Science.gov

Sample records for pacvd protective coating

  1. Investigation of PACVD protective coating processes using advanced diagnostics techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, W.C.

    1992-07-10

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) is used to study the plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) of TiB{sub 2}. CARS is applied to the dominent species in an inductively coupled B{sub 2}H{sub 6}/Ar rf plasma. Axial concentration profiles of diborane and hydrogen are probed in the plasma. A five-step mechanism is developed. Photochemical initiation of the chemical reaction is considered. 16 refs, 5 figs.(DLC)

  2. Investigation of PACVD protective coating processes using advanced diagnostics techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, W.C.

    1993-05-07

    Objective is to understand the mechanisms governing nonequilibrium plasma atomistic or molecular deposition of hard face coatings. Laser diagnostic methods include coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and laser-induced fluorescence. TiB[sub 2] and diamonds were used as the hard face coating materials. Diborane was used as precursor to TiB[sub 2].

  3. Investigation of PACVD protective coating processes using advanced diagnostics techniques. Performance report, 1 September 1992--30 April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, W.C.

    1993-05-07

    Objective is to understand the mechanisms governing nonequilibrium plasma atomistic or molecular deposition of hard face coatings. Laser diagnostic methods include coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and laser-induced fluorescence. TiB{sub 2} and diamonds were used as the hard face coating materials. Diborane was used as precursor to TiB{sub 2}.

  4. Study of RF PACVD diamond like carbon coatings deposited at low bias for vacuum applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercammen, K.; Meneve, J.; Dekempeneer, E.; Roberts, E. W.; Eiden, M. J.

    2001-09-01

    Currently, sputtered molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) is an established coating for space applications. However, when operated in air, molybdenum disulphide loses much of its lubricating power, thus preventing in-air ground testing. In this work, the tribological properties in vacuum, dry N2 and air of a-C:H films produced by radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition (RF PACVD) were studied in order to assess their potential for applications in space. We demonstrated that diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited at low bias voltage show lubricating capacity under vacuum conditions. However, the shorter lifetime of the DLC films as compared to MoS2 under vacuum is considered as an important limiting factor.

  5. Effect of Operating Temperature on Structure Properties of TICX Nanoparticle Coating Applied by Pacvd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanaghi, Ali; Sabour Rouhaghdam, Ali Reza; Ahangarani, Shahrokh; Moradi, Hadi; Mohammadi, Ali

    Titanium carbide (TiC) is a widely used hard coating to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of tools because of its outstanding properties such as high melting point, high hardness, corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance. These properties were drastically improved by using nanotechnology. So in this project, TiCx was applied on hot-working die steel (H11) by Plasma CVD (PACVD). The effect of operating temperatures on TiCx structure properties have been studies by typical and advanced analyses methods such as SEM, XRD, FTIR and Raman. The best properties of TiCx nanoparticle, such as nanostructure, mechanical properties and chemical properties, were obtained at 480 °C.

  6. Effect of active screen plasma nitriding pretreatment on wear behavior of TiN coating deposited by PACVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoufi, M.; Mirdamadi, Sh.; Mahboubi, F.; Ahangarani, Sh.; Mahdipoor, M. S.; Elmkhah, H.

    2012-08-01

    Titanium based alloys are used extensively for improving wear properties of different parts due to their high hardness contents. Titanium nitride (TiN) is among these coatings which can be deposited on surface using various techniques such as CVD, PVD and PACVD. Their weak interface with substrate is one major drawback which can increase the total wear in spite of favorite wear behavior of TiN. Disc shaped samples from AISI H13 (DIN 1.2344) steel were prepared in this study. Single TiN coating was deposited on some of them while others have experienced a TiN deposition by active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN). Hardness at the surface and depth of samples was measured through Vickers micro hardness test which revealed 1810 Hv hardness as the maximum values for a dual-layered ASPN-TiN. Pin-on-disc wear test was done in order to study the wear mechanism. In this regard, the wear behavior of samples was investigated against pins from 100Cr6 (Din 1.3505) bearing steel and tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) steel. It was evidenced that the dual-layer ASPN-TiN coating has shown the least weight loss with the best wearing behavior because of its high hardness values, stable interface and acceptable resistance against peeling during wearing period.

  7. Protective Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Inorganic Coatings, Inc.'s K-Zinc 531 protective coating is water-based non-toxic, non-flammable and has no organic emissions. High ratio silicate formula bonds to steel, and in 30 minutes, creates a very hard ceramic finish with superior adhesion and abrasion resistance. Improved technology allows application over a minimal commercial sandblast, fast drying in high humidity conditions and compatibility with both solvent and water-based topcoats. Coating is easy to apply and provides long term protection with a single application. Zinc rich coating with water-based potassium silicate binder offers cost advantages in materials, labor hours per application, and fewer applications over a given time span.

  8. Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    General Magnaplate Corporation's pharmaceutical machine is used in the industry for high speed pressing of pills and capsules. Machine is automatic system for molding glycerine suppositories. These machines are typical of many types of drug production and packaging equipment whose metal parts are treated with space spinoff coatings that promote general machine efficiency and contribute to compliance with stringent federal sanitation codes for pharmaceutical manufacture. Collectively known as "synergistic" coatings, these dry lubricants are bonded to a variety of metals to form an extremely hard slippery surface with long lasting self lubrication. The coatings offer multiple advantages; they cannot chip, peel or be rubbed off. They protect machine parts from corrosion and wear longer, lowering maintenance cost and reduce undesired heat caused by power-robbing friction.

  9. Tribological and Corrosion Properties of Nickel/TiC Bilayered Coatings Produced by Electroless Deposition and PACVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanaghi, Ali; Chu, Paul K.

    2016-10-01

    Ni/TiC bilayered coatings are deposited on hot-working steel (H11) by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and electroless technique. The TiC layer is deposited at 490 °C using a gas mixture of TiCl4, CH4, H2, and Ar, and a dense nanostructured TiC coating with minimum excessive carbon phases and low chlorine concentration is produced. The effects of the Ni intermediate layer on the microstructure, tribology, and corrosion behavior of the nanostructured TiC coating are investigated. The friction coefficient of the Ni/TiC bilayered coating (Ni thickness = 4 µm) at 500 cycles is much smaller than that of the coating without the Ni intermediate layer. The smallest friction coefficient is about 0.2, and the hardness values of the Ni/TiC bilayered samples with three different Ni layer thicknesses of 2, 4, and 6 µm are 2534, 3070, and 2008 Hv, respectively. The wear mechanism of the Ni/TiC bilayered coatings is abrasive induced by plastic deformation and fatigue during the sliding process. The smaller groove width on the 4-µm electroless nickel-Ni3P/TiC bilayered coating correlates with the larger H/E ratio and the 4-µm nickel/TiC bilayered sample shows the better wear resistance. The polarization resistance of the 6-µm electroless nickel-Ni3P/TiC coating in 0.05 M NaCl and 0.5 M H2SO4 increases by about 8 and 15 times, respectively. The Ni intermediate layer increases the toughness of the coating and adhesion between the hard coating and steel substrate thereby enhancing the tribological properties and corrosion resistance.

  10. Protective coatings for concrete

    SciTech Connect

    NAGY, KATHRYN L.; CYGAN, RANDALL T.; BRINKER, C. JEFFREY; SELLINGER, ALAN

    2000-05-01

    The new two-layer protective coating developed for monuments constructed of limestone or marble was applied to highway cement and to tobermorite, a component of cement, and tested in batch dissolution tests. The goal was to determine the suitability of the protective coating in retarding the weathering rate of concrete construction. The two-layer coating consists of an inner layer of aminoethylaminopropylsilane (AEAPS) applied as a 25% solution in methanol and an outer layer of A2** sol-gel. In previous work, this product when applied to calcite powders, had resulted in a lowering of the rate of dissolution by a factor of ten and was shown through molecular modeling to bind strongly to the calcite surface, but not too strongly so as to accelerate dissolution. Batch dissolution tests at 22 C of coated and uncoated tobermorite (1.1 nm phase) and powdered cement from Gibson Blvd. in Albuquerque indicated that the coating exhibits some protective behavior, at least on short time scales. However, the data suggest that the outer layer of sol-gel dissolves in the high-pH environment of the closed system of cement plus water. Calculated binding configuration and energy of AEAPS to the tobermorite surface suggests that AEAPS is well-suited as the inner layer binder for protecting tobermorite.

  11. Protective coating for ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Churchward, Rex A. (Inventor); Lowe, David M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A protective coating for ceramic materials such as those made of silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, aluminoborosilicate and silicon dioxide, and a thermal control structure comprising a ceramic material having coated thereon the protective coating. The protective coating contains, in admixture, silicon dioxide powder, colloidal silicon dioxide, water, and one or more emittance agents selected from silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, silicon carbide, molybdenum disilicide, tungsten disilicide and zirconium diboride. In another aspect, the protective coating is coated on a flexible ceramic fabric which is the outer cover of a composite insulation. In yet another aspect, a metallic foil is bonded to the outer surface of a ceramic fabric outer cover of a composite insulation via the protective coating. A primary application of this invention is as a protective coating for ceramic materials used in a heat shield for space vehicles subjected to very high aero-convective heating environments.

  12. Advanced protective coating for superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, R. C.; Talboom, F. P.; Wilson, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    Superior oxidation protection for nickel-base alloys at temperatures up to 1367 K was obtained with cobalt-base alloy coating. Coating had 25 Cr, 14 Al, and 0.5 Y weight percent composition. Coating was applied by electron beam vapor deposition to thickness of 76 to 127 microns.

  13. METHOD OF PROTECTIVELY COATING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for protectively coating uranium with zine comprising cleaning the U for coating by pickling in concentrated HNO/sub 3/, dipping the cleaned U into a bath of molten zinc between 430 to 600 C and containing less than 0 01% each of Fe and Pb, and withdrawing and cooling to solidify the coating. The zinccoated uranium may be given a; econd coating with another metal niore resistant to the corrosive influences particularly concerned. A coating of Pb containing small proportions of Ag or Sn, or Al containing small proportions of Si may be applied over the zinc coatings by dipping in molten baths of these metals.

  14. Protective coatings for sensitive materials

    DOEpatents

    Egert, Charles M.

    1997-01-01

    An enhanced protective coating to prevent interaction between constituents of the environment and devices that can be damaged by those constituents. This coating is provided by applying a synergistic combination of diffusion barrier and physical barrier materials. These materials can be, for example, in the form of a plurality of layers of a diffusion barrier and a physical barrier, with these barrier layers being alternated. Further protection in certain instances is provided by including at least one layer of a getter material to actually react with one or more of the deleterious constituents. The coating is illustrated by using alternating layers of an organic coating (such as Parylene-C.TM.) as the diffusion barrier, and a metal coating (such as aluminum) as the physical barrier. For best results there needs to be more than one of at least one of the constituent layers.

  15. Protective coatings for sensitive materials

    DOEpatents

    Egert, C.M.

    1997-08-05

    An enhanced protective coating is disclosed to prevent interaction between constituents of the environment and devices that can be damaged by those constituents. This coating is provided by applying a synergistic combination of diffusion barrier and physical barrier materials. These materials can be, for example, in the form of a plurality of layers of a diffusion barrier and a physical barrier, with these barrier layers being alternated. Further protection in certain instances is provided by including at least one layer of a getter material to actually react with one or more of the deleterious constituents. The coating is illustrated by using alternating layers of an organic coating (such as Parylene-C{trademark}) as the diffusion barrier, and a metal coating (such as aluminum) as the physical barrier. For best results there needs to be more than one of at least one of the constituent layers. 4 figs.

  16. Protective coatings on extensible biofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Fantner, Georg E.; Hohlbauch, Sophia; Waite, J. Herbert; Zok, Frank W.

    2007-09-01

    Formulating effective coatings for use in nano- and biotechnology poses considerable technical challenges. If they are to provide abrasion resistance, coatings must be hard and adhere well to the underlying substrate. High hardness, however, comes at the expense of extensibility. This property trade-off makes the design of coatings for even moderately compliant substrates problematic, because substrate deformation easily exceeds the strain limit of the coating. Although the highest strain capacity of synthetic fibre coatings is less than 10%, deformable coatings are ubiquitous in biological systems. With an eye to heeding the lessons of nature, the cuticular coatings of byssal threads from two species of marine mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Perna canaliculus, have been investigated. Consistent with their function to protect collagenous fibres in the byssal-thread core, these coatings show hardness and stiffness comparable to those of engineering plastics and yet are surprisingly extensible; the tensile failure strain of P. canaliculus cuticle is about 30% and that of M. galloprovincialis is a remarkable 70%. The difference in extensibility is attributable to the presence of deformable microphase-separated granules within the cuticle of M. galloprovincialis. The results have important implications in the design of bio-inspired extensible coatings.

  17. Thin CVD Coating Protects Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald; Wallace, Terryl; Cunnington, George; Robinson, John

    1994-01-01

    Feasibility of using very thin CVD coatings to provide both protection against oxidation and surfaces of low catalytic activity for thin metallic heat-shield materials demonstrated. Use of aluminum in compositions increases emittances of coatings and reduces transport of oxygen through coatings to substrates. Coatings light in weight and applied to foil-gauge materials with minimum weight penalties.

  18. Crop protection by seed coating.

    PubMed

    Ehsanfar, S; Modarres-Sanavy, S A M

    2005-01-01

    Providence of sufficient and healthy food for increasing human population clears the importance of notice to increasing crop production in company with environmental loss reduction. Growth and yield of every plant with sexual reproduction, depends on germination & emergence of sown seeds. Seed is a small alive plant that its biological function is protection and nutrition of embryo. Biological, chemical and physiological characteristics of seed, affect on plant performance & its resistance to undesirable environmental conditions, and even on its total yield. So attention to seed and try to increase its performance is so important. One of the factors that cause reduction in germination percentage and seedling establishment, is seed disease. It's possible to control these diseases by treating the seed before planting it. Coating the seed with pesticides, is one of the ways to gain this goal. Seed coating is a technique in which several material as fertilizers, nutritional elements, moisture attractive or repulsive agents, plant growth regulators, rhizobium inocolum, chemical & pesticide etc, add to seed by adhesive agents and cause to increase seed performance and germination. Seed coating, leads to increase benefits in seed industry, because seeds can use all of their genetic vigor. This technique is used for seeds of many garden plants, valuable crops (such as corn, sunflower, canola, alfalfa,...) and some of the grasses. In this technique that was first used in coating cereal seeds in 1930, a thin and permeable layer of pesticide is stuck on seed surface and prevent damage of seedborn pathogens. This layer is melted or splited after absorption of moisture and suitable temperature by seed, and let the radical to exit the seed. In this approach materials are used accurately with seed, evaporation & leakage of pesticide and also adverse effects of some pesticides on seeds are diminished, and these factors cause to increase the accuracy and performance of pesticide

  19. Flexible fluoropolymer filled protective coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Sovey, James S.; Nahra, Henry; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1991-01-01

    Metal oxide films such as SiO2 are known to provide an effective barrier to the transport of moisture as well as gaseous species through polymeric films. Such thin film coatings have a tendency to crack upon flexure of the polymeric substrate. Sputter co-deposition of SiO2 with 4 to 15 percent fluoropolymers was demonstrated to produce thin films with glass-like barrier properties that have significant increases in strain to failure over pure glass films which improves their tolerance to flexure on polymeric substrates. Deposition techniques capable of producing these films on polymeric substrates are suitable for durable food packaging and oxidation/corrosion protection applications.

  20. Dense protective coatings, methods for their preparation and coated articles

    SciTech Connect

    Tulyani, Sonia; Bhatia, Tania; Smeggil, John G.

    2015-12-29

    A method for depositing a protective coating on a complex shaped substrate includes the steps of: (1) dipping a complex shaped substrate into a slurry to form a base coat thereon, the slurry comprising an aqueous solution, at least one refractory metal oxide, and at least one transient fluid additive present in an amount of about 0.1 percent to 10 percent by weight of the slurry; (2) curing the dipped substrate; (3) dipping the substrate into a precursor solution to form a top barrier coat thereon; and (4) heat treating the dipped, cured substrate to form a protective coating.

  1. Testing of protective coatings in hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier, P.E.; Barletta, R.; Adams, J.; Svandrlik, J.

    1993-07-01

    A series of tests of protective coatings on carbon-carbon substrates were performed. The tests involved exposure of the coated material to hydrogen at high temperatures, the examination of the coatings by scanning electron microscopy and the measurement of weight losses. The coatings included Re, TaHfC, TaC and NbC, with thicknesses of the order of 20--60 {mu}m.

  2. Sputtered protective coatings for die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nieh, C.-Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Three experimental research designs investigating candidate materials and processes involved in protective die surface coating procedures by sputter deposition, using ion beam technologies, are discussed. Various pre-test results show that none of the coatings remained completely intact for 15,000 test cycles. The longest lifetime was observed for coatings such as tungsten, platinum, and molybdenum which reduced thermal fatigue, but exhibited oxidation and suppressed crack initiation only as long as the coating did not fracture. Final test results confirmed earlier findings and coatings with Pt and W proved to be the candidate materials to be used on a die surface to increase die life. In the W-coated specimens, which remained intact on the surface after thermal fatigue testing, no oxidation was found under the coating, although a few cracks formed on the surface where the coating broke down. Further research is planned.

  3. Protective Coats For Zinc-Rich Primers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis G, III

    1993-01-01

    Report describes tests of topcoats for inorganic zinc-rich primers on carbon steel. Topcoats intended to provide additional protection against corrosion in acidic, salty seacoast-air/rocket-engine-exhaust environment of Space Shuttle launch site. Tests focused on polyurethane topcoats on epoxy tie coats on primers. Part of study involved comparison between "high-build" coating materials and thin-film coating materials.

  4. Tests Of Protective Coats For Carbon Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis G., III

    1995-01-01

    Report describes laboratory and field tests of candidate paints (primers, tie coats, and topcoats) for use in protecting carbon-steel structures against corrosion in seaside environment at Kennedy Space Center. Coating materials selected because of utility in preventing corrosion, also on basis of legal requirements, imposed in several urban areas, for reduction of volatile organic contents.

  5. Project Development Specification for Special Protective Coating

    SciTech Connect

    MCGREW, D.L.

    2000-09-28

    Establishes the performance, design development, and test requirements for the Special Protective Coating. The system engineering approach was used to develop this document in accordance with the guidelines laid out in the Systems Engineering Management Plan for Project W-314.

  6. Sputtered protective coatings for die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nieh, C. Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    This investigation determined whether selected ion beam sputtered coatings on H-13 die steel would have the potential of improving the thermal fatigue behavior of the steel used as a die in aluminum die casting. The coatings were selected to test candidate insulators and metals capable of providing protection of the die surface. The studies indicate that 1 micrometer thick W and Pt coatings reduced the thermal fatigue more than any other coating tested and are candidates to be used on a die surface to increase die life.

  7. Paper-Thin Coating Offers Maximum Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Wessex Incorporated has recently taken a technology that was originally developed for NASA as a protective coating for ceramic materials used in heatshields for space vehicles, and modified it for use in applications such as building materials, machinery, and transportation. The technology, developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a protective coating for flexible ceramic composites (PCC), is environmentally safe, water-based, and contains no solvents. Many other flame-retardant materials contain petroleum-based components, which can produce toxic smoke under flame. Wessex versions of PCC can be used to shield ceramics, wood, plasterboard, steel, plastics, fiberglass, and other materials from catastrophic fires. They are extraordinarily tough and exhibit excellent resistance to thermal shock, vibration, abrasion, and mechanical damage. One thin layer of coating provides necessary protection and allows for flexibility while avoiding excessive weight disadvantages. The coating essentially reduces the likelihood of the underlying material becoming so hot that it combusts and thus inhibits the "flashover" phenomenon from occurring.

  8. Space station protective coating development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, H. G.; Hill, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    A generic list of Space Station surfaces and candidate material types is provided. Environmental exposures and performance requirements for the different Space Station surfaces are listed. Coating materials and the processing required to produce a viable system, and appropriate environmental simulation test facilities are being developed. Mass loss data from the original version of the atomic oxygen test chamber and the improved facility; additional environmental exposures performed on candidate materials; and materials properties measurements on candidate coatings to determine the effects of the exposures are discussed. Methodologies of production, and coating materials, used to produce the large scale demonstration articles are described. The electronic data base developed for the contract is also described. The test chamber to be used for exposure of materials to atomic oxygen was built.

  9. Assessment of Thermal Control and Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    This final report is concerned with the tasks performed during the contract period which included spacecraft coating development, testing, and applications. Five marker coatings consisting of a bright yellow handrail coating, protective overcoat for ceramic coatings, and specialized primers for composites (or polymer) surfaces were developed and commercialized by AZ Technology during this program. Most of the coatings have passed space environmental stability requirements via ground tests and/or flight verification. Marker coatings and protective overcoats were successfully flown on the Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA) and the Optical Properties Monitor (OPM) experiments flown on the Russian space station MIR. To date, most of the coatings developed and/or modified during this program have been utilized on the International Space Station and other spacecraft. For ISS, AZ Technology manufactured the 'UNITY' emblem now being flown on the NASA UNITY node (Node 1) that is docked to the Russian Zarya (FGB) utilizing the colored marker coatings (white, blue, red) developed by AZ Technology. The UNITY emblem included the US American flag, the Unity logo, and NASA logo on a white background, applied to a Beta cloth substrate.

  10. Lightweight Protective Coatings For Titanium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, Karl E.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Clark, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Lightweight coating developed to protect titanium and titanium aluminide alloys and titanium-matrix composite materials from attack by environment when used at high temperatures. Applied by sol-gel methods, and thickness less than 5 micrometers. Reaction-barrier and self-healing diffusion-barrier layers combine to protect titanium alloy against chemical attack by oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures with very promising results. Can be extended to protection of other environmentally sensitive materials.

  11. Waste treatment for removed protective coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.; Crosley, S.M.; Gay, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    A molten salt oxidation process is proposed for treatment of removed protective coatings along with the media used for removal. The treatment chemically reduces the waste, leaving any metals associated with the coating as a residue in the salt treatment media. The residue and the salt can be further treated for recycle of the metals, thus all but eliminating metal disposal as a waste problem. The process is expected to be simple and may be integrated into the coatings removal operations on location. Therefore, waste shipment and handling can be significantly reduced, and, as a secondary benefit, other waste can be treated in the same unit.

  12. Development of composite tube protective coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, H.; Hendricks, C.

    1986-01-01

    Protective coatings for graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) tubular structures proposed for the Space Station are evaluated. The program was divided into four parts; System Definition, Coating Concept Selection and Evaluation, Scale-up and Assembly, and Reporting. System Definition involved defining the structural and environmental properties required of the Gr/Ep tubes. The prepreg and ply sequence selected was a P75S/934 (O2, + or - 20, O2)sub s layup which meets the various structural requirements of the Space Station. Coating Concept and Selection comprised the main emphasis of the effort. Concepts for protectively coating the Gr/Ep tubes included the use of metal foil and electroplating. The program results demonstrated that both phosphoric and chromic acid anodized Al foil provided adequate adhesion to the Gr/Ep tubes and stability of optical properties when subjected to atomic oxygen and thermal cycling representative of the LEO environment. SiO2/Al coatings sputtered onto Al foils also resulted in an excellent protective coating. The electroplated Ni possessed unacceptable adhesion loss to the Gr/Ep tubes during atomic oxygen testing. Scale-Up and Assembly involved fabricating and wrapping 8-ft-long by 2-in-diameter Gr/EP tubes with chromic acid anodized foil and delivering these tubes, along with representative Space Station erectable end fittings, to NASA LaRC.

  13. Bondable Stainless Surface Coats Protect Against Rust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Shaffer, D. K.; Clearfield, H. M.; Nagle, D.; Groff, G.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes tests conducted to assess use of bondable stainless surface (BOSS) coating materials to protect steel cases of solid-fuel rocket motors against corrosion and to provide surface microstructure and chemistry suitable for bonding to insulating material. Eliminates need to cover cases with grease to prevent corrosion and degreasing immediately prior to use.

  14. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  15. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  16. Article having an improved platinum-aluminum-hafnium protective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, Bangalore Aswatha (Inventor); Williams, Jeffrey Lawrence (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An article protected by a protective coating has a substrate and a protective coating having an outer layer deposited upon the substrate surface and a diffusion zone formed by interdiffusion of the outer layer and the substrate. The protective coating includes platinum, aluminum, no more than about 2 weight percent hafnium, and substantially no silicon. The outer layer is substantially a single phase.

  17. Method for smoothing the surface of a protective coating

    DOEpatents

    Sangeeta, D.; Johnson, Curtis Alan; Nelson, Warren Arthur

    2001-01-01

    A method for smoothing the surface of a ceramic-based protective coating which exhibits roughness is disclosed. The method includes the steps of applying a ceramic-based slurry or gel coating to the protective coating surface; heating the slurry/gel coating to remove volatile material; and then further heating the slurry/gel coating to cure the coating and bond it to the underlying protective coating. The slurry/gel coating is often based on yttria-stabilized zirconia, and precursors of an oxide matrix. Related articles of manufacture are also described.

  18. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  19. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  20. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  1. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  2. Nanocomposite protective coatings for battery anodes

    DOEpatents

    Lemmon, John P; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-21

    Modified surfaces on metal anodes for batteries can help resist formation of malfunction-inducing surface defects. The modification can include application of a protective nanocomposite coating that can inhibit formation of surface defects. such as dendrites, on the anode during charge/discharge cycles. For example, for anodes having a metal (M'), the protective coating can be characterized by products of chemical or electrochemical dissociation of a nanocomposite containing a polymer and an exfoliated compound (M.sub.a'M.sub.b''X.sub.c). The metal, M', comprises Li, Na, or Zn. The exfoliated compound comprises M' among lamella of M.sub.b''X.sub.c, wherein M'' is Fe, Mo, Ta, W, or V, and X is S, O, or Se.

  3. Sprayable Phase Change Coating Thermal Protection Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Rod W.; Hayes, Paul W.; Kaul, Raj

    2005-01-01

    NASA has expressed a need for reusable, environmentally friendly, phase change coating that is capable of withstanding the heat loads that have historically required an ablative thermal insulation. The Space Shuttle Program currently relies on ablative materials for thermal protection. The problem with an ablative insulation is that, by design, the material ablates away, in fulfilling its function of cooling the underlying substrate, thus preventing the insulation from being reused from flight to flight. The present generation of environmentally friendly, sprayable, ablative thermal insulation (MCC-l); currently use on the Space Shuttle SRBs, is very close to being a reusable insulation system. In actual flight conditions, as confirmed by the post-flight inspections of the SRBs, very little of the material ablates. Multi-flight thermal insulation use has not been qualified for the Space Shuttle. The gap that would have to be overcome in order to implement a reusable Phase Change Coating (PCC) is not unmanageable. PCC could be applied robotically with a spray process utilizing phase change material as filler to yield material of even higher strength and reliability as compared to MCC-1. The PCC filled coatings have also demonstrated potential as cryogenic thermal coatings. In experimental thermal tests, a thin application of PCC has provided the same thermal protection as a much thicker and heavier application of a traditional ablative thermal insulation. In addition, tests have shown that the structural integrity of the coating has been maintained and phase change performance after several aero-thermal cycles was not affected. Experimental tests have also shown that, unlike traditional ablative thermal insulations, PCC would not require an environmental seal coat, which has historically been required to prevent moisture absorption by the thermal insulation, prevent environmental degradation, and to improve the optical and aerodynamic properties. In order to reduce

  4. Tribological behavior of DLC films deposited on nitrided and post-oxidized stainless steel by PACVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalibon, E. L.; Brühl, S. P.; Heim, D.

    2012-06-01

    In this work, the tribological behavior and adhesion of DLC films deposited by PACVD on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel was evaluated. Prior to DLC deposition, the samples were nitrided and some of them also post-oxidized. The films were characterized by Raman and EDS, microhardness was assessed with Vickers indenter and the microstructure was analyzed by OM, SEM, FIB. Fretting and linear reciprocating sliding tests were performed using a WC ball as counterpart, and the adhesion of the DLC films was characterized using the Scratch Test and Rockwell C indentation. Corrosion behavior was evaluated by the Salt Spray Fog Test. The film showed a hardness of only about 1500 HV but it was about 15-20 microns thick. The results of the mechanical tests showed that pre-treatments (nitriding and oxidizing) of the substrate did not have a big influence in the tribological behavior of the coating. However, the nitriding treatment before the DLC coating process reduced the interface stress and enhanced the adhesion. Additionally, all the films evidenced good corrosion resistance in a saline environment, better than the AISI 420 itself.

  5. Liquid Galvanic Coatings for Protection of Imbedded Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor); Curran, Joseph J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Coating compositions and methods of their use are described herein for the reduction of corrosion in imbedded metal structures. The coatings are applied as liquids to an external surface of a substrate in which the metal structures are imbedded. The coatings are subsequently allowed to dry. The liquid applied coatings provide galvanic protection to the imbedded metal structures. Continued protection can be maintained with periodic reapplication of the coating compositions, as necessary, to maintain electrical continuity. Because the coatings may be applied using methods similar to standard paints, and because the coatings are applied to external surfaces of the substrates in which the metal structures are imbedded, the corresponding corrosion protection may be easily maintained. The coating compositions are particularly useful in the protection of metal-reinforced concrete.

  6. Corrosion-protective coatings from electrically conducting polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Karen Gebert; Bryan, Coleman J.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Wrobleski, Debra A.

    1991-01-01

    In a joint effort between NASA Kennedy and LANL, electrically conductive polymer coatings were developed as corrosion protective coatings for metal surfaces. At NASA Kennedy, the launch environment consist of marine, severe solar, and intermittent high acid and/or elevated temperature conditions. Electrically conductive polymer coatings were developed which impart corrosion resistance to mild steel when exposed to saline and acidic environments. Such coatings also seem to promote corrosion resistance in areas of mild steel where scratches exist in the protective coating. Such coatings appear promising for many commercial applications.

  7. Corrosion-protective coatings from electrically conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Wrobleski, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    In a joint research effort involving the Kennedy Space Center and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, electrically conductive polymer coatings have been developed as corrosion-protective coatings for metal surfaces. At the Kennedy Space Center, the launch environment consists of marine, severe solar, and intermittent high acid/elevated temperature conditions. Electrically conductive polymer coatings have been developed which impart corrosion resistance to mild steel when exposed to saline and acidic environments. Such coatings also seem to promote corrosion resistance in areas of mild steel where scratches exist in the protective coating. Such coatings appear promising for many commercial applications.

  8. Diamondlike carbon protective coatings for optical windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swec, Diane M.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited on infrared transmitting optical windows and were evaluated as protective coatings for these windows exposed to particle and rain erosion. The DLC films were deposited on zinc selenide (ZnSe) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) by three different ion beam methods: (1) sputter deposition from a carbon target using an 8-cm argon ion source; (2) direct deposition by a 30-cm hollow cathode ion source with hydrocarbon gas in argon; and (3) dual beam direct deposition by the 30-cm hollow cathode ion source and an 8-cm argon ion source. In an attempt to improve the adherence of the DLC films on ZnSc and ZnS, ion beam cleaning, ion implantation with helium and neon ions, or sputter deposition of a thin, ion beam intermediate coating was employed prior to deposition of the DLC film. The protection that the DLC films afforded the windows from particle and rain erosion was evaluated, along with the hydrogen content, adherence, intrinsic stress, and infrared transmittance of the films. Because of the elevated stress levels in the ion beam sputtered DLC films and in those ion beam deposited with butane, films thicker than 0.1 micron and with good adherence on ZnS and ZnSe could not be generated. An intermediate coating of germanium successfully allowed the DLC films to remain adherent to the optical windows and caused only negligible reduction in the specular transmittance of the ZnS and ZnSe at 10 microns.

  9. Laser-controllable coatings for corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Skorb, Ekaterina V; Skirtach, Andre G; Sviridov, Dmitry V; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2009-07-28

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach to the corrosion protection by use of "smart" laser-controllable coating. The main advantage of the proposed technique is that one could terminate the corrosion process by very intensive healing after an appearance of corrosion centers using local laser irradiation. It is also shown that by applying a polyelectrolyte shell with noble metal particles over the mesoporous titania and silica via layer-by-layer assembly it is possible to fabricate micro- and nanoscaled reservoirs, which, being incorporated into the zirconia-organosilica matrix, are responsible for the ability of laser-driven release of the loaded materials (e.g., corrosion inhibitor). Furthermore, the resultant films are highly adhesive and could be easily deposited onto different metallic substrates. Laser-mediated remote release of incorporated corrosion inhibitor (benzotriazole) from engineered mesoporous containers with silver nanoparticles in the container shell is observed in real time on single and multicontainer levels.

  10. Protective coatings and sealants for solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wischmann, K. B.; Gonzales, M. H.

    1980-09-01

    An aging study has been completed which evaluated a number of polymeric materials for potential use as (1) protective coatings for back surfaces of mirrors and (2) solar heliostat edge seals. These investigations were conducted in an artificial weathering chamber that accelerated thermal cycling. The primary mirror failure mode was observed to be silver corrosion resulting from moisture exposure. To increase mirror longevity in current heliostat designs, intimate bonding at all the composite interfaces is essential to minimize moisture pathways to the silvered surface. If any voids or delaminations are present, mirror degradation will eventually occur. Delaminations can also occur as the result of mechanical stresses brought about by mismatches in the various materials coefficients of thermal expansion. If good bonding cannot be achieved or mechanical stresses avoided, then improved moisture barriers must be designed to assure mirror longevity. With good adhesion, a KRATON rubber was found to exhibit superior back surface mirror protection (12 months in environmental chamber with no corrosion). An ultraviolet stabilized butyl rubber appeared to be the best edge seal. All heliostats edge sealed with silicones showed silver corrosion which indicated either poor bonding or moisture permeation.

  11. Protective coating for salt-bath brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, A. C.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1971-01-01

    Ceramic coating, consisting of graphite, enameler's clay, and algin binder, applied to materials prior to salt bath brazing facilitates brazing process and results in superior joints. Alternate coating materials and their various proportions are given.

  12. Evaluation of several corrosion protective coating systems on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    A study of several protective coating systems for use on aluminum in seawater/seacoast environments was conducted to review the developments made on protective coatings since early in the Space Shuttle program and to perform comparative studies on these coatings to determine their effectiveness for providing corrosion protection during exposure to seawater/seacoast environments. Panels of 2219-T87 aluminum were coated with 21 different systems and exposed to a 5 percent salt spray for 4000 hr. Application properties, adhesion measurements, heat resistance and corrosion protection were evaluated. For comparative studies, the presently specified Bostik epoxy system used on the SRB structures was included. Results of these tests indicate four systems with outstanding performance and four additional systems with protection almost as good. These systems are based on a chromated pretreatment, a chromate epoxy primer, and a polyurethane topcoat. Consideration for one of these systems should be included for those applications where superior corrosion protection for aluminum surfaces is required.

  13. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

  14. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1992-03-31

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

  15. Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Min; Shen, Zhigang; Zhao, Xiaohu; Liang, Shuaishuai; Liu, Lei

    2014-04-07

    The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion.

  16. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  17. Degradation of protective organic coatings after cupping test

    SciTech Connect

    Deflorian, F.; Fedrizzi, L.; Rossi, S.

    1999-11-01

    Coil coating products generally are shaped by deforming and bending after coating. These deformations can produce defects inducing a significant deterioration of the protective properties of the organic coating. An empirical method for the evaluation of the deformation effects is the cupping test. in the present work, effects of the cupping test were studied by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements to study the influence of deformation conditions on the mechanisms of degradation of the protective properties. The materials studied were environmentally friendly coatings based on ion exchange pigments. In addition to the electrochemical characterizations, a finite element model was developed for the estimation of the strain after the cupping test and some adhesion measurements were performed. The cupping test with an electrochemical characterization with EIS is a valid method for the evaluation of the protective behavior of coil coating products after deformation.

  18. Method and coating composition for protecting and decontaminating surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Overhold, D C; Peterson, M D

    1959-03-10

    A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is described. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in water, allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

  19. METHOD AND COATING COMPOSITION FOR PROTECTING AND DECONTAMINATING SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Overhold, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.

    1959-03-10

    A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is presented. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in waters allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

  20. Protective coatings for composite tubes in space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, Harry W.; Hendricks, Carl L.

    1987-01-01

    Protective coatings for graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) tubular structures for a Manned Space Station truss structure were evaluated. The success of the composite tube truss structure depends on its stability to long-term exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment with particular emphasis placed on atomic oxygen. Concepts for protectively coating Gr/Ep tubes include use of inorganic coated metal foils and electroplating. These coatings were applied to Gr/Ep tubes and then subjected to simulated LEO environmnet to evaluate survivability of coatings and coated tubes. Evaluation included: atomic oxygen resistance, changes in optical properties and adhesion, abrasion resistancem surface preparation required, coating uniformity, and formation of microcracks in the Gr/Ep tubes caused by thermal cycling. Program results demonstrated that both phosphoric and chromic acid anodized Al foil provided excellent adhesion to Gr/Ep tubes and exhibited stable optical properties when subjected to simulated LEO environment. The SiO2/Al coatings speuttered onto Al foils also resulted in an excellent protective coating. Electroplated Ni exhibited unaccepatble adhesion loss to Gr/Ep tubes during atomic oxygen exposure.

  1. Corrosion protection mechanism of polyaniline blended organic coating on steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Jeyaram, R.; Muthukrishnan, S.; Venkatachari, G.

    2009-07-01

    Epoxy-coal tar coatings are widely used to protect steel structures exposed to marine atmosphere due to their good barrier property. However, the presence of micropores and microcracks formed during the coating formation leads to failure of the coating due to permeation of corrosive ions. In recent years, it has been established that the coatings containing polyaniline (PANI) is able to protect pinholes and defects due to its passivating ability. Hence, a study has been made on the effect of polyaniline content (1 and 3%) in epoxy-coal tar coating on the corrosion protection of steel in 3% NaCl solution by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies. Both phosphate- and chloride-doped polyanilines were prepared by a chemical oxidative polymerization method. From EIS studies, it has been found that the resistance value of the coatings containing 1 and 3% phosphate-doped polyaniline and 3% chloride-doped polyaniline pigmented coatings are similar to 10{sup 9} {Omega} cm{sup 2} even after 90 days exposure to NaCl solution, which are two orders high in comparison to that of conventional coal tar epoxy coatings. Besides, the conducting state of polyaniline has been found to be decreased after exposure to NaCl solution due to redox property of PANI. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have shown that polyaniline forms a complex layer with iron beneath the coating along with iron oxide.

  2. Renewal of corrosion protection of coated aluminum after welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1969-01-01

    Effectiveness of conversion coatings designed to protect aluminum alloys against atmospheric corrosion is reduced after exposure to high temperature or welding. Damaged coating should be manually stripped six inches from the weld and then recoated by sponge or spray with the original solution.

  3. Coating protects magnesium-lithium alloys against corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Coating protects newly developed magnesium-lithium alloys against corrosion. The procedure includes heating the ingots in a salt bath and rolling them to the desired sheet thickness. The black coating, which is tough though thin and ductile, is derived mainly from chromium.

  4. Iridium Aluminide Coats For Protection Against Ox idation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.; La Ferla, Raffaele; Jang, Qin

    1996-01-01

    Iridium aluminide coats investigated for use in protecting some metallic substrates against oxidation at high temperatures. Investigation prompted by need for cost-effective anti-oxidation coats for walls of combustion chambers in rocket engines. Also useful in special terrestrial applications like laboratory combustion chambers and some chemical-processing chambers.

  5. BORED AND ASSEMBLED GATE VALVES RECEIVING PROTECTIVE COATING IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BORED AND ASSEMBLED GATE VALVES RECEIVING PROTECTIVE COATING IN THE VALVE PAINT BOOTH OF THE VALVE ASSEMBLY BUILDING. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Valve Assembly Building, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Protection of alodine coatings from thermal aging by removable polymer coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Wagstaff, Brett R.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Whinnery, LeRoy L., Jr.

    2006-12-01

    Removable polymer coatings were evaluated as a means to suppress dehydration of Alodine chromate conversion coatings during thermal aging and thereby retain the corrosion protection afforded by Alodine. Two types of polymer coatings were applied to Alodine-treated panels of aluminum alloys 7075-T73 and 6061-T6 that were subsequently aged for 15 to 50 hours at temperatures between 135 F to 200 F. The corrosion resistance of the thermally aged panels was evaluated, after stripping the polymer coatings, by exposure to a standard salt-fog corrosion test and the extent of pitting of the polymer-coated and untreated panels compared. Removable polymer coatings mitigated the loss of corrosion resistance due to thermal aging experienced by the untreated alloys. An epoxide coating was more effective than a fluorosilicone coating as a dehydration barrier.

  7. Test Of Protective Coatings On Carbon Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis

    1993-01-01

    Report describes results of tests in which carbon-steel panels coated with one-or two-component solvent-based inorganic zinc primers and top-coated with inorganic topcoat or any of various organic topcoats, placed on outdoor racks at beach at Kennedy Space Center for 5 years. From time to time, slurry of Al(2)O(3) in 10-percent HCI solution applied to some of panels to simulate corrosive effect of effluent from solid-fuel rocket booster engines. Panels coated with inorganic topcoat performed much better than organic-topcoated panels.

  8. Corrosion-Protection Coatings for Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Study investigates 21 combinatios of surface treatments, primers and topcoats. Study considers several types of coatings, including primers, enamels, chlorinated rubbers, alkyds, epoxies, vinyls, polyurethanes, waterbased paints, and antifouling paints. 20-page report summarizes the study.

  9. Protective Coating For Laser Drilling Of Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    Sodium silicate prevents spattered silicon from fusing with surrounding material. Sodium silicate solution applied to wafer by dipping and draining or by spinning; application by spraying also works. When dried in oven, solution leaves thin coating of sodium silicate glass.

  10. Sputtered silicon nitride coatings for wear protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon nitride films were deposited by RF sputtering on 304 stainless steel substrates in a planar RF sputtering apparatus. The sputtering was performed from a Si3N4 target in a sputtering atmosphere of argon and nitrogen. The rate of deposition, the composition of the coatings, the surface microhardness and the adhesion of the coatings to the substrates were investigated as a function of the process parameters, such as: substrate target distance, fraction nitrogen in the sputtering atmosphere and sputtering pressure. Silicon rich coating was obtained for fraction nitrogen below 0.2. The rate of deposition decreases continuously with increasing fraction nitrogen and decreasing sputtering pressure. It was found that the adherence of the coatings improves with decreasing sputtering pressure, almost independently of their composition.

  11. Smart Coatings for Launch Site Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.

    2014-01-01

    Smart, environmentally friendly paint system for early corrosion detection, mitigation, and healing that will enable supportability in KSC launch facilities and ground systems through their operational life cycles. KSC's Corrosion Technology Laboratory is developing a smart, self-healing coating that can detect and repair corrosion at an early stage. This coating is being developed using microcapsules specifically designed to deliver the contents of their core when corrosion starts.

  12. Protective glass coatings for circuits on ceramic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovsky, E.

    1993-08-01

    Low-melting glass ceramics were developed to form coatings that protect circuits on alumina substrates from corrosion. The influence of (beta) -eucryptite and nitrides on its thermal expansion and crystallization were studied. The coatings, formed from powdered glass at firing temperatures from 430 degree(s) to 480 degree(s)C, have thermal expansion coefficient in the range (95 -85) X 10-7 degree(s)C. High resistance to thermal shock of coatings is due to the presence of crystal phases: 2PbO.ZnO.B2O3 and (beta) - eucryptite. At the surface of the coatings can be seen `islands' of nitrides hydrophobic thin film.

  13. Coated columbium thermal protection systems: An assessment of technological readiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Grisaffe, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation and development to date show that of the coated columbium alloys FS-85 coated with R512E shows significant promise for a reusable thermal protection system (TPS) as judged by environmental resistance and the retention of mechanical properties and structural integrity of panels upon repeated reentry simulation. Production of the alloy, the coating, and full-sized TPS panels is well within current manufacturing technology. Small defects which arise from impact damage or from local coating breakdown do not appear to have serious immediate consequences in the use environment anticipated for the space shuttle orbiter TPS.

  14. Study of protective coatings for aluminum die casting molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Ildiko; Rosso, Mario; Gobber, Federico Simone

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the development and characterization of some protective coatings on steel substrate are presented. The coatings are realized by plasma spray techniques. The substrate material used is a Cr-Mo-V based hot work tool steel, initially submitted to vacuum heat treatment to achieve homogeneous hardness. The main attention is focused on the study of wear and on the characterization of the interface between the substrate material and the coating layer, because of their key role in determining the resistance of the coating layer. Simulation of friction and wear processes is performed by pin-on-disk test and the tested samples are observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Chemical conversion coating for protecting magnesium alloys from corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Bhargava, Gaurang; Allen, Fred M.; Skandan, Ganesh; Hornish, Peter; Jain, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A chromate-free, self-healing conversion coating solution for magnesium alloy substrates, composed of 10-20 wt. % Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2.6H.sub.2O, 1-5 wt. % Al(NO.sub.3).sub.3.9H.sub.2O, and less than 1 wt. % of [V.sub.10O.sub.28].sup.6- or VO.sub.3.sup.- dissolved in water. The corrosion resistance offered by the resulting coating is in several hundreds of hours in salt-spray testing. This prolonged corrosion protection is attributed to the creation of a unique structure and morphology of the conversion coating that serves as a barrier coating with self-healing properties. Hydroxoaluminates form the backbone of the barrier protection offered while the magnesium hydroxide domains facilitate the "slow release" of vanadium compounds as self-healing moieties to defect sites, thus providing active corrosion protection.

  16. Microencapsulation Technologies for Corrosion Protective Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz; Pearman, Benjamin; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Microencapsulation technologies for functional smart Coatings for autonomous corrosion control have been a research area of strong emphasis during the last decade. This work concerns the development of pH sensitive micro-containers (microparticles and microcapsules) for autonomous corrosion control. This paper presents an overview of the state-of-the-art in the field of microencapsulation for corrosion control applications, as well as the technical details of the pH sensitive microcontainer approach, such as selection criteria for corrosion indicators and corrosion inhibitors; the development and optimization of encapsulation methods; function evaluation before and after incorporation of the microcontainers into coatings; and further optimization to improve coating compatibility and performance.

  17. Protective metal matrix coating with nanocomponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Galevsky, S. G.; Efimova, K. A.

    2016-09-01

    Experience of nanocrystalline chromium, titanium, silicon carbides and borides components application as nickel, zinc, chromium based electrodeposited composite coating is generalized. Electrodepositing conditions are determined. Structure and physicochemical properties of coatings, namely micro-hardness, adhesion to steel base, inherent stresses, heat resistance, corrosion currents, en-during quality, and their change during isothermal annealing are studied. As is shown, nanocomponents act as metal matrix modifier. Technological and economic feasibility study to evaluate expediency of replacing high priced nano-diamonds with nanocrystalline borides and carbides is undertaken.

  18. Temporary coatings for protection of microelectronic devices during packaging

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Conley, William R.

    2005-01-18

    The present invention relates to a method of protecting a microelectronic device during device packaging, including the steps of applying a water-insoluble, temporary protective coating to a sensitive area on the device; performing at least one packaging step; and then substantially removing the protective coating, preferably by dry plasma etching. The sensitive area can include a released MEMS element. The microelectronic device can be disposed on a wafer. The protective coating can be a vacuum vapor-deposited parylene polymer, silicon nitride, metal (e.g. aluminum or tungsten), a vapor deposited organic material, cynoacrylate, a carbon film, a self-assembled monolayered material, perfluoropolyether, hexamethyldisilazane, or perfluorodecanoic carboxylic acid, silicon dioxide, silicate glass, or combinations thereof. The present invention also relates to a method of packaging a microelectronic device, including: providing a microelectronic device having a sensitive area; applying a water-insoluble, protective coating to the sensitive area; providing a package; attaching the device to the package; electrically interconnecting the device to the package; and substantially removing the protective coating from the sensitive area.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition coatings for oxidation protection of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, G. R.; Robinson, J. C.; Clark, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the oxidation protection afforded to Ti-14Al-21Nb and Ti-14Al-23Nb-2V titanium aluminides and Ti-17Mo-3Al-3Nb titanium alloy by aluminum-boron-silicon and boron-silicon coatings are presented. These coatings are applied by a combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The former is for the application of aluminum, and the latter is for codeposition of boron and silicon. Coating thickness is in the range of 2 to 7 microns, and coating weights are 0.6 to 2.0 mg/sq cm. Oxidation testing was performed in air at temperatures to 1255 K in both static and hypersonic flow environments. The degree of oxidation protection provided by the coatings is determined from weight change measurements made during the testing and post test compositional analyses. Temperature-dependent total normal emittance data are also presented for four coating/substrate combinations. Both types of coatings provided excellent oxidation protection for the exposure conditions of this investigation. Total normal emittances were greater than 0.80 in all cases.

  20. Sucker rod coupling with protective coating

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, K.W.

    1990-03-06

    This patent describes a coupling adapted to be used in a string of oil well sucker rods. It comprises: a cylindrical metallic cuff having a radial face at each end and internal threads for its entire length, having a resinous coating about 0.040 inches thick bonded over all of the external surfaces, the resinous coating is fused onto the metal. This patent describes a second coupling adapted to be used in a string of oil well sucker rods. It comprises: a cylindrical metallic cuff having a radial face at each end and internal threads for its entire length, having a resinous coating bonded over all of the external surfaces, the resinous coating is fused onto the metal, a distal plug within one end of the cuff, the distal plug snugly fitting the threads of one end and covering all internal surfaces, and an eyelet plug on the other end. The eyelet plug extending within the other end and covering the threads of that end and all internal surfaces.

  1. Nondestructive characterization of corrosion protective coatings on airframe structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Jochen Peter

    Corrosion protective polymeric aircraft coating systems are continuously subject to ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling and humidity exposure causing the coating to fail. This leaves the Aluminum alloy aircraft skin unprotected and frequent paint replacement becomes necessary creating huge amounts of hazardous waste. Current efforts are directed to enhance the coating lifetime and new nondestructive inspection methodologies are needed for monitoring the coating performance periodically. In the scope of this dissertation, several methods were considered to identify potential nondestructive evaluation (NDE) metrics. The approach then concentrated on Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (SAM) which contributed to all main research topics: coating inhomogeneity, coating weathering and interface condition. Developing a new data analysis procedure based on acoustic reflectivity, it became possible to determine the acoustic impedance of the coatings as a function of different weathering exposures. In addition, SAM and thermal techniques were employed to detect microscale sites of coating delamination and early stages of corrosion under a visibly intact coating. Here, the newly developed fan (hot air) thermography was introduced for interface studies. The NDE measurements were benchmarked with results from white light interferometry and electrochemical techniques.

  2. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  3. Gemini's protected silver coatings: first two years in operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucina, Tomislav; Boccas, Maxime; Araya, Claudio; Ahhee, Clayton

    2006-06-01

    The Gemini twins were the first large modern telescopes to receive protected Silver coatings on their mirrors in 2004. We report the performance evolution of these 4-layer coatings in terms of reflectivity and emissivity. We evaluate the durability of these thin films by comparison to the evolution of some samples that we have produced and exposed since 2002. Finally, we will explain our maintenance plan.

  4. Protective coatings for high-temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David R.; Sutter, James K.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was used to deposit silicon nitride on graphite-fiber-reinforced polyimide composites to protect against oxidation at elevated temperatures. The adhesion and integrity of the coating were evaluated by isothermal aging (371 C for 500 hr) and thermal cycling. The amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN:H) coating could withstand stresses ranging from approximately 0.18 GPa (tensile) to -1.6 GPa (compressive) and provided a 30 to 80 percent reduction in oxidation-induced weight loss. The major factor influencing the effectiveness of a-SiN:H as a barrier coating against oxidation is the surface finish of the polymer composite.

  5. Coatings Would Protect Polymers Against Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed interposition of layers of silver oxide tens to hundreds of angstroms thick between polymeric substrates and overlying films helps protect substrates against chemical attack by monatomic oxygen. In original application, polymer substrate would be, sheet of polyimide supporting array of solar photovoltaic cells on spacecraft in low orbit around Earth. Concept also applicable to protection of equipment in terrestrial laboratory and industrial vacuum and plasma chambers in which monatomic oxygen present.

  6. Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

    1984-07-20

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate prior to metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

  7. Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.

    1988-01-01

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

  8. Gas turbines: Protective coatings for corrosion and erosion protection. (Latest citations from Metadex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning protective coatings for gas turbines to minimize corrosion and erosion problems. Citations examine erosion of turbine blades resulting from the presence of fly ash and finely divided particles in the environment, and discuss the use of ceramic coatings for erosion protection. The formation of molten sodium sulfide on turbine blades and resulting hot corrosion are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  9. Gas turbines: Protective coatings for corrosion and erosion protection. (Latest citations from METADEX). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning protective coatings for gas turbines to minimize corrosion and erosion problems. Citations examine erosion of turbine blades resulting from the presence of fly ash and finely divided particles in the environment, and discuss the use of ceramic coatings for erosion protection. The formation of molten sodium sulfide on turbine blades and resulting hot corrosion are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  10. Gas turbines: Protective coatings for corrosion and erosion protection. (Latest citations from Metadex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning protective coatings for gas turbines to minimize corrosion and erosion problems. Citations examine erosion of turbine blades resulting from the presence of fly ash and finely divided particles in the environment, and discuss the use of ceramic coatings for erosion protection. The formation of molten sodium sulfide on turbine blades and resulting hot corrosion are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Simulated Space Environment Effects on Tether Materials with Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria M.; Watts, Ed

    2005-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) erodes most organic materials. and ultraviolet radiation embrittles polymers. A previous study indicated untreated polymers such as ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) are severely degraded when exposed to AO. This test series was performed to determine the effect of AO and UV on the mechanical integrity of tether materials that were treated with AO-protective coatings. Three coating systems were evaluated for their ability to protect the underlying material from AO erosion. The first coating system is the Photosil surface modification process which incorporates silicon-containing functional groups into the top micron of an organic material. The Photosil process has had favorable results with polyurethane- and epoxy-based thermal control coatings . The second coating system is metallization, in this case nickel. The third coating system is silsesquioxane. The Marshall Space Flight Center Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility (AOBF) was used to simulate low Earth orbit AO of 5 eV energy. In addition, some tether samples were exposed to ultraviolet radiation then evaluated for any changes in mechanical strength. Tether missions, such as a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether, may benefit from this research.

  12. Diamondlike carbon protective coatings for IR materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nir, D.; Swec, D. M.; Banks, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films have the potential to protect optical windows in applications where it is important to maintain the integrity of the specular transmittance of these films on ZnS and ZnSe infrared transmitting windows. The films must be adherent and durable such that they protect the windows from rain and particle erosion as well as chemical attack. In order to optimize the performance of these films, 0.1 micro m thick diamondlike carbon films were deposited on fused silica and silicon wafers, using three different methods of ion beam deposition. One method was sputter deposition from a carbon target using an 8 cm ion source. The merits of hydrogen addition were experimentally evaluated in conjunction with this method. The second method used a 30 cm hollow cathode ion source with hydrocarbon/Argon gases to deposit diamondlike carbon films from the primary beam at 90 to 250 eV. The third method used a dual beam system employing a hydrocarbon/Argon 30 cm ion source and an 8 cm ion source. Films were evaluated for adherence, intrinsic stress, infrared transmittance between 2.5 and 50 micro m, and protection from particle erosion. An erosion test using a sandblaster was used to give quantitative values of the protection afforded to the fused silica by the diamondlike carbon films. The fused silica surfaces protected by diamondlike carbon films were exposed to 100 micro m diameter SiO particles at 60 mi/hr (26.8/sec) in the sandblaster.

  13. Mussel-designed Protective Coatings for Compliant Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Holten-Andersen, N.; Waite, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    The byssus of marine mussels has attracted attention as a paradigm of strong and versatile underwater adhesion. As the first of the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa)-containing byssal precursors to be purified, Mytilus edulis foot protein-1 (mefp-1) has been much investigated with respect to its molecular structure, physical properties, and adsorption to surfaces. Although mefp-1 undoubtedly contributes to the durability of byssus, it is not directly involved in adhesion. Rather, it provides a robust coating that is 4-5 times stiffer and harder than the byssal collagens that it covers. Protective coatings for compliant tissues and materials are highly appealing to technology, notwithstanding the conventional wisdom that coating extensibility can be increased only at the expense of hardness and stiffness. The byssal cuticle is the only known coating in which high compliance and hardness co-exist without mutual detriment; thus, the role of mefp-1 in accommodating both parameters deserves further study. PMID:18650539

  14. Coatings for the protection of turbine blades from erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, P.N.; Quets, J.M.; Tucker, R.C. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Many types of turbines, including aircraft gas turbines, steam turbines, and power recovery turbines, suffer from solid particle erosion caused by a variety of materials ingested into the machines. Utilization of various laboratory erosion tests tailored to the specific application by using various erodents, temperatures, velocities, and angles of impact, have been shown to be effective in the development and selection of coatings for the erosion protection of turbine blades and other components. Detonation gun coatings have demonstrated their efficacy in providing substantial protection in many situations. It has now been shown that several tungsten carbide and chromium carbide Super D-Gun{trademark} coatings not only have better erosion resistance than their D-Gun analogs, but cause little or no degradation of the fatigue properties of the blade alloys. Nonetheless, caution should be employed in the application of any laboratory data to a specific situation and additional testing done as warranted by the turbine designer.

  15. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating. 192.461 Section 192.461 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS...

  16. New method for evaluating high-quality fog protective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeremuszkin, Grzegorz; Latreche, Mohamed; Mendoza-Suarez, Guillermo

    2011-05-01

    Fogging is commonly observed when humid-warm air contacts the cold surface of a transparent substrate, i.e. eyewear lenses, making the observed image blurred and hazy. To protect from fogging, the lens inner surfaces are protected with Anti-Fog coatings, which render them hydrophilic and induce water vapor condensation as a smooth, thin and invisible film, which uniformly flows down on the lens as the condensation progresses. Coatings differ in protection level, aging kinetics, and susceptibility to contamination. Some perform acceptably in limited conditions, beyond which the condensing water film becomes unstable, nonuniform, and scatters light or shows refractory distortions, both affecting the observed image. Quantifying the performance of Anti-Fog coated lenses is difficult: they may not show classical fogging and the existing testing methods, based on fog detection, are therefore inapplicable. The presented method for evaluating and quantifying AF properties is based on characterizing light scattering on lenses exposed to controlled humidity and temperature. Changes in intensity of laser light scattered at low angles (1, 2 4 and 8 degrees), observed during condensation of water on lenses, provide information on the swelling of Anti-Fog coatings, formation of uniform water film, going from an unstable to a steady state, and on the coalescence of discontinuous films. Real time observations/measurements allow for better understanding of factors controlling fogging and fog preventing phenomena. The method is especially useful in the development of new coatings for military-, sport-, and industrial protective eyewear as well as for medical and automotive applications. It allows for differentiating between coatings showing acceptable, good, and excellent performance.

  17. Graphene coatings for protection against microbiologically induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ajay

    Microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) is a special form of electrochemical corrosion where micro-organisms affect the local environmental conditions at the metal-electrolyte interface by forming a stable biofilm. The biofilm introduces localized concentration cells, which accelerate the electrochemical corrosion rates. MIC has been found to affect many industrial systems such as sewage waste water pipes, heat exchangers, ships, underwater pipes etc. It has been traditionally eradicated by physical, biochemical and surface protection methods. The cleaning methods and the biocidal deliveries are required periodically and don't provide a permanent solution to the problem. Further, the use of biocides has been harshly criticized by environmentalists due to safety concerns associated with their usage. Surface based coatings have their own drawback of rapid degradation under harsh microbial environments. This has led to the exploration of thin, robust, inert, conformal passivation coatings for the protection of metallic surfaces from microbiologically induced corrosion. Graphene is a 2D arrangement of carbon atoms in a hexagonal honeycomb lattice. The carbon atoms are bonded to one another by sp2 hybridization and each layer of the carbon ring arrangement spans to a thickness of less than a nm. Due to its unique 2D arrangement of carbon atoms, graphene exhibits interesting in-plane and out of plane properties that have led to it being considered as the material for the future. Its excellent thermal, mechanical, electrical and optical properties are being explored in great depth to understand and realize potential applications in various technological realms. Early studies have shown the ability of bulk and monolayer graphene to protect metallic surfaces from air oxidation and solution based galvanic corrosion processes for short periods. However, the role of graphene in resisting MIC is yet to be determined, particularly over the long time spans characteristic of

  18. Organic matrix composite protective coatings for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, Harry W.; George, Pete

    1995-01-01

    Successful use of composites in low earth orbit (LEO) depends on their ability to survive long-term exposure to atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation, charged particle radiation, thermal cycling, and micrometeoroid and space debris. The AO environment is especially severe for unprotected organic matrix composites surfaces in LEO. Ram facing unprotected graphite/epoxy flown on the 69-month Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission lost up to one ply of thickness (5 mils) resulting in decreased mechanical properties. The expected AO fluence of the 30 year Space Station Alpha mission is approximately 20 times that seen on LDEF. This exposure would result in significant material loss of unprotected ram facing organic matrix composites. Several protective coatings for composites were flown on LDEF including anodized aluminum, vacuum deposited coatings, a variety of thermal control coatings, metalized Teflon, and leafing aluminum. Results from the testing and analysis of the coated and uncoated composite specimens flown on LDEF's leading and trailing edges provide the baseline for determining the effectiveness of protectively coated composites in LEO. In addition to LDEF results, results from shuttle flight experiments and ground based testing will be discussed.

  19. Development of Oxidation Protection Coatings for Gamma Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, T. A.; Bird, R. K.; Sankaran, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    Metallic material systems play a key role in meeting the stringent weight and durability requirements for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) airframe hot structures. Gamma titanium aluminides (gamma-TiAl) have been identified as high-payoff materials for high-temperature applications. The low density and good elevated temperature mechanical properties of gamma-TiAl alloys make them attractive candidates for durable lightweight hot structure and thermal protection systems at temperatures as high as 871 C. However, oxidation significantly degrades gamma-TiAl alloys under the high-temperature service conditions associated with the RLV operating environment. This paper discusses ongoing efforts at NASA Langley Research Center to develop durable ultrathin coatings for protecting gamma-TiAl alloys from high-temperature oxidation environments. In addition to offering oxidation protection, these multifunctional coatings are being engineered to provide thermal control features to help minimize heat input into the hot structures. This paper describes the coating development effort and discusses the effects of long-term high-temperature exposures on the microstructure of coated and uncoated gamma-TiAl alloys. The alloy of primary consideration was the Plansee alloy gamma-Met, but limited studies of the newer alloy gamma-Met-PX were also included. The oxidation behavior of the uncoated materials was evaluated over the temperature range of 704 C to 871 C. Sol-gel-based coatings were applied to the gamma-TiAl samples by dipping and spraying, and the performance evaluated at 871 C. Results showed that the coatings improve the oxidation resistance, but that further development is necessary.

  20. Description of particle induced damage on protected silver coatings.

    PubMed

    Schwinde, Stefan; Schürmann, Mark; Jobst, Paul Johannes; Kaiser, Norbert; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    In the visible to infrared spectral range, highly-reflective silver mirrors are applied in the manufacture of optical instruments such as telescopes. However, it is still difficult to combine high reflectivity and long-term stability of the protected silver coating. We show that the deposition of impervious protective layers is necessary but often not sufficient for long-term environmental stability. Hygroscopic air borne particles absorbed by the protections surface attract water molecules and form a solution. This solution first damages the protection, subsequently permeates the protection and finally damages the silver whereby the reflectivity is reduced. We demonstrate this particular damage mechanism with different experiments and describe this mechanism in detail. PMID:26192652

  1. Mullite coatings for corrosion protection of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Mulpuri, R.; Sarin, V.K.

    1995-08-01

    SiC based ceramics have been identified as the leading candidate materials for elevated temperature applications in harsh oxidation/corrosion environments. It has been established that a protective coating can be effectively used to avoid problems with excessive oxidation and hot corrosion. However, to date, no coating configuration has been developed that can satisfy the stringent requirements imposed by such applications. Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) mullite coatings due to their desirable properties of toughness, corrosion resistance, and a good coefficient of thermal expansion match with SiC are being investigated as a potential candidate. Since mullite has never been successfully grown via CVD, the thermodynamics and kinetics of its formation were initially established and used as a guideline in determining the initial process conditions. Process optimization was carried out using an iterative process of theoretical analysis and experimental work coupled with characterization and testing. The results of theoretical analysis and the CVD formation characteristics of mullite are presented.

  2. Method for providing uranium with a protective copper coating

    DOEpatents

    Waldrop, Forrest B.; Jones, Edward

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing uranium metal with a protective coating of copper. Uranium metal is subjected to a conventional cleaning operation wherein oxides and other surface contaminants are removed, followed by etching and pickling operations. The copper coating is provided by first electrodepositing a thin and relatively porous flash layer of copper on the uranium in a copper cyanide bath. The resulting copper-layered article is then heated in an air or inert atmosphere to volatilize and drive off the volatile material underlying the copper flash layer. After the heating step an adherent and essentially non-porous layer of copper is electro-deposited on the flash layer of copper to provide an adherent, multi-layer copper coating which is essentially impervious to corrosion by most gases.

  3. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica flims, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  4. Progress in Protective Coatings for Aircraft Gas Turbines: A Review of NASA Sponsored Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merutka, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Problems associated with protective coatings for advanced aircraft gas turbines are reviewed. Metallic coatings for preventing titanium fires in compressors are identified. Coatings for turbine section are also considered, Ductile aluminide coatings for protecting internal turbine-blade cooling passage surface are also identified. Composite modified external overlay MCrAlY coatings deposited by low-pressure plasma spraying are found to be better in surface protection capability than vapor deposited MCrAlY coatings. Thermal barrier coating (TBC), studies are presented. The design of a turbine airfoil is integrated with a TBC, and computer-aided manufacturing technology is applied.

  5. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-23

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  6. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-01

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50-200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10-50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  7. Thermal Protective Coating for High Temperature Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barron, Andrew R.

    1999-01-01

    The central theme of this research is the application of carboxylate-alumoxane nanoparticles as precursors to thermally protective coatings for high temperature polymer composites. In addition, we will investigate the application of carboxylate-alumoxane nanoparticle as a component to polymer composites. The objective of this research was the high temperature protection of polymer composites via novel chemistry. The significance of this research is the development of a low cost and highly flexible synthetic methodology, with a compatible processing technique, for the fabrication of high temperature polymer composites. We proposed to accomplish this broad goal through the use of a class of ceramic precursor material, alumoxanes. Alumoxanes are nano-particles with a boehmite-like structure and an organic periphery. The technical goals of this program are to prepare and evaluate water soluble carboxylate-alumoxane for the preparation of ceramic coatings on polymer substrates. Our proposed approach is attractive since proof of concept has been demonstrated under the NRA 96-LeRC-1 Technology for Advanced High Temperature Gas Turbine Engines, HITEMP Program. For example, carbon and Kevlar(tm) fibers and matting have been successfully coated with ceramic thermally protective layers.

  8. Thermal certification tests of Orbiter Thermal Protection System tiles coated with KSC coating slurries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milhoan, James D.; Pham, Vuong T.; Sherborne, William D.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal tests of Orbiter thermal protection system (TPS) tiles, which were coated with borosilicate glass slurries fabricated at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), were performed in the Radiant Heat Test Facility and the Atmospheric Reentry Materials & Structures Evaluation Facility at Johnson Space Center to verify tile coating integrity after exposure to multiple entry simulation cycles in both radiant and convective heating environments. Eight high temperature reusable surface insulation (HRSI) tiles and six low temperature reusable surface insulation (LRSI) tiles were subjected to 25 cycles of radiant heat at peaked surface temperatures of 2300 F and 1200 F, respectively. For the LRSI tiles, an additional cycle at peaked surface temperature of 2100 F was performed. There was no coating crack on any of the HRSI specimens. However, there were eight small coating cracks (less than 2 inches long) on two of the six LRSI tiles on the 26th cycle. There was practically no change on the surface reflectivity, physical dimensions, or weight of any of the test specimens. There was no observable thermal-chemical degradation of the coating either. For the convective heat test, eight HRSI tiles were tested for five cycles at a surface temperature of 2300 F. There was no thermal-induced coating crack on any of the test specimens, almost no change on the surface reflectivity, and no observable thermal-chemical degradation with an exception of minor slumping of the coating under painted TPS identification numbers. The tests demonstrated that KSC's TPS slurries and coating processes meet the Orbiter's thermal specification requirements.

  9. Ion beam mixed oxidation protective coating on Zry-4 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Won; Kim, Jae-Un; Park, Jeong-Yong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, SiC was coated on the surface of Zry-4 cladding to improve the oxidation protectiveness. In the coating of SiC onto Zry-4, the prime concern was adhesion at an elevated temperature. Here, a 70 keV N ion beam was irradiated onto a SiC coating layer of ∼100 nm in thickness; this was deposited via the e-beam evaporation method. Additional coating to a target thickness was then carried out. The films deposited without ion-beam mixing (IBM) often peeled-off at an elevated temperature, while the IBM SiC film always adhered to Zry-4, even after heating to ∼1000 °C; at such a temperature, however, cracks formed in the film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the deposited SiC film contained about 20 at.% of O, while after annealing in air, 76 at.% of O was found on the surface layer. This implied that both the surface of SiC film and Zry-4 in the crack lines were oxidized. Comparing the Zr3d peak positions across the interface, a shift of binding energy by ∼1 eV was detected, representing that, in view of favorable thermodynamics, SiC/Zry-4 seems to be an acceptable system to apply IBM. To heal the crack, the process of IBM for a 1 μm thick coating and annealing was repeated. High-resolution field emission secondary electron microscopy (FE-SEM) showed that the crack lines, the main places at which oxidation occurred, were gradually covered as the process was repeated, ensuring enhanced oxidation protectiveness.

  10. Corrosion protection performance of porous strontium hydroxyapatite coating on polypyrrole coated 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Gopi, D; Ramya, S; Rajeswari, D; Kavitha, L

    2013-07-01

    Polypyrrole/strontium hydroxyapatite bilayer coatings were achieved on 316L stainless steel (316L SS) by the electropolymerisation of pyrrole from sodium salicylate solution followed by the electrodeposition of porous strontium hydroxyapatite. The formation and the morphology of the bilayer coatings were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the coated 316L SS specimens was investigated in Ringer's solution by electrochemical techniques and the results were substantiated with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The passive film underneath the polypyrrole layer is effective in protecting 316L SS against corrosion in Ringer's solution. Moreover, we believe that the top porous strontium hydroxyapatite layer can provide potential bioactivity to the 316L SS.

  11. Corrosion protection performance of porous strontium hydroxyapatite coating on polypyrrole coated 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Gopi, D; Ramya, S; Rajeswari, D; Kavitha, L

    2013-07-01

    Polypyrrole/strontium hydroxyapatite bilayer coatings were achieved on 316L stainless steel (316L SS) by the electropolymerisation of pyrrole from sodium salicylate solution followed by the electrodeposition of porous strontium hydroxyapatite. The formation and the morphology of the bilayer coatings were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the coated 316L SS specimens was investigated in Ringer's solution by electrochemical techniques and the results were substantiated with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The passive film underneath the polypyrrole layer is effective in protecting 316L SS against corrosion in Ringer's solution. Moreover, we believe that the top porous strontium hydroxyapatite layer can provide potential bioactivity to the 316L SS. PMID:23475060

  12. Method of protecting a surface with a silicon-slurry/aluminide coating. [coatings for gas turbine engine blades and vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Young, S. G. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A low cost coating for protecting metallic base system substrates from high temperatures, high gas velocity oxidation, thermal fatigue and hot corrosion is described. The coating is particularly useful for protecting vanes and blades in aircraft and land based gas turbine engines. A lacquer slurry comprising cellulose nitrate containing high purity silicon powder is sprayed onto the superalloy substrates. The silicon layer is then aluminized to complete the coating. The Si-Al coating is less costly to produce than advanced aluminides and protects the substrate from oxidation and thermal fatigue for a much longer period of time than the conventional aluminide coatings. While more expensive Pt-Al coatings and physical vapor deposited MCrAlY coatings may last longer or provide equal protection on certain substrates, the Si-Al coating exceeded the performance of both types of coatings on certain superalloys in high gas velocity oxidation and thermal fatigue. Also, the Si-Al coating increased the resistance of certain superalloys to hot corrosion.

  13. SiC protective coating for photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xin; Kane, Sheryl; Cogan, Stuart; Lorach, Henri; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Theodore; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate plasma-enhanced, chemically vapor deposited (PECVD) amorphous silicon carbide (α-SiC:H) as a protective coating for retinal prostheses and other implantable devices, and to study their failure mechanisms in vivo. Approach. Retinal prostheses were implanted in rats sub-retinally for up to 1 year. Degradation of implants was characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dissolution rates of SiC, SiN x and thermal SiO2 were measured in accelerated soaking tests in saline at 87 °C. Defects in SiC films were revealed and analyzed by selectively removing the materials underneath those defects. Main results. At 87 °C SiN x dissolved at 18.3 ± 0.3 nm d‑1, while SiO2 grown at high temperature (1000 °C) dissolved at 0.104 ± 0.008 nm d‑1. SiC films demonstrated the best stability, with no quantifiable change after 112 d. Defects in thin SiC films appeared primarily over complicated topography and rough surfaces. Significance. SiC coatings demonstrating no erosion in accelerated aging test for 112 d at 87 °C, equivalent to about 10 years in vivo, can offer effective protection of the implants. Photovoltaic retinal prostheses with PECVD SiC coatings exhibited effective protection from erosion during the 4 month follow-up in vivo. The optimal thickness of SiC layers is about 560 nm, as defined by anti-reflective properties and by sufficient coverage to eliminate defects.

  14. Diamond-like carbon protective coatings for optical windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swec, Diane M.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1989-09-01

    Two of the materials most often used as optical windows due to their high transmittance at infrared wavelengths are zinc selenide (ZnSe) and zinc sulfide (ZnS). However, these materials are soft and often degrade when subjected to a particle-impacting environment. Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films have the potential to protect optical windows, such as ZnSe and ZnS, from rain and particle erosion as well as chemical attack. Diamondlike carbon films were deposited on ZnSe and ZnS, and have been evaluated as protective coatings for the optical windows exposed to particle and rain erosion. The DLC films were deposited on the windows using three different ion beam methods. One method was sputter deposition, while the other two methods used a 30 cm hollow cathode ion source with hydrocarbon/argon gas to directly deposit the DLC films. In an attempt to improve the adherence of the DLC films on ZnSe and ZnS, techniques such as ion beam cleaning, ion implantation using helium and neon ions, and thin ion beam sputter deposited intermediate coatings were employed prior to deposition of the film and were also evaluated. The protection the DLC films afforded the windows was quantitatively determined by exposing the surfaces to 27-μm-diam A1203 particles in a microsandblaster. A Perkin-Elmer IR spectrophotometer was then utilized to indicated the change in specular transmittance between 2.5 and 50 μm as a result of the erosion. The DLC coated windows were also subjected to water droplets at 400 mph for exposure times up to 15 minutes. These samples were qualitatively evaluated by optically viewing the surfaces. The DLC films were also evaluated for adherence, intrinsic stress, and infrared transmittance.

  15. SiC protective coating for photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xin; Kane, Sheryl; Cogan, Stuart; Lorach, Henri; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Theodore; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate plasma-enhanced, chemically vapor deposited (PECVD) amorphous silicon carbide (α-SiC:H) as a protective coating for retinal prostheses and other implantable devices, and to study their failure mechanisms in vivo. Approach. Retinal prostheses were implanted in rats sub-retinally for up to 1 year. Degradation of implants was characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dissolution rates of SiC, SiN x and thermal SiO2 were measured in accelerated soaking tests in saline at 87 °C. Defects in SiC films were revealed and analyzed by selectively removing the materials underneath those defects. Main results. At 87 °C SiN x dissolved at 18.3 ± 0.3 nm d-1, while SiO2 grown at high temperature (1000 °C) dissolved at 0.104 ± 0.008 nm d-1. SiC films demonstrated the best stability, with no quantifiable change after 112 d. Defects in thin SiC films appeared primarily over complicated topography and rough surfaces. Significance. SiC coatings demonstrating no erosion in accelerated aging test for 112 d at 87 °C, equivalent to about 10 years in vivo, can offer effective protection of the implants. Photovoltaic retinal prostheses with PECVD SiC coatings exhibited effective protection from erosion during the 4 month follow-up in vivo. The optimal thickness of SiC layers is about 560 nm, as defined by anti-reflective properties and by sufficient coverage to eliminate defects.

  16. Protective coatings of metal surfaces by cold plasma treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manory, R.; Grill, A.

    1985-01-01

    The cold plasma techniques for deposition of various types of protective coatings are reviewed. The main advantage of these techniques for deposition of ceramic films is the lower process temperature, which enables heat treating of the metal prior to deposition. In the field of surface hardening of steel, significant reduction of treatment time and energy consumption were obtained. A simple model for the plasma - surface reactions in a cold plasma system is presented, and the plasma deposition techniques are discussed in view of this model.

  17. Silicon-slurry/aluminide coating. [protecting gas turbine engine vanes and blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Young, S. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A low cost coating protects metallic base system substrates from high temperatures, high gas velocity ovidation, thermal fatigue and hot corrosion and is particularly useful fo protecting vanes and blades in aircraft and land based gas turbine engines. A lacquer slurry comprising cellulose nitrate containing high purity silicon powder is sprayed onto the superalloy substrates. The silicon layer is then aluminized to complete the coating. The Si-Al coating is less costly to produce than advanced aluminides and protects the substrates from oxidation and thermal fatigue for a much longer period of time than the conventional aluminide coatings. While more expensive Pt-Al coatings and physical vapor deposited MCrAlY coatings may last longer or provide equal protection on certain substrates, the Si-Al coating exceeded the performance of both types of coatings on certain superalloys in high gas velocity oxidation and thermal fatigue and increased the resistance of certain superalloys to hot corrosion.

  18. Undercutting of defects in thin film protective coatings on polymer surfaces exposed to atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Mihelcic, Judith A.

    1989-01-01

    Protection for polymeric surfaces is needed to make them durable in the low Earth orbital environment, where oxidation by atomic oxygen is the predominant failure mechanism. Thin film coatings of oxides such as silicon dioxide are viable candidates to provide this protection, but concern has been voiced over the ability of these coatings to protect when defects are present in the coating due to surface anomalies occurring during the deposition process, handling, or micrometeoroid and debris bombardment in low Earth orbit. When a defected coating protecting a polymer substrate is exposed to atomic oxygen, the defect provides a pathway to the underlying polymer allowing oxidation and subsequent undercutting to occur. Defect undercutting was studied for sputter deposited coatings of silicon dioxide on polyimide Kapton. Preliminary results indicate that undercutting may be limited as long as the coating remains intact with the substrate. Therefore, coatings may not need to be defect free to give protection to the underlying surface.

  19. Undercutting of defects in thin film protective coatings on polymer surfaces exposed to atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Mihelcic, Judith A.

    1989-01-01

    Protection for polymeric surfaces is needed to make them durable in the low earth orbital environment. Thin film coatings of oxides such as SiO2 are viable candidates to provide this protection, but concern has been voiced over the ability of these coatings to protect when defects are present in the coating due to surface anomalies. When a defected coating protecting a polymer substrate is exposed to atomic oxygen, the defect provides a pathway to the underlying polymer allowing oxidation and subsequent undercutting to occur. Defect undercutting was studied for sputter deposited coatings of SiO2 on polyimide Kapton. Preliminary results indicate that undercutting may be limited as long as the coating remains intact with the substrate. Therefore, coatings may not need to be defect free to give protection to the underlying surface.

  20. Coating Layer and Corrosion Protection Characteristics in Sea Water with Various Thermal Spray Coating Materials for STS304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Jong; Woo, Yong-Bin

    We investigated the optimal method of application and the anticorrosive abilities of Zn, Al, and Zn + 15%Al spray coatings in protecting stainless steel 304 (STS304) in sea water. If a defect such as porosity or an oxide layer, causes STS304 to be exposed to sea water, and the thermal spray coating material will act as the cathode and anode, respectively. The Tafel experiments revealed that Al-coated specimens among applied coating methods had the lowest corrosion current densities. As the corrosion potential decreases with increasing corrosion current density, we estimated the characteristics and lifetime of the protective thermal spray coating layer in the galvanic cell formed by the thermal spray coating layer and STS304.

  1. Protective Coats For High-Temperature Strain Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1993-01-01

    Addition of some rare-earth oxides to prior alumina (only) coating material increases maximum service temperature of palladium/chromium-wire strain gauges. Pd/Cr wires used at temperatures up to 800 degrees C without excessive drift in electrical resistance. Oxides used: zirconia (ZrO2), yttria (Y2O3), ceria (CeO2), and hafnia (HfO2). Addition of one of these oxides to decrease oxidation of wire at high temperature. Protection against oxidation increases with concentration of rare-earth oxide. Addition of ZrO2 at 4 to 6 weight percent or Y2O3 at 1 weight percent results in smallest drift in electrical resistance.

  2. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating. [protecting gas turbines and other engine parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.; Hodge, P. E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates.

  3. Nuclear Technology. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection. Module 30-6, Protective Coating Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This sixth in a series of eight modules for a course titled Mechanical Inspection describes the duties of the nuclear quality assurance/quality control technician that are associated with protective coatings, and the national standards that govern the selection, application, and inspection of protective coatings for the reactor containment…

  4. Process for producing radiation-induced self-terminating protective coatings on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A gas and radiation are used to produce a protective coating that is substantially void-free on the molecular scale, self-terminating, and degradation resistant. The process can be used to deposit very thin (.apprxeq.5-20 .ANG.) coatings on critical surfaces needing protection from degradative processes including, corrosion and contamination.

  5. Protection of Advanced Copper Alloys With Lean Cu-Cr Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor); Thomas-Ogbuji, L.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced copper alloys are used as liners of rocket thrusters and nozzle ramps to ensure dissipation of the high thermal load generated during launch, and Cr-lean coatings are preferred for the protection of these liners from the aggressive ambient environment. It is shown that adequate protection can be achieved with thin Cu-Cr coatings containing as little as 17 percent Cr.

  6. New Materials for Structural Composites and Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this Phase I project was to create novel conductive materials that are lightweight and strong enough for multiple ground support equipment and Exploration applications. The long-term goal is to combine these materials within specially designed devices to create composites or coatings with diagnostic capabilities, increased strength, and tunable properties such as transparency, electroluminescence, and fire resistance. One such technology application is a smart windows system. In such a system, the transmission of light through a window is controlled by electrical power. In the future, these materials may also be able to absorb sunlight and convert it into electrical energy to produce light, thereby creating a self-sufficient lighting system. This experiment, conducted in collaboration with the Georgia Institute of Technology, demonstrated enhancements in fabricating fiber materials from carbon nanotubes (CNT). These nanotubes were grown as forests in an ultra-high-purity chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace and then drawn, using novel processing techniques, into fibers and yarns that would be turned into filaments. This work was submitted to the Journal of Advanced Functional Materials. The CNT fibers were initially tested as filament materials at atmospheric pressure; however, even under high current loads, the filaments produced only random sparking. The CNT fibers were also converted into transparent, hydrophobic, and conductive sheets. Filament testing at low vacuum pressures is in progress, and the technology will be enhanced in 2008. As initial proof of the smart-windows application concept, the use of CNT sheets as composites/ protective coatings was demonstrated in collaboration with Nanocomp Technologies of Concord, New Hampshire.

  7. DLC/BP ultra durable LWIR protective coatings for ZnS windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiantao; Liu, Shijun; Xiong, Changxin

    2007-12-01

    DLC/BP ultra durable LWIR (long wave infrared) protective coatings have been designed and prepared on ZnS (Zinc Sulphide) windows successfully. Both of BP and DLC coatings are deposited by RF-PECVD (radio frequency enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition) process, but in different chamber. The transmittance, micro-hardness and durability of DLC/BP coatings have been investigated, which are measured by FTIR spectroscopy, micro-hardness tester and simulative harsh environmental test system. The ZnS window outer face coated with DLC/BP coatings and inner face coated with high efficient antireflection coatings is also fabricated. In the band of 8~11.5μm, the measured maximum transmittance is above 93% and the average transmittance is about 89%. The coated ZnS windows meet with the demands of LWIR electro-optics systems workable in battlefield environment.

  8. Molybdate/phosphate composite conversion coating on magnesium alloy surface for corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Zhiyi; Zhu, Jin; Qiu, Cheng; Liu, Yali

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, a new conversion coating—molybdate/phosphate (Mo/P) coating on magnesium alloy was prepared and investigated by electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and salt-water immersion experiments, respectively. The results demonstrated that the Mo/P coating contained composite phases, which were consisted of metaphosphate as well as molybdate oxide with an "alveolate-crystallized" structure. The composite Mo/P conversion coating had better corrosion resistance performance than molybdate (Mo) coating, and even had almost comparable corrosion protection for Mg alloy to the traditional chromate-based coating.

  9. Concepts for Smart Protective High-Temperature Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Brady, M.P.; Wright, I.G.

    2003-04-24

    The need for environmental resistance is a critical material barrier to the operation of fossil systems with the improved energy efficiencies and emissions performance described by the goals of the Vision 21 concept of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy. All fossil fuel-derived processes contain reactive species and high-temperature degradation arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensible products often limits performance or materials lifetimes such that efficiency, emission, and/or economic targets or requirements are not realized. Therefore, historically, the development of materials for fossil-fuel combustion and conversion systems has been closely linked to corrosion studies of alloys and ceramics in appropriate environments. This project is somewhat different from such studies in that it focuses on the feasibility of new routes to controlling the critical chemical and mechanical phenomena that collectively form the basis for environmental protection in relevant fossil environments by exploring compositional and microstructural manipulations and cooperative phenomena that have not necessarily been examined in any detail to date. This can hopefully lead to concepts for ''smart'' coatings or materials that have the ability to sense and respond appropriately to a particular set or series of environmental conditions in order to provide high-temperature corrosion protection. The strategies being explored involve cooperative or in-place oxidation or sulfidation reactions of multiphase alloys.[1,2] The first material systems to be evaluated involve silicides as there is some evidence that such materials have enhanced resistance in oxidizing-sulfidizing and sulfidizing environments and in air/oxygen at very high temperatures.[3] In this regard, molybdenum silicides may prove to be of particular interest. Molybdenum is known to sulfidize fairly slowly[4] and there has been recent progress in developing Mo-Si-B systems with improved

  10. Effects of cathodic disbonding and blistering on current demand for cathodic protection of coated steel

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, O.O.; Steinsmo, U.

    2000-03-01

    Cathodic disbonding, blistering, and current demand for cathodic protection were measured for nine commercial coatings for submerged steel structures. The ASTM-G8 standard test and a long-term test (2 years), simulating North Sea conditions, were used. The relevance of the ASTM-G8 test as a prequalification test was evaluated by comparing cathodic disbonding in the two tests. After 800 days in the long-term test, the correlation to ASTM-G8 was good. The correlation coefficient was 0.98. The current demand for cathodic protection increased when the coatings blistered. Examination of the blisters showed that they had cracked. After 2 years of testing, the current demand only had increased for the thin coatings (< 150 {micro}m). The current demand for the thicker coatings (> 450 {micro}m) had not increased, in spite of significant cathodic disbonding for some coatings. Coating breakdown factors, defined as the ratio between current demand for cathodic protection for the coated samples and samples of bare steel, were calculated. These factors were compared with the design values for cathodic protection in Det Norske Veritas (DNV) RP B401 and NORSOK M-CR-503. For all coatings, the coating breakdown rate was lower than the design values.

  11. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2001-02-22

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for debris formation of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is being performed at the Savannah River Technology Center. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause coating disbondment as identified by the Industry Coatings Expert Panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are described in this report and the application of these elements to evaluate the performance of the specific coating system of Phenoline 305 epoxy-phenolic topcoat over Carbozinc 11 primer on a steel substrate. This system is one of the predominant coating systems present on steel substrates in NPP containment.

  12. Evaluation of a new protective coating for porcelain insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.; Orbeck, T.

    1982-12-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of a new elastomeric coating made from a silicone rubber compound for use on porcelain insulators. Field experience has shown that coated insulators have a lower flashover probability under wet contaminated operation than uncoated insulators. Laboratory fog tests also show significant improvements in the wet electrical behavior of clean and contaminated insulators. The Room Temperature Vulcanized (RTV) silicone rubber coating offers both technical and economical advantages for high voltage system operation and maintenance.

  13. Failure modes of protective coatings: Who`s at fault?

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, L.D.

    1999-04-01

    This article abstracts information from 42 articles in industry journals and magazines, and 41 case studies of failure analyses conducted by consultants. The studies demonstrate that 75% of all coating failures are not solely the fault of the contractor, as is commonly believed. Owners, engineers, specifiers, and contractors/applicators share most of the responsibility. A joint responsibility among all parties involved in a coating project is required. The most effective answer to preventing coating failures is training.

  14. Protection of bronze artefacts through polymeric coatings based on nanocarriers filled with corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luna, Martina Salzano; Buonocore, Giovanna; Di Carlo, Gabriella; Giuliani, Chiara; Ingo, Gabriel M.; Lavorgna, Marino

    2016-05-01

    Protective coatings based on polymers synthesized from renewable sources (chitosan or an amorphous vinyl alcohol based polymer) have been prepared for the protection of bronze artifacts from corrosion. Besides acting as an effective barrier against corrosive species present in the environment, the efficiency of the coatings has been improved by adding corrosion inhibitor compounds (benzotriazole or mercaptobenzothiazole) to the formulations. The liquid medium of the formulations has been carefully selected looking at maximizing the wettability on the bronze substrate and optimizing the solvent evaporation rate. The minimum amount of inhibitor compounds has been optimized by performing accelerated corrosion tests on coated bronze substrates. The inhibitors have been directly dissolved in the coating-forming solutions and/or introduced by means of nanocarriers, which allow to control the release kinetics. The free dissolved inhibitor molecules immediately provide a sufficient protection against corrosion. On the other hand, the inhibitor molecules contained in the nanocarriers serve as long-term reservoir, which can be activated by external corrosion-related stimuli in case of particularly severe conditions. Particular attention has been paid to other features which affect the coating performances. Specifically, the adhesion of the protective polymer layer to the bronze substrate has been assessed, as well as its permeability properties and transparency, the latter being a fundamental feature of protective coating for cultural heritages. Finally, the protective efficiency of the produced smart coatings has been assessed through accelerated corrosion tests.

  15. Long-term corrosion protection by a thin nano-composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejenstam, Lina; Tuominen, Mikko; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki M.; Pan, Jinshan; Swerin, Agne; Claesson, Per M.

    2015-12-01

    We report and discuss the corrosion protective properties of a thin nano-composite coating system consisting of an 11 μm thick polyester acrylate (PEA) basecoat, covered by an approximately 1-2 μm thick layer of TiO2 nanoparticles carrying a 0.05 μm thick hexamethyl disiloxane (HMDSO) top coat. The corrosion protective properties were evaluated on carbon steel substrates immersed in 3 wt% NaCl solution by open circuit potential (OCP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The protective properties of each layer, and of each pair of layers, were also evaluated to gain further understanding of the long-term protective properties offered by the nano-composite coating. The full coating system showed excellent corrosion protective properties in the corrosive environment of 3 wt% NaCl-solution for an extended period of 100 days, during which the coating impedance, at the lower frequency limit (0.01 Hz), remained above 108 Ω cm2. We suggest that the excellent corrosion protective properties of the complete coating system is due to a combination of (i) good adhesion and stability of the PEA basecoat, (ii) the surface roughness and the elongated diffusion path provided by the addition of TiO2 nanoparticles, and (iii) the low surface energy provided by the HMDSO top coat.

  16. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-12-01

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel.

  17. Metal flame spray coating protects electrical cables in extreme environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, R. D.; Fox, H. A.

    1967-01-01

    Metal flame spray coating prevents EMF measurement error in sheathed instrumentation cables which are externally attached to cylinders which were cooled on the inside, but exposed to gamma radiation on the outside. The coating provides a thermoconductive path for radiation induced high temperatures within the cables.

  18. Coated silicon comprising material for protection against environmental corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazel, Brian Thomas (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, an article is disclosed. The article comprises a gas turbine engine component substrate comprising a silicon material; and an environmental barrier coating overlying the substrate, wherein the environmental barrier coating comprises cerium oxide, and the cerium oxide reduces formation of silicate glass on the substrate upon exposure to corrodant sulfates.

  19. Antireflection coating with UV-protective properties for polycarbonate.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Ulrike; Lau, Kerstin; Kaiser, Norbert

    2008-05-01

    Polycarbonate is the chosen material for covers of automotive displays because it combines high transparency with high breaking strength. The requirements for coatings include an improvement of the scratch resistance and antireflection properties as well as high stability for challenging environmental conditions. A coating that involves all required properties has been developed and deposited onto polycarbonate by plasma-ion assisted deposition.

  20. Thermal Cycling Assessment of Steel-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings for Al Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Dominique; Lamarre, Jean-Michel; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong interest from the transportation industry to achieve vehicle weight reduction through the replacement of steel components by aluminum parts. For some applications, aluminum requires protective coatings due to its limited wear and lower temperature resistance compared to steel. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of amorphous-type plasma-sprayed steel coatings and conventional arc-sprayed steel coatings as thermal barrier coatings, mainly through the evaluation of their spalling resistance under thermal cycling. The microstructures of the different coatings were first compared via SEM. The amorphicity of the coatings produced via plasma spraying of specialized alloyed steel and the crystalline phases of the conventional arc-sprayed steel coatings were confirmed through x-ray diffraction. The thermal diffusivity of all coatings produced was measured to be about a third of that of bulk stainless steel. Conventional arc-sprayed steel coatings typically offered better spalling resistance under thermal cycling than steel-based amorphous coatings due probably to their higher initial bond strength. However, the presence of vertical cracks in the steel-based amorphous coatings was found to have a beneficial effect on their thermal cycling resistance. The amorphous plasma-sprayed steel coatings presented indications of recrystallization after their exposure to high temperature.

  1. Hybrid organic-inorganic network coatings for protecting metal substrates from abrasion and corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Jordens, K.; Wilkes, G.

    1996-12-31

    Ceramers or Ormocers are hybrid organic-inorganic materials first created a decade ago, and are the subject of a recent review article. Recent research from the authors laboratory in this area of materials science has focused on synthesizing protective coatings for (soft) polymeric substrates, i.e. polycarbonate. The authors have now extended the application of such coatings to metallic substrates.

  2. Project W-314 Polyurea Special Protective Coating (SPC) Test Plan Chemical Compatibility and Physical Characteristics Testing

    SciTech Connect

    MAUSER, R.W.

    2001-01-15

    This Test Plan outlines the testing to be done on the Special Protective Coating (SPC) Polyurea which includes: Tank Waste Compatibility, Decontamination Factor Testing, and Adhesion Strength Testing after a sample has been exposed to Radiation.

  3. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Protective Liner Systems, Inc., Epoxy Mastic, PLS-614

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Protective Liner Systems International, Inc. Epoxy Mastic PLS-614 coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Material and T...

  4. Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings for Flexible Ceramic Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius; Carroll, Carol; Smith, Dane; Guzinski, Mike; Marschall, Jochen; Pallix, Joan; Ridge, Jerry; Tran, Duoc

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the evaluation and testing of high emissivity protective coatings applied to flexible insulations for the Reusable Launch Vehicle technology program. Ceramic coatings were evaluated for their thermal properties, durability, and potential for reuse. One of the major goals was to determine the mechanism by which these coated blanket surfaces become brittle and try to modify the coatings to reduce or eliminate embrittlement. Coatings were prepared from colloidal silica with a small percentage of either SiC or SiB6 as the emissivity agent. These coatings are referred to as gray C-9 and protective ceramic coating (PCC), respectively. The colloidal solutions were either brushed or sprayed onto advanced flexible reusable surface insulation blankets. The blankets were instrumented with thermocouples and exposed to reentry heating conditions in the Ames Aeroheating Arc Jet Facility. Post-test samples were then characterized through impact testing, emissivity measurements, chemical analysis, and observation of changes in surface morphology. The results show that both coatings performed well in arc jet tests with backface temperatures slightly lower for the PCC coating than with gray C-9. Impact testing showed that the least extensive surface destruction was experienced on blankets with lower areal density coatings.

  5. Electro-spark deposited coatings for protection of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.N.

    1995-08-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The coating is fused (metallurgically bonded) to the substrate with such a low total heat input that the bulk substrate material remains at or near ambient temperature. Rapid solidification of the deposit typically results in an extremely fine-grained deposit that may be amorphous for some materials. Nearly any electrically conductive metal, alloy or cermet can be applied to metallic substrates. The ESD process allows multi-layer coatings to be built-up using different materials to create graded structures or surface compositions that would be difficult to achieve by other means. A series of iron-aluminide coatings based on Fe{sub 3}Al and FeAl in combination with refractory metal diffusion-barrier coatings and supplementary additions of other elements are in corrosion testing at ANL. The most recent FeAl coatings are showing a factor of three better corrosion performance than the best previous coatings. Technology transfer activities are a significant portion of the ESD program effort. Notable successes now include the start-up of a new business to commercialize the ESD technology, major new applications in gas turbine engines and steam turbine blade coatings, and in military, medical, metal-working, and recreational equipment applications.

  6. Protective coatings for metal alloys and methods incorporating the same

    SciTech Connect

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Ibanez, Sergio; Swartz, Scott L.

    2015-06-09

    An electrochemical device having one or more solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), each of the SOFCs including a cathode, an anode, and an electrolyte layer positioned between the cathode and anode; and at least one additional component comprising a metallic substrate having an electronically conductive, chromium-free perovskite coating deposited directly thereon. The perovskite coating has the formula ABO.sub.3, wherein A is a lanthanide element or Y, and B is a mixture of two or more transition elements, with the A site undoped by any alkaline earth element, and the perovskite coating exhibits limited or no ionic transport of oxygen.

  7. Conducting polymer/polyimide-clay nanocomposite coatings for corrosion protection of AA-2024 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Kunal G.

    Corrosion of metals is a major problem in the aerospace and automobile industry. The current methods of corrosion protection such as chromate conversion coatings are under increased scrutiny from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) due to their carcinogenic nature. Intrinsically conducting polymers (ICPs) like polyaniline and polypyrrole have been considered as a potential replacement for chromate conversion coatings and have been under investigation since past decade. The goal of this study is to replace the chromate conversion coating by an environmentally friendly organic coating. Poly (N-ethyl aniline) coating was electrodeposited as the primer layer and polyimide-clay nanocomposite was solution cast as the barrier layer on AA-2024 alloy. This study will provide a better understanding of the corrosion protection mechanism of the conducting polymer coating. Various characterization techniques such as infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the formation, chemical structure and morphology of the coatings. Electrodeposition parameters like monomer concentration, applied current density and the reaction time were varied in order to optimize the properties of the conducting polymer coating. The corrosion performance of the primer coating was evaluated by DC polarization studies. It was found that poly (N-ethyl aniline) reduces from emeraldine to leucoemeraldine form; reducing the rate of cathodic reaction, which reduces the rate of corrosion of AA-2024 alloy. Polyimide-clay nanocomposite coating was solution cast on the conducting polymer primer layer for enhancing the barrier and corrosion properties of the coating system. The concentration of polyimide (10--25 vol%) and clay (0.1 and 1 wt%) were varied in the coating formulation to optimize the barrier properties of topcoat. X-ray diffraction showed that the intergallery clay distance decreased from 17.2 A to 11.79 A after immidization of polyimide

  8. Protective coatings for atomic oxygen susceptible spacecraft materials - STS-41G results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Burka, J. A.; Coston, J. E.; Dalins, I.; Little, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Sixteen materials consisting of metallizations, silicones, and FEP Teflon were applied as protective coatings to selected spacecraft material surfaces and exposed on STS-41G to the LEO atomic oxygen environment. Evaluations of their protective effectiveness were made through assessing their mass loss/gain characteristics, maintenance of base material optical properties, and imperviousness to atomic oxygen attack. Generally, all coatings provided some degree of protection for the underlying material. In some cases the overcoat appeared to be too thin thereby providing inadequate protection.

  9. Degradation and failure characteristics of NPP containment protective coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-03-30

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level 1 coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are discussed in this report and the application of these elements to the System 5 coating system (polyamide epoxy primer, carbon steel substrate) is used to evaluate performance.

  10. Plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings for protection against molten metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, K. J.; Peters, M. I.; Bartram, B. D.

    2002-01-01

    Molten metal environments pose a special demand on materials due to the high temperature corrosion effects and thermal expansion mismatch induced stress effects. A solution that has been successfully employed is the use of a base material for the mechanical strength and a coating material for the chemical compatibility with the molten metal. The work described here used such an approach coating tungsten rods with aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia, yttrium oxide, and erbium oxide deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying. The ceramic materials were deposited under varying conditions to produce different structures. Measurement of particle characteristics was performed to correlate to material properties. The coatings were tested in a thermal cycling environment to simulate the metal melting cycle expected in service. Results of the testing indicate the effect of material composition and spray conditions on the thermal cycle crack resistance of the coatings.

  11. Silicide Coating Fabricated by HAPC/SAPS Combination to Protect Niobium Alloy from Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Fu, Qian-Gang; Guo, Li-Ping; Wang, Lu

    2016-06-22

    A combined silicide coating, including inner NbSi2 layer and outer MoSi2 layer, was fabricated through a two-step method. The NbSi2 was deposited on niobium alloy by halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) in the first step. Then, supersonic atmospheric plasma spray (SAPS) was applied to obtain the outer MoSi2 layer, forming a combined silicide coating. Results show that the combined coating possessed a compact structure. The phase constitution of the combined coating prepared by HAPC and SAPS was NbSi2 and MoSi2, respectively. The adhesion strength of the combined coating increased nearly two times than that for single sprayed coating, attributing to the rougher surface of the HAPC-bond layer whose roughness increased about three times than that of the grit-blast substrate. After exposure at 1200 °C in air, the mass increasing rate for single HAPC-silicide coating was 3.5 mg/cm(2) because of the pest oxidation of niobium alloy, whereas the combined coating displayed better oxidation resistance with a mass gain of only 1.2 mg/cm(2). Even more, the combined coating could significantly improve the antioxidation ability of niobium based alloy at 1500 °C. The good oxidation resistance of the combined silicide coating was attributed to the integrity of the combined coating and the continuous SiO2 protective scale provided by the oxidation of MoSi2.

  12. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-08-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  13. Performance and properties of atomic oxygen protective coatings for polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Lamoreaux, Cynthia

    1992-01-01

    Such large LEO spacecraft as the Space Station Freedom will encounter high atomic oxygen fluences which entail the use of protective coatings for their polymeric structural materials. Such coatings have demonstrated polymer mass losses due to oxidation that are much smaller than those of unprotected materials. Attention is here given to protective and/or electrically conductive coatings of SiO(x), Ge, and indium-tin oxide which have been exposed to atomic oxygen in order to ascertain mass loss, electrical conductivity, and optical property dependence on atomic oxygen exposure.

  14. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-10-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  15. Development of Protective Coatings for Co-Sequestration Processes and Pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Bierwagen, Gordon; Huang, Yaping

    2011-11-30

    The program, entitled Development of Protective Coatings for Co-Sequestration Processes and Pipelines, examined the sensitivity of existing coating systems to supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) exposure and developed new coating system to protect pipelines from their corrosion under SCCO2 exposure. A literature review was also conducted regarding pipeline corrosion sensors to monitor pipes used in handling co-sequestration fluids. Research was to ensure safety and reliability for a pipeline involving transport of SCCO2 from the power plant to the sequestration site to mitigate the greenhouse gas effect. Results showed that one commercial coating and one designed formulation can both be supplied as potential candidates for internal pipeline coating to transport SCCO2.

  16. Optical and environmentally protective coatings for potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) harmonic converter crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, I.M.

    1991-06-24

    Potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals have been used as harmonic converters on the Nova laser at LLNL for over six years. All crystals were coated with a single layer, quarterwave AR coating of porous silica with a refractive index of 1.22. This was prepared by a sol-gel process and was applied from a colloidal suspension by spin coating at room temperature. A few crystals were also coated with a methyl silicone coating prior to the application of the AR coating for environmental protection. The initial optical performance of all crystals was very good but there has been some deterioration over the years because of environmental and laser damage degradation. The deterioration in the silicone samples was, however, much less than the others. We are now in the process of replacing all ten KDP arrays with new crystals and will apply the silicone undercoat to all samples. Recently we have been evaluating a new perfluorinated organic polymer coating which has a refractive index of 1.29. This material is soluble in fluorinated solvents and can be applied by dip coating from solution at room temperature. We hope that this can provide environmental protection when applied to KDP and also act as an AR coating at the same time. The optical performance is not as good as our porous silica because of the higher index; about 0.3% reflection per surface is obtained. 4 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Anti-Adhesion Elastomer Seal Coatings for Ultraviolet and Atomic Oxygen Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Groh, Henry C., III; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Waters, Deborah L.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation blocking sunscreen coatings have been developed for the protection of elastomer seals used in low-Earth-orbit (LEO). The coatings protect the seals from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and atomic oxygen (AO) damage. The coatings were developed for use on NASA docking seals. Docking seal damage from the UV and AO present in LEO can constrain mission time-line, flight mode options, and increases risk. A low level of adhesion is also required for docking seals so undocking push-off forces can be low. The coatings presented also mitigate this unwanted adhesion. Greases with low collected volatile condensable materials (CVCM) and low total mass loss (TML) were mixed with slippery and/or UV blocking powders to create the protective coatings. Coatings were applied at rates up to 2 milligrams per square centimeter. Coated seals were exposed to AO and UV in the NUV (near-UV) and UV-C wavelength ranges (300 to 400 nanometers and 254 nanometers, respectively). Ground based ashers were used to simulate the AO of space. The Sun's UV energy was mimicked assuming a nose forward flight mode, resulting in an exposure rate of 2.5 megajoules per square meter per day. Exposures between 0 and 147 megajoules per square meter (UV-C) and 245 megajoules per square meter (NUV) were accomplished. The protective coatings were durable, providing protection from UV after a simulated docking and undocking cycle. The level of protection begins to decline at coverage rates less than 0.9 milligrams per square centimeter. The leakage of seals coated with Braycote plus 20 percent Z-cote ZnO sunscreen increased by a factor of 40 after moderate AO exposure; indicating that this coating might not be suitable due to AO intolerance. Seals coated with DC-7-16.4 percent Z-cote ZnO sunscreen were not significantly affected by combined doses of 2 x 10 (sup 21) atoms per square AO with 73 megajoules per square meter UV-C. Unprotected seals were significantly damaged at UV-C exposures of 0.3 megajoules per

  18. An alternate to chromate conversion coatings for the corrosion protection of aluminum 2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruiguang

    Corrosion of high-strength aluminum alloys used for airspace application is an expensive and serious problem. The most significant environmental factor contributing to the corrosion of these alloys is water condensed from humid air and contaminated with soluble chloride salts. The Al 2024 series used for aircraft are particularly susceptible to corrosion in aqueous chloride solutions due to alloying constituents such as copper and other impurities. Chromates are efficient inhibitors of corrosion of aluminum in near neutral aqueous environments containing aggressive anions such as chlorides. Usually, aluminum alloys are initially protected by chromate conversion coatings. Additional polymer coatings are sometimes added during exposure to corrosive atmospheres such as marine environments. Although chromate coatings are widely used, they require the use of noxious solutions, so they have always presented effluent disposal problems. There are health and safety concerns over the use of chromates due to their toxicity and carcinogenic nature and, as a consequence, the environmental and health risks associated with the use of such coatings will be restricted in the future. It was these health and safety concerns that led to the development of alternative non-toxic coating processes with comparable adhesion properties and corrosion protection. A variety of process technologies are under development and are vying for acceptance in industrial markets. As an alternate conversion coating, a new titanate conversion coating was systematically researched and developed. Research concentrated on producing passive surfaces from a simple titanate solution using an immersion process. The corrosion resistance of the treated surface has been evaluated using simple, rapid electrochemical techniques as well as a more long-term salt spray test. Passivation by titanate conversion treatment exhibits many similarities to chromate conversion treatment. Based on this study of corrosion

  19. Spray shadowing for stress relief and mechanical locking in thick protective coatings

    DOEpatents

    Hollis, Kendall; Bartram, Brian

    2007-05-22

    A method for applying a protective coating on an article, comprising the following steps: selecting an article with a surface for applying a coating thickness; creating undercut grooves on the article, where the grooves depend beneath the surface to a bottom portion with the grooves having an upper width on the surface and a lower width on the bottom portion connected by side walls, where at least one of the side walls connects the upper width and the lower width to form an undercut angle with the surface less than 90.degree.; and, applying the protective coating onto the article to fill the undercut grooves and cover the surface, thereby forming weak paths within the protective coating.

  20. High Temperature Damping Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier and Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    A high temperature damping test apparatus has been developed using a high heat flux CO 2 laser rig in conjunction with a TIRA S540 25 kHz Shaker and Polytec OFV 5000 Vibrometer system. The test rig has been successfully used to determine the damping performance of metallic and ceramic protective coating systems at high temperature for turbine engine applications. The initial work has been primarily focused on the microstructure and processing effects on the coating temperature-dependence damping behavior. Advanced ceramic coatings, including multicomponent tetragonal and cubic phase thermal barrier coatings, along with composite bond coats, have also been investigated. The coating high temperature damping mechanisms will also be discussed.

  1. Deposition of aluminide and silicide based protective coatings on niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, S.; Arya, A.; Sharma, I. G.; Suri, A. K.; Banerjee, S.

    2010-11-01

    We compare aluminide and alumino-silicide composite coatings on niobium using halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) technique for improving its oxidation resistance. The coated samples are characterized by SEM, EDS, EPMA and hardness measurements. We observe formation of NbAl3 in aluminide coating of Nb, though the alumino-silicide coating leads to formation primarily of NbSi2 in the inner layer and a ternary compound of Nb-Si-Al in the outer layer, as reported earlier (Majumdar et al. [11]). Formation of niobium silicide is preferred over niobium aluminide during alumino-silicide coating experiments, indicating Si is more strongly bonded to Nb than Al, although equivalent quantities of aluminium and silicon powders were used in the pack chemistry. We also employ first-principles density functional pseudopotential-based calculations to calculate the relative stability of these intermediate phases and the adhesion strength of the Al/Nb and Si/Nb interfaces. NbSi2 exhibits much stronger covalent character as compared to NbAl3. The ideal work of adhesion for the relaxed Al/Nb and Si/Nb interfaces are calculated to be 3226 mJ/m2 and 3545 mJ/m2, respectively, indicating stronger Nb-Si bonding across the interface.

  2. Thermodynamics and kinetics of reactions in protective coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, B.; Sarkhel, A.; Shankar, S.; Seigle, L.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the aluminization of Ni from packs containing various percentages of unalloyed Al confirmed that the surface aluminum content of specimens aluminized tends to decrease with time and consequently a simple parabolic law for the weight-gain vs. time relationship is not obeyed. The diffusivity-composition relationship in NiAl was examined, and a set of curves is presented. A numerical method for the calculation of coating dissolution rates was developed and applied to NiAl-Ni3Al type of coatings.

  3. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System for Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph; MacDowell, Louis; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem for the Kennedy Space Center, government agencies, and the general public. Existing corrosion protection systems on the market are costly, complex, and time-consuming to install, require continuous maintenance and monitoring, and require specialized skills for installation. NASA's galvanic liquid-applied coating offers companies the ability to conveniently protect embedded steel rebar surfaces from corrosion. Liquid-applied inorganic galvanic coating contains one ore more of the following metallic particles: magnesium, zinc, or indium and may contain moisture attracting compounds that facilitate the protection process. The coating is applied to the outer surface of reinforced concrete so that electrical current is established between metallic particles and surfaces of embedded steel rebar; and electric (ionic) current is responsible for providing the necessary cathodic protection for embedded rebar surfaces.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR SINGLE CRYSTAL TURBINE BLADES

    SciTech Connect

    Amarendra K. Rai

    2006-12-04

    Turbine blades in coal derived syngas systems are subject to oxidation and corrosion due to high steam temperature and pressure. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are developed to address these problems. The emphasis is on prime-reliant design and a better coating architecture, having high temperature and corrosion resistance properties for turbine blades. In Phase I, UES Inc. proposed to develop, characterize and optimize a prime reliant TBC system, having smooth and defect-free NiCoCrAlY bond layer and a defect free oxide sublayer, using a filtered arc technology. Phase I work demonstrated the deposition of highly dense, smooth and defect free NiCoCrAlY bond coat on a single crystal CMSX-4 substrate and the deposition of alpha-alumina and yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) sublayer on top of the bond coat. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation test and pre- and post-characterization of these layers, in Phase I work, (with and without top TBC layer of commercial EB PVD YSZ) revealed significant performance enhancement.

  5. Method of making quasicrystal alloy powder, protective coatings and articles

    DOEpatents

    Shield, Jeffrey E.; Goldman, Alan I.; Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; McCallum, R. William; Sordelet, Daniel J.

    1995-07-18

    A method of making quasicrystalline alloy particulates wherein an alloy is superheated and the melt is atomized to form generally spherical alloy particulates free of mechanical fracture and exhibiting a predominantly quasicrystalline in the atomized condition structure. The particulates can be plasma sprayed to form a coating or consolidated to form an article of manufacture.

  6. Method of making quasicrystal alloy powder, protective coatings and articles

    DOEpatents

    Shield, J.E.; Goldman, A.I.; Anderson, I.E.; Ellis, T.W.; McCallum, R.W.; Sordelet, D.J.

    1995-07-18

    A method of making quasicrystalline alloy particulates is disclosed wherein an alloy is superheated and the melt is atomized to form generally spherical alloy particulates free of mechanical fracture and exhibiting a predominantly quasicrystalline in the atomized condition structure. The particulates can be plasma sprayed to form a coating or consolidated to form an article of manufacture. 3 figs.

  7. Performance of protective polymeric coatings for nonlinear optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, K.L.; Schmid, A.W.; Smith, D.J.; Bevin, A.A.; Guardalben, M.J.; Jacobs, S.D.

    1988-09-01

    KDP, KD*P, and LiNbO/sub 3/, three nonlinear optical materials that have been difficult to coat, are treated with polymeric surface layers. These layers hermetically seal the hygroscopic crystal surfaces. Their optical properties, thermal compatibility, high-power laser damage behavior, abrasive resistance, and suitability for overcoating with traditional, dielectric antireflection multilayers are reported.

  8. Shop primer as part of the corrosion protective coating for submerged steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bjordal, M.; Steinsmo, U.

    1998-12-31

    In Norwegian workshops the standard pre-treatment procedures for steel structures intended for sub-sea use, normally include removal of shop primer by blast cleaning to Sa 2 1/2 before application of corrosion protective coatings. This is also stated in the Norwegian offshore standard NORSOK. Omitting this stage in fabrication will represent large reductions in both time consumption and costs, and reduce the volume of waste from the blast cleaning. This report presents results from investigations of how a shop primer will influence on the coating properties. The aim of the investigation was to test whether the systems are good enough if the shop primer is left on the surface. Two different zinc silicate shop primers have been included in the investigation. As protective coatings the authors have used three different epoxy mastic systems with Al pigments. In addition to panels with original shop primer, they have also tested shop primed panels pre-treated in various ways, such as heated, corroded and blast cleaned to various degrees before coating. The coatings have been tested in the ASTM-G8 121 test and in a long term test in sea water polarized with a Zn anode. They have found that coatings including the zinc silicate shop primer are more susceptible to cathodic disbonding than the coating applied directly on blast cleaned steel. It is however possible to meet the NORSOK criteria with a zinc silicate shop primer as first coat.

  9. A novel powder coating process for attaining taste masking and moisture protective films applied to tablets.

    PubMed

    Cerea, Matteo; Zheng, Weijia; Young, Christopher R; McGinity, James W

    2004-07-26

    A novel powder coating process was developed for the application of taste masking and moisture protective films on tablets while avoiding the use of solvents or water. The coalescence of particles to form a polymeric film was investigated through studies of dry powder layering of micronized acrylic polymer (E PO) to produce free films. Theophylline containing tablets were coated with the same acrylic polymer in a laboratory scale spheronizer using a powder coating technique. The dry powder layer delayed the onset of drug release in pH 6.8 medium, depending on the coating level, while no delay was observed in pH 1.0 medium. The presence of hydrophilic polymers in the acrylic coating layer decreased the lag time for drug release in pH 6.8 medium, while only the presence of HPMC in the film slowed the drug release rate in acidic medium. The dry coating process was demonstrated to be a reliable alternative to solvent or aqueous film coating technologies for applying taste masking and moisture protective film coats onto compressed tablets. A controlled drug release profile was achieved in pH 6.8 media.

  10. Evaluation of a novel sugar coating method for moisture protective tablets.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masaki; Ito, Rina; Ozeki, Yuichi; Nakayama, Yukiharu; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2007-05-24

    A novel method of manufacturing one-step dry-coated (OSDRC) tablets, which we recently invented, was used to produce sugar-coated tablets protected from moisture without the need for a conventional complicated sugar coating process. Amorphous sucrose was selected for the outer layer of the OSDRC tablets as sugar-coated layer. The isothermal crystallization behavior and characteristics such as water vapor permeability, tensile strength, and disintegration time of compressed amorphous sucrose were investigated. Water vapor adsorption measurements showed the crystallization behavior of amorphous tablets to be similar to that of amorphous powder, although it was affected by compression pressure. We found that the crystallized amorphous sucrose after compression at 200 MPa was moisture protective, and the water vapor permeability coefficient was decreased to 1/2000 or less compared with a tablet prepared with a lactose-microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) mixture, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), and sucrose crystal. The water vapor permeability and physicochemical characteristics were influenced by the amorphous content or additive content. It was confirmed that a new sugar-coated tablet using amorphous sucrose and OSDRC technology was moisture protective, therefore, it was concluded that the novel sugar coating method was very useful to obtain a moisture protective tablet.

  11. Evaluation of a novel sugar coating method for moisture protective tablets.

    PubMed

    Ando, Masaki; Ito, Rina; Ozeki, Yuichi; Nakayama, Yukiharu; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2007-05-24

    A novel method of manufacturing one-step dry-coated (OSDRC) tablets, which we recently invented, was used to produce sugar-coated tablets protected from moisture without the need for a conventional complicated sugar coating process. Amorphous sucrose was selected for the outer layer of the OSDRC tablets as sugar-coated layer. The isothermal crystallization behavior and characteristics such as water vapor permeability, tensile strength, and disintegration time of compressed amorphous sucrose were investigated. Water vapor adsorption measurements showed the crystallization behavior of amorphous tablets to be similar to that of amorphous powder, although it was affected by compression pressure. We found that the crystallized amorphous sucrose after compression at 200 MPa was moisture protective, and the water vapor permeability coefficient was decreased to 1/2000 or less compared with a tablet prepared with a lactose-microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) mixture, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), and sucrose crystal. The water vapor permeability and physicochemical characteristics were influenced by the amorphous content or additive content. It was confirmed that a new sugar-coated tablet using amorphous sucrose and OSDRC technology was moisture protective, therefore, it was concluded that the novel sugar coating method was very useful to obtain a moisture protective tablet. PMID:17258875

  12. Study of organic ablative thermal-protection coating for solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Zenggong

    1992-06-01

    A study is conducted to find a new interior thermal-protection material that possesses good thermal-protection performance and simple manufacturing possibilities. Quartz powder and Cr2O3 are investigated using epoxy resin as a binder and Al2O3 as the burning inhibitor. Results indicate that the developed thermal-protection coating is suitable as ablative insulation material for solid rocket motors.

  13. Ground radiation tests and flight atomic oxygen tests of ITO protective coatings for Galileo Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.; Maag, Carl R.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation simulation tests (protons and electrons) were performed along with atomic oxygen flight tests aboard the Shuttle to space qualify the surface protective coatings. The results, which contributed to the selection of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated polyester as the material for the thermal blankets of the Galileo Spacecraft, are given here. Two candidate materials, polyester and Fluorglas, were radiation-tested to determine changes at simulated Jovian radiation levels. The polyester exhibited a smaller weight loss (2.8) than the Fluorglas (8.8 percent). Other changes of polyester are given. During low-earth orbit, prior to transit to Jupiter, the thermal blankets would be exposed to atomic oxygen. Samples of uncoated and ITO-coated polyesters were flown on the Shuttle. Qualitative results are given which indicated that the ITO coating protected the underlying polyester.

  14. The corrosion protection of 6061-T6 aluminum by a polyurethane-sealed anodized coat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion protection of 6061-T6 anodized aluminum afforded by a newly patented polyurethane seal was studied using the ac impedance technique. Values of the average corrosion rates over a 27-day exposure period in 3.5 percent NaCl solutions at pH 5.2 and pH 9.5 compared very favorably for Lockheed-prepared polyurethane-sealed and dichromate-sealed coats of the same thickness. Average corrosion rates for both specimens over the first 7 days of exposure compared well with those for a hard anodized, dichromate-sealed coat, but rose well above those for the hard anodized coat over the entire 27-day period. This is attributed both to the greater thickness of the hard anodized coat, and possibly to its inherently better corrosion protective capability.

  15. Protective, Abrasion-Resistant Coatings With Tailorable Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Because of their light weight and impact resistance, transparent plastic structures are becoming increasingly desirable for use not only on aircraft but also in terrestrial applications such as automotive windshields and ophthalmic lenses. However, plastics are typically soft and scratch readily, reducing their transparency with use. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, reactively deposited aluminum oxide coatings as thin as 12,000 angstroms have been demonstrated to provide improved resistance to most scratches encountered during normal use. The properties of the coating can be adjusted to tailor the surface to meet other needs, such as water shedding. These adjustments can be made during the deposition process so that multiple manufacturing steps are eliminated.

  16. Co-Doped Polypyrrole Coatings for Stainless Steel Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prissanaroon, W.; Brack, N.; Pigram, P. J.; Liesegang, J.

    Polypyrrole (PPy) films have been successfully electrodeposited on stainless steel substrates in aqueous solution. In this work, three systems of electrolytes were studied: oxalic acid, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) and a mixture of oxalic acid and DBSA. A combination of XPS and TOF-SIMS revealed the formation of an iron oxalate layer at the interface between the oxalic acid-doped PPy (PPy(Ox)) and stainless steel and a thin layer of DBSA was observed at the interface between DBSA-doped PPy (PPy(DBSA)) and stainless steel. Similar to the PPy(Ox) system, an iron oxalate was also present at the co-doped PPy/stainless steel interface. Cyclic voltammetry indicated that an iron oxalate layer initially formed at the surface of the stainless steel when the co-doping system was used. The adhesion strength and corrosion performance of the PPy coating on stainless steel were evaluated by lap shear tests and an anodic potentiodynamic polarization technique, respectively. The co-doped PPy-coated stainless steel exhibited the best adhesion and a significant shift of corrosion potential to the positive direction. This finding opens the possibility for the co-doped PPy coating to be deployed as a strongly adherent corrosion inhibitor by using a simple one-step electropolymerization process.

  17. Performance characterization of EURECA retroreflectors with fluoropolymer-filled SiO(x) protective coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Cales, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Aluminized corner-cube polymethylmethacrylate retroreflectors were coated with 92% SiO(x) - 8% fluoropolymer (by volume) and flown on the EURECA spacecraft. The fluoropolymer-filled SiO(x) protective coating was found to be durable to atomic oxygen when exposed in a ground-based plasma asher to an anticipated mission fluence of 2x10(exp 20) atoms/cm(exp 2). Unprotected retroreflector surfaces were found to develop highly diffuse reflectance characteristics, thus inhibiting their use for laser retroreflector purposes. A noncontacting retroreflector optical characterization system was constructed and used to measure the optical retroreflection characteristics of the following retroreflector materials: uncoated unexposed, coated unexposed, both uncoated and coated ground laboratory atomic oxygen exposed, and coated exposed to space atomic oxygen on the EURECA spacecraft. A comparison of the optical characterizations is presented.

  18. Development of a fused slurry silicide coating for the protection of tantalum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packer, C. M.; Perkins, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported of a research program to develop a reliable high-performance, fused slurry silicide protective coating for a tantalum-10 tungsten alloy for use at 1427 to 1538 C at 0.1 to 10 torr air pressure under cyclic temperature conditions. A review of silicide coating performance under these conditions indicated that the primary wear-out mode is associated with widening of hairline fissures in the coating. Consideration has been given to modifying the oxidation products that form on the coating surface to provide a seal for these fissures and to minimize their widening. On the basis of an analysis of the phase relationships between silica and various other oxides, a coating having the slurry composition 2.5Mn-33Ti-64.5Si was developed that is effective in the pressure range from 1 to 10 torr.

  19. Measured catalycities of various candidate space shuttle thermal protection system coatings at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    Atom recombination catalytic rates for surface coatings of various candidate thermal protection system materials for the space shuttle vehicle were obtained from measurements in arc jet, air flow. The coatings, chrome oxides, siliconized carbon/carbon, hafnium/tantalum carbide on carbon/carbon, and niobium silicide, were bonded to the sensitive surface of transient slug calorimeters that measured the heat transfer rates to the coatings. The catalytic rates were inferred from these heat transfer rates Surface temperatures of the calorimeters varied from approximately 300 to 410 K.

  20. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Podojil, G.; Mccollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-01-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept of enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbit is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  1. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, K. K.; Podojil, G.; Mccollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-01-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept for enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbits is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  2. Cathodic protection of steel by electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, K.R.; Smith, C.J.E.; Robinson, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The ability of electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings to cathodically protect steel was studied in dilute chloride solutions. The potential distribution along steel strips partly electroplated with zinc-nickel alloys was determined, and the length of exposed steel that was held below the minimum protection potential (E{sub prot}) was taken as a measure of the level of cathodic protection (CP) provided by the alloy coatings. The level of CP afforded by zinc alloy coatings was found to decrease with increasing nickel content. When nickel content was increased to {approx} {ge} 21 wt%, no CP was obtained. Surface analysis of uncoupled zinc-nickel alloys that were immersed in sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions showed the concentration of zinc decreased in the surface layers while the concentration of nickel increased, indicating that the alloys were susceptible to dezincification. The analysis of zinc-nickel alloy coatings on partly electroplated steel strips that were immersed in chloride solution showed a significantly higher level of dezincification than that found for uncoupled alloy coatings. This effect accounted for the rapid loss of CP afforded to steel by some zinc alloy coatings, particularly those with high initial nickel levels.

  3. "Snow White" Coating Protects SpaceX Dragon's Trunk Against Rigors of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMahan, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    He described it as "snow white." But NASA astronaut Don Pettit was not referring to the popular children's fairy tale. Rather, he was talking about the white coating of the Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) Dragon spacecraft that reflected from the International Space Station s light. As it approached the station for the first time in May 2012, the Dragon s trunk might have been described as the "fairest of them all," for its pristine coating, allowing Pettit to clearly see to maneuver the robotic arm to grab the Dragon for a successful nighttime berthing. This protective thermal control coating, developed by Alion Science and Technology Corp., based in McLean, Va., made its bright appearance again with the March 1 launch of SpaceX's second commercial resupply mission. Named Z-93C55, the coating was applied to the cargo portion of the Dragon to protect it from the rigors of space. "For decades, Alion has produced coatings to protect against the rigors of space," said Michael Kenny, senior chemist with Alion. "As space missions evolved, there was a growing need to dissipate electrical charges that build up on the exteriors of spacecraft, or there could be damage to the spacecraft s electronics. Alion's research led us to develop materials that would meet this goal while also providing thermal controls. The outcome of this research was Alion's proprietary Z-93C55 coating."

  4. Fire propagation performance of intumescent fire protective coatings using eggshells as a novel biofiller.

    PubMed

    Yew, M C; Ramli Sulong, N H; Yew, M K; Amalina, M A; Johan, M R

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to synthesize and characterize an effective intumescent fire protective coating that incorporates eggshell powder as a novel biofiller. The performances of thermal stability, char formation, fire propagation, water resistance, and adhesion strength of coatings have been evaluated. A few intumescent flame-retardant coatings based on these three ecofriendly fire retardant additives ammonium polyphosphate phase II, pentaerythritol and melamine mixed together with flame-retardant fillers, and acrylic binder have been prepared and designed for steel. The fire performance of the coatings has conducted employing BS 476: Part 6-Fire propagation test. The foam structures of the intumescent coatings have been observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy. On exposure, the coated specimens' B, C, and D had been certified to be Class 0 due to the fact that their fire propagation indexes were less than 12. Incorporation of ecofriendly eggshell, biofiller into formulation D led to excellent performance in fire stopping (index value, (I) = 4.3) and antioxidation of intumescent coating. The coating is also found to be quite effective in water repellency, uniform foam structure, and adhesion strength.

  5. Fire Propagation Performance of Intumescent Fire Protective Coatings Using Eggshells as a Novel Biofiller

    PubMed Central

    Yew, M. C.; Ramli Sulong, N. H.; Yew, M. K.; Amalina, M. A.; Johan, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to synthesize and characterize an effective intumescent fire protective coating that incorporates eggshell powder as a novel biofiller. The performances of thermal stability, char formation, fire propagation, water resistance, and adhesion strength of coatings have been evaluated. A few intumescent flame-retardant coatings based on these three ecofriendly fire retardant additives ammonium polyphosphate phase II, pentaerythritol and melamine mixed together with flame-retardant fillers, and acrylic binder have been prepared and designed for steel. The fire performance of the coatings has conducted employing BS 476: Part 6-Fire propagation test. The foam structures of the intumescent coatings have been observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy. On exposure, the coated specimens' B, C, and D had been certified to be Class 0 due to the fact that their fire propagation indexes were less than 12. Incorporation of ecofriendly eggshell, biofiller into formulation D led to excellent performance in fire stopping (index value, (I) = 4.3) and antioxidation of intumescent coating. The coating is also found to be quite effective in water repellency, uniform foam structure, and adhesion strength. PMID:25136687

  6. Silicide Coating Fabricated by HAPC/SAPS Combination to Protect Niobium Alloy from Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Fu, Qian-Gang; Guo, Li-Ping; Wang, Lu

    2016-06-22

    A combined silicide coating, including inner NbSi2 layer and outer MoSi2 layer, was fabricated through a two-step method. The NbSi2 was deposited on niobium alloy by halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) in the first step. Then, supersonic atmospheric plasma spray (SAPS) was applied to obtain the outer MoSi2 layer, forming a combined silicide coating. Results show that the combined coating possessed a compact structure. The phase constitution of the combined coating prepared by HAPC and SAPS was NbSi2 and MoSi2, respectively. The adhesion strength of the combined coating increased nearly two times than that for single sprayed coating, attributing to the rougher surface of the HAPC-bond layer whose roughness increased about three times than that of the grit-blast substrate. After exposure at 1200 °C in air, the mass increasing rate for single HAPC-silicide coating was 3.5 mg/cm(2) because of the pest oxidation of niobium alloy, whereas the combined coating displayed better oxidation resistance with a mass gain of only 1.2 mg/cm(2). Even more, the combined coating could significantly improve the antioxidation ability of niobium based alloy at 1500 °C. The good oxidation resistance of the combined silicide coating was attributed to the integrity of the combined coating and the continuous SiO2 protective scale provided by the oxidation of MoSi2. PMID:27243944

  7. Multifunctional coating MAI D5 intended for the protection of refractory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhestkov, B. E.; Terent'eva, V. S.

    2010-01-01

    A thin-layer heterophase MAI D5 coating intended for the protection of carbon-containing composite materials (C-C-, C-SiC-, SiC-SiC-composite material) and refractory metal-based alloys against high-temperature gas corrosion and erosion is tested. The coating is formed from a specially developed Si-Ti-Mo-B-Y microcomposition powder material. A new approach to creating self-healing heterophase coatings is used. At operating temperatures, the structure and phase composition of the MAI D5 coating provides rapid self-healing of random defects on the coating surface and in the base material owing to the presence of a silicon-containing eutectic, which favors rapid recovery of a protective amorphous silica layer consumed during operation. Under operating conditions, the coating undergoes self-organization to form a multilayer system with a number of functional oxide micro-, submicro-, and nanolayers. Samples with the MAI D5 coating are subjected to combined tests on bench plants located at MAI and TsAGI under conditions emulating the re-entry of a hypersonic aircraft, when its surface temperature reaches 2400 K. Certification tests are performed in wind tunnels located at TsAGI during a simultaneous action of a hypersonic dissociated-air flow and mechanical loads. The protection of heat-loaded structural elements in space vehicles made of ultrahigh-temperature materials against high-temperature gas corrosion and erosion by the MAI D5 coating in hypersonic dissociated-air flows is shown to be efficient.

  8. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  9. Thermodynamics and kinetics of reactions in protective coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, B.; Sarkhel, A.; Sivakumar, R.; Seigle, L.

    1974-01-01

    Investigations of fluoride activated packs with Al:Ni ratios greater than 50 a/o prove that the specimen surface is not in equilibrium with the pack at high Al:Ni ratios but that an activity gradient exists between pack and specimen. Therefore, gaseous diffusion and possibly surface reactions play a role in determining the overall rate of Al deposition in such packs. Noticeable differences in coating behavior have been obtained in packs activated with chloride and iodide, and it appears that poorest results are obtained with iodides, better with chlorides, and best with fluorides. A numerical method has been perfected for calculating rates of solid-state diffusion controlled coating formation, allowing for the variation of diffusivity with composition in the NiAl phase. Layer growth rates can now be accurately predicted from a knowledge of the surface and substrate compositions. Furthermore, the correct diffusion profiles are obtained by this method. These differ substantially from the profile obtained when the diffusivity is assumed constant.

  10. Atomic Oxygen Durability Evaluation of a UV Curable Ceramer Protective Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Karniotis, Christina A.; Dworak, David; Soucek, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The exposure of most silicones to atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit (LEO) results in the oxidative loss of methyl groups with a gradual conversion to oxides of silicon. Typically there is surface shrinkage of oxidized silicone protective coatings which leads to cracking of the partially oxidized brittle surface. Such cracks widen and branch crack with continued atomic oxygen exposure ultimately allowing atomic oxygen to reach any hydrocarbon polymers under the silicone coating. A need exists for a paintable silicone coating that is free from such surface cracking and can be effectively used for protection of polymers and composites in LEO. A new type of silicone based protective coating holding such potential was evaluated for atomic oxygen durability in an RF atomic oxygen plasma exposure facility. The coating consisted of a UV curable inorganic/organic hybrid coating, known as a ceramer, which was fabricated using a methyl substituted polysiloxane binder and nanophase silicon-oxo-clusters derived from sol-gel precursors. The polysiloxane was functionalized with a cycloaliphatic epoxide in order to be cured at ambient temperature via a cationic UV induced curing mechanism. Alkoxy silane groups were also grafted onto the polysiloxane chain, through hydrosilation, in order to form a network with the incorporated silicon-oxo-clusters. The prepared polymer was characterized by H-1 and Si-29 NMR, FT-IR, and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy. The paper will present the results of atomic oxygen protection ability of thin ceramer coatings on Kapton H as evaluated over a range of atomic oxygen fluence levels.

  11. COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF EQUIPMENT FOR BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSING OF GEOTHERMAL RESIDUES: PROGRESS REPORT FY 97

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. The findings are also relevant to other moderate temperature brine environments where corrosion is a problem. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobadus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Long-term tests on the durability of ceramic-epoxy coatings in brine and bacteria are ongoing. Initial indications are that this coating has suitable characteristics. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.

  12. A positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopic study of the corrosion protective properties of epoxy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to measure the free volume cavity sizes and free volume fractions of crosslinked epoxy coatings on steel before and after saturation with liquid water at 23[degrees]C. A direct linear relationship between the equilibrium volume fraction of water absorbed and the dry relative free volume fraction of bisphenol A epoxy coatings was found. The free volume cavity sizes and the number of free volume cavities per unit volume of these epoxies were found to decrease after water saturation. These decreases are ascribed to the occupation of 13-17% of the free volume cavities by 2-4 water molecules per cavity. The free volume cavity size of polyglycol diepoxides was found to increase after water saturation. This increase is ascribed to the expansion of the free volume cavities by water, which is substantiated by the macroscopic swelling observed in these coatings. An inverse, linear relationship between the equilibrium water uptake and the relative free volume fraction of these coatings were observed. This result coupled with the fact that less than one molecule of nitrobenzene was determined to fit into an epoxy free volume cavity, and that nitrobenzene is quite soluble in most of the epoxides, indicates that other factors besides the magnitude of the free volume fraction affect the amount of solvent absorbed by epoxy coatings. The small percentage of free volume occupied by water and the small number of water molecules capable of filling each void of the bisphenol A epoxies after water saturation correlate to the high impedance values and the good corrosion protection of these coatings, suggesting that water passes through these coatings by slow diffusion through the connected free volume cavities in the coating. Increases in the free volume cavity sizes of the polyglycol diepoxides after water saturation correlate to the low impedance and the poor corrosion protection of these coatings.

  13. Protecting BOPP film from UV degradation with an atomic layer deposited titanium oxide surface coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahtinen, Kimmo; Maydannik, Philipp; Seppänen, Tarja; Cameron, David C.; Johansson, Petri; Kotkamo, Sami; Kuusipalo, Jurkka

    2013-10-01

    Titanium oxide layers were deposited onto a BOPP film by atomic layer deposition in order to prevent UV degradation of the film. The coatings were deposited in a low-temperature process at 80 °C by using tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium and ozone as titanium and oxygen precursors, respectively. UV block characteristics of the coatings and their effect on the polymer were measured by using UV-vis and IR spectrometry, and differential scanning calorimetry. According to the results, the coatings provided a considerable decrease in the photodegradation of the BOPP film during UV exposure. IR spectra showed that during a 6-week UV exposure, a 67 nm titanium oxide coating was able to almost completely prevent the formation of photodegradation products in the film. The mechanical properties of the film were also protected by the coating, but as opposed to what the IR study suggested they were still somewhat compromised by the UV light. After a 6-week exposure, the tensile strength and elongation at break of the 67 nm titanium oxide coated film decreased to half of the values measured before the treatment. This should be compared to the complete degradation suffered by the uncoated base sheet already after only 4 weeks of treatment. The results show that nanometre scale inorganic films deposited by ALD show a promising performance as effective UV protection for BOPP substrates.

  14. Plasma sprayed manganese-cobalt spinel coatings: Process sensitivity on phase, electrical and protective performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Su Jung; Pala, Zdenek; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Manganese cobalt spinel (Mn1.5Co1.5O4, MCO) coatings are prepared by the air plasma spray (APS) process to examine their efficacy in serving as protective coatings from Cr-poisoning of the cathode side in intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). These complex oxides are susceptible to process induced stoichiometric and phase changes which affect their functional performance. To critically examine these effects, MCO coatings are produced with deliberate modifications to the spray process parameters to explore relationship among process conditions, microstructure and functional properties. The resultant interplay among particle thermal and kinetic energies are captured through process maps, which serve to characterize the parametric effects on properties. The results show significant changes to the chemistry and phase composition of the deposited material resulting from preferential evaporation of oxygen. Post deposition annealing recovers oxygen in the coatings and allows partial recovery of the spinel phase, which is confirmed through thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA)/differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and magnetic hysteresis measurements. In addition, coatings with high density after sintering show excellent electrical conductivity of 40 S cm-1 at 800 °C while simultaneously providing requisite protection characteristics against Cr-poisoning. This study provides a framework for optimal evaluation of MCO coatings in intermediate temperature SOFCs.

  15. Adherent protective coatings plated on magnesium-lithium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Zinc is plated on a magnesium-lithium alloy by using a modification of the standard zinc-plate immersion bath. Further protection is given the alloy by applying a light plating of copper on the zinc plating. Other metals are plated on the copper by using conventional plating baths.

  16. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating Development for Protection of Steel in Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph John; Curran, Jerry; MacDowell, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is a major problem affecting NASA facilities at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), other government agencies, and the general public. Problems include damage to KSC launch support structures, transportation and marine infrastructures, as well as building structures. A galvanic liquid applied coating was developed at KSC in order to address this problem. The coating is a non-epoxy metal rich ethyl silicate liquid coating. The coating is applied as a liquid from initial stage to final stage. Preliminary data shows that this coating system exceeds the NACE 100 millivolt shift criterion. The remainder of the paper details the development of the coating system through the following phases: Phase I: Development of multiple formulations of the coating to achieve easy application characteristics, predictable galvanic activity, long-term protection, and minimum environmental impact. Phase II: Improvement of the formulations tested in Phase I including optimization of metallic loading as well as incorporation of humectants for continuous activation. Phase III: Application and testing of improved formulations on the test blocks. Phase IV: Incorporation of the final formulation upgrades onto large instrumented structures (slabs).

  17. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) of Ceramics for Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, Bryan J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    In order to generate advanced multilayer thermal and environmental protection systems, a new deposition process is needed to bridge the gap between conventional plasma spray, which produces relatively thick coatings on the order of 125-250 microns, and conventional vapor phase processes such as electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) which are limited by relatively slow deposition rates, high investment costs, and coating material vapor pressure requirements. The use of Plasma Spray - Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) processing fills this gap and allows thin (< 10 microns) single layers to be deposited and multilayer coatings of less than 100 microns to be generated with the flexibility to tailor microstructures by changing processing conditions. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were applied to NiCrAlY bond coated superalloy substrates using the PS-PVD coater at NASA Glenn Research Center. A design-of-experiments was used to examine the effects of process variables (Ar/He plasma gas ratio, the total plasma gas flow, and the torch current) on chamber pressure and torch power. Coating thickness, phase and microstructure were evaluated for each set of deposition conditions. Low chamber pressures and high power were shown to increase coating thickness and create columnar-like structures. Likewise, high chamber pressures and low power had lower growth rates, but resulted in flatter, more homogeneous layers

  18. Corrosion Protection Properties of PPy-ND Composite Coating: Sonoelectrochemical Synthesis and Design of Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Bagheri, R.; Rezaei-Moghadam, B.

    2016-02-01

    In this research, the nanocomposite coatings comprising the polypyrrole-nanodiamond, PPy-ND, on St-12 steel electrodes were electro-synthesized using in situ polymerization process under ultrasonic irradiation. The corrosion protection performance and morphology characterization of prepared coatings were investigated by electrochemical methods and scanning electron microscopy, SEM, respectively. Also, the experimental design was employed to determine the best values considering the effective parameters such as the concentration of nanoparticles, the applied current density and synthesis time to achieve the most protective films. A response surface methodology, RSM, involving a central composite design, CCD, was applied to the modeling and optimization of the PPy-ND nanocomposite deposition. Pareto graphic analysis of the parameters indicated that the applied current density and some of the interactions were effective on the response. The electrochemical results proved that the embedment of diamond nanoparticle, DNP, improves the corrosion resistance of PPy coatings significantly. Therefore, desirable correlation exists between predicted data and experimental results.

  19. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Stratis V. Sotirchos

    2001-02-01

    The main objective of this research project was the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Since alumina has excellent resistance to corrosion but coefficient than silicon carbide, the key idea of this project has been to develop graded coatings with composition varying smoothly along their thickness between an inner (base) layer of mullite in contact with the silicon carbide component and an outer layer of pure alumina, which would function as the actual protective coating of the component. (Mullite presents very good adhesion towards silicon carbide and has thermal expansion coefficient very close to that of the latter.)

  20. Nanoscale coatings for erosion and corrosion protection of copper microchannel coolers for high powered laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flannery, Matthew; Fan, Angie; Desai, Tapan G.

    2014-03-01

    High powered laser diodes are used in a wide variety of applications ranging from telecommunications to industrial applications. Copper microchannel coolers (MCCs) utilizing high velocity, de-ionized water coolant are used to maintain diode temperatures in the recommended range to produce stable optical power output and control output wavelength. However, aggressive erosion and corrosion attack from the coolant limits the lifetime of the cooler to only 6 months of operation. Currently, gold plating is the industry standard for corrosion and erosion protection in MCCs. However, this technique cannot perform a pin-hole free coating and furthermore cannot uniformly cover the complex geometries of current MCCs involving small diameter primary and secondary channels. Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc., presents a corrosion and erosion resistant coating (ANCERTM) applied by a vapor phase deposition process for enhanced protection of MCCs. To optimize the coating formation and thickness, coated copper samples were tested in 0.125% NaCl solution and high purity de-ionized (DIW) flow loop. The effects of DIW flow rates and qualities on erosion and corrosion of the ANCERTM coated samples were evaluated in long-term erosion and corrosion testing. The robustness of the coating was also evaluated in thermal cycles between 30°C - 75°C. After 1000 hours flow testing and 30 thermal cycles, the ANCERTM coated copper MCCs showed a corrosion rate 100 times lower than the gold plated ones and furthermore were barely affected by flow rates or temperatures thus demonstrating superior corrosion and erosion protection and long term reliability.

  1. Aluminum and polymeric coatings for protection of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenares, C.; McCreary, T.; Monaco, S.; Walkup, C.; Gleeson, G.; Kervin, J.; Smith, R.L.; McCaffrey, C.

    1983-12-21

    Ion-plated aluminum films on uranium will not provide adequate protection for 25 years. Magnetron-plated aluminum films on uranium are much better than ion-plated ones. Kel-F 800 films on uranium can provide adequate protection for 25 years. Their use in production must be delayed until the following factors are sorted out: water permeability in Kel-F 800 must be determined between 30 and 60/sup 0/C; the effect of UF/sub 3/, at the Kel-F/metal interface, on the permeability of water must be assessed; and the effect of crystallinity on water permeability must be evaluated. Applying Kel-F films on aluminum ion-plated uranium provides a good interim solution for long term storage.

  2. Chitosan-based ultrathin films as antifouling, anticoagulant and antibacterial protective coatings.

    PubMed

    Bulwan, Maria; Wójcik, Kinga; Zapotoczny, Szczepan; Nowakowska, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Ultrathin antifouling and antibacterial protective nanocoatings were prepared from ionic derivatives of chitosan using layer-by-layer deposition methodology. The surfaces of silicon, and glass protected by these nanocoatings were resistant to non-specific adsorption of proteins disregarding their net charges at physiological conditions (positively charged TGF-β1 growth factor and negatively charged bovine serum albumin) as well as human plasma components. The coatings also preserved surfaces from the formation of bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus) biofilm as shown using microscopic studies (SEM, AFM) and the MTT viability test. Moreover, the chitosan-based films adsorbed onto glass surface demonstrated the anticoagulant activity towards the human blood. The antifouling and antibacterial actions of the coatings were correlated with their physicochemical properties. The studied biologically relevant properties were also found to be dependent on the thickness of those nanocoatings. These materials are promising for biomedical applications, e.g., as protective coatings for medical devices, anticoagulant coatings and protective layers in membranes. PMID:21967904

  3. METHOD OF FORMING A PROTECTIVE COATING ON FERROUS METAL SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Weeks, J.R.; Kammerer, O.F.; Gurinsky, D.H.

    1960-02-23

    A method is described of protecting ferrous metal surfaces from corrosive attack by liquid metals, such as liquid bismuth or lead-bismuth alloys. The nitrogen content of the ferrous metal surface is first reduced by reacting the metal surface with a metal which forms a stable nitride. Thereafter, the surface is contacted with liquid metal containing at least 2 ppm zirconium at a temperature in the range of 550 to 1100 deg C to form an adherent zirconium carbide layer on the ferrous surface.

  4. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    indicators, inhibitors and self-healing agents. This allows the incorporation of autonomous corrosion control functionalities, such as corrosion detection and inhibition as well as the self-healing of mechanical damage, into coatings. This paper presents technical details on the characterization of inhibitor-containing particles and their corrosion inhibitive effects using electrochemical and mass loss methods.Three organic environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic microparticles that are compatible with desired coatings. The release of the inhibitors from the microparticles in basic solution was studied. Fast release, for immediate corrosion protection, as well as long-term release for continued protection, was observed.The inhibition efficacy of the inhibitors, incorporated directly and in microparticles, on carbon steel was evaluated. Polarization curves and mass loss measurements showed that, in the case of 2MBT, its corrosion inhibition effectiveness was greater when it was delivered from microparticles.

  5. Development and Application of HVOF Sprayed Spinel Protective Coating for SOFC Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, O.; Pihlatie, M.; Rautanen, M.; Himanen, O.; Lagerbom, J.; Mäkinen, M.; Varis, T.; Suhonen, T.; Kiviaho, J.

    2013-06-01

    Protective coatings are needed for metallic interconnects used in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks to prevent excessive high-temperature oxidation and evaporation of chromium species. These phenomena affect the lifetime of the stacks by increasing the area-specific resistance (ASR) and poisoning of the cathode. Protective MnCo2O4 and MnCo1.8Fe0.2O4 coatings were applied on ferritic steel interconnect material (Crofer 22 APU) by high velocity oxy fuel spraying. The substrate-coating systems were tested in long-term exposure tests to investigate their high-temperature oxidation behavior. Additionally, the ASRs were measured at 700 °C for 1000 h. Finally, a real coated interconnect was used in a SOFC single-cell stack for 6000 h. Post-mortem analysis was carried out with scanning electron microscopy. The deposited coatings reduced significantly the oxidation of the metal, exhibited low and stable ASR and reduced effectively the migration of chromium.

  6. High Temperature Resistant Organopolysiloxane Coating for Protecting and Repairing Rigid Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Ceramics are protected from high temperature degradation, including high temperature, oxidative, aeroconvective degradation by a high temperature and oxidation resistant coating of a room temperature curing, hydrolyzed and partially condensed liquid polyorganosiloxane to the surface of the ceramic. The liquid polyorganosiloxane is formed by the hydrolysis and partial condensation of an alkyltrialkoxysilane with water or a mixture of an alkyltrialkoxysilane and a dialkyldialkoxysilane with water. The liquid polyorganosiloxane cures at room temperature on the surface of the ceramic to form a hard, protective, solid coating which forms a high temperature environment, and is also used as an adhesive for adhering a repair plug in major damage to the ceramic. This has been found useful for protecting and repairing porous, rigid ceramics of a type used on reentry space vehicles.

  7. Development of self-healing coatings for corrosion protection on metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Alicja; Barker, Michael B.

    2016-08-01

    Inspired by biological systems, artificial self-healing materials are designed for repairing local damage caused by external factors. The rapidly expanding field of self-healing systems contains, among others, materials with well-defined surface properties. Undoubtedly, enhancing surface functionalisation, by applying smart coatings, enjoys an extensive interest. The self-healing ability is particularly essential property for corrosion protection strategies, especially when the use of one of the most effective corrosion systems, based on chromium(VI) compounds, is now banned by the current registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals legislation. Self-healing protective coatings are produced using macromolecular compounds, ceramics, metals and composites. Considering the wide range of available materials, the number of potential combinations seems to be unlimited. The self-healing action of such coatings is activated by appropriate stimuli: temperature changes, radiation, pH changes, pressure changes and mechanical action. In this paper, the research and practical implications of the various approaches to achieving self-healing functionality of protective coatings, as well as potential developments in this area, are explored.

  8. Mathematical models for cathodic protection of an underground pipeline with coating holidays

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, J.M.; Orazem, M.E.; Kennelley, K.J.; Degerstedt, R.M.

    1995-11-01

    Mathematical models were developed that can be used to predict the cathodic protection (CP) requirements for coated pipelines protected by parallel anodes. This work was motivated by the need to estimate the current and potential distribution on the pipe when anodes are placed near the pipeline or when discrete coating holidays expose bare steel. The mathematical model solves Laplace`s equation for potential with boundary conditions appropriate for the pipe being protected, the anode, and any region through which current does not pass, such as the edge of a thaw bulb. The current density on bare steel was assumed to be composed of contributions from corrosion, reduction of dissolved oxygen, and evolution of hydrogen. Kinetic parameters were obtained from independent experiments. The anode was assumed to have a constant potential, and current was allowed to flow through the coating under the assumption that the coating is a high resistance ionic conductor. A boundary element technique coupled with Newton-Raphson iteration was used to solve the governing equations for both two and three dimensional configurations. The results show good agreement with experimental values and can be used to assess the viability of CP designs.

  9. Mathematical models for cathodic protection of an underground pipeline with coating holidays. Part 1: Theoretical development

    SciTech Connect

    Orazem, M.E.; Esteban, J.M.; Kennelley, K.J.; Degerstedt, R.M.

    1997-04-01

    Mathematical models were developed to predict cathodic protection (CP) requirements for coated pipelines protected by parallel anodes. This work was motivated by the need to estimate current and potential distribution on a pipe when anodes are placed nearby or when discrete coating holidays expose bare steel. The mathematical model solves Laplace`s equation for potential with boundary conditions appropriate for the pipe being protected, the anode, and any region through which current does not pass. The current density on bare steel was assumed to be composed of contributions from corrosion, reduction of dissolved oxygen, and evolution of hydrogen. Kinetic parameters were obtained from independent experiments. The anode was assumed to have a constant potential, and current was allowed to flow through the coating under the assumption that the coating is a high-resistance ionic conductor. A boundary element technique coupled with Newton-Raphson iteration was sued to solve the governing equations for two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) configurations. Results showed good agreement with experimental values and can be used to assess viability of CP designs.

  10. Protective coatings on stainless steel bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago, A. S.; Ansar, S. A.; Saruhan, B.; Schulz, U.; Lettenmeier, P.; Cañas, N. A.; Gazdzicki, P.; Morawietz, T.; Hiesgen, R.; Arnold, J.; Friedrich, K. A.

    2016-03-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is a promising technology for large H2 production from surplus electricity from renewable sources. However, the electrolyser stack is costly due to the manufacture of bipolar plates (BPP). Stainless steel can be used as an alternative, but it must be coated. Herein, dense titanium coatings are produced on stainless steel substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS). Further surface modification of the Ti coating with Pt (8 wt% Pt/Ti) deposited by physical vapour deposition (PVD) magnetron sputtering reduces the interfacial contact resistance (ICR). The Ti and Pt/Ti coatings are characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the coatings are evaluated in simulated and real PEM electrolyser environments, and they managed to fully protect the stainless steel substrate. In contrast, the absence of the thermally sprayed Ti layer between Pt and stainless steel leads to pitting corrosion. The Pt/Ti coating is tested in a PEM electrolyser cell for almost 200 h, exhibiting an average degradation rate of 26.5 μV h-1. The results reported here demonstrate the possibility of using stainless steel as a base material for the stack of a PEM electrolyser.

  11. Invitro Evaluation of Fluoride Release from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer with or without Protective Coating

    PubMed Central

    Nandlal, Bhojraj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) is well known for its fluoride releasing property but has its own drawbacks of poor mechanical properties, sensitivity to initial desiccation and moisture contamination. To overcome these, search led to the reinforcement of hydroxyapatite and application of surface coating agent but their effect on fluoride release is still not clear. Aim To evaluate and compare the release of fluoride from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer (HA-GIC) with and without protective coating. Materials and Methods Specimens were prepared as follows- Eight percent by weight conventional glass ionomer was replaced by hydroxyapatite powder (HA) and an indigenous product was prepared (HA-GIC). This powder was mixed with liquid of conventional GIC and allowed to set, then G coat plus coating agent was applied in surface coated group and light cured. Fluoride release of the sample was measured every 24 hrs for seven days and weekly from 7th to 21st day using combination ion selective electrode. Results Mean values clearly reveal a significant decrease in the fluoride release from day 1 to day 21 for both the groups. Results of repeated measure ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference between two groups (p <0.001). Conclusion Coating the hydroxyapatite reinforced glass ionomer will allow for slow and steady release of fluoride for a long period of time into oral environment. PMID:27190957

  12. Electrochemical characterization of plasma polymer coatings in corrosion protection of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yenfong; Yu, Qingsong

    2005-07-01

    Low-temperature plasma polymerization is a promising pretreatment technique to create environmentally friendly coating systems for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys. In this study, the pretreatment effects of plasma treatment and plasma polymerization on corrosion properties of alclad aluminum alloy 2024-T3 ([2A]) were investigated using electrochemical characterization techniques, including cyclic polarization (CP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The [2A] panels were coated with an ultrathin layer (~50 nm) of plasma polymers in a direct current (dc) glow discharge of trimethylsilane or its mixtures with one of two diatomic gases (O2 and N2). The CP measurement results showed that the plasma polymer coated [2A] panels exhibited more negative corrosion potentials (Ecorr), smaller corrosion currents (Icorr), and no surface passivation when compared with uncoated [2A] control panels. The lower values of Icorr imply a higher corrosion resistance on the plasma polymer coated [2A]. When investigated using EIS, these plasma polymer coated [2A] panels exhibited higher impedance (|Z|) at lower frequency when first immersed in electrolyte solution, yet degraded quickly to a similar level as uncoated controls within 1 day of immersion. These results illustrated that thin plasma polymer films provided a certain but very limited corrosion resistance to [2A] substrate; their dominant role in plasma interface engineered coating systems still relied mostly on their adhesion enhancement at metal/paint interface as observed in our previous studies.

  13. Functionalized hexagonal boron nitride nano-coatings for protection of transparent plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tran, Thu; Usta, Aybala; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Nanocoating is the result of a coating application of nanomaterials to build a consistent network of molecules in a paint to protect the surfaces of various materials and devices. Hexagonal Boron Nitride (h-BN) is in two dimensional form with excellent thermal, mechanical and chemical properties. These BN nanocoatings are also a thermally insulating material for heat management. After adding functionalized h-BNs into paints or other coatings, they will absorb the harmful UV part of sunlight and prevent coating against the environmental degradations. The impacts of the environmental factors on the coatings can be substantially eliminated. In the present study, h-BNs were modified with [2-(2-Aminoethylamino) propyl] trimethoxysilane and uniformly dispersed into the polyurethane coatings with different amounts, such as 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8wt% to increase hardness and water resistance, and decrease the UV degradation level of coatings and transparent plastics. The prepared samples were characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-Vis Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Water Contact Angle, and Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The test results showed that the nanocoatings with functionalized h-BN provided excellent physical and chemical behaviors against the UV and other physical degradations on the substrates.

  14. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2015-01-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  15. Vacuum Sputtered and Ion-Plated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1982-01-01

    The plasma or ion-assisted coating techniques such as sputtering and ion plating are discussed in view of wear and corrosion protection. The basic processes and the unique features of the technique are discussed in regard to the synthesis and development of high reliability wear and corrosion resistant films. The ions of the plasma which transfer energy, momentum, and charge to the substrate and the growing films can be beneficially used. As a result, coating adherence and cohesion is improved. Favorable morphological growth such as high density and porosity-free films can be developed, and residual stresses can be reduced.

  16. Evaluation of coated columbium for thermal protection systems application. [spacecraft heat shielding material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummler, D. R.; Black, W. E.

    1975-01-01

    Coated columbium alloys were evaluated for thermal protection system (TPS) application in the maximum operating temperature range from 1370 to 1590 K. Evaluation of materials combinations, subsize panels, and single panel TPS led to the development of a full-size nine-panel TPS array. This array was subjected to simulated shuttle missions of both thermal and acoustic loading. Results are presented which illustrate the structural and thermal adequacy under uniform heating and manufacturability of a full-size coated columbium-alloy TPS which is lightweight, reliable, and reusable.

  17. Coatings for protection of equipment for biochemical processing of geothermal residues: Progress report FY`97

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.

  18. The enhancement of benzotriazole on epoxy functionalized silica sol-gel coating for copper protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shusen; Zhao, Wenjie; Li, He; Zeng, Zhixiang; Xue, Qunji; Wu, Xuedong

    2013-07-01

    The influence of the amount of benzotriazole (BTA) on the wetting and anticorrosion ability of the epoxy functionalized silica sol-gel (ESol) coating was studied by various complementary methods. IR results demonstrate that BTA reacted with ESol through a 1:1 addition reaction of Nsbnd H to epoxy group. The water contact angle of the ESol coating increases with an increase in the amount of BTA. SEM and adhesion tests reveal that BTA could improve the adhesion of ESol to copper surface. Moreover, the best protection was achieved when the amount of BTA equals to the molar number of epoxy group in the ESol coating according to the results of electrochemical measurements and salt spray test.

  19. Semiconductor with protective surface coating and method of manufacture thereof. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1980-09-19

    Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices is provided for by a surface coating of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices, which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device against future impregnation with impurities.

  20. Optical coherence tomography complemented by hyperspectral imaging for the study of protective wood coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingemans, L. M.; Papadakis, V. M.; Liu, P.; Adam, A. J. L.; Groves, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a contactless and non-destructive testing (NDT) technique based on low-coherence interferometry. It has recently become a popular NDT-tool for evaluating cultural heritage. In this study, protective coatings on wood and their penetration into the wood structure were measured with a customized infrared fiber optic OCT instrument. In order to enhance the understanding of the OCT measurements of coatings on real wooden samples, an optimization of the measuring and analyzing methodology was performed by developing an averaging approach and by post-processing the data. The collected information was complemented by data obtained with hyperspectral imaging to allow data from local OCT A-scans to be used in mapping the coating thicknesses over larger areas.

  1. The effect of protective coatings on the high temperature properties of a gamma prime-strengthened Ni-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, R.; Willett, K.P.

    1984-01-01

    This study examined the influence of chrome-aluminide coatings on the creep and stress rupture properties of wrought Udimet-520 used in gas turbine blade applications. Creep and stress rupture tests were conducted at 802/sup 0/C (1475/sup 0/F) on coated and uncoated wrought bars in the fully heat treated condition. Coatings caused a deterioration in rupture strength and ductility. Masking procedures used to protect the blade roots during coating also affected rupture strength or rupture ductility. Mechanical behavior in the coated creep resistant alloy correlated with microstructure and discussed in terms of possible controlling processes.

  2. Space Plasma Testing of High-Voltage Thin-Film Solar Arrays with Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlomak, Pawel; Hausgen, Paul E.; Merrill, John; Senft, Donna; Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the space plasma test program for thin-film photovoltaics (TFPV) technologies developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The main objective of this program is to simulate the effects of space plasma characteristic of LEO and MEO environments on TFPV. Two types of TFPV, amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS), coated with two types of thin-film, multifunctional coatings were used for these studies. This paper reports the results of the first phase of this program, namely the results of preliminary electrostatic charging, arcing, dielectric breakdown, and collection current measurements carried out with a series of TFPV exposed to simulated space plasma at the NASA Glenn Plasma Interaction Facility. The experimental data demonstrate that multifunctional coatings developed for this program provide effective protection against the plasma environment while minimizing impact on power generation performance. This effort is part of an ongoing program led by the Space Vehicles Directorate at the AFRL devoted to the development and space qualification of TFPV and their protective coatings.

  3. Protective Polymer Coatings for High-Throughput, High-Purity Cellular Isolation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies are emerging as the next frontier of medicine, offering a plausible path forward in the treatment of many devastating diseases. Critically, current methods for antigen positive cell sorting lack a high throughput method for delivering ultrahigh purity populations, prohibiting the application of some cell-based therapies to widespread diseases. Here we show the first use of targeted, protective polymer coatings on cells for the high speed enrichment of cells. Individual, antigen-positive cells are coated with a biocompatible hydrogel which protects the cells from a surfactant solution, while uncoated cells are immediately lysed. After lysis, the polymer coating is removed through orthogonal photochemistry, and the isolate has >50% yield of viable cells and these cells proliferate at rates comparable to control cells. Minority cell populations are enriched from erythrocyte-depleted blood to >99% purity, whereas the entire batch process requires 1 h and <$2000 in equipment. Batch scale-up is only contingent on irradiation area for the coating photopolymerization, as surfactant-based lysis can be easily achieved on any scale. PMID:26244409

  4. Evaluation of atomic oxygen resistant protective coatings for fiberglass-epoxy composites in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Brady, Joyce A.

    1989-01-01

    Fiberglass-epoxy composite masts are the prime structural members for the Space Station Freedom solar array. At the altitude where Space Station Freedom will operate, atomic oxygen atoms are the most predominant species. Atomic oxygen is highly reactive and has been shown to oxidize organic and some metallic materials. Tests with random and directed atomic oxygen exposure have shown that the epoxy is removed from the composite exposing brittle glass fibers which could be easily removed from the surface where they could contaminate Space Station Freedom Systems. Protection or fiber containment systems; inorganic based paints, aluminum braid, and a metal coating; were evaluated for resistance to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and mechanical flexing. All appeared to protect well against atomic oxygen and provide fiber containment except for the single aluminum braid covering. UV radiation resistance was acceptable and in general, thermal cycling and flexure had little to no effect on the mass loss rate for most coatings.

  5. Electroless nickel and ion-plated protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, M.A.; Chaudiere, D.A.; Dake, L.S.; Stewart, T.L.

    1982-04-01

    A preliminary examination of two methods of protecting second surface silvered glass mirrors from environmental degradation is presented. One method employed silver mirrors overcoated with Al, Ni, 304 stainless steel, Cr, or an Al/Cu alloy prepared by ion-plating. The other method used conventional wet process silver mirrors protected with a thin electroless nickel coating. No attempt was made to optimize the coatings for either method. These experimental mirrors were compared with conventional paint backed silver/copper mirrors after exposure to elevated temperatures and water vapor in order to estimate their relative environmental stability. The electroless nickel mirrors showed consistently more resistance to these stresses than either the conventional or ion-plated mirrors, suggesting that they may provide more durable field service.

  6. Plasma Sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) Coatings for Corrosion Protection and Adhesion Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Groff, G. B.; Rooney, M.; Cooke, A. V.; Boothe, R.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) coatings are being developed under the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program's (SPIP) Bondlines Package. These coatings are designed as a steel case preparation treatment prior to insulation lay-up. Other uses include the exterior of steel cases and bonding surfaces of nozzle components. They provide excellent bondability - rubber insulation and epoxy bonds fail cohesively within the polymer - for both fresh surfaces and surfaces having undergone natural and accelerated environmental aging. They have passed the MSFC requirements for protection of inland and sea coast environment. Because BOSS coatings are inherently corrosion resistant, they do not require preservation by greases or oils. The reduction/elimination of greases and oils, known bondline degraders, can increase SRM reliability, decrease costs by reducing the number of process steps, and decrease environmental pollution by reducing the amount of methyl chloroform used for degreasing and thus reduce release of the ozone-depleting chemical in accordance with the Clean Air Act and the Montreal Protocol. The coatings can potential extend the life of RSRM case segments and nozzle components by eliminating erosion due to multiple grit blasting during each use cycle and corrosion damage during marine recovery. Concurrent work for the Air Force show that other BOSS coatings give excellent bondline strength and durability for high-performance structures of aluminum and titanium.

  7. Deposition and Evaluation of Protective PVD Coatings on Ferritic Stainless Steel SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Gannon, Paul; Deibert, Max; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; Kopczyk, M.; Van Vorous, D.; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Visco, s.; jacobson, c.; Kurokawa, H.; Sofie, Stephen W.

    2006-09-21

    Reduced operating temperatures (600-800°C) of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) may enable the use of inexpensive ferritic steels as interconnects. Due to the demanding SOFC interconnect operating environment, protective coatings are gaining attention to increase longterm stability. In this study, large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) and hybrid filtered arc assisted electron beam physical vapor deposition (FA-EBPVD) technologies were used for deposition of two-segment coatings with Cr-Co-Al-O-N based sublayer and Mn-Co-O top layer. Coatings were deposited on ferritic steel and subsequently annealed in air for various time intervals. Surface oxidation was investigated using RBS, SEM and EDS analyses. Cr volatilization was evaluated using a transpiration apparatus and ICP-MS analysis of the resultant condensate. Electrical conductivity (Area Specific Resistance) was studied as a function of time using the four-point technique with Ag electrodes. The oxidation behavior, Cr volatilization rate, and electrical conductivity of the coated and uncoated samples are reported. Transport mechanisms for various oxidizing species and coating diffusion barrier properties are discussed.

  8. Investigation of several commercial aluminide coatings for carburization protection of a nickel-base alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, G.Y.

    1980-06-01

    Four commercial aluminide coatings applied to Hastelloy Alloy X were investigated with respect to their carburization resistance in a carburizing impure helium environment. The test gas was helium with 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/, 50 ..mu..atm CO, 50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4/, and < 1.0 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O. The uncoated specimens exposed to this test environment at 900/sup 0/C (1650/sup 0/F) for 1000 and 2000 h exhibited significant carburization. All four coatings provided good protection against carburization of the substrate Hastelloy Alloy X, presumably due to the formation of an Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ oxide scale on the coating surface during the high-temperature corrosion exposure. The Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ oxide is believed to be an effective barrier to carbon transport. Aluminide coatings applied to Hastelloy Alloy X exhibited a tendency for forming Kirkendall diffusion voids (or pores) in the diffusion zone during long-term high-temperature exposures (e.g., 900/sup 0/C (1650/sup 0/F) for 1000 h). Chromium addition during aluminizing, which resulted in a high chromium content in the coating, appears to be effective in preventing the pore formation during subsequent long-term high-temperature exposures.

  9. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V.; Mulpuri, R.; Auger, M.

    1996-04-20

    SiC based ceramics have been identified as the leading candidate materials for elevated temperature applications in harsh oxidation/corrosion environments. It has been established that a protective coating can be effectively used to avoid problems with excessive oxidation and hot corrosion. However, to date, no coating configuration has been developed that can withstand the rigorous requirements imposed by such applications. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) mullite coatings due to their desirable properties of toughness, corrosion resistance, and good coefficient of thermal expansion match with SiC are being developed as a potential solution. Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}- SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  10. Bibliography of information on mechanics of structural failure (hydrogen embrittlement, protective coatings, composite materials, NDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This bibliography is comprised of approximately 1,600 reference citations related to four problem areas in the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the period 1962-1976, the effort being largely limited to documents published in the United States. Listings are subdivided into the four problem areas: Hydrogen Embrittlement; Protective Coatings; Composite Materials; and Nondestructive Evaluation. An author index is included.

  11. Atomic oxygen interaction at defect sights in protective coatings on polymers flown on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Auer, Bruce M.; Gebauer, Linda; Lamoreaux, Cynthia

    1993-01-01

    Although the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has exposed materials with a fixed orientation relative to the ambient low-Earth-orbital environment, arrival of atomic oxygen is angularly distributed as a result of the atomic oxygen's high temperature Maxwellian velocity distribution and the LDEF's orbital inclination. Thus, atomic oxygen entering defects in protective coatings on polymeric surfaces can cause wider undercut cavities than the size of the defect in the protective coating. Because only a small fraction of atomic oxygen reacts upon first impact with most polymeric materials, secondary reactions with lower energy thermally accommodated atomic oxygen can occur. The secondary reactions of scattered and/or thermally accommodated atomic oxygen also contribute to widening the undercut cavity beneath the protective coating defect. As the undercut cavity enlarges, exposing more polymer, the probability of atomic oxygen reacting with underlying polymeric material increases because of multiple opportunities for reaction. Thus, the effective atomic oxygen erosion yield for atoms entering defects increases above that of the unprotected material. Based on the results of analytical modeling and computational modeling, aluminized Kapton multilayer insulation exposed to atomic oxygen on row 9 lost the entire externally exposed layer of polyimide Kapton, yet based on the results of this investigation, the bottom surface aluminum film must have remained in place, but crazed. Atomic oxygen undercutting at defect sites in protective coatings on graphite epoxy composites indicates that between 40 to 100 percent of the atomic oxygen thermally accommodates upon impact, and that the reaction probability of thermally accommodated atomic oxygen may range from 7.7 x 10(exp -6) to 2.1 x 10(exp -3), depending upon the degree of thermal accommodation upon each impact.

  12. Recession Curve Generation for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Thermal Protection System Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanner, Howard S.; Stuckey, C. Irvin; Davis, Darrell W.; Davis, Darrell (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ablatable Thermal Protection System (TPS) coatings are used on the Space Shuttle Vehicle Solid Rocket Boosters in order to protect the aluminum structure from experiencing excessive temperatures. The methodology used to characterize the recession of such materials is outlined. Details of the tests, including the facility, test articles and test article processing are also presented. The recession rates are collapsed into an empirical power-law relation. A design curve is defined using a 95-percentile student-t distribution. based on the nominal results. Actual test results are presented for the current acreage TPS material used.

  13. Electroless nickel and ion-plated protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, M.A.; Chaudiere, D.A.; Stewart, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Two methods of protecting second surface silvered glass mirrors from environmental degradation have been evaluated. One method employed silver mirrors overcoated with Al, Ni, 304 stainless steel, Cr, and an Al/Cu alloy prepared by ion-plating. The other method used conventional wet process silver mirrors protected with a thin electroless nickel coating. These mirrors were compared with conventional paint backed silver/copper mirrors after exposure to elevated temperatures and water vapor. The electroless nickel mirrors showed consistently more resistance to these stresses than either the conventional or ion-plated mirrors suggesting that they may provide more durable field service.

  14. Atomic Oxygen Treatment for Non-Contact Removal of Organic Protective Coatings from Painting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Cales, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Current techniques for removal of varnish (lacquer) and other organic protective coatings from paintings involve contact with the surface. This contact can remove pigment, or alter the shape and location of paint on the canvas surface. A thermal energy atomic oxygen plasma, developed to simulate the space environment in low Earth orbit, easily removes these organic materials. Uniform removal of organic protective coatings from the surfaces of paintings is accomplished through chemical reaction. Atomic oxygen will not react with oxides so that most paint pigments will not be affected by the reaction. For paintings containing organic pigments, the exposure can be carefully timed so that the removal stops just short of the pigment. Color samples of Alizarin Crimson, Sap Green, and Zinc White coated with Damar lacquer were exposed to atomic oxygen. The lacquer was easily removed from all of the samples. Additionally, no noticeable change in appearance was observed after the lacquer was reapplied. The same observations were made on a painted canvas test sample obtained from the Cleveland Museum of Art. Scanning electron microscope photographs showed a slight microscopic texturing of the vehicle after exposure. However, there was no removal or disturbance of the paint pigment on the surface. It appears that noncontact cleaning using atomic oxygen may provide a viable alternative to other cleaning techniques. It is especially attractive in cases where the organic protective surface cannot be acceptably or safely removed by conventional techniques.

  15. Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer in Fire-Protective Coatings Deformable upon Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzinsky, V. P.; Garashchenko, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical studies of heat transfer in fire-protective coatings deformable (intumescent) upon heating have been conducted. The optimum combination of the computation-scheme parameters providing stability, convergence and satisfactory accuracy of solutions has been determined. An effect of basic characteristics of materials in real range of their change that made it possible to estimate the degree of influence of properties on the fire-protective efficiency of coatings and the level of warm-up (flame resistance) of structures to be protected with them has been studied. The possibility of using developed models and techniques to estimate and provide the required level of fire safety of polymer-based materials (in particular, elastomers and structures and products on their basis) is considered. The results of estimating the mass rate of evolving gaseous thermal-decomposition products that determine, in a considerable extent, the material combustibility have been presented. The numerical analysis results have demonstrated the potentiality of reducing the combustibility of such materials and increasing limits of their fire resistance at the expense of organizing the intumescence of a material upon heating by means of modification of their initial formulations as well as with the aid of an additional layer made of the intumescent coating compatible with an elastomer.

  16. Atomic oxygen interaction with solar array blankets at protective coating defect sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Auer, Bruce M.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hill, Carol M.

    1991-01-01

    Atomic oxygen in the low-Earth-orbital environment oxidizes SiOx protected polyimide Kapton solar array blankets at sites which are not protected such as pin windows or scratches in the protective coatings. The magnitude and shape of the atomic oxygen undercutting which occurs at these sites is dependent upon the exposure environment details such as arrival direction and reaction probability. The geometry of atomic oxygen undercutting at defect sites exposed to atomic oxygen in plasma asher was used to develop a Monte Carlo model to simulate atomic oxygen erosion processes at defect sites in protected Kapton. Comparisons of Monte Carlo predictions and experimental results are presented for plasma asher atomic oxygen exposures for large and small defects as well as for protective coatings on one or both sides of Kapton. The model is used to predict in-space exposure results at defect sites for both directed and sweeping atomic oxygen exposure. A comparison of surface textures predicted by the Monte Carlo model and those experimentally observed from both directed space ram and laboratory plasma asher atomic oxygen exposure indicate substantial agreement.

  17. Effect of chelating agent acetylacetone on corrosion protection properties of silane-zirconium sol-gel coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mei; Liang, Min; Liu, Jianhua; Li, Songmei; Xue, Bing; Zhao, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The hybrid sol-gel coatings on AA2024-T3 were prepared with a silane coupling agent 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) and a metal alkoxide tetra-n-propoxyzirconium (TPOZ) as precursors. The effect of acetylacetone (AcAc) as a chelating agent on the corrosion protection properties of sol-gel coatings were evaluated and the optimal AcAc/TPOZ molar ratio was obtained. The sol-gel coatings were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The corrosion protection properties of the coatings were evaluated by means of potentiodynamic polarization study (PDS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). It is demonstrated that AcAc avoids fast hydrolysis of TPOZ and benefits to form stable sols. The coating with AcAc/TPOZ molar ratio of 3 shows the best corrosion protection performance in 0.05 M NaCl solution.

  18. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  19. Development of nanostructured coatings for protecting the surface of aluminum alloys against corrosion and ice accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Shahram

    Ice and wet snow accretion on outdoor structures is a severe challenge for cold climate countries. A variety of de-icing and anti-icing techniques have been developed so far to counter this problem. Passive approaches such as anti-icing or icephobic coatings that inhibit or retard ice accumulation on the surfaces are gaining in popularity. Metal corrosion should also be taken into account as metallic substrates are subject to corrosion problems when placed in humid or aggressive environments. Development of any ice-releasing coatings on aluminum structures, as they must be durable enough, is therefore closely related to anti-corrosive protection of that metal. Accordingly, series of experiments have been carried out to combine reduced ice adhesion and improved corrosion resistance on flat AA2024 substrates via thin films of single and double layer alkyl-terminated SAMs coatings. More precisely, alkyl-terminated aluminum substrates were prepared by depositing layer(s) of 18C-SAMs on BTSE-grafted AA2024 or mirror-polished AA2024 surfaces. This alloy is among the most widely used aluminum alloys in transportation systems (including aircraft), the military, etc. The stability of the coatings in an aggressive environment, their overall ice-repellent performance as well as their corrosion resistance was systematically studied. The stability of one-layer and two-layer coatings in different media was tested by means of CA measurements, demonstrating gradual loss of the hydrophobic property after ~1100-h-long immersion in water, associated by decrease in water CA. Surface corrosion was observed in all cases, except that the double-layer coating system provided improved anti-corrosive protection. All single layer coatings showed initial shear stress of ice detachment values of ~1.68 to 2 times lower than as-received aluminum surfaces and about ~1.22 to 1.5 times lower than those observed on mirror-polished surfaces. These values gradually increased after as many as 5 to 9

  20. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  1. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  2. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  3. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  4. Interfaces of high-protection performance polyaryls-coated zinc phosphated steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate the ability of polyaryl thermoplastic coatings such as polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) and polyphenyletheretherketone (PEEK), to protect zinc phosphate (Zn{center_dot}Ph)-treated steels from corrosion in a wet, harsh environment (1.0 wt % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, 3.0 wt % NaCl and 96.0 wt % water at temperature from 250 to 200 C), we exposed them in autoclave to determine performance in heating-cooling cyclic fatigue tests (1 cycle = 12 hr at 200 C + 12 hr at 25 C) for up to 90 cycles. Although no changes in appearance were seen in the PEEK specimens after 60 cycles, extension to 90 cycles caused delamination of the coating film from the Zn{center_dot}Ph; the major reason was the degradation of the PEEK polymer caused by its hydrothermalcatalyzed esterification. In urea hydrogen peroxide (UHP)-modified PPS-coating systems, chemical reactions at the interfaces between the PPS and Zn in the Zn{center_dot}Ph layer led to the formation of a ZnS reaction product, which enhanced the Zn{center_dot}Ph-to-PPS adhesive bond; correspondingly, there were no signs of peeling nor separation of the coating after 90 cycles. In addition, because these intermediate reaction products are insoluble at high pH, they minimized the rate of delamination of the PPS coating caused by the cathodic reaction, H{sub 2}O + 1/2O{sub 2} + 2e{sup {minus}} {yields} 2OH{sup {minus}}, at the corrosion side of a defect in the film. In contrast, PEEK coatings containing non-reactive Zn{center_dot}Ph underwent cathodic delamination because of the susceptibility of Zn{center_dot}Ph to alkali dissolution.

  5. Role of third bodies in friction and wear of protective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, I. L.; Dvorak, S. D.; Wahl, K. J.; Scharf, T. W.

    2003-09-01

    The literature on protective tribological coatings often focuses on correlations with measurable coating properties (composition, structure, and mechanical) but ignores the mechanisms of friction and wear. In fact, long-lived coatings often survive because of third bodies that form inside the moving contact. This article reviews earlier studies of third body processes carried out by mainly ex situ methods and reports more recent studies investigating third body processes using in situ techniques. Direct evidence that third bodies control friction and wear processes has been obtained with a tribometer incorporating in situ optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Videotapes and Raman spectra of the sliding contact were recorded during reciprocating sliding tests performed in both dry and humid air with transparent hemispheres (glass or sapphire). Third body processes were correlated directly to friction and wear behavior of three low friction coatings: amorphous Pb-Mo-S diamond-like carbon (DLC); and annealed boron carbide. In all three cases, the friction behavior could be explained in terms of the relative motion between a transfer film on the hemisphere and the wear track. With amorphous Pb-Mo-S, the transfer film was MoS2; with DLC, it was a graphite-like carbon; and with annealed boron carbide, it was either a mix of H3BO3 and carbon (at μ=0.08) or, when the H3BO3 wore away, carbon alone (at μ=0.2). Friction rises with Pb-Mo-S and DLC in humid air were ascribed to a change in interfacial shear strength; friction spikes and fluctuations with DLC were associated with periodic loss of transfer film thickness. For all three coatings, interfacial sliding between transfer film and wear track on coating was the dominant velocity accommodation mode.

  6. The second amino acid of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein is critical for coat protein-mediated protection.

    PubMed Central

    Tumer, N E; Kaniewski, W; Haley, L; Gehrke, L; Lodge, J K; Sanders, P

    1991-01-01

    Transgenic plants expressing the coat protein (CP) of alfalfa mosaic virus (AIMV) are resistant to infection by AIMV. A mutation was introduced into the second amino acid of the cDNA for the CP of AIMV. Three different transgenic tobacco lines expressing the mutant CP and two different transgenic tobacco lines expressing the wild-type CP at similar levels were challenged with AIMV virions and viral RNA. Whereas the lines expressing the wild-type CP were highly resistant to infection by AIMV virions and viral RNA, the lines expressing the mutant CP were susceptible to infection by both. The binding affinity of the mutant and the wild-type CPs for the 3' terminal protein binding site on AIMV RNAs was similar, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. A mixture of AIMV genomic RNAs 1-3 was infectious on the plants expressing the mutant CP but not on vector control plants or plants expressing the wild-type CP, indicating that the mutant CP can activate the AIMV genomic RNAs for infection. These results demonstrate that the second amino acid of the AIMV CP is critical for protection from AIMV but not for the initial interaction between the AIMV RNA and CP, suggesting that this initial interaction does not play a major role in CP-mediated protection. Images PMID:11607167

  7. Morphological characterisation of complex powder used for protective coatings for geothermal plant components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csaki, I.; Karlsdottir, S. N.; Buzaianu, A.; Serghiuta, S.; Popescu, G.; Motoiu, V. A.; Ragnarstottir, K. R.; Guðlaugsson, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper aims to review the morphological characteristics, microstructures, physical and chemical properties of two complex composite powders: Ni18Cr5Si2B and Ni21Cr11Al2.5Y. These powders will be used as an option for coating geothermal turbine blades to prevent corrosion. The corrosion process in the steam turbine results in damages being recognized as the leading cause of reduced availability in geothermal power plants and is depends on temperature, mechanical and vaporous carryover of impurities and water treatment. Thermal spraying is a suitable technique for coating layers with wear and corrosion resistance. Therefore this technique could be successfully used in geothermal applications for obtaining coatings layers from new complex composite powders protecting the turbine blades from corrosions and good control of steam chemistry. The composite powders were investigated using X-ray diffraction and electronic microscopy to provide detailed information about composites morphological modifications. The results obtained after morphological evaluation are encouraging for using these composite powders as an option for coating geothermal components using thermal spraying technique.

  8. Coating fabrics with gold nanorods for colouring, UV-protection, and antibacterial functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yidan; Xiao, Manda; Jiang, Shouxiang; Ding, Feng; Wang, Jianfang

    2012-12-01

    Gold nanorods exhibit rich colours owing to the nearly linear dependence of the longitudinal plasmon resonance wavelength on the length-to-diameter aspect ratio. This property of Au nanorods has been utilized in this work for dyeing fabrics. Au nanorods of different aspect ratios were deposited on both cotton and silk fabrics by immersing them in Au nanorod solutions. The coating of Au nanorods makes the fabrics exhibit a broad range of colours varying from brownish red through green to purplish red, which are essentially determined by the longitudinal plasmon wavelength of the deposited Au nanorods. The colorimetric values of the coated fabrics were carefully measured for examining the colouring effects. The nanorod-coated cotton fabrics were found to be commercially acceptable in washing fastness to laundering tests and colour fastness to dry cleaning tests. Moreover, the nanorod-coated cotton and silk fabrics show significant improvements on both UV-protection and antibacterial functions. Our study therefore points out a promising approach for the use of noble metal nanocrystals as dyeing materials for textile applications on the basis of their inherent localized plasmon resonance properties.

  9. POLYPHENYLENESULFIED/MONTOMORILLONITE CLAY NANOCOMPOSITE COATINGS: THEIR EFFICACY IN PROTECTING STEEL AGAINST CORROSION.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA, T.; GAWLIK, K.

    2006-06-01

    Nanoscale montomorillonite (MMT) clay fillers became dispersed in a polyphenylenesulfied (PPS) matrix through the processes of octadecylamine (ODA) intercalation {yields} molten PPS co-intercalation {yields} exfoliation. Cooling this molten exfoliated material led to the formation of a PPS/MMT nanocomposite. The MMT nanofiller conferred three advanced properties on the semi-crystalline PPS: First, it raised its melting point by nearly 40 C to 290 C; second, it increased its crystallization energy, implying that an excellent adherence of the nanofillers surfaces to PPS in terms of a good interfacial bond; and, third, it abated the degree of its hydrothermal oxidation due to sulfide {yields} sulfite linkage transformations. When this advanced PPS nanocomposite was used as a corrosion-preventing coating for carbon steel in a simulated geothermal environment at 300 C, a coating of {approx}150 {micro}m thickness adequately protected the steel against hot brine-caused corrosion. In contrast, an MMT-free PPS coating of similar thickness was not nearly as effective in mitigating corrosion as was the nanocompsite; in fact, the uptake of corrosive ionic electrolyte by the unmodified coating increased with an extending exposure time.

  10. Plasma technology for creation of protective and decorative coatings for building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, Oleg; Volokitin, Gennady; Skripnikova, Nelli; Shekhovtsov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    An experimental setup is developed to create a protective and decorative coating on the surface of building materials. Experimental study is conducted to create a protective coating using low-temperature plasma. The properties of the surface before and after the plasma treatment are investigated. At the increase of the plasma generator power (56-75 kW) the rate of the vitreous coating formation is significantly reduced, and the destruction of hydrous calcium silicates occurs at a lower depth (0.5-2.0 mm). In this case, the adhesive strength increases up to 2.34 MPa. At the increase of the exposure time at 56 kW (0.045 m/s melting rate) plasma generation power, the melt formation is observed not only at the surface but at depth of 0.7 mm and deeper. Also, a deep degradation of the material occurs and the adhesive strength decreases. The optimal heat flux density of plasma generator was established at 1.8-2.6 . 106 W/m2, which allows the achievement of the uniform layer formation on the wood surface that preserves its natural pattern visible.

  11. On the role of hydrophobic Si-based protective coatings in limiting mortar deterioration.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, G; Fermo, P; Pino, F; Pargoletti, E; Pecchioni, E; Fratini, F; Ruffolo, S A; La Russa, M F

    2015-11-01

    In order to avoid both natural and artificial stone decay, mainly due to the interaction with atmospheric pollutants (both gases such as NOx and SO2 and particulate matter), polymeric materials have been widely studied as protective coatings enable to limit the penetration of fluids into the bulk material. In the current work, an air hardening calcic lime mortar (ALM) and a natural hydraulic lime mortar (HLM) were used as substrates, and commercially available Si-based resins (Alpha®SI30 and Silres®BS16) were adopted as protective agents to give hydrophobicity features to the artificial stones. Surface properties of coatings and their performance as hydrophobic agents were studied using different techniques such as contact angle measurements, capillary absorption test, mercury intrusion porosimetry, surface free energy, colorimetric measurements and water vapour permeability tests. Finally, some exposure tests to UV radiation and to real polluted atmospheric environments (a city centre and an urban background site) were carried out during a wintertime period (when the concentrations of the main atmospheric pollutants are higher) in order to study the durability of the coating systems applied. The effectiveness of the two commercial resins in reducing salt formation (sulphate and nitrate), induced by the interaction of the mortars with the atmospheric pollutants, was demonstrated in the case of the HLM mortar. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26154039

  12. On the role of hydrophobic Si-based protective coatings in limiting mortar deterioration.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, G; Fermo, P; Pino, F; Pargoletti, E; Pecchioni, E; Fratini, F; Ruffolo, S A; La Russa, M F

    2015-11-01

    In order to avoid both natural and artificial stone decay, mainly due to the interaction with atmospheric pollutants (both gases such as NOx and SO2 and particulate matter), polymeric materials have been widely studied as protective coatings enable to limit the penetration of fluids into the bulk material. In the current work, an air hardening calcic lime mortar (ALM) and a natural hydraulic lime mortar (HLM) were used as substrates, and commercially available Si-based resins (Alpha®SI30 and Silres®BS16) were adopted as protective agents to give hydrophobicity features to the artificial stones. Surface properties of coatings and their performance as hydrophobic agents were studied using different techniques such as contact angle measurements, capillary absorption test, mercury intrusion porosimetry, surface free energy, colorimetric measurements and water vapour permeability tests. Finally, some exposure tests to UV radiation and to real polluted atmospheric environments (a city centre and an urban background site) were carried out during a wintertime period (when the concentrations of the main atmospheric pollutants are higher) in order to study the durability of the coating systems applied. The effectiveness of the two commercial resins in reducing salt formation (sulphate and nitrate), induced by the interaction of the mortars with the atmospheric pollutants, was demonstrated in the case of the HLM mortar. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. Corrosion Resistance Characterization of Coating Systems Used to Protect Aluminum Alloys Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy and Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambina, Federico

    In this study, the corrosion protection provided by of a number of chromate and chromate-free coatings systems was characterized in detail. High-solids SrCrO4-pigmented epoxy primers applied to 2024 and 7075 substrates were subject to salt spray exposure testing for 30 days. Samples were removed periodically and an electrochemical impedance measurement (EIS) was made. Although none of the coatings tested showed visual evidence of corrosion, the total impedance of the samples decreased by as much as two orders of magnitude. An analysis of capacitance showed that the primer coatings rapidly took up water from the exposure environment, but the coating-metal remained passive despite the fact that it was wet. These results support the idea that chromate coatings protect by creating a chromate-rich electrolyte within the coating that is passivating to the underlying metal substrate. They also suggest that indications of metal substrate passivity found in the low-frequency capacitive reactance of the impedance spectra are a better indicator of corrosion protection than the total impedance. The low-frequency capacitive reactance from EIS measurements is also good at assessing the protectiveness of chromate-free coatings systems. Fifteen different coatings systems comprising high-solids, chromate-free primers and chromate-free conversion coatings were applied to 2024 and 7075 substrates. These coatings were subject to salt spray exposure and EIS measurements. All coatings were inferior to coating systems containing chromate, but changes in the capacitive reactance measured in EIS was shown to anticipate visual indications of coating failure. A predictive model based on neural networks was trained to recognize the pattern in the capacitive reactance in impedance spectra measured after 48 hours of exposure and make an estimate of remaining coating life. A sensitivity analysis was performed to prune the impedance inputs. As a result of this analysis, a very simple but highly

  14. Biomimetic mineralization of metal-organic frameworks as protective coatings for biomacromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Kang; Ricco, Raffaele; Doherty, Cara M.; Styles, Mark J.; Bell, Stephen; Kirby, Nigel; Mudie, Stephen; Haylock, David; Hill, Anita J.; Doonan, Christian J.; Falcaro, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    Enhancing the robustness of functional biomacromolecules is a critical challenge in biotechnology, which if addressed would enhance their use in pharmaceuticals, chemical processing and biostorage. Here we report a novel method, inspired by natural biomineralization processes, which provides unprecedented protection of biomacromolecules by encapsulating them within a class of porous materials termed metal-organic frameworks. We show that proteins, enzymes and DNA rapidly induce the formation of protective metal-organic framework coatings under physiological conditions by concentrating the framework building blocks and facilitating crystallization around the biomacromolecules. The resulting biocomposite is stable under conditions that would normally decompose many biological macromolecules. For example, urease and horseradish peroxidase protected within a metal-organic framework shell are found to retain bioactivity after being treated at 80 °C and boiled in dimethylformamide (153 °C), respectively. This rapid, low-cost biomimetic mineralization process gives rise to new possibilities for the exploitation of biomacromolecules.

  15. Biomimetic mineralization of metal-organic frameworks as protective coatings for biomacromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kang; Ricco, Raffaele; Doherty, Cara M.; Styles, Mark J.; Bell, Stephen; Kirby, Nigel; Mudie, Stephen; Haylock, David; Hill, Anita J.; Doonan, Christian J.; Falcaro, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the robustness of functional biomacromolecules is a critical challenge in biotechnology, which if addressed would enhance their use in pharmaceuticals, chemical processing and biostorage. Here we report a novel method, inspired by natural biomineralization processes, which provides unprecedented protection of biomacromolecules by encapsulating them within a class of porous materials termed metal-organic frameworks. We show that proteins, enzymes and DNA rapidly induce the formation of protective metal-organic framework coatings under physiological conditions by concentrating the framework building blocks and facilitating crystallization around the biomacromolecules. The resulting biocomposite is stable under conditions that would normally decompose many biological macromolecules. For example, urease and horseradish peroxidase protected within a metal-organic framework shell are found to retain bioactivity after being treated at 80 °C and boiled in dimethylformamide (153 °C), respectively. This rapid, low-cost biomimetic mineralization process gives rise to new possibilities for the exploitation of biomacromolecules. PMID:26041070

  16. [beta]-silicon carbide protective coating and method for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.

    1994-11-01

    A polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide film or coating and method for forming same on components, such as the top of solar cells, to act as an extremely hard protective surface, and as an anti-reflective coating are disclosed. This is achieved by DC magnetron co-sputtering of amorphous silicon and carbon to form a SiC thin film onto a surface, such as a solar cell. The thin film is then irradiated by a pulsed energy source, such as an excimer laser, to synthesize the poly- or [mu]c-SiC film on the surface and produce [beta]-SiC. While the method of this invention has primary application in solar cell manufacturing, it has application wherever there is a requirement for an extremely hard surface. 3 figs.

  17. Study of Chromium-Frit-Type Coatings for High-Temperature Protection of Molybdenum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D G; Bolz, L H; Pitts, J W; Harrison, W N

    1951-01-01

    The achievement of more compact and efficient power plants for aircraft is dependent, among other factors, on the perfection of heat-resisting materials that are superior to those in current use. Molybdenum is one of the high-melting metals (melting point, 4750 F). It is fairly abundant and also can be worked into many of the shapes required in modern power plants. To permit its widespread use at elevated temperatures, however, some means must first be found to prevent its rapid oxidation. The application of a protective coating is one method that might be used to achieve this goal. In the present work, a number of chromium-frit-type coatings were studied. These were bonded to molybdenum specimens by firing in controlled atmospheres to temperatures in the range of 2400 to 2700 F.

  18. .beta.-silicon carbide protective coating and method for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.

    1994-01-01

    A polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide film or coating and method for forming same on components, such as the top of solar cells, to act as an extremely hard protective surface, and as an anti-reflective coating. This is achieved by DC magnetron co-sputtering of amorphous silicon and carbon to form a SiC thin film onto a surface, such as a solar cell. The thin film is then irradiated by a pulsed energy source, such as an excimer laser, to synthesize the poly- or .mu.c-SiC film on the surface and produce .beta.--SiC. While the method of this invention has primary application in solar cell manufacturing, it has application wherever there is a requirement for an extremely hard surface.

  19. Incorporation of Fe3O4/CNTs nanocomposite in an epoxy coating for corrosion protection of carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Gia Vu; Truc Trinh, Anh; To, Thi Xuan Hang; Duong Nguyen, Thuy; Trang Nguyen, Thu; Hoan Nguyen, Xuan

    2014-09-01

    In this study Fe3O4/CNTs composite with magnetic property was prepared by attaching magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by hydrothermal method. The obtained Fe3O4/CNTs composite was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, powder x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The Fe3O4/CNTs composite was then incorporated into an epoxy coating at concentration of 3 wt%. Corrosion protection of epoxy coating containing Fe3O4/CNTs composite was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and adhesion measurement. The impedance measurements show that Fe3O4/CNTs composite enhanced the corrosion protection of epoxy coating. The corrosion resistance of the carbon steel coated by epoxy coating containing Fe3O4/CNTs composite was significantly higher than that of carbon steel coated by clear epoxy coating and epoxy coating containing CNTs. FE-SEM photographs of fracture surface of coatings showed good dispersion of Fe3O4/CNTs composite in the epoxy matrix.

  20. Smart epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites for corrosion protection of Mg-Li alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Zhu, Yanhao; Li, Chao; Song, Dalei; Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Xinran; Yan, Yongde; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Jun; Shchukin, Dmitry G.

    2016-04-01

    The epoxy coatings containing MCM-22 and Ce-MCM-22 zeolites were prepared by coating method on the Mg-Li alloy surface. The influence of MCM-22 and Ce-MCM-22 zeolites on corrosion protection of the epoxy coating was studied. The epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites showed high corrosion resistance. Artificial defects in the epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites on the Mg-Li surface were produced by the needle punching. The results show that the epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites exhibits self-healing corrosion inhibition capabilities. It is ascribed to the fact that the Ce3+ ions are released from MCM-22 zeolites based on ion exchange of zeolite in the corrosion process of the Mg-Li alloy substrate. MCM-22 zeolites as reservoirs provided a prolonged release of cerium ions.

  1. A Study on Effects of Mechanical Stress and Cathodic Protection on Marine Coatings on Mild Steel in Artificial Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Qi; Zhang, Qi; Tu, San-Shan; Li, Yi-Min; Wang, You; Huang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the separate and combined effects of elastic stress and cathodic protection (CP) potential on barrier properties of two marine coating systems applied on Q235 steel plates in artificial seawater were investigated through measurements of electrochemical impedance spectra. The obtained results indicated that elastic stress could have a significant influence on coating barrier property, and the extent of this influence depends on both the magnitude and direction of elastic stress. Meanwhile, it was shown that the separate application of CP could also promote coating degradation, and for both coating systems, the more negative the applied CP potential, the more quickly and more seriously the coatings deteriorated. Furthermore, compared with the sample with only stress or CP, the results showed that the interaction between mechanical stress and CP could reduce their respective impact on coating barrier property, and the combined effect depends on the predominant factor.

  2. A Study on Effects of Mechanical Stress and Cathodic Protection on Marine Coatings on Mild Steel in Artificial Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Qi; Zhang, Qi; Tu, San-Shan; Li, Yi-Min; Wang, You; Huang, Yi

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the separate and combined effects of elastic stress and cathodic protection (CP) potential on barrier properties of two marine coating systems applied on Q235 steel plates in artificial seawater were investigated through measurements of electrochemical impedance spectra. The obtained results indicated that elastic stress could have a significant influence on coating barrier property, and the extent of this influence depends on both the magnitude and direction of elastic stress. Meanwhile, it was shown that the separate application of CP could also promote coating degradation, and for both coating systems, the more negative the applied CP potential, the more quickly and more seriously the coatings deteriorated. Furthermore, compared with the sample with only stress or CP, the results showed that the interaction between mechanical stress and CP could reduce their respective impact on coating barrier property, and the combined effect depends on the predominant factor.

  3. History of the Development of Liquid-Applied Coatings for Protection of Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph J.; Hansen, marlin H.

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem for structures at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). KSC is located on the coast of Florida in a highly corrosive atmosphere. Launch pads, highway bridge infrastructure, and buildings are strongly affected. To mitigate these problems, NASA initiated a development program for a Galvanic Liquid-Applied Coating System (GLACS). A breakthrough in this area would have great commercial value in transportation, marine and construction industry infrastructures. The patented NASA GLACS system has undergone considerable testing to meet the needs of commercialization. A moisture-cure coating gives excellent adhesion with ease of application compared to existing galvanic products on the market. The latest development, GalvaCori; can be sprayed or hand applied to almost any structure shape. A self-adhesive conductive tape system has been devised to simplify current collection within the coating areas. In testing programs, millivolt potential and milliamp output per square foot of anode have been closely studied at actual test sites. These two parameters are probably the most challenging items of a resin-based, room-temperature-applied, galvanic coating. Extensive re-formulation has resulted in a system that provides the needed polarization for catholic protection of reinforcing steel in concrete in a variety of structure environments. The rate of corrosion of rebar in concrete is greatly affected by the environment of the structure. In addition to this, for any given concrete structure; moisture level, carbonization, and chloride contamination influences the rate of rebar corrosion. Similarly, the cathodic protection level of galvanic systems is also dependent on the moisture level of the concrete. GalvaCorr is formulated to maintain galvanic activity as the moisture level of the structure declines. GalvaCorr is available as a three-part kit. The mixing step requires about ten minutes. The viscosity can be easily

  4. Amorphous alumina oxidation protective coatings for Zircaloy based on a compositional gradient layer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Tae

    Waterside corrosion of the Zircaloy cladding encasing the uranium oxide pellets is one of the primary factors limiting high "burn up" of nuclear fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). High "burn up" can significantly impact plant safety and economics. Amorphous aluminum oxide coatings with aluminum-based compositional gradient layers (CGLs) were fabricated to develop ceramic coating corrosion protection systems for Zircaloy. Aluminum films were deposited on Zircaloy substrates by electron-beam evaporation, and two-step heat treatments were performed at near the melting temperature of aluminum. Amorphous alumina coatings by rf magnetron sputtering were overcoated on the CGL structures. Morphological and compositional studies were completed using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE SEM), energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX), and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The AES depth profiles of the annealed coatings showed that gradient compositions of Al, Zr, and O were obtained. Glancing angle x-ray diffraction (GAXRD) analysis showed that a variety of intermetallic and oxide phases (such as Al3Zr, Al2Zr3, Al2O3, ZrO2 and Zr3O) were formed in the coatings during processing. The intermetallic layers improved the adhesion property of the alumina overcoating to Zircaloy substrate, and functioned as oxidation resistant layers. In spite of the successful construction of the compositional gradient layer system with a good adhesion and thermal stability, and the report about the stability of pure alumina and amorphous ceramics in hydrothermal conditions, the amorphous alumina coatings in our study were not stable under nuclear reactor conditions of subcritical water at 350°C and 20.1 MPa (3000 psi). We investigated the behavior of amorphous alumina thin films deposited on Zircaloy substrates in the near-supercritical water. When the coatings were exposed to the subcritical conditions, hydrothermally grown well-faceted crystallite formation was observed

  5. Protective coatings for materials in coal gasification plants. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development and use of protective coatings in coal gasification plants. The citations emphasize materials selection and problems associated with erosion and wear on internal surfaces. Refractory materials for corrosion and erosion protection, high temperature corrosion, and sulfidization corrosion are also included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Corrosion Protection Performance of Nano-SiO2/Epoxy Composite Coatings in Acidic Desulfurized Flue Gas Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Wang, Z. Y.; Hu, H. X.; Liu, C. B.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2016-09-01

    Five kinds of nano-SiO2/epoxy composite coatings were prepared on mild steels, and their corrosion protection performance was evaluated at room temperature (RT) and 50 °C (HT) using electrochemical methods combined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of preparation and sealing processes on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coatings were specially focused on. The results showed that it was favorable for the corrosion protection and durable performance to add the modified nano-SiO2 during rather than after the synthesis of epoxy coatings. Furthermore, the employment of sealer varnish also had beneficial effects. The two better coatings still exhibited higher impedance values even after immersion tests for up to 1000 h at RT and 500 h at HT. SEM revealed that the improvement of corrosion protection performance mainly resulted from the enhancement of coating density. Moreover, the evolution of electrochemical behavior of the two better coatings with immersion time was also discussed by means of fitting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results using equivalent circuits with different physical meanings.

  7. Corrosion Protection Performance of Nano-SiO2/Epoxy Composite Coatings in Acidic Desulfurized Flue Gas Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Wang, Z. Y.; Hu, H. X.; Liu, C. B.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2016-07-01

    Five kinds of nano-SiO2/epoxy composite coatings were prepared on mild steels, and their corrosion protection performance was evaluated at room temperature (RT) and 50 °C (HT) using electrochemical methods combined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of preparation and sealing processes on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coatings were specially focused on. The results showed that it was favorable for the corrosion protection and durable performance to add the modified nano-SiO2 during rather than after the synthesis of epoxy coatings. Furthermore, the employment of sealer varnish also had beneficial effects. The two better coatings still exhibited higher impedance values even after immersion tests for up to 1000 h at RT and 500 h at HT. SEM revealed that the improvement of corrosion protection performance mainly resulted from the enhancement of coating density. Moreover, the evolution of electrochemical behavior of the two better coatings with immersion time was also discussed by means of fitting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results using equivalent circuits with different physical meanings.

  8. Study on cerium-doped nano-TiO2 coatings for corrosion protection of 316 L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suning; Wang, Qian; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Zhihua; Wang, Ying; Fu, Jiajun

    2012-04-01

    Many methods have been reported on improving the photogenerated cathodic protection of nano-TiO2 coatings for metals. In this work, nano-TiO2 coatings doped with cerium nitrate have been developed by sol-gel method for corrosion protection of 316 L stainless steel. Surface morphology, structure, and properties of the prepared coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The corrosion protection performance of the prepared coatings was evaluated in 3 wt% NaCl solution by using electrochemical techniques in the presence and absence of simulated sunlight illumination. The results indicated that the 1.2% Ce-TiO2 coating with three layers exhibited an excellent photogenerated cathodic protection under illumination attributed to the higher separation efficiency of electron-hole pairs and higher photoelectric conversion efficiency. The results also showed that after doping with an appropriate concentration of cerium nitrate, the anti-corrosion performance of the TiO2 coating was improved even without irradiation due to the self-healing property of cerium ions.

  9. Mathematical models for cathodic protection of an underground pipeline with coating holidays. Part 2: Case studies of parallel anode cathodic protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Orazem, M.E.; Esteban, J.M.; Kennelley, K.J.; Degerstedt, R.M.

    1997-06-01

    A boundary element mathematical model was used to assess the influence of cathodic protection (CP) design parameters on performance of a parallel-ribbon sacrificial anode CP system for coated pipelines. The model accounted for current and potential distributions associated with discrete holidays on coated pipelines that expose bare steel to the environment. Case studies, based on the CP system were used to provide protection to the Trans-Alaska pipeline, were selected to show conditions under which a given CP system will and will not protect a pipe. In the cases studied, Mg ribbons provided adequate protection i n 50 k{Omega}-cm soil, but almost no additional protection was achieved by retrofitting Mg anodes to a CP system using Zn ribbons if the Zn ribbons remained connected to the pipe. The model also was used to show the lack of sensitivity of above ground on-potential surveys to localized corrosion on the buried pipe.

  10. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the emphasis in space research has been shifting from space exploration to commercialization of space. In order to utilize space for commercial purposes it is necessary to understand the low earth orbit (LEO) space environment where most of the activities will be carried out. The studies on the LEO environment are mainly focused towards understanding the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) on spacecraft materials. In the first few shuttle flights, materials looked frosty because they were actually being eroded and textured: AO reacts with organic materials on spacecraft exteriors, gradually damaging them. When a spacecraft travel in LEO (where crewed vehicles and the International Space Station fly), the AO formed from the residual atmosphere can react with the spacecraft surfaces, causing damage to the vehicle. Polymers are widely used in space vehicles and systems as structural materials, thermal blankets, thermal control coatings, conformal coatings, adhesives, lubricants, etc. Exposure of polymers and composites to the space environment may result in different detrimental effects via modification of their chemical, electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical properties as well as surface erosion. The major degradation effects in polymers are due to their exposure to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet and synergistic effects, which result in different damaging effects by modification of the polymer's chemical properties. In hydrocarbon containing polymers the main AO effect is the surface erosion via chemical reactions and the release of volatile reaction products associated with the mass loss. The application of a thin protective coating to the base materials is one of the most commonly used methods of preventing AO degradation. The purpose is to provide a barrier between base material and AO environment or, in some cases, to alter AO reactions to inhibit its diffusion. The effectiveness of a coating depends on its continuity, porosity, degree of

  11. Effects of weathering on performance of intumescent coatings for structure fire protection in the wildland-urban interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrani, Babak

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of weathering on the performance of intumescent fire-retardant coatings on wooden products. The weathering effects included primary (solar irradiation, moisture, and temperature) and secondary (environmental contaminants) parameters at various time intervals. Wildland urban interface (WUI) fires have been an increasing threat to lives and properties. Existing solutions to mitigate the damages caused by WUI fires include protecting the structures from ignition and minimizing the fire spread from one structure to another. These solutions can be divided into two general categories: active fire protection systems and passive fire protection systems. Passive systems are either using pre-applied wetting agents (water, gel, or foam) or adding an extra layer (composite wraps or coatings). Fire-retardant coating treatment methods can be divided into impregnated (penetrant) and intumescent categories. Intumescent coatings are easy to apply, economical, and have a better appearance in comparison to other passive fire protection methods, and are the main focus of this study. There have been limited studies conducted on the application of intumescent coatings on wooden structures and their performance after long-term weathering exposure. The main concerns of weathering effects are: 1) the reduction of ignition resistance of the coating layer after weathering; and 2) the fire properties of coatings after weathering since coatings might contribute as a combustible fuel and assist the fire growth after ignition. Three intumescent coatings were selected and exposed to natural weathering conditions in three different time intervals. Two types of tests were performed on the specimens: a combustibility test consisted of a bench-scale performance evaluation using a Cone Calorimeter, and a thermal decomposition test using Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) method (also known

  12. Arc-Sprayed Iron-Based Coatings for Erosion-Corrosion Protection of Boiler Tubes at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhmurskii, Vasyl; Student, Mykhailo; Gvozdeckii, Volodymyr; Stypnutskyy, Taras; Student, Oleksandra; Wielage, Bernhard; Pokhmurska, Hanna

    2013-06-01

    Wire arc spraying is an economically attractive thermal spray process that is especially interesting for the protection of large-scale parts or constructions. This study presents the results of the development and investigation of a number of cored wires based on the Fe-Cr-Al system with minor addition of alloying elements (B, Mn, Ni, Si, Ti, Mg, etc.). The microstructure of the coatings, their electrochemical behavior, and isothermal oxidation performance over a temperature range of 20-700 °C were investigated. Erosion resistance at elevated temperatures was determined with a laboratory test unit under test conditions that have simulated the work conditions in fossil-fuel-fired boilers. It was established that the oxidation resistance and the gas-abrasive wear resistance of arc-sprayed coatings depend mostly on the coating microstructure and homogeneity of element distribution rather than on the general alloying level and microhardness of the coating. A new parameter for coating characterization, namely, the coefficient of chemical microheterogeneity, K CMH, is introduced to quantify this influence. Formation of the coating microstructure at elevated temperatures and its influence on the protection ability of the coating are discussed.

  13. Vacuum-arc chromium-based coatings for protection of zirconium alloys from the high-temperature oxidation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuprin, A. S.; Belous, V. A.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Bryk, V. V.; Vasilenko, R. L.; Ovcharenko, V. D.; Reshetnyak, E. N.; Tolmachova, G. N.; V'yugov, P. N.

    2015-10-01

    Multilayer Cr-Zr/Cr/Cr-N coatings for protection of zirconium alloys from the high-temperature oxidation in air have been obtained by the vacuum-arc evaporation technique with application of filters for plasma cleaning from macroparticles. The effect of the coatings on the corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys at test temperatures between 660 and 1100 °C for 3600 s has been investigated. The thickness, structure, phase composition, mechanical properties of the coatings and oxide layers before and after oxidation tests were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and nanoindentation technique. It is shown that the hard multilayer coating effectively protects zirconium from the oxidation in air for 1 h at test temperatures. As a result of the oxidation in the coating the CrO and Cr2O3 oxides are formed which reduce the oxygen penetration through the coating. At maximum test temperature of 1100 °C the oxide layer thickness in the coating is about 5 μm. The tube shape remains unchanged independent of alloy type. It has been found that uncoated zirconium oxidizes rapidly throughout the temperature range under study. At 1100 °C a porous monoclinic ZrO2 oxide layer of ≥120 μm is formed that leads to the deformation of the samples, cracking and spalling of the oxide layer.

  14. The role of surface preparation in corrosion protection of copper with nanometer-thick ALD alumina coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhashemihaghighi, Shadi; Światowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Seyeux, Antoine; Klein, Lorena H.; Salmi, Emma; Ritala, Mikko; Marcus, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    Surface smoothening by substrate annealing was studied as a pre-treatment for improving the corrosion protection provided to copper by 10, 20 and 50 nm thick alumina coatings deposited by atomic layer deposition. The interplay between substrate surface state and deposited film thickness for controlling the corrosion protection provided by ultrathin barrier films is demonstrated. Pre-annealing at 750 °C heals out the dispersed surface heterogeneities left by electropolishing and reduces the surface roughness to less than 2 nm independently of the deposited film thickness. For 10 nm coatings, substrate surface smoothening promotes the corrosion resistance. However, for 20 and 50 nm coatings, it is detrimental to the corrosion protection due to local detachment of the deposited films. The weaker adherence of the thicker coatings is assigned to the stresses accumulated in the films with increasing deposited thickness. Healing out the local heterogeneities on the substrate surface diminishes the interfacial strength that is bearing the stresses of the deposited films, thereby increasing adhesion failure for the thicker films. Pitting corrosion occurs at the local sites of adhesion failure. Intergranular corrosion occurs at the initially well coated substrate grain boundaries because of the growth of a more defective and permeable coating at grain boundaries.

  15. The development of chemically vapor deposited mullite coatings for the corrosion protection of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M.; Hou, P.; Sengupta, A.; Basu, S.; Sarin, V.

    1998-05-01

    Crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance the corrosion and oxidation resistance of the substrate. Current research has been divided into three distinct areas: (1) Development of the deposition processing conditions for increased control over coating`s growth rate, microstructure, and morphology; (2) Analysis of the coating`s crystal structure and stability; (3) The corrosion resistance of the CVD mullite coating on SiC.

  16. Self-generated concentration and modulus gradient coating design to protect Si nano-wire electrodes during lithiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Yup; Ostadhossein, Alireza; van Duin, Adri C T; Xiao, Xingcheng; Gao, Huajian; Qi, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Surface coatings as artificial solid electrolyte interphases have been actively pursued as an effective way to improve the cycle efficiency of nanostructured Si electrodes for high energy density lithium ion batteries, where the mechanical stability of the surface coatings on Si is as critical as Si itself. However, the chemical composition and mechanical property change of coating materials during the lithiation and delithiation process imposed a grand challenge to design coating/Si nanostructure as an integrated electrode system. In our work, we first developed reactive force field (ReaxFF) parameters for Li-Si-Al-O materials to simulate the lithiation process of Si-core/Al2O3-shell and Si-core/SiO2-shell nanostructures. With reactive dynamics simulations, we were able to simultaneously track and correlate the lithiation rate, compositional change, mechanical property evolution, stress distributions, and fracture. A new mechanics model based on these varying properties was developed to determine how to stabilize the coating with a critical size ratio. Furthermore, we discovered that the self-accelerating Li diffusion in Al2O3 coating forms a well-defined Li concentration gradient, leading to an elastic modulus gradient, which effectively avoids local stress concentration and mitigates crack propagation. Based on these results, we propose a modulus gradient coating, softer outside, harder inside, as the most efficient coating to protect the Si electrode surface and improve its current efficiency.

  17. Self-generated concentration and modulus gradient coating design to protect Si nano-wire electrodes during lithiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Yup; Ostadhossein, Alireza; van Duin, Adri C T; Xiao, Xingcheng; Gao, Huajian; Qi, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Surface coatings as artificial solid electrolyte interphases have been actively pursued as an effective way to improve the cycle efficiency of nanostructured Si electrodes for high energy density lithium ion batteries, where the mechanical stability of the surface coatings on Si is as critical as Si itself. However, the chemical composition and mechanical property change of coating materials during the lithiation and delithiation process imposed a grand challenge to design coating/Si nanostructure as an integrated electrode system. In our work, we first developed reactive force field (ReaxFF) parameters for Li-Si-Al-O materials to simulate the lithiation process of Si-core/Al2O3-shell and Si-core/SiO2-shell nanostructures. With reactive dynamics simulations, we were able to simultaneously track and correlate the lithiation rate, compositional change, mechanical property evolution, stress distributions, and fracture. A new mechanics model based on these varying properties was developed to determine how to stabilize the coating with a critical size ratio. Furthermore, we discovered that the self-accelerating Li diffusion in Al2O3 coating forms a well-defined Li concentration gradient, leading to an elastic modulus gradient, which effectively avoids local stress concentration and mitigates crack propagation. Based on these results, we propose a modulus gradient coating, softer outside, harder inside, as the most efficient coating to protect the Si electrode surface and improve its current efficiency. PMID:26760786

  18. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Power Generation, Inc proposed a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  19. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2004-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land -based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems; a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization.

  20. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-04-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  1. ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2002-04-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  2. Synthesis and analysis of Mo-Si-B based coatings for high temperature oxidation protection of ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, Patrick J.

    The use of Ni-based superalloys in turbine engines has all but been exhausted, with operating temperatures nearing the melting point of these materials. The use of ceramics in turbine engines, particularly ceramic matrix composites such as SiC/C and SiC/SiC, is of interest due to their low density and attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The same materials are also in consideration for leading edges on hypersonic vehicles. However, SiC-based composites degrade in high temperature environments with low partial pressures of oxygen due to active oxidation, as well as high temperature environments containing water or sand. The need for a protective external coating for SiC-based composites in service is obvious. To date, no coating investigated for SiC/C or SiC/SiC has been proven to be resistant to oxidation and corrosion at intermediate and high temperatures, as well as in environments deficient in oxygen. The Mo-Si-B coating shows great promise in this area, having been proven resistant to attack from oxidation at extreme temperatures, from water vapor and from calcia-magnesia-aluminosilicate (CMAS). The adaptation of the Mo-Si-B coating for ceramic materials is presented in detail here. Evaluation of the coating under a range of oxidation conditions as well as simulated re-entry conditions confirms the efficacy of the Mo-Si-B based coating as protection from catastrophic failure. The key to the oxidation and corrosion resistance is a robust external aluminoborosilica glass layer that forms and flows quickly to cover the substrate, even under the extreme simulated re-entry conditions. Suppression of active oxidation of SiC, which may occur during atmospheric re-entry and hypersonic flight trajectories, has also been examined. In order to adapt the Mo-Si-B based coating to low partial pressures of oxygen and elevated temperatures, controlled amounts of Al were added to the Mo-Si-B based coating. The resulting coating decreased the inward

  3. Au/Cr Sputter Coating for the Protection of Alumina During Sliding at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoy, Patricia A.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    A sputter deposited bilayer coating of gold and chromium was investigated as a potential solid lubricant to protect alumina substrates in applications involving sliding at high temperature. The proposed lubricant was tested in a pin-on-disk tribometer with coated alumina disks sliding against uncoated alumina pins. Three test parameters; temperature, load, and sliding velocity were varied over a wide range in order to determine the performance envelope on the gold/chromium (Au/Cr) solid lubricant film. The tribo-tests were run in an air atmosphere at temperatures of 25 to 1000 C, under loads of 4.9 to 49.0 N and at sliding velocities from 1 to 15 m/sec. Post test analyses included surface profilometry, wear factor determination and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) examination of worn surfaces. Compared to unlubricated Al2O3 sliding, the use of the Au/Cr film reduced friction by 30 to 50 percent and wear by one to two orders of magnitude. Increases in test temperature resulted in lower friction and the Au/Cr film continued to provide low friction, about 0.3, even at 1000 C. Pin wear factors and friction were largely unaffected by increasing loads up to 29.4 N. Sliding velocity had essentially no effect on friction, however, increased velocity reduced coating life (total sliding distance). Based upon these research results, the Au/Cr film is a promising lubricant for moderately loaded, low speed applications operating at temperatures as high as 1000 C.

  4. A simple composite protective layer coating that enhances the cycling stability of lithium metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hongkyung; Lee, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun-Jung; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-06-01

    Metallic lithium is the most promising negative electrode for high-energy rechargeable batteries due to its extremely high specific capacity and its extremely low redox potential. However, the low cycle efficiency and lithium dendrite formation during the charge/discharge processes consistently hinder its practical application. In this report, we present a stabilized Li electrode on which a Li+ ion conductive inorganic/organic composite protective layer (CPL) is coated. With the introduction of the CPL, the Li dendrite growth and electrolyte decomposition are effectively suppressed; consequently, stable Li plating/stripping at high current densities up to 10 mA cm-2 is possible. Nanoindentation tests demonstrate that the shear modulus of the CPL at narrow indentations is 1.8 times higher than that of the Li metal, which provides a theoretical understanding for its efficacy. Moreover, the LiCoO2/Li cell incorporating CPL exhibits excellent cycling stability up to 400 cycles at 1 mA cm-2 (1 C-rate), which demonstrates practical applicability in Li ion batteries through replacing the graphite anode with a CPL-coated Li metal anode.

  5. The corrosion protection of AA2024-T3 aluminium alloy by leaching of lithium-containing salts from organic coatings.

    PubMed

    Visser, Peter; Liu, Yanwen; Zhou, Xiaorong; Hashimoto, Teruo; Thompson, George E; Lyon, Stuart B; van der Ven, Leendert G J; Mol, Arjan J M C; Terryn, Herman A

    2015-01-01

    Lithium carbonate and lithium oxalate were incorporated as leachable corrosion inhibitors in model organic coatings for the protection of AA2024-T3. The coated samples were artificially damaged with a scribe. It was found that the lithium-salts are able to leach from the organic coating and form a protective layer in the scribe on AA2024-T3 under neutral salt spray conditions. The present paper shows the first observation and analysis of these corrosion protective layers, generated from lithium-salt loaded organic coatings. The scribed areas were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy before and after neutral salt spray exposure (ASTM-B117). The protective layers typically consist of three different layered regions, including a relatively dense layer near the alloy substrate, a porous middle layer and a flake-shaped outer layer, with lithium uniformly distributed throughout all three layers. Scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry surface roughness measurements demonstrate that the formation of the layer occurs rapidly and, therefore provides an effective inhibition mechanism. Based on the observation of this work, a mechanism is proposed for the formation of these protective layers. PMID:25927079

  6. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Coatings Systems Literature Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Whitten, Mary; Perisich, Steven; Trejo, David

    2009-01-01

    When space vehicles are launched, extreme heat, exhaust, and chemicals are produced and these form a very aggressive exposure environment at the launch complex. The facilities in the launch complex are exposed to this aggressive environment. The vehicle exhaust directly impacts the flame deflectors, making these systems very susceptible to high wear and potential failure. A project was formulated to develop or identify new materials or systems such that the wear and/or damage to the flame deflector system, as a result of the severe environmental exposure conditions during launches, can be mitigated. This report provides a survey of potential protective coatings for the refractory concrete lining on the steel base structure on the flame deflectors at Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

  7. Impermeable barrier films and protective coatings based on reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Kravets, V. G.; Wong, S. L.; Waters, J.; Geim, A. K.; Nair, R. R.

    2014-09-01

    Flexible barrier films preventing permeation of gases and moistures are important for many industries ranging from food to medical and from chemical to electronic. From this perspective, graphene has recently attracted particular interest because its defect-free monolayers are impermeable to all atoms and molecules. However, it has been proved to be challenging to develop large-area defectless graphene films suitable for industrial use. Here we report barrier properties of multilayer graphitic films made by gentle chemical reduction of graphene oxide laminates with hydroiodic and ascorbic acids. They are found to be highly impermeable to all gases, liquids and aggressive chemicals including, for example, hydrofluoric acid. The exceptional barrier properties are attributed to a high degree of graphitization of the laminates and little structural damage during reduction. This work indicates a close prospect of graphene-based flexible and inert barriers and protective coatings, which can be of interest for numerous applications.

  8. Diamond Composite Films for Protective Coatings on Metals and Method of Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Composite films consisting of diamond crystallites and hard amorphous films such as diamond-like carbon, titanium nitride, and titanium oxide are provided as protective coatings for metal substrates against extremely harsh environments. A composite layer having diamond crystallites and a hard amorphous film is affixed to a metal substrate via an interlayer including a bottom metal silicide film and a top silicon carbide film. The interlayer is formed either by depositing metal silicide and silicon carbide directly onto the metal substrate, or by first depositing an amorphous silicon film, then allowing top and bottom portions of the amorphous silicon to react during deposition of the diamond crystallites, to yield the desired interlayer structure.

  9. Protective coating and hyperthermal atomic oxygen texturing of optical fibers used for blood glucose monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of producing cones and pillars on polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) optical fibers for glucose monitoring. The method, in one embodiment, consists of using electron beam evaporation to deposit a non-contiguous thin film of aluminum on the distal ends of the PMMA fibers. The partial coverage of aluminum on the fibers is randomly, but rather uniformly distributed across the end of the optical fibers. After the aluminum deposition, the ends of the fibers are then exposed to hyperthermal atomic oxygen, which oxidizes the areas that are not protected by aluminum. The resulting PMMA fibers have a greatly increased surface area and the cones or pillars are sufficiently close together that the cellular components in blood are excluded from passing into the valleys between the cones and pillars. The optical fibers are then coated with appropriated surface chemistry so that they can optically sense the glucose level in the blood sample than that with conventional glucose monitoring.

  10. Morphology, mechanical stability, and protective properties of ultrathin gallium oxide coatings.

    PubMed

    Lawrenz, Frank; Lange, Philipp; Severin, Nikolai; Rabe, Jürgen P; Helm, Christiane A; Block, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Ultrathin gallium oxide layers with a thickness of 2.8 ± 0.2 nm were transferred from the surface of liquid gallium onto solid substrates, including conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). The gallium oxide exhibits high mechanical stability, withstanding normal pressures of up to 1 GPa in contact mode scanning force microscopy imaging. Moreover, it lowers the rate of photodegradation of P3HT by 4 orders of magnitude, as compared to uncovered P3HT. This allows us to estimate the upper limits for oxygen and water vapor transmission rates of 0.08 cm(3) m(-2) day(-1) and 0.06 mg m(-2) day(-1), respectively. Hence, similar to other highly functional coatings such as graphene, ultrathin gallium oxide layers can be regarded as promising candidates for protective layers in flexible organic (opto-)electronics and photovoltaics because they offer permeation barrier functionalities in conjunction with high optical transparency.

  11. Repair of oxidation protection coatings on carbon-carbon using preceramic polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, Stuart T.; Graef, Renee C.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a field-applicable technique for the repair of damage to SiC protective coatings on carbon/carbon composites, using commercial preceramic polymers, such as perhydropolysilazane developed by the Southwest Research Institute and several commercial polymers (NICALON, PS110, PS116, PS117, NCP-200, and PHPS were tested). After being applied on the damaged panel and oxidized at 1400 C, these polymers form either SiC or Si3N4 (or a mixture of both). It was found that impact damaged carbon/carbon specimens repaired with perhydropolysilazane exhibit substantial oxidation resistance. Many of the other tested preceramic polymer were found to be unsuitable for the purpose of repair due to either low ceramic yield, foaming, or intumescence.

  12. Aluminide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Jr; Charles, H; Shin, Yongsoon; Samuels, William D

    2009-08-18

    Disclosed herein are aluminide coatings. In one embodiment coatings are used as a barrier coating to protect a metal substrate, such as a steel or a superalloy, from various chemical environments, including oxidizing, reducing and/or sulfidizing conditions. In addition, the disclosed coatings can be used, for example, to prevent the substantial diffusion of various elements, such as chromium, at elevated service temperatures. Related methods for preparing protective coatings on metal substrates are also described.

  13. Ag/SiO(x)C(y) plasma polymer coating for antimicrobial protection of fracture fixation devices.

    PubMed

    Khalilpour, Poroshat; Lampe, Kai; Wagener, Michael; Stigler, Brigitte; Heiss, Christian; Ullrich, Matthias S; Domann, Eugen; Schnettler, Reinhard; Alt, Volker

    2010-07-01

    Implant-related infections are often devastating situations in orthopaedic trauma surgery particularly if multiresistant bacteria are involved. Protection of the implant surface by an antimicrobial coating exhibiting activity against multiresistant bacterial strains is of high interest. Aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of an Ag/SiO(x)C(y) plasma polymer coating for fracture fixation devices, such as nails, plates, and external fixators, including tests against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and its biocompatibility. The antimicrobial activity of the coating deposited onto 12 x 3 mm(2) stainless steel implants was tested in vitro against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and MRSA using different testing methods (ASTM E-2810, JIS Z 2801, proliferation assay). Additionally, the coated devices were implanted into the paravertebral muscle of rabbits and explanted after 2, 7, 14, and 28 days to test the remaining ex vivo antimicrobial activity. For biocompatibility assessment the Ag/SiO(x)C(y) plasma polymer coating was tested in vitro according to ISO 10993-5. The Ag/SiO(x)C(y) coating exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity against all tested bacterial strains in all three in vitro tests. Ex vivo testing proved suppression of more than 99.9 % of bacterial proliferation by the coating compared to non-coated samples even after 28 days. ISO 10993-5 showed good biocompatibility of the coating without any indications of cytotoxic effects. In summary, Ag/SiO(x)C(y) plasma polymer coating showed excellent antimicrobial activity including effectiveness against MRSA and good in vitro biocompatibility. Therefore, it possesses high potential as a prophylactic agent in orthopaedic trauma surgery.

  14. Enhancing the Lifetime of Welded Joints Using the Protective Coating and Causes the Formation of Defects in Them*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezborodov, V. P.; Saraev, Yu N.

    2016-08-01

    The paper shows the efficacy of eutectic Nickel coatings for protecting welded joints of steels against corrosion. It increases with increasing content of the eutectic and chemical compounds at the grain boundaries γ-solid solution based on Nickel. Refinement of the structure of the coatings and reduce their heterogeneity allows to increase the protective properties and durability of welded joints against corrosion. It is established that the probability of formation of cracks in the coatings increases with their thickness, intensity of heating and cooling after reflow, and also with increasing content of the eutectic and chemical compounds at the grain boundaries γ-solid solution based on Nickel. Shown to prevent the formation of cracks in the coatings when they are melt you can use optimal modes of heating and cooling of the composition. Modification of the structure of the coatings by grinding them and reducing heterogeneity allows to improve the resistance to crack formation and protective properties of welded joints against corrosion.

  15. Effects of alpha-zirconium phosphate on thermal degradation and flame retardancy of transparent intumescent fire protective coating

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Weiyi; Zhang, Ping; Song, Lei; Wang, Xin; Hu, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A transparent intumescent fire protective coating was obtained by UV-cured technology. • OZrP could enhance the thermal stability and anti-oxidation of the coating. • OZrP could reduce the combustion properties of the coatings. - Abstract: Organophilic alpha-zirconium phosphate (OZrP) was used to improve the thermal and fire retardant behaviors of the phenyl di(acryloyloxyethyl)phosphate (PDHA)-triglycidyl isocyanurate acrylate (TGICA)-2-phenoxyethyl acrylate (PHEA) (PDHA-TGICA-PHEA) coating. The morphology of nanocomposite coating was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of OZrP on the flame retardancy, thermal stability, fireproofing time and char formation of the coatings was investigated by microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) and scanning electric microscope (SEM). The results showed that by adding OZrP, the peak heat release rate and total heat of combustion were significantly reduced. The highest improvement was achieved with 0.5 wt% OZrP. XPS analysis indicated that the performance of anti-oxidation of the coating was improved with the addition of OZrP, and SEM images showed that a good synergistic effect was obtained through a ceramic-like layer produced by OZrP covered on the surface of char.

  16. Ion beam sputter-deposited thin film coatings for protection of spacecraft polymers in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Rutledge, S. K.; Swec, D. M.; Nahra, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposited thin films at Al2O3, SiO2, and a codeposited mixture of predominantly SiO2 with small amounts of fluoropolymer were evaluated both in laboratory plasma ashing tests and in space on board Shuttle flight STS-8 for effectiveness in preventing oxidation of polyimide Kapton. Measurements of mass loss and optical performance of coated and uncoated polyimide samples exposed to the low earth orbital environment are presented. Optical techniques were used to measure loss rates of protective films exposed to atomic oxygen. Results of the analysis of the space flight exposed samples indicate that thin film metal oxide coatings are very effective in protecting the polyimide. Metal oxide coatings with a small amount of fluoropolymer codeposited have the additional benefit of great flexibility.

  17. Ion beam sputter-deposited thin film coatings for protection of spacecraft polymers in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Rutledge, S. K.; Swec, D. M.; Nahra, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposited thin films of Al2O3, SiO2, and a codeposited mixture of predominantly SiO2 with small amounts of a fluoropolymer were evaluated both in laboratory plasma ashing tests and in space on board shuttle flight STS-8 for effectiveness in preventing oxidation of polyimide Kapton. Measurements of mass loss and optical performance of coated and uncoated polyimide samples exposed to the low Earth orbital environment are presented. Optical techniques were used to measure loss rates of protective films exposed to atomic oxygen. Results of the analysis of the space flight exposed samples indicate that thin film metal oxide coatings are very effective in protecting the polyimide. Metal oxide coatings with a small amount of fluoropolymer codeposited have the additional benefit of great flexibility.

  18. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED)...

  19. Enteric coated spheres produced by extrusion/spheronization provide effective gastric protection and efficient release of live therapeutic bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Barros, João M S; Lechner, Tabea; Charalampopoulos, Dimitrios; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Edwards, Alexander D

    2015-09-30

    We present a novel but simple enteric coated sphere formulation containing probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus casei). Oral delivery of live bacterial cells (LBC) requires live cells to survive firstly manufacturing processes and secondly GI microbicidal defenses including gastric acid. We incorporated live L. casei directly in the granulation liquid, followed by granulation, extrusion, spheronization, drying and spray coating to produce dried live probiotic spheres. A blend of MCC, calcium-crosslinked alginate, and lactose was developed that gave improved live cell survival during manufacturing, and gave excellent protection from gastric acid plus rapid release in intestinal conditions. No significant loss of viability was observed in all steps except drying, which resulted in approximately 1 log loss of viable cells. Eudragit coating was used to protect dried live cells from acid, and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was combined with sodium alginate to achieve efficient sphere disintegration leading to rapid and complete bacterial cell release in intestinal conditions. Viability and release of L. casei was evaluated in vitro in simulated GI conditions. Uncoated spheres gave partial acid protection, but enteric coated spheres effectively protected dried probiotic LBC from acid for 2h, and subsequently released all viable cells within 1h of transfer into simulated intestinal fluid.

  20. Protective coatings of hafnium dioxide by atomic layer deposition for microelectromechanical systems applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdova, Maria; Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Tallarida, Grazia; Cianci, Elena; Lamagna, Luca; Losa, Stefano; Rossini, Silvia; Somaschini, Roberto; Gioveni, Salvatore; Fanciulli, Marco; Franssila, Sami

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the investigation of HfO2 deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from either HfD-CO4 or TEMAHf and ozone for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications, in particular, for environmental protection of aluminum micromirrors. This work shows that HfO2 films successfully protect aluminum in moist environment and at the same time retain good reflectance properties of underlying material. In our experimental work, the chemical composition, crystal structure, electronic density and roughness of HfO2 films remained the same after one week of humidity treatment (relative humidity of 85%, 85 °C). The reflectance properties underwent only minor changes. The observed shift in reflectance was only from 80-90% to 76-85% in 400-800 nm spectral range when coated with ALD HfO2 films grown with Hf(NMeEt)4 and no shift (remained in the range of 68-83%) for films grown from (CpMe)2Hf(OMe)Me.

  1. Design of Inorganic Water Repellent Coatings for Thermal Protection Insulation on an Aerospace Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, D. W.; Ravikumar, R.

    1997-01-01

    In this report, thin film deposition of one of the model candidate materials for use as water repellent coating on the thermal protection systems (TPS) of an aerospace vehicle was investigated. The material tested was boron nitride (BN), the water-repellent properties of which was detailed in our other investigation. Two different methods, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD), were used to prepare the BN films on a fused quartz substrate (one of the components of thermal protection systems on aerospace vehicles). The deposited films were characterized by a variety of techniques including X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The BN films were observed to be amorphous in nature, and a CVD-deposited film yielded a contact angle of 60 degrees with water, similar to the pellet BN samples investigated previously. This demonstrates that it is possible to use the bulk sample wetting properties as a guideline to determine the candidate waterproofing material for the TPS.

  2. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the emphasis in space research has been shifting from space exploration to commercialization of space. In order to utilize space for commercial purposes it is necessary to understand the low earth orbit (LEO) space environment where most of the activities will be carried out. The studies on the LEO environment are mainly focused towards understanding the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) on spacecraft materials. In the first few shuttle flights, materials looked frosty because they were actually being eroded and textured: AO reacts with organic materials on spacecraft exteriors, gradually damaging them. When a spacecraft travel in LEO (where crewed vehicles and the International Space Station fly), the AO formed from the residual atmosphere can react with the spacecraft surfaces, causing damage to the vehicle. Polymers are widely used in space vehicles and systems as structural materials, thermal blankets, thermal control coatings, conformal coatings, adhesives, lubricants, etc. Exposure of polymers and composites to the space environment may result in different detrimental effects via modification of their chemical, electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical properties as well as surface erosion. The major degradation effects in polymers are due to their exposure to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet and synergistic effects, which result in different damaging effects by modification of the polymer's chemical properties. In hydrocarbon containing polymers the main AO effect is the surface erosion via chemical reactions and the release of volatile reaction products associated with the mass loss. The application of a thin protective coating to the base materials is one of the most commonly used methods of preventing AO degradation. The purpose is to provide a barrier between base material and AO environment or, in some cases, to alter AO reactions to inhibit its diffusion. The effectiveness of a coating depends on its continuity, porosity, degree of

  3. Development of a Mo-Si-B coating for Nb-based Alloys and the Effects of Zr Additions to Mo-Si-B Coatings for Enhanced Oxidation Protection in Ultra-High Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu-Steffes, Otto John

    Higher efficiencies and reduced emissions performance of fossil fuel energy systems are achieved with increasing operation temperatures. This increase in operating temperature requires the use of materials with higher melting points such as refractory metal alloys. However, refractory metals suffer from catastrophic oxidation in this type of environment. Thus, oxidation protection for refractory metal alloys is a crucial step in developing next generation ultra-high temperature materials. To meet this challenge, an oxidation resistant coating for Nb based alloys has been designed as well as the incorporation of zirconium into the Mo-Si-B coating to provide further corrosion protection and a reduction in temperature for the underlying multi-layered structure. Niobium samples coated with a Mo-Si-B coating demonstrate enhanced oxidation protection compared to samples only coated with Si-B. Thermogravimetric analysis testing at 1300°C for 24 hours for both the Mo-Si-B coated Nb and Nb-based alloys show enhanced oxidation protection with mass changes of 0.44 mg/cm2 and 0.55 mg/cm2, respectively, compared to the uncoated alloy that had a mass change of 87.6 mg/cm2. To demonstrate the design concept for a coating with thermal barrier behavior, Zr is added to the Mo-Si-B coating through the pack cementation technique. The resulting coating shows that the Zr reacts with the aluminosilica top layer to form Zr silicides and ZrO2. Upon oxidation, the coating forms a mixed top layer composed of borosilica, ZrO2 and ZrSiO 4. Oxidation testing of the Zr modified Mo-Si-B coating exhibits low mass change indicating that the coating provides oxidation protection and that the Zr additions do not interfere with the oxidation protection of the Mo-Si-B coating. Finite element modeling using object oriented finite element analysis of the coating structures yielded an evaluation of the mechanical and thermal properties of the coatings, providing insight into the thermal performance and

  4. The Prospect of Y2SiO5-Based Materials as Protective Layer in Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, E.; Miranzo, P.; Osendi, M. I.

    2013-06-01

    Bulk yttrium monosilicate (Y2SiO5) possesses interesting properties, such as low thermal expansion coefficient and stability in water vapor atmospheres, which make it a promising protective layer for SiC-based composites, intended for the hottest parts in the future gas turbines. Because protective layers are commonly applied by thermal spraying techniques, it is important to analyze the changes in structure and properties that these methods may produce in yttrium silicate coatings. In this work, two SiO2-Y2O3 compositions were flame sprayed in the form of coatings and beads. In parallel, the beads were spark plasma sintered at relatively low temperature to obtain partially amorphous bulk specimens that are used as model bulk material. The thermal aging—air and water vapor atmosphere—caused extensive nucleation of Y2SiO5 and Y2Si2O7 in both the bulk and coating. The rich water vapor condition caused the selective volatilization of SiO2 from Y2Si2O7 at the specimen surface leaving a very characteristic micro-ridged Y2SiO5 zones—either in coatings or sintered bodies. An important increase in the thermal conductivity of the aged materials was measured. The results of this work may be used as a reference body for the production of Y2SiO5 coatings using thermal spraying techniques.

  5. Characterization of a water-dispersible metal protective coating with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, modulated differential scanning calorimetry, and ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Boyatzis, Stamatis C; Douvas, Antonios M; Argyropoulos, Vassilike; Siatou, Amalia; Vlachopoulou, Marilena

    2012-05-01

    An ethylene-methacrylic acid copolymer, formulated by BASF as a waterborne suspension of its alkylammonium salt and used, among other applications, in art conservation as a temporary protective coating was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy aided by modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) and ellipsometry. The thermal conversion of thin copolymer films from the freshly applied state, where carboxylic acid and carboxylate ion functional groups co-exist, to a purely acidic working state was spectroscopically followed. Transmission mid-infrared data of the working state showed a 1 : 12 ratio of methacrylic acid towards ethylene units. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) in the same state was found at 45 °C. Copolymer films spin-coated on mechanically polished bronze and iron coupons were characterized with transflection infrared spectroscopy and compared to corresponding transmission mid-infrared spectra of copolymer films spin-coated on silicon wafers. In the case of bronze coupons, evidence for interaction of the carboxylate ion with the copper substrate was obtained. The chemical structure and the thermal behavior of the coating, as well as some implications on its protective capability towards iron and copper alloys, is discussed as this material has received considerable attention in the field of metal conservation and coatings.

  6. Development and evaluation of two PVD-coated β-titanium orthodontic archwires for fluoride-induced corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vinod; Krishnan, Anand; Remya, R; Ravikumar, K K; Nair, S Asha; Shibli, S M A; Varma, H K; Sukumaran, K; Kumar, K Jyothindra

    2011-04-01

    The present research was aimed at developing surface coatings on β titanium orthodontic archwires capable of protection against fluoride-induced corrosion. Cathodic arc physical vapor deposition PVD (CA-PVD) and magnetron sputtering were utilized to deposit thin films of titanium aluminium nitride (TiAlN) and tungsten carbide/carbon (WC/C) coatings on β titanium orthodontic archwires. Uncoated and coated specimens were immersed in a high fluoride ion concentration mouth rinse, following a specially designed cycle simulating daily use. All specimens thus obtained were subjected to critical evaluation of parameters such as electrochemical corrosion behaviour, surface analysis, mechanical testing, microstructure, element release, and toxicology. The results confirm previous research that β titanium archwires undergo a degradation process when in contact with fluoride mouth rinses. The study confirmed the superior nature of the TiAlN coating, evident as many fewer changes in properties after fluoride treatment when compared with the WC/C coating. Thus, coating with TiAlN is recommended in order to reduce the corrosive effects of fluorides on β titanium orthodontic archwires. PMID:21111072

  7. A Robust Epoxy Resins @ Stearic Acid-Mg(OH)2 Micronanosheet Superhydrophobic Omnipotent Protective Coating for Real-Life Applications.

    PubMed

    Si, Yifan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2016-06-29

    Superhydrophobic coating has extremely high application value and practicability. However, some difficult problems such as weak mechanical strength, the need for expensive toxic reagents, and a complex preparation process are all hard to avoid, and these problems have impeded the superhydrophobic coating's real-life application for a long time. Here, we demonstrate one kind of omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating via a simple antideposition route and one-step superhydrophobization process. The whole preparation process is facile, and expensive toxic reagents needed. This omnipotent coating can be applied on any solid substrate with great waterproof ability, excellent mechanical stability, and chemical durability, which can be stored in a realistic environment for more than 1 month. More significantly, this superhydrophobic coating also has four protective abilities, antifouling, anticorrosion, anti-icing, and flame-retardancy, to cope with a variety of possible extreme natural environments. Therefore, this omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating not only satisfies real-life need but also has great application potential in many respects.

  8. Measuring the thickness of protective coatings on historic metal objects using nanosecond and femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouli, P.; Melessanaki, K.; Giakoumaki, A.; Argyropoulos, V.; Anglos, D.

    2005-08-01

    Depth profile analysis by means of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was investigated with respect to its potential to measure the thickness of different types of thin organic films used as protective coatings on historical and archaeological metal objects. For the materials examined, acrylic varnish and microcrystalline wax, the output from a nanosecond ArF excimer laser at 193 nm was found appropriate for performing a reliable profiling of the coating films leading to accurate determination of the coating thickness on the basis of the number of laser pulses required to penetrate the coating and on the ablation etch rate of the corresponding coating material under the same irradiation conditions. Nanosecond pulses at 248 nm proved inadequate to profile the coatings because of their weak absorption at the laser wavelength. In contrast, femtosecond irradiation at 248 nm yielded well-resolved profiles as a result of efficient ablation achieved through the increased non-linear absorption induced by the high power density of the ultrashort pulses.

  9. A Robust Epoxy Resins @ Stearic Acid-Mg(OH)2 Micronanosheet Superhydrophobic Omnipotent Protective Coating for Real-Life Applications.

    PubMed

    Si, Yifan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2016-06-29

    Superhydrophobic coating has extremely high application value and practicability. However, some difficult problems such as weak mechanical strength, the need for expensive toxic reagents, and a complex preparation process are all hard to avoid, and these problems have impeded the superhydrophobic coating's real-life application for a long time. Here, we demonstrate one kind of omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating via a simple antideposition route and one-step superhydrophobization process. The whole preparation process is facile, and expensive toxic reagents needed. This omnipotent coating can be applied on any solid substrate with great waterproof ability, excellent mechanical stability, and chemical durability, which can be stored in a realistic environment for more than 1 month. More significantly, this superhydrophobic coating also has four protective abilities, antifouling, anticorrosion, anti-icing, and flame-retardancy, to cope with a variety of possible extreme natural environments. Therefore, this omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating not only satisfies real-life need but also has great application potential in many respects. PMID:27265834

  10. Enhanced protective properties of epoxy/polyaniline-camphorsulfonate nanocomposite coating on an ultrafine-grained metallic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour-Ali, Sadegh; Kiani-Rashid, Alireza; Babakhani, Abolfazl; Davoodi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    An ultrafine-grained surface layer on mild steel substrate with average grain size of 77 nm was produced through wire brushing process. Surface grain size was determined through transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. This substrate was coated with epoxy and an in situ synthesized epoxy/polyaniline-camphorsulfonate (epoxy/PANI-CSA) nanocomposite. The corrosion behavior was studied by open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization and impedance measurements. Results of electrochemical tests evidenced the enhanced protective properties of epoxy/PANI-CSA coating on the substrate with ultrafine-grained surface.

  11. Enhanced Erosion Protection of TWAS Coated Ti6Al4V Alloy Using Boride Bond Coat and Subsequent Laser Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.; Arya, Vivek; Pant, B. K.

    2011-08-01

    The material commonly used in low-pressure high-rating super critical/ultra super critical steam turbines as well as guide and moving blades of high speed aero compressors is Ti6Al4V alloy. These blades are severely affected owing to erosion which leads to drop in efficiency and increase in maintenance cost. This article deals with SHS 7170 coating on Ti6Al4V alloy using twin wire arc spraying (TWAS), enhancing its bonding by providing a thin bond coat and then treating with high-power diode laser (HPDL). Significant improvement in erosion resistance of this multilayer coating has been achieved because of the formation of fine-grained micro structure due to rapid heating and cooling rates associated with the laser surface treatment. After laser surface treatment, the fracture toughness of this multilayer has improved manifold. The water droplet and particulate erosion test results along with the damage mechanism are reported and discussed in this article.

  12. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The main objective of this research project is the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Mullite will be employed as the inner (base) layer and the composition of the film will be continuously changed to a layer of pure alumina, which will function as the actual protective coating of the component. Chemical vapor deposition reactions of silica, alumina, and aluminosilicates (mullite) through hydrolysis of aluminum and silicon chlorides in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} will be employed to deposit compositionally graded films of mullite and alumina. Our studies will include the kinetic investigation of the silica, alumina, and aluminosilicate deposition processes, characterization of the composition, microstructure, surface morphology, and mechanical behavior of the prepared films, and modeling of the various deposition processes. During this six-month reporting period, we continued the work on the development and construction of the thermogravimetric chemical vapor deposition system that we intend to employ for studying the deposition of alumina, silica, and aluminosilicates (such as mullite) from mixtures of metal chlorides in H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Specifically, we worked on the development of the tubular flow reactor that will be used for producing aluminum chloride for delivery to the chemical vapor deposition system and of the vapor and gas supply system. Various problems arising from condensation of aluminum chlorides in some sections of the supply line were resolved, and we expect to perform experiments using mixtures containing AlCl{sub 3} in the next reporting period. Preliminary experiments on the

  13. Investigation of some transparent metal oxides as damp heat protective coating for CIGS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pern, F. J.; Yan, F.; Zaunbrecher, K.; To, B.; Perkins, J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the protective effectiveness of some transparent metal oxides (TMO) on CIGS solar cell coupons against damp heat (DH) exposure at 85°C and 85% relative humidity (RH). Sputter-deposited bilayer ZnO (BZO) with up to 0.5- μm Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer and 0.2-μm bilayer InZnO were used as "inherent" part of device structure on CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG. Sputter-deposited 0.2-μm ZnSnO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) 0.1-μm Al2O3 were used as overcoat on typical BZO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG solar cells. The results were all negative - all TMO-coated CIGS cells exhibited substantial degradation in DH. Combining the optical photographs, PL and EL imaging, SEM surface micromorphology, coupled with XRD, I-V and QE measurements, the causes of the device degradations are attributed to hydrolytic corrosion, flaking, micro-cracking, and delamination induced by the DH moisture. Mechanical stress and decrease in crystallinity (grain size effect) could be additional degrading factors for thicker AZO grown on CdS/CIGS.

  14. Investigation of Some Transparent Metal Oxides as Damp Heat Protective Coating for CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Yan, F.; Zaaunbrecher, B.; To, B.; Perkins, J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the protective effectiveness of some transparent metal oxides (TMO) on CIGS solar cell coupons against damp heat (DH) exposure at 85oC and 85% relative humidity (RH). Sputter-deposited bilayer ZnO (BZO) with up to 0.5-um Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer and 0.2-um bilayer InZnO were used as 'inherent' part of device structure on CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG. Sputter-deposited 0.2-um ZnSnO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) 0.1-um Al2O3 were used as overcoat on typical BZO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG solar cells. The results were all negative -- all TMO-coated CIGS cells exhibited substantial degradation in DH. Combining the optical photographs, PL and EL imaging, SEM surface micro-morphology, coupled with XRD, I-V and QE measurements, the causes of the device degradations are attributed to hydrolytic corrosion, flaking, micro-cracking, and delamination induced by the DH moisture. Mechanical stress and decrease in crystallinity (grain size effect) could be additional degrading factors for thicker AZO grown on CdS/CIGS.

  15. A collagenous protective coat enables Metarhizium anisopliae to evade insect immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengshu; St. Leger, Raymond J.

    2006-01-01

    The ubiquitous fungal pathogen Metarhizium anisopliae kills a wide range of insects. Host hemocytes can recognize and ingest its conidia, but this capacity is lost on production of hyphal bodies. We show that the unusual ability of hyphal bodies to avoid detection depends on a gene (Mcl1) that is expressed within 20 min of the pathogen contacting hemolymph. A mutant disrupted in Mcl1 is rapidly attacked by hemocytes and shows a corresponding reduction of virulence to Manduca sexta. Mcl1 encodes a three domain protein comprising a hydrophilic, negatively charged N-terminal region with 14 cysteine residues, a central region comprising tandem repeats (GXY) characteristic of collagenous domains, and a C-terminal region that includes a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-dependent cell wall attachment site. Immunofluorescence assay showed that hyphal bodies are covered by the N-terminal domains of MCL1. The collagen domain became antibody accessible after treatment with DTT, suggesting that the N termini are linked by interchain disulfide bonds and are presented on the cell surface by extended collagenous fibers. Studies with staining reagents and hemocyte monolayers showed that MCL1 functions as an antiadhesive protective coat because it masks antigenic structural components of the cell wall such as β-glucans, and because its hydrophilic negatively charged nature makes it unattractive to hemocytes. A survey of 54 fungal genomes revealed that seven other species have proteins with collagenous domains suggesting that MCL1 is a member of a patchily distributed gene family. PMID:16614065

  16. It Is Not Just Folklore: The Aqueous Extract of Mung Bean Coat Is Protective against Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Li, Wei; Li, Jianhua; Jundoria, Arvin; Sama, Andrew E; Wang, Haichao

    2012-01-01

    Mung bean (Vigna Radiata) has been traditionally used in China both as nutritional food and herbal medicine against a number of inflammatory conditions since the 1050s. A nucleosomal protein, HMGB1, has recently been established as a late mediator of lethal systemic inflammation with a relatively wider therapeutic window for pharmacological interventions. Here we explored the HMGB1-inhibiting capacity and therapeutic potential of mung bean coat (MBC) extract in vitro and in vivo. We found that MBC extract dose-dependently attenuated LPS-induced release of HMGB1 and several chemokines in macrophage cultures. Oral administration of MBC extract significantly increased animal survival rates from 29.4% (in saline group, N = 17 mice) to 70% (in experimental MBC extract group, N = 17 mice, P < 0.05). In vitro, MBC extract stimulated HMGB1 protein aggregation and facilitated both the formation of microtubule-associatedprotein-1-light-chain-3-(LC3-)containing cytoplasmic vesicles, and the production of LC3-II in macrophage cultures. Consequently, MBC extract treatment led to reduction of cellular HMGB1 levels in macrophage cultures, which was impaired by coaddition of two autophagy inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 and 3-methyladenine). Conclusion. MBC extract is protective against lethal sepsis possibly by stimulating autophagic HMGB1 degradation.

  17. A promising NiCo 2O 4 protective coating for metallic interconnects of solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Bin; Zhang, Wenying; Wu, Juan; Pu, Jian; Chi, Bo; Jian, Li

    The NiCo 2O 4 spinel coating is applied onto the surfaces of the SUS 430 ferritic stainless steel by the sol-gel process; and the coated alloy, together with the uncoated as a comparison, is cyclically oxidized in air at 800 °C for 200 h. The oxidation behavior and oxide scale microstructure as well as the electrical property are characterized. The results indicate that the oxidation resistance is significantly enhanced by the protective coating with a parabolic rate constant of 8.1 × 10 -15 g 2 cm -4 s -1, while the electrical conductivity is considerably improved due to inhibited growth of resistive Cr 2O 3 and the formation of conductive spinel phases in the oxide scale.

  18. Alloy Films Deposited by Electroplating as Precursors for Protective Oxide Coatings on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Metallic Interconnect Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christopher; Gemmen, R.S.; Cross, Caleb

    2006-10-01

    The successful development of stainless steel interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) may be the materials breakthrough that makes SOFC technology truly commercial. Many of the ferritic stainless steels, however, suffer from a relatively high area specific resistance (ASR) after long exposure times at temperature and the Cr in the native oxide can evaporate and contaminate other cell components. Conductive coatings that resist oxide scale growth and chromium evaporation may prevent both of these problems. In the present study electrochemical deposition of binary alloys followed by oxidation of the alloy to form protective and conductive oxide layers is examined. Results are presented for the deposition of Mn/Co and Fe/Ni alloys via electroplating to form a precursor for spinel oxide coating formation. Analysis of the alloy coatings is done by SEM, EDS and XRD.

  19. The Structure and Properties of Inductively Coupled Plasma Assisted Magnetron Sputtered Nanocrystalline CrN Coatings in Corrosion Protective Die Casting Molds.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Yong

    2015-07-01

    Chromium nitride coatings for the surface modified die casting molds with various ICP powers have been prepared using ICP assisted magnetron sputtering. The applied ICP power was varied from 0 to 300 W. The deposited coatings were characterized post-deposition using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Single CrN phased coatings with nano-grain sized (< 20 nm) were identified. The corrosion resistance and hardness of each coating were evaluated from potentiost at and nanoindentator. Superior corrosion protective coatings in excess of 20 GPa were deposited with assistance of ICP plasma during sputtering.

  20. The Structure and Properties of Inductively Coupled Plasma Assisted Magnetron Sputtered Nanocrystalline NbN Coatings in Corrosion Protective Die Casting Molds.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Niobium nitride coatings for the surface modified die casting molds with various ICP powers have been prepared using ICP assisted magnetron sputtering. The applied ICP power was varied from 0 to 200 W. The deposited coatings were characterized post-deposition using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Single NbN phased coatings with nano-grain sized (<7.6 nm) were identified. The corrosion resistance and hardness of each coating were evaluated from potentiostat and nanoindentator. Superior corrosion protective coatings in excess of 13.9 GPa were deposited with assistance of ICP plasma during sputtering.

  1. The Structure and Properties of Inductively Coupled Plasma Assisted Magnetron Sputtered Nanocrystalline NbN Coatings in Corrosion Protective Die Casting Molds.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Niobium nitride coatings for the surface modified die casting molds with various ICP powers have been prepared using ICP assisted magnetron sputtering. The applied ICP power was varied from 0 to 200 W. The deposited coatings were characterized post-deposition using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Single NbN phased coatings with nano-grain sized (<7.6 nm) were identified. The corrosion resistance and hardness of each coating were evaluated from potentiostat and nanoindentator. Superior corrosion protective coatings in excess of 13.9 GPa were deposited with assistance of ICP plasma during sputtering. PMID:27433719

  2. Atmospheric pressure plasma-initiated chemical vapor deposition (AP-PiCVD) of poly(diethylallylphosphate) coating: a char-forming protective coating for cellulosic textile.

    PubMed

    Hilt, Florian; Boscher, Nicolas D; Duday, David; Desbenoit, Nicolas; Levalois-Grützmacher, Joëlle; Choquet, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    An innovative atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method toward the deposition of polymeric layers has been developed. This latter involves the use of a nanopulsed plasma discharge to initiate the free-radical polymerization of an allyl monomer containing phosphorus (diethylallylphosphate, DEAP) at atmospheric pressure. The polymeric structure of the film is evidence by mass spectrometry. The method, highly suitable for the treatment of natural biopolymer substrate, has been carried out on cotton textile to perform the deposition of an efficient and conformal protective coating.

  3. Sol-gel derived C-SiC composites and protective coatings for sustained durability in the space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruvy, Yair; Liedtke, Volker

    2003-09-01

    Composites and coatings were produced via the fast sol-gel process of a mixture of alkoxysilane precursors. The composites were comprised of carbon fibers, fabrics, or their precursors as reinforcement, and sol-gel-derived silicon carbide as matrix, aiming at high-temperature stable ceramics that can be utilized for re-entry structures. The protective coatings were comprised of fluorine-rich sol-gel derived resins, which exhibit high flexibility and coherence to provide sustained ATOX protection necessary for LEO space-exposed elements. For producing the composites, the sol-gel-derived resin is cast onto the reinforcement fibers/fabrics mat (carbon or its precursors) to produce a 'green' composite that is being cured. The 'green' composite is converted into a C-SiC composite via a gradual heat-pressure process under inert atmosphere, during which the organic substituents on the silicon atoms undergo internal oxidative pyrolysis via the schematic reaction: (SiRO3/2)n -> SiC + CO2 + H2O. The composition of the resultant silicon-oxi-carbide is tailorable via modifying the composition of the sol-gel reactants. The reinforcement, when made of carbon precursors, is converted into carbon during the heat-and-pressure processing as well. The C-SiC composites thus derived exhibit superior thermal stability and comparable thermal conductivity, combined with good mechanical strength features and failure resistance, which render them greatly applicable for re-entry shielding, heat-exchange pipes, and the like. Fluorine rich sol-gel derived coatings were developed as well, via the use of HF rich sol-gel process. These coatings provide oxidation-protection via the silica formation process, together with flexibility that allows 18,000 repetitive folding of the coating without cracking.

  4. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  5. Study of electrodeposited polypyrrole coatings for the corrosion protection of stainless steel bipolar plates for the PEM fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, M. A. Lucio; Smit, Mascha A.

    Polypyrrole coatings were prepared on stainless steel SS304 in order to study the corrosion protection provided by the conductive polymer in a simulated PEM fuel cell environment. The polypyrrole was deposited by electrochemical polymerization with 0.04, 0.07 and 0.14 g cm -2 onto SS304 electrodes. Polarization curves, taken after immersion for 1, 3 or 24 h in 0.1 M sulphuric acid at either room temperature or 60 °C were used as an accelerated test. For short immersion times, it was found that corrosion current densities (at free corrosion potentials), diminished up to 2 orders of magnitude for samples tested at room temperature and up to 4 orders of magnitude for samples tested at 60 °C. Furthermore, at potentials in the range of the PEM fuel cell anode potential, corrosion rates also decreased up to several orders of magnitude. However, these protective properties were lost at longer times of immersion. The addition of DBSA to the polypyrrole coatings did lead to improved corrosion current densities at the free corrosion potential, however due to the loss of passivity of these samples, the corrosion rates in the potential range applicable to PEM fuel cells were either similar to or larger than bare metal. SEM was used to determine the morphology of the coatings and showed that the most homogeneous coating was obtained for 0.07 g cm -2 polypyrrole, without the incorporation of DBSA.

  6. Corrosion Protection of Nd-Fe Magnets via Phophatization, Silanization and Electrostatic Spraying with Organic Resin Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xia; Li, Jingjie; Li, Musen; Ge, Shengsong; Wang, Xiuchun; Ding, Kaihong; Cui, Shengli; Sun, Yongcong

    2014-09-01

    Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets possess excellent properties. However, they are highly sensitive to the attack of corrosive environment. The aim of this work is to improve the corrosion resistance of the magnets by phosphatization, silanization, and electrostatic spraying with organic resin composite coatings. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) tests showed that uniform phosphate conversion coatings and spray layers were formed on the surface of the Nd-Fe-B magnets. Neutral salt spray tests exhibited that, after treated by either phosphating, silanization or electrostatic spraying, the protectiveness of Nd-Fe-B alloys was apparently increased. And corrosion performance of magnets treated with silane only was slightly inferior to those of phosphatized ones. However, significant improvement in corrosion protection was achieved after two-step treatments, i.e. by top-coating spray layer with phosphate or silane films underneath. Grid test indicated that the phosphate and silane coating were strongly attached to the substrate while silane film was slightly weaker than the phosphate-treated ones. Magnetic property analysis revealed phosphatization, silanization, and electrostatic spraying caused decrease in magnetism, but silanization had the relatively smaller effect.

  7. Protection of nuclear graphite toward liquid fluoride salt by isotropic pyrolytic carbon coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiujie; Song, Jinliang; Xu, Li; Tan, Jie; Xia, Huihao; Zhang, Baoliang; He, Zhoutong; Gao, Lina; Zhou, Xingtai; Zhao, Mingwen; Zhu, Zhiyong; Bai, Shuo

    2013-11-01

    Infiltration studies were performed on uncoated nuclear graphite and isotropic pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coated graphite in molten FLiNaK salt at 650 °C under argon atmosphere at 1, 3 and 5 atm. Uncoated graphite shows weight gain more obviously than that of PyC coated graphite. Nuclear graphite with PyC coating exhibits excellent infiltration resistance in molten salt due to the small open porosity as conformed from scanning electron microscopy and mercury injection experiments.

  8. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M.L.; Sarin, V.K.

    1997-12-01

    For the first time, crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited on SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion and oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments.

  9. Preparation of co-spray dried cushioning agent containing stearic acid for protecting pellet coatings when compressed.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Xu, De Sheng; Li, Min; Liu, Li; Heng, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the applicability of stearic acid as a co-adjuvant in cushioning agent formulated to prevent coat damage when compressing coated pellets. The co-processed and physical blended fillers were prepared by spray drying and physically blending, respectively, with filler ingredients consisting of stearic acid, microcrystalline cellulose, fully gelatinized starch, and corn starch. Pellets containing drug were produced by coating onto non-pariels a drug layer of metformin followed by a sustained-release layer. Drug release from tablets composed of co-processed or physical blended fillers (0, 1, 5, and 10% stearic acid levels) and coated drug containing pellets were analyzed using similarity factor F2. Under the same force and the stearic acid level, co-processed fillers produced pellet containing tablets which showed higher F2 or t50 values and tensile strengths as well as lower yield pressures as compared with tablets containing physical blended fillers. It was shown that the destructive degree of pellet coating was significantly reduced after being co-processed by homogenization and the incorporation of stearic acid in the cushioning agents, as shown by the improved F2 and t50 values. In addition, disintegrate times of tablets containing co-processed agents decreased despite the hydrophobic stearic acid. In conclusion, the inclusion of stearic acid in co-processed cushioning agents was effective at protecting compacted coated pellets from compression-induced damage without compromising disintegratability. The findings could serve as a step towards resolving the technical challenges of balancing the drug release profiles, tablet tensile strength, and disintegration time of compacting coated pellets into multi-particulate-sustained release tablets.

  10. Epoxy coating and other protective measures for reinforceing steel embedded in concrete subjected to a chloride laden environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratova, Irina

    1999-11-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the most significant factor in the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion of reinforcing steel in marine structures and bridges is initiated mainly by chloride contamination. When steel starts to corrode, the cross section of the reinforcing bar becomes smaller, also the volume of corrosion products exerts a pressure on the concrete resulting in spalling of the concrete cover and directly exposing the steel to the corrosive agents, thus accelerating the corrosion process and further reducing the load carrying capacity of the concrete member. Although there are corrosion protective measures available to the concrete producer such as use of protective coatings on steel surface and use of corrosion inhibitors, a very limited amount of information exists on the comparative behavior of these common corrosion protection strategies in cracked concrete, especially in cracked high performance concrete (HPC). The relative effectiveness of different protection methods for steel reinforcement such as the use of new types of epoxy-coated reinforcement, galvanized reinforcement, and corrosion inhibitors was investigated in concrete with water-to-cement ratios of 0.60 and 0.40 and 0.25. Concrete slabs were uncracked and had preformed transverse cracks. The effect of water-to-cement ratio and crack widths on the rate of corrosion in precracked reinforced concrete slabs also was investigated. Testing was performed in the laboratory and in the field. It was found that cracked HPC concrete alone or with addition of corrosion inhibitors cannot provide sufficient corrosion protection for uncoated steel reinforcement in a chloride-laden environment and that additional protection to the reinforcing steel in the form of epoxy coating is necessary to provide long-term service life of the concrete structure.

  11. The Development of HfO2-Rare Earth Based Oxide Materials and Barrier Coatings for Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan James

    2014-01-01

    Advanced hafnia-rare earth oxides, rare earth aluminates and silicates have been developed for thermal environmental barrier systems for aerospace propulsion engine and thermal protection applications. The high temperature stability, low thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of these oxide material systems make them attractive and potentially viable for thermal protection systems. This paper will focus on the development of the high performance and high temperature capable ZrO2HfO2-rare earth based alloy and compound oxide materials, processed as protective coating systems using state-or-the-art processing techniques. The emphasis has been in particular placed on assessing their temperature capability, stability and suitability for advanced space vehicle entry thermal protection systems. Fundamental thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of the material systems have been investigated at high temperatures. Laser high-heat-flux testing has also been developed to validate the material systems, and demonstrating durability under space entry high heat flux conditions.

  12. FUNCTIONALY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    PROF. STRATIS V. SOTIRCHOS

    1998-10-01

    The main objective of this research project is the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Mullite will be employed as the inner (base) layer and the composition of the film will be continuously changed to a layer of pure alumina, which will function as the actual protective coating of the component. Chemical vapor deposition reactions of silica, alumina, and aluminosilicates (mullite) through hydrolysis of aluminum and silicon chlorides in the presence of CO2 and H2 will be employed to deposit compositionally graded films of mullite and alumina. Our studies will include the kinetic investigation of the silica, alumina, and aluminosilicate deposition processes, characterization of the composition, microstructure, surface morphology, and mechanical behavior of the prepared films, and modeling of the various deposition processes. During this six-month reporting period, the experimental work on the investigation of the deposition of alumina, silica, and aluminosilicates from mixtures of methyltrichlorosilane (MTS), aluminum trichloride, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen was continued. Experiments were also conducted on the deposition processes of the simple oxides, alumina and silica, from mixtures containing only one chloride (AlCl3 and MTS, respectively). Deposition rate data were obtained in a relatively broad range of operating conditions: temperatures in the range 800-1000 o C, 100 Torr pressure, 0.006-0.015 AlCl3 feed mole fraction, 0.011- 0.027 CH3SiCl3 feed mole fraction, and 0.004-0.07 CO2 feed mole fraction, and various positions along the axis of the deposition reactor. Since the effect of temperature had been

  13. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The main objective of this research project is the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Mullite will be employed as the inner (base) layer and the composition of the film will be continuously changed to a layer of pure alumina, which will function as the actual protective coating of the component. Chemical vapor deposition reactions of silica, alumina, and aluminosilicates (mullite) through hydrolysis of aluminum and silicon chlorides in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} will be employed to deposit compositionally graded films of mullite and alumina. Our studies will include the kinetic investigation of the silica, alumina, and aluminosilicate deposition processes, characterization of the composition, microstructure, surface morphology, and mechanical behavior of the prepared films, and modeling of the various deposition processes. During this reporting period, the construction and development of the chemical vapor deposition system was completed, and experiments were conducted on the deposition of alumina, silica, and aluminosilicates (such as mullite) from mixtures of AlCl{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}SiCl{sub 3} in CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. Work was mainly done on the investigation of the effects of the reaction temperature on the deposition kinetics. It was found that the temperature had a positive effect on the single oxides deposition rates and the codeposition rate. The apparent activation energy values extracted from the deposition rate vs. temperature curves in the high temperature region were similar for the three deposition processes, having a value around 20 kcal/mol. The codeposition rates were higher, by a

  14. Method of protecting the surface of a substrate. [by applying aluminide coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A. (Inventor); Grisaffe, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    The surface of a metallic base system is initially coated with a metallic alloy layer that is ductile and oxidation resistant. An aluminide coating is then applied to the metallic alloy layer. The chemistry of the metallic alloy layer is such that the oxidation resistance of the subsequently aluminized outermost layer is not seriously degraded.

  15. Waterborne firm coating for temporary protection of parts, providing controlled lubrication during assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hayner, R.E.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes a protective, emulsified oil in water, dispersible, lubricant coating composition having a pH in the range of about 7.0 to 10, and capable of application and flow on a threaded solid substrate consisting essentially of: A. about 65 to 99% by weight of a composition comprising: (1) about 0.5 to 30 parts by weight of organic wax components having a melting point above 50/sup 0/C, the wax container ester groups; (2) about 0.5 to 6 parts of a surfactant comprising 2 to 8% of carboxylic acid and about 1 to 5% of an amine, the acid and the amine forming a salt providing at least a portion of a surfactant; (3) about 10 to 30 parts of a coupling agent comprising a C/sub 5/-C/sub 30/ liquid hydrocarbon coupling component and a C/sub 2/-C/sub 20/ alcohol in the ratio of between 1:1 and 10:1 by weight respectively, selected from the group consisting of: mineral spirits, kerosene, ethylene glycol ether, butyl cellosolve, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol monopropyl ether, propyl cellosolve, ethyl cellosolve, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol monoacetate, diethylene glycol monoproprionate, diethylene glycol monoacetate, propylene glycol monoacetate, ethanol, isopropanol and isobutanol; and (4) about 30 to 97 parts of water the sum of all parts being equal to 100; and (B) about 3.5 to 9% total pigment comprising about 0.4 to 4% by weight carbon black.

  16. Effects of aging temperature and time on the corrosion protection provided by trivalent chromium process coatings on AA2024-T3.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Swain, Greg M

    2013-08-28

    The effects of aging temperature and time on the physical structure of and corrosion protection provided by trivalent chromium process (TCP) coatings on AA2024-T3 are reported. The TCP coating forms a partially blocking barrier layer on the alloy surface that consists of hydrated channels and or defects. It is through these channels and defects that ions and dissolved O2 can be transported to small areas of the underlying alloy. Reactions initiate at these sites, which can ultimately lead to undercutting of the coating and localized corrosion. We tested the hypothesis that collapsing the channels and or reducing the number of defects in the coating might be possible through post-deposition heat treatment, and that this would enhance the corrosion protection provided by the coating. This was tested by aging the TCP-coated AA2024 alloys in air overnight at room temperature (RT), 55, 100, or 150 °C. The TCP coating became dehydrated and thinner at the high temperatures (55 and 100 °C). This improved the corrosion protection as evidenced by a 2× increase in the charge transfer resistance. Aging at 150 °C caused excessive coating dehydration and shrinkage. This led to severe cracking and detachment of the coating from the surface. The TCP-coated AA2024 samples were also aged in air at RT from 1 to 7 days. There was no thinning of the coating, but the corrosion protection was enhanced with a longer aging period as evidenced by a 4× increase in the charge transfer resistance. The coating became more hydrophobic after aging at elevated temperature (up to 100 °C) and with aging time at RT as evidenced by an increased water contact angle from 7 to 100 °C.

  17. Replacement of corrosion protection chromate primers and paints used in cryogenic applications on the Space Shuttle with wire arc sprayed aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, R. L.; Sanders, H. L.; Zimmerman, F. R.

    1995-01-01

    With the advent of new environmental laws restricting volatile organic compounds and hexavalent chrome emissions, 'environmentally safe' thermal spray coatings are being developed to replace the traditional corrosion protection chromate primers. A wire arc sprayed aluminum coating is being developed for corrosion protection of low pressure liquid hydrogen carrying ducts on the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Currently, this hardware utilizes a chromate primer to provide protection against corrosion pitting and stress corrosion cracking induced by the cryogenic operating environment. The wire are sprayed aluminum coating has been found to have good potential to provide corrosion protection for flight hardware in cryogenic applications. The coating development, adhesion test, corrosion test and cryogenic flexibility test results will be presented.

  18. Impact of Sn/F Pre-Treatments on the Durability of Protective Coatings against Dentine Erosion/Abrasion

    PubMed Central

    Ganss, Carolina; Lussi, Adrian; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Naguib Attia, Nader; Schlueter, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    For preventing erosive wear in dentine, coating with adhesives has been suggested as an alternative to fluoridation. However, clinical studies have revealed limited efficacy. As there is first evidence that Sn2+ increases bond strength of the adhesive Clearfil SE (Kuraray), the aim of the present study was to investigate whether pre-treatment with different Sn2+/F− solutions improves the durability of Clearfil SE coatings. Dentine samples (eight groups, n=16/group) were freed of smear layer (0.5% citric acid, 10 s), treated (15 s) either with no solution (control), aminefluoride (AmF, 500 ppm F−, pH 4.5), SnCl2 (800/1600 ppm Sn2+; pH 1.5), SnCl2/AmF (500 ppm F−, 800 ppm Sn2+, pH 1.5/3.0/4.5), or Elmex Erosion Protection Rinse (EP, 500 ppm F−, 800 ppm Sn2+, pH 4.5; GABA International), then rinsed with water (15 s) and individually covered with Clearfil SE. Subsequently the specimens were subjected to an erosion/abrasion protocol consisting of 1320 cycles of immersion in 0.5% citric acid (5°C/55°C; 2 min) and automated brushing (15 s, 200 g, NaF-toothpaste, RDA 80). As the coatings proved stable up to 1320 cycles, 60 modified cycles (brushing time 30 min/cycle) were added. Wear was measured profilometrically. After SnCl2/AmF, pH 4.5 or EP pre-treatment all except one coating survived. In the other groups, almost all coatings were lost and there was no significant difference to the control group. Pre-treatment with a Sn2+/F− solution at pH 4.5 seems able to improve the durability of adhesive coatings, rendering these an attractive option in preventing erosive wear in dentine. PMID:26075906

  19. Impact of Sn/F Pre-Treatments on the Durability of Protective Coatings against Dentine Erosion/Abrasion.

    PubMed

    Ganss, Carolina; Lussi, Adrian; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Naguib Attia, Nader; Schlueter, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    For preventing erosive wear in dentine, coating with adhesives has been suggested as an alternative to fluoridation. However, clinical studies have revealed limited efficacy. As there is first evidence that Sn(2+) increases bond strength of the adhesive Clearfil SE (Kuraray), the aim of the present study was to investigate whether pre-treatment with different Sn(2+)/F(-) solutions improves the durability of Clearfil SE coatings. Dentine samples (eight groups, n=16/group) were freed of smear layer (0.5% citric acid, 10 s), treated (15 s) either with no solution (control), aminefluoride (AmF, 500 ppm F(-), pH 4.5), SnCl2 (800/1600 ppm Sn(2+); pH 1.5), SnCl2/AmF (500 ppm F(-), 800 ppm Sn(2+), pH 1.5/3.0/4.5), or Elmex Erosion Protection Rinse (EP, 500 ppm F-, 800 ppm Sn(2+), pH 4.5; GABA International), then rinsed with water (15 s) and individually covered with Clearfil SE. Subsequently the specimens were subjected to an erosion/abrasion protocol consisting of 1320 cycles of immersion in 0.5% citric acid (5 °C/55 °C; 2 min) and automated brushing (15 s, 200 g, NaF-toothpaste, RDA 80). As the coatings proved stable up to 1320 cycles, 60 modified cycles (brushing time 30 min/cycle) were added. Wear was measured profilometrically. After SnCl2/AmF, pH 4.5 or EP pre-treatment all except one coating survived. In the other groups, almost all coatings were lost and there was no significant difference to the control group. Pre-treatment with a Sn(2+)/F(-) solution at pH 4.5 seems able to improve the durability of adhesive coatings, rendering these an attractive option in preventing erosive wear in dentine. PMID:26075906

  20. Improved Protection Properties by Using Nanostructured Ceramic Powders for HVOF Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varis, T.; Knuuttila, J.; Turunen, E.; Leivo, J.; Silvonen, J.; Oksa, M.

    2007-12-01

    The potential of the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process for reduced porosity in coatings compared to those produced by other ambient thermal spray processes is well known. The ability to produce high-density ceramic coatings offers potential in high-performance applications in the field of wear, corrosion resistance, and dielectric coatings. However, due to operational limit of the HVOF process to effectively melt the ceramic particles, the process—structure relationship must be well optimized. It has been also demonstrated that benefits from HVOF ceramic coatings can be obtained only if particles are melted enough and good lamella adhesion is produced. One strategy to improve melting of ceramic particles in relative low-flame temperatures of HVOF process is to modify particle crystal structure and composition. In this paper the effect of the powder manufacturing method and the composition on deposition efficiency of spray process as well as on the mechanical properties of the HVOF sprayed are studied. Effect of fuel gas, hydrogen vs. propane, was also demonstrated. Studied materials were alumina-, chromia-, and titania-based agglomerated powders. Coating properties such as microstructure, hardness, abrasive wear resistance, and relative fracture toughness were compared to the coating manufactured by using conventional fused and crushed powders. It can be concluded that powder size distribution and microstructure should be optimized to fulfill process requirements very carefully to produce coatings with high deposition efficiency, dense structure, improved fracture toughness, and adhesion.

  1. Protection of carbon steel against hot corrosion using thermal spray Si- and Cr-base coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J. G.; Martinez, L.

    1998-02-01

    A Fe75Si thermal spray coating was applied on the surface of a plain carbon steel baffle plate. Beneath this coating, a Ni20Cr coating was applied to give better adherence to the silicon coating. The baffle was installed in the high-temperature, fireside, corrosion zone of a steam generator. At the same time, an uncoated 304 stainless steel baffle was installed nearby for comparison. For 13 months the boiler burned heavy fuel oil with high contents of vanadium. The samples were studied employing scanning electron microscopy, x-ray microanalysis, and x-ray diffraction techniques. After that, it was possible to inspect the structural state of the components, and it was found that the stainless steel baffle plates were destroyed almost completely by corrosion, whereas the carbon steel coated baffle plate did not suffer a significant attack, showing that the performance of the thermal spray coating was outstanding and that the coating was not attacked by vanadium salts of the molten slag.

  2. Thermal Barrier and Protective Coatings to Improve the Durability of a Combustor Under a Pulse Detonation Engine Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2008-01-01

    Pulse detonation engine (PDE) concepts are receiving increasing attention for future aeronautic propulsion applications, due to their potential thermodynamic cycle efficiency and higher thrust to density ratio that lead to the decrease in fuel consumption. But the resulting high gas temperature and pressure fluctuation distributions at high frequency generated with every detonation are viewed to be detrimental to the combustor liner material. Experimental studies on a typical metal combustion material exposed to a laser simulated pulse heating showed extensive surface cracking. Coating of the combustor materials with low thermal conductivity ceramics is shown to protect the metal substrate, reduce the thermal stresses, and hence increase the durability of the PDE combustor liner material. Furthermore, the temperature fluctuation and depth of penetration is observed to decrease with increasing the detonation frequency. A crack propagation rate in the coating is deduced by monitoring the variation of the coating apparent thermal conductivity with time that can be utilized as a health monitoring technique for the coating system under a rapid fluctuating heat flux.

  3. Oleic acid-grafted chitosan/graphene oxide composite coating for corrosion protection of carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Fayyad, Eman M; Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Al-Maadeed, Mariam Al Ali

    2016-10-20

    An anticorrosion coating film based on the formation of nanocomposite coating is reported in this study. The composite consisted of chitosan (green matrix), oleic acid, and graphene oxide (nano filler). The nanocomposite coating was arranged on the surface of carbon steel, and the corrosion resistance was monitored using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization (PP). Compared to the pure chitosan (CS) coating, the corrosion resistance of oleic acid-modified chitosan/graphene oxide film (CS/GO-OA) is increased by 100 folds. Since the well-dispersed smart grafted nanolayers delayed the penetration rate of corrosive species and thus maintained long term anticorrosive stability which is correlated with hydrophobicity and permeability.

  4. Oleic acid-grafted chitosan/graphene oxide composite coating for corrosion protection of carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Fayyad, Eman M; Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Al-Maadeed, Mariam Al Ali

    2016-10-20

    An anticorrosion coating film based on the formation of nanocomposite coating is reported in this study. The composite consisted of chitosan (green matrix), oleic acid, and graphene oxide (nano filler). The nanocomposite coating was arranged on the surface of carbon steel, and the corrosion resistance was monitored using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization (PP). Compared to the pure chitosan (CS) coating, the corrosion resistance of oleic acid-modified chitosan/graphene oxide film (CS/GO-OA) is increased by 100 folds. Since the well-dispersed smart grafted nanolayers delayed the penetration rate of corrosive species and thus maintained long term anticorrosive stability which is correlated with hydrophobicity and permeability. PMID:27474635

  5. An intumescent coating for improved fuel fire protection of heat sensitive articles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Fontes, E. J.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Intumescent coating compositions have been prepared using the ammonium salt of 4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid and a copolymer of polysulfide-epoxy resin as the binder, into which have been dispersed various fillers. The fillers used in the study were low density microballoons for density control and fibers for controlled intumescence on contoured substrates. The filler effect on the thermal-physical efficiency of coatings has been measured. The coating utilizing short length silica fibers has been shown to have superior mechanical, environmental, and thermal properties. The coating applied to the exterior of loaded weapons has increased the time-to-detonation from three minutes for the unprotected weapon to 10-13 minutes.

  6. Polarization compensating protective coatings for TPF-Coronagraph optics to control contrast degrading cross polarization leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis Z.; Marchen, Luis F.; Shaklan, Stuart B.

    2005-01-01

    We describe here the design approaches and performance analysis of the OTA in the wavelength band of interest. Coronagraph performance at 600nm wavelength based on a particular coating and occulting focal plane mask is also presented.

  7. Protective lithium ion conducting ceramic coating for lithium metal anodes and associate method

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A battery structure including a cathode, a lithium metal anode and an electrolyte disposed between the lithium anode and the cathode utilizes a thin-film layer of lithium phosphorus oxynitride overlying so as to coat the lithium anode and thereby separate the lithium anode from the electrolyte. If desired, a preliminary layer of lithium nitride may be coated upon the lithium anode before the lithium phosphorous oxynitride is, in turn, coated upon the lithium anode so that the separation of the anode and the electrolyte is further enhanced. By coating the lithium anode with this material lay-up, the life of the battery is lengthened and the performance of the battery is enhanced.

  8. Hybrid nanostructured coatings for corrosion protection of base metals: a sustainability perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Robert V.; Patil, Vikas; Andrews, Justin L.; Aldinger, Jeffrey P.; Yadav, Ganapati D.; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-03-01

    In this topical review article, we attempt to capture recent advances in the development of sustainable hybrid nanocomposite coatings for the corrosion inhibition of structural metals. Spurred primarily by the urgent imperative of replacing hexavalent chromium but also driven by concerns regarding the environmental impact of organic solvents, materials criticality considerations, the need to maintain structural integrity and function under extreme environments, and a renewed impetus towards lightweighting, the design of new coating concepts has seen an explosion of activity. We discuss varying modes of corrosion inhibition and the drive towards multicomponent nanostructured coatings that synergistically unite multiple modes of corrosion inhibition within a single coating system. Nanocomposite coatings in which nanoparticles of one phase are dispersed within a continuous phase, usually a polymeric matrix, provide a modular design approach to multifunctional coatings provided fundamental challenges such as dispersion and compatibility can be resolved. By dint of their high surface-to-volume ratios, the incorporation of nanoparticles profoundly modifies the adjacent polymeric matrix, giving rise to an ‘interphase’ region with modified properties, at relatively low filler loadings. The implications of incorporating metallic, porous metal oxide, and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotubes) within polymeric matrices are explored with an emphasis on active corrosion inhibition. The availability of high-quality nanoparticles that are either electroactive (e.g., metals, graphene, carbon nanotubes, etc.) or are capable of serving as reservoirs for active corrosion inhibitors (e.g., porous silicon oxide, layered double hydroxides, halloysite) provides unprecedented functionality and opportunities for multifunctional coatings. The review emphasizes mechanistic considerations where these have been elucidated with a view towards developing systematic design

  9. Investigation of thermal spray coatings on austenitic stainless steel substrate to enhance corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Daniel M.

    The research is aimed to evaluate thermal spray coatings to address material issues in supercritical and ultra-supercritical Rankine cycles. The primary purpose of the research is to test, evaluate, and eventually implement a coating to improve corrosion resistance and increase efficiency of coal fired power plants. The research is performed as part of a comprehensive project to evaluate the ability of titanium, titanium carbide, or titanium diboride powders to provide fireside corrosion resistance in supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam boilers, specifically, coal driven boilers in Illinois that must utilize high sulfur and high chlorine content coal. [1] The powder coatings that were tested are nano-sized titanium carbide (TiC) and titanium di-boride (TiB2) powders that were synthesized by a patented process at Southern Illinois University. The powders were then sent to Gas Technology Institute in Chicago to coat steel coupons by HVOF (High Velocity Oxy-Fuel) thermal spray technique. The powders were coated on an austenitic 304H stainless steel substrate which is commonly found in high temperature boilers, pipelines, and heat exchangers. The samples then went through various tests for various lengths of time under subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical conditions. The samples were examined using a scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction techniques to study microstructural changes and then determined which coating performed best.

  10. Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Splat Bonding for CMAS and Corrosion Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Yao, Shu-Wei; Wang, Li-Shuang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-01-01

    The infiltration of molten CMAS in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) at high temperature is significantly affected by the microstructure of the ceramic coating. Enhancing the bonding ratio between splats can reduce the interconnected pores and suppress the infiltration of the molten CMAS into the coating. In this study, a dual-layered (DL) TBC with the dense 8YSZ on the top of the conventional porous 8YSZ was proposed to enhance CMAS corrosion of atmospheric plasma-sprayed YSZ. The dense YSZ coating with improved lamellar bonding was deposited at a higher deposition temperature. The microstructure of the coatings before and after CMAS attack test was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It was clearly revealed that by adjusting the microstructure and applying a dense ceramic layer with the improved interface bonding on the top of porous TBC, the infiltration of CMAS into porous YSZ coating can be effectively suppressed. Moreover, by designing DL TBCs, the thermal conductivity of the TBC system exhibits a limited increase. Thus with the design of DL structure, the TBCs with high CMAS corrosion resistance and low thermal conductivity can be achieved.

  11. Examination of the Oxidation Protection of Zinc Coatings Formed on Copper Alloys and Steel Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazoglou, M.; Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Skolianos, S.

    2010-01-01

    The exposure of metallic components at aggressive high temperature environments, usually limit their usage at similar application because they suffer from severe oxidation attack. Copper alloys are used in a wide range of high-quality indoor and outdoor applications, statue parts, art hardware, high strength and high thermal conductivity applications. On the other hand, steel is commonly used as mechanical part of industrial set outs or in the construction sector due to its high mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is the examination of the oxidation resistance of pack cementation zinc coatings deposited on copper, leaded brass and steel substrates at elevated temperature conditions. Furthermore, an effort made to make a long-term evaluation of the coated samples durability. The oxidation results showed that bare substrates appear to have undergone severe damage comparing with the coated ones. Furthermore, the mass gain of the uncoated samples was higher than this of the zinc covered ones. Particularly zinc coated brass was found to be more resistant to oxidation conditions in which it was exposed as it has the lower mass gain as compared to the bare substrates and zinc coated copper. Zinc coated steel was also proved to be more resistive than the uncoated steel.

  12. EXAMINATION OF THE OXIDATION PROTECTION OF ZINC COATINGS FORMED ON COPPER ALLOYS AND STEEL SUBSTRATES

    SciTech Connect

    Papazoglou, M.; Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Skolianos, S.

    2010-01-21

    The exposure of metallic components at aggressive high temperature environments, usually limit their usage at similar application because they suffer from severe oxidation attack. Copper alloys are used in a wide range of high-quality indoor and outdoor applications, statue parts, art hardware, high strength and high thermal conductivity applications. On the other hand, steel is commonly used as mechanical part of industrial set outs or in the construction sector due to its high mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is the examination of the oxidation resistance of pack cementation zinc coatings deposited on copper, leaded brass and steel substrates at elevated temperature conditions. Furthermore, an effort made to make a long-term evaluation of the coated samples durability. The oxidation results showed that bare substrates appear to have undergone severe damage comparing with the coated ones. Furthermore, the mass gain of the uncoated samples was higher than this of the zinc covered ones. Particularly zinc coated brass was found to be more resistant to oxidation conditions in which it was exposed as it has the lower mass gain as compared to the bare substrates and zinc coated copper. Zinc coated steel was also proved to be more resistive than the uncoated steel.

  13. Method for the preparation of protective coatings by low-temperature metal--organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaloyeros, A.E.; Williams, W.S.; Constant, G.

    1988-07-01

    A simple and effective method is reported for the deposition of protective coatings of titanium carbide using low-temperature (as low as 150 /sup 0/C) metal--organic chemical vapor deposition. This method is based on the thermolysis of metal--organic molecules containing titanium and does not require the high temperature (<1100 /sup 0/C) involved in the standard TiC--CVD technique. Furthermore, the structure of the films produced (crystalline or amorphous) and their purity (inclusion of organic clusters or hydrogen) can be tailored easily by simple variations in the deposition parameters. This technique permits the coating of polymers and low-melting metals that are thermally too fragile for other deposition techniques. The process could be applied to produce films of other materials, e.g., niobium carbide, silicon carbide, titanium diboride, and gallium arsenide.

  14. Protection of yttria-stabilized zirconia for dental applications by oxidic PVD coating.

    PubMed

    Hübsch, C; Dellinger, P; Maier, H J; Stemme, F; Bruns, M; Stiesch, M; Borchers, L

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the application of transparent physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings on zirconia ceramics was examined as an approach to retard the low-temperature degradation of zirconia for dental applications. Transparent monolayers of titanium oxide (TixOy) and multilayers consisting of titanium oxide-alumina-titanium oxide (TixOy-AlxOy-TixOy) were deposited onto standardized discs of 3Y-TZP using magnetron sputtering. Using X-ray photospectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry, the compositions of the coatings were verified, and an approximate thickness of 50 nm for each type of coating was ascertained. After aging the coated and uncoated samples in water vapor at 134°C and 3 bar for 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 and 128 h, the monoclinic phase content was determined using X-ray diffraction, and its impact on mechanical properties was assessed in biaxial flexural strength tests. In addition, the depth of the transformation zone was measured from scanning electron microscopy images of the fracture surfaces of hydrothermally aged samples. The results revealed that the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation of the zirconia ceramic was retarded by the application of PVD coatings. During the first stages of aging, the coated samples exhibited a significantly lower monoclinic phase content than the uncoated samples and, after 128 h of aging, showed a transformation zone which was only ∼12-15 μm thick compared to ∼30 μm in the control group. Biaxial flexural strength decreased by ∼10% during aging and was not influenced by the application of a PVD coating.

  15. Nanostructured Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} coatings for high-temperature protection of titanium alloy during ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chonggui; Wang You; Tian Wei; Yang Yong

    2010-08-15

    Plasma-sprayed nanostructured Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-13 wt.%TiO{sub 2} coatings were successfully fabricated on titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-4V) using as-prepared feedstock. Ablation experiments for the titanium alloy samples with or without a coating were carried out using a Metco 9MB plasma gun. The microstructure, phase constituents and mechanical properties of the titanium alloys before and after ablation were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Vickers hardness tester. The surface morphologies, cross-sectional microstructure and hardness of titanium alloys with coatings are similar before and after ablation. In contrast, the microstructure and mechanical properties of the titanium alloy without coating are significantly changed after ablation. The surface coating is found to serve as a protective coating during ablation.

  16. Fe-Al Weld Overlay and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Waterwalls in Fossil Fired Plants with Low NOx Burners

    SciTech Connect

    Regina, J.R.

    2002-02-08

    Iron-aluminum-chromium coatings were investigated to determine the best candidates for coatings of boiler tubes in Low NOx fossil fueled power plants. Ten iron-aluminum-chromium weld claddings with aluminum concentrations up to 10wt% were tested in a variety of environments to evaluate their high temperature corrosion resistance. The weld overlay claddings also contained titanium additions to investigate any beneficial effects from these ternary and quaternary alloying additions. Several High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with higher aluminum concentrations were investigated as well. Gaseous corrosion testing revealed that at least 10wt%Al is required for protection in the range of environments examined. Chromium additions were beneficial in all of the environments, but additions of titanium were beneficial only in sulfur rich atmospheres. Similar results were observed when weld claddings were in contact with corrosive slag while simultaneously, exposed to the corrosive environments. An aluminum concentration of 10wt% was required to prevent large amounts of corrosion to take place. Again chromium additions were beneficial with the greatest corrosion protection occurring for welds containing both 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr. The exposed thermal spray coatings showed either significant cracking within the coating, considerable thickness loss, or corrosion products at the coating substrate interface. Therefore, the thermal spray coatings provided the substrate very little protection. Overall, it was concluded that of the coatings studied weld overlay coatings provide superior protection in these Low NOx environments; specifically, the ternary weld composition of 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr provided the best corrosion protection in all of the environments tested.

  17. Effect of copper content on corrosion behavior and chromate conversion coating protection of 7xxx series aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingjiang

    The addition of Cu in Al-Zn-Mg alloys increases the mechanical strength and resistance to stress corrosion cracking of 7xxx series aluminum alloys (AA7xxx). The peak aged T6 temper provides the maximum mechanical strength by precipitation hardening. However, the presence of noble Cu makes AA7xxx-T6 more susceptible to localized corrosion, such as pitting, crevice and intergranular corrosion (IGC). In order to protect AA7xxx-T6 from localized corrosion, protective chromate conversion coatings (CCCs) must be used. Cu has been reported to affect the CCC protection performance. The exact roles of Cu content in corrosion behavior and CCC protection of AA7xxx-T6 are the focus of this study. Polarization and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) approaches were used in combination with materials characterization techniques, such as Focused Ion Beam (FIB), SEM, TEM, High Resolution TEM (HRTEM), Scanning TEM (STEM), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometry (XPS). Electrochemical tests on AA7xxx-T6 with various Cu content in deaerated chloride solution found that all alloys except for essentially Cu-free AA7004-T6 had two breakdown potentials, which increased logarithmically with increasing Cu content. Transient dissolution of the fine hardening precipitates and the surrounding solid solution in a thin surface layer was found in the Cu-containing alloys polarized at potentials between the two breakdown potentials. Stable dissolution associated with combined IGC and selective grain attack was found above the second breakdown potential. EIS tests revealed that the overall influence of Cu on the corrosion behavior was detrimental due to Cu enrichment in aerated chloride solution. TEM and STEM analysis revealed that CCC was heterogeneous on the heterogeneous microstructure of AA7075-T6. The coatings formed on coarse intermetallic particles were much thinner than CCC formed on the matrix. It was found that the CCC formed on the matrix mainly consisted of a CrIIIOOH backbone

  18. Effect of zinc phosphate chemical conversion coating on corrosion behaviour of mild steel in alkaline medium: protection of rebars in reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simescu, Florica; Idrissi, Hassane

    2008-12-01

    We outline the ability of zinc phosphate coatings, obtained by chemical conversion, to protect mild steel rebars against localized corrosion, generated by chloride ions in alkaline media. The corrosion resistance of coated steel, in comparison with uncoated rebars and coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar, were evaluated by open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, cronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The coated surfaces were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. First, coated mild steel rebars were studied in an alkaline solution with and without chloride simulating a concrete pore solution. The results showed that the slow dissolution of the coating generates hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. After a long immersion, the coating became dense and provided an effective corrosion resistance compared with the mild steel rebar. Secondly, the coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar and immersed in chloride solution showed no corrosion or deterioration of the coated steel. Corrosion rate is considerably lowered by this phosphate coating.

  19. Ultrananocrystalline diamond film as a wear resistant and protective coating for mechanical seal applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumant, A. V.; Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Auciello, O.; Erdemir, A.; Williams, M.; Artiles, A. F.; Adams, W.; Western Michigan Univ.; Flowserve Corp.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical shaft seals used in pumps are critically important to the safe operation of the paper, pulp, and chemical process industry, as well as petroleum and nuclear power plants. Specifically, these seals prevent the leakage of toxic gases and hazardous chemicals to the environment and final products from the rotating equipment used in manufacturing processes. Diamond coatings have the potential to provide negligible wear, ultralow friction, and high corrosion resistance for the sliding surfaces of mechanical seals, because diamond exhibits outstanding tribological, physical, and chemical properties. However, diamond coatings produced by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) exhibit high surface roughness (R{sub a} {>=} 1 {mu}m), which results in high wear of the seal counterface, leading to premature seal failure. To avoid this problem, we have developed an ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) film formed by a unique CH{sub 4}/Ar microwave plasma CVD method. This method yields extremely smooth diamond coatings with surface roughness R{sub a} = 20-30 nm and an average grain size of 2-5 nm. We report the results of a systematic test program involving uncoated and UNCD-coated SiC shaft seals. Results confirmed that the UNCD-coated seals exhibited neither measurable wear nor any leakage during long-duration tests that took 21 days to complete. In addition, the UNCD coatings reduced the frictional torque for seal rotation by five to six times compared with the uncoated seals. This work promises to lead to rotating shaft seals with much improved service life, reduced maintenance cost, reduced leakage of environmentally hazardous materials, and increased energy savings. This technology may also have many other tribological applications involving rolling or sliding contacts.

  20. Atomic oxygen protective coating with resistance to undercutting at defect sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Rutledge, Sharon K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Structures composed at least partially of an organic substrate may be protected from oxidation by applying a catalyst onto said substrate for promoting the combination of atomic oxygen to molecular oxygen. The structure may also be protected by applying both a catalyst and an atomic oxygen shielding layer onto the substrate. The structures to be protected include spacecraft surfaces.

  1. Development of a protective decorative fire resistant low smoke emitting, thermally stable coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development of suitable electrocoatings and subsequent application to nonconductive substrates are discussed. Substrates investigated were plastics or resin-treated materials such as FX-resin (phenolic-type resin) impregnated fiberglass mat, polyphenylene sulfide, polyether sulfone and polyimide-impregnated unidirectional fiberglass. Efforts were aimed at formulating a fire-resistant, low smoke emitting, thermally stable, easily cleaned coating material. The coating is to be used for covering substrate panels, such as aluminum, silicate foam, polymeric structural entities, etc., all of which are applied in the aircraft cabin interior and thus subject to the spillages, scuffing, spotting and the general contaminants which prevail in aircraft passenger compartments.

  2. A Five-year Performance Study of Low VOC Coatings over Zinc Thermal Spray for the Protection of Carbon Steel at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    The launch facilities at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are located approximately 1000 feet from the Atlantic Ocean where they are exposed to salt deposits, high humidity, high UV degradation, and acidic exhaust from solid rocket boosters. These assets are constructed from carbon steel, which requires a suitable coating to provide long-term protection to reduce corrosion and its associated costs. While currently used coating systems provide excellent corrosion control performance, they are subject to occupational, safety, and environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their use. Many contain high volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants, and other hazardous materials. Hazardous waste from coating operations include vacuum filters, zinc dust, hazardous paint related material, and solid paint. There are also worker safety issues such as exposure to solvents and isocyanates. To address these issues, top-coated thermal spray zinc coating systems were investigated as a promising environmentally friendly corrosion protection for carbon steel in an acidic launch environment. Additional benefits of the combined coating system include a long service life, cathodic protection to the substrate, no volatile contaminants, and high service temperatures. This paper reports the results of a performance based study to evaluate low VOC topcoats (for thermal spray zinc coatings) on carbon steel for use in a space launch environment.

  3. Magnetron deposited TiN coatings for protection of Al-Cu-Ag-Mg-Mn alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Tatiana V.; Kaziev, Andrey V.; Atamanov, Mikhail V.; Tumarkin, Alexander V.; Dolzhikova, Svetlana A.; Izmailova, Nelly Ph; Kharkov, Maxim M.; Berdnikova, Maria M.; Mozgrin, Dmitry V.; Pisarev, Alexander A.

    2016-09-01

    TiN coatings were deposited on a new Al super-alloy by magnetron sputtering in argon/nitrogen environment. The deposited layer structure, microhardness, adhesion, corrosion resistance, and fatigue life were investigated and tests demonstrated improved performance of the alloy.

  4. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System For Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph; Curran, Jerome; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem facing Kennedy Space Center (KSC), other Government Agencies, and the general public. These problems include KSC launch support structures, highway bridge infrastructure, and building structures such as condominium balconies. Due to these problems, the development of a Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System would be a breakthrough technology having great commercial value for the following industries: Transportation, Infrastructure, Marine Infrastructure, Civil Engineering, and the Construction Industry. This sacrificial coating system consists of a paint matrix that may include metallic components, conducting agents, and moisture attractors. Similar systems have been used in the past with varying degrees of success. These systems have no proven history of effectiveness over the long term. In addition, these types of systems have had limited success overcoming the initial resistance between the concrete/coating interface. The coating developed at KSC incorporates methods proven to overcome the barriers that previous systems could not achieve. Successful development and continued optimization of this breakthrough system would produce great interest in NASA/KSC for corrosion engineering technology and problem solutions. Commercial patents on this technology would enhance KSC's ability to attract industry partners for similar corrosion control applications.

  5. Protective coating on stainless steel interconnect for SOFCs:Oxidation kinetics and electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xuan; Hou, Peggy Y.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2004-04-01

    An effective, dense and well adherent coating was produced on 430SS that has the result of significantly reducing the oxidation rate of this alloy at elevated temperatures. The coating is essentially a Mn-Co-O spinel, applied in powder form, and compacted to improve its green density. A simplified model is presented that allows an assessment of the effects of the contact and scale geometries. For 850 C, an ASR can be predicted of approximately 0.5 cm2, after 50,000hrs in air, taking in to account a factor of 10 penalty for unfavorable contact geometries. The effect of the densified Mn-Co spinel coating is to reduce significantly Cr2O3 sub-scale formation, lower the thermal expansion mismatch, and increase the electronic conductivity of the scale. The findings point to several potential remedies for achieving coatings on 430 SS that allow for metal interconnects with a service life of 50,000 hrs or more. Considering contact geometries, such service life is unlikely to be possible above operating temperatures of about 700 C, unless highly specialized alloys are used, with potential processing and cost penalties.

  6. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVDMullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V.; Auger, M.

    1997-05-01

    Silicon carbide ceramics are the leading candidate materials for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants because of their unique combination of high temperature strength, high thermal conductivity, excellent thermal shock resistance, and good high temperature stability and oxidation resistance. Ceramic coatings are being considered for diesel engine cylinder liners, piston caps, valve faces and seats, piston rings, and for turbine components such as combustors, blades, stators, seals, and bearings. Under such conditions ceramics are better suited to high temperature environments than metals. For the first time, adherent crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion/oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments. These corrosive environments include thermal, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, O{sub 2} and coal slag.

  7. Raising the shields: PCR in the presence of metallic surfaces protected by tailor-made coatings.

    PubMed

    Scherag, Frank D; Brandstetter, Thomas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    The implementation of PCR reactions in the presence of metallic surfaces is interesting for the generation of novel bioanalytical devices, because metals exhibit high mechanical stability, good thermal conductivity, and flexibility during deformation. However, metallic substrates are usually non-compatible with enzymatic reactions such as PCR due to poisoning of the active center of the enzyme or nonspecific adsorption of the enzymeto the metal surface, which could result in protein denaturation. We present a method for the generation of polymer coatings on metallic surfaces which are designed to minimize protein adsorption and also prevent the release of metal ions. These coatings consist of three layers covalently linked to each other; a self-assembled monolayer to promote adhesion, a photochemically generated barrier layer and a photochemically generated hydrogel. The coatings can be deposited onto aluminum, stainless steel, gold and copper surfaces. We compare PCR efficiencies in the presence of bare metallic surfaces with those of surfaces treated with the novel coating system. PMID:25108478

  8. Molten metal containment vessel with rare earth oxysulfide protective coating thereon and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    An improved molten metal containment vessel is disclosed in which wetting of the vessel's inner wall surfaces by molten metal is inhibited by coating at least the inner surfaces of the containment vessel with one or more rare earth oxysulfide or rare earth sulfide compounds to inhibit wetting and or adherence by the molten metal to the surfaces of the containment vessel.

  9. Protection of aluminium foil AA8021 by molybdate-based conversion coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chang-Sheng; Lv, Zhong-Fei; Zhu, Ye-Ling; Xu, Shi-Ai; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    A quick method for surface treatment of aluminium foil with environment-friendly and effective molybdate-based coating was developed in this study. Aluminium foil samples were treated with molybdate-based solution. The microstructure and composition of the resulting molybdate-based conversion coatings were explored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy (XPS). We found that the molybdate-based conversion coating was composed mainly of MoO3, (MoO3)x(P2O5)y and Al2(MoO4)3 compounds. Furthermore, corrosion resistance of the treated aluminium foil was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. Our results show that all of the aluminium foils with molybdate-based conversion coatings have much better corrosion resistance than bare aluminium foil. Notably, the sample treated at 40 °C exhibited the best corrosion resistance. The new method is very suitable for continuous processing.

  10. Study on cerium-doped nano-TiO2 coatings for corrosion protection of 316 L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Li, Suning; Wang, Qian; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Zhihua; Wang, Ying; Fu, Jiajun

    2012-04-19

    Many methods have been reported on improving the photogenerated cathodic protection of nano-TiO2 coatings for metals. In this work, nano-TiO2 coatings doped with cerium nitrate have been developed by sol-gel method for corrosion protection of 316 L stainless steel. Surface morphology, structure, and properties of the prepared coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The corrosion protection performance of the prepared coatings was evaluated in 3 wt% NaCl solution by using electrochemical techniques in the presence and absence of simulated sunlight illumination. The results indicated that the 1.2% Ce-TiO2 coating with three layers exhibited an excellent photogenerated cathodic protection under illumination attributed to the higher separation efficiency of electron-hole pairs and higher photoelectric conversion efficiency. The results also showed that after doping with an appropriate concentration of cerium nitrate, the anti-corrosion performance of the TiO2 coating was improved even without irradiation due to the self-healing property of cerium ions.

  11. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive

  12. Applications of advanced electrochemical techniques in the study of microbial fuel cells and corrosion protection by polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Aswin Karthik

    determined by the sum of the polarization resistance of the anode (Rap) and the cathode (Rcp), and therefore Rint depends on V. The ohmic contribution to the Rint was very small. It has been found that Rint decreased with decreasing cell voltage as the increasing current flow decreased R ap and Rcp. In the presence of MR-1, Rint was lower by a factor of about 100 than Rint of the MFC with buffer and lactate as anolyte. Additions of SS balls to the anode compartment produced a very large decrease of Rint. For the MFC containing SS balls in the anode compartment no significant further decrease of Rint could be observed when MR-1 was added to the anolyte. In Chapter 2, EIS has been used to determine the properties and stability of polymer coatings based on different chromate or chromate-free pretreatments and primers. Five sets of coated aluminum 2024 samples were exposed to 0.5N NaCl for a period of 31 days. Impedance spectra of the samples were measured during this period and the changes of the properties of the different coatings were studied as a function of time. From the analysis of the fit parameters of the impedance spectra, it was found that the corrosion protection of the coated samples depended on the type of primer used. The coating with the chromate based primer provided better corrosion protection than the coating with the chromate free primer. After 31 days of exposure, one sample from each set was scribed and exposed to 0.5N NaCl. The corrosion behavior of the scribed coatings was found to be dependent upon the type of pretreatment employed. The samples with the chromate conversion coating pretreatment showed better corrosion resistance in the scribed area than the samples that were treated by the trivalent chromium based method.

  13. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    PubMed

    Finkenstadt, Victoria L; Côté, Gregory L; Willett, J L

    2011-06-01

    Corrosion of metals is a serious and challenging problem faced worldwide by industry. Purified Leuconostoc mesenteroides exopolysaccharide (EPS) coatings, cast from aqueous solution, inhibited the corrosion of low-carbon steel as determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). There were two different corrosion behaviors exhibited when EPS films from different strains were cast onto the steel. One EPS coating reacted immediately with the steel substrate to form an iron (III) oxide layer ("rust") during the drying process while another did not. The samples that did not flash corrode had higher corrosion inhibition and formed an iron (II) passivation layer during EIS testing that persisted after the cells were disassembled. Corrosion inhibition was strain-specific as polysaccharides with similar structure did not have the same corrosion potential. PMID:21290167

  14. Antibacterial glass-composite coatings for protection of special purpose steel panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savvova, O.; Bragina, L.; Babich, E.

    2011-12-01

    It has been established that the most informative and universal method for determination of biocide properties of vitreous coatings is qualitative method that takes into account the growth level of biotest microorganisms inoculated into liquid nutrient media. It is shown, that biocidity of glass-composite coatings on the basis of glasses of Na2O - K2O - CaO - ZrO2 - TiO2 - Al2O3 - P2O5 - B2O3 - SiO2 system is determined by the presence of calcium phosphates in them and depends on the type of bactericide filler. The most effective ones by the action on Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterium and Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans fungi are zinc titanate and Ag+, to Escherichia coli- only zinc phosphate.

  15. Corrosion protection of metal implants by hard biocompatible ceramic coatings deposited by radio-frequency sputtering.

    PubMed

    Sella, C; Martin, J C; Lecoeur, J; Bellier, J P; Harmand, M F; Naji, A; Davidas, J P; Le Chanu, A

    1990-01-01

    Most metals used for orthopaedic and stomatology implants and prostheses belong to the families of titanium or nickel-based and cobalt-based superalloys designed for advanced technology industries (e.g. space, aeronautic and nuclear industries). Ideal materials should be as insoluble and biologically compatible as possible. In the present paper the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Cr and Co-Cr alloys in biological media is evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization tests. It is shown that these metals exhibit some minor release of the component elements and degradation products, which may induce cytotoxic and allergic effects. The corrosion resistance of these alloys can be strongly enhanced by hard ceramic coatings deposited by radio-frequency sputtering. The biocompatibility of coated and uncoated metals is compared from differentiated human cell cultures.

  16. On the transfer of protective coating elements on a metal surface from halide gaseous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraimov, N. V.

    2016-06-01

    The processes occurring during the formation of multicomponent diffusion coatings on nickel alloys at the stage of delivery of elements on the article surface when chlorine, bromine, and iodine halides are used as activators are considered. Balance equations and calculated values are given for the partial pressures in the composition of a gas phase of components participating in chemical transport reaction; the possible reactions of delivering elements on the article surfaces and the structures of Ni-Al, Ni-Cr, Ni-Cr-Al, Co-Cr-Al coatings deposited on the ZhS26, ZhS6U, ZhS32, and VZhL12U alloys are presented.

  17. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    PubMed

    Finkenstadt, Victoria L; Côté, Gregory L; Willett, J L

    2011-06-01

    Corrosion of metals is a serious and challenging problem faced worldwide by industry. Purified Leuconostoc mesenteroides exopolysaccharide (EPS) coatings, cast from aqueous solution, inhibited the corrosion of low-carbon steel as determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). There were two different corrosion behaviors exhibited when EPS films from different strains were cast onto the steel. One EPS coating reacted immediately with the steel substrate to form an iron (III) oxide layer ("rust") during the drying process while another did not. The samples that did not flash corrode had higher corrosion inhibition and formed an iron (II) passivation layer during EIS testing that persisted after the cells were disassembled. Corrosion inhibition was strain-specific as polysaccharides with similar structure did not have the same corrosion potential.

  18. Thin film transistors on plastic substrates with reflective coatings for radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Jesse D.; Theiss, Steven D.; Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.; Wickboldt, Paul

    2003-11-04

    Fabrication of silicon thin film transistors (TFT) on low-temperature plastic substrates using a reflective coating so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The TFT can be used in large area low cost electronics, such as flat panel displays and portable electronics such as video cameras, personal digital assistants, and cell phones.

  19. Thin film transistors on plastic substrates with reflective coatings for radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Jesse D.; Theiss, Steven D.; Carey, Paul G.; Smith, Patrick M.; Wickbold, Paul

    2006-09-26

    Fabrication of silicon thin film transistors (TFT) on low-temperature plastic substrates using a reflective coating so that inexpensive plastic substrates may be used in place of standard glass, quartz, and silicon wafer-based substrates. The TFT can be used in large area low cost electronics, such as flat panel displays and portable electronics such as video cameras, personal digital assistants, and cell phones.

  20. Project W-314 Polyurea Special Protective Coating (SPC) Test Report Chemical Compatibility and Physical Characteristics Testing

    SciTech Connect

    MAUSER, R.W.

    2001-04-09

    This Engineering Test report outlines the results obtained from testing polyurea on its decon factor, tank waste compatibility, and adhesion strength when subjected to a high level of gamma radiation. This report is used in conjunction with RPP-7187 Project W-314 Pit Coatings Repair Requirements Analysis, to document the fact polyurea meets the project W-314 requirements contained in HNF-SD-W314-PDS-005 and is therefore an acceptable SPC for use in W-314 pit refurbishments.

  1. Coating carbon nanotubes with a polystyrene-based polymer protects against pulmonary toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background carbon nanotubes (CNT) can have adverse effects on health. Therefore, minimizing the risk associated with CNT exposure is of crucial importance. The aim of this work was to evaluate if coating multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) with polymers could modify their toxicity, thus representing a useful strategy to decrease adverse health effects of CNT. We used industrially-produced MWCNT uncoated (NT1) or coated (50/50 wt%) with acid-based (NT2) or polystyrene-based (NT3) polymer, and exposed murine macrophages (RAW 264.7 cell line) or Balb/c mice by intratracheal administration. Biological experiments were performed both in vitro and in vivo, examining time- and dose-dependent effects of CNT, in terms of cytotoxicity, expression of genes and proteins related to oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue remodeling, cell and lung tissue morphology (optical and transmission electron microscopy), and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid content analysis. Results extensive physico-chemical characterization of MWCNT was performed, and showed, although similar dimensions for the 3 MWCNT, a much smaller specific surface area for NT2 and NT3 as compared to NT1 (54.1, 34 and 227.54 m2/g respectively), along with different surface characteristics. MWCNT-induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation were increased by acid-based and decreased by polystyrene-based polymer coating both in vitro in murine macrophages and in vivo in lung of mice monitored for 6 months. Conclusions these results demonstrate that coating CNT with polymers, without affecting their intrinsic structure, may constitute a useful strategy for decreasing CNT toxicity, and may hold promise for improving occupational safety and that of general the user. PMID:21255417

  2. SiC/C Multi-Layered Sensor for Measurement of Recession Rate of Oxidation Protection Coating during Re-Entry from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Ayaka; Koyama, Masashi; Ookita, Hiroshi; Shiota, Ichiro

    In order to develop reusable space vehicle, it is important to ensure sufficient reliability of thermal protection systems under re-entry environments. For such a purpose, a sensor system to detect a recession rate of anti-oxidation SiC coating on carbon-carbon composite was attempted to be developed. This sensor consisted of multi-layered SiC/carbon coating on a SiC substrate, and high temperature oxidation damage of SiC in the multi-layered coating can be detected by the change of electric resistant of the coating caused by oxidation of carbon layers. In the present paper, conceptual design of the sensor was presented and several required technologies to develop the sensor were discussed. The discussion included how to form the multilayered coating and measuring technique of the electric resistance at high temperatures.

  3. Effect of protective release coatings on the basis of superdispersersed zirconium oxide powder on the formation of gas defects in bronze casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushev, Nikita V.; Risto, Nikolay A.

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigates the use of nanopowders in the composition of foundry coatings when casting leaded tin bronzes. Influence of the composition of the applied protective coating on surface finish is studied. The effects of the coatings of the following compositions are compared: non-stick coating (a mixture of low-dispersed chromium oxide powder and heat-treated vegetable oil); non-stick lubricant ASPF-2/RgU on the basis of low- dispersed graphite powder and heat-treated vegetable oil; patent #2297300 (a mixture of superdispersed zirconium dioxide powder with industrial oil). It is demonstrated that application of foundry coatings containing superdispersed metal oxide powders with low thermal conductivity makes it possible to significantly reduce irregularities and eliminate gas porosity on the surface of tin-leaded bronze castings.

  4. Metal Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, General Magnaplate Corporation developed process techniques for bonding dry lubricant coatings to space metals. The coatings were not susceptible to outgassing and offered enhanced surface hardness and superior resistance to corrosion and wear. This development was necessary because conventional lubrication processes were inadequate for lightweight materials used in Apollo components. General Magnaplate built on the original technology and became a leader in development of high performance metallurgical surface enhancement coatings - "synergistic" coatings, - which are used in applications from pizza making to laser manufacture. Each of the coatings is designed to protect a specific metal or group of metals to solve problems encountered under operating conditions.

  5. Thermally Sprayed Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 Coatings for High-Temperature Protection of SiC Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, E.; Nistal, A.; Martín de la Escalera, F.; Khalifa, A.; Sainz, M. A.; Osendi, M. I.; Miranzo, P.

    2015-01-01

    The suitability of certain glass compositions in the Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 (YAS) system as protecting coatings for silicon carbide components has been prospected. One particular YAS composition was formulated considering its glass formation ability and subsequent crystallization during service. Round-shaped and homogeneous granules of the selected composition were prepared by spray drying the corresponding homogeneous oxide powder mixture. Glassy coatings (197 µm thick) were obtained by oxyacetylene flame spraying the YAS granules over SiC substrates, previously grit blasted and coated with a Si bond layer (56 µm thick). Bulk glass of the same composition was produced by the conventional glass casting method and used as reference material for comparative evaluation of the characteristic glass transition temperatures, crystallization behavior, mechanical, and thermal coating properties. The mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of the coating were lower than those of the bulk glass owing to its lower density, higher porosity, and characteristic lamellar structure. The crystallization of both bulk glass and coating occurred during isothermal treatments in air at 1100-1350 °C. Preliminary data on ablation tests at 900 °C using the oxyacetylene gun indicated that the YAS glassy coating was a viable protective shield for the SiC substrate during 150 s.

  6. Investigation of the weldability of iron-aluminum-chromium overlay coatings for corrosion protection in oxidizing/sulfidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regina, Jonathan R.

    The current study investigated the effect of chromium additions on the hydrogen cracking susceptibility of Fe-Al weld overlay claddings containing chromium additions. It was found that the weldability of FeAlCr claddings was a function of both the aluminum and chromium concentrations of the weld coatings. Weld overlay compositions that were not susceptible to hydrogen cracking were identified and the underlying mechanism behind the hydrogen cracking phenomenon was investigated further. It was concluded that the cracking behavior of the FeAlCr welds depended strongly on the microstructure of the weld fusion zone. Although it was found that the cracking susceptibility was influenced by the presence of Fe-Al intermetallic phases (namely Fe3 Al and FeAl), the cracking behavior of FeAlCr weld overlay claddings also depended on the size and distribution of carbide and oxide particles present within the weld structure. These particles acted as hydrogen trapping sites, which are areas where free hydrogen segregates and can no longer contribute to the hydrogen embrittlement of the metal. It was determined that in practical applications of these FeAlCr weld overlay coatings, carbon should be present within these welds to reduce the amount of hydrogen available for hydrogen cracking. Based on the weldability results of the FeAlCr weld claddings, coating compositions that were able to be deposited crack-free were used for long-term corrosion testing in a simulated low NOx environment. These alloys were compared to a Ni-based superalloy (622), which is commonly utilized as boiler tube coatings in power plant furnaces for corrosion protection. It was found that the FeAlCr alloys demonstrated superior corrosion resistance when compared to the Ni-based superalloy. Due to the excellent long-term corrosion behavior of FeAlCr weld overlays that were immune to hydrogen cracking, it was concluded that select FeAlCr weld overlay compositions would make excellent corrosion resistant

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of atomic oxygen attack of polymers with protective coatings on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Auer, Bruce M.; Gebauer, Linda; Edwards, Jonathan L.

    1993-01-01

    Characterization of the behavior of atomic oxygen interaction with materials on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) assists in understanding of the mechanisms involved. Thus the reliability of predicting in-space durability of materials based on ground laboratory testing should be improved. A computational model which simulates atomic oxygen interaction with protected polymers was developed using Monte Carlo techniques. Through the use of an assumed mechanistic behavior of atomic oxygen interaction based on in-space atomic oxygen erosion of unprotected polymers and ground laboratory atomic oxygen interaction with protected polymers, prediction of atomic oxygen interaction with protected polymers on LDEF was accomplished. However, the results of these predictions are not consistent with the observed LDEF results at defect sites in protected polymers. Improved agreement between observed LDEF results and predicted Monte Carlo modeling can be achieved by modifying of the atomic oxygen interactive assumptions used in the model. LDEF atomic oxygen undercutting results, modeling assumptions, and implications are presented.

  8. Electrochemically assisted deposition of hydroxyapatite on Ti6Al4V substrates covered by CVD diamond films - Coating characterization and first cell biological results.

    PubMed

    Strąkowska, Paulina; Beutner, René; Gnyba, Marcin; Zielinski, Andrzej; Scharnweber, Dieter

    2016-02-01

    Although titanium and its alloys are widely used as implant material for orthopedic and dental applications they show only limited corrosion stability and osseointegration in different cases. The aim of the presented research was to develop and characterize a novel surface modification system from a thin diamond base layer and a hydroxyapatite (HAp) top coating deposited on the alloy Ti6Al4V widely used for implants in contact with bone. This coating system is expected to improve both the long-term corrosion behavior and the biocompatibility and bioactivity of respective surfaces. The diamond base films were obtained by Microwave Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PACVD); the HAp coatings were formed in aqueous solutions by electrochemically assisted deposition (ECAD) at varying polarization parameters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman microscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements were applied to characterize the generated surface states; the calcium phosphate coatings were additionally chemically analyzed for their composition. The biological properties of the coating system were assessed using hMSC cells analyzing for cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation. Varying MW-PACVD process conditions resulted in composite coatings containing microcrystalline diamond (MCD/Ti-C), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) with the NCD coatings being dense and homogeneous and the B-NCD coatings showing increased electrical conductivity. The ECAD process resulted in calcium phosphate coatings from stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric HAp. The deposition of HAp on the B-NCD films run at lower cathodic potentials and resulted both in the highest coating mass and the most homogenous appearance. Initial cell biological investigations showed an improved cell adhesion in the order B-NCD>HAp/B-NCD>uncoated substrate. Cell proliferation was improved for both investigated coatings whereas ALP

  9. Electrochemically assisted deposition of hydroxyapatite on Ti6Al4V substrates covered by CVD diamond films - Coating characterization and first cell biological results.

    PubMed

    Strąkowska, Paulina; Beutner, René; Gnyba, Marcin; Zielinski, Andrzej; Scharnweber, Dieter

    2016-02-01

    Although titanium and its alloys are widely used as implant material for orthopedic and dental applications they show only limited corrosion stability and osseointegration in different cases. The aim of the presented research was to develop and characterize a novel surface modification system from a thin diamond base layer and a hydroxyapatite (HAp) top coating deposited on the alloy Ti6Al4V widely used for implants in contact with bone. This coating system is expected to improve both the long-term corrosion behavior and the biocompatibility and bioactivity of respective surfaces. The diamond base films were obtained by Microwave Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PACVD); the HAp coatings were formed in aqueous solutions by electrochemically assisted deposition (ECAD) at varying polarization parameters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman microscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements were applied to characterize the generated surface states; the calcium phosphate coatings were additionally chemically analyzed for their composition. The biological properties of the coating system were assessed using hMSC cells analyzing for cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation. Varying MW-PACVD process conditions resulted in composite coatings containing microcrystalline diamond (MCD/Ti-C), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) with the NCD coatings being dense and homogeneous and the B-NCD coatings showing increased electrical conductivity. The ECAD process resulted in calcium phosphate coatings from stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric HAp. The deposition of HAp on the B-NCD films run at lower cathodic potentials and resulted both in the highest coating mass and the most homogenous appearance. Initial cell biological investigations showed an improved cell adhesion in the order B-NCD>HAp/B-NCD>uncoated substrate. Cell proliferation was improved for both investigated coatings whereas ALP

  10. Silicon nitride films for the protective functional coating: blood compatibility and biomechanical property study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhifeng; Wang, Yingjun; Du, Chang; Huang, Nan; Wang, Lin; Ning, Chengyun

    2012-12-01

    Behaviors of silicon nitride films and their relation to blood compatibility and biomechanical have been interesting subjects to researchers. A systematic blood compatibility and biomechanical property investigation on the deposition of silicon-nitride films under varying N₂ and CF₄ flows was carried out by direct current unbalanced magnetron sputtering techniques. Significant role of surface property, chemical bonding state of silicon nitride film and blood compatibility, mechanical properties for the films were observed. The chemical bonding configurations, surface topography, contact angle and mechanical properties were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nano-indentation technique and CSEM pin-on-disk tribometer. Blood compatibility of the films was evaluated by platelet adhesion investigation. The results of the platelet adhesion tests shown that the effect of fluorine and nitrogen-doped revealed an intimate relationship between the ratio of polar component and dispersion component of the surface energy and its hemocompatibility. Si-N-O coating can be a great candidate for developing antithrombogenic surfaces in blood contacting materials. The chemical bonding state made an adjustment in microstructured surfaces, once in the totally wettable configuration, may improve the initial contact between platelet and biomedical materials, due to the appropriate ratio of dispersion component and polar component. To resist wear, biomedical components require coatings that are tough and hard, have low friction, and are bio-inert. The study suggests that by Si-N coating the metal surfaces could be a choice to prolong the life of the sliding pair Co-Cr-Mo alloy/UHMWPE implants.

  11. Protective/conductive coatings for ferritic stainless steel interconnects used in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaigan, Nima

    Ferritic stainless steels are the most commonly used materials for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect application. Although these alloys may meet the criteria for interconnect application for short periods of service, their application is limited for long-term use (i.e., 40,000 h) due to poor oxidation behaviour that results in a rapid increase in contact resistance. In addition, volatile Cr species migrating from the chromia scale can poison the cathode resulting in a considerable drop in performance of the cell. Coatings and surface modifications have been developed in order to mitigate the abovementioned problems. In this study, composite electrodeposition of reactive element containing particles in a metal matrix was considered as a solution to the interconnect problems. Nickel and Co were used as the metal matrix and LaCrO3 particles as the reactive element containing particles. The role of the particles was to improve the oxidation resistance and oxide scale adhesion, while the role of Ni or Co was to provide a matrix for embedding of the particles. Also, oxidation of the Ni or Co matrix led to the formation of conductive oxides. Moreover, as another part of this study, the effect of substrate composition on performance of steel interconnects was investigated. Numerous experimental techniques were used to study and characterise the oxidation behaviour of the composite coatings, as well as the metal-oxide scale interface properties. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX), as well as surface analysis techniques including Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), were used for the purpose of characterization. The substrate used for coating was AISI-SAE 430 stainless steel that is considered as a typical, formerly used interconnect material. Also, for the purpose of the metal-oxide scale interfacial study, ZMG232 stainless steel that is a specially

  12. Protective conversion coating on mixed-metal substrates and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    O'Keefe, Matthew J.; Maddela, Surender

    2016-09-06

    Mixed-metal automotive vehicle bodies-in-white comprising ferrous metal surfaces, zinc surfaces, aluminum alloy surfaces, and magnesium alloy surfaces are cleaned and immersed in an aqueous bath comprising an adhesion promoter and an aqueous electrocoat bath (the adhesion promoter may be in the electrocoat bath. The adhesion promoter, which may be a cerium salt, is selected to react with each metal in the body surfaces to form an oxide layer that provides corrosion resistance for the surface and adherence for the deposited polymeric paint coating. The body is cathodic in the electrocoat deposition.

  13. Iron aluminide weld overlay coatings for boiler tube protection in coal-fired low NOx boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide weld overlay coatings are currently being considered for enhanced sulfidation resistance in coal-fired low NO{sub x} boilers. The use of these materials is currently limited due to hydrogen cracking susceptibility, which generally increases with an increase in aluminum concentration of the deposit. The overall objective of this program is to attain an optimum aluminum content with good weldability and improved sulfidation resistance with respect to conventional materials presently in use. Research has been initiated using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) in order to achieve this end. Under different sets of GTAW parameters (wire feed speed, current), both single and multiple pass overlays were produced. Characterization of all weldments was conducted using light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. Resultant deposits exhibited a wide range of aluminum contents (5--43 wt%). It was found that the GTAW overlays with aluminum contents above {approximately}10 wt% resulted in cracked coatings. Preliminary corrosion experiments of 5 to 10 wt% Al cast alloys in relatively simple H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S gas mixtures exhibited corrosion rates lower than 304 stainless steel.

  14. [Monosaccharide and fatty acid composition of exopolymer complex of bacteria-destructors of the protective coating of gas pipeline].

    PubMed

    Kopteva, Zh P; Zanina, V V; Boretskaia, M A; Iumyna, Iu M; Kopteva, A E; Kozlova, I A

    2012-01-01

    Monosaccharide and fatty acid composition of the exopolymer complex (EPC) of heterotrophic bacteria Pseudomonas pseudoalkaligenes 109, Pseudomonas sp. T/2, Rhodococcus erythropolis 102--destructors of the protective coating Polyken 980-25 has been studied. It is shown that qualitative and quantitative composition of EPC components changes depending on the model of bacteria growth. Arabinose, mannose, galactose and glucose are dominating saccharides. Xylose has been revealed only under conditions of the biofilm form of growth of all the studied bacteria; ribose only in the biofilm of Pseudomonas sp. T/2. The fatty acid composition of EPC contains saturated and unsaturated acids with 12-19 carbon atoms. Hexadecanoic acid (C 16:0) acid which content in the biofilm and plankton conditions is from 24.9 to 32.4% prevailed in the spectrum of fatty acids of EPC bacteria. Unsaturated fatty acids: hexadecanoic (C 16:1) and octadecenoic (C 18:1) ones have been revealed only in the biofilm of bacteria-destructors of the coating.

  15. Study of corrosion protection of alumimium by siliconoxid-polymer coatings deposited by a dielectric barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, J. F.; Sonnenfeld, A.; Ivanova, O.; Hippler, R.; To, T. X. H.; Pham, G. V.; Vu, K. O.; Nguyen, T. D.

    2003-10-01

    Aluminum surfaces were treated with the plasma of a dielectric barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure in air and in nitrogen. Tetraethoxysilan (TEOS) was used as the precursor for the deposition of a thin SiOx polymer film with an anticorrosive and an adhesive characteristics. The substrate temperature was varied from 25 C to 50 C. The coated aluminum surface was provided with a painting of primer. The corrosion performance of the layers was evaluated by adhesion measurements, by salt spraying test and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance of the layers depends on the substrate temperature. The results of the impedance measurements show that a surface treatment with a substrate temperature of 50 C supplies the best corrosion protection. The same results were found by using the salt spaying test.

  16. Evaluation of coated columbium alloy heat shields for space shuttle thermal protection system application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    A three-phase program to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a metallic heat shield suitable for use on Space Shuttle Orbiter class vehicles at operating surface temperatures of up to 1590 K (2400 F) is summarized. An orderly progression of configuration studies, material screening tests, and subscale structural tests was performed. Scale-up feasibility was demonstrated in the final phase when a sizable nine-panel array was fabricated and successfully tested. The full-scale tests included cyclic testing at reduced air pressure to 1590 K (2400 F) and up to 158 dB overall sound pressure level. The selected structural configuration and design techniques succesfully eliminated thermal induced failures. The thermal/structural performance of the system was repeatedly demonstrated. Practical and effective field repair methods for coated columbium alloys were demonstrated. Major uncertainties of accessibility, refurbishability, and durability were eliminated.

  17. Reactively Deposited Aluminum Oxide and Fluoropolymer Filled Aluminum Oxide Protective Coatings for Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Hunt, Jason

    1995-01-01

    Reactive ion beam sputter deposition of aluminum simultaneous with low energy arrival of oxygen ions at the deposition surface enables the formation of highly transparent aluminum oxide films. Thick (12 200 A), adherent, low stress, reactively deposited aluminum oxide films were found to provide some abrasion resistance to polycarbonate substrates. The reactively deposited aluminum oxide films are also slightly more hydrophobic and more transmitting in the UV than aluminum oxide deposited from an aluminum oxide target. Simultaneous reactive sputter deposition of aluminum along with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE Teflon) produces fluoropolymer-filled aluminum oxide films which are lower in stress, about the same in transmittance, but more wetting than reactively deposited aluminum oxide films. Deposition properties, processes and potential applications for these coatings will be discussed.

  18. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Ken

    1994-01-01

    An iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100.degree. C.

  19. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1992-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an iron-based alloy containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100{degrees}C.

  20. Structural alloy with a protective coating containing silicon or silicon-oxide

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1994-12-27

    An iron-based alloy is described containing chromium and optionally, nickel. The alloy has a surface barrier of silicon or silicon plus oxygen which converts at high temperature to a protective silicon compound. The alloy can be used in oxygen-sulfur mixed gases at temperatures up to about 1100 C. 8 figures.

  1. Development of a flexible nanocomposite TiO2 film as a protective coating for bioapplications of superelastic NiTi alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aun, Diego Pinheiro; Houmard, Manuel; Mermoux, Michel; Latu-Romain, Laurence; Joud, Jean-Charles; Berthomé, Gregory; Buono, Vicente Tadeu Lopes

    2016-07-01

    An experimental procedure to coat superelastic NiTi alloys with flexible TiO2 protective nanocomposite films using sol-gel technology was developed in this work to improve the metal biocompatibility without deteriorating its superelastic mechanical properties. The coatings were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and glazing incidence X-ray diffraction. The elasticity of the film was tested in coated specimens submitted to three-point bending tests. A short densification by thermal treatment at 500 °C for 10 min yielded a bilayer film consisting of a 50 nm-thick crystallized TiO2 at the inner interface with another 50-nm-thick amorphous oxide film at the outer interface. This bilayer could sustain over 6.4% strain without cracking and could thus be used to coat biomedical instruments as well as other devices made with superelastic NiTi alloys.

  2. Investigation of Wear and Corrosion Protection of AlSi20 Coatings Produced by Plasma Spraying and Laser Cladding on AZ31B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Kopp, Nils; Warda, Thomas; Schulz, Christiane; Rolink, Gesa; Weisheit, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Magnesium and magnesium alloys are the lightest structural materials with an approximate density of 1.7 g/cm2 (density of aluminum ~2.7 g/cm2). Due to poor corrosion and wear resistance properties, they need to be coated for usage in service conditions under corrosive and tribological loads. AlSi20 was found to be a suitable coating material to improve the wear and corrosion protection properties of magnesium alloys. Within this work, AlSi20 coatings were applied by plasma spraying, laser cladding, and a combination of both processes. First, the coatings are characterized by their microhardness and residual stresses formed within the coating during the different coating processes. Then, these coatings were investigated regarding corrosion resistance in 3.5% sodium chloride solution in a three-electrode setup to obtain electrochemical corrosion characteristics. Abrasive wear was investigated using a pin-on-disk tribometer and the abrasion rate was calculated. Resistance against shock loads was tested by applying a cyclic load at 50 Hz to investigate the resistance against impact stresses.

  3. Comparison of the protection effectiveness of acrylic polyurethane coatings containing bark extracts on three heat-treated North American wood species: Surface degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocaefe, Duygu; Saha, Sudeshna

    2012-04-01

    High temperature heat-treatment of wood is a very valuable technique which improves many properties (biological durability, dimensional stability, thermal insulating characteristics) of natural wood. Also, it changes the natural color of wood to a very attractive dark brown color. Unfortunately, this color is not stable if left unprotected in external environment and turns to gray or white depending on the wood species. To overcome this problem, acrylic polyurethane coatings are applied on heat-treated wood to delay surface degradations (color change, loss of gloss, and chemical modifications) during aging. The acrylic polyurethane coatings which have high resistance against aging are further modified by adding bark extracts and/or lignin stabilizer to enhance their effectiveness in preventing the wood aging behavior. The aging characteristic of this coating is compared with acrylic polyurethane combined with commercially available organic UV stabilizers. In this study, their performance on three heat-treated North American wood species (jack pine, quaking aspen and white birch) are compared under accelerated aging conditions. Both the color change data and visual assessment indicate improvement in protective characteristic of acrylic polyurethane when bark extracts and lignin stabilizer are used in place of commercially available UV stabilizer. The results showed that although acrylic polyurethane with bark extracts and lignin stabilizer was more efficient compared to acrylic polyurethane with organic UV stabilizers in protecting heat-treated jack pine, it failed to protect heat-treated aspen and birch effectively after 672 h of accelerated aging. This degradation was not due to the coating adhesion loss or coating degradation during accelerated aging; rather, it was due to the significant degradation of heat-treated aspen and birch surface beneath this coating. The XPS results revealed formation of carbonyl photoproducts after aging on the coated surfaces and

  4. Cathodic protection for nuclear waste packaging under gamma ray irradiation by using TiO{sub 2} coating combined with glass scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, Ryutaro; Tsujikawa, Shigeo

    1995-12-31

    The photoelectrochemical behaviors of a TiO{sub 2} single crystal and TiO{sub 2} coating were studied, for the purposes of cathodic protection of stainless steels and Cu via the TiO{sub 2} coating combined with glass scintillators under gamma ray irradiation. It was confirmed that a TiO{sub 2} coating could protect 304 stainless steel cathodically from crevice corrosion under illumination. A logarithmic relationship between the photopotential of single crystal TiO{sub 2} (rutile) and light intensity was found, moreover, the photopotential was found to be least noble when wavelength equals 375 nm. Under illumination by gamma rays combined with the glass scintillators, the electrode potential of single crystal TiO{sub 2} was found to shift in the less noble direction by about 200 mV. Therefore, the technique of cathodic protection by TiO{sub 2} coating is considered to be applicable to protect the packaging metal from corrosion for a long time.

  5. Method for producing evaporation inhibiting coating for protection of silicon--germanium and silicon--molybdenum alloys at high temperatures in vacuum

    DOEpatents

    Chao, P.J.

    1974-01-01

    A method is given for protecting Si--Ge and Si-- Mo alloys for use in thermocouples. The alloys are coated with silicon to inhibit the evaporation of the alloys at high tempenatures in a vacuum. Specific means and methods are provided. (5 fig) (Official Gazette)

  6. Effects of Protective Resin Coating on the Surface Roughness and Color Stability of Resin-Based Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Tüzüner, Tamer; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Baygın, Özgül; Bağış, Yıldırım Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of nanofilled protective resin coating (RC) on the surface roughness (Ra) and color stability (ΔE) of resin-based restorative materials (RM) (compomer (C), nanofilled composite (NF), and microhybrid composite (MH)) after being submitted to the ultraviolet aging (UV) method. Thirty-six specimens were prepared (n = 6 for each group). The Ra and (ΔE) values and SEM images were obtained before and after UV. Significant interactions were found among the RM-RC-UV procedures for Ra (P < 0.001). After the specimens were submitted to UV, the Ra values were significantly increased, regardless of the RC procedure (with RC; P < 0.01 for all, without RC; C (P < 0.01), NF (P < 0.001), and MH (P < 0.001)) for each RM. Significant interactions were found between the RM-RC (P < 0.001) procedures for the ΔE values. The ΔE values were increased in each group after applying the RC procedures (P < 0.001). Protective RC usage for RM could result in material-related differences in Ra and ΔE as with used UV method. PMID:25162066

  7. Plasma-polymerization-deposited transparent protective coating for plastic display window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Daoyang; Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Ho, Fang C.

    1996-09-01

    The technique of mid-frequency plasma polymerization was employed to deposit scratch-resistant and anti-fogging films on transparent polycarbonate substrates. The input monomer used for depositing scratch-resistant coatings was tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO). Variation of oxygen-to-TMDSO ratio study indicated that the hardest film was formed using equal amount of oxygen and TMDSO. The typical deposition rate was about 3 micrometers /hr. Typical operation pressure, TMDSO flow and oxygen flow were 2 X 10-2 Torr, 30 sccm and 30 sccm, respectively. The deposited polysiloxane layer was characterized as a hard, highly transparent and durable against scratching and abrasion film. Further depositing a thin hydrophilic film on top of the polysiloxane layer significantly improved the surface wettability and therefore dramatically increased the anti-fogging capability. The monomer used for polymerization deposition of the anti- fogging film was vinyl acetate, and the typical flow for vinyl acetate monomer and oxygen were 15 sccm and 10 sccm, respectively.

  8. Oxidation Through Coating Cracks of SiC-Protected Carbon/Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.; Curry, Donald M.

    2007-01-01

    The oxidation of SiC-protected carbon/carbon through machined slots and naturally occurring craze cracks in the SiC was studied. The slot and crack geometries were characterized, and the subsurface oxidation of the carbon/carbon substrate at temperatures of 1000 to 1300 C in air was assessed using weight change, x-ray computed tomography, and optical microscopy of sections. Rate constants were derived from these measurements and compared with a two-step diffusion control model of carbon oxidation. Oxidation kinetic measurements on both the specimens with machined slots and with naturally occurring craze cracks showed good agreement with the model.

  9. Oxidation Through Coating Cracks of SiC-Protected Carbon/Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.; Cawley, James D.; Curry, Donald M.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of SiC-protected carbon/carbon through machined slots and naturally occurring craze cracks in the SiC was studied. The slot and crack geometries were characterized, and the subsurface oxidation of the carbon/carbon substrate at temperatures of 1000 to 1300 C in air was assessed using weight change, x-ray computed tomography, and optical microscopy of sections. Rate constants were derived from these measurements and compared with a two-step diffusion control model of carbon oxidation. Oxidation kinetic measurements on both the specimens with machined slots and with naturally occurring craze cracks showed good agreement with the model.

  10. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  11. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  12. Hydroxyapatite coatings for marble protection: Optimization of calcite covering and acid resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, Gabriela; Sassoni, Enrico; Franzoni, Elisa; Scherer, George W.

    2016-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) has a much lower dissolution rate and solubility than calcite, especially in an acidic environment, so it has been proposed for the protection of marble against acidic rain corrosion. Promising results were obtained, but further optimization is necessary as the treated layer is often incomplete, cracked and/or porous. In this paper, several parameters were investigated to obtain a coherent, uncracked layer, and to avoid the formation of metastable, soluble phases instead of HAP: the role of the pH of the starting solution; the effect of organic and inorganic additions, and in particular that of ethanol, as it is reported to adsorb on calcite, hence possibly favoring the growth of the HAP layer. Finally, a double application of the treatment was tested. Results were compared to those obtained with ammonium oxalate treatment, widely investigated for marble protection. Results indicate that adding small amounts of ethanol to the formulation remarkably increases the acid resistance of treated samples, and yields better coverage of the surface without crack formation. The effectiveness of the treatment is further enhanced when a second treatment is applied. The efficacy of ethanol-doped DAP mixtures was found to be remarkably higher than that of ammonium oxalate based treatments.

  13. Architectural optimization of an epoxy-based hybrid sol-gel coating for the corrosion protection of a cast Elektron21 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo-Gutiérrez, N. V.; Ansart, F.; Bonino, J.-P.; Kunst, S. R.; Malfatti, C. F.

    2014-08-01

    An epoxy-based hybrid sol-gel coating was prepared in various architectural configurations has been studied for the corrosion protection of a cast Elektron21 magnesium alloy. The creation of a single layer of this coating presents defects consisting of macro-pores and protuberances, which opens access for corrosive species to reach the metallic substrate. These defects are suspected to result from the high reactivity of the substrate, as well as to the irregular topography of the substrate disrupted by the microstructure of the own magnesium alloy. Hence, a sol-gel coating in bilayer architecture is proposed, where the first layer would “inert” the surface of the magnesium substrate, and the second layer would cover the defects of the first layer and also thickening the coating. The morphological characteristics of the sol-gel coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and their corrosion behavior was evaluated by OCP (open circuit potential) monitoring and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in chloride media. It is shown that both the architectural arrangement and the individual thickness of the first and second layers have an important influence on the anticorrosion performances of the protective system, just as much as its global thickness.

  14. Spectroelectrochemical Studies on Quinacridone by Using Poly(vinyl alcohol) Coating as Protection Layer

    PubMed Central

    Enengl, Sandra; Enengl, Christina; Stadler, Philipp; Neugebauer, Helmut; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements in the infrared range combined with electrochemistry are a powerful technique for investigation of organic semiconductors to track changes during oxidation and reduction (p- and n-doping) processes. For these measurements it is important that the studied material, mostly deposited as a thin film on an internal reflection element, does not dissolve during this characterization. In this study we introduce a technique that allows infrared spectroelectrochemical characterization of films of these materials for the first time. In many cases so far this has been impossible, due to solubility in the oxidized and/or reduced form. This novel technique is shown on thin films of quinacridone by adding a protection layer of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). PMID:26013836

  15. Investigation of the structural-phase state and the impact-protective properties of optically transparent Si-Al-N coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bozhko, Irina A. Fedorischeva, Marina V. Sergeev, Victor P.; Rybalko, Evgeniya V.

    2015-10-27

    The results of the study of the structural-phase state, the optical and impact-protective properties of Si-Al-N coatings with a thickness from 0.9 to 6.2 μm deposited by pulsed magnetron sputtering on a substrate made of the KV type quartz glass are presented. The formation of the nanoscale single-phase AlN (hcp) with a crystallite size up to 20 nm was discovered by the X-ray diffraction method. Coatings based on Si-Al-N are characterized by high values of microhardness (H{sub μ} ≈ 25 GPa) and the coefficient of elastic recovery (k{sub y} = 0.71–0.85). The Si-Al-N coatings are characterized by a high degree of transparency (about 80%) in the visible range of wavelengths and are completely opaque in the ultra-violet regions. The refractive index of the glass samples with coatings on the basis of Si-Al-N was determined using the transmission spectra whose value decreases from 2.04 to 1.87 with increasing thickness of coatings. The results of the study of the surface density of the craters formed on the surface of the initial quartz glass and the quartz glass with Si-Al-N coatings due to the influence of high-speed Fe particles of the micron size are described.

  16. Characterization of SiO2-TiO2 Hybrid Corrosion Protective Coatings on Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtay, Sebahattin

    2014-12-01

    Organic-inorganic SiO2-TiO2 sol-gel coatings were prepared and applied on a mild steel substrate using dip coating technique and subsequently heat treated at 200 and 300 °C to improve the corrosion resistance. The coating sols were synthesized using Glycidoxytrimethoxysilane and titanium tetraisopropoxide as precursor materials. The corrosion resistances of the both coated and uncoated samples were evaluated by the Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in NaCl solution. The microstructure of coated specimens was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Fourier transformed infrared and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses were used to identify the presence of various functional groups in the coating solutions. A comparison of the corrosion resistance of the coated and uncoated mild steel was presented. i corr values of coated specimens heat treated at 200 °C were between 6.9 and 9.2 times smaller than those of uncoated specimen. In the case of coated specimens heat treated at 300 °C, i corr values were 4.4 and 5 times smaller than those of uncoated specimen. The coating film was noted to be smooth and between 7.2- and 7.5-µm thick. The measured electrochemical parameters indicated that the corrosion resistance was improved by the coating film. The elasticity of the coating can be improved by the presence of organic groups in the coating which reduces stress and crack formations during sintering. Ultimately, crack-free and elastic coating was obtained by heat treating of organic-inorganic coating at as low as 200 °C.

  17. Dispersion and surface functionalization of oxide nanoparticles for transparent photocatalytic and UV-protecting coatings and sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Bertrand; Salazar-Alvarez, German; Ahniyaz, Anwar; Villaluenga, Irune; Berriozabal, Gemma; De Miguel, Yolanda R.; Bergström, Lennart

    2013-04-01

    This review describes recent efforts on the synthesis, dispersion and surface functionalization of the three dominating oxide nanoparticles used for photocatalytic, UV-blocking and sunscreen applications: titania, zinc oxide, and ceria. The gas phase and liquid phase synthesis is described briefly and examples are given of how weakly aggregated photocatalytic or UV-absorbing oxide nanoparticles with different composition, morphology and size can be generated. The principles of deagglomeration are reviewed and the specific challenges for nanoparticles highlighted. The stabilization of oxide nanoparticles in both aqueous and non-aqueous media requires a good understanding of the magnitude of the interparticle forces and the surface chemistry of the materials. Quantitative estimates of the Hamaker constants in various media and measurements of the isoelectric points for the different oxide nanoparticles are presented together with an overview of different additives used to prepare stable dispersions. The structural and chemical requirements and the various routes to produce transparent photocatalytic and nanoparticle-based UV-protecting coatings, and UV-blocking sunscreens are described and discussed.

  18. Corrosion resistant coatings. (Latest citations from World Surface Coatings abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning anticorrosive protective coatings. Patents include surface treatments, paints, antistatic coatings, silicate coatings, fatty acids, organic and inorganic materials, and techniques for applying various coatings. Citations concerning epoxy coatings, acrylic and acrylate coatings, urethane coatings, and water-borne coatings are excluded and examined in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. CE-MS analysis of heroin and its basic impurities using a charged polymer-protected gold nanoparticle-coated capillary.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengxiang; Yan, Bo; Liu, Kelin; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2009-01-01

    The first application of charged polymer-protected gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) as semi-permanent capillary coating in CE-MS was presented. Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) was the only reducing and stabilizing agent for Au NPs preparation. Stable and repeatable coating with good tolerance to 0.1 M HCl, methanol, and ACN was obtained via a simple rinsing procedure. Au NPs enhanced the coating stability toward flushing by methanol, improved the run-to-run and capillary-to-capillary repeatabilities, and improved the separation efficiency of heroin and its basic impurities for tracing geographical origins of illicit samples. Baseline resolution of eight heroin-related alkaloids was achieved on the PDDA-protected Au NPs-coated capillary under the optimum conditions: 120 mM ammonium acetate (pH 5.2) with addition of 13% methanol, separation temperature 20 degrees C, applied voltage -20 kV, and capillary effective length 60.0 cm. CE-MS analysis with run-to-run RSDs (n=5) of migration time in the range of 0.43-0.62% and RSDs (n=5) of peak area in the range of 1.49-4.68% was obtained. The established CE-MS method would offer sensitive detection and confident identification of heroin and related compounds and provide an alternative to LC-MS and GC-MS for illicit drug control.

  20. Microstructure characterization of advanced protective Cr/CrN+a-C:H/a-C:H:Cr multilayer coatings on carbon fibre composite (CFC).

    PubMed

    Major, L; Janusz, M; Lackner, J M; Kot, M; Major, B

    2016-06-01

    Studies of advanced protective chromium-based coatings on the carbon fibre composite (CFC) were performed. Multidisciplinary examinations were carried out comprising: microstructure transmission electron microscopy (TEM, HREM) studies, micromechanical analysis and wear resistance. Coatings were prepared using a magnetron sputtering technique with application of high-purity chromium and carbon (graphite) targets deposited on the CFC substrate. Selection of the CFC for surface modification in respect to irregularities on the surface making the CFC surface more smooth was performed. Deposited coatings consisted of two parts. The inner part was responsible for the residual stress compensation and cracking initiation as well as resistance at elevated temperatures occurring namely during surgical tools sterilization process. The outer part was responsible for wear resistance properties and biocompatibility. Experimental studies revealed that irregularities on the substrate surface had a negative influence on the crystallites growth direction. Chromium implanted into the a-C:H structure reacted with carbon forming the cubic nanocrystal chromium carbides of the Cr23 C6 type. The cracking was initiated at the coating/substrate interface and the energy of brittle cracking was reduced because of the plastic deformation at each Cr interlayer interface. The wear mechanism and cracking process was described in micro- and nanoscale by means of transmission electron microscope studies. Examined materials of coated CFC type would find applications in advanced surgical tools.

  1. Microstructure characterization of advanced protective Cr/CrN+a-C:H/a-C:H:Cr multilayer coatings on carbon fibre composite (CFC).

    PubMed

    Major, L; Janusz, M; Lackner, J M; Kot, M; Major, B

    2016-06-01

    Studies of advanced protective chromium-based coatings on the carbon fibre composite (CFC) were performed. Multidisciplinary examinations were carried out comprising: microstructure transmission electron microscopy (TEM, HREM) studies, micromechanical analysis and wear resistance. Coatings were prepared using a magnetron sputtering technique with application of high-purity chromium and carbon (graphite) targets deposited on the CFC substrate. Selection of the CFC for surface modification in respect to irregularities on the surface making the CFC surface more smooth was performed. Deposited coatings consisted of two parts. The inner part was responsible for the residual stress compensation and cracking initiation as well as resistance at elevated temperatures occurring namely during surgical tools sterilization process. The outer part was responsible for wear resistance properties and biocompatibility. Experimental studies revealed that irregularities on the substrate surface had a negative influence on the crystallites growth direction. Chromium implanted into the a-C:H structure reacted with carbon forming the cubic nanocrystal chromium carbides of the Cr23 C6 type. The cracking was initiated at the coating/substrate interface and the energy of brittle cracking was reduced because of the plastic deformation at each Cr interlayer interface. The wear mechanism and cracking process was described in micro- and nanoscale by means of transmission electron microscope studies. Examined materials of coated CFC type would find applications in advanced surgical tools. PMID:26788794

  2. Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; White, Rickey L.; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.

    2000-01-01

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

  3. An investigation on corrosion protection of chromium nitride coated Fe-Cr alloy as a bipolar plate material for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, T. J.; Zhang, B.; Li, J.; He, Y. X.; Lin, F.

    2014-12-01

    The corrosion properties of chromium nitride (CrN) coating are investigated to assess the potential use of this material as a bipolar plate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Conductive metallic ceramic CrN layers are firstly deposited onto Fe-Cr alloy using a multi-arc ion plating technique to increase the corrosion resistance of the base alloy. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the corrosion resistance of the substrate alloy is greatly enhanced by the CrN coating. The free corrosion potential of the substrate is increased by more than 50 mV. Furthermore, a decrease in three orders of magnitude of corrosive current density for the CrN-coated alloy is observed compared to the as-received Fe-Cr alloy. Long-term immersion tests show that the CrN layer is highly stable and effectively acts as a barrier to inhibit permeation of corrosive species. On the contrary, corrosion of the Fe-Cr alloy is rather severe without the protection of CrN coating due to the active dissolution. Finally, the corresponding electrochemical impedance models are proposed to elucidate the corrosion process of the CrN/Fe-Cr alloy submerged in a simulated PEMFCs environment.

  4. Use of silane-based primer on silicon wafers to enhance adhesion of edge-protective coatings during wet etching: application of the TALON Wrap process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi-Malhotra, J.; Brand, G. J.; Zhong, X.-F.

    2007-02-01

    Hydrolyzed silane primer solutions were made of an organosilane in glycolether diluted with a large amount of water with or without an acid as a catalyst. The newly developed primer compositions exhibited an extended shelf life of 3 months or more. The compositions were specially designed to accommodate ProTEK TM. layer adhesion in the TALON Wrap. process. In this application, a spin-coatable polymeric material, ProTEK TM., is applied as the protective coating to coat the top, edge, and underside rim of the wafer in preparation for backside etching. By applying an underlayer of primer and an overlayer of ProTEK TM. coating to the top, edge and the bottom side rim of the wafer, an effective encapsulation of the wafer was achieved by using a custom-designed baffle. Each layer was applied by spin coating followed by baking at a wide temperature range. Thermal processing was followed by wet etching in KOH at an elevated temperature for . 10 hr. Post-etched wafers were rinsed with deionized (DI) water. Excellent edge profiles without "knife-edges" were obtained after etching the unprotected areas of the wafer. The process is fully automated because it is carried out in the TALON TM automated wafer-processing tool. Intact films with no lifting or peeling were obtained during or after the KOH etch process/DI rinse for silicon substrates.

  5. Silicon carbide multilayer protective coating on carbon obtained by thermionic vacuum arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupină, Victor; Lungu, Cristian Petrica; Vladoiu, Rodica; Prodan, Gabriel; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Belc, Marius; Stanescu, Iuliana M.; Vasile, Eugeniu; Rughinis, Razvan

    2014-01-01

    Thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method is currently developing, in particular, to work easily with heavy fusible material for the advantage presented by control of directing energy for the elements forming a plasma. The category of heavy fusible material can recall C and W (high-melting point materials), and are difficult to obtain or to control by other means. Carbon is now used in many areas of special mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. We refer in particular to high-temperature applications where unwanted effects may occur due to oxidation. Changed properties may lead to improper functioning of the item or device. For example, increasing the coefficient of friction may induce additional heat on moving items. One solution is to protect the item in question by coating with proper materials. Silicon carbide (SiC) was chosen mainly due to compatibility with coated carbon substrate. Recently, SiC has been used as conductive transparent window for optical devices, particularly in thin film solar cells. Using the TVA method, SiC coatings were obtained as thin films (multilayer structures), finishing with a thermal treatment up to 1000°C. Structural properties and oxidation behavior of the multilayer films were investigated, and the measurements showed that the third layer acts as a stopping layer for oxygen. Also, the friction coefficient of the protected films is lower relative to unprotected carbon films.

  6. Production of carbon nano-tubes via CCVD method and their corrosion protection performance in epoxy based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, M. A.; Ghauri, F. A.; Awan, M. S.; Farooq, A.; Ahmad, R.

    2016-08-01

    Good yield of carbon products was obtained by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) technique using 100-500mg of ferrocene catalyst at temperature of 900 °C and acetylene flow rate of 150-200cc/min. The effects of amount of ferrocene, temperature and hydrocarbons precursors on the yield of carbon nanomaterial's was calculated and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) andenergy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Good yield of carbon nanomaterials primarily consisted of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanoparticles was obtained. CNTs obtained after purification were dispersed in epoxy resin to produce composite coatings which were coated on stainless steel 316L. The coated stainless steel samples’ corrosion behavior was studied using open circuit potential (OCP), cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Results showed that epoxy coating containing 4 wt. % of CNTs offered improved corrosion resistance to stainless steel.

  7. Adhesive and Protective Characteristics of Ceramic Coating A-417 and Its Effect on Engine Life of Forged Refractaloy-26 (AMS 5760) and Cast Stellite 21 (AMS 5385) Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Floyd B; Gyorgak, Charles A

    1953-01-01

    The adhesive and protective characteristics of National Bureau of Standards Coating A-417 were investigated, as well as the effect of the coating on the life of forged Refractaloy 26 and cast Stellite 21 turbine blades. Coated and uncoated blades were run in a full-scale J33-9 engine and were subjected to simulated service operations consisting of consecutive 20-minute cycles (15 min at rated speed and approximately 5 min at idle). The ceramic coating adhered well to Refractaloy 26 and Stellite 21 turbine blades operated at 1500 degrees F. The coating also prevented corrosion of the Refractaloy 26, a corrosion-sensitive nickel-base alloy, and of the Stellite 21, a relatively corrosion-resistant cobalt-base alloy. Although the coating prevented corrosion of both alloys, it had no apparent effect on blade life.

  8. Aircraft surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Liquid, spray on elastomeric polyurethanes are selected and investigated as best candidates for aircraft external protective coatings. Flight tests are conducted to measure drag effects of these coatings compared to paints and a bare metal surface. The durability of two elastometric polyurethanes are assessed in airline flight service evaluations. Laboratory tests are performed to determine corrosion protection properties, compatibility with aircraft thermal anti-icing systems, the effect of coating thickness on erosion durability, and the erosion characteristics of composite leading edges-bare and coated. A cost and benefits assessment is made to determine the economic value of various coating configurations to the airlines.

  9. Coating Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Gedwill, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Hot-section gas-turbine components typically require some form of coating for oxidation and corrosion protection. Efficient use of coatings requires reliable and accurate predictions of the protective life of the coating. Currently engine inspections and component replacements are often made on a conservative basis. As a result, there is a constant need to improve and develop the life-prediction capability of metallic coatings for use in various service environments. The purpose of this present work is aimed at developing of an improved methodology for predicting metallic coating lives in an oxidizing environment and in a corrosive environment.

  10. Electrocurtain coating process for coating solar mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Boyd, Donald W.; Buchanan, Michael J.; Kelly, Patrick; Kutilek, Luke A.; McCamy, James W.; McPheron, Douglas A.; Orosz, Gary R.; Limbacher, Raymond D.

    2013-10-15

    An electrically conductive protective coating or film is provided over the surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by flowing or directing a cation containing liquid and an anion containing liquid onto the conductive surface. The cation and the anion containing liquids are spaced from, and preferably out of contact with one another on the surface of the reflective coating as an electric current is moved through the anion containing liquid, the conductive surface between the liquids and the cation containing liquid to coat the conductive surface with the electrically conductive coating.

  11. Oxide coating development

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.

    1995-06-01

    Monolithic SiC heat exchangers and fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite heat exchangers and filters are susceptible to corrosion by alkali metals at elevated temperatures. Protective coatings are currently being developed to isolate the SiC materials from the corrodants. Unfortunately, these coatings typically crack and spall when applied to SiC substrates. The purpose of this task is to determine the feasibility of using a compliant material between the protective coating and the substrate. The low-modulus compliant layer could absorb stresses and eliminate cracking and spalling of the protective coatings.

  12. Depletion Of The Protective Aluminum Hydroxide Coating In TiO2-Based Sunscreens By Swimming Pool Water Ingredients

    EPA Science Inventory

    In sunscreen lotion (SSL) formulations, titanium dioxide (nTiO2) nanoparticles are coated with an Al(OH)3 layer to shield against the harmful effects of hydroxyl radicals (•OH), superoxide anion radicals (O2-•), and other reactive oxyge...

  13. Functionally graded coatings on SiC fibers for protection in Ti-based metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, K.L.

    1996-06-01

    The incorporation of SiC fibers in Ti-based alloys, has led to the development of high strength, low density and high creep resistant properties of titanium-based metal matrix composites (Ti-MMCs). These composites have applications in the aerospace industry as structural materials for aerojet components and compressor blades. The processing of Ti-based composites usually involves a consolidation stage using diffusion bonding or hot isostatic pressing where the consolidation temperatures are in excess of 800 C for a significant period of time. Severe interdiffusion and chemical reactions between the SiC and Ti-alloy matrices occur under such processing conditions, leading to the formation of brittle reaction layer and deterioration of the mechanical properties of the composites. In addition, the SiC/Ti interfacial reactions can also occur during in service if the operating temperature is above 700 C. A variety of approaches has been examined to prevent or reduce the SiC/Ti interfacial reactions in MMCs at elevated temperatures during material manufacturing and in service. Coating of the SiC fibers prior to incorporation into the Ti matrices seems to be the most viable approach to overcome this technical problem. This has prompted the development of functionally graded coatings onto SiC fibers. Functionally graded coating consists a systematic but continuous variation in the composition and microstructure across the coating thickness, resulting in a gradual change in properties. Consequently, this has led to the distinct multifunction characteristics. This work describes the influence of functionally graded coatings of C/TiC/(Ti,C)/Ti in preserving the surface integrity and strength of the as-received SiC fibers, and effectiveness to prevent deleterious reaction with Ti-matrix as compared with the unprotected SiC fibers.

  14. Phenol-formaldehyde intumescent coating composition and coating prepared therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salyer, Ival O. (Inventor); Fox, Bernard L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Intumescent coatings which form a thick, uniform, fine celled, low density foam upon exposure to a high intensity heat flux or flame are disclosed, the invention coatings comprise phenolic resin prepolymer containing a blowing agent and a nucleating agent; in the preferred embodiments the coatings also contains a silicone surfactant, the coatings are useful in thermal and fire protection systems.

  15. TiO2/SiO2 multilayer as an antireflective and protective coating deposited by microwave assisted magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, M.; Wojcieszak, D.; Domaradzki, J.; Kaczmarek, D.; Song, S.; Placido, F.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper designing, preparation and characterization of multifunctional coatings based on TiO2/SiO2 has been described. TiO2 was used as a high index material, whereas SiO2 was used as a low index material. Multilayers were deposited on microscope slide substrates by microwave assisted reactive magnetron sputtering process. Multilayer design was optimized for residual reflection of about 3% in visible spectrum (450-800 nm). As a top layer, TiO2 with a fixed thickness of 10 nm as a protective film was deposited. Based on transmittance and reflectance spectra, refractive indexes of TiO2 and SiO2 single layers were calculated. Ultra high vacuum atomic force microscope was used to characterize the surface properties of TiO2/SiO2 multilayer. Surface morphology revealed densely packed structure with grains of about 30 nm in size. Prepared samples were also investigated by nanoindentation to evaluate their protective performance against external hazards. Therefore, the hardness of the thin films was measured and it was equal to 9.34 GPa. Additionally, contact angle of prepared coatings has been measured to assess the wetting properties of the multilayer surface.

  16. CoFe 2O 4 spinel protection coating thermally converted from the electroplated Co-Fe alloy for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Z. H.; Zhu, J. H.; Batey, J. L.

    CoFe 2O 4 has been demonstrated as a potential spinel coating for protecting the Cr-containing ferritic interconnects. This spinel had an electrical conductivity of 0.85 S cm -1 at 800 °C in air and an average coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of 11.80 × 10 -6 K -1 from room temperature to 800 °C. A series of Co-Fe alloys were co-deposited onto the Crofer 22 APU ferritic steel via electroplating with an acidic chloride solution. After thermal oxidation in air at 800 °C, a CoFe 2O 4 spinel layer was attained from the plated Co 0.40Fe 0.60 film. Furthermore, a channeled Crofer 22 APU interconnect electrodeposited with a 40-μm Co 0.40Fe 0.60 alloy film as a protective coating was evaluated in a single-cell configuration. The presence of the dense, Cr-free CoFe 2O 4 spinel layer was effective in blocking the Cr migration/transport and thus contributed to the improvement in cell performance stability.

  17. Development of novel cationic chitosan-and anionic alginate–coated poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for controlled release and light protection of resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Vanna; Roggio, Anna Maria; Siliani, Silvia; Piccinini, Massimo; Marceddu, Salvatore; Mariani, Alberto; Sechi, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Background Resveratrol, like other natural polyphenols, is an extremely photosensitive compound with low chemical stability, which limits the therapeutic application of its beneficial effects. The development of innovative formulation strategies, able to overcome physicochemical and pharmacokinetic limitations of this compound, may be achieved via suitable carriers able to associate controlled release and protection. In this context, nanotechnology is proving to be a powerful strategy. In this study, we developed novel cationic chitosan (CS)- and anionic alginate (Alg)-coated poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with the bioactive polyphenolic trans-(E)-resveratrol (RSV) for biomedical applications. Methods NPs were prepared by the nanoprecipitation method and characterized in terms of morphology, size and zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, Raman spectroscopy, swelling properties, differential scanning calorimetry, and in vitro release studies. The protective effect of the nanosystems under the light-stressed RSV and long-term stability were investigated. Results NPs turned out to be spherical in shape, with size ranging from 135 to about 580 nm, depending on the composition and the amount of polyelectrolytes, while the encapsulation efficiencies increased from 8% of uncoated poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) to 23% and 32% of Alg- and CS-coated PLGA NPs, respectively. All nanocarriers are characterized by a biphasic release pattern, and more effective controlled release rates are obtained for NPs formulated with higher polyelectrolyte concentrations. Stability studies revealed that encapsulation provides significant protection against light-exposure degradation, by reducing the trans–cis photoisomerization reaction. Moreover, the nanosystems are able to prevent the degradation of trans isoform and the leakage of RSV from the carrier for a period of 6 months. Conclusion Our findings indicated that the newly developed CS- and Alg-coated

  18. NiFe2O4 Spinel Protection Coating for High-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnect Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irankhah, Reza; Raissi, Babak; Maghsoudipour, Amir; Irankhah, Abdullah; Ghashghai, Sasan

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, Ni-Fe spinel powder was synthesized via a solid state reaction. In the next step, the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method was used to apply the NiFe2O4 spinel, as an oxidation-resistant layer, on a commercially available stainless steel (SUS 430) in a potential range of 100 to 300 V. Microscopic studies of the deposited layers showed that crack-free NiFe2O4 films were obtained at 100 V. The coated and uncoated samples were then pre-sintered in air and 5% H2 bal Ar atmospheres at 900 °C for 3 h followed by cyclic oxidation at 800 °C for 500 h. The investigation of the oxidation resistance of the samples using Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that the NiFe2O4 coating acted as an effective barrier against chromium migration into the coating. The oxidation resistance of 5% H2 bal Ar pre-sintered sample was enhanced with an oxidation rate constant ( K P) of 8.9 × 10-15 g2 cm-4 s-1.

  19. Cermet composite thermal spray coatings for erosion and corrosion protection in combustion environments of advanced coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1996-05-01

    Research is presently being initiated to determine the optimum ceramic/metal combination in thermally sprayed metal matrix composite coatings for erosion and corrosion resistance in new coal-fired boilers. The research will be accomplished by producing model cermet composites using powder metallurgy and electrodeposition methods in which the effect of ceramic/metal combination for the erosion and corrosion resistance will be determined. These results will provide the basis for determining the optimum hard phase constituents` size and volume percent in thermal spray coatings. Thermal spray coatings will be applied by our industrial sponsor and tested in our erosion and corrosion laboratories. During the last quarter, model Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder cermet composites were produced at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory by the Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) technique. The composite samples contained 0, 21, 27, 37, and 45 volume percent of Al{sub 2}O{sub 2} in a nickel matrix with an average size of alumina particles of 12 micrometers. The increase in volume fraction of alumina in the nickel matrix from 0 to 45% led to an increase in hardness of these composites from 85 to 180 HV{sub 1000}. The experimental procedure and preliminary microstructural characterization of Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites are presented in this progress report along with plans for the research in coming year. 3 figs.

  20. Effects of MAR-M247 substrate (modified) composition on coating oxidation coating/substrate interdiffusion. M.S. Thesis. Final Report; [protective coatings for hot section components of gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilsner, B. H.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of gamma+gamma' Mar-M247 substrate composition on gamma+beta Ni-Cr-Al-Zr coating oxidation and coating/substrate interdiffusion were evaluated. These results were also compared to a prior study for a Ni-Cr-Al-Zr coated gamma Ni-Cr-Al substrate with equivalent Al and Cr atomic percentages. Cyclic oxidation behavior at 1130 C was investigated using change in weight curves. Concentration/distance profiles were measured for Al, Cr, Co, W, and Ta. The surface oxides were examined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that variations of Ta and C concentrations in the substrate do not affect oxidation resistance, while additions of grain boundary strengthening elements (Zr, Hf, B) increase oxidation resistance. In addition, the results indicate that oxidation phenomena in gamma+beta/gamma+gamma' Mar-M247 systems have similar characteristics to the l gamma+beta/gamma Ni-Cr-Al system.

  1. Nanostructured Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, J.-P.

    In many branches of technology where surfaces are playing a growing role, the use of coatings is often the only way to provide surfaces with specific functional properties. For example, the austenitic stainless steels or titanium alloys exhibit poor resistance to wear and low hardness values, which limits the field of applications. The idea then is to develop new solutions which would improve the mechanical performance and durability of objects used in contact and subjected to mechanical forces in hostile gaseous or liquid environments. Hard coatings are generally much sought after to enhance the resistance to wear and corrosion. They are of particular importance because they constitute a class of protective coatings which is already widely used on an industrial scale to improve the hardness and lifetime of cutting tools.

  2. Impact of laser-contaminant interaction on the performance of the protective capping layer of 1w high-reflection mirror coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S. R.; Norton, M. A.; Raman, R. N.; Rubenchik, A. M.; Boley, C. D.; Rigatti, A.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Stolz, C. J.; Matthews, M. J.

    2015-10-02

    In this paper, high dielectric constant multilayer coatings are commonly used on high-reflection mirrors for high-peak-power laser systems because of their high laser-damage resistance. However, surface contaminants often lead to damage upon laser exposure, thus limiting the mirror’s lifetime and performance. One plausible approach to improve the overall mirror resistance against laser damage, including that induced by laser-contaminant coupling, is to coat the multilayers with a thin protective capping (absentee) layer on top of the multilayer coatings. An understanding of the underlying mechanism by which laser-particle interaction leads to capping layer damage is important for the rational design and selection of capping materials of high-reflection multilayer coatings. In this paper, we examine the responses of two candidate capping layer materials, made of SiO2 and Al2O3, over silica-hafnia multilayer coatings. These are exposed to a single oblique shot of a 1053 nm laser beam (fluence ~10 J/cm2, pulse length 14 ns), in the presence of Ti particles on the surface. We find that the two capping layers show markedly different responses to the laser-particle interaction. The Al2O3 cap layer exhibits severe damage, with the capping layer becoming completely delaminated at the particle locations. The SiO2 capping layer, on the other hand, is only mildly modified by a shallow depression. Combining the observations with optical modeling and thermal/mechanical calculations, we argue that a high-temperature thermal field from plasma generated by the laser-particle interaction above a critical fluence is responsible for the surface modification of each capping layer. The great difference in damage behavior is mainly attributed to the large disparity in the thermal expansion coefficient of the two capping materials, with that of Al2O3 layer being about 15 times greater

  3. Impact of laser-contaminant interaction on the performance of the protective capping layer of 1w high-reflection mirror coatings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qiu, S. R.; Norton, M. A.; Raman, R. N.; Rubenchik, A. M.; Boley, C. D.; Rigatti, A.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Stolz, C. J.; Matthews, M. J.

    2015-10-02

    In this paper, high dielectric constant multilayer coatings are commonly used on high-reflection mirrors for high-peak-power laser systems because of their high laser-damage resistance. However, surface contaminants often lead to damage upon laser exposure, thus limiting the mirror’s lifetime and performance. One plausible approach to improve the overall mirror resistance against laser damage, including that induced by laser-contaminant coupling, is to coat the multilayers with a thin protective capping (absentee) layer on top of the multilayer coatings. An understanding of the underlying mechanism by which laser-particle interaction leads to capping layer damage is important for the rational design and selectionmore » of capping materials of high-reflection multilayer coatings. In this paper, we examine the responses of two candidate capping layer materials, made of SiO2 and Al2O3, over silica-hafnia multilayer coatings. These are exposed to a single oblique shot of a 1053 nm laser beam (fluence ~10 J/cm2, pulse length 14 ns), in the presence of Ti particles on the surface. We find that the two capping layers show markedly different responses to the laser-particle interaction. The Al2O3 cap layer exhibits severe damage, with the capping layer becoming completely delaminated at the particle locations. The SiO2 capping layer, on the other hand, is only mildly modified by a shallow depression. Combining the observations with optical modeling and thermal/mechanical calculations, we argue that a high-temperature thermal field from plasma generated by the laser-particle interaction above a critical fluence is responsible for the surface modification of each capping layer. The great difference in damage behavior is mainly attributed to the large disparity in the thermal expansion coefficient of the two capping materials, with that of Al2O3 layer being about 15 times greater than that of SiO2.« less

  4. Parylene coating for circuit components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkebile, M. J.; Holbrook, R. J.; Oberin, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    Inexpensive internal coating improves reliability of plastic-packaged parts. Coating protects device from effects of humidity and heat and acts as barrier between device and harmful substances generated by plastic-packaging material.

  5. Feasibility Assessment of Self-Grading Metallic Bond Coat Alloys for EBCs/TBCs to Protect Si-Based Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Armstrong, Beth L; Lin, Hua-Tay; Lance, Michael J; More, Karren Leslie; Walker, Larry R; Huang, F; Weaver, Mark

    2005-01-01

    A sputtered {gamma} (TiAl)+Laves TiAlCr coating formed an adherent Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale on SN 282 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} when oxidized. A Ti-N rich layer was formed at the TiAlCr-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} interface, which effectively resulted in beneficial local Al enrichment underneath the growing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, rather than detrimental Al loss to the substrate.

  6. COATING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, R.G.

    1959-08-25

    A method is described for protectively coating beryllium metal by etching the metal in an acid bath, immersing the etched beryllium in a solution of sodium zincate for a brief period of time, immersing the beryllium in concentrated nitric acid, immersing the beryhlium in a second solution of sodium zincate, electroplating a thin layer of copper over the beryllium, and finally electroplating a layer of chromium over the copper layer.

  7. Protective coatings for alloys in contact with molten drawsalt (NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/)

    SciTech Connect

    Carling, R.W.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Mar, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    Molten drawsalt (NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/) is being considered as the energy transfer and storage medium for many solar central receiver applications. In an effort to reduce the cost of the containment material while maintaining corrosion resistance, alloys with aluminide coatings have been examined while in contact with molten drawsalt for more than 6000 hours at 600/sup 0/C. The alloys examined were 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 5 Cr-1/2 Mo, and 9 Cr-1 Mo low-alloy steels, and 316 stainless steel. The results show a steady, albeit slow, net weight loss over the course of the experiment. The weight loss has been attributed to spalling of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from the surface (the occurrence of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is a result of the aluminizing process) and dissolution of corrosion products NaAlO/sub 2/ and/or NaFeO/sub 2/ during post-immersion handling. Scanning electron micrographs of exposed surfaces revealed little or no corrosion of the base metal. It has been concluded that aluminide coated alloys could provide significant cost savings (approx. 50%) relative to Incoloy 800, and provide at least equivalent corrosion resistance.

  8. Development of a combined piezoresistive pressure and temperature sensor using a chemical protective coating for Kraft pulp digester process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Abdolreza R.; Bennington, Chad P. J.; Chiao, Mu

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an integrated piezoresistive pressure and temperature sensor for multiphase chemical reactors, primarily Kraft pulp digesters (pH 13.5, temperatures up to 175 °C, reaching a local maximum of 180 °C and pressures up to 2 MPa). The absolute piezoresistive pressure sensor consisted of a large square silicon diaphragm (1000 × 1000 µm2) and high resistance piezoresistors (10 000 Ω). A 4500 Ω buried piezoresistive wire was patterned on the silicon chip to form a piezoresistive temperature sensor which was used for pressure sensor compensation and temperature measurement. A 4 µm thick Parylene HT® coating, a chemically resistant epoxy and a silicone conformal coating were deposited to passivate the pressure sensor against the caustic environment in Kraft digesters. The sensors were characterized up to 2 MPa and 180 °C in an environment chamber. A maximum thermal error of ±0.72% full-scale output (FSO), an average sensitivity of 0.116 mV (V kPa)-1 and a power consumption of 0.3 mW were measured in the pressure sensor. The sensors' resistances were measured before and after test in a Kraft pulping cycle and showed no change in their values. SEM pictures and topographical surfaces were also analyzed before and after pulp liquor exposure and showed no observable changes.

  9. Impact of particle shape on the laser-contaminant interaction induced damage on the protective capping layer of 1ω high reflector mirror coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, S. R.; Norton, M. A.; Honig, J.; Rubenchik, A. M.; Boley, C. D.; Rigatti, A.; Stolz, C. J.; Matthews, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We report an investigation on the response to laser exposure of a protective capping layer of 1ω (1053 nm) high-reflector mirror coatings, in the presence of differently shaped Ti particles. We consider two candidate capping layer materials, namely SiO2 and Al2O3. They are coated over multiple silica-hafnia multilayer coatings. Each sample is exposed to a single oblique (45°) shot of a 1053 nm laser beam (p polarization, fluence ~ 10 J/cm2, pulse length 14 ns), in the presence of spherically or irregularly shaped Ti particles on the surface. We observe that the two capping layers show markedly different responses. For spherically shaped particles, the Al2O3 cap layer exhibits severe damage, with the capping layer becoming completely delaminated at the particle locations. In contrast, the SiO2 capping layer is only mildly modified by a shallow depression, likely due to plasma erosion. For irregularly shaped Ti filings, the Al2O3 capping layer displays minimal to no damage while the SiO2 capping layer is significantly damaged. In the case of the spherical particles, we attribute the different response of the capping layer to the large difference in thermal expansion coefficient of the materials, with that of the Al2O3 about 15 times greater than that of the SiO2 layer. For the irregularly shaped filings, we attribute the difference in damage response to the large difference in mechanical toughness between the two materials, with that of the Al2O3 being about 10 times stronger than that of the SiO2.

  10. Maintaining high-volume, low-pressure surface-coating regulatory compliance using the U.s. Environmental Protection Agency's data quality objectives process.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Palmer, Glenn R; Peters, Scott; Olivas, Arthur C; Nelson, Tim M

    2005-03-01

    To effectively reduce the environmental compliance costs associated with meeting specific requirements under the Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Facility's National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants rule, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Data Quality Objective (DQO) process has been proposed as a suitable framework for developing a scientifically defensible surface compliance monitoring program. By estimating the variability associated with the air cap pressure of high- volume, low-pressure (HVLP) surface-coating spray equipment, the number of monitoring samples necessary for an affected facility to claim compliance with a desired statistical confidence level was established. Using data taken from the pilot test facility, the DQO process indicated that the mean of at least 21 HVLP air cap pressure samples taken over the compliance period must be < or = 10 pounds per square inch (psig) gauge for the facility to claim regulatory compliance with 99.99% statistical confidence. Fewer compliance samples could be taken, but that decision would lead to a commensurate reduction in the compliance confidence level. Implementation of the DQO-based compliance sampling plan eliminates the need for an affected facility to sample all regulated HVLP surface-coating processes while still maintaining a high level of compliance assurance.

  11. Studies on nano-additive for the substitution of hazardous chemical substances in antifouling coatings for the protection of ship hulls.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Fan, Weijie; Duan, Jizhou; Hou, Baorong

    2014-07-01

    Adhesion and growth of biofouling organisms have severe influence on the reliability, service life and environmental adaptability of marine ships. Based on the bactericidal capacity of cuprous oxide and photochemical effect of nano-additive, environment-friendly and efficient marine antifouling paints were prepared in this study. The evaluation of the antifouling paints was carried out by the laboratory method using bacteria and phytoplanktonic microorganisms as target organisms, as well as measurements with panels in shallow submergence in natural seawater. Results showed good agreement of all the tests, indicating the remarkable antifouling performance of the paints. To our knowledge, this was one of the first systematic studies on effects of nano-additive for the substitution of hazardous chemical substances in antifouling coatings for the protection of ship hulls by measurements on bacterial inhibition, algal adhesion and growth of large organisms. PMID:25016277

  12. Sol-gel deposited aluminum-doped and gallium-doped zinc oxide thin-film transparent conductive electrodes with a protective coating of reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhaozhao; Mankowski, Trent; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Shikoh, Ali Sehpar; Touati, Farid; Benammar, Mohieddine A.; Mansuripur, Masud; Falco, Charles M.

    2016-04-01

    Using a traditional sol-gel deposition technique, we successfully fabricated aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) and gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) thin films on glass substrates. Employing a plasma treatment method as the postannealing process, we produced thin-film transparent conductive electrodes exhibiting excellent optical and electrical properties, with transmittance greater than 90% across the entire visible spectrum and the near-infrared range, as well as good sheet resistance under 200 Ω/sq. More importantly, to improve the resilience of our fabricated thin-film samples at elevated temperatures and in humid environments, we deposited a layer of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as protective overcoating. The stability of our composite AZO/rGO and GZO/rGO samples improved substantially compared to that of their counterparts with no rGO coating.

  13. Studies on nano-additive for the substitution of hazardous chemical substances in antifouling coatings for the protection of ship hulls.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Fan, Weijie; Duan, Jizhou; Hou, Baorong

    2014-07-01

    Adhesion and growth of biofouling organisms have severe influence on the reliability, service life and environmental adaptability of marine ships. Based on the bactericidal capacity of cuprous oxide and photochemical effect of nano-additive, environment-friendly and efficient marine antifouling paints were prepared in this study. The evaluation of the antifouling paints was carried out by the laboratory method using bacteria and phytoplanktonic microorganisms as target organisms, as well as measurements with panels in shallow submergence in natural seawater. Results showed good agreement of all the tests, indicating the remarkable antifouling performance of the paints. To our knowledge, this was one of the first systematic studies on effects of nano-additive for the substitution of hazardous chemical substances in antifouling coatings for the protection of ship hulls by measurements on bacterial inhibition, algal adhesion and growth of large organisms.

  14. X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction studies of the adhesion of protective wax coatings on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creagh, D. C.; Otieno-Alego, V.; O'Neill, P. M.

    2001-06-01

    More than 50 years after the introduction of water displacing petroleum additives for corrosion protection, scientists are still trying to understand how and why they work. This paper continues research on corrosion preventatives used on objects in museum custody using synchrotron radiation techniques to assess the thickness and organization of the protective layers of corrosion preventative. The organization of sodium dodecylsulphate on aluminium, zinc and platinum surfaces has been studied. As well, preliminary in situ experiments using synchrotron radiation have been undertaken on electrode processes in an electrochemical cell using platinum electrodes and a sodium sulphate solution at different applied potentials.

  15. Effect of plasma CVD operating temperature on nanomechanical properties of TiC nanostructured coating investigated by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shanaghi, Ali; Rouhaghdam, Ali Reza Sabour; Ahangarani, Shahrokh; Chu, Paul K.

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► The TiC{sub x} nanostructure coatings have been deposited by PACVD method. ► Dominant mechanism of growth structure at 490 °C is island-layer type. ► TiC{sub x} nanostructure coating applied at 490 °C, exhibits lowest friction coefficient. ► Young's moduli are 289.9, 400 and 187.6 GPa for 470, 490 and 510 °C, respectively. ► This higher elastic modulus and higher hardness of nanocoating obtain at 490 °C. -- Abstract: The structure, composition, and mechanical properties of nanostructured titanium carbide (TiC) coatings deposited on H{sub 11} hot-working tool steel by pulsed-DC plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition at three different temperatures are investigated. Nanoindentation and nanoscratch tests are carried out by atomic force microscopy to determine the mechanical properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, surface roughness, and friction coefficient. The nanostructured TiC coatings prepared at 490 °C exhibit lower friction coefficient (0.23) than the ones deposited at 470 and 510 °C. Increasing the deposition temperature reduces the Young's modulus and hardness. The overall superior mechanical properties such as higher hardness and lower friction coefficient render the coatings deposited at 490 °C suitable for wear resistant applications.

  16. Ellipsometric study of Al2O3/Ag/Si and SiO2/Ag/quartz ashed in an oxygen plasma. [protective coatings to prevent degradation of materials in low earth orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, Bhola N.; Woollam, John A.

    1989-01-01

    The growth of silver oxide (proposed as a potentially useful protective coating for space environment) on a silver mirror coated with an Al2O3 or a SiO2 protective layer was investigated using the monolayer-sensitive variable angle of incidence spectroscopic ellipsometry technique. The samples were exposed to a pure oxygen plasma in a plasma asher, and the silver oxide growth was monitored as a function of the exposure time. It was found that atomic oxygen in the asher penetrated through the SiO2 or Al2O3 coatings to convert the silver underneath to silver oxide, and that the quantity of the silver oxide formed was proportional to the ashing time. The band gap of silver oxide was determined to be 1.3 eV. A schematic diagram of the variable angle of incidence spectroscopic ellipsometer is included.

  17. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  18. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  19. Overlay metallic-cermet alloy coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A.; Levine, S. R.; Glasgow, T. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A substrate, such as a turbine blade, vane, or the like, which is subjected to high temperature use is coated with a base coating of an oxide dispersed, metallic alloy (cermet). A top coating of an oxidation, hot corrosion, erosion resistant alloy of nickel, cobalt, or iron is then deposited on the base coating. A heat treatment is used to improve the bonding. The base coating serves as an inhibitor to interdiffusion between the protective top coating and the substrate. Otherwise, the protective top coating would rapidly interact detrimentally with the substrate and degrade by spalling of the protective oxides formed on the outer surface at elevated temperatures.

  20. Characterization and Mechanism for the Protection of Photolytic Decomposition of N-Halamine Siloxane Coatings by Titanium Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Li, Jing; Li, Lin; McFarland, Stuart; Ren, Xuehong; Acevedo, Orlando; Huang, T S

    2016-02-10

    N-Halamine antibacterial materials have superior inactivation activities due to oxidative chlorine species. However, N-Cl bonds and bonds between N-halamine and substrates often decompose rapidly under UV irradiation, leading to unrecoverable loss of antimicrobial activity. In this study, titanium dioxide was covalently bonded onto N-halamine siloxane poly[5,5-dimethyl-3-(3'-triethoxysilylpropyl)hydantoin] (PSPH) via a sol-gel process. Experimental testing of the chlorinated cotton fabrics treated with TiO2/PSPH demonstrated that the residual oxidative chlorine in cotton-TiO2/PSPH-Cl was still effective for inactivating bacteria after 50 washing cycles and under UV light irradiation for 24 h. Quantum mechanical calculations found that TiO2 improves the UV stability of the PSPH-Cl system by increasing the activation barrier of the C-Si scission reaction responsible for the loss of the biocidal hydantoin moiety. SEM, XPS and FTIR spectra were used to characterize the coated cotton samples. Cotton-TiO2/PSPH-Cl samples exhibited good antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) and Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895). The storage stability and washing stability of treated cotton fabrics were also investigated.

  1. Polyphosphazene Icephobic Coating Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.

    1992-01-01

    Coating materials consisting mostly of modified polyphosphazene (Class FZ) elastomers provide better protection against icing than fluorocarbon polymers and silicone elastomers. Reduces adhesive force between ice and surface. As consequence, increasing weight of ice, wind loading, or vibration of surface causes ice to be shed. New icephobic coats reduce accumulation of ice on aircraft, radomes, antennas, ships, and power-transmission lines.

  2. No additional protection against ventriculitis with prolonged systemic antibiotic prophylaxis for patients treated with antibiotic-coated external ventricular drains.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Rory K J; Liu, Betty; Srinath, Abhinav; Reynolds, Matthew R; Liu, Jingxia; Craighead, Martha C; Camins, Bernard C; Dhar, Rajat; Kummer, Terrance T; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT External ventricular drains (EVDs) are commonly used for CSF diversion but pose a risk of ventriculitis, with rates varying in frequency from 2% to 45%. Results of studies examining the utility of prolonged systemic antibiotic therapy for the prevention of EVD-related infection have been contradictory, and no study to date has examined whether this approach confers additional benefit in preventing ventriculitis when used in conjunction with antibiotic-coated EVDs (ac-EVDs). METHODS A prospective performance analysis was conducted over 4 years to examine the impact of discontinuing systemic antibiotic prophylaxis after insertion of an ac-EVD on rates of catheter-related ventriculitis. Ventriculitis and other nosocomial infections were ascertained by a qualified infection disease nurse using definitions based on published standards from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, comparing the period when patients received systemic antibiotic therapy for the duration of EVD treatment (Period 1) compared with only for the peri-insertion period (Period 2). Costs were analyzed and compared across the 2 time periods. RESULTS Over the 4-year study period, 866 patients were treated with ac-EVDs for a total of 7016 catheter days. There were 8 cases of ventriculitis, for an overall incidence of 0.92%. Rates of ventriculitis did not differ significantly between Period 1 and Period 2 (1.1% vs 0.4%, p = 0.22). The rate of nosocomial infections, however, was significantly higher in Period 1 (2.0% vs 0.0% in Period 2, p = 0.026). Cost savings of $162,516 were realized in Period 2 due to decreased drug costs and savings associated with the reduction in nosocomial infections. CONCLUSIONS Prolonged systemic antibiotic therapy following placement of ac-EVDs does not seem to reduce the incidence of catheter-related ventriculitis and was associated with a higher rate of nosocomial infections and increased cost. PMID:25794343

  3. Prolonged systemic antibiotics confer no additional protection against ventriculitis in patients treated with antibiotic-coated external ventricular drains

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Rory K. J.; Liu, Betty; Srinath, Abhinav; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Liu, Jingxia; Craighead, Martha C.; Camins, Bernard C.; Dhar, Rajat; Kummer, Terrance T.; Zipfel, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Object External ventricular drains (EVDs) are commonly used for CSF diversion but pose a risk of ventriculitis, with rates varying in frequency from 2% to 45%. Results of studies examining the utility of prolonged systemic antibiotic therapy for the prevention of EVD-related infection have been contradictory, and no study to date has examined whether this approach confers additional benefit in preventing ventriculitis when used in conjunction with antibiotic-coated EVDs (ac-EVDs). Methods A prospective performance analysis was conducted over 4 years to examine the impact of discontinuing systemic antibiotic prophylaxis after insertion of an ac-EVD on rates of catheter-related ventriculitis. Ventriculitis and other nosocomial infections were ascertained by a qualified infection disease nurse using definitions based on published standards from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, comparing the period when patients received systemic antibiotic therapy for the duration of EVD treatment (Period 1) compared with only for the peri-insertion period (Period 2). Costs were analyzed and compared across the 2 time periods Results Over the 4-year study period, 866 patients were treated with ac-EVDs for a total of 7016 catheter days. There were 8 cases of ventriculitis, for an overall incidence of 0.92%. Rates of ventriculitis did not differ significantly between Period 1 and Period 2 (1.1% vs 0.4%, p = 0.22). The rate of nosocomial infections, however, was significantly higher in Period 1 (2.0% vs 0.0% in Period 2, p = 0.026). Cost savings of $162,516 were realized in Period 2 due to decreased drug costs and savings associated with the reduction in nosocomial infections. Conclusions Prolonged systemic antibiotic therapy following placement of ac-EVDs does not seem to reduce the incidence of catheter-related ventriculitis, and was associated with a higher rate of nosocomial infections and increased cost. PMID:25794343

  4. Boron trifluoride coatings for plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubacki, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Tough, durable coatings of boron triflouride can be deposited on plastic optical components to protect them from destructive effects of abrasion, scratching, and environment. Coating material can be applied simultaneously with organic polymers, using plasma glow-discharge methods, or it can be used as base material for other coatings to increase adhesion.

  5. Aerocoat 7 Replacement Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center has used Aerocoat 7 (AR-7) to protect stainless-steel flex hoses at Launch Complex (LC-39) and hydraulic lines of the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) because it provides excellent corrosion protection in low-temperature applications. The Sovereign Company produced AR-7 exclusively for NASA but discontinued production because the coating released high levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and had a significant environmental impact. The purpose of this project was to select and evaluate potential replacement coatings for AR-7 that would be more environmentally sound. The physical and mechanical properties of commercially available coatings were investigated through the Internet. The ideal coating would be fluid enough to penetrate the outer mesh of a stainless-steel flex hose and coat the inner hose, and flexible enough to withstand the movement of the hose, as well as the expansion and contraction of its metal caused by changes in temperature.

  6. A protective coat of microorganisms on macroalgae: inhibitory effects of bacterial biofilms and epibiotic microbial assemblages on barnacle attachment.

    PubMed

    Nasrolahi, Ali; Stratil, Stephanie B; Jacob, Katharina J; Wahl, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Effects of epibiotic bacteria associated with macroalgae on barnacle larval attachment were investigated. Eight bacterial isolates obtained from samples of three macroalga species were cultured as monospecies bacterial films and tested for their activity against barnacle (Amphibalanus improvisus) attachment in field experiments (Western Baltic Sea). Furthermore, natural biofilm communities associated with the surface of the local brown alga, Fucus vesiculosus, which were exposed to different temperatures (5, 15 and 20 °C), were harvested and subsequently tested. Generally, monospecies bacterial biofilms, as well as natural microbial assemblages, inhibited barnacle attachment by 20-67%. denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints showed that temperature treatment shifted the bacterial community composition and weakened the repellent effects at 20 °C. Repellent effects were absent when settlement pressure of cyprids was high. Nonviable bacteria tended to repel cyprids when compared to the unfilmed surfaces. We conclude that biofilms can have a repellent effect benefiting the host by preventing heavy fouling on its surface. However, severe settlement pressure, as well as stressful temperature, may reduce the protective effects of the alga's biofilm. Our results add to the notion that the performance of F. vesiculosus may be reduced by multiple stressors in the course of global warming.

  7. Highly robust electron beam lithography lift-off process using chemically amplified positive tone resist and PEDOT:PSS as a protective coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofler, Johannes; Schmoltner, Kerstin; Klug, Andreas; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2014-09-01

    Highly sensitive chemically amplified resists are well suited for large-area, high-resolution rapid prototyping by electron beam lithography. The major drawback of these resists is their susceptibility to T-topping effects, sensitivity losses, and linewidth variations caused by delay times between individual process steps. Hence, they require a very tight process control, which hinders their potentially wide application in R&D. We demonstrate a highly robust electron beam lithography lift-off process using a chemically amplified positive tone 40XT photoresist in combination with an acidic conducting polymer (PEDOT:PSS) as a protective top-coating. Even extended delay times of 24 h did not lead to any sensitivity losses or linewidth variations. Moreover, an overall high performance with a resolution of 80 nm (after lift-off) and a high sensitivity (<10 µC/cm2) comparable to other standard chemically amplified resists was achieved. The development characteristics of this resist-layer system revealed new insights into the immanent trade-off between resolution and process stability.

  8. The role of the egg jelly coat in protecting Hyla regilla and Bufo canorus embryos from Ultraviolet B radiation during development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, L.J.; Fabacher, D.L.; Calfee, R.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Previous studies have suggested that Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation may play a role in amphibian population declines. Some of these studies also indicate that egg hatching success is unaltered in some species of anurans as a result of UVB exposure. It has been proposed that the egg mass jelly provides photoprotection to the developing embryos. Methods. Direct spectrophotometric scans of egg jelly, scans of egg jelly methanol extracts, and experimental manipulation in a solar simulator during development were all used to assess the role of egg mass jelly as a photoprotective agent. Results/Discussion. For Hyla regilla, scans of egg jelly and methanolic extracts (for mycosporine-like amino acid content) both displayed no absorption in the UV range. Experimental manipulation (removal of egg mass jelly) with both Hyla regilla and Bufo canorus egg masses in a solar simulator demonstrated that egg mass jelly played no apparent role in photoprotection of either of these species. Conclusions. Based on the results in this study it seems unlikely that the egg jelly coat is playing a crucial role in protecting developing embryos from the impact of UVB radiation.

  9. Silver-doped nanocomposite carbon coatings (Ag-DLC) for biomedical applications - Physiochemical and biological evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bociaga, Dorota; Komorowski, Piotr; Batory, Damian; Szymanski, Witold; Olejnik, Anna; Jastrzebski, Krzysztof; Jakubowski, Witold

    2015-11-01

    The formation of bacteria biofilm on the surface of medical products is a major clinical issue nowadays. Highly adaptive ability of bacteria to colonize the surface of biomaterials causes a lot of infections. This study evaluates samples of the AISI 316 LVM with special nanocomposite silver-doped (by means of ion implantation) diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating prepared by hybrid RF/MS PACVD (radio frequency/magnetron sputtering plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition) deposition technique in order to improve the physicochemical and biological properties of biomaterials and add new features such as antibacterial properties. The aim of the following work was to evaluate antimicrobial efficacy and biocompatibility of gradient a-C:H/Ti + Ag coatings in relation to the physiochemical properties of the surface and chemical composition of coating. For this purpose, samples were tested in live/dead test using two cell strains: human endothelial cells (Ea.hy926) and osteoblasts-like cells (Saos-2). For testing bactericidal activity of the coatings, an exponential growth phase of Escherichia coli strain DH5α was used as a model microorganism. Surface condition and its physicochemical properties were investigated using SEM, AFM and XPS. Examined coatings showed a uniformity of silver ions distribution in the amorphous DLC matrix, good biocompatibility in contact with mammalian cells and an increased level of bactericidal properties. What is more, considering very good mechanical parameters of these Ag including gradient a-C:H/Ti coatings, they constitute an excellent material for biomedical application in e.g. orthopedics or dentistry.

  10. Use of a TiBN Multilayer Coating for Wear Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Moehwald, Kai; Deißer, Todd Alexander; Bistron, Marcus

    2007-05-01

    The near surface area of forging dies is exposed to high mechanical loads. Additionally thermal and chemical stresses occur during the forging process. Depending on the number of forged parts, several kinds of damage develop in the surface area, which lead to failures of forging dies. Die wear is the main reason of failure with a 70% ratio. The abrasion resistance of the surface area of forging dies has to be increased in order to reduce wear. Therefore different methods were examined such as the increase of the abrasion resistance by plasma nitriding and by coating with ceramic layers (TiN, TiCN, TiC, CrN). These layers are applied to the forging die by using PACVD or PAPVD treatment. At the Institute of Metal Forming and Metal-Forming Machines of the University of Hanover a wear reduction by factor 3.5 compared to nitrided forging dies for forging helical gears was achieved. This was possible by using a coating compound of 18 ceramic layers. These excellent results for the multilayer system can be explained through the energy reduction at the inner boundaries and a crack deflection effect at the phase transitions. The layer support of neighboring layers and a stress relaxation through the stacked construction of the layer system are also improving the durability of the coating. This multilayer coating consists of a TiN-TiCN-TiC layer system with an overall thickness of 1.8 μm. This paper presents investigations of this multilayer compound and further research to reduce wear through an additional TiBN coating layer. With this additional top coating an increase of the thermal resistance and the oxidation resistance can be achieved. As a result of this enhancement a further increase of the wear reduction was expected.

  11. Corrosion protection of aluminum bipolar plates with polyaniline coating containing carbon nanotubes in acidic medium inside the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyab, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the corrosion resistance of conductive polymer coating (polyaniline) that coated aluminum bipolar plates in acidic environment inside the PEM fuel cell (0.1 M H2SO4) was investigated using electrical conductivity, polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the coating morphology. The results show that the addition of CNTs to polyaniline coating enhanced the electrical conductivity and the corrosion resistance of polyaniline polymer. The inhibition efficiency of polyaniline polymer increased with increasing CNTs concentration. The best inhibition was generally obtained at 0.8% CNTs concentration in the acidic medium. This was further confirmed by decreasing the oxygen and water permeability and increasing coating adhesion in the presence of CNTs. EIS measurements indicated that the incorporation of CNTs in coating increased both the charge transfer and pore resistances while reducing the double layer capacitance.

  12. Corrosion prevention: Conversion coatings and coating processes. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning conversion coatings and coating processes for the prevention of metal corrosion in various environments. Conversion coating patents for the application of phosphates and chromates to the surfaces of aluminum, zinc, ferrous metals, titanium, cadmium, iron, steels, and various alloys are presented. Topics include coating compositions, surface preparations and pretreatments prior to coating applications, post-treatment of coated metal surfaces, coating quality control, and sacrificial coatings for jet engines. Specific patents concerning protective coatings are excluded and covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 162 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Investigation to identify paint coatings resistive to microorganism growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, C. W.; Kemp, H. T.

    1971-01-01

    All selected coatings contain nutrients that support microbial growth and survival. Incorporation of microbiocidal agents into coatings more susceptible to attack is recommended for improved inhibition of microorganism growth and for increased protection against deterioration of coatings by microorganisms.

  14. Mechanism of the Formation of a Protective Fluoride Coating on Steel Surfaces Contacting Freons as Candidates for Brest-Type Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebaev, S. A.; Orlova, E. A.; Alekseev, V. V.; Zhmurin, V. G.; Orlov, M. A.; Shirshov, Ya. N.; Torbenkova, I. Yu.; Tychinskii, P. I.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of the formation of MgF2 coatings on ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels contacting liquid magnesium and gaseous silicon tetrafluoride (SiF4) has been investigated. An MgF2 coating on steel possesses high plastic properties. The proposed method can be used to improve corrosion resistance of steels contacting freons and other fluorine-containing materials.

  15. Large Area Vacuum Deposited Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-04-30

    It's easy to make the myriad of types of large area and decorative coatings for granted. We probably don't even think about most of them; the low-e and heat mirror coatings on our windows and car windows, the mirrors in displays, antireflection coatings on windows and displays, protective coatings on aircraft windows, heater coatings on windshields and aircraft windows, solar reflectors, thin film solar cells, telescope mirrors, Hubble mirrors, transparent conductive coatings, and the list goes on. All these products require large deposition systems and chambers. Also, don't forget that large batches of small substrates or parts are coated in large chambers. In order to be cost effective hundreds of ophthalmic lenses, automobile reflectors, display screens, lamp reflectors, cell phone windows, laser reflectors, DWDM filters, are coated in batches.

  16. Intumescent coating development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayler, I. O.; Griffen, C. W.

    1983-01-01

    A program was completed at the University of Dayton Research Institute in which polyimide and phenolic intumescent coatings were evaluated as supplemental thermal insulation for the sprayed-on foam insulation on the aft bulkhead of the space shuttle external tank. The purpose of the intumescent coating was to provide additional thermal protection during lift-off in order to replace the ablative heat resistant layer with a lighter weight material for increased payload in the shuttle.

  17. Multi-seasonal barnacle (Balanus improvisus) protection achieved by trace amounts of a macrocyclic lactone (ivermectin) included in rosin-based coatings.

    PubMed

    Pinori, Emiliano; Berglin, Mattias; Brive, Lena M; Hulander, Mats; Dahlström, Mia; Elwing, Hans

    2011-10-01

    Rosin-based coatings loaded with 0.1% (w/v) ivermectin were found to be effective in preventing colonization by barnacles (Balanus improvisus) both on test panels as well as on yachts for at least two fouling seasons. The leaching rate of ivermectin was determined by mass-spectroscopy (LC/MS-MS) to be 0.7 ng cm(-2) day(-1). This low leaching rate, as deduced from the Higuchi model, is a result of the low loading, low water solubility, high affinity to the matrix and high molar volume of the model biocide. Comparison of ivermectin and control areas of panels immersed in the field showed undisturbed colonisation of barnacles after immersion for 35 days. After 73 days the mean barnacle base plate area on the controls was 13 mm(2), while on the ivermectin coating it was 3 mm(2). After 388 days, no barnacles were observed on the ivermectin coating while the barnacles on the control coating had reached a mean of 60 mm(2). In another series of coated panels, ivermectin was dissolved in a cosolvent mixture of propylene glycol and glycerol formal prior to the addition to the paint base. This method further improved the anti-barnacle performance of the coatings. An increased release rate (3 ng cm(-2) day(-1)) and dispersion of ivermectin, determined by fluorescence microscopy, and decreased hardness of the coatings were the consequences of the cosolvent mixture in the paint. The antifouling mechanism of macrocyclic lactones, such as avermectins, needs to be clarified in further studies. Beside chronic intoxication as ivermectin is slowly released from the paint film even contact intoxication occurring inside the coatings, triggered by penetration of the coating by barnacles, is a possible explanation for the mode of action and this is under investigation.

  18. Analysis of corrosion layers on protective coatings and high temperature materials in simulated service environments of modern power plants using SNMS, SIMS, SEM, TEM, RBS and X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Nickel, H; Quadakkers, W J; Singheiser, L

    2002-10-01

    In three different examples, the effects of the oxidation behaviour as well as the microstructural stability of high temperature materials and protective coatings was determined by combining the results of kinetic studies with extensive analytical investigations using, among other techniques, SNMS, SIMS, SEM, TEM, Rutherford back scattering (RBS) as well as X-ray diffraction. 1). The effect of water vapour on the oxidation behaviour of 9% Cr steels in simulated combustion gases has been determined. The effects of O2 and H2O content on the oxidation behaviour of 9% Cr steel in the temperature range 600-800 degrees C showed that in dry oxygen a protective scale was formed with an oxidation rate controlled by diffusion in the protective scale. In the presence of water vapour, after an incubation period, the scales became non-protective as a result of a change in the oxidation limiting process. The destruction of the protective scale by water vapour does not only depend on H2O content but also on the H2O/O2-ratio. 2). The increase of component surface temperature in modern gas turbines leads to an enhanced oxidation attack of the blade coating. Improvements in corrosion resistance and longer lifetime thermal barrier coatings in gas turbines have been achieved by improvement of the high temperature properties of MCrAlY coatings by additions of minor alloying elements such as yttrium, silicon and titanium. 3). The use of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys provides excellent creep resistance up to much higher temperatures than can be achieved with conventional wrought or cast alloys in combination with suitable high temperature oxidation/corrosion resistance. Investigation of the growth mechanisms of protective chromia and alumina scales were examined by a two-stage oxidation method with 18O tracer. The distribution of the oxygen isotopes in the oxide scale was determined by SIMS and SNMS. The results show the positive influence of a Y2O3 dispersion on the

  19. Synthesize and characterization of a novel anticorrosive cobalt ferrite nanoparticles dispersed in silica matrix (CoFe2O4-SiO2) to improve the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharagozlou, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.; Baradaran, Z.

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed at studying the effect of an anticorrosive nickel ferrite nanoparticle dispersed in silica matrix (NiFe2O4-SiO2) on the corrosion protection properties of steel substrate. NiFe2O4 and NiFe2O4-SiO2 nanopigments were synthesized and then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then, 1 wt.% of nanopigments was dispersed in an epoxy coating and the resultant nanocomposites were applied on the steel substrates. The corrosion inhibition effects of nanopigments were tested by an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and salt spray test. Results revealed that dispersing nickel ferrite nanoparticles in a silica matrix (NiFe2O4-SiO2) resulted in the enhancement of the nanopigment dispersion in the epoxy coating matrix. Inclusion of 1 wt.% of NiFe2O4-SiO2 nanopigment into the epoxy coating enhanced its corrosion protection properties before and after scratching.

  20. A SPION-eicosane protective coating for water soluble capsules: Evidence for on-demand drug release triggered by magnetic hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Che Rose, Laili; Bear, Joseph C.; McNaughter, Paul D.; Southern, Paul; Piggott, R. Ben; Parkin, Ivan P.; Qi, Sheng; Mayes, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    An orally-administered system for targeted, on-demand drug delivery to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is highly desirable due to the high instances of diseases of that organ system and harsh mechanical and physical conditions any such system has to endure. To that end, we present an iron oxide nanoparticle/wax composite capsule coating using magnetic hyperthermia as a release trigger. The coating is synthesised using a simple dip-coating process from pharmaceutically approved materials using a gelatin drug capsule as a template. We show that the coating is impervious to chemical conditions within the GI tract and is completely melted within two minutes when exposed to an RF magnetic field under biologically-relevant conditions. The overall simplicity of action, durability and non-toxic and inexpensive nature of our system demonstrated herein are key for successful drug delivery systems. PMID:26842884

  1. A SPION-eicosane protective coating for water soluble capsules: Evidence for on-demand drug release triggered by magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Rose, Laili; Bear, Joseph C.; McNaughter, Paul D.; Southern, Paul; Piggott, R. Ben; Parkin, Ivan P.; Qi, Sheng; Mayes, Andrew G.

    2016-02-01

    An orally-administered system for targeted, on-demand drug delivery to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is highly desirable due to the high instances of diseases of that organ system and harsh mechanical and physical conditions any such system has to endure. To that end, we present an iron oxide nanoparticle/wax composite capsule coating using magnetic hyperthermia as a release trigger. The coating is synthesised using a simple dip-coating process from pharmaceutically approved materials using a gelatin drug capsule as a template. We show that the coating is impervious to chemical conditions within the GI tract and is completely melted within two minutes when exposed to an RF magnetic field under biologically-relevant conditions. The overall simplicity of action, durability and non-toxic and inexpensive nature of our system demonstrated herein are key for successful drug delivery systems.

  2. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  3. Protective overcoating of films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maas, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    Kodak Film Type SO-212 was emulsion overcoated with gelatin and lacquer to evaluate the feasibility of application of the coatings, any image degradation, and the relative protection offered against abrasion. Evaluated were: Eastman motion picture film lacquer Type 485, water solutions of Eastman purified Calfskin gelatin, and experimental Eastman gelatin stripping film of 4 and 6 microns. Conclusions reached were: (1) All coatings can be applied with relative ease with the only limitation being that of equipment. (2) None of the coatings degrade the processed image. (3) All of the coatings provide protection to the emulsion. These conclusions apply to any film which may be considered for overcoating.

  4. Cermet composite thermal spray coatings for erosion and corrosion protection in combustion environments of advanced coal-fired boilers. Semiannual technical report, January 14, 1997--August 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Schorr, B.S.; Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1997-08-31

    Research is presently being conducted to determine the optimum ceramic/metal combination in thermally sprayed metal matrix composite coatings for erosion and corrosion resistance in new coal-fired boilers. The research will be accomplished by producing model cermet composites using powder metallurgy and electrodeposition methods in which the effect of ceramic/metal combination for the erosion and corrosion resistance will be determined. These results will provide the basis for determining the optimum hard phase constituent size and volume percent in thermal spray coatings. Thermal spray coatings will be applied by our industrial sponsor and tested in our erosion and corrosion laboratories. Bulk powder processed Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were produced at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The composite samples contained 0, 21, 27, 37, and 45 volume percent Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with an average particle size of 12 um. Also, to deposit model Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings, an electrodeposition technique was developed and coatings with various volume fractions (0-35%) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were produced. The powder and electrodeposition processing of Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Composites provide the ability to produce two phase microstructure without changing the microstructure of the matrix material. Therefore, the effect of hard second phase particles size and volume fraction on erosion resistance could be analyzed.

  5. Corrosion beneath disbonded pipeline coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.

    1997-04-01

    The relationship between coatings, cathodic protection (CP), and external corrosion of underground pipelines is described. Historically, this problem has been addressed by focusing on the corrosion and CP processes associated with holidays, e.g., coating disbondment and CP current flow within the disbonded region. These issues and those associated with disbonded areas distant from holidays are also discussed.

  6. Eliminated Phototoxicity of TiO2 Particles by an Atomic-Layer-Deposited Al2 O3 Coating Layer for UV-Protection Applications.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eunyong; Sridharan, Kishore; Park, Young Min; Park, Tae Joo

    2016-08-16

    We demonstrate the conformal coating of an ultrathin Al2 O3 layer on TiO2 nanoparticles through atomic layer deposition by using a specifically designed rotary reactor to eliminate the phototoxicity of the particles for cosmetic use. The ALD reactor is modified to improve the coating efficiency as well as the agitation of the particles for conformal coating. Elemental and microstructural analyses show that ultrathin Al2 O3 layers are conformally deposited on the TiO2 nanoparticles with a controlled thickness. Rhodamine B dye molecules on Al2 O3 -coated TiO2 exhibited a long life time under UV irradiation, that is, more than 2 h, compared to that on bare TiO2 , that is, 8 min, indicating mitigation of photocatalytic activity by the coated layer. The effect of carbon impurities in the film resulting from various deposition temperatures and thicknesses of the Al2 O3 layer on the photocatalytic activity are also thoroughly investigated with controlled experimental condition by using dye molecules on the surface. Our results reveal that an increased carbon impurity resulting from a low processing temperature provides a charge conduction path and generates reactive oxygen species causing the degradation of dye molecule. A thin coated layer, that is, less than 3 nm, also induced the tunneling of electrons and holes to the surface, hence oxidizing dye molecules. Furthermore, the introduction of an Al2 O3 layer on TiO2 improves the light trapping thus, enhances the UV absorption. PMID:27405514

  7. Eliminated Phototoxicity of TiO2 Particles by an Atomic-Layer-Deposited Al2 O3 Coating Layer for UV-Protection Applications.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eunyong; Sridharan, Kishore; Park, Young Min; Park, Tae Joo

    2016-08-16

    We demonstrate the conformal coating of an ultrathin Al2 O3 layer on TiO2 nanoparticles through atomic layer deposition by using a specifically designed rotary reactor to eliminate the phototoxicity of the particles for cosmetic use. The ALD reactor is modified to improve the coating efficiency as well as the agitation of the particles for conformal coating. Elemental and microstructural analyses show that ultrathin Al2 O3 layers are conformally deposited on the TiO2 nanoparticles with a controlled thickness. Rhodamine B dye molecules on Al2 O3 -coated TiO2 exhibited a long life time under UV irradiation, that is, more than 2 h, compared to that on bare TiO2 , that is, 8 min, indicating mitigation of photocatalytic activity by the coated layer. The effect of carbon impurities in the film resulting from various deposition temperatures and thicknesses of the Al2 O3 layer on the photocatalytic activity are also thoroughly investigated with controlled experimental condition by using dye molecules on the surface. Our results reveal that an increased carbon impurity resulting from a low processing temperature provides a charge conduction path and generates reactive oxygen species causing the degradation of dye molecule. A thin coated layer, that is, less than 3 nm, also induced the tunneling of electrons and holes to the surface, hence oxidizing dye molecules. Furthermore, the introduction of an Al2 O3 layer on TiO2 improves the light trapping thus, enhances the UV absorption.

  8. Semiconductor surface protection material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, R. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method and a product for protecting semiconductor surfaces is disclosed. The protective coating material is prepared by heating a suitable protective resin with an organic solvent which is solid at room temperature and converting the resulting solution into sheets by a conventional casting operation. Pieces of such sheets of suitable shape and thickness are placed on the semiconductor areas to be coated and heat and vacuum are then applied to melt the sheet and to drive off the solvent and cure the resin. A uniform adherent coating, free of bubbles and other defects, is thus obtained exactly where it is desired.

  9. Formulation and production of intumescent coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J.; Schwartz, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    Methods for manufacturing and producing fire protective intumescent coatings are described. The coatings consist of three reactive parts mixed together at the time of use. The chemical composition of the reactive parts is discussed. The characteristics of the coatings which are obtained by three types of processing are analyzed. Qualification tests of the materials to determine acceptability are reported.

  10. Compliant alkali silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cell applications: the effect of protective YSZ coating on electrical stability in dual environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-03-15

    Recently, compliant sealing glass has been proposed as a potential candidate sealant for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. In a previous paper, the thermal stability and chemical compatibility were reported for a compliant alkali-containing silicate glass sealed between anode supported YSZ bi-layer and YSZ-coated stainless steel interconnect. In this paper, we will report the electrical stability of the compliant glass under a DC load and dual environment at 700-800 degrees C. Apparent electrical resistivity was measured with a 4-point method for the glass sealed between two plain SS441 metal coupons or YSZ-coated aluminized substrates. The results showed instability with plain SS441 at 800 degrees C, but stable behavior of increasing resistivity with time was observed with the YSZ coated SS441. In addition, results of interfacial microstructure analysis with scanning electron microscopy will be correlated with the measured resistivity results. Overall, the YSZ coating demonstrated chemically stability with the alkali-containing compliant silicate sealing glass under electrical field and dual environments.

  11. Mn1.4Co1.4Cu0.2O4 spinel protective coating on ferritic stainless steels for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guoyi; Xin, Xianshuang; Luo, Ting; Liu, Leimin; Zhou, Yuchun; Yuan, Chun; Lin, Chucheng; Zhan, Zhongliang; Wang, Shaorong

    2015-03-01

    In an attempt to reduce the oxidation and Cr evaporation rates of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), Mn1.4Co1.4Cu0.2O4 spinel coating is developed on the Crofer22 APU ferritic stainless steel substrate by a powder reduction technique. Doping of Cu into Mn-Co spinels improves electrical conductivity as well as thermal expansion match with the Crofer22 APU interconnect. Good adhesion between the coating and the alloy substrate is achieved by the reactive sintering process using the reduced powders. Long-term isothermal oxidation experiment and area specific resistance (ASR) measurement are investigated. The ASR is less than 4 mΩ cm2 even though the coated alloy undergoes oxidation at 800 °C for 530 h and four thermal cycles from 800 °C to room temperature. The Mn1.4Co1.4Cu0.2O4 spinel coatings demonstrate excellent anti-oxidation performance and long-term stability. It exhibits a promising prospect for the practical application of SOFC alloy interconnect.

  12. Erosion resistance of titanium nitride coatings and their possible use to protect components of fusion devices subjected to a high power load

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, E.D.; Volkov, Y.F.; Demidenko, I.I.; Dyatlov, V.G.; Il'enko, B.P.; Kolot, V.Y.; Konovalov, V.G.; Lomino, N.S.; Nazarov, N.I.; Pavlichenko, O.S.; and others

    1987-10-01

    Tin coating were bombarded by 80-kev He/sup +/ ions in order to study composition and erosion resistance. The results were compared to those obtained for stainless steels. All of the measurements were carried out in the Uragan-3 device. (AIP)

  13. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, S.R.; Miller, R.A.; Hodge, P.E.

    1981-03-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

  14. Corrosion prevention: Conversion coatings and coating processes. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning conversion coatings and coating processes for the prevention of metal corrosion in various environments. Conversion coating patents for the application of phosphates and chromates to the surfaces of aluminum, zinc, ferrous metals, titanium, cadmium, iron, steels, and various alloys are presented. Topics include coating compositions, surface preparations and pretreatments prior to coating applications, post-treatment of coated metal surfaces, coating quality control, and sacrificial coatings for jet engines. Specific patents concerning protective coatings are excluded and covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. Corrosion prevention: Conversion coatings and coating processes. (Latest citations from the US Patent Bibliographic File with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning conversion coatings and coating processes for the prevention of metal corrosion in various environments. Conversion coating patents for the application of phosphates and chromates to the surfaces of aluminum, zinc, ferrous metals, titanium, cadmium, iron, steels, and various alloys are presented. Topics include coating compositions, surface preparations and pretreatments prior to coating applications, post-treatment of coated metal surfaces, coating quality control, and sacrificial coatings for jet engines. Specific patents concerning protective coatings are excluded and covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 191 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Corrosion prevention: Conversion coatings and coating processes. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning conversion coatings and coating processes for the prevention of metal corrosion in various environments. Conversion coating patents for the application of phosphates and chromates to the surfaces of aluminum, zinc, ferrous metals, titanium, cadmium, iron, steels, and various alloys are presented. Topics include coating compositions, surface preparations and pretreatments prior to coating applications, post-treatment of coated metal surfaces, coating quality control, and sacrificial coatings for jet engines. Specific patents concerning protective coatings are excluded and covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 166 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Silicon Nitride Thin Films and Their Application as Hermetic Coatings on Optical Fibers for Protection against Hydrogen Penetration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Hsien

    1995-01-01

    Silicon nitride has been proposed to be a hermetic coating on optical fibers against the penetration of hydrogen which can induce optical losses in silica-based fibers in the region 1.08 to 1.24 μm and a broad absorption edge above 1.5 mum. Silicon nitride coatings have been deposited on flat substrates and optical fibers by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and rf reactive magnetron sputtering. Properties of the coatings have been studied using several techniques: profilometry, ellipsometry, XRD, XPS, AES, OM, SEM, TEM, EPR, FTIR, and SIMS. Properties were related to the deposition parameters such as reactant gas ratio, gas flow rate, and substrate position (in MOCVD); sputtering gas composition, pressure, and rf power (in rf sputtering). Diffusion of hydrogen in rf sputtered silicon nitride has been studied for the first time by annealing the deuterium-implanted silicon nitride films at elevated temperatures (700-1000^circC) for various periods of time. The broadening of the SIMS deuterium depth profile has been simulated by a modified plane source diffusion equation to calculate diffusion coefficients. The hydrogen concentrations in the as-deposited stoichiometric Si_3rm N_4 and Si-rich Si_3rm N_3 film has been determined to be 1.28 times 10^{20} and 7.22 times10^{19} atoms/cm ^3, which are less than the conventional LPCVD and PECVD prepared silicon nitride films (10 ^{21}-10^{22 } atoms/cm^3) Activation energies of deuterium diffusion in Si_3 rm N_4 and Si_3rm N_3 are 3.33 and 2.33 eV. Si_3 rm N_4 was found to contain more N -H traps which limit the diffusion of hydrogen. The effectiveness of the silicon nitride coating against hydrogen penetration has been studied by testing the uncoated and coated optical fibers in a hydrogen atmosphere. Electron paramagnetic resonance and a fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor composed of a WO_3 or Pd/WO _3 coated borosilicate fiber were used to monitor the diffusion of hydrogen into the fibers. Both results have

  18. Zinc-rich coatings: A market survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizak, R.

    1975-01-01

    Zinc-rich coatings with both organic and inorganic binders were considered for coastal bridges which require more corrosion protection than inland bridges because of exposure to salt spray and fog. Inorganics give longer protection and may be applied without a finish coat; those currently available are harder to apply than organics. The NASA potassium silicate/zinc - dust coating appears to provide longer protection, resist thermal shock, and overcome the application problem. Panels coated with the formulation withstood 5308 hours in a salt spray chamber with no rusting or blistering.

  19. Fusion silicide coatings for tantalum alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warnock, R. V.; Stetson, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the performance of fusion silicide coatings under simulated atmospheric reentry conditions to a maximum temperature of 1810 K (2800 F). Both recently developed and commercially available coatings are included. Data are presented on oxidation rate with and without intentional defecting, the influence of the coatings on the ductile-brittle bend transition temperature, and the mechanical properties. Coatings appear capable of affording protection for at least 100 simulated cycles to 2600 F and 63 cycles to 2800 F.

  20. Inexpensive anti-fog coating for windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmin, D. L., Jr.; Morrison, H. D.

    1971-01-01

    Coating applications include anti-fog protection for deep-sea diving equipment, fire protection helmets, and windows of vehicles used in hazardous environments. Basic coating composition includes liquid detergent, deionized water, and oxygen compatible fire-resistant oil. Composition prevents visor fogging under maximum metabolic load for 5 hours and longer.