous bleeding at.

  5. Residual stress effects on fracture energies of cement-bone and cement-implant interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zor, Mehmet; Küçük, Mümin; Aksoy, Sami

    2002-04-01

    The effects of residual stresses, which are caused by the temperature difference arising after polymerisation of bone cement, on the fracture energies of cement bone and cement-implant interfaces have been examined by using both experimental and numerical works. Only fracture loads of the test specimen having interfacial cracks have been measured in the experimental stage. The values of fracture loads and temperature difference after polymerisation have been applied to finite element models of the test specimens to calculate critical J-integral values of these both interfaces in the numerical stage. In addition, fracture energies of bone and cement, have been obtained by experimentally, using three-point bending test method The results have shown that residual stresses can produce changes in the fracture energies of these bimaterial systems, especially in cement implant interface and J(Ic) values of interfaces are considerably smaller than the experimentally determined J(Ic) values of cement and bone.

  6. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1993-09-21

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

  7. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120.degree. C. to about 300.degree. C. to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate.

  8. Cemented and cementless fixation: results and techniques.

    PubMed

    Silverton, Craig D

    2006-01-01

    There are multiple reports of successful cemented and cementless total knee arthroplasty in the current literature. Although technically more demanding to implant, selected cementless designs, with nearly 20 years of follow-up, demonstrate near-equal success compared with cemented implants, the gold standard. Far more important than the decision to use a cemented or cementless implant is the use of precise technique, adequate balancing of the soft tissues, and proper overall alignment. Failure to achieve these basic principles can lead to early failure in any total knee replacement system.

  9. Binary Mixtures of Particles with Different Diffusivities Demix.

    PubMed

    Weber, Simon N; Weber, Christoph A; Frey, Erwin

    2016-02-05

    The influence of size differences, shape, mass, and persistent motion on phase separation in binary mixtures has been intensively studied. Here we focus on the exclusive role of diffusivity differences in binary mixtures of equal-sized particles. We find an effective attraction between the less diffusive particles, which are essentially caged in the surrounding species with the higher diffusion constant. This effect leads to phase separation for systems above a critical size: A single close-packed cluster made up of the less diffusive species emerges. Experiments for testing our predictions are outlined.

  10. Rate of CO2 Attack on Hydrated Class H Well Cement under Geologic Sequestration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kutchko, Barbara G.; Strazisar, Brian R.; Lowry, Gregory V.; Dzombak, David A.; Thaulow, Niels

    2008-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the degradation of hardened cement paste due to exposure to CO2 and brine under geologic sequestration conditions (T = 50 degrees C and 30.3 MPa). The goal was to determine the rate of reaction of hydrated cement exposed to supercritical CO2 and to CO2-saturated brine to assess the potential impact of degradation in existing wells on CO2 storage integrity. Two different forms of chemical alteration were observed. The supercritical CO2 alteration of cement was similar in process to cement in contact with atmospheric CO2 (ordinary carbonation), while alteration of cement exposed to CO2-saturated brine was typical of acid attack on cement. Extrapolation of the hydrated cement alteration rate measured for I year indicates a penetration depth range of 1.00 +/- 0.07 mm for the CO2-saturated brine and 1.68 +/- 0.24 mm for the supercritical CO2 after 30 years. These penetration depths are consistent with observations of field samples from an enhanced oil recovery site after 30 years of exposure to CO2-saturated brine under similar temperature and pressure conditions. These results suggest that significant degradation due to matrix diffusion of CO2 in intact Class H neat hydrated cement is unlikely on time scales of decades.

  11. Assessing the effect of cement-steel interface on well casing corrosion in aqueous CO2 environments

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jiabin; Carey, James W; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2010-01-01

    CO{sub 2} leakage is a critical safety concern for geologic storage. In wellbore environments, important leakage paths include the rock-cement and cement-casing interfaces. If the cement-casing interface is filled with escaping CO{sub 2}, the well casing directly contacts the CO{sub 2}. This can cause severe corrosion in the presence of water. This paper studies the effect of steel-cement interface gaps, ranging from 1 mm to 0 um, on casing corrosion. Corrosion kinetics were measured employing electrochemical techniques including linear polarization resistance, open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the corrosion of steel is not significant where the gap between steel and cement is small ({le} 100 {micro}m). Corrosion rates are controlled by the diffusion of corrosive species (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and H{sup +}) along the interface. In contrast, steel corrosion is severe in a broad gap where the corrosion process is limited only by the reaction kinetics of steel and corrosive species. The threshold leading to severe corrosion in terms of the cement-steel interface size (100 {micro}m) was determined. Our research clarifies a corrosion scenario at the cement-steel interface. Casing steel corrosion is initiated when attacked by corrosive species at the cement-steel interface. For relatively tight interfaces, this results in a slow thinning of the casing and expansion of the interface width. If the gap increases beyond the critical threshold size, the corrosion rate increases significantly, and a potentially damaging cycle of corrosion and interface expansion is developed.

  12. Leachability of decontamination reagents from cement waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Piciulo, P.L.; Davis, M.S.; Adams, J.W.

    1984-11-26

    Brookhaven National Laboratory, in order to provide technical information needed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the adequacy of near-surface disposal of decontamination wstes, has begun to study the leachability of organic reagents from solidified simulated decontamination wastes. Laboratory-scale cement waste forms containing EDTA, picolinic acid or simulated LOMI decontamination reagent were leach tested. Samples containing an organic reagent on either mixed bed ion-exchange resins or anion exchange resins were tested. A fixed interval leach procedure was used, as well as the standard procedure ANS 16.1. The leachability indices measured for the release of the acid from resin/cement composites are: 10.1 for EDTA on mixed bed resins; 9.1 for picolinic acid on mixed bed resins; 9.2 for picolinic acid on anion exchange resins; 8.8 for picolinic acid in forms containing simulated low oxidation metallic ion (LOMI) reagent on mixed bed resins and 8.7 for picolinic acid in forms containing simulated LOMI reagent on anion exchange resins. The leachability indices measured varied with leach time and the data indicate that the release mechanism may not be simply diffusion controlled. 5 references, 2 tables.

  13. The Powder-Pack Nitriding Process: Growth Kinetics of Nitride Layers on Pure Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Ortiz-Dominguez, M.; Elias-Espinosa, M.; Vega-Morón, R. C.; Bravo-Bárcenas, D.; Figueroa-López, U.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the growth kinetics of nitride layers that develop during the powder-pack nitriding process on the surface of ARMCO pure iron was estimated. The powder-pack nitriding of pure iron was performed according to the Pulnieren© (H.E.F. Durferrit) method using a "Pulnier" powder and an activator, at 798-848 K with different exposure times (2-12 h) for each temperature. In addition, for the entire set of nitriding conditions, three different activator/"Pulnier" powder ratios (0.20, 0.25, and 0.35) were used to evaluate the activation level during the growth of nitride layers. The kinetics of the nitride layers over the surface of ARMCO pure iron were estimated by two mathematical approaches, that consider the mass balance equations at the growth interphases. The resulting expressions for the effective diffusion coefficients in the nitride layers were evaluated as a function of nitriding temperatures and activator/"Pulnier" powder ratio. Finally, based on the experimental parameters ascribed to the powder-pack nitriding process, two expressions were proposed to estimate the nitride layer thicknesses at 798 and 823 K after 9 h of exposure for each temperature, to validate the diffusion models used in this work.

  14. Mineral scale in gravel packed wells

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, T.; Soereide, F.

    1994-12-31

    Mineral scales of barium, strontium and calcium sulphate are well known to the oil industry. The most common scale is calcium carbonate. However carbonate, unlike the three other scales mentioned, is acid soluble and it is perhaps the sulphate scales which gives the greatest problems. One additional feature of the sulphate scales is that they very often coprecipitate radium sulphate which is radioactive and difficult to dispose of and troublesome to work with from a health and safety aspect. This paper presents the production history of gravel packed wells which have experienced the deposition and removal of mainly strontium sulphate (SrSO{sub 4}) scale. A scale prediction program is used to analyze the scale tendencies under both equilibrium and kinetic controlled conditions. The flow and scale characteristics of gravel packed and naturally completed wells are compared.

  15. Body Packing: From Seizures to Laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Janczak, Joanna M.; Beutner, Ulrich; Hasler, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Body packing is a common method for illegal drug trafficking. Complications associated with body packing can be severe and even lead to rapid death. Thus, a timely diagnosis is warranted. As most body packers initially do not show any symptoms, making a correct diagnosis can be rather challenging. We describe a case of a 41-year-old male, who was admitted with an epileptic seizure and who turned out to be a cocaine intoxicated body packer. Due to neurological and cardiovascular deterioration an emergency surgery was performed. Four bags of cocaine could be removed. We discuss the current management regimen in symptomatic and asymptomatic body packers and highlight pearls and pitfalls with diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25883813

  16. Is incest common in gray wolf packs?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.; Meier, T.; Geffen, E.; Mech, L.D.; Burch, J.W.; Adams, L.G.; Wayne, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Wolf packs generally consist of a breeding pair and their maturing offspring that help provision and protect pack young. Because the reproductive tenure in wolves often is short, reproductively mature offspring might replace their parents, resulting in sibling or parent-offspring matings. To determine the extent of incestuous pairings, we measure relatedness based on variability in 20 microsatellite loci of mated pairs, parent-offspring pairs and siblings in two populations of gray wolves. Our 16 sampled mated pairs had values of relatedness not overlapping those of known parent-offspring or sibling dyads, which is consistent with their being unrelated or distantly related. These results suggest that full siblings or a parent and their offspring rarely mate and that incest avoidance is an important constraint on gray wolf behavioral ecology.

  17. Radiographic appearance of commonly used cements in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pette, Gregory A; Ganeles, Jeffrey; Norkin, Frederic J

    2013-01-01

    Cement-retained restorations allow for a conventional fixed partial denture approach to restoring dental implants. However, inadequate removal of excess cement at the time of cementation may introduce a severe complication: cement-induced peri-implantitis. Radiopaque cements are more easily detected on radiographs and should improve the recognition of extravasated cement at the time of insertion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of commercially available cements in vitro. Eighteen different cements commonly used for luting restorations to implants were tested at both 0.5- and 1.0-mm thicknesses. The cements examined were zinc oxide eugenol, zinc oxide, zinc polycarboxylate, zinc phosphate, resin-reinforced glass ionomer, urethane resin, resin, and composite resin. Two samples of each cement thickness underwent standardized radiography next to an aluminum step wedge as a reference. The mean grayscale value of each of the nine 1-mm steps in the step wedge were used as reference values and compared to each of the cement samples. Temp Bond Clear (resin), IMProv (urethane resin), Premier Implant Cement (resin), and Temrex NE (resin) were not radiographically detectable at either sample thickness. Cements containing zinc were the most detectable upon radiographic analysis. There are significant differences in the radiopacity of many commonly used cements. Since cementinduced peri-implantitis can lead to late implant failure, cements that can be visualized radiographically may reduce the incidence of this problem.

  18. Radiopacity Evaluation of Contemporary Luting Cements by Digitization of Images

    PubMed Central

    Reis, José Maurício dos Santos Nunes; Jorge, Érica Gouveia; Ribeiro, João Gustavo Rabelo; Pinelli, Ligia Antunes Pereira; Abi-Rached, Filipe de Oliveira; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of two conventional cements (Zinc Cement and Ketac Cem Easymix), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX Luting 2) and six resin cements (Multilink, Bistite II DC, RelyX ARC, Fill Magic Dual Cement, Enforce and Panavia F) by digitization of images. Methods. Five disc-shaped specimens (10 × 1.0 mm) were made for each material, according to ISO 4049. After setting of the cements, radiographs were made using occlusal films and a graduated aluminum stepwedge varying from 1.0 to 16 mm in thickness. The radiographs were digitized, and the radiopacity of the cements was compared with the aluminum stepwedge using the software VIXWIN-2000. Data (mmAl) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Results. The Zinc Cement was the most radiopaque material tested (P < 0.05). The resin cements presented higher radiopacity (P < 0.05) than the conventional (Ketac Cem Easymix) or resin-modified glass ionomer (RelyX Luting 2) cements, except for the Fill Magic Dual Cement and Enforce. The Multilink presented the highest radiopacity (P < 0.05) among the resin cements. Conclusion. The glass ionomer-based cements (Ketac Cem Easymix and RelyX Luting 2) and the resin cements (Fill Magic Dual Cement and Enforce) showed lower radiopacity values than the minimum recommended by the ISO standard. PMID:23008777

  19. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  20. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  1. 29 CFR 784.135 - “Packing.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... packing of the various named marine products at sea as an incident to, or in conjunction with, the fishing..., sizing, and placing layers of crushed ice in the containers are deemed a part of packing when performed... to no more than the simple operation, of packing the product in chipped or crushed ice in...

  2. 29 CFR 784.135 - “Packing.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... packing of the various named marine products at sea as an incident to, or in conjunction with, the fishing..., sizing, and placing layers of crushed ice in the containers are deemed a part of packing when performed... to no more than the simple operation, of packing the product in chipped or crushed ice in...

  3. 29 CFR 784.135 - “Packing.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... packing of the various named marine products at sea as an incident to, or in conjunction with, the fishing..., sizing, and placing layers of crushed ice in the containers are deemed a part of packing when performed... to no more than the simple operation, of packing the product in chipped or crushed ice in...

  4. 29 CFR 784.135 - “Packing.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... packing of the various named marine products at sea as an incident to, or in conjunction with, the fishing..., sizing, and placing layers of crushed ice in the containers are deemed a part of packing when performed... to no more than the simple operation, of packing the product in chipped or crushed ice in...

  5. 29 CFR 784.135 - “Packing.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... packing of the various named marine products at sea as an incident to, or in conjunction with, the fishing..., sizing, and placing layers of crushed ice in the containers are deemed a part of packing when performed... to no more than the simple operation, of packing the product in chipped or crushed ice in...

  6. 48 CFR 211.272 - Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., packaging, and packing. 211.272 Section 211.272 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Requirements Documents 211.272 Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing. Use the provision at 252.211-7004, Alternate Preservation, Packaging, and Packing, in solicitations which include...

  7. 48 CFR 452.247-72 - Packing for Domestic Shipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Packing for Domestic Shipment. 452.247-72 Section 452.247-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Packing for Domestic Shipment. As prescribed in 447.305-10(b), insert the following clause: Packing...

  8. 48 CFR 452.247-73 - Packing for Overseas Shipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Packing for Overseas Shipment. 452.247-73 Section 452.247-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Packing for Overseas Shipment. As prescribed in 447.305-10(c), insert the following clause: Packing...

  9. 48 CFR 552.211-77 - Packing List.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Packing List. 552.211-77... FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 552.211-77 Packing List. As prescribed in 511.204(c), insert the following clause: Packing List (FEB 1996) (a) A...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1312 - Tolerances for standard pack.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tolerances for standard pack. 51.1312 Section 51.1312... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Winter Pears 1 Standard Pack § 51.1312 Tolerances for standard pack... are both stated, an additional 10 percent tolerance shall be allowed for pears which are larger...

  11. Steam injection well gravel pack material of sintered bauxite

    SciTech Connect

    Elson, T. D.; Millhone, R. S.

    1985-08-27

    A packing material useful in a gravel pack for open or cased wells or in a prepack for use in steam or hot fluid injection and production wells. The packing material is a material which is insoluble in high temperature caustic fluids and subsurface formation fluids. Sintered bauxite is a claimed material.

  12. 27 CFR 24.255 - Bottling or packing wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bottling or packing wine..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine Bottling, Packing, and Labeling of Wine § 24.255 Bottling or packing wine. (a) General. Proprietors of a bonded wine premises...

  13. 27 CFR 24.255 - Bottling or packing wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bottling or packing wine..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine Bottling, Packing, and Labeling of Wine § 24.255 Bottling or packing wine. (a) General. Proprietors of a bonded wine premises...

  14. 27 CFR 24.255 - Bottling or packing wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bottling or packing wine..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine Bottling, Packing, and Labeling of Wine § 24.255 Bottling or packing wine. (a) General. Proprietors of a bonded wine premises...

  15. 27 CFR 24.255 - Bottling or packing wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bottling or packing wine..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine Bottling, Packing, and Labeling of Wine § 24.255 Bottling or packing wine. (a) General. Proprietors of a bonded wine premises...

  16. 27 CFR 24.255 - Bottling or packing wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bottling or packing wine..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine Bottling, Packing, and Labeling of Wine § 24.255 Bottling or packing wine. (a) General. Proprietors of a bonded wine premises...

  17. 7 CFR 51.2840 - Export packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export packing requirements. 51.2840 Section 51.2840 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards...) Export Packing Requirements § 51.2840 Export packing requirements. Onions specified as meeting...

  18. 48 CFR 552.211-87 - Export packing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Export packing. 552.211-87... FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 552.211-87 Export packing. As prescribed in 511.204(b)(7), insert the following clause: Export Packing (JAN 2010)...

  19. 1. Contextual view looking west, showing packing house and Union ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Contextual view looking west, showing packing house and Union Ice building, which is located to the north of Packing House (right hand side in photo) - College Heights Lemon Packing House, 519-532 West First Street, Claremont, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 36 CFR 34.10 - Saddle and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Saddle and pack animals. 34... INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.10 Saddle and pack animals. The use of saddle and pack animals is prohibited without a permit from the Superintendent....

  1. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of...

  2. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of...

  3. 36 CFR 34.10 - Saddle and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Saddle and pack animals. 34... INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.10 Saddle and pack animals. The use of saddle and pack animals is prohibited without a permit from the Superintendent....

  4. 36 CFR 1002.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 1002... AND RECREATION § 1002.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of transporting equipment. (b) The use...

  5. 36 CFR 1002.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 1002... AND RECREATION § 1002.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of transporting equipment. (b) The use...

  6. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of...

  7. 36 CFR 34.10 - Saddle and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Saddle and pack animals. 34... INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.10 Saddle and pack animals. The use of saddle and pack animals is prohibited without a permit from the Superintendent....

  8. 36 CFR 34.10 - Saddle and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Saddle and pack animals. 34... INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.10 Saddle and pack animals. The use of saddle and pack animals is prohibited without a permit from the Superintendent....

  9. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of...

  10. 36 CFR 1002.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 1002... AND RECREATION § 1002.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of transporting equipment. (b) The use...

  11. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of...

  12. 36 CFR 1002.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 1002... AND RECREATION § 1002.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of transporting equipment. (b) The use...

  13. 36 CFR 34.10 - Saddle and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Saddle and pack animals. 34... INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.10 Saddle and pack animals. The use of saddle and pack animals is prohibited without a permit from the Superintendent....

  14. 36 CFR 1002.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Horses and pack animals. 1002... AND RECREATION § 1002.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of transporting equipment. (b) The use...

  15. Protection of gravel pack well completions during steam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, D.N.; Northrop, P.S.

    1993-08-31

    A method is described for protecting a gravel pack completion in a well through which steam is injected into a subterranean formation wherein gravel used to form said gravel pack completion contains silica; said method comprising: passing said steam through a silica-containing particulate material at the surface prior to injecting said steam through said gravel pack well completion.

  16. Influence of the temperature on the cement disintegration in cement-retained implant restorations.

    PubMed

    Linkevicius, Tomas; Vindasiute, Egle; Puisys, Algirdas; Linkeviciene, Laura; Svediene, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the average disintegration temperature of three dental cements used for the cementation of the implant-supported prostheses. One hundred and twenty metal frameworks were fabricated and cemented on the prosthetic abutments with different dental cements. After heat treatment in the dental furnace, the samples were set for the separation to test the integration of the cement. Results have shown that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RGIC) exhibited the lowest disintegration temperature (p<0.05), but there was no difference between zinc phosphate cement (ZPC) and dual cure resin cement (RC) (p>0.05). Average separation temperatures: RGIC - 306 ± 23 °C, RC - 363 ± 71 °C, it could not be calculated for the ZPC due to the eight unseparated specimens. Within the limitations of the study, it could be concluded that RGIC cement disintegrates at the lowest temperature and ZPC is not prone to break down after exposure to temperature.

  17. Cementation of prosthetic restorations: from conventional cementation to dental bonding concept.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Marcela Filié; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves

    2011-05-01

    The cementation procedure of metal-free fixed partial dentures exhibits special characteristics about the porcelains and cementation agents, which turns the correct association between these materials necessary. Our purpose in this literature review was to point the main groups of cements associated to metal-free restoration and discuss about the advantages, disadvantages, and recommendations of each one. Our search was confined to the electronic databases PubMed and SciELO and to books about this matter. There are essentially 3 types of hard cement: conventional, resin, or a hybrid of the two. The metal-free restorations can be fixed with conventional or resin cements. The right choice of luting material is of vital importance to the longevity of dental restorative materials. Conventional cements are advantageous when good compressive straight, good film thickness, and water dissolution resistance are necessary. However, they need an ideal preparation, and they are not acid dissolution resistant. Conventional cements are indicated to porcelains that cannot be acid etched. Resin cements represent the choice to metal-free restoration cementation because they present better physical properties and aesthetic than conventional agents.

  18. Partitioning And Packing Equations For Parallel Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arpasi, Dale J.; Milner, Edward J.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithm developed to identify parallelism in set of coupled ordinary differential equations that describe physical system and to divide set into parallel computational paths, along with parts of solution proceeds independently of others during at least part of time. Path-identifying algorithm creates number of paths consisting of equations that must be computed serially and table that gives dependent and independent arguments and "can start," "can end," and "must end" times of each equation. "Must end" time used subsequently by packing algorithm.

  19. Sensory Analysis of Stored Tray Pack Foods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    Milk chocolate brown. ODOR: Sweet, typical of heat processed milk cocoa . FLAVOR: Sweet, full milk cocoa flavor. TEXTURE: Smooth, medium thick...7B DEGREES 100 DEGREES 6. DESSERTS Chocolate Pudding There was no significant finding with this Tray Pack item. Marble Cake At 70°F, the effect...and 6 months. The main effect of temperature on acceptability of this item was not significant. Chocolate Cake At 70°F, there was a significant

  20. Convection-diffusion effects in marathon race dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the face of the recent terrorist attack event on the 2013 Boston Marathon, the increasing participation of recreational runners in large marathon races has imposed important logistical and safety issues for organizers and city authorities. An accurate understanding of the dynamics of the marathon pack along the race course can provide important insights for improving safety and performance of these events. On the other hand, marathon races can be seen as a model of pedestrian movement under confined conditions. This work used data of the 2011 Chicago Marathon event for modeling the dynamics of the marathon pack from the corral zone to the finish line. By considering the marathon pack as a set of particles moving along the race course, the dynamics are modeled as a convection-diffusion partial differential equation with position-dependent mean velocity and diffusion coefficient. A least-squares problem is posed and solved with optimization techniques for fitting field data from the 2011 Chicago Marathon. It was obtained that the mean pack velocity decreases while the diffusion coefficient increases with distance. This means that the dispersion rate of the initially compact marathon pack increases as the marathon race evolves along the race course.