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Sample records for packed red cell

  1. Prolonged storage of packed red blood cells for blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Simancas-Racines, Daniel; Peña-González, Barbra S

    2015-07-14

    A blood transfusion is an acute intervention, used to address life- and health-threatening conditions on a short-term basis. Packed red blood cells are most often used for blood transfusion. Sometimes blood is transfused after prolonged storage but there is continuing debate as to whether transfusion of 'older' blood is as beneficial as transfusion of 'fresher' blood. To assess the clinical benefits and harms of prolonged storage of packed red blood cells, in comparison with fresh, on recipients of blood transfusion. We ran the search on 1st May 2014. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), CINAHL (EBSCO Host) and two other databases. We also searched clinical trials registers and screened reference lists of the retrieved publications and reviews. We updated this search in June 2015 but these results have not yet been incorporated. Randomised clinical trials including participants assessed as requiring red blood cell transfusion were eligible for inclusion. Prolonged storage was defined as red blood cells stored for ≥ 21 days in a blood bank. We did not apply limits regarding the duration of follow-up, or country where the study took place. We excluded trials where patients received a combination of short- and long-stored blood products, and also trials without a clear definition of prolonged storage. We independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction by at least two review authors. The major outcomes were death from any cause, transfusion-related acute lung injury, and adverse events. We estimated relative risk for dichotomous outcomes. We measured statistical heterogeneity using I(2). We used a random-effects model to synthesise the findings. We identified three randomised clinical trials, involving a total of 120 participants, comparing packed red blood cells with ≥ 21 days storage

  2. Sodium, potassium, water, and haemoglobin in the packed red cells of severe thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Choremis, C.; Economou-Mavrou, Cleopatra; Tsenghi, Christina

    1961-01-01

    Sodium, potassium, water, and the mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration were determined in the packed erythrocytes of children with severe thalassaemia. The concentration of sodium in the packed red cells was higher than normal in a significant proportion of children with thalassaemia whereas potassium in the packed cells and sodium and potassium in the plasma were normal. On average, the cell water content was a little higher and the mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration a little lower than normal. The cation concentrations in the packed cells of thalassaemia are compared with those in other anaemias. Similarities are pointed out between the sodium concentrations in the packed cells of thalassaemia and those from the foetus and children suffering from malnutrition. PMID:13879177

  3. Effects of 4000 rad irradiation on the in vitro storage properties of packed red cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.L.; Ledford, M.E.

    1985-11-01

    Immunosuppressed patients who require red cell transfusions receive irradiated (1500-3000 rad) packed red cells. These cells are irradiated immediately before infusion. If a large group of patients become immunosuppressed due to exposure to radiation or chemicals, the ability to supply large volumes of irradiated blood at the time of use might not be possible. An alternate solution to providing quantities of irradiated blood is to irradiate the units prior to storage. This study presents in vitro data comparing storage of paired packed red cell units either irradiated or not irradiated. Five units of fresh blood drawn into citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine (CPDA-1) were packed to a hematocrit of 75 +/- 1 percent, and then each unit was divided in two equal parts. One of each pair was irradiated (4000 rads), and both parts of each unit were stored for 35 days at 4 degrees C. Samples were analyzed every 7 days. Irradiation caused a slight drop in red cell adenosine triphosphate and 2,3 diphosphoglycerate and a slight increase in plasma hemoglobin compared to controls. Methemoglobin, pH, and glucose consumption were identical to the controls. The evidence indicates that irradiation did not cause biochemical or metabolic changes in the red cells that would lead us to suspect a difference between irradiated and nonirradiated stored red cells in function or viability. These negative findings require in vivo confirmation.

  4. Reduction of prion infectivity in packed red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Rodrigo; Buytaert-Hoefen, Kimberley A.; Gonzalez-Romero, Dennisse; Castilla, Joaquin; Hansen, Eric T.; Hlavinka, Dennis; Goodrich, Raymond P.; Soto, Claudio

    2008-12-12

    The link between a new variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and the consumption of prion contaminated cattle meat as well as recent findings showing that vCJD can be transmitted by blood transfusion have raised public health concerns. Currently, a reliable test to identify prions in blood samples is not available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to remove scrapie prion protein (PrP{sup Sc}) and infectivity from red blood cell (RBC) suspensions by a simple washing procedure using a cell separation and washing device. The extent of prion removal was assessed by Western blot, PMCA and infectivity bioassays. Our results revealed a substantial removal of infectious prions ({>=}3 logs of infectivity) by all techniques used. These data suggest that a significant amount of infectivity present in RBC preparations can be removed by a simple washing procedure. This technology may lead to increased safety of blood products and reduce the risk of further propagation of prion diseases.

  5. Cryopreserved packed red blood cells in surgical patients: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex; Kim, Young; Hoehn, Richard; Jernigan, Peter; Pritts, Timothy

    2016-09-08

    Since the advent of anticoagulation and component storage of human blood products, allogeneic red blood cell transfusion has been one of the most common practices in modern medicine. Efforts to reduce the biochemical effects of storage, collectively known as the red blood cell storage lesion, and prolong the storage duration have led to numerous advancements in erythrocyte storage solutions. Cryopreservation and frozen storage of red blood cells in glycerol have been successfully utilised by many civilian and military institutions worldwide. Through progressive improvements in liquid storage of erythrocytes in novel storage solutions, the logistical need for cryopreserved red blood cells in the civilian setting has diminished. A growing body of current literature is focused on the clinical consequences of packed red blood cell age. Modern cryopreservation techniques show promise as a cost-effective method to ameliorate the negative effect of the red blood cell storage lesion, while meeting the technical and logistical needs of both civilian and military medicine. This review outlines the history of red blood cell cryopreservation, the clinical impact of red cell storage, and highlights the current literature on frozen blood and its impact on modern transfusion.

  6. Hyperkalemia after irradiation of packed red blood cells: Possible effects with intravascular fetal transfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Thorp, J.A.; Plapp, F.V.; Cohen, G.R.; Yeast, J.D.; O'Kell, R.T.; Stephenson, S. )

    1990-08-01

    Plasma potassium, calcium, and albumin concentrations in irradiated blood, and in fetal blood before and after transfusion, were measured. Dangerously high plasma potassium levels were observed in some units of irradiated packed red blood cells (range, 13.9 to 66.5 mEq/L; mean, 44.7 mEq/L) and could be one possible explanation for the high incidence of fetal arrhythmia associated with fetal intravascular transfusion. There are many factors operative in the preparation of irradiated packed red blood cells that may predispose to high potassium levels: the age of the red blood cells, the number of procedures used to concentrate the blood, the duration of time elapsed from concentration, the duration of time elapsed from irradiation, and the hematocrit. Use of fresh blood, avoidance of multiple packing procedures, limiting the hematocrit in the donor unit to less than or equal to 80%, and minimizing the time between concentration, irradiation and transfusion may minimize the potassium levels, and therefore making an additional washing procedure unnecessary.

  7. [Evaluation of non-compliance of transfusion requests of packed red blood cells].

    PubMed

    Ben Romdhane, Asma Rym; Ben Ayoub, Wided; Gouider, Emna

    2015-06-01

    Despite legislative acts develloped, many deficiencies were identified in blood requests at the National Blood TransfusionCenter impedding board and blood safety. to evaluate the conformity of the different topics of packed red blood cells requests to the legislation. Our study was prospective descriptive lasting six months (March-August 2011). It assessed all packed red blood cells requests which reached the national blood transfusion center. 16064 packed red blood cells requests from 21 public institutions and 28 private institutions were studied. There was different deficiencies in each item.The absence of birth date in 67.18% of request represented the largest non-compliance within administrative information. A predominance of shortcomings related to transfusion and obstetric history was recorded for clinical information with absence of date of the last transfusion in 91.72% cases, lack of accuracy of any previous transfusion reactions in 88.63% cases and absence of the number of previous pregnancies in 93.15% of transfusion requests prescribed to women. Non-conformities related to the prescribing physician concerned mainly the phone number which was absent in 55.82% of cases. This study revealed a significant lack of awareness of physicians in relation to the law governing transfusion. It is therefore essential to develop training for prescribers to improve transfusion safety.

  8. Packed red blood cell transfusions as a risk factor for parenteral nutrition associated liver disease in premature infants

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Antoni; Algotar, Anushree; Pan, Ling; Schwarz, Steven M; Treem, William R; Valencia, Gloria; Rabinowitz, Simon S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine if packed red blood cell transfusions contribute to the development of parenteral nutrition associated liver disease. METHODS A retrospective chart review of 49 premature infants on parenteral nutrition for > 30 d who received packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions was performed. Parenteral nutrition associated liver disease was primarily defined by direct bilirubin (db) > 2.0 mg/dL. A high transfusion cohort was defined as receiving > 75 mL packed red blood cells (the median value). Kaplan-Meier plots estimated the median volume of packed red blood cells received in order to develop parenteral nutrition associated liver disease. RESULTS Parenteral nutritional associated liver disease (PNALD) was noted in 21 (43%) infants based on db. Among the 27 high transfusion infants, PNALD was present in 17 (64%) based on elevated direct bilirubin which was significantly greater than the low transfusion recipients. About 50% of the infants, who were transfused 101-125 mL packed red blood cells, developed PNALD based on elevation of direct bilirubin. All infants who were transfused more than 200 mL of packed red blood cells developed PNALD. Similar results were seen when using elevation of aspartate transaminase or alanine transaminase to define PNALD. CONCLUSION In this retrospective, pilot study there was a statistically significant correlation between the volume of PRBC transfusions received by premature infants and the development of PNALD. PMID:27872824

  9. Mortality risk is dose-dependent on the number of packed red blood cell transfused after coronary artery bypass graft

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Antônio Alceu; Sousa, Alexandre Gonçalves; Piotto, Raquel Ferrari; Pedroso, Juan Carlos Montano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Transfusions of one or more packed red blood cells is a widely strategy used in cardiac surgery, even after several evidences of increased morbidity and mortality. The world's blood shortage is also already evident. Objective To assess whether the risk of mortality is dose-de>pendent on the number of packed red blood cells transfused after coronary artery bypass graft. Methods Between June 2009 and July 2010, were analyzed 3010 patients: transfused and non-transfused. Transfused patients were divided into six groups according to the number of packed red blood cells received: one, two, three, four, five, six or more units, then we assess the mortality risk in each group after a year of coronary artery bypass graft. To calculate the odds ratio was used the multivariate logistic regression model. Results The increasing number of allogeneic packed red blood cells transfused results in an increasing risk of mortality, highlighting a dose-dependent relation. The odds ratio values increase with the increased number of packed red blood cells transfused. The death's gross odds ratio was 1.42 (P=0.165), 1.94 (P=0.005), 4.17; 4.22, 8.70, 33.33 (P<0.001) and the adjusted death's odds ratio was 1.22 (P=0.43), 1.52 (P=0.08); 2.85; 2.86; 4.91 and 17.61 (P<0.001), as they received one, two, three, four, five, six or more packed red blood cells, respectively. Conclusion The mortality risk is directly proportional to the number of packed red blood cells transfused in coronary artery bypass graft. The greater the amount of allogeneic blood transfused the greater the risk of mortality. The current transfusion practice needs to be reevaluated. PMID:24598957

  10. Effects of 4000-rad irradiation on the in vitro storage properties of packed red cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.L.; Ledford, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Immunosuppressed patients who require red cell transfusions receive irradiated (1500-3000 rad) packed red cells. These cells are irradiated immediately before infusion. If a large group of patients become immunosuppressed due to exposure to radiation or chemicals, the ability to supply large volumes of irradiated blood at the time of use might not be possible. An alternate solution to providing quantities of irradiated blood is to irradiate the units prior to storage. This study presents in vitro data comparing storage of paired packed red cell units either irradiated or not irradiated. Five units of fresh blood drawn into citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine (CPDA-1) were packed to a hematocrit of 75 + or - 1%, and then each unit was divided in two equal parts. One of each pair was irradiated (4000 rads), and both parts of each unit were stored for 35 days at 4 C. Samples were analyzed every 7 days. Irradiation caused a slight drop in red cell adenosine triphosphate and 2,3 diphosphoglycerate and a slight increase in plasma hemoglobin compared to controls. Methemoglobin, pH, and glucose consumption were identical to the controls. The evidence indicates that irradiation did not cause biochemical or metabolic changes in the red cells that would lead us to suspect a difference between irradiated and nonirradiated stored red cells in function or viability. These negative findings require in vivo confirmation.

  11. Nanodefects of membranes cause destruction of packed red blood cells during long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Kozlova, Еlena; Chernysh, Аleksandr; Moroz, Victor; Sergunova, Victoria; Gudkova, Оlga; Kuzovlev, Аrtem

    2015-10-01

    Packed red blood cells (PRBC) are used for blood transfusion. PRBC were stored for 30 days under 4 °С in hermetic blood bags with CPD anticoagulant-preservative solution. Hematocrit was 50-55%. The distortions of PRBC membranes nanostructure and cells morphology during storage were studied by atomic force microscopy. Basic measurements were performed at the day 2, 6, 9, 16, 23 and 30 of storage and additionally 2-3 days after it. Topological defects occurred on RBC membranes by day 9. They appeared as domains with grain-like structures ("grains") sized up to 200 nm. These domains were appeared in almost all cells. Later these domains merged and formed large defects on cells. It was the formation of domains with the "grains" which was onset process leading eventually to destruction of PRBC. Possible mechanisms of transformation of PRBC and their membrane are related to the alterations of spectrin cytoskeleton. During this storage period potassium ions and lactat concentrations increased, pH decreased, intracellular concentration of reduced glutathione diminished in the preservative solution. Changes of PRBC morphology were detected within the entire period of PRBC storage. Discocytes predominated at the days 1 and 2. By day 30 PRBC transformed into irreversible echinocytes and spheroechinocytes. Study of defects of membranes nanostructure may form the basis of assessing the quality of the stored PRBC. This method may allow to work out the best recommendations for blood transfusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Time Dependent Assessment of Morphological Changes: Leukodepleted Packed Red Blood Cells Stored in SAGM.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Ibrahim; Al Marwani, Asma; Mamdouh Nasr, Khuloud; Abdulla Kano, Noora; Hadwan, Tameem

    2016-01-01

    Usually packed red blood cells (pRBCs) require specific conditions in storage procedures to ensure the maximum shelf life of up to 42 days in 2-6°C. However, molecular and biochemical consequences can affect the stored blood cells; these changes are collectively labeled as storage lesions. In this study, the effect of prolonged storage was assessed through investigating morphological changes and evaluating oxidative stress. Samples from leukodepleted pRBC in SAGM stored at 4°C for 42 days were withdrawn aseptically on day 0, day 14, day 28, and day 42. Morphological changes were observed using scanning electron microscopy and correlated with osmotic fragility and hematocrit. Oxidative injury was studied through assessing MDA level as a marker for lipid peroxidation. Osmotic fragility test showed that extended storage time caused increase in the osmotic fragility. The hematocrit increased by 6.6% from day 0 to day 42. The last 2 weeks show alteration in the morphology with the appearance of echinocytes and spherocytes. Storage lesions and morphological alterations appeared to affect RBCs during the storage period. Further studies should be performed to develop strategies that will aid in the improvement of stored pRBC quality and efficacy.

  13. [Effectiveness of a nursing intervention on patient anxiety before transfusion of packed red blood cells].

    PubMed

    Martín Díaz, Jesús Fernando; Hidalgo Gutiérrez, M Jesús; Cerezo Solana, M Fátima; Martín Morcillo, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention regarding anxiety and satisfaction in patients requiring a red blood cell transfusion. Randomised, controlled, single-blind clinical trial in patients requiring a packed red blood cell transfusion. alpha=.05, beta=.10, to detect a 10% difference, 70 subjects in each group. The sampling recruitment was randomised to the intervention group (IG) and the control group (CG). an intervention protocol with oral and written information using a published guide on the safety, risks and benefits of haemotherapy for the IG, and an equivalent one on general health topics for the CG. pre- and post-anxiety state; Spielberger's validated questionnaire: STAI. Satisfaction, by an ad hoc questionnaire. Sociodemographic and clinical variables: description, reason for transfusion, prescription knowledge, incidents, records. There was a total of 144 subjects, 73 (50.69%) in the IG, and 71 (49.31%) in the CG. The mean age was 55.80 years, with 56.94% males, and a first transfusion in 52.08%. Comparability between the IG and the CG was tested and confirmed. The decrease in anxiety after the intervention for the IG was 19.99, compared to 25.48 in CG. The difference was greater than the proposed 10%, and was statistically significant. The preference for information was 98.60% in IG, compared to 43.70% in CG. The hypothesis was confirmed; a protocolised nursing educational intervention protocol increased patient satisfaction with nursing care, and decreased patient anxiety, thus preventing complications and providing greater safety to the users. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. [Anesthesiologists' knowledge about packed red blood cells transfusion in surgical patients].

    PubMed

    Soares, Joyce Mendes; Queiroz, Athos Gabriel Vilela; Queiroz, Vaniely Kaliny Pinheiro de; Falbo, Ana Rodrigues; Silva, Marcelo Neves; Couceiro, Tania Cursino de Menezes; Lima, Luciana Cavalcanti

    2016-10-10

    Blood is an important resource in several lifesaving interventions, such as anemia correction and improvement of oxygen transport capacity. Despite advances, packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion still involves risks. The aim of this study was to describe the knowledge of anesthesiologists about the indications, adverse effects, and alternatives to red blood cell transfusion intraoperatively. Cross-sectional study using a questionnaire containing multiple choice questions and clinical cases related to relevant factors on the decision whether to perform PRBC transfusion, its adverse effects, hemoglobin triggers, preventive measures, and blood conservation strategies. The questionnaire was filled without the presence of the investigator. Likert scale was used and the average rank of responses was calculated. The Epi Info 7 software was used for data analysis. 79% of the institution's anesthesiologists answered the questionnaire; 100% identified the main adverse effects related to blood transfusion. When asked about the factors that influence the transfusion decision, hemoglobin level had the highest agreement (MR=4.46) followed by heart disease (MR=4.26); hematocrit (MR=4.34); age (RM=4.1) and microcirculation evaluation (MR=4.22). Respondents (82.3%) identified levels of Hb=6g.dL(-1) as a trigger to transfuse healthy patient. Regarding blood conservation strategies, hypervolemic hemodilution (MR=2.81) and decided by drugs (MR=2.95) were the least reported. We identify a good understanding of anesthesiologists about PRBC transfusion; however, there is a need for refresher courses on the subject. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  15. Temporal sequence of major biochemical events during Blood Bank storage of packed red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Karon, Brad S.; van Buskirk, Camille M.; Jaben, Elizabeth A.; Hoyer, James D.; Thomas, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Background. We used sensitive spectroscopic techniques to measure changes in Band 3 oligomeric state during storage of packed red blood cells (RBC); these changes were compared to metabolic changes, RBC morphology, cholesterol and membrane protein loss, phospholipid reorganisation of the RBC membrane, and peroxidation of membrane lipid. The aim of the study was to temporally sequence major biochemical events occurring during cold storage, in order to determine which changes may underlie the structural defects in stored RBC. Materials and methods. Fifteen RBC units were collected from normal volunteers and stored under standard blood bank conditions; both metabolic changes and lipid parameters were measured by multiple novel assays including a new mass spectrometric measurement of isoprostane (lipid peroxidation) and flow cytometric assessment of CD47 expression. Band 3 oligomeric state was assessed by time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy, and RBC morphology by microscopy of glutaraldehyde-fixed RBC. Results. Extracellular pH decreased and extracellular potassium increased rapidly during cold storage. Band 3 on the RBC membrane aggregated into large oligomers early in the storage period and coincident with changes in RBC morphology. Membrane lipid changes, including loss of unesterified cholesterol, lipid peroxidation and expression of CD47, also changed early during the storage period. In contrast loss of acetylcholinesterase activity and haemolysis of RBC occurred late during storage. Discussion. Our results demonstrate that changes in the macromolecular organisation of membrane proteins on the RBC occur early in storage and suggest that lipid peroxidation and/or oxidative damage to the membrane are responsible for irreversible morphological changes and loss of function during red cell storage. PMID:22507860

  16. Nanodefects of membranes cause destruction of packed red blood cells during long-term storage

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlova, Elena; Chernysh, Aleksandr; Moroz, Victor; Sergunova, Victoria; Gudkova, Olga; Kuzovlev, Artem

    2015-10-01

    Packed red blood cells (PRBC) are used for blood transfusion. PRBC were stored for 30 days under 4 °C in hermetic blood bags with CPD anticoagulant-preservative solution. Hematocrit was 50–55%. The distortions of PRBC membranes nanostructure and cells morphology during storage were studied by atomic force microscopy. Basic measurements were performed at the day 2, 6, 9, 16, 23 and 30 of storage and additionally 2–3 days after it. Topological defects occurred on RBC membranes by day 9. They appeared as domains with grain-like structures (“grains”) sized up to 200 nm. These domains were appeared in almost all cells. Later these domains merged and formed large defects on cells. It was the formation of domains with the “grains” which was onset process leading eventually to destruction of PRBC. Possible mechanisms of transformation of PRBC and their membrane are related to the alterations of spectrin cytoskeleton. During this storage period potassium ions and lactat concentrations increased, pH decreased, intracellular concentration of reduced glutathione diminished in the preservative solution. Changes of PRBC morphology were detected within the entire period of PRBC storage. Discocytes predominated at the days 1 and 2. By day 30 PRBC transformed into irreversible echinocytes and spheroechinocytes. Study of defects of membranes nanostructure may form the basis of assessing the quality of the stored PRBC. This method may allow to work out the best recommendations for blood transfusion. - Highlights: • Domains with “grains” are formed on membranes surface on 9–16 days of PRBC storage. • The development of domains is the reason of irreversible changes of PRBC structure. • The origin of domains is the consequence of alterations of spectrin cytoskeleton. • Study of nanostructure may form basis of assessing the quality of the stored PRBC.

  17. Packed Red Blood Cells Are an Abundant and Proximate Potential Source of Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zwemer, Charles F.; Davenport, Robertson D.; Gomez-Espina, Juan; Blanco-Gonzalez, Elisa; Whitesall, Steven E.; D'Alecy, Louis G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We determined, for packed red blood cells (PRBC) and fresh frozen plasma, the maximum content, and ability to release the endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and monomethylarginine (LNMMA). Background ADMA and LNMMA are near equipotent NOS inhibitors forming blood’s total NOS inhibitory content. The balance between removal from, and addition to plasma determines their free concentrations. Removal from plasma is by well-characterized specific hydrolases while formation is restricted to posttranslational protein methylation. When released into plasma they can readily enter endothelial cells and inhibit NOS. Fresh rat and human whole blood contain substantial protein incorporated ADMA however; the maximum content of ADMA and LNMMA in PRBC and fresh frozen plasma has not been determined. Methods We measured total (free and protein incorporated) ADMA and LNMMA content in PRBCs and fresh frozen plasma, as well as their incubation induced release, using HPLC with fluorescence detection. We tested the hypothesis that PRBC and fresh frozen plasma contain substantial inhibitory methylarginines that can be released chemically by complete in vitro acid hydrolysis or physiologically at 37°C by enzymatic blood proteolysis. Results In vitro strong-acid-hydrolysis revealed a large PRBC reservoir of ADMA (54.5 ± 9.7 µM) and LNMMA (58.9 ± 28.9 μM) that persisted over 42-d at 6° or -80°C. In vitro 5h incubation at 37°C nearly doubled free ADMA and LNMMNA concentration from PRBCs while no change was detected in fresh frozen plasma. Conclusion The compelling physiological ramifications are that regardless of storage age, 1) PRBCs can rapidly release pathologically relevant quantities of ADMA and LNMMA when incubated and 2) PRBCs have a protein-incorporated inhibitory methylarginines reservoir 100 times that of normal free inhibitory methylarginines in blood and thus could represent a clinically relevant and proximate

  18. Early coagulopathy and metabolic acidosis predict transfusion of packed red blood cells in pediatric trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shane A; Livingston, Michael H; Merritt, Neil H

    2016-05-01

    Severely injured pediatric trauma patients often present to hospital with early coagulopathy and metabolic acidosis. These derangements are associated with poor outcomes, but it is unclear to what degree they predict transfusion of packed red blood cells (pRBC). We retrospectively identified pediatric trauma patients from a level 1 trauma center from 2006 to 2013. Inclusion criteria were age less than 18years, Injury Severity Score greater than 12, and pRBC transfusion within 24h of admission. We identified 96 pediatric trauma patients who underwent pRBC transfusion within 24h of presentation to hospital. On admission, 43% of these patients had one or more signs of coagulopathy, and 81% had metabolic acidosis. Size of pRBC transfusion in the first 24h ranged from 3 to 177mL/kg (mean 29mL/kg), and nineteen patients (20%) underwent massive transfusion (>40ml/kg in 24h). Univariate analysis indicated that size of pRBC transfusion was associated with initial base excess (r=0.46), international normalized ratio (r=0.35), partial thromboplastin time (r=0.41), fibrinogen (r=0.46), and BIG score (Base deficit, INR, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), r=0.36). Platelet count, age, GCS, and direct versus referred presentation were not predictive. Multivariable linear regression confirmed that coagulopathy and metabolic acidosis remained predictive after adjusting for direct versus referred presentation (R(2)=0.30). Early coagulopathy and metabolic acidosis predict size of pRBC transfusion among pediatric trauma patients. Further research is needed to develop massive transfusion protocols and guidelines for activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pre-hospital transfusion of packed red blood cells in 147 patients from a UK helicopter emergency medical service.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard M; de Sausmarez, Eleanor; McWhirter, Emily; Wareham, Gary; Nelson, Magnus; Matthies, Ashley; Hudson, Anthony; Curtis, Leigh; Russell, Malcolm Q

    2017-02-14

    Early transfusion of packed red blood cells (PRBC) has been associated with improved survival in patients with haemorrhagic shock. This study aims to describe the characteristics of patients receiving pre-hospital blood transfusion and evaluate their subsequent need for in-hospital transfusion and surgery. The decision to administer a pre-hospital PRBC transfusion was based on clinical judgment. All patients transfused pre-hospital PRBC between February 2013 and December 2014 were included. Pre-hospital and in-hospital records were retrospectively reviewed. One hundred forty-seven patients were included. 142 patients had traumatic injuries and 5 patients had haemorrhagic shock from a medical origin. Median Injury Severity Score was 30. 90% of patients receiving PRBC had an ISS of >15. Patients received a mean of 2.4(±1.1) units of PRBC in the pre-hospital phase. Median time from initial emergency call to hospital arrival was 114 min (IQR 103-140). There was significant improvement in systolic (p < 0.001), diastolic (p < 0.001) and mean arterial pressures (p < 0.001) with PRBC transfusion but there was no difference in HR (p = 0.961). Patients received PRBC significantly faster in the field than waiting until hospital arrival. At the receiving hospital 57% required an urgent surgical or interventional radiology procedure. At hospital arrival, patients had a mean lactate of 5.4(±4.4) mmol/L, pH of 6.9(±1.3) and base deficit of -8.1(±6.7). Mean initial serum adjusted calcium was 2.26(±0.29) mmol/L. 89% received further blood products in hospital. No transfusion complications or significant incidents occurred and 100% traceability was achieved. Pre-hospital transfusion of packed red cells has the potential to improvde outcome for trauma patients with major haemorrhage. The pre-hospital time for trauma patients can be several hours, suggesting transfusion needs to start in the pre-hospital phase. Hospital transfusion research suggests a 1:1 ratio

  20. Procoagulant role of microparticles in routine storage of packed red blood cells: potential risk for prothrombotic post-transfusion complications.

    PubMed

    Aung, Htet Htet; Tung, John-Paul; Dean, Melinda M; Flower, Robert L; Pecheniuk, Natalie M

    2017-01-01

    During routine storage, packed red blood cells (PRBC) undergo biochemical and morphological changes including loss of red blood cell (RBC) membrane asymmetry and release of microparticles (MPs) bearing phosphatidylserine (PS), a procoagulant phospholipid. This study investigated the association between PRBC storage duration, MP profile and procoagulant activity. Leukodepleted PRBC-supernatant (PRBC-SN; n=13) was prepared at weekly intervals throughout storage. Phospholipid-dependent procoagulant activity, assessed using a factor X-activated clotting time (XACT) assay, decreased throughout storage (p<0.0001), corresponding with increased procoagulant phospholipid content. As determined by flow cytometry, total numbers of MPs and of PS-bearing MPs increased by Day 28 of storage (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively, versus D1), and these MPs were predominantly RBC-derived (CD235(+)). Depletion of MPs from stored (Day 42) PRBC-SN using 0.22 μm filters reduced the number of PS-bearing MPs (p<0.01) but did not increase XACT clotting times. Furthermore, the reduction in procoagulant activity when lactadherin was used to block PS was not altered pre- or post-filtration of PRBC-SN. In conclusion, routine PRBC storage was associated with accumulation of MPs (particularly RBC-derived PS-bearing MPs) and of procoagulant phospholipids; however, depletion of PS-bearing MPs by 0.22 μm filtration did not reduce phospholipid-dependent procoagulant activity. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effects of Morphine Sulfate on Agglutination, Clot Formation and Hemolysis in Packed Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    of the CRNA to learn and keep updated on the pharmacokinetics , pharmacodynamics, untoward reactions, side effects, and incompatibilities of all...alcohol, and chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Seeman, Kwant, Sauks and Argent (1969) also found that many types of cells are protected or stabilized by a... pharmacokinetics of the offending drug. Specifically, defects in erythrocyte glucose-6-phospahte dehydrogenase induce hemolysis after analgesics like

  2. The Effects of Morphine Sulfate on Agglutination, Clot Formation and Hemolysis in Packed Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-18

    learn and keep updated on the pharmacokinetics , pharmacodynamics, untoward reactions, side effects, and incompatibilities of all these drugs can be at... chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Seeman, Kwant, Sauks and Argent (1969) also found that many types of cells are protected or stabilized by a very wide variety...associated with the pharmacokinetics of the offending drug. Specifically, defects in erythrocyte glucose-6-phospahte dehydrogenase induce hemolysis

  3. Use of Esophageal Hemoximetry to Assess the Effect of Packed Red Blood Cell Transfusion on Gastrointestinal Oxygenation in Newborn Infants.

    PubMed

    Vora, Farha M; Gates, Judy; Gerard, Kimberley; Hanson, Shawn; Applegate, Richard L; Blood, Arlin B

    2017-01-18

    Objectives There are no widely accepted methods of continuously monitoring gut oxygenation in the newborn during packed red blood cell transfusion. We investigated the use of an orally inserted light spectroscopy probe to measure lower esophageal oxyhemoglobin saturations (eStO2) before, during, and after transfusion and made comparisons with abdominal near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) flow. Study Design Thirteen neonates with corrected gestational ages ranging from 22 weeks, 0 day to 37 weeks, 5 days were enrolled. eStO2 and NIRS measurements were recorded continuously for a 25-hour period starting 1 hour prior to starting the 4-hour transfusion. Transabdominal ultrasound was used to measure SMA flow prior to, upon completion, and 20 hours after the transfusion. Results Twelve infants completed the study. eStO2 was well-tolerated and was weakly (r = 0.06) correlated (p < 0.001) with NIRS. Compared with NIRS, eStO2 demonstrated a markedly greater variation in oxyhemoglobin values. NIRS and SMA flow measurements did not change, while eStO2 increased from 48 ± 5% and 45 ± 5% in the pre- and intratransfusion periods to 57 ± 4% in the posttransfusion period (p = 0.03). Conclusion Measurement of eStO2 is feasible in neonates and may provide a continuous and sensitive index of rapid changes in mesenteric oxygenation in this patient population.

  4. Safety and efficacy of packed red blood cell transfusions at different doses in very low birth weight infants

    PubMed Central

    Govande, Vinayak P.; Shetty, Ashita; Beeram, Madhava R.

    2016-01-01

    This double-blinded, randomized, crossover study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of 20 mL/kg aliquots of packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions versus 15 mL/kg aliquot transfusions in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants with anemia. The study enrolled 22 hemodynamically stable VLBW infants requiring PRBC transfusions, with a mean gestational age of 25.7 ± 2.2 weeks and birth weight of 804 ± 261 g. Each infant was randomized to receive one of two treatment sequences: 15 mL/kg followed by 20 mL/kg or 20 mL/kg followed by 15 mL/kg. The infants were monitored during and after transfusions, and the efficacy and safety of the treatments were evaluated. Infants had higher posttransfusion hemoglobin (13.2 g/dL vs 11.8 g/dL, P < 0.01) and hematocrit levels (38.6 g/dL vs 34.4 g/dL, P < 0.01) following 20 mL/kg PRBC transfusions when compared to 15 mL/kg transfusions. There were no differences in the incidence of tachypnea, hepatomegaly, edema, hypoxia, necrotizing enterocolitis, or vital sign instability between groups. In conclusion, high-volume PRBC transfusions (20 mL/kg) were associated with higher posttransfusion hemoglobin and hematocrit levels but no adverse effects. Higher-volume transfusions may reduce the need for multiple transfusions and therefore the number of donors the infant is exposed to. PMID:27034542

  5. Assessment of clinical and laboratory variables as a guide to packed red blood cell transfusion of euvolemic anemic dogs.

    PubMed

    Kisielewicz, C; Self, I; Bell, R

    2014-01-01

    There are no standardized guidelines for determining the likelihood that euvolemic anemic dogs will benefit from transfusion of packed red blood cells (pRBC). To report clinical and laboratory variables of dogs receiving pRBC transfusion, which could guide transfusion of other anemic dogs. Twenty-four client-owned anemic dogs receiving pRBC transfusion. Prospective study; 30 transfusions assessed. Clinical findings (mucosal color, pulse quality, heart rate, respiratory rate, mentation/exercise tolerance) before and after transfusion were evaluated by the anemic dog clinical assessment score (ADCAS). Hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, venous oxygen content (CvO2 ), and lactate concentration were measured from blood samples taken before and after transfusion. These results were not used for case management. All ADCAS variables decreased significantly with transfusion (P < .001); the total score was ≥5/12 before transfusion, and ≤3/12 in all cases that were deemed to no longer require transfusion. Hematocrit and CvO2 were <17% and <5 mL/dL, respectively, in 83% of cases before transfusion and hemoglobin concentration was <5.8 g/dL in 80%. Hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, and CvO2 increased significantly with transfusion (P < .001); lactate concentration decreased significantly (P = .006). Clinical and laboratory variables improved significantly after transfusion of pRBC. By identifying how transfusion affected these variables, it was possible to recognize clinical (ADCAS) and laboratory (hemoglobin, CvO2 , lactate) variables, which could be useful in guiding the decision to transfuse dogs with similar presentations. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Changes in gene expression following trauma are related to the age of transfused packed red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Torrance, Hew D T; Vivian, Mark E; Brohi, Karim; Prowle, John R; Pearse, Rupert M; Owen, Helen C; Hinds, Charles J; O'Dwyer, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Transfusion of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) is associated with an increased incidence of nosocomial infections and an increased risk of death. The duration of storage before transfusion may influence these outcomes. Here, we explore the association between the age of transfused PRBCs and specific patterns of inflammatory gene expression in severely injured trauma patients. Severely injured trauma patients requiring intensive care unit treatment and receiving transfusion of PRBCs within 24 hours of the injury were recruited. Blood samples were obtained within 2 hours of the trauma, at 24 hours, and at 72 hours. Messenger RNA was extracted from whole blood, and gene expression was quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The median age of the units of PRBCs transfused to each patient was recorded. The primary outcome measure was the change in candidate gene expression over the initial 72 hours. Sixty-four patients were studied. Fifty-three patients (83%) were male, and the median age was 40.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 31-59). Median Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 31.5 (IQR, 23-43), and 55 patients (86%) experienced a blunt injury. Forty-one patients (64%) developed a nosocomial infection, and 15 patients (23%) died before hospital discharge. Each patient received a median of 5 U of PRBCs (IQR, 4-9.8 U) during the first 24 hours of hospital admission. The median age of the units of PRBCs transfused in each patient was 20 days (IQR, 17-22 days). Older blood was associated with greater decreases in interleukin 12 (IL-12), IL-23, and RORγt (all p's < 0.05) gene expression over the initial 24 hours, greater decreases in IL-12 gene expression over 72 hours, and a rise in transforming growth factor β gene expression over the first 72 hours. A multivariate analysis confirmed the independence of these associations. Increasing the duration of storage of PRBCs before transfusion is associated with a pattern of gene expression consistent with more

  7. Ultrasound-guided intracardiac xenotransfusion of canine packed red blood cells and epinephrine to the left ventricle of a severely anemic cat during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Oron, Liron; Bruchim, Yaron; Klainbart, Sigal; Kelmer, Efrat

    2017-03-01

    To describe the use of an ultrasound-guided intracardiac xenotransfusion of canine packed red blood cells (pRBC) to the left ventricle of a severely anemic cat during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). An 8-year-old previously healthy neutered female cat was presented with severe weakness after she had disappeared for 1 month. On presentation, the cat was in hypovolemic shock, laterally recumbent, and severely anemic with massive flea infestation. Within minutes of admission, the cat became agonal and suffered cardiopulmonary arrest. CPR was immediately initiated; however, attempts to gain IV access during CPR were unsuccessful. As the cat's blood type was yet unknown, 10 mL of canine pRBC was transfused directly into the left ventricular chamber using ultrasound guidance, as well as 0.02 mg/kg of epinephrine using a similar technique. The cat regained cardiac activity and once the jugular vein was cannulated it received 20 additional mL of canine pRBC intravenously. The packed cell volume and total plasma protein following the intracardiac transfusion were 0.09 L/L [9%] and 30 g/L [3.0 g/dL], respectively. Subsequent blood typing revealed the cat had type B blood. The cat was discharged 3 days post-CPR and was alive and doing well 3 months following discharge. This is the first reported case of ultrasound-guided intracardiac canine-to-feline xenotransfusion during CPR. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  8. Saline-expanded group O uncrossmatched packed red blood cells as an initial resuscitation fluid in severe shock.

    PubMed

    Schwab, C W; Civil, I; Shayne, J P

    1986-11-01

    Despite an excellent military experience with the use of the "universal donor" as an immediately available blood component, considerable reluctance to use uncrossmatched Group O packed cells (TOB) remains. In addition, problems continue with rapid blood acquisition in the emergency department. To study the safety of TOB used as an immediate resuscitation component, a 30-month prospective study of all patients arriving at a single trauma unit was undertaken. By protocol TOB (O-, female; O+, male) was delivered to the shock room prior to patient arrival and was expanded to 500 mL by adding 250 mL prewarmed saline (39.4 C) to the existing RBC unit. Transfusion was ordered on clinical signs of Class III or Class IV hemorrhage. Ninety-nine patients entered the protocol, receiving a total of 1,136 units of blood (11.5 units/patient). Four hundred ten units (4.1 units/patient) of uncrossmatched blood were administered on patient arrival--322 units of TOB and 88 units of type-specific blood (TSB). Seven patients (7.4%) had prior transfusions, and 14 (58%) women had prior pregnancies. Complications included disseminated intravascular coagulation, 12%; adult respiratory distress syndrome, 8%; and hepatitis, 1%. Forty-nine patients (49%) required massive transfusion (greater than 10 units/24 hr). All patients were followed clinically and by the blood bank for any signs of transfusion reactions or incompatibility throughout their hospital courses; none developed. There were no deaths related to transfusion incompatibility. We conclude that TOB used as an immediate resuscitative blood component is safe.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Efficacy of fresh packed red blood transfusion in organophosphate poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hang-xing; Tong, Pei-jian; Li, Cai-xia; Du, Jing; Chen, Bing-yu; Huang, Zhi-hui; Wang, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The mortality rate caused by organophosphate (OP) poisoning is still high, even the standard treatment such as atropine and oxime improves a lot. To search for alternative therapies, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of packed red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in acute OP poisoning, and compare the therapeutic effects of RBCs at different storage times. Patients diagnosed with OP poisoning were included in this prospective study. Fresh RBCs (packed RBCs stored less than 10 days) and longer-storage RBCs (stored more than 10 days but less than 35 days) were randomly transfused or not into OP poisoning patients. Cholinesterase (ChE) levels in blood, atropine usage and durations, pralidoxime durations were measured. We found that both fresh and longer-storage RBCs (200–400 mL) significantly increased blood ChE levels 6 hours after transfusion, shortened the duration for ChE recovery and length of hospital stay, and reduced the usage of atropine and pralidoxime. In addition, fresh RBCs demonstrated stronger therapeutic effects than longer-storage RBCs. Packed RBCs might be an alternative approach in patients with OP poisoning, especially during early stages. PMID:28296779

  10. Plasma from stored packed red blood cells and MHC class I antibodies causes acute lung injury in a 2-event in vivo rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kelher, Marguerite R.; Masuno, Tomhiko; Moore, Ernest E.; Damle, Sagar; Meng, Xianzhong; Song, Yong; Liang, Xiayuan; Niedzinski, Jerry; Geier, Steven S.; Khan, Samina Y.; Gamboni-Robertson, Fabia

    2009-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion death. We hypothesize that TRALI requires 2 events: (1) the clinical condition of the patient and (2) the infusion of antibodies against MHC class I antigens or the plasma from stored blood. A 2-event rat model was developed with saline (NS) or endotoxin (LPS) as the first event and the infusion of plasma from packed red blood cells (PRBCs) or antibodies (OX18 and OX27) against MHC class I antigens as the second event. ALI was determined by Evans blue dye leak from the plasma to the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), protein and CINC-1 concentrations in the BALF, and the lung histology. NS-treated rats did not evidence ALI with any second events, and LPS did not cause ALI. LPS-treated animals demonstrated ALI in response to plasma from stored PRBCs, both prestorage leukoreduced and unmodified, and to OX18 and OX27, all in a concentration-dependent fashion. ALI was neutrophil (PMN) dependent, and OX18/OX27 localized to the PMN surface in vivo and primed the oxidase of rat PMNs. We conclude that TRALI is the result of 2 events with the second events consisting of the plasma from stored blood and antibodies that prime PMNs. PMID:19131548

  11. Outcomes of a Quality Improvement Initiative to Prevent Unnecessary Packed Red Blood Cell Transfusions Among Extremely Low Birth-Weight Neonates.

    PubMed

    Beniwal, Lindsay A; Kleven, Karen L; Moody, Leslie T; Molin, Brianna M; Kantola, Stephanie J; Carlson, Michelle L; Schuning, Virginia S; Jain, Sneha; van Buskirk, Camille M; Harris, Malinda N; Carey, William A; Ellsworth, Marc A

    2016-02-01

    Extremely low birth-weight (ELBW) infants frequently receive packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions. Recent studies have shown that more restrictive PRBC transfusion guidelines limit donor exposure and reduce transfusion-related costs without any increase in adverse clinical outcomes. We developed and implemented an evidence-based PRBC transfusion guideline for ELBW infants treated in our unit and then measured provider adherence to this guideline. We performed a retrospective review of all PRBC transfusions given to ELBW infants in 2012 (preguideline) and the first half of 2014 (postguideline). We identified the indication for each transfusion by reviewing physiological/laboratory data and the daily clinical note. We then determine whether each transfusion met criteria according to our new evidence-based guideline. When extrapolating the newly developed protocol to 2012 data, less than 15% of transfusions among ELBW infants would have met the current evidence-based standard. Conversely, during the first 6 months of 2014, 61% of transfusions were administered in adherence to the guideline (P < 001). Using current cost estimates, this represents a projected cost savings of $31,000 in that 6-month period. A multidisciplinary approach to improving PRBC transfusion practices results in potentially safer, more cost-effective care for ELBW infants. Given the frequency, potential harms, and costs associated with PRBC transfusions in ELBW infants, it seems both feasible and important to pursue prospective clinical trials comparing permissive and restrictive approaches to transfusion in this vulnerable population.

  12. Intraoperative transfusion of packed red blood cells in microvascular free tissue transfer patients: assessment of 30-day morbidity using the NSQIP dataset.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bobby D; Ver Halen, Jon P; Mlodinow, Alexei S; Kim, John Y S

    2014-02-01

    Although often a life-saving therapeutic maneuver, there is minimal data available that details the effects of intraoperative packed red blood cell transfusion (IOT) after microvascular free tissue transfer. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried to identify all patients who underwent microvascular free tissue transfer between 2006 and 2010. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the association between intraoperative transfusion and outcomes. Upon bivariate and multivariate analyses, IOT was significantly associated with higher rates of overall complications (odds ratio [OR], 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-3.63), medical complications (OR, 3.35; 95% CI, 1.75-6.42), postoperative transfusion (OR, 6.02; 95% CI, 2.02-17.97), and reoperation (OR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.24-4.04). IOT was not associated with either surgical complications or free flap loss. IOT significantly increases risk for adverse overall and medical complications. However, IOT was not associated with surgical complications or free flap loss. Transfusion practices in the operating room should be reevaluated to improve overall outcomes.

  13. Phthalate esters used as plasticizers in packed red blood cell storage bags may lead to progressive toxin exposure and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Rael, Leonard T; Bar-Or, Raphael; Ambruso, Daniel R; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta S; Craun, Michael L; Bar-Or, David

    2009-01-01

    Phthalate esters (PE's) are plasticizers used to soften PVC-based medical devices. PE's are the most abundant man-made pollutants and increase the risk of developing an allergic respiratory disease or a malignancy. The leaching of PE's in donated packed red blood cells (PRBC) during storage was assessed. PRBC transfusion bags containing CPD/AS-1 (ADSOL) buffer were analyzed. Samples were collected on storage day 1 and day 42. Two PE's, di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), were measured by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LCMS). Interleukin-8 (IL-8) was measured by standard ELISA techniques. DEHP significantly increased from 34.3 microM (+/-20.0 SD) on day 1 to 433.2 microM (+/-131.2 SD) on day 42, a 12.6-fold increase. Similarly, MEHP significantly increased from 3.7 microM (+/-2.8 SD) on day 1 to 74.0 microM (+/-19.1 SD) on day 42, a 20.2-fold increase. Also, DEHP and MEHP increased the release of IL-8 from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The transfusion of older units of PRBC could lead to an accumulation of PE's possibly resulting in inflammation and other effects. This accumulation could be exacerbated due to the decreased metabolism of PE's since trauma patients have a lower esterase activity, the enzymes responsible for metabolizing PE's. The effect of oxidative stress caused by PE's is discussed as a potential mechanism for increases in inflammation caused by older units of PRBC.

  14. Interleukin-8, interleukin-1β and tumour necrosis factor-α in sequential units of packed red blood cells collected from retired racing Greyhounds.

    PubMed

    Purcell, S L; Claus, M; Hosgood, G; Smart, L

    2017-01-01

    We hypothesised that concentrations of interleukin-8 (IL-8), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) would increase during storage in the third sequential unit (U3) of canine packed red blood cells (PRBC) collected from terminal donors in haemorrhagic shock. We further hypothesised that leucoreduction would prevent cytokine accumulation in U3 and that cytokine concentrations in U3 would be higher than in the first units (U1) collected from the same dogs. U1 and U3 were each collected from 12 anaesthetised healthy Greyhounds. Removal of leucocytes from half of each PRBC unit produced one leucoreduced (LR) and one non-leucoreduced (NLR) unit. Canine IL-8, IL-1β and TNF-α concentrations were measured in samples collected from the units during storage on days 0, 10, 20, 30 and 37. The IL-8 concentration in U3 NLR units was significantly higher on days 10, 20, 30 and 37 than on day 0 and was significantly higher than in the LR units at all time points. The IL-1β concentration in U3 did not change over time, or between LR and NLR units. TNF-α was not detected in any unit. There were no significant differences in IL-8 or IL-1β concentrations between U3 and U1 at any time point; however, some NLR U3 units had markedly elevated IL-8 concentrations at day 37 (2060-20,682 pg/mL) compared with NLR U1 units (3369-5280 pg/mL). NLR U3 units collected from dogs in haemorrhagic shock showed a significant increase in IL-8 concentrations during storage. Leucoreduction was effective at preventing the accumulation of IL-8. There was no difference detected between U3 and U1. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  15. Impact of transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma and packed red blood cells in a 1:1 ratio on survival of emergency department patients with severe trauma.

    PubMed

    Zehtabchi, Shahriar; Nishijima, Daniel K

    2009-05-01

    Coagulopathy is common after severe trauma and occurs very early after the initial insult. Some investigators have suggested early and aggressive treatment of the trauma-induced coagulopathy by transfusion of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) and packed red blood cells (PRBC) in a 1:1 ratio. This evidence-based emergency medicine (EBM) review evaluates the evidence regarding the impact of 1:1 ratio of FFP:PRBC transfusion on survival of emergency department (ED) patients with severe trauma. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and other databases were searched. Studies were selected for inclusion if they included trauma patients who required blood transfusion. The outcome measures of interest included mortality and adverse effects of high FFP:PRBC ratios. For comparison, the patients were classified into high ratio (1:1, defined as a ratio of 1:< or =1.5) and low ratio (1:>1.5) groups. The authors did not identify any randomized controlled trials (RCT), but included four observational studies (three retrospective registry and one prospective cohort studies), which enrolled 1,511 patients cumulatively. One study found a statistically significant difference in mortality rate, favoring high FFP:PRBC ratio (relative risk = 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.59 to 0.89), while three studies showed no benefits. One study reported higher rates of sepsis and single/multiorgan failure (MOF), and another study revealed a higher risk of nosocomial infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in the high FFP:PRBC ratio group. Three retrospective registry reviews with suboptimal methodologies and one prospective cohort study provide inadequate evidence to support or refute the use of a high FFP:PRBC ratio in patients with severe trauma.

  16. A high fresh frozen plasma: packed red blood cell transfusion ratio decreases mortality in all massively transfused trauma patients regardless of admission international normalized ratio.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lisa M; Aro, Seppo O; Cohen, Mitchell J; Holcomb, J B; Wade, C E; Brasel, K J; Vercruysse, G; MacLeod, J; Dutton, R P; Hess, J R; Duchesne, J C; McSwain, N E; Muskat, P; Johannigamn, J; Cryer, H M; Tillou, A; Pittet, J F; Knudson, P; De Moya, M A; Schreiber, M A; Tieu, B; Brundage, S; Napolitano, L M; Brunsvold, M; Sihler, K C; Beilman, G; Peitzman, A B; Zenait, M S; Sperry, J; Alarcon, L; Croce, M A; Minei, J P; Kozar, R; Gonzalez, E A; Stewart, R M; Cohn, S M; Mickalek, J E; Bulger, E M; Cotton, B A; Nunez, T C; Ivatury, R; Meredith, J W; Miller, P; Pomper, G J; Marin, B

    2011-08-01

    Coagulopathy is present in 25% to 38% of trauma patients on arrival to the hospital, and these patients are four times more likely to die than trauma patients without coagulopathy. Recently, a high ratio of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) to packed red blood cells (PRBCs) has been shown to decrease mortality in massively transfused trauma patients. Therefore, we hypothesized that patients with elevated International Normalized Ratio (INR) on arrival to the hospital may benefit more from transfusion with a high ratio of FFP:PRBC than those with a lower INR. Retrospective multicenter cohort study of 437 massively transfused trauma patients was conducted to determine whether the effect of the ratio of FFP:PRBC on death at 24 hours is modified by a patient's admission INR on arrival to the hospital. Contingency tables and logistic regression were used. Trauma patients who arrived to the hospital with an elevated INR had a greater risk of death than those with a lower INR. However, as the ratio of FFP:PRBC transfused increased, mortality decreased similarly between the INR quartiles. The mortality benefit from a high FFP:PRBC ratio is similar for all massively transfused trauma patients. This is contrary to the current belief that only coagulopathic trauma patients benefit from a high FFP:PRBC ratio. Furthermore, it is unnecessary to determine whether INR is elevated before transfusing a high FFP:PRBC ratio. Future studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which a high FFP:PRBC ratio decreases mortality in all massively transfused trauma patients.

  17. Cell aggregation: Packing soft grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Karttunen, M.

    2006-06-01

    Cellular aggregates may be considered as collections of membrane enclosed units with a pressure difference between the internal and external liquid phases. Cells are kept together by membrane adhesion and/or confined space compression. Pattern formation and, in particular, intercellular spacing have important roles in controlling solvent diffusion within such aggregates. A physical approach is used to study generic aspects of cellular packings in a confined space. Average material properties are derived from the free energy. The appearance of penetrating intercellular void channels is found to be critically governed by the cell wall adhesion mechanisms during the formation of dense aggregates. A fully relaxed aggregate efficiently hinders solvent diffusion at high hydrostatic pressures, while a small fraction (˜0.1) of adhesion related packing frustration is sufficient for breaking such a blockage even at high a pressure.

  18. Are there benefits to a fresh whole blood vs. packed red blood cell cardiopulmonary bypass prime on outcomes in neonatal and pediatric cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    Valleley, Melinda S; Buckley, Klayton W; Hayes, Kylie M; Fortuna, Randall R; Geiss, Dale M; Holt, David W

    2007-09-01

    Techniques for pediatric cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have significantly improved over the years. The use of fresh whole blood (FWB) and pre-bypass ultrafiltration (PBUF) has been suggested as means for improving perioperative and postoperative outcomes. It is the intent of this study to show that fresh whole blood along with PBUF will result in balanced CPB prime that can offer a reduction in blood product exposures and blood loss along with improving several measured postoperative outcomes. After institutional review board approval, a retrospective review was conducted on 100 patients to analyze the benefits of FWB and PBUF on outcomes in neonatal and pediatric cardiac surgery. Data analysis included preoperative and CPB data, perioperative inotrope and blood product exposure, and postoperative blood loss and blood product exposure measured for up to a 12-hour period in the intensive care unit (ICU). The three groups compared were FWB prime vs. packed red blood cell (PRBC) prime, < 5 kg FWB prime vs. < 5 kg PRBC prime, and 5+ kg FWB prime and 5+ kg PRBC prime. Cumulative blood product exposures for the FWB prime group found 62% received one blood exposure for the operative and postoperative period (p < .0001). The majority of patients who received a PRBC prime (64%) received three or more cumulative exposures (p < .0003). The < 5 kg FWB group also received significantly less cumulative blood exposure, with 64% receiving just one exposure. Comparatively, 85% of the < 5 kg PRBC patients received three or more blood product exposures perioperatively and postoperatively (p < .0001). Perioperative inotrope and postoperative blood loss did not differ among the groups. Outcomes for intraoperative death, intraoperative extubation, delayed sternal closure, and mediastinal reexploration were also not statistically different. The results of this study found that FWB leads to significantly less blood exposure, specifically in the < 5-kg population

  19. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... to one part of the body or another. Red blood cells are an important element of blood. Their job ... is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of ...

  20. Modification of sodium, glucose, potassium, and osmolarity in packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma using a desktop hemoconcentrator setup.

    PubMed

    Striker, Carrie Whittaker; Woldorf, Stacia; Holt, David

    2012-06-01

    Massive transfusion with packed blood cells (PRBCs) or fresh frozen plasma (FFP) can result in dangerous complications including stroke, kidney failure, and cardiac arrest. A simple, bench top technique using a hemoconcentrator and dialysate solution is described to correct critical values of sodium, glucose, potassium, and osmolarity in PRBCs and FFP. Sodium, glucose, and osmolarity were corrected to normal or near normal values. Elevated potassium was reduced by 65%, but not completely normalized. A simple, bench top method for correcting dangerous abnormalities with PRBCs and FFP can be used to improve the safety of massive blood transfusion.

  1. Nitric oxide scavenging by red cell microparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; Christ, George J; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2013-12-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the important signaling molecule NO almost as fast as cell-free hemoglobin, about 1000 times faster than red-cell-encapsulated hemoglobin. The degree to which this fast reaction with NO by red cell microparticles influences NO bioavailability depends on several factors that are explored here. In the context of stored blood preserved in ADSOL, we find that both cell-free hemoglobin and red cell microparticles increase as a function of duration of storage, and the proportion of extra erythrocytic hemoglobin in the red cell microparticle fraction is about 20% throughout storage. Normalized by hemoglobin concentration, the NO-scavenging ability of cell-free hemoglobin is slightly higher than that of red cell microparticles as determined by a chemiluminescence NO-scavenging assay. Computational simulations show that the degree to which red cell microparticles scavenge NO will depend substantially on whether they enter the cell-free zone next to the endothelial cells. Single-microvessel myography experiments performed under laminar flow conditions demonstrate that microparticles significantly enter the cell-free zone and inhibit acetylcholine, endothelial-dependent, and NO-dependent vasodilation. Taken together, these data suggest that as little as 5 μM hemoglobin in red cell microparticles, an amount formed after the infusion of one unit of aged stored packed red blood cells, has the potential to reduce NO bioavailability and impair endothelial-dependent vasodilation.

  2. Evaluation of concurrent collection of in-line filtered platelets and packed red blood cells by multicomponent apheresis with three last-generation apparatuses.

    PubMed

    Picker, S M; Radojska, S M; Gathof, B S

    2006-07-01

    Multicomponent apheresis enables the collection and procession of different blood products in a single donation. Different apparatuses vary in terms of principle and efficiency. Knowledge of them is essential to analyse cost effectiveness. A total of 30 donors, well matched for baseline parameters, were randomly assigned to the concurrent collection of red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets (PLTs) with the Baxter Amicus (AM), the Haemonetics MCS plus (MCS+), and the Gambro Trima Accel (TA). The procedures were prospectively evaluated, focusing on yield, time, efficiency, citrate donor load and in vitro quality. PLT yield (x 10(11)/unit; mean +/- standard deviation) was 3.09 +/- 0.34 (AM), 2.53 +/- 0.35 (MCS+), 2.51 +/- 0.32 (TA). Absolute RBC mass (ml/unit; mean +/- standard deviation) was 177.4 +/- 2.7 (AM), 161.5 +/- 0.7 (MCS+), and 163.7 +/- 5.4 (TA). The programmed RBC collection target of 160-180 ml was reached by all instruments, whereas the programmed PLT yield of 3.0 x 10(11) was met satisfactorily by AM only. All units contained < 1 x 10(6) WBCs. In vitro RBC quality was equivalent among the systems. No significant differences were noted with collection efficiency, processed whole blood or citrate donor load. Owing to high collection and draw rates, the TA was the fastest of all the systems. The MCS+ had the longest donation/needle time and the highest PLT activation, but compensated with significantly lower draw and citrate infusion rates. The overall processing time was longest with the AM, as a result of manual procedures from donor disconnection to the final products. Multicomponent apheresis was performed safely and efficiently with all three instruments. There was no 'magic apparatus' as each system combined advantages and pitfalls for the diverse parameters evaluated.

  3. High Red Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms High red blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A high red blood cell count is an increase in oxygen-carrying cells in your bloodstream. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to tissues throughout ...

  4. Red cell membrane disorders.

    PubMed

    Narla, J; Mohandas, N

    2017-05-01

    Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the structural basis for altered cell function in various inherited red cell membrane disorders with reduced red cell survival and resulting hemolytic anemia. The current review summarizes these advances as they relate to defining the molecular and structural basis for disorders involving altered membrane structural organization (hereditary spherocytosis [HS] and hereditary elliptocytosis [HE]) and altered membrane transport function (hereditary overhydrated stomatocytosis and hereditary xerocytosis). Mutations in genes encoding membrane proteins that account for these distinct red cell phenotypes have been identified. These molecular insights have led to improved understanding of the structural basis for altered membrane function in these disorders. Weakening of vertical linkage between the lipid bilayer and spectrin-based membrane skeleton leads to membrane loss in HS. In contrast, weakening of lateral linkages among different skeletal proteins leads to membrane fragmentation and decreased surface area in HE. The degrees of membrane loss and resultant increases in cell sphericity determine the severity of anemia in these two disorders. Splenectomy leads to amelioration of anemia by increasing the circulatory red cell life span of spherocytic red cells that are normally sequestered by the spleen. Disordered membrane cation permeability and resultant increase or decrease in red cell volume account for altered cellular deformability of hereditary overhydrated stomatocytosis and hereditary xerocytosis, respectively. Importantly, splenectomy is not beneficial in these two membrane transport disorders and in fact contraindicated due to severe postsplenectomy thrombotic complications. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  6. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-15

    chromium labelled mRBC via an intravenous catheter in the peripheral saphenous vein . Following administration of labelled mRBC into each monkey, 0.2ml...with a single dose of autologous , lyophilized and reconstituted, 5 1Cr-labelled packed erythrocytes via an intravenous catheter in a peripheral vein ...study site, at which time a 25 ml aliquot of reconstituted 51-Cr labeled autologous red blood cells will be infused intravenously into a large arm vein

  7. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). The abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as seen in ...

  8. Dog Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parker, John C.

    1973-01-01

    Dog red blood cells (RBC) lack a ouabain-sensitive sodium pump, and yet they are capable of volume regulation in vivo. The present study was designed to find in vitro conditions under which dog RBC could transport sodium outward, against an electrochemical gradient. Cells were first loaded with sodium chloride and water by preincubation in hypertonic saline. They were then incubated at 37°C in media containing physiologic concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, glucose, and calcium. The cells returned to a normal salt and water content in 16–20 h. Without calcium in the medium the cells continued slowly to accumulate sodium. Removal of glucose caused rapid swelling and lysis, whether or not calcium was present. The net efflux of sodium showed a close relationship to medium calcium over a concentration range from 0 to 5 mM. Extrusion of salt and water was also demonstrated in fresh RBC (no hypertonic preincubation) when calcium levels in the media were sufficiently raised. The ion and water movements in these experiments were not influenced by ouabain or by removal of extracellular potassium. Magnesium could not substitute for calcium. It is concluded that dog RBC have an energy-dependent mechanism for extruding sodium chloride which requires external calcium and is quite distinct from the sodium-potassium exchange pump. PMID:4722565

  9. Oxygen delivery from red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A; Federspiel, W J; Clark, P A; Cokelet, G R

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical analysis of the unloading of oxygen from a red cell. A scale analysis of the governing transport equations shows that the solutions have a boundary layer structure near the red-cell membrane. The boundary layer is a region of chemical nonequilibrium, and it owes its existence to the fact that the kinetic time scales are shorter than the diffusion time scales in the red cell. The presence of the boundary layer allows an analytical solution to be obtained by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. A very useful result from the analysis is a simple, lumped-parameter description of the oxygen delivery from a red cell. The accuracy of the lumped-parameter description has been verified by comparing its predictions with results obtained by numerical integration of the full equations for a one-dimensional slab. As an application, we calculate minimum oxygen unloading times for red cells. PMID:3978198

  10. Pediatric red cell disorders and pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Sherrie L

    2004-12-01

    Anemia in children may arise from a wide variety of pathogenetic mechanisms that include congenital and acquired disorders. Often the diagnostic considerations include disorders that are not seen commonly in adults and lifelong disorders that arise in children and persist throughout life. Consideration of diverse causes of anemia such as red cell membrane disorders, red cell enzymopathies, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, congenital sideroblastic anemias, and hereditary pure red cell aplasia (Diamond-Blackfan anemia), as well as infectious causes such as parvovirus B19 infection, often is required when diagnosing anemia in an infant or young child. Knowledge of these entities that are important causes of anemia in the pediatric population, including clinical manifestations and laboratory workup, will aid in recognition of the specific disease entities and effective workup of pediatric red cell disorders.

  11. Red blood cells, spherocytosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Spherocytosis is a hereditary disorder of the red blood cells (RBCs), which may be associated with a mild anemia. Typically, the affected RBCs are small, spherically shaped, and lack the light centers seen ...

  12. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; RBC Antibody Screen ; Blood Typing ; Type ... a positive RBC antibody screen or a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT) . It is used to identify ...

  13. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Blood samples from Spacelab crewmembers were studied for possible environment effects on red cell components. Analysis involved peroxidation of red cell lipids, enzymes of red cell metabolism, and levels of 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate. Results show that there is no evidence of lipid peroxidation, that biochemical effect known to be associated with irreversible red cell damage. Changes observed in glycolytic intermediates and enzymes cannot be directly implicated as indicating evidence of red cell damage.

  14. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Blood samples from Spacelab crewmembers were studied for possible environment effects on red cell components. Analysis involved peroxidation of red cell lipids, enzymes of red cell metabolism, and levels of 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate. Results show that there is no evidence of lipid peroxidation, that biochemical effect known to be associated with irreversible red cell damage. Changes observed in glycolytic intermediates and enzymes cannot be directly implicated as indicating evidence of red cell damage.

  15. Red Blood Cell Magnetophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Zborowski, Maciej; Ostera, Graciela R.; Moore, Lee R.; Milliron, Sarah; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Schechter, Alan N.

    2003-01-01

    The existence of unpaired electrons in the four heme groups of deoxy and methemoglobin (metHb) gives these species paramagnetic properties as contrasted to the diamagnetic character of oxyhemoglobin. Based on the measured magnetic moments of hemoglobin and its compounds, and on the relatively high hemoglobin concentration of human erythrocytes, we hypothesized that differential migration of these cells was possible if exposed to a high magnetic field. With the development of a new technology, cell tracking velocimetry, we were able to measure the migration velocity of deoxygenated and metHb-containing erythrocytes, exposed to a mean magnetic field of 1.40 T and a mean gradient of 0.131 T/mm, in a process we call cell magnetophoresis. Our results show a similar magnetophoretic mobility of 3.86 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg for erythrocytes with 100% deoxygenated hemoglobin and 3.66 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg for erythrocytes containing 100% metHb. Oxygenated erythrocytes had a magnetophoretic mobility of from −0.2 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg to +0.30 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg, indicating a significant diamagnetic component relative to the suspension medium, in agreement with previous studies on the hemoglobin magnetic susceptibility. Magnetophoresis may open up an approach to characterize and separate cells for biochemical analysis based on intrinsic and extrinsic magnetic properties of biological macromolecules. PMID:12668472

  16. Red blood cell magnetophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, Maciej; Ostera, Graciela R; Moore, Lee R; Milliron, Sarah; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Schechter, Alan N

    2003-04-01

    The existence of unpaired electrons in the four heme groups of deoxy and methemoglobin (metHb) gives these species paramagnetic properties as contrasted to the diamagnetic character of oxyhemoglobin. Based on the measured magnetic moments of hemoglobin and its compounds, and on the relatively high hemoglobin concentration of human erythrocytes, we hypothesized that differential migration of these cells was possible if exposed to a high magnetic field. With the development of a new technology, cell tracking velocimetry, we were able to measure the migration velocity of deoxygenated and metHb-containing erythrocytes, exposed to a mean magnetic field of 1.40 T and a mean gradient of 0.131 T/mm, in a process we call cell magnetophoresis. Our results show a similar magnetophoretic mobility of 3.86 x 10(-6) mm(3) s/kg for erythrocytes with 100% deoxygenated hemoglobin and 3.66 x 10(-6) mm(3) s/kg for erythrocytes containing 100% metHb. Oxygenated erythrocytes had a magnetophoretic mobility of from -0.2 x 10(-6) mm(3) s/kg to +0.30 x 10(-6) mm(3) s/kg, indicating a significant diamagnetic component relative to the suspension medium, in agreement with previous studies on the hemoglobin magnetic susceptibility. Magnetophoresis may open up an approach to characterize and separate cells for biochemical analysis based on intrinsic and extrinsic magnetic properties of biological macromolecules.

  17. Effects of helicopter transport on red blood cell components

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Taiichi; Oki, Ken-ichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Tamura, Satoru; Naito, Yuki; Homma, Chihiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Sumita, Shinzou

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no reported studies on whether a helicopter flight affects the quality and shelf-life of red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate. Materials and methods Seven days after donation, five aliquots of red blood cells from five donors were packed into an SS-BOX-110 container which can maintain the temperature inside the container between 2 °C and 6 °C with two frozen coolants. The temperature of an included dummy blood bag was monitored. After the box had been transported in a helicopter for 4 hours, the red blood cells were stored again and their quality evaluated at day 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21 and 42 after donation. Red blood cell quality was evaluated by measuring adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and supernatant potassium, as well as haematocrit, intracellular pH, glucose, supernatant haemoglobin, and haemolysis rate at the various time points. Results During the experiment the recorded temperature remained between 2 and 6 °C. All data from the red blood cells that had undergone helicopter transportation were the same as those from a control group of red blood cell samples 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21, and 42 days after the donation. Only supernatant Hb and haemolysis rate 42 days after the donation were slightly increased in the helicopter-transported group of red blood cell samples. All other parameters at 42 days after donation were the same in the two groups of red blood cells. Discussion These results suggest that red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate are not significantly affected by helicopter transportation. The differences in haemolysis by the end of storage were small and probably not of clinical significance. PMID:22153688

  18. Effects of helicopter transport on red blood cell components.

    PubMed

    Otani, Taiichi; Oki, Ken-ichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Tamura, Satoru; Naito, Yuki; Homma, Chihiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Sumita, Shinzou

    2012-01-01

    There are no reported studies on whether a helicopter flight affects the quality and shelf-life of red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate. Seven days after donation, five aliquots of red blood cells from five donors were packed into an SS-BOX-110 container which can maintain the temperature inside the container between 2 °C and 6 °C with two frozen coolants. The temperature of an included dummy blood bag was monitored. After the box had been transported in a helicopter for 4 hours, the red blood cells were stored again and their quality evaluated at day 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21 and 42 after donation. Red blood cell quality was evaluated by measuring adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and supernatant potassium, as well as haematocrit, intracellular pH, glucose, supernatant haemoglobin, and haemolysis rate at the various time points. During the experiment the recorded temperature remained between 2 and 6 °C. All data from the red blood cells that had undergone helicopter transportation were the same as those from a control group of red blood cell samples 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21, and 42 days after the donation. Only supernatant Hb and haemolysis rate 42 days after the donation were slightly increased in the helicopter-transported group of red blood cell samples. All other parameters at 42 days after donation were the same in the two groups of red blood cells. These results suggest that red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate are not significantly affected by helicopter transportation. The differences in haemolysis by the end of storage were small and probably not of clinical significance.

  19. Red cell DAMPs and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Rafaela; Silveira, Angélica A A; Conran, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular hemolysis, or the destruction of red blood cells in the circulation, can occur in numerous diseases, including the acquired hemolytic anemias, sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, as well as during some transfusion reactions, preeclampsia and infections, such as those caused by malaria or Clostridium perfringens. Hemolysis results in the release of large quantities of red cell damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) into the circulation, which, if not neutralized by innate protective mechanisms, have the potential to activate multiple inflammatory pathways. One of the major red cell DAMPs, heme, is able to activate converging inflammatory pathways, such as toll-like receptor signaling, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and inflammasome formation, suggesting that this DAMP both activates and amplifies inflammation. Other potent DAMPs that may be released by the erythrocytes upon their rupture include heat shock proteins (Hsp), such as Hsp70, interleukin-33 and Adenosine 5' triphosphate. As such, hemolysis represents a major inflammatory mechanism that potentially contributes to the clinical manifestations that have been associated with the hemolytic diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension and leg ulcers, and likely plays a role in specific complications of sickle cell disease such as endothelial activation, vaso-occlusive processes and tissue injury.

  20. Volatile compounds and odor preferences of ground beef added with garlic and red wine, and irradiated with charcoal pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung Haeng; Yun, Hyejeong; Lee, Ju Woon; Ahn, Dong Uk; Lee, Eun Joo; Jo, Cheorun

    2012-08-01

    Irradiation is the most efficient non-thermal technology for improving hygienic quality and extending the shelf-life of food products. One of the adverse effects of food irradiation, however, is off-flavor production, which significantly affects the sensory preferences for certain foods. In this study, garlic (5%, w/w) and red wine (1:1, w/w) were added to ground beef to increase the radiation sensitivity of pathogens and improve meat odor/flavor. Samples were irradiated at 0 or 5 kGy in the presence of charcoal pack. SPME-GC-MS analysis was performed to measure the changes in the volatile compounds and sensory characteristics of the samples. The amount of total volatile compounds produced from ground beef was greater when the sample was irradiated. When garlic and red wine were added to the ground beef, the amount of volatile compounds significantly increased, and the amount of volatile compounds increased even further after irradiation. However, when the samples were irradiated with charcoal pack, the amount of volatile compounds decreased significantly. Sensory evaluation indicated that charcoal pack significantly increased the odor preferences for both irradiated and non-irradiated ground beef added with garlic. These results indicated that addition of charcoal pack to ground beef could reduce off-odor problems induced by irradiation, and this effect was consistent even when certain additives such as garlic and red wine were added.

  1. Red cell distribution width and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gulcan Kurt, Yasemin; Cayci, Tuncer; Aydin, Fevzi Nuri; Agilli, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Red cell distribution width is a measure of deviation of the volume of red blood cells. It is a marker of anisocytosis and often used to evaluate the possible causes of anemia. Elevated red cell distribution width levels are also associated with acute and chronic inflammatory responses. In nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, inflammation is accompanied with steatosis. For assuming red cell distribution width as a marker of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, intervening factors such as levels of inflammatory markers should also be evaluated. PMID:25473202

  2. cellPACK: a virtual mesoscope to model and visualize structural systems biology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Graham T; Autin, Ludovic; Al-Alusi, Mostafa; Goodsell, David S; Sanner, Michel F; Olson, Arthur J

    2015-01-01

    cellPACK assembles computational models of the biological mesoscale, an intermediate scale (10-100 nm) between molecular and cellular biology scales. cellPACK's modular architecture unites existing and novel packing algorithms to generate, visualize and analyze comprehensive three-dimensional models of complex biological environments that integrate data from multiple experimental systems biology and structural biology sources. cellPACK is available as open-source code, with tools for validation of models and with 'recipes' and models for five biological systems: blood plasma, cytoplasm, synaptic vesicles, HIV and a mycoplasma cell. We have applied cellPACK to model distributions of HIV envelope protein to test several hypotheses for consistency with experimental observations. Biologists, educators and outreach specialists can interact with cellPACK models, develop new recipes and perform packing experiments through scripting and graphical user interfaces at http://cellPACK.org/.

  3. From Global Stresses to Local Cell Packing During Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubensky, David

    2011-03-01

    To perform their functions, cells in epithelial tissues must often adopt highly regular packings. It is still not fully understood how these ordered arrangements of cells arise from disordered, proliferative epithelia during development. I will use experimental and theoretical studies on an attractive model system, the cone cell mosaic in fish retina, to illustrate some ways that mechanical forces and cell signaling can interact to produce this transformation. Experiments examining the response to surgical lesions suggest that the correct mechanical environment at the tissue scale is essential to induce cone cells to rearrange into a rectangular lattice. Starting from this observation, I will argue that large-scale mechanical stresses naturally couple to and orient cell polarization and that this coupling can lead cells to line up in regular rows, as observed in the fish retina. This model predicts that cells in the rows will adopt characteristic trapezoidal shapes and that fragments of rows will persist even in tissue where the mosaic pattern is disrupted by lesions; these predictions are borne out by an analysis of cell packings at the level of the zonula occludens in wildtype and lesioned retinas. Supported by NSF grant IOS-0952873.

  4. cellPACK: A Virtual Mesoscope to Model and Visualize Structural Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Graham T.; Autin, Ludovic; Al-Alusi, Mostafa; Goodsell, David S.; Sanner, Michel F.; Olson, Arthur J.

    2014-01-01

    cellPACK assembles computational models of the biological mesoscale, an intermediate scale (10−7–10−8m) between molecular and cellular biology. cellPACK’s modular architecture unites existing and novel packing algorithms to generate, visualize and analyze comprehensive 3D models of complex biological environments that integrate data from multiple experimental systems biology and structural biology sources. cellPACK is currently available as open source code, with tools for validation of models and with recipes and models for five biological systems: blood plasma, cytoplasm, synaptic vesicles, HIV and a mycoplasma cell. We have applied cellPACK to model distributions of HIV envelope protein to test several hypotheses for consistency with experimental observations. Biologists, educators, and outreach specialists can interact with cellPACK models, develop new recipes and perform packing experiments through scripting and graphical user interfaces at http://cellPACK.org. PMID:25437435

  5. Ratchets, red cells, and metastability.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, Frank A; Aprelev, Alexey

    2013-06-01

    Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder in which a negatively charged glutamic acid is replaced by a hydrophobic valine on the surface of the hemoglobin molecule, leading to polymerization of the deoxygenated form, and resulting in microvascular obstruction. Because of the high volume occupancy under which polymerization occurs physiologically, this process has been an exemplar in the study of excluded volume effects on assembly. More recently, we have identified yet another type of crowding effect involving the obstruction of the ends at which the polymers grow as a consequence of the dense arrays in which these polymers form. This makes such solutions metastable, and leads to Brownian ratchet behavior in which pressure is exerted outward when the gel occupies a finite volume, as in an emulsion or red cell. Such behavior is capable of holding sickled cells in place in the microcirculation against weak pressure differentials (hundreds of Pa), but not against the typical pressures found in vivo.

  6. Prolonged red cell storage before transfusion increases extravascular hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Rapido, Francesca; Brittenham, Gary M.; Bandyopadhyay, Sheila; La Carpia, Francesca; L’Acqua, Camilla; McMahon, Donald J.; Rebbaa, Abdelhadi; Wojczyk, Boguslaw S.; Netterwald, Jane; Wang, Hangli; Schwartz, Joseph; Eisenberger, Andrew; Soffing, Mark; Yeh, Randy; Divgi, Chaitanya; Ginzburg, Yelena Z.; Shaz, Beth H.; Sheth, Sujit; Francis, Richard O.; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Hod, Eldad A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Some countries have limited the maximum allowable storage duration for red cells to 5 weeks before transfusion. In the US, red blood cells can be stored for up to 6 weeks, but randomized trials have not assessed the effects of this final week of storage on clinical outcomes. METHODS. Sixty healthy adult volunteers were randomized to a single standard, autologous, leukoreduced, packed red cell transfusion after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 weeks of storage (n = 10 per group). 51-Chromium posttransfusion red cell recovery studies were performed and laboratory parameters measured before and at defined times after transfusion. RESULTS. Extravascular hemolysis after transfusion progressively increased with increasing storage time (P < 0.001 for linear trend in the AUC of serum indirect bilirubin and iron levels). Longer storage duration was associated with decreasing posttransfusion red cell recovery (P = 0.002), decreasing elevations in hematocrit (P = 0.02), and increasing serum ferritin (P < 0.0001). After 6 weeks of refrigerated storage, transfusion was followed by increases in AUC for serum iron (P < 0.01), transferrin saturation (P < 0.001), and nontransferrin-bound iron (P < 0.001) as compared with transfusion after 1 to 5 weeks of storage. CONCLUSIONS. After 6 weeks of refrigerated storage, transfusion of autologous red cells to healthy human volunteers increased extravascular hemolysis, saturated serum transferrin, and produced circulating nontransferrin-bound iron. These outcomes, associated with increased risks of harm, provide evidence that the maximal allowable red cell storage duration should be reduced to the minimum sustainable by the blood supply, with 35 days as an attainable goal. REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02087514. FUNDING. NIH grant HL115557 and UL1 TR000040. PMID:27941245

  7. The influence of storage age on iron status, oxidative stress and antioxidant protection in paediatric packed cell units.

    PubMed

    Collard, Keith; White, Desley; Copplestone, Adrian

    2014-04-01

    Receipt of blood transfusions is associated with the major consequences of prematurity such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Transfusion-mediated (iron-induced) oxidative damage, coupled with the limited ability of the premature baby to deal with enhanced iron and oxidative load may contribute to this. Adverse effects of transfusion may be related to duration of storage. This study examined the influence of storage on iron and oxidative status in paediatric packed red blood cell units. Paediatric packed red blood cell units were sampled 3 days post-donation, then at 7 days and weekly until day 35. The extracellular medium was separated and the following measured: total iron concentration, total iron binding capacity, non-transferrin-bound iron, haemoglobin, total and reduced ascorbate, glutathione and malondialdehyde. Measurable total and non-transferrin bound iron were present in the extracellular fluid of paediatric packs on day 3. Both parameters rose almost linearly to maximal values at 35 days. Haemoglobin and malondialdehyde levels rose gradually from day 3 to day 21, then more steeply to day 35. Ascorbate existed mainly in the oxidised form and fell rapidly towards the end of storage. Intracellular GSH fell throughout the period of storage. Strong correlations existed between biomarkers of oxidative damage and iron parameters. These data suggest that iron released following the initial preparation of packed red blood cell units may derive from free radical-mediated oxidative damage to the red blood cells and haemoglobin, rather than from extracellular haemoglobin. Iron continues to be released during storage as antioxidant protection declines. A cycle of free radical-mediated damage may initiate and then further exacerbate iron release during storage which, in turn, may mediate further free radical-mediated cellular damage. The potential consequences to recipients of older stored blood may be significant.

  8. The influence of storage age on iron status, oxidative stress and antioxidant protection in paediatric packed cell units

    PubMed Central

    Collard, Keith; White, Desley; Copplestone, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Background Receipt of blood transfusions is associated with the major consequences of prematurity such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Transfusion-mediated (iron-induced) oxidative damage, coupled with the limited ability of the premature baby to deal with enhanced iron and oxidative load may contribute to this. Adverse effects of transfusion may be related to duration of storage. This study examined the influence of storage on iron and oxidative status in paediatric packed red blood cell units. Materials and methods Paediatric packed red blood cell units were sampled 3 days post-donation, then at 7 days and weekly until day 35. The extracellular medium was separated and the following measured: total iron concentration, total iron binding capacity, non-transferrin-bound iron, haemoglobin, total and reduced ascorbate, glutathione and malondialdehyde. Results Measurable total and non-transferrin bound iron were present in the extracellular fluid of paediatric packs on day 3. Both parameters rose almost linearly to maximal values at 35 days. Haemoglobin and malondialdehyde levels rose gradually from day 3 to day 21, then more steeply to day 35. Ascorbate existed mainly in the oxidised form and fell rapidly towards the end of storage. Intracellular GSH fell throughout the period of storage. Strong correlations existed between biomarkers of oxidative damage and iron parameters. Discussion These data suggest that iron released following the initial preparation of packed red blood cell units may derive from free radical-mediated oxidative damage to the red blood cells and haemoglobin, rather than from extracellular haemoglobin. Iron continues to be released during storage as antioxidant protection declines. A cycle of free radical-mediated damage may initiate and then further exacerbate iron release during storage which, in turn, may mediate further free radical-mediated cellular damage. The potential consequences to recipients of older stored blood may be significant

  9. Chemical toxicity of red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, S

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to toxic chemicals may result in alterations of red cell function. In certain cases, the toxic effect requires a genetic predisposition and thus affects only a restricted number of individuals; in other instances, the toxic effect is exerted on the hematopoietic system of every person. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is probably the most widespread genetic disorder. It is observed at highest frequency in populations from subtropical countries as a result of its selective advantage vis à vis falciparum malaria. The gene controlling this enzyme is located on the X-chromosome; thus, the defect is sex-linked. Individuals with a genetic defect of this enzyme are extremely susceptible to hemolysis, when exposed to oxidant drugs (such as certain antimalarials and sulfonamides) because of the inability of their red cells to regenerate NADPH. Lead poisoning result in profound effects on the process of heme synthesis. Among the steps most sensitive to lead toxicity are the enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase and the intramitochondrial step that leads to the incorporation of iron into protoporphyrin. By these mechanisms, in severe lead intoxication there is an accumulation of large amounts of delta-aminolevulinic acid (a compound with inherent neurotoxicity), and there are abnormalities of mitochondrial function in all cells of the body. Individuals living in an industrialized society are unavoidably exposed to some environmental lead. Recent evidence indicates that, even at levels of exposure which do not increase the blood lead level above values presently considered normal, abnormalities of heme synthesis are clearly detectable. PMID:7016524

  10. Red cell transfusion "trigger": a review.

    PubMed

    Petrides, Marian

    2003-07-01

    Despite the publication of several consensus guidelines that set forth recommendations for the transfusion of red cells, actual clinical practice continues to vary widely. Animal data and studies in human volunteers and patients support a red cell transfusion threshold of 7 to 8 g/dl in most patients. However, conflicting data, particularly in cardiac patients and in the elderly, suggest that it may be impossible to define a single red cell "trigger" for all patients. A well-designed, randomized, controlled trial is still needed to establish a safe threshold for red cell transfusion in adults with coronary artery disease.

  11. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  12. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  13. Altered red blood cell surface area in hereditary xerocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sauberman, N; Fairbanks, G; Lutz, H U; Fortier, N L; Snyder, L M

    1981-08-10

    Hereditary xerocytes appear larger than normal red cells in scanning electron micrographs and exhibit a higher ghost packing volume. The major chemical components--protein, phosphorus, cholesterol and sialic acid--are increased uniformly, as are all polypeptides visible on gel electrophoresis patterns of xerocyte membranes. These data are consistent with a xerocyte surface area 15 to 25% above normal. Certain clinical anomalies common to this disorder, including unexpectedly low reticulocyte count and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate level, are discussed in the light of the present findings.

  14. Pure red cell hypoplasia secondary to isoniazid.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, C. R.; Manoharan, A.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a 77 year old man who developed pure red cell aplasia while receiving antituberculous therapy including isoniazid. Prompt recovery occurred following cessation of isoniazid. In this paper we also review previously described case reports of isoniazid-induced pure red cell aplasia. PMID:3120168

  15. Hyperkalemia After Packed Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Trauma Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    both adults and children, hypokalemia has been reported more frequently than hyperkalemia. The largest reported series of which we are aware...retrospective in nature, reported an incidence of hypokalemia of 72% in children undergoing liver transplantation; hyperkalemia occurred in less than 5% of...patients.1 Others have likewise observed hypokalemia to be more common after transfusion.2–4 In the few, small studies describing hyperkalemia after

  16. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  17. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  18. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  19. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  20. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  1. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  2. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  3. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-08

    which we thought may improve the resealing and phospholipid packing of the cell membranes. Neither treatment appeared to significantly improve the cell...cells were experiencing subtle membrane damage. This hypothesis was based on our model of transient lysis- resealing of the cells during the shock of...appreciable rates of chemical reactions. This theory has already found general application in the food and pharmaceuticals (i.e., lyophilized protein

  4. Uptake of carnitine by red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Campa, M.; Borum, P.

    1986-05-01

    A significant amount of blood carnitine (70% of cord blood and 40% of blood from healthy adults) is partitioned into the red blood cell compartment of whole blood. Data indicate that the plasma compartment and the red blood cell compartment of whole blood represent different metabolic pools of carnitine. There are no data to indicate that red blood cells synthesize carnitine, but our understanding of the uptake of carnitine by red blood cells is negligible. Red blood cells were obtained from healthy adults, washed twice with normal saline, and used for uptake experiments. When the cells were incubated at 37/sup 0/C in the presence of /sup 14/C-carnitine, radioactivity was found both in the soluble cytosolic and membrane fractions of the cells following lysis. The uptake was dependent upon the time of incubation, temperature of incubation, and carnitine concentration in the incubation medium. Washed red blood cell membranes incubated with /sup 14/C-carnitine showed specific binding of radioactivity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that red blood cells have an uptake mechanism for L-carnitine.

  5. Fire Tests on E-vehicle Battery Cells and Packs.

    PubMed

    Sturk, David; Hoffmann, Lars; Ahlberg Tidblad, Annika

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of abuse conditions, including realistic crash scenarios, on Li ion battery systems in E-vehicles in order to develop safe practices and priorities when responding to accidents involving E-vehicles. External fire tests using a single burning item equipment were performed on commercial Li ion battery cells and battery packs for electric vehicle (E-vehicle) application. The 2 most common battery cell technologies were tested: Lithium iron phosphate (LFP) and mixed transition metal oxide (lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide, NMC) cathodes against graphite anodes, respectively. The cell types investigated were "pouch" cells, with similar physical dimensions, but the NMC cells have double the electric capacity of the LFP cells due to the higher energy density of the NMC chemistry, 7 and 14 Ah, respectively. Heat release rate (HRR) data and concentrations of toxic gases were acquired by oxygen consumption calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. The test results indicate that the state of charge (SOC) affects the HRR as well as the amount of toxic hydrogen fluoride (HF) gas formed during combustion. A larger number of cells increases the amount of HF formed per cell. There are significant differences in response to the fire exposure between the NMC and LFP cells in this study. The LFP cells generate a lot more HF per cell, but the overall reactivity of the NMC cells is higher. However, the total energy released by both batteries during combustion was independent of SOC, which indicates that the electric energy content of the test object contributes to the activation energy of the thermal and heat release process, whereas the chemical energy stored in the materials is the main source of thermal energy in the batteries. The results imply that it is difficult to draw conclusions about higher order system behavior with respect to HF emissions based on data from tests on single

  6. Sickle red blood cells accumulate in tumor.

    PubMed

    Brown, S L; Ewing, J R; Nagaraja, T N; Swerdlow, P S; Cao, Y; Fenstermacher, J D; Kim, J H

    2003-12-01

    The preferential accumulation of sickle blood cells in tumor vasculature is demonstrated noninvasively using MRI and sickle red blood cells loaded with Gd-DTPA and invasively by two other techniques. The distribution of red blood cells in rat brain tumors relative to normal brains were measured using three separate techniques: MRI of Gd-DTPA loaded cells, fluorescent microscopy detection of Oregon Green 488 fluorescence conjugated to a streptavidin-biotin complex that binds to red blood cell surface proteins, and autoradiography using a technetium (99m)Tc-labeling kit. Labeled red cells were infused intravenously in rats with brain tumors. Sickle cells preferentially accumulated in tumor relative to normal brain, with highest concentrations near the tumor / normal tissue boundary, whereas control normal red cells did not preferentially aggregate at the tumor periphery. This demonstrates the potential of sickle red blood cells to accumulate in the abnormal tumor vessel network, and the ability to detect their aggregation noninvasively and at high spatial resolution using MRI. The application of the noninvasive measurement of sickle cells for imaging tumor neovasculature, or as a delivery tool for therapy, requires further study. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Red cell membrane: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2008-01-01

    As a result of natural selection driven by severe forms of malaria, 1 in 6 humans in the world, more than 1 billion people, are affected by red cell abnormalities, making them the most common of the inherited disorders. The non-nucleated red cell is unique among human cell type in that the plasma membrane, its only structural component, accounts for all of its diverse antigenic, transport, and mechanical characteristics. Our current concept of the red cell membrane envisions it as a composite structure in which a membrane envelope composed of cholesterol and phospholipids is secured to an elastic network of skeletal proteins via transmembrane proteins. Structural and functional characterization of the many constituents of the red cell membrane, in conjunction with biophysical and physiologic studies, has led to detailed description of the way in which the remarkable mechanical properties and other important characteristics of the red cells arise, and of the manner in which they fail in disease states. Current studies in this very active and exciting field are continuing to produce new and unexpected revelations on the function of the red cell membrane and thus of the cell in health and disease, and shed new light on membrane function in other diverse cell types. PMID:18988878

  8. Red cell membrane: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Narla; Gallagher, Patrick G

    2008-11-15

    As a result of natural selection driven by severe forms of malaria, 1 in 6 humans in the world, more than 1 billion people, are affected by red cell abnormalities, making them the most common of the inherited disorders. The non-nucleated red cell is unique among human cell type in that the plasma membrane, its only structural component, accounts for all of its diverse antigenic, transport, and mechanical characteristics. Our current concept of the red cell membrane envisions it as a composite structure in which a membrane envelope composed of cholesterol and phospholipids is secured to an elastic network of skeletal proteins via transmembrane proteins. Structural and functional characterization of the many constituents of the red cell membrane, in conjunction with biophysical and physiologic studies, has led to detailed description of the way in which the remarkable mechanical properties and other important characteristics of the red cells arise, and of the manner in which they fail in disease states. Current studies in this very active and exciting field are continuing to produce new and unexpected revelations on the function of the red cell membrane and thus of the cell in health and disease, and shed new light on membrane function in other diverse cell types.

  9. Human spleen and red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivkin, Igor; Peng, Zhangli; Karniadakis, George; Buffet, Pierre; Dao, Ming

    2016-11-01

    Spleen plays multiple roles in the human body. Among them is removal of old and altered red blood cells (RBCs), which is done by filtering cells through the endothelial slits, small micron-sized openings. There is currently no experimental technique available that allows us to observe RBC passage through the slits. It was previously noticed that people without a spleen have less deformable red blood cells, indicating that the spleen may play a role in defining the size and shape of red blood cells. We used detailed RBC model implemented within the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation framework to study the filter function of the spleen. Our results demonstrate that spleen indeed plays major role in defining the size and shape of the healthy human red blood cells.

  10. Microstructured multi-well plate for three-dimensional packed cell seeding and hepatocyte cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Goral, Vasiliy N.; Au, Sam H.; Faris, Ronald A.; Yuen, Po Ki

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a microstructured multi-well plate for enabling three-dimensional (3D) high density seeding and culture of cells through the use of a standard laboratory centrifuge to promote and maintain 3D tissue-like cellular morphology and cell-specific functionality in vitro without the addition of animal derived or synthetic matrices or coagulants. Each well has microfeatures on the bottom that are comprised of a series of ditches/open microchannels. The dimensions of the microchannels promote and maintain 3D tissue-like cellular morphology and cell-specific functionality in vitro. After cell seeding with a standard pipette, the microstructured multi-well plates were centrifuged to tightly pack cells inside the ditches in order to enhance cell-cell interactions and induce formation of 3D cellular structures during cell culture. Cell-cell interactions were optimized based on cell packing by considering dimensions of the ditches/open microchannels, orientation of the microstructured multi-well plate during centrifugation, cell seeding density, and the centrifugal force and time. With the optimized cell packing conditions, we demonstrated that after 7 days of cell culture, primary human hepatocytes adhered tightly together to form cord-like structures that resembled 3D tissue-like cellular architecture. Importantly, cell membrane polarity was restored without the addition of animal derived or synthetic matrices or coagulants. PMID:25379107

  11. Microstructured multi-well plate for three-dimensional packed cell seeding and hepatocyte cell culture.

    PubMed

    Goral, Vasiliy N; Au, Sam H; Faris, Ronald A; Yuen, Po Ki

    2014-07-01

    In this article, we present a microstructured multi-well plate for enabling three-dimensional (3D) high density seeding and culture of cells through the use of a standard laboratory centrifuge to promote and maintain 3D tissue-like cellular morphology and cell-specific functionality in vitro without the addition of animal derived or synthetic matrices or coagulants. Each well has microfeatures on the bottom that are comprised of a series of ditches/open microchannels. The dimensions of the microchannels promote and maintain 3D tissue-like cellular morphology and cell-specific functionality in vitro. After cell seeding with a standard pipette, the microstructured multi-well plates were centrifuged to tightly pack cells inside the ditches in order to enhance cell-cell interactions and induce formation of 3D cellular structures during cell culture. Cell-cell interactions were optimized based on cell packing by considering dimensions of the ditches/open microchannels, orientation of the microstructured multi-well plate during centrifugation, cell seeding density, and the centrifugal force and time. With the optimized cell packing conditions, we demonstrated that after 7 days of cell culture, primary human hepatocytes adhered tightly together to form cord-like structures that resembled 3D tissue-like cellular architecture. Importantly, cell membrane polarity was restored without the addition of animal derived or synthetic matrices or coagulants.

  12. Malaria and Human Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2013-01-01

    Invasion by the malaria parasite, P. falciparum brings about extensive changes in the host red cells. These include loss of the normal discoid shape, increased rigidity of the membrane, elevated permeability to a wide variety of ionic and other species, and increased adhesiveness, most notably to endothelial surfaces. These effects facilitate survival of the parasite within the host cell and tend to increase the virulence of disease that include cerebral malaria and anemia. Numerous proteins secreted by the internalized parasite and interaction with red cell membrane proteins are responsible for the changes occurring to the host cell. Anemia a serious clinical manifestation of malaria is due to increased destruction of both infected and uninfected red cells due to membrane alterations, as well as ineffective erythropoiesis. There is very good evidence that various red cell disorders including hemoglobinopathies and hereditary ovalocytosis decrease the virulence of disease following parasite infection. A number of mechanism(s) are likely responsible for the protective effect of various red cell abnormalities including decreased invasion, impaired intraerythrocytic development of the parasites and altered interaction between exported parasite proteins and the red cell membrane skeleton. PMID:22965173

  13. Malaria and human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2012-11-01

    Invasion by the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, brings about extensive changes in the host red cells. These include loss of the normal discoid shape, increased rigidity of the membrane, elevated permeability to a wide variety of ionic and other species and increased adhesiveness, most notably to endothelial surfaces. These effects facilitate survival of the parasite within the host cell and tend to increase the virulence of disease that includes cerebral malaria and anemia. Numerous proteins secreted by the internalized parasite and interacting with red cell membrane proteins are responsible for the changes occurring to the host cell. Anemia, a serious clinical manifestation of malaria, is due to increased destruction of both infected and uninfected red cells due to membrane alterations, as well as ineffective erythropoiesis. There is very good evidence that various red cell disorders including hemoglobinopathies and hereditary ovalocytosis decrease the virulence of disease following parasite infection. A number of mechanism(s) are likely responsible for the protective effect of various red cell abnormalities including decreased invasion, impaired intraerythrocytic development of the parasites and altered interaction between exported parasite proteins and the red cell membrane skeleton.

  14. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-15

    instructed not to consume any alcohol -containing beverage during the period from seven days prior to phlebotomy to the completion of the follow-up...over the heart, spleen and liver at 4 hours and 24 hours post-infusion to determine the organ distribution of the radiolabeled reconstituted red blood...cells. 4. External probe counts taken over the heart, liver and spleen to determine the distribution of the lyophilized red blood cells at 4 hours and

  15. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome with Red Cell Aplasia.

    PubMed

    Meena, K R; Bisht, Supriya; Tamaria, K C

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is a rare inherited disorder of abnormal lymphocyte apoptosis, leading to chronic lymphoproliferation. It presents as lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and autoimmune phenomena. Pure red cell aplasia is characterized by normochromic normocytic anemia, reticulocytopenia, and absence of erythroblasts from a normal bone marrow. Only few lymphoproliferative disorders have been associated with erythroid aplasia. The authors are reporting a case of ALPS associated with red cell aplasia in a 7-y-old girl.

  16. Diphenylhydantoin-induced pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Rusia, Usha; Malhotra, Purnima; Joshi, Panul

    2006-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon complication of diphenylhydantoin therapy. It has not been reported in Indian literature. Awareness of the entity helps in establishing the cause of anaemia in these patients and alerts the physicians to the need of comprehensive haematological monitoring in these patients. A case of 58-year-old male who developed pure red cell aplasia following three months of diphenylhydantoin therapy is reported here.

  17. Modular Approach for Continuous Cell-Level Balancing to Improve Performance of Large Battery Packs: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muneed ur Rehman, M.; Evzelman, M.; Hathaway, K.; Zane, R.; Plett, G. L.; Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Maksimovic, D.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage systems require battery cell balancing circuits to avoid divergence of cell state of charge (SOC). A modular approach based on distributed continuous cell-level control is presented that extends the balancing function to higher level pack performance objectives such as improving power capability and increasing pack lifetime. This is achieved by adding DC-DC converters in parallel with cells and using state estimation and control to autonomously bias individual cell SOC and SOC range, forcing healthier cells to be cycled deeper than weaker cells. The result is a pack with improved degradation characteristics and extended lifetime. The modular architecture and control concepts are developed and hardware results are demonstrated for a 91.2-Wh battery pack consisting of four series Li-ion battery cells and four dual active bridge (DAB) bypass DC-DC converters.

  18. Genomic Typing of Red Cell Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Antigen‐Matched  Red  Cells   for  Sickle   Cell   Anemia  Patients  Using  Molecular Typing to Augment Testing: Meghan Delaney, Prashant Gaur, Askale...H, Constans J, Quilici JC, Lefevre‐Witier P, Sevin J, Stevens M: Study of red blood  cell  and serum enzymes in  five  Pyrenean communities and in a...Antigen‐Matched Red  Cells  for  Sickle   Cell  Anemia Patients  Using Molecular Typing to Augment Testing: AABB (poster) 2009.  Background: Patients with  sickle

  19. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  20. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  1. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell indices...

  2. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  3. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell indices...

  4. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell indices...

  5. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell indices...

  6. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  7. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  8. Red blood cell storage and cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Blasi, B; D'Alessandro, A; Ramundo, N; Zolla, L

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we performed weekly assessment of morphology-related parameters through monitoring of CPD-SAGM leuco-filtered erythrocyte concentrates from blood withdrawal until the 42nd day of storage. Liquid storage of red blood cells (RBCs) delivers a blood-derived therapeutic, which is safe, available, effective and affordable for most patients who need transfusion therapy in developed countries. However, a growing body of accumulating controversial evidences, from either biochemical or retrospective clinical studies, prompted safety concerns about longer stored RBCs. Statistical image analysis through scanning electron microscope was coupled to osmotic fragility and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. We could observe that by day 21 more than 50% of RBCs displayed non-discocyte phenotypes. This observation was related to an increase in osmotic fragility, which was totally overlapped in day 0 controls and day 7 RBCs while only slightly augmented in day 14 samples. Cation dysregulation (pH internal/external alteration and potassium) might both reflect and trigger a negative feedback loop with metabolic fluxes and membrane cation pumps. Morphology parameters suggest that significant alterations to RBC morphology over storage duration occur soon after the 14th day of storage, as to become significant enough within the 21st day. © 2012 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2012 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  9. Bi-Functional Biobased Packing of the Cassava Starch, Glycerol, Licuri Nanocellulose and Red Propolis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Samantha Serra; Druzian, Janice Izabel; Machado, Bruna Aparecida Souza; de Souza, Carolina Oliveira; Guimarães, Alaíse Gil

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and determine the bi-functional efficacy of active packaging films produced with starch (4%) and glycerol (1.0%), reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (0–1%) and activated with alcoholic extracts of red propolis (0.4 to 1.0%). The cellulose nanocrystals used in this study were extracted from licuri leaves. The films were characterized using moisture, water-activity analyses and water vapor-permeability tests and were tested regarding their total phenolic compounds and mechanical properties. The antimicrobial and antioxidant efficacy of the films were evaluated by monitoring the use of the active films for packaging cheese curds and butter, respectively. The cellulose nanocrystals increased the mechanical strength of the films and reduced the water permeability and water activity. The active film had an antimicrobial effect on coagulase-positive staphylococci in cheese curds and reduced the oxidation of butter during storage. PMID:25383783

  10. Bi-functional biobased packing of the cassava starch, glycerol, licuri nanocellulose and red propolis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Samantha Serra; Druzian, Janice Izabel; Machado, Bruna Aparecida Souza; de Souza, Carolina Oliveira; Guimarães, Alaíse Gil

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and determine the bi-functional efficacy of active packaging films produced with starch (4%) and glycerol (1.0%), reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (0-1%) and activated with alcoholic extracts of red propolis (0.4 to 1.0%). The cellulose nanocrystals used in this study were extracted from licuri leaves. The films were characterized using moisture, water-activity analyses and water vapor-permeability tests and were tested regarding their total phenolic compounds and mechanical properties. The antimicrobial and antioxidant efficacy of the films were evaluated by monitoring the use of the active films for packaging cheese curds and butter, respectively. The cellulose nanocrystals increased the mechanical strength of the films and reduced the water permeability and water activity. The active film had an antimicrobial effect on coagulase-positive staphylococci in cheese curds and reduced the oxidation of butter during storage.

  11. Theory of non-Newtonian viscosity of red blood cell suspension: effect of red cell deformation.

    PubMed

    Murata, T

    1983-01-01

    The effects of the deformation of red blood cells on non-Newtonian viscosity of a concentrated red cell suspension are investigated theoretically. To simplify the problem an elastic spherical shell filled with an incompressible Newtonian fluid is considered as a model of a normal red cell. The equation of the surface of the shell suspended in a steady simple shear flow is calculated on the assumption that the deformation from a spherical shape is very small. The relative viscosity of a concentrated suspension of such particles is obtained based on the "free surface cell" method proposed by Happel. It is shown that the relative viscosity decreases as the shear rate increases.

  12. The role of filament-packing dynamics in powering amoeboid cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Long; Vanderlinde, Orion; Liu, Jun; Grant, Richard P.; Wouterse, Alan; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Philipse, Albert; Stewart, Murray; Roberts, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Although several models have been proposed to account for how cytoskeleton polymerization drives protrusion in cell motility, the precise mechanism remains controversial. Here, we show that, in addition to force exerted directly against the membrane by growing filaments, the way elongating filaments pack also contributes to protrusion by generating an expansion of the cytoskeleton gel. Tomography shows that filament packing in the major sperm protein (MSP) -based nematode sperm-motility machinery resembles that observed with rigid rods. Maximum rod-packing density decreases dramatically as the rods lengthen. Therefore, as filaments elongate, the cytoskeleton gel expands to accommodate their packing less densely. This volume expansion combines with polymerization to drive protrusion. Consistent with this hypothesis, an engineered MSP mutant that generates shorter filaments shows higher filament-packing density and slower movement. PMID:18385381

  13. The role of filament-packing dynamics in powering amoeboid cell motility.

    PubMed

    Miao, Long; Vanderlinde, Orion; Liu, Jun; Grant, Richard P; Wouterse, Alan; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Philipse, Albert; Stewart, Murray; Roberts, Thomas M

    2008-04-08

    Although several models have been proposed to account for how cytoskeleton polymerization drives protrusion in cell motility, the precise mechanism remains controversial. Here, we show that, in addition to force exerted directly against the membrane by growing filaments, the way elongating filaments pack also contributes to protrusion by generating an expansion of the cytoskeleton gel. Tomography shows that filament packing in the major sperm protein (MSP) -based nematode sperm-motility machinery resembles that observed with rigid rods. Maximum rod-packing density decreases dramatically as the rods lengthen. Therefore, as filaments elongate, the cytoskeleton gel expands to accommodate their packing less densely. This volume expansion combines with polymerization to drive protrusion. Consistent with this hypothesis, an engineered MSP mutant that generates shorter filaments shows higher filament-packing density and slower movement.

  14. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    On the basis of these background data, metabolic studies were performed on humans involved in space flight. These studies included the Skylab experiences. The primary purpose of the investigations was to study red cells for: (1) evidences of lipid peroxidation, or (2) changes at various points in the glycolytic pathway. The Skylab missions were an opportunity to study blood samples before, during, and after flight and to compare results with simultaneous controls. No direct evidence that lipid peroxidation had occurred in the red blood cells was apparent in the studies.

  15. Cryopreserved red blood cells are superior to standard liquid red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hampton, David A; Wiles, Connor; Fabricant, Loïc J; Kiraly, Laszlo; Differding, Jerome; Underwood, Samantha; Le, Dinh; Watters, Jennifer; Schreiber, Martin A

    2014-07-01

    Liquid preserved packed red blood cell (LPRBC) transfusions are used to treat anemia and increase end-organ perfusion. Throughout their storage duration, LPRBCs undergo biochemical and structural changes collectively known as the storage lesion. These changes adversely affect perfusion and oxygen off-loading. Cryopreserved RBCs (CPRBC) can be stored for up to 10 years and potentially minimize the associated storage lesion. We hypothesized that CPRBCs maintain a superior biochemical profile compared with LPRBCs. This was a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. Adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 4 and an anticipated 1-U to 2-U transfusion of PRBCs were eligible. Enrolled patients were randomized to receive either CPRBCs or LPRBCs. Serum proteins (haptoglobin, serum amyloid P, and C-reactive protein), proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, d-dimer, nitric oxide, and 2,3-DPG concentrations were analyzed. Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to assess significance (p < 0.05). Fifty-seven patients were enrolled (CPRBC, n = 22; LPRBC, n = 35). The LPRBC group's final interleukin 8, tumor necrosis factor α, and d-dimer concentrations were elevated compared with their pretransfusion values (p < 0.05). After the second transfused units, 2,3-DPG was higher in the patients receiving CPRBCs (p < 0.05); this difference persisted throughout the study. Finally, serum protein concentrations were decreased in the transfused CPRBC units compared with LPRBC (p < 0.01). CPRBC transfusions have a superior biochemical profile: an absent inflammatory response, attenuated fibrinolytic state, and increased 2,3-DPG. A blood banking system using both storage techniques will offer the highest-quality products to critically injured patients virtually independent of periodic changes in donor availability and transfusion needs. Therapeutic study, level II.

  16. Metabolic dependence of red cell deformability

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Robert I.; LaCelle, Paul L.; Merrill, Edward W.

    1969-01-01

    The contribution of the metabolic state of human erythrocytes to maintenance of cellular deformability was studied during and after in vitro incubation in serum for periods up to 28 hr. An initial loss of membrane deformability became apparent between 4 and 6 hr when cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were approximately 70% of initial values. Membrane deformability then remained stable between 6 and 10 hr. After 10 hr, when cellular ATP had decreased to < 15% of initial values, progressive parallel changes occurred in red cell calcium which increased 400% by 24 hr and in the viscosity of red cell suspensions which had risen 500-750% at 24 hr. A further progressive decrease in membrane deformability also occurred and was reflected by a 1000% increase in negative pressure required to deform the membrane. Red cell filterability decreased to zero as the disc-sphere shape transformation ensued. These changes were accompanied by an increase in ghost residual hemoglobin and nonhemoglobin protein. Regeneration of ATP in depleted cells by incubation with adenosine produced significant reversal of these changes, even in the presence of ouabain. Introduction of calcium into reconstituted ghosts prepared from fresh red cells mimicked the depleted state, and introduction of ATP, ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA), and magnesium into depleted cells mimicked the adenosine effects in intact depleted cells. ATP added externally to 24-hr depleted cells was without effect. Simultaneous introduction of EDTA, ATP, or magnesium along with calcium into reconstituted ghosts prevented the marked decrease in deformability produced by calcium alone. Incorporation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), NAD phosphate (NADP), NADP, reduced form (NADPH), glutatione, reduced form (GSH), inosine triphosphate (ITP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), and uridine triphosphate (UTP) was without effect. These data suggest that a major role of ATP in maintenance

  17. Storage Lesion. Role of Red Cell Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Lee, Janet; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    As stored blood ages intraerythrocytic energy sources are depleted resulting in reduced structural integrity of the membrane. Thus, stored red cells become less deformable and more fragile as they age. This fragility leads to release of cell-free hemoglobin and formation of microparticles, sub-micron hemoglobin-containing vesicles. Upon transfusion, it is likely that additional hemolysis and microparticle formation occurs due to breakdown of fragile red blood cells. Release of cell-free hemoglobin and microparticles leads to increased consumption of nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that modulates blood flow, and may promote inflammation. Stored blood may also be deficient in recently discovered blood nitric oxide synthase activity. We hypothesize that these factors play a potential role in the blood storage lesion. PMID:21496045

  18. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-15

    outlined in our November progress report had been successfully used to repair damage incurred by RBC during hypotonic lysis ( referencesl and 2). The...reconstitution. Figures IA-IF show the osmotic deformability profiles of our thawed red cell preparation. Note the well defined hypotonic and hypertonic...upon rehydration. The osmotic deformability profiles of the reconstituted lyophilized cells are also nearly normal with well defined hypotonic and

  19. Red cell investigations: art and artefacts.

    PubMed

    Minetti, Giampaolo; Egée, Stephane; Mörsdorf, Daniel; Steffen, Patrick; Makhro, Asya; Achilli, Cesare; Ciana, Annarita; Wang, Jue; Bouyer, Guillaume; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Wagner, Christian; Thomas, Serge; Bogdanova, Anna; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-03-01

    Red blood cell research is important for both, the clinical haematology, such as transfusion medicine or anaemia investigations, and the basic research fields like exploring general membrane physiology or rheology. Investigations of red blood cells include a wide spectrum of methodologies ranging from population measurements with a billion cells evaluated simultaneously to single-cell approaches. All methods have a potential for pitfalls, and the comparison of data achieved by different technical approaches requires a consistent set of standards. Here, we give an overview of common mistakes using the most popular methodologies in red blood cell research and how to avoid them. Additionally, we propose a number of standards that we believe will allow for data comparison between the different techniques and different labs. We consider biochemical analysis, flux measurements, flow cytometry, patch-clamp measurements and dynamic fluorescence imaging as well as emerging single-cell techniques, such as the use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interferometric phase microscopy of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Sun, Nan; Tang, Xian; Wang, Yin; Wang, Shouyu

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative phase imaging of cells with high accuracy in a completely noninvasive manner is a challenging task. To provide a proper solution to this important need, interferometric phase microscopy is described which relies on the off-axis interferometry, confocal microscopy and high-speed image capture technology. Phase retrieval from the single interferogram is done by algorithms based on the fast Fourier transform, traditional Hilbert transform and two-step Hilbert transform, respectively. Furthermore, a phase aberrations compensation approach is applied to correct the phase distribution of the red blood cells obtained via the three methods mentioned before without the pre-known knowledge for removing the wave front curvature introduced by the microscope objectives, off-axis imaging, etc., which otherwise hinders the phase reconstruction. The improved results reveal the better inner structures of the red blood cells. The development of quantitative phase imaging technique is shedding light on their future directions and applications for basic and clinical research.

  1. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments intended...

  2. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments intended...

  3. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments intended...

  4. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments intended...

  5. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be Reagent...

  6. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  7. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  8. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  9. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in...

  14. Red Cell Immunohematology Research Conducted in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ziyan; Ye, Luyi; Li, Qin; Gao, Hongwei; Tan, Yinxia; Cai, Wei

    2017-04-01

    ABO subtypes and RhD variants are the most studied blood groups in China. Some of the polymorphisms in these two blood groups have direct clinical relevance. Molecular diagnosis of blood group polymorphisms is underway in China. In addition, research groups have developed methods such as screening for blood group mimetic peptides using phage display technology. New reagents, akin to antibodies directed against RhD and ABO, are being investigated using aptamer-based techniques. Progress is also being made in the development of synthetic exoglycosidases for conversion of group A and/or B antigens to group O. Development of methoxy-polyethylene-glycol modified red cells has been successful in vitro but has not reached clinical application. In this paper, we summarize red cell immunohematology research that has been conducted in China. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Red cell distribution width and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Red cell distribution width (RDW) is an index which primarily reflects impaired erythropoiesis and abnormal red blood cell survival. In last years the interest in this marker has considerably grown and now a lot of data are available indicating that this simple and inexpensive parameter is a strong and independent risk factor for death in the general population. Moreover, several investigations have been performed to investigate the role of RDW in cardiovascular and thrombotic disorders. Contrarily, there are relatively few reports focusing on RDW in the area of oncology and to date none review have been performed in this specific field. As such, the aim of this narrative review is to summarize some interesting results obtained in studies performed in patients affected by solid and hematological tumors. Even if larger studies are needed before these preliminary findings can be generalized, it seems plausible to affirm that RDW can be useful by adding prognostic information in patients with oncologic disease. PMID:27867951

  16. Studies with nonradioisotopic sodium chromate. I. Development of a technique for measuring red cell volume

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, W.A.; Hanbury, C.M.; Keegan, T.E.; Pleban, P.; Holme, S. )

    1989-10-01

    A nonradioisotopic method for measuring red cell volume that involves the use of 52Cr-sodium chromate as the red cell label and of graphite furnace atomic absorption analysis of chromium is described. The technique allows the labelling of 20 mL of packed red cells with 40 to 50 micrograms of sodium chromate (Na2CrO4) in 30 minutes at 22 degrees C with 94 +/- 6 percent uptake. Approximately 40 micrograms of Na2CrO4 was injected for in vivo studies. This results in posttransfusion in vivo red cell chromium levels after sample processing in the range of 1 to 7 micrograms per L, which could be quantitated accurately (coefficient of variation = 4.7%) by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The labeling concentration of chromium did not cause increased hemolysis, and the labeled cells exhibited an osmotic fragility curve similar to that of unlabeled, fresh ACD red cells. Red cell glutathione peroxidase was unaffected by labeling, although glutathione reductase was reduced by approximately 13 percent (p less than 0.05). The 52Cr red cell volume-measuring method was evaluated by concurrent in vivo studies with the standard 51Cr and 125I-albumin methods for that procedure. Simultaneous measurement of red cell volumes in seven volunteers by the 51Cr, 52Cr, and 125I-albumin techniques correlated highly with each other (r greater than 0.76), with mean values of 2294 +/- 199, 2191 +/- 180, and 2243 +/- 291 mL, respectively. The standard deviations of the differences were small: 134 mL for 52Cr versus 51Cr and 183 mL for 52Cr versus 125I.

  17. Multiscale simulation of red blood cell aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, P.; Popel, A. S.

    2004-11-01

    In humans and other mammals, aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is a major determinant to blood viscosity in microcirculation under physiological and pathological conditions. Elevated levels of aggregation are often related to cardiovascular diseases, bacterial infection, diabetes, and obesity. Aggregation is a multiscale phenomenon that is governed by the molecular bond formation between adjacent cells, morphological and rheological properties of the cells, and the motion of the extra-cellular fluid in which the cells circulate. We have developed a simulation technique using front tracking methods for multiple fluids that includes the multiscale characteristics of aggregation. We will report the first-ever direct computer simulation of aggregation of deformable cells in shear flows. We will present results on the effect of shear rate, strength of the cross-bridging bonds, and the cell rheological properties on the rolling motion, deformation and subsequent breakage of an aggregate.

  18. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P.

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar “pearling instability.”

  19. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar "pearling instability."

  20. From Red Cells to Soft Porous Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qianhong; Gacka, Thomas; Nathan, Rungun; Crawford, Robert; Vucbmss Team

    2014-11-01

    Biological scientists have wondered, since the motion of red cells was first observed in capillaries, how the highly flexible red cell can move with so little friction in tightly fitting microvessels without being damaged or undergoing hemolysis. Theoretical studies (Feng and Weinbaum, 2000, JFM; Wu et al., 2004, PRL) attributed this frictionless motion to the dramatically enhanced hydrodynamic lifting force generated inside the soft, porous, endothelial surface layer (ESL) covering the inner surfaces of our capillaries, as a red blood cell glides over it. Herein we report the first experimental examination of this concept. The results conclusively demonstrate that significant fraction of the overall lifting force generated in a soft porous layer as a planing surface glides over it, is contributed by the pore fluid pressure, and thus frictional loss is reduced significantly. Moreover, the experimental predictions showed excellent agreement with the experimental data. This finding has the potential of dramatically changing existing lubrication approaches, and can result in substantial savings in energy consumption and thus reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

  1. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  2. Glycolate kinase activity in human red cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, S; Beutler, E

    1985-02-01

    Human red cells manifest glycolate kinase activity. This activity copurifies with pyruvate kinase and is decreased in the red cells of subjects with hereditary pyruvate kinase deficiency. Glycolate kinase activity was detected in the presence of FDP or glucose-1,6-P2. In the presence of 1 mmol/L FDP, the Km for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was 0.28 mmol/L and a half maximum velocity for glycolate was obtained at 40 mmol/L. The pH optimum of the reaction was over 10.5 With 10 mumol/L FDP, 500 mumol/L glucose-1,6-P2, 2 mmol/L ATP, 5 mmol/L MgCl2, and 50 mmol/L glycolate at pH 7.5, glycolate kinase activity was calculated to be approximately 0.0013 U/mL RBC. In view of this low activity even in the presence of massive amounts of glycolate, the glycolate kinase reaction cannot account for the maintenance of the reported phosphoglycolate level in human red cells.

  3. Osmotic properties of human red cells.

    PubMed

    Solomon, A K; Toon, M R; Dix, J A

    1986-01-01

    When an osmotic pressure gradient is applied to human red cells, the volume changes anomalously, as if there were a significant fraction of "nonosmotic water" which could not serve as solvent for the cell solutes, a finding which has been discussed widely in the literature. In 1968, Gary-Bobo and Solomon (J. Gen. Physiol. 52:825) concluded that the anomalies could not be entirely explained by the colligative properties of hemoglobin (Hb) and proposed that there was an additional concentration dependence of the Hb charge (ZHb). A number of investigators, particularly Freedman and Hoffman (1979, J. Gen. Physiol. 74:157) have been unable to confirm Gary-Bobo and Solomon's experimental evidence for this concentration dependence of ZHb and we now report that we are also unable to repeat the earlier experiments. Nonetheless, there still remains a significant anomaly which amounts to 12.5 +/- 0.8% of the total isosmotic cell water (P much less than 0.0005, t test), even after taking account of the concentration dependence of the Hb osmotic coefficient and all the other known physical chemical constraints, ideal and nonideal. It is suggested that the anomalies at high Hb concentration in shrunken cells may arise from the ionic strength dependence of the Hb osmotic coefficient. In swollen red cells at low ionic strength, solute binding to membrane and intracellular proteins is increased and it is suggested that this factor may account, in part, for the anomalous behavior of these cells.

  4. THE SPECIFIC HEAT OF RED CELLS, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE PARACRYSTALLINE RAT RED CELL

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Eric

    1953-01-01

    The specific heat of the rat red cell, kept in cold sodium citrate, changes in the neighborhood of 6°C., the temperature near which the cell passes from its paracrystalline state to a state of greater disorder. The change in the specific heat is from 0.74 with a standard deviation of ±0.022 (paracrystalline state) to 0.87 with a standard deviation of ±0.021 (normal state). Although it has been looked for, no evidence of a change in specific heat has been found, between 1°C. and 15°C., in the case of the human red cell or of the fresh rat red cell in saline or plasma. PMID:13035066

  5. Osmotic water permeability of human red cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The osmotic water permeability of human red cells has been reexamined with a stopped-flow device and a new perturbation technique. Small osmotic gradients are used to minimize the systematic error caused by nonlinearities in the relationship between cell volume and light scattering. Corrections are then made for residual systematic error. Our results show that the hydraulic conductivity, Lp, is essentially independent of the direction of water flow and of osmolality in the range 184-365 mosM. the mean value of Lp obtained obtained was 1.8 +/- 0.1 (SEM) X 10-11 cm3 dyne -1 s-1. PMID:7229611

  6. Simulations of molecular diffusion in lattices of cells: insights for NMR of red blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Regan, David G; Kuchel, Philip W

    2002-01-01

    The pulsed field-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment, conducted on a suspension of red blood cells (RBC) in a strong magnetic field yields a q-space plot consisting of a series of maxima and minima. This is mathematically analogous to a classical optical diffraction pattern. The method provides a noninvasive and novel means of characterizing cell suspensions that is sensitive to changes in cell shape and packing density. The positions of the features in a q-space plot characterize the rate of exchange across the membrane, cell dimensions, and packing density. A diffusion tensor, containing information regarding the diffusion anisotropy of the system, can also be derived from the PGSE NMR data. In this study, we carried out Monte Carlo simulations of diffusion in suspensions of "virtual" cells that had either biconcave disc (as in RBC) or oblate spheroid geometry. The simulations were performed in a PGSE NMR context thus enabling predictions of q-space and diffusion tensor data. The simulated data were compared with those from real PGSE NMR diffusion experiments on RBC suspensions that had a range of hematocrit values. Methods that facilitate the processing of q-space data were also developed. PMID:12080109

  7. Red cell damage after pumping by two infusion control devices (Arcomed VP 7000 and IVAC 572).

    PubMed

    Parfitt, H S; Davies, S V; Tighe, P; Ewings, P

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance in terms of red cell damage of two peristaltic volumetric infusion pumps - the Alaris IVAC 572 (San Diego, CA, USA) and Arcomed Volumed VP7000 (Regensdorf, Switzerland). Various infusion pumps are available to transfuse blood at a predetermined rate. It is recommended that each machine should be individually assessed. This experiment used six units of single-donor-transfusable packed red cells and ran each unit through both pumps. This was carried out at 9, 28 and 35 days post-donation at rates from 2 to 150 mL h(-1). Post-pumping samples from these experiments, and a pre-pumping sample in each case, were analysed for levels of potassium and free haemoglobin (Hb). They were also examined microscopically for evidence of cell damage. Potassium levels showed no significant change with pumping on any occasion, but rose significantly as the samples aged. Free Hb showed some variation, but the only consistent finding was a similar rise in value with increasing pack age. Microscopic examination revealed no cell damage under any condition. Both pumps performed to an acceptable level and appear safe to be used for red cell transfusion.

  8. Neocytolysis: physiological down-regulator of red-cell mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Rice, L.; Udden, M. M.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    It is usually considered that red-cell mass is controlled by erythropoietin-driven bone marrow red-cell production, and no physiological mechanisms can shorten survival of circulating red cells. In adapting to acute plethora in microgravity, astronauts' red-cell mass falls too rapidly to be explained by diminished red-cell production. Ferrokinetics show no early decline in erythropolesis, but red cells radiolabelled 12 days before launch survive normally. Selective destruction of the youngest circulating red cells-a process we call neocytolysis-is the only plausible explanation. A fall in erythropoietin below a threshold is likely to initiate neocytolysis, probably by influencing surface-adhesion molecules. Recognition of neocytolysis will require re-examination of the pathophysiology and treatment of several blood disorders, including the anaemia of renal disease.

  9. Neocytolysis: physiological down-regulator of red-cell mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Rice, L.; Udden, M. M.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    It is usually considered that red-cell mass is controlled by erythropoietin-driven bone marrow red-cell production, and no physiological mechanisms can shorten survival of circulating red cells. In adapting to acute plethora in microgravity, astronauts' red-cell mass falls too rapidly to be explained by diminished red-cell production. Ferrokinetics show no early decline in erythropolesis, but red cells radiolabelled 12 days before launch survive normally. Selective destruction of the youngest circulating red cells-a process we call neocytolysis-is the only plausible explanation. A fall in erythropoietin below a threshold is likely to initiate neocytolysis, probably by influencing surface-adhesion molecules. Recognition of neocytolysis will require re-examination of the pathophysiology and treatment of several blood disorders, including the anaemia of renal disease.

  10. Oxygen supply for CHO cells immobilized on a packed-bed of Fibra-Cel disks.

    PubMed

    Meuwly, F; Loviat, F; Ruffieux, P-A; Bernard, A R; Kadouri, A; von Stockar, U

    2006-03-05

    Packed-bed bioreactors (PBR) have proven to be efficient systems to culture mammalian cells at very high cell density in perfusion mode, thus leading to very high volumetric productivity. However, the immobilized cells must be continuously supplied with all nutrients in sufficient quantities to remain viable and productive over the full duration of the perfusion culture. Among all nutrients, oxygen is the most critical since it is present at very low concentration due to its low solubility in cell culture medium. This work presents the development of a model for oxygenation in a packed-bed bioreactor system. The experimental system used to develop the model was a packed-bed of Fibra-Cel disk carriers used to cultivate Chinese Hamster Ovary cells at high density ( approximately 6.1 x 10(7) cell/mL) in perfusion mode. With the help of this model, it was possible to identify if a PBR system is operated in optimal or sub-optimal conditions. Using the model, two options were proposed, which could improve the performance of the basal system by about twofold, that is, by increasing the density of immobilized cells per carrier volume from 6.1 x 10(7) to 1.2 x 10(8) cell/mL, or by increasing the packed-bed height from 0.2 to 0.4 m. Both strategies would be rather simple to test and implement in the packed-bed bioreactor system used for this study. As a result, it would be possible to achieve a substantial improvement of about twofold higher productivity as compared with the basal conditions.

  11. Impact of glycocalyx structure on red cell-red cell affinity in polymer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Rad, Samar; Meiselman, Herbert J; Neu, Björn

    2014-11-01

    A theoretical framework based on macromolecular depletion has been utilized in order to examine the energetics of red blood cell interactions. Three different glycocalyx structures are considered and cell-cell affinities are calculated by superposition of depletion, steric and electrostatic interactions. The theoretical model predicts a non-monotonic dependence of the interaction energies on polymer size. Further, our results indicate that the glycocalyx segment distribution has a large impact on adhesion energies between cells: a linear segment distribution induces the strongest adhesion between cells followed by pseudo-tail and uniform distributions. Our approach confirms the concept of a depletion mechanism for RBC aggregation, and also provides new insights that may eventually help to understand and quantify cellular factors that control red blood cell interactions in health and disease.

  12. Argon laser radiation of human clots: differential photoabsorption in red cell rich and red cell poor clots

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.; Chan, M.C.; Seckinger, D.L.; Vazquez, A.; Rosenthal, P.K.; Lee, K.K.; Ikeda, R.M.; Reis, R.L.; Hanna, E.S.; Mason, D.T.

    1985-06-01

    Since argon laser radiation (454-514 nm) can vaporize human clots, the authors determined whether the absorption of laser energies can differ among different types of blood clots. Thus, they performed spectrophotometric studies and examined the ability of this laser to penetrate red cell rich and red cell poor clots. Fifty-four red cell rich and red cell poor clot samples, varying in depth from 1.8 to 5.0 mm, were subjected to 3, 5 and 7 watts from an argon laser beam. At a given power intensity, the deeper the red cell rich clot, the longer was the time needed to penetrate the clot. The higher the power used, the shorter was the red clot penetration time. In contrast, all power levels used up to 5 minutes did not penetrate any of the varying depths of red cell poor clots. Spectrophotometrically, the red cell rich clot had an absorption curve typical of hemoglobin pigment while the red cell poor clot, in the absence of hemoglobin, had poor absorption between 350 and 600 nm and was unable to absorb argon laser energies. Thus, the argon laser provides a therapeutic modality for human red cell rich clot dissolution but the present approach does not appear to be effective against red cell poor clots.

  13. Anesthetics and red blood cell rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Burcu; Aydogan, Sami

    2014-05-01

    There are many conditions where it is useful for anesthetists to have a knowledge of blood rheology. Blood rheology plays an important role in numerous clinical situations. Hemorheologic changes may significantly affect the induction and recovery times with anesthetic agents. But also, hemorheologic factors are directly or indirectly affected by many anesthetic agents or their metabolites. In this review, the blood rheology with special emphasis on its application in anesthesiology, the importance hemorheological parameters in anesthesiology and also the effect of some anesthetic substances on red blood cell rheology were presented.

  14. Effects of storage on irradiated red blood cells: An in-vitro and in-vivo study. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, S.E.

    1991-08-01

    Irradiation of red blood cell units has recently become a topic of special concern as the result of increasing reports of graft versus host disease in immunocompetent blood transfusion recipients. This study was designed to evaluate the potassium elevations observed in stored irradiated red blood cells and to evaluate the in vivo survival of stored irradiated red blood cells using a dog model. In the in vitro study ten units of human CPDA-1 packed red blood cells were made into paired aliquots; one aliquot of each pair was irradiated with 3000 rads of gamma radiation and the potassium content measured at points throughout 35 days of storage. A significant increase in potassium levels in the irradiated aliquots was observed from the first day after irradiation and continued through the entire storage period.

  15. A simple technique for red blood cell removal in major ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, G; Wernet, D; Northoff, H; Schneider, W

    1994-01-01

    A simple technique for red blood cell (RBC) removal in major ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation is reported requiring two centrifugation steps, special blood bags and a mechanical device to separate the buffy coat from RBCs within the bag. In 42 transplantations an average of 84% of nucleated cells was recovered with an average contamination of 7.5 ml packed RBCs. The preparations were well tolerated in all patients whose isoagglutinin titers had not been reduced. Bone marrow engraftment was not significantly different from control groups.

  16. Image analysis of nucleated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Zajicek, G; Shohat, M; Melnik, Y; Yeger, A

    1983-08-01

    Bone marrow smears stained with Giemsa were scanned with a video camera under computer control. Forty-two cells representing the six differentiation classes of the red bone marrow were sampled. Each cell was digitized into 70 X 70 pixels, each pixel representing a square area of 0.4 micron2 in the original image. The pixel gray values ranged between 0 and 255. Zero stood for white, 255 represented black, while the numbers in between stood for the various shades of gray. After separation and smoothing the images were processed with a Sobel operator outlining the points of steepest gray level change in the cell. These points constitute a closed curve denominated as inner cell boundary, separating the cell into an inner and an outer region. Two types of features were extracted from each cell: form features, e.g., area and length, and gray level features. Twenty-two features were tested for their discriminative merit. After selecting 16, the discriminant analysis program classified correctly all 42 cells into the 6 classes.

  17. DNA unmasked in the red rain cells of Kerala.

    PubMed

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Hogg, Stuart I

    2013-01-01

    Extraordinary claims have been made for the biological properties of the red rain cells of Kerala, including a suggestion that they lack DNA. We have investigated the fluorescence properties of red rain cells, and the solubility of the red pigment in a variety of solvents. Extraction of the pigment with DMSO allowed successful demonstration of DNA using DAPI staining. Cellular impermeability to staining reagents due to the red pigment is the likely explanation for the failure of previous efforts to demonstrate DNA in red rain cells.

  18. Hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and other red cell membrane disorders.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Lydie; Galimand, Julie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis are the two most common inherited red cell membrane disorders resulting from mutations in genes encoding various red cell membrane and skeletal proteins. Red cell membrane, a composite structure composed of lipid bilayer linked to spectrin-based membrane skeleton is responsible for the unique features of flexibility and mechanical stability of the cell. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Both these diseases can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include red blood cell cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of the red cell membrane proteins, and mutational analysis of gene encoding red cell membrane proteins.

  19. Functions of red cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G

    2007-11-01

    The external membrane of the red cell contains numerous proteins that either cross the lipid bilayer one or more times or are anchored to it through a lipid tail. Many of these proteins express blood group activity. The functions of some of these proteins are known; in others their function can only be surmised from the protein structure or from limited experimental evidence. They are loosely divided into four categories based on their functions: membrane transporters; adhesion molecules and receptors; enzymes; and structural proteins that link the membrane with the membrane skeleton. Some of the proteins carry out more than one of these functions. Some proteins may complete their major functions during erythropoiesis or may only be important under adverse physiological conditions. Furthermore, some might be evolutionary relics and may no longer have significant functions. Polymorphisms or rare changes in red cell surface proteins are often responsible for blood groups. The biological significance of these polymorphisms or the selective pressures responsible for their stability within populations are mostly not known, although exploitation of the proteins by pathogenic micro-organisms has probably played a major role.

  20. Red cell antigens: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Pourazar, Abbasali

    2007-01-01

    Landsteiner and his colleagues demonstrated that human beings could be classified into four groups depending on the presence of one (A) or another (B) or both (AB) or none (O) of the antigens on their red cells. The number of the blood group antigens up to 1984 was 410. In the next 20 years, there were 16 systems with 144 antigens and quite a collection of antigens waiting to be assigned to systems, pending the discovery of new information about their relationship to the established systems. The importance of most blood group antigens had been recognized by immunological complications of blood transfusion or pregnancies; their molecular structure and function however remained undefined for many decades. Recent advances in molecular genetics and cellular biochemistry resulted in an abundance of new information in this field of research. In this review, we try to give some examples of advances made in the field of ‘structure and function of the red cell surface molecules.’ PMID:21938229

  1. Red blood cell volume in preterm neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Quaife, M.A.; Dirksen, J.W.; Paxson, C.L. Jr.; McIntire, R.H. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    In the high-risk neonate, the direct determination of the red cell volume by radionuclide dilution technique appears to be the singularly definitive method of defining treatment efficacy, and is thus a useful evaluation and management tool for the pediatrician. For effective patient management, the red blood cell(RBC) volume of 69 preterm and term neonates was determined. The method utilized, Tc-99m-labeled RBCs, provided a fast and accurate answer with a large reduction in the absorbed radiation dose. In the population studied within a high-risk newborn ICU, the mean RBC volumes between the preterm and term neonates were without significant difference. Grouping and analysis of the RBC volume data with respect to birth weight, gestational ages, and 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores revealed on statistical difference. The mean value found in our population, 32.2 +/- 9.2 ml/kg, however, does differ from those previously reported in which the determinations were made using an indirect estimation from the plasma compartment.

  2. Mechanosensing Dynamics of Red blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jiandi

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stress-induced deformation of human red blood cells (RBCs) plays important physiopathological roles in oxygen delivery, blood rheology, transfusion, and malaria. Recent studies demonstrate that, in response to mechanical deformation, RBCs release adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), suggesting the existence of mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs. Most importantly, the released ATP from RBCs regulates vascular tone and impaired release of ATP from RBCs has been linked to diseases such as type II diabetes and cystic fibrosis. To date, however, the mechanisms of mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs remain unclear. Given that RBCs experience shear stresses continuously during the circulation cycle and the released ATP plays a central role in vascular physiopathology, understanding the mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs will provide not only fundamental insights to the role of RBCs in vascular homeostasis but also novel therapeutic strategies for red cell dysfunction and vascular disease. This talk describes the main research in my group on integrating microfluidic-based approaches to study the mechanosensing dynamics of RBCs. Specifically, I will introduce a micro?uidic approach that can probe the dynamics of shear-induced ATP release from RBCs with millisecond resolution and provide quantitative understandings of the mechanosensitive ATP release processes in RBCs. Furthermore, I will also describe our recent findings about the roles of the Piezo1 channel, a newly discovered mechanosensitive cation channel in the mechanotransductive ATP release in RBCs. Last, possible functions of RBCs in the regulation of cerebral blood flow will be discussed.

  3. A power pack based on organometallic perovskite solar cell and supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaobao; Li, Shaohui; Zhang, Hua; Shen, Yan; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Graetzel, Michael; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Wang, Mingkui

    2015-02-24

    We present an investigation on a power pack combining a CH3NH3PbI3-based solar cell with a polypyrrole-based supercapacitor and evaluate its performance as an energy pack. The package achieved an energy storage efficiency of 10%, which is much higher than that of other systems combining a PV cell with a supercapacitor. We find a high output voltage of 1.45 V for the device under AM 1.5G illumination when the CH3NH3PbI3-based solar cell is connected in series with a polypyrrole-based supercapacitor. This system affords continuous output of electric power by using CH3NH3PbI3-based solar cell as an energy source mitigating transients caused by light intensity fluctuations or the diurnal cycle.

  4. Effects of Aged Stored Autologous Red Blood Cells on Human Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Kanias, Tamir; Triulzi, Darrel; Donadee, Chenell; Barge, Suchitra; Badlam, Jessica; Jain, Shilpa; Belanger, Andrea M.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: A major abnormality that characterizes the red cell “storage lesion” is increased hemolysis and reduced red cell lifespan after infusion. Low levels of intravascular hemolysis after transfusion of aged stored red cells disrupt nitric oxide (NO) bioavailabity, via accelerated NO scavenging reaction with cell-free plasma hemoglobin. The degree of intravascular hemolysis post-transfusion and effects on endothelial-dependent vasodilation responses to acetylcholine have not been fully characterized in humans. Objectives: To evaluate the effects of blood aged to the limits of Food and Drug Administration–approved storage time on the human microcirculation and endothelial function. Methods: Eighteen healthy individuals donated 1 U of leukopheresed red cells, divided and autologously transfused into the forearm brachial artery 5 and 42 days after blood donation. Blood samples were obtained from stored blood bag supernatants and the antecubital vein of the infusion arm. Forearm blood flow measurements were performed using strain-gauge plethysmography during transfusion, followed by testing of endothelium-dependent blood flow with increasing doses of intraarterial acetylcholine. Measurements and Main Results: We demonstrate that aged stored blood has higher levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin. Compared with 5-day blood, the transfusion of 42-day packed red cells decreases acetylcholine-dependent forearm blood flows. Intravascular venous levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin increase immediately after red cell transfusion, with more significant increases observed after infusion of 42-day-old blood. Conclusions: We demonstrate that the transfusion of blood at the limits of Food and Drug Administration–approved storage has a significant effect on the forearm circulation and impairs endothelial function. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01137656) PMID:26222884

  5. Effects of Aged Stored Autologous Red Blood Cells on Human Endothelial Function.

    PubMed

    Risbano, Michael G; Kanias, Tamir; Triulzi, Darrel; Donadee, Chenell; Barge, Suchitra; Badlam, Jessica; Jain, Shilpa; Belanger, Andrea M; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Gladwin, Mark T

    2015-11-15

    A major abnormality that characterizes the red cell "storage lesion" is increased hemolysis and reduced red cell lifespan after infusion. Low levels of intravascular hemolysis after transfusion of aged stored red cells disrupt nitric oxide (NO) bioavailabity, via accelerated NO scavenging reaction with cell-free plasma hemoglobin. The degree of intravascular hemolysis post-transfusion and effects on endothelial-dependent vasodilation responses to acetylcholine have not been fully characterized in humans. To evaluate the effects of blood aged to the limits of Food and Drug Administration-approved storage time on the human microcirculation and endothelial function. Eighteen healthy individuals donated 1 U of leukopheresed red cells, divided and autologously transfused into the forearm brachial artery 5 and 42 days after blood donation. Blood samples were obtained from stored blood bag supernatants and the antecubital vein of the infusion arm. Forearm blood flow measurements were performed using strain-gauge plethysmography during transfusion, followed by testing of endothelium-dependent blood flow with increasing doses of intraarterial acetylcholine. We demonstrate that aged stored blood has higher levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin. Compared with 5-day blood, the transfusion of 42-day packed red cells decreases acetylcholine-dependent forearm blood flows. Intravascular venous levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin increase immediately after red cell transfusion, with more significant increases observed after infusion of 42-day-old blood. We demonstrate that the transfusion of blood at the limits of Food and Drug Administration-approved storage has a significant effect on the forearm circulation and impairs endothelial function. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01137656).

  6. A strategy to reduce inappropriate red blood cell transfusion.

    PubMed

    Brandis, K; Richards, B; Ghent, A; Weinstein, S

    1994-06-06

    To evaluate the effectiveness of policies intended to decrease unnecessary packed red cell transfusions. The transfusion records of a 550-bed acute care facility were obtained and two six-month periods, one before and one after the introduction of new transfusion policies, were compared. Meaningful reductions were seen in crossmatch requests, number of units crossmatched and units transfused. After standardising for rising patient numbers, units transfused per 1000 admissions fell by 28.8%. Units crossmatched fell by slightly more than did units transfused, resulting in lower crossmatch-to-transfusion ratios, and indicating more effective use of resources. Total requests fell while "group-and-screen" requests rose, showing a shift toward more appropriate ordering in the face of increasing workload. The transfusion policies have succeeded in curtailing unnecessary transfusion practices. They included the lowering of "transfusion-triggering" haemoglobin levels, registrar or consultant approval of transfusions and enforcement of patient consent and chart documentation of transfusion indications, verified by the laboratory. The surgical blood ordering schedule was reviewed under the overall direction of the transfusion committee. A strong institutional commitment is required to lift the profile of blood transfusion.

  7. Microconfined flow behavior of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; D'Apolito, Rosa; Cassinese, Antonio; Guido, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) perform essential functions in human body, such as gas exchange between blood and tissues, thanks to their ability to deform and flow in the microvascular network. The high RBC deformability is mainly due to the viscoelastic properties of the cell membrane. Since an impaired RBC deformability could be found in some diseases, such as malaria, sickle cell anemia, diabetes and hereditary disorders, there is the need to provide further insight into measurement of RBC deformability in a physiologically relevant flow field. Here, RBCs deformability has been studied in terms of the minimum apparent plasma-layer thickness by using high-speed video microscopy of RBCs flowing in cylindrical glass capillaries. An in vitro systematic microfluidic investigation of RBCs in micro-confined conditions has been performed, resulting in the determination of the RBCs time recovery constant, RBC volume and surface area and RBC membrane shear elastic modulus and surface viscosity. It has been noticed that the deformability of RBCs induces cells aggregation during flow in microcapillaries, allowing the formation of clusters of cells. Overall, our results provide a novel technique to estimate RBC deformability and also RBCs collective behavior, which can be used for the analysis of pathological RBCs, for which reliable quantitative methods are still lacking.

  8. Rules of tissue packing involving different cell types: human muscle organization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Daniel; Sáez, Aurora; Gómez-Gálvez, Pedro; Paradas, Carmen; Escudero, Luis M

    2017-01-10

    Natural packed tissues are assembled as tessellations of polygonal cells. These include skeletal muscles and epithelial sheets. Skeletal muscles appear as a mosaic composed of two different types of cells: the "slow" and "fast" fibres. Their relative distribution is important for the muscle function but little is known about how the fibre arrangement is established and maintained. In this work we capture the organizational pattern in two different healthy muscles: biceps brachii and quadriceps. Here we show that the biceps brachii muscle presents a particular arrangement, based on the different sizes of slow and fast fibres. By contrast, in the quadriceps muscle an unbiased distribution exists. Our results indicate that the relative size of each cellular type imposes an intrinsic organization into natural tessellations. These findings establish a new framework for the analysis of any packed tissue where two or more cell types exist.

  9. Rules of tissue packing involving different cell types: human muscle organization

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Daniel; Sáez, Aurora; Gómez-Gálvez, Pedro; Paradas, Carmen; Escudero, Luis M.

    2017-01-01

    Natural packed tissues are assembled as tessellations of polygonal cells. These include skeletal muscles and epithelial sheets. Skeletal muscles appear as a mosaic composed of two different types of cells: the “slow” and “fast” fibres. Their relative distribution is important for the muscle function but little is known about how the fibre arrangement is established and maintained. In this work we capture the organizational pattern in two different healthy muscles: biceps brachii and quadriceps. Here we show that the biceps brachii muscle presents a particular arrangement, based on the different sizes of slow and fast fibres. By contrast, in the quadriceps muscle an unbiased distribution exists. Our results indicate that the relative size of each cellular type imposes an intrinsic organization into natural tessellations. These findings establish a new framework for the analysis of any packed tissue where two or more cell types exist. PMID:28071729

  10. Red Blood Cell Count Automation Using Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting; Guo, Fangmin

    2015-12-01

    Red blood cell counts have been proven to be one of the most frequently performed blood tests and are valuable for early diagnosis of some diseases. This paper describes an automated red blood cell counting method based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging technology. Unlike the light microscopy-based red blood count methods, a combined spatial and spectral algorithm is proposed to identify red blood cells by integrating active contour models and automated two-dimensional k-means with spectral angle mapper algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better performance than spatial based algorithm because the new algorithm can jointly use the spatial and spectral information of blood cells.

  11. Delayed onset of infectious mononucleosis associated with acquired agammaglobulinemia and red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Purtilo, D T; Zelkowitz, L; Harada, S; Brooks, C D; Bechtold, T; Lipscomb, H; Yetz, J; Rogers, G

    1984-08-01

    In 1974, an 11-year-old white boy with the X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome developed hyper-IgM after becoming infected with Epstein-Barr virus. However, he failed to develop normal immune responses against the virus. In December 1981, when red cell aplasia occurred, he was given packed erythrocytes and gammaglobulin. Nine weeks later, acute infectious mononucleosis developed. Concurrently, his T4/T8 helper/suppressor ratio decreased from 2.7 to 0.2, and IgM antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus appeared. Subsequently, circulating B cells became undetectable in his blood, and agammaglobulinemia appeared. Red cell aplasia abated transiently. This patient's course was complicated by Haemophilus influenzae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis pneumonias, and red cell aplasia and agammaglobulinemia have persisted. Epstein-Barr virus acting as a slow virus probably induced the red cell aplasia and agammaglobulinemia because of the aberrant immune responses to Epstein-Barr virus. Immunodeficient responses to Epstein-Barr virus should be sought in other patients with the diseases documented in our patient.

  12. Optical analysis of red blood cell suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szołna, Alicja A.; Grzegorzewski, Bronisław

    2008-12-01

    The optical properties of suspensions of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied. Fresh human venues blood was obtained from adult healthy donors. RBCs were suspended in isotonic salt solution, and in autologous plasma. Suspensions with haematocrit 0.25 - 3% were investigated. Novel technique was proposed to determine the scattering coefficient μs for the suspensions. The intensity of He-Ne laser light transmitted through a wedge-shape container filled with a suspension was recorded. To find the dependence of the intensity on the thickness of the sample the container was moved horizontally. The dependence of μs on the haematocrit was determined for RBCs suspended in the isotonic salt solution. RBCs suspended in plasma tend to form rouleaux. For the RBCs suspended in plasma, the scattering coefficient as a function of time was obtained. It is shown that this technique can be useful in the study of rouleaux formation.

  13. Fluorometric assay for red blood cell antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.B.; Lambermont, M.; Strosberg, A.D.; Wybran, J.

    1981-03-01

    A fluorometric assay is described for the detection of red blood cell antibodies. The assay reveals as little as 600 molecules of bound, fluoroesceinated rabbit anti-human IgG antibodies per erythrocyte. Eleven patients with possible autoimmune erythrocyte disorder and negative direct antiglobulin test were studied by the fluorometric assay. The outcome of the fluorometric assay was compared with that of the human allogeneic rosette test. Results obtained by the two methods were in complete agreement. Five of the patients were shown to possess unexpectedly high levels of erythrocyte-bound IgG in spite of a negative, direct antiglobulin test. These findings and the validity of the fluorometric assay are discussed.

  14. Packed Bed Bioreactor for the Isolation and Expansion of Placental-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Osiecki, Michael J; Michl, Thomas D; Kul Babur, Betul; Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Atkinson, Kerry; Lott, William B; Griesser, Hans J; Doran, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Large numbers of Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are required for clinical relevant doses to treat a number of diseases. To economically manufacture these MSCs, an automated bioreactor system will be required. Herein we describe the development of a scalable closed-system, packed bed bioreactor suitable for large-scale MSCs expansion. The packed bed was formed from fused polystyrene pellets that were air plasma treated to endow them with a surface chemistry similar to traditional tissue culture plastic. The packed bed was encased within a gas permeable shell to decouple the medium nutrient supply and gas exchange. This enabled a significant reduction in medium flow rates, thus reducing shear and even facilitating single pass medium exchange. The system was optimised in a small-scale bioreactor format (160 cm2) with murine-derived green fluorescent protein-expressing MSCs, and then scaled-up to a 2800 cm2 format. We demonstrated that placental derived MSCs could be isolated directly within the bioreactor and subsequently expanded. Our results demonstrate that the closed system large-scale packed bed bioreactor is an effective and scalable tool for large-scale isolation and expansion of MSCs.

  15. Packed Bed Bioreactor for the Isolation and Expansion of Placental-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Osiecki, Michael J.; Michl, Thomas D.; Kul Babur, Betul; Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Atkinson, Kerry; Lott, William B.; Griesser, Hans J.; Doran, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Large numbers of Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are required for clinical relevant doses to treat a number of diseases. To economically manufacture these MSCs, an automated bioreactor system will be required. Herein we describe the development of a scalable closed-system, packed bed bioreactor suitable for large-scale MSCs expansion. The packed bed was formed from fused polystyrene pellets that were air plasma treated to endow them with a surface chemistry similar to traditional tissue culture plastic. The packed bed was encased within a gas permeable shell to decouple the medium nutrient supply and gas exchange. This enabled a significant reduction in medium flow rates, thus reducing shear and even facilitating single pass medium exchange. The system was optimised in a small-scale bioreactor format (160 cm2) with murine-derived green fluorescent protein-expressing MSCs, and then scaled-up to a 2800 cm2 format. We demonstrated that placental derived MSCs could be isolated directly within the bioreactor and subsequently expanded. Our results demonstrate that the closed system large-scale packed bed bioreactor is an effective and scalable tool for large-scale isolation and expansion of MSCs. PMID:26660475

  16. Mechanisms of immune red cell destruction, and red cell compatibility testing

    SciTech Connect

    Garratty, G.

    1983-03-01

    The immune destruction of red cells can occur as a complement-mediated intravascular process, or extravascularly, where the red cells are destroyed by macrophages following interaction with cell-bound IgG1, IgG3, and/or C3b. Many of the factors that affect this in vivo destruction are not taken into account during in vitro pretransfusion compatibility testing. At present, even by use of more elaborate tests, it is difficult to accurately predict the fate of a transfused unit of blood. By using some simple information, such as antibody specificity and thermal range, it is sometimes possible to predict the outcome of transfusing a unit of blood that is incompatible in vitro. At other times it may be necessary to utilize /sup 51/Cr-labeled red cells to determine the risk of transfusing such units. Because of the paucity of reported clinical correlations, macrophage/monocyte monolayer assays are of little practical value at present.

  17. Square cell packing in the Drosophila embryo through spatiotemporally regulated EGF receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tamada, Masako; Zallen, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cells display dynamic and diverse morphologies during development, but the strategies by which differentiated tissues achieve precise shapes and patterns are not well understood. Here we identify a developmental program that generates a highly ordered square cell grid in the Drosophila embryo through sequential and spatially regulated cell alignment, oriented cell division, and apicobasal cell elongation. The basic leucine zipper transcriptional regulator Cnc is necessary and sufficient to produce a square cell grid in the presence of a midline signal provided by the EGF receptor ligand, Spitz. Spitz orients cell divisions through a Pins/LGN-dependent spindle positioning mechanism and controls cell shape and alignment through a transcriptional pathway that requires the Pointed ETS domain protein. These results identify a strategy for producing ordered square cell packing configurations in epithelia and reveal a molecular mechanism by which organized tissue structure is generated through spatiotemporally regulated responses to EGF receptor activation. PMID:26506305

  18. Cerebral blood flow and red cell delivery in normal subjects and in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, R.L.; Roth, J.G.; Woody, D.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined in 77 normal females and 53 normal males of different ages and in 26 men and 45 women with multiple sclerosis by the inhalation of radioactive Xe133 method. In the normal subjects the CBF was relatively high in the teens and fell, at first rapidly and then slowly in both sexes with age. During adult life the flow in females was significantly higher than in males. The delivery of packed red cells (RCD) was determined by multiplying the CBF by the percentage concentration of red cells (HCT). The RCD for both sexes was nearly the same. In the patients with multiple sclerosis there occurred a progressive generalized decrease in CBF and in RCD with age which was significantly greater than observed in normal subjects. The rate of decrease in CBF and RCD correlated directly with the rate of progress of the disease.

  19. Growth and replication of red rain cells at 121°C and their red fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Wickramasinghe, Chandra; Wainwright, Milton; Kumar, A. Santhosh; Louis, Godfrey

    2010-09-01

    We have shown that the red cells found in the Red Rain (which fell on Kerala, India, in 2001) survive and grow after incubation for periods of up to two hours at 121°C . Under these conditions daughter cells appear within the original mother cells and the number of cells in the samples increases with length of exposure to 121°C. No such increase in cells occurs at room temperature, suggesting that the increase in daughter cells is brought about by exposure of the Red Rain cells to high temperatures. This is an independent confirmation of results reported earlier by two of the present authors, claiming that the cells can replicate under high pressure at temperatures upto 300°C. The flourescence behaviour of the red cells is shown to be in remarkable correspondence with the extended red emission observed in the Red Rectagle planetary nebula and other galactic and extragalactic dust clouds, suggesting, though not proving an extraterrestrial origin.

  20. Red blood cell membrane fragments but not intact red blood cells promote calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chutipongtanate, Somchai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2010-08-01

    Cell membranes are thought to promote calcium oxalate kidney stone formation but to our knowledge the modulating effect of red blood cell membranes on calcium oxalate crystals has not been previously investigated. Thus, we examined the effects of red blood cell membrane fragments on calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystal growth and aggregation. Calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals were treated with red blood cell membrane fragments or intact red blood cells from a healthy donor. Phase contrast microscopy was performed to evaluate crystal morphology and aggregation. We used ImageMaster 2D Platinum software to evaluate crystal size and spectrophotometric oxalate depletion assay to monitor crystal growth. Red blood cell membrane fragments had significant promoting activity on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth with an approximately 75% increase in size and aggregation with an approximately 2.5-fold increase in aggregate number compared to the control without membrane fragments or cells. Approximately 50% of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals were adhered by red blood cell membrane fragments. Intact red blood cells had no significant effect on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth or aggregation but they could transform calcium oxalate monohydrate to calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals. Red blood cell membrane fragments and intact red blood cells had no effect on calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals. The promoting activity of red blood cell membrane fragments on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth was successfully confirmed by spectrophotometric oxalate depletion assay. To our knowledge our data provide the first direct evidence that red blood cell membrane fragments are a promoting factor for calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth and aggregation. Thus, they may aggravate calcium oxalate stone formation. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  1. Destruction of newly released red blood cells in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Udden, M. M.; Huntoon, C. L.; Driscoll, T.

    1996-01-01

    Space flight results in a rapid change in total blood volume, plasma volume, and red blood cell mass because the space to contain blood is decreased. The plasma volume and total blood volume decreases during the first hours in space and remain at a decreased level for the remainder of the flight. During the first several hours following return to earth, plasma volume and total blood volume increase to preflight levels. During the first few days in space recently produced red blood cells disappear from the blood resulting in a decrease in red blood cell mass of 10-15%. Red cells 12 d old or older survive normally and production of new cells continues at near preflight levels. After the first few days in space, the red cell mass is stable at the decreased level. Following return to earth the hemoglobin and red blood cell mass concentrations decrease reflecting the increase in plasma volume. The erythropoietin levels increase responding to "postflight anemia"; red cell production increases, and the red cell mass is restored to preflight levels after several weeks.

  2. Destruction of newly released red blood cells in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Udden, M. M.; Huntoon, C. L.; Driscoll, T.

    1996-01-01

    Space flight results in a rapid change in total blood volume, plasma volume, and red blood cell mass because the space to contain blood is decreased. The plasma volume and total blood volume decreases during the first hours in space and remain at a decreased level for the remainder of the flight. During the first several hours following return to earth, plasma volume and total blood volume increase to preflight levels. During the first few days in space recently produced red blood cells disappear from the blood resulting in a decrease in red blood cell mass of 10-15%. Red cells 12 d old or older survive normally and production of new cells continues at near preflight levels. After the first few days in space, the red cell mass is stable at the decreased level. Following return to earth the hemoglobin and red blood cell mass concentrations decrease reflecting the increase in plasma volume. The erythropoietin levels increase responding to "postflight anemia"; red cell production increases, and the red cell mass is restored to preflight levels after several weeks.

  3. Red blood cell nitric oxide synthase modulates red blood cell deformability in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Mozar, Anaïs; Connes, Philippe; Collins, Bianca; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Romana, Marc; Lemonne, Nathalie; Bloch, Wilhelm; Grau, Marijke

    2016-11-04

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited red blood cells (RBC) disorder characterized by significantly decreased RBC deformability. The present study aimed to assess whether modulation of RBC Nitric Oxide Synthase (RBC-NOS) activation could affect RBC deformability in SCA.Blood of twenty-five SCA patients was treated for 1 hour at 37°C with Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) or PBS containing 1% of Dimethylsulfoxyde as control, L-arginine or N(5)-(1-Iminoethyl)-L-ornithine (L-NIO) to directly stimulate or inhibit RBC-NOS, insulin or wortmannin to indirectly stimulate or inhibit RBC-NOS through their effects on the PI3 Kinase/Akt pathway, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) as NO donor and NO scavenger, respectively. RBC deformability was measured by ektacytometry at 3 Pa.RBC deformability significantly increased after insulin treatment and significantly decreased after L-NIO and wortmannin incubation. The other conditions did not affect deformability. Significantly increased nitrotyrosine levels, a marker of enhanced free radical generation, were detected by immunohistochemistry in SNP and insulin treated samples.These data suggest that RBC deformability of SCA can be modulated by RBC-NOS activity but also that oxidative stress may impair effectiveness of RBC-NOS produced NO.

  4. Red blood cell alloimmunization among sickle cell Kuwaiti Arab patients who received red blood cell transfusion.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Reem; Al Shemmari, Salem; Al-Bashir, Abdulaziz

    2009-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is common in the Arabian Gulf region. Most cases require a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, increasing the potential for RBC alloantibody development. The incidence of RBC alloimmunization among Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients is not yet known. This study retrospectively assessed the effect of using two different matching protocols on the incidence of alloimmunization among multiply transfused Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients. A total of 233 Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 (n = 110) received RBC transfusion through standard ABO- and D-matched nonleukoreduced blood; Group 2 (n = 123) received RBCs matched for ABO, Rh, and K1 poststorage-leukoreduced blood. Multivariate analysis was performed on the factors associated with RBC alloimmunization and antibody specificity. Sixty-five percent of patients in Group 1 developed clinically significant RBC alloantibody with an increased prevalence in females; in patients in Group 2, 23.6% developed RBC alloantibodies (p = 0.01). In Group 1, 72 patients (65.5%) had alloantibodies directed against Rh and Kell systems (p = 0.01). Multivariate analysis further confirmed the results, showing that blood transfusion type and sex have significant effects on the rate of alloimmunizations. This study confirms the importance of selecting RBCs matched for Rh and Kell to reduce the risk of alloimmunizations among Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients.

  5. Virtual modeling of polycrystalline structures of materials using particle packing algorithms and Laguerre cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfa, Carlos Recarey; Farias, Márcio Muniz de; Morales, Irvin Pablo Pérez; Navarra, Eugenio Oñate Ibañez de; Valera, Roberto Roselló

    2017-06-01

    The influence of the microstructural heterogeneities is an important topic in the study of materials. In the context of computational mechanics, it is therefore necessary to generate virtual materials that are statistically equivalent to the microstructure under study, and to connect that geometrical description to the different numerical methods. Herein, the authors present a procedure to model continuous solid polycrystalline materials, such as rocks and metals, preserving their representative statistical grain size distribution. The first phase of the procedure consists of segmenting an image of the material into adjacent polyhedral grains representing the individual crystals. This segmentation allows estimating the grain size distribution, which is used as the input for an advancing front sphere packing algorithm. Finally, Laguerre diagrams are calculated from the obtained sphere packings. The centers of the spheres give the centers of the Laguerre cells, and their radii determine the cells' weights. The cell sizes in the obtained Laguerre diagrams have a distribution similar to that of the grains obtained from the image segmentation. That is why those diagrams are a convenient model of the original crystalline structure. The above-outlined procedure has been used to model real polycrystalline metallic materials. The main difference with previously existing methods lies in the use of a better particle packing algorithm.

  6. Hypoalbuminemia causes high blood viscosity by increasing red cell lysophosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Joles, J A; Willekes-Koolschijn, N; Koomans, H A

    1997-09-01

    Albumin deficiency is accompanied by a reduction in red cell deformability and blood hyperviscosity. Albumin deficiency increases plasma fibrinogen and triglyceride levels and may alter red cell membrane lipid composition. These options, which could all contribute to reduced red cell deformability (RCD) and hyperviscosity, were studied in the Nagase analbuminemic rat (NAR), a mutant Sprague Dawley rat (CON), characterized by normal total protein levels, with an absolute deficiency of albumin, but elevated levels of non-albumin proteins and hyperlipidemia. Plasma protein-binding of the polar phopholipid lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) was markedly decreased. LPC comprised only 26 +/- 1% of total plasma phospholipids as compared to 42 +/- 2% in CON. NAR red cells in CON plasma had a viscosity that was similar to CON red cells in CON plasma. Conversely, CON red cells in NAR plasma show an increased viscosity as compared to CON red cells in CON plasma. The maximum deformation index of both NAR and CON red cells was markedly decreased in NAR plasma as compared to either NAR or CON cells in CON plasma (0.04 +/- 0.03 and 0.02 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.22 +/- 0.06 and 0.15 +/- 0.04, respectively; P < 0.05). Thus, plasma composition causes hyperviscosity and reduced RCD in NAR. Fibrinogen is not responsible since red cells in serum and red cells in plasma had a similar viscosity and differences in viscosity and RCD between NAR and CON were maintained. Plasma triglycerides are also not responsible since the viscosity of red cells in serum with a 50% reduction in triglycerides was not reduced. LPC levels in red cells were increased in NAR (8.7 +/- 0.2 vs. 5.5 +/- 0.3% of total phospholipids; P < 0.01). Adding albumin to NAR blood dose-dependently decreased whole blood viscosity, despite marked increases in plasma viscosity, and increased RCD of NAR cells (from 0.04 +/- 0.03 to 0.21 +/- 0.01; P < 0.05). There was also some effect on CON RCD of similar albumin addition to CON blood (from 0

  7. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing...

  8. Efflux of red cell water into buffered hypertonic solutions.

    PubMed

    OLMSTEAD, E G

    1960-03-01

    Buffered NaCl solutions hypertonic to rabbit serum were prepared and freezing point depressions of each determined after dilution with measured amounts of water. Freezing point depression of these dilutions was a linear function of the amount of water added. One ml. of rabbit red cells was added to each 4 ml. of the hypertonic solutions and after incubation at 38 degrees C. for 30 minutes the mixture was centrifuged and a freezing point depression determined on the supernatant fluid. The amount of water added to the hypertonic solutions by the red cells was calcuated from this freezing point depression. For each decrease in the freezing point of -0.093 degrees C. of the surrounding solution red cells gave up approximately 5 ml. of water per 100 ml. of red cells in the range of -0.560 to -0.930 degrees C. Beyond -0.930 degrees C. the amount of water given up by 100 ml. of red cells fits best a parabolic equation. The maximum of this equation occurred at a freezing point of the hypertonic solution of -2.001 degrees C. at which time the maximum amount of water leaving the red cells would be 39.9 ml. per 100 ml. of red cells. The data suggest that only about 43 per cent of the red cell water is available for exchange into solutions of increasing tonicity.

  9. Control of red blood cell mass during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T. B.; Smith, S. M.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1996-01-01

    Data are reviewed from twenty-two astronauts from seven space missions in a study of red blood cell mass. The data show that decreased red cell mass in all astronauts exposed to space for more than nine days, although the actual dynamics of mass changes varies with flight duration. Possible mechanisms for these changes, including alterations in erythropoietin levels, are discussed.

  10. Control of red blood cell mass during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T. B.; Smith, S. M.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1996-01-01

    Data are reviewed from twenty-two astronauts from seven space missions in a study of red blood cell mass. The data show that decreased red cell mass in all astronauts exposed to space for more than nine days, although the actual dynamics of mass changes varies with flight duration. Possible mechanisms for these changes, including alterations in erythropoietin levels, are discussed.

  11. Red blood cells in sports: effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2013-01-01

    During exercise the cardiovascular system has to warrant substrate supply to working muscle. The main function of red blood cells in exercise is the transport of O2 from the lungs to the tissues and the delivery of metabolically produced CO2 to the lungs for expiration. Hemoglobin also contributes to the blood's buffering capacity, and ATP and NO release from red blood cells contributes to vasodilation and improved blood flow to working muscle. These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called "sports anemia." This is not anemia in a clinical sense, because athletes have in fact an increased total mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin in circulation relative to sedentary individuals. The slight decrease in hematocrit by training is brought about by an increased plasma volume (PV). The mechanisms that increase total red blood cell mass by training are not understood fully. Despite stimulated erythropoiesis, exercise can decrease the red blood cell mass by intravascular hemolysis mainly of senescent red blood cells, which is caused by mechanical rupture when red blood cells pass through capillaries in contracting muscles, and by compression of red cells e.g., in foot soles during running or in hand palms in weightlifters. Together, these adjustments cause a decrease in the average age of the population of circulating red blood cells in trained athletes. These younger red cells are characterized by improved oxygen release and deformability, both of which also improve tissue oxygen supply during exercise.

  12. Red blood cells in sports: effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2013-01-01

    During exercise the cardiovascular system has to warrant substrate supply to working muscle. The main function of red blood cells in exercise is the transport of O2 from the lungs to the tissues and the delivery of metabolically produced CO2 to the lungs for expiration. Hemoglobin also contributes to the blood's buffering capacity, and ATP and NO release from red blood cells contributes to vasodilation and improved blood flow to working muscle. These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called “sports anemia.” This is not anemia in a clinical sense, because athletes have in fact an increased total mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin in circulation relative to sedentary individuals. The slight decrease in hematocrit by training is brought about by an increased plasma volume (PV). The mechanisms that increase total red blood cell mass by training are not understood fully. Despite stimulated erythropoiesis, exercise can decrease the red blood cell mass by intravascular hemolysis mainly of senescent red blood cells, which is caused by mechanical rupture when red blood cells pass through capillaries in contracting muscles, and by compression of red cells e.g., in foot soles during running or in hand palms in weightlifters. Together, these adjustments cause a decrease in the average age of the population of circulating red blood cells in trained athletes. These younger red cells are characterized by improved oxygen release and deformability, both of which also improve tissue oxygen supply during exercise. PMID:24273518

  13. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  14. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M; van Solinge, Wouter W; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-12-13

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias.

  15. Hemodynamic effects of red blood cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Baskurt, Oguz K; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2007-01-01

    The influence of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation on blood flow in vivo has been under debate since early 1900's, yet a full understanding has still has not been reached. Enhanced RBC aggregation is well known to increase blood viscosity measured in rotational viscometers. However, it has been demonstrated that RBC aggregation may decrease flow resistance in cylindrical tubes, due to the formation of a cell-poor zone near the tube wall which results from the enhanced central accumulation of RBC. There is also extensive discussion regarding the effects of RBC aggregation on in vivo blood flow resistance. Several groups have reported increased microcirculatory flow resistance with enhanced RBC aggregation in experiments that utilized intravital microscopy. Alternatively, whole organ studies revealed that flow resistance may be significantly decreased if RBC aggregation is enhanced. Recently, new techniques have been developed to achieve well-controlled, graded alterations in RBC aggregation without influencing suspending phase properties. Studies using this technique revealed that the effects of RBC aggregation are determined by the degree of aggregation changes, and that this relationship can be explained by different hemodynamic mechanisms.

  16. Developmental Plasticity of Red Blood Cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.; Malka, Roy; Higgins, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Most human physiologic set points like body temperature are tightly regulated and show little variation between healthy individuals. Red blood cell (RBC) characteristics such as hematocrit (HCT) and mean cell volume (MCV) are stable within individuals but can vary by 20% from one healthy person to the next. The mechanisms for the majority of this inter-individual variation are unknown and do not appear to involve common genetic variation. Here we show that environmental conditions present during development, namely in utero iron availability, can exert long-term influence on a set point related to the RBC life cycle. In a controlled study of rhesus monkeys and a retrospective study of humans, we use a mathematical model of in vivo RBC population dynamics to show that in utero iron deficiency is associated with a lowered threshold for RBC clearance and turnover. This in utero effect is plastic, persisting at least two years after birth and after the cessation of iron deficiency. Our study reports a rare instance of developmental plasticity in the human hematologic systems and also shows how mathematical modeling can be used to identify cellular mechanisms involved in the adaptive control of homeostatic set points. PMID:24415575

  17. Red blood cells in retinal vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Sherwood, Joseph; Chhablani, Jay; Ricchariya, Ashutosh; Kim, Sangho; Jones, Philip H; Balabani, Stavroula; Shima, David

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular circulation plays a vital role in regulating physiological functions, such as vascular resistance, and maintaining organ health. Pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes, or hematologic diseases affect the microcirculation posing a significant risk to human health. The retinal vasculature provides a unique window for non-invasive visualisation of the human circulation in vivo and retinal vascular image analysis has been established to predict the development of both clinical and subclinical cardiovascular, metabolic, renal and retinal disease in epidemiologic studies. Blood viscosity which was otherwise thought to play a negligible role in determining blood flow based on Poiseuille's law up to the 1970s has now been shown to play an equally if not a more important role in controlling microcirculation and quantifying blood flow. Understanding the hemodynamics/rheology of the microcirculation and its changes in diseased states remains a challenging task; this is due to the particulate nature of blood, the mechanical properties of the cells (such as deformability and aggregability) and the complex architecture of the microvasculature. In our review, we have tried to postulate a possible role of red blood cell (RBC) biomechanical properties and laid down future framework for research related to hemorrheological aspects of blood in patients with retinal vascular disorders.

  18. Polypeptide multilayer nanofilm artificial red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Palath, Naveen; Bhad, Sujaykumar; Montazeri, Reza; Guidry, Christopher A; Haynie, Donald T

    2007-04-01

    Reliable encapsulation of hemoglobin (Hb) within polypeptide multilayer nanofilms has been achieved by a template-based approach, and protein functionality has been demonstrated postencapsulation. The method is general in scope and could be useful for many other encapsulants. Met-Hb was adsorbed onto 5 microm-diameter CaCO3 microparticles, and the Hb-coated particles were encapsulated within a multilayer nanofilm of poly(L-glutamic acid) (PLGA) and poly(L-lysine) (PLL) by layer-by-layer assembly. The CaCO3 templates were then dissolved within the PLGA/PLL nanofilms by addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Encapsulation of Hb was proved by fluorescence microscopy, the pH-dependence of retention of Hb was determined by visible wavelength absorbance, and conversion of the encapsulated met-Hb to deoxy-Hb and oxy-Hb was demonstrated by spectroscopic analysis of the Soret absorption peak under various conditions. It thus has been shown that control of Hb oxygenation within polypeptide multilayer nanofilm artificial cells is possible, and that Hb thus encapsulated can bind, release, and subsequently rebind molecular oxygen. This work therefore represents an advance in the development of polypeptide multilayer film artificial red blood cells. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Red blood cell transfusion in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Klein, Harvey G; Spahn, Donat R; Carson, Jeffrey L

    2007-08-04

    Every year, about 75 million units of blood are collected worldwide. Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is one of the few treatments that adequately restore tissue oxygenation when oxygen demand exceeds supply. Although the respiratory function of blood has been studied intensively, the trigger for RBC transfusion remains controversial, and doctors rely primarily on clinical experience. Laboratory assays that indicate failing tissue oxygenation would be ideal to guide the need for transfusion, but none has proved easy, reproducible, and sensitive to regional tissue hypoxia. The clinical importance of the RBCs storage lesion (ie, the time-dependent metabolic, biochemical, and molecular changes that stored blood cells undergo) is poorly understood. RBCs can be filtered, washed, frozen, or irradiated for specific indications. Donor screening and testing have dramatically reduced infectious risks in the developed world, but infection remains a major hazard in developing countries, where 13 million units of blood are not tested for HIV or hepatitis viruses. Pathogen inactivation techniques are in clinical trials for RBCs, but none is available for use. Despite serious immunological and non-immunological complications, RBC transfusion holds a therapeutic index that exceeds that of many common medications.

  20. Red blood cell storage duration and trauma.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2015-04-01

    Numerous retrospective clinical studies suggest that transfusion of longer stored red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with an independent risk of poorer outcomes for certain groups of patients, including trauma, intensive care, and cardiac surgery patients. Large multicenter randomized controlled trials are currently underway to address the concern about RBC storage duration. However, none of these randomized controlled trials focus specifically on trauma patients with hemorrhage. Major trauma, particularly due to road accidents, is the leading cause of critical injury in the younger-than-40-year-old age group. Severe bleeding associated with major trauma induces hemodynamic dysregulation that increases the risk of hypoxia, coagulopathy, and potentially multiorgan failure, which can be fatal. In major trauma, a multitude of stress-associated changes occur to the patient's RBCs, including morphological changes that increase cell rigidity and thereby alter blood flow hemodynamics, particularly in the microvascular vessels, and reduce RBC survival. Initial inflammatory responses induce deleterious cellular interactions, including endothelial activation, RBC adhesion, and erythrophagocytosis that are quickly followed by profound immunosuppressive responses. Stored RBCs exhibit similar biophysical characteristics to those of trauma-stressed RBCs. Whether transfusion of RBCs that exhibit storage lesion changes exacerbates the hemodynamic perturbations already active in the trauma patient is not known. This article reviews findings from several recent nonrandomized studies examining RBC storage duration and clinical outcomes in trauma patients. The rationale for further research on RBC storage duration in the trauma setting is provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Understanding red blood cell alloimmunization triggers.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Tormey, Christopher A

    2016-12-02

    Blood group alloimmunization is "triggered" when a person lacking a particular antigen is exposed to this antigen during transfusion or pregnancy. Although exposure to an antigen is necessary for alloimmunization to occur, it is not alone sufficient. Blood group antigens are diverse in structure, function, and immunogenicity. In addition to red blood cells (RBCs), a recipient of an RBC transfusion is exposed to donor plasma, white blood cells, and platelets; the potential contribution of these elements to RBC alloimmunization remains unclear. Much attention in recent years has been placed on recipient factors that influence RBC alloantibody responses. Danger signals, identified in murine and human studies alike as being risk factors for alloimmunization, may be quite diverse in nature. In addition to exogenous or condition-associated inflammation, autoimmunity is also a risk factor for alloantibody formation. Triggers for alloimmunization in pregnancy are not well-understood beyond the presence of a fetal/maternal bleed. Studies using animal models of pregnancy-induced RBC alloimmunization may provide insight in this regard. A better understanding of alloimmunization triggers and signatures of "responders" and "nonresponders" is needed for prevention strategies to be optimized. A common goal of such strategies is increased transfusion safety and improved pregnancy outcomes.

  2. Electricity generation and microbial community changes in microbial fuel cells packed with different anodic materials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanmei; Wei, Jincheng; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2011-12-01

    Four materials, carbon felt cube (CFC), granular graphite (GG), granular activated carbon (GAC) and granular semicoke (GS) were tested as packed anodic materials to seek a potentially practical material for microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The microbial community and its correlation with the electricity generation performance of MFCs were explored. The maximum power density was found in GAC, followed by CFC, GG and GS. In GAC and CFC packed MFCs, Geobacter was the dominating genus, while Azospira was the most populous group in GG. Results further indicated that GAC was the most favorable for Geobacter adherence and growth, and the maximum power densities had positive correlation with the total biomass and the relative abundance of Geobacter, but without apparent correlation with the microbial diversity. Due to the low content of Geobacter in GS, power generated in this system may be attributed to other microorganisms such as Synergistes, Bacteroidetes and Castellaniella.

  3. COMPARISON OF OUTCOMES BETWEEN BLOOD GROUP O AND NON-GROUP O PREMATURE NEONATES RECEIVING RED CELL TRANSFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Boral, Leonard I.; Staubach, Zane G.; de Leeuw, Reny; MacIvor, Duncan C.; Kryscio, Richard; Bada, Henrietta S.

    2015-01-01

    Background At some institutions all babies requiring red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) receive group O RBCs. Although transfused O plasma is minimized in packed RBCs, small amounts of residual anti-A, anti-B and anti-A, B in group O packed RBCs may bind to the corresponding A and B antigens of non-group O RBCs, possibly hemolyzing their native RBCs and thereby releasing free hemoglobin theoretically resulting in hypercoagulability and promoting bacterial growth from free iron. Study Design and Methods Transfused group O and non- group O premature infants in the University of Kentucky Children’s Hospital NICU database were compared for a number of severity markers to determine if transfused non-group O patients had worse outcomes than those of group O. Results 724 neonates in this sample of NICU babies received at least one blood component. There were no significant differences between group O and non-group O babies with regard to final disposition or complications. Conclusions This reassuring finding validates the longstanding neonatal transfusion practice of using group O packed red cells for NICU babies of all blood groups. However, because a recent study shows increased mortality from NEC in AB neonates receiving only group O RBC and suggests a change in neonatal transfusion practice to ABO group specific red cells, more studies may be warranted PMID:24225743

  4. Photochemical decontamination of red cell concentrates with the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 and red light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Zuk, Maria M.; Oetjen, Joyce; Chan, Wai-Shun; Lenny, Leslie; Horowitz, Bernard

    1999-07-01

    Virus inactivation in red blood cells concentrates (RBCC) is being studied in order to increase the safety of the blood supply. For this purpose we have been studying the silicon phthalocyanine (Pc 4), a photosensitizer activated with red light. Two approaches were used to achieve enhanced selectivity of Pc 4 for virus inactivation. One was formulation of Pc 4 in liposomes that reduce its binding to red cells. The other was the use of a light emitting diode (LED) array emitting at 700 nm. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infectivity served as an endpoint for virus kill in treated RBCC. Red cell hemolysis and circulatory survival in rabbits served as measures for red cell damage. Treatment of small aliquots of human RBCC with 2 (mu) M Pc 4 in liposomes and 10 J/cm2 of 700 nm LED light in the presence of the quenches of reactive oxygen species glutathione and trolox resulted in 6 log10 inactivation of VSV. Under these conditions hemolysis of treated red cells stored at 4 degree(s)C for 21 days was only slightly above that of control cells. Rabbit RBCC similarly treated circulated with a half life of 7.5 days compared with 10.5 days of control. It is concluded that Pc 4 used as described here may be useful for viral decontamination of RBCC, pending toxicological and clinical studies.

  5. [Regularity of sugar-uptake in human red blood cells].

    PubMed

    Quan, Guo-Bo; Lü, Cui-Cui; Liu, Min-Xia; Hu, Wen-Bo; Wang, Yan; Han, Ying

    2006-06-01

    Lyophilization of human red blood cells has important significance in clinical application. Some sugars, especially trehalose, can be more tolerant of some organism or cells to dry environments, But, how to bring sugars into cells is a challenge. This study was aimed to investigate the regularity of sugar-uptake in human red blood cells. The absorption rate of trehalose and glucose in red blood cells, free hemoglobin level and erythrocyte deformation index were determined at different incubation temperature (4, 25 and 37 degrees C), different sugar concentration (0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1 mol/L) and different incubation time (1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 hours). The results showed that with increase of temperature and extracellular sugar concentration, the uptake of sugar in red blood cells also increased, the intracellular trehalose and glucose concentrations were over 30 mmol/L and 40 mmol/L respectively. The effects of incubation time on uptake of trehalose and glucose were different. With prolonging of incubation time, the uptake of trehalose showed firstly increase and then decrease, however, the uptake of glucose showed a constant increase. But the loading process had side-effect on free hemoglobin and maximum deformation index (MAXDI) of red blood cells, especially for trehalose, which mainly come from high osmotic pressure. It is concluded that the uptake of sugars in red blood cells is closely dependent on incubation temperature, extracellular sugar concentration and incubation time. In certain condition, the efficiency of sugar uptake is very high, but this process also damages red blood cells so as to affect the application of sugars in lyophilization of red blood cells. The research in the future should focus on how to deal with the relation between cell injury and uptake efficiency of sugar in red blood cells.

  6. A counting method for density packed cells based on sliding band filter image enhancement.

    PubMed

    Sui, D; Wang, K

    2013-04-01

    Cell loss and addition is an important biological event in pathology, and it usually provides central information to the changes of biological activity in the histological sections. To develop a reliable and accurate cell counting tools in tissue section, in this paper, we proposed a novel cell nuclei detecting method based on the sliding band filter which is a member of convergence index family. We evaluated the accuracy and performance of our method on density packed retinal outer nuclear layer cell confocal multivariate fluorescence microscopy image datasets. The results show our proposed method exhibited an excellent performance with its accuracy compared with human manual counting. It is worth noting that the proposed cell counting method can clearly benefit for retinal detachment and reattachment visual diagnostics close related to cell loss and addition. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. Integration Issues of Cells into Battery Packs for Plug-in and Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A. A.; Kim, G. H.; Keyser, M.

    2009-05-01

    The main barriers to increased market share of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and commercialization of plug-in HEVs are the cost, safety, and life of lithium ion batteries. Significant effort is being directed to address these issues for lithium ion cells. However, even the best cells may not perform as well when integrated into packs for vehicles because of the environment in which vehicles operate. This paper discusses mechanical, electrical, and thermal integration issues and vehicle interface issues that could impact the cost, life, and safety of the system. It also compares the advantages and disadvantages of using many small cells versus a few large cells and using prismatic cells versus cylindrical cells.

  8. Hitchhiker's guide to the red cell storage galaxy: Omics technologies and the quality issue.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2017-04-01

    Red blood cell storage in the blood bank makes millions of units of available for transfusion to civilian and military recipients every year. From glass bottles to plastic bags, from anticoagulants to complex additives, from whole blood to leukocyte filtered packed red blood cells: huge strides have been made in the field of blood component processing and storage in the blood bank during the last century. Still, refrigerated preservation of packed red blood cells under blood bank conditions results in the progressive accumulation of a wide series of biochemical and morphological changes to the stored erythrocytes, collectively referred to as the storage lesion(s). Approximately ten years ago, retrospective clinical evidence had suggested that such lesion(s) may be clinically relevant and mediate some of the untoward transfusion-related effects observed especially in some categories of recipients at risk (e.g. massively or chronically transfused recipients). Since then, randomized clinical trials have failed to prospectively detect any signal related to red cell storage duration and increased morbidity and mortality in several categories of recipients, at the limits of the statistical power of these studies. While a good part of the transfusion community has immediately adopted the take-home message "if it isn't broken, don't fix it" (i.e. no change to the standard of practice should be pursued), decision makers have been further questioning whether there may be room for further improvements in this field. Provocatively, we argue that consensus has yet to be unanimously reached on what makes a good quality marker of the red cell storage lesion and transfusion safety/efficacy. In other words, if it is true that "you can't manage what you can't measure", then future advancements in the field of transfusion medicine will necessarily rely on state of the art analytical omics technologies of well-defined quality parameters. Heavily borrowing from Douglas Adam's imaginary

  9. Context aware spatio-temporal cell tracking in densely packed multilayer tissues.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Roy-Chowdhury, Amit K

    2015-01-01

    Modern live imaging technique enables us to observe the internal part of a tissue over time by generating serial optical images containing spatio-temporal slices of hundreds of tightly packed cells. Automated tracking of plant and animal cells from such time lapse live-imaging datasets of a developing multicellular tissue is required for quantitative, high throughput analysis of cell division, migration and cell growth. In this paper, we present a novel cell tracking method that exploits the tight spatial topology of neighboring cells in a multicellular field as contextual information and combines it with physical features of individual cells for generating reliable cell lineages. The 2D image slices of multicellular tissues are modeled as a conditional random field and pairwise cell to cell similarities are obtained by estimating marginal probability distributions through loopy belief propagation on this CRF. These similarity scores are further used in a spatio-temporal graph labeling problem to obtain the optimal and feasible set of correspondences between individual cell slices across the 4D image dataset. We present results on (3D+t) confocal image stacks of Arabidopsis shoot meristem and show that the method is capable of handling many visual analysis challenges associated with such cell tracking problems, viz. poor feature quality of individual cells, low SNR in parts of images, variable number of cells across slices and cell division detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Light scattering by aggregated red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsinopoulos, Stephanos V.; Sellountos, Euripides J.; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    2002-03-01

    In low flow rates, red blood cells (RBCs) fasten together along their axis of symmetry and form a so-called rouleaux. The scattering of He-Ne laser light by a rouleau consisting of n (2 less-than-or-equal n less-than-or-equal 8) average-sized RBCs is investigated. The interaction problem is treated numerically by means of an advanced axisymmetric boundary element--fast Fourier transform methodology. The scattering problem of one RBC was solved first, and the results showed that the influence of the RBC's membrane on the scattering patterns is negligible. Thus the rouleau is modeled as an axisymmetric, homogeneous, low-contrast dielectric cylinder, on the surface of which appears, owing to aggregated RBCs, a periodic roughness along the direction of symmetry. The direction of the incident laser light is considered to be perpendicular to the scatterer's axis of symmetry. The differential scattering cross sections in both perpendicular and parallel scattering planes and for all the scattering angles are calculated and presented in detail.

  11. Effects of red blood cells on hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Roeloffzen, Wilfried W H; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C; Bosman, Lotte; de Wolf, Joost Th M

    2010-07-01

    Currently there is no sensitive laboratory test to establish the influence of red blood cells (RBCs) on hemostasis. As thromboelastography (TEG) measures hemostasis in whole blood, taking into account the interactions of all cellular elements, we used this instrument to investigate the role that RBCs play in hemostasis. In 29 patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia we studied the effect of progressive anemia on the coagulation profile. In 24 patients with chronic anemia we studied the effect of transfusion of RBCs on coagulation. Finally, in 18 patients we evaluated whether storage time of RBCs has additional effects on hemostasis. We observed a significant negative correlation between hemoglobin and TEG variables related to both clot strength and elasticity (p < 0.05). Moreover, anemia was associated with a delay in the initiation of the coagulation cascade. Correction of anemia by RBC transfusion resulted in significant shortening of this initiation phase with now the opposite effect on clot strength and elasticity. The negative effects on clot quality were significantly worse when fresh RBCs were transfused compared to longer-stored RBCs. Furthermore, in contrast to the longer-stored RBCs, fresh RBCs did not enhance initial fibrin formation. In this study we found that anemia was associated with a delay in the initiation of the coagulation cascade with a finally formed clot with superior strength and viscoelastic properties. Transfusion of RBCs was associated with impaired clot quality, with even worse effects on the initial fibrin build-up and clot quality by fresh RBCs.

  12. Association between anemia and packed cell transfusion and outcomes of ventricular septal defect and atrioventricular canal repair in children.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Natarajan, Girija; Sallaam, Salaam; Bondarenko, Igor; Walters, Henry L; Delius, Ralph; Aggarwal, Sanjeev

    2014-03-01

    Data on the prevalence and impact of anemia and packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions in children with congenital heart disease are limited. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of anemia and its impact and the impact of PRBC transfusion in the initial 5 days after surgical repair on postoperative outcomes in infants with ventricular septal defect (VSD) and atrioventricular (AV) canal. Retrospective chart review of infants (1 year old) (n = 195) with AV canal or VSD who underwent surgical repair at Children's Hospital of Michigan during a 10-year period. Statistical analyses (SPSS 17.0) included Chi square and Student t test as well as regression analysis with significance set at p = 0.05. Preoperative anemia was diagnosed in 45 of 195 (23%) children. Anemic infants had VSD more frequently (80%), significantly shorter bypass and cross-clamp durations, and higher red cell distribution widths. Postoperative outcomes and PRBC transfusions were similar in the groups. On regression analysis, AV canal was associated with a significantly lower (odds ratio 0.21; 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.68, p = 0.009) risk of anemia. Infants who received a PRBC transfusion (n = 42) had significantly lower birth weights as well as weights at surgery and longer postoperative durations of pressor use, ventilation, oxygen supplementation, and length of stay than those who did not (n = 153) receive transfusions. PRBC transfusion was independently associated with longer postoperative length of stay, oxygen, pressor use, and ventilator duration. Approximately 23% of infants with AV canal or VSD are anemic. PRBC transfusions in the initial 5 postoperative days, but not anemia, are independently associated with adverse postoperative outcomes. Further studies to evaluate conservative transfusion strategies in this population are needed.

  13. Abnormal Red Cell Structure and Function in Neuroacanthocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cluitmans, Judith C. A.; Tomelleri, Carlo; Yapici, Zuhal; Dinkla, Sip; Bovee-Geurts, Petra; Chokkalingam, Venkatachalam; De Franceschi, Lucia; Brock, Roland; Bosman, Giel J. G. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) belongs to a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders known as neuroacanthocytosis (NA). This genetically heterogeneous group of diseases is characterized by degeneration of neurons in the basal ganglia and by the presence of deformed red blood cells with thorny protrusions, acanthocytes, in the circulation. Objective The goal of our study is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this aberrant red cell morphology and the corresponding functional consequences. This could shed light on the etiology of the neurodegeneration. Methods We performed a qualitative and semi-quantitative morphological, immunofluorescent, biochemical and functional analysis of the red cells of several patients with PKAN and, for the first time, of the red cells of their family members. Results We show that the blood of patients with PKAN contains not only variable numbers of acanthocytes, but also a wide range of other misshapen red cells. Immunofluorescent and immunoblot analyses suggest an altered membrane organization, rather than quantitative changes in protein expression. Strikingly, these changes are not limited to the red blood cells of PKAN patients, but are also present in the red cells of heterozygous carriers without neurological problems. Furthermore, changes are not only present in acanthocytes, but also in other red cells, including discocytes. The patients’ cells, however, are more fragile, as observed in a spleen-mimicking device. Conclusion These morphological, molecular and functional characteristics of red cells in patients with PKAN and their family members offer new tools for diagnosis and present a window into the pathophysiology of neuroacanthocytosis. PMID:25933379

  14. Preparation of immobilized whole cell biocatalyst and biodiesel production using a packed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kyeong, Jin Seon; Yeom, Sung Ho

    2014-11-01

    Rhizopus oryzae NBRC 4697 was selected from among promising candidates as a biocatalyst for biodiesel production. This microorganism was immobilized on to polyurethane foam coated with activated carbon for reuse, and, for biodiesel production. Vacuum drying of the immobilized cells was found to be more efficient than natural or freeze-drying processes. Although the immobilized cells were severely inhibited by a molar ratio of methanol to soybean oil in excess of 2.0, stepwise methanol addition (3 aliquots at 24-h feeding intervals) significantly prevented methanol inhibition. A packed-bed bioreactor (PBB) containing the immobilized whole cell biocatalyst was then operated under circulating batch mode. Stepwise methanol feeding was used to mitigate methanol inhibition of the immobilized cells in the PBB. An increase in the feeding rate (circulating rate) of the reaction mixture barely affected biodiesel production, while an increase in the packing volume of the immobilized cells enhanced biodiesel production noticeably. Finally, repeated circulating batch operation of the PBB was carried out for five consecutive rounds without a noticeable decrease in the performance of the PBB for the three rounds.

  15. Electrochemical removal of nitrate using ZVI packed bed bipolar electrolytic cell.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joo-Young; Kim, Han-Ki; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Joo-Yang

    2012-09-01

    The present study investigates the performance of the zero valent iron (ZVI, Fe(0)) packed bed bipolar electrolytic cell for nitrate removal. The packing mixture consists of ZVI as electronically conducting material and silica sand as non-conducting material between main cathode and anode electrodes. In the continuous column experiments for the simulated groundwater (initial nitrate and electrical conductivity of about 30 mg L(-1) as N and 300 μS cm(-1), respectively), above 99% of nitrate was removed at the applied potential of 600 V with the main anode placed on the bottom of reactor. The influx nitrate was converted to ammonia (20% to maximum 60%) and nitrite (always less than 0.5 mg L(-1) as N in the effluent). The optimum packing ratio (v/v) of silica sand to ZVI was found to be 1:1-2:1. Magnetite was observed on the surface of the used ZVI as corrosion product. The reduction at the lower part of the reactor in acidic condition and adsorption at the upper part of the reactor in alkaline condition are the major mechanism of nitrate removal.

  16. Quantification of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, M; McDonnell, L; O'Mullane, J

    2001-01-01

    For humans the sizes and shapes of their red blood cells are important indicators of well being. In this study, the feasibility of using the atomic force microscope (AFM) to provide the sizes and shapes of red blood cells has been investigated. An immobilisation procedure has been developed that enabled red blood cells to be reliably imaged by contact AFM in air. The shapes of the red blood cells were readily apparent in the AFM images. Various cell quantification parameters were investigated, including thickness, width, surface area and volume. Excellent correlation was found between the AFM-derived immobilised mean cell volume (IMCV) parameter and the mean cell volume (MCV) parameter used in current haematological practice. The correlation between MCV and IMCV values has validated the immobilisation procedure by demonstrating that the significant cell shrinkage that occurs during immobilisation and drying does not introduce quantification artifacts. Reliable IMCV values were obtained by quantifying 100 red blood cells and this typically required 3-5 AFM images of 100 microm x 100 microm area. This work has demonstrated that the AFM can provide in a single test the red blood cell size and shape data needed in the assessment of human health.

  17. Lack of Erythropoietic Inhibitory Effect of Serum From Patients with Congenital Pure Red Cell Aplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Gary; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Serum of five children ages 1 to 19 months with congenital pure red cell aplasia (incomplete or defective development of red blood cells) was injected in normal mice to determine possible inhibition of red blood cell formulating stimulants. (CL)

  18. Lack of Erythropoietic Inhibitory Effect of Serum From Patients with Congenital Pure Red Cell Aplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Gary; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Serum of five children ages 1 to 19 months with congenital pure red cell aplasia (incomplete or defective development of red blood cells) was injected in normal mice to determine possible inhibition of red blood cell formulating stimulants. (CL)

  19. Effects of increased red cell mass on subclinical tissue acidosis in hyaline membrane disease.

    PubMed Central

    La Gamma, E F; Krauss, A; Auld, P A

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether there are subclinical deficits in oxygen delivery in ventilated premature neonates. METHOD: Ventilated premature neonates weighing less than 1500 g, who were transfused for anaemia or who were given colloids for clotting abnormalities (or oedema), were haemodynamically monitored during the first week of life. Calf muscle surface pH (pH) was measured in conjunction with peripheral limb blood flow by occlusion plethysmography. RESULTS: Packed red blood cell transfusions corrected a subclinical regional tissue acidosis (low tpH) without affecting arterial pH or limb blood flow. This observation also correlated with an increase in regional oxygen delivery. The data were also suggestive of a pattern of pathological, supply dependent, oxygen delivery and are similar to other observations made in adults with adult respiratory distress syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Packed red blood cells increase regional oxygen delivery and tissue surface pH. In contrast, colloid infusion provided no substantial cardiovascular or metabolic benefit to these patients and should be avoided when oxygen delivery is at issue and when there may be leaky pulmonary capillaries. PMID:8949689

  20. In vitro combinations of red blood cell, plasma and platelet components evaluated by thromboelastography.

    PubMed

    Agren, Anna; Edgren, Gustaf; Kardell, Malin; Ostlund, Anders; Wikman, Agneta Taune

    2014-10-01

    Thromboelastography is increasingly used to evaluate coagulation in massively bleeding patients. The aim of this study was to investigate how different combinations of blood components affect in vitro whole blood clotting measured by thromboelastography. Packed red blood cells, plasma and platelets from fresh and old blood components were mixed in vitro, in proportions of 4:4:1, 5:5:2, 8:4:1 and 2:1:0, and analysed with thromboelastography. For the ratio 4:4:1 the experiment was done at both 37 °C and 32 °C. Thromboelastography curves were within normal reference values for the blood component proportions of 4:4:1 and 5:5:2. For 8:4:1, the angle and maximal amplitude were reduced below normal values, indicating low levels of fibrinogen and/or platelets. For the 2:1:0 proportion, all parameters were affected resulting in severely impaired in vitro clot formation. The reaction-time, reflecting the coagulation factor-dependent, initial clot formation, was slightly increased at a low temperature. Prolonged storage of the components did not affect the curve. With the introduction of guidelines on the management of massive bleeding it is important to have tools for the assessment of the new protocols. In vitro evaluation of mixtures of packed red blood cells, plasma and platelets by thromboelastography may be relevant in the prediction of in vivo clot formation and haemostasis.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment of dogs has no effect on red cell deformability but causes an acute fluid shift.

    PubMed

    Martindale, V E; McKay, K

    1995-01-01

    Red blood cells respond to a number of perturbations, including hypoxia, with a reduction in deformability. Local hypoxia may become self-reinforcing, as hypoxic cells block capillaries preventing perfusion by oxygenated cells. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is frequently used to treat conditions involving some degree of local hypoxia, but does it have a direct effect on deformability? To investigate this, 12 normal dogs received a 10 week "clinical" course of HBO: one 90 min treatment per weekday at 2.4 ATA (243 kPa), 100% O2. On Mondays and Fridays, a blood sample was drawn into EDTA, centrifuged, and the packed red blood cells resuspended in medium to a dilution of 2 x 10(6) to 5 x 10(6) cells/ml, and filtered under constant of 1.08 kPa through a precalibrated Nucleopore Hemafil Polycarbonate membrane. Filtrate was collected for one minute and weighed, and the red blood cell "incremental volume" calculated according to Engstrom (Engstrom and Ohlsson, Pediatric Res. 27:220-226, 1990). No significant change was seen in filtration rates, indicating that HBO itself neither improves nor impairs dog red blood cell deformability. Changes in other commonly measured blood parameters remained within clinical norms. An acute fluid shift out of red blood cells and into plasma was indicated.

  2. Numerical analysis on cell-cell interaction of red blood cells during sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xing

    2017-07-01

    The long-range hydrodynamic interaction among red blood cells plays an important role on the macroscopic behaviors, however, the molecular interaction at such scale is much weaker. In this paper, the sedimentations under external body force of two red blood cells are numerical simulated to investigate the hydrodynamic interaction between cells. The flow is solved by lattice Boltzmann method and the membrane of red blood cell is model by the spring model where the fluid-membrane interaction is coupled by fictitious domain method. It is found that the cells have the tendency to aggregate and may be aligned in a line along the sediment direction. Compared to the properties of a single cell under the same conditions, the sediment velocity of red blood cell group is larger; the leading cell deforms less and the following cell endures larger deformation.

  3. Red cell exchange: special focus on sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haewon C

    2014-12-05

    The primary function of red blood cells (RBCs) is to deliver oxygen from the lungs to tissues. Tissue hypoxia occurs when the oxygen-carrying capacity of RBCs is compromised due primarily to 3 causes: (1) a reduction in circulating RBC mass, (2) an increase in circulating RBC mass, or (3) abnormal hemoglobin (Hb) that either does not sufficiently release oxygen to tissues (high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin) or occludes the microvasculature due to deformed RBCs (sickled RBCs). To improve oxygenation in patients with reduced or increased RBC mass, RBC administration (simple transfusion) or RBC removal (RBC depletion) is performed, respectively. However, for patients with abnormal Hb, RBCs containing abnormal Hb are removed and replaced by healthy volunteer donor RBCs by red cell exchange (RCE). RCE can be performed by manual exchange or by automated exchange using a blood cell separator (erythrocytapheresis). In this review, indications for RCE in sickle cell disease using the evidence-based American Society for Apheresis categories(1) are presented and the rationale for RCE in each disorder are discussed. Simple transfusion versus RCE and manual RCE versus automated RCE are compared. Finally, this review briefly presents some of the challenges of performing erythrocytapheresis in small children and discusses various choices for central venous access during RCE.(2.)

  4. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864.7100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood...

  5. Qualitative assessment of red blood cell parameters for signs of anemia in patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nubesh S.; Luke, Roji; Soman, Rino Roopak; Krishna, Praveen M.; Safar, Iqbal P.; Swaminathan, Senthil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Anemia of chronic disease is defined as anemia occurring in chronic infections and inflammatory conditions that is not caused by marrow deficiencies or other diseases and in the presence of adequate iron stores and vitamins. The present case control study was aimed to assess the red blood cell parameters for signs of anemia in patients with mild, moderate, and severe chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A simple random sampling method was used to select 80 healthy male patients, who were divided into four groups based on full mouth periodontal examination as follows: group I patients comprised the control group (n = 20), which included patients with a clinically healthy periodontium, group II patients (n = 20) were diagnosed with mild chronic periodontitis, group III (n = 20) included moderate chronic periodontitis patients, and patients with severe chronic periodontitis formed group IV (n = 20). Laboratory blood investigations included total number of erythrocytes, hemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. Results: Data analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in red blood cell parameters with increase in different grades of periodontitis. Conclusion: Results of the present study show a substantial decrease in red blood cell parameters with increase in the severity of periodontal destruction. PMID:26759801

  6. Dysferlin and other non-red cell proteins accumulate in the red cell membrane of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Pesciotta, Esther N; Sriswasdi, Sira; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Speicher, David W; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a congenital anemia usually caused by diverse mutations in ribosomal proteins. Although the genetics of DBA are well characterized, the mechanisms that lead to macrocytic anemia remain unclear. We systematically analyzed the proteomes of red blood cell membranes from multiple DBA patients to determine whether abnormalities in protein translation or erythropoiesis contribute to the observed macrocytosis or alterations in the mature red blood cell membrane. In depth proteome analysis of red cell membranes enabled highly reproducible identification and quantitative comparisons of 1100 or more proteins. These comparisons revealed clear differences between red cell membrane proteomes in DBA patients and healthy controls that were consistent across DBA patients with different ribosomal gene mutations. Proteins exhibiting changes in abundance included those known to be increased in DBA such as fetal hemoglobin and a number of proteins not normally found in mature red cell membranes, including proteins involved in the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway. Most striking was the presence of dysferlin in the red blood cell membranes of DBA patients but absent in healthy controls. Immunoblot validation using red cell membranes isolated from additional DBA patients and healthy controls confirmed a distinct membrane protein signature specific to patients with DBA.

  7. Column performance of carbon nanotube packed bed for methylene blue and orange red dye removal from waste water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, G. K.; Mubarak, N. M.; Nizamuddin, S.; Al-Salim, H. S.; Sahu, J. N.

    2017-06-01

    Environmental issues have always been a major issue among human kind for the past decades. As the time passes by, the technology field has grown and has helped a lot in order to reduce these environmental issues. Industries such as metal plating facilities, mining operations and batteries production are a few examples that involves in the environmental issues. Carbon nanotube is proven to possess excellent adsorption capacity for the removal of methylene blue and orange red dyes. The effect of process parameters such as pH and contact time was investigated The results revealed that optimized conditions for the highest removal for methylene blue (MB) (97%) and orange red (94%) are at pH 10, CNTs dosage of 1 grams, and 15 minutes for each dyes removal respectively. The equilibrium adsorption data obtained was best fit to Freundlich model, while kinetic data can be characterized by the pseudo second-order rate kinetics.

  8. Nitric Oxide Scavenging by Red Cell Microparticles and Cell Free Hemoglobin as a Mechanism for the Red Cell Storage Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Donadee, Chenell; Raat, Nicolaas J.H.; Kanias, Tamir; Tejero, Jesús; Lee, Janet S.; Kelley, Eric E.; Zhao, Xuejun; Liu, Chen; Reynolds, Hannah; Azarov, Ivan; Frizzell, Sheila; Meyer, E Michael; Donnenberg, Albert D.; Qu, Lirong; Triulzi, Darrel; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intravascular red cell hemolysis impairs NO-redox homeostasis, producing endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation and vasculopathy. Red blood cell storage under standard conditions results in reduced integrity of the erythrocyte membrane, with formation of exocytic microvesicles or “microparticles” and hemolysis, which we hypothesized could impair vascular function and contribute to the putative “storage lesion” of banked blood. Methods and Results We now find that storage of human red blood cells under standard blood banking conditions results in the accumulation of cell free and microparticle-encapsulated hemoglobin which, despite 39 days of storage, remains in the reduced ferrous oxyhemoglobin redox state and stoichiometrically reacts with and scavenges the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO). Using stopped-flow spectroscopy and laser triggered NO release from a caged NO compound we found that both free hemoglobin and microparticles react with NO about 1000 times faster than with intact erythrocytes. In complementary in vivo studies we show that hemoglobin, even at concentrations below 10 μM (in heme), produces potent vasoconstriction when infused into the rat circulation, while controlled infusions of methemoglobin and cyanomethemoglobin, which do not consume NO, have substantially reduced vasoconstrictor effects. Infusion of the plasma from stored human red cell units into the rat circulation produces significant vasoconstriction related to the magnitude of storage related hemolysis. Conclusions The results of these studies suggest new mechanisms for endothelial injury and impaired vascular function associated with the most fundamental of storage lesions, hemolysis. PMID:21747051

  9. Models for the Red Blood Cell Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rajiv P.; Horowitz, Joseph; Hollot, Christopher V.; Germain, Michael J.; Widness, John A.; Mock, Donald M.; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chait, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs) plays an important role in the study and interpretation of various clinical conditions. Yet, confusion about the meanings of fundamental terms related to cell survival and their quantification still exists in the literature. To address these issues, we started from a compartmental model of RBC populations based on an arbitrary full lifespan distribution, carefully defined the residual lifespan, current age, and excess lifespan of the RBC population, and then derived the distributions of these parameters. For a set of residual survival data from biotin-labeled RBCs, we fit models based on Weibull, gamma, and lognormal distributions, using nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) modeling and parametric bootstrapping. From the estimated Weibull, gamma, and lognormal parameters we computed the respective population mean full lifespans (95% confidence interval): 115.60 (109.17–121.66), 116.71 (110.81–122.51), and 116.79 (111.23–122.75) days together with the standard deviations of the full lifespans: 24.77 (20.82–28.81), 24.30 (20.53–28.33), and 24.19 (20.43–27.73). We then estimated the 95th percentiles of the lifespan distributions (a surrogate for the maximum lifespan): 153.95 (150.02–158.36), 159.51 (155.09–164.00), and 160.40 (156.00–165.58) days, the mean current ages (or the mean residual lifespans): 60.45 (58.18–62.85), 60.82 (58.77–63.33), and 57.26 (54.33–60.61) days, and the residual half-lives: 57.97 (54.96–60.90), 58.36 (55.45–61.26), and 58.40 (55.62–61.37) days, for the Weibull, gamma, and lognormal models respectively. Corresponding estimates were obtained for the individual subjects. The three models provide equally excellent goodness-of-fit, reliable estimation, and physiologically plausible values of the directly interpretable RBC survival parameters. PMID:27039311

  10. Models for the red blood cell lifespan.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rajiv P; Horowitz, Joseph; Hollot, Christopher V; Germain, Michael J; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chait, Yossi

    2016-06-01

    The lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs) plays an important role in the study and interpretation of various clinical conditions. Yet, confusion about the meanings of fundamental terms related to cell survival and their quantification still exists in the literature. To address these issues, we started from a compartmental model of RBC populations based on an arbitrary full lifespan distribution, carefully defined the residual lifespan, current age, and excess lifespan of the RBC population, and then derived the distributions of these parameters. For a set of residual survival data from biotin-labeled RBCs, we fit models based on Weibull, gamma, and lognormal distributions, using nonlinear mixed effects modeling and parametric bootstrapping. From the estimated Weibull, gamma, and lognormal parameters we computed the respective population mean full lifespans (95 % confidence interval): 115.60 (109.17-121.66), 116.71 (110.81-122.51), and 116.79 (111.23-122.75) days together with the standard deviations of the full lifespans: 24.77 (20.82-28.81), 24.30 (20.53-28.33), and 24.19 (20.43-27.73). We then estimated the 95th percentiles of the lifespan distributions (a surrogate for the maximum lifespan): 153.95 (150.02-158.36), 159.51 (155.09-164.00), and 160.40 (156.00-165.58) days, the mean current ages (or the mean residual lifespans): 60.45 (58.18-62.85), 60.82 (58.77-63.33), and 57.26 (54.33-60.61) days, and the residual half-lives: 57.97 (54.96-60.90), 58.36 (55.45-61.26), and 58.40 (55.62-61.37) days, for the Weibull, gamma, and lognormal models respectively. Corresponding estimates were obtained for the individual subjects. The three models provide equally excellent goodness-of-fit, reliable estimation, and physiologically plausible values of the directly interpretable RBC survival parameters.

  11. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Israel, O.; Groshar, D.; Weininger, J.

    1984-07-01

    Red blood cells labeled with 99mTc constitute a suitable intravascular agent for imaging of vascular abnormalities. Hemangiomas are characterized by low perfusion and a high blood pool. This ''perfusion blood-pool mismatch,'' not encountered in other lesions, may help in the specific diagnosis of this tumor. This is particularly so in cavernous hemangiomas of the liver where three-phase 99mTc-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy should precede liver biopsy. Red cell scintigraphy also is useful for establishing the vascular nature of hemangiomas of the head and neck and the skin and for diagnosis of venous occlusion. Heat-damaged red blood cells provide a specific spleen imaging agent. This should be used when patients with suspected splenic pathology have equivocal colloid scintigraphy.

  12. Red Blood Cell Supernatant Potentiates LPS-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Response From Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nydam, Trevor L.; Clarke, Jason H.; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.; McCarter, Martin D.

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion has an immunomodulatory capacity on its recipients through accumulation of immunologically active substances with blood storage, and prestorage leukoreduction reduces many of these mediators. We investigated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to packed red blood cell (PRBC) supernatants from leukoreduced (LR) or non-leukoreduced (NLR) units with variable duration of storage. PRBC units were collected with or without leukoreduction on Day 0 before routine storage. The plasma fraction (supernatant) was isolated from LR and NLR units after 1 day (D1) or 42 days (D42) of storage and exposed to PBMCs versus control media for 24 h, then with LPS for an additional 24 h. Cell supernatants were analyzed for IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α by cytokine bead array. IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 were significantly elevated in PRBC groups versus control. D42 NLR PRBC supernatant significantly increased secretion of IL-1β and IL-6 compared to D1 NLR PRBC supernatant. LR significantly attenuated the cytokine response of IL-1β. Thus, PRBC supernatant potentiates proinflammatory LPS-induced cytokine secretion from PBMCs. This response is accentuated with storage duration and partially attenuated with leukoreduction. These findings may partially explain the immune activation seen clinically after blood transfusion. PMID:19441884

  13. Ex-vivo generation of human red cells for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Anstee, David J; Gampel, Alexandra; Toye, Ashley M

    2012-05-01

    The present article reviews the recent data concerning the generation of red blood cells from haematopoietic stem cells using laboratory culture and discusses the potential for generating cultured red cells in sufficient quantity for use in transfusion practice. Functional human reticulocytes have been generated from adult peripheral blood haematopoietic stem cells in laboratory culture without the use of heterologous feeder cells and their viability was demonstrated in vivo. Human erythroid progenitor cells lines have been produced from cord and human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) haematopoietic progenitors. Availability of cultured human red cells from haematopoietic stem cells in the quantities required for transfusion therapy would have a major impact on healthcare provision worldwide. Recent studies provide cause for optimism that this ambitious goal is achievable. Functional adult reticulocytes have been made in culture and shown to survive in vivo. Erythroid progenitor cell lines have been derived from cord blood and from human induced pluripotent stem cells, suggesting that large-scale culture of erythroid cell lines and their differentiation to reticulocytes will be possible. Significant problems remain. More efficient enucleation and induction of maturation to an adult phenotype will be required in order to exploit high proliferative capacity of human embryonic stem cells and hiPSCs. Novel bioengineering solutions will be required to generate cultured red cells in the large quantities required, and in this context, use of synthetic three-dimensional scaffolds to mimic the bone marrow niche holds great promise for the future.

  14. Reflectance confocal microscopy of red blood cells: simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2015-11-01

    Measuring the morphology of red blood cells is important for clinical diagnosis, providing valuable indications on a patient's health. In this work, we have simulated the appearance of normal red blood cells under a reflectance confocal microscope and discovered unique relations between the morphological parameters and the resulting characteristic interference patterns of the cell. The simulation results showed good agreement with in vitro reflectance confocal images of red blood cells, acquired using spectrally encoded flow cytometry that imaged the cells in a linear flow without artificial staining. By matching the simulated patterns to confocal images of the cells, this method could be used for measuring cell morphology in three dimensions and for studying their physiology.

  15. Method for determining properties of red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for quantifying the concentration of hemoglobin in a cell, and indicia of anemia, comprises determining the wavelength of the longitudinal mode of a liquid in a laser microcavity; determining the wavelength of the fundamental transverse mode of a red blood cell in the liquid in the laser microcavity; and determining if the cell is anemic from the difference between the wavelength of the longitudinal mode and the fundamental transverse mode. In addition to measuring hemoglobin, the invention includes a method using intracavity laser spectroscopy to measure the change in spectra as a function of time for measuring the influx of water into a red blood cell and the cell's subsequent rupture.

  16. Red blood cell-derived microparticles: An overview.

    PubMed

    Westerman, Maxwell; Porter, John B

    2016-07-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) is historically the original parent cell of microparticles (MPs). In this overview, we describe the discovery and the early history of red cell-derived microparticles (RMPs) and present an overview of the evolution of RMP. We report the formation, characteristics, effects of RMP and factors which may affect RMP evaluation. The review examines RMP derived from both normal and pathologic RBC. The pathologic RBC studies include sickle cell anemia (SCA), sickle cell trait (STr), thalassemia intermedia (TI), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Target analysis studies of red cell water and urea transport.

    PubMed

    Dix, J A; Ausiello, D A; Jung, C Y; Verkman, A S

    1985-12-05

    Radiation inactivation was used to determine the nature and molecular weight of water and urea transporters in the human red cell. Red cells were frozen to -50 degrees C in a cryoprotectant solution, irradiated with 1.5 MeV electrons, thawed, washed and assayed for osmotic water and urea permeability by stopped-flow light scattering. The freezing and thawing process did not affect the rates of water or urea transport or the inhibitory potency of p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonate (pCMBS) on water transport and of phloretin on urea transport. Red cell urea transport inactivated with radiation (0-4 Mrad) with a single target size of 469 +/- 36 kDa. 40 microM phloretin inhibited urea flux by approx. 50% at each radiation dose, indicating that urea transporters surviving radiation were inhibitable. Water transport did not inactivate with radiation; however, the inhibitory potency of 2.5 mM pCMBS decreased from 86 +/- 1% to 4 +/- 9% over a 0-2 Mrad dose range. These studies suggest that red cell water transport either required one or more low-molecular-weight proteins, or is lipid-mediated, and that the pCMBS-binding site which regulates water flow inactivates with radiation. These results also suggest that red cell urea transport is mediated by a specific, high-molecular-weight protein. These results do not support the hypothesis that a band 3 dimer (190 kDa) mediates red cell osmotic water and urea transport.

  18. [Effects of infusion media on human red blood cell morphology].

    PubMed

    Burova, O O; Gusev, A A; Petrikov, S S; Gusev, S A; Basyreva, L Iu

    2006-01-01

    The effect of various infusion media on the structure of human red blood cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro experiments used 10% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution, 10% glucose solution, 20% albumin solution, Rheopolyglucin, HyperHAES solution (18 g of NaCl in combination with 60 g of hydroxyethylstarch (HES), 200/0.5), Voluven (HES 130/0.4/9:1), and a combination of hypertensive NaCl solution and Rheopolyglucin. The morphofunctional response of red blood cells was studied in the clinical setting when 6% Voluven solution (HES 130/0.4/ 9:1) and hypertensive NaCl and glucose solutions were used. It was established that 10% NaCl solution caused considerable changes in the morphology of red blood cells both in the experiment and in patients with severe brain injury. The magnitude of structural changes increased as blood NaCl concentrations became higher. 10% glucose solution, Voluven, Rheopolyglucin, and albumin did not virtually affect the structure of red blood cells. Infusion of Voluven (500 ml of 6% solution for 40 minutes) induced no changes in the morphology of red blood cells in the clinical setting. Among the test solutions used to correct intracranial hypertension (HyperHAES, 10% NaCl, a combination of rheopolyglucin and 10% NaCl), HyperHAES exerted the least effect on the morphology of red blood cells.

  19. Cloning of intronic sequence within DsRed2 increased the number of cells expressing red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Pisal, Rishikaysh V; Hrebikova, Hana; Chvatalova, Jana; Soukup, Tomas; Stanislav, Filip; Mokry, Jaroslav

    2017-08-24

    Cloning of artificial intronic sequence within the open reading frame (ORF) of DsRed2 gene. Splice prediction software was used to analyze DsRed2 sequence to find an ideal site for cloning artificial intronic sequence. Intron was cloned within DsRed2 using cyclic ligation assembly. Flow cytometry was used to quantify the number of cells expressing red fluorescence. Sequencing data confirmed precise cloning of intron at the desired position using cyclic ligation assembly. Successful expression of red fluorescence after cloning of intron confirmed successful intron recognition and splicing by host cell line. Cloning of intron increased the number of cells expressing red fluorescent protein. Cloning of intronic sequence within DsRed2 has helped to increase the number of cells expressing red fluorescence by approximately four percent.

  20. In vivo red blood cell compatibility testing using indium-113m tropolone-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, G.J.; Gravelle, D.; Dietz, G.; Driedger, A.A.; King, M.; Cradduck, T.D.

    1988-05-01

    In vivo radionuclide crossmatch is a method for identifying compatible blood for transfusion when allo- or autoantibodies preclude the use of conventional crossmatching techniques. A technique for labeling small volumes of donor red blood cells with (/sup 113m/In)tropolone is reported. The use of /sup 113m/In minimizes the accumulation of background radioactivity and the radiation dose especially so when multiple crossmatches are performed. Labeling red cells with (/sup 113m/In)tropolone is faster and easier to perform than with other radionuclides. Consistently high labeling efficiencies are obtained and minimal /sup 113m/In activity elutes from the labeled red blood cells. A case study involving 22 crossmatches is presented to demonstrate the technique. The radiation dose equivalent from /sup 113m/In is significantly less than with other radionuclides that may be used to label red cells.

  1. Born approximation model for light scattering by red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joonoh; Ding, Huafeng; Mir, Mustafa; Zhu, Ruoyu; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    The primary role of a red blood cell (RBC) is delivering oxygen throughout our body. Abnormalities of this basic function lead to anemia and are caused by numerous diseases such as malaria and sickle cell anemia. As prompt and inexpensive tests for blood screening are in demand, we have developed a faster and reliable way to measure morphological parameters associated with the structure of red blood cells and the size distribution of the cells in a whole blood smear. Modeling the RBC shape under Born approximation, we are able to determine parameters of clinical relevance, such as the diameter, thickness and dimple size. From a measured quantitative phase image of a blood smear, we can determine the average and standard deviation of the red blood cell volume simultaneously, i.e., without analyzing each cell individually. This approach may open the door for a new generation of label-free, high-throughput blood testing.

  2. Modification of red blood cells for laboratory quality control use.

    PubMed

    Henry, Stephen M

    2009-11-01

    This review describes the current state-of-the-art with respect to the modification of red blood cells for creating quality controls for use in immunohaematology. The author has identified five technologies able to create modified red blood cells potentially suitable for use in quality control. Two of the technologies use enzymes, glycosidases or glycosyltransferases, to modify red blood cells and create ABO quality control cells. A third technology uses polyethylene glycol to reduce antigen expression by masking epitopes, whereas a fourth technology is speculative and involves the in-vitro generation of genetically modified erythroid cells. None of these four technologies are in routine use to make commercially available quality controls. A fifth commercially available technology creates quality controls by adding synthetic blood group A and B antigens (FSLs) to group O red blood cells, creating what are referred to as 'kodecytes'. This technology is also being used to add blood group peptides onto red cells for use in the future in a range of diagnostic applications. Transducing cell-derived erythroid populations with blood group encoding or silencing vectors, and the use of FSLs to create kodecytes, are two technologies with the potential to provide quality controls for laboratory use.

  3. Red cell exchange to mitigate a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient transfused with incompatible red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Irani, Mehraboon S; Karafin, Matthew S; Ernster, Luke

    2017-02-01

    A red cell exchange was performed to prevent a potentially fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient with anti-e who was transfused with e-antigen unscreened red blood cells during liver transplant surgery. A 64-year-old woman with cirrhosis due to hepatitis C was scheduled to receive a liver transplant. She had a previously documented anti-e, an antibody to the Rh(e)-antigen that is known to cause delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. Pre-operatively and intra-operatively, she had massive hemorrhage which required transfusion of 34 e-antigen unscreened red blood cells (RBCs) most of which were incompatible. The hemoglobin dropped from 9.1 g/dL on post-operative day (POD)1 to 6.6 g/dL on POD6, with no evidence of blood loss. The bilirubin also increased from 5.0 mg/dL on POD 1 to 11.0 mg/dL on POD 6. As she was also becoming more hemodynamically unstable, a red cell exchange with 10 units of e-negative RBCs was performed on POD 6. She improved clinically and was extubated the following day. A few residual transfused e-positive red cells were detected after the red cell exchange until POD 13. This case illustrates how a red cell exchange can mitigate the potentially harmful effects of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction caused by red cell antibodies. With massive intraoperative blood loss it may not be possible to have antigen-negative RBCs immediately available, particularly for the e-antigen, which is present in 98% of the donor population. The ability to perform such a procedure may be life-saving in such patients. J. Clin. Apheresis 32:59-61, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Immunologic profiles of red blood cells using in vitro models of transfusion.

    PubMed

    Long, Kristin; Meier, Cindy; Ward, Martin; Williams, Dennis; Woodward, Jerold; Bernard, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Transfusion of packed red blood cells (RBCs) produces a myriad of immunologic derangements, from suppressive to stimulatory. Proliferation of human T cells is suppressed in vitro after exposure to processed red blood cells (PRBCs). We hypothesized that this effect would be mitigated by using fresh RBCs. We also hypothesized that this suppressive effect was a generalized effect on lymphocyte proliferation and would be observed in both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subpopulations as well as B cells. We isolated human T cells from donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells and exposed them to either blood bank PRBCs or fresh RBCs from volunteer donors and stimulated them with anti-CD3/anti-CD28. Human B cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and exposed to PRBCs or fresh RBCs. We measured proliferation of B cells by thymidine incorporation assays. We also treated RBCs with citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD) at different time points before culture them with stimulated T cells to determine the role of this common RBC storage solution in lymphocyte proliferation. In vitro proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was suppressed by blood bank RBCs. This suppression is eliminated when fresh RBCs were used. The B cells showed inhibition of proliferation when exposed to similar conditions, which appeared to be consistent over serial dilutions. Fresh RBCs exposed to CPD did not appear suppressive in the first 6 h after exposure. T-cell and B-cell proliferation inhibition by blood banked RBCs suggests a generalized effect of RBCs on cellular proliferation. The lack of suppression by fresh RBCs further suggests that something involved in blood banking alters RBC properties such that they attain a suppressive phenotype. One such blood banking component, CPD, does not appear to affect this suppressive phenotype within the first 6 h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A New Family of Multilevel Grid Connected Inverters Based on Packed U Cell Topology.

    PubMed

    Pakdel, Majid; Jalilzadeh, Saeid

    2017-09-29

    In this paper a novel packed U cell (PUC) based multilevel grid connected inverter is proposed. Unlike the U cell arrangement which consists of two power switches and one capacitor, in the proposed converter topology a lower DC power supply from renewable energy resources such as photovoltaic arrays (PV) is used as a base power source. The proposed topology offers higher efficiency and lower cost using a small number of power switches and a lower DC power source which is supplied from renewable energy resources. Other capacitor voltages are extracted from the base lower DC power source using isolated DC-DC power converters. The operation principle of proposed transformerless multilevel grid connected inverter is analyzed theoretically. Operation of the proposed multilevel grid connected inverter is verified through simulation studies. An experimental prototype using STM32F407 discovery controller board is performed to verify the simulation results.

  6. Quantification of Depletion-Induced Adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, P.; Verdier, C.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  7. Radiolabeled red blood cells: status, problems, and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclidic labels for red cells can be divided into two main categories - cohort or pulse labels, and random labels. The random labels are incorporated into circulating cells of all ages and the labeling process is usually carried out in vitro. The red cell labels in predominant use involve random labeling and employ technetium-99m, chromium-51, indium-111, and gallium-68, roughly in that order. The extent of usefulness depends on the properties of the label such as the half-life, decay mode, and in-vivo stability, etc. Labeled cells can be used for red cell survival measurements when the half-life of the radionuclide is sufficiently long. The major portion of this article deals with random labels.

  8. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Steffen, P; Verdier, C; Wagner, C

    2013-01-04

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  9. Microbial desalination cells packed with ion-exchange resin to enhance water desalination rate.

    PubMed

    Morel, Alexandre; Zuo, Kuichang; Xia, Xue; Wei, Jincheng; Luo, Xi; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia

    2012-08-01

    A novel configuration of microbial desalination cell (MDC) packed with ion-exchange resin (R-MDC) was proposed to enhance water desalination rate. Compared with classic MDC (C-MDC), an obvious increase in desalination rate (DR) was obtained by R-MDC. With relatively low concentration (10-2 g/L NaCl) influents, the DR values of R-MDC were about 1.5-8 times those of C-MDC. Ion-exchange resins packed in the desalination chamber worked as conductor and thus counteracted the increase in ohmic resistance during treatment of low concentration salt water. Ohmic resistances of R-MDC stabilized at 3.0-4.7 Ω. By contrast, the ohmic resistances of C-MDC ranged from 5.5 to 12.7 Ω, which were 55-272% higher than those of R-MDC. Remarkable improvement in desalination rate helped improve charge efficiency for desalination in R-MDC. The results first showed the potential of R-MDC in the desalination of water with low salinity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A morphologically distinct granule cell type in the dentate gyrus of the red fox correlates with adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Amrein, Irmgard; Slomianka, Lutz

    2010-04-30

    Wild red foxes, proverbially cunning carnivores, are investigated for adult hippocampal neurogenesis and morphological characteristics of the dentate gyrus. Adult red foxes harbor almost 15-times more young, doublecortin-positive neurons in their dentate gyrus than domesticated dogs. The number of doublecortin-positive cells corresponds to 4.4% of the total granule cell number, whereas dividing cells amount to only 0.06%. Compared to laboratory mice, proliferating (Ki67-positive) and dying cells are rare, but the percentage of new neurons is quite similar. The numbers of proliferating cells, young cells of neuronal lineage and dying cells correlate. Resident granule cells can be divided into two types with strikingly different morphologies, staining patterns and distinct septotemporal distributions. Small sized granule cells with a nuclear diameter of 7.3 microm account for approximately 83% of all granule cells. The remaining granule cells are significantly larger with a nuclear diameter of 9.4 microm diameter and stain heavily for NeuN. Septally and mid-septotemporally, densely packed small cells dominate. Here, only few large granule cells are scattered throughout the layer. Temporally, granule cells become more loosely packed and most of the cells are of the large type. High rates of neurogenesis are observed in foxes with high numbers of large granule cells, whereas the number of small granule cells does not correlate with any of the neurogenesis-related cell counts. Staining for parvalbumin, glutamate receptor 2/3, GAP-43 and dynorphin shows an anatomical context that is a composite of features common also to other mammalian species. In summary, we report a morphologically distinct granule cell type which correlates with adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the fox. Furthermore, the maturation phase of the young neurons may be prolonged as in other long living species such as primates. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Modelling the structure of the red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Burton, Nicholas M; Bruce, Lesley J

    2011-04-01

    The red cell membrane has long been the focus of extensive study. The macromolecules embedded within the membrane carry the blood group antigens and perform many functions including the vital task of gas exchange. Links between the intramembrane macromolecules and the underlying cytoskeleton stabilize the biconcave morphology of the red cell and allow deformation during microvascular transit. Much is now known about the proteins of the red cell membrane and how they are organised. In many cases we have an understanding of which proteins are expressed, the number of each protein per cell, their oligomeric state(s), and how they are collected in large multi-protein complexes. However, our typical view of these structures is as cartoon shapes in schematic figures. In this study we have combined knowledge of the red cell membrane with a wealth of protein structure data from crystallography, NMR, and homology modelling to generate the first, tentative models of the complexes which link the membrane to the cytoskeleton. Measurement of the size of these complexes and comparison with known cytoskeletal distance parameters suggests the idea of interaction between the membrane complexes, which may have profound implications for understanding red cell function and deformation.

  12. Image classification of unlabeled malaria parasites in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng Zhang; Ong, L L Sharon; Kong Fang; Matthew, Athul; Dauwels, Justin; Ming Dao; Asada, Harry

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a method to detect unlabeled malaria parasites in red blood cells. The current "gold standard" for malaria diagnosis is microscopic examination of thick blood smear, a time consuming process requiring extensive training. Our goal is to develop an automate process to identify malaria infected red blood cells. Major issues in automated analysis of microscopy images of unstained blood smears include overlapping cells and oddly shaped cells. Our approach creates robust templates to detect infected and uninfected red cells. Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOGs) features are extracted from templates and used to train a classifier offline. Next, the ViolaJones object detection framework is applied to detect infected and uninfected red cells and the image background. Results show our approach out-performs classification approaches with PCA features by 50% and cell detection algorithms applying Hough transforms by 24%. Majority of related work are designed to automatically detect stained parasites in blood smears where the cells are fixed. Although it is more challenging to design algorithms for unstained parasites, our methods will allow analysis of parasite progression in live cells under different drug treatments.

  13. Red blood cell dynamics: from cell deformation to ATP release.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiandi; Forsyth, Alison M; Stone, Howard A

    2011-10-01

    The mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) deformation under both static and dynamic, i.e., flow, conditions have been studied extensively since the mid 1960s. Deformation-induced biochemical reactions and possible signaling in RBCs, however, were proposed only fifteen years ago. Therefore, the fundamental relationship between RBC deformation and cellular signaling dynamics i.e., mechanotransduction, remains incompletely understood. Quantitative understanding of the mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs requires integrative studies of physical models of RBC deformation and cellular biochemical reactions. In this article we review the physical models of RBC deformation, spanning from continuum membrane mechanics to cellular skeleton dynamics under both static and flow conditions, and elaborate the mechanistic links involved in deformation-induced ATP release.

  14. Red cell membrane response to hydrogen peroxide-sensitivity in hereditary xerocytosis and in other abnormal red cells.

    PubMed

    Snyder, L M; Sauberman, N; Condara, H; Dolan, J; Jacobs, J; Szymanski, I; Fortier, N L

    1981-07-01

    Osmotically resistant red cells associated with some haemolytic anaemias, including hereditary xerocytosis, sickle-cell disease and beta thalassaemia minor, are more sensitive than normal red cells to exogenous in vitro hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This sensitivity is manifested by a rapid loss of intracellular potassium, shape change, protein aggregation, and methaemoglobin formation at lower concentrations of H2O2 (225 microM) than are required to induce similar effects in normal red cells (450 microM). Malonyldialdehyde (MDA) formation occurs later than the other effects and can be inhibited by the antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), without affecting protein aggregation or potassium leak. Incubation of normal red cells directly with MDA induces protein aggregation, but only after 1 h of incubation. Although nystatin-sucrose treated normal cells which are dehydrated with altered cation content, and therefore osmotically resistant, do not display abnormal H2O2 hypersensitivity as manifested by excessive potassium permeability, they do show an increase in methaemoglobin formation and protein aggregation similar to xerocytes. These data indicate that membrane protein cross-linking occurring immediately following H2O2 exposure seems independent of either the sulfhydryl or MDA mechanisms, and that the membrane permeability of the abnormal red cells predisposes them to oxidative damage.

  15. Mechanisms linking red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mozos, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk.

  16. Mechanisms Linking Red Blood Cell Disorders and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk. PMID:25710019

  17. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged according to approved and... that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in which they are packed, and that...

  18. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged according to approved and... that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in which they are packed, and that...

  19. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged according to approved and... that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in which they are packed, and that...

  20. Red blood cell ghosts and intact red blood cells as complementary models in photodynamic cell research.

    PubMed

    Kaestner, Lars

    2004-05-01

    Recent research on erythrocytes as model cells for photodynamic therapy showed differing behaviour of certain photosensitisers in erythrocytes compared to other cells. Differences of dye accumulation in the cell membrane were proposed to be the reason for the distinct photodynamic effects. Using pheophorbide a as an example, the combination of erythrocyte ghosts as models to follow the dye accumulation in the cell membrane and intact erythrocytes as model cells to show the photodynamic damage is provided. Evidence for the correctness of the combination of erythrocyte ghosts and intact erythrocytes as a functioning model system in photodynamic cell research is provided using the confocal laser scanning microscopy on intact, pheophorbide a loaded erythrocytes.

  1. Red blood cell aggregate flux in a bifurcating microchannel.

    PubMed

    Kaliviotis, E; Pasias, D; Sherwood, J M; Balabani, S

    2017-10-01

    Red blood cell aggregation plays a key role in microcirculatory flows, however, little is known about the transport characteristics of red blood cell aggregates in branching geometries. This work reports on the fluxes of red blood cell aggregates of various sizes in a T-shaped microchannel, aiming to clarify the effects of different flow conditions in the outlet branches of the channel. Image analysis techniques, were utilised, and moderately aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were tested in symmetric (∼50-50%) and asymmetric flow splits through the two outlet (daughter) branches. The results revealed that the flux decreases with aggregate size in the inlet (parent) and daughter branches, mainly due to the fact that the number of larger structures is significantly smaller than that of smaller structures. However, when the flux in the daughter branches is examined relative to the aggregate size flux in the parent branch an increase with aggregate size is observed for a range of asymmetric flow splits. This increase is attributed to size distribution and local concentration changes in the daughter branches. The results show that the flow of larger aggregates is not suppressed downstream of a bifurcation, and that blood flow is maintained, for physiological levels of red blood cell aggregation. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Observation of dynamic subdomains in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Gabriel; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    We quantify the nanoscale structure and low-frequency dynamics associated with live red blood cells. The membrane displacements are measured using quantitative phase images provided by Fourier phase microscopy, with an average path-length stability of 0.75 nm over 45 min. The results reveal the existence of dynamic, independent subdomains across the cells that fluctuate at various dominant frequencies.

  3. Computational Biomechanics of Human Red Blood Cells in Hematological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Li, He; Chang, Hung-Yu; Lykotrafitis, George; Em Karniadakis, George

    2017-02-01

    We review recent advances in multiscale modeling of the biomechanical characteristics of red blood cells (RBCs) in hematological diseases, and their relevance to the structure and dynamics of defective RBCs. We highlight examples of successful simulations of blood disorders including malaria and other hereditary disorders, such as sickle-cell anemia, spherocytosis, and elliptocytosis.

  4. Semantic Extension of Agent-Based Control: The Packing Cell Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, Pavel; Radakovič, Miloslav; Obitko, Marek; Mařík, Vladimír

    The paper reports on the latest R&D activities in the field of agent-based manufacturing control systems. It is documented that this area becomes strongly influenced by the advancements of semantic technologies like the Web Ontology Language. The application of ontologies provides the agents with much more effective means for handling, exchanging and reasoning about the knowledge. The ontology dedicated for semantic description of orders, production processes and material handling tasks in discrete manufacturing domain has been developed. In addition, the framework for integration of this ontology in distributed, agent-based control solutions is given. The Manufacturing Agent Simulation Tool (MAST) is used as a base for pilot implementation of the ontology-powered multiagent control system; the packing cell environment is selected as a case study.

  5. Method of assay of red cell folate activity and the value of the assay as a test for folate deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoffbrand, A. V.; Newcombe, Beverley F. A.; Mollin, D. L.

    1966-01-01

    A simplified microbiological assay for determining the folate content of red cells is described. As in previously reported methods Lactobacillus casei is used as test organism but two modifications are introduced. First, haemolysis is carried out in water containing 1 g.% of ascorbic acid; secondly, haemolysates are not incubated before the assay. Using this assay, recovery of pteroylglutamic acid added in two different concentrations to five different whole blood samples was 97·0 ± 1·9 S.E. % and 106·1 ± 4·7 S.E. % respectively. The coefficient of variation of the assay was between 11·2 and 15·0%. Haemolysates were best stored deep frozen, showing no significant loss of L. casei activity for three to five months at −20°C. On the other hand, non-haemolysed blood samples were best stored at 4°C. when there was no loss of activity for seven to 10 days. Experiments confirmed that plasma is necessary for the maximum release of red cell L. casei activity, and showed that only small amounts of plasma are necessary; folate- and B12-deficient plasma released slightly lower L. casei activities from red cells than did normal plasma. The red cell folate levels of 40 healthy normal subjects ranged from 160 to 640 mμg. per ml. of packed red cells. One hundred and twenty patients with subnormal serum folate levels due to idiopathic steatorrhoea, nutritional folate deficiency and Crohn's disease, partial gastrectomy, myelosclerosis, and polycythaemia vera were studied. Red cell folate levels were subnormal (range from 7 to 143 mμg. per ml.) in 40 patients with megaloblastic anaemia, the lowest levels occurring in the most anaemic patients. Subnormal red cell folate levels also occurred in 23 (29%) of the 80 non-anaemic patients. There was a good correlation between red cell folate level and severity of folate deficiency assessed by polymorph nuclear lobe counts, and, in the non-anaemic patients bone marrow morphology. It is concluded that, in the absence of B12

  6. Decolorization and biosorption for Congo red by system rice hull- Schizophyllum sp. F17 under solid-state condition in a continuous flow packed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xudong; Jia, Rong

    2008-10-01

    Synthetic dyes are important chemical pollutants from various industries. This work developed an efficient and relatively simple continuous decolorization system rice hull-Schizophyllum sp. F17 under solid-state condition in a packed-bed bioreactor, for decolorizing Congo red. In the decolorization system, two decolorization mechanisms exist, one is decolorization by Schizophyllum sp. F17, the other is biosorption by rice hull. The decolorization efficiency was greatly affected by dye concentration and hydraulic retention time (HRT), which were quantificationally analyzed and optimized through response surface methodology (RSM). A 2(2) full factorial central composite design (CCD) was performed, and three second order polynomial models were generated to describe the effects of dye concentration and HRT on total decolorization (R2=0.902), decolorization by Schizophyllum sp. F17 (R2=0.866) and biosorption by rice hull (R2=0.890). Response surface contour plots were constructed to show the individual and cumulative effects of dye concentration and HRT, and the optimum values. A maximum total decolorization 89.71% and maximum decolorization by Schizophyllum sp. F17 60.44% was achieved at dye concentration 142.63mg/L, HRT 41h, and dye concentration 110.7mg/L, HRT 29.4h, respectively. Meanwhile, the role of manganese peroxidase (MnP) in the decolorizaion process was investigated. This study proved the feasibility of continuous mode for decolorizing synthetic dyes by white-rot fungi in solid-state fermentation bioreactors.

  7. Multilayered particle-packed column: Evaluation and comparison with monolithic and core-shell particle columns for the determination of red azo dyes in Sequential Injection Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chocholouš, Petr; Gil, Renato; Acebal, Carolina C; Kubala, Viktor; Šatínský, Dalibor; Solich, Petr

    2017-03-01

    A recently presented new type of "multilayered" organic-inorganic hybrid silica particle packed column YMC-Triart C18 (50 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) was used for the development of a sequential injection chromatography method for determination of five azo dyes (Sudan I, Sudan II, Sudan III, Sudan orange G, and para red) in selected food seasonings. The use of a novel sorbent brings attractive features, reduced backpressure, and broader chemical stability together with high separation performance, which are discussed and compared with that of three types of columns typically used in medium-pressure flow chromatography techniques (classic monolithic, narrow monolithic, and core-shell particle columns). The separation was performed in gradient elution mode created by the zone mixing of two mobile phases (acetonitrile/water 90:10, 1.5 mL + acetonitrile/water 100:0, 2.3 mL) at a flow rate of 0.60 mL/min and time of analysis <9.5 min. The spectrophotometric detection wavelengths were set to 400, 480, and 500 nm. The high performance of the developed method with multilayered particle column was well documented and the results indicate a broad capability of sequential injection chromatography. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Involvement of ligninolytic enzymes of Phanerochaete chrysosporium in treating the textile effluent containing Astrazon Red FBL in a packed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sedighi, M; Karimi, A; Vahabzadeh, F

    2009-09-30

    The effect of Tween80, Mn(II) and veratryl alcohol (VA) on the production of ligninolytic enzymes of Phanerochaete chrysosporium in a packed-bed bioreactor using small pieces of Kissiris as carrier, was investigated. The results of the enzyme activities were noticeable in terms of decolorization and COD removal of the textile effluent containing an azo dye (Astrazon Red FBL). No dilution was made on the tested textile effluent and it was not sterilized, also. Maximum decolorization of the dye (87%) and COD removal (42%), both occurred when only Tween80 (0.05%, w/v) was added to the effluent. The maximum activities of lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) were (U/l): 17 and 52, respectively. The role of MnP was pronounced in the dye decolorization process, while the influence of LiP was noticeable on COD removal. The reusability of the original biomass was examined by replacing undiluted textile effluent (i.e., five times). The cellular performance of the original biomass in repeated-batch operations was promising.

  9. In vivo red cell destruction by anti-Lu6

    SciTech Connect

    Issitt, P.D.; Valinsky, J.E.; Marsh, W.L.; DiNapoli, J.; Gutgsell, N.S. )

    1990-03-01

    An example is presented of an IgG1, anti-Lu6, that reacted by indirect antiglobulin test and was capable of destroying antigen-positive red cells in vivo. Two methods for the measurement of red cell survival, {sup 51}Cr labeling and flow cytometry, gave the same result: 20 percent of the test dose of Lu:6 red cells was destroyed in the first hour after injection and 80 percent in the first 24 hours. The clinical relevance of the antibody was correctly predicted by an in vitro monocyte monolayer assay. The finding that this example of anti-Lu6 was clinically significant should not be taken to mean that all antibodies directed against high-incidence Lutheran and Lutheran system-related antigens will behave similarly. When such antibodies are encountered, in vivo and/or in vitro studies to assess their clinical significance are necessary before rare blood is used for transfusion.

  10. Cytosolic protein concentration is the primary volume signal in dog red cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    It is not known whether the activation of Na/H exchange by shrinkage in dog red cells is due to the packing of cell contents or a change in cell configuration. To make this distinction we prepared resealed ghosts that resembled intact cells in hemoglobin concentration and surface area, but had one-third their volume. A shrinkage-induced, amiloride-sensitive Na flux in the ghosts was activated at a much smaller volume in the ghosts than in the intact cells, but at the same concentration (by weight) of dry solids in both preparations. Na/H exchange in ghosts containing a mixture of 40% albumin and 60% hemoglobin (weight/weight) was activated by osmotic shrinkage at a dry solid concentration similar to that of intact cells or of ghosts containing only hemoglobin. We conclude that the process of Na/H exchange activation by cell shrinkage originates with an increase in the concentration of intracellular protein and not with a change in membrane configuration or tension. The macromolecular crowding that accompanies the reduction in cell volume probably alters the activities of key enzymes that in turn modulate the Na/H exchanger. PMID:1662684

  11. Electronically configured battery pack

    SciTech Connect

    Kemper, D.

    1997-03-01

    Battery packs for portable equipment must sometimes accommodate conflicting requirements to meet application needs. An electronically configurable battery pack was developed to support two highly different operating modes, one requiring very low power consumption at a low voltage and the other requiring high power consumption at a higher voltage. The configurable battery pack optimizes the lifetime and performance of the system by making the best use of all available energy thus enabling the system to meet its goals of operation, volume, and lifetime. This paper describes the cell chemistry chosen, the battery pack electronics, and tradeoffs made during the evolution of its design.

  12. Photoacoustic response of suspended and hemolyzed red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ratan K.; Karmakar, Subhajit; Roy, Madhusudan

    2013-07-01

    The effect of confinement of hemoglobin molecules on photoacoustic (PA) signal is studied experimentally. The PA amplitudes for samples with suspended red blood cells (SRBCs) and hemolyzed red blood cells (HRBCs) were found to be comparable at each hematocrit for 532 nm illumination. The difference between the corresponding amplitudes increased with increasing hematocrit for 1064 nm irradiation. For example, the PA amplitude for the SRBCs was about 260% higher than that of the HRBCs at 40% hematocrit. This observation may help to develop a PA method detecting hemolysis noninvasively.

  13. Fibrinogen, red blood cells, and factor XIII in venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Walton, B L; Byrnes, J R; Wolberg, A S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Among cardiovascular causes of death, venous thrombosis (VT) is ranked third most common in the world. Venous thrombi have high red blood cell and fibrin content; however, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that contribute to venous thrombus composition and stability are still poorly understood. This article reviews biological, biochemical, and biophysical contributions of fibrinogen, factor XIII, and red blood cells to VT, and new evidence suggesting interactions between these components mediate venous thrombus composition and size.

  14. Enhanced harvesting of red photons in nanowire solar cells: evidence of resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Karthik; Feng, Xinjian; Grimes, Craig A

    2009-04-28

    Modern excitonic solar cells efficiently harvest photons in the 350-650 nm spectral range; however, device efficiencies are typically limited by poor quantum yields for red and near-infrared photons. Using Forster-type resonance energy transfer from zinc phthalocyanine donor molecules to ruthenium polypyridine complex acceptors, we demonstrate a four-fold increase in quantum yields for red photons in dye-sensitized nanowire array solar cells. The dissolved donor and surface anchored acceptor molecules are not tethered to each other, through either a direct chemical bond or a covalent linker layer. The spatial confinement of the electrolyte imposed by the wire-to-wire spacing of the close-packed nanowire array architecture ensures that the distances between a significant fraction of donors and acceptors are within a Förster radius. The critical distance for energy transfer from an isolated donor chromophore to a self-assembled monolayer of acceptors on a plane follows the inverse fourth power instead of the inverse sixth power relation. Consequently, we observe near quantitative energy transfer efficiencies in our devices. Our results represent a new design paradigm in excitonic solar cells and show it is possible to more closely match the spectral response of the device to the AM 1.5 solar spectrum through use of electronic energy transfer.

  15. Battery Pack Life Estimation through Cell Degradation Data and Pack Thermal Modeling for BAS+ Li-Ion Batteries. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-489

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kandler

    2016-01-21

    Battery Life estimation is one of the key inputs required for Hybrid applications for all GM Hybrid/EV/EREV/PHEV programs. For each Hybrid vehicle program, GM has instituted multi-parameter Design of Experiments generating test data at Cell level and also Pack level on a reduced basis. Based on experience, generating test data on a pack level is found to be very expensive, resource intensive and sometimes less reliable. The proposed collaborative project will focus on a methodology to estimate Battery life based on cell degradation data combined with pack thermal modeling. NREL has previously developed cell-level battery aging models and pack-level thermal/electrical network models, though these models are currently not integrated. When coupled together, the models are expected to describe pack-level thermal and aging response of individual cells. GM and NREL will use data collected for GM's Bas+ battery system for evaluation of the proposed methodology and assess to what degree these models can replace pack-level aging experiments in the future.

  16. On-line equalization for lithium-ion battery packs based on charging cell voltages: Part 1. Equalization based on remaining charging capacity estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuejiu; Ouyang, Minggao; Lu, Languang; Li, Jianqiu; Han, Xuebing; Xu, Liangfei

    2014-02-01

    Because of the inevitable inconsistency during manufacture and use of battery cells, cell variations in battery packs have significant impacts on battery pack capacities, durability and safety for electric vehicles (EVs). To reduce cell variations and increase pack capacity, cell equalization is essentially required. In the series of two papers, we discover that dissipative cell equalization (DCE) using dissipative resistances is a feasible on-line equalization method for battery packs in EVs. We subsequently propose on-line equalization algorithms for lithium-ion battery packs based on charging cell voltage curves (CCVCs). The objective of these algorithms is to maximize pack capacities by conditioning CCVCs. As the first paper of the series, we first briefly review equalization topologies and algorithms. We discover cell remaining charging capacity (RCC) can be on-line estimated and further propose DCE algorithm based on remaining charging capacity estimation (RCCE). We establish a pack model with 8 cells in series and simulate 4 scenes with different cell variations. RCCE-DCE algorithm is proved to be effective by comparing pack capacities with/without RCCE-DCE algorithm. The equalization capability and over-equalization prevention are further examined, and the result shows that RCCE-DCE algorithm is suitable for on-line equalization in EVs.

  17. Squeezing red blood cells on an optical waveguide to monitor cell deformability during blood storage.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh; McCourt, Peter; Oteiza, Ana; Wilkinson, James S; Huser, Thomas R; Hellesø, Olav Gaute

    2015-01-07

    Red blood cells squeeze through micro-capillaries as part of blood circulation in the body. The deformability of red blood cells is thus critical for blood circulation. In this work, we report a method to optically squeeze red blood cells using the evanescent field present on top of a planar waveguide chip. The optical forces from a narrow waveguide are used to squeeze red blood cells to a size comparable to the waveguide width. Optical forces and pressure distributions on the cells are numerically computed to explain the squeezing process. The proposed technique is used to quantify the loss of blood deformability that occurs during blood storage lesion. Squeezing red blood cells using waveguides is a sensitive technique and works simultaneously on several cells, making the method suitable for monitoring stored blood.

  18. Anatomy of the red cell membrane skeleton: unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Lux, Samuel E

    2016-01-14

    The red cell membrane skeleton is a pseudohexagonal meshwork of spectrin, actin, protein 4.1R, ankyrin, and actin-associated proteins that laminates the inner membrane surface and attaches to the overlying lipid bilayer via band 3-containing multiprotein complexes at the ankyrin- and actin-binding ends of spectrin. The membrane skeleton strengthens the lipid bilayer and endows the membrane with the durability and flexibility to survive in the circulation. In the 36 years since the first primitive model of the red cell skeleton was proposed, many additional proteins have been discovered, and their structures and interactions have been defined. However, almost nothing is known of the skeleton's physiology, and myriad questions about its structure remain, including questions concerning the structure of spectrin in situ, the way spectrin and other proteins bind to actin, how the membrane is assembled, the dynamics of the skeleton when the membrane is deformed or perturbed by parasites, the role lipids play, and variations in membrane structure in unique regions like lipid rafts. This knowledge is important because the red cell membrane skeleton is the model for spectrin-based membrane skeletons in all cells, and because defects in the red cell membrane skeleton underlie multiple hemolytic anemias.

  19. Urgent replacement of a mechanical mitral prosthesis in an anticoagulated patient with Bombay red blood cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Nairn, Travis K; Giulivi, Antonio; Neurath, Doris; Tokessy, Melanie; Sia, Ying T; Ruel, Marc; Wilkes, Peter R H

    2010-06-01

    Bombay red blood cell phenotype is an extremely rare blood type for which patients can receive only autologous or Bombay phenotype red blood cells. We report a case of urgent repeat sternotomy for replacement of a mechanical mitral prosthesis in a patient with Bombay phenotype anticoagulated with warfarin, to emphasize the transfusion challenges in such patients. A male of Indian descent presented to hospital with New York Heart Association IV symptoms. His medical history revealed previous mitral valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis in 2005 and Bombay phenotype blood. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated thrombus obstruction of the mitral prosthesis despite anticoagulation with warfarin. Right ventricular systolic pressure was >100 mmHg with 3+ tricuspid regurgitation. The patient's condition was temporized with diuretics, bronchodilators, and bi-level positive airway pressure ventilation while transfusion medicine and cardiac surgery were consulted for urgent surgery. The patient received vitamin K and prothrombin complex concentrate prior to repeat sternotomy and successful mitral prosthesis replacement. After cardiopulmonary bypass, heparinization was corrected with protamine and followed by a second dose of prothrombin complex concentrate and recombinant activated factor VIIa. Postoperatively, the patient received four units of packed red blood cells, two autologous units and two units of Bombay specific red blood cells. Right ventricular pressures stabilized at 40 mmHg following surgery. The patient recovered following several days of inotropic support with milrinone, diuretics, and bronchodilators. Patients with Bombay phenotype red blood cells present as type O, but they are unable to receive red blood cells from any phenotype other than Bombay phenotype. They are able to receive all other blood products, including fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, platelets, prothrombin complex concentrate, and recombinant activated factor

  20. Endothelial Lu/BCAM glycoproteins are novel ligands for red blood cell alpha4beta1 integrin: role in adhesion of sickle red blood cells to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    El Nemer, Wassim; Wautier, Marie-Paule; Rahuel, Cécile; Gane, Pierre; Hermand, Patricia; Galactéros, Frédéric; Wautier, Jean-Luc; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2007-04-15

    The Lutheran (Lu) blood group and basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) antigens are both carried by 2 glycoprotein isoforms of the immunoglobulin superfamily representing receptors for the laminin alpha(5) chain. In addition to red blood cells, Lu/BCAM proteins are highly expressed in endothelial cells. Abnormal adhesion of red blood cells to the endothelium could potentially contribute to the vaso-occlusive episodes in sickle cell disease. Considering the presence of integrin consensus-binding sites in Lu/BCAM proteins, we investigated their potential interaction with integrin alpha(4)beta(1), the unique integrin expressed on immature circulating sickle red cells. Using cell adhesion assays under static and flow conditions, we demonstrated that integrin alpha(4)beta(1) expressed on transfected cells bound to chimeric Lu-Fc protein. We showed that epinephrine-stimulated sickle cells, but not control red cells, adhered to Lu-Fc via integrin alpha(4)beta(1) under flow conditions. Antibody-mediated activation of integrin alpha(4)beta(1) induced adhesion of sickle red cells to primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells; this adhesion was inhibited by soluble Lu-Fc and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-Fc proteins. This novel interaction between integrin alpha(4)beta(1) in sickle red cells and endothelial Lu/BCAM proteins could participate in sickle cell adhesion to endothelium and potentially play a role in vaso-occlusive episodes.

  1. Fermented red ginseng extract inhibits cancer cell proliferation and viability.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jisun; Jeon, Seong Bin; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Hyeji; Kim, Ju; Kwon, Bo Ra; Yu, Kang-Yeol; Cha, Jeong-Dan; Hwang, Seung-Mi; Choi, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Yong-Seob

    2015-04-01

    Red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) is the most widely recognized medicinal herb due to its remedial effects in various disorders, such as cancers, diabetes, and heart problems. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of fermented red ginseng extract (f-RGE; provided by Jeonju Biomaterials Institute, Jeonju, South Korea) in a parallel comparison with the effect of nonfermented red ginseng extract (nf-RGE; control) on several cancer cell lines--MCF-7 breast cancer cells, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and reprogrammed MCF-7 cells (mimicking cancer stem cells). Cells were cultured at various concentrations of RGE (from 0.5 up to 5 mg/mL) and their viabilities and proliferative properties were examined. Our data demonstrate the following: (1) nf-RGE inhibited cell viability at ≥1 mg/mL for MCF-7 cells and ≥2 mg/mL for HepG2 cells, (2) in the presence of a carcinogenic agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), nf-RGE treatment in combination with paclitaxel synergistically decreased MCF-7 as well as HepG2 cell viability, (3) f-RGE (which contained a greater level of Rg3 content) more effectively decreased the viability of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells compared to nf-RGE, and (4) f-RGE appeared more potent for inhibiting cancerous differentiation of reprogrammed MCF-7 cells in a synergistic fashion with paclitaxel, especially in the presence of TPA, compared to nf-RGE. These findings suggest that f-RGE treatment may be more effective for decreasing cancer cell survival by inducing apoptotic cell death and also presumably for preventing cancer stem cell differentiation compared to nf-RGE.

  2. Artificial Red Cells with Polyhemoglobin Membranes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    preparing emulsions and ejecting cells from the oil phase. IX. REFERENCES 1. Wallace, H. W., Asher, W. J., and Li, N. N. Liquid - liquid oxygenation: a...1S. KEY WORDS (Continue, an reverse side if naceoay mnd identify by block number) Artificial Blood, Hemoglobin, Polyhemoglobin, Biotonometry Liquid ...cell-size microdroplets containing 30% of hemoglobin were held in liquid membrane capsules and treated with glutaralddhyde that cross linked the

  3. Chronic red blood cell exchange to prevent clinical complications in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Cabibbo, Sergio; Fidone, Carmelo; Garozzo, Giovanni; Antolino, Agostino; Manenti, Giovanna Oriella; Bennardello, Francesco; Licitra, Vincenzo; Calabrese, Salvatore; Costantino, Francesco; Travali, Simone; Distefano, Roberto; Bonomo, Pietro

    2005-06-01

    We tracked the results of 394 manual or automatic red blood cell exchanges done with a cell separator in 20 sickle cell patients at high risk for recurrent complications. Over an average of 6 years, none of the patients developed complications related to the procedure or to the increased blood use. It was safe and effective in preventing complications of sickle cell disease, and if done automatically, reduced iron overload. Ferritin levels also decreased in patients treated with automatic red blood cell exchange. Furthermore, using Single Donor Red Blood Cell units (SDRC) we reduced the potential exposure to transfusion transmitted infectious diseases (TTI).

  4. Biomarkers defining the metabolic age of red blood cells during cold storage.

    PubMed

    Paglia, Giuseppe; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Rolfsson, Óttar; Sigurjónsson, Ólafur E; Bordbar, Aarash; Palsson, Sirus; Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Gudmundsson, Sveinn; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2016-09-29

    Metabolomic investigations of packed red blood cells (RBCs) stored under refrigerated conditions in saline adenine glucose mannitol (SAGM) additives have revealed the presence of 3 distinct metabolic phases, occurring on days 0-10, 10-18, and after day 18 of storage. Here we used receiving operating characteristics curve analysis to identify biomarkers that can differentiate between the 3 metabolic states. We first recruited 24 donors and analyzed 308 samples coming from RBC concentrates stored in SAGM and additive solution 3. We found that 8 extracellular compounds (lactic acid, nicotinamide, 5-oxoproline, xanthine, hypoxanthine, glucose, malic acid, and adenine) form the basis for an accurate classification/regression model and are able to differentiate among the metabolic phases. This model was then validated by analyzing an additional 49 samples obtained by preparing 7 new RBC concentrates in SAGM. Despite the technical variability associated with RBC processing strategies, verification of these markers was independently confirmed in 2 separate laboratories with different analytical setups and different sample sets. The 8 compounds proposed here highly correlate with the metabolic age of packed RBCs, and can be prospectively validated as biomarkers of the RBC metabolic lesion. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. Role of red blood cell lysis and iron in hydrocephalus after intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Du, Hanjian; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Strahle, Jennifer; Xi, Guohua

    2014-06-01

    Thrombin and iron are two major players in intracerebral hemorrhage-induced brain injury and our recent study found that thrombin contributes to hydrocephalus development in a rat model of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH). This study investigated the role of red blood cell (RBC) lysis and iron in hydrocephalus after IVH. There were three parts to this study. First, male Sprague-Dawley rats received an injection of saline, packed, or lysed RBCs into the right lateral ventricle. Second, rats had an intraventricular injection of iron or saline. Third, the rats received intraventricular injection of lysed RBCs mixed with deferoxamine (0.5 mg in 5 μL saline) or saline. All rats underwent magnetic resonance imaging at 24 hours and were then euthanized for brain edema measurement, western blot analysis, or brain histology. We found that intraventricular injection of lysed RBCs, but not packed RBCs, resulted in ventricular enlargement and marked increases in brain heme oxygenase-1 and ferritin at 24 hours. Intraventricular injection of iron also resulted in ventricular enlargement and ventricular wall damage 24 hours later. Coinjection of deferoxamine reduced lysed RBC-induced ventricular enlargement (P<0.01). These results suggest that iron, a degradation product of hemoglobin, has an important role in hydrocephalus development after IVH.

  6. Deoxygenation affects tyrosine phosphoproteome of red cell membrane from patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Angela; Turrini, Franco; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Matte, Alessandro; Pantaleo, Antonella; Olivieri, Oliviero; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2010-04-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a worldwide distributed hereditary red cell disorder related to the production of a defective form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S (HbS). One of the hallmarks of SCD is the presence of dense, dehydrate highly adhesive sickle red blood cells (RBCs) that result from persistent membrane damage associated with HbS polymerization, abnormal activation of membrane cation transports and generation of distorted and rigid red cells with membrane perturbation and cytoskeleton dysfunction. Although modulation of phosphorylation state of the proteins from membrane and cytoskeleton networks has been proposed to participate in red cell homeostasis, much still remains to be investigated in normal and diseased red cells. Here, we report that tyrosine (Tyr-) phosphoproteome of sickle red cells was different from normal controls and was affected by deoxygenation. We found proteins, p55 and band 4.1, from the junctional complex, differently Tyr-phosphorylated in SCD RBCs compared to normal RBCs under normoxia and modulated by deoxygenation, while band 4.2 was similarly Tyr-phosphorylated in both conditions. In SCD RBCs we identified the phosphopeptides for protein 4.1R located in the protein FERM domain (Tyr-13) and for alpha-spectrin located near or in a linker region (Tyr-422 and Tyr-1498) involving protein areas crucial for their functions in the context of red cell membrane properties, suggesting that Tyr-phosphorylation may be part of the events involved in maintaining membrane mechanical stability in SCD red cells.

  7. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology.

    PubMed

    Fens, Marcel H A M; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje; van Rooijen, Karlijn L; Dijstelbloem, Hilde M; Rasmussen, Jan T; de Vooght, Karen M K; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Gaillard, Carlo A J M; van Solinge, Wouter W

    2012-04-01

    Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells generally occurs by macrophages in the spleen and liver. Previously, however, we have shown that endothelial cells are also capable of erythrophagocytosis. Key players in the erythrophagocytosis by endothelial cells appeared to be lactadherin and α(v)-integrin. Phagocytosis via the phosphatidylserine-lactadherin-α(v)-integrin pathway is the acknowledged route for removal of apoptotic innate cells by phagocytes. Endothelial cell phagocytosis of red blood cells was further explored using a more (patho)physiological approach. Red blood cells were exposed to oxidative stress, induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide. After opsonization with lactadherin, red blood cells were incubated with endothelial cells to study erythrophagocytosis and examine cytotoxicity. Red blood cells exposed to oxidative stress show alterations such as phosphatidylserine exposure and loss of deformability. When incubated with endothelial cells, marked erythrophagocytosis occurred in the presence of lactadherin under both static and flow conditions. As a consequence, intracellular organization was disturbed and endothelial cells were seen to change shape ('rounding up'). Increased expression of apoptotic markers indicated that marked erythrophagocytosis has cytotoxic effects. Activated endothelial cells show significant phagocytosis of phosphatidylserine-exposing and rigid red blood cells under both static and flow conditions. This results in a certain degree of cytotoxicity. We postulate that activated endothelial cells play a role in red blood cell clearance in vivo. Significant erythrophagocytosis can induce endothelial cell loss, which may contribute to vasopathological effects as seen, for instance, in sickle cell

  8. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology

    PubMed Central

    Fens, Marcel H.A.M.; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje; van Rooijen, Karlijn L.; Dijstelbloem, Hilde M.; Rasmussen, Jan T.; de Vooght, Karen M.K.; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Gaillard, Carlo A.J.M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells generally occurs by macrophages in the spleen and liver. Previously, however, we have shown that endothelial cells are also capable of erythrophagocytosis. Key players in the erythrophagocytosis by endothelial cells appeared to be lactadherin and αv-integrin. Phagocytosis via the phosphatidylserine-lactadherin-αv-integrin pathway is the acknowledged route for removal of apoptotic innate cells by phagocytes. Design and Methods Endothelial cell phagocytosis of red blood cells was further explored using a more (patho)physiological approach. Red blood cells were exposed to oxidative stress, induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide. After opsonization with lactadherin, red blood cells were incubated with endothelial cells to study erythrophagocytosis and examine cytotoxicity. Results Red blood cells exposed to oxidative stress show alterations such as phosphatidylserine exposure and loss of deformability. When incubated with endothelial cells, marked erythrophagocytosis occurred in the presence of lactadherin under both static and flow conditions. As a consequence, intracellular organization was disturbed and endothelial cells were seen to change shape (‘rounding up’). Increased expression of apoptotic markers indicated that marked erythrophagocytosis has cytotoxic effects. Conclusions Activated endothelial cells show significant phagocytosis of phosphatidylserine-exposing and rigid red blood cells under both static and flow conditions. This results in a certain degree of cytotoxicity. We postulate that activated endothelial cells play a role in red blood cell clearance in vivo. Significant erythrophagocytosis can induce endothelial cell loss, which may contribute to

  9. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices §...

  10. Hereditary red cell membrane disorders and laboratory diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    King, M-J; Zanella, A

    2013-06-01

    This overview describes two groups of nonimmune hereditary hemolytic anemias caused by defects in membrane proteins located in distinct layers of the red cell membrane. Hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) represent disorders of the red cell cytoskeleton. Hereditary stomatocytoses represents disorders of cation permeability in the red cell membrane. The current laboratory screening tests for HS are the osmotic fragility test, acid glycerol lysis time test (AGLT), cryohemolysis test, and eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA)-binding test. For atypical HS, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of erythrocyte membrane proteins is carried out to confirm the diagnosis. The diagnosis of HE/HPP is based on abnormal red cell morphology and the detection of protein 4.1R deficiency or spectrin variants using gel electrophoresis. None of screening tests can detect all HS cases. Some testing centers (a survey of 25 laboratories) use a combination of tests (e.g., AGLT and EMA). No specific screening test for hereditary stomatocytoses is available. The preliminary diagnosis is based on presenting a compensated hemolytic anemia, macrocytosis, and a temperature or time dependent pseudohyperkalemia in some patients. Both the EMA-binding test and the osmotic fragility test may help in differential diagnosis of HS and hereditary stomatocytosis.

  11. Quenching of red cell tryptophan fluorescence by mercurial compounds.

    PubMed

    Verkman, A S; Lukacovic, M F; Tinklepaugh, M S; Dix, J A

    1986-01-01

    Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in red cell ghost membranes labeled with N-ethylmaleimide (N-EM) is quenched in a dose-dependent manner by the organic mercurial p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate (p-CMBS). Fluorescence lifetime analysis shows that quenching occurs by a static mechanism. Binding of p-CMBS occurs by a rapid (less than 5 s) biomolecular association (dissociation constant K1 = 1.8 mM) followed by a slower unimolecular transition with forward rate constant k2 = 0.015 s-1 and reverse rate constant k-2 = 0.0054 s-1. Analysis of the temperature dependence of k2 gives delta H = 6.5 kcal/mol and delta S = -21 eu. The mercurial compounds p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, p-aminophenylmercuric acetate, and mercuric chloride quench red cell tryptophan fluorescence by the same mechanism as p-CMBS does; the measured k2 value was the same for each compound, whereas K1 varied. p-CMBS also quenches the tryptophan fluorescence in vesicles reconstituted with purified band 3, the red cell anion exchange protein, in a manner similar to that in ghost membranes. These experiments define a mercurial binding site on band 3 in ghosts treated with N-EM and establish the binding mechanism to this site. The characteristics of this p-CMBS binding site on band 3 differ significantly from those of the p-CMBS binding site involved in red cell water and urea transport inhibition.

  12. Adhesion of platelets to artificial surfaces: effect of red cells.

    PubMed

    Brash, J L; Brophy, J M; Feuerstein, I A

    1976-05-01

    Adhesion of platelets to several polymer- and protein-coated glass surfaces has been studied in vitro. The apparatus consists of a cylindrical probe rotating in a test tube containing the platelet medium and allows close control of fluid shear and mass transport. Suspensions of washed pig platelets constitute the basic platelet medium, and can be modified by adding back red cells and plasma proteins. Adhesion is measured via 51Cr-labeling of platelets. In the absence of red cells, identical low levels of adhesion were seen on all surfaces and saturation was reached within 2 min. In the presence of red cells, adhesion was greater. Saturation on all surfaces except fibrinogen and collagen again occurred within 2 min. The adhesion levels on polymer surfaces and glass were indistinguishable, while those on albumin were lower and those on fibrinogen were higher. Collagen was the most reactive surface. It did not equilibrate within 15 min., and kinetic data indicated a platelet diffusivity strongly dependent on hematocrit. These effects were attributed to rotational and translational motion of the red cells causing increased diffusion and surface-platelet collision energy.

  13. Spatial Distributions of Red Blood Cells Significantly Alter Local Haemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Joseph M.; Holmes, David; Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Balabani, Stavroula

    2014-01-01

    Although bulk changes in red blood cell concentration between vessels have been well characterised, local distributions are generally overlooked. Red blood cells aggregate, deform and migrate within vessels, forming heterogeneous distributions which have considerable effect on local haemodynamics. The present study reports data on the local distribution of human red blood cells in a sequentially bifurcating microchannel, representing the branching geometry of the microvasculature. Imaging methodologies with simple extrapolations are used to infer three dimensional, time-averaged velocity and haematocrit distributions under a range of flow conditions. Strong correlation between the bluntness of the velocity and haematocrit profiles in the parent branch of the geometry is observed and red blood cell aggregation has a notable effect on the observed trends. The two branches of the first bifurcation show similar characteristics in terms of the shapes of the profiles and the extent of plasma skimming, despite the difference in geometric configuration. In the second bifurcation, considerable asymmetry between the branches in the plasma skimming relationship is observed, and elucidated by considering individual haematocrit profiles. The results of the study highlight the importance of considering local haematocrit distributions in the analysis of blood flow and could lead to more accurate computational models of blood flow in microvascular networks. The experimental approaches developed in this work provide a foundation for further examining the characteristics of microhaemodynamics. PMID:24950214

  14. Shape of red blood cells in contact with artificial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Grzhibovskis, Richards; Krämer, Elisabeth; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Kemper, Björn; Zanden, Carl; Repin, Nikolay V; Tkachuk, Bogdan V; Voinova, Marina V

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of physical contact between red blood cells and artificial surfaces is considered. A fully three-dimensional mathematical model of a bilayer membrane in contact with an artificial surface is presented. Numerical results for the different geometries and adhesion intensities are found to be in agreement with experimentally observed geometries obtained by means of digital holographic microscopy.

  15. Full dynamics of a red blood cell in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Dupire, Jules; Socol, Marius; Viallat, Annie

    2012-12-18

    At the cellular scale, blood fluidity and mass transport depend on the dynamics of red blood cells in blood flow, specifically on their deformation and orientation. These dynamics are governed by cellular rheological properties, such as internal viscosity and cytoskeleton elasticity. In diseases in which cell rheology is altered genetically or by parasitic invasion or by changes in the microenvironment, blood flow may be severely impaired. The nonlinear interplay between cell rheology and flow may generate complex dynamics, which remain largely unexplored experimentally. Under simple shear flow, only two motions, "tumbling" and "tank-treading," have been described experimentally and relate to cell mechanics. Here, we elucidate the full dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow by coupling two videomicroscopy approaches providing multidirectional pictures of cells, and we analyze the mechanical origin of the observed dynamics. We show that contrary to common belief, when red blood cells flip into the flow, their orientation is determined by the shear rate. We discuss the "rolling" motion, similar to a rolling wheel. This motion, which permits the cells to avoid energetically costly deformations, is a true signature of the cytoskeleton elasticity. We highlight a hysteresis cycle and two transient dynamics driven by the shear rate: an intermittent regime during the "tank-treading-to-flipping" transition and a Frisbee-like "spinning" regime during the "rolling-to-tank-treading" transition. Finally, we reveal that the biconcave red cell shape is highly stable under moderate shear stresses, and we interpret this result in terms of stress-free shape and elastic buckling.

  16. THE AGGLUTINATION OF RED BLOOD CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Northrop, John H.; Freund, Jules

    1924-01-01

    1. Unsensitized sheep cells suspended in sugar solutions are agglutinated by electrolytes whenever the potential is depressed to 6 millivolts or less, except in the case of MgCl2 or CaCl2. 2. With these salts no agglutination occurs although there is practically no potential. The presence of these salts prevents acid agglutination. This is presumably due to a decrease in the "cohesion" between the cells. 3. Cells which have been sensitized with specific antibody, ricin, colloidal stannic hydroxide, or paraffin oil, are agglutinated whenever the potential is decreased below about 12 millivolts. 4. The agglutination by electrolytes is therefore primarily due to a decrease in the potential whereas agglutination by immune serum, ricin, etc., is due primarily to an increase in the critical potential. PMID:19872099

  17. H+ and Cl- ion equilibrium across the red cell membrane in the carp.

    PubMed

    Albers, C; Goetz, K G

    1985-08-01

    H2O and electrolyte distribution were studied in carp erythrocytes at various pH values achieved by CO2/O2 equilibration in vitro. Intracellular pH was measured by means of glass electrode and by DMO-14C. rH+, rCl- and rDMO- varied linearly and in a comparable manner with pHe. At pHe = 7.8, rH+, rCl- and rDMO- were 0.21, 0.29 and 0.30. rCl- and rDMO- were closely correlated and exhibited only minor differences. rH+ was closely correlated with rCl- and rDMO-, but was, however, significantly lower than rCl- or rDMO-. This difference is considered to be due to a systematic error of the glass electrode when used in highly concentrated protein solutions. The coulometric determination of chloride in packed red cells is shown to be highly susceptible to protein. The results are consistent with the assumption that H+ and Cl- ions are passively distributed across the red cell membrane.

  18. Reducing red cell transfusion by audit, education and a new guideline in a large teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Garrioch, M; Sandbach, J; Pirie, E; Morrison, A; Todd, A; Green, R

    2004-02-01

    Safety concerns combined with the greatly increased costs and difficulties of maintaining the blood supply are major considerations for transfusion services. Previous local surveys demonstrated that hospital blood use at our hospital could be improved. Excessive cross-matching, unnecessary transfusion and high return rates of unused blood were commonplace. Transfusion practice was audited over a 3-month period. An education package with guidelines for transfusion was delivered to all clinician groups within the hospital, over the following 9 months. The audit was repeated exactly 1 year later at the same time period. During the second audit, inpatient hospital numbers increased by 1.02% (from n = 7262 to n = 7336) but no differences in length of stay, cardiovascular morbidity or mortality were demonstrated. Twenty percent (n = 254, 2002; n = 316, 2001) fewer patients received blood, and the number of red cell packs used reduced by 19% (from n = 1093 to n = 880). Total number of patients transfused reduced from 4.4% to 3.5% which, as an absolute difference, is a reduction of 0.9% (CI 0.3-1.5, P = 0.006). The audit, guideline and education package had a major impact on red cell use within the hospital with no adverse effects. Blood use can be improved by the implementation of a suitable education package and guideline. If it is possible to replicate the results of this education programme nationwide, the effect on blood use, with subsequent savings and enhanced patient safety could be significant.

  19. Red blood cell replacement, or nanobiotherapeutics with enhanced red blood cell functions?

    PubMed

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2015-06-01

    Why is this important? Under normal circumstances, donor blood is the best replacement for blood. However, there are exceptions: During natural epidemics (e.g., HIV, Ebola, etc.) or man-made epidemics (terrorism, war, etc.), there is a risk of donor blood being contaminated, and donors being disqualified because they have contracted disease. Unlike red blood cells (RBCs), blood substitutes can be sterilized to remove infective agents. Heart attack and stroke are usually caused by obstruction of arterial blood vessels. Unlike RBCs, which are particulate, blood substitutes are in the form of a solution that can perfuse through obstructed vessels with greater ease to reach the heart and brain, as has been demonstrated in animal studies. Severe blood loss from injuries sustained during accidents, disasters, or war may require urgent blood transfusion that cannot wait for transportation to the hospital for blood group testing. Unlike RBCs, blood substitutes do not have specific blood groups, and can be administered on the spot. RBCs have to be stored under refrigeration for up to 42 days, and are thus difficult to transport and store in times of disaster and at the battlefront. Blood substitutes can be stored at room temperature for more than 1 year, compared to the RBC shelf life of 1 day, at room temperature. In cases of very severe hemorrhagic shock, there is usually a safety window of 60 min for blood replacement, beyond which there could be problems related to irreversible shock. Animal studies show that a particular type of blood substitute, with enhanced RBC enzymes, may be able to prolong the duration of the safety window.

  20. Preliminary evaluation of rechargeable lithium-ion cells for an implantable battery pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, Gregory K.; Aiken, Peter A.; Adams, William A.; Mussivand, Tofy

    A preliminary evaluation of the performance characteristics of 1.08 Ah lithium-ion cells was undertaken utilizing operating conditions similar to that required for an implanted medical device, such as a ventricular assist device or total artificial heart, in order to determine their potential usefulness for this application. The major parameters studied at 22 or 37 °C were discharge-rate capability, specific energy and energy density, surface temperature, self-discharge and cycle life. The discharge loads used in the cycle-life study were either constant or pulsatile, with the constant discharge load being equivalent to the average of the pulsatile load. The lithium-ion cells showed high discharge-rate capability up to 1.5 A at 37 °C, with over 74% of their rated capacity being obtained and a midpoint voltage of over 3.3 V (> 72% of rated capacity and > 3.3 V for up to 1.0 A discharges at 22 °C), before the first indication of cell polarization was noticed. The specific energy and energy density of cells discharged at 0.88 A to 2.5 V at 37 °C was 73 Wh/kg and 190 Wh/l, respectively (64 Wh/kg and 167 Wh/l at 22 °C). The internal resistance of the cells was calculated to be 198 mΩ at 37 °C (316 mΩ at 22 °C), which resulted in a relatively high, 8.0 °C, increase in surface temperature under a 0.88 A discharge load. The self-discharge of the cells at 37 °C was relatively low, with only a 1.3% loss in capacity being observed after 24 h. The lithium-ion cells yielded longer cycle lives at 37 °C (2 239 cycles) compared with 22 °C operation (1539 cycles) under similar 0.88 A discharge loads. The cells performed slightly better under constant discharge loads than under pulsatile loads of equivalent average current (0.83 A average) with cycles lives of 2279 cycles versus 1941 cycles and operating times were 1.6 ± 1.1 min (mean) longer. Preliminary indications are that these lithium-ion cells would be suitable for use in a rechargeable battery pack capable of

  1. Aggregation of red blood cells: From rouleaux to clot formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Steffen, Patrick; Svetina, Saša

    2013-06-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the adhesion mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the adhesion strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life-saving in the case of wound healing, but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  2. Calcium movements across the membrane of human red cells

    PubMed Central

    Schatzmann, H. J.; Vincenzi, F. F.

    1969-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the cellular content and movement of Ca across the membrane of human red blood cells. 2. The [Ca] in the cellular contents of fresh red cells is 4·09 × 10-2 mM. The intracellular concentration of free ionic Ca ([Ca2+]) is considered to be less than this value and therefore less than extracellular [Ca2+] under normal conditions. 3. Observation of unidirectional Ca fluxes with 45Ca confirms previous reports of low permeability of the red cell membrane for Ca. After nearly 1 week of loading in the cold, intracellular 45Ca content is 1·8% of extracellular 45Ca content. Appearance in extracellular fluid of 45Ca from coldloaded cells can be considered to arise from two compartments. Efflux of 45Ca from the `slower compartment' is accelerated by the addition of glucose. 4. Starved red cells, incubated at 37° C, after reversible haemolysis for loading with Ca and Mg-ATP, exhibit an outward net transport of Ca against an electrochemical gradient. The transport is associated with the appearance of inorganic phosphate (Pi). Cells treated similarly, but without ATP show no transport and no appearance of Pi. 5. During the initial phase of transport, 1·3 mole Pi appear per mole Ca transported. 6. The transport of Ca from ATP-loaded cells is highly temperature-dependent, with a Q10 of 3·5. 7. Cell membrane adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of reversibly haemolysed cells is stimulated only by intracellular, and not by extracellular Ca. 8. Neither Ca transport in reversibly haemolysed cells, nor the Ca-Mg activated ATPase of isolated cell membranes is sensitive to Na, K, ouabain or oligomycin. 9. Mg is not transported under the conditions which reveal Ca transport, but Mg appears to be necessary for Ca transport. 10. Sr is transported from reversibly haemolysed Mg-ATP-loaded cells. Sr also can substitute for Ca, but not for Mg, in the activation of membrane ATPase. 11. It is concluded that, in addition to a low passive permeability, an

  3. Red blood cells transfusion in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Solange Emanuelle; Ferreira, Jovino Dos Santos; Ferreira, Vera Lúcia Paes Cavalcanti; Ferreira, David Cavalcanti

    2009-12-01

    The anemia is a common problem upon admission of the patients in the intensive care unit being the red blood cell transfusion a frequent therapeutic. The causes of anemia in critical patients who under go red blood cell transfusion are several: acute loss of blood after trauma, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, surgery amongst others. Currently, few studies are available regarding the use of blood components in patients at intensive care unit. Although blood transfusions are frequent in intensive care unit, the optimized criteria for handling are not clearly defined, with no available guidelines. To analyze the clinical indications of the use of the red blood cell in the intensive care unit. The clinical history of the patients admitted in the intensive care unit were analyzed, revisiting which had have red blood cell transfusion in the period between January 1st 2005 and December 31 2005. The study was accepted by the Research Ethics Committee - Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa (CEP) - of the University of South of Santa Catarina (UNISUL). The transfusion rate was 19,33, and the majority of the patients were of the male gender. Their age prevalence was of 60 years old or older. The mortality rate among patients who under went red blood cell transfusion died was of 38,22%. The transfusions criterias were low serum hemoglobin (78%) and the hemoglobin pre - transfusion was 8,11 g/dL. Politrauma and sepsis/sepsis chock were the pre diagnosis criteria. A low hemoglobin level is the main clinical criteria with average hemoglobin pre - transfusion was 8,11 g/dL.

  4. Red Blood Cell Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Peter A.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Howes, Rosalind E.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to Plasmodium vivax blood-stage infection has been widely recognised to result from absence of the Duffy (Fy) blood group from the surface of red blood cells (RBCs) in individuals of African descent. Interestingly, recent studies from different malaria-endemic regions have begun to reveal new perspectives on the association between Duffy gene polymorphism and P. vivax malaria. In Papua New Guinea and the Americas, heterozygous carriers of a Duffy-negative allele are less susceptible to P. vivax infection than Duffy-positive homozygotes. In Brazil, studies show that the Fya antigen, compared to Fyb, is associated with lower binding to the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein and reduced susceptibility to vivax malaria. Additionally, it is interesting that numerous studies have now shown that P. vivax can infect RBCs and cause clinical disease in Duffy-negative people. This suggests that the relationship between P. vivax and the Duffy antigen is more complex than customarily described. Evidence of P. vivax Duffy-independent red cell invasion indicates that the parasite must be evolving alternative red cell invasion pathways. In this chapter, we review the evidence for P. vivax Duffy-dependent and Duffy-independent red cell invasion. We also consider the influence of further host gene polymorphism associated with malaria endemicity on susceptibility to vivax malaria. The interaction between the parasite and the RBC has significant potential to influence the effectiveness of P. vivax-specific vaccines and drug treatments. Ultimately, the relationships between red cell polymorphisms and P. vivax blood-stage infection will influence our estimates on the population at risk and efforts to eliminate vivax malaria. PMID:23384621

  5. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  6. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  7. [Familial transient red cell aplasia from parvovirus B-19 infection].

    PubMed

    Salvini, F; Tonella, M; Carpani, G; Scaglioni, S; Zuccotti, G V

    2002-01-01

    In our Paediatric Clinic we observed a case of transient aplastic crisis caused by Parvovirus B19 in a child and his mother, both affected by spherocytic haemolytic anemia. Anti-Parvovirus IgM antibody titre and viral search by PCR were positive. Anemia was treated with transfusion of concentrated red blood cells. In case of a family onset of hyperacute anemia it is necessary to consider a bone marrow aplastic crisis of the red series, induced by Parvovirus B19, especially if there is notice of an ongoing outbreak of erythema infectiosum.

  8. Alloimmunization screening after transfusion of red blood cells in a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vitor Mendonça; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano; Soares, Sheila; Araújo, Gislene; Schmidt, Luciana Cayres; Costa, Sidneia Sanches de Menezes; Langhi, Dante Mário; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Background Several irregular red blood cell alloantibodies, produced by alloimmunization of antigens in transfusions or pregnancies, have clinical importance because they cause hemolysis in the fetus and newborn and in transfused patients. Objective a prospective analysis of patients treated by the surgical and clinical emergency services of Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro (HC/UFTM), Brazil was performed to correlate alloimmunization to clinical and epidemiological data. Methods Blood samples of 143 patients with initial negative antibody screening were collected at intervals for up to 15 months after the transfusion of packed red blood cells. Samples were submitted to irregular antibody testing and, when positive, to the identification and serial titration of alloantibodies. The Fisher Exact test and Odds Ratio were employed to compare proportions. Results Fifteen (10.49%) patients produced antibodies within six months of transfusion. However, for 60% of these individuals, the titers decreased and disappeared by 15 months after transfusion. Anti-K antibodies and alloantibodies against antigens of the Rh system were the most common; the highest titer was 1:32 (anti-K). There was an evident correlation with the number of transfusions. Conclusions Given the high incidence of clinically important red blood cell alloantibodies in patients transfused in surgical and clinical emergency services, we suggest that phenotyping and pre-transfusion compatibilization for C, c, E, e (Rh system) and K (Kell system) antigens should be extended to all patients with programmed surgeries or acute clinical events that do not need emergency transfusions. PMID:23049421

  9. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-12

    cells with 5 1Cr sodium chromate, collection of urine and peripheral blood samples, 5 1Cr organ uptake, whole body gamma imaging, and calculation of whole...7. Subject does not have a history of: - Renal disorders or BUN, creatinine, uric acid, sodium , potassium or chloride values outside the...uric acid, calcium, inorganic phosphorus, glucose, sodium , potassium, chloride, bicarbonate. Coagulation: prothrombin time (subject and control) and

  10. The red cell storage lesion(s): of dogs and men

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harvey G.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of preservative solutions permitted refrigerated storage of red blood cells. However, the convenience of having red blood cell inventories was accompanied by a disadvantage. Red cells undergo numerous physical and metabolic changes during cold storage, the “storage lesion(s)”. Whereas controlled clinical trials have not confirmed the clinical importance of such changes, ethical and operational issues have prevented careful study of the oldest stored red blood cells. Suggestions of toxicity from meta-analyses motivated us to develop pre-clinical canine models to compare the freshest vs the oldest red blood cells. Our model of canine pneumonia with red blood cell transfusion indicated that the oldest red blood cells increased mortality, that the severity of pneumonia is important, but that the dose of transfused red blood cells is not. Washing the oldest red blood cells reduces mortality by removing senescent cells and remnants, whereas washing fresher cells increases mortality by damaging the red blood cell membrane. An opposite effect was found in a model of haemorrhagic shock with reperfusion injury. Physiological studies indicate that release of iron from old cells is a primary mechanism of toxicity during infection, whereas scavenging of cell-free haemoglobin may be beneficial during reperfusion injury. Intravenous iron appears to have toxicity equivalent to old red blood cells in the pneumonia model, suggesting that intravenous iron and old red blood cells should be administered with caution to infected patients. PMID:28263166

  11. The red cell storage lesion(s): of dogs and men.

    PubMed

    Klein, Harvey G

    2017-03-01

    The advent of preservative solutions permitted refrigerated storage of red blood cells. However, the convenience of having red blood cell inventories was accompanied by a disadvantage. Red cells undergo numerous physical and metabolic changes during cold storage, the "storage lesion(s)". Whereas controlled clinical trials have not confirmed the clinical importance of such changes, ethical and operational issues have prevented careful study of the oldest stored red blood cells. Suggestions of toxicity from meta-analyses motivated us to develop pre-clinical canine models to compare the freshest vs the oldest red blood cells. Our model of canine pneumonia with red blood cell transfusion indicated that the oldest red blood cells increased mortality, that the severity of pneumonia is important, but that the dose of transfused red blood cells is not. Washing the oldest red blood cells reduces mortality by removing senescent cells and remnants, whereas washing fresher cells increases mortality by damaging the red blood cell membrane. An opposite effect was found in a model of haemorrhagic shock with reperfusion injury. Physiological studies indicate that release of iron from old cells is a primary mechanism of toxicity during infection, whereas scavenging of cell-free haemoglobin may be beneficial during reperfusion injury. Intravenous iron appears to have toxicity equivalent to old red blood cells in the pneumonia model, suggesting that intravenous iron and old red blood cells should be administered with caution to infected patients.

  12. Biological Membrane-Packed Mesenchymal Stem Cells Treat Acute Kidney Disease by Ameliorating Mitochondrial-Related Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiaodong; Hong, Quan; Wang, Weiwei; Zheng, Wei; Li, Ou; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei; Wu, Di

    2017-01-01

    The mortality of rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI remains high because no effective therapy exists. We investigated a new therapeutic method using MSCs. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential and anti-apoptotic mechanisms of action of MSCs in the treatment of AKI induced by glycerol in vivo and in vitro. We used Duragen as a biological membrane to pack MSCs on the glycerol-injured renal tissue in vivo. The anti-apoptotic mechanism was investigated. In vitro, HK-2 cells were incubated with ferrous myoglobin and MSCs-conditioned medium, followed by cell proliferation and apoptosis assays. We founded that packing MSCs on the injured renal tissue preserved renal function, ameliorated renal tubular lesions, and reduced apoptosis in the mice with glycerol-induced AKI. The MSC-conditioned medium improved HK-2 cell viability and inhibited apoptosis. These effects were reversed by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Biological membrane packing of MSCs on the renal tissue has a therapeutic rescue function by inhibiting cell apoptosis in vivo. MSCs protect renal cells from apoptosis induced by myoglobin in vitro. We have thus demonstrated MSCs reduced rhabdomyolysis-associated renal injury and cell apoptosis by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:28117405

  13. Backward elastic light scattering of malaria infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the backward light scattering pattern of healthy and malaria (Plasmodium falciparum) parasitized red blood cells. The spectrum could clearly distinguish between predominant ring stage infected blood cells and healthy blood cells. Further, we found that infected samples mixed with different stages of P. falciparum showed different signals, suggesting that even variance in parasite stages could also be detected by the spectrum. These results together with the backward scattering technique suggest the potential of non-invasive diagnosis of malaria through light scattering of blood cells near the surface of human body, such as using eyes or skin surface.

  14. Evaluation of Membrane Systems for Washing/Deglycerolizing Packed Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-20

    CLASSIFICATION Of THIS PAGE REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OM8 No 0704 0188 la REPORT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Unclassified lb RESTRICTIVE...Bend Research, Inc. 6b OFFICE SYMBOL (if •pptktbh) 7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION •c AOOfttSS (City. State. end ZIP Code) 64550 Research Road...8b OFFICE SYMBOL (If ipplktble) 9 PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER DAMD17-86-C-6142 8c AOORESSfOfy. Stttr ind ZIP Cod*) Fort

  15. Effect of Packed Red Blood Cell Cryopreservation on Development of the Storage Lesion and Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    drawings, specifications, or other data does not license the holder or any other person or corporation or convey any rights or permission to manufacture ...their use after thawing and removal of glycerol is currently limited to 14 days due in part to concerns about bacterial contamination [7,8]. The...were cultured at the end of 42 days of storage to ensure no bacterial contamination had occurred. 3.2 Biochemical Measurements Samples from

  16. Assessing the Compatibility of Packed Red Blood Cells With Lactated Ringer’s Solution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    the use of human blood and blood components (AABB, 1995). The CRNA must be fully cognizant of the contents of this blood product circular of...approved for addition to blood components or for simultaneous administration via the same intravenous line include lactated...expanders, blood and blood components . Obviously, the potential exists for iatrogenic incompatibilities between the many different solutions that may

  17. Characterization of dsRed2-positive cells in the doublecortin-dsRed2 transgenic adult rat retina.

    PubMed

    Trost, A; Schroedl, F; Marschallinger, J; Rivera, F J; Bogner, B; Runge, C; Couillard-Despres, S; Aigner, L; Reitsamer, H A

    2014-12-01

    Doublecortin (DCX) is predominantly expressed in neuronal precursor cells and young immature neurons of the developing and adult brain, where it is involved in neuronal differentiation, migration and plasticity. Moreover, its expression pattern reflects neurogenesis, and transgenic DCX promoter-driven reporter models have been previously used to investigate adult neurogenesis. In this study, we characterize dsRed2 reporter protein-expressing cells in the adult retina of the transgenic DCX promoter-dsRed2 rat model, with the aim to identify cells with putative neurogenic activity. Additionally, we confirmed the expression of the dsRed2 protein in DCX-expressing cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus. Adult DCX-dsRed2 rat retinas were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of DCX, NF200, Brn3a, Sox2, NeuN, calbindin, calretinin, PKC-a, Otx2, ChAT, PSA-NCAM and the glial markers GFAP and CRALBP, followed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. In addition, brain sections of transgenic rats were analyzed for dsRed2 expression and co-localization with DCX, NeuN, GFAP and Sox2 in the cortex and dentate gyrus. Endogenous DCX expression in the adult retina was confined to horizontal cells, and these cells co-expressed the DCX promoter-driven dsRed2 reporter protein. In addition, we encountered dsRed2 expression in various other cell types in the retina: retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), a subpopulation of amacrine cells, a minority of bipolar cells and in perivascular cells. Since also RGCs expressed dsRed2, the DCX-dsRed2 rat model might offer a useful tool to study RGCs in vivo under various conditions. Müller glial cells, which have previously been identified as cells with stem cell features and with neurogenic potential, did express neither endogenous DCX nor the dsRed2 reporter. However, and surprisingly, we identified a perivascular glial cell type expressing the dsRed2 reporter, enmeshed with the glia/stem cell marker GFAP and colocalizing with the

  18. Oriented cell division affects the global stress and cell packing geometry of a monolayer under stretch.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Zhaoliang

    2016-02-08

    Cell division plays a vital role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, and the division plane is crucial for cell fate. For isolated cells, extensive studies show that the orientation of divisions is sensitive to cell shape and the direction of extrinsic mechanical forces. However, it is poorly understood that how the cell divides within a cell monolayer and how the local stress change, due to the division, affects the global stress of epithelial monolayers. Here, we use the vertex dynamics models to investigate the effects of division orientation on the configurations and mechanics of a cell monolayer under stretch. We examine three scenarios of the divisions: dividing along the stretch axis, dividing along the geometric long axis of cells, and dividing at a random angle. It is found that the division along the long cell axis can induce the minimal energy difference, and the global stress of the monolayer after stretch releases more rapidly in this case. Moreover, the long-axis division can result in more random cell orientations and more isotropic cell shapes within the monolayer, comparing with other two cases. This study helps understand the division orientation of cells within a monolayer under mechanical stimuli, and may shed light on linking individual cell's behaviors to the global mechanics and patterns of tissues.

  19. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-03-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance.

  20. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    PubMed Central

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance. PMID:28303921

  1. Alterations of Red Cell Membrane Properties in Nneuroacanthocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Siegl, Claudia; Hamminger, Patricia; Jank, Herbert; Ahting, Uwe; Bader, Benedikt; Danek, Adrian; Gregory, Allison; Hartig, Monika; Hayflick, Susan; Hermann, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger; Sammler, Esther M.; Yapici, Zuhal; Prohaska, Rainer; Salzer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Neuroacanthocytosis (NA) refers to a group of heterogenous, rare genetic disorders, namely chorea acanthocytosis (ChAc), McLeod syndrome (MLS), Huntington’s disease-like 2 (HDL2) and pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), that mainly affect the basal ganglia and are associated with similar neurological symptoms. PKAN is also assigned to a group of rare neurodegenerative diseases, known as NBIA (neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation), associated with iron accumulation in the basal ganglia and progressive movement disorder. Acanthocytosis, the occurrence of misshaped erythrocytes with thorny protrusions, is frequently observed in ChAc and MLS patients but less prevalent in PKAN (about 10%) and HDL2 patients. The pathological factors that lead to the formation of the acanthocytic red blood cell shape are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether NA/NBIA acanthocytes differ in their functionality from normal erythrocytes. Several flow-cytometry-based assays were applied to test the physiological responses of the plasma membrane, namely drug-induced endocytosis, phosphatidylserine exposure and calcium uptake upon treatment with lysophosphatidic acid. ChAc red cell samples clearly showed a reduced response in drug-induced endovesiculation, lysophosphatidic acid-induced phosphatidylserine exposure, and calcium uptake. Impaired responses were also observed in acanthocyte-positive NBIA (PKAN) red cells but not in patient cells without shape abnormalities. These data suggest an “acanthocytic state” of the red cell where alterations in functional and interdependent membrane properties arise together with an acanthocytic cell shape. Further elucidation of the aberrant molecular mechanisms that cause this acanthocytic state may possibly help to evaluate the pathological pathways leading to neurodegeneration. PMID:24098554

  2. Enhanced desalination performance of membrane capacitive deionization cells by packing the flow chamber with granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yanhong; Yang, Xufei; Liang, Peng; Jiang, Yong; Zhang, Changyong; Huang, Xia

    2015-11-15

    A new design of membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI) cell was constructed by packing the cell's flow chamber with granular activated carbon (GAC). The GAC packed-MCDI (GAC-MCDI) delivered higher (1.2-2.5 times) desalination rates than the regular MCDI at all test NaCl concentrations (∼ 100-1000 mg/L). The greatest performance enhancement by packed GAC was observed when treating saline water with an initial NaCl concentration of 100 mg/L. Several different GAC materials were tested and they all exhibited similar enhancement effects. Comparatively, packing the MCDI's flow chamber with glass beads (GB; non-conductive) and graphite granules (GG; conductive but with lower specific surface area than GAC) resulted in inferior desalination performance. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis showed that the GAC-MCDI had considerably smaller internal resistance than the regular MCDI (∼ 19.2 ± 1.2 Ω versus ∼ 1222 ± 15 Ω at 100 mg/L NaCl). The packed GAC also decreased the ionic resistance across the flow chamber (∼ 1.49 ± 0.05 Ω versus ∼ 1130 ± 12 Ω at 100 mg/L NaCl). The electric double layer (EDL) formed on the GAC surface was considered to store salt ions during electrosorption, and facilitate the ion transport in the flow chamber because of the higher ion conductivity in the EDLs than in the bulk solution, thereby enhancing the MCDI's desalination rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Blood volume and red cell life span (M113), part C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Prechamber, in-chamber, and postchamber blood samples taken from Skylab simulation crewmembers did not indicate significant shortening of the red cell life span during the mission. This does not suggest that the space simulation environment could not be associated with red cell enzyme changes. It does show that any changes in enzymes were not sufficiently great to significantly shorten red cell survival. There was no evidence of bone marrow erythropoetic suppression nor was there any evidence of increased red cell destruction.

  4. Blood volume and red cell life span (M113), part C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Prechamber, in-chamber, and postchamber blood samples taken from Skylab simulation crewmembers did not indicate significant shortening of the red cell life span during the mission. This does not suggest that the space simulation environment could not be associated with red cell enzyme changes. It does show that any changes in enzymes were not sufficiently great to significantly shorten red cell survival. There was no evidence of bone marrow erythropoetic suppression nor was there any evidence of increased red cell destruction.

  5. Quantitative measurement of red blood cell central pallor and hypochromasia.

    PubMed

    Bacus, J W

    1980-06-01

    A quantitataive definition and techniques of measurement for central pallor of red blood cells are proposed. These are based on high-resolution measurements of absorbance across the center of the cell. Thus, the measurements reflect both variations in cell thickness and hemoglobin concentration. Although contributions of thickness and concentration may differ in individual cells, to a first approximation, a specific cell may be considered as having a similar concentration of hemoglobin throughout, and thus the major contribution to the central pallor is that due to the difference in thickness between the edges of the cell and the center. The definition proposed expresses central pallor as the percentage volume of indentation, comparing the red cell to a disc of uniform absorbance equal to the maximum found at the cell edges. Population distributions of central pallor then provide a basis for quantitation of hypochromasia. The mean and standard deviation of such distributions are proposed as quantitative descriptors. Sample distributions from 27 normal persons, 8 patients with spherocytic anemia and 26 patients with iron deficiency anemia were studied.

  6. Expression of blood group antigens on red cell microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Oreskovic, R T; Dumaswala, U J; Greenwalt, T J

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether epitopes of the A, B, D, Fya, M, N, S, s, and K blood group antigens are present on microvesicle membranes shed by red cells during storage. Vesicles were isolated from outdated units of blood having and lacking the specified antigens. Diluted antisera were absorbed with fixed quantities of vesicles from red cells with the test antigen and red cells lacking that antigen (controls). The adsorbed and unadsorbed antisera were titrated and scored by using panel cells from persons known to be heterozygous for all the non-AB antigens. The mean titration scores following adsorption with the vesicles from A, B, D, M+N-, M-N+, S+s-, S-s+, and Fy(a+b-) units were appreciably lower than the control scores (0, 0, 3, 2, 2, 0, 4, and 4 vs. 19, 23, 34, 13, 12, 16, 18, and 29, respectively), which indicated the presence of these epitopes on the membrane of shed vesicles. The results following adsorption with K:1,2 vesicles were equivocal.

  7. Nanomechanical characterization of red blood cells using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Liu, K K

    2008-04-01

    Deformation behaviours of red blood cells (RBCs) have been studied by applying stretching forces via optical tweezers. Combined with finite-element analyses (FEA), the RBCs' mechanical properties are determined quantitatively based on a best fitting between the experimental deformed geometries and the simulated counterparts. Experimentally, a silica beads attached erythrocyte is optical-mechanically stretched to different lengths. On the theoretical front, a large deformation model with Mooney-Rivlin constitutive equations has been simulated by using FEA to predict the cell deformation geometries. The numerically simulated transverse and longitudinal strains which are in a good agreement with the experimental measurements facilitate the determination of elastic constants of the cells.

  8. Multiscale Modeling of Red Blood Cells Squeezing through Submicron Slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Lu, Huijie

    2016-11-01

    A multiscale model is applied to study the dynamics of healthy red blood cells (RBCs), RBCs in hereditary spherocytosis, and sickle cell disease squeezing through submicron slits. This study is motivated by the mechanical filtration of RBCs by inter-endothelial slits in the spleen. First, the model is validated by comparing the simulation results with experiments. Secondly, the deformation of the cytoskeleton in healthy RBCs is investigated. Thirdly, the mechanisms of damage in hereditary spherocytosis are investigated. Finally, the effects of cytoplasm and membrane viscosities, especially in sickle cell disease, are examined. The simulations results provided guidance for future experiments to explore the dynamics of RBCs under extreme deformation.

  9. Photoacoustic tomography of unlabelled red blood cell at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samant, Pratik; Chen, Jian; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2016-09-01

    In this letter, we present the principle behind nanoscale photoacoustic tomography (nPAT), in addition to simulation results demonstrating the thermal safety and the diagnostic potential of such a modality. Nanoscale photoacoustic tomography is a novel biomedical imaging modality that can allow for the 3D imaging of cells at nanometer resolutions. This modality also allows for the imaging of single red blood cells (RBCs) such that the hemoglobin concentration quantities can be visualized within the cell. As a result, we believe that nPAT can allow for diagnostic information at unprecedented resolutions and enable the visualization of previously unseen phenomenon in RBCs.

  10. Is pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) a clonal disorder?

    PubMed

    Sivakumaran, M; Bhavnani, M; Stewart, A; Roberts, B E; Geary, G C

    1993-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is an uncommon disorder, many cases lacking a well defined aetiology. This report describes three cases of PRCA (two idiopathic and one associated with B-CLL) who were investigated to assess the possibility of their PRCA being associated with a clonal proliferation of T-lymphocytes. The results show that one patient had evidence of T-cell receptor (TCR) gamma chain rearrangement, and the other had a TCR delta chain rearrangement. These two cases raise the possibility of PRCA being associated with a clonal proliferation of T-cells and further studies are warranted.

  11. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.

    1995-01-01

    Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient.

  12. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.

    1995-12-19

    A method is disclosed using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient. 5 figs.

  13. Photodynamic treatment of red blood cell concentrates for virus inactivation enhances red blood cell aggregation: protection with antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Ben-Hur, E; Barshtein, G; Chen, S; Yedgar, S

    1997-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment (PDT) using phthalocyanines and red light appears to be a promising procedure for decontamination of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates for transfusion. A possible complication of this treatment may be induced aggregation of RBC. The production of RBC aggregates was measured with a novel computerized cell flow properties analyzer (CFA). The PDT of RBC concentrates with sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AIPcS4) and the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 under virucidal conditions markedly enhanced RBC aggregation and higher shear stress was required to disperse these aggregates. The clusters of cells were huge and abnormally shaped, unlike the rouleaux formed by untreated RBC. This aggregation was prevented when a mixture of antioxidants was included during PDT. Addition of the antioxidants after PDT reduced aggregation only partially. It is concluded that inclusion of antioxidants during PDT of RBC concentrates prior to transfusion may reduce or eliminate the hemodynamic risk that the virucidal treatment may present to the recipient.

  14. A model for oxygen-dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single red blood cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongrong; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Hao F.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The oxygen-dependent absorption of hemoglobin provides the fundamental contrast for all label-free techniques measuring blood oxygenation. When hemoglobin is packaged into red blood cells (RBCs), the structure of the cells creates light scattering which also depends on the absorption based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship. Thus a proper characterization of the optical behaviors of blood has been a key to any accurate measurement of blood oxygenation, particularly at the capillary level where RBCs are dispersed individually in contrast to a densely packed whole blood. Here we provided a theoretical model under Born Approximation to characterize the oxygen dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single RBCs. Using this theoretical model, we conducted simulations on both oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs with different sizes for standard and possible deformed cell geometries in blood flow, all which suggested similar backscattering spectroscopic contrast and were confirmed by Mie Theory and experiments using visible Optical Coherence Tomography (visOCT). As long as the cell size satisfies Gaussian distribution with a coefficient variance (C.V.) large enough, there is clear absorption contrast between the backscattering spectra of oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs calculated by this model, so oxygen saturation can then be characterized. Thus, this theoretical model can be extended to extract absorption features of other scattering particles as long as they satisfy Born Approximation.

  15. Effect of visible laser light on ATP level of anaemic red blood cell.

    PubMed

    Suardi, Nursakinah; Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Mustafa, Mohd Zulkifli; Ali, Zalila

    2016-09-01

    In this work we present influence of visible laser light on ATP level and viability of anaemic red blood cell (RBC). The visible laser lights used in this work are 460nm and 532nm. The responses of ATP level in anaemic and normal RBC before and after laser irradiation at different exposure time (30, 40, 50 and 60s) were observed. Three aliquots were prepared from the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) blood sample. One served as a control (untreated) and another two were irradiated with 460nm and 560nm lasers. Packed RBC was prepared to study ATP level in the RBC using CellTiter-GloLuminescent cell Viability Assay kit. The assay generates a glow type signal produced by luciferase reaction, which is proportional to the amount of ATP present in RBCs. Paired t-test were done to analyse ATP level before and after laser irradiation. The results revealed laser irradiation improve level of ATP in anaemic RBC. Effect of laser light on anaemic RBCs were significant over different exposure time for both 460nm (p=0.000) and 532nm (p=0.003). The result of ATP level is further used as marker for RBC viability. The influence of ATP level and viability were studied. Optical densities obtained from the data were used to determine cell viability of the samples. Results showed that laser irradiation increased viability of anaemic RBC compared to normal RBC.

  16. Design Of A Hybrid Jet Impingement / Microchannel Cooling Device For Densely Packed PV Cells Under High Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrau, Jérôme; Rosell, Joan; Ibañez, Manel

    2010-10-01

    A hybrid jet impingement / microchannel cooling scheme was designed and applied to densely packed PV cells under high concentration. An experimental study allows validating the principles of the design and confirming its applicability to the cited system. In order to study the characteristics of the device in a wide range of conditions, a numerical model was developed and experimentally validated. The results allow evaluating the contributions of the cooling device to the performances of densely packed PV cells under high concentration. The main advantages of the system are related to its compactness, its good capacity of heat extraction associated to relatively low pressure losses and its capability to improve the temperature uniformity of the PV receiver with respect to other cooling schemes. These features improve the net electric output of the whole system and its reliability.

  17. THE BIREFRINGENCE OF THE HUMAN RED CELL GHOSTS

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Eric; Barreto, Delia

    1956-01-01

    The type of birefringence described by Mitchison, which extends some 0.5 µ in from the surface of the human red cell ghost in glycerol and which shows a maximum retardation of about 7 A, is only found in ghosts which are sufficiently well hemoglobinised to be seen with the ordinary microscope. Ghosts from which all hemoglobin has been lost are not visible with the ordinary microscope and are not birefringent, although they are clearly visible with phase contrast. About 90 per cent of the ghosts in glycerol preparations are of the latter type, the exact percentage being a function of time. Mitchison's measurements of birefringence, although reproducible, accordingly apply only to ghosts in which some hemoglobin still remains complexed with the lipoprotein layers of the red cell ultrastructure, and do not enable one to draw conclusions as to the thickness and orientation of the lipoprotein surface layers. PMID:13286451

  18. Patterns of Nonelectrolyte Permeability in Human Red Blood Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Naccache, P.; Sha'afi, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    The permeability of human red cell membrane to 90 different molecules has been measured. These solutes cover a wide spectrum of nonelectrolytes with varying chemical structure, chain length, lipid solubility, chemical reactive group, ability to form hydrogen bonds, and other properties. In general, the present study suggests that the permeability of red cell membrane to a large solute is determined by lipid solubility, its molecular size, and its hydrogen-bonding ability. The permeability coefficient increases with increasing lipid solubility and decreasing ability to form hydrogen bonds, whereas it decreases with increasing molecular size. In the case of small solutes, the predominant diffusion factor is steric hindrance augmented by lipid solubility. It is also found that replacement of a hydroxyl group by a carbonyl group or an ether linkage tends to increase permeability. On the other hand, replacement of a hydroxyl group by an amide group tends to decrease the permeability coefficient. PMID:4804758

  19. Online biomedical resources for malaria-related red cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Piel, Frédéric B; Howes, Rosalind E; Nyangiri, Oscar A; Moyes, Catherine L; Williams, Thomas N; Weatherall, David J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-07-01

    Warnings about the expected increase of the global public health burden of malaria-related red cell disorders are accruing. Past and present epidemiological data are necessary to track spatial and temporal changes in the frequencies of these genetic disorders. A number of open access biomedical databases including data on malaria-related red cell disorders have been launched over the last two decades. Here, we review the content of these databases, most of which focus on genetic diversity, and we describe a new epidemiological resource developed by the Malaria Atlas Project. To tackle upcoming public health challenges, the integration of epidemiological and genetic data is important. As many countries are considering implementing national screening programs, strategies to make such data more accessible are also needed.

  20. Automation of cross-matching and red cell antibody screening.

    PubMed

    Wattar, B; Lambermont, M; Govaerts, A

    1982-01-01

    This automatic system combines the major cross-match with screening for allo- and autoantibodies. Moreover, the detected antibodies can be identified on a panel of frozen and thawed red blood cells (RBC). The system is made up of two connected samplers, three channels working, respectively, with bromelin PVP, LISP and saline PVP at 4 degrees C, three colorimeters or three red cell autocounters and their recorders. The optimal speed is 50 samples/h and one whole test requires 19 min. Our experience indicates that this automatic system is appreciably more sensitive and much more rapid and efficient than manual techniques. In spite of increased sensitivity, the ratio of rejected bags does not exceed 2.7%.

  1. Low frequency electrorotation of fixed red blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, R; Neu, B; Shilov, V M; Knippel, E; Budde, A; Latza, R; Donath, E; Kiesewetter, H; Bäumler, H

    1998-01-01

    Electrorotation of fixed red blood cells has been investigated in the frequency range between 16 Hz and 30 MHz. The rotation was studied as a function of electrolyte conductivity and surface charge density. Between 16 Hz and 1 kHz, fixed red blood cells undergo cofield rotation. The maximum of cofield rotation occurs between 30 and 70 Hz. The position of the maximum depends weakly on the bulk electrolyte conductivity and surface charge density. Below 3.5 mS/m, the cofield rotation peak is broadened and shifted to higher frequencies accompanied by a decrease of the rotation speed. Surface charge reduction leads to a decrease of the rotation speed in the low frequency range. These observations are consistent with the recently developed electroosmotic theory of low frequency electrorotation. PMID:9545070

  2. Online Biomedical Resources for Malaria-Related Red Cell Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Piel, Frédéric B; Howes, Rosalind E; Nyangiri, Oscar A; Moyes, Catherine L; Williams, Thomas N; Weatherall, David J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-01-01

    Warnings about the expected increase of the global public health burden of malaria-related red cell disorders are accruing. Past and present epidemiological data are necessary to track spatial and temporal changes in the frequencies of these genetic disorders. A number of open access biomedical databases including data on malaria-related red cell disorders have been launched over the last two decades. Here, we review the content of these databases, most of which focus on genetic diversity, and we describe a new epidemiological resource developed by the Malaria Atlas Project. To tackle upcoming public health challenges, the integration of epidemiological and genetic data is important. As many countries are considering implementing national screening programs, strategies to make such data more accessible are also needed. PMID:23568771

  3. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged.... 3 2 “Fairly tight” means that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in which...

  4. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements. (a) Apples tray packed or cell packed in cartons shall be arranged.... 3 2 “Fairly tight” means that apples are of the proper size for molds or cell compartments in which...

  5. Color contrast of red blood cells on solid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiziev, Adkham A.

    2013-02-01

    In present study we developed the new method of colour visualization of red blood cells without using any chemical staining. The method based on physical phenomena a white light interference on thin transparent films. It is shown that in the case of thin human blood smears colour interference contrast occurs on solid polished substrates. The best contrast shows substrates with maximal refractive index (Mo, W, Si). These materials have been selected as substrate instead of ordinary microscopic slide in reflected light microscopy. It is shown that reflection of incident white light from blood cell surface and boundary cell-substrate generate two coherent lights. The second one (object signal) after passing through red blood cell gathers additional phase and after interference interaction with reference signal (light reflected from outer cell surface) enables cell image in colour. Number of blood smears of healthy persons (control) and patients who were diagnosed with cancer are presented. It is concluded that the offered method may be used as an effective diagnostic tool to detect early stage blood cells lesion by its interference painting in white light. Offered method may be used in research laboratories, hospitals, diagnostic centres, emergency medicine and other as complementary diagnostic tool to present convenient optical and electron microscopy technique.

  6. Characterization of red blood cells (RBCs) using dual Brillouin/Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Bustamante-Lopez, Sandra C.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocytes, or red blood cells, transport oxygen to and carbon dioxide from the body's tissues and organs. Red blood cell mechanical properties are altered in a number of diseases such as sickle cell anaemia and malaria. Additionally, mechanically modified red blood cell ghosts are being considered as a long-term, biocompatible carrier for drug delivery and for blood analyte sensing. Brillouin spectroscopy enables viscoelastic characterization of samples at the microscale. In this report, Brillouin spectroscopy is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of red blood cells and red blood cell ghosts.

  7. Role of Complement in Red Cell Dysfunction in Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    3 Introduction Trauma-induced changes in the red blood cells ( RBC ) contribute to the reduction of blood flow to distant...The expression of C4d on the surface of RBCs was measured by flow cytometry and expressed as mean fluorescence intensity. (A) Representative data. (B...measured by flow cytometry. Fluorescence levels of RBCs were acquired for 30 seconds using FACScan flow cytometer to establish a baseline for intra- 8

  8. Pure Red Cell Aplasia Associated with Good Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Okui, Masayuki; Yamamichi, Takashi; Asakawa, Ayaka; Harada, Masahiko; Horio, Hirotoshi

    2017-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and hypogammaglobulinemia are paraneoplastic syndromes that are rarer than myasthenia gravis in patients with thymoma. Good syndrome coexisting with PRCA is an extremely rare pathology. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with thymoma and PRCA associated with Good syndrome who achieved complete PRCA remission after thymectomy and postoperative immunosuppressive therapy, and provide a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:28382272

  9. Red blood cells flows in rectilinear microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Anandan, P; Ortiz, D; Intaglietta, M; Cabrales, P J; Bucolo, M

    2015-01-01

    The red blood cells flow in a controlled environment as a microfluidic chip with a rectilinear geometry was investigated. The optical monitoring performed by an automatic Particle Image Velocimetry procedure has allowed a quantitative analysis on flow features. Various parameters such as velocity, shear rate, strain rate, vorticity, divergence were extracted. The comparisons of the results obtained from the different experiments was used for the overall understanding of the RBC movements in different conditions and the establishment of the analysis procedure.

  10. Research on red cell membrane permeability in arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gatina, R; Balta, N; Moisin, C; Burtea, C; Botea, S; Ioan, M; Teleianu, C

    1998-01-01

    Arterial hypertension, including the elucidation of hypertension pathogenic mechanisms involving elements in the composition of the blood, continues to represent a topical research area. Recent work, such as nuclear magnetic resonance studies looking into red cell permeability, illustrates the presence of modifications of red cell permeability to water (RCPW) related to the stage of arterial hypertension. The identification of a significant increase of RCPW compared to that present in the population with normal arterial pressure values can be useful both in early diagnosis and in warning about a possible predisposition for this condition. At the same time, the dynamic investigation of protonic relaxation time of both intra- and extra-erythrocytic water, the assessment of proton exchange time across the red cell and the calculation of permeability to water enable one not only to diagnose arterial hypertension but also to ascertain the evolution of the disease, its complications and the effectiveness of anti-hypertensive medication. Our studies have also proven the existence of a correlation between the values of systolic arterial pressure and red cell permeability to water. The curve describing the interdependence of the two values has the shape of a bell, in the case of males. The peak of the curve is reached for a systolic pressure of 160 mmHg and gets below the values of the control group in the case of systolic pressures above 200 mmHg. The RCPW test can also be considered a valuable indicator in evaluating the risk of stroke in hypertensive patients. In the chronic therapy of arterial hypertension with various types of anti-hypertensive drugs, one can note differences in the RCPW values related to the effectiveness of the respective medication, to the clinical form and stage of the disease, the sex of the patient as well as to the existence of cerebro-vascular complications.

  11. My passion and passages with red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph F

    2008-01-01

    This article mainly presents, in sequential panels of time, an overview of my professional involvements and laboratory experiences. I became smitten with red blood cells early on, and this passion remains with me to this day. I highlight certain studies, together with those who performed the work, recognizing that it was necessary to limit the details and the topics chosen for discussion. I am uncertain of the interest a personal account has for others, but at least it's here for the record.

  12. Progress in improving the pathogen safety of red cell concentrates.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J

    2000-01-01

    Current methods of preparing red cell concentrates do not include a process step to decontaminate pathogens potentially present in the transfusion product. Although substantial progress has been made in the reduction of the frequency of transmission of HIV, HCV, HBV and HTLV-I as a result of the implementation of diagnostic screening processes, the need for further reduction in transmission rate of these viruses remains. In addition, there are viruses which are known to be be present in blood but for which no screening test has been implemented to remove contaminated units from the blood supply. These viruses include but are not limited to TTV, HGV and Parvo B19. Finally, the lack of a pathogen inactivation process for red cells maintains the blood supply in a state of vulnerability to new viruses or virus variants as they enter the donor population. Recently, substantial progress has been made in the research and development of a class of chemical compounds designated as INACTINE. These compounds are being investigated for their potential to inactivate viruses in red cells without adversely affecting their physiologic function. One of the INACTINE compounds, designated as PEN110, is now in the clinical trial phase of development.

  13. Thymoma associated with hypogammaglobulinaemia and pure red cell aplasia

    PubMed Central

    Briones, Juan; Iruretagoyena, Mirentxu; Galindo, Héctor; Ortega, Claudia; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Valbuena, José; Acevedo, Francisco; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Sánchez, Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Thymomas are neoplasias that begin in the thymus and develop in the anterior mediastinum. They are commonly associated with a variety of systemic and autoimmune disorders, such as pure red cell aplasia, hypogammaglobulinaemia, pancytopaenia, collagen diseases, and, most commonly, myasthenia gravis. The presence of inter-current infections, especially diarrhoea and pneumonia, in the presence of lymphocyte B depletion and hypogammaglobulinaemia is known as Good’s syndrome and may affect up to 5% of patients with thymoma. While anaemia is present in 50%–86% of patients with Good’s syndrome, only 41.9% of cases present pure red cell aplasia. Concomitance of these two conditions has only been rarely studied. We report on the case of a 55-year-old man diagnosed with advanced thymoma, who, during the progression of his disease, developed signs and symptoms suggesting Good’s syndrome and pure red cell aplasia. We also performed a brief review of the literature concerning this association, its clinical characteristics, and treatment. PMID:24171048

  14. Study of Collagen Birefringence in Different Grades of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using Picrosirius Red and Polarized Light Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arun Gopinathan, Pillai; Kokila, Ganganna; Jyothi, Mahadesh; Ananjan, Chatterjee; Pradeep, Linganna; Humaira Nazir, Salroo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The present study was done to evaluate birefringence pattern of collagen fibres in different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma using Picrosirius red stain and polarization microscopy and to determine if there is a change in collagen fibres between different grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and Methods. Picrosirius red stained 5 μm thick sections of previously diagnosed different grades of squamous cell carcinoma and normal oral mucosa were studied under polarization microscopy for arrangement as well as birefringence of collagen fibres around tumour islands. Results. It was found that thin collagen fibres increased and thick collagen fibres decreased with dedifferentiation of OSCC (P < 0.0001). It was observed that there was change in polarization colours of thick fibres from yellowish orange to greenish yellow with dedifferentiation of OSCC indicating loosely packed fibres (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. There was a gradual change of birefringence of collagen from yellowish orange to greenish yellow from well to poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, indicating that there is a change from mature form of collagen to immature form as tumour progresses. Studying collagen fibres with Picrosirius red for stromal changes around tumour islands along with routine staining may help in predicting the prognosis of tumour. PMID:26587310

  15. Blood clinical biochemistry and packed cell volume of the Chinese three-striped box turtle, Cuora trifasciata (Reptilia: Geoemydidae).

    PubMed

    Grioni, Alessandro; Ho, Kevin K Y; Karraker, Nancy E; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2014-06-01

    Reference intervals for blood biochemical analytes and packed cell volume are useful to veterinarians and conservation programs for monitoring the health of threatened species. Populations of the critically endangered Chinese three-striped box turtle, Cuora trifasciata (Bell, 1825), are heavily depleted in the wild because of overharvesting; and many individuals are now maintained in captive breeding programs. Reference intervals of biochemical analytes and packed cell volume were established for individuals of this species held in a captive breeding program at Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden, Hong Kong. Blood samples were obtained from 86 healthy individuals from a captive population during annual health examinations between 2006 and 2010. Packed cell volume and 17 biochemical analytes were measured, and data were analyzed using both multivariate and univariate statistical analyses. Significant differences in eight analytes between males and females were identified. Ten analytes were found to increase or decrease significantly with the body weight of the turtles. The reported plasma reference intervals, based on 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles, may serve as benchmarks for clinical assessment and conservation of this critically endangered species.

  16. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  17. Training the next generation analyst using red cell analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Meghan N.; Graham, Jacob L.

    2016-05-01

    We have seen significant change in the study and practice of human reasoning in recent years from both a theoretical and methodological perspective. Ubiquitous communication coupled with advances in computing and a plethora of analytic support tools have created a push for instantaneous reporting and analysis. This notion is particularly prevalent in law enforcement, emergency services and the intelligence community (IC), where commanders (and their civilian leadership) expect not only a birds' eye view of operations as they occur, but a play-by-play analysis of operational effectiveness. This paper explores the use of Red Cell Analytics (RCA) as pedagogy to train the next-gen analyst. A group of Penn State students in the College of Information Sciences and Technology at the University Park campus of The Pennsylvania State University have been practicing Red Team Analysis since 2008. RCA draws heavily from the military application of the same concept, except student RCA problems are typically on non-military in nature. RCA students utilize a suite of analytic tools and methods to explore and develop red-cell tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs), and apply their tradecraft across a broad threat spectrum, from student-life issues to threats to national security. The strength of RCA is not always realized by the solution but by the exploration of the analytic pathway. This paper describes the concept and use of red cell analytics to teach and promote the use of structured analytic techniques, analytic writing and critical thinking in the area of security and risk and intelligence training.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy of glomerular and non glomerular red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Fassett, R G; Horgan, B; Gove, D; Mathew, T H

    1983-07-01

    Phase contrast microscopic examination of the urine has been recently shown to be of value in predicting whether hematuria is due to glomerulonephritis or lesions of the lower urinary tract. Glomerular red cells show variations in size and shape and have distorted surfaces. Non glomerular red cells are uniform in size and shape and have smooth surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on urine sediment containing either glomerular or non glomerular red cells to better define their surface characteristics. Glomerular red cells exhibited a variety of forms, most cells having lumpy projections from the surface, some showing fragmentation of the membrane and others showing gross distortion. In contrast non glomerular red cells show smooth surfaces and usually maintain the normal biconcave disc shape of peripheral red blood cells. Scanning electron microscopy can better define surface structural abnormalities of urinary glomerular and non glomerular red blood cells.

  19. Red blood cell clustering in Poiseuille microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Misbah, Chaouqi; Guido, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) flowing in microcapillaries tend to associate into clusters, i.e., small trains of cells separated from each other by a distance comparable to cell size. This process is usually attributed to slower RBCs acting to create a sequence of trailing cells. Here, based on the first systematic investigation of collective RBC flow behavior in microcapillaries in vitro by high-speed video microscopy and numerical simulations, we show that RBC size polydispersity within the physiological range does not affect cluster stability. Lower applied pressure drops and longer residence times favor larger RBC clusters. A limiting cluster length, depending on the number of cells in a cluster, is found by increasing the applied pressure drop. The insight on the mechanism of RBC clustering provided by this work can be applied to further our understanding of RBC aggregability, which is a key parameter implicated in clotting and thrombus formation.

  20. Shape anisotropy induces rotations in optically trapped red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambardekar, Kapil; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Yamada, Toshihoro; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-07-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is carried out to probe the rotational behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in a single beam optical trap. We induce shape changes in RBCs by altering the properties of the suspension medium in which live cells float. We find that certain shape anisotropies result in the rotation of optically trapped cells. Indeed, even normal (healthy) RBCs can be made to rotate using linearly polarized trapping light by altering the osmotic stress the cells are subjected to. Hyperosmotic stress is found to induce shape anisotropies. We also probe the effect of the medium's viscosity on cell rotation. The observed rotations are modeled using a Langevin-type equation of motion that takes into account frictional forces that are generated as RBCs rotate in the medium. We observe good correlation between our measured data and calculated results.

  1. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  2. Home improvements: malaria and the red blood cell.

    PubMed

    Foley, M; Tilley, L

    1995-11-01

    In real-estate agent's terms, the red blood cell is a renovator's dream. The mature human erythrocyte has no internal organelles, no protein synthesis machinery and no infrastructure for protein trafficking. The malaria parasite invades this empty shell and effectively converts the erythrocyte back into a fully functional eukaryotic cell. In this article, Michael Foley and Leann Tilley examine the Plasmodium falciparum proteins that interact with the membrane skeleton at different stages of the infection and speculate on the roles of these proteins in the remodelling process.

  3. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Korde, Neha; Zhang, Yong; Loeliger, Kelsey; Poon, Andrea; Simakova, Olga; Zingone, Adriana; Costello, Rene; Childs, Richard; Noel, Pierre; Silver, Samuel; Kwok, Mary; Mo, Clifton; Young, Neal; Landgren, Ola; Sloand, Elaine; Maric, Irina

    2016-06-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare disorder characterized by inhibition of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow and normochromic, normocytic anaemia with reticulocytopenia. Among 51 PRCA patients, we identified 12 (24%) patients having monoclonal gammopathy, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or smouldering multiple myeloma, with presence of monoclonal protein or abnormal serum free light chains and atypical bone marrow features of clonal plasmacytosis, hypercellularity and fibrosis. Thus far, three patients treated with anti-myeloma based therapeutics have responded with reticulocyte recovery and clinical transfusion independence, suggesting plasma cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of this specific monoclonal gammopathy-associated PRCA.

  4. N-acetylcysteine improves the quality of red blood cells stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Amen, Florencia; Machin, Andrea; Touriño, Cristina; Rodríguez, Ismael; Denicola, Ana; Thomson, Leonor

    2017-04-06

    Storage inflicts a series of changes on red blood cells (RBC) that compromise the cell survival and functionality; largely these alterations (storage lesions) are due to oxidative modifications. The possibility of improving the quality of packed RBC stored for transfusion including N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in the preservation solution was explored. Relatively high concentrations of NAC (20-25 mM) were necessary to prevent the progressive leakage of hemoglobin, while lower concentrations (≥2.5 mM) were enough to prevent the loss of reduced glutathione during the first 21 days of storage. Peroxiredoxin-2 was also affected during storage, with a progressive accumulation of disulfide-linked dimers and hetero-protein complexes in the cytosol and also in the membrane of stored RBC. Although the presence of NAC in the storage solution was unable to avoid the formation of thiol-mediated protein complexes, it partially restored the capacity of the cell to metabolize H2O2, indicating the potential use of NAC as an additive in the preservation solution to improve RBC performance after transfusion.

  5. Dealcoholated red wine induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in an osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, I; Russo, M; Bilotto, S; Spagnuolo, C; Scognamiglio, A; Palumbo, R; Nappo, A; Iacomino, G; Moio, L; Russo, G L

    2013-10-01

    Until recently, the supposed preventive effects of red wine against cardiovascular diseases, the so-called "French Paradox", has been associated to its antioxidant properties. The interest in the anticancer capacity of polyphenols present in red wine strongly increased consequently to the enormous number of studies on resveratrol. In this study, using lyophilized red wine, we present evidence that its anticancer effect in a cellular model is mediated by apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Using a human osteosarcoma cell line, U2Os, we found that the lyophilized red wine was cytotoxic in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum effect in the range of 100-200 μg/ml equivalents of gallic acid. A mixed phenotype of types I/II cell death was evidenced by means of specific assays following treatment of U2Os with lyophilized red wine, e.g., autophagy and apoptosis. We found that cell death induced by lyophilized red wine proceeded through a mechanism independent from its anti-oxidant activity and involving the inhibition of PI3K/Akt kinase signaling. Considering the relative low concentration of each single bioactive compound in lyophilized red wine, our study suggests the activation of synergistic mechanism able to inhibit growth in malignant cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis. PMID:27319318

  7. Effects of ethanol on red blood cell rheological behavior.

    PubMed

    Rabai, M; Detterich, J A; Wenby, R B; Toth, K; Meiselman, H J

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of red wine is associated with a decreased risk of several cardiovascular diseases (e.g., coronary artery disease, stroke), but unfortunately literature reports regarding ethanol's effects on hemorheological parameters are not concordant. In the present study, red blood cell (RBC) deformability was tested via laser ektacytometry (LORCA, 0.3-30 Pa) using two approaches: 1) addition of ethanol to whole blood at 0.25%-2% followed by incubation and testing in ethanol-free LORCA medium; 2) addition of ethanol to the LORCA medium at 0.25%-6% then testing untreated native RBC in these media. The effects of ethanol on deformability for oxidatively stressed RBC were investigated as were changes of RBC aggregation (Myrenne Aggregometer) for cells in autologous plasma or 3% 70 kDa dextran. Significant dose-related increases of RBC deformability were observed at 0.25% (p < 0.05) and higher concentrations only if ethanol was in the LORCA medium; no changes occurred for cells previously incubated with ethanol then tested in ethanol-free medium. The impaired deformability of cells pre-exposed to oxidative stress was improved only if ethanol was in the LORCA medium. RBC aggregation decreased with concentration at 0.25% and higher for cells in both autologous plasma and dextran 70. Our results indicate that ethanol reversibly improves erythrocyte deformability and irreversibly decreases erythrocyte aggregation; the relevance of these results to the health benefits of moderate wine consumption require further investigation.

  8. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-06-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis.

  9. Cytoplasmic calcium buffers in intact human red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tiffert, T; Lew, V L

    1997-01-01

    1. Precise knowledge of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering behaviour in intact human red cells is essential for the characterization of their [Ca2+]i-dependent functions. This was investigated by using a refined method and experimental protocols which allowed continuity in the estimates of [Ca2+]i, from nanomolar to millimolar concentrations, in the presence and absence of external Ca2+ chelators. 2. The study was carried out in human red cells whose plasma membrane Ca2+ pump was inhibited either by depleting the cells of ATP or by adding vanadate to the cell suspension. Cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering was analysed from plots of total cell calcium content vs. ionized cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([CaT]i vs. [Ca2+]i) obtained from measurements of the equilibrium distribution of 45Ca2+ at different external Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]o), in conditions known to clamp cell volume and pH. The equilibrium distribution of 45Ca2+ was induced by the divalent cation ionophore A23187. 3. The results showed the following. (i) The known red cell Ca2+ buffer represented by alpha, with a large capacity and low Ca2+ affinity, was the main cytoplasmic Ca2+ binding agent. (ii) The value of alpha was remarkably constant; the means for each of four donors ranged from 0.33 to 0.35, with a combined value of all independent measurements of 0.34 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 16). This contrasts with the variability previously reported. (iii) There was an additional Ca2+ buffering complex with a low capacity (approximately 80 micromol (340 g Hb)(-1)) and intermediate Ca2+ affinity (apparent dissociation constant, K(D,app) approximately 4-50 microM) whose possible identity is discussed. (iv) The cell content of putative Ca2+ buffers with submicromolar Ca2+ dissociation constants was below the detection limit of the methods used here (less than 2 micromol (340 g Hb)(-1)). 4. Vanadate (1 mM) inhibited the Vmax of the Ca2+ pump in inosine-fed cells by 99.7%. The cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering behaviour

  10. Metabolic pathways that correlate with post-transfusion circulation of stored murine red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    de Wolski, Karen; Fu, Xiaoyoun; Dumont, Larry J.; Roback, John D.; Waterman, Hayley; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Howie, Heather L.; Zimring, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells is a very common inpatient procedure, with more than 1 in 70 people in the USA receiving a red blood cell transfusion annually. However, stored red blood cells are a non-uniform product, based upon donor-to-donor variation in red blood cell storage biology. While thousands of biological parameters change in red blood cells over storage, it has remained unclear which changes correlate with function of the red blood cells, as opposed to being co-incidental changes. In the current report, a murine model of red blood cell storage/transfusion is applied across 13 genetically distinct mouse strains and combined with high resolution metabolomics to identify metabolic changes that correlated with red blood cell circulation post storage. Oxidation in general, and peroxidation of lipids in particular, emerged as changes that correlated with extreme statistical significance, including generation of dicarboxylic acids and monohydroxy fatty acids. In addition, differences in anti-oxidant pathways known to regulate oxidative stress on lipid membranes were identified. Finally, metabolites were identified that differed at the time the blood was harvested, and predict how the red blood cells perform after storage, allowing the potential to screen donors at time of collection. Together, these findings map out a new landscape in understanding metabolic changes during red blood cell storage as they relate to red blood cell circulation. PMID:26921359

  11. Metabolic pathways that correlate with post-transfusion circulation of stored murine red blood cells.

    PubMed

    de Wolski, Karen; Fu, Xiaoyoun; Dumont, Larry J; Roback, John D; Waterman, Hayley; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Howie, Heather L; Zimring, James C

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells is a very common inpatient procedure, with more than 1 in 70 people in the USA receiving a red blood cell transfusion annually. However, stored red blood cells are a non-uniform product, based upon donor-to-donor variation in red blood cell storage biology. While thousands of biological parameters change in red blood cells over storage, it has remained unclear which changes correlate with function of the red blood cells, as opposed to being co-incidental changes. In the current report, a murine model of red blood cell storage/transfusion is applied across 13 genetically distinct mouse strains and combined with high resolution metabolomics to identify metabolic changes that correlated with red blood cell circulation post storage. Oxidation in general, and peroxidation of lipids in particular, emerged as changes that correlated with extreme statistical significance, including generation of dicarboxylic acids and monohydroxy fatty acids. In addition, differences in anti-oxidant pathways known to regulate oxidative stress on lipid membranes were identified. Finally, metabolites were identified that differed at the time the blood was harvested, and predict how the red blood cells perform after storage, allowing the potential to screen donors at time of collection. Together, these findings map out a new landscape in understanding metabolic changes during red blood cell storage as they relate to red blood cell circulation.

  12. Trapping red blood cells in living animals using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Min-Cheng; Wei, Xun-Bin; Zhou, Jin-Hua; Wang, Zi-Qiang; Li, Yin-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The recent development of non-invasive imaging techniques has enabled the visualization of molecular events underlying cellular processes in live cells. Although microscopic objects can be readily manipulated at the cellular level, additional physiological insight is likely to be gained by manipulation of cells in vivo, which has not been achieved so far. Here we use infrared optical tweezers to trap and manipulate red blood cells within subdermal capillaries in living mice. We realize a non-contact micro-operation that results in the clearing of a blocked microvessel. Furthermore, we estimate the optical trap stiffness in the capillary. Our work expands the application of optical tweezers to the study of live cell dynamics in animals.

  13. Red blood cell transfusion for people undergoing hip fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, Susan J; Millette, Sarah L; Shokoohi, Ali; Pulford, E C; Doree, Carolyn; Murphy, Michael F; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-04-21

    The incidence of hip fracture is increasing and it is more common with increasing age. Surgery is used for almost all hip fractures. Blood loss occurs as a consequence of both the fracture and the surgery and thus red blood cell transfusion is frequently used. However, red blood cell transfusion is not without risks. Therefore, it is important to identify the evidence for the effective and safe use of red blood cell transfusion in people with hip fracture. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of red blood cell transfusion in people undergoing surgery for hip fracture. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (31 October 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE (January 1946 to 20 November 2014), EMBASE (January 1974 to 20 November 2014), CINAHL (January 1982 to 20 November 2014), British Nursing Index Database (January 1992 to 20 November 2014), the Systematic Review Initiative's Transfusion Evidence Library, PubMed for e-publications, various other databases and ongoing trial registers. Randomised controlled trials comparing red blood cell transfusion versus no transfusion or an alternative to transfusion, different transfusion protocols or different transfusion thresholds in people undergoing surgery for hip fracture. Three review authors independently assessed each study's risk of bias and extracted data using a study-specific form. We pooled data where there was homogeneity in the trial comparisons and the timing of outcome measurement. We used GRADE criteria to assess the quality (low, moderate or high) of the evidence for each outcome. We included six trials (2722 participants): all compared two thresholds for red blood cell transfusion: a 'liberal' strategy to maintain a haemoglobin concentration of usually 10 g/dL versus a more 'restrictive' strategy based on symptoms of anaemia or a lower haemoglobin concentration, usually 8 g/dL. The exact

  14. Challenges for red blood cell biomarker discovery through proteomics.

    PubMed

    Barasa, Benjamin; Slijper, Monique

    2014-05-01

    Red blood cells are rather unique body cells, since they have lost all organelles when mature, which results in lack of potential to replace proteins that have lost their function. They maintain only a few pathways for obtaining energy and reducing power for the key functions they need to fulfill. This makes RBCs highly sensitive to any aberration. If so, these RBCs are quickly removed from circulation, but if the RBC levels reduce extremely fast, this results in hemolytic anemia. Several causes of HA exist, and proteome analysis is the most straightforward way to obtain deeper insight into RBC functioning under the stress of disease. This should result in discovery of biomarkers, typical for each source of anemia. In this review, several challenges to generate in-depth RBC proteomes are described, like to obtain pure RBCs, to overcome the wide dynamic range in protein expression, and to establish which of the identified/quantified proteins are active in RBCs. The final challenge is to acquire and validate suited biomarkers unique for the changes that occur for each of the clinical questions; in red blood cell aging (also important for transfusion medicine), for thalassemias or sickle cell disease. Biomarkers for other hemolytic anemias that are caused by dysfunction of RBC membrane proteins (the RBC membrane defects) or RBC cytosolic proteins (the enzymopathies) are sometimes even harder to discover, in particular for the patients with RBC rare diseases with unknown cause. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  15. Viscoelastic properties of the human red blood cell membrane. II. Area and volume of individual red cells entering a micropipette.

    PubMed Central

    Jay, A W; Canham, P B

    1977-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated that human red cells can be drawn into cylindrical glass micropipettes of internal diameter approximately 2.0 mum without lysing. For pipettes of less than approximately 2.9 mum inside diameter, the red cell must become less spherical, that is, reduce its volume-to-area ratio. In this work measurements were made from 16-mm film records that allowed the determination of the cellular area and volume of individual erythrocytes as they were drawn into a 2.0-mum pipette with negative pressures. The results showed that the total surface area of the membrane remains constant and that the cell endures the passage into the pipette by losing volume. The volume loss was interpreted to be due to cell water and solute loss when the membrane is under stress. The loss of cell volume, rather than the stretching of the membrane, adds confirmation that although it is very deformable, the membrane is very resistant to two-dimensional strain. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:836934

  16. Deformation of red blood cells using acoustic radiation forces

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Puja; Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation forces have been used to manipulate cells and bacteria in a number of recent microfluidic applications. The net force on a cell has been subject to careful investigation over a number of decades. We demonstrate that the radiation forces also act to deform cells. An ultrasonic standing wave field is created in a 0.1 mm glass capillary at a frequency of 7.9 MHz. Using osmotically swollen red-blood cells, we show observable deformations up to an aspect ratio of 1.35, comparable to deformations created by optical tweezing. In contrast to optical technologies, ultrasonic devices are potentially capable of deforming thousands of cells simultaneously. We create a finite element model that includes both the acoustic environment of the cell, and a model of the cell membrane subject to forces resulting from the non-linear aspects of the acoustic field. The model is found to give reasonable agreement with the experimental results, and shows that the deformation is the result of variation in an acoustic force that is directed outwards at all points on the cell membrane. We foresee applications in diagnostic devices, and in the possibility of mechanically stimulating cells to promote differentiation and physiological effects. PMID:25379070

  17. Measuring osmosis and hemolysis of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Goodhead, Lauren K; MacMillan, Frances M

    2017-06-01

    Since the discovery of the composition and structure of the mammalian cell membrane, biologists have had a clearer understanding of how substances enter and exit the cell's interior. The selectively permeable nature of the cell membrane allows the movement of some solutes and prevents the movement of others. This has important consequences for cell volume and the integrity of the cell and, as a result, is of utmost clinical importance, for example in the administration of isotonic intravenous infusions. The concepts of osmolarity and tonicity are often confused by students as impermeant isosmotic solutes such as NaCl are also isotonic; however, isosmotic solutes such as urea are actually hypotonic due to the permeant nature of the membrane. By placing red blood cells in solutions of differing osmolarities and tonicities, this experiment demonstrates the effects of osmosis and the resultant changes in cell volume. Using hemoglobin standard solutions, where known concentrations of hemoglobin are produced, the proportion of hemolysis and the effect of this on resultant hematocrit can be estimated. No change in cell volume occurs in isotonic NaCl, and, by placing blood cells in hypotonic NaCl, incomplete hemolysis occurs. By changing the bathing solution to either distilled water or isosmotic urea, complete hemolysis occurs due to their hypotonic effects. With the use of animal blood in this practical, students gain useful experience in handling tissue fluids and calculating dilutions and can appreciate the science behind clinical scenarios. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Battery Pack Thermal Design

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-14

    This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep the fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.

  19. Metabolic profiling of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during proliferation and differentiation into red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daud, Hasbullah; Browne, Susan; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Murphy, William; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-01-25

    An understanding of the metabolic profile of cell proliferation and differentiation should support the optimization of culture conditions for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into red blood cells. We have evaluated the key metabolic parameters during each phase of HSPC culture for red blood cell production in serum-supplemented (SS) and serum-free (SF) conditions. A simultaneous decrease in growth rate, total protein content, cell size, and the percentage of cells in the S/G2 phase of cell cycle, as well as an increase in the percentage of cells with a CD71(-)/GpA(+) surface marker profile, indicates HSPC differentiation into red blood cells. Compared with proliferating HSPCs, differentiating HSPCs showed significantly lower glucose and glutamine consumption rates, lactate and ammonia production rates, and amino acid consumption and production rates in both SS and SF conditions. Furthermore, extracellular acidification was associated with late proliferation phase, suggesting a reduced cellular metabolic rate during the transition from proliferation to differentiation. Under both SS and SF conditions, cells demonstrated a high metabolic rate with a mixed metabolism of both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in early and late proliferation, an increased dependence on OXPHOS activity during differentiation, and a shift to glycolytic metabolism only during maturation phase. These changes indicate that cell metabolism may have an important impact on the ability of HSPCs to proliferate and differentiate into red blood cells.

  20. Why and how does collective red blood cells motion occur in the blood microcirculation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Selmi, Hassib; Asmi, Lassaad El; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2012-10-01

    The behaviour of red blood cells (RBCs), modelled as vesicles, in Poiseuille flow, mimicking the microvasculature, is studied with numerical simulations in two dimensions. RBCs moving in the centre of the Poiseuille flow (as in blood capillaries) are shown to attract each other and form clusters only due to hydrodynamic interactions, provided that their distance at a given time is below a certain critical value. This distance depends on physical parameters, such as the flow strength. Our simulations reveal that clusters are unstable above a threshold value in the number of forming RBCs, beyond which one or few cells escape the pack by a self-regulating mechanism that select the marginally stable size. This size selection depends on the flow strength as well as on the RBC swelling ratio. The results are interpreted via the analysis of the perturbation of the flow field induced by the vesicles and the interplay with bending and tension forces. This sheds a novel light on the process of collective motion of RBCs observed in vivo.

  1. Highly efficient polymer solar cells by step-by-step optimizing donor molecular packing and acceptor redistribution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qianqian; Zhang, Fujun; An, Qiaoshi; Zhang, Miao; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jian

    2016-12-21

    The dynamic drying process of the active layer should play a vitally important role in determining the performance of polymer solar cells (PSCs). Donor molecular packing and acceptor redistribution can be optimized by two successive post-treatments on the active layer. The blend films were freshly prepared by spin-coating method and then immediately transferred to a covered glass Petri dish to allow self-assembly of the donor molecules. The films were then treated with methanol or PFN-methanol solution to adjust the acceptor redistribution. In this study, power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of PSCs with PffBT4T-2OD:PC71BM as the active layer were improved from 6.74% to 8.75% by employing 80 min for self-assembly and 20 s of methanol soaking. The PCE was improved even further to 9.72% by inserting a PFN interfacial layer. The performance improvement was mainly attributed to the optimized PffBT4T-2OD molecular packing during the self-assembly process, ideal vertical phase separation driven by methanol soaking and efficient charge collection by insertion of a PFN interfacial layer. The molecular packing and vertical phase separation were characterized by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The experimental results solidly supported the effectiveness of the step-by-step optimization strategy.

  2. Red blood cell tracking using optical flow methods.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongmin; van de Ven, Anne L; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2014-05-01

    The investigation of microcirculation is an important task in biomedical and physiological research because the microcirculation information, such as flow velocity and vessel density, is critical to monitor human conditions and develop effective therapies of some diseases. As one of the tasks of the microcirculation study, red blood cell (RBC) tracking presents an effective approach to estimate some parameters in microcirculation. The common method for RBC tracking is based on spatiotemporal image analysis, which requires the image to have high qualification and cells should have fixed velocity. Besides, for in vivo cell tracking, cells may disappear in some frames, image series may have spatial and temporal distortions, and vessel distribution can be complex, which increase the difficulties of RBC tracking. In this paper, we propose an optical flow method to track RBCs. It attempts to describe the local motion for each visible point in the frames using a local displacement vector field. We utilize it to calculate the displacement of a cell in two adjacent frames. Additionally, another optical flow-based method, scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) flow, is also presented. The experimental results show that optical flow is quite robust to the case where the velocity of cell is unstable, while SIFT flow works well when there is a large displacement of the cell between two adjacent frames. Our proposed methods outperform other methods when doing in vivo cell tracking, which can be used to estimate the blood flow directly and help to evaluate other parameters in microcirculation.

  3. Deformation of red blood cells using acoustic radiation forces.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Puja; Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Acoustic radiation forces have been used to manipulate cells and bacteria in a number of recent microfluidic applications. The net force on a cell has been subject to careful investigation over a number of decades. We demonstrate that the radiation forces also act to deformcells. An ultrasonic standing wave field is created in a 0.1 mm glass capillary at a frequency of 7.9 MHz. Using osmotically swollen red-blood cells, we show observable deformations up to an aspect ratio of 1.35, comparable to deformations created by optical tweezing. In contrast to optical technologies, ultrasonic devices are potentially capable of deforming thousands of cells simultaneously. We create a finite element model that includes both the acoustic environment of the cell, and a model of the cell membrane subject to forces resulting from the non-linear aspects of the acoustic field. The model is found to give reasonable agreement with the experimental results, and shows that the deformation is the result of variation in an acoustic force that is directed outwards at all points on the cell membrane. We foresee applications in diagnostic devices, and in the possibility of mechanically stimulating cells to promote differentiation and physiological effects.

  4. Glutaraldehyde fixation of sodium transport in dog red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.C.

    1984-11-01

    The large increase in passive Na flux that occurs when dog red blood cells are caused to shrink is amiloride sensitive and inhibited when Cl is replaced by nitrate or thiocyanate. Activation and deactivation of this transport pathway by manipulation of cell volume is reversible. Brief treatment of the cells with 0.01-0.03% glutaraldehyde can cause the shrinkage-activated transporter to become irreversibly activated or inactivated, depending on the volume of the cells at the time of glutaraldehyde exposure. Thus, if glutaraldehyde is applied when the cells are shrunken, the amiloride-sensitive Na transporter is activated and remains so regardless of subsequent alterations in cell volume. If the fixative is applied to swollen cells, no amount of subsequent shrinkage will turn on the Na pathway. In its fixed state, the activated transporter is fully amiloride sensitive, but it is no longer inhibited when Cl is replaced by thiocyanate. The action of glutaraldehyde thus allows one to dissect the response to cell shrinkage into two phases. Activation of the pathway is affected by anions and is not prevented by amiloride. Once activated and fixed, the anion requirement disappears. Amiloride inhibits movement of Na through the activated transporter. These experiments demonstrate how a chemical cross-linking agent may be used to study the functional properties of a regulable transport pathway.

  5. Depletion induced clustering of red blood cells in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Brust, Mathias; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou

    2012-11-01

    The flow properties of blood are determined by the physical properties of its main constituents, the red blood cells (RBC's). At low shear rates RBC's form aggregates, so called rouleaux. Higher shear rates can break them up and the viscosity of blood shows a shear thinning behavior. The physical origin of the rouleaux formation is not yet fully resolved and there are two competing models available. One predicts that the adhesion is induced by bridging of the plasma (macromolecular) proteins in-between two RBC's. The other is based on the depletion effect and thus predicts the absence of macromolecules in-between the cells of a rouleaux. Recent single cell force measurements by use of an AFM support strongly the depletion model. By varying the concentration of Dextran at different molecular weights we can control the adhesions strength. Measurements at low hematocrit in a microfluidic channel show that the number of size of clusters is determined by the depletion induced adhesion strength.

  6. Automatic analysis of microscopic images of red blood cell aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichini, Pablo A.; Larese, Mónica G.; Riquelme, Bibiana D.

    2015-06-01

    Red blood cell aggregation is one of the most important factors in blood viscosity at stasis or at very low rates of flow. The basic structure of aggregates is a linear array of cell commonly termed as rouleaux. Enhanced or abnormal aggregation is seen in clinical conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, producing alterations in the microcirculation, some of which can be analyzed through the characterization of aggregated cells. Frequently, image processing and analysis for the characterization of RBC aggregation were done manually or semi-automatically using interactive tools. We propose a system that processes images of RBC aggregation and automatically obtains the characterization and quantification of the different types of RBC aggregates. Present technique could be interesting to perform the adaptation as a routine used in hemorheological and Clinical Biochemistry Laboratories because this automatic method is rapid, efficient and economical, and at the same time independent of the user performing the analysis (repeatability of the analysis).

  7. Measurement of red blood cell mechanics during morphological changes.

    PubMed

    Park, YongKeun; Best, Catherine A; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Kuriabova, Tatiana; Henle, Mark L; Levine, Alex J; Popescu, Gabriel

    2010-04-13

    The human red blood cell (RBC) membrane, a fluid lipid bilayer tethered to an elastic 2D spectrin network, provides the principal control of the cell's morphology and mechanics. These properties, in turn, influence the ability of RBCs to transport oxygen in circulation. Current mechanical measurements of RBCs rely on external loads. Here we apply a noncontact optical interferometric technique to quantify the thermal fluctuations of RBC membranes with 3 nm accuracy over a broad range of spatial and temporal frequencies. Combining this technique with a new mathematical model describing RBC membrane undulations, we measure the mechanical changes of RBCs as they undergo a transition from the normal discoid shape to the abnormal echinocyte and spherical shapes. These measurements indicate that, coincident with this morphological transition, there is a significant increase in the membrane's shear, area, and bending moduli. This mechanical transition can alter cell circulation and impede oxygen delivery.

  8. Phosphatidylserine exposure on stored red blood cells as a parameter for donor-dependent variation in product quality.

    PubMed

    Dinkla, Sip; Peppelman, Malou; Van Der Raadt, Jori; Atsma, Femke; Novotný, Vera M J; Van Kraaij, Marian G J; Joosten, Irma; Bosman, Giel J C G M

    2014-04-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine on the outside of red blood cells contributes to recognition and removal of old and damaged cells. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells varies between donors, and increases in red blood cell concentrates during storage. The susceptibility of red blood cells to stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage. Phosphatidylserine exposure may, therefore, constitute a link between donor variation and the quality of red blood cell concentrates. In order to examine the relationship between storage parameters and donor characteristics, the percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells was measured in red blood cell concentrates during storage and in fresh red blood cells from blood bank donors. The percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells was compared with red blood cell susceptibility to osmotic stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure in vitro, with the regular red blood cell concentrate quality parameters, and with the donor characteristics age, body mass index, haemoglobin level, gender and blood group. Phosphatidylserine exposure varies between donors, both on red blood cells freshly isolated from the blood, and on red blood cells in red blood cell concentrates. Phosphatidylserine exposure increases with storage time, and is correlated with stress-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. Increased phosphatidylserine exposure during storage was found to be associated with haemolysis and vesicle concentration in red blood cell concentrates. The percentage of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells showed a positive correlation with the plasma haemoglobin concentration of the donor. The fraction of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells is a parameter of red blood cell integrity in red blood cell concentrates and may be an indicator of red blood cell survival after transfusion. Measurement of phosphatidylserine exposure may be useful in the selection of donors and

  9. Vibrational modes of hemoglobin in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Martel, P; Calmettes, P; Hennion, B

    1991-02-01

    Equine red blood cells were washed in saline heavy water (2H2O) to exchange the hydrogen atoms of the non-hemoglobin components with deuterons. This led to novel neutron scattering measurements of protein vibrations within a cellular system and permitted a comparison with inelastic neutron scattering measurements on purified horse hemoglobin, either dry or wetted with 2H2O. As a function of wavevector transfer Q and the frequency transfer v the neutron response typified by the dynamic structure factor S(Q, v) was found to be similar for extracted and cellular hemoglobin at low and high temperatures. At 77 K, in the cells, a peak in S(Q, v) due to the protein was found near 0.7 THz, approximately half the frequency of a strong peak in the aqueous medium. Measurements at higher temperatures (170 and 230 K) indicated similar small shifts downwards in the peak frequencies of both components. At 260 K the low frequency component became predominantly quasielastic, but a significant inelastic component could still be ascribed to the aqueous scattering. Near 295 K the frequency responses of both components were similar and centered near zero. When scattering due to water is taken into account it appears that the protein neutron response in, or out of, red blood cells is little affected by hydration in the low frequency regime where Van der Waals forces are thought to be effective.

  10. Vibrational modes of hemoglobin in red blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Martel, P; Calmettes, P; Hennion, B

    1991-01-01

    Equine red blood cells were washed in saline heavy water (2H2O) to exchange the hydrogen atoms of the non-hemoglobin components with deuterons. This led to novel neutron scattering measurements of protein vibrations within a cellular system and permitted a comparison with inelastic neutron scattering measurements on purified horse hemoglobin, either dry or wetted with 2H2O. As a function of wavevector transfer Q and the frequency transfer v the neutron response typified by the dynamic structure factor S(Q, v) was found to be similar for extracted and cellular hemoglobin at low and high temperatures. At 77 K, in the cells, a peak in S(Q, v) due to the protein was found near 0.7 THz, approximately half the frequency of a strong peak in the aqueous medium. Measurements at higher temperatures (170 and 230 K) indicated similar small shifts downwards in the peak frequencies of both components. At 260 K the low frequency component became predominantly quasielastic, but a significant inelastic component could still be ascribed to the aqueous scattering. Near 295 K the frequency responses of both components were similar and centered near zero. When scattering due to water is taken into account it appears that the protein neutron response in, or out of, red blood cells is little affected by hydration in the low frequency regime where Van der Waals forces are thought to be effective. PMID:1849028

  11. Red Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticle-Based Cell Imaging Probe.

    PubMed

    Ali, Haydar; Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Dalal, Chumki; Jana, Nikhil R

    2016-04-13

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based probes with tunable visible emission are biocompatible, environment friendly and most suitable for various biomedical applications. However, synthesis of red fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and their transformation into functional nanoparticles are very challenging. Here we report red fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based nanobioconjugates of <25 nm hydrodynamic size and their application as fluorescent cell labels. Hydrophobic carbon nanoparticles are synthesized via high temperature colloid-chemical approach and transformed into water-soluble functional nanoparticles via coating with amphiphilic polymer followed by covalent linking with desired biomolecules. Following this approach, carbon nanoparticles are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, primary amine, glucose, arginine, histidine, biotin and folic acid. These functional nanoparticles can be excited with blue/green light (i.e., 400-550 nm) to capture their emission spanning from 550 to 750 nm. Arginine and folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have been demonstrated as fluorescent cell labels where blue and green excitation has been used for imaging of labeled cells. The presented method can be extended for the development of carbon nanoparticle-based other bioimaging probes.

  12. Structural analysis of red blood cell aggregates under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chesnutt, J K W; Marshall, J S

    2010-03-01

    A set of measures of red blood cell (RBC) aggregates are developed and applied to examine the aggregate structure under plane shear and channel flows. Some of these measures are based on averages over the set of red blood cells which are in contact with each other at a given time. Other measures are developed by first fitting an ellipse to the planar projection of the aggregate, and then examining the area and aspect ratio of the fit ellipse as well as the orientations of constituent RBCs with respect to the fit ellipse axes. The aggregate structural measures are illustrated using a new mesoscale computational model for blood cell transport, collision and adhesion. The sensitivity of this model to change in adhesive surface energy density and shear rate on the aggregate structure is examined. It is found that the mesoscale model predictions exhibit reasonable agreement with experimental and theoretical data for blood flow in plane shear and channel flows. The new structural measures are used to examine the differences between predictions of two- and three-dimensional computations of the aggregate formation, showing that two-dimensional computations retain some of the important aspects of three-dimensional computations.

  13. Transport of diseased red blood cells in the spleen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pivkin, Igor; Dao, Ming

    2012-11-01

    A major function of the spleen is to remove old and diseased red blood cells (RBCs) with abnormal mechanical properties. We investigated this mechanical filtering mechanism by combining experiments and computational modeling, especially for red blood cells in malaria and sickle cell disease (SCD). First, utilizing a transgenic line for 3D confocal live imaging, in vitro capillary assays and 3D finite element modeling, we extracted the mechanical properties of both the RBC membrane and malaria parasites for different asexual malaria stages. Secondly, using a non-invasive laser interferometric technique, we optically measured the dynamic membrane fluctuations of SCD RBCs. By simulating the membrane fluctuation experiment using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model, we retrieved mechanical properties of SCD RBCs with different shapes. Finally, based on the mechanical properties obtained from these experiments, we simulated the full fluid-structure interaction problem of diseased RBCs passing through endothelial slits in the spleen under different fluid pressure gradients using the DPD model. The effects of the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer, the cytoskeleton and the parasite on the critical pressure of splenic passage of RBCs were investigated separately. This work is supported by NIH and Singapore-MIT Alliance for Science and Technology (SMART).

  14. Aplastic anemia and red cell aplasia due to pentachlorophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Repeated exposure to commercial (technical grade) pentachlorophenol (PCP) preceded aplastic anemia in four patients and pure red cell aplasia in two. Two patients developed concomitant or subsequent Hodgkin's disease and acute leukemia. The hematologic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effect of PCP and its chemical contaminants have been documented in other clinical and experimental reports. In view of the widespread contamination of our environment by PCP, clinicians and public health investigators must seek out such exposure in these and related disorders and initiate measures to reduce it.

  15. Pure red cell aplasia induced by epoetin zeta

    PubMed Central

    Panichi, Vincenzo; Ricchiuti, Guido; Scatena, Alessia; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) may develop in patients with chronic kidney disease receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA). We report on a 72-year-old patient who developed hypo-proliferative anaemia unresponsive to ESA following the administration of epoetin zeta subcutaneously for 7 months. On the basis of severe isolated hypoplasia of the erythroid line in the bone marrow and high-titre neutralizing anti-erythropoietin antibodies (Ab), a diagnosis of Ab-mediated PRCA was made. Epoetin zeta was discontinued and the patient was given steroids. This was associated with anaemia recovery. To our knowledge this is the first PRCA case related to epoetin zeta. PMID:27478604

  16. Clustering of red blood cells using digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaferzadeh, K.; Ahmadzadeh, E.; Moon, I.; Gholami, S.

    2017-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy can provide quantitative phase images (QPIs) of 3D profile of red blood cell (RBC) with nanometer accuracy. In this paper we propose applying k-means clustering method to cluster RBCs into two groups of young and old RBCs by using a four-dimensional feature vector. The features are RBC thickness average, surface area-volume ratio, sphericity coefficient and RBC perimeter that can be obtained from QPIs. The proposed features are related to the morphology of RBC. The experimental result shows that by utilizing the proposed method two groups of sphero-echinocytes (old RBCs) and non-spheroechinocytes RBCs can be perfectly clustered.

  17. Cytoskeleton confinement and tension of red blood cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Gov, N; Zilman, A G; Safran, S

    2003-06-06

    We analyze theoretically both the static and dynamic fluctuation spectra of the red blood cell in a unified manner, using a simple model of the composite membrane. In this model, the two-dimensional spectrin network that forms the cytoskeleton is treated as a rigid shell, located at a fixed, average distance from the lipid bilayer. The cytoskeleton thereby confines both the static and dynamic fluctuations of the lipid bilayer. The sparse connections of the cytoskeleton and bilayer induce a surface tension, for wavelengths larger than the bilayer persistence length. The predictions of the model give a consistent account for both the wave vector and frequency dependence of the experimental data.

  18. Lipaemic plasma induces haemolysis in resuspended red cell concentrate.

    PubMed

    Bashir, S; Wiltshire, M; Cardigan, R; Thomas, S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated whether haemolysis in red cells suspended in plasma was affected by the lipid content and/or methylene blue (MB) treatment of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP). We also investigated whether haemolysis was affected by the conditions under which lipaemic plasma was stored. Study 1: Visibly lipaemic (n = 22) or nonlipaemic FFP (n = 24) units were thawed, pooled and split into identical pairs, one of which was MB treated. These units were used to resuspend red cell concentrates (RCC) and tested for haemolysis immediately and after 24 and 48 h of storage at 2-6°C. Study 2: Fresh plasma was aliquoted into 15-ml tubes and stored in one of four ways as follows: room temperature; 2-6°C; frozen and thawed; or twice frozen and thawed. A sample of RCC was resuspended in each of these plasmas and haemolysis measured after 2 h. Study 3: Plasma was divided into 15-ml tubes and stored as in study 2 followed by storage left standing upright in a refrigerator (2-6°C) for 24 h (with the exception of the room temperature sample). Plasma was separated into top, middle and bottom fractions and used to resuspend RCC that were assessed for haemolysis after 2 h. The levels of haemolysis in RCC were immediately greater when suspended in lipaemic plasma (0·70 ± 0·53% v 0·05 ± 0·06% for nonlipaemic plasma), which increased further on subsequent storage for 48 h (1·22 ± 0·40% v 0·15 ± 0·14% for nonlipaemic plasma). This was irrespective of whether plasma was MB treated. Lipaemic plasma stored frozen and then thawed resulted in the greatest haemolysis. In lipaemic plasma stored at 2-6°C, the chylomicron-rich top fraction caused the highest level of haemolysis. Haemolysis in red cells is increased in those suspended in lipaemic plasma and is dependent upon the storage conditions of that plasma prior to suspension. These data are relevant to the choice of plasma used to suspend red cells for neonatal exchange transfusion. © 2012 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2012

  19. Red blood cell adhesion on a solid/liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Lavalle, Ph.; Stoltz, J.-F.; Senger, B.; Voegel, J.-C.; Schaaf, P.

    1996-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs), previously fixed with glutaraldehyde, adhere to glass slides coated with fibrinogen. The RBC deposition process on the horizontal glass surface is investigated by analyzing the relative surface covered by the RBCs, as well as the variance of this surface coverage, as a function of the concentration of particles. This study is performed by optical microscopy and image analysis. A model, derived from the classical random sequential adsorption model, has been developed to account for the experimental results. This model highlights the strong influence of the hydrodynamic interactions during the deposition process. PMID:8986776

  20. The nature of multiphoton fluorescence from red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Murphy, Michael; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana M.; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    We report on the nature of multiphoton excited fluorescence observed from human erythrocytes (red blood cells RBC's) and their "ghosts" following 800nm sub-15 fs excitation. The detected optical signal is assigned as two-photon excited fluorescence from hemoglobin. Our findings are supported by wavelength-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay measurements using time-correlated single photon counting system from RBC's, their ghosts as well as in vitro samples of various fluorophores including riboflavin, NADH, NAD(P)H, hemoglobin. We find that low-energy and short-duration pulses allow two-photon imaging of RBC's, but longer more intense pulses lead to their destruction.

  1. Effect of asbestos on lipid peroxidation in the red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gabor, S; Anca, Z

    1975-01-01

    In vitro exposure of red cells to vie International Union against Cancer (UICC) standard reference asbestos samples resulted in an increase of thiobarbituric acid substances. Chrysotiles developed the largest amounts of lipid peroxides, followed by anthophyllite, amosite, and crocidolite in decreasing order. Compared with the control samples erythrocytes free of dusts, all types of the asbestos examined disclosed significant differences. The results obtained provide support for the cytotoxic potential of amosite and crocidolite and, on the other hand, suggest that a lipid peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids may be involved in the mechanisms(s) of membrane-damaging effects of asbestos dusts. PMID:1125126

  2. Sodium-dependent magnesium uptake by ferret red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Flatman, P W; Smith, L M

    1991-01-01

    1. Magnesium uptake can be measured in ferret red cells incubated in media containing more than 1 mM-magnesium. Uptake is substantially increased if the sodium concentration in the medium is reduced. 2. Magnesium uptake is half-maximally activated by 0.37 mM-external magnesium when the external sodium concentration is 5 mM. Increasing the external sodium concentration increases the magnesium concentration needed to activate the system. 3. Magnesium uptake is increased by reducing the external sodium concentration. Uptake is half-maximum at sodium concentrations of 17, 22 and 62 nM when the external magnesium concentrations are 2, 5 and 10 mM respectively. 4. Replacement of external sodium with choline does not affect the membrane potential of ferret red cells over a 45 min period. 5. Magnesium uptake from media containing 5 mM-sodium is inhibited by amiloride, quinidine and imipramine. It is not affected by ouabain or bumetanide. Vanadate stimulates magnesium uptake but has no effect on magnesium efflux. 6. When cell ATP content is reduced to 19 mumol (1 cell)-1 by incubating cells for 3 h with 2-deoxyglucose, magnesium uptake falls by 50% in the presence of 5 mM-sodium and is completely abolished in the presence of 145 mM-sodium. Some of the inhibition may be due to the increase in intracellular ionized magnesium concentration ([Mg2+]i) from 0.7 to 1.0 mM which occurs under these conditions. 7. Magnesium uptake can be driven against a substantial electrochemical gradient if the external sodium concentration is reduced sufficiently. 8. These findings are discussed in terms of several possible models for magnesium transport. It is concluded that the majority of magnesium uptake observed in low-sodium media is via sodium-magnesium antiport. A small portion of uptake is through a parallel leak pathway. It is believed that the antiport is responsible for maintaining [Mg2+]i below electrochemical equilibrium in these cells at physiological external sodium concentration

  3. [Evaluation of riboflavin photochemical inactivation efficacy of virus in red blood cells by using animal models].

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Zhang, Xun-Shan; Cheng, Yue; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Ming-Li

    2011-02-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of riboflavin photochemical inactivation of virus in red blood cells by using animal models. human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) plus red blood cells were used as indicator, 30 BALA/c mice were divided into the experimental group (n = 10), virus control group (n = 10), visible light control group (n = 5) and red blood cell control group (n = 5). Mice in experimental group were inoculated with red blood cells inactive by the riboflavin photochemical, mice in virus control group was injected with red blood cells without riboflavin photochemical inactivation treatment, and mice in light control group was infused with red blood cells irradiated by visible light, and mice in red blood cells control group was injected with normal red blood cells. The virus was isolated in vitro from mice of various groups, the HCMV UL83 gene was detected by PCR, the PP65 antigen was identified by indirect immunofluorescence. The results indicated that the virus isolation, PCR detection and indirect immunofluorescence identification all showed positive in virus control group and visible light control group, while the results of detection in experimental and red blood cell control groups were negative. It is concluded that riboflavin photochemical viral inactivation of red blood cells is effective.

  4. [Red Blood Cells Raman Spectroscopy Comparison of Type Two Diabetes Patients and Rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Gui-dong; Mu, Xin; Xiao, Hong-bin; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Si-qi; Niu Wen-ying; Jiang, Guang-kun; Feng, Yue-nan; Bian, Jing-qi

    2015-10-01

    By using confocal Raman spectroscopy, Raman spectra were measured in normal rat red blood cells, normal human red blood cells, STZ induced diabetetic rats red blood cells, Alloxan induced diabetetic rats red blood cells and human type 2 diabetes red blood cells. Then principal component analysis (PCA) with support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used for data analysis, and then the distance between classes was used to judge the degree of close to two kinds of rat model with type 2 diabetes. The results found significant differences in the Raman spectra of red blood cell in diabetic and normal red blood cells. To diabetic red blood cells, the peak in the amide VI C=O deformation vibration band is obvious, and amide V N-H deformation vibration band spectral lines appear deviation. Belong to phospholipid fatty acyl C-C skeleton, the 1 130 cm(-1) spectral line is enhanced and the 1 088 cm(-1) spectral line is abated, which show diabetes red cell membrane permeability increased. Raman spectra of PCA combined with SVM can well separate 5 types of red blood cells. Classifier test results show that the classification accuracy is up to 100%. Through the class distance between the two induced method and human type 2 diabetes, it is found that STZ induced model is more close to human type 2 diabetes. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy can be used for diagnosis of diabetes and rats STZ induced diabetes method is closer to human type 2 diabetes.

  5. Utilization and quality of cryopreserved red blood cells in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Henkelman, S; Noorman, F; Badloe, J F; Lagerberg, J W M

    2015-02-01

    Cryopreserved (frozen) red blood cells have been used in transfusion medicine since the Vietnam war. The main method to freeze the red blood cells is by usage of glycerol. Although the usage of cryopreserved red blood cells was promising due to the prolonged storage time and the limited cellular deterioration at subzero temperatures, its usage have been hampered due to the more complex and labour intensive procedure and the limited shelf life of thawed products. Since the FDA approval of a closed (de) glycerolization procedure in 2002, allowing a prolonged postthaw storage of red blood cells up to 21 days at 2-6°C, cryopreserved red blood cells have become a more utilized blood product. Currently, cryopreserved red blood cells are mainly used in military operations and to stock red blood cells with rare phenotypes. Yet, cryopreserved red blood cells could also be useful to replenish temporary blood shortages, to prolong storage time before autologous transfusion and for IgA-deficient patients. This review describes the main methods to cryopreserve red blood cells, explores the quality of this blood product and highlights clinical settings in which cryopreserved red blood cells are or could be utilized.

  6. Perchlorate remediation using packed-bed bioreactors and electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Booki

    Two pilot-scale fixed bed bioreactors were operated in continuous mode in order to treat groundwater contaminated by perchlorate. The bioreactors were constructed and operated side-by-side at the Texas Street Well Facility in Redlands, California. Each reactor was packed with either sand or plastic media. A perchlorate-reducing bacterium, Dechlorosoma sp. KJ, was used to inoculate the bioreactors. Perchlorate was successfully removed down to a non-detectable level (<4mug/L) in both bioreactors with acetate as a carbon source and nutrients at loading rates less than 0.063 L/s (1 gpm; 0.34 L/m2s). The sand medium bioreactor could achieve complete-perchlorate removal up to flow rate of 0.126 L/s. A regular backwashing cycle (once a week) was an important factor for completely removing perchlorate in groundwater. Power generation directly from pure or mixed organic matter was examined using microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which were run either in batch or continuous mode. In batch experiments, both a pure culture (Geobactor metallireducens) and a mixed culture (wastewater inoculum) were used as the biocatalyst, and acetate was added as substrate in the anode chamber of the MFC. Power output in a membrane MFC with either inoculum was essentially the same, with 40 +/- 1 mW/m2 for G. metallireducens and 38 +/- 1 mW/m2 for mixed culture. A different type of the MFC containing a salt bridge instead of a membrane system was examined to generate power using the same substrate and pure culture as used in the membrane MFC. Power output in the salt bridge MFC was 2.2 mW/m 2. It was found that the lower power output was directly attributed to the higher internal resistance of the salt bridge system (19920 +/- 50 O) in comparison with that of the membrane system (1286 +/- 1 O). Continuous electricity generation was examined in a flat plate microbial fuel cell (FPMFC) using domestic wastewater and specific organic substrates. The FPMFC, containing a combined electrode/proton exchange

  7. Bio-inspired Cryo-ink Preserves Red Blood Cell Phenotype and Function during Nanoliter Vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Assal, Rami El; Guven, Sinan; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Gozen, Irep; Shafiee, Hadi; Dalbeyber, Sedef; Abdalla, Noor; Thomas, Gawain; Fuld, Wendy; Illigens, Ben M.W.; Estanislau, Jessica; Khoory, Joseph; Kaufman, Richard; Zylberberg, Claudia; Lindeman, Neal; Wen, Qi; Ghiran, Ionita; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Current red blood cell cryopreservation methods utilize bulk volumes, causing cryo-injury of cells, which results in irreversible disruption of cell morphology, mechanics, and function. An innovative approach to preserve human red blood cell morphology, mechanics, and function following vitrification in nanoliter volumes is developed using a novel cryo-ink integrated with a bio-printing approach. PMID:25047246

  8. The Ratio of Fibrinogen to Red Cells Transfused Affects Survival in Casualties Receiving Massive Transfusions at an Army Combat Support Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    cell (RBC) units, fresh whole blood (FWB) units, fresh frozen plasma (FFP) units, cryoprecipitate (Cryo) 10-unit bags, and apheresis platelet (aPLT...cryoprecipitate; aPLT, apheresis platelets ; RBC, red blood cells. Table 1 Fibrinogen Content in Various Blood Products 1 unit of FFP 400 mg fibrinogen in 200...250 mL 1 six-pack of platelets 80 mg 6 units 480 mg in 300 mL 1 unit of apheresis platelets 300 mg in 200–250 mL 1 10-unit bag of cryoprecipitate

  9. Chaotic dynamics of red blood cells in oscillating shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit; Cordasco, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    A 3D computational study of deformable red blood cells in dilute suspension and subject to sinusoidally oscillating shear flow is considered. It is observed that the cell exhibits either a periodic motion or a chaotic motion. In the periodic motion, the cell reverses its orientation either about the flow direction or about the flow gradient, depending on the initial conditions. In certain parameter range, the initial conditions are forgotten and the cells become entrained in the same sequence of horizontal reversals. The chaotic dynamics is characterized by a nonperiodic sequence of horizontal and vertical reversals, and swings. The study provides the first conclusive evidence of the chaotic dynamics of fully deformable cells in oscillating flow using a deterministic numerical model without the introduction of any stochastic noise. An analysis of the chaotic dynamics shows that chaos is only possible in certain frequency bands when the cell membrane can rotate by a certain amount allowing the cells to swing near the maximum shear rate. We make a novel observation that the occurrence of the vertical or horizontal reversal depends only on whether a critical angle, that is independent of the flow frequency, is exceeded at the instant of flow reversal.

  10. Mechanochemistry of single red blood cells monitored using Raman tweezers.

    PubMed

    Raj, Saurabh; Marro, Mónica; Wojdyla, Michal; Petrov, Dmitri

    2012-04-01

    Two microparticles were biochemically attached to a red blood cell at diametrically opposite parts and held by optical traps allowing to impose deformations. The cell deformation was monitored from the microscopy images. Raman spectra of the cell under tunable deformations were studied. Vibrational spectra analysis at different stretching states was supported with two statistical methods. Principal Component Analysis distinguishes the most prominent changes in spectra while 2D correlation technique monitors the evolution of Raman bands during stretching. The measurements show significant changes in the cell chemical structure with stretching however the changes saturate above 20% of cell deformation. Mechanical deformation of the cell mainly affects the bands corresponding to hemoglobin but contributions from spectrin and membrane proteins can not be excluded. The saturation of bands at higher deformations suggests some structural relaxation that RBC has to undergo to bear extra load. The results confirm widely accepted belief that spectrin released from membrane proteins allows for significant shape changes of the cells. We therefore tentatively suggest that interaction between membrane and cytoskeleton during deformation can be efficiently probed by confocal Raman spectroscopy, in particular via the peak around 1035 cm(-1).

  11. Mechanical modeling of red blood cells during optical stretching.

    PubMed

    Tan, Youhua; Sun, Dong; Huang, Wenhao

    2010-04-01

    Mechanical properties of red blood cells (RBCs) play an important role in regulating cellular functions. Many recent researches suggest that the cell properties or deformability may be used as a diagnostic indicator for the onset and progression of some human diseases. Although optical stretcher (OS) has emerged as an effective tool to investigate the cell mechanics of RBCs, little is known about the deformation behavior of RBCs in an OS. To address this problem, the mechanical model proposed in our previous work is extended in this paper to describe the mechanical responses of RBCs in the OS. With this model, the mechanical responses, such as the tension distribution, the effect of cell radius, and the deformed cell shapes, can be predicted. It is shown that the results obtained from our mechanical model are in good agreement with the experimental data, which demonstrates the validity of the developed model. Based on the derived model, the mechanical properties of RBCs can be further obtained. In conclusion, this study indicates that the developed mechanical model can be used to predict the deformation responses of RBCs during optical stretching and has potential biomedical applications such as characterizing cell properties and distinguishing abnormal cells from normal ones.

  12. Synthetic glycolipid modification of red blood cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Frame, Tom; Carroll, Tim; Korchagina, Elena; Bovin, Nicolai; Henry, Stephen

    2007-05-01

    Glycolipids have a natural ability to insert into red cell (RBC) membranes. Based on this concept the serology of RBCs modified with synthetic analogs of blood group glycolipids (KODE technology) was developed, which entails making synthetic glycolipid constructs engineered to have specific performance criteria. Such synthetic constructs can be made to express a potentially unlimited range of carbohydrate blood group determinants. Synthetic constructs incorporating A, B, acquired-B, and Le(a) blood group determinants were constructed and used to modify RBCs. Modified cells were assessed by routine serologic methods using a range of commercially available monoclonal antibodies. RBCs modified with different concentrations of synthetic glycolipids were able to give controllable serologic results. Synthetic A and B modified cells were able to be created to represent the serology of "weak" subgroups. Specialized cells such as those bearing synthetic acquired-B antigen reacted as expected, but also exhibited extended features due to the cells bearing only specific antigen. Synthetic Le(a)-modified cells reacted as expected with anti-Le(a) reagents, but unexpectedly, were also able to detect the chemical anti-Le(ab) specificity of serologic monoclonal anti-Le(b) reagents. RBCs can be created to express normal and novel carbohydrate profiles by inserting synthetic glycolipids into them. Such cells will be useful in creating specialized antigen panels and for quality control purposes.

  13. A system for counting fetal and maternal red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ji; Gong, Zheng; Chen, Jun; Liu, Jun; Nguyen, John; Yang, Zongyi; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2014-12-01

    The Kleihauer-Betke (KB) test is the standard method for quantitating fetal-maternal hemorrhage in maternal care. In hospitals, the KB test is performed by a certified technologist to count a minimum of 2000 fetal and maternal red blood cells (RBCs) on a blood smear. Manual counting suffers from inherent inconsistency and unreliability. This paper describes a system for automated counting and distinguishing fetal and maternal RBCs on clinical KB slides. A custom-adapted hardware platform is used for KB slide scanning and image capturing. Spatial-color pixel classification with spectral clustering is proposed to separate overlapping cells. Optimal clustering number and total cell number are obtained through maximizing cluster validity index. To accurately identify fetal RBCs from maternal RBCs, multiple features including cell size, roundness, gradient, and saturation difference between cell and whole slide are used in supervised learning to generate feature vectors, to tackle cell color, shape, and contrast variations across clinical KB slides. The results show that the automated system is capable of completing the counting of over 60,000 cells (versus ∼2000 by technologists) within 5 min (versus ∼15 min by technologists). The throughput is improved by approximately 90 times compared to manual reading by technologists. The counting results are highly accurate and correlate strongly with those from benchmarking flow cytometry measurement.

  14. Developments in red cell rheology at the Institut de Pathologie Cellulaire.

    PubMed

    Evans, E; Mohandas, N

    1986-01-01

    The present day rheological approximation, which has been used successfully to quantitate the deformability properties of red cells, is based on the view that the cell has a liquid interior encapsulated by a viscoelastic solid membrane shell. A review of historical developments in this field shows that determination of intrinsic red cell membrane properties has not come from simple mathematical analysis of experiments. On the contrary, considerable insight has been required to bring together physical and biological methods to rationalize the unique deformability characteristics of the red blood cell. Key developments at the Institut de Pathologie Cellulaire (IPC) in the early 1970s played a role in our improved understanding of red cell rheology. In this article, we describe the material concepts of the red cell membrane held before 1970, discuss the seminal developments at Bicetre, and, finally, outline the contemporary view of red cell deformability.

  15. Evaluation of an autologous red cell agglutination test, VetRED FIV, for the presence of FIV antibody in cats.

    PubMed

    del Fierro, G M; Bundesen, P; Martin, S; Jones, S; Beetson, S; Robinson, W F

    1995-05-01

    A commercially available whole blood agglutination test, VetRED FIV, used for the detection of antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), was evaluated. The test is based on the use of a synthetic peptide conjugated to a non-agglutinating anti-feline red blood cell monoclonal antibody. The amino acid sequence of the synthetic peptide was derived from the predicted sequence of the transmembrane protein of FIV. The sensitivity and specificity of VetRED FIV was 100% when 34 known FIV-positive and 15 known FIV-negative cats were tested. These cats were part of studies on experimentally induced FIV infection, with their FIV status confirmed by virus isolation. Further, VetRED FIV was compared with another commercially available test for FIV antibody, PetChek in a field trial on 548 feline blood samples received by a diagnostic laboratory. Of the test results 94.2% (516/548) were in agreement: 112 were positive by VetRED FIV and PetChek; 404 were negative by both tests and 32 were discordant. These 5.8% discordant samples producing VetRED FIV-positive/PetChek-negative or VetRED FIV-negative/PetChek-positive were further assessed by Western blot assay. In the field trial, the sensitivity and specificity of VetRED FIV was 97% and 97%, respectively, comparable to the 98% sensitivity and 99% specificity for PetChek. The results from the trial also confirm the relatively high overall prevalence of FIV in Australian cats predominantly among mature male cats in the 9-12 year age group. Given the simplicity of the VetRED FIV procedure, it is concluded that VetRED FIV is a useful addition to the available commercial tests for FIV infection.

  16. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome following red blood cells transfusion: a case series of 7 patients.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Xu, Ziqi; Zheng, Zhijun; Lou, Haiyan; Yue, Wei

    2015-04-22

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is an infrequent disease characterized by severe headaches with or without focal neurological deficits or seizures and a reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. The Orpha number for RCVS is ORPHA284388. However, RCVS triggered by blood transfusion is rare. Here we provided the clinical, neuroimaging and outcome data of patients diagnosed with RCVS resulting from red blood cells transfusion. We retrospectively identified 7 patients presenting with RCVS after red blood cells transfusion from January 2010 to May 2014. The information on clinical features, neuroimaging and outcome were collected and analyzed. All 7 patients were Chinese women, with a mean age of 42 years (38-46). All the patients had severe anemia (Hb level < 6 g/dl) caused by primary menorrhagia due to uterine myoma (n = 5) or end-stage renal disease (n = 2) and severe anemia persisted for a average period of 4 months (2-6). Each patient received packed red blood cells transfusion (average: 1580 ml) over a period of 2-5 days. Blood transfusion increased the hemoglobin level by at least 4.5 g/dL from baseline. The neurological symptoms appeared a mean of 6.3 days (2-13) after the last blood transfusion. Headache was the most frequent symptom and seizure, transient or persistent neurological disorders were observed. Neuroimaging showed cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 2), focal intracerebral hemorrhage (n = 2), localized brain edema (n = 3), cerebral infarction (n = 1), and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (n = 2). Cerebral vasoconstrictions were demonstrated by magnetic resonance angiography or cerebral angiography. Arterial constriction reversed in all patients within 1 to 3 months of follow-up after disease onset and no relapse was observed up to a mean of 17.1 ± 4.8 months of follow-up. RCVS is a rare complication as a result of blood transfusion in patients with chronic

  17. Attenuation of Red Blood Cell Storage Lesions with Vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Kimberly; Fisher, Bernard J; Fowler, Evan; Fowler, Alpha A; Natarajan, Ramesh

    2017-07-12

    Stored red blood cells (RBCs) undergo oxidative stress that induces deleterious metabolic, structural, biochemical, and molecular changes collectively referred to as "storage lesions". We hypothesized that vitamin C (VitC, reduced or oxidized) would reduce red cell storage lesions, thus prolonging their storage duration. Whole-blood-derived, leuko-reduced, SAGM (saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol)-preserved RBC concentrates were equally divided into four pediatric storage bags and the following additions made: (1) saline (saline); (2) 0.3 mmol/L reduced VitC (Lo VitC); (3) 3 mmol/L reduced VitC (Hi VitC); or (4) 0.3 mmol/L oxidized VitC (dehydroascorbic acid, DHA) as final concentrations. Biochemical and rheological parameters were serially assessed at baseline (prior to supplementation) and Days 7, 21, 42, and 56 for RBC VitC concentration, pH, osmotic fragility by mechanical fragility index, and percent hemolysis, LDH release, glutathione depletion, RBC membrane integrity by scanning electron microscopy, and Western blot for β-spectrin. VitC exposure (reduced and oxidized) significantly increased RBC antioxidant status with varying dynamics and produced trends in reduction in osmotic fragility and increases in membrane integrity. VitC partially protects RBC from oxidative changes during storage. Combining VitC with other antioxidants has the potential to improve long-term storage of RBC.

  18. Tension of red blood cell membrane in simple shear flow.

    PubMed

    Omori, T; Ishikawa, T; Barthès-Biesel, D; Salsac, A-V; Imai, Y; Yamaguchi, T

    2012-11-01

    When a red blood cell (RBC) is subjected to an external flow, it is deformed by the hydrodynamic forces acting on its membrane. The resulting elastic tensions in the membrane play a key role in mechanotransduction and govern its rupture in the case of hemolysis. In this study, we analyze the motion and deformation of an RBC in a simple shear flow and the resulting elastic tensions on the membrane. The large deformation of the red blood cell is modelled by coupling a finite element method to solve the membrane mechanics and a boundary element method to solve the flows of the internal and external liquids. Depending on the capillary number Ca, ratio of the viscous to elastic forces, we observe three kinds of RBC motion: tumbling at low Ca, swinging at larger Ca, and breathing at the transitions. In the swinging regime, the region of the high principal tensions periodically oscillates, whereas that of the high isotropic tensions is almost unchanged. Due to the strain-hardening property of the membrane, the deformation is limited but the membrane tension increases monotonically with the capillary number. We have quantitatively compared our numerical results with former experimental results. It indicates that a membrane isotropic tension O(10{-6} N/m) is high enough for molecular release from RBCs and that the typical maximum membrane principal tension for haemolysis would be O(10{-4} N/m). These findings are useful to clarify not only the membrane rupture but also the mechanotransduction of RBCs.

  19. Creep and stress relaxation of human red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Thomas M

    2017-02-01

    In contrast to most mechanical properties of the red cell, experimental information on stress relaxation (SR) of the membrane skeleton is scarce. On the other hand, many postulates or assumptions as to the value of the characteristic time of SR [Formula: see text] can be found in the literature. Here, an experiment is presented that allows measurement of [Formula: see text] up to values of about 10 h. The membrane skeleton was deformed passively by changing the spontaneous curvature of the bilayer thus transforming the natively biconcave red cells into echinocytes. This shape and the concomitant deformation of the skeleton were kept up to 4 h by incubation at 37 ℃. During this period, no plastic deformation (creep) was observed. After the incubation, the spontaneous curvature was returned to normal. The resulting shape was smooth showing no remnants of the echinocytic shape. Both observations indicate [Formula: see text] 10 h. This result is in gross disagreement to postulates or assumptions existing in the literature.

  20. Three-dimensional simulation of red blood cells in microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Freund, Jonathan

    2007-11-01

    The hydrodynamic interactions between blood cells are critical for understanding the hemodynamics in microcirculations. We perform a three-dimensional simulation based on the Stokes-flow boundary integral equations to study such systems. The red blood cells are modeled as three-dimensional elastic shells, being highly resistant to any surface dilatation but compliant to bending. The cell shape is approximated by truncated series of spherical harmonics; this spectral representation results in high numerical accuracy and rigorous dealiasing without adding any numerical dissipation. The moving velocities of cell surfaces are solved from a boundary integral equation. The periodic Stokes-flow Green's function is decomposed into a short-range point-to-point-interaction part and a long-range smooth Fourier part; the computational cost is made O(NN) by using a P^3M method. The no-slip boundary condition on the vessel wall is imposed by a penalty method, which enables simulating complex geometries with simple periodic Green's functions. Preliminary results include the deformation of a single cell in a shear flow and multiple cells through a blood vessel.

  1. Certain Red Blood Cell Indices of Maternal and Umbilical Cord Blood in Owerri, Nigeria: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Nneli, RO; Amadi, SCA; Nwafia, WC

    2011-01-01

    Background: Umbilical cord blood analysis may give a clue to the state of health of both pregnant mothers and their neonates. However, there is paucity of literature on some of these indices from our area. Objectives: This present study determined the red blood indices of maternal and umbilical cord blood in Owerri, Nigeria. Methods: Pregnant mothers aged 18 - 42 years who booked and received antenatal care until vaginal delivery at the antenatal clinics of two tertiary health care centres in Owerri, Nigeria were divided into five age groups I – V. Maternal blood samples were obtained immediately after delivery of the baby. The umbilical blood samples were collected from the umbilical cord of the baby at the end of the second stage of labour. The haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and packed cell volume (PCV) were determined using standard procedures. The mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) was calculated mathematically. Results: The result of the cord blood haemoglobin concentration and packed cell volume were significantly higher than the maternal values (14.22 ± 1.25 g/dl versus 11.20 ± 0.92g/d and 42.6 9± 3.80% versus 33.67 ± 2.71% respectively; (P < 0.0001).However, there was no significant differences between cord blood and maternal mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (33.24 ±0.23% versus 33.29 ± 0.45 % ;P = 0.310). Furthermore, a positive linear Pearson's correlation was observed between the mean Hb and PCV of cord blood and maternal blood (r=1.11 and r=1.15 respectively <0.0001). Conclusion: This result provides a baseline data for further studies on establishing a reference value for maternal and umbilical cord packed cell volume and haemoglobin concentration in our locality. PMID:23209948

  2. Interaction of injectable neurotropic drugs with the red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Walter H; Lubszky, Szabina; Thöny, Sandra; Schulzki, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The normal red blood cell (RBC) shape is a biconcave discocyte. An intercalation of a drug in the outer half of the membrane lipid bilayer leads to echinocytosis, an intercalation in the inner half to stomatocytosis. We have used the shape transforming capacity of RBCs as a model to analyse the membrane interaction potential of various neurotropic drugs. Chlorpromazine, clomipramine, citalopram, clonazepam, and diazepam induced a reversible stomatocytosis, phenytoin induced echinocytosis, while the anticonvulsants levetiracetam, valproic acid and phenobarbital had no effect. This diversity of RBC shape transformations suggests that the pharmacological action is not linked to the membrane interaction. We conclude that this simple RBC shape transformation assay could be a useful tool to screen for potential drug interactions with cell membranes.

  3. Geometric localization of thermal fluctuations in red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Arthur A.; Bhaduri, Basanta; Popescu, Gabriel; Levine, Alex J.

    2017-01-01

    The thermal fluctuations of membranes and nanoscale shells affect their mechanical characteristics. Whereas these fluctuations are well understood for flat membranes, curved shells show anomalous behavior due to the geometric coupling between in-plane elasticity and out-of-plane bending. Using conventional shallow shell theory in combination with equilibrium statistical physics we theoretically demonstrate that thermalized shells containing regions of negative Gaussian curvature naturally develop anomalously large fluctuations. Moreover, the existence of special curves, “singular lines,” leads to a breakdown of linear membrane theory. As a result, these geometric curves effectively partition the cell into regions whose fluctuations are only weakly coupled. We validate these predictions using high-resolution microscopy of human red blood cells (RBCs) as a case study. Our observations show geometry-dependent localization of thermal fluctuations consistent with our theoretical modeling, demonstrating the efficacy in combining shell theory with equilibrium statistical physics for describing the thermalized morphology of cellular membranes. PMID:28242681

  4. Atomic force microscopy: From red blood cells to immunohaematology.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Natasha; Tabor, Rico F; Garnier, Gil

    2017-05-11

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers complementary imaging modes that can provide morphological and structural details of red blood cells (RBCs), and characterize interactions between specific biomolecules and RBC surface antigen. This review describes the applications of AFM in determining RBC health by the observation of cell morphology, elasticity and surface roughness. Measurement of interaction forces between plasma proteins and antibodies against RBC surface antigen using the AFM also brought new information to the immunohaematology field. With constant improvisation of the AFM in resolution and imaging time, the reaction of RBC to changes in the physico-chemistry of its environment and the presence of RBC surface antigen specific-biomolecules is achievable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A new material concept for the red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Evans, E A

    1973-09-01

    The proposition is made that the red cell membrane is a two-dimensional, incompressible material and a general stress-strain law is developed for finite deformations. In the linear form, the character of such a material is analogous to a two-dimensional Mooney material (e.g., rubber), indicating that the molecular structure in the plane of the membrane would consist of long chains, randomly kinked and cross-linked in the natural state. The loose network could be provided by the protein component and the lipid phase could exist interstitially as a liquid bilayer, giving the membrane its two-dimensional incompressibility. The material provides the capability of large deformations exhibited by the discocyte and yet the rigidity associated with the osmotic spherocyte state. It is demonstrated that a membrane of this type can form a sphere at constant area. An illustrative example of the application to single cell discocyte-to-osmotic spherocyte transformations is presented.

  6. Active elastic network: cytoskeleton of the red blood cell.

    PubMed

    Gov, Nir S

    2007-01-01

    In red blood cells there is a cortical cytoskeleton; a two-dimensional elastic network of membrane-attached proteins. We describe, using a simple model, how the metabolic activity of the cell, through the consumption of ATP, controls the stiffness of this elastic network. The unusual mechanical property of active strain softening is described and compared to experimental data. As a by-product of this activity there is also an active contribution to the amplitude of membrane fluctuations. We model this membrane as a field of independent "curvature motors," and calculate the spectrum of active fluctuations. We find that the active cytoskeleton contributes to the amplitude of the membrane height fluctuations at intermediate wavelengths, as observed experimentally.

  7. Geometric localization of thermal fluctuations in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Arthur A; Bhaduri, Basanta; Popescu, Gabriel; Levine, Alex J

    2017-03-14

    The thermal fluctuations of membranes and nanoscale shells affect their mechanical characteristics. Whereas these fluctuations are well understood for flat membranes, curved shells show anomalous behavior due to the geometric coupling between in-plane elasticity and out-of-plane bending. Using conventional shallow shell theory in combination with equilibrium statistical physics we theoretically demonstrate that thermalized shells containing regions of negative Gaussian curvature naturally develop anomalously large fluctuations. Moreover, the existence of special curves, "singular lines," leads to a breakdown of linear membrane theory. As a result, these geometric curves effectively partition the cell into regions whose fluctuations are only weakly coupled. We validate these predictions using high-resolution microscopy of human red blood cells (RBCs) as a case study. Our observations show geometry-dependent localization of thermal fluctuations consistent with our theoretical modeling, demonstrating the efficacy in combining shell theory with equilibrium statistical physics for describing the thermalized morphology of cellular membranes.

  8. Anisotropic light scattering of individual sickle red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngchan; Higgins, John M.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Suresh, Subra; Park, YongKeun

    2012-04-01

    We present the anisotropic light scattering of individual red blood cells (RBCs) from a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD). To measure light scattering spectra along two independent axes of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs with arbitrary orientation, we introduce the anisotropic Fourier transform light scattering (aFTLS) technique and measured both the static and dynamic anisotropic light scattering. We observed strong anisotropy in light scattering patterns of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs along its major axes using static aFTLS. Dynamic aFTLS analysis reveals the significantly altered biophysical properties in individual sickle RBCs. These results provide evidence that effective viscosity and elasticity of sickle RBCs are significantly different from those of the healthy RBCs.

  9. Value of dysmorphic red cells and G1 cells by phase contrast microscopy in the diagnosis of glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Sultana, T; Sultana, T; Rahman, M Q; Rahman, F; Islam, M S; Ahmed, A N

    2011-01-01

    The morphology of red cells by phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) is a useful diagnostic marker for glomerular haematuria. This study evaluated the value of urinary dysmorphic red cells and G1 cells (special type of dysmorphic red cell) count by PCM providing a simple, cost effective and low risk technique in the diagnosis of glomerular diseases. Urine samples of 120 patients with haematuria and proteinuria were examined and the percentage of dysmorphic red cells and G1 cells were calculated. Cases were divided into two groups; group I (>20% dysmorphic red cells- glomerular group) and group II (≤20% dysmorphic red cells as non glomerular group). Renal histopathology was used as the gold standard method for the diagnosis of glomerulonephritis. Results from PCM showed a sensitivity of 92.7%, specificity 100% by the detection of dysmorphic red cell while by the detection of G1 cells, a sensitivity of 97.6% and specificity 100% were observed. The percentage of G1 cells is superior to counting dysmorphic red cells. The high sensitivity of phase contrast microscopy confirms its usefulness for the detection of dysmorphic red cells and G1 cells that can guide clinicians in the identification of the site of haematuria using non invasive tests.

  10. Drug pharmacophores covalently linked to the red cell surface are active without prior release. Drug targeting of renin with a synthetic ligand conjugated to red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Krantz, A; Song, Y; DeNagel, D; Hartmann, C; Bridon, D

    1999-01-01

    Red blood cells have been labeled with an anti-renin pharmacophore using the activated labeling agent Boc-Phe-His-ACHPA-Ile-6-NH(CH2)5CO-NHS (4) and the corresponding sulfo-NHS-ester (5). Renin inhibition by labeled cells varies according to the concentrations of 4 or 5 used in the labeling protocols, and with the densities of the red cells employed. Flow cytometry measurements using specific polyclonal antibodies toward the anti-renin pharmacophore confirm that red cells are labeled on their outer surfaces with anti-renin pharmacophores. Inhibitory activity of labeled red cells is clearly associated with the cells themselves, and does not require prior release of an inhibitory entity: renin inhibition increases as a function of the concentration of NHS-ester used to label cells suspended in buffer, and with cell density; on the other hand, the separated supernatant portions of the medium make only minor contributions to the observed inhibitory activities. Renin inhibition also increases with increasing concentrations of ghosts derived from labeled red cells, firmly establishing that activity is intimately associated with cell membranes. Thus, the composite evidence is strongly supportive of inhibitory activity specific to the extracellular surface of red cells, which has been modified by the introduction of anti-renin pharmacophores. This study of inhibitory activity by drug/red blood cell-conjugates represents one of the few examples of a red cell-bound ligand of synthetic origin capable, without prior release, of specifically blocking the activity of its target enzyme. As well, it demonstrates the feasibility of exploiting the activity of covalently bound pharmacophores, free from interference of their carriers, for drug targeting.

  11. From stem cell to erythroblast: regulation of red cell production at multiple levels by multiple hormones.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Harvey; Flygare, Johan; Chou, Song

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews the regulation of production of red blood cells at several levels: (1) the ability of erythropoietin and adhesion to a fibronectin matrix to stimulate the rapid production of red cells by inducing terminal proliferation and differentiation of committed erythroid CFU-E progenitors; (2) the regulated expansion of the pool of earlier BFU-E erythroid progenitors by glucocorticoids and other factors that occurs during chronic anemia or inflammation; and (3) the expansion of thehematopoietic cell pool to produce more progenitors of all hematopoietic lineages.

  12. Regulation of Cell Volume by Active Cation Transport in High and Low Potassium Sheep Red Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tosteson, D. C.; Hoffman, J. F.

    1960-01-01

    A model cell which controls its cation composition and volume by the action of a K-Na exchange pump and leaks for both ions working in parallel is presented. Equations are formulated which describe the behavior of this model in terms of three membrane parameters. From these equations and the steady state concentrations of Na, K, and Cl, values for these parameters in high potassium (HK) and low potassium (LK) sheep red cells are calculated. Kinetic experiments designed to measure the membrane parameters directly in the two types of sheep red cells are also reported. The values of the parameters obtained in these experiments agreed well with those calculated from the steady state concentrations of ions and the theoretical equations. It is concluded that both HK and LK sheep red cells control their cation composition and volume in a manner consistent with the model cell. Both have a cation pump which exchanges one sodium ion from inside the cell with one potassium ion from outside the cell but the pump is working approximately four times faster in the HK cell. The characteristics of the cation leak in the two cell types are also very different since the HK cells are relatively more leaky to sodium as compared with potassium than is the case in the LK cells. Both cell types show appreciable sodium exchange diffusion but this process is more rapid in the LK than in the HK cells. PMID:13777653

  13. Biochemistry of malaria parasite infected red blood cells by X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kapishnikov, S; Leiserowitz, L; Yang, Y; Cloetens, P; Pereiro, E; Awamu Ndonglack, F; Matuschewski, K; Als-Nielsen, J

    2017-04-11

    Red blood cells infected by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are correlatively imaged by tomography using soft X-rays as well as by scanning hard nano-X-ray beam to obtain fluorescence maps of various elements such as S and Fe. In this way one can deduce the amount of Fe bound either in hemoglobin or in hemozoin crystals in the digestive vacuole of the malaria parasite as well as determine the hemoglobin concentrations in the cytosols of the red blood cell and of the parasite. Fluorescence map of K shows that in the parasite's schizont stage the K concentration in the red blood cell cytosol is diminished by a factor of seven relative to a pristine red blood cell but the total amount of K in the infected red blood cell is the same as in the pristine red blood cell.

  14. Experimental ultrasound characterization of red blood cell aggregation using the structure factor size estimator.

    PubMed

    Yu, François T H; Cloutier, Guy

    2007-07-01

    The frequency dependence of the ultrasonic backscattering coefficient (BSC) was studied to assess the level of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. Three monoelement focused wideband transducers were used to insonify porcine blood sheared in a Couette flow from 9 to 30 MHz. A high shear rate was first applied to promote disaggregation. Different residual shear rates were then used to promote formation of RBC aggregates. The structure factor size estimator (SFSE), a second-order data reduction model based on the structure factor, was applied to the frequency-dependent BSC. Two parameters were extracted from the model to describe the level of aggregation at 6% and 40% hematocrits: W, the packing factor, and D the aggregate diameter, expressed in number of RBCs. Both parameters closely matched theoretical values for nonaggregated RBCs. W and D increased during aggregation with stabilized values modulated by the applied residual shear rate. Furthermore, parameter D during the kinetics of aggregation at 6% hematocrit under static conditions correlated with an optical RBC aggregate size estimation from microscopic images (r(2)=0.76). To conclude, the SFSE presents an interesting framework for tissue characterization of partially correlated dense tissues such as aggregated RBCs.

  15. A system-based approach to modeling the ultrasound signal backscattered by red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, I; Bertrand, M; Cloutier, G

    1999-01-01

    A system-based model is proposed to describe and simulate the ultrasound signal backscattered by red blood cells (RBCs). The model is that of a space-invariant linear system that takes into consideration important biological tissue stochastic scattering properties as well as the characteristics of the ultrasound system. The formation of the ultrasound signal is described by a convolution integral involving a transducer transfer function, a scatterer prototype function, and a function representing the spatial arrangement of the scatterers. The RBCs are modeled as nonaggregating spherical scatterers, and the spatial distribution of the RBCs is determined using the Percus-Yevick packing factor. Computer simulations of the model are used to study the power backscattered by RBCs as a function of the hematocrit, the volume of the scatterers, and the frequency of the incident wave (2-500 MHz). Good agreement is obtained between the simulations and theoretical and experimental data for both Rayleigh and non-Rayleigh scattering conditions. In addition to these results, the renewal process theory is proposed to model the spatial arrangement of the scatterers. The study demonstrates that the system-based model is capable of accurately predicting important characteristics of the ultrasound signal backscattered by blood. The model is simple and flexible, and it appears to be superior to previous one- and two-dimensional simulation studies. PMID:10545342

  16. The effects of red blood cell infusion on 10-km race time.

    PubMed

    Brien, A J; Simon, T L

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of infusion of 400 mL of red blood cells (RBCs) on 10-km track race time, submaximal heart rate, hematocrit, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and partial pressure of oxygen at 50% hemoglobin saturation. Six highly trained, male, distance runners twice donated a unit of RBCs, which was frozen for subsequent reinfusion. Eleven weeks after the second donation, they undertook a series of three competitive 10-km races on a standard 400-m track: before infusion, after 100 mL of saline solution, and after 400 mL of autologous, previously frozen deglycerolized RBCs. All subjects took all trials in this double-blind, placebo, crossover, experimental design. Running time was recorded at each 400-m split, and blood was collected prior to each trial. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance. Results following the RBC infusion showed a significantly higher hematocrit concentration, a significantly faster 10-km run, a nonsignificant decrease in submaximal heart rate (10 beats faster 10-km run, a nonsignificant decrease in submaximal heart rate (10 beats per minute), and no significant changes in either 2,3-diphosphoglycerate or partial pressure of oxygen at 50% hemoglobin saturation. Erythrocythemia induced by the infusion of 400 mL of autologous packed RBCs effectively increased performance capacity in a 10-km track race, probably due to an increase in oxygen delivery to the working muscles.

  17. An evidence-based approach to red blood cell transfusions in asymptomatically anaemic patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, AW; de Gara, CJ

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgeons and physicians encounter blood transfusions on a daily basis but a robust evidence-based strategy on indications and timing of transfusion in asymptomatic anaemic patients is yet to be determined. For judicious use of blood products, the risks inherent to packed red blood cells, the patient’s co-morbidities and haemoglobin (Hb)/haematocrit levels should be considered. This review critiques and summarises the latest available evidence on the indications for transfusions in healthy and cardiac disease patients as well as the timing of transfusions relative to surgery. Methods An electronic literature search of the MEDLINE®, Google Scholar™ and Trip databases was conducted for articles published in English between January 2006 and January 2015. Studies discussing timing and indications of transfusion in medical and surgical patients were retrieved. Bibliographies of studies were checked for other pertinent articles that were missed by the initial search. Findings Six level 1 studies (randomised controlled trials or systematic reviews) and six professional society guidelines were included in this review. In healthy patients without cardiac disease, a restrictive transfusion trigger of Hb 70–80g/l is safe and appropriate whereas in cardiac patients, the trigger is Hb 80–100g/l. The literature on timing of transfusions relative to surgery is limited. For the studies available, preoperative transfusions were associated with a decreased incidence of subsequent transfusions and timing of transfusions did not affect the rates of colorectal cancer recurrence. PMID:26492900

  18. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. 864.8185 Section 864.8185 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents §...

  19. Washing stored red blood cells in an albumin solution improves their morphological and hemorheological properties

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Walter H.; Piety, Nathaniel Z.; Deuel, Jeremy W.; Makhro, Asya; Schulzki, Thomas; Bogdanov, Nikolay; Goede, Jeroen S.; Bogdanova, Anna; Abidi, Rajaa; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prolonged storage of red blood cells leads to storage lesions, which may impair clinical outcomes after transfusion. A hallmark of storage lesions is progressive echinocytic shape transformation, which can be partially reversed by washing in albumin solutions. Here we have investigated the impact of this shape recovery on biorheological parameters. METHODS Red blood cells stored hypothermically for 6–7 weeks were washed in a 1% human serum albumin solution. Red cell deformability was measured with osmotic gradient ektacytometry. The viscosity of red cell suspensions were measured with a Couette-type viscometer. The flow behaviour of red cells suspended at 40% hematocrit was tested with an artificial microvascular network. RESULTS Washing in 1% albumin reduced higher degrees of echinocytes and increased the frequency of discocytes, thereby shifting the morphological index towards discocytosis. Washing also reduced red cell swelling. This shape recovery was not seen after washing in saline, buffer or plasma. Red cell shape normalisation did not improve cell deformability measured by ektacytometry, but it tended to decrease suspension viscosities at low shear rates and improved the perfusion of an artificial microvascular network. CONCLUSIONS Washing of stored red blood cells in a 1% human serum albumin solution specifically reduces echinocytosis, and this shape recovery has a beneficial effect on microvascular perfusion in vitro. Washing in 1% albumin may represent a new approach to improving the quality of stored red cells, and thus potentially reducing the likelihood of adverse clinical outcomes associated with transfusion of blood stored for longer periods of time. PMID:25752902

  20. 3D morphometry of red blood cells by digital holography.

    PubMed

    Memmolo, Pasquale; Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Gennari, Oriella; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2014-12-01

    Three dimensional (3D) morphometric analysis of flowing and not-adherent cells is an important aspect for diagnostic purposes. However, diagnostics tools need to be quantitative, label-free and, as much as possible, accurate. Recently, a simple holographic approach, based on shape from silhouette algorithm, has been demonstrated for accurate calculation of cells biovolume and displaying their 3D shapes. Such approach has been adopted in combination with holographic optical tweezers and successfully applied to cells with convex shape. Nevertheless, unfortunately, the method fails in case of specimen with concave surfaces. Here, we propose an effective approach to achieve correct 3D shape measurement that can be extended in case of cells having concave surfaces, thus overcoming the limit of the previous technique. We prove the new procedure for healthy red blood cells (RBCs) (i.e., discocytes) having a concave surface in their central region. Comparative analysis of experimental results with a theoretical 3D geometrical model of RBC is discussed in order to evaluate accuracy of the proposed approach. Finally, we show that the method can be also useful to classify, in terms of morphology, different varieties of RBCs.

  1. Dynamic deformability of sickle red blood cells in microphysiological flow.

    PubMed

    Alapan, Y; Matsuyama, Y; Little, J A; Gurkan, U A

    2016-06-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), hemoglobin molecules polymerize intracellularly and lead to a cascade of events resulting in decreased deformability and increased adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs). Decreased deformability and increased adhesion of sickle RBCs lead to blood vessel occlusion (vaso-occlusion) in SCD patients. Here, we present a microfluidic approach integrated with a cell dimensioning algorithm to analyze dynamic deformability of adhered RBC at the single-cell level in controlled microphysiological flow. We measured and compared dynamic deformability and adhesion of healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs in blood samples obtained from 24 subjects. We introduce a new parameter to assess deformability of RBCs: the dynamic deformability index (DDI), which is defined as the time-dependent change of the cell's aspect ratio in response to fluid flow shear stress. Our results show that DDI of HbS-containing RBCs were significantly lower compared to that of HbA-containing RBCs. Moreover, we observed subpopulations of HbS containing RBCs in terms of their dynamic deformability characteristics: deformable and non-deformable RBCs. Then, we tested blood samples from SCD patients and analyzed RBC adhesion and deformability at physiological and above physiological flow shear stresses. We observed significantly greater number of adhered non-deformable sickle RBCs than deformable sickle RBCs at flow shear stresses well above the physiological range, suggesting an interplay between dynamic deformability and increased adhesion of RBCs in vaso-occlusive events.

  2. Stretching and relaxation of malaria-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2013-09-03

    The invasion of red blood cells (RBCs) by malaria parasites is a complex dynamic process, in which the infected RBCs gradually lose their deformability and their ability to recover their original shape is greatly reduced with the maturation of the parasites. In this work, we developed two types of cell model, one with an included parasite, and the other without an included parasite. The former is a representation of real malaria-infected RBCs, in which the parasite is treated as a rigid body. In the latter, where the parasite is absent, the membrane modulus and viscosity are elevated so as to produce the same features present in the parasite model. In both cases, the cell membrane is modeled as a viscoelastic triangular network connected by wormlike chains. We studied the transient behaviors of stretching deformation and shape relaxation of malaria-infected RBCs based on these two models and found that both models can generate results in agreement with those of previously published studies. With the parasite maturation, the shape deformation becomes smaller and smaller due to increasing cell rigidity, whereas the shape relaxation time becomes longer and longer due to the cell's reduced ability to recover its original shape. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of red blood cell deformability change during blood storage.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Jun; Cui, Tony; Shehata, Nadine; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2014-02-07

    Stored red blood cells (RBCs) show progressive deformability changes during blood banking/storage. Their deformability changes over an 8 weeks' storage period were measured using a microfluidic device. Hydrodynamic focusing controls the orientation and position of individual RBCs within the microchannel. High-speed imaging (5000 frames s(-1)) captures the dynamic deformation behavior of the cells, and together with automated image analysis, enables the characterization of over 1000 RBCs within 3 minutes. Multiple parameters including deformation index (DI), time constant (shape recovery rate), and RBC circularity were quantified. Compared to previous studies on stored RBC deformability, our results include a significantly higher number of cells (>1000 cells per sample vs. a few to tens of cells per sample) and, for the first time, reveal deformation changes of stored RBCs when traveling through human-capillary-like microchannels. Contrary to existing knowledge, our results demonstrate that the deformation index of RBCs under folding does not change significantly over blood storage. However, significant differences exist in time constants and circularity distribution widths, which can be used to quantify stored RBC quality or age.

  4. Imaging red blood cell dynamics by quantitative phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Gabriel; Park, YoungKeun; Choi, Wonshik; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) play a crucial role in health and disease, and structural and mechanical abnormalities of these cells have been associated with important disorders such as Sickle cell disease and hereditary cytoskeletal abnormalities. Although several experimental methods exist for analysis of RBC mechanical properties, optical methods stand out as they enable collecting mechanical and dynamic data from live cells without physical contact and without the need for exogenous contrast agents. In this report, we present quantitative phase microscopy techniques that enable imaging RBC membrane fluctuations with nanometer sensitivity at arbitrary time scales from milliseconds to hours. We further provide a theoretical framework for extraction of membrane mechanical and dynamical properties using time series of quantitative phase images. Finally, we present an experimental approach to extend quantitative phase imaging to 3-dimensional space using tomographic methods. By providing non-invasive methods for imaging mechanics of live cells, these novel techniques provide an opportunity for high-throughput analysis and study of RBC mechanical properties in health and disease.

  5. Skeleton deformation of red blood cells during tank treading motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Peng, Zhangli

    2012-11-01

    By coupling a fluid-structure interaction algorithm with a three-level multiscale structural model, we simulate the tank treading responses of erythrocytes (red blood cells, or RBC) in shear flows. The fluid motion is depicted within the Stokes-flow framework, and is mathematically formulated with the boundary integral equations. The structural model takes into account the flexible connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the protein skeleton as well as the viscoelastic responses. The concentration of this study is on the transient process involving the development of the local area deformation of the protein skeleton. Under the assumption that the protein skeleton is stress-free in the natural biconcave configuration, our simulations indicate the following properties: (1) During tank treading motions it takes long time for significant area deformations to establish. For cells with diminished connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the protein skeleton (e.g. cells with mutations or defects), the relaxation time will be greatly reduced; (2) Deformations of the skeleton depend on the initial orientation of the cell with respect to the incoming flow; (3) The maximum area expansion occurs around the regions corresponding to the dimples in the original biconcave state; (4) Oscillations in cell geometry (breathing) and orientation (e.g. swinging) are observed. This work was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute under award number R01HL092793.

  6. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  7. Research opportunities in loss of red blood cell mass in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, J. M.; Fisher, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    Decreases of red blood cell mass and plasma volume have been observed consistently following manned space flights. Losses of red cell mass by United States astronauts have averaged 10 to 15% (range: 2 to 21%). Based on postflight estimates of total hemoglobin, Soviet cosmonauts engaged in space missions lasting from 1 to 7 months have exhibited somewhat greater losses. Restoration of red cell mass requires from 4 to 6 weeks following return to Earth, regardless of the duration of space flight.

  8. Usefulness of particle image analyzer for evaluation of fragmented red cells.

    PubMed

    Saigo, Katsuyasu; Hashimoto, Makoto; Kumagai, Shunichi; Tanaka, Chiaki; Imoto, Shion

    2005-08-01

    Quantitative determination of fragmented red cells (FRCs) in peripheral blood is useful in various clinical fields. We have previously reported an automatic detection method using a hematology analyzer essentially based on detection of small red cells. We then tried to use another instrument, the FPIA 2100, to reflect the characteristic morphology of red cells. As the circularity obtained by FPIA 2100 correlated with the FRC%, this type of instrument might be helpful to establish better automatic detection methods.

  9. Measuring skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution by laser ektacytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, S. Yu; Priezzhev, A. V.; Lugovtsov, A. E.; Ustinov, V. D.

    2014-08-01

    An algorithm is proposed for measuring the parameters of red blood cell deformability distribution based on laser diffractometry of red blood cells in shear flow (ektacytometry). The algorithm is tested on specially prepared samples of rat blood. In these experiments we succeeded in measuring the mean deformability, deformability variance and skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution with errors of 10%, 15% and 35%, respectively.

  10. Measuring skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution by laser ektacytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Lugovtsov, A E; Ustinov, V D

    2014-08-31

    An algorithm is proposed for measuring the parameters of red blood cell deformability distribution based on laser diffractometry of red blood cells in shear flow (ektacytometry). The algorithm is tested on specially prepared samples of rat blood. In these experiments we succeeded in measuring the mean deformability, deformability variance and skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution with errors of 10%, 15% and 35%, respectively. (laser biophotonics)

  11. Red Dot Basal Cell Carcinoma: An Unusual Variant of a Common Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Loh, Tiffany Y; Cohen, Philip R

    2016-05-01

    Red dot basal cell carcinoma is a distinct but rare subtype of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). It presents as a red macule or papule; therefore, in most cases, it may easily be mistaken for a benign vascular lesion, such as a telangiectasia or angioma.
    A red dot BCC in an older woman is described. Clinical and histological differences between red dot BCCs and telangiectasias are described.
    A 72-year-old woman initially presented with a painless red macule on her nose. Biopsy of the lesion established the diagnosis of a red dot BCC. Pubmed was searched for the following terms: angioma, basal cell carcinoma, dermoscope, diascopy, red dot, non-melanoma skin cancer, telangiectasia, and vascular. The papers were reviewed for cases of red dot basal cell carcinoma. Clinical and histological characteristics of red dot basal cell carcinoma and telangiectasias were compared.
    Red dot BCC is an extremely rare variant of BCC that may be confused with benign vascular lesions. Although BCCs rarely metastasize and are associated with low mortality, they have the potential to become locally invasive and destructive if left untreated. Thus, a high index of suspicion for red dot BCC is necessary.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(5):645-647.

  12. Rheology of red blood cell aggregation by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Liu, Wing Kam

    2006-12-01

    The aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) induced by the interactions between RBCs is a dominant factor of the in vitro rheological properties of blood, and existing models of blood do not contain full cellular information. In this work, we introduce a new three-dimensional model that couples Navier-Stokes equations with cell interactions to investigate RBC aggregation and its effect on blood rheology. It consists of a depletion mediated aggregation model to describe the interactions of RBCs and an immersed continuum model to track the deformation/motion of RBCs in blood plasma. To overcome the large deformation of RBCs, the meshfree method is used to model the RBCs. Three important phenomena in blood rheology are successfully captured and studied via this approach: the shear rate dependence of blood viscosity, the influence of cell rigidity on blood viscosity, and the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect. As a microscopic illustration of the shear-rate dependence of the blood's viscoelasticity, the disaggregation of an RBC rouleau at shear rates varying between 0.125 and 24 s -1 is modeled. Lower RBC deformability and higher shear rates above 0.5 s -1 are found to facilitate disaggregation. The effective viscosities at different shear rates and for cells with different deformabilities are simulated. The numerical results are shown to agree with the reported experimental measurements. The Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is, for the first time, studied through three-dimensional numerical simulations of blood flow through tubes with different diameters and is shown to be directly linked to axial-migration of deformable cells. This study shows that cell-cell interaction and cell deformability have significant effects on blood rheology in capillaries.

  13. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  14. Red blood cells ageing markers: a multi-parametric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bardyn, Manon; Rappaz, Benjamin; Jaferzadeh, Keyvan; Crettaz, David; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Moon, Inkyu; Turcatti, Gerardo; Lion, Niels; Prudent, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Background Red blood cells collected in citrate-phosphate-dextrose can be stored for up to 42 days at 4 °C in saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol additive solution. During this controlled, but nevertheless artificial, ex vivo ageing, red blood cells accumulate lesions that can be reversible or irreversible upon transfusion. The aim of the present study is to follow several parameters reflecting cell metabolism, antioxidant defences, morphology and membrane dynamics during storage. Materials and methods Five erythrocyte concentrates were followed weekly during 71 days. Extracellular glucose and lactate concentrations, total antioxidant power, as well as reduced and oxidised intracellular glutathione levels were quantified. Microvesiculation, percentage of haemolysis and haematologic parameters were also evaluated. Finally, morphological changes and membrane fluctuations were recorded using label-free digital holographic microscopy. Results The antioxidant power as well as the intracellular glutathione concentration first increased, reaching maximal values after one and two weeks, respectively. Irreversible morphological lesions appeared during week 5, where discocytes began to transform into transient echinocytes and finally spherocytes. At the same time, the microvesiculation and haemolysis started to rise exponentially. After six weeks (expiration date), intracellular glutathione was reduced by 25%, reflecting increasing oxidative stress. The membrane fluctuations showed decreased amplitudes during shape transition from discocytes to spherocytes. Discussion Various types of lesions accumulated at different chemical and cellular levels during storage, which could impact their in vivo recovery after transfusion. A marked effect was observed after four weeks of storage, which corroborates recent clinical data. The prolonged follow-up period allowed the capture of deep storage lesions. Interestingly, and as previously described, the severity of the changes differed among

  15. Red blood cells serve as intravascular carriers of myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Adam, Matti; Gajdova, Silvie; Kolarova, Hana; Kubala, Lukas; Lau, Denise; Geisler, Anne; Ravekes, Thorben; Rudolph, Volker; Tsao, Philip S; Blankenberg, Stefan; Baldus, Stephan; Klinke, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a heme enzyme abundantly expressed in polymorphonuclear neutrophils. MPO is enzymatically capable of catalyzing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the consumption of nitric oxide (NO). Thus MPO has both potent microbicidal and, upon binding to the vessel wall, pro-inflammatory properties. Interestingly, MPO - a highly cationic protein - has been shown to bind to both endothelial cells and leukocyte membranes. Given the anionic surface charge of red blood cells, we investigated binding of MPO to erythrocytes. Red blood cells (RBCs) derived from patients with elevated MPO plasma levels showed significantly higher amounts of MPO by flow cytometry and ELISA than healthy controls. Heparin-induced MPO-release from patient-derived RBCs was significantly increased compared to controls. Ex vivo experiments revealed dose and time dependency for MPO-RBC binding, and immunofluorescence staining as well as confocal microscopy localized MPO-RBC interaction to the erythrocyte plasma membrane. NO-consumption by RBC-membrane fragments (erythrocyte "ghosts") increased with incrementally greater concentrations of MPO during incubation, indicating preserved catalytic MPO activity. In vivo infusion of MPO-loaded RBCs into C57BL/6J mice increased local MPO tissue concentrations in liver, spleen, lung, and heart tissue as well as within the cardiac vasculature. Further, NO-dependent relaxation of aortic rings was altered by RBC bound-MPO and systemic vascular resistance significantly increased after infusion of MPO-loaded RBCs into mice. In summary, we find that MPO binds to RBC membranes in vitro and in vivo, is transported by RBCs to remote sites in mice, and affects endothelial function as well as systemic vascular resistance. RBCs may avidly bind circulating MPO, and act as carriers of this leukocyte-derived enzyme. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The novel role of peroxiredoxin-2 in red cell membrane protein homeostasis and senescence.

    PubMed

    Matté, Alessandro; Pantaleo, Antonella; Ferru, Emanuela; Turrini, Franco; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Lupo, Francesca; Siciliano, Angela; Ho Zoon, Chae; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2014-11-01

    Peroxiredoxin-2 (Prx2), a typical two-cysteine peroxiredoxin, is the third most abundant protein in red cells. Although progress has been made in the functional characterization of Prx2, its role in red cell membrane protein homeostasis is still under investigation. Here, we studied Prx2(-/-) mouse red cells. The absence of Prx2 promotes (i) activation of the oxidative-induced Syk pathway; (ii) increased band 3 Tyr phosphorylation, with clustered band 3; and (iii) increased heat shock protein (HSP27 and HSP70) membrane translocation. This was associated with enhanced in vitro erythrophagocytosis of Prx2(-/-) red cells and reduced Prx2(-/-) red cell survival, indicating the possible role of Prx2 membrane recruitment in red cell aging and in the clearance of oxidized hemoglobin and damaged proteins through microparticles. Indeed, we observed an increased release of microparticles from Prx2(-/-) mouse red cells. The mass spectrometric analysis of erythroid microparticles found hemoglobin chains, membrane proteins, and HSPs. To test these findings, we treated Prx2(-/-) mice with antioxidants in vivo. We observed that N-acetylcysteine reduced (i) Syk activation, (ii) band 3 clusterization, (iii) HSP27 membrane association, and (iv) erythroid microparticle release, resulting in increased Prx2(-/-) mouse red cell survival. Thus, we propose that Prx2 may play a cytoprotective role in red cell membrane protein homeostasis and senescence.

  17. The deformation behavior of multiple red blood cells in a capillary vessel.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaobo; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2009-07-01

    The deformation of multiple red blood cells in a capillary flow was studied numerically. The immersed boundary method was used for the fluid red blood cells interaction. The membrane of the red blood cell was modeled as a hyperelastic thin shell. The numerical results show that the apparent viscosity in the capillary flow is more sensitive to the change of shear coefficient of the membrane than the bending coefficient and surface dilation coefficient, and the increase in the shear coefficient results in an increase in the pressure drop in the blood flow in capillary vessels in order to sustain the same flux rate of red blood cells.

  18. Storage time of red blood cells and mortality of transfusion recipients.

    PubMed

    Middelburg, Rutger A; van de Watering, Leo M G; Briët, Ernest; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2013-01-01

    Storage of red cells and the associated storage lesion have been suggested to contribute to adverse clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increasing storage time of red cells is associated with mortality of recipients. From all patients who received red cell transfusions between January 2005 and May 2009, in the Leiden University Medical Center, we selected those who received only-young or only-old red cells, defined as below or above the median storage time. Mortality was compared in a Cox regression model. Subsequently, similar comparisons were made between subgroups with increasing contrast between old and young red cells. Among adult patients, after correction for potential confounders, the hazard ratio of death within 1 year after receiving red cells stored for more than 17 days compared with 17 days or less was 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.2). With increasing contrast, the hazard ratio decreased to 0.56 (95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.97) for red cells stored for more than 24 days compared with less than 10 days. In contrast to what has previously been suggested, we find an almost 2-fold increase in mortality rate after the transfusion of fresh red cells compared with old red cells. Results dependent on analyses chosen and previous studies may not have used optimal analyses. The tendency to demand ever-fresher blood could actually be detrimental for at least some patient groups.

  19. Red cell or serum folate: what to do in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Farrell, Christopher-John L; Kirsch, Susanne H; Herrmann, Markus

    2013-03-01

    Folate deficiency has been linked to diverse clinical manifestations and despite the importance of accurate assessment of folate status, the best test for routine use is uncertain. Both serum and red cell folate assays are widely available in clinical laboratories; however, red cell folate is the more time-consuming and costly test. This review sought to evaluate whether the red cell assay demonstrated superior performance characteristics to justify these disadvantages. Red cell folate, but not serum folate, measurements demonstrated analytical variation due to sample pre-treatment parameters, oxygen saturation of haemoglobin and haematocrit. Neither marker was clearly superior in characterising deficiency but serum folate more frequently showed the higher correlation with homocysteine, a sensitive marker of deficiency. Similarly, both serum and red cell folate were shown to increase in response to folic acid supplementation. However, serum folate generally gave the greater response and was able to distinguish different supplementation doses. The C677T polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase alters the distribution of folate forms in red cells and may thereby cause further analytical variability in routine red cell folate assays. Overall, serum folate is cheaper and faster to perform than red cell folate, is influenced by fewer analytical variables and provides an assessment of folate status that may be superior to red cell folate.

  20. Red cell pulmonary transit times through the healthy human lung.

    PubMed

    Zavorsky, G S; Walley, K R; Russell, J A

    2003-03-01

    It has previously been postulated that rapid red cell capillary transit through the human lung plays a role in the mechanism of diffusion limitation in some endurance athletes. Methodological limitations currently prevent researchers from directly measuring pulmonary capillary transit times in humans during exercise; however, first pass radionuclide cardiography allows direct measurement of red blood cell (RBC) transit times through the whole lung at various exercise intensities. We examined the relationship between mean whole lung red cell pulmonary transit times (cardiopulmonary transit times or CPTT) and different levels of flow in 88 healthy humans (76 males, 12 females) from several studies (mean age 31 years). The pooled data suggest that the relationship between CPTT and cardiac index (CI), beginning at rest and progressing through to maximum exercise demonstrates that CPTT reaches its minimum value when CI is about 8.1 l m2 x min(-1) (2.5-3 times the CI value at rest), and does not significantly change with further increases in CI. Cardiopulmonary blood volume (CPBV) index also does not change significantly until CI reaches 2.5 to 3 times the CI value at rest and then increases roughly linearly after that point. Consequently, the systematic increase in CPBV index with increasing pulmonary blood flow between 8.1 and 20 l m2 x min(-1) displays an adaptive response of the cardiopulmonary system by augmenting CPBV (and perhaps pulmonary capillary blood volume through distension and recruitment) to offset the reduction in CPTT, as no significant difference in mean CPTT is observed between these levels of flow (P > 0.05). Therefore, these data demonstrate that CPBV does not reach maximum capacity during strenuous or maximum exercise. This does not support the principle of quarter-power allometric scaling for flow when explaining modifications during exercise. Therefore, we speculate that the observed relationships between CPTT, CBPV index and flow may prevent

  1. Axial dispersion in flowing red blood cell suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Losserand, Sylvain; Coupier, Gwennou

    2016-11-01

    A key parameter in blood microcirculation is the transit time of red blood cells (RBCs) through an organ, which can influence the efficiency of gas exchange and oxygen availability. A large dispersion of this transit time is observed in vivo and is partly due to the axial dispersion in the flowing suspension. In the classic Taylor-Aris example of a solute flowing in a tube, the combination of molecular diffusion and parabolic velocity profile leads to enhanced axial dispersion. In suspensions of non-Brownian deformable bodies such as RBCs, axial dispersion is governed by a combination of shear induced migration and shear-induced diffusion arising from hydrodynamic interactions. We revisit this problem in the case of RBC pulses flowing in a microchannel and show that the axial dispersion of the pulse eventually saturates with a final extension that depends directly on RBC mechanical properties. The result is especially interesting in the dilute limit since the final pulse length depends only on the channel width, exponent of the migration law and dimensionless migration velocity. In continuous flow, the dispersion of transit times is the result of complex cell-cell and cell-wall interactions and is strongy influenced by the polydispersity of the blood sample. The authors acknowledge support from LabEx TEC21 and CNES.

  2. Dynamics of Red Cells in Spleen: How Does Vesiculation Happen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Salehyar, Sara; Cabrales, Pedro; Asaro, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Vesiculation of red blood cells as a result of local separation between lipid bilayer and cytoskeleton is known to happen in vivo, most likely inside spleen where they sustain large mechanical loads during the passage through venus slits. There is, however, little knowledge about the detailed scenario and condition. We address this question via a fluid-cell interaction model by coupling a multiscale model of the cell membrane (including molecular details) with a fluid dynamics model based on boundary-integral equations. A numerical flow channel is created where the cell is driven through a narrow slit by pressure (imitating the transit through venus slits in spleen). The concentration is the occurrence of large dissociation (negative) pressure between the skeleton/membrane connection that promotes separation, a precursor of vesicle formation. Critical levels for the negative pressure are estimated using published data. By following the maximum range of pressure, we conclude that for vesiculation to happen there must be biochemical influences (e.g. binding of degraded haemoglobin) that significantly reduce effective attachment density. This is consistent with reported trends in vesiculation that are believed to occur in cases of various hereditary anemias and during blood storage. Our findings also suggest the criticality of understanding the biochemical phenomena involved with cytoskeleton/membrane attachment.

  3. Regulation of phosphatidylserine exposure in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Bach; Wagner-Britz, Lisa; Maia, Sara; Steffen, Patrick; Wagner, Christian; Kaestner, Lars; Bernhardt, Ingolf

    2011-01-01

    The exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer membrane leaflet of red blood cells (RBCs) serves as a signal for eryptosis, a mechanism for the RBC clearance from blood circulation. The process of PS exposure was investigated as function of the intracellular Ca(2+) content and the activation of PKCα in human and sheep RBCs. Cells were treated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), 4-bromo-A23187, or phorbol-12 myristate-13 acetate (PMA) and analysed by flow cytometry, single cell fluorescence video imaging, or confocal microscopy. For human RBCs, no clear correlation existed between the number of cells with an elevated Ca(2+) content and PS exposure. Results are explained by three different mechanisms responsible for the PS exposure in human RBCs: (i) Ca(2+)-stimulated scramblase activation (and flippase inhibition) by LPA, 4-bromo-A23187, and PMA; (ii) PKC activation by LPA and PMA; and (iii) enhanced lipid flop caused by LPA. In sheep RBCs, only the latter mechanism occurs suggesting absence of scramblase activity. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Modeling of Red Blood Cells and Related Spleen Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pivkin, Igor; Dao, Ming

    2011-11-01

    A key function of the spleen is to clear red blood cells (RBCs) with abnormal mechanical properties from the circulation. These abnormal mechanical properties may be due to RBC aging or RBC diseases, e.g., malaria and sickle cell anemia. Specifically, 10% of RBCs passing through the spleen are forced to squeeze into the narrow slits between the endothelial cells, and stiffer cells which get stuck are killed and digested by macrophages. To investigate this important physiological process, we employ three different approaches to study RBCs passage through these small slits, including analytical theory, Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation and Multiscale Finite Element Method (MS-FEM). By applying the analytical theory, we estimate the critical limiting geometries RBCs can pass. By using the DPD method, we study the full fluid-structure interaction problem, and compute RBC deformation under different pressure gradients. By employing the MS-FEM approach, we model the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton as two distinct layers, and focus on the cytoskeleton deformation and the bilayer-skeleton interaction force at the molecular level. Finally the results of these three approaches are compared to each other and correlated to the experimental observations.

  5. Minimal RED cell pairs markedly improve electrode kinetics and power production in microbial reverse electrodialysis cells.

    PubMed

    Cusick, Roland D; Hatzell, Marta; Zhang, Fang; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-12-17

    Power production from microbial reverse electrodialysis cell (MRC) electrodes is substantially improved compared to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) solutions in multiple RED cell pair stacks and the cathode chamber. Reducing the number of RED membranes pairs while maintaining enhanced electrode performance could help to reduce capital costs. We show here that using only a single RED cell pair (CP), created by operating the cathode in concentrated AmB, dramatically increased power production normalized to cathode area from both acetate (Acetate: from 0.9 to 3.1 W/m(2)-cat) and wastewater (WW: 0.3 to 1.7 W/m(2)), by reducing solution and charge transfer resistances at the cathode. A second RED cell pair increased RED stack potential and reduced anode charge transfer resistance, further increasing power production (Acetate: 4.2 W/m(2); WW: 1.9 W/m(2)). By maintaining near optimal electrode power production with fewer membranes, power densities normalized to total membrane area for the 1-CP (Acetate: 3.1 W/m(2)-mem; WW: 1.7 W/m(2)) and 2-CP (Acetate: 1.3 W/m(2)-mem; WW: 0.6 W/m(2)) reactors were much higher than previous MRCs (0.3-0.5 W/m(2)-mem with acetate). While operating at peak power, the rate of wastewater COD removal, normalized to reactor volume, was 30-50 times higher in 1-CP and 2-CP MRCs than that in a single chamber MFC. These findings show that even a single cell pair AmB RED stack can significantly enhance electrical power production and wastewater treatment.

  6. Unbalanced discharging and aging due to temperature differences among the cells in a lithium-ion battery pack with parallel combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Naixing; Zhang, Xiongwen; Shang, BinBin; Li, Guojun

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the unbalanced discharging and aging due to temperature difference between the parallel-connected cells. A thermal-electrochemical model is developed for the parallel-connected battery pack. The effects of temperature difference on the unbalanced discharging performances are studied by simulations and experiments. For the parallel-connected cells, the cell at higher temperature experiences a larger current in the early discharging process before approximately 75% of depth of discharge (DOD). When the discharge process approaches the voltage turn point of the battery pack, the discharge current through the cell at higher temperature begins to decrease significantly. After the DOD reaches approximately 90%, the discharge current of the cell at higher temperature rises again. Correspondingly, the changes in the discharging current through the cell at lower temperature are opposite to that of the cell at higher temperature. Simulations also show that the temperature difference between the parallel-connected cells greatly aggravates the imbalance discharge phenomenon between the cells, which accelerates the losses of the battery pack capacity. For the parallel-connected battery pack, the capacity loss rate approximately increases linearly as the temperature difference between the cells increases. This trend is magnified with the increase of operating temperature.

  7. A red/far-red light-responsive bi-stable toggle switch to control gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Metzger, Stéphanie; Schulz, Simon; Kämpf, Michael M.; Busacker, Moritz; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Ehrbar, Martin; Nagy, Ferenc; Timmer, Jens; Zubriggen, Matias D.; Weber, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Growth and differentiation of multicellular systems is orchestrated by spatially restricted gene expression programs in specialized subpopulations. The targeted manipulation of such processes by synthetic tools with high-spatiotemporal resolution could, therefore, enable a deepened understanding of developmental processes and open new opportunities in tissue engineering. Here, we describe the first red/far-red light-triggered gene switch for mammalian cells for achieving gene expression control in time and space. We show that the system can reversibly be toggled between stable on- and off-states using short light pulses at 660 or 740 nm. Red light-induced gene expression was shown to correlate with the applied photon number and was compatible with different mammalian cell lines, including human primary cells. The light-induced expression kinetics were quantitatively analyzed by a mathematical model. We apply the system for the spatially controlled engineering of angiogenesis in chicken embryos. The system’s performance combined with cell- and tissue-compatible regulating red light will enable unprecedented spatiotemporally controlled molecular interventions in mammalian cells, tissues and organisms. PMID:23355611

  8. Nanostructural Changes in the Cell Membrane of Gamma-Irradiated Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    AlZahrani, Khalid; Al-Sewaidan, Hamed A

    2017-03-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on the ultrastructure of the cell membranes of red blood cells has been probed using a powerful tool, namely, atomic force microscopy. We used mice erythrocytes as a model. Blood samples withdrawn from mice were gamma-irradiated using a (60)Co source unit with doses of 10,15,20,25 and 30 Gy. Structural changes appeared in the form of nanoscale potholes, depressions and alterations of the cell membrane roughness. The roughness of the cell membrane increased dramatically with increasing doses, although at 10 Gy , the cell membrane roughness was less than that of normal red blood cells (controls). Therefore, such modifications at the nano-scale level may affect the biophysical properties of membranes, resulting in impairment of their function.

  9. Drugs for preventing red blood cell dehydration in people with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Nagalla, Srikanth; Ballas, Samir K

    2016-03-04

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited disorder of hemoglobin, resulting in abnormal red blood cells. These are rigid and may block blood vessels leading to acute painful crises and other complications. Recent research has focused on therapies to rehydrate the sickled cells by reducing the loss of water and ions from them. Little is known about the effectiveness and safety of such drugs. This is an updated version of a previously published review. To assess the relative risks and benefits of drugs to rehydrate sickled red blood cells. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register.Last search of the Group's Trials Register: 28 November 2015. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials of drugs to rehydrate sickled red blood cells compared to placebo or an alternative treatment. Both authors independently selected studies for inclusion, assessed study quality and extracted data. Of the 51 studies identified, three met the inclusion criteria. The first study tested the effectiveness of zinc sulphate to prevent sickle cell-related crises in a total of 145 participants and showed a significant reduction in painful crises over one and a half years, mean difference -2.83 (95% confidence interval -3.51 to -2.15). However, analysis was restricted due to limited statistical data. Changes to red cell parameters and blood counts were inconsistent. No serious adverse events were noted in the study.The second study was a Phase II dose-finding study of senicapoc (a Gardos channel blocker) compared to placebo. Compared to the placebo group the high dose senicapoc showed significant improvement in change in hemoglobin level, number and proportion of dense red blood cells, red blood cell count and indices and hematocrit. The results with low-dose senicapoc were similar to the high-dose senicapoc group but of lesser magnitude. There was no difference in the frequency of painful crises between the three groups. A

  10. Duration of red blood cell storage and inflammatory marker generation

    PubMed Central

    Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Chou, Ming Li; Garraud, Olivier; Laradi, Sandrine; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Seghatchian, Jerard; Burnouf, Thierry; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a life-saving treatment for several pathologies. RBCs for transfusion are stored refrigerated in a preservative solution, which extends their shelf-life for up to 42 days. During storage, the RBCs endure abundant physicochemical changes, named RBC storage lesions, which affect the overall quality standard, the functional integrity and in vivo survival of the transfused RBCs. Some of the changes occurring in the early stages of the storage period (for approximately two weeks) are reversible but become irreversible later on as the storage is extended. In this review, we aim to decipher the duration of RBC storage and inflammatory marker generation. This phenomenon is included as one of the causes of transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM), an emerging concept developed to potentially elucidate numerous clinical observations that suggest that RBC transfusion is associated with increased inflammatory events or effects with clinical consequence. PMID:28263172

  11. Considerations of red blood cell molecular testing in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Annika M; Delaney, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    The field of transfusion medicine is on the threshold of a paradigm shift, as the technology for genotyping of red blood cell antigens, including US FDA-approved arrays, is now moving into standard practice. Access to cost-efficient, high-resolution genotyping has the potential to increase the quality of care by decreasing the risk for alloimmunization and incompatible transfusions in individuals on long-term blood transfusion protocols, including patient groups with hemoglobinopathies and other chronic diseases. Current and future applications of molecular methods in transfusion medicine and blood banking are discussed, with emphasis on indications for genotyping in various clinical scenarios. Furthermore, limitations of the current gold standard methodology and serology, as well as of contemporary molecular methodology, are examined.

  12. Magnetic nanoparticle effects on the red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creangă, D. E.; Culea, M.; Nădejde, C.; Oancea, S.; Curecheriu, L.; Racuciu, M.

    2009-05-01

    In vitro tests on magnetite colloidal nanoparticles effects upon animal red blood cells were carried out. Magnetite cores were stabilized with citric acid in the form of biocompatible magnetic fluid administrated in different dilutions in the whole blood samples. The hemolysis extent was found increased up to 2.75 in horse blood and respectively up to 2.81 in the dog blood. The electronic transitions assigned to the heme group were found shifted with about 500 cm-1 or, respectively, affected by supplementary vibronic structures. The Raman vibrations assigned to oxyhemoglobin were much diminished in intensity probably due to the bonding of OH group from citrate shell to the heme iron ion.

  13. SEM analysis of red blood cells in aged human bloodstains.

    PubMed

    Hortolà, P

    1992-08-01

    Mammal red blood cells (RBC) in bloodstains have been previously detected by light microscopy on stone tools from as early as 100,000 +/- 25,000 years ago. In order to evaluate the degree of morphological preservation of erythrocytes in bloodstains, an accidental human blood smear on white chert and several experimental bloodstains on hard substrates (the same stone-white chert; another type of stone-graywacke; a non-stone support-stainless steel), were stored in a room, in non-sterile and fluctuating conditions, for lengths of time ranging from 3 to 18 months. Afterwards, the specimens were coated with gold and examined by a Cambridge Stereoscan 120 scanning electron microscope. Results revealed a high preservation of RBC integrity, with the maintenance of several discocytary shapes, a low tendency to echinocytosis and a frequent appearance of a moon-like erythrocytary shape in the thinner areas of the bloodstains.

  14. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  15. Pure red cell aplasia following autoimmune hemolytic anemia: an enigma.

    PubMed

    Saha, M; Ray, S; Kundu, S; Chakrabarti, P

    2013-01-01

    A 26-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 6-month history of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolytic anemia and direct antiglobulin test was positive. With a diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), prednisolone was started but was ineffective after 1 month of therapy. A bone marrow trephine biopsy revealed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) showing severe erythroid hypoplasia. The case was considered PRCA following AIHA. This combination without clear underlying disease is rare. Human parvovirus B19 infection was not detected in the marrow aspirate during reticulocytopenia. The patient received azathioprine, and PRCA improved but significant hemolysis was once again documented with a high reticulocyte count. The short time interval between AIHA and PRCA phase suggested an increased possibility of the evolution of a single disease.

  16. Numerical studies of a red blood cell in rectangular microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ting; Shi, Huixin; Peng, Lina; Li, Yu

    2017-08-01

    The study of red blood cells (RBCs) flowing through rectangular microchannels has attracted an increasing interest, because most of the current microfluidic chips are designed as rectangular microchannels for the purpose of easy fabrication. In this paper, we numerically investigate the 3D motion and deformation of a RBC in rectangular microchannels, by using the smoothed dissipative particle dynamics to model the fluid flow and coupling the immersed boundary method to treat the fluid-RBC interaction. We have considered several fundamental questions concerned in experiments, including the effect of the mechanical properties of RBC, the initial position and orientation of RBC, as well as the asymmetry of the microchannel. In addition, we have demonstrated the differences among the fully 3D, axisymmetric, and 2D simulations of a RBC in microchannels.

  17. Automatic tracking of labeled red blood cells in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Diana; Lima, Rui; Pereira, Ana I; Gayubo, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    The current study proposes an automatic method for the segmentation and tracking of red blood cells flowing through a 100- μm glass capillary. The original images were obtained by means of a confocal system and then processed in MATLAB using the Image Processing Toolbox. The measurements obtained with the proposed automatic method were compared with the results determined by a manual tracking method. The comparison was performed by using both linear regressions and Bland-Altman analysis. The results have shown a good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, the proposed automatic method is a powerful way to provide rapid and accurate measurements for in vitro blood experiments in microchannels. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Image-based red cell counting for wild animals blood.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, Claudio R M; Schneider, Fabio K; Dos Santos, Leonilda Correia

    2010-01-01

    An image-based red blood cell (RBC) automatic counting system is presented for wild animals blood analysis. Images with 2048×1536-pixel resolution acquired on an optical microscope using Neubauer chambers are used to evaluate RBC counting for three animal species (Leopardus pardalis, Cebus apella and Nasua nasua) and the error found using the proposed method is similar to that obtained for inter observer visual counting method, i.e., around 10%. Smaller errors (e.g., 3%) can be obtained in regions with less grid artifacts. These promising results allow the use of the proposed method either as a complete automatic counting tool in laboratories for wild animal's blood analysis or as a first counting stage in a semi-automatic counting tool.

  19. Pressure and temperature effects on human red cell cation transport.

    PubMed

    Hall, A C; Ellory, J C; Klein, R A

    1982-01-01

    The effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the three components of K+ uptake in human red cells have been investigated, using ouabain and bumetanide to distinguish between the pump, passive diffusion and cotransport. The pressure sensitivity for passive diffusion has been shown to depend on the counter-ion present. The order of this effect, Cl- greater than Br- greater than NO3- greater than I-, is the same as for the ionic partial molal volumes and the Hofmeister series. We have analyzed our experimental results thermodynamically, and propose a model for the activated transition-state complex of the potassium ion which involves the loss of water molecules from the secondary hydration shell, cosphere II.

  20. Stretching Behavior of Red Blood Cells at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this work, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that a simple viscoelastic model captures the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 1000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  1. Mobility Enhancement of Red Blood Cells with Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahara, Daiki; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion of red blood cells (RBC) to substrates are one of crucial problems for a blood clot. Here we investigate the mobility of RBC between two glass substrates in saline with polymer systems. We find that RBCs are adhered to the glass substrate with PEG, however the mobility steeply increases with fibrinogen and dextran, which are biopolymers. We also find that the mobility affects an aggregation dynamics of RBCs, which is related with diseases such as influenza, blood clot and so on. The Brownian motion helps to increase probability of contact with each other and to find a more stable condition of the aggregation. Thus the biopolymers play important roles not only for preventing the adhesion but also for the aggregation.

  2. Vesicles, capsules and red blood cells under flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misbah, Chaouqi

    2012-12-01

    Blood flow is dictated by the dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs), which constitute by far the major component. RBCs are made of a a two dimensional fluid bilayer of phospholipids, having underneath a network of proteins conferring to them shear elasticity, and they possess many membrane and transmembrane proteins (like ion channels). Simplified systems, like vesicles (made of a pure bilayer of phospholipid) and capsules (made of an extensible polymer shell) are used as models for RBCs. Both systems reproduce several features known for RBCs under flow. Their interest lies, besides some simplicity, in the fact that they can be fabricated in the laboratory, and their properties (size, stiffness, internal content....) can be varied in a wide range allowing thus to explore a quite significant parameter space that is essential to test predictions and discriminate between different models. We shall review the main recent achievement in this field, both for a single entity, collective effects and the impact on rheology.

  3. Red cell enzyme polymorphisms in Papua New Guinea Eastern Highlands.

    PubMed

    Seger, J; Godelier, M; Halle, L; Lemonnier, P; Lory, J L; Rouger, P; Ruffie, J; Salmon, D

    1988-01-01

    Ten red cell enzyme polymorphisms, malic dehydrogenase (MDH1), adenylate kinase (AK), phosphohexose isomerase (PHI), adenosine deaminase (ADA), esterase D (ESD), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), acid phosphatase (ACP1), phosphoglucomutase 1 and 2 (PGM1, PGM2), phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) were investigated in the Baruya tribe and several Anga tribes living high in the Wonenara and Marawaka valleys in Papua New Guinea Eastern Highlands (6.5S, 145.5E). Also a non-Anga tribe, the Aziana or Kenaze, was sampled. Variants were observed in ADA, PGM1 and PGM2. AK and PHI were monomorphic, all subjects being AK 1 and PHI 1; MDH1 was also monomorphic in Anga while variants were observed in Aziana. This latter tribe differed markedly in each system from the Anga peoples.

  4. Simulation of red blood cell aggregation in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Lim, B; Bascom, P A; Cobbold, R S

    1997-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed for red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in shear flow. It is based on a description of the collision rates of RBC, the probability of particles sticking together, and the breakage of aggregates by shear forces. The influence of shear rate, hematocrit, aggregate fractal dimension, and binding strength on aggregation kinetics were investigated and compared to other theoretical and experimental results. The model was used to simulate blood flow in a long large diameter tube under steady flow conditions at low Reynolds numbers. The time and spatial distribution of the state of aggregation are shown to be in qualitative agreement with previous B-mode ultrasound studies in which a central region of low echogenicity was noted. It is suggested that the model can provide a basis for interpreting prior measurements of ultrasound echogenicity and may help relate them to the local state of aggregation.

  5. Acquired pure red cell aplasia: updated review of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Kenichi; Fujishima, Naohito; Hirokawa, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a syndrome characterized by a severe normocytic anaemia, reticulocytopenia, and absence of erythroblasts from an otherwise normal bone marrow. Primary PRCA, or secondary PRCA which has not responded to treatment of the underlying disease, is treated as an immunologically-mediated disease. Although vigorous immunosuppressive treatments induce and maintain remissions in a majority of patients, they carry an increased risk of serious complications. Corticosteroids were used in the treatment of PRCA and this has been considered the treatment of first choice although relapse is not uncommon. Cyclosporine A (CsA) has become established as one of the leading drugs for treatment of PRCA. However, common concerns have been the number of patients treated with CsA who achieve sustained remissions and the number that relapse. This article reviews the current status of CsA therapy and compares it to other treatments for diverse PRCAs. PMID:18510682

  6. The preparation of human red cell ghosts containing calcium buffers.

    PubMed Central

    Simons, T J

    1976-01-01

    1. Ca buffers may be introduced into human red cells by reversible haemolysis. The resealed ghosts retain Ca and chelating anions in the same ratio as in the haemolysing solution, enabling the intracellular Ca2+ concentration to be calculated simply. 2. The passive permeability of the ghosts to Na and Cl is unaffected by intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in the 10(-8)-10(-4) M range, whereas the K permeability is greatly increased at concentrations above 10(-7) M. 3. These preparations enable Ca-dependent K movements to be studied under stable conditions. When the ghosts contain about 5 X 10(-6) M-Ca2+, over 96% of K transport occurs via the Ca-sensitive route. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:933031

  7. P2X and P2Y receptor signaling in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Sluyter, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Purinergic signaling involves the activation of cell surface P1 and P2 receptors by extracellular nucleosides and nucleotides such as adenosine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respectively. P2 receptors comprise P2X and P2Y receptors, and have well-established roles in leukocyte and platelet biology. Emerging evidence indicates important roles for these receptors in red blood cells. P2 receptor activation stimulates a number of signaling pathways in progenitor red blood cells resulting in microparticle release, reactive oxygen species formation, and apoptosis. Likewise, activation of P2 receptors in mature red blood cells stimulates signaling pathways mediating volume regulation, eicosanoid release, phosphatidylserine exposure, hemolysis, impaired ATP release, and susceptibility or resistance to infection. This review summarizes the distribution of P2 receptors in red blood cells, and outlines the functions of P2 receptor signaling in these cells and its implications in red blood cell biology.

  8. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

  9. Importance of Mean Red Cell Distribution Width in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Ahmed; Farooq, Junaid H; Assad, Salman; Ghazanfar, Haider; Ahmed, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Red cell distribution width (RDW), expressed in femtoliters (fl), is a measure of the variation in the size of circulating erythrocytes and is often expressed as a direct measurement of the width of the distribution. We aim to observe the mean value of red cell distribution width (RDW) in hypertensive patients. Increased RDW can be used as a tool for early diagnosis, as an inflammatory marker, and a mortality indicator in hypertensive patients due to its close relation to inflammation. Materials and methodology Hypertensive patients who had the condition for more than one year duration, diagnosed according to the Joint National Committee (JNC 7) criteria were subjected to complete blood count and RDW measurement. One hundred patients, aged between 12 years and 65 years were enrolled from the outpatient department of medicine at the Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Results The mean age (± SD) of the patients was 51.48 ± 10.08 years. Out of 100 patients 69% were males whereas 31% were females. The overall frequency of hypertension more than five years was 55% subjects whereas 45% individuals had duration of hypertension less than five years. Mean RDW in females was found to be 49.35±8.42 fl while mean RDW in males was 44.78±7.11 fl. An independent sample t-test was applied to assess if there was any significant difference between age and gender. No significant difference between age and gender was found (p<0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to assess any association of RDW with gender. RDW values in females was found to be statistically significantly higher than in males (U=603, p=0.01). Linear regression showed that mean RDW value increased with increasing age (P <0.001). Conclusions A significant number of patients with hypertension have increased levels of RDW. Therefore, it is recommended that serum RDW should be checked regularly in patients with hypertension. PMID:28070471

  10. Platelet and red blood cell indices in Harris platelet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naina, Harris V K; Harris, Samar

    2010-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias, including inherited giant platelet disorders (IGPD) or macro thrombocytopenias are relatively rare, but their prevalence is likely underestimated from complexities of diagnosis and a spectrum of subclinical phenotypes. Harris platelet syndrome (HPS) is the most common IGPD reported from the Indian subcontinent. Of note there are an increased number of hemoglobinopathies reported from the geographic location. We analysed red blood cell and platelet indices of blood donors with HPS from the north eastern part of India and compared them with blood indices of blood donors of south India. We found a statistically significant lower platelet count in blood donors with HPS (median, range) 132 (71-267) vs. 252 (160-478) as compared to donors from south India (P < 0.001). Mean platelet volume (MPV) was higher in donors with HPS 13.1, (range 12-21.9 fl) as compared to donors from south India 7.35 (range 6-9.2 fl) (P < 0.001). This study showed that blood donors with HPS had a low median platelet bio-mass 0.17 (0.10-0.38%) vs. 0.19 (0.13-0.28%) in donors from south India. The platelet distribution width (PDW) was 17.4 (14.9-19.6) in donors with HPS vs. 16.38 (15.2-18.5) in south Indian blood donors (P < 0.001). Thirty-three donors with HPS had a normal platelet count with MPV more than 12 fL. Only donors with HPS had giant platelets and thrombocytopenia on peripheral blood smear examination. None of these donors had Dohle body inclusion in their leukocytes. Compared to donors from south India, donors with HPS had a significantly lower hemoglobin 13.8 (12-16.3 gm/dL) vs. 14.8 (12-18) respectively (P < 0.001) while red distribution width (RDW) was higher in HPS 13.6 (11.5-16.7) vs. 12.8 (11.4-15.1). However we did not find any statistically significant difference in MCV, MCH, MCHC between the two groups. Peripheral blood smear did not show any obvious abnormal red blood cell morphology. In the blood donors with HPS we found a statistically higher MPV

  11. Analysis of the internal temperature of the cells in a battery pack during SOC balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizanur, R.; Rashid, M. M.; Rahman, A.; Zahirul Alam, A. H. M.; Ihsan, S.; Mollik, M. S.

    2017-03-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are more suitable for the application of electric vehicle due to high energy and power density compared to other rechargeable batteries. However, the battery pack temperature has a great impact on the overall performance, cycle life, normal charging-discharging behaviour and even safety. During rapid charge transferring process, the internal temperature may exceed its allowable limit (460C). In this paper, an analysis of internal temperature during charge balancing and discharging conditions is presented. Specific interest is paid to the effects of temperature on the different rate of ambient temperature and discharging current. Matlab/Simulink Li-ion battery model and quasi-resonant converter base balancing system are used to study the temperature effect. Rising internal temperature depends on the rate of balancing current and ambient temperature found in the simulation results.

  12. Clinical utility of flow cytometry in the study of erythropoiesis and nonclonal red cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Chesney, Alden; Good, David; Reis, Marciano

    2011-01-01

    Erythropoiesis involves proliferation and differentiation of small population of hematopoietic stem cells resident in the bone marrow into mature red blood cells. The determination of the cellular composition of the blood is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of diseases and monitoring of therapy. Flow cytometric analysis is increasingly being used to characterize the heterogeneous cell populations present in the blood and the hematopoietic cell differentiation and maturation pathways of the bone marrow. Here we discuss the role of flow cytometry in the study of erythropoiesis and nonclonal red blood cell disorders. First, we discuss flow cytometric analysis of reticulocytes. Next, we review salient quantitative methods that can be used for detection of fetal-maternal hemorrhage (FMH). We also discuss flow cytometric analysis of high hemoglobin F (HbF) in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), red cell survival and red cell volume. We conclude by discussing cell cycle of erythroid cells.

  13. Pure red cell aplasia and lymphoproliferative disorders: an infrequent association.

    PubMed

    Vlachaki, Efthymia; Diamantidis, Michael D; Klonizakis, Philippos; Haralambidou-Vranitsa, Styliani; Ioannidou-Papagiannaki, Elizabeth; Klonizakis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare bone marrow failure syndrome defined by a progressive normocytic anaemia and reticulocytopenia without leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Secondary PRCA can be associated with various haematological disorders, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The aim of the present review is to investigate the infrequent association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders. PRCA might precede the appearance of lymphoma, may present simultaneously with the lymphoid neoplastic disease, or might appear following the lymphomatic disorder. Possible pathophysiological molecular mechanisms to explain the rare association between PRCA and lymphoproliferative disorders are reported. Most cases of PRCA are presumed to be autoimmune mediated by antibodies against either erythroblasts or erythropoietin, by T-cells secreting factors selectively inhibiting erythroid colonies in the bone marrow or by NK cells directly lysing erythroblasts. Finally, focus is given to the therapeutical approach, as several treatment regimens have failed for PRCA. Immunosuppressive therapy and/or chemotherapy are effective for improving anaemia in the majority of patients with lymphoma-associated PRCA. Further investigation is required to define the pathophysiology of PRCA at a molecular level and to provide convincing evidence why it might appear as a rare complication of lymphoproliferative disorders.

  14. The buckling instability of aggregating red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Flormann, Daniel; Aouane, Othmane; Kaestner, Lars; Ruloff, Christian; Misbah, Chaouqi; Podgorski, Thomas; Wagner, Christian

    2017-08-11

    Plasma proteins such as fibrinogen induce the aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) into rouleaux, which are responsible for the pronounced shear thinning behavior of blood, control the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) - a common hematological test - and are involved in many situations of physiological relevance such as structuration of blood in the microcirculation or clot formation in pathological situations. Confocal microscopy is used to characterize the shape of RBCs within rouleaux at equilibrium as a function of macromolecular concentration, revealing the diversity of contact zone morphology. Three different configurations that have only been partly predicted before are identified, namely parachute, male-female and sigmoid shapes, and quantitatively recovered by numerical simulations. A detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of clusters of two cells shows that the deformation increases nonlinearly with the interaction energy. Models indicate a forward bifurcation in which the contacting membrane undergoes a buckling instability from a flat to a deformed contact zone at a critical value of the interaction energy. These results are not only relevant for the understanding of the morphology and stability of RBC aggregates, but also for a whole class of interacting soft deformable objects such as vesicles, capsules or cells in tissues.

  15. Influence of space flight on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Talbot, J M; Fisher, K D

    1986-08-01

    Losses of red blood cell mass (RCM) averaging 10-15% have been observed consistently in astronauts after space flight; postflight recovery of RCM requires 4-6 wk. Although apparently not harmful to the health and effectiveness of crews during uncomplicated flights, decreased RCM could compromise health and performance in the event of illness, injury, or partial malfunction of the life support system. Whether the loss of RCM would worsen or stabilize in missions longer than 7 months is unknown. As a biological response, it is a significant, predictable reaction whose etiology, biological mechanisms, and potential operational significance are inadequately defined. Weightlessness is probably the primary cause; however, contributory factors may include hypokinesia/hypodynamia, bone loss, muscle atrophy, altered hemodynamics, stress, and metabolic disturbances. Space medical specialists consider other possible influences such as hypoxia, hypobaria, radiation, toxic contaminants, and launch and reentry accelerations as less likely factors. Because the data base on loss of RCM is insufficient for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's space medical responsibilities, the Life Sciences Research Office ad hoc Working Group on Space Anemia suggested research approaches ranging form fundamental topics such as utilization of erythropoietin and oxygen in target organs and cell-cell interactions, through possible splenic and vascular dysfunctions, metabolic disturbances, and inhibitors of erythropoiesis, to methodology and models.

  16. Red Blood Cells Play a Role in Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Kimberly T.; Berisha, Stela Z.; Ritchey, Brian M.; Santore, Jennifer; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) involves the removal of cholesterol from peripheral tissue for excretion in the feces. Here, we determined whether red blood cells (RBCs) can contribute to RCT. Methods and Results We performed a series of studies in apoAI-deficient mice where the HDL-mediated pathway of RCT is greatly diminished. RBCs carried a higher fraction of whole blood cholesterol than plasma in apoAI-deficient mice, and as least as much of the labeled cholesterol derived from injected foam cells appeared in RBCs compared to plasma. To determine if RBCs mediate RCT to the fecal compartment, we measured RCT in anemic and control apoAI-deficient mice and found that anemia decreased RCT to the feces by over 35% after correcting for fecal mass. Transfusion of [3H]cholesterol labeled RBCs led to robust delivery of the labeled cholesterol to the feces in apoAI-deficient hosts. In wild type mice, the majority of the blood cholesterol mass, as well as [3H]cholesterol derived from the injected foam cells, was found in plasma, and anemia did not significantly alter RCT to the feces after correction for fecal mass. Conclusion The RBC cholesterol pool is dynamic and facilitates RCT of peripheral cholesterol to the feces, particularly in the low HDL state. PMID:22499994

  17. Red blood cell as an adaptive optofluidic microlens.

    PubMed

    Miccio, L; Memmolo, P; Merola, F; Netti, P A; Ferraro, P

    2015-03-11

    The perspective of using live cells as lenses could open new revolutionary and intriguing scenarios in the future of biophotonics and biomedical sciences for endoscopic vision, local laser treatments via optical fibres and diagnostics. Here we show that a suspended red blood cell (RBC) behaves as an adaptive liquid-lens at microscale, thus demonstrating its imaging capability and tunable focal length. In fact, thanks to the intrinsic elastic properties, the RBC can swell up from disk volume of 90 fl up to a sphere reaching 150 fl, varying focal length from negative to positive values. These live optofluidic lenses can be fully controlled by triggering the liquid buffer's chemistry. Real-time accurate measurement of tunable focus capability of RBCs is reported through dynamic wavefront characterization, showing agreement with numerical modelling. Moreover, in analogy to adaptive optics testing, blood diagnosis is demonstrated by screening abnormal cells through focal-spot analysis applied to an RBC ensemble as a microlens array.

  18. Red blood cell as an adaptive optofluidic microlens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Merola, F.; Netti, P. A.; Ferraro, P.

    2015-03-01

    The perspective of using live cells as lenses could open new revolutionary and intriguing scenarios in the future of biophotonics and biomedical sciences for endoscopic vision, local laser treatments via optical fibres and diagnostics. Here we show that a suspended red blood cell (RBC) behaves as an adaptive liquid-lens at microscale, thus demonstrating its imaging capability and tunable focal length. In fact, thanks to the intrinsic elastic properties, the RBC can swell up from disk volume of 90 fl up to a sphere reaching 150 fl, varying focal length from negative to positive values. These live optofluidic lenses can be fully controlled by triggering the liquid buffer’s chemistry. Real-time accurate measurement of tunable focus capability of RBCs is reported through dynamic wavefront characterization, showing agreement with numerical modelling. Moreover, in analogy to adaptive optics testing, blood diagnosis is demonstrated by screening abnormal cells through focal-spot analysis applied to an RBC ensemble as a microlens array.

  19. Manipulation of red blood cells with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2009-11-01

    Manipulation of bioparticles and macromolecules is the central task in many biological and biotechnological processes. The current methods for physical manipulation takes advantage of different forces such as acoustic, centrifugal, magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric forces, as well as using optical tweezers or filtration. Among all these methods, however, the electrical forces are particularly attractive because of their favorable scale up with the system size which makes them well-suited for miniaturization. Currently the electric field is used for transportation, poration, fusion, rotation, and separation of biological cells. The aim of the current research is to gain fundamental understanding of the effect of electric field on the human red blood cells (RBCs) using direct numerical simulation. A front tracking/finite difference technique is used to solve the fluid flow and electric field equations, w