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Sample records for package astm type

  1. Microbial ranking of porous packaging materials (exposure chamber method), ASTM method: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Placencia, A M; Peeler, J T

    1999-01-01

    A collaborative study involving 11 laboratories was conducted to measure the microbial barrier effectiveness of porous medical packaging. Two randomly cut samples from each of 6 commercially available porous materials and one positive and one negative control were tested by one operator in each of 11 laboratories. Microbial barrier effectiveness was measured in terms of logarithm reduction value (LRV), which reflects the log10 microbial penetration of the material being tested. The logarithm of the final concentration is subtracted from that of the initial concentration to obtain the LRV. Thus the higher the LRV, the better the barrier. Repeatability standard deviations ranged from 6.42 to 16.40; reproducibility standard deviations ranged from 15.50 to 22.70. Materials B(53), C(50), D(CT), and E(45MF) differ significantly from the positive control. The microbial ranking of porous packaging materials (exposure chamber method), ASTM method, has been adopted First Action by AOAC INTERNATIONAL.

  2. Type B drum packages

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, J.C.

    1994-08-01

    The Type B drum packages (TBD) are conceptualized as a family of containers in which a single 208 L or 114 L (55 gal or 30 gal) drum containing Type B quantities of radioactive material (RAM) can be packaged for shipment. The TBD containers are being developed to fill a void in the packaging and transportation capabilities of the U.S. Department of Energy as no container packaging single drums of Type B RAM exists offering double containment. Several multiple-drum containers currently exist, as well as a number of shielded casks, but the size and weight of these containers present many operational challenges for single-drum shipments. As an alternative, the TBD containers will offer up to three shielded versions (light, medium, and heavy) and one unshielded version, each offering single or optional double containment for a single drum. To reduce operational complexity, all versions will share similar design and operational features where possible. The primary users of the TBD containers are envisioned to be any organization desiring to ship single drums of Type B RAM, such as laboratories, waste retrieval activities, emergency response teams, etc. Currently, the TBD conceptual design is being developed with the final design and analysis to be completed in 1995 to 1996. Testing and certification of the unshielded version are planned to be completed in 1996 to 1997 with production to begin in 1997 to 1998.

  3. Final Report, Volume 5, Data Package for ASTM A923 Supporting Inclusion of A890-5 Super Duplex Stainless Steel (Cast Equivalent of 2507)

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    Volume 5 is the Data Package for the evaluation of Super Duplex Stainless Steel Castings prepared at the end of work comprised in volumes 3 and 4. The document deals with the various evaluation methods used in the work documented in volume 3 and 4. This document covers materials regarding evaluation of the A890-5A material in terms of inclusion in ASTM A923. The various tests which were conducted on the A890-5A material are included in this document.

  4. Final Report, Volume 5, Data Package for ASTM A923 Supporting Inclusion of A890-5A Super Duplex Stainless Steel ( Cast Equivalent of 2507)

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    Volume 5 is the Data Package for the evaluation of Super Duplex Stainless Steel Castings prepared at the end of work comprised in volumes 3 and 4. The document deals with the various evaluation methods used in the work documented in volume 3 and 4. This document covers materials regarding evaluation of the A890-5A material in terms of inclusion in ASTM A923. The various tests which were conducted on the A890-5A material are included in this document.

  5. Standard specification for nonoriented electrical steel, fully processed types (metric). ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-6 on Magnetic Properties and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A06.02 on Materials Specifications. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1998 and published September 1998. Originally published as A 677M-83. Last previous edition was A 677M-96.

  6. Standard specification for non-oriented electrical steel fully processed types. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-6 on Magnetic Properties and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A06.02 on Materials Specifications. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1998 and published September 1998. Originally published as A 677-73. Last previous edition A 677-96.

  7. Type A radioactive liquid sample packaging family

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.S.

    1995-11-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed two packagings that can be used to ship Type A quantities of radioactive liquids. WHC designed these packagings to take advantage of commercially available items where feasible to reduce the overall packaging cost. The Hedgehog packaging can ship up to one liter of Type A radioactive liquid with no shielding and 15 cm of distance between the liquid and the package exterior, or 30 ml of liquid with 3.8 cm of stainless steel shielding and 19 cm of distance between the liquid and the package exterior. The One Liter Shipper can ship up to one liter of Type A radioactive liquid that does not require shielding.

  8. Lessons learned during Type A Packaging testing

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.H.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    For the past 6 years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Facility Safety Analysis (EH-32) has contracted Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct compliance testing on DOE Type A packagings. The packagings are tested for compliance with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A, general packaging, Type A requirements. The DOE has shared the Type A packaging information throughout the nuclear materials transportation community. During testing, there have been recurring areas of packaging design that resulted in testing delays and/or initial failure. The lessons learned during the testing are considered a valuable resource. DOE requested that WHC share this resource. By sharing what is and can be encountered during packaging testing, individuals will hopefully avoid past mistakes.

  9. 49 CFR 173.415 - Authorized Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Authorized Type A packages. 173.415 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.415 Authorized Type A packages... A2 as appropriate: (a) DOT Specification 7A (see § 178.350 of this subchapter) Type A general...

  10. 49 CFR 173.415 - Authorized Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Authorized Type A packages. 173.415 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.415 Authorized Type A packages... A2 as appropriate: (a) DOT Specification 7A (see § 178.350 of this subchapter) Type A general...

  11. 49 CFR 173.415 - Authorized Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Authorized Type A packages. 173.415 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.415 Authorized Type A packages... A2 as appropriate: (a) DOT Specification 7A (see § 178.350 of this subchapter) Type A general...

  12. 49 CFR 173.413 - Requirements for Type B packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... packages. Except as provided in § 173.416, each Type B(U) or Type B(M) package must be designed and... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for Type B packages. 173.413 Section 173.413 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  13. 49 CFR 173.416 - Authorized Type B packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.416 Authorized Type B packages... for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, No. TS-R-1” (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter)...

  14. 49 CFR 173.416 - Authorized Type B packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.416 Authorized Type B packages... for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, No. TS-R-1” (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter)...

  15. Fuel and Fuel System Materials Compatibility Test Program for A JP-8+100 Fuel Additive. Volume 1: Thermal Stability Additive Package BetzDearborn Spec Aid(Registered) 8Q462

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    detergent/dispersant component in the additive package.) ASTM D4054 and D-2-1137 requires the evaluation results to be based on a 4x fuel additive...specification requirements of ASTM D1655. The 93-POSF-2980 is a Merox treated fuel. The 92-POSF-2926 is a hydro treated fuel which oxidizes at a...TEST SPECIFICATION / DOCUMENT Tensile / Elongation ASTM D-1414 (Type I / O Rings) ASTM D-412 Type II Compression Set

  16. 49 CFR 173.415 - Authorized Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.415 Authorized Type A packages... detailed description of each test performed including equipment used, and the damage to each item of the... fissile materials in 10 CFR part 71 and is used in accordance with § 173.471. (c) Any Type B(U) or Type...

  17. EARLY TESTS OF DRUM TYPE PACKAGINGS - THE LEWALLEN REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.

    2010-07-29

    The need for robust packagings for radioactive materials (RAM) was recognized from the earliest days of the nuclear industry. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant developed a packaging for shipment of Pu in the early 1960's, which became the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 6M specification package. The design concepts were employed in other early packagings. Extensive tests of these at Savannah River Laboratory (now Savannah River National Laboratory) were performed in 1969 and 1970. The results of these tests were reported in 'Drum and Board-Type Insulation Overpacks of Shipping Packages for Radioactive Materials', by E. E. Lewallen. The Lewallen Report was foundational to design of subsequent drum type RAM packaging. This paper summarizes this important early study of drum type packagings. The Lewallen Report demonstrated the ability packagings employing drum and insulation board overpacks and engineered containment vessels to meet the Type B package requirements. Because of the results of the Lewallen Report, package designers showed high concern for thermal protection of 'Celotex'. Subsequent packages addressed this by following strategies like those recommended by Lewallen and by internal metal shields and supplemental, encapsulated insulation disks, as in 9975. The guidance provide by the Lewallen Report was employed in design of a large number of drum size packagings over the following three decades. With the increased public concern over transportation of radioactive materials and recognition of the need for larger margins of safety, more sophisticated and complex packages have been developed and have replaced the simple packagings developed under the Lewallen Report paradigm.

  18. Sensitization Behavior of Type 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel: Confronting DL-EPR Test and Practice W of ASTM A763

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, Taís Campos; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes; Sayeg, Isaac Jamil; Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2014-06-01

    Stainless steels employed for manufacturing automotive exhaust systems must withstand severe thermal cycles, corrosive environment due to urea decomposition, and welding operations. AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel can be considered a low-cost alternative for this application. However, depending on the manufacturing conditions during welding cycles, this material can be sensitized due to the precipitation of chromium carbides at grain boundaries. In this work, the intergranular corrosion resistances of the AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel were evaluated after annealing at 300, 500, and 700 °C for 2, 4, and 6 h. Solution-annealed samples were also tested for comparison purposes. Two methodologies were used to assess the sensitization behavior of the 409 stainless steel samples: the first one was based on the ASTM A763 (practice W), while the second one was based on the double-loop electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation test. It was possible to identify that the annealing treatment performed at 500 °C was more critical to the occurrence of intergranular corrosion.

  19. Operating and maintenance instructions for the Hedgehog sample package (A DOT 7A Type A Package)

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.S.

    1995-04-07

    The Operating and Maintenance Instructions for the HEDGEHOG Sample Package describe the sequence of operations required to use this package as a US Department of Transportation (DOT) Requirements Specification 7A, Type A package for radioactive materials (RAM). This instruction includes air shipment in accordance with the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Dangerous Goods Regulations, as well as the DOT. This package can be used to ship up to one liter of radioactive liquid without shielding and up to 250 ml of radioactive liquid that requires shielding.

  20. Packaging design criteria for the Type B Drum

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.S.; Smith, R.J.; Wells, A.H.

    1995-09-01

    The Type B Drum package is a transportation cask capable of shipping a single 55-gal (208 L) drum of transuranic (TRU) waste. The Type B Drum is smaller than existing certified packages, such as the TRUPACT-II cask, but will allow payloads with higher thermal and gas generation rates, thus providing greater operational flexibility. The Type B Drum package has double containment so that plutonium contents and other radioactive material may be transported in Type B quantities. Conceptual designs of unshielded and shielded versions of the Type B Drum were completed in Report on the Conceptual Design of the Unshielded Type B Drum Packaging and Report on the Conceptual Design of the Shielded type B Drum Packaging (WEC 1994a, WEC 1994b), which demonstrated the Type B Drum to be a viable packaging system. A Type B package containment system must withstand the normal conditions of transport and the hypothetical accident conditions, which include a 9-m (30-ft) drop onto an unyielding surface and a 1-m (3-ft) drop onto a 15-cm (6-in.) diameter pin, and a fire and immersion scenarios.

  1. THERMAL UPGRADING OF 9977 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL (RAM) TYPE B PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.; Abramczyk, G.

    2012-03-26

    The 9977 package is a radioactive material package that was originally certified to ship Heat Sources and RTG contents up to 19 watts and it is now being reviewed to significantly expand its contents in support of additional DOE missions. Thermal upgrading will be accomplished by employing stacked 3013 containers, a 3013 aluminum spacer and an external aluminum sleeve for enhanced heat transfer. The 7th Addendum to the original 9977 package Safety Basis Report describing these modifications is under review for the DOE certification. The analyses described in this paper show that this well-designed and conservatively analyzed package can be upgraded to carry contents with decay heat up to 38 watts with some simple design modifications. The Model 9977 package has been designed as a replacement for the Department of Transportation (DOT) Fissile Specification 6M package. The 9977 package is a very versatile Type B package which is certified to transport and store a wide spectrum of radioactive materials. The package was analyzed quite conservatively to increase its usefulness and store different payload configurations. Its versatility is evident from several daughter packages such as the 9978 and H1700, and several addendums where the payloads have been modified to suit the Shipper's needs without additional testing.

  2. TYPE A FISSILE PACKAGING FOR AIR TRANSPORT PROJECT OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Eberl, K.; Blanton, P.

    2013-10-11

    This paper presents the project status of the Model 9980, a new Type A fissile packaging for use in air transport. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed this new packaging to be a light weight (<150-lb), drum-style package and prepared a Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) for submission to the DOE/EM. The package design incorporates unique features and engineered materials specifically designed to minimize packaging weight and to be in compliance with 10CFR71 requirements. Prototypes were fabricated and tested to evaluate the design when subjected to Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). An overview of the design details, results of the regulatory testing, and lessons learned from the prototype fabrication for the 9980 will be presented.

  3. Development of an Air Transport Type A Fissile Package

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Ebert, K.

    2011-07-13

    This paper presents the summary of testing by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to support development of a light weight (<140 lbs) air transport qualified Type A Fissile Packaging. The package design incorporates features and materials specifically designed to minimize packaging weight. The light weight package is being designed to provide confinement to the contents when subjected to the normal and hypothetical conditions required of an air transportable Type A Fissile radioactive material shipping package. The objective of these tests was to provide design input to the final design for the LORX Type A Fissile Air Transport Packaging when subjected to the performance requirements of the drop, crush and puncture probe test of 10CFR71. The post test evaluation of the prototype packages indicates that all of the tested designs would satisfactorily confine the content within the packaging. The differences in the performance of the prototypes varied significantly depending on the core materials and their relative densities. Information gathered from these tests is being used to develop the final design for the Department of Homeland Security.

  4. DOE evaluation document for DOT 7A Type A packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Edling, D.A.; Hopkins, D.R.; Williams, R.L.

    1987-03-01

    This document is a support document for the ''DOE Evaluation Document for DOT 7A Type A Packaging,'' MLM-3245, March 1987. Provided herein are details concerning the performance requirements specified in 178.350 Specification 7A, General Packaging, Type A. MLM-3245 references appropriate sections in this document. This document does not by itself meet the documentation requirements specified in 49 CFR 173.415 and has compliance value only when used in conjunction with MLM-3245.

  5. Poststapedectomy hearing gain: comparison of a Teflon (fluoroplastic ASTM F 754) prosthesis with a Schuknecht-type wire/Teflon prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Zepeda-López, Emilia Guadalupe; Bello-Mora, Antonio; Félix-Trujillo, Manuel Martín

    2005-11-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to compare poststapedectomy hearing gain in study-eligible patients who had received a Teflon (fluoroplastic ASTM F 754) prosthesis (study group; n = 76) with hearing gain achieved in a matched group (by age, sex, and degree of hypoacusis) of patients who had received a Schuknecht-type wire/Teflon prosthesis (control group; n = 70). All procedures had been performed by the authors at our institution between Jan. 2, 1994, and Dec. 31, 1997. Airway averages at low, medium, and high frequencies were estimated on the basis ofpre- and postoperative audiologic evaluations, as were total air-bone gaps at 7 frequencies between 125 and 8, 000 Hz. We found that the study group achieved a significantly greater degree of hearing gain at 125 and 250 Hz and significantly better closure of the air-bone gap at 250, 500, 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 Hz. The hearing outcomes among patients in the study group were excellent.

  6. Potential Vulnerability Issues for Drum-Type Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Hagler, L.B.; Sheaffer, M.K.; Anderson, B.L.; Hafner, R.S.; Witte, M.C.

    2000-05-24

    Type B and Type A fissile drum packages are required to undergo a series of tests that simulate both normal conditions of transport (NCT) and hypothetical accident conditions (HAC) as specified in 10 CFR Part 71. In particular for HAC, it must be demonstrated that the package can withstand a 30 ft. drop in the most unfavorable orientation without damage that would compromise its ability to survive a subsequent regulatory fire test. Historically, it has usually been assumed that the most unfavorable orientations are those that allow the maximum amount of available kinetic energy to be used for package deformation. Therefore, drop test orientations have been mostly limited to Top-Down, Bottom-Down, Side, and C.G. Over Top-Corner. (Where C.G. refers to the center of gravity of the package.) Here, it is shown that shallow angle top impact, where a portion of the translational kinetic energy of the package is transformed into rotational kinetic energy at impact, may also be a likely orientation that will lead to failure of drum packages that use bolted ring closures.

  7. DOT-7A Type A packaging design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L.

    1995-01-23

    The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide instruction for designing a U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) Type A packaging. Another purpose for this Design Guide is to support the evaluation and testing activities that are performed on new designs by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) test facility. This evaluation and testing program is called the DOT-7A Program. When an applicant has determined that a DOT-7A packaging is needed and not commercially available, a design may be created according to this document. The design should include a packaging drawing, specifications, analysis report, operating instructions, and a Packaging Qualification Checklist; all of which should be forwarded to a DOE/HQ approved test facility for evaluation and testing. This report is being submitted through the Engineering Documentation System so that it may be used for reference and information purposes.

  8. 49 CFR 178.350 - Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Packagings for Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 178.350 Specification 7A; general packaging, Type A. (a) Each packaging must meet all applicable requirements of...

  9. DEB Type I Reconstitution Package Deployment Manual (RPDM).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    AD-AIOO 30 MITRE CORP BE.FOR. MA F /G 17/2 DEB TYPE I RECONSTITUTION PACKAGE DEPLOYMENT MANUAL (RPOM).(U) MAY 81 0 H BRENDEN F19626-61-C-0O01...U:nannounccd f JuAtific-~-; iAvail- /C rD St -J TABLE OF CONTENTS Paragraph Title Page LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 6 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Configuration...Repeaters 103 2.1.3.1 Mt. Corna 107 2.1.3.2 Mt. Venda 115 2.2 Type I A Reconstitution Package (AN/GSC-47) Configurations 123 2.2.1 Cima Gallina VF

  10. Laboratory Study on Prevention of CaO-Containing ASTM "D-Type" Inclusions in Al-Deoxidized Low-Oxygen Steel Melts During Basic Slag Refining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Min; Wang, Xin-Hua; Yang, Die; Lei, Shao-Long; Wang, Kun-Peng

    2015-12-01

    Present work was attempted to explore the possibility of preventing CaO-containing inclusions in Al-deoxidized low-oxygen special steel during basic slag refining, which were known as ASTM D-type inclusions. Based on the analysis on formation thermodynamics of CaO-containing inclusions, a series of laboratory experiments were designed and carried out in a vacuum induction furnace. During the experiments, slag/steel reaction equilibrium was intentionally suppressed with the aim to decrease the CaO contents in inclusions, which is different from ordinary concept that slag/steel reaction should be promoted for better control of inclusions. The obtained results showed that high cleanliness of steel was obtained in all the steel melts, with total oxygen contents varied between 0.0003 and 0.0010 pct. Simultaneously, formation of CaO-containing inclusions was successfully prohibited, and all the formed oxide inclusions were MgO-Al2O3 or/and Al2O3 in very small sizes of about 1 to 3 μm. And 90 pct to nearly 98 pct of them were wrapped by relative thicker MnS outer surface layers to produce dual-phased "(MgO-Al2O3) + MnS" or "Al2O3 + MnS" complex inclusions. Because of much better ductility of MnS, certain deformability of these complex inclusions can be expected which is helpful to improve fatigue resistance property of steel. Only very limited number of singular MnS inclusions were with sizes larger than 13 μm, which were formed during solidification because of. In the end, formation of oxide inclusions in steel was qualitatively evaluated and discussed.

  11. Effect of Insolation Boundary Conditions on Type B Package Internal Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hovingh, J; Shah, VL

    2002-05-30

    The prescription of the initial conditions and the final conditions for a thermal accident for Type B packages are different for differing regulations. This paper presents an analytical method for estimating the effect of the boundary conditions on post-fire peak internal package temperatures. Results are given for several boundary conditions for a Type B drum-type package.

  12. 49 CFR 173.466 - Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional tests for Type A packagings designed...) Materials § 173.466 Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases. (a) In addition to the tests prescribed in § 173.465, Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases must be...

  13. Inducible human immunodeficiency virus type 1 packaging cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, H; Rabson, A B; Kaul, M; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    Packaging cell lines are important tools for transferring genes into eukaryotic cells. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based packaging cell lines are difficult to obtain, in part owing to the problem that some HIV-1 proteins are cytotoxic in a variety of cells. To overcome this, we have developed an HIV-1-based packaging cell line which has an inducible expression system. The tetracycline-inducible expression system was utilized to control the expression of the Rev regulatory protein, which in turn controls the expression of the late proteins including Gag, Pol, and Env. Western blotting (immunoblotting) demonstrated that the expression of p24gag and gp120env from the packaging cells peaked on days 6 and 7 postinduction. Reverse transcriptase activity could be detected by day 4 after induction and also peaked on days 6 and 7. Defective vector virus could be propagated, yielding titers as high as 7 x 10(3) CFU/ml, while replication-competent virus was not detectable at any time. Thus, the cell line should enable the transfer of specific genes into CD4+ cells and should be a useful tool for studying the biology of HIV-1. We have also established an inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line which could be used to propagate HIV-1 vectors that require only Env in trans. The env-minus vector virus titer produced from the Env-expressing cells reached 2 x 10(4) CFU/ml. The inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line should be a useful tool for the study of HIV-1 Env as well. PMID:8676479

  14. 47 CFR 90.379 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard... Communications Service (dsrcs) § 90.379 ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard). Roadside Units... incorporated by reference: American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E2213-03, “Standard Specification...

  15. 47 CFR 90.379 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard... Communications Service (dsrcs) § 90.379 ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard). Roadside Units... incorporated by reference: American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E2213-03, “Standard Specification...

  16. 47 CFR 90.379 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard... Communications Service (dsrcs) § 90.379 ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard). Roadside Units... incorporated by reference: American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E2213-03, “Standard Specification...

  17. 47 CFR 90.379 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard... Communications Service (dsrcs) § 90.379 ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard (ASTM-DSRC Standard). Roadside Units... incorporated by reference: American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E2213-03, “Standard Specification...

  18. Technical problems encountered during certification of a Type B (plutonium) package

    SciTech Connect

    Gromada, R.J.; Opperman, E.K.

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is the packaging designer for the 5320 Type (B) PuO/AmO Packaging (DPSU79-124-1,''Safety Analysis Report Packages). The predecessor to the 5320 Packaging introduced in 1980, was originally developed in 1973 for shipping plutonium and americium. The 5320 Packaging has undergone numerous design changes since 1980 to meet changing packaging and transportation regulations. During the current certificate renewal process, WSRC experienced significant technical problems with the packaging design. This paper will discuss the technical problems asbociated with the design, the technical challenges they presented and the design solutions that were implemented to meet current Department of Energy (DOE) regulations.

  19. Polymer dispensing and embossing technology for the lens type LED packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chien-Lin Chang; Huang, Yu-Che; Hu, Syue-Fong; Chang, Chung-Min; Yip, Ming-Chuen; Fang, Weileun

    2013-06-01

    This study presents a ring-type micro-structure design on the substrate and its corresponding micro fabrication processes for a lens-type light-emitting diode (LED) package. The dome-type or crater-type silicone lenses are achieved by a dispensing and embossing process rather than a molding process. Silicone with a high viscosity and thixotropy index is used as the encapsulant material. The ring-type micro structure is adopted to confine the dispensed silicone encapsulant so as to form the packaged lens. With the architecture and process described, this LED package technology herein has three merits: (1) the flexibility of lens-type LED package designs is enhanced; (2) a dome-type package design is used to enhance the intensity; (3) a crater-type package design is used to enhance the view angle. Measurement results show the ratio between the lens height and lens radius can vary from 0.4 to 1 by changing the volume of dispensed silicone. The view angles of dome-type and crater-type packages can reach 155° ± 5° and 175° ± 5°, respectively. As compared with the commercial plastic leaded chip carrier-type package, the luminous flux of a monochromatic blue light LED is improved by 15% by the dome-type package (improved by 7% by the crater-type package) and the luminous flux of a white light LED is improved by 25% by the dome-type package (improved by 13% by the crater-type package). The luminous flux of monochromatic blue light LED and white light LED are respectively improved by 8% and 12% by the dome-type package as compare with the crater-type package.

  20. 49 CFR 173.431 - Activity limits for Type A and Type B packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Activity limits for Type A and Type B packages. 173.431 Section 173.431 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS...

  1. Types, production and assessment of biobased food packaging materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Food packaging performs an essential function, but packaging materials can have a negative impact on the environment. This book describes the latest advances in bio-based food packaging materials. Book provides a comprehensive review on bio-based, biodegradable and recycled materials and discusses t...

  2. 49 CFR 173.412 - Additional design requirements for Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Additional design requirements for Type A packages. In addition to meeting the general design requirements... gas by chemical reaction and radiolysis. (f) The containment system will retain its...

  3. 49 CFR 173.412 - Additional design requirements for Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Additional design requirements for Type A packages. In addition to meeting the general design requirements... gas by chemical reaction and radiolysis. (f) The containment system will retain its...

  4. 49 CFR 173.412 - Additional design requirements for Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Additional design requirements for Type A packages. In addition to meeting the general design requirements... gas by chemical reaction and radiolysis. (f) The containment system will retain its...

  5. 49 CFR 173.412 - Additional design requirements for Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Additional design requirements for Type A packages. In addition to meeting the general design requirements... gas by chemical reaction and radiolysis. (f) The containment system will retain its...

  6. First Cavanaugh Award given by ASTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    With the unanimous approval of the Board of Directors of the American Society for Testing and Materials, Ivan Johnson of A. Ivan Johnson, Inc., Arvada, Colo., received the first William T. Cavanaugh Memorial Award which recognizes outstanding eminence in the national and international voluntary standards field. This is the highest award offered by ASTM and carries with it the title of ASTM Honorary Member.The award was presented by ASTM Chairman of the Board Wayne France (General Motors Research Laboratories, Warren, Mich.) during an ASTM meeting in Albuquerque, N.Mex. in January. Pictured, left to right, are Joseph O'Grady (President, ASTM), Johnson, and Wayne Francis.

  7. FABRICATION AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE 9979 TYPE AF RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGING FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2013-10-10

    This paper summarizes the development, testing, and certification of the 9979 Type A Fissile Packaging that replaces the UN1A2 Specification Shipping Package eliminated from Department of Transportation (DOT) 49 CFR 173. The DOT Specification Package was used for many decades by the U.S. nuclear industry as a fissile waste container until its removal as an authorized container by DOT. This paper will discuss stream lining procurement of high volume radioactive material packaging manufacturing, such as the 9979, to minimize packaging production costs without sacrificing Quality Assurance. The authorized content envelope (combustible and non-combustible) as well as planned content envelope expansion will be discussed.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW TYPE A(F)RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2008-09-14

    In a coordinated effort, the Department of Transportation (DOT) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proposed the elimination of the Specification Packaging from 49 CFR 173.[1] In accordance with the Federal Register, issued on October 1, 2004, new fabrication of Specification Packages would no longer be authorized. In accordance with the NRC final rulemaking published January 26, 2004, Specification Packagings are mandated by law to be removed from service no later than October 1, 2008. This coordinated effort and resulting rulemaking initiated a planned phase out of Specification Type B and Type A fissile (F) material transportation packages within the Department of Energy (DOE) and its subcontractors. One of the Specification Packages affected by this regulatory change is the UN1A2 Specification Package, per DOT 49 CFR 173.417(a)(6). To maintain continuing shipments of DOE materials currently transported in UN1A2 Specification Package after the existing authorization expires, a replacement Type A(F) material packaging design is under development by the Savannah River National Laboratory. This paper presents a summary of the prototype design effort and testing of the new Type A(F) Package development for the DOE. This paper discusses the progress made in the development of a Type A Fissile Packaging to replace the expiring 49 CFR UN1A2 Specification Fissile Package. The Specification Package was mostly a single-use waste disposal container. The design requirements and authorized radioactive material contents of the UN1A2 Specification Package were defined in 49 CFR. A UN1A2 Specification Package was authorized to ship up to 350 grams of U-235 in any enrichment and in any non-pyrophoric form. The design was specified as a 55-gallon 1A2 drum overpack with a body constructed from 18 gauge steel with a 16 gauge drum lid. Drum closure was specified as a standard 12-gauge ring closure. The inner product container size was not specified but was listed as any

  9. 49 CFR 173.466 - Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for liquids and gases. 173.466 Section 173.466 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to...) Materials § 173.466 Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases. (a) In addition to the tests prescribed in § 173.465, Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases must...

  10. 49 CFR 173.466 - Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for liquids and gases. 173.466 Section 173.466 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to...) Materials § 173.466 Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases. (a) In addition to the tests prescribed in § 173.465, Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases must...

  11. 49 CFR 173.466 - Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for liquids and gases. 173.466 Section 173.466 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to...) Materials § 173.466 Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases. (a) In addition to the tests prescribed in § 173.465, Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases must...

  12. Packaging capacity and stability of human adenovirus type 5 vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bett, A J; Prevec, L; Graham, F L

    1993-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are extensively used for high-level expression of proteins in mammalian cells and are receiving increasing attention for their potential use as live recombinant vaccines and as transducing viruses for use in gene therapy. Although it is commonly argued that one of the chief advantages of adenovirus vectors is their relative stability, this has not been thoroughly investigated. To examine the genetic stability of adenovirus type 5 vectors and in particular to examine the relationship between genetic stability and genome size, adenovirus vectors were constructed with inserts of 4.88 (herpes simplex virus type 1 gB), 4.10 (herpes simplex virus type 1 gB), or 3.82 (LacZ) kb combined with a 1.88-kb E3 deletion or with a newly generated 2.69-kb E3 deletion. The net excess of DNA over the wild-type (wt) genome size ranged from 1.13 to 3.00 kb or 3.1 to 8.3%. Analysis of these vectors during serial passage in tissue culture revealed that when the size exceeded 105% of the wt genome length by approximately 1.2 kb (4.88-kb insert combined with a 1.88-kb deletion), the resulting vector grew very poorly and underwent rapid rearrangement, resulting in loss of the insert after only a few passages. In contrast, vectors with inserts resulting in viral DNA close to or less than a net genome size of 105% of that of the wt grew well and were relatively stable. In general, viruses with genomes only slightly above 105% of that of the wt were unstable and the rapidity with which rearrangement occurred correlated with the size of the insert. These findings suggest that there is a relatively tight constraint on the amount of DNA which can be packaged into virions and that exceeding the limit results in a sharply decreased rate of virus growth. The resultant strong selection for variants which have undergone rearrangement, generating smaller genomes, is manifested as genetic instability of the virus population. Images PMID:8371349

  13. THERMAL EVALUATION OF DRUM TYPE RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING ARRAYS IN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N

    2009-04-27

    Drum type packages are routinely used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. These packages are designed to meet the federal regulations described in 10 CFR 71.[1] In recent years, there has been a greater need to use these packagings to store the excess fissile material, especially plutonium for long term storage. While the design requirements for safe transportation of these packagings are well defined, the requirements for safe long term storage are not well established. Since the RAM contents in the packagings produce decay heat, it is important that they are stored carefully to prevent overheating of the containment vessel (CV) seals to prevent any leakage and the impact limiter to maintain the package structural integrity. This paper analyzes different storage arrays for a typical 9977 packaging for thermal considerations and makes recommendations for their safe storage under normal operating conditions.

  14. ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.

    1999-09-14

    The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation.

  15. Types of packaging waste from secondary sources (supermarkets)--the situation in the UK.

    PubMed

    Dixon-Hardy, Darron W; Curran, Beverley A

    2009-03-01

    Packaging waste is a contributing factor to the large quantity of waste that is sent to landfill in the UK. This research focuses on waste from the secondary packaging sector in the UK. In particular, supermarkets were investigated as they supply a large section of consumers with their grocery and other requirements and generate high quantities of packaging waste due to the high turnover within the store. In general, supermarkets use either metal cages or wooden pallets to transport products from depot to store. Investigation shows that packaging waste produced when using the wooden pallets is greater than for metal cages but the use of wooden pallets allows for greater versatility when in the store. The type of transit packaging used depends on what the products are initially packaged in and how the supermarket supply chain works. All cardboard and high-grade plastic is recycled but, depending on the facilities at the stores, the low-grade plastic can be recycled as well. This paper details types of packaging used within the supermarket secondary packaging sector and how waste can be reduced. To reduce the amount of packaging waste produced by the supermarkets, the products will have to be wrapped differently by the producers so that less packaging is needed in transit.

  16. Hypothetical accident condition thermal analysis and testing of a Type B drum package

    SciTech Connect

    Hensel, S.J.; Alstine, M.N. Van; Gromada, R.J.

    1995-07-01

    A thermophysical property model developed to analytically determine the thermal response of cane fiberboard when exposed to temperatures and heat fluxes associated with the 10 CFR 71 hypothetical accident condition (HAC) has been benchmarked against two Type B drum package fire test results. The model 9973 package was fire tested after a 30 ft. top down drop and puncture, and an undamaged model 9975 package containing a heater (21W) was fire tested to determine content heat source effects. Analysis results using a refined version of a previously developed HAC fiberboard model compared well against the test data from both the 9973 and 9975 packages.

  17. Type B plutonium transport package development that uses metallic filaments and composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, J. D.; Moya, J. L.; McClure, J. D.; Hohnstreiter, G. F.; Golliher, K. G.

    1991-01-01

    A new package was developed for transporting Pu and U quantities that are currently carried in DOT-6M packages. It uses double containment with threaded closures and elastomeric seals. A composite overpack of metallic wire mesh and ceramic or quartz cloth insulation is provided for protection in accidents. Two prototypes were subjected to dynamic crush tests. A thermal computer model was developed and benchmarked by test results to predict package behavior in fires. The material performed isotropically in a global fashion. A Type B Pu transport package can be developed for DOE Pu shipments for less than $5000 if manufactured in quantity. 5 figs, 6 refs. (DLC)

  18. cis and trans requirements for the selective packaging of adenovirus type 5 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gräble, M; Hearing, P

    1992-01-01

    Polar packaging of adenovirus DNA into virions is dependent on the presence of cis-acting sequences at the left end of the viral genome. Our previous analyses demonstrated that the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) packaging domain (nucleotides 194 to 358) is composed of at least five elements that are functionally redundant. A repeated sequence, termed the A repeat, was associated with packaging function. Here we report a more detailed analysis of the requirements for the selective packaging of Ad5 DNA. By introducing site-directed point mutations into specific A repeat sequences, we demonstrate that the A repeats represent cis-acting functional components of the packaging signal. Additional elements, located outside the originally defined packaging domain boundaries and that resemble the A repeat consensus sequence, also are capable of promoting the packaging of viral DNA. The cis-acting components of the packaging signal appear to be subject to certain spatial constraints for function, possibly reflecting a necessity for the coordinate binding of packaging proteins to these sites. In agreement with this idea, we present evidence that the interaction of a limiting trans-acting factor(s) with the packaging domain in vivo is required for efficient encapsidation of the Ad5 genome. Images PMID:1731109

  19. 78 FR 26090 - Content Specifications and Shielding Evaluations for Type B Transportation Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) 2013-04, ``Content Specifications and Shielding Evaluations for Type B Transportation Packages.'' This RIS clarifies the NRC's use of staff guidance in NUREG-1609, ``Standard Review Plan for Transport Packages for Radioactive Material,'' for the review of content specifications and shielding evaluations......

  20. 21 CFR 610.62 - Proper name; package label; legible type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Proper name; package label; legible type. 610.62 Section 610.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.62 Proper name; package...

  1. 21 CFR 610.62 - Proper name; package label; legible type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Proper name; package label; legible type. 610.62 Section 610.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.62 Proper name; package...

  2. 21 CFR 610.62 - Proper name; package label; legible type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Proper name; package label; legible type. 610.62 Section 610.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.62 Proper name; package...

  3. 21 CFR 610.62 - Proper name; package label; legible type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proper name; package label; legible type. 610.62 Section 610.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.62 Proper name; package...

  4. 21 CFR 610.62 - Proper name; package label; legible type.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Proper name; package label; legible type. 610.62 Section 610.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.62 Proper name; package...

  5. Drop Tests of a Type IP-2 Transport Package with a Bolted Lid

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.H.; Seo, K.S.; Jung, K.J.; Lee, K.H.; Cho, C.H.; Chung, S.H.

    2006-07-01

    IP-2 transport package for radioactive wastes shall be designed in accordance with designated regulations such as the IAEA Safety standard series TS-R-1. In general, IP-2 transport packages are used as ISO containers that have doors for a package closure. If the shielding thickness of the IP-2 package is thick, a bolted lid type may be safer or stronger than a door type. The closure mechanism of a bolted lid withstands a drop impact well. If the IP-2 package were subjected to the free drop test under the normal conditions of a transport, it should ensure the prevention of a loss or dispersal of the radioactive contents and a loss of its shielding integrity. Therefore, it is important that the integrity of the lid and its bolts are sustained under a drop impact. This paper presents the results of the type IP-2 package which undertook a vertical drop of 0.9 in height. An opening displacement of the lid and the torques of the lid bolts are changed before or after the drop impact of the type IP-2 package. Also the thicknesses of the shielding material are measured before or after the drop impact. The acceleration, strain and the bolt tension are measured during the test. The accelerations and the strains measured from a test are compared with the results from a finite element analysis. (authors)

  6. 10 CFR 71.61 - Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2. 71.61 Section 71.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.61 Special requirements for Type...

  7. 10 CFR 71.61 - Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2. 71.61 Section 71.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.61 Special requirements for Type...

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF THE HS99 AIR TRANSPORT TYPE A FISSILE PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2012-07-10

    An air-transport Type A Fissile radioactive shipping package for the transport of special form uranium sources has been developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Homeland Security. The Package model number is HS99 for Homeland Security Model 99. This paper presents the major design features of the HS99 and highlights engineered materials necessary for meeting the design requirements for this light-weight Type AF packaging. A discussion is provided demonstrating how the HS99 complies with the regulatory safety requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The paper summarizes the results of structural testing to specified in 10 CFR 71 for Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Conditions events. Planned and proposed future missions for this packaging are also addressed.

  9. 9977 TYPE B PACKAGING INTERNAL DATA COLLECTION FEASIBILITY TESTING - MAGNETIC FIELD COMMUNICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, D.

    2012-06-18

    The objective of this report is to document the findings from proof-of-concept testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) R&D Engineering and Visible Assets, Inc. for the DOE Packaging Certification Program (PCP) to determine if RuBee (IEEE 1902.1) tags and readers could be used to provide a communication link from within a drum-style DOE certified Type B radioactive materials packaging. A Model 9977 Type B Packaging was used to test the read/write capability and range performance of a RuBee tag and reader. Testing was performed with the RuBee tags placed in various locations inside the packaging including inside the drum on the outside of the lid of the containment vessel and also inside of the containment vessel. This report documents the test methods and results. A path forward will also be recommended.

  10. Regulatory compliance guide for DOT-7A type A packaging design

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L.

    1996-06-04

    The purpose of this guide is to provide instruction for assuring that the regulatory design requirements for a DOT-7A Type A packaging are met. This guide also supports the testing and evaluation activities that are performed on new packaging designs by a DOE-approved test facility through the DOE`s DOT-7A Test Program. This Guide was updated to incorporate regulatory changes implemented by HM-169A (49 CFR, `Transportation`).

  11. Test and evaluation document for DOT Specification 7A type A packaging. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D L

    1997-08-04

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting, through several of its operating contractors, an evaluation and testing program to qualify Type A radioactive material packagings per US Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A (DOT-7A) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 49, Part 178 (49 CFR 178). This document summarizes the evaluation and testing performed for all of the packagings successfully qualified in this program. This document supersedes DOE Evaluation Document for DOT-7A Type A Packaging (Edling 1987), originally issued in 1987 by Monsanto Research Corporation Mound Laboratory (MLM), Miamisburg, Ohio, for the Department of Energy, Security Evaluation Program (I)P-4. Mound Laboratory issued four revisions to the document between November 1988 and December 1989. In September 1989, the program was transferred to Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) in Richland, Washington. One additional revision was issued in March 1990 by Westinghouse Hanford. This revision reflects the earlier material and incorporates a number of changes. Evaluation and testing activities on 1208 three DOT-7A Program Dockets resulted in the qualification of three new packaging configurations, which are incorporated herein and summarized. This document presents approximately 300 different packagings that have been determined to meet the requirements for a DOT-7A, type A packaging per 49 CFR 178.350.

  12. Retail colour stability of lamb meat is influenced by breed type, muscle, packaging and iron concentration.

    PubMed

    Warner, R D; Kearney, G; Hopkins, D L; Jacob, R H

    2017-01-17

    The longissmus lumborum (LL) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles from 391 lamb carcasses, derived from various breed types, were used to investigate the effect of animal/muscle factors, packaging type [over-wrap (OW) or high oxygen modified atmosphere packaging (MAPO2)] and duration of display on redness of meat during simulated retail display. Using statistical models the time required (in days) for redness to reach a threshold value of 3.5 (below this is unacceptable) was predicted. High levels of iron in the SM, but not LL, reduced the time for redness to reach 3.5 by 2-2.6days in MAPO2 and 0.5-0.8days in OW. The greater the proportion of Merino breed type, the shorter was the time for redness to reach the value of 3.5, an effect consistent across muscles and packaging types. In summary, breed type, packaging format, muscle and muscle iron levels had a significant impact on colour stability of sheep meat in oxygen-available packaging systems.

  13. 46 CFR 163.003-3 - ASTM standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false ASTM standard. 163.003-3 Section 163.003-3 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-3 ASTM standard. The following standard of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is incorporated by reference into this subpart: ASTM D...

  14. 46 CFR 163.003-3 - ASTM standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false ASTM standard. 163.003-3 Section 163.003-3 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-3 ASTM standard. The following standard of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is incorporated by reference into this subpart: ASTM D...

  15. 46 CFR 163.003-3 - ASTM standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false ASTM standard. 163.003-3 Section 163.003-3 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-3 ASTM standard. The following standard of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is incorporated by reference into this subpart: ASTM D...

  16. 46 CFR 163.003-3 - ASTM standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false ASTM standard. 163.003-3 Section 163.003-3 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-3 ASTM standard. The following standard of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is incorporated by reference into this subpart: ASTM D...

  17. 46 CFR 163.003-3 - ASTM standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false ASTM standard. 163.003-3 Section 163.003-3 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL CONSTRUCTION Pilot Ladder § 163.003-3 ASTM standard. The following standard of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is incorporated by reference into this subpart: ASTM D...

  18. 49 CFR 173.467 - Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B and fissile materials packagings to withstand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.467 Tests for demonstrating the ability of... packaging or packaging for fissile material must meet the test requirements prescribed in 10 CFR part 71 for... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B...

  19. 49 CFR 173.467 - Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B and fissile materials packagings to withstand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.467 Tests for demonstrating the ability of... packaging or packaging for fissile material must meet the test requirements prescribed in 10 CFR part 71 for... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B...

  20. 49 CFR 173.467 - Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B and fissile materials packagings to withstand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.467 Tests for demonstrating the ability of... packaging or packaging for fissile material must meet the test requirements prescribed in 10 CFR part 71 for... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B...

  1. 49 CFR 173.467 - Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B and fissile materials packagings to withstand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.467 Tests for demonstrating the ability of... packaging or packaging for fissile material must meet the test requirements prescribed in 10 CFR part 71 for... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B...

  2. 49 CFR 173.467 - Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B and fissile materials packagings to withstand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.467 Tests for demonstrating the ability of... packaging or packaging for fissile material must meet the test requirements prescribed in 10 CFR part 71 for... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tests for demonstrating the ability of Type B...

  3. 9978 AND 9975 TYPE B PACKAGING INTERNAL DATA COLLECTION FEASIBILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Fogle, R.

    2012-05-07

    The objective of this report is to document the findings from a series of proof-of-concept tests performed by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) R and D Engineering, for the DOE Packaging Certification Program to determine if a viable radio link could be established from within the stainless steel confines of several drum-style DOE certified Type B radioactive materials packagings. Two in-hand, off-the-shelf radio systems were tested. The first system was a Wi-Fi Librestream Onsight{trademark} camera with a Fortress ES820 Access Point and the second was the On-Ramp Wireless Ultra-Link Processing{trademark} (ULP) radio system. These radio systems were tested within the Model 9975 and 9978 Type B packagings at the SRNL. This report documents the test methods and results. A path forward will also be recommended.

  4. TEST & EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE HEDGEHOG-II PACKAGING SYSTEMS DOT-7A TYPE A CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY, D.L.

    2003-12-29

    This report documents the US. Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) Type A compliance test and evaluation results for the Hedgehog-II packaging systems. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations provide primary and secondary containment. The approved packaging configurations described within this report are designed to ship Type A quantities of radioactive materials, normal form. Contents may be in solid or liquid form. Liquids transported in the approved 1 L glass bottle assembly shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 1.6. Liquids transported in all other approved configurations shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 2.0. The solid contents, including packaging, are limited in weight to the gross weight of the as-tested liquids and bottles. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations described in this report may be transported by air, and have been evaluated as meeting the applicable International Air Transport Association/International Civil Aviation Organization (IATA/ICAO) Dangerous Goods Regulations in addition to the DOT requirements.

  5. Practical Thermal Evaluation Methods For HAC Fire Analysis In Type B Radiaoactive Material (RAM) Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, Glenn; Hensel, Stephen J; Gupta, Narendra K.

    2013-03-28

    Title 10 of the United States Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR Part 71.73) requires that Type B radioactive material (RAM) packages satisfy certain Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) thermal design requirements to ensure package safety during accidental fire conditions. Compliance with thermal design requirements can be met by prototype tests, analyses only or a combination of tests and analyses. Normally, it is impractical to meet all the HAC using tests only and the analytical methods are too complex due to the multi-physics non-linear nature of the fire event. Therefore, a combination of tests and thermal analyses methods using commercial heat transfer software are used to meet the necessary design requirements. The authors, along with his other colleagues at Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, SC, USA, have successfully used this 'tests and analyses' approach in the design and certification of several United States' DOE/NNSA certified packages, e.g. 9975, 9977, 9978, 9979, H1700, and Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP). This paper will describe these methods and it is hoped that the RAM Type B package designers and analysts can use them for their applications.

  6. An AVHRR Multiple Cloud-Type Classification Package.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tag, Paul M.; Bankert, Richard L.; Brody, L. Robin

    2000-02-01

    Using imagery from NOAA's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) orbiting sensor, one of the authors (RLB) earlier developed a probabilistic neural network cloud classifier valid over the world's maritime regions. Since then, the authors have created a database of nearly 8000 16 × 16 pixel cloud samples (from 13 Northern Hemispheric land regions) independently classified by three experts. From these samples, 1605 were of sufficient quality to represent 11 conventional cloud types (including clear). This database serves as the training and testing samples for developing a classifier valid over land. Approximately 200 features, calculated from a visible and an infrared channel, form the basis for the computer vision analysis. Using a 1-nearest neighbor classifier, meshed with a feature selection method using backward sequential selection, the authors select the fewest features that maximize classification accuracy. In a leave-one-out test, overall classification accuracies range from 86% to 78% for the water and land classifiers, with accuracies at 88% or greater for general height-dependent groupings. Details of the databases, feature selection method, and classifiers, as well as example simulations, are presented.

  7. Test and evaluation document for DOT Specification 7A Type A Packaging. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-30

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting, through several of its operating contractors, an evaluation and testing program to qualify Type A radioactive material packagings per US Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A (DOT-7A) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 49, Part 178 (49 CFR 178). The program is currently administered by the DOE, Office of Facility Safety Analysis, DOE/EH-32, at DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) in Germantown, Maryland. This document summarizes the evaluation and testing performed for all of the packagings successfully qualified in this program.

  8. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for cesium chloride capsules with type W overpacks

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, J.C.

    1997-09-15

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) documents the evaluation of a new basket design and overpacked cesium chloride capsule payload for the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) Cask in accordance with the onsite transportation requirements of the Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping manual, WHC-CM-2-14. This design supports the one-time onsite shipment of 16 cesium chloride capsules with Type W overpacks from the 324 Building to the 224T Building at the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The SEP is valid for a one-time onsite shipment or until August 1, 1998, whichever occurs first.

  9. ASTM Validates Air Pollution Test Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has validated six basic methods for measuring pollutants in ambient air as the first part of its Project Threshold. Aim of the project is to establish nationwide consistency in measuring pollutants; determining precision, accuracy and reproducibility of 35 standard measuring methods. (BL)

  10. ASTM Validates Air Pollution Test Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has validated six basic methods for measuring pollutants in ambient air as the first part of its Project Threshold. Aim of the project is to establish nationwide consistency in measuring pollutants; determining precision, accuracy and reproducibility of 35 standard measuring methods. (BL)

  11. SHIPMENT OF TWO DOE-STD-3013 CONTAINERS IN A 9977 TYPE B PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Loftin, B.; Nathan, S.

    2011-06-06

    The 9977 is a certified Type B Packaging authorized to ship uranium and plutonium in metal and oxide forms. Historically, the standard container for these materials has been the DOE-STD-3013 which was specifically designed for the long term storage of plutonium bearing materials. The Department of Energy has used the 9975 Packaging containing a single 3013 container for the transportation and storage of these materials. In order to reduce container, shipping, and storage costs, the 9977 Packaging is being certified for transportation and storage of two 3013 containers. The challenges and risks of this content and the 9977s ability to meet the Code of Federal Regulations for the transport of these materials are presented.

  12. Safety evaluation for packaging 222-S laboratory cargo tank for onetime type B material shipment

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, P.M.

    1994-08-19

    The purpose of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is to evaluate and document the safety of the onetime shipment of bulk radioactive liquids in the 222-S Laboratory cargo tank (222-S cargo tank). The 222-S cargo tank is a US Department of Transportation (DOT) MC-312 specification (DOT 1989) cargo tank, vehicle registration number HO-64-04275, approved for low specific activity (LSA) shipments in accordance with the DOT Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). In accordance with the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Order 5480.1A, Chapter III (RL 1988), an equivalent degree of safety shall be provided for onsite shipments as would be afforded by the DOT shipping regulations for a radioactive material package. This document demonstrates that this packaging system meets the onsite transportation safety criteria for a onetime shipment of Type B contents.

  13. SHIPMENT OF NON-TRADITIONAL CONTENTS IN THE 9977 TYPE B PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.

    2011-06-06

    The 9977 is a certified Type B Packaging authorized to ship uranium and plutonium in metal and oxide forms. These materials are typically confined within metallic containers designed for ease of handling and to prevent the spread of contamination. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) uses Pu and U sources for the training of domestic and international customs agents in the identification and detection of radioactive materials (RAM). These materials are packed in polycarbonate containers which permit the trainees to view the RAM. The safety basis was made to authorize the use of these unusual containers. The inclusion of the PNNL Training Source Contents into the 9977 Packaging imposed unique conditions previously unanalyzed. The use of polycarbonate as a content container material, while different from any configuration previously considered, does not raise any safety issues with the package which continues to operate with a large safety margin for temperatures, pressures, containment, dose rates, and subcriticality.

  14. Development of Facility Type Information Packages for Design of Air Force Facilities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    uate s ;Per- 143 child care centers (FUNCTIONAL Outdoors (cont’d) IAREA Infants 2. Pornes and Decks. Consider the use of porches and decks as part of o...directions for incorporating site specific information. General guidelines for the preparation of *FTIP’s and an example for a Child Care Center are also...facility type information package for a Child Care Center so that it may be compared with previous methods for transmitting facility type information

  15. Test and evaluation document for DOT Specification 7A Type A packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting, through several of its operating contractors, an evaluation and testing program to qualify Type A radioactive material packagings per US Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) of the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49, Part 178, Section 178.350 (49 CFR 178.350). This program is called the DOT-7A Program. The DOT-7A Program is currently administered by the DOE, Division of Quality Verification and Transportation Safety, DOE/EH-33.3, at DOE-Headquarters in Germantown, Maryland. This document presents approximately 200 different packagings that have been determined to meet the requirements for a DOT Specification 7A Type A packaging per 49 CFR 178.350. It was originally prepared in 1987 by Monsanto Research Corporation -- Mound Laboratory for the DOE`s Security Evaluation Program to facilitate the regulation changes implemented by HM-169 for all DOE contractors. In September 1989, the program was transferred to Westinghouse Hanford Company, which is located in Richland, Washington. The specific packaging data contained in this document will serve to meet the requirements of 49 CFR 173.415(a) for ``. . . documentation of tests . . . `` when the packagings are used as prescribed herein. However, shippers are cautioned that additional documentation will be needed to fulfill all of the requirements for a particular shipment. Most important is the evaluation of the contents to be shipped for compatibility with the packaging and that their characteristics are bounded by the simulated contents used in qualification testing.

  16. Bacteria associated with processed crawfish and potential toxin production by Clostridium botulinum type E in vacuum-packaged and aerobically packaged crawfish tails.

    PubMed

    Lyon, W J; Reddmann, C S

    2000-12-01

    Refrigerated vacuum-packaged storage has been shown to increase significantly the shelf life of fresh fish and seafood products, but the effect, if any, on the outgrowth and toxin production of Clostridium botulinum type E on cooked crawfish is unknown. Microflora associated with live crawfish reflect the microbial populations of the harvest water and sediments in which they are living. The presence or absence of specific pathogens in either vacuum-packaged or air-permeable bags of cooked crawfish have not been thoroughly evaluated. This study evaluates the potential survival and outgrowth of biological hazards in both vacuum-packaged and air-permeable-packaged cooked crawfish held at 4 and 10 degrees C for 30 days. During shelf-life studies of vacuum-packaged and air-permeable-bagged cooked crawfish, a total of 31 bacterial species were isolated and identified from crawfish samples using both selective and nonselective media. The only pathogens isolated from both vacuum-packed and air-permeable bags of processed crawfish samples during shelf-life studies were strains of Aeromonas hydrophila and Staphylococcus aureus. C. botulinum type E and Clostridium perfringens species were not isolated from any of the uninoculated crawfish samples. Cooked crawfish were inoculated with 10(3) C. botulinum type E spores per g of crawfish tail meat to determine whether cooked crawfish tails would support the growth of C. botulinum type E strains and produce toxin at refrigerated temperatures. Spore-inoculated crawfish tails were vacuum packaged in both a high barrier film and an air-permeable bag and stored at 4 degrees C and 10 degrees C for 30 days. C. botulinum toxin E was not detected in any of the spore-inoculated packages throughout the shelf-life study until day 30. Microbiological data from this study should be useful in the development and implementation of the hazard analysis and critical control point plans for processed crawfish tails.

  17. Possible Role of Dimerization in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Genome RNA Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Sakuragi, Jun-Ichi; Ueda, Shigeharu; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2003-01-01

    The dimer initiation site/dimer linkage sequence (DIS/DLS) region in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA genome is suggested to play important roles in various steps of the virus life cycle. However, due to the presence of a putative DIS/DLS region located within the encapsidation signal region (E/psi), it is difficult to perform a mutational analysis of DIS/DLS without affecting the packaging of RNA into virions. Recently, we demonstrated that duplication of the DIS/DLS region in viral RNA caused the production of partially monomeric RNAs in virions, indicating that the region indeed mediated RNA-RNA interaction. We utilized this system to assess the precise location of DIS/DLS in the 5′ region of the HIV-1 genome with minimum effect on RNA packaging. We found that the entire lower stem of the U5/L stem-loop was required for packaging, whereas the region important for dimer formation was only 10 bases long within the lower stem of the U5/L stem-loop. The R/U5 stem-loop was required for RNA packaging but was completely dispensable for dimer formation. The SL1 lower stem was important for both dimerization and packaging, but surprisingly, deletion of the palindromic sequence at the top of the loop only partially affected dimerization. These results clearly indicated that the E/psi of HIV-1 is much larger than the DIS/DLS and that the primary DIS/DLS is completely included in the E/psi. Therefore, it is suggested that RNA dimerization is a part of RNA packaging, which requires multiple steps. PMID:12634365

  18. ANTS2 package: simulation and experimental data processing for Anger camera type detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Martins, R.; Neves, F.; Domingos, V.; Chepel, V.

    2016-04-01

    ANTS2 is a simulation and data processing package developed for position sensitive detectors with Anger camera type readout. The simulation module of ANTS2 is based on ROOT package from CERN, which is used to store the detector geometry and to perform 3D navigation. The module is capable of simulating particle sources, performing particle tracking, generating photons of primary and secondary scintillation, tracing optical photons and generating photosensor signals. The reconstruction module features several position reconstruction methods based on the statistical reconstruction algorithms (including GPU-based implementations), artificial neural networks and k-NN searches. The module can process simulated as well as imported experimental data containing photosensor signals. A custom library for B-spline parameterization of spatial response of photosensors is implemented which can be used to calculate and parameterize the spatial response of a detector. The package includes a graphical user interface with an extensive set of configuration, visualization and analysis tools. ANTS2 is being developed with the focus on the iterative (adaptive) reconstruction of the detector response using flood field irradiation data. The package is implemented in C++ programming language and it is a multiplatform, open source project.

  19. Programmed packaging of multicomponent envelope-type nanoparticle system for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Daniela; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Marchini, Cristina; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2010-05-01

    A programmed packaging strategy to develop a multicomponent envelope-type nanoparticle system (MENS) is presented. To this end, we took specific advantage of using in-house tailored liposomes that have been recently shown to exhibit intrinsic endosomal rupture properties that allow plasmid DNA to escape from endosomes and to enter the nucleus with extremely high efficiency. Transfection efficiency experiments on NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts indicate that MENS is a promising transfection candidate.

  20. Productivity Techniques and Quality Aspects in the Criticality Safety Evaluation of Y-12 Type-B Fissile Material Packages

    SciTech Connect

    DeClue, J. F.

    2011-06-28

    The inventory of certified Type-B fissile material packages consists of ten performance-based packages for offsite transportation purposes, serving transportation programs at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The containment vessels range from 5 to 19 in. in diameter and from 17 to 58 in. in height. The drum assembly external to the containment vessel ranges from 18 to 34 in. in diameter and from 26 to 71 in. in height. The weight of the packaging (drum assembly and containment vessel) ranges from 239 to 1550 lb. The older DT-nn series of Cellotex-based packages are being phased-out and replaced by a new generation of Kaolite-based ('Y-12 patented insulation') packages capable of withstanding the dynamic crush test 10 CFR 71.73(c)(2). Three replacement packages are in various stages of development; two are in use. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 6M specification package, which does not conform to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements for Type-B packages, is no longer authorized for service on public roads. The ES-3100 shipping package is an example of a Kaolite-based Type-B fissile material package developed as a replacement package for the DOT 6M. With expanded utility, the ES-3100 is designed and licensed for transporting highly enriched uranium and plutonium materials on public roads. The ES-3100 provides added capability for air transport of up to 7-kg quantities of uranium material. This paper presents the productivity techniques and quality aspects in the criticality safety evaluation of Y-12 packages using the ES-3100 as an example.

  1. Type B package for the transport of large medical and industrial sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Darrell Dwaine; Noss, Philip W

    2010-09-14

    AREVA Federal Services LLC, under contract to the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Offsite Source Recovery Project, is developing a new Type B(U)-96 package for the transport of unwanted or abandoned high activity gamma and neutron radioactive sealed sources (sources). The sources were used primarily in medical or industrial devices, and are of domestic (USA) or foreign origin. To promote public safety and mitigate the possibility of loss or misuse, the Offsite Source Recovery Project is recovering and managing sources worldwide. The package, denoted the LANL-B, is designed to accommodate the sources within an internal gamma shield. The sources are located either in the IAEA's Long Term Storage Shield (LTSS), or within intact medical or industrial irradiation devices. As the sources are already shielded separately, the package does not include any shielding of its own. A particular challenge in the design of the LANL-B has been weight. Since the LTSS shield weighs approximately 5,000 lb [2,270 kg], and the total package gross weight must be limited to 10,000 lb [4,540 kg], the net weight of the package was limited to 5,000 lb, for an efficiency of 50% (i.e., the payload weight is 50% of the gross weight of the package). This required implementation of a light-weight bell-jar concept, in which the containment takes the form of a vertical bell which is bolted to a base. A single impact limiter is used on the bottom, to protect the elastomer seals and bolted joint. A top-end impact is mitigated by the deformation of a tori spherically-shaped head. Impacts in various orientations on the bottom end are mitigated by a cylindrical, polyurethane foam-filled impact limiter. Internally, energy is absorbed using honeycomb blocks at each end, which fill the torispherical head volumes. As many of the sources are considered to be in normal form, the LANL-B package offers leak-tight containment using an elastomer seal at the joint between the bell and the base, as well as on the

  2. 10 CFR 71.61 - Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... than 105A2. 71.61 Section 71.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.61 Special requirements for Type B... its undamaged containment system can withstand an external water pressure of 2 MPa (290 psi) for a...

  3. 10 CFR 71.61 - Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... than 105A2. 71.61 Section 71.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.61 Special requirements for Type B... its undamaged containment system can withstand an external water pressure of 2 MPa (290 psi) for a...

  4. 10 CFR 71.61 - Special requirements for Type B packages containing more than 105A2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... than 105A2. 71.61 Section 71.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Package Approval Standards § 71.61 Special requirements for Type B... its undamaged containment system can withstand an external water pressure of 2 MPa (290 psi) for a...

  5. Definition of Small Gram Quantity Contents for Type B Radioactive Material Transportation Packages: Activity-Based Content Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaraman, S; Kim, S; Biswas, D; Hafner, R; Anderson, B

    2010-10-27

    Since the 1960's, the Department of Transportation Specification (DOT Spec) 6M packages have been used extensively for transportation of Type B quantities of radioactive materials between Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, laboratories, and productions sites. However, due to the advancement of packaging technology, the aging of the 6M packages, and variability in the quality of the packages, the DOT implemented a phased elimination of the 6M specification packages (and other DOT Spec packages) in favor of packages certified to meet federal performance requirements. DOT issued the final rule in the Federal Register on October 1, 2004 requiring that use of the DOT Specification 6M be discontinued as of October 1, 2008. A main driver for the change was the fact that the 6M specification packagings were not supported by a Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) that was compliant with Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 71 (10 CFR 71). Therefore, materials that would have historically been shipped in 6M packages are being identified as contents in Type B (and sometimes Type A fissile) package applications and addenda that are to be certified under the requirements of 10 CFR 71. The requirements in 10 CFR 71 include that the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) must identify the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents (10 CFR 71.33(b)(1) and 10 CFR 71.33(b)(2)), and that the application (i.e., SARP submittal or SARP addendum) demonstrates that the external dose rate (due to the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents) on the surface of the packaging (i.e., package and contents) not exceed 200 mrem/hr (10 CFR 71.35(a), 10 CFR 71.47(a)). It has been proposed that a 'Small Gram Quantity' of radioactive material be defined, such that, when loaded in a transportation package, the dose rates at external points of an unshielded packaging

  6. A COMPARISON OF TWO THERMAL INSULATION AND STRUCTURAL MATERIALS FOR USE IN TYPE B PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2010-07-16

    This paper presents the summary of design features and test results of two Type B Shipping Package prototype configurations comprising different insulating materials developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Energy. The materials evaluated, a closed-cell polyurethane foam and a vacuformed ceramic fiber material, were selected to provide adequate structural protection to the package containment vessel during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and to provide thermal protection during the HAC fire. Polyurethane foam has been used in shipping package designs for many years because of the stiffness it provides to the structure and because of the thermal protection it provides during fire scenarios. This comparison describes how ceramic fiber material offers an alternative to the polyurethane foam in a specific overpack design. Because of the high operating temperature ({approx}2,300 F) of the ceramic material, it allows for contents with higher heat loads to be shipped than is possible with polyurethane foam. Methods of manufacturing and design considerations using the two materials will be addressed.

  7. Analysis of thermal characteristics based on a new type diode laser packaging structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Bo, Baoxue; Qiao, Zhongliang; Xu, Yumeng; Gao, Xin

    2017-08-01

    In order to improve the thermal characteristics of single-chip semiconductor lasers and increase the output power of the device, a new type of vertical packaging structure of heat sink is proposed and analyzed. The heat sink retains the advantages of simplicity and being easy to apply, and the performance of heat dissipation has been improved obviously. The new heat sink structure is believed to be more suitable for packaging of the high-power semiconductor laser chips by heat conduction. Finite-element thermal analysis was used to simulate the thermal field distribution and thermal vector distribution in the conventional structure and the new structure. The simulation results show that the thermal resistance of the conventional structure is 2.0 K/W and the thermal resistance of the new heat sink is less than 1.6 K/W. The theoretical calculation results show that the output power of the packaged laser by new heat sinks can be significantly improved.

  8. Effects of calf diet, antioxidants, packaging type and storage time on beef steak storage.

    PubMed

    Franco, Daniel; González, Laura; Bispo, Esperanza; Latorre, Alicia; Moreno, Teresa; Sineiro, Jorge; Sánchez, Marivel; Núñez, María José

    2012-04-01

    The effect of basal dietary supplemented with vegetable oils plus vitamin E (sunflower, soybean, linseed and a basal diet control), type of packaging (MAP or vacuum), addition of natural antioxidant (grape seed, rosemary) and storage time (0, 7, 14 and 21 days) on lipid oxidation, color stability, vitamin E content, and total aerobic bacterial counts in steaks of Longissimus thoracis was studied. The triple interaction diet × time × packaging affected oxidative stability, redness and yellowness of the meat. TBARS values did not increase with time in vacuum-packaged samples for all dietary treatments. However, samples from MAP and control showed the highest TBARS values after 21 days of storage (0.72 mg MDA/kg of meat, P<0.05). Both exogenous antioxidant extracts and MAP maintained low total aerobic counts in steaks until the 21st day. Calves should be fed a diet supplemented with L-VE, stored in MAP and treated with grape seed extract to extend the shelf life of their meat.

  9. Shelf-life of almond pastry cookies with different types of packaging and levels of temperature.

    PubMed

    Romeo, F V; De Luca, S; Piscopo, A; Santisi, V; Poiana, M

    2010-06-01

    Almond pastries are typical cookies of the south of Italy. Introduction of new packaging for this kind of cookies requires shelf-life assessments. This study, related to different types of packaging under various storage conditions of time and temperature, identifies critical parameters, as color and texture, to track during storage studies and to extend the shelf-life. The cookies were packed in three different ways and stored at two different temperatures. The pastries were separately stored: (1) in polyvinylchloride film; (2) in aluminum foil (ALL); (3) with modified atmosphere (MAP) in plastic vessels sealed into a polyamide/ polyethylene film; and (4) in vessels without any polymeric film. The storage temperatures were 20 and 30 °C. Evolution of texture, water activity, dry matter and color was assessed. Texture was evaluated by a texture analyzer with a puncturing test. Indices for hardening were the area under the curve (N × mm) up to 10 mm of distance, and the maximum force (N) corresponding to the crust fracture. The best results were obtained with ALL packaging and MAP condition, and above all, in all the trials a temperature of 30 °C reduced the crust hardness.

  10. Growth and toxigenesis of C. botulinum type E in fishes packaged under modified atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Baker, D A; Genigeorgis, C; Glover, J; Razavilar, V

    1990-05-01

    Modified atmosphere packaging of fresh fish is used to market high quality products in some European countries. The potential risk of C. botulinum growth in these extended shelf-life foods is still a concern; especially since toxigenesis may precede organoleptic spoilage. This paper will present toxigenic data from rockfish, salmon and sole muscle tissues which were inoculated with a pool of non-proteolytic C. botulinum type E at seven levels (10(-2)-10(4) spores/sample), and stored under vacuum and 100% CO2, at incubation temperatures between 30 and 4 degrees C, for up to 60 days. Factorial experimental design allowed predictive formulae to be developed able to describe the lag time prior to C. botulinum toxigenesis and the probability of one spore to initiate toxigenesis based upon the storage conditions. Accurate characterization of the microbial ecology of C. botulinum in modified atmosphere-packaged fish, will support safe exploitation of these packaging systems in the market place, and identify critical control points for potential product or process abuses.

  11. Type of oral solid medication packaging and medication preparation time in nursing homes: A direct observation study.

    PubMed

    Cready, C M; Hudson, C; Dreyer, K

    2017-06-05

    Medication administration is a substantial portion of the workday in nursing homes, with the medication preparation step being the most time-consuming. However, little is known about how medication preparation time is affected by the type of packaging used for oral solid medications (ie, tablets/capsules). We examined the effects of two types of packaging. As fewer steps are associated with strip packaging compared to bingo card packaging, we hypothesized that the increase in medication preparation seconds per resident with each additional oral solid medication would be smaller when strip packaging was used. A total of 430 medication preparations conducted by eight nurses during the regularly scheduled morning medication administration period in two nursing homes-using strip packaging and bingo card packaging, respectively-were observed. Each medication preparation observation was matched to its corresponding medication administration record and observations averaged across resident. Using the resident sample (N=149), we estimated three regression models (adjusting the standard errors for the clustering of resident by nurse). The first model regressed medication preparation seconds on the number of oral solid medications. The second model added the type of packaging used and the control variables (type of unit [long-term care, post-acute care], the number of one-half pills and the dosage form diversity in the preparation). To test our hypothesis, the third model added an interaction term between the number of oral solid medications and the type of packaging used. As hypothesized, all else equal, the number of oral solid medications tended to increase medication preparation time per resident in both nursing homes, but the increase was smaller in the strip packaging nursing home (P<.05). Each additional oral solid medication in the bingo card packaging nursing home increased medication preparation by an average of 13 seconds (b=13.077), whereas each oral solid

  12. Upgrading UNLV's ASTM E477 test facility to meet the current requirements of ASTM E477

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fojas, Ronn Reinier

    A by-product of Heating, Ventilation, and Air-conditioning (HVAC) systems is noise that is produced by fans, compressors, and other related equipments and the noises from the turbulence that is created by moving air. Sometimes, it is impractical to modify the sources of the noise, which requires designers to modify the path of the noise, the duct system. These modifications might include installing an in-duct silencer or acoustical lining on the inside walls of the ducts. The testing and the precise quantification of the performance of these silencers and duct linings are necessary for any designer to be able to make the correct modifications to the ventilation system. The ASTM E477 code calls for strict standardization of the testing of such noise attenuation devices. The ASTM E477 test facility used by the Center for Mechanical & Environmental Systems Technology (CMEST) at UNLV was first constructed in 1991 and required upgrades to meet the newer revisions of the ASTM code. This study includes making modifications to the facility (1) to increase sound input, (2) reduce sound leakage, and (3) to integrate the measurement systems. These upgrades will bring the facility into compliance with the current version of the ASTM E477 test standard.

  13. ASTM standardization of electrochemical noise measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, J.R.; Eden, D.A.; Yaffe, M.R.; Fahey, J.V.; Reichert, D.L.; Silverman, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    The increased utilization of electrochemical noise measurement in corrosion research and industrial process monitoring prompted the formation in 1991 of an ASTM Task Group within the G1 Corrosion of Metals Committee. The scope of the task group was to develop standards that describe instruments and methods for making and analyzing electrochemical noise measurements. Task group activities are focused exclusively on measurements to be made in the laboratory. The initial goal has been to develop consensus on: (a) terminology, (b) specifications and configurations for laboratory instrumentation, (c) laboratory apparatus, and (d) data analysis methods. A round robin was also organized to develop a body of data on different material/environment systems using a variety of instrument configurations and data analysis techniques. A guide for making valid electrochemical noise results is being prepared based on the round robin results. The status of the effort to address these and other standardization issues within the ASTM G1.11.04 Task Group on Electrochemical Noise Measurement will be presented.

  14. Nucleocapsid and matrix protein contributions to selective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genomic RNA packaging.

    PubMed

    Poon, D T; Li, G; Aldovini, A

    1998-03-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NC) of retroviruses plays a major role in genomic RNA packaging, and some evidence has implicated the matrix protein (MA) of certain retroviruses in viral RNA binding. To further investigate the role of NC in the selective recognition of genomic viral RNA and to address the potential contribution of MA in this process, we constructed chimeric and deletion human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mutants that alter the NC or MA protein. Both HIV and mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) NC proteins have two zinc-binding domains and similar basic amino acid compositions but differ substantially in total length, amino acid sequence, and spacing of the zinc-binding motifs. When the entire NC coding sequence of HIV was replaced with the MMTV NC coding sequence, we found that the HIV genome was incorporated into virions at 50% of wild-type levels. Viruses produced from chimeric HIV genomes with complete NC replacements, or with the two NC zinc-binding domains replaced with MMTV sequences, preferentially incorporated HIV genomes when both HIV and MMTV genomes were simultaneously present in the cell. Viruses produced from chimeric MMTV genomes in which the MMTV NC had been replaced with HIV NC preferentially incorporated MMTV genomes when both HIV and MMTV genomes were simultaneously present in the cell. In contrast, viruses produced from chimeric HIV genomes containing the Moloney NC, which contains a single zinc-binding motif, were previously shown to preferentially incorporate Moloney genomic RNA. Taken together, these results indicate that an NC protein with two zinc-binding motifs is required for specific HIV RNA packaging and that the amino acid context of these motifs, while contributing to the process, is less crucial for specificity. The data also suggest that HIV NC may not be the exclusive determinant of RNA selectivity. Analysis of an HIV MA mutant revealed that specific RNA packaging does not require MA protein.

  15. Nucleocapsid and Matrix Protein Contributions to Selective Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Genomic RNA Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Dexter T. K.; Li, Guangde; Aldovini, Anna

    1998-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NC) of retroviruses plays a major role in genomic RNA packaging, and some evidence has implicated the matrix protein (MA) of certain retroviruses in viral RNA binding. To further investigate the role of NC in the selective recognition of genomic viral RNA and to address the potential contribution of MA in this process, we constructed chimeric and deletion human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mutants that alter the NC or MA protein. Both HIV and mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) NC proteins have two zinc-binding domains and similar basic amino acid compositions but differ substantially in total length, amino acid sequence, and spacing of the zinc-binding motifs. When the entire NC coding sequence of HIV was replaced with the MMTV NC coding sequence, we found that the HIV genome was incorporated into virions at 50% of wild-type levels. Viruses produced from chimeric HIV genomes with complete NC replacements, or with the two NC zinc-binding domains replaced with MMTV sequences, preferentially incorporated HIV genomes when both HIV and MMTV genomes were simultaneously present in the cell. Viruses produced from chimeric MMTV genomes in which the MMTV NC had been replaced with HIV NC preferentially incorporated MMTV genomes when both HIV and MMTV genomes were simultaneously present in the cell. In contrast, viruses produced from chimeric HIV genomes containing the Moloney NC, which contains a single zinc-binding motif, were previously shown to preferentially incorporate Moloney genomic RNA. Taken together, these results indicate that an NC protein with two zinc-binding motifs is required for specific HIV RNA packaging and that the amino acid context of these motifs, while contributing to the process, is less crucial for specificity. The data also suggest that HIV NC may not be the exclusive determinant of RNA selectivity. Analysis of an HIV MA mutant revealed that specific RNA packaging does not require MA protein. PMID:9499052

  16. Packaging Your Training Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espeland, Pamela

    1977-01-01

    The types of packaging and packaging materials to use for training materials should be determined during the planning of the training programs, according to the packaging market. Five steps to follow in shopping for packaging are presented, along with a list of packaging manufacturers. (MF)

  17. Packaging Your Training Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espeland, Pamela

    1977-01-01

    The types of packaging and packaging materials to use for training materials should be determined during the planning of the training programs, according to the packaging market. Five steps to follow in shopping for packaging are presented, along with a list of packaging manufacturers. (MF)

  18. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Part 23: Water; Atmospheric Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, PA.

    Standards for water and atmospheric analysis are compiled in this segment, Part 23, of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) annual book of standards. It contains all current formally approved ASTM standard and tentative test methods, definitions, recommended practices, proposed methods, classifications, and specifications. One…

  20. Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Part 23: Water; Atmospheric Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, PA.

    Standards for water and atmospheric analysis are compiled in this segment, Part 23, of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) annual book of standards. It contains all current formally approved ASTM standard and tentative test methods, definitions, recommended practices, proposed methods, classifications, and specifications. One…

  1. ORNL testing of DOT specification 17H drums (55-gallon) for compliance with DOT specifications for Type A packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, J.S.; Lasher, L.C.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.; Van Hoesen, S.D.

    1986-07-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) proposes using Department of Transportation (DOT) specification 17H drums (55-gal) for transporting low-level waste (LLW) to Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) for interim storage. This container type was tested and found to be in compliance with DOT specifications for Type A packaging.

  2. A novel post-weld-shift measurement and compensation technique in butterfly-type laser module packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yi-Cheng, Sr.; Tsai, Y. C.; Hung, Y. S.; Cheng, W. H.

    2005-08-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the packaging of laser modules using laser welding technique is to use a reliable and accurate joining process. However, during welding, due to the material property difference between welded components, the rapid solidification of the welded region and the associated material shrinkage often introduced a post-weld-shift (PWS) between welded components. For a typical single-mode fiber application, if the PWS induced fiber alignment shift by the laser welding joining process is even a few micrometers, up to 50 % or greater loss in the coupled power may occur. The fiber alignment shift of the PWS effect in the laser welding process has a significant impact on the laser module package yield. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the effects of PWS on the fiber alignment shifts in laser-welded laser module packages and then the compensation of the fiber alignment shifts due to PWS effects are the key research subjects in laser welding techniques for optoelectronic packaging applications. Previously, the power losses due to PWS in butterfly-type laser module packages have been qualitatively corrected by applying the laser hammering technique to the direction of the detected shift. Therefore, by applying an elastic deformation to the welded components and by observing the corresponding power variation, the direction and magnitude of the PWS may be predicted. Despite numerous studies on improving the fabrication yields of laser module packaging using the PWS correction in laser welding techniques by a qualitative estimate, limited information is available for the quantitative understanding of the PWS induced fiber alignment shift which can be useful in designing and fabricating high-yield and high-performance laser module packages. The purpose of this paper is to present a quantitative probing of the PWS induced fiber alignment shift in laser-welded butterfly-type laser module packaging by employing a novel technique of a high

  3. Specificity of neomycin analogues bound to the packaging region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA.

    PubMed

    McPike, Mark P; Goodisman, Jerry; Dabrowiak, James C

    2004-04-15

    The packaging region of HIV-1 RNA contains a number of structural features which are important in the life cycle of the virus, making this segment of RNA a potential target for new types of AIDS-directed drugs. We studied the binding of three neomycin analogues (neo-guanidino, neo-acridine, and neo-neo) to a 171-mer RNA molecule from the packaging region of HIV-1 using quantitative footprinting and circular dichroism. Neo-guanidino produced footprinting patterns and effects on the CD similar to those observed for neomycin and paromomycin, indicating that all three compounds bind to the same regions of the 171-mer. Neo-guanidino binds to SL 1 where it joins the large internal loop, near a bulge in the stem of SL 1, and on SL 2. Neo-acridine, which has an acridine attached to neomycin, and neo-neo, which has two neomycins linked by a flexible tether, bind bivalently, and give very different footprinting and CD results from the other compounds. The neomycin portion of neo-acridine binds to the same sites as neomycin, while the attached acridine group appears to bind to a duplex region in the main stem of the folded 171-mer. Since the footprinting data for this analogue show few enhancements, bivalent binding of neo-acridine appears to stabilize the folded structure of RNA by effectively 'stapling' parts of the structure together. Neo-neo induces significant structural changes in RNA where neomycin binds. This may be related to the inability of both neomycins of neo-neo it find optimal binding sites adjacent to one another without changing RNA structure. The intensity of a strong negative CD band in the spectrum of psi-RNA at 208 nm is sensitive to drug-induced changes in RNA structure. Neo-guanidino and neo-neo (also neomycin and paromomycin), which change RNA structure, cause an increase in intensity while neo-acridine, which induces little distortion to RNA, causes a decrease in intensity. Molecular modeling analysis shows that C-5' of ribose of neo-acridine and neo

  4. ASTM/NBS base stock consistency study

    SciTech Connect

    Frassa, K.A.

    1980-11-01

    This paper summarizes the scope of a cooperative ASTM/NBS program established in June 1979. The contemplated study will ascertain the batch-to-batch consistency of re-refined and virgin base stocks manufactured by various processes. For one year, approximately eight to ten different base stocks samples, will be obtained by NBS every two weeks. One set of bi-monthly samples will be forwarded to each participant, on a coded basis monthly. Seven to eight samples will be obtained from six different re-refining processes and two virgin oil samples from a similar manufacturing process. The participants will report their results on a monthly basis. The second set of samples will be retained by NBS for an interim monthly sample study, if required, based on data analysis. Each sample's properties will be evaluated using various physical tests, chemical tests, and bench tests. The total testing program should define the batch-to-batch base stock consistency short of engine testing.

  5. Pressure Build-Up During the Fire Test in Type B(U) Packages Containing Water - 13280

    SciTech Connect

    Feldkamp, Martin; Nehrig, Marko; Bletzer, Claus; Wille, Frank

    2013-07-01

    The safety assessment of packages for the transport of radioactive materials with content containing liquids requires special consideration. The main focus is on water as supplementary liquid content in Type B(U) packages. A typical content of a Type B(U) package is ion exchange resin, waste of a nuclear power plant, which is not dried, normally only drained. Besides the saturated ion exchange resin, a small amount of free water can be included in these contents. Compared to the safety assessment of packages with dry content, attention must be paid to some more specific issues. An overview of these issues is provided. The physical and chemical compatibility of the content itself and the content compatibility with the packages materials must be demonstrated for the assessment. Regarding the mechanical resistance the package has to withstand the forces resulting from the freezing liquid. The most interesting point, however, is the pressure build-up inside the package due to vaporization. This could for example be caused by radiolysis of the liquid and must be taken into account for the storage period. If the package is stressed by the total inner pressure, this pressure leads to mechanical loads to the package body, the lid and the lid bolts. Thus, the pressure is the driving force on the gasket system regarding the activity release and a possible loss of tightness. The total pressure in any calculation is the sum of partial pressures of different gases which can be caused by different effects. The pressure build-up inside the package caused by the regulatory thermal test (30 min at 800 deg. C), as part of the cumulative test scenario under accident conditions of transport is discussed primarily. To determine the pressure, the temperature distribution in the content must be calculated for the whole period from beginning of the thermal test until cooling-down. In this case, while calculating the temperature distribution, conduction and radiation as well as evaporation

  6. Pyrolysis behavior of different type of materials contained in the rejects of packaging waste sorting plants.

    PubMed

    Adrados, A; De Marco, I; Lopez-Urionabarrenechea, A; Caballero, B M; Laresgoiti, M F

    2013-01-01

    In this paper rejected streams coming from a waste packaging material recovery facility have been characterized and separated into families of products of similar nature in order to determine the influence of different types of ingredients in the products obtained in the pyrolysis process. The pyrolysis experiments have been carried out in a non-stirred batch 3.5 dm(3) reactor, swept with 1 L min(-1) N(2), at 500°C for 30 min. Pyrolysis liquids are composed of an organic phase and an aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is greater as higher is the cellulosic material content in the sample. The organic phase contains valuable chemicals as styrene, ethylbenzene and toluene, and has high heating value (HHV) (33-40 MJ kg(-1)). Therefore they could be used as alternative fuels for heat and power generation and as a source of valuable chemicals. Pyrolysis gases are mainly composed of hydrocarbons but contain high amounts of CO and CO(2); their HHV is in the range of 18-46 MJ kg(-1). The amount of COCO(2) increases, and consequently HHV decreases as higher is the cellulosic content of the waste. Pyrolysis solids are mainly composed of inorganics and char formed in the process. The cellulosic materials lower the quality of the pyrolysis liquids and gases, and increase the production of char.

  7. Test Plan for Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO), ARROW-PAK Packaging, Docket 95-40-7A, Type A Container

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L.

    1995-10-23

    This report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A (DOT-7A) compliance testing to be followed for qualification of the Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, ARROW-PAK, for use as a Type A Packaging. The packaging configuration being tested is intended for transportation of radioactive solids, Form No. 1, Form No. 2, and Form No. 3.

  8. Normal Condition on Transport Thermal Analysis and Testing of a Type B Drum Package

    SciTech Connect

    Jerrell, J.W.; van Alstine, M.N.; Gromada, R.J.

    1995-03-21

    Increasing the content limits of radioactive material packagings can save money and increase transportation safety by decreasing the total number of shipments required to transport large quantities of material. The contents of drum packages can be limited by unacceptable containment vessel pressures and temperatures due to the thermal properties of the insulation. The purpose of this work is to understand and predict the effects of insulation properties on containment system performance.

  9. Pyrolysis behavior of different type of materials contained in the rejects of packaging waste sorting plants

    SciTech Connect

    Adrados, A.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the influence of materials in the pyrolysis of real plastic waste samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inorganic compounds remain unaltered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellulosic components give rise to an increase in char formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellulosic components promote the production of aqueous phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellulosic components increase CO and CO{sub 2} contents in the gases. - Abstract: In this paper rejected streams coming from a waste packaging material recovery facility have been characterized and separated into families of products of similar nature in order to determine the influence of different types of ingredients in the products obtained in the pyrolysis process. The pyrolysis experiments have been carried out in a non-stirred batch 3.5 dm{sup 3} reactor, swept with 1 L min{sup -1} N{sub 2}, at 500 Degree-Sign C for 30 min. Pyrolysis liquids are composed of an organic phase and an aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is greater as higher is the cellulosic material content in the sample. The organic phase contains valuable chemicals as styrene, ethylbenzene and toluene, and has high heating value (HHV) (33-40 MJ kg{sup -1}). Therefore they could be used as alternative fuels for heat and power generation and as a source of valuable chemicals. Pyrolysis gases are mainly composed of hydrocarbons but contain high amounts of CO and CO{sub 2}; their HHV is in the range of 18-46 MJ kg{sup -1}. The amount of CO-CO{sub 2} increases, and consequently HHV decreases as higher is the cellulosic content of the waste. Pyrolysis solids are mainly composed of inorganics and char formed in the process. The cellulosic materials lower the quality of the pyrolysis liquids and gases, and increase the production of char.

  10. Model of ASTM Flammability Test in Microgravity: Iron Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Theodore A; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is extensive qualitative results from burning metallic materials in a NASA/ASTM flammability test system in normal gravity. However, this data was shown to be inconclusive for applications involving oxygen-enriched atmospheres under microgravity conditions by conducting tests using the 2.2-second Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Drop Tower. Data from neither type of test has been reduced to fundamental kinetic and dynamic systems parameters. This paper reports the initial model analysis for burning iron rods under microgravity conditions using data obtained at the LERC tower and modeling the burning system after ignition. Under the conditions of the test the burning mass regresses up the rod to be detached upon deceleration at the end of the drop. The model describes the burning system as a semi-batch, well-mixed reactor with product accumulation only. This model is consistent with the 2.0-second duration of the test. Transient temperature and pressure measurements are made on the chamber volume. The rod solid-liquid interface melting rate is obtained from film records. The model consists of a set of 17 non-linear, first-order differential equations which are solved using MATLAB. This analysis confirms that a first-order rate, in oxygen concentration, is consistent for the iron-oxygen kinetic reaction. An apparent activation energy of 246.8 kJ/mol is consistent for this model.

  11. Model of ASTM Flammability Test in Microgravity: Iron Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Theodore A; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is extensive qualitative results from burning metallic materials in a NASA/ASTM flammability test system in normal gravity. However, this data was shown to be inconclusive for applications involving oxygen-enriched atmospheres under microgravity conditions by conducting tests using the 2.2-second Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Drop Tower. Data from neither type of test has been reduced to fundamental kinetic and dynamic systems parameters. This paper reports the initial model analysis for burning iron rods under microgravity conditions using data obtained at the LERC tower and modeling the burning system after ignition. Under the conditions of the test the burning mass regresses up the rod to be detached upon deceleration at the end of the drop. The model describes the burning system as a semi-batch, well-mixed reactor with product accumulation only. This model is consistent with the 2.0-second duration of the test. Transient temperature and pressure measurements are made on the chamber volume. The rod solid-liquid interface melting rate is obtained from film records. The model consists of a set of 17 non-linear, first-order differential equations which are solved using MATLAB. This analysis confirms that a first-order rate, in oxygen concentration, is consistent for the iron-oxygen kinetic reaction. An apparent activation energy of 246.8 kJ/mol is consistent for this model.

  12. The major types of added sugars and non-nutritive sweeteners in a sample of Australian packaged foods.

    PubMed

    Probst, Yasmine C; Dengate, Alexis; Jacobs, Jenny; Louie, Jimmy Cy; Dunford, Elizabeth K

    2017-08-30

    Limiting the intake of added sugars in the diet remains a key focus of global dietary recommendations. To date there has been no systematic monitoring of the major types of added sugars used in the Australian food supply. The present study aimed to identify the most common added sugars and non-nutritive sweeteners in the Australian packaged food supply. Secondary analysis of data from the Australian FoodSwitch database was undertaken. Forty-six added sugars and eight non-nutritive sweetener types were extracted from the ingredient lists of 5744 foods across seventeen food categories. Australia. Not applicable. Added sugar ingredients were found in 61 % of the sample of foods examined and non-nutritive sweetener ingredients were found in 69 %. Only 31 % of foods contained no added sugar or non-nutritive sweetener. Sugar (as an ingredient), glucose syrup, maple syrup, maltodextrin and glucose/dextrose were the most common sugar ingredient types identified. Most Australian packaged food products had at least one added sugar ingredient, the most common being 'sugar'. The study provides insight into the most common types of added sugars and non-nutritive sweeteners used in the Australian food supply and is a useful baseline to monitor changes in how added sugars are used in Australian packaged foods over time.

  13. Effect of different types of plastic packaging films on the moisture and aflatoxin contents of pistachio nuts during storage.

    PubMed

    Shakerardekani, Ahmad; Karim, Roselina

    2013-04-01

    Pistachio nut (Pistacia vera L.) is one of the popular tree nuts in the world. Proper selection of packaging materials is necessary to prevent absorption of moisture and aflatoxin formation which will influence the overall product quality and safety. This research is undertaken to study the effect of different type of flexible packaging films on the moisture and aflatoxin contents of whole pistachio nuts during storage at ambient temperature (22-28 °C) and relative humidity of 85-100%. Five types of plastic films tested were low density polyethylene (LDPE) which serves as the control, food-grade polyvinyl chloride (PVC), nylon (LDPE/PA), polyamide/polypropylene (PA/PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). The moisture content and aflatoxin content of pistachio nuts were measured using oven drying method and HPLC, respectively. Sample were analysed at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 months during the storage period. Results showed that there was an increase in moisture content with the increase in storage time of pistachio nuts. The increase in moisture content was associated with the aflatoxin level of pistachio nuts during storage time. All the packaging materials except LDPE delayed the moisture absorption and aflatoxin formation of the product. The most suitable packaging materials for maintaining the quality and safety of pistachio nuts is PET films followed by nylon, PA/PP and PVC. The shelf-life of pistachio can be extended from 2 months (Control) to 5 months when PET is used as the packaging material.

  14. [Serum mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (ASTm) in acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Zhang, G

    1991-06-01

    The increase of serum ASTm activity might reflect the severity of damage at the subcellular level of the myocardium. 50 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were observed. The mean peak ASTm activity was 34.34 +/- 34.60 IU/L and 48 patients (96%) greater than or equal to 9 IU/L (two times median value of normal subject). The peak time (36 h) came later and the duration (120 h) was longer than that of CK-MB. ASTm/ASTt ratio in groups of AMI, non-AMI heart failure and acute ictero-hepatitis was 0.25 +/- 0.10, 0.02 +/- 0.05 and 0.05 +/- 0.02 respectively. The former was significantly greater than other two groups (P less than 0.01). The activity of ASTm in AMI cases with heart function at I, II and III + IV (Killip classification) was 21.8, 40.2 and 76.2 IU/L respectively (F = 8.407 P less than 0.01) and it was 84.9 and 24.7 IU/L in the death and surviving groups (P less than 0.01). The result showed that the estimation of serum ASTm level was helpful to the establishment of diagnosis in the patients with AMI who were sent delayed to the hospital. It held special significance in evaluating the severity of myocardial damage, heart function and in predicting the prognosis of AMI.

  15. Vacuum decay container/closure integrity testing technology. Part 1. ASTM F2338-09 precision and bias studies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Heinz; Stauffer, Tony; Chen, Shu-Chen Y; Lee, Yoojin; Forster, Ronald; Ludzinski, Miron; Kamat, Madhav; Godorov, Phillip; Guazzo, Dana Morton

    2009-01-01

    ASTM F2338-09 Standard Test Method for Nondestructive Detection of Leaks in Packages by Vacuum Decay Method is applicable for leak-testing rigid and semi-rigid non-lidded trays; trays or cups sealed with porous barrier lidding materials; rigid, nonporous packages; and flexible, nonporous packages. Part 1 of this series describes the precision and bias studies performed in 2008 to expand this method's scope to include rigid, nonporous packages completely or partially filled with liquid. Round robin tests using three VeriPac 325/LV vacuum decay leak testers (Packaging Technologies & Inspection, LLC, Tuckahoe, NY) were performed at three test sites. Test packages were 1-mL glass syringes. Positive controls had laser-drilled holes in the barrel ranging from about 5 to 15 microm in nominal diameter. Two different leak tests methods were performed at each site: a "gas leak test" performed at 250 mbar (absolute) and a "liquid leak test" performed at about 1 mbar (absolute). The gas leak test was used to test empty, air-filled syringes. All defects with holes > or = 5.0 microm and all no-defect controls were correctly identified. The only false negative result was attributed to a single syringe with a < 5.0-microm hole. Tests performed using a calibrated air leak supported a 0.10-cm3 x min(-1) (ccm) sensitivity limit (99/99 lower tolerance limit). The liquid leak test was used to test both empty, air-filled syringes and water-filled syringes. Test results were 100% accurate for all empty and water-filled syringes, both without holes and with holes (5, 10, and 15 microm). Tests performed using calibrated air flow leaks of 0, 0.05, and 0.10 ccm were also 100% accurate; data supported a 0.10-ccm sensitivity limit (99/99 lower tolerance limit). Quantitative differential pressure results strongly correlated to hole size using either liquid or gas vacuum decay leak tests. The higher vacuum liquid leak test gave noticeably higher pressure readings when water was present in the

  16. 49 CFR 173.466 - Additional tests for Type A packagings designed for liquids and gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... target so as to suffer the maximum damage to its containment. The height of the drop measured from the lowest part of the packaging specimen to the upper surface of the target must be 9 m (30 feet) or greater. The target must be as specified in § 173.465(c)(5). (2) Penetration test. The specimen must be...

  17. 49 CFR 173.412 - Additional design requirements for Type A packages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... than tritium not exceeding 40 TBq (1080Ci) or noble gases not exceeding the A2 value appropriate for the noble gas, will be able to prevent loss or dispersal of contents when the package is subjected to... gas by chemical reaction and radiolysis. (f) The containment system will retain its radioactive...

  18. Use of ASTM D5304 in assessing unstable diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.M.; Martin, C.J.; Beal, E.J.; Hardy, D.R.

    1995-05-01

    The storage stability, or the length of time a fuel can be stored, is of great concern to diesel fuel users. This paper reports on the use of the new ASTM accelerated test for storage stability by oxygen overpressure (D5304) to predict future storage life span of 63,000,000 gallons of a diesel fuel for US Naval vessel use. This paper demonstrates the use of ASTM D5304 at storage times of 16, 40 and 96 hours to accurately determine the length of time that this large quantity of diesel fuel could be stored at ambient temperatures before the maximum allowable amount of particulate contamination was reached.

  19. The role of DPB at anoxic stage in a novel package type BNR process with batch settler.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hang-Sik; Lee, Sang-Hyung; Nam, Se-Yong; Park, Myung-Gyun

    2003-01-01

    In this research, package type BNR process was developed to remove nutrients as well as suspended solids from domestic sewage. The effect of HRT reduction of settler on the removal of pollutants as well as the role of DPBs at anoxic reactor were investigated. The proposed package system was composed of sludge denitrification tank, anaerobic, anoxic, oxic, and batch settler. This system could remove nitrogen and phosphorus effectively at low COD/N ratio and also remove SS more effectively than other ordinary BNR system having the conventional settlers. The removal efficiency of total nitrogen (T-N) in optimal condition was about 75.1% under the TCOD/TKN ratio as low as 5.7. The average concentration of the effluent TCOD, ortho-P, NH4+-N, NO3- -N and SS in the package type BNR system of 2 h settler retention time were 15.6. 1.38, 1.4, 10.3 and 3.9 mg/L, respectively. In anoxic state, denitrifying dephosphatation, that is uptaking phosphate by using nitrate-nitrogen as an electron acceptor was observed. The removed NO3- -N concentration by denitrifying dephosphatation was 1.62 mg NO3- -N/mg PO4(3-)-P.

  20. Final evaluation report for Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, ARROW-PAK packaging, Docket 95-40-7A, Type A container

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A (DOT-7A) compliance test results of the ARROW-PAK packaging. The ARROW-PAK packaging system consists of Marlex M-8000 Driscopipe (Series 8000 [gas] or Series 8600 [industrial]) resin pipe, manufactured by Phillips-Driscopipe, Inc., and is sealed with two dome-shaped end caps manufactured from the same materials. The patented sealing process involves the use of electrical energy to heat opposing faces of the pipe and end caps, and hydraulic rams to press the heated surfaces together. This fusion process produces a homogeneous bonding of the end cap to the pipe. The packaging may be used with or without the two internal plywood spacers. This packaging was evaluated and tested in October 1995. The packaging configuration described in this report is designed to ship Type A quantities of solid radioactive materials, Form No. 1, Form No. 2, and Form No. 3.

  1. Trans-packaging of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genome into Gag virus-like particles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tomo, Naoki; Goto, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Yuko

    2013-03-26

    Yeast is recognized as a generally safe microorganism and is utilized for the production of pharmaceutical products, including vaccines. We previously showed that expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae spheroplasts released Gag virus-like particles (VLPs) extracellularly, suggesting that the production system could be used in vaccine development. In this study, we further establish HIV-1 genome packaging into Gag VLPs in a yeast cell system. The nearly full-length HIV-1 genome containing the entire 5' long terminal repeat, U3-R-U5, did not transcribe gag mRNA in yeast. Co-expression of HIV-1 Tat, a transcription activator, did not support the transcription. When the HIV-1 promoter U3 was replaced with the promoter for the yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, gag mRNA transcription was restored, but no Gag protein expression was observed. Co-expression of HIV-1 Rev, a factor that facilitates nuclear export of gag mRNA, did not support the protein synthesis. Progressive deletions of R-U5 and its downstream stem-loop-rich region (SL) to the gag start ATG codon restored Gag protein expression, suggesting that a highly structured noncoding RNA generated from the R-U5-SL region had an inhibitory effect on gag mRNA translation. When a plasmid containing the HIV-1 genome with the R-U5-SL region was coexpressed with an expression plasmid for Gag protein, the HIV-1 genomic RNA was transcribed and incorporated into Gag VLPs formed by Gag protein assembly, indicative of the trans-packaging of HIV-1 genomic RNA into Gag VLPs in a yeast cell system. The concentration of HIV-1 genomic RNA in Gag VLPs released from yeast was approximately 500-fold higher than that in yeast cytoplasm. The deletion of R-U5 to the gag gene resulted in the failure of HIV-1 RNA packaging into Gag VLPs, indicating that the packaging signal of HIV-1 genomic RNA present in the R-U5 to gag region functions similarly in yeast cells

  2. Standard terminology of coal and coke. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This terminology is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-5 on Coal and Coke and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D05.02 on Nomenclature, Definitions and Editorial. The current edition was approved on March 10, 1998, and published May 1998. It was originally published as D 121-21T. The last previous edition was D 121-95.

  3. HACCP: Integrating Science and Management through ASTM Standards

    EPA Science Inventory

    From a technical perspective, hazard analysis-critical control point (HACCP) evaluation may be considered a risk management tool suited to a wide range of applications. As one outcome of a symposium convened by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) in August, 2005, th...

  4. Standard specification for glass fiber felt thermal insulation. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1997-01-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-16 on Thermal Insulation and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C16.23 on Blanket and Loose Fill Insulation. Current edition approved Dec. 10, 1996. Published January 1997. Originally published as C 1086-87. Last previous edition was C 1086-90a.

  5. Standard classification of coals by rank. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    This classification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-5 on Coal and Coke and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D05.18 on Classification of Coals. The current edition was approved on Sep. 10, 1998. It was published in November 1998. It was originally published as D 388-34T. The last previous edition D 388-98.

  6. HACCP: Integrating Science and Management through ASTM Standards

    EPA Science Inventory

    From a technical perspective, hazard analysis-critical control point (HACCP) evaluation may be considered a risk management tool suited to a wide range of applications. As one outcome of a symposium convened by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) in August, 2005, th...

  7. Standard specification for nuclear grade hafnium oxide pellets. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-26 on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C26.03 on Neutron Absorber Materials Specifications. Current edition approved May 10, 1997. Published May 1998. Originally published as C 1076-87. Last previous edition C 1076-92.

  8. funtooNorm: an R package for normalization of DNA methylation data when there are multiple cell or tissue types

    PubMed Central

    Oros Klein, Kathleen; Grinek, Stepan; Bernatsky, Sasha; Bouchard, Luigi; Ciampi, Antonio; Colmegna, Ines; Fortin, Jean-Philippe; Gao, Long; Hivert, Marie-France; Hudson, Marie; Kobor, Michael S.; Labbe, Aurelie; MacIsaac, Julia L.; Meaney, Michael J.; Morin, Alexander M.; O’Donnell, Kieran J.; Pastinen, Tomi; Van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H.; Voisin, Gregory; Greenwood, Celia M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: DNA methylation patterns are well known to vary substantially across cell types or tissues. Hence, existing normalization methods may not be optimal if they do not take this into account. We therefore present a new R package for normalization of data from the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip (Illumina 450 K) built on the concepts in the recently published funNorm method, and introducing cell-type or tissue-type flexibility. Results: funtooNorm is relevant for data sets containing samples from two or more cell or tissue types. A visual display of cross-validated errors informs the choice of the optimal number of components in the normalization. Benefits of cell (tissue)-specific normalization are demonstrated in three data sets. Improvement can be substantial; it is strikingly better on chromosome X, where methylation patterns have unique inter-tissue variability. Availability and Implementation: An R package is available at https://github.com/GreenwoodLab/funtooNorm, and has been submitted to Bioconductor at http://bioconductor.org. Contact: celia.greenwood@mcgill.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26500152

  9. CAFE: A Computer Tool for Accurate Simulation of the Regulatory Pool Fire Environment for Type B Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Gritzo, L.A.; Koski, J.A.; Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1999-03-16

    The Container Analysis Fire Environment computer code (CAFE) is intended to provide Type B package designers with an enhanced engulfing fire boundary condition when combined with the PATRAN/P-Thermal commercial code. Historically an engulfing fire boundary condition has been modeled as {sigma}T{sup 4} where {sigma} is the Stefan-Boltzman constant, and T is the fire temperature. The CAFE code includes the necessary chemistry, thermal radiation, and fluid mechanics to model an engulfing fire. Effects included are the local cooling of gases that form a protective boundary layer that reduces the incoming radiant heat flux to values lower than expected from a simple {sigma}T{sup 4} model. In addition, the effect of object shape on mixing that may increase the local fire temperature is included. Both high and low temperature regions that depend upon the local availability of oxygen are also calculated. Thus the competing effects that can both increase and decrease the local values of radiant heat flux are included in a reamer that is not predictable a-priori. The CAFE package consists of a group of computer subroutines that can be linked to workstation-based thermal analysis codes in order to predict package performance during regulatory and other accident fire scenarios.

  10. Randomization and In Vivo Selection Reveal a GGRG Motif Essential for Packaging Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 RNA ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Tayyba T.; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The packaging signal (ψ) of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) is present in the 5′ noncoding region of RNA and contains a 10-nucleotide palindrome (pal; 5′-392-GGAGUGCUCC) located upstream of the dimerization signal stem-loop 1 (SL1). pal has been shown to be functionally important in vitro and in vivo. We previously showed that the 3′ side of pal (GCUCC-3′) is involved in base-pairing interactions with a sequence downstream of SL1 to make an extended SL1, which is important for replication in vivo and the regulation of dimerization in vitro. However, the role of the 5′ side of pal (5′-GGAGU) was less clear. Here, we characterized this role using an in vivo SELEX approach. We produced a population of HIV-2 DNA genomes with random sequences within the 5′ side of pal and transfected these into COS-7 cells. Viruses from COS-7 cells were used to infect C8166 permissive cells. After several weeks of serial passage in C8166 cells, surviving viruses were sequenced. On the 5′ side of pal there was a striking convergence toward a GGRGN consensus sequence. Individual clones with consensus and nonconsensus sequences were tested in infectivity and packaging assays. Analysis of individuals that diverged from the consensus sequence showed normal viral RNA and protein synthesis but had replication defects and impaired RNA packaging. These findings clearly indicate that the GGRG motif is essential for viral replication and genomic RNA packaging. PMID:18971263

  11. Image analysis of corrosion pit initiation on ASTM type A240 stainless steel and ASTM type A 1008 carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nine, H. M. Zulker

    The adversity of metallic corrosion is of growing concern to industrial engineers and scientists. Corrosion attacks metal surface and causes structural as well as direct and indirect economic losses. Multiple corrosion monitoring tools are available although those are time-consuming and costly. Due to the availability of image capturing devices in today's world, image based corrosion control technique is a unique innovation. By setting up stainless steel SS 304 and low carbon steel QD 1008 panels in distilled water, half-saturated sodium chloride and saturated sodium chloride solutions and subsequent RGB image analysis in Matlab, in this research, a simple and cost-effective corrosion measurement tool has identified and investigated. Additionally, the open circuit potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results have been compared with RGB analysis to gratify the corrosion. Additionally, to understand the importance of ambiguity in crisis communication, the communication process between Union Carbide and Indian Government regarding the Bhopal incident in 1984 was analyzed.

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Modified To Package Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Vpx Efficiently Infects Macrophages and Dendritic Cells▿†

    PubMed Central

    Sunseri, Nicole; O'Brien, Meagan; Bhardwaj, Nina; Landau, Nathaniel R.

    2011-01-01

    The lentiviral accessory protein Vpx is thought to facilitate the infection of macrophages and dendritic cells by counteracting an unidentified host restriction factor. Although human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) does not encode Vpx, the accessory protein can be provided to monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) in virus-like particles, dramatically enhancing their susceptibility to HIV-1. Vpx and the related accessory protein Vpr are packaged into virions through a virus-specific interaction with the p6 carboxy-terminal domain of Gag. We localized the minimal Vpx packaging motif of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 p6 to a 10-amino-acid motif and introduced this sequence into an infectious HIV-1 provirus. The chimeric virus packaged Vpx that was provided in trans and was substantially more infectious on MDDC and MDM than the wild-type virus. We further modified the virus by introducing the Vpx coding sequence in place of nef. The resulting virus produced Vpx and replicated efficiently in MDDC and MDM. The virus also induced a potent type I interferon response in MDDC. In a coculture system, the Vpx-containing HIV-1 was more efficiently transmitted from MDDC to T cells. These findings suggest that in vivo, Vpx may facilitate transmission of the virus from dendritic cells to T cells. In addition, the chimeric virus could be used to design dendritic cell vaccines that induce an enhanced innate immune response. This approach could also be useful in the design of lentiviral vectors that transduce these relatively resistant cells. PMID:21507971

  13. 77 FR 14046 - Amended Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ...--ASTM International Standards Notice is hereby given that, on February 10, 2012, pursuant to Section 6(a...''), ASTM International Standards (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the..., ASTM has provided an updated list of current, ongoing ASTM standards activities originating between...

  14. 76 FR 63658 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; ASTM International

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; ASTM International Notice is hereby given that, on August 31....C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications.... Specifically, ASTM has provided an updated list of current, ongoing ASTM standards activities originating...

  15. Fatigue Strength of BGA Type Solder Joints between Package and Printed Wiring Board of Portable Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Kohta; Yaguchi, Akihiro; Terasaki, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kenichi

    Solder joints between a package and a printed wiring board (PWB) of a portable electronic device sustain heat cycling as a result of power on-off operations, cyclic bending by key pad operation, and impact bending by dropping. Therefore, heat cycling, cyclic bending, and cyclic impact bending tests were conducted on the ball grid array solder joints between a chip scale package and a PWB. The evaluated solders were Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu and Sn-37Pb. The tests showed that the life cycles of the Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu solder joints for the heat cycling and cyclic bending tests were approximately twice those of the Sn-37Pb solder joints. For the cyclic impact bending test, however, the life cycle of the Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu joint under large strain was smaller than that of the Sn-37Pb solder joint because of interfacial crack growth between the solder and the PWB. Finally, fatigue lives of the joints were compared with crack initiation and failure lives of plain specimens by calculating local strain ranges in the joints by elastic-plastic finite element analysis.

  16. ANTS — a simulation package for secondary scintillation Anger-camera type detector in thermal neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Defendi, I.; Engels, R.; Fraga, F. A. F.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Guerard, B.; Jurkovic, M.; Kemmerling, G.; Manzin, G.; Margato, L. M. S.; Niko, H.; Pereira, L.; Petrillo, C.; Peyaud, A.; Piscitelli, F.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N. J.; Sacchetti, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Van Esch, P.; Zeitelhack, K.

    2012-08-01

    A custom and fully interactive simulation package ANTS (Anger-camera type Neutron detector: Toolkit for Simulations) has been developed to optimize the design and operation conditions of secondary scintillation Anger-camera type gaseous detectors for thermal neutron imaging. The simulation code accounts for all physical processes related to the neutron capture, energy deposition pattern, drift of electrons of the primary ionization and secondary scintillation. The photons are traced considering the wavelength-resolved refraction and transmission of the output window. Photo-detection accounts for the wavelength-resolved quantum efficiency, angular response, area sensitivity, gain and single-photoelectron spectra of the photomultipliers (PMTs). The package allows for several geometrical shapes of the PMT photocathode (round, hexagonal and square) and offers a flexible PMT array configuration: up to 100 PMTs in a custom arrangement with the square or hexagonal packing. Several read-out patterns of the PMT array are implemented. Reconstruction of the neutron capture position (projection on the plane of the light emission) is performed using the center of gravity, maximum likelihood or weighted least squares algorithm. Simulation results reproduce well the preliminary results obtained with a small-scale detector prototype. ANTS executables can be downloaded from http://coimbra.lip.pt/~andrei/.

  17. Safety analysis report for packaging for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory TRA Type 1 Shipping Container and TRA Type 2 Shipping Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Havlovick, B.J.

    1992-07-27

    The TRA Type I Shipping Container and TRA Type II Shipping Capsule were designed and fabricated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as special form containers for the transport of non-fissile radioisotopes and fissile radioisotopes in exempt quantities. The Type I container measures 0.75 in. outside diameter and 3.000 in long. The Type II capsule is 0.495 in. outside diameter 2.000 in. long. The container and capsule were tested and evaluated to determine their compliance with Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations 173, which governs packages for special form radioactive material. This report is based upon those tests and evaluations. The results of those tests and evaluations demonstrate the container and capsule are in full compliance with the special form shipping container regulations of 49 CFR 173.

  18. Verification of the ASTM G-124 Purge Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, Katherine E.; Davis, Samuel Eddie

    2009-01-01

    ASTM G-124 seeks to evaluate combustion characteristics of metals in high-purity (greater than 99%) oxygen atmospheres. ASTM G-124 provides the following equation to determine the minimum number of purges required to reach this level of purity in a test chamber: n = -4/log10(Pa/Ph), where "n" is the total number of purge cycles required, Ph is the absolute pressure used for the purge on each cycle and Pa is the atmospheric pressure or the vent pressure. The origin of this equation is not known and has been the source of frequent questions as to its accuracy and reliability. This paper shows the derivation of the G-124 purge equation, and experimentally explores the equation to determine if it accurately predicts the number of cycles required.

  19. 78 FR 14836 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--ASTM... National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the...

  20. 77 FR 61786 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--ASTM... National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the...

  1. 78 FR 1884 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--ASTM... National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the...

  2. 47 CFR 95.1509 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard. 95.1509 Section 95... ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard. On-Board Units operating in the 5850-5925 MHz band shall comply with the... Materials (ASTM) E2213-03, Standard Specification for Telecommunications and Information Exchange Between...

  3. 47 CFR 95.1509 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard. 95.1509 Section 95... ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard. On-Board Units operating in the 5850-5925 MHz band shall comply with the... Materials (ASTM) E2213-03, Standard Specification for Telecommunications and Information Exchange Between...

  4. 78 FR 64248 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--ASTM... National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the...

  5. 47 CFR 95.1509 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard. 95.1509 Section 95... ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard. On-Board Units operating in the 5850-5925 MHz band shall comply with the... Materials (ASTM) E2213-03, Standard Specification for Telecommunications and Information Exchange Between...

  6. 76 FR 34252 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; ASTM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; ASTM... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International Standards (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the...

  7. 47 CFR 95.1509 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard. 95.1509 Section 95... ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard. On-Board Units operating in the 5850-5925 MHz band shall comply with the... Materials (ASTM) E2213-03, Standard Specification for Telecommunications and Information Exchange Between...

  8. 78 FR 35646 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--ASTM... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the Federal Trade...

  9. 76 FR 12370 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--ASTM... National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International Standards (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and...

  10. 78 FR 13243 - Updates to Standards Incorporated by Reference; Reapproved ASTM Standards; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ..., 160, 162, and 193 RIN 1625-AB98 Updates to Standards Incorporated by Reference; Reapproved ASTM... other than the Coast Guard. This final rule updates references to standards developed by ASTM.... Reformatting Involving Standards Other Than Reapproved ASTM Standards C. Removal of 33 CFR 155.140(c)(3) VI...

  11. 47 CFR 95.1509 - ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard. 95.1509 Section 95... ASTM E2213-03 DSRC Standard. On-Board Units operating in the 5850-5925 MHz band shall comply with the... Materials (ASTM) E2213-03, Standard Specification for Telecommunications and Information Exchange Between...

  12. 77 FR 34069 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--ASTM... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the Federal Trade...

  13. An Automated Safe-to-Mate (ASTM) Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Phuc; Scott, Michelle; Leung, Alan; Lin, Michael; Johnson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Safe-to-mate testing is a common hardware safety practice where impedance measurements are made on unpowered hardware to verify isolation, continuity, or impedance between pins of an interface connector. A computer-based instrumentation solution has been developed to resolve issues. The ASTM is connected to the circuit under test, and can then quickly, safely, and reliably safe-to-mate the entire connector, or even multiple connectors, at the same time.

  14. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Haydary, J.; Susa, D.; Dudáš, J.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis of aseptic packages was carried out in a laboratory flow reactor. ► Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields was obtained. ► Composition of the pyrolysis products was estimated. ► Secondary thermal and catalytic decomposition of tars was studied. ► Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work.

  15. Effects of retail style or food service style packaging type and storage time on sensory characteristics of bacon manufactured from commercially sourced pork bellies.

    PubMed

    Lowe, B K; Bohrer, B M; Holmer, S F; Boler, D D; Dilger, A C

    2014-06-01

    Objectives were to characterize differences in pork bellies that were stored frozen for different durations prior to processing and characterize sensory properties of the bacon derived from those bellies when stored in either retail or food service style packaging. Bellies (n = 102) were collected from 4 different time periods, fresh bellies (never frozen) and bellies frozen for 2, 5, or 7 mo, and manufactured into bacon under commercial conditions. Food service bacon was packaged in oxygen-permeable polyvinyl lined boxes layered on wax-covered lined paper and blast frozen (-33 °C) for 45 or 90 d after slicing. Retail bacon was vacuum-packaged in retail packages and refrigerated (2 °C) in the dark for 60 or 120 d after slicing. At the end of respective storage times after slicing, bacon was analyzed for sensory attributes and lipid oxidation. Off-flavor and oxidized odor of bacon increased (P < 0.01) with increasing storage time in both packaging types. Lipid oxidation increased (P < 0.01) as storage time increased from day 0 to day 45 in food service packaged bacon from frozen bellies, but was unchanged (P ≥ 0.07) with time in food service packaged bacon from fresh bellies. Lipid oxidation was also unchanged (P ≥ 0.21) over time in retail packaged bacon, with the exception of bellies frozen for 5 mo, which was increased from day 0 to day 90. Overall, off-flavor, oxidized odor, and lipid oxidation increased as storage time after processing increased. Freezing bellies before processing may exacerbate lipid oxidation as storage time after processing was extended. Bacon can be packaged and managed several different ways before it reaches the consumer. This research simulated food service (frozen) and retail packaged (refrigerated) bacon over a range of storage times after slicing. Off-flavor and oxidized odor increased as storage time after processing increased in both packaging types. Lipid oxidation increased as storage time after slicing increased to a

  16. Fluorescently-labeled RNA packaging into HIV-1 particles: Direct examination of infectivity across central nervous system cell types

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ruqiang; El-Hage, Nazira; Dever, Seth M.

    2015-01-01

    HIV penetrates the central nervous system (CNS), and although it is clear that microglia and to a lesser extent astrocytes are infected, whether certain other cell types such as neurons are infected remains unclear. Here, we confirmed the finding that RNAs of both cellular and viral origins are present in native HIV-1 particles and exploited this phenomenon to directly examine HIV-1 infectivity of CNS cell types. Using in vitro transcribed mRNAs that were labeled with a fluorescent dye, we showed that these fluorescent mRNAs were packaged into HIV-1 particles by directly examining infected cells using fluorescence microscopy. Cells in culture infected with these labeled HIV-1 particles showed the fluorescent signals of labeled mRNAs by a distinct pattern of punctate, focal signals within the cells which was used to demonstrate that the CXCR4-tropic NL4-3 strain was able to enter microglia and to a lesser extent astrocytes, but not neurons. The strategy used in the present study may represent a novel approach of simplicity, robustness and reliability for versatile applications in HIV studies, such as the determination of infectivity across a broad range of cell types and within subpopulations of an individual cell type by direct visualization of viral entry into cells. PMID:26272129

  17. Fluorescently-labeled RNA packaging into HIV-1 particles: Direct examination of infectivity across central nervous system cell types.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruqiang; El-Hage, Nazira; Dever, Seth M

    2015-11-01

    HIV penetrates the central nervous system (CNS), and although it is clear that microglia and to a lesser extent astrocytes are infected, whether certain other cell types such as neurons are infected remains unclear. Here, we confirmed the finding that RNAs of both cellular and viral origins are present in native HIV-1 particles and exploited this phenomenon to directly examine HIV-1 infectivity of CNS cell types. Using in vitro transcribed mRNAs that were labeled with a fluorescent dye, we showed that these fluorescent mRNAs were packaged into HIV-1 particles by directly examining infected cells using fluorescence microscopy. Cells in culture infected with these labeled virions showed the fluorescent signals of mRNA labels by a distinct pattern of punctate, focal signals within the cells which was used to demonstrate that the CXCR4-tropic NL4-3 strain was able to enter microglia and to a lesser extent astrocytes, but not neurons. The strategy used in the present study may represent a novel approach of simplicity, robustness and reliability for versatile applications in HIV studies, such as the determination of infectivity across a broad range of cell types and within sub-populations of an individual cell type by direct visualization of viral entry into cells.

  18. ASTM International Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Carl G.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Tomlins, Paul; Luginbuehl, Reto; Tesk, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The “Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds” was held on May 21, 2013 in Indianapolis, IN and was sponsored by the ASTM International (ASTM). The purpose of the workshop was to identify the highest priority items for future standards work for scaffolds used in the development and manufacture of tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs). Eighteen speakers and 78 attendees met to assess current scaffold standards and to prioritize needs for future standards. A key finding was that the ASTM TEMPs subcommittees (F04.41-46) have many active “guide” documents for educational purposes, but that few standard “test methods” or “practices” have been published. Overwhelmingly, the most clearly identified need was standards for measuring the structure of scaffolds, followed by standards for biological characterization, including in vitro testing, animal models and cell-material interactions. The third most pressing need was to develop standards for assessing the mechanical properties of scaffolds. Additional needs included standards for assessing scaffold degradation, clinical outcomes with scaffolds, effects of sterilization on scaffolds, scaffold composition and drug release from scaffolds. Discussions also highlighted the need for additional scaffold reference materials and the need to use them for measurement traceability. Finally, dialogue emphasized the needs to promote the use of standards in scaffold fabrication, characterization, and commercialization and to assess the use and impact of standards in the TEMPs community. Many scaffold standard needs have been identified and focus should now turn to generating these standards to support the use of scaffolds in TEMPs. PMID:25220952

  19. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition.

    PubMed

    Haydary, J; Susa, D; Dudáš, J

    2013-05-01

    Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 850 °C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H2, CO, CH4, CO2 and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 °C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work.

  20. ASTM standards for fire debris analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Eric; Lentini, John J

    2003-03-12

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) recently updated its standards E 1387 and E 1618 for the analysis of fire debris. The changes in the classification of ignitable liquids are presented in this review. Furthermore, a new standard on extraction of fire debris with solid phase microextraction (SPME) was released. Advantages and drawbacks of this technique are presented and discussed. Also, the standard on cleanup by acid stripping has not been reapproved. Fire debris analysts that use the standards should be aware of these changes.

  1. Effect of forage and retail packaging types on meat quality of long-term chilled lamb loins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y H B; Stuart, A; Rosenvold, K; Maclennan, G

    2013-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of different forage regimes and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) systems [high oxygen (HiOx-MAP): 80% O2 and 20% CO2; and CO2-MAP: 20% CO2 and 80% N2] on color and lipid oxidation stability and sensory attributes of long-term chilled lamb loins during retail display. Lambs (n = 124) were randomly assigned to several pasture-feeding regimes for 12 wk before slaughter. Some had ryegrass (n = 18), lucerne (n = 18), chicory (n = 19), plantain (n = 16), or red clover (Clover 12; n = 17) for all 12 wk. Some were assigned a regime of red clover for 11 wk and pasture for 1 wk (Clover 11; n = 18), with others on red clover for 9 wk and pasture for 3 wk (Clover 9; n = 18). After the lambs were slaughtered, the paired loins (M. longissimus dorsi) were excised at 24 h postmortem, vacuum-packed and stored at -1.5 °C for 9 wk. Cuts were then made from each loin and randomly allocated to either HiOx-MAP or CO2-MAP, and displayed for 7 d at 4 °C under light. Chemical attributes including lipid oxidation, surface color-reversing ability, oxygen consumption, and meat quality attributes (color stability and sensory characteristics) were determined. Among the different forage types, the loins from lambs finished on ryegrass appeared to have greater color stability and less lipid oxidation than the loins from lambs finished on other forage types (P < 0.05). On the other hand, the loins from lambs finished on lucerne had the least color and lipid oxidation stabilities and least color-reversing ability (P < 0.05). The loins from lambs finished on chicory had higher aroma and flavor scores than other pasture types in general (P < 0.05). HiOx-MAP negatively influenced meat quality attributes of lamb loins during display, as substantial increases in surface discoloration and lipid oxidation were observed, along with significant decreases in aroma and flavor during retail display compared with the loins in CO2-MAP. These results

  2. Device characteristics and thermal analysis of GaN-based vertical light-emitting diodes with different types of packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiang-Yu; Lee, Hee Kwan; Lee, Soo Hyun; Yu, Jae Su

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the device characteristics of GaN-based blue vertical light-emitting diodes (VLEDs) with two different package structures (i.e., lead frame with metal/plastic body (MPLF package) and lead frame with metal body (MLF package)) under various measurement conditions. In comparison with the MPLF packaged VLEDs, the MLF packaged VLEDs exhibited relatively lower junction temperature and thermal resistance values due to the better heat dissipation capability, leading to further improved optical, spectral, and thermal device characteristics. Thermal simulations of the VLEDs with two different packages were performed using three-dimensional steady-state device models to theoretically calculate their thermal and mechanical behaviours. The maximum temperatures, internal temperature distributions, and thermomechanical stresses were analysed by a finite element method.

  3. The results of pre-design studies on the development of a new design of gas turbine compressor package of GPA-C-16 type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Chobenko, V. M.; Shcherbakov, O. M.; Ushakov, S. M.; Parafiynyk, V. P.; Sereda, R. M.

    2017-08-01

    The article summarizes the results of analysis of data concerning the operation of turbocompressor packages at compressor stations for the natural gas transmission system of Ukraine. The basic requirements for gas turbine compressor packages used for modernization and reconstruction of compressor stations are considered. Using a 16 MW gas turbine package GPA-C-16S/76-1,44M1 as an example, the results of pre-design studies and some technical solutions that improve the energy efficiency of gas turbine compressor packages and their reliability, as well as its environmental performance are given. In particular, the article deals with the matching of performance characteristics of a centrifugal compressor (hereinafter compressor) and gas turbine drive to reduce fuel gas consumption; as well as application of energy efficient technologies, in particular, exhaust gas heat recovery units and gas-oil heat exchangers in turbocompressor packages oil system; as well as reducing emissions of carbon monoxide into the atmosphere using a catalytic exhaust system. Described technical solutions can be used for development of other types of gas turbine compressor packages.

  4. Infectivity of Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors in dendritic cells is determined by the helper virus strain used for packaging

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Kathlyn; Sanfilippo, Christine M.; Narrow, Wade C.; Casey, Ann E.; Rodriguez-Colon, Sol M.; McDermott, Michael P.; Federoff, Howard J.; Bowers, William J.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors are being explored for a wide range of potential applications, including vaccine delivery and immunotherapy of cancer. While extensive effort has been directed towards the improvement of the amplicon “payload” in these vectors, relatively little attention has been paid to the effect of the packaging HSV-1 strains on the biological properties of co-packaged amplicon vectors. We therefore compared the biological properties of amplicon stocks prepared using a panel of primary HSV-1 isolates, a molecularly cloned strain used to package helper-free amplicons (designated here as F5), and two laboratory isolates (KOS and strain 17, which is the parent of the F5 clone). This analysis revealed considerable inter-strain variability in the ability of amplicon stocks packaged by different primary HSV-1 isolates to efficiently transduce established cell lines and primary human dendritic cells (DC). Amplicons packaged by both the F5 molecularly cloned virus and its lab-adapted parent (strain 17) were very inefficient at transducing DC, when compared to amplicons packaged by KOS or by several of the primary virus isolates. These finding have important implications for the future development of improved amplicon-based vaccine delivery systems and suggest that DC tropism may be an instrinsic property of some HSV-1 strains, independent of passage history or molecular cloning. PMID:17606303

  5. Evaluation of weldment sensitization on Type 304 and 304L stainless steel spent-fuel canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Filippio, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Sensitization was evaluated on welded Type 304 and 304L stainless steel canisters produced for the Commercial Waste Spent Fuel Packaging Program (CWSFPP) and the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Program (NNWSP). The canister weldments which were made under conditions having the greatest potential for causing sensitization were examined using metallographic and corrosion test practices described in Specification ASTM A-262, and also by exposure to hypothetical conditions simulating continuous boiling water immersion at the storage sites. When tested to ASTM A-262, the Type 304 weldments displayed classical evidence of sensitization; i.e., loss of corrosion resistance at heat affected zones, but no evidence of sensitizations was uncovered on the Type 304L weldments. Both the Type 304 and 304L weldments were totally unaffected by exposure for 1500 hours under conditions of continuous boiling water immersion, indicating that the CWSFPP and NNWSP canisters have adequate corrosion resistance for the intended applications.

  6. 75 FR 30440 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM International

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--ASTM... Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International (``ASTM... actual damages under specified circumstances. Specifically, ASTM has provided an updated list of current...

  7. Effects of vegetable type, package atmosphere and storage temperature on growth and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Francis, G A; O'Beirne, D

    2001-08-01

    The survival and growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43888 and NCTC 12900) and Listeria monocytogenes (ATCC 19114 and NCTC 11994) during storage (4 and 8 degrees C) on ready-to-use (RTU) packaged vegetables (lettuce, swedes (rutabaga), dry coleslaw mix, soybean sprouts) were studied. The vegetables were sealed within oriented polypropylene packaging film, and modified atmospheres developed in packs during storage due to produce respiration. Survival and growth patterns were dependent on vegetable type, package atmosphere, storage temperature and bacterial strain. Populations of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 increased (P<0.05, by 1.5 to 2.5 log cycles, depending on strain) during a 12-day storage period on shredded lettuce (8 degrees C). L. monocytogenes populations also increased (by approximately 1 log cycle) on packaged swedes, did not change significantly (P>0.05) in packages of soybean sprouts and decreased by approximately 1.5 log cycles (P<0.05) on coleslaw mix (8 degrees C). E. coli O157:H7 populations on packaged coleslaw and soybean sprouts increased (by 1.5 to 2.5 log cycles) up to day 5, but declined during subsequent storage (8 degrees C). On packaged swedes (8 degrees C), populations of E. coli O157:H7 strain ATCC 43888 increased (by approximately 1 log cycle) during storage, whereas populations of strain 12900 increased between days 2 and 5, and declined during subsequent storage. Reducing the storage temperature from 8 to 4 degrees C reduced the growth of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 on packaged RTU vegetables. However, viable populations remained at the end of the storage period at 4 degrees C.

  8. Advancements in meat packaging.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Kenneth W

    2017-10-01

    Packaging of meat provides the same or similar benefits for raw chilled and processed meats as other types of food packaging. Although air-permeable packaging is most prevalent for raw chilled red meat, vacuum and modified atmosphere packaging offer longer shelf life. The major advancements in meat packaging have been in the widely used plastic polymers while biobased materials and their integration into composite packaging are receiving much attention for functionality and sustainability. At this time, active and intelligent packaging are not widely used for antioxidant, antimicrobial, and other functions to stabilize and enhance meat properties although many options are being developed and investigated. The advances being made in nanotechnology will be incorporated into food packaging and presumably into meat packaging when appropriate and useful. Intelligent packaging using sensors for transmission of desired information and prompting of subsequent changes in packaging materials, environments or the products to maintain safety and quality are still in developmental stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Packaged die heater

    DOEpatents

    Spielberger, Richard; Ohme, Bruce Walker; Jensen, Ronald J.

    2011-06-21

    A heater for heating packaged die for burn-in and heat testing is described. The heater may be a ceramic-type heater with a metal filament. The heater may be incorporated into the integrated circuit package as an additional ceramic layer of the package, or may be an external heater placed in contact with the package to heat the die. Many different types of integrated circuit packages may be accommodated. The method provides increased energy efficiency for heating the die while reducing temperature stresses on testing equipment. The method allows the use of multiple heaters to heat die to different temperatures. Faulty die may be heated to weaken die attach material to facilitate removal of the die. The heater filament or a separate temperature thermistor located in the package may be used to accurately measure die temperature.

  10. Recommendations for fluorescence instrument qualification: the new ASTM Standard Guide.

    PubMed

    DeRose, Paul C; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2010-03-01

    Aimed at improving quality assurance and quantitation for modern fluorescence techniques, ASTM International (ASTM) is about to release a Standard Guide for Fluorescence, reviewed here. The guide's main focus is on steady state fluorometry, for which available standards and instrument characterization procedures are discussed along with their purpose, suitability, and general instructions for use. These include the most relevant instrument properties needing qualification, such as linearity and spectral responsivity of the detection system, spectral irradiance reaching the sample, wavelength accuracy, sensitivity or limit of detection for an analyte, and day-to-day performance verification. With proper consideration of method-inherent requirements and limitations, many of these procedures and standards can be adapted to other fluorescence techniques. In addition, procedures for the determination of other relevant fluorometric quantities including fluorescence quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes are briefly introduced. The guide is a clear and concise reference geared for users of fluorescence instrumentation at all levels of experience and is intended to aid in the ongoing standardization of fluorescence measurements.

  11. Overview (this manuscript is an overview of an ASTM ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Symposium on Developing Consensus Standards for Measuring Chemical Emissions from Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Insulation was held on April 30th and May 1, 2015. Sponsored by ASTM Committee D22 on Air Quality, the symposium was held in Anaheim, CA, in conjunction with the standards development meetings of the Committee. ASTM D22.05 is developing tools to answer fundamental questions: what is emitted from SPF, how long do the emissions persist, how does ventilation impact concentrations and potential exposures? How can we model these processes to address the multiplicity of products, applications, and environmental conditions that may impact exposure to emissions over the life cycle of the material? These are complex and interrelated questions that have challenged the indoor environments research community for many years. Objectives of Symposium: Standardized methods are needed to assess the potential impacts of SPF insulation products on indoor air quality, establish re-entry times for trade workers or re-occupancy times for building occupants after product installation and to evaluate post-occupancy ventilation. The objective of the symposium was to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas from SPF manufacturers, regulatory agencies, indoor air quality professionals, testing labs, air quality consultants, instrument vendors and other stakeholders. Following the presentations on the current status of measuring emissions from SPF insulation, participants di

  12. Packaging development programs recommended for the U.S.Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, W.S.

    1996-05-21

    U.S. Department of Energy facilities were visited to determine their specific packaging needs. Those individual site needs were analyzed to determine widespread packaging needs. Those packaging needs are: replacements for aging Type B packagings, plutonium packaging, overpacks for large containers, heavily shielded Type B packaging, large radioactive liquid packaging, standardized waste packaging, and packaging for explosives.

  13. Definition of "Small Gram Quantity Contents" for Type B Radioactive Material Transportation Packages: Activity-Based Content Limitations, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaraman, S.; Kim, S.; Biswas, D.; Hafner, R.; Anderson, B.

    2011-07-08

    The results presented are a compendium of allowable masses (and activities) of a variety of different isotopes ( with varying impurity levels of beryllium in some of the actinide isotopes) that, when loaded in an unshielded packaging, do not result in an external dose rate on the surface of the package that exceeds 190 mrem/hr.

  14. Recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 replication and packaging is entirely supported by a herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon expressing Rep and Cap.

    PubMed Central

    Conway, J E; Zolotukhin, S; Muzyczka, N; Hayward, G S; Byrne, B J

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 2 (rAAV) vectors have recently been shown to have great utility as gene transfer agents both in vitro and in vivo. One of the problems associated with the use of rAAV vectors has been the difficulty of large-scale vector production. Low-efficiency plasmid transfection of the rAAV vector and complementing AAV type 2 (AAV-2) functions (rep and cap) followed by superinfection with adenovirus has been the standard approach to rAAV production. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the ability of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon expressing AAV-2 Rep and Cap to support replication and packaging of rAAV vectors. HSV-1 amplicon vectors were constructed which contain the AAV-2 rep and cap genes under control of their native promoters (p5, p19, and p40). An HSV-1 amplicon vector, HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27, was generated by supplying helper functions with either wild-type HSV-1 (KOS strain) or the ICP27-deleted mutant of HSV-1, d27-1, respectively. Replication of the amplicon stocks is not inhibited by the presence of AAV-2 Rep proteins, which highlights important differences between HSV-1 and adenovirus replication and the mechanism of providing helper function for productive AAV infection. Coinfection of rAAV and HSV-RC/KOS resulted in the replication and amplification of rAAV genomes. Similarly, rescue and replication of rAAV genomes occurred when rAAV vector plasmids were transfected into cells followed by HSV-RC/KOS infection and when two rAAV proviral cell lines were infected with HSV-RC/KOS or HSV-RC/d27. Production of infectious rAAV by rescue from two rAAV proviral cell lines has also been achieved with HSV-RC/KOS and HSV-RC/d27. The particle titer of rAAV produced with HSV-RC/d27 is equal to that achieved by supplying rep and cap by transfection followed by adenovirus superinfection. Importantly, no detectable wild-type AAV-2 is generated with this approach. These results demonstrate

  15. Effects of pork meat cut and packaging type on lipid oxidation and oxidative products during refrigerated storage (8 degrees C).

    PubMed

    Park, S Y; Kim, Y J; Lee, H C; Yoo, S S; Shim, J H; Chin, K B

    2008-04-01

    Lipid oxidation and oxidative products as affected by pork meat cut, packaging method, and storage time were evaluated during refrigerated storage. Pork belly had higher pH and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values than pork loin, and aerobic-packaged belly had higher TBARS than vacuum-packaged counterparts. Loin had higher free fatty acid (FFA) values than belly, and increased FFA values were observed with increased storage time. Peroxide values increased up to 7 d and decreased thereafter. Volatile compounds such as alkanes, aldehydes, ketones, and alcohols with high volatility in belly were higher than those in loin. Nonanoic acid, ethyl ester in belly, and hexadecanoic acid in loin might be considered as indices of lipid oxidation. Overall, vacuum packaging was better than aerobic packaging to retard lipid oxidation and production of oxidative products, and loin was more sensitive to lipid oxidation than belly.

  16. Standard test method for vinyl chloride in workplace atmospheres (charcoal tube method). ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-22 on Sampling and Analysis of Atmospheres and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D22.04 on Workplace Atmospheres. Current edition approved May 10, 1998. Published July 1998. Originally published as D 4766-88. Last previous edition D 4766-88(1993). Copyright American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428, USA. This document is available from NTIS under license from ASTM.

  17. Evaluation of Instrumentation for Measuring Undissolved Water in Aviation Turbine Fuels per ASTM D3240

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-05

    Undissolved Water in Aviation Turbine Fuels per ASTM D3240 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Joel Schmitigal...water) in Aviation Turbine Fuels per ASTM D3240 15. SUBJECT TERMS fuel, JP-8, aviation fuel, contamination, free water, undissolved water, Aqua-Glo 16...in Aviation Turbine Fuels per ASTM D3240 November 2015 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Joel Schmitigal 27372 UNCLASSIFIED NOTICES Disclaimers The

  18. Standard guide for acute toxicity test with the rotifer Brachionus. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1991-06-01

    This guide is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee E-47 on Biological Effects and Environmental Fate and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee E47.01 on Aquatic Toxicology. Current edition approved Sep. 15, 1991. Published November 1991. Reapproved 1998. Copyright American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428, USA. This document is available from NTIS under license from ASTM.

  19. Standard specification for faced rigid cellular polyisocyanurate thermal insulation board. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-16 on Thermal Insulation and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C16.22 on Organic and Nonhomogeneous Inorganic Thermal Insulations. Current edition approved Mar. 10, 1998. Published June 1998. Originally published as C 1289-95. Last previous edition C 1289-95. Copyright American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428, USA. This document is available from NTIS under license from ASTM.

  20. Environmental impact assessment of a package type IFAS reactor during construction and operational phases: a life cycle approach.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nitin Kumar; Singh, Rana Pratap; Kazmi, Absar Ahmad

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach was used to analyse the environmental impacts associated with the construction and operational phases of an integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) reactor treating municipal wastewater. This study was conducted within the boundaries of a research project that aimed to investigate the implementation related challenges of a package type IFAS reactor from an environmental perspective. Along with the LCA results of the construction phase, a comparison of the LCA results of seven operational phases is also presented in this study. The results showed that among all the inputs, the use of stainless steel in the construction phase caused the highest impact on environment, followed by electricity consumption in raw materials production. The impact of the construction phase on toxicity impact indicators was found to be significant compared to all operational phases. Among the seven operational phases of this study, the dissolved oxygen phase III, having a concentration of ∼4.5 mg/L, showed the highest impact on abiotic depletion, acidification, global warming, ozone layer depletion, human toxicity, fresh water eco-toxicity, marine aquatic eco-toxicity, terrestrial eco-toxicity, and photochemical oxidation. However, better effluent quality in this phase reduced the eutrophication load on environment.

  1. Forging of Naval Brass (ASTM B16) - Finite Element Analysis using Ls Dyna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subha Sankari, T.; Sangavi, S.; Paneerselvam, T.; Venkatraman, R.; Venkatesan, M.

    2016-09-01

    Forging is one of the important manufacturing process in which products like connecting rod, transmission shaft, clutch hubs and gears are produced. Finite element analysis (FEA) in forming techniques is of recent interest for the optimal design and determination of right manufacturing forming process. The data from the numerical results can help in providing the information for selecting the ideal process conditions. Thus aside from experimental values, simulation by the finite element analysis software's such as LS DYNA can be used for the analysis of strain distribution in forging processes. In the present work, Finite element simulation of open die forging of naval brass (ASTM B16) is done at an optimal temperature. An advanced multi physics simulation software package by the Livermore software technology cooperation LSTC - LS DYNA is utilized for the simulation of forging process. For the forging validation, experiment is conducted with a cylindrical billet having height 45 mm and diameter of 40mm. The numerical results are compared with that of experimental results carried out at the same temperature and dimensions for validation. The distribution of strain is analyzed. Energy analysis due to impact load is detailed. The simulation results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Interpreting the ASTM 'content standard for digital geospatial metadata'

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nebert, Douglas D.

    1996-01-01

    ASTM and the Federal Geographic Data Committee have developed a content standard for spatial metadata to facilitate documentation, discovery, and retrieval of digital spatial data using vendor-independent terminology. Spatial metadata elements are identifiable quality and content characteristics of a data set that can be tied to a geographic location or area. Several Office of Management and Budget Circulars and initiatives have been issued that specify improved cataloguing of and accessibility to federal data holdings. An Executive Order further requires the use of the metadata content standard to document digital spatial data sets. Collection and reporting of spatial metadata for field investigations performed for the federal government is an anticipated requirement. This paper provides an overview of the draft spatial metadata content standard and a description of how the standard could be applied to investigations collecting spatially-referenced field data.

  3. Mobile Robot and Mobile Manipulator Research Towards ASTM Standards Development

    PubMed Central

    Bostelman, Roger; Hong, Tsai; Legowik, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Performance standards for industrial mobile robots and mobile manipulators (robot arms onboard mobile robots) have only recently begun development. Low cost and standardized measurement techniques are needed to characterize system performance, compare different systems, and to determine if recalibration is required. This paper discusses work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and within the ASTM Committee F45 on Driverless Automatic Guided Industrial Vehicles. This includes standards for both terminology, F45.91, and for navigation performance test methods, F45.02. The paper defines terms that are being considered. Additionally, the paper describes navigation test methods that are near ballot and docking test methods being designed for consideration within F45.02. This includes the use of low cost artifacts that can provide alternatives to using relatively expensive measurement systems. PMID:28690359

  4. Mobile Robot and Mobile Manipulator Research Towards ASTM Standards Development.

    PubMed

    Bostelman, Roger; Hong, Tsai; Legowik, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Performance standards for industrial mobile robots and mobile manipulators (robot arms onboard mobile robots) have only recently begun development. Low cost and standardized measurement techniques are needed to characterize system performance, compare different systems, and to determine if recalibration is required. This paper discusses work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and within the ASTM Committee F45 on Driverless Automatic Guided Industrial Vehicles. This includes standards for both terminology, F45.91, and for navigation performance test methods, F45.02. The paper defines terms that are being considered. Additionally, the paper describes navigation test methods that are near ballot and docking test methods being designed for consideration within F45.02. This includes the use of low cost artifacts that can provide alternatives to using relatively expensive measurement systems.

  5. Mobile robot and mobile manipulator research towards ASTM standards development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostelman, Roger; Hong, Tsai; Legowik, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Performance standards for industrial mobile robots and mobile manipulators (robot arms onboard mobile robots) have only recently begun development. Low cost and standardized measurement techniques are needed to characterize system performance, compare different systems, and to determine if recalibration is required. This paper discusses work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and within the ASTM Committee F45 on Driverless Automatic Guided Industrial Vehicles. This includes standards for both terminology, F45.91, and for navigation performance test methods, F45.02. The paper defines terms that are being considered. Additionally, the paper describes navigation test methods that are near ballot and docking test methods being designed for consideration within F45.02. This includes the use of low cost artifacts that can provide alternatives to using relatively expensive measurement systems.

  6. White Paper Summary of 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.; Louthan, M.; PNNL, B.

    2015-05-29

    This white paper recommends that ASTM International develop standards to address the potential impact of hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium alloys. The need for such standards was apparent during the 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding and Assembly Components, sponsored by ASTM International Committee C26.13 and held on June 10-12, 2014, in Jackson, Wyoming. The potentially adverse impacts of hydrogen and hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium-alloy cladding on used fuel were shown to depend on multiple factors such as alloy chemistry and processing, irradiation and post irradiation history, residual and applied stresses and stress states, and the service environment. These factors determine the hydrogen content and hydride morphology in the alloy, which, in turn, influence the response of the alloy to the thermo-mechanical conditions imposed (and anticipated) during storage, transport and disposal of used nuclear fuel. Workshop presentations and discussions showed that although hydrogen/hydride induced degradation of zirconium alloys may be of concern, the potential for occurrence and the extent of anticipated degradation vary throughout the nuclear industry because of the variations in hydrogen content, hydride morphology, alloy chemistry and irradiation conditions. The tools and techniques used to characterize hydrides and hydride morphologies and their impacts on material performance also vary. Such variations make site-to-site comparisons of test results and observations difficult. There is no consensus that a single material or system characteristic (e.g., reactor type, burnup, hydrogen content, end-of life stress, alloy type, drying temperature, etc.) is an effective predictor of material response during long term storage or of performance after long term storage. Multi-variable correlations made for one alloy may not represent the behavior of another alloy exposed to

  7. ASTM and VAMAS activities in titanium matrix composites test methods development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Harmon, D. M.; Bartolotta, P. A.; Russ, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMC's) are being considered for a number of aerospace applications ranging from high performance engine components to airframe structures in areas that require high stiffness to weight ratios at temperatures up to 400 C. TMC's exhibit unique mechanical behavior due to fiber-matrix interface failures, matrix cracks bridged by fibers, thermo-viscoplastic behavior of the matrix at elevated temperatures, and the development of significant thermal residual stresses in the composite due to fabrication. Standard testing methodology must be developed to reflect the uniqueness of this type of material systems. The purpose of this paper is to review the current activities in ASTM and Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) that are directed toward the development of standard test methodology for titanium matrix composites.

  8. ASTM and VAMAS activities in titanium matrix composites test methods development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Harmon, D. M.; Bartolotta, P. A.; Russ, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMC's) are being considered for a number of aerospace applications ranging from high performance engine components to airframe structures in areas that require high stiffness to weight ratios at temperatures up to 400 C. TMC's exhibit unique mechanical behavior due to fiber-matrix interface failures, matrix cracks bridged by fibers, thermo-viscoplastic behavior of the matrix at elevated temperatures, and the development of significant thermal residual stresses in the composite due to fabrication. Standard testing methodology must be developed to reflect the uniqueness of this type of material systems. The purpose of this paper is to review the current activities in ASTM and Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) that are directed toward the development of standard test methodology for titanium matrix composites.

  9. The influence of package size and flute type of corrugated boxes on load bridging in unit loads

    Treesearch

    Jonghun Park; Laszlo Horvath; Marshall S. White; Samantha Phanthanousy; Philip Araman; Robert J. Bush

    2017-01-01

    Shipping pallets often are designed with the assumption that the payload carried is flexible and uniformly distributed on the pallet surface. However, packages on the pallet can act as a series of discrete loads, and the physical interactions among the packages can add stiffness to the pallet/load combination. The term ‘load bridging’ has been used to describe this...

  10. Biocompatibility of metal injection molded versus wrought ASTM F562 (MP35N) and ASTM F1537 (CCM) cobalt alloys.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Sago, Alan; West, Shari; Farina, Jeff; Eckert, John; Broadley, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We present a comparative analysis between biocompatibility test results of wrought and Metal Injection Molded (MIM) ASTM F562-02 UNS R30035 (MP35N) and F1537 UNS R31538 (CCM) alloy samples that have undergone the same generic orthopedic implant's mechanical, chemical surface pre-treatment, and a designed pre-testing sample preparation method. Because the biocompatibility properties resulting from this new MIM cobalt alloy process are not well understood, we conducted tests to evaluate cytotoxicity (in vitro), hemolysis (in vitro), toxicity effects (in vivo), tissue irritation level (in vivo), and pyrogenicity count (in vitro) on such samples. We show that our developed MIM MP35N and CCM materials and treatment processes are biocompatible, and that both the MIM and wrought samples, although somewhat different in microstructure and surface, do not show significant differences in biocompatibility.

  11. GENERAL PURPOSE ADA PACKAGES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Ten families of subprograms are bundled together for the General-Purpose Ada Packages. The families bring to Ada many features from HAL/S, PL/I, FORTRAN, and other languages. These families are: string subprograms (INDEX, TRIM, LOAD, etc.); scalar subprograms (MAX, MIN, REM, etc.); array subprograms (MAX, MIN, PROD, SUM, GET, and PUT); numerical subprograms (EXP, CUBIC, etc.); service subprograms (DATE_TIME function, etc.); Linear Algebra II; Runge-Kutta integrators; and three text I/O families of packages. In two cases, a family consists of a single non-generic package. In all other cases, a family comprises a generic package and its instances for a selected group of scalar types. All generic packages are designed to be easily instantiated for the types declared in the user facility. The linear algebra package is LINRAG2. This package includes subprograms supplementing those in NPO-17985, An Ada Linear Algebra Package Modeled After HAL/S (LINRAG). Please note that LINRAG2 cannot be compiled without LINRAG. Most packages have widespread applicability, although some are oriented for avionics applications. All are designed to facilitate writing new software in Ada. Several of the packages use conventions introduced by other programming languages. A package of string subprograms is based on HAL/S (a language designed for the avionics software in the Space Shuttle) and PL/I. Packages of scalar and array subprograms are taken from HAL/S or generalized current Ada subprograms. A package of Runge-Kutta integrators is patterned after a built-in MAC (MIT Algebraic Compiler) integrator. Those packages modeled after HAL/S make it easy to translate existing HAL/S software to Ada. The General-Purpose Ada Packages program source code is available on two 360K 5.25" MS-DOS format diskettes. The software was developed using VAX Ada v1.5 under DEC VMS v4.5. It should be portable to any validated Ada compiler and it should execute either interactively or in batch. The largest package

  12. GENERAL PURPOSE ADA PACKAGES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Ten families of subprograms are bundled together for the General-Purpose Ada Packages. The families bring to Ada many features from HAL/S, PL/I, FORTRAN, and other languages. These families are: string subprograms (INDEX, TRIM, LOAD, etc.); scalar subprograms (MAX, MIN, REM, etc.); array subprograms (MAX, MIN, PROD, SUM, GET, and PUT); numerical subprograms (EXP, CUBIC, etc.); service subprograms (DATE_TIME function, etc.); Linear Algebra II; Runge-Kutta integrators; and three text I/O families of packages. In two cases, a family consists of a single non-generic package. In all other cases, a family comprises a generic package and its instances for a selected group of scalar types. All generic packages are designed to be easily instantiated for the types declared in the user facility. The linear algebra package is LINRAG2. This package includes subprograms supplementing those in NPO-17985, An Ada Linear Algebra Package Modeled After HAL/S (LINRAG). Please note that LINRAG2 cannot be compiled without LINRAG. Most packages have widespread applicability, although some are oriented for avionics applications. All are designed to facilitate writing new software in Ada. Several of the packages use conventions introduced by other programming languages. A package of string subprograms is based on HAL/S (a language designed for the avionics software in the Space Shuttle) and PL/I. Packages of scalar and array subprograms are taken from HAL/S or generalized current Ada subprograms. A package of Runge-Kutta integrators is patterned after a built-in MAC (MIT Algebraic Compiler) integrator. Those packages modeled after HAL/S make it easy to translate existing HAL/S software to Ada. The General-Purpose Ada Packages program source code is available on two 360K 5.25" MS-DOS format diskettes. The software was developed using VAX Ada v1.5 under DEC VMS v4.5. It should be portable to any validated Ada compiler and it should execute either interactively or in batch. The largest package

  13. Effects of packaging type and storage temperature on the growth of foodborne pathogens on shredded 'Romaine' lettuce.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M; Usall, J; Solsona, C; Alegre, I; Viñas, I; Abadias, M

    2010-05-01

    Fresh produce can be a vehicle for the transmission of pathogens capable of causing human illnesses and some of them can grow on fresh-cut vegetables. The survival and growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto shredded lettuce was determined under modified atmosphere packaging conditions, at various storage temperatures. We also monitored changes in pH and gas atmospheres within the packages and the growth of psychrotrophic and mesophilic microorganisms. After pathogen inoculation, shredded lettuce was packaged in films of different permeability and stored at 5 and 25 degrees C. After 10 days at 5 degrees C populations of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella decreased approximately 1.00 log unit while L. monocytogenes increased about 1.00 log unit, in all package films. Moreover, the pathogens level increased between 2.44 and 4.19 log units after 3 days at 25 degrees C. Psychrotrophic and mesophilic bacteria had similar growth at both temperatures with higher populations in air than in the other atmospheres. The composition of the storage atmosphere within the packaging of lettuce had no significant effect on the survival and growth of the pathogens used in this study at refrigeration temperatures. The results obtained can be considered as a warning indicator, which reinforces the necessity for corrective measures to avoid contamination of vegetables.

  14. Cryo-electron Microscopy Reconstruction and Stability Studies of the Wild Type and the R432A Variant of Adeno-associated Virus Type 2 Reveal that Capsid Structural Stability Is a Major Factor in Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, Lauren M.; Lins, Bridget; Janssen, Maria; Bennett, Antonette; Chipman, Paul; McKenna, Robert; Chen, Weijun; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Cardone, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are promising therapeutic gene delivery vectors and better understanding of their capsid assembly and genome packaging mechanism is needed for improved vector production. Empty AAV capsids assemble in the nucleus prior to genome packaging by virally encoded Rep proteins. To elucidate the capsid determinants of this process, structural differences between wild-type (wt) AAV2 and a packaging deficient variant, AAV2-R432A, were examined using cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction both at an ∼5.0-Å resolution (medium) and also at 3.8- and 3.7-Å resolutions (high), respectively. The high resolution structures showed that removal of the arginine side chain in AAV2-R432A eliminated hydrogen bonding interactions, resulting in altered intramolecular and intermolecular interactions propagated from under the 3-fold axis toward the 5-fold channel. Consistent with these observations, differential scanning calorimetry showed an ∼10°C decrease in thermal stability for AAV2-R432A compared to wt-AAV2. In addition, the medium resolution structures revealed differences in the juxtaposition of the less ordered, N-terminal region of their capsid proteins, VP1/2/3. A structural rearrangement in AAV2-R432A repositioned the βA strand region under the icosahedral 2-fold axis rather than antiparallel to the βB strand, eliminating many intramolecular interactions. Thus, a single amino acid substitution can significantly alter the AAV capsid integrity to the extent of reducing its stability and possibly rendering it unable to tolerate the stress of genome packaging. Furthermore, the data show that the 2-, 3-, and 5-fold regions of the capsid contributed to producing the packaging defect and highlight a tight connection between the entire capsid in maintaining packaging efficiency. IMPORTANCE The mechanism of AAV genome packaging is still poorly understood, particularly with respect to the capsid determinants

  15. On The Application of Flow Forming to the Fabrication of Type B Radioactive Material Package Containment Vessels, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, G.; DeMicco, M.; Fischer, L.; Hagler, L.; Russell, E.; Wen, J.; Hafner, R.; Anderson, B.

    2010-07-02

    Flow forming is a modernized and improved version of metal spinning, which is one of the oldest methods of chipless forming. The metal spinning method used a pivoted pointer to manually push a metal sheet mounted at one end of a spinning mandrel. As a result, the modernized version of metal spinning, i.e. flow forming evolved. The recent proposal in the radioactive material (RAM) packaging community to use flow forming for mass production of small containment vessels for drum packages is a natural continuation of the trend. We will discuss how the vessel can have the special material properties and stabilities required for a RAM containment vessel.

  16. RH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-17

    This procedure provides operating instructions for the RH-TRU 72-B Road Cask, Waste Shipping Package. In this document, ''Packaging'' refers to the assembly of components necessary to ensure compliance with the packaging requirements (not loaded with a payload). ''Package'' refers to a Type B packaging that, with its radioactive contents, is designed to retain the integrity of its containment and shielding when subject to the normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident test conditions set forth in 10 CFR Part 71. Loading of the RH 72-B cask can be done two ways, on the RH cask trailer in the vertical position or by removing the cask from the trailer and loading it in a facility designed for remote-handling (RH). Before loading the 72-B cask, loading procedures and changes to the loading procedures for the 72-B cask must be sent to CBFO at sitedocuments@wipp.ws for approval.

  17. Fracture Toughness of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Applying ASTM C1421

    DOE PAGES

    Swab, Jeffrey J.; Tice, Jason; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; ...

    2014-11-03

    The three methods of determining the quasi-static Mode I fracture toughness (KIc) (surface crack in flexure – SC, single-edge precracked beam – PB, and chevron notched beam – VB) found in ASTM C1421 were applied to a variety of advanced ceramic materials. All three methods produced valid and comparable KIc values for the Al2O3, SiC, Si3N4 and SiAlON ceramics examined. However, not all methods could successfully be applied to B4C, ZrO2 and WC ceramics due to a variety of material factors. The coarse-grained microstructure of one B4C hindered the ability to observe and measure the precracks generated in the SCmore » and PB methods while the transformation toughening in the ZrO2 prevented the formation of the SC and PB precracks and thus made it impossible to use either method on this ceramic. The high strength and elastic modulus of the WC made it impossible to achieve stable crack growth using the VB method because the specimen stored a tremendous amount of energy prior to fracture. Even though these methods have passed the rigors of the standardization process there are still some issues to be resolved when the methods are applied to certain classes of ceramics. We recommend that at least two of these methods be employed to determine the KIc, especially when a new or unfamiliar ceramic is being evaluated.« less

  18. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  19. Laser induced damage in optical materials: ninth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1978-08-01

    The Ninth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 4-6 October 1977. The symposium was under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy (formerly ERDA), and the Office of Naval Research. About 185 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Australia, Union of South Africa, and the Soviet Union. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Laser Windows and Materials, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, Laser Glass and Glass Lasers, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the uv region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were also discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The Tenth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 12-14 September 1978 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  20. Laser-induced damage in optical materials: sixteenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Guenther, A H; Milam, D; Newnam, B E

    1987-03-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, CO, 15-17 Oct. 1984. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Approximately 180 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives from England, France, The Netherlands, Scotland, and West Germany. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Materials and Measurements, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6,microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin-film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. Harold E. Bennett of the U.S. Naval Weapons Center, Arthur H. Guenther of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Laboratory, David Milam of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the Symposium.

  1. Development of an ASTM Graphite Oxidation Test Method

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Burchell, Timothy D

    2006-01-01

    Oxidation behavior of graphite is of practical interest because of extended use of graphite materials in nuclear reactors. High temperature gas-cooled reactors are expected to become the nuclear reactors of the next generation. The most critical factor in their safe operation is an air-ingress accident, in which case the graphite materials in the moderator and reflector would come in contact with oxygen at a high temperature. Many results on graphite oxidation have been obtained from TGA measurements using commercial instruments, with sample sizes of a few hundred milligrams. They have demonstrated that graphite oxidation is in kinetic control regime at low temperatures, but becomes diffusion-limited at high temperatures. These effects are better understood from measurement results with large size samples, on which the shape and structural factors that control diffusion can be more clearly evidenced. An ASTM test for characterization of oxidation resistance of machined carbon and graphite materials is being developed with ORNL participation. The test recommends the use of large machined samples (~ 20 grams) in a dry air flow system. We will report on recent results and progress in this direction.

  2. Effects of temperature and packaging types on ergosterol and Howard mold count values of tomato paste during storage.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Raci; Kadakal, Çetin; Otağ, Mustafa

    2014-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of temperature and packaging on ergosterol and Howard mold count (HMC) changes of tomato paste during storage. The other purpose of this study was to determine whether the measurement of ergosterol stability in tomato paste can be useful for the assessment of microbiological quality of tomato paste as related to the storage temperature (4, 20, 28, or 37°C) and time. Ergosterol analysis was done by using high-performance liquid chromatography. Tomato paste samples were packaged in either aseptic bags or tin boxes and stored at 4, 20, 28, or 37°C for a period of 10 months. The detection limit of ergosterol was 0.1 mg/kg. Measurements showed that packaging and storage temperatures of 28 and 37°C have a considerable influence on ergosterol and HMC changes in the product. The poor precision of the "percentage of discarded fruits" and HMC methods has increased the importance of ergosterol for the microbiological quality evaluation of tomato and tomato products. This article reports the data from what we believe to be the first survey for the influence of storage temperature and packaging material on ergosterol and HMC changes of tomato paste during storage.

  3. Perturbation of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Particle Morphology by Differential Gag Co-Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Angert, Isaac; Cao, Sheng; Berk, Serkan; Zhang, Wei; Mueller, Joachim D.

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an important cancer-causing human retrovirus that has infected approximately 15 million individuals worldwide. Many aspects of HTLV-1 replication, including virus particle structure and assembly, are poorly understood. Group-specific antigen (Gag) proteins labeled at the carboxy terminus with a fluorophore protein have been used extensively as a surrogate for fluorescence studies of retroviral assembly. How these tags affect Gag stoichiometry and particle morphology has not been reported in detail. In this study, we used an HTLV-1 Gag expression construct with the yellow fluorescence protein (YFP) fused to the carboxy-terminus as a surrogate for the HTLV-1 Gag-Pol to assess the effects of co-packaging of Gag and a Gag-YFP on virus-like particle (VLP) morphology and analyzed particles by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) were also used to determine the Gag stoichiometry. We found that ratios of 3:1 (Gag:Gag-YFP) or greater resulted in a particle morphology indistinguishable from that of VLPs produced with the untagged HTLV-1 Gag, i.e., a mean diameter of ~113 nm and a mass of 220 MDa as determined by cryo-TEM and STEM, respectively. Furthermore, FFS analysis indicated that HTLV-1 Gag-YFP was incorporated into VLPs in a predictable manner at the 3:1 Gag:Gag-YFP ratio. Both STEM and FFS analyses found that the Gag copy number in VLPs produced with a 3:1 ratio of Gag:Gag-YFP was is in the range of 1500–2000 molecules per VLP. The observations made in this study indicate that biologically relevant Gag–Gag interactions occur between Gag and Gag-YFP at ratios of 3:1 or higher and create a Gag lattice structure in VLPs that is morphologically indistinguishable from that of VLPs produced with just untagged Gag. This information is useful for the quantitative analysis of Gag–Gag interactions that occur

  4. Perturbation of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Particle Morphology by Differential Gag Co-Packaging.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, José O; Angert, Isaac; Cao, Sheng; Berk, Serkan; Zhang, Wei; Mueller, Joachim D; Mansky, Louis M

    2017-07-19

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an important cancer-causing human retrovirus that has infected approximately 15 million individuals worldwide. Many aspects of HTLV-1 replication, including virus particle structure and assembly, are poorly understood. Group-specific antigen (Gag) proteins labeled at the carboxy terminus with a fluorophore protein have been used extensively as a surrogate for fluorescence studies of retroviral assembly. How these tags affect Gag stoichiometry and particle morphology has not been reported in detail. In this study, we used an HTLV-1 Gag expression construct with the yellow fluorescence protein (YFP) fused to the carboxy-terminus as a surrogate for the HTLV-1 Gag-Pol to assess the effects of co-packaging of Gag and a Gag-YFP on virus-like particle (VLP) morphology and analyzed particles by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) were also used to determine the Gag stoichiometry. We found that ratios of 3:1 (Gag:Gag-YFP) or greater resulted in a particle morphology indistinguishable from that of VLPs produced with the untagged HTLV-1 Gag, i.e., a mean diameter of ~113 nm and a mass of 220 MDa as determined by cryo-TEM and STEM, respectively. Furthermore, FFS analysis indicated that HTLV-1 Gag-YFP was incorporated into VLPs in a predictable manner at the 3:1 Gag:Gag-YFP ratio. Both STEM and FFS analyses found that the Gag copy number in VLPs produced with a 3:1 ratio of Gag:Gag-YFP was is in the range of 1500-2000 molecules per VLP. The observations made in this study indicate that biologically relevant Gag-Gag interactions occur between Gag and Gag-YFP at ratios of 3:1 or higher and create a Gag lattice structure in VLPs that is morphologically indistinguishable from that of VLPs produced with just untagged Gag. This information is useful for the quantitative analysis of Gag-Gag interactions that occur during

  5. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Type K (HERV-K) Particles Package and Transmit HERV-K–Related Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Galindo, Rafael; Kaplan, Mark H.; Dube, Derek; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J.; Chan, Susana; Meng, Fan; Dai, Manhong; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Gitlin, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) make up 8% of the human genome. While the youngest of these retroviruses, HERV-K(HML-2), termed HK2, is able to code for all viral proteins and produce virus-like particles, it is not known if these virus particles package and transmit HK2-related sequences. Here, we analyzed the capacity of HK2 for packaging and transmitting HK2 sequences. We created an HK2 probe, termed Bogota, which can be packaged into HK2 viruses, and transfected it into cells that make HK2 particles. Supernatants of the transfected cells, which contained HK2 viral particles, then were added to target cells, and the transmissibility of the HK2 Bogota reporter was tracked by G418 resistance. Our studies revealed that contemporary HK2 virions produced by some teratocarcinoma and breast cancer cell lines, as well as by peripheral blood lymphocytes from lymphoma patients, can package HK2 Bogota probes, and these viruses transmitted these probes to other cells. After transmission, HK2 Bogota transcripts undergo reverse transcription, a step impaired by antiretroviral agents or by introduction of mutations into the probe sequences required for reverse transcription. HK2 viruses were more efficiently transmitted in the presence of HK2 Rec or HIV-1 Tat and Vif. Transmitted Bogota probes formed episomes but did not integrate into the cellular genome. Resistance to integration might explain the relatively low number of HK2 insertions that were acquired during the last 25 million years of evolution. Whether transient transmission of modern HK2 sequences, which encode two putative oncoproteins, can lead to disease remains to be studied. IMPORTANCE Retroviruses invaded the genome of human ancestors over the course of millions of years, yet these viruses generally have been inactivated during evolution, with only remnants of these infectious sequences remaining in the human genome. One of these viruses, termed HK2, still is capable of producing virus particles

  6. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vif Protein Reduces Intracellular Expression and Inhibits Packaging of APOBEC3G (CEM15), a Cellular Inhibitor of Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Sandra; Khan, Mohammad A.; Miyagi, Eri; Plishka, Ron; Buckler-White, Alicia; Strebel, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in most primary cells and some immortalized T-cell lines depends on the activity of the viral infectivity factor (Vif). Vif has the ability to counteract a cellular inhibitor, recently identified as CEM15, that blocks infectivity of Vif-defective HIV-1 variants. CEM15 is identical to APOBEC3G and belongs to a family of proteins involved in RNA and DNA deamination. We cloned APOBEC3G from a human kidney cDNA library and confirmed that the protein acts as a potent inhibitor of HIV replication and is sensitive to the activity of Vif. We found that wild-type Vif inhibits packaging of APOBEC3G into virus particles in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, biologically inactive variants carrying in-frame deletions in various regions of Vif or mutation of two highly conserved cysteine residues did not inhibit packaging of APOBEC3G. Interestingly, expression of APOBEC3G in the presence of wild-type Vif not only affected viral packaging but also reduced its intracellular expression level. This effect was not seen in the presence of biologically inactive Vif variants. Pulse-chase analyses did not reveal a significant difference in the stability of APOBEC3G in the presence or absence of Vif. However, in the presence of Vif, the rate of synthesis of APOBEC3G was slightly reduced. The reduction of intracellular APOBEC3G in the presence of Vif does not fully account for the Vif-induced reduction of virus-associated APOBEC3G, suggesting that Vif may function at several levels to prevent packaging of APOBEC3G into virus particles. PMID:14557625

  7. 77 FR 10358 - Acceptance of ASTM F963-11 as a Mandatory Consumer Product Safety Standard

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... ASTM F963-11 standard titled, Standard Consumer Safety Specifications for Toy Safety. Pursuant to... 110-314, made the provisions of ASTM F963-07, Standard Consumer Safety Specifications for Toy Safety... toy chests). The requirements of ASTM F963-08 became effective on August 16, 2009, except for section...

  8. Sources of Confusion in the Determination of ASTM Repetitive Member Factors for the Allowable Properties of Wood Products

    Treesearch

    S. Verrill; D. Kretschmann

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that there should be an upward repetitive member allowable property adjustment. ASTM D245 (2011c) and ASTM D1990 (2011b) specify a 1.15 factor for allowable bending stress. This factor is also listed in ASTM D6555 (2011a, Table 1). In this technical note, sources of confusion regarding appropriate repetitive member factors are identified. This...

  9. 77 FR 1085 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM International

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--ASTM... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the Federal Trade...

  10. 76 FR 78614 - Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... International Trade Administration Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan... welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from South Korea (Korea) and Taiwan would likely lead to... published the antidumping duty orders on welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan.\\1\\ On...

  11. 75 FR 65657 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM International

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--ASTM... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the Federal Trade...

  12. 75 FR 11196 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM International

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--ASTM... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the Federal Trade...

  13. 76 FR 1459 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM International

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-ASTM... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), ASTM International (``ASTM'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and the Federal Trade...

  14. Scoring Package

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Scoring Package (PC database for purchase)   The NIST Scoring Package (Special Database 1) is a reference implementation of the draft Standard Method for Evaluating the Performance of Systems Intended to Recognize Hand-printed Characters from Image Data Scanned from Forms.

  15. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  16. Laser induced damage in optical materials: eleventh ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1980-07-15

    The eleventh Symposium on Optical Materials for High-Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30-31 October 1979. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and Denmark. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning transparent optical materials and the measurement of their properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film characteristics, thin film damage, considerations for high-power systems, and finally theory and breakdown. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory were cochairpersons. The twelfth annual symposium is scheduled for 30 September-1 October 1980 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  17. Laser induced damage in optical materials: twelfth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1981-09-01

    The twelfth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30 Sept.-l Oct., 1980. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-l, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific research. Over 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Japan, and West Germany. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning materials and measurements, mirrors and surfaces, thin films, and finally fundamental mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high power systems. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the symposium. The thirteenth annual symposium is scheduled for 17-18 Nov. 1981 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  18. Fracture Toughness of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Applying ASTM C1421

    SciTech Connect

    Swab, Jeffrey J.; Tice, Jason; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Kraft, Reuben H.

    2014-11-03

    The three methods of determining the quasi-static Mode I fracture toughness (KIc) (surface crack in flexure – SC, single-edge precracked beam – PB, and chevron notched beam – VB) found in ASTM C1421 were applied to a variety of advanced ceramic materials. All three methods produced valid and comparable KIc values for the Al2O3, SiC, Si3N4 and SiAlON ceramics examined. However, not all methods could successfully be applied to B4C, ZrO2 and WC ceramics due to a variety of material factors. The coarse-grained microstructure of one B4C hindered the ability to observe and measure the precracks generated in the SC and PB methods while the transformation toughening in the ZrO2 prevented the formation of the SC and PB precracks and thus made it impossible to use either method on this ceramic. The high strength and elastic modulus of the WC made it impossible to achieve stable crack growth using the VB method because the specimen stored a tremendous amount of energy prior to fracture. Even though these methods have passed the rigors of the standardization process there are still some issues to be resolved when the methods are applied to certain classes of ceramics. We recommend that at least two of these methods be employed to determine the KIc, especially when a new or unfamiliar ceramic is being evaluated.

  19. TEX macro packages

    SciTech Connect

    Poggio, M.E.

    1985-02-26

    This manual is documentation for the macro packages that are available with the TEX82 system distributed by the Computer Systems Research Group, Engineering Research Division, Electronics Engineering Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. TEX is a computerized typesetting system created by Professor Donald E. Knuth at Stanford University. Macro packages have been developed to extend the capabilities of TEX and aid the user in generating various types of output (e.g., chapter format, letter format, memo format, and viewgraphs).

  20. Influence of package, type of apple juice and temperature on the production of patulin by Byssochlamys nivea and Byssochlamys fulva.

    PubMed

    Sant'Ana, Anderson S; Simas, Rosineide Costa; Almeida, Carlos A A; Cabral, Elaine C; Rauber, Ricardo H; Mallmann, Carlos A; Eberlin, Marcos N; Rosenthal, Amauri; Massaguer, Pilar R

    2010-08-15

    Although the production of patulin in apple fruits is mainly by Penicillium expansum, there is no information on the ability of heat resistant moulds that may survive pasteurization to produce this mycotoxin in juice packages during storage and distribution. In this study, the production of patulin by Byssochlamys spp (Byssochlamys nivea FRR 4421, B. nivea ATCC 24008 and Byssochlamys fulva IOC 4518) in cloudy and clarified apple juices packaged in laminated paperboard packages or in polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PET) and stored at both 21 degrees C and 30 degrees C, was investigated. The three Byssochlamys strains were able to produce patulin in both cloudy and clarified apple juices. Overall, the lower the storage temperature, the lower the patulin levels and mycelium dry weight in the apple juices (p<0.05). The greatest variations in pH and degrees Brix were observed in the juices from which the greatest mycelium dry weights were recovered. The maximum levels of patulin recovered from the juices were ca. 150 microg/kg at 21 degrees C and 220 microg/kg at 30 degrees C. HPLC-UV, HPCL-DAD and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the ability of B. fulva IOC 4518 to produce patulin. Due to the heat resistance of B. nivea and B. fulva and their ability to produce patulin either in PET bottles or in laminated paperboard packages, the control of contamination and the incidence of these fungi should be a matter of concern for food safety. Control measures taken by juice industries must also focus on controlling the ascospores of heat resistant moulds. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of antioxidants, packaging type and frozen storage time on the quality of cooked turkey meatballs.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Tymoszczyk, Mirosława

    2014-04-01

    Oil-soluble rosemary extract (OR) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) were added individually and in mixture (MIX) to raw turkey meatballs. After cooking and chilling, samples were air- and vacuum-packaged and frozen stored for 90 days. The synthetic antioxidant, the natural antioxidant and their mixture significantly decreased TBA values. Lipid oxidation was most effectively inhibited by a mixture of BHT and OR during storage in the air, and by BHT in vacuum-packaged samples. A lower rate of the hydrolytic process was observed in BHT samples. All additives stabilized the red colour of turkey meatballs, but samples with a mixture of natural and synthetic antioxidants showed higher a(∗) values than OR samples. Vacuum-packaged turkey meatballs were darker in colour, and the contribution of redness in these samples continued to increase until day 80. OR added alone or in combination with BHT maintained the quality of turkey meatballs during frozen storage, but samples with the synthetic antioxidant were characterized by a non-typical flavour after a longer time of storage.

  2. Guide to ASTM test methods for the analysis of coal and coke

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Kishore Nadkarni

    2008-07-01

    The guide includes brief descriptions of all 56 ASTM test methods that cover the physical, chemical, and spectroscopic analytical techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively identify over 40 chemical and physical properties of coal, coke, their products, and by-products.

  3. Outcomes of Kidney Transplantations Under the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation's Type Z Benefit Package at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Pamugas, G E P; Arakama, M-H I; Danguilan, R A; Ledesma, D

    2016-04-01

    Under the Universal Health Care Program of the Department of Health, the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PHIC) launched the Case Type Z benefit package for kidney transplantation, providing the largest amount (USD $13,300.00) for any single medical procedure. The objective of this study was to describe under the PHIC Case Type Z Benefit Package for kidney transplantation at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute and kidney transplantation outcomes under this package. Included in the benefit were standard risk recipients between 10 and 70 years of age with at least 1 human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR match with the donor, panel-reactive antibody (PRA) less than 20%, and absence of donor-specific antibody (DSA). Previous transplantations, malignancy, hepatitis B and C, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positivity, cytomegalovirus (CMV) R-/D+, congestive heart failure, and liver cirrhosis were exclusion criteria. Patients were evaluated by a medical social worker according to their family's financial status. Since June 2012, a total of 261 patients have received the benefit, with 44 under service, 37 with fixed co-pay and 180 with variable co-pay. Of the living donor kidney transplants, 98% had immediate graft function, with 2.3% (6/261) acute rejection rates at 1 year. The total cost of hospitalization was within the benefit for living donor kidney transplants (less than USD 8000.00) but exceeded it in all cases of deceased donor kidney transplants. The successful use of and excellent outcomes under the Case Type Z benefit demonstrated how collaboration among government agencies, health care providers, and pharmaceutical companies could result in a program that improved the access to health care for Filipino patients with end-stage renal disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 10 CFR 71.19 - Previously approved package.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL General... fissile material package, previously approved by the NRC but without the designation “-85” in the.... (c) A Type B(U) package, a Type B(M) package, or a fissile material package previously approved...

  5. Evaluation of the spoilage lactic acid bacteria in modified-atmosphere-packaged artisan-type cooked ham using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulos, C; Ravyts, F; De Maere, H; De Mey, E; Paelinck, H; De Vuyst, L; Leroy, F

    2008-05-01

    To investigate microbial diversity and population dynamics of spoilage-sensitive modified-atmosphere-packaged (MAP) artisan-type cooked ham in relation to storage temperature. Modified-atmosphere-packaged cooked ham samples were stored at different temperatures (4, 7, 12 and 26 degrees C). Traditional methods were combined with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques, i.e. a culture-dependent, repetitive DNA sequence-based method (rep-PCR) and a culture-independent approach (PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene fragments; PCR-DGGE). rep-PCR on DNA extracted from MRS isolates indicated that Leuconostoc carnosum and Enterococcus faecalis prevailed at all temperatures, with the latter becoming more important above 7 degrees C. PCR-DGGE indicated the additional presence of Carnobacterium divergens and Brochothrix thermosphacta at all temperatures. Discriminant analysis related variation within the Leuc. carnosum cluster to the storage temperature. High performance liquid chromatography revealed that lactic acid was the main metabolite because of glucose consumption. Leuconostoc carnosum, C. divergens, E. faecalis and Br. thermosphacta are the main spoilage bacteria of artisan-type MAP cooked ham. Their population dynamics are affected by storage temperature. Temperature can condition the development of spoilage in artisan-type MAP cooked ham, acting at both species and biotype level.

  6. Safety Analysis Report for packaging (onsite) steel waste package

    SciTech Connect

    BOEHNKE, W.M.

    2000-07-13

    The steel waste package is used primarily for the shipment of remote-handled radioactive waste from the 324 Building to the 200 Area for interim storage. The steel waste package is authorized for shipment of transuranic isotopes. The maximum allowable radioactive material that is authorized is 500,000 Ci. This exceeds the highway route controlled quantity (3,000 A{sub 2}s) and is a type B packaging.

  7. Heat treatment temperature influence on ASTM A890 GR 6A super duplex stainless steel microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Marcelo; E-mail: marcelo.martins@sulzer.com; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos

    2005-09-15

    Duplex and super duplex stainless steels are ferrous alloys with up to 26% chromium, 8% nickel, 5% molybdenum and 0.3% nitrogen, which are largely used in applications in media containing ions from the halogen family, mainly the chloride ion (Cl{sup -}). The emergence of this material aimed at substituting Copper-Nickel alloys (Cupro-Nickel) that despite presenting good corrosion resistance, has mechanical properties quite inferior to steel properties. The metallurgy of duplex and super duplex stainless steel is complex due to high sensitiveness to sigma phase precipitation that becomes apparent, due to the temperatures they are exposed on cooling from solidification as well as from heat treatment processes. The objective of this study was to verify the influence of heat treating temperatures on the microstructure and hardness of ASTM A890/A890M Gr 6A super duplex stainless steel type. Microstructure control is of extreme importance for castings, as the chemical composition and cooling during solidification inevitably provide conditions for precipitation of sigma phase. Higher hardness in these materials is directly associated to high sigma phase concentration in the microstructure, precipitated in the ferrite/austenite interface. While heat treatment temperature during solution treatment increases, the sigma phase content in the microstructure decreases and consequently, the material hardness diminishes. When the sigma phase was completely dissolved by the heat treatment, the material hardness was influenced only due to ferrite and austenite contents in the microstructure.

  8. Packaging investigation of optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhike, Zhang; Yu, Liu; Jianguo, Liu; Ninghua, Zhu

    2015-10-01

    Compared with microelectronic packaging, optoelectronic packaging as a new packaging type has been developed rapidly and it will play an essential role in optical communication. In this paper, we try to summarize the development history, research status, technology issues and future prospects, and hope to provide a meaningful reference. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Nos. 2013AA014201, 2013AA014203) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61177080, 61335004, 61275031).

  9. Molding compound trends in a denser packaging world: Qualification tests and reliability concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Lo, R. H. Y.; Chen, A. S.; Belani, J. G.

    1993-12-01

    Molding compound development has traditionally been driven by the memory market, then subsequent applications filter down to other IC technologies such as logic, analog, and ASIC. However, this strategy has changed lately with the introduction of thin packages such as PQFP & TSOP. Rather than targeting a compound for a family of IC such as DRAM or SRAM, compound development efforts are now focused at specific classes of packages. The configurations of these thin packages impose new functional requirements that need to be revisited to provide the optimized combination of properties. The evolution of qualification tests mirrors the advances in epoxy and compounding technologies. From the first standard novolac-based epoxies of the 1970s to the latest 3(sup rd)-generation ultra-low stress materials, longer test times at increasingly harsher environments were achieved. This paper benchmarks the current reliability tests used by the electronic industry, examines those tests that affect and are affected by the molding compounds, discusses the relevance of accelerated testing, and addresses the major reliability issues facing current molding compound development efforts. Six compound-related reliability concerns were selected: moldability, package stresses, package cracking, halogen-induced intermetallic growth at bond pads, moisture-induced corrosion, and interfacial delamination. Causes of each failure type are surveyed and remedies are recommended. Accelerated tests are designed to apply to a limited quantity of devices, bias, or environmental conditions larger than usual ratings, to intensify failure mechanisms that would occur under normal operating conditions. The observed behavior is then extrapolated from the lot to the entire population. Emphasis is on compressing the time necessary to obtain reliability data. This approach has two main drawbacks. With increasingly complex devices, even accelerated tests are expensive. And with new technologies, it becomes

  10. The influence of threatening visual warnings on tobacco packaging: Measuring the impact of threat level, image size, and type of pack through psychophysiological and self-report methods.

    PubMed

    Droulers, Olivier; Gallopel-Morvan, Karine; Lacoste-Badie, Sophie; Lajante, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    The first aim of this research was to assess the effectiveness, in terms of emotional and behavioral reactions, of moderately vs. highly TVWs (Threatening Visual Warnings) displayed on tobacco packs. Given the key role that emotional reactions play in explaining the effect of TVWs on behaviors, psychophysiological and self-report methods were used-for the first time in this context-to measure the emotions provoked by TVWs. The second aim of this research was to determine whether increasing the size of warnings, and their display on plain packaging (compared with branded packaging) would improve their effectiveness. A within-subjects experiment was conducted. Three variables were manipulated: health warning threat level (high vs. moderate), image size (40% vs. 75%) and pack type (plain vs. branded). A convenience sample of 48 French daily smokers participated. They were exposed to eight different packs of cigarettes in a research lab at the University of Rennes. Smokers' emotions and behavioral intentions were recorded through self-reports. Emotions were also evaluated using psychophysiological measurements: electrodermal activity and facial electromyography. The results revealed that TVWs with a high threat level are the most effective in increasing negative emotions (fear, disgust, valence, arousal) and behavioral intentions conducive to public health (desire to quit, etc.). They also highlight the appeal of increasing the size of the warnings and displaying them on plain packs, because this influences emotions, which is the first step toward behavioral change. Increasing the threat level of TVWs from moderate to high seems beneficial for public health. Our results also confirm the relevance of recent governmental decisions to adopt plain packaging and larger TVWs (in the UK, France, Ireland, Canada, New Zealand, Hungary, etc.).

  11. Post-approval appending of CSARs to drug package inserts: an analysis of the types of adverse reactions and time to addition.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Norio; Ishiguro, Chieko; Matsuda, Tsutomu

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyze clinically significant adverse reactions (CSARs) added to drug package inserts after approval and to investigate the time to these post-approval additions as an indicator of safety-related regulatory actions. Drugs containing new active ingredients that had been approved in Japan from April 2001 to December 2010 were analyzed. We examined CSARs that had been reported in the first version of the package inserts and subsequent additions through notifications from Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare until the end of 2011. Relative risks (RRs) for post-approval addition of CSARs were calculated for various categories of disorders. The median lengths of time to post-approval addition of CSARs were compared. A total of 238 drugs were examined. Of the 2487 CSARs associated with these drugs, 737 had been added after approval. The analysis revealed a higher likelihood for post-approval addition of CSARs for "Hepatobiliary disorders" (RR: 1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-1.68), "Gastrointestinal disorders" (RR: 1.35; 95%CI: 1.10-1.66), and "Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders" (RR: 1.52; 95%CI: 1.11-2.07). In contrast, "Cardiac disorders" showed reduced likelihood in comparison with other disorders. For the time until post-approval addition of CSARs, "Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders" showed the longest durations, with a median of 3020 days. Our quantitative analysis suggests that some CSARs were added more frequently to package inserts after approval and that time to post-approval additions of CSARs varied with the types of adverse drug reactions. These results can support the coherent implementation of pharmacovigilance activities. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. 49 CFR 173.411 - Industrial packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...), and Industrial Packaging Type 3 (IP-3). (b) Industrial packaging certification and tests. (1) Each IP... Organization for Standardization document ISO 1496-1: “Series 1 Freight Containers—Specifications and Testing...

  13. Estimation of exposure to food packaging materials. 3: Development of consumption factors and food-type distribution factors from data collected on Irish children.

    PubMed

    Duffy, E; Hearty, A P; McCarthy, S; Gibney, M J

    2007-01-01

    There are many initiatives in Europe trying to refine the exposure assessment for food packaging migrants. In the USA, the US Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) uses food consumption and food-type distribution factors to aid the exposure assessment process and generate more realistic estimates of exposure. The present study developed food-consumption factors and food-type distribution factors for Irish children aged 5-12 years from data collected as part of a National Children's Food Survey (NCFS) completed in Ireland in 2003-04, combined with data from the 2003-05 Irish Food Packaging Database and from literature data on surface area-to-weight ratios for food packaging. Consumption factors are defined as the fraction of a person's diet likely to contact a specific food-contact material, while food-type distribution factors reflect the fraction of all food contacting each material that is aqueous, acidic, alcoholic or fatty. In this study, it was found that 'total plastics' had the highest consumption factor of 0.83, while 'total paper and board' had a factor of 0.13 and 'total metal and alloys' had a factor of 0.06. Although it is tentative to compare the US FDA factors with the factors derived in the current study, as the US FDA data are for the total US population, the consumption factor for 'total plastics' in the present study (0.83) was similar to that used by the US FDA (0.79). However, a large difference existed for the consumption factor for 'total metal and alloys' in the Irish data (0.06) and the US FDA data (0.2). In terms of the type of materials used for foods, glass was used mainly for acidic foods (0.67), while plastic was uniformly used for all food types. The food-contact area for plastic packaging for all foods consumed by children was 10.67 dm2/child day(-1), which is slightly lower than the proposed value for the average European consumer of 12.4 dm2/person day(-1). However, this should be expected, as children do not consume as much food as

  14. Chemical Energy: A Learning Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Ita; Ben-Zvi, Ruth

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive teaching/learning chemical energy package was developed to overcome conceptual/experimental difficulties and time required for calculation of enthalpy changes. The package consists of five types of activities occuring in repeated cycles: group activities, laboratory experiments, inquiry questionnaires, teacher-led class…

  15. Chemical Energy: A Learning Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Ita; Ben-Zvi, Ruth

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive teaching/learning chemical energy package was developed to overcome conceptual/experimental difficulties and time required for calculation of enthalpy changes. The package consists of five types of activities occuring in repeated cycles: group activities, laboratory experiments, inquiry questionnaires, teacher-led class…

  16. Ada Namelist Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, Allan R.

    1991-01-01

    Ada Namelist Package, developed for Ada programming language, enables calling program to read and write FORTRAN-style namelist files. Features are: handling of any combination of types defined by user; ability to read vectors, matrices, and slices of vectors and matrices; handling of mismatches between variables in namelist file and those in programmed list of namelist variables; and ability to avoid searching entire input file for each variable. Principle benefits derived by user: ability to read and write namelist-readable files, ability to detect most file errors in initialization phase, and organization keeping number of instantiated units to few packages rather than to many subprograms.

  17. ASTM standard practice for testing fixed-wavelength photometric detectors used in liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, T.; Fritz, G.T.; Palmer, L.R.

    1981-08-01

    A standard testing procedure has been devised for fixed-wavelength photometric detectors (FWPD) used in liquid chromatography. The need for this procedure, the objectives for developing it, and the means for accomplishing the objectives are outlined. Salient details of the procedure are discussed including the determination of nine characteristics of FWPDs. After an evaluation by ten laboratories, the revised procedure was balloted and revised again according to ASTM procedures (1). The final revised version is now available from ASTM as Standard Practice E 685 (2).

  18. The breaking load method - Results and statistical modification from the ASTM interlaboratory test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, E. L.; Emptage, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    The breaking load test provides quantitative stress corrosion cracking data by determining the residual strength of tension specimens that have been exposed to corrosive environments. Eight laboratories have participated in a cooperative test program under the auspices of ASTM Committee G-1 to evaluate the new test method. All eight laboratories were able to distinguish between three tempers of aluminum alloy 7075. The statistical analysis procedures that were used in the test program do not work well in all situations. An alternative procedure using Box-Cox transformations shows a great deal of promise. An ASTM standard method has been drafted which incorporates the Box-Cox procedure.

  19. The breaking load method - Results and statistical modification from the ASTM interlaboratory test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, E. L.; Emptage, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    The breaking load test provides quantitative stress corrosion cracking data by determining the residual strength of tension specimens that have been exposed to corrosive environments. Eight laboratories have participated in a cooperative test program under the auspices of ASTM Committee G-1 to evaluate the new test method. All eight laboratories were able to distinguish between three tempers of aluminum alloy 7075. The statistical analysis procedures that were used in the test program do not work well in all situations. An alternative procedure using Box-Cox transformations shows a great deal of promise. An ASTM standard method has been drafted which incorporates the Box-Cox procedure.

  20. Final evaluation report for Westinghouse Hanford Company, WRAP-1,208 liter waste drum, docket 94-35-7A, type A packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-12

    This report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A (DOT-7A) compliance test results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module 1 (WRAP-1) Drum. The WRAP-1 Drum was tested for DOE-HQ in August 1994, by Los Alamos National Laboratory, under docket number 94-35-7A. Additionally, comparison and evaluation of the approved, as-tested packaging configuration was performed by WHC in September 1995. The WRAP-1 Drum was evaluated against the performance of the DOT-17C, 208 1 (55-gal) steel drums tested and evaluated under dockets 89-13-7A/90-18-7A and 94-37-7A.

  1. Effect of plasticizer type and concentration on physical properties of biodegradable films based on sugar palm (arenga pinnata) starch for food packaging.

    PubMed

    Sanyang, M L; Sapuan, S M; Jawaid, M; Ishak, M R; Sahari, J

    2016-01-01

    In this study, sugar palm starch (SPS) films were developed using glycerol (G), sorbitol (S) or their combination (GS) as plasticizers at the ratio of 15, 30 and 45 (wt)% using casting technique. The addition of plasticizers to SPS film-forming solutions helped to overcome the brittle and fragile nature of unplasticized SPS films. Increased plasticizer concentration resulted to an increase in film thickness, moisture content and solubility. On the contrary, density and water absorption of plasticized films decreased with increasing plasticizer concentration. Raising the plasticizer content from 15 to 45 % showed less effect on the moisture content and water absorption of S-plasticized films. Films containing glycerol and glycerol-sorbitol plasticizer (G, and GS) demonstrated higher moisture content, solubility and water absorption capacity compared to S-plasticized films. The results obtained in this study showed that plasticizer type and concentration significantly improves film properties and enhances their suitability for food packaging applications.

  2. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) concrete-lined waste packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, T.

    1997-09-25

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a package to ship Type A, non-transuranic, fissile excepted quantities of liquid or solid radioactive material and radioactive mixed waste to the Central Waste Complex for storage on the Hanford Site.

  3. Changes in use of types of tobacco products by pack sizes and price segments, prices paid and consumption following the introduction of plain packaging in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Scollo, Michelle; Zacher, Meghan; Coomber, Kerri; Bayly, Megan; Wakefield, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe changes among smokers in use of various types of tobacco products, reported prices paid and cigarette consumption following the standardisation of tobacco packaging in Australia. Methods National cross-sectional telephone surveys of adult smokers were conducted from April 2012 (6 months before transition to plain packaging (PP)) to March 2014 (15 months afterwards). Multivariable logistic regression assessed changes in products, brands and pack types/sizes; multivariable linear regression examined changes in inflation-adjusted prices paid and reported cigarette consumption between the pre-PP and three subsequent periods—the transition phase, PP year 1 and PP post-tax (post a 12.5% tax increase in December 2013). Results The proportion of current smokers using roll-your-own (RYO) products fluctuated over the study period. Proportions using value brands of factory-made (FM) cigarettes increased from pre-PP (21.4%) to PP year 1 (25.5%; p=0.002) and PP post-tax (27.8%; p<0.001). Inflation-adjusted prices paid increased in the PP year 1 and PP post-tax phases; the largest increases were among premium FM brands, the smallest among value brands. Consumption did not change in PP year 1 among daily, regular or current smokers or among smokers of brands in any market segment. Consumption among regular smokers declined significantly in PP post-tax (mean=14.0, SE=0.33) compared to PP year 1 (mean=14.8, SE=0.17; p=0.037). Conclusions Introduction of PP was associated with an increase in use of value brands, likely due to increased numbers available and smaller increases in prices for value relative to premium brands. Reported consumption declined following the December 2013 tax increase.

  4. Seafood Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's Technology Transfer Office at Stennis Space Center worked with a New Orleans seafood packaging company to develop a container to improve the shipping longevity of seafood, primarily frozen and fresh fish, while preserving the taste. A NASA engineer developed metalized heat resistant polybags with thermal foam liners using an enhanced version of the metalized mylar commonly known as 'space blanket material,' which was produced during the Apollo era.

  5. Seafood Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's Technology Transfer Office at Stennis Space Center worked with a New Orleans seafood packaging company to develop a container to improve the shipping longevity of seafood, primarily frozen and fresh fish, while preserving the taste. A NASA engineer developed metalized heat resistant polybags with thermal foam liners using an enhanced version of the metalized mylar commonly known as 'space blanket material,' which was produced during the Apollo era.

  6. Packaged Food

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    After studies found that many elderly persons don't eat adequately because they can't afford to, they have limited mobility, or they just don't bother, Innovated Foods, Inc. and JSC developed shelf-stable foods processed and packaged for home preparation with minimum effort. Various food-processing techniques and delivery systems are under study and freeze dried foods originally used for space flight are being marketed. (See 77N76140)

  7. The Packaging Handbook -- A guide to package design

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Packaging Handbook is a compilation of 14 technical chapters and five appendices that address the life cycle of a packaging which is intended to transport radioactive material by any transport mode in normal commerce. Although many topics are discussed in depth, this document focuses on the design aspects of a packaging. The Handbook, which is being prepared under the direction of the US Department of Energy, is intended to provide a wealth of technical guidance that will give designers a better understanding of the regulatory approval process, preferences of regulators in specific aspects of packaging design, and the types of analyses that should be seriously considered when developing the packaging design. Even though the Handbook is concerned with all packagings, most of the emphasis is placed on large packagings that are capable of transporting large radioactive sources that are also fissile (e.g., spent fuel). These are the types of packagings that must address the widest range of technical topics in order to meet domestic and international regulations. Most of the chapters in the Handbook have been drafted and submitted to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for editing; the majority of these have been edited. This report summarizes the contents.

  8. On carbide dissolution in an as-cast ASTM F-75 alloy.

    PubMed

    Caudillo, M; Herrera-Trejo, M; Castro, M R; Ramírez, E; González, C R; Juárez, J I

    2002-02-01

    The solution treatment of an as-cast ASTM F-75 alloy was investigated. Microstructural evolution was followed during thermal processing, in particular with regard to the content and type of carbides formed. To evidence any probable carbide transformations occurring during the heating stage, as well as to clarify their effect on the carbide dissolution kinetics, three heating rates were studied. Image analysis and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for microstructural characterization. For the identification of precipitates, these were electrolytically extracted from the matrix and then analyzed by X-ray diffraction. It was found that the precipitates in the as-cast alloy were constituted by both a M(23)C(6) carbide and a sigma intermetallic phase. The M(23)C(6) carbide was the only phase identified in solution-treated specimens, regardless of the heating rate employed, which indicated that this carbide dissolved directly into the matrix without being transformed first into an M(6)C carbide, as reported in the literature. It was found that the kinetics of dissolution for the M(23)C(6) carbide decreased progressively during the solution treatment, and that it was sensitive to the heating rate, decreasing whenever the latter was decreased. Because the M(23)C(6) carbide was not observed to suffer a phase transformation prior to its dissolution into the matrix, the effect of the heating rate was associated to the morphological change occurred as the specimens were heated. The occurrence of the observed phases was analyzed with the aid of phase diagrams computed for the system Co-Cr-Mo-C. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 59: 378-385, 2002

  9. IN-PACKAGE CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    E. Thomas

    2005-07-14

    This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for Postclosure Waste Form Modeling'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173246]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as a function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model, which uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model, which is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials, and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed (CDSP) waste packages containing high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor diffusing into the waste package, and (2) seepage water entering the waste package as a liquid from the drift. (1) Vapor-Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H{sub 2}O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Liquid-Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package.

  10. Management of different data types encountered in the analysis of nuclear physics experiments in the DALI development package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuer, D.

    1993-01-01

    Various modules are described for constructing, storing, and referencing different data types encountered in the analysis of voluminous data collected in nuclear physics experiments. These modules are available under the VMS operating system on VAX computers and have been designed to be easily installed in any application. The algorithms are fast, and the data structures are compact.

  11. AN ADA NAMELIST PACKAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Ada Namelist Package, developed for the Ada programming language, enables a calling program to read and write FORTRAN-style namelist files. A namelist file consists of any number of assignment statements in any order. Features of the Ada Namelist Package are: the handling of any combination of user-defined types; the ability to read vectors, matrices, and slices of vectors and matrices; the handling of mismatches between variables in the namelist file and those in the programmed list of namelist variables; and the ability to avoid searching the entire input file for each variable. The principle user benefits of this software are the following: the ability to write namelist-readable files, the ability to detect most file errors in the initialization phase, a package organization that reduces the number of instantiated units to a few packages rather than to many subprograms, a reduced number of restrictions, and an increased execution speed. The Ada Namelist reads data from an input file into variables declared within a user program. It then writes data from the user program to an output file, printer, or display. The input file contains a sequence of assignment statements in arbitrary order. The output is in namelist-readable form. There is a one-to-one correspondence between namelist I/O statements executed in the user program and variables read or written. Nevertheless, in the input file, mismatches are allowed between assignment statements in the file and the namelist read procedure statements in the user program. The Ada Namelist Package itself is non-generic. However, it has a group of nested generic packages following the nongeneric opening portion. The opening portion declares a variety of useraccessible constants, variables and subprograms. The subprograms are procedures for initializing namelists for reading, reading and writing strings. The subprograms are also functions for analyzing the content of the current dataset and diagnosing errors. Two nested

  12. AN ADA NAMELIST PACKAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Ada Namelist Package, developed for the Ada programming language, enables a calling program to read and write FORTRAN-style namelist files. A namelist file consists of any number of assignment statements in any order. Features of the Ada Namelist Package are: the handling of any combination of user-defined types; the ability to read vectors, matrices, and slices of vectors and matrices; the handling of mismatches between variables in the namelist file and those in the programmed list of namelist variables; and the ability to avoid searching the entire input file for each variable. The principle user benefits of this software are the following: the ability to write namelist-readable files, the ability to detect most file errors in the initialization phase, a package organization that reduces the number of instantiated units to a few packages rather than to many subprograms, a reduced number of restrictions, and an increased execution speed. The Ada Namelist reads data from an input file into variables declared within a user program. It then writes data from the user program to an output file, printer, or display. The input file contains a sequence of assignment statements in arbitrary order. The output is in namelist-readable form. There is a one-to-one correspondence between namelist I/O statements executed in the user program and variables read or written. Nevertheless, in the input file, mismatches are allowed between assignment statements in the file and the namelist read procedure statements in the user program. The Ada Namelist Package itself is non-generic. However, it has a group of nested generic packages following the nongeneric opening portion. The opening portion declares a variety of useraccessible constants, variables and subprograms. The subprograms are procedures for initializing namelists for reading, reading and writing strings. The subprograms are also functions for analyzing the content of the current dataset and diagnosing errors. Two nested

  13. Romanian experience on packaging testing

    SciTech Connect

    Vieru, G.

    2007-07-01

    With more than twenty years ago, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), through its Reliability and Testing Laboratory, was licensed by the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body- CNCAN and to carry out qualification tests [1] for packages intended to be used for the transport and storage of radioactive materials. Radioactive materials, generated by Romanian nuclear facilities [2] are packaged in accordance with national [3] and the IAEA's Regulations [1,6] for a safe transport to the disposal center. Subjecting these packages to the normal and simulating test conditions accomplish the evaluation and certification in order to prove the package technical performances. The paper describes the qualification tests for type A and B packages used for transport and storage of radioactive materials, during a period of 20 years of experience. Testing is used to substantiate assumption in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural response. The Romanian test facilities [1,3,6] are used to simulate the required qualification tests and have been developed at INR Pitesti, the main supplier of type A packages used for transport and storage of low radioactive wastes in Romania. The testing programme will continue to be a strong option to support future package development, to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on radioactive material packages or component sections, such as packages used for transport of radioactive sources to be used for industrial or medical purposes [2,8]. The paper describes and contain illustrations showing some of the various tests packages which have been performed during certain periods and how they relate to normal conditions and minor mishaps during transport. Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design there are also presented and commented. (authors)

  14. Manual sampling of coal from tops of railroad cars. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1989-08-01

    This practice is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-5 on Coal and Coke and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D05.23 on Coal Sampling. The current edition was approved July 24, 1989 and published in August 1989.

  15. Standard descriptive nomenclature of constituents of aggregates for radiation-shielding concrete. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1992-05-01

    This nomenclature is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-9 on Concrete and Concrete Aggregates and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C09.41 on Concrete for Radiation Shielding. Current edition approved Mar. 15, 1992 and published May 1992. Originally published as C 638-73. Last previous edition was C 638-84(1990). It was reapproved 1997.

  16. ASTM and other specifications and classifications for petroleum products and lubricants. Fifth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book includes specifications and classifications from ASTM committees on paint and related coatings and materials; road and paving materials; wood; roofing, waterproofing and bituminous materials; rubber; soaps and other detergents; aromatic hydrocarbons and related chemicals; and electrical insulating liquids and gases. Also included are several related, important specifications and classifications from other organizations.

  17. An evaluation of efforts by nuclear power plants to use ASTM D3803-89

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, W.P.

    1995-02-01

    The number of nuclear power plants are now using ASTM D3803-89, {open_quotes}Standard Test Method for Nuclear-Grade Activated Carbon{close_quotes} for routine surveillance testing of adsorbents. In order to judge the impact of this change, we have gathered radioiodine removal test results from our data base on a system-by-system basis (i.e. control room, technical support center, and spent fuel pool) and compared test results obtained for the same kind of systems using the new and older test methods. Included in this comparison are systems with and without humidity control. Results are discussed from the standpoint of what to expect if a change to testing using ASTM D3803-89 is contemplated, especially regarding test results in light existing acceptance criteria. Additionally, the results are discussed from the standpoint of the sensitivity of the ASTM test method to detect when the performance of the carbon in air cleaning systems has been compromised (compared to the older methods). Finally, we offer some suggestions for how other plants might upgrade their carbon testing to incorporate testing to ASTM D3803-89.

  18. Microwave digestion of industrial furnace feedstreams for trace element analysis. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    This practice is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-34 on Waste Management and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D34.02 on Physical and Chemical Characterization. The current edition was approved March 15, 1994 and published in May 1994.

  19. Standard practice for use of scrap tires in civil engineering applications. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    This practice is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-34 on Biotechnology and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D34.06 on Recovery and Reuse. The current edition was approved on Jun. 10, 1998. It was published in August 1998.

  20. Standard test method for the performance of conveyor ovens. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee F-26 on Food Service Equipment and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee F26.06 on Productivity and Energy Protocol. The current edition was approved Jul. 10, 1997. It was published August 1998.

  1. Standard practice for use of cellulose acetate dosimetry systems. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This practice is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee E-10 on Nuclear Technology and Applications and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee E10.01 on Dosimetry for Radiation Processing. Current edition approved Jun. 10, 1997 and published May 1998. Originally published as E 1650-94. Last previous edition was E 1650-94.

  2. ASTM Committee D-7 : Wood : promoting safety and standardization for 100 years

    Treesearch

    David W. Green; Robert L. Ethington

    2004-01-01

    In October 2004, Committee D-7 on Wood of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is celebrating 100 years of contributions to the safe and efficient use of wood as a building material. Born during a period of rapid social, economic, and technological change, the Committee faced controversial issues and the challenge of a changing forest resource. This...

  3. Standard specification for forged carbon and alloy steel flanges for low-temperature service. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee A-1 on Steel, Stainless Steel, and Related Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee A01.22 on Steel Forgings and Wrought Fittings for Piping Applications and Bolting Materials for Piping and Special Purpose Applications. Current edition approved Mar. 10, 1998 and published October 1998.

  4. Comparing the Methodologies in ASTM G198: Is There an Easy Way Out?

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2013-01-01

    ASTM(1) G198, Standard test method for determining the relative corrosion performance of driven fasteners in contact with treated wood, was accepted by consensus and published in 2011. The method has two different exposure conditions for determining fastener corrosion performance in treated wood. The first method places the wood and embedded...

  5. Combustion Gas Properties I-ASTM Jet a Fuel and Dry Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. E.; Trout, A. M.; Wear, J. D.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    A series of computations was made to produce the equilibrium temperature and gas composition for ASTM jet A fuel and dry air. The computed tables and figures provide combustion gas property data for pressures from 0.5 to 50 atmospheres and equivalence ratios from 0 to 2.0.

  6. Deriving allowable properties of lumber : a practical guide for interpretation of ASTM standards

    Treesearch

    Alan Bendtsen; William L. Galligan

    1978-01-01

    The ASTM standards for establishing clear wood mechanical properties and for deriving structural grades and related allowable properties for visually graded lumber can be confusing and difficult for the uninitiated to interpret. This report provides a practical guide to using these standards for individuals not familiar with their application. Sample stress...

  7. Comparing the Methodologies in ASTM G198 Using Combined Hygrothermal-Corrosion Modeling

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2013-01-01

    ASTM G198, “Standard test method for determining the relative corrosion performance of driven fasteners in contact with treated wood,” was accepted by consensus and published in 2011. The method has two different exposure conditions for determining fastener corrosion performance in treated wood. The first method places the wood and embedded fasteners in a...

  8. PROPOSED ASTM METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ASBESTOS IN AIR BY TEM AND INFORMATION ON INTERFERING FIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The draft of the ASTM Test Method for air entitled: "Airborne Asbestos Concentration in Ambient and Indoor Atmospheres as Determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy Direct Transfer (TEM)" (ASTM Z7077Z) is an adaptation of the International Standard, ISO 10312. It is currently...

  9. PROPOSED ASTM METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ASBESTOS IN AIR BY TEM AND INFORMATION ON INTERFERING FIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The draft of the ASTM Test Method for air entitled: "Airborne Asbestos Concentration in Ambient and Indoor Atmospheres as Determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy Direct Transfer (TEM)" (ASTM Z7077Z) is an adaptation of the International Standard, ISO 10312. It is currently...

  10. Final evaluation & test report for the standard waste box (docket 01-53-7A) type A packaging

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY, D L

    2001-10-15

    This report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A compliance test and evaluation results of the Standard Waste Box. Testing and evaluation activities documented herein are on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Safety, Health and Security (EM-5), Germantown, Maryland. Duratek Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations performed an evaluation of the changes as documented herein under Docket 01-53-7A.

  11. Vero/BC-F: an efficient packaging cell line stably expressing F protein to generate single round-infectious human parainfluenza virus type 2 vector.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, J; Fukumura, M; Tsurudome, M; Hara, K; Nishio, M; Kawano, M; Nosaka, T

    2014-08-01

    A stable packaging cell line (Vero/BC-F) constitutively expressing fusion (F) protein of the human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2) was established for production of the F-defective and single round-infectious hPIV2 vector in a strategy for recombinant vaccine development. The F gene expression has not evoked cytostatic or cytotoxic effects on the Vero/BC-F cells and the F protein was physiologically active to induce syncytial formation with giant polykaryocytes when transfected with a plasmid expressing hPIV2 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN). Transduction of the F-defective replicon RNA into the Vero/BC-F cells led to the release of the infectious particles that packaged the replicon RNA (named as hPIV2ΔF) without detectable mutations, limiting the infectivity to a single round. The maximal titer of the hPIV2ΔF was 6.0 × 10(8) median tissue culture infections dose per ml. The influenza A virus M2 gene was inserted into hPIV2ΔF, and the M2 protein was found to be highly expressed in a human lung cancer cell line after transduction. Furthermore, in vivo airway infection experiments revealed that the hPIV2ΔF was capable of delivering transgenes to hamster tracheal cells. Thus, non-transmissible or single round-infectious hPIV2 vector will be potentially applicable to human gene therapy or recombinant vaccine development.

  12. Reflective Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The aluminized polymer film used in spacecraft as a radiation barrier to protect both astronauts and delicate instruments has led to a number of spinoff applications. Among them are aluminized shipping bags, food cart covers and medical bags. Radiant Technologies purchases component materials and assembles a barrier made of layers of aluminized foil. The packaging reflects outside heat away from the product inside the container. The company is developing new aluminized lines, express mailers, large shipping bags, gel packs and insulated panels for the building industry.

  13. Final evaluation & test report for the standard waste box (docket 01-53-7A) type A packaging

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY, D.L.

    2001-08-15

    This report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A (DOT-7A) compliance test and evaluation results of the Standard Waste Box (SWB). Testing and evaluation activities documented herein are on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), Office of Safety, Health and Security (EM-5), Germantown, Maryland. Dwatek Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations (DFSNW) performed an evaluation of the changes as documented herein under Docket 01-53-7A.

  14. Interactions between bacterial isolates from modified-atmosphere-packaged artisan-type cooked ham in view of the development of a bioprotective culture.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulos, Charalampos; De Mey, Eveline; Dewulf, Lore; Paelinck, Hubert; De Smedt, Anny; Vandendriessche, Frank; De Vuyst, Luc; Leroy, Frédéric

    2010-12-01

    Growth and metabolite production of three dominant bacterial isolates (Carnobacterium divergens 3M14, Leuconostoc carnosum 3M42, and Brochothrix thermosphacta RMS6) from modified-atmosphere-packaged (MAP), artisan-type cooked ham were assessed for their interactions in view of the development of a bioprotective culture. During monoculture experiments in cooked ham simulation medium, Leuc. carnosum 3M42 converted the available glucose into lactic acid and ethanol, whereas the two other strains produced additional metabolites such as acetic acid and 3-methyl-1-butanol. When grown in co-culture, Leuc. carnosum 3M42 suppressed the growth and metabolism of B. thermosphacta RMS6. In contrast, a co-culture of the latter bacterium with C. divergens 3M14 led to a variety of spoilage-related metabolic compounds. Subsequently, experiments with a commercial cooked ham product indicated that Leuc. carnosum 3M42 dominated the meat matrix and improved acceptability of the product over time, hence acting as a bioprotective culture for MAP, artisan-type cooked ham.

  15. Overview of ASTM standard activities in support of advanced structural ceramics development

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Quinn, G.D.; McClung, R.W.

    1995-07-01

    An overview is presented of the activities of ASTM Committee C-28 on Advanced Ceramics. This activity originated in 1986 when it became apparent that advanced ceramics were being considered for extensive use in applications such as advanced heat engines, heat exchangers, combustors, etc. in aerospace and energy conservation activities. These applications require optimum material behavior with physical and mechanical property reproducibility, component reliability, and well defined methods of data treatment and material analysis for both monolithic and composite ceramic materials. As new materials are introduced into the market place, these issues are best dealt with via standard methods. Therefore, a progress report is given describing activities of the five standard writing subcommittees who support the ASTM Committee C-28 effort. Accomplishments to date are given, as well as likely future activities, including a brief summary of joint cooperative efforts with international standard formulating organizations.

  16. Results of ASTM round robin testing for mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Martin, Roderick H.

    1992-01-01

    The results are summarized of several interlaboratory 'round robin' test programs for measuring the mode 1 interlaminar fracture toughness of advanced fiber reinforced composite materials. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests were conducted by participants in ASTM committee D30 on High Modulus Fibers and their Composites and by representatives of the European Group on Fracture (EGF) and the Japanese Industrial Standards Group (JIS). DCB tests were performed on three AS4 carbon fiber reinforced composite materials: AS4/3501-6 with a brittle epoxy matrix; AS4/BP907 with a tough epoxy matrix; and AS4/PEEK with a tough thermoplastic matrix. Difficulties encountered in manufacturing panels, as well as conducting the tests are discussed. Critical issues that developed during the course of the testing are highlighted. Results of the round robin testing used to determine the precision of the ASTM DCB test standard are summarized.

  17. TRU waste transportation package development

    SciTech Connect

    Eakes, R. G.; Lamoreaux, G. H.; Romesberg, L. E.; Sutherland, S. H.; Duffey, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    Inventories of the transuranic wastes buried or stored at various US DOE sites are tabulated. The leading conceptual design of Type-B packaging for contact-handled transuranic waste is the Transuranic Package Transporter (TRUPACT), a large metal container comprising inner and outer tubular steel frameworks which are separated by rigid polyurethane foam and sheathed with steel plate. Testing of TRUPACT is reported. The schedule for its development is given. 6 figures. (DLC)

  18. Proposed annex to the ASTM Standard Guide E1676-95, bioaccumulation testing utilizing Eisenia foetida

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, J.; Simmers, J.; Lee, C.; Tatem, H.

    1995-12-31

    A detailed description of the method developed at the Waterways Experiment Station (WES) to determine sediment toxicity utilizing the earthworm, Eisenia foetida. This method has been used successfully in evaluating the target contaminants; metals, PAHs, and PCBs. This procedure is currently a proposed annex to the ASTM Standard Guide E1676-95: Conducting a Laboratory Soil Toxicity Test With The Lumbricid Earthworm, Eisenia foetida.

  19. Cyclic oxidation to high temperature of ASTM - A53 grade B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, D.; Marulanda, J. L.; Santos, A.

    2017-01-01

    Samples of ASTM A53 steel grade B underwent 500 oxidation cycles at 600°C. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) were performed to study the morphology, composition and phase structure of Fe2O3 y Fe3O4 layers on oxidation surface. Such layers were homogenous and poorly adhesive. Mass loss was significant due to absence of protective oxides and inevitable flaking, leaving the substrate exposed to corrosive environment.

  20. An Evaluation of a Proposed Revision of the ASTM D 1990 Grouping Procedure

    Treesearch

    Steve P Verrill; James W. Evans; David E. Kretschmann; Cherilyn A. Hatfield

    2013-01-01

    Lum, Taylor, and Zidek have proposed a revised procedure for wood species grouping in ASTM standard D 1990. We applaud the authors’ recognition of the importance of considering a strength distribution’s variability as well as its fifth percentile. However, we have concerns about their proposed method of incorporating this information into a standard. We detail these...

  1. CCR+: Metadata Based Extended Personal Health Record Data Model Interoperable with the ASTM CCR Standard

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yu Rang; Yoon, Young Jo; Jang, Tae Hun; Seo, Hwa Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Extension of the standard model while retaining compliance with it is a challenging issue because there is currently no method for semantically or syntactically verifying an extended data model. A metadata-based extended model, named CCR+, was designed and implemented to achieve interoperability between standard and extended models. Methods Furthermore, a multilayered validation method was devised to validate the standard and extended models. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Community Care Record (CCR) standard was selected to evaluate the CCR+ model; two CCR and one CCR+ XML files were evaluated. Results In total, 188 metadata were extracted from the ASTM CCR standard; these metadata are semantically interconnected and registered in the metadata registry. An extended-data-model-specific validation file was generated from these metadata. This file can be used in a smartphone application (Health Avatar CCR+) as a part of a multilayered validation. The new CCR+ model was successfully evaluated via a patient-centric exchange scenario involving multiple hospitals, with the results supporting both syntactic and semantic interoperability between the standard CCR and extended, CCR+, model. Conclusions A feasible method for delivering an extended model that complies with the standard model is presented herein. There is a great need to extend static standard models such as the ASTM CCR in various domains: the methods presented here represent an important reference for achieving interoperability between standard and extended models. PMID:24627817

  2. CCR+: Metadata Based Extended Personal Health Record Data Model Interoperable with the ASTM CCR Standard.

    PubMed

    Park, Yu Rang; Yoon, Young Jo; Jang, Tae Hun; Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Ju Han

    2014-01-01

    Extension of the standard model while retaining compliance with it is a challenging issue because there is currently no method for semantically or syntactically verifying an extended data model. A metadata-based extended model, named CCR+, was designed and implemented to achieve interoperability between standard and extended models. Furthermore, a multilayered validation method was devised to validate the standard and extended models. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Community Care Record (CCR) standard was selected to evaluate the CCR+ model; two CCR and one CCR+ XML files were evaluated. In total, 188 metadata were extracted from the ASTM CCR standard; these metadata are semantically interconnected and registered in the metadata registry. An extended-data-model-specific validation file was generated from these metadata. This file can be used in a smartphone application (Health Avatar CCR+) as a part of a multilayered validation. The new CCR+ model was successfully evaluated via a patient-centric exchange scenario involving multiple hospitals, with the results supporting both syntactic and semantic interoperability between the standard CCR and extended, CCR+, model. A feasible method for delivering an extended model that complies with the standard model is presented herein. There is a great need to extend static standard models such as the ASTM CCR in various domains: the methods presented here represent an important reference for achieving interoperability between standard and extended models.

  3. RECLAMATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.

    2011-06-06

    Radioactive material packages are withdrawn from use for various reasons; loss of mission, decertification, damage, replacement, etc. While the packages themselves may be decertified, various components may still be able to perform to their required standards and find useful service. The Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems group of the Savannah River National Laboratory has been reducing the cost of producing new Type B Packagings by reclaiming, refurbishing, and returning to service the containment vessels from older decertified packagings. The program and its benefits are presented.

  4. Packageable antiviral therapeutics against human immunodeficiency virus type 1: virion-targeted virus inactivation by incorporation of a single-chain antibody against viral integrase into progeny virions.

    PubMed

    Okui, N; Sakuma, R; Kobayashi, N; Yoshikura, H; Kitamura, T; Chiba, J; Kitamura, Y

    2000-03-01

    To determine their activities as an antiviral agent packageable within virions and suitable for continued expression in cells, we tested a single-chain antibody (scAb) against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase and its three fusion proteins: fused to viral protein R (scab-Vpr), a double-cassette of the WXXF motif binding to Vpr (scAb-WXXF), and viral major capsid protein (scAb-CA), respectively. Cotransfection of human 293T cells with expression plasmid for scAb-Vpr or -WXXF along with HIV-1 clone pLAI resulted in the production of a normal amount of progeny virions with infectivity decreased by more than 10(3)-fold. Immunoblot analyses showed that scAb-Vpr or -WXXF was associated with virions, whereas scAb or scAb-CA was not, suggesting that scAb-Vpr or -WXXF was incorporated into virions. The incorporation of scAb-WXXF appeared to be Vpr dependent, because the fusion protein was associated with the wild-type but not with Vpr-truncated HIV-1 virions. Since G418-selected HeLa clones carrying expression plasmid for scAb-WXXF were obtained much more frequently than those for scAb-Vpr, scAb-WXXF was inferred to be less toxic to cells than scAb-Vpr. These results suggest that scAb-WXXF may serve as a novel class of antiviral therapeutic that inactivates progeny HIV virions from within.

  5. Neural biomarkers for assessing different types of imagery in pictorial health warning labels for cigarette packaging: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Norlund, Roger D; Thrasher, James F; Fridriksson, Johann; Brixius, William; Froeliger, Brett; Hammond, David; Cummings, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Objective Countries around the world have increasingly adopted pictorial health warning labels (HWLs) for tobacco packages to warn consumers about smoking-related risks. Research on how pictorial HWLs work has primarily analysed self-reported responses to HWLs; studies at the neural level comparing the brain's response to different types of HWLs may provide an important complement to prior studies, especially if self-reported responses are systematically biased. In this study we characterise the brain's response to three types of pictorial HWLs for which prior self-report studies indicated different levels of efficacy. Methods Current smokers rated pictorial HWLs and then observed the same HWLs during functional MRI (fMRI) scanning. Fifty 18–50-year-old current adult smokers who were free from neurological disorders were recruited from the general population and participated in the study. Demographics, smoking-related behaviours and self-reported ratings of pictorial HWL stimuli were obtained prior to scanning. Brain responses to HWLs were assessed using fMRI, focusing on a priori regions of interest. Results Pictorial HWL stimuli elicited activation in a broad network of brain areas associated with visual processing and emotion. Participants who rated the stimuli as more emotionally arousing also showed greater neural responses at these sites. Conclusions Self-reported ratings of pictorial HWLs are correlated with neural responses in brain areas associated with visual and emotional processing. Study results cross-validate self-reported ratings of pictorial HWLs and provide insights into how pictorial HWLs are processed. PMID:25552613

  6. TaqMan 5'-nuclease human immunodeficiency virus type 1 PCR assay with phage-packaged competitive internal control for high-throughput blood donor screening.

    PubMed

    Drosten, C; Seifried, E; Roth, W K

    2001-12-01

    Screening of blood donors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection by PCR permits the earlier diagnosis of HIV-1 infection compared with that by serologic assays. We have established a high-throughput reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay based on 5'-nuclease PCR. By in-tube detection of HIV-1 RNA with a fluorogenic probe, the 5'-nuclease PCR technology (TaqMan PCR) eliminates the risk of carryover contamination, a major problem in PCR testing. We outline the development and evaluation of the PCR assay from a technical point of view. A one-step RT-PCR that targets the gag genes of all known HIV-1 group M isolates was developed. An internal control RNA detectable with a heterologous 5'-nuclease probe was derived from the viral target cDNA and was packaged into MS2 coliphages (Armored RNA). Because the RNA was protected against digestion with RNase, it could be spiked into patient plasma to control the complete sample preparation and amplification process. The assay detected 831 HIV-1 type B genome equivalents per ml of native plasma (95% confidence interval [CI], 759 to 936 HIV-1 B genome equivalents per ml) with a >or=95% probability of a positive result, as determined by probit regression analysis. A detection limit of 1,195 genome equivalents per ml of (individual) donor plasma (95% CI, 1,014 to 1,470 genome equivalents per ml of plasma pooled from individuals) was achieved when 96 samples were pooled and enriched by centrifugation. Up to 4,000 plasma samples per PCR run were tested in a 3-month trial period. Although data from the present pilot feasibility study will have to be complemented by a large clinical validation study, the assay is a promising approach to the high-throughput screening of blood donors and is the first noncommercial test for high-throughput screening for HIV-1.

  7. Parenteral packaging waste reduction.

    PubMed

    Baetz, B W

    1990-08-01

    The consumption of pharmaceutical products generates waste materials which can cause significant environmental impact when incinerated or landfilled. The purpose of this work is to stimulate discussion among hospital pharmacists and purchasing managers relating to the waste management aspects of their purchasing decisions. As a case study example, a number of commercially available "single use" parenterals are evaluated from a waste reduction perspective, for both the product container and for the packaging of these containers. Glass vials are non-incinerable, and are currently non-recyclable due to the higher melting temperatures required for borosilicate glass. However, plastic vials are potentially both incinerable and recyclable. Packaging quantities are considerably lower for plastic vials on a unit container basis, and also vary to a measurable degree between different manufacturers for a given type of container material. From an environmental perspective, waste reduction potential should become an important criterion in the selection of pharmaceutical products for hospital use.

  8. 21 CFR 226.80 - Packaging and labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packaging and labeling. 226.80 Section 226.80 Food...: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR TYPE A MEDICATED ARTICLES Packaging and Labeling § 226.80 Packaging and labeling. (a) Packaging and labeling operations shall be adequately controlled: (1) To...

  9. Science packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    Primary science teachers in Scotland have a new updating method at their disposal with the launch of a package of CDi (Compact Discs Interactive) materials developed by the BBC and the Scottish Office. These were a response to the claim that many primary teachers felt they had been inadequately trained in science and lacked the confidence to teach it properly. Consequently they felt the need for more in-service training to equip them with the personal understanding required. The pack contains five disks and a printed user's guide divided up as follows: disk 1 Investigations; disk 2 Developing understanding; disks 3,4,5 Primary Science staff development videos. It was produced by the Scottish Interactive Technology Centre (Moray House Institute) and is available from BBC Education at £149.99 including VAT. Free Internet distribution of science education materials has also begun as part of the Global Schoolhouse (GSH) scheme. The US National Science Teachers' Association (NSTA) and Microsoft Corporation are making available field-tested comprehensive curriculum material including 'Micro-units' on more than 80 topics in biology, chemistry, earth and space science and physics. The latter are the work of the Scope, Sequence and Coordination of High School Science project, which can be found at http://www.gsh.org/NSTA_SSandC/. More information on NSTA can be obtained from its Web site at http://www.nsta.org.

  10. Microelectronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, A. J., Jr.

    1983-07-01

    Microelectronic packaging design problems for high-speed digital computers are discussed. The dense packing requirements of the task necessitate account be taken of proper cooling for the chips, minimization of distortion of signals, and efficient placement of the chips and terminals. The increase in the numbers of circuits in a chip has permitted manufacturing of multichip boards and elimination of some previously needed cards in the mainframe hierarchy. Electrical signals travel at about 15 cm/nsec through conductors on a board, a speed affected by the inductance and capacitance of the line, as well as its geometry. Signals in one line need to be prevented from jumping into another line passing close by. Any discontinuities can cause signal reflection, i.e., noise. Array formatting reduces the space necessary for chip connections and mounting. Interconnections between vertically stacked boards, vias, can be made into the grids. Air and water cooling systems are used for cooling the boards to temperatures which allow continued high-speed operation.

  11. Packaging of an AAV vector encoding human acid alpha-glucosidase for gene therapy in glycogen storage disease type II with a modified hybrid adenovirus-AAV vector.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Chen, Y-T; Bird, Andrew; Xu, Fang; Hou, Yang-Xun; Amalfitano, Andrea; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2003-04-01

    We have developed an improved method for packaging adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors with a replication-defective adenovirus-AAV (Ad-AAV) hybrid virus. The AAV vector encoding human acid alpha-glucosidase (hGAA) was cloned into an E1, polymerase/preterminal protein-deleted adenovirus, such that it is packaged as an Ad vector. Importantly, the Ad-AAV hybrid cannot replicate during AAV vector packaging in 293 cells, because of deletion of polymerase/preterminal protein. The residual Ad-AAV in the AAV vector stock was reduced to <1 infectious particle per 10(10) AAV vector particles. These modifications resulted in approximately 30-fold increased packaging of the AAV vector for the hybrid Ad-AAV vector method as compared with standard transfection-only methods. Similarly improved packaging was demonstrated for pseudotyping the AAV vector as AAV6, and for AAV vector packaging with a second Ad-AAV vector encoding canine glucose-6-phosphatase. Liver-targeted delivery of either the Ad-AAV hybrid or AAV vector particles in acid alpha-glucosidase-knockout (GAA-KO) mice revealed secretion of hGAA with the Ad-AAV vector, and sustained secretion of hGAA with an AAV vector in hGAA-tolerant GAA-KO mice. Further development of hybrid Ad-AAV vectors could offer distinct advantages for gene therapy in glycogen storage diseases.

  12. The Major Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) Packaging Signal Is Present on All HIV-2 RNA Species: Cotranslational RNA Encapsidation and Limitation of Gag Protein Confer Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Stephen D. C.; Allen, Jane F.; Lever, Andrew M. L.

    2001-01-01

    Deletion of a region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) 5′ leader RNA reduces genomic RNA encapsidation to about 5% that of wild-type virus with no defect in viral protein production but severely limits virus spread in Jurkat T cells, indicating that this region contains a major cis-acting encapsidation signal, or psi (Ψ). Being upstream of the major splice donor, it is present on all viral transcripts. We have shown that HIV-2 selects its genomic RNA for encapsidation cotranslationally, rendering wild-type HIV-2 unable to encapsidate vector RNAs in trans . Virus with Ψ deleted, however, encapsidates an HIV-2 vector, demonstrating competition for Gag protein. HIV-2 overcomes the lack of packaging signal location specificity by two novel mechanisms, cotranslational packaging and competition for limiting Gag polyprotein. PMID:11711596

  13. Recent Improvements to the ASTM-Type Ultrasonic Reference Block System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    80 80 80 93.0 82.2 97.7 49.7 50.0 58.5 20.3 20,2 24,5 (a) Spread/Average LS-4 LS-5 LS-6 Percent a 80 80 80 80 80 92.3 91.2...63 64,5 +14,3 -11.4 37 39,5 +18.1 -13,3 14 13,5 11/16-ln ball (17,5-inin ball) 8-0050 8-0100 8-0225 80 80 80 80 80 80 78,8 77,7 91,0 86,5

  14. Child-resistant and tamper-resistant packaging: A systematic review to inform tobacco packaging regulation.

    PubMed

    Jo, Catherine L; Ambs, Anita; Dresler, Carolyn M; Backinger, Cathy L

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of special packaging (child-resistant, adult-friendly) and tamper-resistant packaging on health and behavioral outcomes in order to identify research gaps and implications for packaging standards for tobacco products. We searched seven databases for keywords related to special and tamper-resistant packaging, consulted experts, and reviewed citations of potentially relevant studies. 733 unique papers were identified. Two coders independently screened each title and abstract for eligibility. They then reviewed the full text of the remaining papers for a second round of eligibility screening. Included studies investigated a causal relationship between type of packaging or packaging regulation and behavioral or health outcomes and had a study population composed of consumers. Studies were excluded on the basis of publication type, if they were not peer-reviewed, and if they had low external validity. Two reviewers independently coded each paper for study and methodological characteristics and limitations. Discrepancies were discussed and resolved. The review included eight studies: four assessing people's ability to access the contents of different packaging types and four evaluating the impact of packaging requirements on health-related outcomes. Child-resistant packaging was generally more difficult to open than non-child-resistant packaging. Child-resistant packaging requirements have been associated with reductions in child mortality. Child-resistant packaging holds the expectation to reduce tobacco product poisonings among children under six. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Comparative results of autogenous ignition temperature measurements by ASTM G 72 and pressurized scanning calorimetry in gaseous oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, C. J.; Lowrie, R.

    1986-01-01

    The autogenous ignition temperature of four materials was determined by ASTM (G 72) and pressurized differential scanning calorimetry at 0.68-, 3.4-, and 6.8-MPa oxygen pressure. All four materials were found to ignite at lower temperatures in the ASTM method. The four materials evaluated in this program were Neoprene, Vespel SP-21, Fluorel E-2160, and nylon 6/6.

  16. Comparative results of autogenous ignition temperature measurements by ASTM G 72 and pressurized scanning calorimetry in gaseous oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, C. J.; Lowrie, R.

    1986-01-01

    The autogenous ignition temperature of four materials was determined by ASTM (G 72) and pressurized differential scanning calorimetry at 0.68-, 3.4-, and 6.8-MPa oxygen pressure. All four materials were found to ignite at lower temperatures in the ASTM method. The four materials evaluated in this program were Neoprene, Vespel SP-21, Fluorel E-2160, and nylon 6/6.

  17. Analysis and evaluation of the Electronic Health Record standard in China: a comparison with the American national standard ASTM E 1384.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Guan, Zhiyu; Cao, Hongxin; Zhang, Haiyan; Lu, Min; Li, Tiejun

    2011-08-01

    To analyze and evaluate the newly issued Electronic Health Record (EHR) Architecture and Data Standard of China (Chinese EHR Standard) and identify areas of improvement for future revisions. We compared the Chinese EHR Standard with the standard of the American Society for Testing and Materials Standard Practice for Content and Structure of Electronic Health Records in the United States (ASTM E 1384 Standard). The comparison comprised two steps: (1) comparing the conformance of the two standards to the international standard: Health Informatics-Requirements for an Electronic Health Record Architecture (ISO/TS 18308), and showing how the architectures of the two standards satisfy or deviate from the ISO requirements and (2) comparing the detailed data structures between the two standards. Of the 124 requirement items in ISO/TS 18308, the Chinese EHR Standard and the ASTM E 1384 Standard conformed to 77 (62.1%) and 111 (89.5%), respectively. The Chinese EHR Standard conformed to 34 of 50 Structure requirements (68.0%), 22 of 24 Process requirements (91.7%), and 21 of 50 Other requirements (42.0%). The ASTM E 1384 Standard conformed to 49 of 50 Structure requirements (98.0%), 23 of 24 Process requirements (95.8%), and 39 of 40 Other requirements (78.0%). Further development of the Chinese EHR Standard should focus on supporting privacy and security mechanism, diverse data types, more generic and extensible lower level data structures, and relational attributes for data elements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cyclic Polarization Behavior of ASTM A537-Cl.1 Steel in the Vapor Space Above Simulated Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B

    2004-11-01

    An assessment of the potential degradation mechanisms of Types I and II High-Level Waste (HLW) Tanks determined that pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking were the two most significant degradation mechanisms. Specifically, nitrate induced stress corrosion cracking was determined to be the principal degradation mechanism for the primary tank steel of non-stress relieved tanks. Controls on the solution chemistry have been in place to preclude the initiation and propagation of degradation in the tanks. However, recent experience has shown that steel not in contact with the bulk waste solution or slurry, but exposed to the ''vapor space'' above the bulk waste, may be vulnerable to the initiation and propagation of degradation, including pitting and stress corrosion cracking. A program to resolve the issues associated with potential vapor space corrosion is in place. The objective of the program is to develop understanding of vapor space (VSC) and liquid/air interface (LAIC) corrosion to ensure a defensible technical basis to provide accurate corrosion evaluations with regard to vapor space and liquid/air interface corrosion (similar to current evaluations). There are several needs for a technically defensible basis with sufficient understanding to perform these evaluations. These include understanding of the (1) surface chemistry evolution, (2) corrosion response through coupon testing, and (3) mechanistic understanding through electrochemical studies. Experimentation performed in FY02 determined the potential for vapor space and liquid/air interface corrosion of ASTM A285-70 and ASTM A537-Cl.1 steels. The material surface characteristics, i.e. mill-scale, polished, were found to play a key role in the pitting response. The experimentation indicated that the potential for limited vapor space and liquid/air interface pitting exists at 1.5M nitrate solution when using chemistry controls designed to prevent stress corrosion cracking. Experimentation performed in

  19. In-Package Chemistry Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    E. Thomas

    2004-11-09

    This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model that uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model that is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed waste packages that contain both high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor that diffuses into the waste package, and (2) seepage water that enters the waste package from the drift as a liquid. (1) Vapor Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H2O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Water Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package. TSPA-LA uses the vapor influx case for the nominal scenario for simulations where the waste package has been

  20. ASTM international workshop on standards and measurements for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yaszemski, Michael J; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Tomlins, Paul; Luginbuehl, Reto; Tesk, John A

    2015-07-01

    The "Workshop on Standards & Measurements for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds" was held on May 21, 2013 in Indianapolis, IN, and was sponsored by the ASTM International (ASTM). The purpose of the workshop was to identify the highest priority items for future standards work for scaffolds used in the development and manufacture of tissue engineered medical products (TEMPs). Eighteen speakers and 78 attendees met to assess current scaffold standards and to prioritize needs for future standards. A key finding was that the ASTM TEMPs subcommittees (F04.41-46) have many active "guide" documents for educational purposes, but few standard "test methods" or "practices." Overwhelmingly, the most clearly identified need was standards for measuring the structure of scaffolds, followed by standards for biological characterization, including in vitro testing, animal models and cell-material interactions. The third most pressing need was to develop standards for assessing the mechanical properties of scaffolds. Additional needs included standards for assessing scaffold degradation, clinical outcomes with scaffolds, effects of sterilization on scaffolds, scaffold composition, and drug release from scaffolds. Discussions highlighted the need for additional scaffold reference materials and the need to use them for measurement traceability. Workshop participants emphasized the need to promote the use of standards in scaffold fabrication, characterization, and commercialization. Finally, participants noted that standards would be more broadly accepted if their impact in the TEMPs community could be quantified. Many scaffold standard needs have been identified and focus is turning to generating these standards to support the use of scaffolds in TEMPs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. ASTM STANDARD GUIDE FOR EVALUATING DISPOSAL OPTIONS FOR REUSE OF CONCRETE FROM NUCLEAR FACILITY DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Ann Marie; Meservey, Richard H.

    2003-02-27

    Within the nuclear industry, many contaminated facilities that require decommissioning contain huge volumes of concrete. This concrete is generally disposed of as low-level waste at a high cost. Much of the concrete is lightly contaminated and could be reused as roadbed, fill material, or aggregate for new concrete, thus saving millions of dollars. However, because of the possibility of volumetric contamination and the lack of a method to evaluate the risks and costs of reusing concrete, reuse is rarely considered. To address this problem, Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory teamed to write a ''concrete protocol'' to help evaluate the ramifications of reusing concrete within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document, titled the Protocol for Development of Authorized Release Limits for Concrete at U.S. Department of Energy Site (1) is based on ANL-E's previously developed scrap metal recycle protocols; on the 10-step method outlined in DOE's draft handbook, Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material (2); and on DOE Order 4500.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (3). The DOE concrete protocol was the basis for the ASTM Standard Guide for Evaluating Disposal Options for Concrete from Nuclear Facility Decommissioning, which was written to make the information available to a wider audience outside DOE. The resulting ASTM Standard Guide is a more concise version that can be used by the nuclear industry worldwide to evaluate the risks and costs of reusing concrete from nuclear facility decommissioning. The bulk of the ASTM Standard Guide focuses on evaluating the dose and cost for each disposal option. The user calculates these from the detailed formulas and tabulated data provided, then compares the dose and cost for each disposal option to select the best option that meets regulatory requirements. With this information

  2. The ASTM viscosity index and other systems for classifying lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Zakarian, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    Even though the ASTM V.I. is based on an arbitrary and inconsistent series of reference oils, the system still persists as an industry standard to rate the viscosity-temperature characteristics of lubricating oils. There is need for an industry wide reassessment of the value of the V.I., particularly to answer the question, ''What does the V.I. measure.''. Before defining an alternative classification system, it is important to clearly formulate the problem and to realize that both relative and nonrealtive indices suffer from inherent assumptions and limitations, and that the choice of no rating index may be better than the choice of a misleading one.

  3. Impact of ASTM Standard E722 update on radiation damage metrics

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, Kendall Russell

    2014-06-01

    The impact of recent changes to the ASTM Standard E722 is investigated. The methodological changes in the production of the displacement kerma factors for silicon has significant impact for some energy regions of the 1-MeV(Si) equivalent fluence response function. When evaluating the integral over all neutrons energies in various spectra important to the SNL electronics testing community, the change in the response results in an increase in the total 1-MeV(Si) equivalent fluence of 2 7%. Response functions have been produced and are available for users of both the NuGET and MCNP codes.

  4. Data development for ASTM E24.06.02 round robin program on instability prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccabe, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Basis data for use in an ASTM E24.06.02 task group round robin activity was developed. Compact specimens were made of 2024-T351, 7075-T651 aluminum alloys, and 304 stainless steel. All were 12.7 mm thick and planar dimension variables incorporated were for 1T, 2T and 4T sizes. Representative raw data for each material and specimen size are contained herein. R-curves plotted in terms of delta a physical and delta a effective are plotted for each material.

  5. Glove powder's carrying capacity for latex protein: analysis using the ASTM ELISA test.

    PubMed

    Beezhold, D; Horton, K; Hickey, V; Daddona, J; Kostyal, D

    2003-01-01

    Glove donning powders carry latex proteins and disperse them into the workplace environment. We have used the ASTM D6499 ELISA to quantify the amount of latex antigen bound to and carried by glove powders. We could differentiate between a small amount of protein actually bound to the powders and a larger amount carried by the powder. Enhanced binding of a major allergen, Hev b 5, to the starch powders was demonstrated by Western blot. The D6499 ELISA is able to measure total latex antigen, soluble and powder bound, simultaneously without the need to centrifuge the samples.

  6. Application of ASTM E-1559 Apparatus to Study H2O Desorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael; Perry, Radford, III; Meadows, George A.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA James Webb Space Telescope project identified a need to measure water vapor desorption from cryogenic surfaces in order to validate predictions of spacecraft design performance. A review of available scientific literature indicated no such measurements had been reported below 131 K. Contamination control personnel at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center recognized the possibility they readily possessed the means to collect these measurements at lower temperatures using an existing apparatus commonly employed for making outgassing observations. This presentation will relate how the ASTM E-1559 Molekit apparatus was used without physical modification to measure water vapor sublimation down to 120 K and compare this data to existing equilibrium vapor pressure models.

  7. ASTM Photovoltaic Performance Standards: Their Use at the National Renewable Energy Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.

    2007-07-01

    The performance of photovoltaic devices is typically rated in terms of their peak power with respect to a specific spectrum, total irradiance and temperature. The PV Cell and Module Performance Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colo., has been measuring the performance of cells and modules for the U.S. terrestrial PV community since 1980. NREL typically calibrates 200 cells and modules per month. The laboratory follows the procedures described in ASTM International standards for calibrating its primary reference cells (E 1125), spectral responsivity measurements (E 1021), secondary reference cells (E 948), secondary modules (E 1036), concentrator modules (E 2527), and multi-junction cells and modules (E 2236).

  8. Assessment of wrought ASTM F1058 cobalt alloy properties for permanent surgical implants.

    PubMed

    Clerc, C O; Jedwab, M R; Mayer, D W; Thompson, P J; Stinson, J S

    1997-01-01

    The behavior of the ASTM F1058 wrought cobalt-chromium-nickel-molybdenum-iron alloy (commonly referred to as Elgiloy or Phynox) is evaluated in terms of mechanical properties, magnetic resonance imaging, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. The data found in the literature, the experimental corrosion and biocompatibility results presented in this article, and its long track record as an implant material demonstrate that the cobalt superalloy is an appropriate material for permanent surgical implants that require high yield strength and fatigue resistance combined with high elastic modulus, and that it can be safely imaged with magnetic resonance.

  9. Packaging Review Guide for Reviewing Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A; Biswas, D; DeMicco, M; Fisher, L E; Hafner, R; Haslam, J; Mok, G; Patel, C; Russell, E

    2007-04-12

    This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material. It fulfills, in part, the requirements of DOE Order 460.1B for the Headquarters Certifying Official to establish standards and to provide guidance for the preparation of Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings (SARPs). This PRG is intended for use by the Headquarters Certifying Official and his or her review staff, DOE Secretarial offices, operations/field offices, and applicants for DOE packaging approval. This PRG is generally organized at the section level in a format similar to that recommended in Regulatory Guide 7.9 (RG 7.9). One notable exception is the addition of Section 9 (Quality Assurance), which is not included as a separate chapter in RG 7.9. Within each section, this PRG addresses the technical and regulatory bases for the review, the manner in which the review is accomplished, and findings that are generally applicable for a package that meets the approval standards. This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for DOE review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material. It fulfills, in part, the requirements of DOE O 460.1B for the Headquarters Certifying Official to establish standards and to provide guidance for the preparation of Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings (SARPs). This PRG is intended for use by the Headquarters Certifying Official and his review staff, DOE Secretarial offices, operations/field offices, and applicants for DOE packaging approval. The primary objectives of this PRG are to: (1) Summarize the regulatory requirements for package approval; (2) Describe the technical review procedures by which DOE determines that these requirements have been satisfied; (3) Establish and maintain the quality and uniformity of reviews; (4) Define the base from which to evaluate proposed changes in scope

  10. Permeation of 70% isopropyl alcohol through surgical gloves: comparison of the standard methods ASTM F739 and EN 374.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Erja A; Vainiotalo, Sinikka; Peltonen, Kimmo

    2003-06-01

    Standard test methods ASTM F739 and EN 374 were compared by assessing the permeation of 70% isopropyl alcohol (2-propanol) through seven brands of surgical gloves. The two standards differ in the flow rates of the collection medium and in the chemical permeation rate at which the breakthrough time (BTT) is detected, the EN detection level being 10 times higher than the permeation rate used by ASTM. In a departure from the EN standard method, a 4 h testing time was used instead of 8 h. All of the tested gloves were from the same manufacturer and were made from either natural rubber (NR) (six brands) or chloroprene rubber (CR) (one brand). Two of the NR glove brands were double layered. For the thin NR gloves (0.22, 0.28 and 0.27 mm) the permeation rates were higher throughout the tests with a flow rate of 474 ml/min (EN) of the collection medium (nitrogen) compared with the permeation rates obtained with a flow rate of 52 ml/min (ASTM). These resulted in BTTs of 4.6, 6.5 and 7.6 min (EN) and 4.8, 6.5 and 9.1 min (ASTM), respectively. No statistical difference could be observed between the BTT values obtained with the two standard methods for any of the thin gloves. Thus, although the ASTM standard has a lower criterion for the detection of permeation, it does not necessarily produce shorter BTTs. For the better barriers the methods yielded more equivalent permeation rate curves and thus the EN BTTs were longer than the ASTM BTTs: the EN results were 21, 80, 122 and >240 min compared with the ASTM results of 12, 32, 38 and 103 min for glove thicknesses of 0.37 (NR), 0.22 + 0.22 (double layered NR), 0.31 + 0.29 (double layered NR) and 0.19 mm (CR), respectively.

  11. Development of an Automated Testing System for ASTM Test Method E1007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scinto, Jennifer

    The use of a tapping machine in four specific configurations is required in the determination of the FIIC rating of a floor-ceiling assembly as prescribed in ASTM Test Method E1007, as well as in the laboratory IIC measurements prescribed in ASTM E492. When performed with presently available equipment, the procedure requires either two acousticians be present--one taking measurements in the room below while the other moves the tapping machine to four required positions in the room above--or one acoustician who must return to the tapping machine on the floor above after taking each measurement below. The objective of this work is to design an automated testing system using National Instruments myRIO robotics components to be retrofitted to an existing tapping machine. This allows for wireless control of the position of the tapping machine from the floor below, allowing a single acoustician to perform the test more quickly. The prototype was tested for accuracy with varying levels of weight and the positional error was measured using an on-board webcam. Overall, the error in the movement of the prototype is not statistically significant (alpha = 0.05), indicating little sensitivity of the system to changes in weight, but requires future work for further increased accuracy.

  12. Effect of casting parameters on the microstructure of ASTM F-75 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mancha, H.; Castro, M.; Mendez, M.; Mendez, J.; Cepeda, F.

    1996-10-01

    Hip replacement implants fabricated from the ASTM F-75 alloy sometimes fail in a sudden catastrophic way. In general, fractures start at microstructural defects subjected to stress-corrosion under chemical attack by body fluids. In this paper the results of a study on the effect of casting parameters on the microstructure of ASTM F-75 alloy are presented. The pre-heating mold and the liquid temperatures were varied between 900 and 1,000 C, and 1,410 and 1,470 C, respectively. The best static strength and ductility were obtained when shrinkage microporosity and the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} eutectic carbides precipitation at grain boundaries were minimized by increasing the pre-heating mold temperature up to 1,000 C and keeping intermediate pouring temperatures at 1,455 C. Under these casting conditions, however, the solidification rates are low leading to large grain sizes which reduce the strength of the material under dynamic loading conditions. The volume fraction of the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} blocky carbides, appears to have a small variation with casting conditions, however, their size and space distributions seem to be very important to determine the mechanical properties of the as-cast alloys.

  13. Low-energy photon spectroscopy data in support of ASTM method development

    SciTech Connect

    Dry, D. E.; Boone, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry (C-INC) Radioassay Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been in operation since 1948 to measure fission-product and actinide activities from the U.S. weapons testing program. Since the cessation of testing in 1992, the facility has remained in continuous operation by analyzing samples for environmental, bioassay and research projects. In addition to the many gamma spectroscopy systems, two independent planar germanium detectors are employed for measurement of x-rays and low-energy gsunma rays. 'These counters were used to collect data of select isotopes to support the development of a new ASTM standard, 'Standard Practice for High-Resolution Low-Energy Photon Spectrometry of Water'. This standard is being developed by ASTM Subcommittee D19.04 as a tool for measurement of low-energy gamma-rays and x-rays fiom approximately 4 keV to 150 keV. This work describes empirical counting results obtained fkom traceable sources covering the energy range of interest. Specifically, the isotopes used were 5%i, 55Fe, Am, I, Cd, and 57C0 which provide a range of 5.9 to 136 keV. Mixed nuclide sources were also counted for the purpose of providing data for coincidence summing effects. All data is presented in hardcopy and accompanying electronic form.

  14. Improved ASTM G72 Test Method for Ensuring Adequate Fuel-to-Oxidizer Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harper, Susana A.

    2016-01-01

    The ASTM G72/G72M-15 Standard Test Method for Autogenous Ignition Temperature of Liquids and Solids in a High-Pressure Oxygen-Enriched Environment is currently used to evaluate materials for the ignition susceptibility driven by exposure to external heat in an enriched oxygen environment. Testing performed on highly volatile liquids such as cleaning solvents has proven problematic due to inconsistent test results (non-ignitions). Non-ignition results can be misinterpreted as favorable oxygen compatibility, although they are more likely associated with inadequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios. Forced evaporation during purging and inadequate sample size were identified as two potential causes for inadequate available sample material during testing. In an effort to maintain adequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios within the reaction vessel during test, several parameters were considered, including sample size, pretest sample chilling, pretest purging, and test pressure. Tests on a variety of solvents exhibiting a range of volatilities are presented in this paper. A proposed improvement to the standard test protocol as a result of this evaluation is also presented. Execution of the final proposed improved test protocol outlines an incremental step method of determining optimal conditions using increased sample sizes while considering test system safety limits. The proposed improved test method increases confidence in results obtained by utilizing the ASTM G72 autogenous ignition temperature test method and can aid in the oxygen compatibility assessment of highly volatile liquids and other conditions that may lead to false non-ignition results.

  15. Improved ASTM G72 Test Method for Ensuring Adequate Fuel-to-Oxidizer Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harper, Susana Tapia

    2016-01-01

    The ASTM G72/G72M-15 Standard Test Method for Autogenous Ignition Temperature of Liquids and Solids in a High-Pressure Oxygen-Enriched Environment is currently used to evaluate materials for the ignition susceptibility driven by exposure to external heat in an enriched oxygen environment. Testing performed on highly volatile liquids such as cleaning solvents has proven problematic due to inconsistent test results (non-ignitions). Non-ignition results can be misinterpreted as favorable oxygen compatibility, although they are more likely associated with inadequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios. Forced evaporation during purging and inadequate sample size were identified as two potential causes for inadequate available sample material during testing. In an effort to maintain adequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios within the reaction vessel during test, several parameters were considered, including sample size, pretest sample chilling, pretest purging, and test pressure. Tests on a variety of solvents exhibiting a range of volatilities are presented in this paper. A proposed improvement to the standard test protocol as a result of this evaluation is also presented. Execution of the final proposed improved test protocol outlines an incremental step method of determining optimal conditions using increased sample sizes while considering test system safety limits. The proposed improved test method increases confidence in results obtained by utilizing the ASTM G72 autogenous ignition temperature test method and can aid in the oxygen compatibility assessment of highly volatile liquids and other conditions that may lead to false non-ignition results.

  16. Cavitation erosion - corrosion behaviour of ASTM A27 runner steel in natural river water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tôn-Thât, L.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation erosion is still one of the most important degradation modes in hydraulic turbine runners. Part of researches in this field focuses on finding new materials, coatings and surface treatments to improve the resistance properties of runners to this phenomenon. However, only few studies are focused on the deleterious effect of the environment. Actually, in some cases a synergistic effect between cavitation erosion mechanisms and corrosion kinetics can establish and increase erosion rate. In the present study, the cavitation erosion-corrosion behaviour of ASTM A27 steel in natural river water is investigated. This paper state the approach which has been used to enlighten the synergy between both phenomena. For this, a 20 kHz vibratory test according ASTM G32 standard is coupled to an electrochemical cell to be able to follow the different corrosion parameters during the tests to get evidence of the damaging mechanism. Moreover, mass losses have been followed during the exposure time. The classical degradation parameters (cumulative weight loss and erosion rate) are determined. Furthermore, a particular effort has been implemented to determine the evolution of surface damages in terms of pitting, surface cracking, material removal and surface corrosion. For this, scanning electron microscopy has been used to link the microstructure to the material removal mechanisms.

  17. ASTM clustering for improving coal analysis by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Andrés, J M; Bona, M T

    2006-11-15

    Multivariate analysis techniques have been applied to near-infrared (NIR) spectra coals to investigate the relationship between nine coal properties (moisture (%), ash (%), volatile matter (%), fixed carbon (%), heating value (kcal/kg), carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%) and sulphur (%)) and the corresponding predictor variables. In this work, a whole set of coal samples was grouped into six more homogeneous clusters following the ASTM reference method for classification prior to the application of calibration methods to each coal set. The results obtained showed a considerable improvement of the error determination compared with the calibration for the whole sample set. For some groups, the established calibrations approached the quality required by the ASTM/ISO norms for laboratory analysis. To predict property values for a new coal sample it is necessary the assignation of that sample to its respective group. Thus, the discrimination and classification ability of coal samples by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) in the NIR range was also studied by applying Soft Independent Modelling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) techniques. Modelling of the groups by SIMCA led to overlapping models that cannot discriminate for unique classification. On the other hand, the application of Linear Discriminant Analysis improved the classification of the samples but not enough to be satisfactory for every group considered.

  18. Relation between the national handbook of recommended methods for water data acquisition and ASTM standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glysson, G. Douglas; Skinner, John V.

    1991-01-01

    In the late 1950's, intense demands for water and growing concerns about declines in the quality of water generated the need for more water-resources data. About thirty Federal agencies, hundreds of State, county and local agencies, and many private organizations had been collecting water data. However, because of differences in procedures and equipment, many of the data bases were incompatible. In 1964, as a step toward establishing more uniformity, the Bureau of the Budget (now the Office of Management and Budget, OMB) issued 'Circular A-67' which presented guidelines for collecting water data and also served as a catalyst for creating the Office of Water Data Coordination (OWDC) within the U.S. Geological Survey. This paper discusses past, present, and future aspects of the relation between methods in the National Handbook and standards published by ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) Committee D-19 on Water's Subcommittee D-19.07 on Sediment, Geomorphology, and Open Channel Flow. The discussion also covers historical aspects of standards - development work jointly conducted by OWDC and ASTM.

  19. Relationship between microstructure and ductility of investment cast ASTM F-75 implant alloy.

    PubMed

    Gómez, M; Mancha, H; Salinas, A; Rodríguez, J L; Escobedo, J; Castro, M; Méndez, M

    1997-02-01

    Hip replacement implants fabricated using the ASTM F-75 alloy sometimes fail in a sudden catastrophic way. In general, fractures start at microstructural defects subjected to stress-corrosion under chemical attack by body fluids. In this paper the results of a study on the effect of casting parameters on the microstructure of ASTM F-75 are presented. The preheating mold temperature and the liquid temperature were varied between 900 and 1000 degrees C, and 1410 and 1470 degrees C, respectively. Optimum static strength and ductility were obtained when shrinkage microporosity and the volume fraction of M23C6 "eutectic" carbides precipitated at grain boundaries were minimized by increasing the preheating mold temperature to 1000 degrees C and by using intermediate pouring temperatures of 1455 degrees C. Under these casting conditions, however, the solidification rates are low, leading to large grain sizes, which, in turn, reduce the strength of the material under dynamic loading conditions. The volume fraction of the M23C6 "blocky" carbides appears to be independent of the casting conditions; however, their size and spatial distributions determine the strength of the as-cast alloys.

  20. PRIDE Surveillance Projects Data Packaging Project, Information Package Specification Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, D.M.; Shipp, R. L.; Mason, J. D.

    2009-09-28

    This document contains a specification for a standard XML document format called an information package that can be used to store information and the context required to understand and use that information in information management systems and other types of information archives. An information package consists of packaged information, a set of information metadata that describes the packaged information, and an XML signature that protects the packaged information. The information package described in this specification was designed to be used to store Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) information and includes the metadata required for that information: a unique package identifier, information marking that conforms to DOE and NNSA requirements, and access control metadata. Information package metadata can also include information search terms, package history, and notes. Packaged information can be text content, binary content, and the contents of files and other containers. A single information package can contain multiple types of information. All content not in a text form compatible with XML must be in a text encoding such as base64. Package information is protected by a digital XML signature that can be used to determine whether the information has changed since it was signed and to identify the source of the information. This specification has been tested but has not been used to create production information packages. The authors expect that gaps and unclear requirements in this specification will be identified as this specification is used to create information packages and as information stored in information packages is used. The authors expect to issue revised versions of this specification as needed to address these issues.

  1. Chronic ankle pain and fibrosis successfully treated with a new noninvasive augmented soft tissue mobilization technique (ASTM): a case report.

    PubMed

    Melham, T J; Sevier, T L; Malnofski, M J; Wilson, J K; Helfst, R H

    1998-06-01

    This clinical case report demonstrates the clinical effectiveness of a new form of soft tissue mobilization in the treatment of excessive connective tissue fibrosis (scar tissue) around an athlete's injured ankle. The scar tissue was causing the athlete to have pain with activity, pain on palpation of the ankle, decreased range of motion, and loss of function. Surgery and several months of conventional physical therapy failed to alleviate the athlete's symptoms. As a final resort, augmented soft tissue mobilization (ASTM) was administered. ASTM is an alternative nonsurgical treatment modality that is being researched at Performance Dynamics (Muncip, IN). ASTM is a process that uses ergonomically designed instruments that assist therapists in the rapid localization and effective treatment of areas exhibiting excessive soft tissue fibrosis. This is followed by a stretching and strengthening program. Upon the completion of 6 wk of ASTM therapy, the athlete had no pain and had regained full range of motion and function. This case report is an example of how a noninvasive augmented form of soft tissue mobilization (ASTM) demonstrated impressive clinical results in treating a condition caused by connective tissue fibrosis.

  2. Packaging of MEMS microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiertag, Gregor; Winter, Matthias; Leidl, Anton

    2009-05-01

    To miniaturize MEMS microphones we have developed a microphone package using flip chip technology instead of chip and wire bonding. In this new packaging technology MEMS and ASIC are flip chip bonded on a ceramic substrate. The package is sealed by a laminated polymer foil and by a metal layer. The sound port is on the bottom side in the ceramic substrate. In this paper the packaging technology is explained in detail and results of electro-acoustic characterization and reliability testing are presented. We will also explain the way which has led us from the packaging of Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) components to the packaging of MEMS microphones.

  3. Packaging for Food Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stilwell, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Most of the key areas of concern in packaging the three principle food forms for the space station were covered. It can be generally concluded that there are no significant voids in packaging materials availability or in current packaging technology. However, it must also be concluded that the process by which packaging decisions are made for the space station feeding program will be very synergistic. Packaging selection will depend heavily on the preparation mechanics, the preferred presentation and the achievable disposal systems. It will be important that packaging be considered as an integral part of each decision as these systems are developed.

  4. Packaging for Food Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stilwell, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Most of the key areas of concern in packaging the three principle food forms for the space station were covered. It can be generally concluded that there are no significant voids in packaging materials availability or in current packaging technology. However, it must also be concluded that the process by which packaging decisions are made for the space station feeding program will be very synergistic. Packaging selection will depend heavily on the preparation mechanics, the preferred presentation and the achievable disposal systems. It will be important that packaging be considered as an integral part of each decision as these systems are developed.

  5. General-Purpose Ada Software Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, Allan R.

    1991-01-01

    Collection of subprograms brings to Ada many features from other programming languages. All generic packages designed to be easily instantiated for types declared in user's facility. Most packages have widespread applicability, although some oriented for avionics applications. All designed to facilitate writing new software in Ada. Written on IBM/AT personal computer running under PC DOS, v.3.1.

  6. Packaging - Materials review

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Matthias

    2014-06-16

    Nowadays, a large number of different electrochemical energy storage systems are known. In the last two decades the development was strongly driven by a continuously growing market of portable electronic devices (e.g. cellular phones, lap top computers, camcorders, cameras, tools). Current intensive efforts are under way to develop systems for automotive industry within the framework of electrically propelled mobility (e.g. hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, full electric vehicles) and also for the energy storage market (e.g. electrical grid stability, renewable energies). Besides the different systems (cell chemistries), electrochemical cells and batteries were developed and are offered in many shapes, sizes and designs, in order to meet performance and design requirements of the widespread applications. Proper packaging is thereby one important technological step for designing optimum, reliable and safe batteries for operation. In this contribution, current packaging approaches of cells and batteries together with the corresponding materials are discussed. The focus is laid on rechargeable systems for industrial applications (i.e. alkaline systems, lithium-ion, lead-acid). In principle, four different cell types (shapes) can be identified - button, cylindrical, prismatic and pouch. Cell size can be either in accordance with international (e.g. International Electrotechnical Commission, IEC) or other standards or can meet application-specific dimensions. Since cell housing or container, terminals and, if necessary, safety installations as inactive (non-reactive) materials reduce energy density of the battery, the development of low-weight packages is a challenging task. In addition to that, other requirements have to be fulfilled: mechanical stability and durability, sealing (e.g. high permeation barrier against humidity for lithium-ion technology), high packing efficiency, possible installation of safety devices (current interrupt device

  7. Packaging - Materials review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, a large number of different electrochemical energy storage systems are known. In the last two decades the development was strongly driven by a continuously growing market of portable electronic devices (e.g. cellular phones, lap top computers, camcorders, cameras, tools). Current intensive efforts are under way to develop systems for automotive industry within the framework of electrically propelled mobility (e.g. hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, full electric vehicles) and also for the energy storage market (e.g. electrical grid stability, renewable energies). Besides the different systems (cell chemistries), electrochemical cells and batteries were developed and are offered in many shapes, sizes and designs, in order to meet performance and design requirements of the widespread applications. Proper packaging is thereby one important technological step for designing optimum, reliable and safe batteries for operation. In this contribution, current packaging approaches of cells and batteries together with the corresponding materials are discussed. The focus is laid on rechargeable systems for industrial applications (i.e. alkaline systems, lithium-ion, lead-acid). In principle, four different cell types (shapes) can be identified - button, cylindrical, prismatic and pouch. Cell size can be either in accordance with international (e.g. International Electrotechnical Commission, IEC) or other standards or can meet application-specific dimensions. Since cell housing or container, terminals and, if necessary, safety installations as inactive (non-reactive) materials reduce energy density of the battery, the development of low-weight packages is a challenging task. In addition to that, other requirements have to be fulfilled: mechanical stability and durability, sealing (e.g. high permeation barrier against humidity for lithium-ion technology), high packing efficiency, possible installation of safety devices (current interrupt device

  8. CRRES Microelectronics Test Package (MEP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, E. G.; Ray, K. P.

    1993-04-01

    The Microelectronics Test Package (MEP) flown on board the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) contained over 60 device types and approximately 400 total devices which were tested for both single event upset (SEU) and total dose (parametric degradation and annealing). A description of the experiment, the method of testing devices, and the structure of data acquisition are presented. Sample flight data are shown. These included SEUs from a GaAs 1 K RAM during the March 1991 solar flare, and a comparison between passive shielding and a specially designed spot shielding package.

  9. CRRES microelectronics test package (MEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, E.G.; Ray, K.P. )

    1993-04-01

    The Microelectronics Test Package (MEP) flown on board the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) contained over 60 device types and approximately 400 total devices which were tested for both single event upset (SEU) and total dose (parametric degradation and annealing). A description of the experiment, the method of testing devices, and the structure of data acquisition are presented. Sample flight data are shown. These included SEUs from a GaAs 1 K RAM during the March 1991 solar flare, and a comparison between passive shielding and a specially designed spot shielding package.

  10. An Arbitrary Precision Computation Package

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-14

    This package permits a scientist to perform computations using an arbitrarily high level of numeric precision (the equivalent of hundreds or even thousands of digits), by making only minor changes to conventional C++ or Fortran-90 soruce code. This software takes advantage of certain properties of IEEE floating-point arithmetic, together with advanced numeric algorithms, custom data types and operator overloading. Also included in this package is the "Experimental Mathematician's Toolkit", which incorporates many of these facilities into an easy-to-use interactive program.

  11. Natural biopolimers in organic food packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczynska, Justyna; Cavoski, Ivana; Chami, Ziad Al; Mondelli, Donato; Di Donato, Paola; Di Terlizzi, Biagio

    2014-05-01

    Concerns on environmental and waste problems caused by use of non-biodegradable and non-renewable based plastic packaging have caused an increase interest in developing biodegradable packaging using renewable natural biopolymers. Recently, different types of biopolymers like starch, cellulose, chitosan, casein, whey protein, collagen, egg white, soybean protein, corn zein, gelatin and wheat gluten have attracted considerable attention as potential food packaging materials. Recyclable or biodegradable packaging material in organic processing standards is preferable where possible but specific principles of packaging are not precisely defined and standards have to be assessed. There is evidence that consumers of organic products have specific expectations not only with respect to quality characteristics of processed food but also in social and environmental aspects of food production. Growing consumer sophistication is leading to a proliferation in food eco-label like carbon footprint. Biopolymers based packaging for organic products can help to create a green industry. Moreover, biopolymers can be appropriate materials for the development of an active surfaces designed to deliver incorporated natural antimicrobials into environment surrounding packaged food. Active packaging is an innovative mode of packaging in which the product and the environment interact to prolong shelf life or enhance safety or sensory properties, while maintaining the quality of the product. The work will discuss the various techniques that have been used for development of an active antimicrobial biodegradable packaging materials focusing on a recent findings in research studies. With the current focus on exploring a new generation of biopolymer-based food packaging materials with possible applications in organic food packaging. Keywords: organic food, active packaging, biopolymers , green technology

  12. Standard test method for airborne asbestos concentration in ambient and indoor atmospheres as determined by transmission electron microscopy direct transfer (TEM). ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-22 on Sampling and Analysis of Atmospheres and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D22.07 on Asbestos. Current edition approved Jul. 10, 1998. Published October 1998. Copyright American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428, USA. This document is available from NTIS under license from ASTM.

  13. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-13

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the CH Packaging Drum payload assembly, Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly, Abnormal Operations and ICV and OCV Preshipment Leakage Rate Tests on the packaging seals, using a nondestructive Helium (He) Leak Test.

  14. Creative Thinking Package

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Clive

    1972-01-01

    A look at the latest package from a British managment training organization, which explains and demonstrates creative thinking techniques, including brainstorming. The package, designed for groups of twelve or more, consists of tapes, visuals, and associated exercises. (Editor/JB)

  15. Comparative Packaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele; Antonini, David

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a comparative packaging study for use on long duration space missions. The topics include: 1) Purpose; 2) Deliverables; 3) Food Sample Selection; 4) Experimental Design Matrix; 5) Permeation Rate Comparison; and 6) Packaging Material Information.

  16. Efficacy of UV-C irradiation for inactivation of food-borne pathogens on sliced cheese packaged with different types and thicknesses of plastic films.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jae-Won; Back, Kyeong-Hwan; Kim, Yoon-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the efficacy of using UV-C light to inactivate sliced cheese inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes and, packaged with 0.07 mm films of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyvinylchloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), and polyethylene (PE) was investigated. The results show that compared with PET and PVC, PP and PE films showed significantly reduced levels of the three pathogens compared to inoculated but non-treated controls. Therefore, PP and PE films of different thicknesses (0.07 mm, 0.10 mm, and 0.13 mm) were then evaluated for pathogen reduction of inoculated sliced cheese samples. Compared with 0.10 and 0.13 mm, 0.07 mm thick PP and PE films did not show statistically significant reductions compared to non-packaged treated samples. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences between the efficacy of PP and PE films. These results suggest that adjusted PP or PE film packaging in conjunction with UV-C radiation can be applied to control foodborne pathogens in the dairy industry.

  17. ASTM standard recommended guide on application of ENDF/A cross section and uncertainty file: establishment of the file

    SciTech Connect

    Lippincott, E.P.; McElroy, W.N.

    1981-10-01

    A new ASTM Standard Recommended Guide on Application of ENDF/A Cross Section and Uncertainty File is in preparation by ASTM Committee E10 on Nuclear Technology and Applications. This ASTM Standard is being prepared in support of the standardization of physics-dosimetry procedures and data needed for Light Water Reactor (LWR) power plant pressure vessel and support structure materials surveillance and test reactor development programs. The main subject of this paper is the estabilishment of the ENDF/A Cross Section and Uncertainty File. The development of evaluated cross section files such as the evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF/B, has occurred mainly to meet the needs of physics calculators. These files are tested by calculations of well-measured benchmark problems such as reactivity or critical mass measurements. Data in the files have then been re-evaluated where disagreements with the benchmark measurements indicate data to be deficient.

  18. ADVANCED ELECTRONIC PACKAGING TECHNIQUES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MICROMINIATURIZATION (ELECTRONICS), *PACKAGED CIRCUITS, CIRCUITS, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, MANUFACTURING, NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING, RESISTANCE (ELECTRICAL), SEMICONDUCTORS, TESTS, THIN FILMS (STORAGE DEVICES), WELDING.

  19. Comparing Aperture Photometry Software Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, V.; Khandrika, H.

    2017-04-01

    Multiple software packages exist to perform aperture photometry on HST data. Three of the most used softwares are the Python package PhotUtils, the IDL function APER, and the IRAF/PyRAF package DAOPHOT. The results produced by DAOPHOT are slightly incorrect, at approximately 0.1% too large for WFC3/IR images measured with a 3-pixel aperture (PhotUtils and APER produce the correct results). The magnitude of the DAOPHOT discrepancy is dependent on the type of source and filter used (as this impacts the PSF) due to DAOPHOT's approximation of a circle as a slightly larger irregular polygon. We present a quantification of this error for WFC3/IR data, though the analysis is applicable for any small-aperture photometry.

  20. Effectiveness of some recent antimicrobial packaging concepts.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, L; Devlieghere, F; Debevere, J

    2002-01-01

    A new type of active packaging is the combination of food-packaging materials with antimicrobial substances to control microbial surface contamination of foods. For both migrating and non-migrating antimicrobial materials, intensive contact between the food product and packaging material is required and therefore potential food applications include especially vacuum or skin-packaged products, e.g. vacuum-packaged meat, fish, poultry or cheese. Several antimicrobial compounds have been combined with different types of carriers (plastic and rubber articles, paper-based materials, textile fibrils and food-packaging materials). Until now, however, few antimicrobial concepts have found applications as a food-packaging material. Antimicrobial packaging materials cannot legally be used in the EU at the moment. The potential use would require amendments of several different legal texts involving areas such as food additives, food packaging, hygiene, etc. The main objective of this paper is to provide a state of the art about the different types of antimicrobial concepts, their experimental development and commercialization, and to present a case study summarizing the results of investigations on the feasibility of a low-density polyethylene (LDPE)-film containing triclosan to inhibit microbial growth on food surfaces and consequently prolong shelf-life or improve microbial food safety. In contrast with the strong antimicrobial effect in in-vitro simulated vacuum-packaged conditions against the psychrotrophic food pathogen L. monocytogenes, the 1000 mg kg(-1) containing triclosan film did not effectively reduce spoilage bacteria and growth of L. monocytogenes on refrigerated vacuum-packaged chicken breasts stored at 7 degrees C.

  1. Nanocellulose in green food packaging.

    PubMed

    Vilarinho, Fernanda; Sanches Silva, Ana; Vaz, M Fátima; Farinha, José Paulo

    2017-01-26

    The development of packaging materials with new functionalities and lower environmental impact is now an urgent need of our society. On one hand, the shelf-life extension of packaged products can be an answer to the exponential increase of worldwide demand for food. On the other hand, uncertainty of crude oil prices and reserves has imposed the necessity to find raw materials to replace oil-derived polymers. Additionally, consumers' awareness toward environmental issues increasingly pushes industries to look with renewed interest to "green" solutions. In response to these issues, numerous polymers have been exploited to develop biodegradable food packaging materials. Although the use of biopolymers has been limited due to their poor mechanical and barrier properties, these can be enhanced by adding reinforcing nanosized components to form nanocomposites. Cellulose is probably the most used and well-known renewable and sustainable raw material. The mechanical properties, reinforcing capabilities, abundance, low density, and biodegradability of nanosized cellulose make it an ideal candidate for polymer nanocomposites processing. Here we review the potential applications of cellulose based nanocomposites in food packaging materials, highlighting the several types of biopolymers with nanocellulose fillers that have been used to form bio-nanocomposite materials. The trends in nanocellulose packaging applications are also addressed.

  2. Trends in Food Packaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Dana B.

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses developments in food packaging, processing, and preservation techniques in terms of packaging materials, technologies, consumer benefits, and current and potential food product applications. Covers implications due to consumer life-style changes, cost-effectiveness of packaging materials, and the ecological impact of…

  3. Effect of Heat Treatment on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Four Different Heats of ASTM A710 Steel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    HEAT TREATMENT ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES t AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF FOUR DIFFERENT HEATS OF ASTM A710 STEEL by G.E. Hicho, C.H. Brady, L.C. Smith, and...Properties and Microstructure of Four Different Heats of ASTM A710 Steel I.E Hicho, C.H. Brady, L.C. Smith and R.J. Fields (" REPORT 13lb TIM E COVERED 14DATE...necessary and Identify by block number) iD GROUP SUBGROUP A710 HSLA Steel Heat Treatment Tensile Properties Grain Size Impact Properties Frnr-ngrphy Mi

  4. Comparison of combustion characteristics of ASTM A-1, propane, and natural-gas fuels in an annular turbojet combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wear, J. D.; Jones, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of an annular turbojet combustor using natural-gas fuel is compared with that obtained using ASTM A-1 and propane fuels. Propane gas was used to simulate operation with vaporized kerosene fuels. The results obtained at severe operating conditions and altitude relight conditions show that natural gas is inferior to both ASTM A-1 and propane fuels. Combustion efficiencies were significantly lower and combustor pressures for relight were higher with natural-gas fuel than with the other fuels. The inferior performance of natural gas is shown to be caused by the chemical stability of the methane molecule.

  5. Comparisons of ASTM standards cited in the NRC standard review plan, NUREG-0800 and related documents

    SciTech Connect

    Ankrum, A.R.; Bohlander, K.L.; Gilbert, E.R.; Pawlowski, R.A.; Spiesman, J.B.

    1995-10-01

    This report provides the results of comparisons of the cited and latest versions of ASTM standards cited in the NRC Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants (NUREG 0800) and related documents. The comparisons were performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories in support of the NRC`s Standard Review Plan Update and Development Program. Significant changes to the standards, from the cited version to the latest version, are described and discussed in a tabular format for each standard. Recommendations for updating each citation in the Standard Review Plan are presented. Technical considerations and suggested changes are included for related regulatory documents (i.e., Regulatory Guides and the Code of Federal Regulations) citing the standard. The results and recommendations presented in this document have not been subjected to NRC staff review.

  6. Development of ASTM standards in support of advanced ceramics -- continuing efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.

    1998-02-01

    An update is presented of the activities of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Committee C-28 on Advanced Ceramics. Since its inception in 1986, this committee, which has five standard producing subcommittees, has written and published over 32 consensus standards. These standards are concerned with mechanical testing of monolithic and composite ceramics, nondestructive examination, statistical analysis and design, powder characterization, quantitative microscopy, fractography, and terminology. These standards ensure optimum material behavior with physical and mechanical property reproducibility, component reliability, and well-defined methods of data treatment and material analysis for both monolithic and composite materials. Committee C-28 continues to sponsor technical symposia and to cooperate in the development of international standards. An update of recent and current activities as well as possible new areas of standardization work will be presented.

  7. Standards for surface analysis: ASTM committee E-42 on surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czanderna, A. W.

    2003-07-01

    Surface analysis is of critical importance to most of the Divisions of the American Vacuum Society and has been one of the most dynamic scientific and technological growth areas for the last 30 yr. The ASTM Committee E-42 on Surface Analysis was formed in 1976 to help advance the quality of surface analysis by developing appropriate standards (reference materials, reference data, and reference procedures), and by leading round robin comparisons, preparing publications, and holding symposia and workshops. A major function of the committee has been the development of standards and reference procedures. This article is a description of the organization of Committee E-42, and a summary of recent activities by this volunteer group with an emphasis on the processes used, a description of standards published, and standards that are being developed by Committee E-42 and other international organizations.

  8. A study of the safety of the ASTM D5304 oxygen overpressure stability test

    SciTech Connect

    White, E.W.; Flohr, K.W.

    1995-04-01

    While the test method for assessing distillate fuel storage stability by oxygen overpressure was being evaluated as a potential ASTM standard, a question of its safety was raised, specifically whether the juxta-position of liquid fuel and oxygen at elevated pressure could lead to explosive self ignition. As a consequence, the authors conducted a literature search followed by a small experimental program. The results of those studies show that the temperature and pressure used in Test Method D5304 are probably safely below the conditions that would lead to autoignition of normal middle distillate fuels. However, middle distillate fuels of unknown or unusual sources, or containing additives, e.g. ignition improvers, should be screened before evaluating their stability by Test Method D5304.

  9. Stress analysis of the cracked-lap-shear specimen - An ASTM round-robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1987-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  10. Designing cathodic protection systems for marine structures and vehicles. ASTM special technical publication 1370

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, H.P.

    1999-07-01

    Cathodic protection is an important method of protecting structures and ships from the corrosive effects of seawater. Poor designs can be far more costly to implement than optimal designs, Improper design can cause overprotection, with resulting paint blistering and accelerated corrosion of some alloys, underprotection, with resultant structure corrosion, or stray current corrosion of nearby structures. The first ASTM symposium specifically aimed at cathodic protection in seawater was intended to compile all the criteria and philosophy for designing both sacrificial and impressed current cathodic protection systems for structures and vehicles in seawater. The papers which are included in this STP are significant in that they summarize the major seawater cathodic protection system design philosophies. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  11. Dynamic Fracture Initiation Toughness of ASTM A533, Grade B Steel Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, S.M.; Link, R.E.

    1999-05-01

    The dynamic fracture toughness of an ASTM A533, Grade B steel plate was determined at several temperatures in the ductile-brittle transition region. Crack-tip loading rates ranged from approximately 10(sup3) to 10(sup5) MPa m/s. The fracture toughness was shown to decrease with increased loading rate. The dynamic fracture toughness was compared with results from previous investigations, and it was shown that the decrease in toughness due to increased loading rate at the highest test temperature was not as severe as reported in previous investigations. It was also shown that the reference temperature. T(sub0) was better index of the fracture toughness vs. temperature relationship than the nil-ductility temperature, RT(subNDT), for this material.

  12. Effect of crack curvature on stress intensity factors for ASTM standard compact tension specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alam, J.; Mendelson, A.

    1983-01-01

    The stress intensity factors (SIF) are calculated using the method of lines for the compact tension specimen in tensile and shear loading for curved crack fronts. For the purely elastic case, it was found that as the crack front curvature increases, the SIF value at the center of the specimen decreases while increasing at the surface. For the higher values of crack front curvatures, the maximum value of the SIF occurs at an interior point located adjacent to the surface. A thickness average SIF was computed for parabolically applied shear loading. These results were used to assess the requirements of ASTM standards E399-71 and E399-81 on the shape of crack fronts. The SIF is assumed to reflect the average stress environment near the crack edge.

  13. Stress analysis of the cracked-lap-shear specimen - An ASTM round-robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1987-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  14. Enabling joint commission medication reconciliation objectives with the HL7 / ASTM Continuity of Care Document standard.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Robert H; Giannone, Gay; Schadow, Gunther

    2007-10-11

    We sought to determine how well the HL7/ASTM Continuity of Care Document (CCD) standard supports the requirements underlying the Joint Commission medication reconciliation recommendations. In particular, the Joint Commission emphasizes that transition points in the continuum of care are vulnerable to communication breakdowns, and that these breakdowns are a common source of medication errors. These transition points are the focus of communication standards, suggesting that CCD can support and enable medication related patient safety initiatives. Data elements needed to support the Joint Commission recommendations were identified and mapped to CCD, and a detailed clinical scenario was constructed. The mapping identified minor gaps, and identified fields present in CCD not specifically identified by Joint Commission, but useful nonetheless when managing medications across transitions of care, suggesting that a closer collaboration between the Joint Commission and standards organizations will be mutually beneficial. The nationally recognized CCD specification provides a standards-based solution for enabling Joint Commission medication reconciliation objectives.

  15. Stress analysis of the cracked lap shear specimens: An ASTM round robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  16. Enabling Joint Commission Medication Reconciliation Objectives with the HL7 / ASTM Continuity of Care Document Standard

    PubMed Central

    Dolin, Robert H.; Giannone, Gay; Schadow, Gunther

    2007-01-01

    We sought to determine how well the HL7 / ASTM Continuity of Care Document (CCD) standard supports the requirements underlying the Joint Commission medication reconciliation recommendations. In particular, the Joint Commission emphasizes that transition points in the continuum of care are vulnerable to communication breakdowns, and that these breakdowns are a common source of medication errors. These transition points are the focus of communication standards, suggesting that CCD can support and enable medication related patient safety initiatives. Data elements needed to support the Joint Commission recommendations were identified and mapped to CCD, and a detailed clinical scenario was constructed. The mapping identified minor gaps, and identified fields present in CCD not specifically identified by Joint Commission, but useful nonetheless when managing medications across transitions of care, suggesting that a closer collaboration between the Joint Commission and standards organizations will be mutually beneficial. The nationally recognized CCD specification provides a standards-based solution for enabling Joint Commission medication reconciliation objectives. PMID:18693823

  17. Extended precision software packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    A description of three extended precision packages is presented along with three small conversion subroutines which can be used in conjunction with the extended precision packages. These extended packages represent software packages written in FORTRAN 4. They contain normalized or unnormalized floating point arithmetic with symmetric rounding and arbitrary mantissa lengths, and normalized floating point interval arithmetic with appropriate rounding. The purpose of an extended precision package is to enable the user to use and manipulate numbers with large decimal places as well as those with small decimal places where precision beyond double precision is required.

  18. Life cycle management of radioactive materials packaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Bellamy, S.; Shuler, J.; Decision and Information Sciences; SRL; DOE

    2007-01-01

    The objective of life cycle management of radioactive materials packaging is to ensure the safety functions (i.e. containment of radioactivity, protection against radiation, and criticality safety for fissile contents) during the entire life cycle of the packaging in storage, transportation and disposal. A framework has been developed for life cycle management regarding type B radioactive and fissile materials packaging, drawing upon current US Department of Energy (DOE) storage standards and examples from interim storage of Pu bearing materials in model 9975 transportation packagings. Key issues highlighted during long term storage of Pu bearing materials included gas generation and stability of PuO{sub 2+x}; other operation safety issues highlighted for interim storage of model 9975 transportation packagings included the need to consider a facility design basis fire event and the long term behaviour of packaging components such as Celotex and elastomeric O-ring seals. The principles of aging management are described, and the key attributes and examples of effective aging management programmes are provided based on the guidance documents for license renewal of nuclear power plants. The Packaging Certification Program of DOE Environmental Management, Office of Safety Management and Operations, plans to expand its mission into packaging certification for storage and aging management, as well as application of advanced technology, such as radiofrequency identification, for life cycle management of radioactive materials packagings.

  19. Tritium waste package

    DOEpatents

    Rossmassler, R.; Ciebiera, L.; Tulipano, F.J.; Vinson, S.; Walters, R.T.

    1995-11-07

    A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium oxide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within the outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen and oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB. 1 fig.

  20. Tritium waste package

    DOEpatents

    Rossmassler, Rich; Ciebiera, Lloyd; Tulipano, Francis J.; Vinson, Sylvester; Walters, R. Thomas

    1995-01-01

    A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium xide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen add oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB.

  1. Bioactivity of water soluble extracts and some characteristics of white cheese during the ripening period as effected by packaging type and probiotic adjunct cultures.

    PubMed

    Erkaya, Tuba; Şengul, Mustafa

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the chemical composition, proteolysis and in vitro angiotensin-converting enzyme-(ACE)-inhibitory and antioxidant activities of white cheeses made using probiotic adjunct cultures (Bifidobacterium bifidum DSMZ 20456 and Lactobacillus acidophilus DSMZ 20079) were investigated. The cheeses were ripened in a vacuum package or brine for 120 d at 4 °C. The cheese samples maintained the probiotic characteristics of the viable cells as >106 cfu/g even after ripening for 120 d. The proteolysis degrees in terms of water-soluble nitrogen/total nitrogen (WSN/TN), trichloroacetic acid-soluble nitrogen/total nitrogen (TCA-SN/TN) and phosphotungstic acid-soluble nitrogen/total nitrogen (PTA-SN/TN) values in the cheeses increased throughout the ripening. The highest levels of proteolysis were found in cheese made using Lb. acidophilus DSMZ 20079 and ripened in a vacuum package. ACE-inhibitory activity of the water soluble extracts (WSEs) of the cheeses increased significantly (P < 0·05) throughout the ripening (IC50 values 82·78-140·99 μg/ml). Use of Lb. acidophilus DSMZ 20079 and packaging under vacuum significantly increased the percentage of ACE inhibiting activity. WSEs had DPPH scavenging activity (the IC50 values were 2·41-5·39 mg/ml and the inhibition values were 5·10-10·38%), increasing up to 60 d ripening. In the present study, it was observed that Lb. acidophilus DSMZ 20079 was more effective than Bifido. bifidum DSMZ 20456 in terms of the cheese characteristics investigated.

  2. Edible packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Janjarasskul, Theeranun; Krochta, John M

    2010-01-01

    Research groups and the food and pharmaceutical industries recognize edible packaging as a useful alternative or addition to conventional packaging to reduce waste and to create novel applications for improving product stability, quality, safety, variety, and convenience for consumers. Recent studies have explored the ability of biopolymer-based food packaging materials to carry and control-release active compounds. As diverse edible packaging materials derived from various by-products or waste from food industry are being developed, the dry thermoplastic process is advancing rapidly as a feasible commercial edible packaging manufacturing process. The employment of nanocomposite concepts to edible packaging materials promises to improve barrier and mechanical properties and facilitate effective incorporation of bioactive ingredients and other designed functions. In addition to the need for a more fundamental understanding to enable design to desired specifications, edible packaging has to overcome challenges such as regulatory requirements, consumer acceptance, and scaling-up research concepts to commercial applications.

  3. JAVA SWING-BASED PLOTTING PACKAGE RESIDING WITHIN XAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlo, Andrei P; Chu, Paul; Pelaia II, Tom

    2007-01-01

    A data plotting package residing in the XAL tools set is presented. This package is based on Java SWING, and therefore it has the same portability as Java itself. The data types for charts, bar-charts, and color-surface plots are described. The algorithms, performance, interactive capabilities, limitations, and the best usage practices of this plotting package are discussed.

  4. Nitrite-embedded packaging film effects on fresh and frozen beef color development and stability as influenced by meat age and muscle type.

    PubMed

    Claus, James R; Du, Chen

    2013-11-01

    Muscles (Longissimus lumborum, LL; Psoas major, PM, semitendinosus, ST) were aged (2, 9d postmortem), cut into steaks, anaerobically packaged (nitrite-embedded film, NEF), and displayed (fresh, 19d; frozen, 39d). Fresh NEF increased (P<0.05) in redness (first 48h). Upon opening fresh NEF (d 6) and overwrapping in PVC film, redness declined (P<0.05). NEF cooked LL had more red surface compared to non-NEF. Meat age influenced NEF color. Intact NEF maintained acceptable red color throughout display. Residual nitrite and nitrate associated with fresh NEF and nitrate in NEF cooked LL were found (P<0.05) in the outer layer. Consideration should be given to providing sufficient time for nitric oxide myoglobin development when using NEF which may be influenced by meat age and muscle differences. NEF packaging has potential to extend fresh beef color display life. NEF appears to offer the opportunity to display bright red beef in frozen display by limiting typical effects of photooxidation.

  5. Isolation and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Listeria monocytogenes from modified atmosphere packaged fresh-cut vegetables collected in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Francis, Gillian A; O'Beirne, David

    2006-10-01

    The incidence of Listeria monocytogenes in modified atmosphere packaged fresh-cut fruits and vegetables from chill cabinets of a supermarket in Ireland was investigated over a 2-year period. Overall, 9.58% of fresh-cut produce was contaminated with Listeria spp. Various species of Listeria were isolated from samples, including L. monocytogenes, L. seeligeri, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, and L. ivanovii. No fruit samples contained detectable L. monocytogenes. Overall, a total of 21 L. monocytogenes isolates (2.9% of samples) were recovered from a range of products, including dry coleslaw mix (80% shredded cabbage and 20% shredded carrot), bean sprouts, and leafy vegetables such iceberg, romaine, and radicchio lettuce and mixed salad leaves (curly endive, escarole, and radicchio leaves). Dry coleslaw mix appeared to have the highest incidence of Listeria contamination (20%) compared with other products. Listeria contamination was more frequent (P < 0.05) during the summer and autumn months than during the winter and spring months. The 21 L. monocytogenes isolates were subsequently subtyped by genomic macrorestriction techniques using ApaI with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PFGE of digested DNA produced bands of 79 to 518 kb. Four PFGE profiles were identified, and approximately 50% of the isolates were associated with profile 1. This study indicates that fresh-cut vegetables packaged under a modified atmosphere can support growth of numerous species of Listeria, including L. monocytogenes.

  6. 76 FR 2056 - Incorporation of Revised ASTM Standards That Provide Flexibility in the Use of Alternatives to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ...; Solicitation of Public Comment on the Required Use of Mercury- Containing Thermometers in EPA Regulations... standards (ASTM standards) into EPA regulations that provide flexibility to use alternatives to mercury... regulations. Additionally, EPA is seeking public input on the need to address the remaining EPA regulations...

  7. Standard specification for coextruded poly (vinyl chloride) (pvc) non-pressure plastic pipe having reprocessed-recycled content. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee F-17 on Plastic Piping Systems and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee F17.25 on Vinyl Based Pipe. Current edition approved Oct. 10, 1997 and published October 1998. Originally published as F 1760-96. Last previous edition was F 1760-96.

  8. Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-26 on Nuclear Fuel Cycles and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C26.05 on Methods of Test. The current edition was approved July 10, 1998, and published in October 1998. It was originally published as C 1295-95. The last previous edition was C 1295-95.

  9. Standard guide for consideration of anaerobic bioremediation as a chemical pollutant mitigation method on land. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This guide is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee F-20 on Hazardous Substances and Oil Spill Response and is the responsibility of Subcommittee F20.24 on Bioremediation. Current edition approved Nov. 10, 1997 and March 10, 1998. Published July 1998.

  10. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) steel drum

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-09-29

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the steel drum packaging system meets the transportation safety requirements of HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments, for an onsite packaging containing Type B quantities of solid and liquid radioactive materials. The basic component of the steel drum packaging system is the 208 L (55-gal) steel drum.

  11. GETWRD Package Update: New Features and Modifications to the GETWRD Package.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    1985 . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . ........ . . . . . **,****.. ... * . .Z. Abstract The GETWRD Package is a library of procedures designed to ease the...user-supplied dictionary. Features designed to increase the friendliness of the program/user interface include a type ahead facility, recognition of...The GETWRD Package’ is a library of procedures designed to ease the Implementation of command languages written in FORTRAN 77. The procedures provide

  12. Smart packaging for photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Carson, R.F.; Sullivan, C.T.; McClellan, G.; Palmer, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Unlike silicon microelectronics, photonics packaging has proven to be low yield and expensive. One approach to make photonics packaging practical for low cost applications is the use of {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} packages. {open_quotes}Smart{close_quotes} in this context means the ability of the package to actuate a mechanical change based on either a measurement taken by the package itself or by an input signal based on an external measurement. One avenue of smart photonics packaging, the use of polysilicon micromechanical devices integrated with photonic waveguides, was investigated in this research (LDRD 3505.340). The integration of optical components with polysilicon surface micromechanical actuation mechanisms shows significant promise for signal switching, fiber alignment, and optical sensing applications. The optical and stress properties of the oxides and nitrides considered for optical waveguides and how they are integrated with micromechanical devices were investigated.

  13. Paperless Work Package Application

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgore, Jr., William R.; Morrell, Jr., Otto K.; Morrison, Dan; Ferrell, Jerrod; Connelley, Sherry; Hall, Tommy; Carzoli, Mary; Hott, Ken; Zylka, Sandy; Wong, Roger; Dang, Ling; Kalyani, Nik; Pearson, Terry; Rogers, Mark; Mannis, Nathan; Bakke, Dave; Shoner, Bruce; Vogel, Loring; Davis, Pat; Hitselberger, Charlie

    2014-07-31

    Paperless Work Package (PWP) System is a computer program process that takes information from Asset Suite, provides a platform for other electronic inputs, Processes the inputs into an electronic package that can be downloaded onto an electronic work tablet or laptop computer, provides a platform for electronic inputs into the work tablet, and then transposes those inputs back into Asset Suite and to permanent SRS records. The PWP System will basically eliminate paper requirements from the maintenance work control system. The program electronically relays the instructions given by the planner to work on a piece of equipment which is currently relayed via a printed work package. The program does not control/approve what is done. The planner will continue to plan the work package, the package will continue to be routed, approved, and scheduled. The supervisor reviews and approves the work to be performed and assigns work to individuals or to a work group. (The supervisor conducts pre job briefings with the workers involved in the job) The Operations Manager (Work Controlling Entity) approves the work package electronically for the work that will be done in his facility prior to work starting. The PWP System will provide the package in an electronic form. All the reviews, approvals, and safety measures taken by people outside the electronic package does not change from the paper driven work packages.

  14. The ZOOM minimization package

    SciTech Connect

    Fischler, Mark S.; Sachs, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    A new object-oriented Minimization package is available for distribution in the same manner as CLHEP. This package, designed for use in HEP applications, has all the capabilities of Minuit, but is a re-write from scratch, adhering to modern C++ design principles. A primary goal of this package is extensibility in several directions, so that its capabilities can be kept fresh with as little maintenance effort as possible. This package is distinguished by the priority that was assigned to C++ design issues, and the focus on producing an extensible system that will resist becoming obsolete.

  15. Cigarette package design: opportunities for disease prevention

    PubMed Central

    DiFranza, JR; Clark, DM; Pollay, RW

    2003-01-01

    Objective To learn how cigarette packages are designed and to determine to what extent cigarette packages are designed to target children. Methods A computer search was made of all Internet websites that post tobacco industry documents using the search terms: packaging, package design, package study, box design, logo, trademark and design study. All documents were retrieved electronically and analyzed by the first author for recurrent themes. Data Synthesis Cigarette manufacturers devote a great deal of attention and expense to package design because it is central to their efforts to create brand images. Colors, graphic elements, proportioning, texture, materials and typography are tested and used in various combinations to create the desired product and user images. Designs help to create the perceived product attributes and project a personality image of the user with the intent of fulfilling the psychological needs of the targeted type of smoker. The communication of these images and attributes is conducted through conscious and subliminal processes. Extensive testing is conducted using a variety of qualitative and quantitative research techniques. Conclusion The promotion of tobacco products through appealing imagery cannot be stopped without regulating the package design. The same marketing research techniques used by the tobacco companies can be used to design generic packaging and more effective warning labels targeted at specific consumers.

  16. Cigarette package design: opportunities for disease prevention

    PubMed Central

    DiFranza, JR; Clark, DM; Pollay, RW

    2003-01-01

    Objective To learn how cigarette packages are designed and to determine to what extent cigarette packages are designed to target children. Methods A computer search was made of all Internet websites that post tobacco industry documents using the search terms: packaging, package design, package study, box design, logo, trademark and design study. All documents were retrieved electronically and analyzed by the first author for recurrent themes. Data Synthesis Cigarette manufacturers devote a great deal of attention and expense to package design because it is central to their efforts to create brand images. Colors, graphic elements, proportioning, texture, materials and typography are tested and used in various combinations to create the desired product and user images. Designs help to create the perceived product attributes and project a personality image of the user with the intent of fulfilling the psychological needs of the targeted type of smoker. The communication of these images and attributes is conducted through conscious and subliminal processes. Extensive testing is conducted using a variety of qualitative and quantitative research techniques. Conclusion The promotion of tobacco products through appealing imagery cannot be stopped without regulating the package design. The same marketing research techniques used by the tobacco companies can be used to design generic packaging and more effective warning labels targeted at specific consumers. PMID:19570250

  17. Cigarette package design: opportunities for disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Difranza, J R; Clark, D M; Pollay, R W

    2002-06-15

    To learn how cigarette packages are designed and to determine to what extent cigarette packages are designed to target children. A computer search was made of all Internet websites that post tobacco industry documents using the search terms: packaging, package design, package study, box design, logo, trademark and design study. All documents were retrieved electronically and analyzed by the first author for recurrent themes. Cigarette manufacturers devote a great deal of attention and expense to package design because it is central to their efforts to create brand images. Colors, graphic elements, proportioning, texture, materials and typography are tested and used in various combinations to create the desired product and user images. Designs help to create the perceived product attributes and project a personality image of the user with the intent of fulfilling the psychological needs of the targeted type of smoker. The communication of these images and attributes is conducted through conscious and subliminal processes. Extensive testing is conducted using a variety of qualitative and quantitative research techniques. The promotion of tobacco products through appealing imagery cannot be stopped without regulating the package design. The same marketing research techniques used by the tobacco companies can be used to design generic packaging and more effective warning labels targeted at specific consumers.

  18. The Meta-Lax method of stress reduction in welds. [ASTM A36; AISI 4140

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.M.

    1992-07-31

    This study is the second phase of ongoing research into the mechanics and feasibility of using the Meta-Lax method of vibratory stress relief in place of thermal methods of stress relief. The first phase of this research revealed results that were similar to, and even superior to those achieved using thermal methods. The testing here was designed to eliminate the effects of interbead tempering by utilizing single pass bead-on-plate welds only. A metallurgical explanation for the success of the Meta-Lax method was not found. No significant structure or chemical changes were noted when used with ASTM A36 or AISI 4140 materials, and the phenomena noted in phase I was apparently due to interbead tempering. The theory of accelerated aging has been proposed and studies exist which observed dislocation motion as a result of vibratory treatment. It is evident that the vibratory stress relief system does not impart sufficient energy to bring about the magnitude of change seen with thermal methods. however the physical improvement is a reality, and vibratory methods should be evaluated further.

  19. Silicon Damage Response Function Derivation and Verification: Assessment of Impact on ASTM Standard E722

    SciTech Connect

    Depriest, Kendall

    2016-06-01

    Unsuccessful attempts by members of the radiation effects community to independently derive the Norgett-Robinson-Torrens (NRT) damage energy factors for silicon in ASTM standard E722-14 led to an investigation of the software coding and data that produced those damage energy factors. The ad hoc collaboration to discover the reason for lack of agreement revealed a coding error and resulted in a report documenting the methodology to produce the response function for the standard. The recommended changes in the NRT damage energy factors for silicon are shown to have significant impact for a narrow energy region of the 1-MeV(Si) equivalent fluence response function. However, when evaluating integral metrics over all neutrons energies in various spectra important to the SNL electronics testing community, the change in the response results in a small decrease in the total 1- MeV(Si) equivalent fluence of ~0.6% compared to the E722-14 response. Response functions based on the newly recommended NRT damage energy factors have been produced and are available for users of both the NuGET and MCNP codes.

  20. Hot Corrosion Behavior of HVOF Sprayed Coatings on ASTM SA213-T11 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, H. S.; Sidhu, B. S.; Prakash, S.

    2007-09-01

    Cr3C2-NiCr, NiCr, WC-Co and Stellite-6 alloy coatings were sprayed on ASTM SA213-T11 steel using the HVOF process. Liquid petroleum gas was used as the fuel gas. Hot corrosion studies were conducted on the uncoated as well as HVOF sprayed specimens after exposure to molten salt at 900 °C under cyclic conditions. The thermo-gravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion. XRD, SEM/EDAX and EPMA techniques were used to analyze the corrosion products. All these overlay coatings showed a better resistance to hot corrosion as compared to that of uncoated steel. NiCr Coating was found to be most protective followed by the Cr3C2-NiCr coating. WC-Co coating was least effective to protect the substrate steel. It is concluded that the formation of Cr2O3, NiO, NiCr2O4, and CoO in the coatings may contribute to the development of a better hot-corrosion resistance. The uncoated steel suffered corrosion in the form of intense spalling and peeling of the scale, which may be due to the formation of unprotective Fe2O3 oxide scale.

  1. Characterization of Multilayered Multipass Friction Stir Weld on ASTM A572 G50 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Yu, Xinghua; Qiao, Dongxiao; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    A multilayered multipass friction stir weld (MM-FSW) on ASTM A572 Grade 50 steel was characterized to understand its potential application for thick-section structures. The 15-mm-thick section was fabricated by stacking up three steel plates and then friction stir welding the plates together in a total of 5 passes. The unique butt/lap joint configuration encountered in the multilayer weld was examined to understand the effect of tool rotation direction on the joint quality especially the formation of hooking defect. Charpy V-notch impact toughness tests showed generally higher impact toughness energy for the stir zone than the base metal with a ductile fracture mode. The microhardness value was measured from 195 to 220 HV in the stir zone, while the base metal showed an average value of 170 HV. The microstructure in the stir zone and the adjacent heat affected zone was quantified using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) including Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The increased toughness and hardness were correlated with the refined microstructure in stir zone, resulting from severe plastic deformation and subsequent dynamic recrystallization during friction stir welding.

  2. Characterization of Multilayered Multipass Friction Stir Weld on ASTM A572 G50 Steel

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; ...

    2014-01-01

    A multilayered multipass friction stir weld (MM-FSW) on ASTM A572 Grade 50 steel was characterized to understand its potential application for thick-section structures. The 15-mm-thick section was fabricated by stacking up three steel plates and then friction stir welding the plates together in a total of 5 passes. The unique butt/lap joint configuration encountered in the multilayer weld was examined to understand the effect of tool rotation direction on the joint quality especially the formation of hooking defect. Charpy V-notch impact toughness tests showed generally higher impact toughness energy for the stir zone than the base metal with a ductilemore » fracture mode. The microhardness value was measured from 195 to 220 HV in the stir zone, while the base metal showed an average value of 170 HV. The microstructure in the stir zone and the adjacent heat affected zone was quantified using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) including Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The increased toughness and hardness were correlated with the refined microstructure in stir zone, resulting from severe plastic deformation and subsequent dynamic recrystallization during friction stir welding.« less

  3. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Compression Strength Measurements Conducted According to ASTM E9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luecke, William E.; Ma, Li; Graham, Stephen M.; Adler, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Ten commercial laboratories participated in an interlaboratory study to establish the repeatability and reproducibility of compression strength tests conducted according to ASTM International Standard Test Method E9. The test employed a cylindrical aluminum AA2024-T351 test specimen. Participants measured elastic modulus and 0.2 % offset yield strength, YS(0.2 % offset), using an extensometer attached to the specimen. The repeatability and reproducibility of the yield strength measurement, expressed as coefficient of variations were cv(sub r)= 0.011 and cv(sub R)= 0.020 The reproducibility of the test across the laboratories was among the best that has been reported for uniaxial tests. The reported data indicated that using diametrically opposed extensometers, instead of a single extensometer doubled the precision of the test method. Laboratories that did not lubricate the ends of the specimen measured yield stresses and elastic moduli that were smaller than those measured in laboratories that lubricated the specimen ends. A finite element analysis of the test specimen deformation for frictionless and perfect friction could not explain the discrepancy, however. The modulus measured from stress-strain data were reanalyzed using a technique that finds the optimal fit range, and applies several quality checks to the data. The error in modulus measurements from stress-strain curves generally increased as the fit range decreased to less than 40 % of the stress range.

  4. Amplitude distribution modelling and ultimate strength prediction of ASTM D-3039 graphite/epoxy tensile specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, James L., II; Hill, Eric V. K.

    As the aerospace industry increases its usage of composite materials in primary structures, techniques must be developed to nondestructively predict and monitor structural integrity at low proof stresses. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of predicting ultimate strengths at stress levels less than 25 percent of the expected ultimate strength, thereby reducing the unintentional structural damage caused by higher proof loads. The research presented herein has shown that an ultimate strength prediction equation can be generated for ASTM D-3039 unidirectional graphite/epoxy tensile specimens. From an original sample set of six specimens, a multivariate statistical analysis was used to generate an ultimate strength prediction equation. The variables of the multivariate statistical analysis were obtained through the mathematical modelling of the low amplitude (matrix cracking) portion of the specimens' AE amplitude distributions produced during the early stages of proof testing. A Weibull distribution was used to represent the amplitude band, and its parameters were correlated with known failure strengths to produce ultimate strength prediction equations. Ultimate strengths were then accurately predicted at proof stresses less than 25 percent of the expected failure stress for several randomly drawn tensile coupons.

  5. Processing and properties of superclean ASTM A508 Cl. 4 forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, A.V.; Handerhan, K.J.; Manzo, G.J.; Simkins, G.P.

    1988-12-31

    Steels with improved resistance to temper embrittlement are now being produced using ``superclean`` steelmaking technology. This technology involves the use of scrap control, proper electric arc furnace and ladle refining furnace practices to produce steel with very low Mn, Si, P, S and other residual impurities such as Sn, As and Sb. This technology has been applied on a production basis to modified ASTM A508 Cl- 4 material intended for high temperature pressure vessel forgings. Processing and properties of this superclean material are reviewed. In addition, the cleanliness and mechanical properties are compared to conventionally melted A508 Cl. 4 material. The ``superclean`` A508 Cl. 4 mod. was found to meet all specification requirements. In addition, the superclean material was found to possess superior upper shelf CVN properties, a lower FATT{sub 50} and NDTT, along with superior microcleanliness compared to conventional material. Finally, the superclean material was found to be immune to temper embrittlement based on the short-term embrittlement treatments examined.

  6. The optimization of mechanical properties for nuclear transportation casks in ASTM A350 LF5

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.; Honeyman, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    Transport flasks are required for the movement of spent nuclear fuel. Due to their nature of operation, it is necessary that these flasks are produced from forged steels with exceptional toughness properties. The material specification generally cited for flask manufacture is ASTM A350 Grade LF5 Class 1, a carbon-manganese-nickel alloy. The range of chemical analysis permitted by this specification is very broad and it is the responsibility of the material manufacturer to select a composition within this range which will satisfy all the mechanical properties requirements, and to ensure safe and reliable performance. Forgemasters Steel and Engineering Limited have experience in the manufacture of large high integrity fuel element flask forgings which extend over several decades. This experience and involvement in international standards in US, Europe and Japan has facilitated the development of an optimized analysis with a low carbon content, nickel levels towards the top end of the allowed range, a deliberate aluminum addition to control grain size and strictly controlled residual element levels. The resultant steel has excellent low temperature impact properties which greatly exceed the requirements of the specification. This analysis is now being adopted for the manufacture of all current transport flasks.

  7. Simplification and transformation of ASTM F1292 measurement procedure for fall accident injury criteria.

    PubMed

    Kato, Maki; Shimodaira, Yoshie; Sato, Takeshi; Iida, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Protecting children from injuries caused by fall accidents from playground equipment is important. Therefore, measures toward minimizing the risk of fall accident injuries are required. The risk of injury can be evaluated using ASTM F1292. In this test, G-max and the HIC are used to estimate the risk of injury. However, the measurement procedure is too complicated for application to a large number of installed equipment. F1292 requires simplified by reducing the number of phases, even with a small risk of loss in accuracy. With this in mind, this study proposes a shortened measurement procedure and a transformation equation to estimate the risk as same as F1292. As the result of experiments, it was revealed that G-max and the HIC values for both procedures linearly increase with drop height. The differences in outcomes between the regression equations of the standardized procedure and those of the shortened procedure can be used as a correction value. They can be added to the value measured by the shortened procedure. This suggests that the combination of the shortened procedure and transformation equation would be equivalent to F1292, with the advantage of being more easily and efficiently applied to the evaluation of installed playground equipment.

  8. Simplification and Transformation of ASTM F1292 Measurement Procedure for Fall Accident Injury Criteria

    PubMed Central

    KATO, Maki; SHIMODAIRA, Yoshie; SATO, Takeshi; IIDA, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Protecting children from injuries caused by fall accidents from playground equipment is important. Therefore, measures toward minimizing the risk of fall accident injuries are required. The risk of injury can be evaluated using ASTM F1292. In this test, G-max and the HIC are used to estimate the risk of injury. However, the measurement procedure is too complicated for application to a large number of installed equipment. F1292 requires simplified by reducing the number of phases, even with a small risk of loss in accuracy. With this in mind, this study proposes a shortened measurement procedure and a transformation equation to estimate the risk as same as F1292. As the result of experiments, it was revealed that G-max and the HIC values for both procedures linearly increase with drop height. The differences in outcomes between the regression equations of the standardized procedure and those of the shortened procedure can be used as a correction value. They can be added to the value measured by the shortened procedure. This suggests that the combination of the shortened procedure and transformation equation would be equivalent to F1292, with the advantage of being more easily and efficiently applied to the evaluation of installed playground equipment. PMID:25088989

  9. Optical smart packaging to reduce transmitted information.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Luisa; Tebaldi, Myrian; Barrera, John Fredy; Bolognini, Néstor; Torroba, Roberto

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate a smart image-packaging optical technique that uses what we believe is a new concept to save byte space when transmitting data. The technique supports a large set of images mapped into modulated speckle patterns. Then, they are multiplexed into a single package. This operation results in a substantial decreasing of the final amount of bytes of the package with respect to the amount resulting from the addition of the images without using the method. Besides, there are no requirements on the type of images to be processed. We present results that proof the potentiality of the technique.

  10. Developing Large CAI Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Mary Jac M.; Smith, Lynn H.

    1983-01-01

    When developing large computer-assisted instructional (CAI) courseware packages, it is suggested that there be more attentive planning to the overall package design before actual lesson development is begun. This process has been simplified by modifying the systems approach used to develop single CAI lessons, followed by planning for the…

  11. Project Information Packages: Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RMC Research Corp., Mountain View, CA.

    This brochure describes a new series of Project Information Packages, a U.S. Office of Education response to the need for a systematic approach to disseminating exemplary projects. The packages describe procedures for developing the necessary administrative support and management framework, as well as instructional methods and techniques. The six…

  12. Developing Large CAI Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Mary Jac M.; Smith, Lynn H.

    1983-01-01

    When developing large computer-assisted instructional (CAI) courseware packages, it is suggested that there be more attentive planning to the overall package design before actual lesson development is begun. This process has been simplified by modifying the systems approach used to develop single CAI lessons, followed by planning for the…

  13. Packaging issues: avoiding delamination.

    PubMed

    Hall, R

    2005-10-01

    Manufacturers can minimise delamination occurrence by applying the appropriate packaging design and process features. The end user can minimise the impact of fibre tear and reduce subsequent delamination by careful package opening. The occasional inconvenient delamination is a small price to pay for the high level of sterility assurance that comes with the use of Tyvek.

  14. The LCDROOT Analysis Package

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Toshinori

    2001-10-18

    The North American Linear Collider Detector group has developed simulation and analysis program packages. LCDROOT is one of the packages, and is based on ROOT and the C++ programing language to maximally benefit from object oriented programming techniques. LCDROOT is constantly improved and now has a new topological vertex finder, ZVTOP3. In this proceeding, the features of the LCDROOT simulation are briefly described.

  15. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  16. Nutritional value of cold-pressed rapeseed oil during long term storage as influenced by the type of packaging material, exposure to light & oxygen and storage temperature.

    PubMed

    Wroniak, Małgorzata; Rękas, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    The effect of various conditions (storage temperature, exposure to light, access of oxygen) and different packaging material (amber glass, amber polyethylene terephthalate) on the nutritional value of cold-pressed rapeseed oil during 12 months of storage was investigated. Quantified quality parameters included: acidity, peroxide value, spectrophotometric indices (K 232 , K 268 ), fatty acid composition, tocopherols and sterols. Storage of oil at 4 °C was found to be most appropriate for maintaining the quality of cold-pressed rapeseed oil. Exposure of oil samples stored at room temperature to light in combination with the access of oxygen caused the most pronounced losses in the total tocopherols (ca. 90-91 % of α-T, and ca. 80-81 % of γ-T), total phytosterols (ca. 15-16 %) and substantial deterioration in oil qualitative properties. Although storage at room temperature is common for use in households, storage of at low temperatures (4 °C) significantly increases the possibility of prolonged shelf life of cold-pressed rapeseed oil.

  17. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL DOT specification 6M - special form package

    SciTech Connect

    Schaich, R.W.

    1982-07-01

    The ORNL DOT Specification 6M - Special Form Package was fabricated at the Oak Ridge Nation al Laboratory (ORNL) for the transport of Type B solid non-fissile radioactive materials in special form. The package was evaluated on the basis of tests performed by the Dow Chemical Company, Rocky Flats Division, on the DOT-6M container and special form tests performed on a variety of stainless steel capsules at ORNL by Operations Division personnel. The results of these evaluations demonstrate that the package is in compliance with the applicable regulations for the transport of Type B quantities in special form of non-fissile radioactive materials.

  18. Chip Scale Package Implementation Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    1998-01-01

    The JPL-led MicrotypeBGA Consortium of enterprises representing government agencies and private companies have jointed together to pool in-kind resources for developing the quality and reliability of chip scale packages (CSPs) for a variety of projects. In the process of building the Consortium CSP test vehicles, many challenges were identified regarding various aspects of technology implementation. This paper will present our experience in the areas of technology implementation challenges, including design and building both standard and microvia boards, and assembly of two types of test vehicles. We also discuss the most current package isothermal aging to 2,000 hours at 100 C and 125 C and thermal cycling test results to 1,700 cycles in the range of -30 to 100 C.

  19. Packaging Concerns/Techniques for Large Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews packaging challenges and options for electronic parts. The presentation includes information about non-hermetic packages, space challenges for packaging and complex package variations.

  20. Procedures for developing allowable properties for a single species under ASTM D1990 and computer programs useful for the calculations

    Treesearch

    James W. Evans; David E. Kretschmann; Victoria L. Herian; David W. Green

    2001-01-01

    ASTM D1990, “Establishing Allowable Properties for Visually Graded Dimension Lumber from In-Grade Tests of Full-Size Specimens,” is the consensus standard used to make submissions of allowable properties for many U.S., Canadian, and foreign species to the Board of Review of the American Lumber Standards Committee. Recently, it has become apparent how difficult it is to...

  1. Standard test method for expansion or contraction of coal by the sole-heated oven. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This test method is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee D-5 on Coal and Coke and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee D05.15 on Metallurgical Properties of Coal and Coke. The current edition was approved on April 10, 1997, and published May 1998. It was originally published as D 2014-62. The last previous edition was D 2014-96a.

  2. A Homecare Application based on the ASTM E2369-05 Standard Specification for Continuity of Care Record

    PubMed Central

    Botsivaly, M.; Spyropoulos, B.; Koutsourakis, K.; Mertika, K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the presentation of a system appropriate to be used upon the transition of a patient from hospital to homecare. The developed system is structured according to the ASTM E2369-05 Standard Specification for Continuity of Care Record and its function is based upon the creation of a structured subset of data, containing the patient’s most relevant clinical information, enabling simultaneously the planning and the optimal documentation of the provided homecare. PMID:17238479

  3. A homecare application based on the ASTM E2369-05 Standard Specification for Continuity of Care Record.

    PubMed

    Botsivaly, M; Spyropoulos, B; Koutsourakis, K; Mertika, K

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is the presentation of a system appropriate to be used upon the transition of a patient from hospital to homecare. The developed system is structured according to the ASTM E2369-05 Standard Specification for Continuity of Care Record and its function is based upon the creation of a structured subset of data, containing the patient's most relevant clinical information, enabling simultaneously the planning and the optimal documentation of the provided homecare.

  4. Creep and microstructural processes in a low-alloy 2.25%Cr1.6%W steel (ASTM Grade 23)

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharova, K.; Sklenicka, V.; Kvapilova, M.; Svoboda, M.

    2015-11-15

    A low-alloy 2.25%Cr1%Mo steel (ASTM Grade 22) has been greatly improved by the substitution of almost all of the 1%Mo by 1.6%W. The improved material has been standardized as P/T23 steel (Fe–2.25Cr–1.6W–0.25V–0.05Nb–0.07C). The present investigation was conducted on T23 steel in an effort to obtain a more complete description and understanding of the role of the microstructural evolution and deformation processes in high-temperature creep. Constant load tensile creep tests were carried out in an argon atmosphere in the temperature range 500–650 °C at stresses ranging from 50 to 400 MPa. It was found that the diffusion in the matrix lattice is the creep-rate controlling process. The results of an extensive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis programme to investigate microstructure evolution as a function of temperature are described and compared with the thermodynamic calculations using the software package Thermo-Calc. The significant creep-strength drop of T23 steel after long-term creep exposures can be explained by the decrease in dislocation hardening, precipitation hardening and solid solution hardening due to the instability of the microstructure at high temperature. - Highlights: • The constant load creep tests of T23 steel were carried out at 500–650 °C. • The stress exponents of the creep rate correspond to power law (dislocation) creep. • Diffusion in the matrix lattice is the creep-rate controlling process. • The microstructure instability is the main creep degradation process in T23 steel.

  5. ASTM standards for measuring solar reflectance and infrared emittance of construction materials and comparing their steady-state surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Levinson, R.; Berdahl, P.

    1996-08-01

    Numerous experiments on individual buildings in California and Florida show that painting roofs white reduces air conditioning load up to 50%, depending on the thermal resistance or amount of insulation under the roof. The savings, of course, are strong functions of the thermal integrity of a building and climate. In earlier work, the authors have estimated the national energy savings potential from reflective roofs and paved surfaces. Achieving this potential, however, is conditional on receiving the necessary Federal, states, and electric utilities support to develop materials with high solar reflectance and design effective implementation programs. An important step in initiating an effective program in this area is to work with the american Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the industry to create test procedures, rating, and labeling for building and paving materials. A subcommittee of ASTM E06, E06.42, on Cool Construction Materials, was formed as the vehicle to develop standard practices for measuring, rating, and labeling cool construction materials. The subcommittee has also undertaken the development of a standard practice for calculating a solar reflectance index (SRI) of horizontal and low-sloped surfaces. SRI is a measure of the relative steady-state temperature of a surface with respect to a standard white surface (SRI = 100) and a standard black surface (SRI = 0) under standard solar and ambient conditions. This paper discusses the technical issues relating to development of these two ASTM standards.

  6. Prospects for Adapting Current ASTM Wear and Erosion Tests for Bulk Materials to Thin Films, Coatings, and Surface Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2007-01-01

    Most of ASTM Committee G2's erosion, wear, and friction test standards were developed for use with bulk materials, yet there is a growing need to evaluate the tribological behavior of films, coatings, and surface treatments (FCSTs), some that affect layers only tens of nanometers to a few micrometers thick. Tribotesting standards for bulk materials can sometimes be modified for use on FCSTs, but the conditions and methods developed for bulk materials may sometimes be too severe or inapplicable. An internet search and literature review indicated that a number of G2 Committee standards are currently being used for FCSTs. Of these, ASTM G99 and G65 seem to be the most popular. When attempting to apply an existing wear standard for bulk materials to FCSTs, two key issues must be addressed: (1) whether changes are needed in the magnitudes of the applied conditions, and (2) whether more precise methods are needed to measure the magnitude of surface damage. Straightforward calculations underscore the limitations for wear measurement of thin layers when evaluated using block-on-ring and pin-on-disk tests. Finally, suggestions are given for modifying selected ASTM G2 standards to enable their use on films, coatings, and surface treatments.

  7. Considerations on the ASTM standards 1789-04 and 1422-05 on the forensic examination of ink.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Cedric; Margot, Pierre

    2010-09-01

    The ASTM standards on Writing Ink Identification (ASTM 1789-04) and on Writing Ink Comparison (ASTM 1422-05) are the most up-to-date guidelines that have been published on the forensic analysis of ink. The aim of these documents is to cover most aspects of the forensic analysis of ink evidence, from the analysis of ink samples, the comparison of the analytical profile of these samples (with the aim to differentiate them or not), through to the interpretation of the result of the examination of these samples in a forensic context. Significant evolutions in the technology available to forensic scientists, in the quality assurance requirements brought onto them, and in the understanding of frameworks to interpret forensic evidence have been made in recent years. This article reviews the two standards in the light of these evolutions and proposes some practical improvements in terms of the standardization of the analyses, the comparison of ink samples, and the interpretation of ink examination. Some of these suggestions have already been included in a DHS funded project aimed at creating a digital ink library for the United States Secret Service. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  8. Identification of collected volatile condensable material (CVCM) from ASTM E595 of silicone damper fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Myriam P.; Labatete-Goeppinger, Aura C.; Fowler, Jesse D.; Liu, De-Ling

    2014-09-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane damping fluids used for structural deployment mechanisms are not required to be low outgassing. During normal use, these damping fluids are typically encapsulated; however, an unintentional leak may occur which would cause an undesirable contamination at the leak point and form volatile condensable that could reach contamination-sensitive surfaces, degrading the performance of satellites. The collected volatile condensable material (CVCM) at 25 °C from ASTM E595 of a damping fluid, MeSi-300K, was < 0.10%, when the damping fluid was maintained at 125 °C for 24 hours under 10-6 Torr vacuum. MeSi-300K viscosity is 300,000 cSt, which indicates an average molecular weight (MW) of 204,000. This large MW polymer would contain about 2,756 dimethyl siloxane (DMS) units in the chain. These long chains are not expected to be volatile; however, during manufacture, linear chains and cyclic compounds of a smaller number of DMS units produced are volatile. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to identify the CVCM. Characterization of these materials revealed that the CVCM contained higher MW siloxanes, straight chain and cyclic, in the range of 682 to 1196 (9 to 16 DMS units), whereas CVCM from spacequalified, silicone-based materials have lower MW, 222 to 542 (3 to 7 DMS units). Consequently, contamination from MeSi-300K material would produce greater amounts of higher-MW siloxanes than space-qualified silicones. These higher-MW species would be harder to remove by evaporation and could remain on sensitive surfaces.

  9. Fractionation and characterization of particles simulating wear of total joint replacement (TJR) following ASTM standards.

    PubMed

    Saha, Subrata; Musib, Mrinal

    2011-01-01

    Reactions of bone cells to orthopedic wear debris produced by the articulating motion of total joint replacements (TJRs) are largely responsible for the long-term failure of such replacements. Metal and polyethylene (PE) wear particles isolated from fluids from total joint simulators, as well as particles that are fabricated by other methods, are widely used to study such in vitro cellular response. Prior investigations have revealed that cellular response to wear debris depends on the size, shape, and dose of the particles. Hence, to have a better understanding of the wear-mediated osteolytic process it is important that these particles are well characterized and clinically relevant, both qualitatively, and quantitatively. In this study we have fractionated both ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and Ti particles, into micron (1.0-10.0 μm), submicron (0.2-1.0 μm), and nanoparticle (0.01-0.2 μm) fractions, and characterized them based on the following size-shape descriptors as put forth in ASTM F1877: i) equivalent circle diameter (ECD), ii) aspect ratio (AR), iii) elongation (E), iv) roundness (R), and v) form factor (FF). The mean (± SD) ECDs (in μm) for micron, submicron, and nanoparticles of UHMWPE were 1.652 ± 0.553, 0.270 ± 0.180, and 0.061 ± 0.035, respectively, and for Ti were 1.894 ± 0.667, 0.278 ± 0.180, and 0.055 ± 0.029, respectively. The values for other descriptors were similar (no statistically significant difference). The nanofraction particles were found to be more sphere-like (higher R and FF values, and lower E and AR values) as compared to larger particles. Future experiments will involve use of these well characterized particles for in vitro studies.

  10. STRUMPACK -- STRUctured Matrices PACKage

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    STRUMPACK - STRUctured Matrices PACKage - is a package for computations with sparse and dense structured matrix, i.e., matrices that exhibit some kind of low-rank property, in particular Hierarchically Semi Separable structure (HSS). Such matrices appear in many applications, e.g., FEM, BEM, Integral equations. etc. Exploiting this structure using certain compression algorithms allow for fast solution of linear systems and/or fast computation of matrix-vector products, which are the two main building blocks of matrix computations. STRUMPACK has presently two main components: a distributed-memory dense matrix computations package and a shared-memory sparse direct solver.

  11. Packaging for Posterity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sias, Jim

    1990-01-01

    A project in which students designed environmentally responsible food packaging is described. The problem definition; research on topics such as waste paper, plastic, metal, glass, incineration, recycling, and consumer preferences; and the presentation design are provided. (KR)

  12. Packaging for Posterity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sias, Jim

    1990-01-01

    A project in which students designed environmentally responsible food packaging is described. The problem definition; research on topics such as waste paper, plastic, metal, glass, incineration, recycling, and consumer preferences; and the presentation design are provided. (KR)

  13. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-03-04

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT Shipping Package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the SARP and/or C of C shall govern. C of Cs state: ''each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' They further state: ''each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SAR P charges the WIPP Management and Operation (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR 71.11. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packaging. The intent of these instructions is to standardize these operations. All users will follow these instructions or equivalent instructions that assure operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARPs.

  14. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-04-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: ''each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' They further state: ''each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the WIPP management and operating (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR 71.11. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document provides the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packaging. The intent of these instructions is to standardize operations. All users will follow these instructions or equivalent instructions that assure operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARPs.

  15. Electronic Packaging Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A characteristic of aerospace system design is that equipment size and weight must always be kept to a minimum, even in small components such as electronic packages. The dictates of spacecraft design have spawned a number of high-density packaging techniques, among them methods of connecting circuits in printed wiring boards by processes called stitchbond welding and parallel gap welding. These processes help designers compress more components into less space; they also afford weight savings and lower production costs.

  16. Battery packaging - Technology review

    SciTech Connect

    Maiser, Eric

    2014-06-16

    This paper gives a brief overview of battery packaging concepts, their specific advantages and drawbacks, as well as the importance of packaging for performance and cost. Production processes, scaling and automation are discussed in detail to reveal opportunities for cost reduction. Module standardization as an additional path to drive down cost is introduced. A comparison to electronics and photovoltaics production shows 'lessons learned' in those related industries and how they can accelerate learning curves in battery production.

  17. Radioactive material package seal tests

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} std cm{sup 3}/s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Auxiliary propulsion system flight package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collett, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    Hughes Aircraft Company developed qualified and integrated flight, a flight test Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS), on an Air Force technology satellite. The IAPS Flight Package consists of two identical Thruster Subsystems and a Diagnostic Subsystem. Each thruster subsystem (TSS) is comprised of an 8-cm ion Thruster-Gimbal-Beam Shield Unit (TGBSU); Power Electronics Unit; Digital Controller and Interface Unit (DCIU); and Propellant Tank, Valve and Feed Unit (PTVFU) plus the requisite cables. The Diagnostic Subsystem (DSS) includes four types of sensors for measuring the effect of the ion thrusters on the spacecraft and the surrounding plasma. Flight qualifications of IAPS, prior to installation on the spacecraft, consisted of performance, vibration and thermal-vacuum testing at the unit level, and thermal-vacuum testing at the subsystem level. Mutual compatibility between IAPS and the host spacecraft was demonstrated during a series of performance and environmental tests after the IAPS Flight Package was installed on the spacecraft. After a spacecraft acoustic test, performance of the ion thrusters was reverified by removing the TGBSUs for a thorough performance test at Hughes Research Laboratories (HRL). The TGBSUs were then reinstalled on the spacecraft. The IAPS Flight Package is ready for flight testing when Shuttle flights are resumed.

  19. THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGES IN TRANSPORT CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.

    2010-03-04

    Drum type packages are routinely used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. These packages are designed to meet the federal regulations described in 10 CFR Part 71. The packages are transported in specially designed vehicles like Safe Secure Transport (SST) for safety and security. In the transport vehicles, the packages are placed close to each other to maximize the number of units in the vehicle. Since the RAM contents in the packagings produce decay heat, it is important that they are spaced sufficiently apart to prevent overheating of the containment vessel (CV) seals and the impact limiter to ensure the structural integrity of the package. This paper presents a simple methodology to assess thermal performance of a typical 9975 packaging in a transport configuration.

  20. Numerical simulation of a flow past a triangular sail-type blade of a wind generator using the ANSYS FLUENT software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaiynov, K.; Tanasheva, N. K.; Min'kov, L. L.; Nusupbekov, B. R.; Stepanova, Yu. O.; Rozhkova, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    An air flow past a single triangular sail-type blade of a wind turbine is analyzed by numerical simulation for low velocities of the incoming flow. The results of numerical simulation indicate a monotonic increase in the drag force and the lift force as functions of the incoming flow; empirical dependences of these quantities are obtained.

  1. Comparative Packaging Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele H.; Oziomek, Thomas V.

    2009-01-01

    Future long duration manned space flights beyond low earth orbit will require the food system to remain safe, acceptable and nutritious. Development of high barrier food packaging will enable this requirement by preventing the ingress and egress of gases and moisture. New high barrier food packaging materials have been identified through a trade study. Practical application of this packaging material within a shelf life test will allow for better determination of whether this material will allow the food system to meet given requirements after the package has undergone processing. The reason to conduct shelf life testing, using a variety of packaging materials, stems from the need to preserve food used for mission durations of several years. Chemical reactions that take place during longer durations may decrease food quality to a point where crew physical or psychological well-being is compromised. This can result in a reduction or loss of mission success. The rate of chemical reactions, including oxidative rancidity and staling, can be controlled by limiting the reactants, reducing the amount of energy available to drive the reaction, and minimizing the amount of water available. Water not only acts as a media for microbial growth, but also as a reactant and means by which two reactants may come into contact with each other. The objective of this study is to evaluate three packaging materials for potential use in long duration space exploration missions.

  2. Certification testing for the ES-2 shipping package

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.R.; Byington, G.A.; Handy, K.D.; Shappert, L.B.; Handy, K.D.; Oaks, R.E. Jr.; Stumpfl, E.

    1998-02-01

    The ES-2 is a multiconfiguration, Type B fissile material shipping package, designed by the Y-12 Nuclear Packaging Systems. It is unique in that a castable refractory material performs primary impact absorption and thermal insulation duties. This material, unlike the insulation often used in fissile material packages, such as Celotex and various foams, is fireproof at temperatures associated with Type B package testing (800 C). The ES-2 is designed to permit the use of three different containment vessels which can result in as many as six different configurations. Eight prototype units were manufactured and successfully tested to US Federal Regulatory Requirements.

  3. Alternative methods for evaluating corrosion deterioration on existing USTs prior to upgrading with cathodic protection as defined in ASTM standard practice ES40-94

    SciTech Connect

    Bushman, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    In November, 1994 ASTM approved the issuance of Emergency Standard ES40-94 defining new means for evaluating the corrosion condition of existing USTs. This paper presents the background information which lead to the formation of a committee which undertook the development of the new standard, general descriptions of each of the methodologies provided, information on the standard approval process and an outline of the continuing work effort to reissue the standard with minor editorial modifications as a regular ASTM standard.

  4. Whole glove permeation of cyclohexanol through disposable nitrile gloves on a dextrous robot hand and comparison with the modified closed-loop ASTM F739 method 1. No fist clenching.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Airek R; Que Hee, Shane S

    2017-04-01

    The aim was to develop a whole glove permeation method for cyclohexanol to generate permeation parameter data for a non-moving dextrous robot hand (normalized breakthrough time tb, standardized breakthrough time ts, steady state permeation rate Ps, and diffusion coefficient D). Four types of disposable powderless, unsupported, and unlined nitrile gloves from the same producer were investigated: Safeskin Blue and Kimtech Science Blue, Purple, and Sterling. The whole glove method developed involved a peristaltic pump for water circulation through chemically resistant Viton tubing to continually wash the inner surface of the test glove via holes in the tubing, a dextrous robot hand operated by a microprocessor, a chemically protective nitrile glove to protect the robot hand, an incubator to maintain 35°C temperature, and a hot plate to maintain 35°C at the sampling point of the circulating water. Aliquots of 1.0 mL were sampled at regular time intervals for the first 60 min followed by removal of 0.5 mL aliquots every hour to 8 hr. Quantification was by the internal standard method after gas chromatography-selective ion electron impact mass spectrometry using a non-polar capillary column. The individual glove values of tb and ts differed for the ASTM closed loop method except for Safeskin Blue, but did not for the whole glove method. Most of the kinetic parameters agreed within an order of magnitude for the two techniques. The order of most protective to least protective glove was Blue and Safeskin, then Purple followed by Sterling for the whole gloves. The analogous order for the modified F739 ASTM closed loop method was: Safeskin, Blue, Purple, and Sterling, almost the same as for the whole glove. The Sterling glove was "not recommended" from the modified ASTM data, and was "poor" from the whole glove data.

  5. Certification of a radioactive materials shipping container under USDOT Specification 7A, General Packaging, Type A (49CFR178.350)

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, J.F.; Pratt, D.S.; Cordell, S.M.

    1990-07-01

    A containment system for shipping Type A quantities of solid or liquid radioactive material in normal or special form has been designed and tested for certification as a USDOT Type A, Specification 7A container. The purpose of this paper is to describe to the research reactor community the advantages of this type of radioactive material shipping container, to present the extensive testing program which was performed to certify the container and to document the specific US Department of Transportation regulations which dictate the certification requirements. The specific advantages of the shipping container described in this paper are that it is inexpensive, constructed from readily available materials and it has proven to be well suited for shipping the types of irradiated samples which are generated at research reactor facilities such as the OSU TRIGA Reactor. The containment system consists of the primary container, a 404 x 700 steel can, an outer container, a one gallon steel paint can and a cardboard box for convenient labeling. The only major piece of equipment which is required to use this system is a canning machine for sealing the inner steel can. The results of the container system design and testing program are presented. The twenty two design requirements from 49 CFR 173.411 and the nine environmental and test conditions from 49 CFR 173.465 and 49 CFR 173.466 are addressed in the testing program. The containment system was shown to be capable of preventing the loss or dispersal of radioactive contents as well as preventing any increase in radiation levels at the exterior surfaces. The details of test documentation are also presented. (author)

  6. RH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-11-07

    The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to

  7. RH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-01-12

    The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package (also known as the "RH-TRU 72-B cask") and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: "...each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." It further states: "...each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8, "Deliberate Misconduct." Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, "Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material," certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, "Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance," regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a

  8. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: "each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." They further state: "each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and operating (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21 regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are

  9. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2008-09-11

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: "each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the pplication." They further state: "each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and operating (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21 regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are

  10. ASTM and ASME-BPE Standards--Complying with the Needs of the Pharmaceutical Industry.

    PubMed

    Huitt, William M

    2011-01-01

    Designing and building a pharmaceutical facility requires the owner, engineer of record, and constructor to be knowledgeable with regard to the industry codes and standards that apply to this effort. Up until 1997 there were no industry standards directed at the needs and requirements of the pharmaceutical industry. Prior to that time it was a patchwork effort at resourcing and adopting nonpharmaceutical-related codes and standards and then modifying them in order to meet the more stringent requirements of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In 1997 the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) published the first Bioprocessing Equipment (BPE) Standard. Through harmonization efforts this relatively new standard has brought together, scrutinized, and refined industry accepted methodologies together with FDA compliance requirements, and has established an American National Standard that provides a comprehensive set of standards that are integral to the pharmaceutical industry. This article describes various American National Standards, including those developed and published by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), and how they apply to the pharmaceutical industry. It goes on to discuss the harmonization effort that takes place between the various standards developers in an attempt to prevent conflicts and omissions between the many standards. Also included are examples of tables and figures taken from the ASME-BPE Standard. These examples provide the reader with insight to the relevant content of the ASME-BPE Standard. Designing and building a pharmaceutical facility requires the owner, engineer of record, and constructor to be knowledgeable with regard to the industry codes and standards that apply to this effort. Up until 1997 there were no industry standards directed at the needs and requirements of the pharmaceutical industry. Prior to that time it was a patchwork effort at resourcing and adopting nonpharmaceutical-related codes and

  11. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-02-28

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: "each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." They further state: "each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and operating (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.

  12. Food Packaging Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The photos show a few of the food products packaged in Alure, a metallized plastic material developed and manufactured by St. Regis Paper Company's Flexible Packaging Division, Dallas, Texas. The material incorporates a metallized film originally developed for space applications. Among the suppliers of the film to St. Regis is King-Seeley Thermos Company, Winchester, Ma'ssachusetts. Initially used by NASA as a signal-bouncing reflective coating for the Echo 1 communications satellite, the film was developed by a company later absorbed by King-Seeley. The metallized film was also used as insulating material for components of a number of other spacecraft. St. Regis developed Alure to meet a multiple packaging material need: good eye appeal, product protection for long periods and the ability to be used successfully on a wide variety of food packaging equipment. When the cost of aluminum foil skyrocketed, packagers sought substitute metallized materials but experiments with a number of them uncovered problems; some were too expensive, some did not adequately protect the product, some were difficult for the machinery to handle. Alure offers a solution. St. Regis created Alure by sandwiching the metallized film between layers of plastics. The resulting laminated metallized material has the superior eye appeal of foil but is less expensive and more easily machined. Alure effectively blocks out light, moisture and oxygen and therefore gives the packaged food long shelf life. A major packaging firm conducted its own tests of the material and confirmed the advantages of machinability and shelf life, adding that it runs faster on machines than materials used in the past and it decreases product waste; the net effect is increased productivity.

  13. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation of Navy Waste Packages

    SciTech Connect

    S. LeStrange

    1999-11-15

    The Monitored Geologic Repository Waste Package Operations of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the Navy (Refs. 1 and 2). The Navy SNF has been considered for disposal at the potential Yucca Mountain site. For some waste packages, the containment may breach (Ref. 3), allowing the influx of water. Water in the waste package may moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the waste package. The water may gradually leach the fissile components and neutron absorbers out of the waste package. In addition, the accumulation of silica (SiO{sub 2}) in the waste package over time may further affect the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of waste packages containing the Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) II inner shell, Navy canister, and basket components. The calculations do not include the Navy SNF in the waste package. The specific study objectives were to determine the chemical composition of the water and the quantity of silicon (Si) and other solid corrosion products in the waste package during the first million years after the waste package is breached. The results of this calculation will be used to ensure that the type and amount of criticality control material used in the waste package design will prevent criticality.

  14. Food packages for Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fohey, M. F.; Sauer, R. L.; Westover, J. B.; Rockafeller, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews food packaging techniques used in space flight missions and describes the system developed for the Space Shuttle. Attention is directed to bite-size food cubes used in Gemini, Gemini rehydratable food packages, Apollo spoon-bowl rehydratable packages, thermostabilized flex pouch for Apollo, tear-top commercial food cans used in Skylab, polyethylene beverage containers, Skylab rehydratable food package, Space Shuttle food package configuration, duck-bill septum rehydration device, and a drinking/dispensing nozzle for Space Shuttle liquids. Constraints and testing of packaging is considered, a comparison of food package materials is presented, and typical Shuttle foods and beverages are listed.

  15. Decision support system for material handling and packaging design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Mats I.; Mazouz, Abdel K.; Han, Chingping

    1992-02-01

    The reliability of the materials handling process involving automated stacking of packages on a pallet or automated sorting of packages in a distribution system depends mainly on the design of the package and the material used for the package. Many problems can be eliminated that result in a higher utilization of the system if the package is designed not only for the product and its requirements but also for an automated handling system with different types of grasping devices. A decision support system is being developed to help the package designer select the most appropriate material and design to satisfy the requirements of the automated materials handling process. The decision support system is programmed in C++ which gives the flexibility and portability needed for this type of system. The user interface is using graphics to ease the understanding of different design options during the selection process.

  16. Detecting small holes in packages

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.; Cadieux, James R.

    1996-01-01

    A package containing a tracer gas, and a method for determining the presence of a hole in the package by sensing the presence of the gas outside the package. The preferred tracer gas, especially for food packaging, is sulfur hexafluoride. A quantity of the gas is added to the package and the package is closed. The concentration of the gas in the atmosphere outside the package is measured and compared to a predetermined value of the concentration of the gas in the absence of the package. A measured concentration greater than the predetermined value indicates the presence of a hole in the package. Measuring may be done in a chamber having a lower pressure than that in the package.

  17. Detecting small holes in packages

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.; Cadieux, J.R.

    1996-03-19

    A package containing a tracer gas, and a method for determining the presence of a hole in the package by sensing the presence of the gas outside the package are disclosed. The preferred tracer gas, especially for food packaging, is sulfur hexafluoride. A quantity of the gas is added to the package and the package is closed. The concentration of the gas in the atmosphere outside the package is measured and compared to a predetermined value of the concentration of the gas in the absence of the package. A measured concentration greater than the predetermined value indicates the presence of a hole in the package. Measuring may be done in a chamber having a lower pressure than that in the package. 3 figs.

  18. Comparison of analytical methods for percent phosphorous determination in electroless nickel plate. [UCC-ND alkalimetric method; UCC-ND Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) method; ASTM-E39 gravimetric method; development colorimetric method; independent colorimetric method

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, W.W.; Sullivan, H.H.

    1982-01-01

    Electroless nicke-plate characteristics are substantially influenced by percent phosphorous concentrations. Available ASTM analytical methods are designed for phosphorous concentrations of less than one percent compared to the 4.0 to 20.0% concentrations common in electroless nickel plate. A variety of analytical adaptations are applied through the industry resulting in poor data continuity. This paper presents a statistical comparison of five analytical methods and recommends accurate and precise procedures for use in percent phosphorous determinations in electroless nickel plate. 2 figures, 1 table.

  19. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2006-04-25

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package TransporterModel II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: "each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." They further state: "each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant| (WIPP) management and operating (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations(CFR) §71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions ofapproval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21 regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are

  20. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2007-12-13

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: "each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application." They further state: "each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application." Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and operating (M&O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21 regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations are

  1. Space Food Package - Gemini-Titan (GT)-4 Flight - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-05-01

    Food packages of beef and gravy fully reconstituted and ready to eat. An astronaut would squeeze food through opening at right side of package. Water gun is used to reconstitute dehydrated food. Scissors are used to open packages. This is the type of space food which will be used on the Gemini-Titan 4 spaceflight. MSC, Houston, TX *S65-24895 thru S65-24899

  2. Neural Network Simulation Package from Ohio State University

    SciTech Connect

    Wickham, K.L.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the Neural Network Simulation Package acquired from Ohio State University. The package known as Neural Shell V2.1 was evaluated and benchmarked at the INEL Supercomputing Center (ISC). The emphasis was on the Back Propagation Net which is currently considered one of the more promising types of neural networks. This report also provides additional documentation that may be helpful to anyone using the package.

  3. ASTM E 1559 method for measuring material outgassing/deposition kinetics has applications to aerospace, electronics, and semiconductor industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, J. W.; Glassford, A. P. M.; Steakley, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The American Society for Testing and Materials has published a new standard test method for characterizing time and temperature-dependence of material outgassing kinetics and the deposition kinetics of outgassed species on surfaces at various temperatures. This new ASTM standard, E 1559(1), uses the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) collection measurement approach. The test method was originally developed under a program sponsored by the United States Air Force Materials Laboratory (AFML) to create a standard test method for obtaining outgassing and deposition kinetics data for spacecraft materials. Standardization by ASTM recognizes that the method has applications beyond aerospace. In particular, the method will provide data of use to the electronics, semiconductor, and high vacuum industries. In ASTM E 1559 the material sample is held in vacuum in a temperature-controlled effusion cell, while its outgassing flux impinges on several QCM's which view the orifice of the effusion cell. Sample isothermal total mass loss (TML) is measured as a function of time from the mass collected on one of the QCM's which is cooled by liquid nitrogen, and the view factor from this QCM to the cell. The amount of outgassed volatile condensable material (VCM) on surfaces at higher temperatures is measured as a function of time during the isothermal outgassing test by controlling the temperatures of the remaining QCM's to selected values. The VCM on surfaces at temperatures in between those of the collector QCM's is determined at the end of the isothermal test by heating the QCM's at a controlled rate and measuring the mass loss from the end of the QCM's as a function of time and temperature. This reevaporation of the deposit collected on the QCM's is referred to as QCM thermogravimetric analysis. Isothermal outgassing and deposition rates can be determined by differentiating the isothermal TML and VCM data, respectively, while the evaporation rates of the species can be obtained as a

  4. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John l. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-07-01

    The 1st generation acoustic monitoring package was designed to detect and analyze weak acoustic signals inside natural gas transmission lines. Besides a microphone it housed a three-inch diameter aerodynamic acoustic signal amplifier to maximize sensitivity to leak induced {Delta}p type signals. The theory and test results of this aerodynamic signal amplifier was described in the master's degree thesis of our Research Assistant Deepak Mehra who is about to graduate. To house such a large three-inch diameter sensor required the use of a steel 300-psi rated 4 inch weld neck flange, which itself weighed already 29 pounds. The completed 1st generation Acoustic Monitoring Package weighed almost 100 pounds. This was too cumbersome to mount in the field, on an access port at a pipeline shut-off valve. Therefore a 2nd generation and truly Portable Acoustic Monitor was built. It incorporated a fully self-contained {Delta}p type signal sensor, rated for line pressures up to 1000 psi with a base weight of only 6 pounds. This is the Rosemont Inc. Model 3051CD-Range 0, software driven sensor, which is believed to have industries best total performance. Its most sensitive unit was purchased with a {Delta}p range from 0 to 3 inch water. This resulted in the herein described 2nd generation: Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) for pipelines up to 1000 psi. Its 32-pound total weight includes an 18-volt battery. Together with a 3 pound laptop with its 4-channel data acquisition card, completes the equipment needed for field acoustic monitoring of natural gas transmission pipelines.

  5. MMIC packaging with Waffleline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, R. W.; Ellis, T. T.; Schineller, E. R.

    1990-06-01

    The design principle of Waffleline, a patented MMIC packaging technology, is discussed, and several recent applications are described and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and photographs. Standard Waffleline is a foil-covered waffle-iron-like grid with dielectric-coated signal and power wires running in the channels and foil-removed holes for mounting prepackaged chips or chip carriers. With spacing of 50 mils between center conductors, this material is applicable at frequencies up to 40 GHz; EHF devices require Waffleline with 25-mil spacing. Applications characterized include a subassembly for a man-transportable SHF satellite-communication terminal, a transmitter driver for a high-power TWT, and a 60-GHz receiver front end (including an integrated monolithic microstrip antenna, a low-noise amplifier, a mixer, and an IF amplifier in a 0.25-inch-thick 1.6-inch-diameter package). The high package density and relatively low cost of Waffleline are emphasized.

  6. Waste package reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pescatore, C.; Sastre, C.

    1983-01-01

    Proof of future performance of a complex system such as a high-level nuclear waste package over a period of hundreds to thousands of years cannot be had in the ordinary sense of the word. The general method of probabilistic reliability analysis could provide an acceptable framework to identify, organize, and convey the information necessary to satisfy the criterion of reasonable assurance of waste package performance according to the regulatory requirements set forth in 10 CFR 60. General principles which may be used to evaluate the qualitative and quantitative reliability of a waste package design are indicated and illustrated with a sample calculation of a repository concept in basalt. 8 references, 1 table.

  7. Effect of ionising radiation treatment on the specific migration characteristics of packaging-food simulant combinations: effect of type and dose of radiation.

    PubMed

    Zygoura, P D; Paleologos, E K; Kontominas, M G

    2011-05-01

    Migration levels of acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC) plasticiser from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) film into the European Union specified aqueous food simulants (distilled water, 3% w/v acetic acid and 10% v/v ethanol) were monitored as a function of time. Migration testing was carried out at 40°C for 10 days. Determination of the analyte was performed by applying an analytical methodology based on surfactant (Triton X-114) mediated extraction prior to gas chromatographic-flame ionisation detection. PVC cling film used was subjected to ionising treatment with a [(60)Co] source, as well as to electron-beam irradiation at doses equal to 5, 15 and 25 kGy, with the aim to compare the effect of type and dose of radiation on the specific migration behaviour of PVC. Equilibrium concentrations of acetyl tributyl citrate into the aqueous solvents covered the ranges 173-422 µg l(-1) and 296-513 µg l(-1) for gamma- and electron-irradiated PVC, respectively. Hence, e-beam irradiation resulted in significantly higher ATBC migration compared with gamma treatment. The highest extraction efficiency of the 10% ethanol solution was common in both gamma and e-beam treatments; distilled water demonstrated the lowest migration. Gamma-irradiation at intermediate doses up to 5 kGy produced no statistically significant (p > 0.05) effect on ATBC migration into all three aqueous simulants; however, this does not apply for high-energy electrons. Both ionising treatments were similar in that they resulted in statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences in plasticiser migrating amounts between non-irradiated and irradiated at doses of 15 and 25 kGy samples. Gamma-radiation did not affect the kinetics of plasticiser migration. On the contrary, electron-beam radiation produced shorter equilibration times for all food-simulating solvents tested at 40°C. The above values regarding ATBC migration into aqueous food simulants are far below the European Union restriction (1 mg kg(-1) body weight

  8. Characterization of a Novel Type of HIV-1 Particle Assembly Inhibitor Using a Quantitative Luciferase-Vpr Packaging-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Errazuriz, Elisabeth; Coric, Pascale; Souquet, Florence; Turcaud, Serge; Boulanger, Pierre; Bouaziz, Serge; Hong, Saw See

    2011-01-01

    The HIV-1 auxiliary protein Vpr and Vpr-fusion proteins can be copackaged with Gag precursor (Pr55Gag) into virions or membrane-enveloped virus-like particles (VLP). Taking advantage of this property, we developed a simple and sensitive method to evaluate potential inhibitors of HIV-1 assembly in a living cell system. Two proteins were coexpressed in recombinant baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells, Pr55Gag, which formed the VLP backbone, and luciferase fused to the N-terminus of Vpr (LucVpr). VLP-encapsidated LucVpr retained the enzymatic activity of free luciferase. The levels of luciferase activity present in the pelletable fraction recovered from the culture medium correlated with the amounts of extracellular VLP released by Sf9 cells assayed by conventional immunological methods. Our luciferase-based assay was then applied to the characterization of betulinic acid (BA) derivatives that differed from the leader compound PA-457 (or DSB) by their substituant on carbon-28. The beta-alanine-conjugated and lysine-conjugated DSB could not be evaluated for their antiviral potentials due to their high cytotoxicity, whereas two other compounds with a lesser cytotoxicity, glycine-conjugated and ε-NH-Boc-lysine-conjugated DSB, exerted a dose-dependent negative effect on VLP assembly and budding. A fifth compound with a low cytotoxicity, EP-39 (ethylene diamine-conjugated DSB), showed a novel type of antiviral effect. EP-39 provoked an aberrant assembly of VLP, resulting in nonenveloped, morula-like particles of 100-nm in diameter. Each morula was composed of nanoparticle subunits of 20-nm in diameter, which possibly mimicked transient intermediates of the HIV-1 Gag assembly process. Chemical cross-linking in situ suggested that EP-39 favored the formation or/and persistence of Pr55Gag trimers over other oligomeric species. EP-39 showed a novel type of negative effect on HIV-1 assembly, targeting the Pr55Gag oligomerisation. The biological effect of EP-39 underlined the

  9. SPHINX experimenters information package

    SciTech Connect

    Zarick, T.A.

    1996-08-01

    This information package was prepared for both new and experienced users of the SPHINX (Short Pulse High Intensity Nanosecond X-radiator) flash X-Ray facility. It was compiled to help facilitate experiment design and preparation for both the experimenter(s) and the SPHINX operational staff. The major areas covered include: Recording Systems Capabilities,Recording System Cable Plant, Physical Dimensions of SPHINX and the SPHINX Test cell, SPHINX Operating Parameters and Modes, Dose Rate Map, Experiment Safety Approval Form, and a Feedback Questionnaire. This package will be updated as the SPHINX facilities and capabilities are enhanced.

  10. Uptakes of Cs and Sr on San Joaquin soil measured following ASTM method C1733.

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.; Petri, E.T.

    2012-04-04

    Series of tests were conducted following ASTM Standard Procedure C1733 to evaluate the repeatability of the test and the effects of several test parameters, including the solution-to-soil mass ratio, test duration, pH, and the concentrations of contaminants in the solution. This standard procedure is recommended for measuring the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) of a contaminant in a specific soil/groundwater system. One objective of the current tests was to identify experimental conditions that can be used in future interlaboratory studies to determine the reproducibility of the test method. This includes the recommendation of a standard soil, the range of contaminant concentrations and solution matrix, and various test parameters. Quantifying the uncertainty in the distribution coefficient that can be attributed to the test procedure itself allows the differences in measured values to be associated with differences in the natural systems being studied. Tests were conducted to measure the uptake of Cs and Sr dissolved as CsCl and Sr(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} in a dilute NaHCO{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} solution (representing contaminants in a silicate groundwater) by a NIST standard reference material of San Joaquin soil (SRM 2709a). Tests were run to measure the repeatability of the method and the sensitivity of the test response to the reaction time, the mass of soil used (at a constant soil-to-solution ratio), the solution pH, and the contaminant concentration. All tests were conducted in screw-top Teflon vessels at 30 C in an oven. All solutions were passed through a 0.45-{mu}m pore size cellulose acetate membrane filter and stabilized with nitric acid prior to analysis with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Scoping tests with soil in demineralized water resulted in a solution pH of about 8.0 and the release of small amounts of Sr from the soil. Solutions were made with targeted concentrations of 1 x 10{sup -6} m, 1 x 10{sup -5} m, 2.5 x 10{sup -5} m, 5

  11. Color stability of ground beef packaged in a low carbon monoxide atmosphere or vacuum.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Youn; Claus, James R

    2011-01-01

    Ground beef was either packaged in an atmosphere of 0.4% CO, 30% CO₂, and 69.6% N₂ (CO-MAP) or vacuum. After storage (48 h, 2-3°C), packages of CO-MAP and vacuum were opened and overwrapped with polyvinyl chloride. Other CO-MAP and vacuum packages were left intact. Packages were initially displayed for 7 days (2-3°C). Intact packages were further displayed up to 35 days before being opened and displayed (1 or 3 days). Intact CO-MAP packaged ground beef was always more red than intact vacuum-packaged ground beef. Color was relatively stable for both types of intact packages over 35 days of display. Upon opening CO-MAP packaged ground beef, the red color decreased slower than in ground beef from vacuum packages.

  12. Sensing deep extreme environments: the receptor cell types, brain centers, and multi-layer neural packaging of hydrothermal vent endemic worms.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Shuichi; Ogura, Atsushi; Mori, Tsukasa; Toyohara, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Takao; Tsuchida, Shinji; Fujikura, Katsunori

    2014-01-01

    Deep-sea alvinellid worm species endemic to hydrothermal vents, such as Alvinella and Paralvinella, are considered to be among the most thermotolerant animals known with their adaptability to toxic heavy metals, and tolerance of highly reductive and oxidative stressful environments. Despite the number of recent studies focused on their overall transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolic stabilities, little is known regarding their sensory receptor cells and electrically active neuro-processing centers, and how these can tolerate and function in such harsh conditions. We examined the extra- and intracellular organizations of the epidermal ciliated sensory cells and their higher centers in the central nervous system through immunocytochemical, ultrastructural, and neurotracing analyses. We observed that these cells were rich in mitochondria and possessed many electron-dense granules, and identified specialized glial cells and serial myelin-like repeats in the head sensory systems of Paralvinella hessleri. Additionally, we identified the major epidermal sensory pathways, in which a pair of distinct mushroom bodies-like or small interneuron clusters was observed. These sensory learning and memory systems are commonly found in insects and annelids, but the alvinellid inputs are unlikely derived from the sensory ciliary cells of the dorsal head regions. Our evidence provides insight into the cellular and system-wide adaptive structure used to sense, process, and combat the deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment. The alvinellid sensory cells exhibit characteristics of annelid ciliary types, and among the most unique features were the head sensory inputs and structure of the neural cell bodies of the brain, which were surrounded by multiple membranes. We speculated that such enhanced protection is required for the production of normal electrical signals, and to avoid the breakdown of the membrane surrounding metabolically fragile neurons from oxidative stress. Such pivotal

  13. Future trends in electronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshabini, Aicha; Wang, Gangqiang; Barlow, Fred

    2006-03-01

    Electronic packaging is traditionally defined as the back-end process that transforms bare integrated circuits (IC) into functional products. As the IC feature size decreases and the size of silicon wafer increases, the cost per IC is reduced and the performance is enhanced. The future IC chips will be larger in size, have more input/output terminals (I/Os), and require higher power. In addition to the advancements in IC technology, electronic packaging is also driven by the market requirements for low cost, small size, and multi-functional electronic products. In response to these requirements, packaging related areas such as design, packaging architectures, materials, processes, and manufacturing equipment are all changing rapidly. Wafer-level packaging (WLP) offers the benefits of low cost and smallest size for single chip packages, since the package is done at wafer level other than individual die. After packages reach the horizontal limit of dimensions, 3D stacking solution provides more efficient packages through expanding packages in the vertical dimension. Functional integration is achieved with 3D stacking architectures. System in package (SiP), one of the solutions to system integration, incorporates electronics, non-electronic devices such as optical devices, biological devices, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), etc, and interconnection in a single package, to form smart structures or microsystems. MEMS devices require specialized packaging to serve new market applications. This paper and presentation describe the technology requirements and challenges of these advancing packaging areas. The potential solutions and future trends are presented.

  14. Disinfectant wipes are appropriate to control microbial bioburden from surfaces: use of a new ASTM standard test protocol to demonstrate efficacy.

    PubMed

    Sattar, S A; Bradley, C; Kibbee, R; Wesgate, R; Wilkinson, M A C; Sharpe, T; Maillard, J-Y

    2015-12-01

    The use of disinfectant pre-soaked wipes (DPW) to decontaminate high-touch environmental surfaces (HTES) by wiping is becoming increasingly widespread in the healthcare environment. However, DPW are rarely tested using conditions simulating their field use, and the label claims of environmental surface disinfectants seldom include wiping action. To evaluate the new E2967-15 standard test specific to wipes, particularly their ability to decontaminate surfaces and to transfer acquired contamination to clean surfaces. ASTM Standard E2967-15 was used by three independent laboratories to test the efficacy of five types of commercially available wipe products. All data generated were pulled together, and reproducibility and repeatability of the standard were measured. All the commercial DPW tested achieved a >4log10 (>99.99%) reduction in colony-forming units (CFU) of Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumanii with 10s of wiping, but only one DPW containing 0.5% accelerated H2O2 prevented the transfer of bacteria to another surface. This newly introduced standard method represents a significant advance in assessing DPW for microbial decontamination of HTES, and should greatly assist research and development, and in making more relevant and reliable claims on marketed DPW. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Analytical screening studies on irradiated food packaging.

    PubMed

    Driffield, M; Bradley, E L; Leon, I; Lister, L; Speck, D R; Castle, L; Potter, E L J

    2014-01-01

    Foods may be irradiated in their final packaging and this process may affect the composition of the packaging and in turn affect the migration of substances into food. Headspace and liquid injection GC-MS and HPLC with time-of-flight MS have been used to identify and estimate levels of radiolytic products in irradiated finished plastic packaging materials. Fifteen retail packaging materials were studied. Investigations were carried out into the effect of different irradiation types (gamma and electron beam), irradiation doses (1, 3, 7 and 10 kGy) and dose rates (5 kGy s(-1) for electron beam and 0.4 and 1.85 kGy h(-1) for gamma) on the radiolytic products. Any differences seen in comparing the two ionising radiation types were attributed largely to the very different dose rates; for electron beam a 10 kGy dose was delivered in just 2 s whereas using gamma it took 5.4 h. Differences were also seen when comparing the same samples irradiated at different doses. Some substances were not affected by irradiation, others decreased in concentration and others were formed upon increasing doses of irradiation. These results confirm that irradiation-induced changes do occur in substances with the potential to migrate and that the safety of the finished packaging material following irradiation should be assessed.

  16. Attenuated human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV1) expressing the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion F glycoprotein from an added gene: effects of pre-fusion stabilization and packaging of RSV F.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Liang, Bo; Ngwuta, Joan; Liu, Xueqiao; Surman, Sonja; Lingemann, Matthias; Kwong, Peter D; Graham, Barney S; Collins, Peter L; Munir, Shirin

    2017-08-23

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most prevalent worldwide cause of severe respiratory tract infection in infants and young children. Human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV1) also causes severe pediatric respiratory illness, especially croup. Both viruses lack vaccines. Here, we describe the preclinical development of a bivalent RSV/HPIV1 vaccine based on a recombinant HPIV1 vector, attenuated by a stabilized mutation, that expresses RSV F protein modified for increased stability in the pre-fusion (pre-F) conformation by previously-described disulfide bond (DS) and hydrophobic cavity-filling (Cav1) mutations. RSV F was expressed from the first or second gene position as the full-length protein or as a chimeric protein with its transmembrane (TM) and cytoplasmic tail (CT) domains substituted with those of HPIV1 F in an effort to direct packaging in the vector particles. All constructs were recovered by reverse genetics. The TMCT versions of RSV F were packaged in the rHPIV1 particles much more efficiently than their full-length counterparts. In hamsters, the presence of the RSV F gene, and in particular the TMCT versions, was attenuating and resulted in reduced immunogenicity. However, the vector expressing full-length RSV F from the pre-N position was immunogenic for RSV and HPIV1. It conferred complement-independent high-quality RSV-neutralizing antibodies at titers similar to those of wild type RSV and provided protection against RSV challenge. The vectors exhibited stable RSV F expression in vitro and in vivo In conclusion, an attenuated rHPIV1 vector expressing a pre-F-stabilized form of RSV F demonstrated promising immunogenicity and should be further developed as an intranasal pediatric vaccine.Importance. RSV and HPIV1 are major viral causes of acute pediatric respiratory illness for which no vaccines or suitable antiviral drugs are available. The RSV F glycoprotein is the major RSV neutralization antigen. We used a rHPIV1 vector, bearing a

  17. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  18. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  19. Metric Education Evaluation Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansky, Bob; And Others

    This document was developed out of a need for a complete, carefully designed set of evaluation instruments and procedures that might be applied in metric inservice programs across the nation. Components of this package were prepared in such a way as to permit local adaptation to the evaluation of a broad spectrum of metric education activities.…

  20. Nutrition Learning Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This book presents nine packages of learning materials for trainers to use in teaching community health workers to carry out the nutrition element of their jobs. Lessons are intended to help health workers acquire skill in presenting to communities the principles and practice of good nutrition. Responding to the most common causes of poor…

  1. Automatic Differentiation Package

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David M.; Phipps, Eric; Bratlett, Roscoe

    2007-03-01

    Sacado is an automatic differentiation package for C++ codes using operator overloading and C++ templating. Sacado provide forward, reverse, and Taylor polynomial automatic differentiation classes and utilities for incorporating these classes into C++ codes. Users can compute derivatives of computations arising in engineering and scientific applications, including nonlinear equation solving, time integration, sensitivity analysis, stability analysis, optimization and uncertainity quantification.

  2. Learning Activity Package, Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Diane

    A set of ten teacher-prepared Learning Activity Packages (LAPs) in beginning algebra and nine in intermediate algebra, these units cover sets, properties of operations, number systems, open expressions, solution sets of equations and inequalities in one and two variables, exponents, factoring and polynomials, relations and functions, radicals,…

  3. Radiographic film package

    SciTech Connect

    Muylle, W. E.

    1985-08-27

    A radiographic film package for non-destructive testing, comprising a radiographic film sheet, an intensifying screen with a layer of lead bonded to a paper foil, and a vacuum heat-sealed wrapper with a layer of aluminum and a heat-sealed easy-peelable thermoplastic layer.

  4. YWCA Vocational Readiness Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jeanne

    This document outlines, in detail, the Vocational Readiness Package for young girls, which is a week-long program utilizing simulation games and role-playing, while employing peer group counseling techniques to dramatize the realities concerning women in marriage and careers today. After three years of using this program, the authors have compiled…

  5. Packaging Materials Properties Data

    SciTech Connect

    Leduc, D.

    1991-10-30

    Several energy absorbing materials are used in nuclear weapons component shipping containers recently designed for the Y-12 Plant Program Management Packaging Group. As a part of the independent review procedure leading to Certificates of Compliance, the U.S. Department of Energy Technical Safety Review Panels requested compression versus deflection . data on these materials. This report is a compilation of that data.

  6. Packaging materials properties data

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Several energy absorbing materials are used in nuclear weapons component shipping containers recently designed for the Y-12 Plant Program Management Packaging Group. As a part of the independent review procedure leading to Certificates of Compliance, the US Department of Energy Technical Safety Review Panels requested compression versus deflection data on these materials. This report is a compilation of that data.

  7. Project Information Packages Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RMC Research Corp., Mountain View, CA.

    Presented are an overview booklet, a project selection guide, and six Project Information Packages (PIPs) for six exemplary projects serving underachieving students in grades k through 9. The overview booklet outlines the PIP projects and includes a chart of major project features. A project selection guide reviews the PIP history, PIP contents,…

  8. Packaging, transportation of LLW

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, P.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation is an overview of the regulations and requirements for the packaging and transportation of low-level radioactive wastes. United States Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Transportation regulations governing the classification of wastes and the transport documentation are also described.

  9. The Superintendent's Compensation Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzke, Eugene R.

    Guidelines are presented to help school boards evaluate superintendents and set up their compensation packages. The author describes informal and formal evaluation procedures and states his preference for the latter, since they promote mutual understanding between the superintendent and the board. A flow chart illustrates a superintendent…

  10. Jpetra Kernel Package

    SciTech Connect

    Heroux, Michael A.

    2004-03-01

    A package of classes for constructing and using distributed sparse and dense matrices, vectors and graphs, written in Java. Jpetra is intended to provide the foundation for basic matrix and vector operations for Java developers. Jpetra provides distributed memory operations via an abstract parallel machine interface. The most common implementation of this interface will be Java sockets.

  11. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, G. L.; Galambos, P. C.

    2002-06-01

    There are many examples of electro-microfluidic products that require cost effective packaging solutions. Industry has responded to a demand for products such as drop ejectors, chemical sensors, and biological sensors. Drop ejectors have consumer applications such as ink jet printing and scientific applications such as patterning self-assembled monolayers or ejecting picoliters of expensive analytes/reagents for chemical analysis. Drop ejectors can be used to perform chemical analysis, combinatorial chemistry, drug manufacture, drug discovery, drug delivery, and DNA sequencing. Chemical and biological micro-sensors can sniff the ambient environment for traces of dangerous materials such as explosives, toxins, or pathogens. Other biological sensors can be used to improve world health by providing timely diagnostics and applying corrective measures to the human body. Electro-microfluidic packaging can easily represent over fifty percent of the product cost and, as with Integrated Circuits (IC), the industry should evolve to standard packaging solutions. Standard packaging schemes will minimize cost and bring products to market sooner.

  12. Waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  13. Educational Software for Teaching Physics: Commercial Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjertsen, Margaret; Risley, John S.

    1987-01-01

    This document was developed to help teachers locate computer software to enhance the teaching of traditional physics at all educational levels. It contains a table listing approximately 900 packages. The table is organized by type of computer (Apple II, Atari, Commodore, IBM PC, Macintosh, and TRS-80) and is alphabetized first by publisher and…

  14. Sensors Umbra Package v 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Oppel, Fred J.; Hart, Brian E.; Whitford, Gregg Douglas; Xavier, Patrick G.; Rigdon, James Brian; Gottlieb, Eric Joseph; McDonald, Michael J.; Hart, Derek H.; Jungels, John; Little, Charles Q.

    2016-08-25

    This package contains modules that model sensors in Umbra. There is a mix of modalities for both accumulating and tracking energy sensors: seismic, magnetic, and radiation. Some modules fuss information from multiple sensor types. Sensor devices (e.g., seismic sensors), detect objects such as people and vehicles that have sensor properties attached (e.g., seismic properties).

  15. Safety Analysis for Packaging Steel Banded Wooden Shipping Containers

    SciTech Connect

    FERRELL, P.C.

    2000-12-05

    This safety analysis report for packaging describes the steel banded wooden shipping containers, which are certified as Type AF packagings. The authorized payload for these containers is unirradiated, slightly enriched, uranium ingots, billets, extrusions, and scrap materials. The amount of uranium in the containers will not exceed the LSA-II material requirements as defined in 49 CFR 173.403.

  16. 49 CFR 178.940 - Standards for flexible Large Packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR...) Construction requirements for flexible Large Packagings are as follows: (1) The strength of the material and... use. (2) All materials used in the construction of flexible Large Packagings of types 51M must, after...

  17. 49 CFR 178.940 - Standards for flexible Large Packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS...) Construction requirements for flexible Large Packagings are as follows: (1) The strength of the material and... use. (2) All materials used in the construction of flexible Large Packagings of types 51M must, after...

  18. TERM IO: An Ada (Trade Name) Terminal Interface Package.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    States Navy B.S.M.E., University of Wisconsin, 1981 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER...8217 emillating it .. lodifying the parkage to uie oin another Terminail Type can he done with changes to The package b odv Th, ,’,,iplt.t package bo),v for

  19. High Efficiency Integrated Package

    SciTech Connect

    Ibbetson, James

    2013-09-15

    Solid-state lighting based on LEDs has emerged as a superior alternative to inefficient conventional lighting, particularly incandescent. LED lighting can lead to 80 percent energy savings; can last 50,000 hours – 2-50 times longer than most bulbs; and contains no toxic lead or mercury. However, to enable mass adoption, particularly at the consumer level, the cost of LED luminaires must be reduced by an order of magnitude while achieving superior efficiency, light quality and lifetime. To become viable, energy-efficient replacement solutions must deliver system efficacies of ≥ 100 lumens per watt (LPW) with excellent color rendering (CRI > 85) at a cost that enables payback cycles of two years or less for commercial applications. This development will enable significant site energy savings as it targets commercial and retail lighting applications that are most sensitive to the lifetime operating costs with their extended operating hours per day. If costs are reduced substantially, dramatic energy savings can be realized by replacing incandescent lighting in the residential market as well. In light of these challenges, Cree proposed to develop a multi-chip integrated LED package with an output of > 1000 lumens of warm white light operating at an efficacy of at least 128 LPW with a CRI > 85. This product will serve as the light engine for replacement lamps and luminaires. At the end of the proposed program, this integrated package was to be used in a proof-of-concept lamp prototype to demonstrate the component’s viability in a common form factor. During this project Cree SBTC developed an efficient, compact warm-white LED package with an integrated remote color down-converter. Via a combination of intensive optical, electrical, and thermal optimization, a package design was obtained that met nearly all project goals. This package emitted 1295 lm under instant-on, room-temperature testing conditions, with an efficacy of 128.4 lm/W at a color temperature of ~2873

  20. Development of ASTM Standard for SiC-SiC Joint Testing Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, George; Back, Christina

    2015-10-30

    As the nuclear industry moves to advanced ceramic based materials for cladding and core structural materials for a variety of advanced reactors, new standards and test methods are required for material development and licensing purposes. For example, General Atomics (GA) is actively developing silicon carbide (SiC) based composite cladding (SiC-SiC) for its Energy Multiplier Module (EM2), a high efficiency gas cooled fast reactor. Through DOE funding via the advanced reactor concept program, GA developed a new test method for the nominal joint strength of an endplug sealed to advanced ceramic tubes, Fig. 1-1, at ambient and elevated temperatures called the endplug pushout (EPPO) test. This test utilizes widely available universal mechanical testers coupled with clam shell heaters, and specimen size is relatively small, making it a viable post irradiation test method. The culmination of this effort was a draft of an ASTM test standard that will be submitted for approval to the ASTM C28 ceramic committee. Once the standard has been vetted by the ceramics test community, an industry wide standard methodology to test joined tubular ceramic components will be available for the entire nuclear materials community.