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Sample records for pacvd protective coating

  1. Investigation of PACVD protective coating processes using advanced diagnostics techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, W.C.

    1993-05-07

    Objective is to understand the mechanisms governing nonequilibrium plasma atomistic or molecular deposition of hard face coatings. Laser diagnostic methods include coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and laser-induced fluorescence. TiB[sub 2] and diamonds were used as the hard face coating materials. Diborane was used as precursor to TiB[sub 2].

  2. RF-PACVD of water repellent and protective HMDSO coatings on bell metal surfaces: Correlation between discharge parameters and film properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A. J.; Barve, S. A.; Chutia, Joyanti; Pal, A. R.; Kishore, R.; Jagannath; Pande, M.; Patil, D. S.

    2011-08-01

    Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) films have been deposited on bell metal using radiofrequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (RF-PACVD) technique. The protective performances of the HMDSO films and their water repellency have been investigated as a function of DC self-bias voltage on the substrates during deposition. Plasma potential measurements during film deposition process are carried out by self-compensated emissive probe. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) analyses of the plasma during deposition reveal no significant change in the plasma composition within the DC self-bias voltage range of -40 V to -160 V that is used. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies are carried out for film chemistry analysis and indicate that the impinging ion energy on the substrates influences the physio-chemical properties of the HMDSO films. At critical ion energy of 113 qV (corresponding to DC self-bias voltage of -100 V), the deposited HMDSO film exhibits least defective Si-O-Si chemical structure and highest inorganic character and this contributes to its best corrosion resistance behavior. The hardness and elastic modulus of the films are found to be bias dependent and are 1.27 GPa and 5.36 GPa for films deposited at -100 V. The critical load for delamination is also bias dependent and is 11 mN for this film. The water repellency of the HMDSO films is observed to be dependent on the variation in surface roughness. The results of the investigations suggest that HMDSO films deposited by RF-PACVD can be used as protective coatings on bell metal surfaces.

  3. Investigation of PACVD protective coating processes using advanced diagnostics techniques. Performance report, 31 May 1991--30 June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, W. C.

    1992-07-10

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) is used to study the plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) of TiB{sub 2}. CARS is applied to the dominent species in an inductively coupled B{sub 2}H{sub 6}/Ar rf plasma. Axial concentration profiles of diborane and hydrogen are probed in the plasma. A five-step mechanism is developed. Photochemical initiation of the chemical reaction is considered. 16 refs, 5 figs.(DLC)

  4. Investigation of PACVD protective coating processes using advanced diagnostics techniques. Performance report, 1 September 1992--30 April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, W.C.

    1993-05-07

    Objective is to understand the mechanisms governing nonequilibrium plasma atomistic or molecular deposition of hard face coatings. Laser diagnostic methods include coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and laser-induced fluorescence. TiB{sub 2} and diamonds were used as the hard face coating materials. Diborane was used as precursor to TiB{sub 2}.

  5. Effect of Operating Temperature on Structure Properties of TICX Nanoparticle Coating Applied by Pacvd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanaghi, Ali; Sabour Rouhaghdam, Ali Reza; Ahangarani, Shahrokh; Moradi, Hadi; Mohammadi, Ali

    Titanium carbide (TiC) is a widely used hard coating to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of tools because of its outstanding properties such as high melting point, high hardness, corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance. These properties were drastically improved by using nanotechnology. So in this project, TiCx was applied on hot-working die steel (H11) by Plasma CVD (PACVD). The effect of operating temperatures on TiCx structure properties have been studies by typical and advanced analyses methods such as SEM, XRD, FTIR and Raman. The best properties of TiCx nanoparticle, such as nanostructure, mechanical properties and chemical properties, were obtained at 480 °C.

  6. Surface characterization and biological evaluation of silver-incorporated DLC coatings fabricated by hybrid RF PACVD/MS method.

    PubMed

    Bociąga, Dorota; Jakubowski, Witold; Komorowski, Piotr; Sobczyk-Guzenda, Anna; Jędrzejczak, Anna; Batory, Damian; Olejnik, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Since the biological response of the body towards an implanted material is mainly governed by its surface properties, biomaterials are improved by various kinds of coatings. Their role is to provide good mechanical and biological characteristics, and exclude some disadvantages like post-implantation infections. This phenomenon may be reduced by introduction of silver as an antibacterial agent. This study evaluates the Ag-DLC films synthesized by the hybrid RF PACVD/MS method according to the patent number PL401955-A1 worked out inter alia by the authors. Such tests as XPS, SEM, EDS, AFM, FTIR, Raman and ICP-TOF-MS were used to determine surface properties of the coatings. The obtained results were correlated with the biological response estimated on the basis of cells viability assay (osteoblast cells line Saos-2) and bacterial colonization test (Escherichia coli strain DH5α). Results showed that the hybrid RF PACVD/MS method allows one to get tight coating preventing the diffusion of harmful elements from the metallic substrate. Ag concentration increases with the growing power density, it occurs in metallic state, does not create chemical bonds and is evenly dispersed within the DLC matrix in the form of nanoscale silver clusters. Increasing silver content above 2at.% improves bactericidal properties, but decreases cell viability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Grey fuzzy logic approach for the optimization of DLC thin film coating process parameters using PACVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadai, R. K.; Das, P. P.; Shivakoti, I.; Mondal, S. C.; Swain, B. P.

    2017-07-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are widely used in medical, manufacturing and aerospace industries due to their excellent mechanical, biological, optical and tribological properties. The selection of optimal process parameters for efficient characteristics of DLC film is always a challenging issue for the materials science researchers. The optimal combination of the process parameters involved in the deposition of DLC films provide a better result, which subsequently help other researchers to choose the process parameters. In the present work Grey Relation Analysis (GRA) and Fuzzy-logic are being used for the optimization of process parameters in DLC film coating by using plasma assist chemical vapour deposition (PACVD) technique. The bias voltage, bias frequency, deposition pressure, gas composition are considered as input process parameters and hardness (GPa), Young's modulus (GPa), ratio between diamond to graphic fraction, (Id/Ig) ratio are considered as response parameters. The input parameters are optimized by grey fuzzy analysis. The contribution of individual input parameter is done by ANOVA. In this analysis found that bias voltage having the least influence and gas composition has highest influence in the PACVD deposited DLC films. The grey fuzzy analysis results indicated that optimum results for bias voltage, bias frequency, deposition pressure, gas composition for the DLC thin films are -50 V, 6 kHz, 4 μbar and 60:40 % respectively.

  8. Characteristics of CrAlSiN + DLC coating deposited by lateral rotating cathode arc PVD and PACVD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukaszkowicz, Krzysztof; Sondor, Jozef; Balin, Katarzyna; Kubacki, Jerzy

    2014-09-01

    Coating system composed of CrAlSiN film covered by diamond-like carbon (DLC)-based lubricant, deposited on hot work tool steel substrate was the subject of the research. The CrAlSiN and DLC layers were deposited by PVD lateral rotating ARC-cathodes (LARC) and PACVD technology on the X40CrMoV5-1 respectively. HRTEM investigation shows an amorphous character of DLC layer. It was found that the tested CrAlSiN layer has a nanostructural character with fine crystallites while their average size is less than 10 nm. Based on the XRD pattern of the CrAlSiN, the occurrence of fcc phase was only observed in the coating, the texture direction <3 1 1> is perpendicular to the sample surface. Combined SEM, AES and ToF-SIMS studies confirmed assumed chemical composition and layered structure of the coating. The chemical distribution of the elements inside the layers and at the interfaces was analyzed by SEM and AES methods. It was shown that additional CrN layer is present between substrate and CrAlSiN coating. The atomic concentration of the particular elements of DLC and CrAlSiN layer was calculated from the XPS measurements. In sliding dry friction conditions the friction coefficient for the investigated elements is set in the range between 0.05 and 0.07. The investigated coating reveals high wear resistance. The coating demonstrated a dense cross-sectional morphology as well as good adhesion to the substrate.

  9. The Influence of Plasma Nitriding Pre-Treatment on Tribological Properties of TiN Coatings Deposited by PACVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdipoor, M. S.; Mahboubi, F.; Ahangarani, Sh.; Raoufi, M.; Elmkhah, H.

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of plasma nitriding pre-treatment (PN) on mechanical and tribological behavior of TiN coatings produced by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD). The heat treatment of quench and temper was carried out on hot work AISI H11 (DIN 1.2343) steel samples. A group of samples were plasma nitrided at 500 °C for 4 h in an atmosphere containing 25 vol.% nitrogen and 75 vol.% hydrogen. Then TiN layer was deposited on all of samples at 520 °C temperature, 8 kHz frequency, and 33% duty cycle. The microstructural, mechanical, and tribological properties of the coatings were investigated using SEM, WDS, AFM, microhardness tester, and pin-on-disc wear test. The load of wear test was 10 N and the samples were worn against different pins, ball-bearing steel (DIN 1.3505), and cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co). The results indicate that the difference of hardness between the samples with PN-TiNlayer and those samples with only TiN layer without PN was 450 HV and the former samples showed a significant amount of wear resistance in comparison to the latter ones.

  10. Protective Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Inorganic Coatings, Inc.'s K-Zinc 531 protective coating is water-based non-toxic, non-flammable and has no organic emissions. High ratio silicate formula bonds to steel, and in 30 minutes, creates a very hard ceramic finish with superior adhesion and abrasion resistance. Improved technology allows application over a minimal commercial sandblast, fast drying in high humidity conditions and compatibility with both solvent and water-based topcoats. Coating is easy to apply and provides long term protection with a single application. Zinc rich coating with water-based potassium silicate binder offers cost advantages in materials, labor hours per application, and fewer applications over a given time span.

  11. Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    General Magnaplate Corporation's pharmaceutical machine is used in the industry for high speed pressing of pills and capsules. Machine is automatic system for molding glycerine suppositories. These machines are typical of many types of drug production and packaging equipment whose metal parts are treated with space spinoff coatings that promote general machine efficiency and contribute to compliance with stringent federal sanitation codes for pharmaceutical manufacture. Collectively known as "synergistic" coatings, these dry lubricants are bonded to a variety of metals to form an extremely hard slippery surface with long lasting self lubrication. The coatings offer multiple advantages; they cannot chip, peel or be rubbed off. They protect machine parts from corrosion and wear longer, lowering maintenance cost and reduce undesired heat caused by power-robbing friction.

  12. Tribological and Corrosion Properties of Nickel/TiC Bilayered Coatings Produced by Electroless Deposition and PACVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanaghi, Ali; Chu, Paul K.

    2016-11-01

    Ni/TiC bilayered coatings are deposited on hot-working steel (H11) by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and electroless technique. The TiC layer is deposited at 490 °C using a gas mixture of TiCl4, CH4, H2, and Ar, and a dense nanostructured TiC coating with minimum excessive carbon phases and low chlorine concentration is produced. The effects of the Ni intermediate layer on the microstructure, tribology, and corrosion behavior of the nanostructured TiC coating are investigated. The friction coefficient of the Ni/TiC bilayered coating (Ni thickness = 4 µm) at 500 cycles is much smaller than that of the coating without the Ni intermediate layer. The smallest friction coefficient is about 0.2, and the hardness values of the Ni/TiC bilayered samples with three different Ni layer thicknesses of 2, 4, and 6 µm are 2534, 3070, and 2008 Hv, respectively. The wear mechanism of the Ni/TiC bilayered coatings is abrasive induced by plastic deformation and fatigue during the sliding process. The smaller groove width on the 4-µm electroless nickel-Ni3P/TiC bilayered coating correlates with the larger H/ E ratio and the 4-µm nickel/TiC bilayered sample shows the better wear resistance. The polarization resistance of the 6-µm electroless nickel-Ni3P/TiC coating in 0.05 M NaCl and 0.5 M H2SO4 increases by about 8 and 15 times, respectively. The Ni intermediate layer increases the toughness of the coating and adhesion between the hard coating and steel substrate thereby enhancing the tribological properties and corrosion resistance.

  13. Protective coatings for concrete

    SciTech Connect

    NAGY, KATHRYN L.; CYGAN, RANDALL T.; BRINKER, C. JEFFREY; SELLINGER, ALAN

    2000-05-01

    The new two-layer protective coating developed for monuments constructed of limestone or marble was applied to highway cement and to tobermorite, a component of cement, and tested in batch dissolution tests. The goal was to determine the suitability of the protective coating in retarding the weathering rate of concrete construction. The two-layer coating consists of an inner layer of aminoethylaminopropylsilane (AEAPS) applied as a 25% solution in methanol and an outer layer of A2** sol-gel. In previous work, this product when applied to calcite powders, had resulted in a lowering of the rate of dissolution by a factor of ten and was shown through molecular modeling to bind strongly to the calcite surface, but not too strongly so as to accelerate dissolution. Batch dissolution tests at 22 C of coated and uncoated tobermorite (1.1 nm phase) and powdered cement from Gibson Blvd. in Albuquerque indicated that the coating exhibits some protective behavior, at least on short time scales. However, the data suggest that the outer layer of sol-gel dissolves in the high-pH environment of the closed system of cement plus water. Calculated binding configuration and energy of AEAPS to the tobermorite surface suggests that AEAPS is well-suited as the inner layer binder for protecting tobermorite.

  14. Protective coating for ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Churchward, Rex A. (Inventor); Lowe, David M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A protective coating for ceramic materials such as those made of silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, aluminoborosilicate and silicon dioxide, and a thermal control structure comprising a ceramic material having coated thereon the protective coating. The protective coating contains, in admixture, silicon dioxide powder, colloidal silicon dioxide, water, and one or more emittance agents selected from silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, silicon carbide, molybdenum disilicide, tungsten disilicide and zirconium diboride. In another aspect, the protective coating is coated on a flexible ceramic fabric which is the outer cover of a composite insulation. In yet another aspect, a metallic foil is bonded to the outer surface of a ceramic fabric outer cover of a composite insulation via the protective coating. A primary application of this invention is as a protective coating for ceramic materials used in a heat shield for space vehicles subjected to very high aero-convective heating environments.

  15. METHOD OF PROTECTIVELY COATING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for protectively coating uranium with zine comprising cleaning the U for coating by pickling in concentrated HNO/sub 3/, dipping the cleaned U into a bath of molten zinc between 430 to 600 C and containing less than 0 01% each of Fe and Pb, and withdrawing and cooling to solidify the coating. The zinccoated uranium may be given a; econd coating with another metal niore resistant to the corrosive influences particularly concerned. A coating of Pb containing small proportions of Ag or Sn, or Al containing small proportions of Si may be applied over the zinc coatings by dipping in molten baths of these metals.

  16. Protective coatings for sensitive materials

    DOEpatents

    Egert, C.M.

    1997-08-05

    An enhanced protective coating is disclosed to prevent interaction between constituents of the environment and devices that can be damaged by those constituents. This coating is provided by applying a synergistic combination of diffusion barrier and physical barrier materials. These materials can be, for example, in the form of a plurality of layers of a diffusion barrier and a physical barrier, with these barrier layers being alternated. Further protection in certain instances is provided by including at least one layer of a getter material to actually react with one or more of the deleterious constituents. The coating is illustrated by using alternating layers of an organic coating (such as Parylene-C{trademark}) as the diffusion barrier, and a metal coating (such as aluminum) as the physical barrier. For best results there needs to be more than one of at least one of the constituent layers. 4 figs.

  17. Protective coatings for sensitive materials

    DOEpatents

    Egert, Charles M.

    1997-01-01

    An enhanced protective coating to prevent interaction between constituents of the environment and devices that can be damaged by those constituents. This coating is provided by applying a synergistic combination of diffusion barrier and physical barrier materials. These materials can be, for example, in the form of a plurality of layers of a diffusion barrier and a physical barrier, with these barrier layers being alternated. Further protection in certain instances is provided by including at least one layer of a getter material to actually react with one or more of the deleterious constituents. The coating is illustrated by using alternating layers of an organic coating (such as Parylene-C.TM.) as the diffusion barrier, and a metal coating (such as aluminum) as the physical barrier. For best results there needs to be more than one of at least one of the constituent layers.

  18. Protective coatings on extensible biofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Fantner, Georg E.; Hohlbauch, Sophia; Waite, J. Herbert; Zok, Frank W.

    2007-09-01

    Formulating effective coatings for use in nano- and biotechnology poses considerable technical challenges. If they are to provide abrasion resistance, coatings must be hard and adhere well to the underlying substrate. High hardness, however, comes at the expense of extensibility. This property trade-off makes the design of coatings for even moderately compliant substrates problematic, because substrate deformation easily exceeds the strain limit of the coating. Although the highest strain capacity of synthetic fibre coatings is less than 10%, deformable coatings are ubiquitous in biological systems. With an eye to heeding the lessons of nature, the cuticular coatings of byssal threads from two species of marine mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Perna canaliculus, have been investigated. Consistent with their function to protect collagenous fibres in the byssal-thread core, these coatings show hardness and stiffness comparable to those of engineering plastics and yet are surprisingly extensible; the tensile failure strain of P. canaliculus cuticle is about 30% and that of M. galloprovincialis is a remarkable 70%. The difference in extensibility is attributable to the presence of deformable microphase-separated granules within the cuticle of M. galloprovincialis. The results have important implications in the design of bio-inspired extensible coatings.

  19. Smart Coatings for Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Li, Wendy; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  20. Protective Coating Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    coatings were applied with High Volume Low Pressure ( HVLP ) spray guns . Application, recoat time, and dry times were per the individual manufacturer’s...TABLE 3. TEST EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURER MODEL Paint spray guns Air-Verter AV-001MG (#5cap,#12noz) Viscosity cup Zahn Signature Series S90, #2...appearance and working ( spraying and drying) properties of the paint. Self-lifting Properties - MIL-L-81352A. Primer is applied to each panel and

  1. Thermal Protective Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-31

    wcre prepared by placing a sheet of nylon film over an aluminum plate, theo a layer of zilicne impregnated fiber glass cloth (used for release) A was...placed over the nylon. The silicone impregnated fiber glass cloth vas coated .ith a thin layer of ALBI-107A and allowed to dry to resist further...absorption when the fire retardant mixture was applied. A total of 10 4 4 g of the fire retardant was mixed and poured onto the release n- 1 cloth and

  2. Contamination protective coatings: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirich, Ronald

    2013-09-01

    Tailored protective coatings have the potential for tremendous technical and affordability benefits to ground, air and space systems because of their ability to reduce surface contamination, minimize icing, reduce friction, and to reduce corrosion for a wide variety of applications and missions. The thermal and radiation environment of space systems also pose unique challenges to protective coatings because of the space environment's large temperature variations, the plasma environment and solar UV and Xrays. Contamination may accumulate on sensors inhibiting accurate and timely data acquisition and their efficiency can be seriously affected by contamination buildup. For polymeric materials, not all properties are affected to the same degree by radiation but are often localized at a specific molecular bond. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic coating approaches may be important to address specific design requirements. Hydrophilic materials are composed of polar molecules and have been used to defog glass and enable oil spots to be swept away with water. Hydrophobic molecules tend to be nonpolar and thus prefer other neutral molecules and nonpolar solvents. Hydrophobic molecules often cluster and are difficult to wet with liquids. This paper presents an overview of various types of contamination that adheres to critical air and space surfaces and potential coatings phenomenology that may be used to eliminate contamination.

  3. Oxidation protection coatings for polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.; Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A polymeric substrate is coated with a metal oxide film to provide oxidation protection in low Earth orbital environments. The film contains about 4 volume percent polymer to provide flexibility. A coil of polymer material moves through an ion beam as it is fed between reels. The ion beam first cleans the polymer material surface and then sputters the film material from a target onto this surface.

  4. Thin CVD Coating Protects Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald; Wallace, Terryl; Cunnington, George; Robinson, John

    1994-01-01

    Feasibility of using very thin CVD coatings to provide both protection against oxidation and surfaces of low catalytic activity for thin metallic heat-shield materials demonstrated. Use of aluminum in compositions increases emittances of coatings and reduces transport of oxygen through coatings to substrates. Coatings light in weight and applied to foil-gauge materials with minimum weight penalties.

  5. Thin CVD Coating Protects Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald; Wallace, Terryl; Cunnington, George; Robinson, John

    1994-01-01

    Feasibility of using very thin CVD coatings to provide both protection against oxidation and surfaces of low catalytic activity for thin metallic heat-shield materials demonstrated. Use of aluminum in compositions increases emittances of coatings and reduces transport of oxygen through coatings to substrates. Coatings light in weight and applied to foil-gauge materials with minimum weight penalties.

  6. Graphene: Atomically thin protective coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Bolotin, Kirill; Tuberquia, Juan; Harl, Robert; Jennings, Kane

    2011-03-01

    We explore the properties of graphene as a cathodic coating to protect copper substrates from oxidation and further corrosion. High-quality and large area graphene films are grown on copper substrates by chemical vapor deposition. Samples were thermally oxidized in an oxygen-rich environment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization of a Graphene/copper and bare copper samples reveals the absence of oxidized copper at the graphene/copper interface indicating that the graphene monolayer protects the underlying copper. We also determine the protective properties of graphene in aqueous media using electrochemical characterization techniques. First, we use Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) to show that graphene coated substrates lower frequencies (1Hz) exhibit impedance values 2 orders of magnitude higher compared to bare Cu substrates. Cyclic voltammetry also shows that a monolayer of graphene significantly reduces the oxygen reduction, thus exhibiting little charge transfer at the solid-liquid interface. Finally, we use Tafel analysis to estimate that the corrosion rate exhibited by Graphene/Cu is ~ 7 times lower than that of bare Cu substrates.

  7. Corrosion Protection by Calcite-Type Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    CORROSION PROTECTION BY CALCITE -TYPE COATINGS OCTOBER, 1989 Prepared by: OCEAN CITY RESEARCH CORPORATION Tennessee Avenue & Beach Thorofare Ocean...REPORT DATE OCT 1989 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Corrosion Protection by Calcite -Type Coatings 5a. CONTRACT... calcite -type coatings to segregated seawater ballast tanks. If perfected, a calcite coating approach could substantially reduce the cost of corrosion

  8. Crop protection by seed coating.

    PubMed

    Ehsanfar, S; Modarres-Sanavy, S A M

    2005-01-01

    Providence of sufficient and healthy food for increasing human population clears the importance of notice to increasing crop production in company with environmental loss reduction. Growth and yield of every plant with sexual reproduction, depends on germination & emergence of sown seeds. Seed is a small alive plant that its biological function is protection and nutrition of embryo. Biological, chemical and physiological characteristics of seed, affect on plant performance & its resistance to undesirable environmental conditions, and even on its total yield. So attention to seed and try to increase its performance is so important. One of the factors that cause reduction in germination percentage and seedling establishment, is seed disease. It's possible to control these diseases by treating the seed before planting it. Coating the seed with pesticides, is one of the ways to gain this goal. Seed coating is a technique in which several material as fertilizers, nutritional elements, moisture attractive or repulsive agents, plant growth regulators, rhizobium inocolum, chemical & pesticide etc, add to seed by adhesive agents and cause to increase seed performance and germination. Seed coating, leads to increase benefits in seed industry, because seeds can use all of their genetic vigor. This technique is used for seeds of many garden plants, valuable crops (such as corn, sunflower, canola, alfalfa,...) and some of the grasses. In this technique that was first used in coating cereal seeds in 1930, a thin and permeable layer of pesticide is stuck on seed surface and prevent damage of seedborn pathogens. This layer is melted or splited after absorption of moisture and suitable temperature by seed, and let the radical to exit the seed. In this approach materials are used accurately with seed, evaporation & leakage of pesticide and also adverse effects of some pesticides on seeds are diminished, and these factors cause to increase the accuracy and performance of pesticide

  9. Flexible fluoropolymer filled protective coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Sovey, James S.; Nahra, Henry; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1991-01-01

    Metal oxide films such as SiO2 are known to provide an effective barrier to the transport of moisture as well as gaseous species through polymeric films. Such thin film coatings have a tendency to crack upon flexure of the polymeric substrate. Sputter co-deposition of SiO2 with 4 to 15 percent fluoropolymers was demonstrated to produce thin films with glass-like barrier properties that have significant increases in strain to failure over pure glass films which improves their tolerance to flexure on polymeric substrates. Deposition techniques capable of producing these films on polymeric substrates are suitable for durable food packaging and oxidation/corrosion protection applications.

  10. Testing of protective coatings in hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier, P.E.; Barletta, R.; Adams, J.; Svandrlik, J.

    1993-07-01

    A series of tests of protective coatings on carbon-carbon substrates were performed. The tests involved exposure of the coated material to hydrogen at high temperatures, the examination of the coatings by scanning electron microscopy and the measurement of weight losses. The coatings included Re, TaHfC, TaC and NbC, with thicknesses of the order of 20--60 {mu}m.

  11. Diamondlike Protective Coats For Infrared Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swec, Diane M.; Banks, Bruce A.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments in which four infrared-transparent window materials were coated with diamondlike carbon films. Purpose to investigate ability of films to protect infrared windows against erosion by rain and wind-blown hard particles. Diamondlike films chosen as protective coats because they are transparent over broad spectral range and resist attack by chemicals, moisture, and abrasion. Experiments yield mixed results.

  12. Sputtered protective coatings for die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nieh, C.-Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Three experimental research designs investigating candidate materials and processes involved in protective die surface coating procedures by sputter deposition, using ion beam technologies, are discussed. Various pre-test results show that none of the coatings remained completely intact for 15,000 test cycles. The longest lifetime was observed for coatings such as tungsten, platinum, and molybdenum which reduced thermal fatigue, but exhibited oxidation and suppressed crack initiation only as long as the coating did not fracture. Final test results confirmed earlier findings and coatings with Pt and W proved to be the candidate materials to be used on a die surface to increase die life. In the W-coated specimens, which remained intact on the surface after thermal fatigue testing, no oxidation was found under the coating, although a few cracks formed on the surface where the coating broke down. Further research is planned.

  13. Sputtered protective coatings for die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nieh, C.-Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Three experimental research designs investigating candidate materials and processes involved in protective die surface coating procedures by sputter deposition, using ion beam technologies, are discussed. Various pre-test results show that none of the coatings remained completely intact for 15,000 test cycles. The longest lifetime was observed for coatings such as tungsten, platinum, and molybdenum which reduced thermal fatigue, but exhibited oxidation and suppressed crack initiation only as long as the coating did not fracture. Final test results confirmed earlier findings and coatings with Pt and W proved to be the candidate materials to be used on a die surface to increase die life. In the W-coated specimens, which remained intact on the surface after thermal fatigue testing, no oxidation was found under the coating, although a few cracks formed on the surface where the coating broke down. Further research is planned.

  14. Protective, Sacrificial Coats On Optical Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Jones, Cherie A.

    1994-01-01

    Clear, easily cleaned sacrificial coats of polytetrafluoroethylene, polyurethane, silicone, or other low-outgassing organic films help maintain optical properties of surfaces of radiators, solar panels, and other components. Contamination removed by erosion of coats. Applied by conventional spraying or other techniques. Originally coats intended to protect surfaces of radiators on spacecraft in low orbit around the Earth. On Earth, used to protect optical surfaces against damage during manufacture or protect and facilitate cleaning of optical surfaces particularly delicate or otherwise not cleaned easily.

  15. Protective, Sacrificial Coats On Optical Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babel, Henry W.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Jones, Cherie A.

    1994-01-01

    Clear, easily cleaned sacrificial coats of polytetrafluoroethylene, polyurethane, silicone, or other low-outgassing organic films help maintain optical properties of surfaces of radiators, solar panels, and other components. Contamination removed by erosion of coats. Applied by conventional spraying or other techniques. Originally coats intended to protect surfaces of radiators on spacecraft in low orbit around the Earth. On Earth, used to protect optical surfaces against damage during manufacture or protect and facilitate cleaning of optical surfaces particularly delicate or otherwise not cleaned easily.

  16. Protective Coats For Zinc-Rich Primers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis G, III

    1993-01-01

    Report describes tests of topcoats for inorganic zinc-rich primers on carbon steel. Topcoats intended to provide additional protection against corrosion in acidic, salty seacoast-air/rocket-engine-exhaust environment of Space Shuttle launch site. Tests focused on polyurethane topcoats on epoxy tie coats on primers. Part of study involved comparison between "high-build" coating materials and thin-film coating materials.

  17. Permeability of protective coatings to tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, J.M.; Williamson, A.S.

    1985-09-01

    The permeability of four protective coatings to tritium gas and tritiated water was investigated. The coatings, including two epoxies, one vinyl and one urethane, were selected for their suitability in CANDU plant service in Ontario Hydro. Sorption rates of tritium gas into the coatings were considerably larger than for tritiated water, by as much as three to four orders of magnitude. However, as a result of the very large solubility of tritiated water in the coatings, the overall permeability to tritium gas and tritiated water is comparable. Marked differences were also evident among the four coatings, the vinyl exhibiting an abnormally high retention of free water because of a highly porous surface structure. It appears that epoxy coatings having a high pigment-to-binder ratio are most suited for coating concrete in tritium handling facilities.

  18. Tests Of Protective Coats For Carbon Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis G., III

    1995-01-01

    Report describes laboratory and field tests of candidate paints (primers, tie coats, and topcoats) for use in protecting carbon-steel structures against corrosion in seaside environment at Kennedy Space Center. Coating materials selected because of utility in preventing corrosion, also on basis of legal requirements, imposed in several urban areas, for reduction of volatile organic contents.

  19. Tests Of Protective Coats For Carbon Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis G., III

    1995-01-01

    Report describes laboratory and field tests of candidate paints (primers, tie coats, and topcoats) for use in protecting carbon-steel structures against corrosion in seaside environment at Kennedy Space Center. Coating materials selected because of utility in preventing corrosion, also on basis of legal requirements, imposed in several urban areas, for reduction of volatile organic contents.

  20. Sputtered protective coatings for die casting dies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nieh, C. Y.; Wallace, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    This investigation determined whether selected ion beam sputtered coatings on H-13 die steel would have the potential of improving the thermal fatigue behavior of the steel used as a die in aluminum die casting. The coatings were selected to test candidate insulators and metals capable of providing protection of the die surface. The studies indicate that 1 micrometer thick W and Pt coatings reduced the thermal fatigue more than any other coating tested and are candidates to be used on a die surface to increase die life.

  1. Paper-Thin Coating Offers Maximum Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Wessex Incorporated has recently taken a technology that was originally developed for NASA as a protective coating for ceramic materials used in heatshields for space vehicles, and modified it for use in applications such as building materials, machinery, and transportation. The technology, developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a protective coating for flexible ceramic composites (PCC), is environmentally safe, water-based, and contains no solvents. Many other flame-retardant materials contain petroleum-based components, which can produce toxic smoke under flame. Wessex versions of PCC can be used to shield ceramics, wood, plasterboard, steel, plastics, fiberglass, and other materials from catastrophic fires. They are extraordinarily tough and exhibit excellent resistance to thermal shock, vibration, abrasion, and mechanical damage. One thin layer of coating provides necessary protection and allows for flexibility while avoiding excessive weight disadvantages. The coating essentially reduces the likelihood of the underlying material becoming so hot that it combusts and thus inhibits the "flashover" phenomenon from occurring.

  2. Space station protective coating development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, H. G.; Hill, S. G.

    1989-01-01

    A generic list of Space Station surfaces and candidate material types is provided. Environmental exposures and performance requirements for the different Space Station surfaces are listed. Coating materials and the processing required to produce a viable system, and appropriate environmental simulation test facilities are being developed. Mass loss data from the original version of the atomic oxygen test chamber and the improved facility; additional environmental exposures performed on candidate materials; and materials properties measurements on candidate coatings to determine the effects of the exposures are discussed. Methodologies of production, and coating materials, used to produce the large scale demonstration articles are described. The electronic data base developed for the contract is also described. The test chamber to be used for exposure of materials to atomic oxygen was built.

  3. Assessment of Thermal Control and Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    This final report is concerned with the tasks performed during the contract period which included spacecraft coating development, testing, and applications. Five marker coatings consisting of a bright yellow handrail coating, protective overcoat for ceramic coatings, and specialized primers for composites (or polymer) surfaces were developed and commercialized by AZ Technology during this program. Most of the coatings have passed space environmental stability requirements via ground tests and/or flight verification. Marker coatings and protective overcoats were successfully flown on the Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA) and the Optical Properties Monitor (OPM) experiments flown on the Russian space station MIR. To date, most of the coatings developed and/or modified during this program have been utilized on the International Space Station and other spacecraft. For ISS, AZ Technology manufactured the 'UNITY' emblem now being flown on the NASA UNITY node (Node 1) that is docked to the Russian Zarya (FGB) utilizing the colored marker coatings (white, blue, red) developed by AZ Technology. The UNITY emblem included the US American flag, the Unity logo, and NASA logo on a white background, applied to a Beta cloth substrate.

  4. Lightweight Protective Coatings For Titanium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, Karl E.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Clark, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Lightweight coating developed to protect titanium and titanium aluminide alloys and titanium-matrix composite materials from attack by environment when used at high temperatures. Applied by sol-gel methods, and thickness less than 5 micrometers. Reaction-barrier and self-healing diffusion-barrier layers combine to protect titanium alloy against chemical attack by oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures with very promising results. Can be extended to protection of other environmentally sensitive materials.

  5. Lightweight Protective Coatings For Titanium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, Karl E.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Clark, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Lightweight coating developed to protect titanium and titanium aluminide alloys and titanium-matrix composite materials from attack by environment when used at high temperatures. Applied by sol-gel methods, and thickness less than 5 micrometers. Reaction-barrier and self-healing diffusion-barrier layers combine to protect titanium alloy against chemical attack by oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures with very promising results. Can be extended to protection of other environmentally sensitive materials.

  6. Waste treatment for removed protective coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, U.; Crosley, S.M.; Gay, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    A molten salt oxidation process is proposed for treatment of removed protective coatings along with the media used for removal. The treatment chemically reduces the waste, leaving any metals associated with the coating as a residue in the salt treatment media. The residue and the salt can be further treated for recycle of the metals, thus all but eliminating metal disposal as a waste problem. The process is expected to be simple and may be integrated into the coatings removal operations on location. Therefore, waste shipment and handling can be significantly reduced, and, as a secondary benefit, other waste can be treated in the same unit.

  7. Development of composite tube protective coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, H.; Hendricks, C.

    1986-01-01

    Protective coatings for graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) tubular structures proposed for the Space Station are evaluated. The program was divided into four parts; System Definition, Coating Concept Selection and Evaluation, Scale-up and Assembly, and Reporting. System Definition involved defining the structural and environmental properties required of the Gr/Ep tubes. The prepreg and ply sequence selected was a P75S/934 (O2, + or - 20, O2)sub s layup which meets the various structural requirements of the Space Station. Coating Concept and Selection comprised the main emphasis of the effort. Concepts for protectively coating the Gr/Ep tubes included the use of metal foil and electroplating. The program results demonstrated that both phosphoric and chromic acid anodized Al foil provided adequate adhesion to the Gr/Ep tubes and stability of optical properties when subjected to atomic oxygen and thermal cycling representative of the LEO environment. SiO2/Al coatings sputtered onto Al foils also resulted in an excellent protective coating. The electroplated Ni possessed unacceptable adhesion loss to the Gr/Ep tubes during atomic oxygen testing. Scale-Up and Assembly involved fabricating and wrapping 8-ft-long by 2-in-diameter Gr/EP tubes with chromic acid anodized foil and delivering these tubes, along with representative Space Station erectable end fittings, to NASA LaRC.

  8. Graphene coatings: An efficient protection from oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topsakal, Mehmet; Sahin, Hasan; Ciraci, Salim

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate that graphene coating can provide an efficient protection from oxidation by posing a high energy barrier to the path of oxygen atom, which could have penetrated from the top of graphene to the reactive surface underneath. Graphene bilayer, which blocks the diffusion of oxygen with a relatively higher energy barrier provides even better protection from oxidation. While an oxygen molecule is weakly bound to bare graphene surface and hence becomes rather inactive, it can easily dissociates into two oxygen atoms adsorbed to low coordinated carbon atoms at the edges of a vacancy. For these oxygen atoms the oxidation barrier is reduced and hence the protection from oxidation provided by graphene coatings is weakened. Our predictions obtained from the state of the art first-principles calculations of electronic structure, phonon density of states and reaction path will unravel how a graphene can be used as a corrosion resistant coating and guide further studies aiming at developing more efficient nanocoating materials.

  9. Molybdenum protective coatings adhesion to steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesman, A. I.; Postnikov, D. V.; Polonyankin, D. A.; Teplouhov, A. A.; Tyukin, A. V.; Tkachenko, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Protection of the critical parts, components and assemblies from corrosion is an urgent engineering problem and many other industries. Protective coatings’ forming on surface of metal products is a promising way of corrosionprevention. The adhesion force is one of the main characteristics of coatings’ durability. The paper presents theoretical and experimental adhesion force assessment for coatings formed by molybdenum magnetron sputtering ontoa steel substrate. Validity and reliability of results obtained by simulation and sclerometry method allow applying the developed model for adhesion force evaluation in binary «steel-coating» systems.

  10. Composite protective coating for carbon-carbon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, J.W.; Forcht, B.A.; Moss, R.W.

    1985-02-19

    Composite protective coatings for protecting carbonaceous substrates from degrading in oxygen containing environments are provided. The composite protective coatings include a first coating layer applied to the surface of the substrate. The first coating layer is a silicon carbide type coating. The second coating layer is applied to the surface of a first coating layer and is a sputter deposited phase stabilized zirconium oxide having a columnar microstructure. Carbonaceous substrates having the composite protective coatings are able to withstand temperatures of about 4100/sup 0/ F. in oxygen containing environments.

  11. Properties of Lightning Strike Protection Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Martin

    Composite materials are being increasingly used by many industries. In the case of aerospace companies, those materials are installed on their aircraft to save weight, and thus, fuel costs. These aircraft are lighter, but the loss of electrical conductivity makes aircraft vulnerable to lightning strikes, which hit commercial aircrafts on average once per year. This makes lightning strike protection very important, and while current metallic expanded copper foils offer good protection, they increase the weight of composites. Therefore, under the CRIAQ COMP-502 project, a team of industrial partners and academic researchers are investigating new conductive coatings with the following characteristics: High electromagnetic protection, high mechanical resistance, good environmental protection, manufacturability and moderate cost. The main objectives of this thesis, as part of this project, was to determine the main characteristics, such as electrical and tribomechanical properties, of conductive coatings on composite panels. Their properties were also to be tested after destructive tests such as current injection and environmental testing. Bombardier Aerospace provided the substrate, a composite of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix, and the current commercial product, a surfacing film that includes an expanded copper foil used to compare with the other coatings. The conductive coatings fabricated by the students are: silver nanoparticles inside a binding matrix (PEDOT:PSS or a mix of Epoxy and PEDOT:PSS), silvered carbon nanofibers embedded in the surfacing film, cold sprayed tin, graphene oxide functionalized with silver nanowires, and electroless plated silver. Additionally as part of the project and thesis, magnetron sputtered aluminum coated samples were fabricated. There are three main types of tests to characterize the conductive coatings: electrical, mechanical and environmental. Electrical tests consist of finding the sheet resistance and specific resistivity

  12. Article having an improved platinum-aluminum-hafnium protective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, Bangalore Aswatha (Inventor); Williams, Jeffrey Lawrence (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An article protected by a protective coating has a substrate and a protective coating having an outer layer deposited upon the substrate surface and a diffusion zone formed by interdiffusion of the outer layer and the substrate. The protective coating includes platinum, aluminum, no more than about 2 weight percent hafnium, and substantially no silicon. The outer layer is substantially a single phase.

  13. Bondable Stainless Surface Coats Protect Against Rust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Shaffer, D. K.; Clearfield, H. M.; Nagle, D.; Groff, G.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes tests conducted to assess use of bondable stainless surface (BOSS) coating materials to protect steel cases of solid-fuel rocket motors against corrosion and to provide surface microstructure and chemistry suitable for bonding to insulating material. Eliminates need to cover cases with grease to prevent corrosion and degreasing immediately prior to use.

  14. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  15. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    DOEpatents

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  16. Bondable Stainless Surface Coats Protect Against Rust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Shaffer, D. K.; Clearfield, H. M.; Nagle, D.; Groff, G.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes tests conducted to assess use of bondable stainless surface (BOSS) coating materials to protect steel cases of solid-fuel rocket motors against corrosion and to provide surface microstructure and chemistry suitable for bonding to insulating material. Eliminates need to cover cases with grease to prevent corrosion and degreasing immediately prior to use.

  17. Method for smoothing the surface of a protective coating

    DOEpatents

    Sangeeta, D.; Johnson, Curtis Alan; Nelson, Warren Arthur

    2001-01-01

    A method for smoothing the surface of a ceramic-based protective coating which exhibits roughness is disclosed. The method includes the steps of applying a ceramic-based slurry or gel coating to the protective coating surface; heating the slurry/gel coating to remove volatile material; and then further heating the slurry/gel coating to cure the coating and bond it to the underlying protective coating. The slurry/gel coating is often based on yttria-stabilized zirconia, and precursors of an oxide matrix. Related articles of manufacture are also described.

  18. Thin film heater for removable volatile protecting coatings.

    PubMed

    Karim, Abid

    2013-01-01

    Freshly coated aluminum mirrors have excellent reflectivity at far ultraviolet wavelengths. However, reflectivity rapidly degrades when the mirror surfaces are exposed to atmosphere. In order to avoid this problem, freshly coated aluminum surface can be protected by over-coating of a removable volatile protecting coating. This protecting coating can be re-evaporated by controlled heating or by some other methods when required. This type of removable coating has immediate application in UV space astronomy. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of re-evaporation of removable volatile Zn protecting coating using a NiCr thin film heater without affecting the reflection properties of Al mirror surfaces.

  19. Molybdate Coatings for Protecting Aluminum Against Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; MacDowell, Louis G.

    2005-01-01

    Conversion coatings that comprise mixtures of molybdates and several additives have been subjected to a variety of tests to evaluate their effectiveness in protecting aluminum and alloys of aluminum against corrosion. Molybdate conversion coatings are under consideration as replacements for chromate conversion coatings, which have been used for more than 70 years. The chromate coatings are highly effective in protecting aluminum and its alloys against corrosion but are also toxic and carcinogenic. Hexavalent molybdenum and, hence, molybdates containing hexavalent molybdenum, have received attention recently as replacements for chromates because molybdates mimic chromates in a variety of applications but exhibit significantly lower toxicity. The tests were performed on six proprietary formulations of molybdate conversion coatings, denoted formulations A through F, on panels of aluminum alloy 2024-T3. A bare alloy panel was also included in the tests. The tests included electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), measurements of corrosion potentials, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  20. Antioxidative protective coatings for carbon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kravetskii, G.A.; Kostikov, V.I.; Demin, A.V.; Rodionova, V.V.

    1995-12-01

    A widespread use of carbon-carbon and carbon-ceramic materials (CCM) in the aerospace industry, metallurgy (crucibles for melting metals) and electrical engineering is limited because of the need for protecting CCM parts against oxidation at service temperatures above 500 to 700{degrees}C. At temperatures up to 1300-1400{degrees}C, the problem can be solved by volume siliconizing CCM parts, impregnating C-C substrates with organosilicon compounds or gas-phase depositing (CVD process) silicon-containing compounds (SiC or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). For CCM parts to be used at temperatures above 1500{degrees}C in oxidative environments (space structures; aircraft gas-turbine engine components in contact with a hot gas; crucibles for melting metals), the following techniques are being devised to apply protective coatings, as evident from a patent literature analysis: (1) Application of SiC coatings onto the surface of graphite or C-C parts by the CVD or CVR methods; such coatings can be quite efficient for parts operating short time at temperatures up to 2000{degrees}C, for example in rocket engines; (2) SiC coatings applied onto the surface of large-sized or intricately-shaped parts frequently experience cracking; this necessitates the application of multilayered or multicomponent coatings (by subsequent impregnation with various silicate compositions, covering with glass or glass-like compositions to {open_quotes}heal{close_quotes} cracks; applying surface oxide or silicate coatings); (3) Application on the surface of CCM parts of refractory, self-healing-in use coatings containing refractory borides and silicides; to this end the CVD method and plasma spraying in controlled atmospheres are employed. Given below are results of the investigations conducted at NIIGRA-FIT in the above-mentioned directions with the use of the slip-casting technology.

  1. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  2. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  3. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  4. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  5. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion...

  6. Advanced protective coatings for gas turbine blading

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, N.; Stamm, W.

    1998-07-01

    The new gas turbines now being marketed are characterized by outputs and efficiencies which were unthinkable just a few years ago. A key factor for achieving efficiency is the highest possible turbine inlet temperature, currently approx. 1,400 C. In such a machine, it is the turbine blades which are subjected to the greatest thermal and mechanical stresses. They are also subjected to extreme chemical stress in the form of oxidation, which in the following is understood as the corrosive action due almost exclusively to the temperature of the turbine blade surface and (to a much lesser degree) the pressure and oxygen content of the hot gas. In many cases, this is compounded by hot corrosion, which results in accelerated oxidation due to impurities in the fuel and air. In terms of physics, this demanding challenge requires the use of cooling techniques which push the envelope of feasibility. In terms of materials engineering, an innovative multifaceted solution is called for. In more concrete terms, this means a combination of convection, impingement and film cooling of blades made of the strongest high-temperature alloy materials and coated with one or possibly multiple coatings. The base material ensures the blade's mechanical integrity while the coating(s) provide(s) protection against the oxidizing and corrosive attack, as well as the thermal stresses which cannot be sufficiently mitigated by cooling. The superiority of single crystal materials over polycrystalline or directionally solidified nickel-base superalloys is illustrated. The coating is a third-generation NiCoCrAIY VPS (vacuum plasma spray) coating. In the paper, the authors discuss the current status of coating developments for large, stationary gas turbines and present solutions for achieving important development objectives.

  7. Nanocomposite protective coatings for battery anodes

    DOEpatents

    Lemmon, John P; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-21

    Modified surfaces on metal anodes for batteries can help resist formation of malfunction-inducing surface defects. The modification can include application of a protective nanocomposite coating that can inhibit formation of surface defects. such as dendrites, on the anode during charge/discharge cycles. For example, for anodes having a metal (M'), the protective coating can be characterized by products of chemical or electrochemical dissociation of a nanocomposite containing a polymer and an exfoliated compound (M.sub.a'M.sub.b''X.sub.c). The metal, M', comprises Li, Na, or Zn. The exfoliated compound comprises M' among lamella of M.sub.b''X.sub.c, wherein M'' is Fe, Mo, Ta, W, or V, and X is S, O, or Se.

  8. Sprayable Phase Change Coating Thermal Protection Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Rod W.; Hayes, Paul W.; Kaul, Raj

    2005-01-01

    NASA has expressed a need for reusable, environmentally friendly, phase change coating that is capable of withstanding the heat loads that have historically required an ablative thermal insulation. The Space Shuttle Program currently relies on ablative materials for thermal protection. The problem with an ablative insulation is that, by design, the material ablates away, in fulfilling its function of cooling the underlying substrate, thus preventing the insulation from being reused from flight to flight. The present generation of environmentally friendly, sprayable, ablative thermal insulation (MCC-l); currently use on the Space Shuttle SRBs, is very close to being a reusable insulation system. In actual flight conditions, as confirmed by the post-flight inspections of the SRBs, very little of the material ablates. Multi-flight thermal insulation use has not been qualified for the Space Shuttle. The gap that would have to be overcome in order to implement a reusable Phase Change Coating (PCC) is not unmanageable. PCC could be applied robotically with a spray process utilizing phase change material as filler to yield material of even higher strength and reliability as compared to MCC-1. The PCC filled coatings have also demonstrated potential as cryogenic thermal coatings. In experimental thermal tests, a thin application of PCC has provided the same thermal protection as a much thicker and heavier application of a traditional ablative thermal insulation. In addition, tests have shown that the structural integrity of the coating has been maintained and phase change performance after several aero-thermal cycles was not affected. Experimental tests have also shown that, unlike traditional ablative thermal insulations, PCC would not require an environmental seal coat, which has historically been required to prevent moisture absorption by the thermal insulation, prevent environmental degradation, and to improve the optical and aerodynamic properties. In order to reduce

  9. Liquid Galvanic Coatings for Protection of Imbedded Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis G. (Inventor); Curran, Joseph J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Coating compositions and methods of their use are described herein for the reduction of corrosion in imbedded metal structures. The coatings are applied as liquids to an external surface of a substrate in which the metal structures are imbedded. The coatings are subsequently allowed to dry. The liquid applied coatings provide galvanic protection to the imbedded metal structures. Continued protection can be maintained with periodic reapplication of the coating compositions, as necessary, to maintain electrical continuity. Because the coatings may be applied using methods similar to standard paints, and because the coatings are applied to external surfaces of the substrates in which the metal structures are imbedded, the corresponding corrosion protection may be easily maintained. The coating compositions are particularly useful in the protection of metal-reinforced concrete.

  10. Corrosion-protective coatings from electrically conducting polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Karen Gebert; Bryan, Coleman J.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Wrobleski, Debra A.

    1991-01-01

    In a joint effort between NASA Kennedy and LANL, electrically conductive polymer coatings were developed as corrosion protective coatings for metal surfaces. At NASA Kennedy, the launch environment consist of marine, severe solar, and intermittent high acid and/or elevated temperature conditions. Electrically conductive polymer coatings were developed which impart corrosion resistance to mild steel when exposed to saline and acidic environments. Such coatings also seem to promote corrosion resistance in areas of mild steel where scratches exist in the protective coating. Such coatings appear promising for many commercial applications.

  11. Corrosion-protective coatings from electrically conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Wrobleski, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    In a joint research effort involving the Kennedy Space Center and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, electrically conductive polymer coatings have been developed as corrosion-protective coatings for metal surfaces. At the Kennedy Space Center, the launch environment consists of marine, severe solar, and intermittent high acid/elevated temperature conditions. Electrically conductive polymer coatings have been developed which impart corrosion resistance to mild steel when exposed to saline and acidic environments. Such coatings also seem to promote corrosion resistance in areas of mild steel where scratches exist in the protective coating. Such coatings appear promising for many commercial applications.

  12. Diamondlike carbon protective coatings for optical windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swec, Diane M.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited on infrared transmitting optical windows and were evaluated as protective coatings for these windows exposed to particle and rain erosion. The DLC films were deposited on zinc selenide (ZnSe) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) by three different ion beam methods: (1) sputter deposition from a carbon target using an 8-cm argon ion source; (2) direct deposition by a 30-cm hollow cathode ion source with hydrocarbon gas in argon; and (3) dual beam direct deposition by the 30-cm hollow cathode ion source and an 8-cm argon ion source. In an attempt to improve the adherence of the DLC films on ZnSc and ZnS, ion beam cleaning, ion implantation with helium and neon ions, or sputter deposition of a thin, ion beam intermediate coating was employed prior to deposition of the DLC film. The protection that the DLC films afforded the windows from particle and rain erosion was evaluated, along with the hydrogen content, adherence, intrinsic stress, and infrared transmittance of the films. Because of the elevated stress levels in the ion beam sputtered DLC films and in those ion beam deposited with butane, films thicker than 0.1 micron and with good adherence on ZnS and ZnSe could not be generated. An intermediate coating of germanium successfully allowed the DLC films to remain adherent to the optical windows and caused only negligible reduction in the specular transmittance of the ZnS and ZnSe at 10 microns.

  13. Thin Film Heater for Removable Volatile Protecting Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Abid

    2013-01-01

    Freshly coated aluminum mirrors have excellent reflectivity at far ultraviolet wavelengths. However, reflectivity rapidly degrades when the mirror surfaces are exposed to atmosphere. In order to avoid this problem, freshly coated aluminum surface can be protected by over-coating of a removable volatile protecting coating. This protecting coating can be re-evaporated by controlled heating or by some other methods when required. This type of removable coating has immediate application in UV space astronomy. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of re-evaporation of removable volatile Zn protecting coating using a NiCr thin film heater without affecting the reflection properties of Al mirror surfaces. PMID:24327809

  14. Tests validate fiberglass cement to protect subsea FBE coating

    SciTech Connect

    Traulsen, C.; Nielsen, N.J.R.; Nielsen, T.S. )

    1990-09-17

    Rock-shield coating on subsea pipelines is a viable alternative to concrete coating when protection against rock dumping is required. Tests and installation experience indicates this use, providing that special attention is paid to the priming process, cleanliness of the coating applicator, handling of the line pipe, and selection of a suitable plow for trenching.

  15. Protective coatings for columbium applied in the field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J.; Culp, J.

    1971-01-01

    The various aspects of field repair of columbium alloy panels with protective coatings designed as part of the Space Shuttle thermal protection system are examined. The field repair of the coatings is accomplished by employing ceramic cement repairs, and reapplying the fused slurry silicide coating. Techniques are described which improve the practicality of these repairs by employing torch heating. The repair coating quality is demonstrated by testing which simulates flight temperature, pressure, stress and acoustic vibration conditions as a function of time. Conclusions on the present status of field repair coatings are presented and recommendations are given for appropriate future activities relative to the use on an operational Space Shuttle system.

  16. Durability of Metallic Interconnects and Protective Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2009-12-15

    To build up a useful voltage, a number of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrically connected into series in a stack via interconnects, which are placed between adjacent cells. In addition to functioning as a bi-polar electrical connector, the interconnect also acts as a separator plate that separates the fuel at the anode side of one cell from the air at the cathode side on an adjacent cell. During SOFC operation at the high temperatures, the interconnects are thus simultaneously exposed to the oxidizing air at one side and a reducing fuel that can be either hydrogen or hydrocarbon at the other. Besides, they are in contact with adjacent components, such as electrodes or electrical contacts, seals, etc. With steady reduction in SOFC operating temperatures into the low or intermediate range 600-850oC, oxidation resistant alloys are often used to construct interconnects. However, the metallic interconnects may degrade via interactions at their interfaces with surrounding environments or adjacent components, potentially affecting the stability and performance of interconnects and the SOFC stacks. Thus protection layers are applied to metallic interconnects that also intend to mitigate or prevent chromium migration into cells and the cell poisoning. This chapter provides a comprehensive review of materials for metallic interconnects, their degradation and coating protection.

  17. Protective coatings and sealants for solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wischmann, K. B.; Gonzales, M. H.

    1980-09-01

    An aging study has been completed which evaluated a number of polymeric materials for potential use as (1) protective coatings for back surfaces of mirrors and (2) solar heliostat edge seals. These investigations were conducted in an artificial weathering chamber that accelerated thermal cycling. The primary mirror failure mode was observed to be silver corrosion resulting from moisture exposure. To increase mirror longevity in current heliostat designs, intimate bonding at all the composite interfaces is essential to minimize moisture pathways to the silvered surface. If any voids or delaminations are present, mirror degradation will eventually occur. Delaminations can also occur as the result of mechanical stresses brought about by mismatches in the various materials coefficients of thermal expansion. If good bonding cannot be achieved or mechanical stresses avoided, then improved moisture barriers must be designed to assure mirror longevity. With good adhesion, a KRATON rubber was found to exhibit superior back surface mirror protection (12 months in environmental chamber with no corrosion). An ultraviolet stabilized butyl rubber appeared to be the best edge seal. All heliostats edge sealed with silicones showed silver corrosion which indicated either poor bonding or moisture permeation.

  18. Protective coating for salt-bath brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, A. C.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1971-01-01

    Ceramic coating, consisting of graphite, enameler's clay, and algin binder, applied to materials prior to salt bath brazing facilitates brazing process and results in superior joints. Alternate coating materials and their various proportions are given.

  19. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1992-03-31

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

  20. Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

  1. Evaluation of several corrosion protective coating systems on aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, R.H.

    1981-02-01

    A study of several protective coating systems for use on aluminum in seawater/seacoast environments was conducted to review the developments made on protective coatings since early in the Space Shuttle program and to perform comparative studies on these coatings to determine their effectiveness for providing corrosion protection during exposure to seawater/seacoast environments. Panels of 2219-T87 aluminum were coated with 21 different systems and exposed to a 5 percent salt spray for 4000 h. Application properties, adhesion measurements, heat resistance and corrosion protection were evaluated. For comparative studies, the presently specified Bostik epoxy system used on the SRB structures was included. Results of these tests indicate four systems with outstanding performance and four additional systems with protection almost as good. These systems are based on a chromated pretreatment, a chromate epoxy primer, and a polyurethane topcoat. Consideration for one of these systems should be included for those applications where superior corrosion protection for aluminum surfaces is required.

  2. Evaluation of several corrosion protective coating systems on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    A study of several protective coating systems for use on aluminum in seawater/seacoast environments was conducted to review the developments made on protective coatings since early in the Space Shuttle program and to perform comparative studies on these coatings to determine their effectiveness for providing corrosion protection during exposure to seawater/seacoast environments. Panels of 2219-T87 aluminum were coated with 21 different systems and exposed to a 5 percent salt spray for 4000 hr. Application properties, adhesion measurements, heat resistance and corrosion protection were evaluated. For comparative studies, the presently specified Bostik epoxy system used on the SRB structures was included. Results of these tests indicate four systems with outstanding performance and four additional systems with protection almost as good. These systems are based on a chromated pretreatment, a chromate epoxy primer, and a polyurethane topcoat. Consideration for one of these systems should be included for those applications where superior corrosion protection for aluminum surfaces is required.

  3. Accelerated Test Method for Corrosion Protective Coatings Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Calle, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a new accelerated corrosion test method that predicts the long-term corrosion protection performance of spaceport structure coatings as accurately and reliably as current long-term atmospheric exposure tests. This new accelerated test method will shorten the time needed to evaluate the corrosion protection performance of coatings for NASA's critical ground support structures. Lifetime prediction for spaceport structure coatings has a 5-year qualification cycle using atmospheric exposure. Current accelerated corrosion tests often provide false positives and negatives for coating performance, do not correlate to atmospheric corrosion exposure results, and do not correlate with atmospheric exposure timescales for lifetime prediction.

  4. Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Min; Shen, Zhigang; Zhao, Xiaohu; Liang, Shuaishuai; Liu, Lei

    2014-04-01

    The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion.

  5. Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Min; Shen, Zhigang; Zhao, Xiaohu; Liang, Shuaishuai; Liu, Lei

    2014-04-07

    The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion.

  6. METHOD AND COATING COMPOSITION FOR PROTECTING AND DECONTAMINATING SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Overhold, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.

    1959-03-10

    A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is presented. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in waters allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

  7. Method and coating composition for protecting and decontaminating surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Overhold, D C; Peterson, M D

    1959-03-10

    A protective coating useful in the decontamination of surfaces exposed to radioactive substances is described. This coating is placed on the surface before use and is soluble in water, allowing its easy removal in the event decontamination becomes necessary. Suitable coating compositions may be prepared by mixing a water soluble carbohydrate such as sucrose or dextrin, together with a hygroscopic agent such as calcium chloride or zinc chloride.

  8. Mechanical behavior of segmented oxide protected coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, J.W.; Prater, J.T.; Hays, D.D.; Moss, R.W.

    1980-04-01

    Mechanically and thermally induced fractures were examined in sputtered coatings consisting of a NiCrAlY underlayer, either a thin or a thick transition layer graded from NiCrAlY to ZrO/sub 2/, and an outer ZrO/sub 2/ layer. A pronounced columnar (fibrous) microstructure was obtained, although the columnar boundaries in the ZrO/sub 2/ layers and in the thick transition layers were much more open than in the NiCrAlY, effectively producing a more segmented structure. Fractures in the coatings with thick transition layers always followed the columnar boundaries and did not affect coating adherence. Fractures in the coatings with thin transition layers were similar except that fractures in the transition layer and parallel to the layer plane were observed in addition to the columnar fractures and would be expected to result in loss of coating adherence.

  9. Issues/considerations and performance prediction of LEO protective coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Organic materials can be used in low earth orbit for long periods only if they are made to be durable to atomic oxygen in addition to the threats of ultraviolet radiation, micrometeoroid and debris impact, thermal cycling, and charged particle radiation. In many materials applications, it is more cost-effective to utilize atomic oxygen protective coatings over materials which are vulnerable to attack by atomic oxygen rather than developing alternative materials which are inherently durable. Many metal and metal oxide coatings have been shown to be potentially suitable for long term protection of organic polymers in low earth orbit. The protection afforded by thin film coatings on polymeric substrates is highly dependent on the completeness of coverage of the coating. Thus, the prime indicator of durability is the size and abundance of pin windows and scratches in the protective coating. Such defects depend on the deposition technique, smoothness of the surface to be protected, and presence of particulate contaminants. Issues and considerations relevant to substrate preparation, deposition of protective coatings, ground laboratory simulation and evaluation of threats in low earth orbit to protective materials, results of in-space tests, and the use of Monte Carlo modeling techniques to predict in-space durability are presented in graphic form.

  10. Corrosion protection mechanism of polyaniline blended organic coating on steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Jeyaram, R.; Muthukrishnan, S.; Venkatachari, G.

    2009-07-01

    Epoxy-coal tar coatings are widely used to protect steel structures exposed to marine atmosphere due to their good barrier property. However, the presence of micropores and microcracks formed during the coating formation leads to failure of the coating due to permeation of corrosive ions. In recent years, it has been established that the coatings containing polyaniline (PANI) is able to protect pinholes and defects due to its passivating ability. Hence, a study has been made on the effect of polyaniline content (1 and 3%) in epoxy-coal tar coating on the corrosion protection of steel in 3% NaCl solution by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies. Both phosphate- and chloride-doped polyanilines were prepared by a chemical oxidative polymerization method. From EIS studies, it has been found that the resistance value of the coatings containing 1 and 3% phosphate-doped polyaniline and 3% chloride-doped polyaniline pigmented coatings are similar to 10{sup 9} {Omega} cm{sup 2} even after 90 days exposure to NaCl solution, which are two orders high in comparison to that of conventional coal tar epoxy coatings. Besides, the conducting state of polyaniline has been found to be decreased after exposure to NaCl solution due to redox property of PANI. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have shown that polyaniline forms a complex layer with iron beneath the coating along with iron oxide.

  11. Protective coatings for composite tubes in space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, Harry W.; Hendricks, Carl L.

    1987-01-01

    Protective coatings for graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) tubular structures for a Manned Space Station truss structure were evaluated. The success of the composite tube truss structure depends on its stability to long-term exposure to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment with particular emphasis placed on atomic oxygen. Concepts for protectively coating Gr/Ep tubes include use of inorganic coated metal foils and electroplating. These coatings were applied to Gr/Ep tubes and then subjected to simulated LEO environmnet to evaluate survivability of coatings and coated tubes. Evaluation included: atomic oxygen resistance, changes in optical properties and adhesion, abrasion resistancem surface preparation required, coating uniformity, and formation of microcracks in the Gr/Ep tubes caused by thermal cycling. Program results demonstrated that both phosphoric and chromic acid anodized Al foil provided excellent adhesion to Gr/Ep tubes and exhibited stable optical properties when subjected to simulated LEO environment. The SiO2/Al coatings speuttered onto Al foils also resulted in an excellent protective coating. Electroplated Ni exhibited unaccepatble adhesion loss to Gr/Ep tubes during atomic oxygen exposure.

  12. Coating protects magnesium-lithium alloys against corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Coating protects newly developed magnesium-lithium alloys against corrosion. The procedure includes heating the ingots in a salt bath and rolling them to the desired sheet thickness. The black coating, which is tough though thin and ductile, is derived mainly from chromium.

  13. Iridium Aluminide Coats For Protection Against Ox idation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.; La Ferla, Raffaele; Jang, Qin

    1996-01-01

    Iridium aluminide coats investigated for use in protecting some metallic substrates against oxidation at high temperatures. Investigation prompted by need for cost-effective anti-oxidation coats for walls of combustion chambers in rocket engines. Also useful in special terrestrial applications like laboratory combustion chambers and some chemical-processing chambers.

  14. Renewal of corrosion protection of coated aluminum after welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1969-01-01

    Effectiveness of conversion coatings designed to protect aluminum alloys against atmospheric corrosion is reduced after exposure to high temperature or welding. Damaged coating should be manually stripped six inches from the weld and then recoated by sponge or spray with the original solution.

  15. Iridium Aluminide Coats For Protection Against Ox idation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.; La Ferla, Raffaele; Jang, Qin

    1996-01-01

    Iridium aluminide coats investigated for use in protecting some metallic substrates against oxidation at high temperatures. Investigation prompted by need for cost-effective anti-oxidation coats for walls of combustion chambers in rocket engines. Also useful in special terrestrial applications like laboratory combustion chambers and some chemical-processing chambers.

  16. Protection of alodine coatings from thermal aging by removable polymer coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Wagstaff, Brett R.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Whinnery, LeRoy L., Jr.

    2006-12-01

    Removable polymer coatings were evaluated as a means to suppress dehydration of Alodine chromate conversion coatings during thermal aging and thereby retain the corrosion protection afforded by Alodine. Two types of polymer coatings were applied to Alodine-treated panels of aluminum alloys 7075-T73 and 6061-T6 that were subsequently aged for 15 to 50 hours at temperatures between 135 F to 200 F. The corrosion resistance of the thermally aged panels was evaluated, after stripping the polymer coatings, by exposure to a standard salt-fog corrosion test and the extent of pitting of the polymer-coated and untreated panels compared. Removable polymer coatings mitigated the loss of corrosion resistance due to thermal aging experienced by the untreated alloys. An epoxide coating was more effective than a fluorosilicone coating as a dehydration barrier.

  17. Flexible protective coatings made from silicon-nitrogen materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Flexible protective coatings formed from either of two polymers endure high temperatures for long periods. One polymer is a byproduct in hexaphenylcyclotrisilazane preparation, the other is obtained by heating bis/methylamino/diphenylsilane.

  18. Corrosion protection by sonoelectrodeposited organic films on zinc coated steel.

    PubMed

    Et Taouil, Abdeslam; Mahmoud, Mahmoud Mourad; Lallemand, Fabrice; Lallemand, Séverine; Gigandet, Marie-Pierre; Hihn, Jean-Yves

    2012-11-01

    A variety of coatings based on electrosynthesized polypyrrole were deposited on zinc coated steel in presence or absence of ultrasound, and studied in terms of corrosion protection. Cr III and Cr VI commercial passivation were used as references. Depth profiling showed a homogeneous deposit for Cr III, while SEM imaging revealed good surface homogeneity for Cr VI layers. These chromium-based passivations ensured good protection against corrosion. Polypyrrole (PPy) was also electrochemically deposited on zinc coated steel with and without high frequency ultrasound irradiation in aqueous sodium tartrate-molybdate solution. Such PPy coatings act as a physical barrier against corrosive species. PPy electrosynthesized in silent conditions exhibits similar properties to Cr VI passivation with respect to corrosion protection. Ultrasound leads to more compact and more homogeneous surface structures for PPy, as well as to more homogeneous distribution of doping molybdate anions within the film. Far better corrosion protection is exhibited for such sonicated films.

  19. BORED AND ASSEMBLED GATE VALVES RECEIVING PROTECTIVE COATING IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BORED AND ASSEMBLED GATE VALVES RECEIVING PROTECTIVE COATING IN THE VALVE PAINT BOOTH OF THE VALVE ASSEMBLY BUILDING. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Valve Assembly Building, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Evaluation of Protective Coatings for Aluminum Torpedoes. Phase 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    48 is primarily made of 6000 and 7000 series aluminum , both of which are lightweight and strong, but have poor -~ resistance to corrosion. On the...D-A195 153 EVALUATION OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR ALUMINUM 1 TORPEDOES PHASE 20U) CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING RESEARCH LAB (ARMY) CHAMPAIGN IL S R...Engineering Research Laboratory AD-A195 153 Evaluation of Protective Coatings for Aluminum Torpedoes: Phase II by Susan A. Johnston This report

  1. Corrosion-Protection Coatings for Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Study investigates 21 combinatios of surface treatments, primers and topcoats. Study considers several types of coatings, including primers, enamels, chlorinated rubbers, alkyds, epoxies, vinyls, polyurethanes, waterbased paints, and antifouling paints. 20-page report summarizes the study.

  2. Protective Coating For Laser Drilling Of Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    Sodium silicate prevents spattered silicon from fusing with surrounding material. Sodium silicate solution applied to wafer by dipping and draining or by spinning; application by spraying also works. When dried in oven, solution leaves thin coating of sodium silicate glass.

  3. Corrosion-Protection Coatings for Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Study investigates 21 combinatios of surface treatments, primers and topcoats. Study considers several types of coatings, including primers, enamels, chlorinated rubbers, alkyds, epoxies, vinyls, polyurethanes, waterbased paints, and antifouling paints. 20-page report summarizes the study.

  4. Sputtered silicon nitride coatings for wear protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grill, A.; Aron, P. R.

    1982-01-01

    Silicon nitride films were deposited by RF sputtering on 304 stainless steel substrates in a planar RF sputtering apparatus. The sputtering was performed from a Si3N4 target in a sputtering atmosphere of argon and nitrogen. The rate of deposition, the composition of the coatings, the surface microhardness and the adhesion of the coatings to the substrates were investigated as a function of the process parameters, such as: substrate target distance, fraction nitrogen in the sputtering atmosphere and sputtering pressure. Silicon rich coating was obtained for fraction nitrogen below 0.2. The rate of deposition decreases continuously with increasing fraction nitrogen and decreasing sputtering pressure. It was found that the adherence of the coatings improves with decreasing sputtering pressure, almost independently of their composition.

  5. Study of protective coatings for aluminum die casting molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Ildiko; Rosso, Mario; Gobber, Federico Simone

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the development and characterization of some protective coatings on steel substrate are presented. The coatings are realized by plasma spray techniques. The substrate material used is a Cr-Mo-V based hot work tool steel, initially submitted to vacuum heat treatment to achieve homogeneous hardness. The main attention is focused on the study of wear and on the characterization of the interface between the substrate material and the coating layer, because of their key role in determining the resistance of the coating layer. Simulation of friction and wear processes is performed by pin-on-disk test and the tested samples are observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Coated columbium thermal protection systems: An assessment of technological readiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Grisaffe, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation and development to date show that of the coated columbium alloys FS-85 coated with R512E shows significant promise for a reusable thermal protection system (TPS) as judged by environmental resistance and the retention of mechanical properties and structural integrity of panels upon repeated reentry simulation. Production of the alloy, the coating, and full-sized TPS panels is well within current manufacturing technology. Small defects which arise from impact damage or from local coating breakdown do not appear to have serious immediate consequences in the use environment anticipated for the space shuttle orbiter TPS.

  7. Corrosion Embrittlement of Duralumin IV : The Use of Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawdon, Henry S

    1928-01-01

    Although the corrosion resistance of sheet duralumin can be greatly improved by suitable heat treatment, protection of the surface is still necessary if long life under varied service conditions is to be insured. The coatings used for this purpose may be grouped into three classes: the varnish type of coating, the oxide type produced by a chemical treatment of the surface, and metallic coatings, of which aluminum appears to be the most promising. Since the necessary weather exposure tests are not complete, some of the conclusions regarding the value of various surface coatings are necessarily tentative.

  8. Field repair of coated columbium Thermal Protection System (TPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culp, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements for field repair of coated columbian panels were studied, and the probable cause of damage were identified. The following types of repair methods were developed, and are ready for use on an operational system: replacement of fused slurrey silicide coating by a short processing cycle using a focused radiant spot heater; repair of the coating by a glassy matrix ceramic composition which is painted or sprayed over the defective area; and repair of the protective coating by plasma spraying molybdenum disilicide over the damaged area employing portable equipment.

  9. Smart Coatings for Launch Site Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.

    2014-01-01

    Smart, environmentally friendly paint system for early corrosion detection, mitigation, and healing that will enable supportability in KSC launch facilities and ground systems through their operational life cycles. KSC's Corrosion Technology Laboratory is developing a smart, self-healing coating that can detect and repair corrosion at an early stage. This coating is being developed using microcapsules specifically designed to deliver the contents of their core when corrosion starts.

  10. Positron annihilation behavior in several corrosion protective polymeric coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leidheiser, Henry; Szeles, Csaba; Vértes, Attila

    1987-04-01

    Positron annihilation was studied in a vinyl ester and four epoxy coatings on steel. Measurements were made on coatings in equilibrium with air at approximately 50% relative humidity and on coatings immersed in liquid water for 24 h. Three spectral components were identified: a short-lived component associated with annihilation largely in the steel substrate; a medium-lived component associated with annihilation in small voids in the coating; and a long-lived component associated with annihilation of o-positronium in the polymer matrix and within large voids in the polymer and at the polymer/metal interface. An excellent correlation was observed between the effect of water exposure on the annihilation spectra and the protective properties of the coating in an aggressive H 2SO 4 environment. Other correlations between the annihilation spectra and the protective properties were also identified.

  11. Chemical conversion coating for protecting magnesium alloys from corrosion

    DOEpatents

    Bhargava, Gaurang; Allen, Fred M.; Skandan, Ganesh; Hornish, Peter; Jain, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A chromate-free, self-healing conversion coating solution for magnesium alloy substrates, composed of 10-20 wt. % Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2.6H.sub.2O, 1-5 wt. % Al(NO.sub.3).sub.3.9H.sub.2O, and less than 1 wt. % of [V.sub.10O.sub.28].sup.6- or VO.sub.3.sup.- dissolved in water. The corrosion resistance offered by the resulting coating is in several hundreds of hours in salt-spray testing. This prolonged corrosion protection is attributed to the creation of a unique structure and morphology of the conversion coating that serves as a barrier coating with self-healing properties. Hydroxoaluminates form the backbone of the barrier protection offered while the magnesium hydroxide domains facilitate the "slow release" of vanadium compounds as self-healing moieties to defect sites, thus providing active corrosion protection.

  12. Influence of high temperatures on optical fibers coated with multilayer protective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanczyk, T.; Fidelus, J.; Wysokinski, K.; Lipinski, S.; Tenderenda, T.; Kuklińska, M.; Kołakowska, A.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Canadas Martinez, I.; Nasiłowski, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present an innovative method of enhancing optical fibers' resistance to extremely high temperatures by deposition of a multilayer metal coating on the fibers' surface. Such multilayer coating is necessary because of the silica degradation at elevated temperatures. Despite the fact that copper coated fibers work well at temperatures up to 400°C, at higher temperatures copper oxidizes and can no longer protect the fiber. To hold back the copper oxidation and silica degradation processes we developed a dedicated multilayer coating which allows fibers to operate at temperatures up to 700°C. The optimal protective layer has been chosen after numerous high-temperature tests, where copper plates coated with different kinds of coatings were evaluated. What is more, we present results of the high-temperature reliability tests of copper coated fibers protected with our multilayer coating. Performed tests proved that our solution significantly improved optical fibers' reliability to both: elevated temperatures and rapid changes of temperature. Furthermore the developed metal coatings allow fibers' to be electrolytically bonded to other metal elements (e.g. sensor transducers) what makes them great candidates for harsh environment fiber optic sensor applications.

  13. Microencapsulation Technologies for Corrosion Protective Coating Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz; Pearman, Benjamin; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Microencapsulation technologies for functional smart Coatings for autonomous corrosion control have been a research area of strong emphasis during the last decade. This work concerns the development of pH sensitive micro-containers (microparticles and microcapsules) for autonomous corrosion control. This paper presents an overview of the state-of-the-art in the field of microencapsulation for corrosion control applications, as well as the technical details of the pH sensitive microcontainer approach, such as selection criteria for corrosion indicators and corrosion inhibitors; the development and optimization of encapsulation methods; function evaluation before and after incorporation of the microcontainers into coatings; and further optimization to improve coating compatibility and performance.

  14. Temporary coatings for protection of microelectronic devices during packaging

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Conley, William R.

    2005-01-18

    The present invention relates to a method of protecting a microelectronic device during device packaging, including the steps of applying a water-insoluble, temporary protective coating to a sensitive area on the device; performing at least one packaging step; and then substantially removing the protective coating, preferably by dry plasma etching. The sensitive area can include a released MEMS element. The microelectronic device can be disposed on a wafer. The protective coating can be a vacuum vapor-deposited parylene polymer, silicon nitride, metal (e.g. aluminum or tungsten), a vapor deposited organic material, cynoacrylate, a carbon film, a self-assembled monolayered material, perfluoropolyether, hexamethyldisilazane, or perfluorodecanoic carboxylic acid, silicon dioxide, silicate glass, or combinations thereof. The present invention also relates to a method of packaging a microelectronic device, including: providing a microelectronic device having a sensitive area; applying a water-insoluble, protective coating to the sensitive area; providing a package; attaching the device to the package; electrically interconnecting the device to the package; and substantially removing the protective coating from the sensitive area.

  15. Protective metal matrix coating with nanocomponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Galevsky, S. G.; Efimova, K. A.

    2016-09-01

    Experience of nanocrystalline chromium, titanium, silicon carbides and borides components application as nickel, zinc, chromium based electrodeposited composite coating is generalized. Electrodepositing conditions are determined. Structure and physicochemical properties of coatings, namely micro-hardness, adhesion to steel base, inherent stresses, heat resistance, corrosion currents, en-during quality, and their change during isothermal annealing are studied. As is shown, nanocomponents act as metal matrix modifier. Technological and economic feasibility study to evaluate expediency of replacing high priced nano-diamonds with nanocrystalline borides and carbides is undertaken.

  16. SiOx Protective Coat For Polyimide Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Sovey, James; Mirtich, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Report and detailed appendix describe protective coat of SiOx (where x is 1.9 - 2.0) on Kapton H(R) polyimide sheet. Surface film protects substrate from bombardment by atomic oxygen. Intended for use as blanket substrate material of flexible array of solar photovoltaic cells on Space Station Freedom.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition coatings for oxidation protection of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, G. R.; Robinson, J. C.; Clark, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the oxidation protection afforded to Ti-14Al-21Nb and Ti-14Al-23Nb-2V titanium aluminides and Ti-17Mo-3Al-3Nb titanium alloy by aluminum-boron-silicon and boron-silicon coatings are presented. These coatings are applied by a combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The former is for the application of aluminum, and the latter is for codeposition of boron and silicon. Coating thickness is in the range of 2 to 7 microns, and coating weights are 0.6 to 2.0 mg/sq cm. Oxidation testing was performed in air at temperatures to 1255 K in both static and hypersonic flow environments. The degree of oxidation protection provided by the coatings is determined from weight change measurements made during the testing and post test compositional analyses. Temperature-dependent total normal emittance data are also presented for four coating/substrate combinations. Both types of coatings provided excellent oxidation protection for the exposure conditions of this investigation. Total normal emittances were greater than 0.80 in all cases.

  18. Coatings for Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Protection of Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, Jim; Gabb, Tim; Draper, Sue; Miller, Bob; Locci, Ivan; Sudbrack, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Increasing temperatures in aero gas turbines is resulting in oxidation and hot corrosion attack of turbine disks. Since disks are sensitive to low cycle fatigue (LCF), any environmental attack, and especially hot corrosion pitting, can potentially seriously degrade the life of the disk. Application of metallic coatings are one means of protecting disk alloys from this environmental attack. However, simply the presence of a metallic coating, even without environmental exposure, can degrade the LCF life of a disk alloy. Therefore, coatings must be designed which are not only resistant to oxidation and corrosion attack, but must not significantly degrade the LCF life of the alloy. Three different Ni-Cr coating compositions (29, 35.5, 45wt. Cr) were applied at two thicknesses by Plasma Enhanced Magnetron Sputtering (PEMS) to two similar Ni-based disk alloys. One coating also received a thin ZrO2 overcoat. The coated samples were also given a short oxidation exposure in a low PO2 environment to encourage chromia scale formation. Without further environmental exposure, the LCF life of the coated samples, evaluated at 760C, was less than that of uncoated samples. Hence, application of the coating alone degraded the LCF life of the disk alloy. Since shot peening is commonly employed to improve LCF life, the effect of shot peening the coated and uncoated surface was also evaluated. For all cases, shot peening improved the LCF life of the coated samples. Coated and uncoated samples were shot peened and given environmental exposures consisting of 500 hrs of oxidation followed by 50 hrs of hot corrosion, both at 760C). The high-Cr coating showed the best LCF life after the environmental exposures. Results of the LCF testing and post-test characterization of the various coatings will be presented and future research directions discussed.

  19. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  20. Duct Protection Coating Concept Development and Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    clean surfaces for coating steel substrates. These particular techniques are strongly discouraged and basically "outlawed" at the AEDC facilities. Water ...blasting is an acceptable technique, but requires a high pressure water stream, expensive equipment, and considerable clean up. 14 SUBJECT TERMS 15...Analysis Results and Discussion 26 2.8 Water Blasting Evaluation 28 2.8.1 Test Panels 28 2.8.2 Requirements and Feasibility for Blasting 30 2.9

  1. Protective coatings for high-temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David R.; Sutter, James K.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was used to deposit silicon nitride on graphite-fiber-reinforced polyimide composites to protect against oxidation at elevated temperatures. The adhesion and integrity of the coating were evaluated by isothermal aging (371 C for 500 hr) and thermal cycling. The amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN:H) coating could withstand stresses ranging from approximately 0.18 GPa (tensile) to -1.6 GPa (compressive) and provided a 30 to 80 percent reduction in oxidation-induced weight loss. The major factor influencing the effectiveness of a-SiN:H as a barrier coating against oxidation is the surface finish of the polymer composite.

  2. Protective coatings for FUV to NIR advanced telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Nikzad, S.; Hennessy, J.; Raouf, N.; Green, J. C.; Scowen, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Cosmic Origins Program Annual Technology Report of Oct 2011 defined the goal for the “Development of UV coatings with high reflectivity (>90-95%), high uniformity (<1-0.1%), and wide bandpasses 100 nm to 300-1000 nm)”. We address this goal by exploring applicable materials and processes to produce protected aluminum mirror coatings that will satisfy the needs of future space telescope systems of interest to NASA and the astrophysics community. Void-free thin films of absorption-free materials are required to protect and maintain high reflectivity and durability of aluminum mirrors in laboratory and pre-launch environments. Precisely controllable and scalable deposition process is also required to produce such coatings on large telescope mirrors. In this report, we present our preliminary experimental studies on various fluoride coatings by conventional coating techniques. MgF2 coating by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), a promising technique, is also presented. Spectrophotometric and ellipsometric measurements of the optical properties of these coatings are reported.

  3. Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

    1984-07-20

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate prior to metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

  4. Protective Coatings for Niobium Alloys and Their Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-06

    AD-A254 252 ’AST-IDR)T-o9 -11111111 INl 11111ll) 1111111 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION PROTECTIVE COATINGS IOR NIOBIUM ALLOYS AND THEIR PROPERTIES by...liilii~~l~! FASTC-ID (RS) T-0919-91 HUMAN TRANSLATION FASTC-ID(RS)T-0919-91 6 February 1992 PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR NIOBIUM ALLOYS AND THEIR PROPERTIES ... PROPERTIES * Ye. L. Geraseva, A. N. Sokolov, A. S Stroyev, N. F. Lashko, M. N. Kozlova, and I. I. Titarenko Niobium alloys cannot be used for operation at high

  5. Silicon nitride protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.

    1988-01-01

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer or coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors.

  6. Graphene Nanoplatelets Based Protective and Functionalizing Coating for Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Jayanta; Kozlova, Jekaterina; Sammelselg, Väino

    2015-09-01

    Stainless steel is the most widely used alloy for many industrial and everyday applications, and protection of this alloy substrate against corrosion is an important industrial issue. Here we report a promising application of graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets as effective corrosion inhibitors for AISI type 304 stainless steel alloy. The graphene oxide and graphene coatings on the stainless steel substrates were prepared using spin coating techniques. Homogeneous and complete surface coverage by the graphene oxide and graphene nanoplatelets were observed with a high-resolution scanning electron microscope. The corrosion inhibition ability of these materials was investigated through measurement of open circuit potential and followed by potentiodymamic polarization analysis in aqueous sodium chloride solution before and after a month of immersion. Analyzed result exhibits effective corrosion inhibition for both substrates coated with graphene oxide or graphene nanoplatelets by increasing corrosion potential, pitting potential and decreasing passive current density. The corrosion inhibition ability of the coated substrates has not changed even after the long-term immersion. The result showed both graphene materials can be used as an effective corrosion inhibitor for the stainless steel substrates, which would certainly increase lifetime the substrate. However, long-term protection ability of the graphene coated susbtsrate showed somewhat better inhibition performance than the ones coated with graphene oxide.

  7. Simulated Space Environment Effects on Tether Materials with Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria M.; Watts, Ed

    2005-01-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) erodes most organic materials. and ultraviolet radiation embrittles polymers. A previous study indicated untreated polymers such as ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) are severely degraded when exposed to AO. This test series was performed to determine the effect of AO and UV on the mechanical integrity of tether materials that were treated with AO-protective coatings. Three coating systems were evaluated for their ability to protect the underlying material from AO erosion. The first coating system is the Photosil surface modification process which incorporates silicon-containing functional groups into the top micron of an organic material. The Photosil process has had favorable results with polyurethane- and epoxy-based thermal control coatings . The second coating system is metallization, in this case nickel. The third coating system is silsesquioxane. The Marshall Space Flight Center Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility (AOBF) was used to simulate low Earth orbit AO of 5 eV energy. In addition, some tether samples were exposed to ultraviolet radiation then evaluated for any changes in mechanical strength. Tether missions, such as a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether, may benefit from this research.

  8. Optical coherence tomography for evaluation of enamel and protective coatings.

    PubMed

    Alsayed, Ehab Z; Hariri, Ilnaz; Sadr, Alireza; Nakashima, Syozi; Bakhsh, Turki A; Shimada, Yasushi; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an interferometric imaging technique. This study aimed to employ OCT to evaluate four different resin-based materials including a coating containing glass-ionomer filler and calcium, a giomer, and two fluoride-releasing self-etch resins. The coating and its underlying and adjacent enamel were monitored using swept-source OCT (center wavelength: 1330 nm) at baseline, after 5,000 thermal cycles, and after 1, 4 and 7 days of demineralization (pH 4.5). The coatings showed different thicknesses (60-250 micrometers) and various levels of structural and interfacial integrity. OCT could detect a demineralization inhibition zone adjacent to the edge of the fluoride- and calcium-releasing material. Localized demineralization was occasionally observed under thinner coatings. Protection of susceptible enamel surfaces by thin resin-based bioactive coatings provides protection from demineralization. OCT can be used to non-destructively monitor the integrity of such coatings, as well as enamel changes beneath and adjacent to them.

  9. Diamondlike carbon protective coatings for IR materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Nir, D.; Swec, D. M.; Banks, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films have the potential to protect optical windows in applications where it is important to maintain the integrity of the specular transmittance of these films on ZnS and ZnSe infrared transmitting windows. The films must be adherent and durable such that they protect the windows from rain and particle erosion as well as chemical attack. In order to optimize the performance of these films, 0.1 micro m thick diamondlike carbon films were deposited on fused silica and silicon wafers, using three different methods of ion beam deposition. One method was sputter deposition from a carbon target using an 8 cm ion source. The merits of hydrogen addition were experimentally evaluated in conjunction with this method. The second method used a 30 cm hollow cathode ion source with hydrocarbon/Argon gases to deposit diamondlike carbon films from the primary beam at 90 to 250 eV. The third method used a dual beam system employing a hydrocarbon/Argon 30 cm ion source and an 8 cm ion source. Films were evaluated for adherence, intrinsic stress, infrared transmittance between 2.5 and 50 micro m, and protection from particle erosion. An erosion test using a sandblaster was used to give quantitative values of the protection afforded to the fused silica by the diamondlike carbon films. The fused silica surfaces protected by diamondlike carbon films were exposed to 100 micro m diameter SiO particles at 60 mi/hr (26.8/sec) in the sandblaster.

  10. Mussel-designed Protective Coatings for Compliant Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Holten-Andersen, N.; Waite, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    The byssus of marine mussels has attracted attention as a paradigm of strong and versatile underwater adhesion. As the first of the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa)-containing byssal precursors to be purified, Mytilus edulis foot protein-1 (mefp-1) has been much investigated with respect to its molecular structure, physical properties, and adsorption to surfaces. Although mefp-1 undoubtedly contributes to the durability of byssus, it is not directly involved in adhesion. Rather, it provides a robust coating that is 4-5 times stiffer and harder than the byssal collagens that it covers. Protective coatings for compliant tissues and materials are highly appealing to technology, notwithstanding the conventional wisdom that coating extensibility can be increased only at the expense of hardness and stiffness. The byssal cuticle is the only known coating in which high compliance and hardness co-exist without mutual detriment; thus, the role of mefp-1 in accommodating both parameters deserves further study. PMID:18650539

  11. Preliminary Investigation of Ceramic-Coated Anodes for Cathodic Protection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    used Electrodes," Journal De Physique, Vol 4. p CI (1977) R. Itai and anodes that are either inexpensive and very large, or H. Kunai, U.S. Patent No...have been made to manu- protection system anodes was only begun recently. facture anodes coated with magnetite. Itai and Kanai Two types of systems

  12. Protecting polymers in space with atomic layer deposition coatings.

    PubMed

    Minton, Timothy K; Wu, Bohan; Zhang, Jianming; Lindholm, Ned F; Abdulagatov, Aziz I; O'Patchen, Jennifer; George, Steven M; Groner, Markus D

    2010-09-01

    Polymers in space may be subjected to a barrage of incident atoms, photons, and/or ions. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques can produce films that mitigate many of the current challenges for space polymers. We have studied the efficacy of various ALD coatings to protect Kapton polyimide, FEP Teflon, and poly(methyl methacrylate) films from atomic-oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) attack. Atomic-oxygen and VUV studies were conducted with the use of a laser-detonation source for hyperthermal O atoms and a D2 lamp as a source of VUV light. These studies used a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to monitor mass loss in situ, as well as surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy to study the surface recession and morphology changes ex situ. Al2O3 ALD coatings protected the underlying substrates from atomic-oxygen attack, and the addition of TiO2 coatings protected the substrates from VUV-induced damage. The results indicate that ALD coatings can simultaneously protect polymers from oxygen-atom erosion and VUV radiation damage.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTECTIVE COATING FOR TANTALUM BASE ALLOYS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TANTALUM ALLOYS, PROTECTIVE TREATMENTS), (*REFRACTORY COATINGS , SILICIDES ), TUNGSTEN ALLOYS, OXIDATION, OXIDES, OXYGEN, DIFFUSION, HIGH TEMPERATURE...HAFNIUM COMPOUNDS, ZIRCONIUM COMPOUNDS, NIOBIUM ALLOYS, VANADIUM ALLOYS, THERMAL EXPANSION, THERMAL STRESSES, MICROSTRUCTURE, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS...TANTALUM COMPOUNDS, ADDITIVES, ALUMINUM, BORON, CHROMIUM, MANGANESE, MOLYBDENUM, TITANIUM, TUNGSTEN, VANADIUM, NIOBIUM , SODIUM COMPOUNDS, FLUORIDES, SILICON

  14. New method for evaluating high-quality fog protective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeremuszkin, Grzegorz; Latreche, Mohamed; Mendoza-Suarez, Guillermo

    2011-05-01

    Fogging is commonly observed when humid-warm air contacts the cold surface of a transparent substrate, i.e. eyewear lenses, making the observed image blurred and hazy. To protect from fogging, the lens inner surfaces are protected with Anti-Fog coatings, which render them hydrophilic and induce water vapor condensation as a smooth, thin and invisible film, which uniformly flows down on the lens as the condensation progresses. Coatings differ in protection level, aging kinetics, and susceptibility to contamination. Some perform acceptably in limited conditions, beyond which the condensing water film becomes unstable, nonuniform, and scatters light or shows refractory distortions, both affecting the observed image. Quantifying the performance of Anti-Fog coated lenses is difficult: they may not show classical fogging and the existing testing methods, based on fog detection, are therefore inapplicable. The presented method for evaluating and quantifying AF properties is based on characterizing light scattering on lenses exposed to controlled humidity and temperature. Changes in intensity of laser light scattered at low angles (1, 2 4 and 8 degrees), observed during condensation of water on lenses, provide information on the swelling of Anti-Fog coatings, formation of uniform water film, going from an unstable to a steady state, and on the coalescence of discontinuous films. Real time observations/measurements allow for better understanding of factors controlling fogging and fog preventing phenomena. The method is especially useful in the development of new coatings for military-, sport-, and industrial protective eyewear as well as for medical and automotive applications. It allows for differentiating between coatings showing acceptable, good, and excellent performance.

  15. Method of Fabricating Protective Coating for a Crucible with the Coating Having Channels Formed Therein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method is provided for the fabrication of a protective coating for a crucible with channels being formed in the coating. A material is adhered to the outer wall of the crucible to form a pattern thereon. The outer wall of the crucible along with the pattern of material adhered thereto is next coated with another material. The material used to form the pattern should extend through the outer material coating to define at least one port therein. Next, the crucible with its pattern of material and outer coating material is heated to a temperature of transformation at which the pattern of material is transformed to a fluidic state while the crucible and outer coating material maintain their solid integrity. Such transformation could also be accomplished by using a solvent that causes the pattern of material to dissolve. Finally, the material in its fluidic state is removed via the at least one port formed in the outer material coating thereby leaving channels defined in the coating adjacent the outer wall of the crucible.

  16. Method of Fabricating Protective Coating for a Crucible with the Coating Having Channels Formed Therein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method is provided for the fabrication of a protective coating for a crucible with channels being formed in the coating. A material is adhered to the outer wall of the crucible to form a pattern thereon. The outer wall of the crucible along with the pattern of material adhered thereto is next coated with another material. The material used to form the pattern should extend through the outer material coating to define at least one port therein. Next, the crucible with its pattern of material and outer coating material is heated to a temperature of transformation at which the pattern of material is transformed to a fluidic state while the crucible and outer coating material maintain their solid integrity. Such transformation could also be accomplished by using a solvent that causes the pattern of material to dissolve. Finally, the material in its fluidic state is removed via the at least one port formed in the outer material coating thereby leaving channels defined in the coating adjacent the outer wall of the crucible.

  17. Graphene coatings for protection against microbiologically induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ajay

    Microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) is a special form of electrochemical corrosion where micro-organisms affect the local environmental conditions at the metal-electrolyte interface by forming a stable biofilm. The biofilm introduces localized concentration cells, which accelerate the electrochemical corrosion rates. MIC has been found to affect many industrial systems such as sewage waste water pipes, heat exchangers, ships, underwater pipes etc. It has been traditionally eradicated by physical, biochemical and surface protection methods. The cleaning methods and the biocidal deliveries are required periodically and don't provide a permanent solution to the problem. Further, the use of biocides has been harshly criticized by environmentalists due to safety concerns associated with their usage. Surface based coatings have their own drawback of rapid degradation under harsh microbial environments. This has led to the exploration of thin, robust, inert, conformal passivation coatings for the protection of metallic surfaces from microbiologically induced corrosion. Graphene is a 2D arrangement of carbon atoms in a hexagonal honeycomb lattice. The carbon atoms are bonded to one another by sp2 hybridization and each layer of the carbon ring arrangement spans to a thickness of less than a nm. Due to its unique 2D arrangement of carbon atoms, graphene exhibits interesting in-plane and out of plane properties that have led to it being considered as the material for the future. Its excellent thermal, mechanical, electrical and optical properties are being explored in great depth to understand and realize potential applications in various technological realms. Early studies have shown the ability of bulk and monolayer graphene to protect metallic surfaces from air oxidation and solution based galvanic corrosion processes for short periods. However, the role of graphene in resisting MIC is yet to be determined, particularly over the long time spans characteristic of

  18. Organic matrix composite protective coatings for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, Harry W.; George, Pete

    1995-01-01

    Successful use of composites in low earth orbit (LEO) depends on their ability to survive long-term exposure to atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation, charged particle radiation, thermal cycling, and micrometeoroid and space debris. The AO environment is especially severe for unprotected organic matrix composites surfaces in LEO. Ram facing unprotected graphite/epoxy flown on the 69-month Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission lost up to one ply of thickness (5 mils) resulting in decreased mechanical properties. The expected AO fluence of the 30 year Space Station Alpha mission is approximately 20 times that seen on LDEF. This exposure would result in significant material loss of unprotected ram facing organic matrix composites. Several protective coatings for composites were flown on LDEF including anodized aluminum, vacuum deposited coatings, a variety of thermal control coatings, metalized Teflon, and leafing aluminum. Results from the testing and analysis of the coated and uncoated composite specimens flown on LDEF's leading and trailing edges provide the baseline for determining the effectiveness of protectively coated composites in LEO. In addition to LDEF results, results from shuttle flight experiments and ground based testing will be discussed.

  19. Development of Oxidation Protection Coatings for Gamma Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, T. A.; Bird, R. K.; Sankaran, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    Metallic material systems play a key role in meeting the stringent weight and durability requirements for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) airframe hot structures. Gamma titanium aluminides (gamma-TiAl) have been identified as high-payoff materials for high-temperature applications. The low density and good elevated temperature mechanical properties of gamma-TiAl alloys make them attractive candidates for durable lightweight hot structure and thermal protection systems at temperatures as high as 871 C. However, oxidation significantly degrades gamma-TiAl alloys under the high-temperature service conditions associated with the RLV operating environment. This paper discusses ongoing efforts at NASA Langley Research Center to develop durable ultrathin coatings for protecting gamma-TiAl alloys from high-temperature oxidation environments. In addition to offering oxidation protection, these multifunctional coatings are being engineered to provide thermal control features to help minimize heat input into the hot structures. This paper describes the coating development effort and discusses the effects of long-term high-temperature exposures on the microstructure of coated and uncoated gamma-TiAl alloys. The alloy of primary consideration was the Plansee alloy gamma-Met, but limited studies of the newer alloy gamma-Met-PX were also included. The oxidation behavior of the uncoated materials was evaluated over the temperature range of 704 C to 871 C. Sol-gel-based coatings were applied to the gamma-TiAl samples by dipping and spraying, and the performance evaluated at 871 C. Results showed that the coatings improve the oxidation resistance, but that further development is necessary.

  20. High temperature corrosion-resistant protective coatings in stationary gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruenling, H. W.

    1977-01-01

    Methods currently used to deposit protective coatings in gas turbines are reviewed, and the structure of the respective coatings is examined. The corrosion behavior of such coatings is discussed on the basis of experimental data. General trends in the preparation of protective coatings are noted.

  1. Mullite coatings for corrosion protection of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Mulpuri, R.; Sarin, V.K.

    1995-08-01

    SiC based ceramics have been identified as the leading candidate materials for elevated temperature applications in harsh oxidation/corrosion environments. It has been established that a protective coating can be effectively used to avoid problems with excessive oxidation and hot corrosion. However, to date, no coating configuration has been developed that can satisfy the stringent requirements imposed by such applications. Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) mullite coatings due to their desirable properties of toughness, corrosion resistance, and a good coefficient of thermal expansion match with SiC are being investigated as a potential candidate. Since mullite has never been successfully grown via CVD, the thermodynamics and kinetics of its formation were initially established and used as a guideline in determining the initial process conditions. Process optimization was carried out using an iterative process of theoretical analysis and experimental work coupled with characterization and testing. The results of theoretical analysis and the CVD formation characteristics of mullite are presented.

  2. Method for providing uranium with a protective copper coating

    DOEpatents

    Waldrop, Forrest B.; Jones, Edward

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing uranium metal with a protective coating of copper. Uranium metal is subjected to a conventional cleaning operation wherein oxides and other surface contaminants are removed, followed by etching and pickling operations. The copper coating is provided by first electrodepositing a thin and relatively porous flash layer of copper on the uranium in a copper cyanide bath. The resulting copper-layered article is then heated in an air or inert atmosphere to volatilize and drive off the volatile material underlying the copper flash layer. After the heating step an adherent and essentially non-porous layer of copper is electro-deposited on the flash layer of copper to provide an adherent, multi-layer copper coating which is essentially impervious to corrosion by most gases.

  3. Progress in Protective Coatings for Aircraft Gas Turbines: A Review of NASA Sponsored Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merutka, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Problems associated with protective coatings for advanced aircraft gas turbines are reviewed. Metallic coatings for preventing titanium fires in compressors are identified. Coatings for turbine section are also considered, Ductile aluminide coatings for protecting internal turbine-blade cooling passage surface are also identified. Composite modified external overlay MCrAlY coatings deposited by low-pressure plasma spraying are found to be better in surface protection capability than vapor deposited MCrAlY coatings. Thermal barrier coating (TBC), studies are presented. The design of a turbine airfoil is integrated with a TBC, and computer-aided manufacturing technology is applied.

  4. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica flims, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  5. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica films, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  6. Apparatus for producing oxidation protection coatings for polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J. (Inventor); Sovey, J. S. (Inventor); Banks, A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A polymeric substrate is coated with a metal oxide film to provide oxidation protection in low Earth orbital environments. The film contains about 4 volume percent polymer to provide flexibility. A coil of polymer materials moves through an ion beam as it is fed between reels. The ion beam first cleans the polymer material surface and then sputters the film material from a target onto this surface.

  7. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-23

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  8. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-01

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50-200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10-50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  9. Thermal Protective Coating for High Temperature Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barron, Andrew R.

    1999-01-01

    The central theme of this research is the application of carboxylate-alumoxane nanoparticles as precursors to thermally protective coatings for high temperature polymer composites. In addition, we will investigate the application of carboxylate-alumoxane nanoparticle as a component to polymer composites. The objective of this research was the high temperature protection of polymer composites via novel chemistry. The significance of this research is the development of a low cost and highly flexible synthetic methodology, with a compatible processing technique, for the fabrication of high temperature polymer composites. We proposed to accomplish this broad goal through the use of a class of ceramic precursor material, alumoxanes. Alumoxanes are nano-particles with a boehmite-like structure and an organic periphery. The technical goals of this program are to prepare and evaluate water soluble carboxylate-alumoxane for the preparation of ceramic coatings on polymer substrates. Our proposed approach is attractive since proof of concept has been demonstrated under the NRA 96-LeRC-1 Technology for Advanced High Temperature Gas Turbine Engines, HITEMP Program. For example, carbon and Kevlar(tm) fibers and matting have been successfully coated with ceramic thermally protective layers.

  10. Thermal certification tests of Orbiter Thermal Protection System tiles coated with KSC coating slurries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milhoan, James D.; Pham, Vuong T.; Sherborne, William D.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal tests of Orbiter thermal protection system (TPS) tiles, which were coated with borosilicate glass slurries fabricated at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), were performed in the Radiant Heat Test Facility and the Atmospheric Reentry Materials & Structures Evaluation Facility at Johnson Space Center to verify tile coating integrity after exposure to multiple entry simulation cycles in both radiant and convective heating environments. Eight high temperature reusable surface insulation (HRSI) tiles and six low temperature reusable surface insulation (LRSI) tiles were subjected to 25 cycles of radiant heat at peaked surface temperatures of 2300 F and 1200 F, respectively. For the LRSI tiles, an additional cycle at peaked surface temperature of 2100 F was performed. There was no coating crack on any of the HRSI specimens. However, there were eight small coating cracks (less than 2 inches long) on two of the six LRSI tiles on the 26th cycle. There was practically no change on the surface reflectivity, physical dimensions, or weight of any of the test specimens. There was no observable thermal-chemical degradation of the coating either. For the convective heat test, eight HRSI tiles were tested for five cycles at a surface temperature of 2300 F. There was no thermal-induced coating crack on any of the test specimens, almost no change on the surface reflectivity, and no observable thermal-chemical degradation with an exception of minor slumping of the coating under painted TPS identification numbers. The tests demonstrated that KSC's TPS slurries and coating processes meet the Orbiter's thermal specification requirements.

  11. Corrosion protection performance of porous strontium hydroxyapatite coating on polypyrrole coated 316L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Gopi, D; Ramya, S; Rajeswari, D; Kavitha, L

    2013-07-01

    Polypyrrole/strontium hydroxyapatite bilayer coatings were achieved on 316L stainless steel (316L SS) by the electropolymerisation of pyrrole from sodium salicylate solution followed by the electrodeposition of porous strontium hydroxyapatite. The formation and the morphology of the bilayer coatings were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the coated 316L SS specimens was investigated in Ringer's solution by electrochemical techniques and the results were substantiated with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The passive film underneath the polypyrrole layer is effective in protecting 316L SS against corrosion in Ringer's solution. Moreover, we believe that the top porous strontium hydroxyapatite layer can provide potential bioactivity to the 316L SS.

  12. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2001-04-10

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) must ensure that the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) or safety-related containment spray system (CSS) remains capable of performing its design safety function throughout the life of the plant. This requires ensuring that long-term core cooling can be maintained following a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Adequate safety operation can be impaired if the protective coatings which have been applied to the concrete and steel structures within the primary containment fail, producing transportable debris which could then accumulate on BWR ECCS suction strainers or PWR ECCS sump debris screens located within the containment. This document will present the data collected during the investigation of coating specimens from plants.

  13. Measurement of corrosion under insulation and effectiveness of protective coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Abayarathna, D.; Ashbaugh, W.G.; Kane, R.D.; McGowan, N. Heimann, B.

    1997-08-01

    A laboratory cell set-up was designed and constructed for the simulation of corrosion under insulation (CUI) on a pipe section at elevated temperature. The CUI cell consisted of six carbon steel ring specimens separated by insulation spacers and held together by blind flanged pipe sections on both ends. Thermal insulation which was placed around the testing section provided the annular space to retain the test environment. The ring specimens were used as test electrodes in two separate electrochemical cells. One cell was used as the control while the other was used to test applied protective coatings. Corrosion measurements were made using both electrochemical polarization resistance and mass loss data under isothermal and cyclic wet/dry test conditions. The test cell was used to (1) successfully simulate CUI in the laboratory, (2) evaluate the corrosivity and different modes of corrosion observed with CUI and (3) evaluate proprietary coatings for minimizing CUI under simulated CUI conditions.

  14. Film coatings for taste masking and moisture protection.

    PubMed

    Joshi, S; Petereit, H-U

    2013-12-05

    Taste masking and moisture protection of oral dosage forms contribute significantly to the therapeutic effect of pharmaceutical and nutraceutical formulations either by ensuring patient compliance or by providing stability through shelf life of the dosage form. Among different types of taste, bitter taste is the most relevant for patient acceptance because of the extremely high sensitivity. As hydrolysis is the most common mode of degradation of an active ingredient, moisture protection plays a vital role in the stability of the active during manufacturing and storage. Optimized oral dosage forms need to reliably hinder the release of bitter drug molecules in the mouth or ensure stability of the active compound, while also ensuring fast drug release in the stomach to enable early therapeutic onset. Besides different formulation concepts, film coating is found to be the most effective and commonly used approach for taste masking and moisture protection. Film coating can be achieved through the use of water-soluble, cationic, anionic or neutral insoluble polymers from different chemical structures. Cationic polymers provide efficient moisture protection as well as taste masking without influencing the release of the drug in the gastric fluids. Polymers may be sprayed onto various types of cores from dispersions or solutions in organic, solvents or water in drum or fluidzed bed coaters. Applied quantities need insuring complete coating thickness ranging from 0.5 to 50 μm or more finally. Insulating excipients, such as hydrophobic plasticizers, lipids, pigments or other insoluble substances will influence the functionality of films. Organoleptic tests are still common in testing the quality of taste-masked formulations. Recently, multi-channel taste sensors have been developed to quantify different types of taste. Dynamic vapor sorption technique and studies at elevated temperature provide effective concepts study the efficacy of the formulations. Efficient taste

  15. Method of protecting a surface with a silicon-slurry/aluminide coating. [coatings for gas turbine engine blades and vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Young, S. G. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A low cost coating for protecting metallic base system substrates from high temperatures, high gas velocity oxidation, thermal fatigue and hot corrosion is described. The coating is particularly useful for protecting vanes and blades in aircraft and land based gas turbine engines. A lacquer slurry comprising cellulose nitrate containing high purity silicon powder is sprayed onto the superalloy substrates. The silicon layer is then aluminized to complete the coating. The Si-Al coating is less costly to produce than advanced aluminides and protects the substrate from oxidation and thermal fatigue for a much longer period of time than the conventional aluminide coatings. While more expensive Pt-Al coatings and physical vapor deposited MCrAlY coatings may last longer or provide equal protection on certain substrates, the Si-Al coating exceeded the performance of both types of coatings on certain superalloys in high gas velocity oxidation and thermal fatigue. Also, the Si-Al coating increased the resistance of certain superalloys to hot corrosion.

  16. SiC protective coating for photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xin; Kane, Sheryl; Cogan, Stuart; Lorach, Henri; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Theodore; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate plasma-enhanced, chemically vapor deposited (PECVD) amorphous silicon carbide (α-SiC:H) as a protective coating for retinal prostheses and other implantable devices, and to study their failure mechanisms in vivo. Approach. Retinal prostheses were implanted in rats sub-retinally for up to 1 year. Degradation of implants was characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dissolution rates of SiC, SiN x and thermal SiO2 were measured in accelerated soaking tests in saline at 87 °C. Defects in SiC films were revealed and analyzed by selectively removing the materials underneath those defects. Main results. At 87 °C SiN x dissolved at 18.3 ± 0.3 nm d-1, while SiO2 grown at high temperature (1000 °C) dissolved at 0.104 ± 0.008 nm d-1. SiC films demonstrated the best stability, with no quantifiable change after 112 d. Defects in thin SiC films appeared primarily over complicated topography and rough surfaces. Significance. SiC coatings demonstrating no erosion in accelerated aging test for 112 d at 87 °C, equivalent to about 10 years in vivo, can offer effective protection of the implants. Photovoltaic retinal prostheses with PECVD SiC coatings exhibited effective protection from erosion during the 4 month follow-up in vivo. The optimal thickness of SiC layers is about 560 nm, as defined by anti-reflective properties and by sufficient coverage to eliminate defects.

  17. SiC Protective Coating for Photovoltaic Retinal Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xin; Kane, Sheryl; Cogan, Stuart; Lorach, Henri; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Theodore; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate PECVD SiC as a protective coating for retinal prostheses and other implantable devices, and to study their failure mechanisms in vivo. Approach Retinal prostheses were implanted in rats subretinally for up to 1 year. Degradation of implants was characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dissolution rates of SiC, SiNx and thermal SiO2 were measured in accelerated soaking tests in saline at 87°C. Defects in SiC films were revealed and analyzed by selectively removing the materials underneath those defects. Main results At 87°C SiNx dissolved at 18.3±0.3nm/day, while SiO2 grown at high temperature (1000°C) dissolved at 1.04±0.08A/day. SiC films demonstrated the best stability, with no quantifiable change after 112 days. Defects in thin SiC films appeared primarily over complicated topography and rough surfaces. Significance SiC coatings demonstrating no erosion in accelerated aging test for 112 days at 87°C, equivalent to about 10 years in vivo, can offer effective protection of the implants. Photovoltaic retinal prostheses with PECVD SiC coatings exhibited effective protection from erosion during the 4-month follow-up in vivo. The optimal thickness of SiC layers is about 560nm, as defined by anti-reflective properties and by sufficient coverage to eliminate defects. PMID:27323882

  18. Protective coatings of metal surfaces by cold plasma treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manory, R.; Grill, A.

    1985-01-01

    The cold plasma techniques for deposition of various types of protective coatings are reviewed. The main advantage of these techniques for deposition of ceramic films is the lower process temperature, which enables heat treating of the metal prior to deposition. In the field of surface hardening of steel, significant reduction of treatment time and energy consumption were obtained. A simple model for the plasma - surface reactions in a cold plasma system is presented, and the plasma deposition techniques are discussed in view of this model.

  19. Aircraft surface coatings reduce drag, may protect against corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitinger, R.L.; Middleton, D.B.

    1982-02-01

    The aerodynamic drag on an airplane is a very important design parameter. However, after exposure to the environment and accidental spills the surface of the airplane may become corroded or erode; thus the drag may change. Researchers at Boeing Commercial Airplane Co. and the NASA-Langley Research Center have been studying the possibility of using smooth surface coatings to help reduce drag and protect the surface of the airplane. Elastomeric polyurethanes on portions of a test airplane have reduced total drag by 0.2% (as compared to a bare surface) at cruise Reynolds number.

  20. Silicon-slurry/aluminide coating. [protecting gas turbine engine vanes and blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Young, S. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A low cost coating protects metallic base system substrates from high temperatures, high gas velocity ovidation, thermal fatigue and hot corrosion and is particularly useful fo protecting vanes and blades in aircraft and land based gas turbine engines. A lacquer slurry comprising cellulose nitrate containing high purity silicon powder is sprayed onto the superalloy substrates. The silicon layer is then aluminized to complete the coating. The Si-Al coating is less costly to produce than advanced aluminides and protects the substrates from oxidation and thermal fatigue for a much longer period of time than the conventional aluminide coatings. While more expensive Pt-Al coatings and physical vapor deposited MCrAlY coatings may last longer or provide equal protection on certain substrates, the Si-Al coating exceeded the performance of both types of coatings on certain superalloys in high gas velocity oxidation and thermal fatigue and increased the resistance of certain superalloys to hot corrosion.

  1. Do petroleum-based protective coatings add fuel value to slash

    Treesearch

    James L. Murphy; Charles W. Philpot

    1965-01-01

    Asphalts and wax emulsions have been recommended as protective coatings to help obtain clean, safe burns in slash disposal work. Fuel value determinations in the laboratory indicate that such coatings add little to the fuel value of slash.

  2. Refractory coating protects intricate graphite elements from high-temperature hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. R.; Patterson, R. L.; Steffen, R. J.; Vogel, C. E.

    1966-01-01

    Refractory coating protects graphite heater elements operating at high temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere. The coating is formed by painting the graphite elements with a composition containing powdered tungsten, and heat-treating it.

  3. Undercutting of defects in thin film protective coatings on polymer surfaces exposed to atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Mihelcic, Judith A.

    1989-01-01

    Protection for polymeric surfaces is needed to make them durable in the low Earth orbital environment, where oxidation by atomic oxygen is the predominant failure mechanism. Thin film coatings of oxides such as silicon dioxide are viable candidates to provide this protection, but concern has been voiced over the ability of these coatings to protect when defects are present in the coating due to surface anomalies occurring during the deposition process, handling, or micrometeoroid and debris bombardment in low Earth orbit. When a defected coating protecting a polymer substrate is exposed to atomic oxygen, the defect provides a pathway to the underlying polymer allowing oxidation and subsequent undercutting to occur. Defect undercutting was studied for sputter deposited coatings of silicon dioxide on polyimide Kapton. Preliminary results indicate that undercutting may be limited as long as the coating remains intact with the substrate. Therefore, coatings may not need to be defect free to give protection to the underlying surface.

  4. Undercutting of defects in thin film protective coatings on polymer surfaces exposed to atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Mihelcic, Judith A.

    1989-01-01

    Protection for polymeric surfaces is needed to make them durable in the low earth orbital environment. Thin film coatings of oxides such as SiO2 are viable candidates to provide this protection, but concern has been voiced over the ability of these coatings to protect when defects are present in the coating due to surface anomalies. When a defected coating protecting a polymer substrate is exposed to atomic oxygen, the defect provides a pathway to the underlying polymer allowing oxidation and subsequent undercutting to occur. Defect undercutting was studied for sputter deposited coatings of SiO2 on polyimide Kapton. Preliminary results indicate that undercutting may be limited as long as the coating remains intact with the substrate. Therefore, coatings may not need to be defect free to give protection to the underlying surface.

  5. Coating Layer and Corrosion Protection Characteristics in Sea Water with Various Thermal Spray Coating Materials for STS304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Jong; Woo, Yong-Bin

    We investigated the optimal method of application and the anticorrosive abilities of Zn, Al, and Zn + 15%Al spray coatings in protecting stainless steel 304 (STS304) in sea water. If a defect such as porosity or an oxide layer, causes STS304 to be exposed to sea water, and the thermal spray coating material will act as the cathode and anode, respectively. The Tafel experiments revealed that Al-coated specimens among applied coating methods had the lowest corrosion current densities. As the corrosion potential decreases with increasing corrosion current density, we estimated the characteristics and lifetime of the protective thermal spray coating layer in the galvanic cell formed by the thermal spray coating layer and STS304.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR TANTALUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PHASE STUDIES, PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, REFRACTORY MATERIALS, SILICIDES , SILICON COATINGS , SILICON COMPOUNDS, TANTALUM, TENSILE PROPERTIES, TITANIUM COMPOUNDS, TUNGSTEN ALLOYS, VANADIUM ALLOYS, VAPOR PLATING, ZINC COATINGS ....TANTALUM ALLOYS, ALLOYS, ALUMINUM COATINGS , ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, BORON COMPOUNDS, CERAMIC COATINGS , CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS, COATINGS , FLAME SPRAYING...HAFNIUM ALLOYS, HAFNIUM COMPOUNDS, HARDNESS, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, METAMATHEMATICS, NIOBIUM ALLOYS, OSCILLOGRAPHS, OXIDES

  7. Solid particle erosion mechanisms of protective coatings for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousser, Etienne

    The main objective of this PhD project is to investigate the material loss mechanisms during Solid Particle Erosion (SPE) of hard protective coatings, including nanocomposite and nanostructured systems. In addition, because of the complex nature of SPE mechanisms, rigorous testing methodologies need to be employed and the effects of all testing parameters need to be fully understood. In this PhD project, the importance of testing methodology is addressed throughout in order to effectively study the SPE mechanisms of brittle materials and coatings. In the initial stage of this thesis, we studied the effect of the addition of silicon (Si) on the microstructure, mechanical properties and, more specifically, on the SPE resistance of thick CrN-based coatings. It was found that the addition of Si significantly improved the erosion resistance and that SPE correlated with the microhardness values, i.e. the coating with the highest microhardness also had the lowest erosion rate (ER). In fact, the ERs showed a much higher dependence on the surface hardness than what has been proposed for brittle erosion mechanisms. In the first article, we study the effects of the particle properties on the SPE behavior of six brittle bulk materials using glass and alumina powders. First, we apply a robust methodology to accurately characterize the elasto-plastic and fracture properties of the studied materials. We then correlate the measured ER to materials' parameters with the help of a morphological study and an analysis of the quasi-static elasto-plastic erosion models. Finally, in order to understand the effects of impact on the particles themselves and to support the energy dissipation-based model proposed here, we study the particle size distributions of the powders before and after erosion testing. It is shown that tests using both powders lead to a material loss mechanism related to lateral fracture, that the higher than predicted velocity exponents point towards a velocity

  8. Thin Coatings of Polymeric Carbon and Carbon Nanotubes for Corrosion Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    Carbon Nanotube Functionalization /Doping Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) A) p-Doping C) Polymer Wrapping Model B) n-Doping Polyethyleneimine ( PEI ) SWCNT Paint...fluorine-containing) groups functions as the barrier layer Multilayer Smart Carbon Nanotube Coating Insoluble polymer layer top coating -PMMA Substrate...Thin Coatings of Polymeric Carbon and Carbon Nanotubes for Corrosion Protection Zafar Iqbal Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science New

  9. Protective Coats For High-Temperature Strain Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1993-01-01

    Addition of some rare-earth oxides to prior alumina (only) coating material increases maximum service temperature of palladium/chromium-wire strain gauges. Pd/Cr wires used at temperatures up to 800 degrees C without excessive drift in electrical resistance. Oxides used: zirconia (ZrO2), yttria (Y2O3), ceria (CeO2), and hafnia (HfO2). Addition of one of these oxides to decrease oxidation of wire at high temperature. Protection against oxidation increases with concentration of rare-earth oxide. Addition of ZrO2 at 4 to 6 weight percent or Y2O3 at 1 weight percent results in smallest drift in electrical resistance.

  10. Protective Coats For High-Temperature Strain Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1993-01-01

    Addition of some rare-earth oxides to prior alumina (only) coating material increases maximum service temperature of palladium/chromium-wire strain gauges. Pd/Cr wires used at temperatures up to 800 degrees C without excessive drift in electrical resistance. Oxides used: zirconia (ZrO2), yttria (Y2O3), ceria (CeO2), and hafnia (HfO2). Addition of one of these oxides to decrease oxidation of wire at high temperature. Protection against oxidation increases with concentration of rare-earth oxide. Addition of ZrO2 at 4 to 6 weight percent or Y2O3 at 1 weight percent results in smallest drift in electrical resistance.

  11. Development of Anticorrosive Polymer Nanocomposite Coating for Corrosion Protection in Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardare, L.; Benea, L.

    2017-06-01

    The marine environment is considered to be a highly aggressive environment for metal materials. Steels are the most common materials being used for shipbuilding. Corrosion is a major cause of structural deterioration in marine and offshore structures. Corrosion of carbon steel in marine environment becomes serious due to the highly corrosive nature of seawater with high salinity and microorganism. To protect metallic materials particularly steel against corrosion occurrence various organic and inorganic coatings are used. The most used are the polymeric protective coatings. The nanostructured TiO2 polymer coating is able to offer higher protection to steel against corrosion, and performed relatively better than other polymer coatings.

  12. Physical and mechanical properties and thermal protection efficiency of intumescent coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverev, V. G.; Zinchenko, V. I.; Tsimbalyuk, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The new engineering technique for the experimental investigation of physical and mechanical characteristics of thermal protective intumescent coatings is offered. A mathematical model is proposed for predicting the thermal behavior of structures protected by coatings; the model is closed by the studied material characteristics. The heating of a metal plate under standard thermal loading conditions is modeled mathematically. The modeling results are in good agreement with bench test results for metal temperature under the coating. The proposed technique of studying physical and mechanical characteristics can be applied to identify and monitor the state of thermal protective intumescent coatings in the long-term operation.

  13. Strain Compatible Oxidation and Corrosion Protection Coatings for Enhanced Thermo-Mechanical Durability of Turbine Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-05

    Report: Grant N00014-08-0331 Technical Objectives As critical components of advanced aircraft engines , turbine airfoils require coatings for...advanced aircrafi engines , turbine airfoils require coatings for enhancement of oxidation, corrosion and thermal capabilities . Airfoil coatings ofien...Oxidation and Corrosion Protection Coatings for Enhanced Thermo-Mechanical Durability of Turbine Airfoils 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-08-l-0331 5c

  14. Quantitative thermal diffusivity imaging of disbonds in thermal protective coatings using inductive heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    An inductive heating technique for making thermal diffusivity images of disbonds between thermal protective coatings and their substrates is presented. Any flaw in the bonding of the coating and the substrate shows as an area of lowered values in the diffusivity image. The benefits of the inductive heating approach lie in its ability to heat the conductive substrate without directly heating the dielectric coating. Results are provided for a series of samples with fabricated disbonds, for a range of coating thicknesses.

  15. Quantitative thermal diffusivity imaging of disbonds in thermal protective coatings using inductive heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. M.; Winfree, William P.

    1990-01-01

    An inductive heating technique for making thermal diffusivity images of disbonds between thermal protective coatings and their substrates is presented. Any flaw in the bonding of the coating and the substrate shows as an area of lowered values in the diffusivity image. The benefits of the inductive heating approach lie in its ability to heat the conductive substrate without directly heating the dielectric coating. Results are provided for a series of samples with fabricated disbonds, for a range of coating thicknesses.

  16. Corrosion resistant thermal barrier coating. [protecting gas turbines and other engine parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.; Hodge, P. E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system for protecting metal surfaces at high temperature in normally corrosive environments is described. The thermal barrier coating system includes a metal alloy bond coating, the alloy containing nickel, cobalt, iron, or a combination of these metals. The system further includes a corrosion resistant thermal barrier oxide coating containing at least one alkaline earth silicate. The preferred oxides are calcium silicate, barium silicate, magnesium silicate, or combinations of these silicates.

  17. Process for producing radiation-induced self-terminating protective coatings on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A gas and radiation are used to produce a protective coating that is substantially void-free on the molecular scale, self-terminating, and degradation resistant. The process can be used to deposit very thin (.apprxeq.5-20 .ANG.) coatings on critical surfaces needing protection from degradative processes including, corrosion and contamination.

  18. Nuclear Technology. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection. Module 30-6, Protective Coating Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This sixth in a series of eight modules for a course titled Mechanical Inspection describes the duties of the nuclear quality assurance/quality control technician that are associated with protective coatings, and the national standards that govern the selection, application, and inspection of protective coatings for the reactor containment…

  19. Nuclear Technology. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection. Module 30-6, Protective Coating Inspection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This sixth in a series of eight modules for a course titled Mechanical Inspection describes the duties of the nuclear quality assurance/quality control technician that are associated with protective coatings, and the national standards that govern the selection, application, and inspection of protective coatings for the reactor containment…

  20. Protection of Advanced Copper Alloys With Lean Cu-Cr Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor); Thomas-Ogbuji, L.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced copper alloys are used as liners of rocket thrusters and nozzle ramps to ensure dissipation of the high thermal load generated during launch, and Cr-lean coatings are preferred for the protection of these liners from the aggressive ambient environment. It is shown that adequate protection can be achieved with thin Cu-Cr coatings containing as little as 17 percent Cr.

  1. Corrosion protection of Nd-Fe-B magnets by bismaleimide coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, F. T.; Man, H. C.; Chan, W. M.; Cheng, C. W.; Chan, W. O.

    1999-04-01

    Samples of Nd-Fe-B were coated with bismaleimide (BMI), a resin which is well known for its desirable barrier, mechanical, and thermal properties but has not been used as a coating material. The performance of BMI-coated samples (average coating thickness ˜15 μm) was compared with commercial epoxy-coated samples (average coating thickness ˜20 μm) in a series of tests. In the copper-accelerated acetic acid-salt spray test, the epoxy-coated samples failed badly (damaged area >50%) within 20 h while the BMI-coated samples showed no sign of failure up to 200 h. Using the cross-cut tape test for adhesion strength (ASTM D 3359), the commercial epoxy coatings suffered 25% area detachment while for the BMI coatings, no detachment was observed. The scratch resistance of the BMI coatings, measured in terms of scratch depth in the pin scratch test, was about 1.5 that of the commercial epoxy coatings, and the Vickers hardness was higher by a factor of about 2.5. When magnetized under the same magnetizing field, there was no significant difference in the magnetization obtained among bare, epoxy-coated, and BMI-coated samples. These results suggest that BMI coatings are excellent for protection of the Nd-Fe-B magnets against corrosion and function better than the commonly used epoxy resin.

  2. New Materials for Structural Composites and Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this Phase I project was to create novel conductive materials that are lightweight and strong enough for multiple ground support equipment and Exploration applications. The long-term goal is to combine these materials within specially designed devices to create composites or coatings with diagnostic capabilities, increased strength, and tunable properties such as transparency, electroluminescence, and fire resistance. One such technology application is a smart windows system. In such a system, the transmission of light through a window is controlled by electrical power. In the future, these materials may also be able to absorb sunlight and convert it into electrical energy to produce light, thereby creating a self-sufficient lighting system. This experiment, conducted in collaboration with the Georgia Institute of Technology, demonstrated enhancements in fabricating fiber materials from carbon nanotubes (CNT). These nanotubes were grown as forests in an ultra-high-purity chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace and then drawn, using novel processing techniques, into fibers and yarns that would be turned into filaments. This work was submitted to the Journal of Advanced Functional Materials. The CNT fibers were initially tested as filament materials at atmospheric pressure; however, even under high current loads, the filaments produced only random sparking. The CNT fibers were also converted into transparent, hydrophobic, and conductive sheets. Filament testing at low vacuum pressures is in progress, and the technology will be enhanced in 2008. As initial proof of the smart-windows application concept, the use of CNT sheets as composites/ protective coatings was demonstrated in collaboration with Nanocomp Technologies of Concord, New Hampshire.

  3. Protective coating for copper in aluminum heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avazian, R.

    1978-01-01

    Application of ultrathin layer of molybdenum disulfied coating to copper tubing permits utilization of tubing in cast-aluminum heat exchangers. Coating prevents formation of copper/aluminum eutectic, but does not impede heat transfer.

  4. Structural and corrosion protection properties of electrochemically deposited nano-sized Zn-Ni alloy coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozar, A.; Karahan, İ. H.

    2014-11-01

    Zn-Ni alloy coatings were fabricated galvanostatically by applying varied current densities from 10 to 30 mA cm-2. Surface morphology of the coatings was examined with SEM. Crystal structure of the coatings was studied with X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). Compositions of the coatings were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Corrosion protection properties studied using open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, potentiodynamic polarization measurements (Tafel), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Deposited alloy coatings were compact and nano-sized. Crystallite sizes of the coatings were varying from 26 nm to 36 nm. Nickel content of the samples were increased by increasing current densities and varied from 6.7 to 18.9 wt.%. Best corrosion protection performance was seen on the sample obtained at 30 mA cm-2. Our results are considerably encouraging for protection of mild steel against corrosion by obtained Zn-Ni alloys.

  5. Estimation of the efficiency of application of protective coatings on the turbine blades in a gas turbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, E. G.; Samoilenko, V. M.; Drevnyak, V. V.; Ravilov, R. G.

    2016-12-01

    The results of studying the efficiency of application of protective coatings on GTE turbine blades are presented. The efficiency of application of protective coatings in the production and repair of the blades is considered.

  6. Corrosion protection comparison of a chromate conversion coating to a novel conductive polymer coating on aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Racicot, R.J.; Yang, S.C.; Brown, R.

    1997-12-01

    Comparisons of the corrosion resistance performance of a novel polyaniline based double strand conductive polymer coating versus a chromate conversion coating on two aluminum alloys were made. Potentiodynamic scans, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.5N NaCl solutions and ASTM B-117 salt spray tests were performed on coated samples of AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 aluminum alloys. Results show the conductive polymer film offers, at the least, an equivalent protection performance as the chromate coating with a two order of magnitude reduction in corrosion current densities in cyclic polarization tests, near equivalent impedance values and less undercutting of a scribed area in salt spray test samples. In an acidic salt solution of pH 3.6, the conductive polymer offers an improved performance with a one order of magnitude higher impedance over the chromate coatings.

  7. Low-Cost Protective Layer Coatings on Thermal Barrier Coatings via CCVD. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrick, Michelle

    2003-09-18

    MicroCoating Technologies, Inc., investigated the use of the Combustion Chemical Vapor Deposition (CCVD) process to deposit oxygen or sintering barrier coatings for thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. In addition, it looked at the use of its nanopowders by the NanoSpray process for developing smoothing layers on TBCs. Testing and analysis of coated substrates included heat treatments, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and profilometry. Coatings on TBC-coated superalloy coupons were tested by an outside collaborator. Results from the investigations indicated that the thin film coatings were not well-suited as barrier layers on the rough bond coat or TBC. Subsequent investigations considered smoothing layers on the TBC, as suggested by the collaborator, using nanopowder-based coatings. Smoothing of substrate surfaces by 50% was observed by profilometry.

  8. Radwaste immobilization with the use of special protective coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhitonov, Yury; Pokrovski, Yury; Kolobov, Evgeniy; Strelkov, Sergey

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: One of the most important conditions for the realization of the concept of closed nuclear fuel cycle consists in the availability of highly developed infrastructure, including reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and further utilization of the resulted waste. The major way for increasing the safety of rad-wastes management is the development of advanced technologies, which would enable to reprocess the whole volume of high-level waste (HLW) and to obtain the solid products offering high chemical stability which would be suitable for long-term monitored storage and/or final disposal. At the same time another way to enhance the safety of solidified HLW storage and disposal is to apply a special coating on granulated wastes or to encapsulate solidified HLW using adequate materials. The object of this work was to conduct experimental study on technology development to obtain protective covering at ceramic materials containing cesium radionuclides. Physicochemical characteristics of these materials (data on cesium leaching rate) are presented. An alternative objective of the work was to perform experiments on increasing the chemical stability of matrix compositions based on 'reactor' palladium containing europium oxide and iodine. (authors)

  9. Boron nitride protective coating of beryllium window surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.

    1991-12-01

    The use of beryllium windows on white synchrotron radiation beamlines is constrained by the fact that the downstream surfaces of these windows should not be exposed to ambient atmosphere. They should, rather, be protected by a tail-piece under vacuum or containing helium atmosphere. This tailpiece is typically capped by Kapton (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) or aluminum foil. The reason for such an arrangement is due to the health risk associated with contaminants (BeO) which from on the exposed beryllium window surfaces and due to possible loss of integrity of the windows. Such a tail-piece may, however, add unwanted complications to the beamline in the form of vacuum pumps or helium supplies and their related monitoring systems. The Kapton windows may burn through in the case of high intensity beams and lower energy radiation may be absorbed in the case of aluminum foil windows. A more ideal situation would be to provide a coating for the exposed beryllium window surface, sealing it off from the atmosphere, thus preventing contamination and/or degradation of the window, and eliminating the need for helium or vacuum equipment.

  10. Effects of cathodic disbonding and blistering on current demand for cathodic protection of coated steel

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, O.O.; Steinsmo, U.

    2000-03-01

    Cathodic disbonding, blistering, and current demand for cathodic protection were measured for nine commercial coatings for submerged steel structures. The ASTM-G8 standard test and a long-term test (2 years), simulating North Sea conditions, were used. The relevance of the ASTM-G8 test as a prequalification test was evaluated by comparing cathodic disbonding in the two tests. After 800 days in the long-term test, the correlation to ASTM-G8 was good. The correlation coefficient was 0.98. The current demand for cathodic protection increased when the coatings blistered. Examination of the blisters showed that they had cracked. After 2 years of testing, the current demand only had increased for the thin coatings (< 150 {micro}m). The current demand for the thicker coatings (> 450 {micro}m) had not increased, in spite of significant cathodic disbonding for some coatings. Coating breakdown factors, defined as the ratio between current demand for cathodic protection for the coated samples and samples of bare steel, were calculated. These factors were compared with the design values for cathodic protection in Det Norske Veritas (DNV) RP B401 and NORSOK M-CR-503. For all coatings, the coating breakdown rate was lower than the design values.

  11. Characterization of thermally sprayed coatings for high-temperature wear-protection applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.C.

    1980-03-01

    Under normal high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating conditions, faying surfaces of metallic components under high contact pressure are prone to friction, wear, and self-welding damage. Component design calls for coatings for the protection of the mating surfaces. Anticipated operating temperatures up to 850 to 950/sup 0/C (1562 to 1742/sup 0/F) and a 40-y design life require coatings with excellent thermal stability and adequate wear and spallation resistance, and they must be compatible with the HTGR coolant helium environment. Plasma and detonation-gun (D-gun) deposited chromium carbide-base and stabilized zirconia coatings are under consideration for wear protection of reactor components such as the thermal barrier, heat exchangers, control rods, and turbomachinery. Programs are under way to address the structural integrity, helium compatibility, and tribological behavior of relevant sprayed coatings. In this paper, the need for protection of critical metallic components and the criteria for selection of coatings are discussed. The technical background to coating development and the experience with the steam cycle HTGR (HTGR-SC) are commented upon. Coating characterization techniques employed at General Atomic Company (GA) are presented, and the progress of the experimental programs is briefly reviewed. In characterizing the coatings for HTGR applications, it is concluded that a systems approach to establish correlation between coating process parameters and coating microstructural and tribological properties for design consideration is required.

  12. Optimization of pulsed DC PACVD parameters: Toward reducing wear rate of the DLC films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Mansoureh; Mahboubi, Farzad; Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza

    2016-12-01

    The effect of pulsed direct current (DC) plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) parameters such as temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH4 flow ratio on the wear behavior and wear durability of the diamond-like carbon (DLC) films was studied by using response surface methodology (RSM). DLC films were deposited on nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel. Wear rate and wear durability of the DLC films were examined with the pin-on-disk method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques were used for studying wear mechanisms, chemical structure, and hardness of the DLC films. RSM results show that duty cycle is one of the important parameters that affect the wear rate of the DLC samples. The wear rate of the samples deposited with a duty cycle of >75% decreases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. In contrast, for a duty cycle of <65%, the wear rate increases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. The wear durability of the DLC samples increases with an increase in the duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH4 flow ratio at the deposition temperature between 85 °C and 110 °C. Oxidation, fatigue, abrasive wear, and graphitization are the wear mechanisms observed on the wear scar of the DLC samples deposited with the optimum deposition conditions.

  13. Studies on adhesion characteristics and corrosion behaviour of vinyltriethoxysilane/epoxy coating protective system on aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajat, Jelena B.; Milošev, Ingrid; Jovanović, Željka; Mišković-Stanković, Vesna B.

    2010-03-01

    The corrosion stability of vinyltriethoxysilane/epoxy coating protective system on aluminium is strongly related to the strength of bonds forming at the metal/organic coating interface. This article is a study of adhesion, composition, electrochemical and transport properties of epoxy coatings electrodeposited on bare aluminium and aluminium pretreated by vinyltriethoxysilane (VTES) during exposure to 3% NaCl. The VTES film was deposited on aluminium surface from 2% vinyltriethoxysilane solution during 30 s. From the values of adhesion strength (pull-off test), time dependence of pore resistance and coating capacitance of epoxy coating (impedance measurements) and diffusion coefficient of water through epoxy coating (gravimetric liquid sorption measurements), the influence of VTES sublayer on the corrosion stability of the electrodeposited epoxy coating was shown. The work discusses the role of the VTES pretreatment in the enhanced adhesion and corrosion stability of epoxy cataphoretic coating. The electrochemical results showed that the aluminium pretreatment by VTES film improved barrier properties of epoxy coating (greater pore resistance and lower coating capacitance). The lower value of diffusion coefficient of water through epoxy coating indicates the lower porosity, while the smaller adhesion reduction points to better adhesion of epoxy coating on aluminium pretreated by VTES film. The composition of the deposited coatings investigated by XPS enabled the clarification of the bonding mechanism.

  14. Concepts for Smart Protective High-Temperature Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Brady, M.P.; Wright, I.G.

    2003-04-24

    The need for environmental resistance is a critical material barrier to the operation of fossil systems with the improved energy efficiencies and emissions performance described by the goals of the Vision 21 concept of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy. All fossil fuel-derived processes contain reactive species and high-temperature degradation arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensible products often limits performance or materials lifetimes such that efficiency, emission, and/or economic targets or requirements are not realized. Therefore, historically, the development of materials for fossil-fuel combustion and conversion systems has been closely linked to corrosion studies of alloys and ceramics in appropriate environments. This project is somewhat different from such studies in that it focuses on the feasibility of new routes to controlling the critical chemical and mechanical phenomena that collectively form the basis for environmental protection in relevant fossil environments by exploring compositional and microstructural manipulations and cooperative phenomena that have not necessarily been examined in any detail to date. This can hopefully lead to concepts for ''smart'' coatings or materials that have the ability to sense and respond appropriately to a particular set or series of environmental conditions in order to provide high-temperature corrosion protection. The strategies being explored involve cooperative or in-place oxidation or sulfidation reactions of multiphase alloys.[1,2] The first material systems to be evaluated involve silicides as there is some evidence that such materials have enhanced resistance in oxidizing-sulfidizing and sulfidizing environments and in air/oxygen at very high temperatures.[3] In this regard, molybdenum silicides may prove to be of particular interest. Molybdenum is known to sulfidize fairly slowly[4] and there has been recent progress in developing Mo-Si-B systems with improved

  15. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2001-02-22

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for debris formation of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is being performed at the Savannah River Technology Center. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause coating disbondment as identified by the Industry Coatings Expert Panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are described in this report and the application of these elements to evaluate the performance of the specific coating system of Phenoline 305 epoxy-phenolic topcoat over Carbozinc 11 primer on a steel substrate. This system is one of the predominant coating systems present on steel substrates in NPP containment.

  16. Highly Damping Hard Coatings for Protection of Titanium Blades

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    with ENERGY 200 system, allowing local chemical analysis of element distribution across the coating thickness to be performed. The same samples were...evaluations. As is seen from the dark field image of the microstructure (Fig. 4), taken in the magnesium oxide reflection, and their statistical analysis ...from large coating regions have other reflections, in addition to magnesium oxide reflection. Their analysis showed that the coating has a multiphase

  17. Protective matching polymer powder coating of piezoelectric element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilova, V. A.; Fazlyyyakhmatov, M. G.; Kashapov, N. F.

    2013-12-01

    Objects of research are coatings and technology of their applying to the piezoelectric elements for ultrasound. Acoustic impedance and thicknesses of matching layers for medical ultrasound transducers have been defined. In this paper performance characteristics of coating systems with predetermined properties have been selected. The conditions for selection of polymer powder paint for quarter wave matching layer have been determined. Conditions of forming polymer powder coatings have been proposed.

  18. Evaluation of a new protective coating for porcelain insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.; Orbeck, T.

    1982-12-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of a new elastomeric coating made from a silicone rubber compound for use on porcelain insulators. Field experience has shown that coated insulators have a lower flashover probability under wet contaminated operation than uncoated insulators. Laboratory fog tests also show significant improvements in the wet electrical behavior of clean and contaminated insulators. The Room Temperature Vulcanized (RTV) silicone rubber coating offers both technical and economical advantages for high voltage system operation and maintenance.

  19. Solid-state interactions at the core-coat interface: physicochemical characterization of enteric-coated omeprazole pellets without a protective sub-coat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishnu Dutt; Akocak, Suleyman; Ilies, Marc A; Fassihi, Reza

    2015-08-01

    Conventionally, scanning electron or transmission microscopy, Raman and near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, terahertz, florescence, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging have been used to characterize functional coating structure. This study highlights the use of fluorescence microscopy to investigate the physicochemical stability and coating integrity of the commercially available enteric-coated omeprazole pellets containing a basic excipient and prepared by extrusion and spheronization or drug layering on the nonpareil seed, immediately followed by enteric coating (i.e., absence of protective sub-coat). The nature of coating interface and the likely development of an in situ interfacial layer after the application of enteric coating solution was examined using HPLC, NMR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and fluorescent imaging methods. Likewise for the characterization of the solid pellet structure via fluorescence microscopy, a new approach based on fracturing technique (to avoid surface contamination) rather than microtome sectioning was used and validated. Analytical data showed that the pellets containing omeprazole remained chemically stable (>99.5% recovered). Control of the microenvironmental pH by the addition of alkalinizing excipient within a core formulation or as part of drug layering on top of nonpareil seed appears to efficiently neutralize the acidic effect of enteric coating dispersion. Fluorescence images further illustrate the absence of any discernable in situ layer formation at the coat-core interface.

  20. Long-term corrosion protection by a thin nano-composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejenstam, Lina; Tuominen, Mikko; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki M.; Pan, Jinshan; Swerin, Agne; Claesson, Per M.

    2015-12-01

    We report and discuss the corrosion protective properties of a thin nano-composite coating system consisting of an 11 μm thick polyester acrylate (PEA) basecoat, covered by an approximately 1-2 μm thick layer of TiO2 nanoparticles carrying a 0.05 μm thick hexamethyl disiloxane (HMDSO) top coat. The corrosion protective properties were evaluated on carbon steel substrates immersed in 3 wt% NaCl solution by open circuit potential (OCP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The protective properties of each layer, and of each pair of layers, were also evaluated to gain further understanding of the long-term protective properties offered by the nano-composite coating. The full coating system showed excellent corrosion protective properties in the corrosive environment of 3 wt% NaCl-solution for an extended period of 100 days, during which the coating impedance, at the lower frequency limit (0.01 Hz), remained above 108 Ω cm2. We suggest that the excellent corrosion protective properties of the complete coating system is due to a combination of (i) good adhesion and stability of the PEA basecoat, (ii) the surface roughness and the elongated diffusion path provided by the addition of TiO2 nanoparticles, and (iii) the low surface energy provided by the HMDSO top coat.

  1. Protection of bronze artefacts through polymeric coatings based on nanocarriers filled with corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luna, Martina Salzano; Buonocore, Giovanna; Di Carlo, Gabriella; Giuliani, Chiara; Ingo, Gabriel M.; Lavorgna, Marino

    2016-05-01

    Protective coatings based on polymers synthesized from renewable sources (chitosan or an amorphous vinyl alcohol based polymer) have been prepared for the protection of bronze artifacts from corrosion. Besides acting as an effective barrier against corrosive species present in the environment, the efficiency of the coatings has been improved by adding corrosion inhibitor compounds (benzotriazole or mercaptobenzothiazole) to the formulations. The liquid medium of the formulations has been carefully selected looking at maximizing the wettability on the bronze substrate and optimizing the solvent evaporation rate. The minimum amount of inhibitor compounds has been optimized by performing accelerated corrosion tests on coated bronze substrates. The inhibitors have been directly dissolved in the coating-forming solutions and/or introduced by means of nanocarriers, which allow to control the release kinetics. The free dissolved inhibitor molecules immediately provide a sufficient protection against corrosion. On the other hand, the inhibitor molecules contained in the nanocarriers serve as long-term reservoir, which can be activated by external corrosion-related stimuli in case of particularly severe conditions. Particular attention has been paid to other features which affect the coating performances. Specifically, the adhesion of the protective polymer layer to the bronze substrate has been assessed, as well as its permeability properties and transparency, the latter being a fundamental feature of protective coating for cultural heritages. Finally, the protective efficiency of the produced smart coatings has been assessed through accelerated corrosion tests.

  2. A shape-recovery polymer coating for the corrosion protection of metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Alexander; van den Berg, Otto; Van Damme, Jonas; Verheyen, Karen; Bauters, Erwin; De Graeve, Iris; Du Prez, Filip E; Terryn, Herman

    2015-01-14

    Self-healing polymer coatings are a type of smart material aimed for advanced corrosion protection of metals. This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of two new UV-cure self-healing coatings based on acrylated polycaprolactone polyurethanes. On a macroscopic scale, the cured films all show outstanding mechanical properties, combining relatively high Young's modulus of up to 270 MPa with a strain at break above 350%. After thermal activation the strained films recover up to 97% of their original length. Optical and electron microscopy reveals the self-healing properties of these coatings on hot dip galvanized steel with scratches and microindentations. The temperature-induced closing of such defects restores the corrosion protection and barrier properties of the coating as shown by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning vibrating electrode technique. Therefore, such coatings are a complementary option for encapsulation-based autonomous corrosion protection systems.

  3. Physical and Mathematical Modeling of Heat Transfer in Intumescent Thermal Protective Coatings Under Radiative Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverev, V. G.; Goldin, V. D.; Teploukhov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Radiative heating of a metal plate protected by an intumescent coating layer has been studied experimentally and theoretically. Special aspects of physical modeling of intumescent coating heating on a test bench for radiative heating are considered. Heat resistance testing of metal structures is justified. A conjugate mathematical model of radiative-conductive heat transfer in an intumesced material layer is proposed. The experimental and calculation data on the metal plate temperature beneath the coating are shown to agree well.

  4. Degradation and Failure Characteristics of NPP Containment Protective Coating Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-12-01

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level I coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel.

  5. Coated silicon comprising material for protection against environmental corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazel, Brian Thomas (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, an article is disclosed. The article comprises a gas turbine engine component substrate comprising a silicon material; and an environmental barrier coating overlying the substrate, wherein the environmental barrier coating comprises cerium oxide, and the cerium oxide reduces formation of silicate glass on the substrate upon exposure to corrodant sulfates.

  6. Metal flame spray coating protects electrical cables in extreme environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, R. D.; Fox, H. A.

    1967-01-01

    Metal flame spray coating prevents EMF measurement error in sheathed instrumentation cables which are externally attached to cylinders which were cooled on the inside, but exposed to gamma radiation on the outside. The coating provides a thermoconductive path for radiation induced high temperatures within the cables.

  7. Thermal Cycling Assessment of Steel-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings for Al Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Dominique; Lamarre, Jean-Michel; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong interest from the transportation industry to achieve vehicle weight reduction through the replacement of steel components by aluminum parts. For some applications, aluminum requires protective coatings due to its limited wear and lower temperature resistance compared to steel. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of amorphous-type plasma-sprayed steel coatings and conventional arc-sprayed steel coatings as thermal barrier coatings, mainly through the evaluation of their spalling resistance under thermal cycling. The microstructures of the different coatings were first compared via SEM. The amorphicity of the coatings produced via plasma spraying of specialized alloyed steel and the crystalline phases of the conventional arc-sprayed steel coatings were confirmed through x-ray diffraction. The thermal diffusivity of all coatings produced was measured to be about a third of that of bulk stainless steel. Conventional arc-sprayed steel coatings typically offered better spalling resistance under thermal cycling than steel-based amorphous coatings due probably to their higher initial bond strength. However, the presence of vertical cracks in the steel-based amorphous coatings was found to have a beneficial effect on their thermal cycling resistance. The amorphous plasma-sprayed steel coatings presented indications of recrystallization after their exposure to high temperature.

  8. Thin coatings for protecting titanium aluminides in high-temperature oxidizing environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Taylor, P. J.; Clark, R. K.; Wallace, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Titanium aluminides have high specific strengths at high temperatures but are susceptible to environmental attack. Their use in many aerospace applications would require that they be protected with coatings that, for structural efficiency, must be thin. It is conceivable that acceptable coatings might be found in several oxide systems, and consequently, oxide coatings of many compositions were prepared from sol-gels for study. Response-surface methodology was used to refine coating compositions and factorial experiments were used to develop coating strategies. Oxygen permeability diagrams of two-layer coatings for several oxide systems, an analysis of multiple-layer coatings on rough and polished surfaces, and modeling of the oxidation weight gain are presented.

  9. Thermal Management Coating As Thermal Protection System for Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Raj; Stuckey, C. Irvin

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the development of a non-ablative thermal management coating used as the thermal protection system material for space shuttle rocket boosters and other launch vehicles. The topics include: 1) Coating Study; 2) Aerothermal Testing; 3) Preconditioning Environments; 4) Test Observations; 5) Lightning Strike Test Panel; 6) Test Panel After Impact Testing; 7) Thermal Testing; and 8) Mechanical Testing.

  10. Hybrid organic-inorganic network coatings for protecting metal substrates from abrasion and corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Jordens, K.; Wilkes, G.

    1996-12-31

    Ceramers or Ormocers are hybrid organic-inorganic materials first created a decade ago, and are the subject of a recent review article. Recent research from the authors laboratory in this area of materials science has focused on synthesizing protective coatings for (soft) polymeric substrates, i.e. polycarbonate. The authors have now extended the application of such coatings to metallic substrates.

  11. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Protective Liner Systems, Inc., Epoxy Mastic, PLS-614

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Protective Liner Systems International, Inc. Epoxy Mastic PLS-614 coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Material and T...

  12. Project W-314 Polyurea Special Protective Coating (SPC) Test Plan Chemical Compatibility and Physical Characteristics Testing

    SciTech Connect

    MAUSER, R.W.

    2001-01-15

    This Test Plan outlines the testing to be done on the Special Protective Coating (SPC) Polyurea which includes: Tank Waste Compatibility, Decontamination Factor Testing, and Adhesion Strength Testing after a sample has been exposed to Radiation.

  13. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Protective Liner Systems, Inc., Epoxy Mastic, PLS-614

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Protective Liner Systems International, Inc. Epoxy Mastic PLS-614 coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Material and T...

  14. Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings for Flexible Ceramic Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius; Carroll, Carol; Smith, Dane; Guzinski, Mike; Marschall, Jochen; Pallix, Joan; Ridge, Jerry; Tran, Duoc

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the evaluation and testing of high emissivity protective coatings applied to flexible insulations for the Reusable Launch Vehicle technology program. Ceramic coatings were evaluated for their thermal properties, durability, and potential for reuse. One of the major goals was to determine the mechanism by which these coated blanket surfaces become brittle and try to modify the coatings to reduce or eliminate embrittlement. Coatings were prepared from colloidal silica with a small percentage of either SiC or SiB6 as the emissivity agent. These coatings are referred to as gray C-9 and protective ceramic coating (PCC), respectively. The colloidal solutions were either brushed or sprayed onto advanced flexible reusable surface insulation blankets. The blankets were instrumented with thermocouples and exposed to reentry heating conditions in the Ames Aeroheating Arc Jet Facility. Post-test samples were then characterized through impact testing, emissivity measurements, chemical analysis, and observation of changes in surface morphology. The results show that both coatings performed well in arc jet tests with backface temperatures slightly lower for the PCC coating than with gray C-9. Impact testing showed that the least extensive surface destruction was experienced on blankets with lower areal density coatings.

  15. Electro-spark deposited coatings for protection of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.N.

    1995-08-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The coating is fused (metallurgically bonded) to the substrate with such a low total heat input that the bulk substrate material remains at or near ambient temperature. Rapid solidification of the deposit typically results in an extremely fine-grained deposit that may be amorphous for some materials. Nearly any electrically conductive metal, alloy or cermet can be applied to metallic substrates. The ESD process allows multi-layer coatings to be built-up using different materials to create graded structures or surface compositions that would be difficult to achieve by other means. A series of iron-aluminide coatings based on Fe{sub 3}Al and FeAl in combination with refractory metal diffusion-barrier coatings and supplementary additions of other elements are in corrosion testing at ANL. The most recent FeAl coatings are showing a factor of three better corrosion performance than the best previous coatings. Technology transfer activities are a significant portion of the ESD program effort. Notable successes now include the start-up of a new business to commercialize the ESD technology, major new applications in gas turbine engines and steam turbine blade coatings, and in military, medical, metal-working, and recreational equipment applications.

  16. Protective coatings for metal alloys and methods incorporating the same

    DOEpatents

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Ibanez, Sergio; Swartz, Scott L.

    2015-06-09

    An electrochemical device having one or more solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), each of the SOFCs including a cathode, an anode, and an electrolyte layer positioned between the cathode and anode; and at least one additional component comprising a metallic substrate having an electronically conductive, chromium-free perovskite coating deposited directly thereon. The perovskite coating has the formula ABO.sub.3, wherein A is a lanthanide element or Y, and B is a mixture of two or more transition elements, with the A site undoped by any alkaline earth element, and the perovskite coating exhibits limited or no ionic transport of oxygen.

  17. Silicide Coating Fabricated by HAPC/SAPS Combination to Protect Niobium Alloy from Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Fu, Qian-Gang; Guo, Li-Ping; Wang, Lu

    2016-06-22

    A combined silicide coating, including inner NbSi2 layer and outer MoSi2 layer, was fabricated through a two-step method. The NbSi2 was deposited on niobium alloy by halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) in the first step. Then, supersonic atmospheric plasma spray (SAPS) was applied to obtain the outer MoSi2 layer, forming a combined silicide coating. Results show that the combined coating possessed a compact structure. The phase constitution of the combined coating prepared by HAPC and SAPS was NbSi2 and MoSi2, respectively. The adhesion strength of the combined coating increased nearly two times than that for single sprayed coating, attributing to the rougher surface of the HAPC-bond layer whose roughness increased about three times than that of the grit-blast substrate. After exposure at 1200 °C in air, the mass increasing rate for single HAPC-silicide coating was 3.5 mg/cm(2) because of the pest oxidation of niobium alloy, whereas the combined coating displayed better oxidation resistance with a mass gain of only 1.2 mg/cm(2). Even more, the combined coating could significantly improve the antioxidation ability of niobium based alloy at 1500 °C. The good oxidation resistance of the combined silicide coating was attributed to the integrity of the combined coating and the continuous SiO2 protective scale provided by the oxidation of MoSi2.

  18. Degradation and failure characteristics of NPP containment protective coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.

    2000-03-30

    A research program to investigate the performance and potential for failure of Service Level 1 coating systems used in nuclear power plant containment is in progress. The research activities are aligned to address phenomena important to cause failure as identified by the industry coatings expert panel. The period of interest for performance covers the time from application of the coating through 40 years of service, followed by a medium-to-large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario, which is a design basis accident (DBA) scenario. The interactive program elements are discussed in this report and the application of these elements to the System 5 coating system (polyamide epoxy primer, carbon steel substrate) is used to evaluate performance.

  19. Protective coatings preventing hydrogen desorption from titanium during ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evsin, A. E.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Dovganyuk, S. S.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Shutikova, M. I.

    2017-05-01

    Effect of yttria and titanium nitride coatings on features of deuterium desorption from titanium layer is investigated. It is shown that both coatings significantly raise the temperature of maximum of deuterium thermal desorption from titanium under linear heating and prevent desorption under prolonged keeping at the operating temperature of a neutron tube target. However, under irradiation with ions of H2 + O2 plasma the barrier properties of titanium nitride appear to degrade.

  20. Plasma Enhanced PVD Protective Coatings for Wear and Erosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Fig. 2. The oxygen concentration depth profiles were taken using Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). Based on the AES analysis, thermal oxides are at...samples were then ion sputter cleaned in Ar at Id =10 Amp and Vb= 120 volts for 30, 60, 90 minutes; then sensitive Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS...groove adhesion testing was used to test mechanical adhesion strength of thick coatings using a tungsten carbide tool. All thick coatings in Table 1

  1. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-10-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  2. Lead dodecanoate coatings for the protection of lead and lead-tin alloy artifacts: Two examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keersmaecker, Michel; Verbeken, Kim; Adriaens, Annemie

    2014-02-01

    In order to understand the corrosive and morphological characteristics of lead dodecanoate protective coatings on real samples, three pipe organ samples were studied using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion products and elemental composition of the top layer of the different pipe organ samples were investigated. The results indicate that the three pipe organ samples are made of an alloy composed mainly of lead and tin. After immersion and the deposition of the protective coating, only lead and no tin is detected, which indicates the formation of a thick coating containing lead dodecanoate complexes.

  3. Self-healing effect of the protective inhibitor-containing coatings on Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedenkov, A. S.; Sinebryukhov, S. L.; Mashtalyar, D. V.; Gnedenkov, S. V.

    2017-09-01

    The method of self-healing coating formation on the surface of magnesium alloys on the base of plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) with subsequent impregnation of the obtained layer with inhibitor has been suggested. The protective and electrochemical properties of such coatings have been described. Localised Scanning Electrochemical Methods were used for determining the kinetics and mechanism of the self-healing process. The treatment with the solution containing inhibitor enables us to increase the protective properties of the PEO-coating in 30 times in the corrosion-active environment.

  4. Development of Protective Coatings for Co-Sequestration Processes and Pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Bierwagen, Gordon; Huang, Yaping

    2011-11-30

    The program, entitled Development of Protective Coatings for Co-Sequestration Processes and Pipelines, examined the sensitivity of existing coating systems to supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) exposure and developed new coating system to protect pipelines from their corrosion under SCCO2 exposure. A literature review was also conducted regarding pipeline corrosion sensors to monitor pipes used in handling co-sequestration fluids. Research was to ensure safety and reliability for a pipeline involving transport of SCCO2 from the power plant to the sequestration site to mitigate the greenhouse gas effect. Results showed that one commercial coating and one designed formulation can both be supplied as potential candidates for internal pipeline coating to transport SCCO2.

  5. Optical and environmentally protective coatings for potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) harmonic converter crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, I.M.

    1991-06-24

    Potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals have been used as harmonic converters on the Nova laser at LLNL for over six years. All crystals were coated with a single layer, quarterwave AR coating of porous silica with a refractive index of 1.22. This was prepared by a sol-gel process and was applied from a colloidal suspension by spin coating at room temperature. A few crystals were also coated with a methyl silicone coating prior to the application of the AR coating for environmental protection. The initial optical performance of all crystals was very good but there has been some deterioration over the years because of environmental and laser damage degradation. The deterioration in the silicone samples was, however, much less than the others. We are now in the process of replacing all ten KDP arrays with new crystals and will apply the silicone undercoat to all samples. Recently we have been evaluating a new perfluorinated organic polymer coating which has a refractive index of 1.29. This material is soluble in fluorinated solvents and can be applied by dip coating from solution at room temperature. We hope that this can provide environmental protection when applied to KDP and also act as an AR coating at the same time. The optical performance is not as good as our porous silica because of the higher index; about 0.3% reflection per surface is obtained. 4 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. An alternate to chromate conversion coatings for the corrosion protection of aluminum 2024-T3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruiguang

    Corrosion of high-strength aluminum alloys used for airspace application is an expensive and serious problem. The most significant environmental factor contributing to the corrosion of these alloys is water condensed from humid air and contaminated with soluble chloride salts. The Al 2024 series used for aircraft are particularly susceptible to corrosion in aqueous chloride solutions due to alloying constituents such as copper and other impurities. Chromates are efficient inhibitors of corrosion of aluminum in near neutral aqueous environments containing aggressive anions such as chlorides. Usually, aluminum alloys are initially protected by chromate conversion coatings. Additional polymer coatings are sometimes added during exposure to corrosive atmospheres such as marine environments. Although chromate coatings are widely used, they require the use of noxious solutions, so they have always presented effluent disposal problems. There are health and safety concerns over the use of chromates due to their toxicity and carcinogenic nature and, as a consequence, the environmental and health risks associated with the use of such coatings will be restricted in the future. It was these health and safety concerns that led to the development of alternative non-toxic coating processes with comparable adhesion properties and corrosion protection. A variety of process technologies are under development and are vying for acceptance in industrial markets. As an alternate conversion coating, a new titanate conversion coating was systematically researched and developed. Research concentrated on producing passive surfaces from a simple titanate solution using an immersion process. The corrosion resistance of the treated surface has been evaluated using simple, rapid electrochemical techniques as well as a more long-term salt spray test. Passivation by titanate conversion treatment exhibits many similarities to chromate conversion treatment. Based on this study of corrosion

  7. Anti-Adhesion Elastomer Seal Coatings for Ultraviolet and Atomic Oxygen Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Groh, Henry C., III; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Waters, Deborah L.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation blocking sunscreen coatings have been developed for the protection of elastomer seals used in low-Earth-orbit (LEO). The coatings protect the seals from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and atomic oxygen (AO) damage. The coatings were developed for use on NASA docking seals. Docking seal damage from the UV and AO present in LEO can constrain mission time-line, flight mode options, and increases risk. A low level of adhesion is also required for docking seals so undocking push-off forces can be low. The coatings presented also mitigate this unwanted adhesion. Greases with low collected volatile condensable materials (CVCM) and low total mass loss (TML) were mixed with slippery and/or UV blocking powders to create the protective coatings. Coatings were applied at rates up to 2 milligrams per square centimeter. Coated seals were exposed to AO and UV in the NUV (near-UV) and UV-C wavelength ranges (300 to 400 nanometers and 254 nanometers, respectively). Ground based ashers were used to simulate the AO of space. The Sun's UV energy was mimicked assuming a nose forward flight mode, resulting in an exposure rate of 2.5 megajoules per square meter per day. Exposures between 0 and 147 megajoules per square meter (UV-C) and 245 megajoules per square meter (NUV) were accomplished. The protective coatings were durable, providing protection from UV after a simulated docking and undocking cycle. The level of protection begins to decline at coverage rates less than 0.9 milligrams per square centimeter. The leakage of seals coated with Braycote plus 20 percent Z-cote ZnO sunscreen increased by a factor of 40 after moderate AO exposure; indicating that this coating might not be suitable due to AO intolerance. Seals coated with DC-7-16.4 percent Z-cote ZnO sunscreen were not significantly affected by combined doses of 2 x 10 (sup 21) atoms per square AO with 73 megajoules per square meter UV-C. Unprotected seals were significantly damaged at UV-C exposures of 0.3 megajoules per

  8. High Temperature Damping Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier and Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    A high temperature damping test apparatus has been developed using a high heat flux CO 2 laser rig in conjunction with a TIRA S540 25 kHz Shaker and Polytec OFV 5000 Vibrometer system. The test rig has been successfully used to determine the damping performance of metallic and ceramic protective coating systems at high temperature for turbine engine applications. The initial work has been primarily focused on the microstructure and processing effects on the coating temperature-dependence damping behavior. Advanced ceramic coatings, including multicomponent tetragonal and cubic phase thermal barrier coatings, along with composite bond coats, have also been investigated. The coating high temperature damping mechanisms will also be discussed.

  9. Parylene coatings on stainless steel 316L surface for medical applications--mechanical and protective properties.

    PubMed

    Cieślik, Monika; Kot, Marcin; Reczyński, Witold; Engvall, Klas; Rakowski, Wiesław; Kotarba, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical and protective properties of parylene N and C coatings (2-20 μm) on stainless steel 316L implant materials were investigated. The coatings were characterized by scanning electron and confocal microscopes, microindentation and scratch tests, whereas their protective properties were evaluated in terms of quenching metal ion release from stainless steel to simulated body fluid (Hanks solution). The obtained results revealed that for parylene C coatings, the critical load for initial cracks is 3-5 times higher and the total metal ions release is reduced 3 times more efficiently compared to parylene N. It was thus concluded that parylene C exhibits superior mechanical and protective properties for application as a micrometer coating material for stainless steel implants.

  10. Spray shadowing for stress relief and mechanical locking in thick protective coatings

    DOEpatents

    Hollis, Kendall; Bartram, Brian

    2007-05-22

    A method for applying a protective coating on an article, comprising the following steps: selecting an article with a surface for applying a coating thickness; creating undercut grooves on the article, where the grooves depend beneath the surface to a bottom portion with the grooves having an upper width on the surface and a lower width on the bottom portion connected by side walls, where at least one of the side walls connects the upper width and the lower width to form an undercut angle with the surface less than 90.degree.; and, applying the protective coating onto the article to fill the undercut grooves and cover the surface, thereby forming weak paths within the protective coating.

  11. [Studies on organic protective coatings for anti-atomic oxygen effects by spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes organic protective coatings on space material for anti-AO effects and the experiments to assess properties of the coatings. Organic protection was analyzed after exposures to ground state fast atomic (AO) radiation in the atomic oxygen beam facility for ground simulation experiments. The tests results have been analyzed with advanced FTIR, XPS and SEM. The test indicated that epoxy, alkyd and urethane organic coatings were highly reactive to AO with a strong degradation and changed in morphology of the surface layer. It is evident that siloxane coatings have excellent properties for anti-AO effects. The erosion product has SiO2 left on the surface, thus providing protection from further attack by the energetic oxygen atoms.

  12. Deposition of aluminide and silicide based protective coatings on niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, S.; Arya, A.; Sharma, I. G.; Suri, A. K.; Banerjee, S.

    2010-11-01

    We compare aluminide and alumino-silicide composite coatings on niobium using halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) technique for improving its oxidation resistance. The coated samples are characterized by SEM, EDS, EPMA and hardness measurements. We observe formation of NbAl3 in aluminide coating of Nb, though the alumino-silicide coating leads to formation primarily of NbSi2 in the inner layer and a ternary compound of Nb-Si-Al in the outer layer, as reported earlier (Majumdar et al. [11]). Formation of niobium silicide is preferred over niobium aluminide during alumino-silicide coating experiments, indicating Si is more strongly bonded to Nb than Al, although equivalent quantities of aluminium and silicon powders were used in the pack chemistry. We also employ first-principles density functional pseudopotential-based calculations to calculate the relative stability of these intermediate phases and the adhesion strength of the Al/Nb and Si/Nb interfaces. NbSi2 exhibits much stronger covalent character as compared to NbAl3. The ideal work of adhesion for the relaxed Al/Nb and Si/Nb interfaces are calculated to be 3226 mJ/m2 and 3545 mJ/m2, respectively, indicating stronger Nb-Si bonding across the interface.

  13. Thermodynamics and kinetics of reactions in protective coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, B.; Sarkhel, A.; Shankar, S.; Seigle, L.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the aluminization of Ni from packs containing various percentages of unalloyed Al confirmed that the surface aluminum content of specimens aluminized tends to decrease with time and consequently a simple parabolic law for the weight-gain vs. time relationship is not obeyed. The diffusivity-composition relationship in NiAl was examined, and a set of curves is presented. A numerical method for the calculation of coating dissolution rates was developed and applied to NiAl-Ni3Al type of coatings.

  14. Reactive Coatings as a Protective Shelter Liner Against CB Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    3.0 36,000 1,150 Shell/Espun/ Chloramine 2.7 29,000 720 Shell/Coated/ Chloramine 9.6 1,610 0 front back BG -reactivity regenerates...Simulant Oxidation of Chemical Agent Simulants by Chlorinated BA-1 Fabric (In Acetonitrile) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Time (min...Experimental chloramine monomers: DC, MC, BA-1, poly-TTDD Synthesized by: Auburn University •Reactive System = Silicone coating with Chloramine

  15. Laboratory investigation of fire protection coatings for creosote-treated timber railroad bridges

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen; Robert H. White; James P. Wacker; Stan T. Lebow; Mark A. Dietenberger; Samuel L. Zelinka; Nicole M. Stark

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of timber railroad bridge fires increases, so has the need to develop protective measures to reduce the risk from accidental ignitions primarily caused by hot metal objects. Of the six barrier treatments evaluated in the laboratory for their ability to protect timbers from fires sourced with ignition from hot metal objects only one intumescent coating...

  16. 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole doped chitosan/11-alkanethiolate acid composite coating: Dual function for copper protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Qi; Zhang, Dun; Wan, Yi

    2011-10-01

    Chitosan (CS) hydrogel loaded with the well-known corrosion inhibitor 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) has been introduced into a composite coating to improve copper protection. This composite coating, which has both anticorrosion and antibacterial properties, was fabricated onto the surface of copper by combining a simple self-assembled monolayer technique with a sol-gel method. The anti-corrosion ability of the coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was investigated by electrochemical methods including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The protection efficiency of the coating is 97.70%, calculated on the basis of the corrosion current density. The stability and integrity of the composite coating were evaluated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The FESEM and EDS results suggest that the composite coating endows the copper substrate with antibacterial properties, as untreated bare copper underwent microbiologically influenced corrosion in the presence of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB). This antibacterial feature was further confirmed by the SRB culture method. In a 3.5% NaCl solution and highly corrosive SRB culture media, the as-prepared CS based composite coating gave corrosion protection by exhibiting better barrier effects against the attack of aggressive environments.

  17. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System for Protection of Embedded Steel Surfaces from Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph; MacDowell, Louis; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem for the Kennedy Space Center, government agencies, and the general public. Existing corrosion protection systems on the market are costly, complex, and time-consuming to install, require continuous maintenance and monitoring, and require specialized skills for installation. NASA's galvanic liquid-applied coating offers companies the ability to conveniently protect embedded steel rebar surfaces from corrosion. Liquid-applied inorganic galvanic coating contains one ore more of the following metallic particles: magnesium, zinc, or indium and may contain moisture attracting compounds that facilitate the protection process. The coating is applied to the outer surface of reinforced concrete so that electrical current is established between metallic particles and surfaces of embedded steel rebar; and electric (ionic) current is responsible for providing the necessary cathodic protection for embedded rebar surfaces.

  18. Shop primer as part of the corrosion protective coating for submerged steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bjordal, M.; Steinsmo, U.

    1998-12-31

    In Norwegian workshops the standard pre-treatment procedures for steel structures intended for sub-sea use, normally include removal of shop primer by blast cleaning to Sa 2 1/2 before application of corrosion protective coatings. This is also stated in the Norwegian offshore standard NORSOK. Omitting this stage in fabrication will represent large reductions in both time consumption and costs, and reduce the volume of waste from the blast cleaning. This report presents results from investigations of how a shop primer will influence on the coating properties. The aim of the investigation was to test whether the systems are good enough if the shop primer is left on the surface. Two different zinc silicate shop primers have been included in the investigation. As protective coatings the authors have used three different epoxy mastic systems with Al pigments. In addition to panels with original shop primer, they have also tested shop primed panels pre-treated in various ways, such as heated, corroded and blast cleaned to various degrees before coating. The coatings have been tested in the ASTM-G8 121 test and in a long term test in sea water polarized with a Zn anode. They have found that coatings including the zinc silicate shop primer are more susceptible to cathodic disbonding than the coating applied directly on blast cleaned steel. It is however possible to meet the NORSOK criteria with a zinc silicate shop primer as first coat.

  19. Practical Implications of the Use of Aluminide Coatings for the Corrosion Protection of Superalloys in Gas Turbines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    Strategic Materials Usage. Practical Implications of the Use of Aluminide Coatings for the Corrosion Protection of Superalloys in Gas Turbines. Coatings ... Aluminide protective coatings have been in use on nickel a superalloys in gas turbines with a considerable degree of As a result a considerable amount of...used for the application of aluminide coatings to superalloy substitutes are those of chemical vapour deposition (CVÜ

  20. Electrochemical investigation of powder coatings and their application to magnesium-rich primers for corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgon, Casey Roy

    Corrosion is the decomposition of metal and metal alloys which threatens the integrity of man-made structures. One of the more efficient methods of delaying the corrosion process in metals is by coatings. In this work, the durability of two polyester powder coatings were investigated for corrosion protection of AA-2024-T3. Polyester powder coatings crosslinked by either triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC) or beta-hydroxyalkyl amide (HAA) compounds were prepared and investigated for barrier protection of metal substrates by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Polyester-TGIC coatings were found to provide better long-term protection, which can be attributed to the increased mechanical strength and higher concentration of crosslinking in the coating films. Additionally, the polyester powder coatings, along with a fusion bonded epoxy (FBE) were investigated for their compatibility as a topcoat for magnesium-rich primers (MgRP). Under proper application conditions, powder topcoats were successfully applied to cured MgRP while corrosion protection mechanisms of each system were maintained.

  1. Method of making quasicrystal alloy powder, protective coatings and articles

    DOEpatents

    Shield, J.E.; Goldman, A.I.; Anderson, I.E.; Ellis, T.W.; McCallum, R.W.; Sordelet, D.J.

    1995-07-18

    A method of making quasicrystalline alloy particulates is disclosed wherein an alloy is superheated and the melt is atomized to form generally spherical alloy particulates free of mechanical fracture and exhibiting a predominantly quasicrystalline in the atomized condition structure. The particulates can be plasma sprayed to form a coating or consolidated to form an article of manufacture. 3 figs.

  2. Method of making quasicrystal alloy powder, protective coatings and articles

    DOEpatents

    Shield, Jeffrey E.; Goldman, Alan I.; Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; McCallum, R. William; Sordelet, Daniel J.

    1995-07-18

    A method of making quasicrystalline alloy particulates wherein an alloy is superheated and the melt is atomized to form generally spherical alloy particulates free of mechanical fracture and exhibiting a predominantly quasicrystalline in the atomized condition structure. The particulates can be plasma sprayed to form a coating or consolidated to form an article of manufacture.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR SINGLE CRYSTAL TURBINE BLADES

    SciTech Connect

    Amarendra K. Rai

    2006-12-04

    Turbine blades in coal derived syngas systems are subject to oxidation and corrosion due to high steam temperature and pressure. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are developed to address these problems. The emphasis is on prime-reliant design and a better coating architecture, having high temperature and corrosion resistance properties for turbine blades. In Phase I, UES Inc. proposed to develop, characterize and optimize a prime reliant TBC system, having smooth and defect-free NiCoCrAlY bond layer and a defect free oxide sublayer, using a filtered arc technology. Phase I work demonstrated the deposition of highly dense, smooth and defect free NiCoCrAlY bond coat on a single crystal CMSX-4 substrate and the deposition of alpha-alumina and yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) sublayer on top of the bond coat. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation test and pre- and post-characterization of these layers, in Phase I work, (with and without top TBC layer of commercial EB PVD YSZ) revealed significant performance enhancement.

  4. Activated platelets form protected zones of adhesion on fibrinogen and fibronectin-coated surfaces

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Leukocytes form zones of close apposition when they adhere to ligand- coated surfaces. Because plasma proteins are excluded from these contact zones, we have termed them protected zones of adhesion. To determine whether platelets form similar protected zones of adhesion, gel-filtered platelets stimulated with thrombin or ADP were allowed to adhere to fibrinogen- or fibronectin-coated surfaces. The protein- coated surfaces with platelets attached were stained with either fluorochrome-conjugated goat anti-human fibrinogen or anti-human fibronectin antibodies, or with rhodamine-conjugated polyethylene glycol polymers. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that F(ab')2 anti- fibrinogen (100 kD) did not penetrate into the contact zones between stimulated platelets and the underlying fibrinogen-coated surface, while Fab antifibrinogen (50 kD) and 10 kD polyethylene glycol readily penetrated and stained the substrate beneath the platelets. Thrombin- or ADP-stimulated platelets also formed protected zones of adhesion on fibronectin-coated surfaces. F(ab')2 anti-fibronectin and 10 kD polyethylene glycol were excluded from these adhesion zones, indicating that they are much less permeable than those formed by platelets on fibrinogen-coated surfaces. The permeability properties of protected zones of adhesion formed by stimulated platelets on surfaces coated with both fibrinogen and fibronectin were similar to the zones of adhesion formed on fibronectin alone. mAb 7E3, directed against the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin blocked the formation of protected adhesion zones between thrombin-stimulated platelets and fibrinogen or fibronectin coated surfaces. mAb C13 is directed against the alpha 5 beta 1 integrin on platelets. Stimulated platelets treated with this mAb formed protected zones of adhesion on surfaces coated with fibronectin. These protected zones were impermeable to F(ab')2 antifibronectin but were permeable to 10 kD polyethylene glycol. These results show that activated

  5. Cleaning and Decontamination Using Strippable and Protective Coatings at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    J. Tripp; K. Archibald; L. Lauerhass; M. Argyle; R. Demmer

    1999-03-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Radioactive Liquid Waste Reduction (RLWR) group is conducting a testing and evaluation program on strippable and protective coatings. The purpose of the program is to determine how and where these coatings can be used to aid in the minimization of liquid waste generation. These coatings have become more important in daily operations because of the increased concern of secondary liquid waste generation at the INEEL. Several different strippable and protective coatings were investigated by the RLWR group, including Pentek 604, Bartlett (TLC), and ALARA 1146. During the tests quantitative data was determined, such as effectiveness at reducing contamination levels, or costs, as well as some qualitative data on issues like ease of application or removal. PENTEK 604 and Bartlett TLC are seen as superior products with slightly different uses.

  6. The corrosion protection of 6061-T6 aluminum by a polyurethane-sealed anodized coat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion protection of 6061-T6 anodized aluminum afforded by a newly patented polyurethane seal was studied using the ac impedance technique. Values of the average corrosion rates over a 27-day exposure period in 3.5 percent NaCl solutions at pH 5.2 and pH 9.5 compared very favorably for Lockheed-prepared polyurethane-sealed and dichromate-sealed coats of the same thickness. Average corrosion rates for both specimens over the first 7 days of exposure compared well with those for a hard anodized, dichromate-sealed coat, but rose well above those for the hard anodized coat over the entire 27-day period. This is attributed both to the greater thickness of the hard anodized coat, and possibly to its inherently better corrosion protective capability.

  7. Phytic acid doped polyaniline containing epoxy coatings for corrosion protection of Q235 carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yongsheng; Sani, Luqman Abdullahi; Ge, Tiejun; Fang, Qinghong

    2017-10-01

    Corrosion protection of epoxy coatings contained with phytic acid-doped polyaniline (PANI-PA) for Q235 carbon steel was studied in this work. Synthesized PANI-PA particles were characterized by XPS, TGA, and FTIR, respectively. The coating performance was investigated by OCP, EIS, and SVET, respectively. The experimental results show that the concentration of PANI-PA has a significant influence to the barrier effect of the epoxy coating. Epoxy coating loaded with 2 wt.% PANI-PA has the best protection ability and self-healing function to a certain degree. The self-healing function of PANI-PA is attributed to the synergistic effect of the passivation of PANI and the chelation of the dedoped phytic acid ions with iron ions. Therefore, PANI-PA can be used as an effective anticorrosion pigment in future.

  8. Ground radiation tests and flight atomic oxygen tests of ITO protective coatings for Galileo Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, Frank L.; Maag, Carl R.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation simulation tests (protons and electrons) were performed along with atomic oxygen flight tests aboard the Shuttle to space qualify the surface protective coatings. The results, which contributed to the selection of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated polyester as the material for the thermal blankets of the Galileo Spacecraft, are given here. Two candidate materials, polyester and Fluorglas, were radiation-tested to determine changes at simulated Jovian radiation levels. The polyester exhibited a smaller weight loss (2.8) than the Fluorglas (8.8 percent). Other changes of polyester are given. During low-earth orbit, prior to transit to Jupiter, the thermal blankets would be exposed to atomic oxygen. Samples of uncoated and ITO-coated polyesters were flown on the Shuttle. Qualitative results are given which indicated that the ITO coating protected the underlying polyester.

  9. Marine corrosion protective coatings of hexagonal boron nitride thin films on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Husain, Esam; Narayanan, Tharangattu N; Taha-Tijerina, Jose Jaime; Vinod, Soumya; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2013-05-22

    Recently, two-dimensional, layered materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have been identified as interesting materials for a range of applications. Here, we demonstrate the corrosion prevention applications of h-BN in marine coatings. The performance of h-BN/polymer hybrid coatings, applied on stainless steel, were evaluated using electrochemical techniques in simulated seawater media [marine media]. h-BN/polymer coating shows an efficient corrosion protection with a low corrosion current density of 5.14 × 10(-8) A/cm(2) and corrosion rate of 1.19 × 10(-3) mm/year and it is attributed to the hydrofobic, inert and dielectric nature of boron nitride. The results indicated that the stainless steel with coatings exhibited improved corrosion resistance. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic analysis were used to propose a mechanism for the increased corrosion resistance of h-BN coatings.

  10. Development of a fused slurry silicide coating for the protection of tantalum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packer, C. M.; Perkins, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported of a research program to develop a reliable high-performance, fused slurry silicide protective coating for a tantalum-10 tungsten alloy for use at 1427 to 1538 C at 0.1 to 10 torr air pressure under cyclic temperature conditions. A review of silicide coating performance under these conditions indicated that the primary wear-out mode is associated with widening of hairline fissures in the coating. Consideration has been given to modifying the oxidation products that form on the coating surface to provide a seal for these fissures and to minimize their widening. On the basis of an analysis of the phase relationships between silica and various other oxides, a coating having the slurry composition 2.5Mn-33Ti-64.5Si was developed that is effective in the pressure range from 1 to 10 torr.

  11. Wideband optical coatings for protecting artwork from ultraviolet and infrared radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegari, Angela; Polato, Pietro

    2003-09-01

    The damaging effects of illumination on artwork are well known. Art conservation requires protection from both vandalism and radiation damage. Glass is an appropriate material for these requirements but it partially transmits UV and IR radiation. An optical coating on glass that eliminates UV and IR radiation coming from natural or artificial illumination, is proposed. This coated glass, positioned in front of the artwork, is also able to reduce reflection without altering the appearance or colour.

  12. Effect of surface catalysis on heating to ceramic coated thermal protection systems for transatmospheric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Kolodziej, Paul; Henline, William D.; Pincha, Elizabeth M. W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of surface catalysis on the heat transfer rate to the heat shield of a typical Transatmospheric Vehicle (TAV) during ascent and atmospheric entry. Surface kinetics and optical properties obtained from arc-jet tests on candidate thermal protection systems (coated metals) were used in a reacting boundary layer code to estimate the heating distribution along the surface of a TAV. Thermochemical stability of the coatings is described in terms of reduction in emittance and loss of opacifiers from the coatings during the arc-jet tests.

  13. Measured catalycities of various candidate space shuttle thermal protection system coatings at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    Atom recombination catalytic rates for surface coatings of various candidate thermal protection system materials for the space shuttle vehicle were obtained from measurements in arc jet, air flow. The coatings, chrome oxides, siliconized carbon/carbon, hafnium/tantalum carbide on carbon/carbon, and niobium silicide, were bonded to the sensitive surface of transient slug calorimeters that measured the heat transfer rates to the coatings. The catalytic rates were inferred from these heat transfer rates Surface temperatures of the calorimeters varied from approximately 300 to 410 K.

  14. SiC coating: An alternative for the protection of nuclear graphite from liquid fluoride salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiujie; Song, Jinliang; Tan, Jie; Zhang, Baoliang; Xia, Huihao; He, Zhoutong; Zhou, Xingtai; Zhao, Mingwen; Liu, Xiangdong; Xu, Li; Bai, Shuo

    2014-05-01

    SiC coating is produced on a nuclear graphite (NG) substrate using chemical vapor deposition at 1150 °C to protect it from molten salt diffusion. Infiltration studies, performed in molten FLiNaK salt under an argon atmosphere at 5 atm, show that uncoated NG exhibits significantly higher weight gain than SiC-coated NG. The continuous and compact SiC coating exhibits excellent infiltration resistance in liquid fluoride salt as confirmed by synchrotron radiation X-ray microbeam fluorescence.

  15. Effect of surface catalysis on heating to ceramic coated thermal protection systems for transatmospheric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Kolodziej, Paul; Henline, William D.; Pincha, Elizabeth M. W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of surface catalysis on the heat transfer rate to the heat shield of a typical Transatmospheric Vehicle (TAV) during ascent and atmospheric entry. Surface kinetics and optical properties obtained from arc-jet tests on candidate thermal protection systems (coated metals) were used in a reacting boundary layer code to estimate the heating distribution along the surface of a TAV. Thermochemical stability of the coatings is described in terms of reduction in emittance and loss of opacifiers from the coatings during the arc-jet tests.

  16. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, K. K.; Podojil, G.; Mccollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-01-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept for enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbits is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  17. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Podojil, G.; Mccollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-01-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept of enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbit is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  18. "Snow White" Coating Protects SpaceX Dragon's Trunk Against Rigors of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMahan, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    He described it as "snow white." But NASA astronaut Don Pettit was not referring to the popular children's fairy tale. Rather, he was talking about the white coating of the Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) Dragon spacecraft that reflected from the International Space Station s light. As it approached the station for the first time in May 2012, the Dragon s trunk might have been described as the "fairest of them all," for its pristine coating, allowing Pettit to clearly see to maneuver the robotic arm to grab the Dragon for a successful nighttime berthing. This protective thermal control coating, developed by Alion Science and Technology Corp., based in McLean, Va., made its bright appearance again with the March 1 launch of SpaceX's second commercial resupply mission. Named Z-93C55, the coating was applied to the cargo portion of the Dragon to protect it from the rigors of space. "For decades, Alion has produced coatings to protect against the rigors of space," said Michael Kenny, senior chemist with Alion. "As space missions evolved, there was a growing need to dissipate electrical charges that build up on the exteriors of spacecraft, or there could be damage to the spacecraft s electronics. Alion's research led us to develop materials that would meet this goal while also providing thermal controls. The outcome of this research was Alion's proprietary Z-93C55 coating."

  19. Cathodic protection of steel by electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, K.R.; Smith, C.J.E.; Robinson, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    The ability of electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings to cathodically protect steel was studied in dilute chloride solutions. The potential distribution along steel strips partly electroplated with zinc-nickel alloys was determined, and the length of exposed steel that was held below the minimum protection potential (E{sub prot}) was taken as a measure of the level of cathodic protection (CP) provided by the alloy coatings. The level of CP afforded by zinc alloy coatings was found to decrease with increasing nickel content. When nickel content was increased to {approx} {ge} 21 wt%, no CP was obtained. Surface analysis of uncoupled zinc-nickel alloys that were immersed in sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions showed the concentration of zinc decreased in the surface layers while the concentration of nickel increased, indicating that the alloys were susceptible to dezincification. The analysis of zinc-nickel alloy coatings on partly electroplated steel strips that were immersed in chloride solution showed a significantly higher level of dezincification than that found for uncoupled alloy coatings. This effect accounted for the rapid loss of CP afforded to steel by some zinc alloy coatings, particularly those with high initial nickel levels.

  20. Self-healing coatings based on halloysite clay polymer composites for protection of copper alloys.

    PubMed

    Abdullayev, Elshad; Abbasov, Vagif; Tursunbayeva, Asel; Portnov, Vasiliy; Ibrahimov, Hikmat; Mukhtarova, Gulbaniz; Lvov, Yuri

    2013-05-22

    Halloysite clay nanotubes loaded with corrosion inhibitors benzotriazole (BTA), 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI), and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) were used as additives in self-healing composite paint coating of copper. These inhibitors form protective films on the metal surface and mitigate corrosion. Mechanisms involved in the film formation have been studied with optical and electron microscopy, UV-vis spectrometry, and adhesivity tests. Efficiency of the halloysite lumen loading ascended in the order of BTA < MBT < MBI; consequently, MBI and MBT halloysite formulations have shown the best protection. Inhibitors were kept in the tubes buried in polymeric paint layer for a long time and release was enhanced in the coating defects exposed to humid media with 20-50 h, sufficient for formation of protective layer. Anticorrosive performance of the halloysite-based composite acrylic and polyurethane coatings have been demonstrated for 110-copper alloy strips exposed to 0.5 M aqueous NaCl for 6 months.

  1. Conducting polyaniline nanoparticles and their dispersion for waterborne corrosion protection coatings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Liu, Peng

    2011-07-01

    A novel approach for preparing waterborne corrosion protection polyaniline (PANI)-containing coatings was developed. First, conducting polyaniline/partially phosphorylated poly(vinyl alcohol) (PANI/P-PVA) spherical nanoparticles with significant dispersibility in aqueous media were prepared by the chemical oxidative dispersion polymerization in presence of partially phosphorylated poly(vinyl alcohol) (P-PVA). The PANI/P-PVA-containing coatings with different PANI/P-PVA contents were then prepared, employing waterborne epoxy resin as the matrix. The corrosion protection property of PANI/P-PVA-containing coatings on mild steel was investigated by salt spray test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique in 3.0 wt % NaCl aqueous solution. The results indicated that the waterborne PANI/P-PVA-containing coatings (PANI/P-PVA content, 2.5 wt %) could offer high protection because the impedance values remained at higher than 1 × 10(7) Ω cm(2) after 30 days of salt spray tests. All the results were compared with these of the waterborne coatings containing PANI nanoparticles in the emeraldine salt form (PANI ES), and the protection mechanism was also proposed with the evidence of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS).

  2. Fire propagation performance of intumescent fire protective coatings using eggshells as a novel biofiller.

    PubMed

    Yew, M C; Ramli Sulong, N H; Yew, M K; Amalina, M A; Johan, M R

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to synthesize and characterize an effective intumescent fire protective coating that incorporates eggshell powder as a novel biofiller. The performances of thermal stability, char formation, fire propagation, water resistance, and adhesion strength of coatings have been evaluated. A few intumescent flame-retardant coatings based on these three ecofriendly fire retardant additives ammonium polyphosphate phase II, pentaerythritol and melamine mixed together with flame-retardant fillers, and acrylic binder have been prepared and designed for steel. The fire performance of the coatings has conducted employing BS 476: Part 6-Fire propagation test. The foam structures of the intumescent coatings have been observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy. On exposure, the coated specimens' B, C, and D had been certified to be Class 0 due to the fact that their fire propagation indexes were less than 12. Incorporation of ecofriendly eggshell, biofiller into formulation D led to excellent performance in fire stopping (index value, (I) = 4.3) and antioxidation of intumescent coating. The coating is also found to be quite effective in water repellency, uniform foam structure, and adhesion strength.

  3. Fire Propagation Performance of Intumescent Fire Protective Coatings Using Eggshells as a Novel Biofiller

    PubMed Central

    Yew, M. C.; Ramli Sulong, N. H.; Yew, M. K.; Amalina, M. A.; Johan, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to synthesize and characterize an effective intumescent fire protective coating that incorporates eggshell powder as a novel biofiller. The performances of thermal stability, char formation, fire propagation, water resistance, and adhesion strength of coatings have been evaluated. A few intumescent flame-retardant coatings based on these three ecofriendly fire retardant additives ammonium polyphosphate phase II, pentaerythritol and melamine mixed together with flame-retardant fillers, and acrylic binder have been prepared and designed for steel. The fire performance of the coatings has conducted employing BS 476: Part 6-Fire propagation test. The foam structures of the intumescent coatings have been observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy. On exposure, the coated specimens' B, C, and D had been certified to be Class 0 due to the fact that their fire propagation indexes were less than 12. Incorporation of ecofriendly eggshell, biofiller into formulation D led to excellent performance in fire stopping (index value, (I) = 4.3) and antioxidation of intumescent coating. The coating is also found to be quite effective in water repellency, uniform foam structure, and adhesion strength. PMID:25136687

  4. Electroless Nickel And Ion-Plated Protective Coatings For Silvered Glass Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, M. A.; Chaudiere, D. A.; Stewart, T. L.

    1982-04-01

    Two methods of protecting second surface silvered glass mirrors from environmental degradation have been evaluated. One method employed silver mirrors overcoated with Al, Ni, 304 stainless steel, Cr, or an Al/Cu alloy that were prepared by ion-plating. The other method used conventional wet process silver/copper mirrors protected with a thin electroless nickel coating. These mirrors were compared with conventional paint backed silver/ copper mirrors after exposure. to elevated temperatures and water vapor. The electroless nickel coated mirrors showed consistently more resistance to these stresses than either the conventional or ion-plated mirrors suggesting that they may prove more durable for field service.*

  5. Wideband optical coatings for artwork protection from ultraviolet and infrared radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegari, Angela M.; Polato, Pietro

    2003-11-01

    The damaging effects of illumination on artworks are well known. Art conservation requires protection against vandalism and protection against radiation damage. Glass is an appropriate material for both requirements, but it partially transmits ultraviolet and infrared radiation. An optical coating on glass that eliminates the ultraviolet and the infrared radiation coming from natural or artificial source of illumination, is proposed. This coated glass, positioned in front of the artwork, is also able to reduce the visible radiation without altering the vision or the color rendering.

  6. Comparison of some corrosion-protective coatings for inner surfaces of tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Mityagin, V.A.; Vigant, G.T.; Zakharova, N.N.

    1995-07-01

    Zinc-filled, sprayed-zinc, epoxy, and vinyl chloride coatings were comparatively studied as applied to corrosion protection of inner surfaces and tanks for clarified petroleum products. Tests were carried out by cycles of temperature variation from 60{degrees}C to - 25{degrees}C, on steel plates in vapor, in fuel, and in electrolyte, simulating sub-product water. The coatings KhS-5132, KhS-717 (vinyl chloride) and BEP-68, EP-525, EP-0010 (epoxy) are of the highest protective properties, resistant to steaming and washing with aqueous solutions of synthetic detergents, and are compatible with clarified petroleum products.

  7. Multifunctional coating MAI D5 intended for the protection of refractory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhestkov, B. E.; Terent'eva, V. S.

    2010-01-01

    A thin-layer heterophase MAI D5 coating intended for the protection of carbon-containing composite materials (C-C-, C-SiC-, SiC-SiC-composite material) and refractory metal-based alloys against high-temperature gas corrosion and erosion is tested. The coating is formed from a specially developed Si-Ti-Mo-B-Y microcomposition powder material. A new approach to creating self-healing heterophase coatings is used. At operating temperatures, the structure and phase composition of the MAI D5 coating provides rapid self-healing of random defects on the coating surface and in the base material owing to the presence of a silicon-containing eutectic, which favors rapid recovery of a protective amorphous silica layer consumed during operation. Under operating conditions, the coating undergoes self-organization to form a multilayer system with a number of functional oxide micro-, submicro-, and nanolayers. Samples with the MAI D5 coating are subjected to combined tests on bench plants located at MAI and TsAGI under conditions emulating the re-entry of a hypersonic aircraft, when its surface temperature reaches 2400 K. Certification tests are performed in wind tunnels located at TsAGI during a simultaneous action of a hypersonic dissociated-air flow and mechanical loads. The protection of heat-loaded structural elements in space vehicles made of ultrahigh-temperature materials against high-temperature gas corrosion and erosion by the MAI D5 coating in hypersonic dissociated-air flows is shown to be efficient.

  8. COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF EQUIPMENT FOR BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSING OF GEOTHERMAL RESIDUES: PROGRESS REPORT FY 97

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. The findings are also relevant to other moderate temperature brine environments where corrosion is a problem. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobadus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Long-term tests on the durability of ceramic-epoxy coatings in brine and bacteria are ongoing. Initial indications are that this coating has suitable characteristics. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.

  9. Atomic Oxygen Durability Evaluation of a UV Curable Ceramer Protective Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Karniotis, Christina A.; Dworak, David; Soucek, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The exposure of most silicones to atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit (LEO) results in the oxidative loss of methyl groups with a gradual conversion to oxides of silicon. Typically there is surface shrinkage of oxidized silicone protective coatings which leads to cracking of the partially oxidized brittle surface. Such cracks widen and branch crack with continued atomic oxygen exposure ultimately allowing atomic oxygen to reach any hydrocarbon polymers under the silicone coating. A need exists for a paintable silicone coating that is free from such surface cracking and can be effectively used for protection of polymers and composites in LEO. A new type of silicone based protective coating holding such potential was evaluated for atomic oxygen durability in an RF atomic oxygen plasma exposure facility. The coating consisted of a UV curable inorganic/organic hybrid coating, known as a ceramer, which was fabricated using a methyl substituted polysiloxane binder and nanophase silicon-oxo-clusters derived from sol-gel precursors. The polysiloxane was functionalized with a cycloaliphatic epoxide in order to be cured at ambient temperature via a cationic UV induced curing mechanism. Alkoxy silane groups were also grafted onto the polysiloxane chain, through hydrosilation, in order to form a network with the incorporated silicon-oxo-clusters. The prepared polymer was characterized by H-1 and Si-29 NMR, FT-IR, and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy. The paper will present the results of atomic oxygen protection ability of thin ceramer coatings on Kapton H as evaluated over a range of atomic oxygen fluence levels.

  10. Diamond-like carbon coatings for the protection of metallic artefacts: effect on the aesthetic appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraldi, Federica; Angelini, Emma; Caschera, Daniela; Mezzi, Alessio; Riccucci, Cristina; Caro, Tilde De

    2014-03-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) is an environmentally friendly process used to deposit a variety of nano-structured coatings for the protection or the surface modification of metallic artefacts like the SiO2-like films that have been successfully tested on ancient silver, bronze and iron artefacts as barriers against aggressive agents. This paper deals with the preliminary results of a wider investigation aimed to the development of eco-sustainable coatings for the protection of Cu and Ag-based artefacts of archaeological and historic interest. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings have been deposited by PECVD in different experimental conditions, in a capacitively coupled asymmetric plasma reactor, placing the substrates either on electrically powered electrode (cathodic mode) or grounded electrode (anodic mode) with and without hydrogen addition in the gas mixture. The final goal is to develop a coating with good protective effectiveness against aggressive atmospheres and contemporarily with negligible effects on the aesthetic appearance of the artefacts. The evaluation of possible colour changes of the surface patinas, due to coating process, was performed by optical microscopy and colorimetric measurements. Furthermore, to evaluate the reversibility of the thin DLC layer, an etching treatment in oxygen plasma has been successfully carried out and optimized. The chemical-physical characterization of the deposited DLC coatings was performed by means of the combined use of micro-Raman and XPS spectroscopies. The results show that the DLC films obtained in the anodic mode, may be proposed as a viable alternative to polymeric coatings for the protection of metallic ancient objects.

  11. Thermodynamics and kinetics of reactions in protective coating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, B.; Sarkhel, A.; Sivakumar, R.; Seigle, L.

    1974-01-01

    Investigations of fluoride activated packs with Al:Ni ratios greater than 50 a/o prove that the specimen surface is not in equilibrium with the pack at high Al:Ni ratios but that an activity gradient exists between pack and specimen. Therefore, gaseous diffusion and possibly surface reactions play a role in determining the overall rate of Al deposition in such packs. Noticeable differences in coating behavior have been obtained in packs activated with chloride and iodide, and it appears that poorest results are obtained with iodides, better with chlorides, and best with fluorides. A numerical method has been perfected for calculating rates of solid-state diffusion controlled coating formation, allowing for the variation of diffusivity with composition in the NiAl phase. Layer growth rates can now be accurately predicted from a knowledge of the surface and substrate compositions. Furthermore, the correct diffusion profiles are obtained by this method. These differ substantially from the profile obtained when the diffusivity is assumed constant.

  12. Review of Rover fuel element protective coating development at Los Alamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Terry C.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) entered the nuclear propulsion field in 1955 and began work on all aspects of a nuclear propulsion program with a target exhaust temperature of about 2750 K. A very extensive chemical vapor deposition coating technology for preventing catastrophic corrosion of reactor core components by the high temperature, high pressure hydrogen propellant gas was developed. Over the 17-year term of the program, more than 50,000 fuel elements were coated and evaluated. Advances in performance were achieved only through closely coupled interaction between the developing fuel element fabrication and protective coating technologies. The endurance of fuel elements in high temperature, high pressure hydrogen environment increased from several minutes at 2000 K exit gas temperature to 2 hours at 2440 K exit gas temperature in a reactor test and 10 hours at 2350 K exit gas temperature in a hot gas test. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the rationale for selection of coating materials used (NbC and ZrC), identify critical fuel element-coat interactions that had to be modified to increase system performance, and review the evolution of protective coating technology.

  13. Plasma sprayed manganese-cobalt spinel coatings: Process sensitivity on phase, electrical and protective performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Su Jung; Pala, Zdenek; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Manganese cobalt spinel (Mn1.5Co1.5O4, MCO) coatings are prepared by the air plasma spray (APS) process to examine their efficacy in serving as protective coatings from Cr-poisoning of the cathode side in intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). These complex oxides are susceptible to process induced stoichiometric and phase changes which affect their functional performance. To critically examine these effects, MCO coatings are produced with deliberate modifications to the spray process parameters to explore relationship among process conditions, microstructure and functional properties. The resultant interplay among particle thermal and kinetic energies are captured through process maps, which serve to characterize the parametric effects on properties. The results show significant changes to the chemistry and phase composition of the deposited material resulting from preferential evaporation of oxygen. Post deposition annealing recovers oxygen in the coatings and allows partial recovery of the spinel phase, which is confirmed through thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA)/differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and magnetic hysteresis measurements. In addition, coatings with high density after sintering show excellent electrical conductivity of 40 S cm-1 at 800 °C while simultaneously providing requisite protection characteristics against Cr-poisoning. This study provides a framework for optimal evaluation of MCO coatings in intermediate temperature SOFCs.

  14. Antimicrobial coating of devices for prevention of infection: principles and protection.

    PubMed

    Darouiche, R O

    2007-09-01

    Device-associated infections are responsible for about half of nosocomial infections and can cause major medical and economical sequelae. Despite adherence to basic infection control measures, which constitute the mainstay for preventing infection, infections associated with certain devices continue to exist at unacceptably high rates. Potentially-preventive, antimicrobial-utilizing strategies include systemic antibiotic prophylaxis and local administration of antimicrobial agents (antibiotics or antiseptics), which includes antimicrobial irrigation of the surgical field, placement of antimicrobial carriers, antiseptic cleansing of the skin, dipping of surgical implants in antimicrobial solutions, and inserting antimicrobial-coated implants. Since bacterial colonization of the indwelling device is a prelude to infection, prevention of device colonization may lead to a lower rate of clinical infection. Different approaches for antimicrobial coating of devices have been variably successful in preventing device-associated infections. Optimal characteristics of antimicrobial coating can help predict the likelihood and degree of clinical protection against infection. This review addresses the impact of device-related infection, antimicrobial-utilizing approaches for preventing infection, clinical protection afforded by different types of antimicrobial coating, characteristics that predict the ability of antimicrobial coating of devices to prevent clinical infection, and future directions of antimicrobial coating.

  15. Adherent protective coatings plated on magnesium-lithium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Zinc is plated on a magnesium-lithium alloy by using a modification of the standard zinc-plate immersion bath. Further protection is given the alloy by applying a light plating of copper on the zinc plating. Other metals are plated on the copper by using conventional plating baths.

  16. Use of coatings for protection of welded joints of steels, their structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezborodov, V. P.; Saraev, Yu N.

    2017-05-01

    The paper studies the structure and demonstrates the efficiency of application of eutectic nickel coatings for protection of welded joints of the 10G2S-type steels from corrosive action. It increases simultaneously with the increase of eutectic content and chemical compounds along the grain boundaries of the γ-solid solution based on nickel. The refinement of the coatings’ structure and the reduction of their heterogeneity allow enhancing the protective properties and resistance of welded joints to corrosion.

  17. Corrosion Protection of Al Alloys for Aircraft by Coatings With Advanced Properties and Enhanced Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-20

    Sim6es, D. E. Tallman, G. P. Bierwagen, "Electrochemical Behaviour of a Mg-Rich Primer in the Protection of Al Alloys ," Corrosion Science 48 (2006...December 20, 200 Final Report July 1, 2004-June 30, 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Corrosion Protection of Al Alloys for Aircraft by...Prof. Dennis E. Tallman: A) New Scanning Probe Studies of Novel Cr-free Active Coatings B) Examination of the Influence of Surface Preparation of Al

  18. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) of Ceramics for Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, Bryan J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    In order to generate advanced multilayer thermal and environmental protection systems, a new deposition process is needed to bridge the gap between conventional plasma spray, which produces relatively thick coatings on the order of 125-250 microns, and conventional vapor phase processes such as electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) which are limited by relatively slow deposition rates, high investment costs, and coating material vapor pressure requirements. The use of Plasma Spray - Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) processing fills this gap and allows thin (< 10 microns) single layers to be deposited and multilayer coatings of less than 100 microns to be generated with the flexibility to tailor microstructures by changing processing conditions. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were applied to NiCrAlY bond coated superalloy substrates using the PS-PVD coater at NASA Glenn Research Center. A design-of-experiments was used to examine the effects of process variables (Ar/He plasma gas ratio, the total plasma gas flow, and the torch current) on chamber pressure and torch power. Coating thickness, phase and microstructure were evaluated for each set of deposition conditions. Low chamber pressures and high power were shown to increase coating thickness and create columnar-like structures. Likewise, high chamber pressures and low power had lower growth rates, but resulted in flatter, more homogeneous layers

  19. Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating Development for Protection of Steel in Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph John; Curran, Jerry; MacDowell, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is a major problem affecting NASA facilities at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), other government agencies, and the general public. Problems include damage to KSC launch support structures, transportation and marine infrastructures, as well as building structures. A galvanic liquid applied coating was developed at KSC in order to address this problem. The coating is a non-epoxy metal rich ethyl silicate liquid coating. The coating is applied as a liquid from initial stage to final stage. Preliminary data shows that this coating system exceeds the NACE 100 millivolt shift criterion. The remainder of the paper details the development of the coating system through the following phases: Phase I: Development of multiple formulations of the coating to achieve easy application characteristics, predictable galvanic activity, long-term protection, and minimum environmental impact. Phase II: Improvement of the formulations tested in Phase I including optimization of metallic loading as well as incorporation of humectants for continuous activation. Phase III: Application and testing of improved formulations on the test blocks. Phase IV: Incorporation of the final formulation upgrades onto large instrumented structures (slabs).

  20. Pulsed laser deposition of corrosion protective Yttrium Oxide (Y 2O 3) coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Kutty, T. R. G.; Sinha, Sucharita

    2012-01-01

    Among ceramics and oxides, Yttria (Y 2O 3) films have been widely investigated as potential corrosion protective coatings largely on account of their wear resistant and non-wettable properties. Results presented here describe successful use of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique for deposition of thin film Yttria coating on stainless steel substrates. Deposited Yttria coatings have been characterized in terms of their microstructure, crystalline phase and hardness using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scratch test techniques, respectively. Characterization tests of these coatings of thickness up to 50 μm have shown strong bonding with substrate surface and a high degree of homogeneity and compaction. Resistance of these PLD based Yttria coatings to molten uranium have also been studied via Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). Our results on DTA tests evaluating compatibility of the Yttria coatings with molten uranium have established the excellent corrosion resistance property of such Y 2O 3 coatings when exposed to molten uranium.

  1. Corrosion Protection Properties of PPy-ND Composite Coating: Sonoelectrochemical Synthesis and Design of Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Bagheri, R.; Rezaei-Moghadam, B.

    2016-02-01

    In this research, the nanocomposite coatings comprising the polypyrrole-nanodiamond, PPy-ND, on St-12 steel electrodes were electro-synthesized using in situ polymerization process under ultrasonic irradiation. The corrosion protection performance and morphology characterization of prepared coatings were investigated by electrochemical methods and scanning electron microscopy, SEM, respectively. Also, the experimental design was employed to determine the best values considering the effective parameters such as the concentration of nanoparticles, the applied current density and synthesis time to achieve the most protective films. A response surface methodology, RSM, involving a central composite design, CCD, was applied to the modeling and optimization of the PPy-ND nanocomposite deposition. Pareto graphic analysis of the parameters indicated that the applied current density and some of the interactions were effective on the response. The electrochemical results proved that the embedment of diamond nanoparticle, DNP, improves the corrosion resistance of PPy coatings significantly. Therefore, desirable correlation exists between predicted data and experimental results.

  2. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Stratis V. Sotirchos

    2001-02-01

    The main objective of this research project was the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Since alumina has excellent resistance to corrosion but coefficient than silicon carbide, the key idea of this project has been to develop graded coatings with composition varying smoothly along their thickness between an inner (base) layer of mullite in contact with the silicon carbide component and an outer layer of pure alumina, which would function as the actual protective coating of the component. (Mullite presents very good adhesion towards silicon carbide and has thermal expansion coefficient very close to that of the latter.)

  3. Nanoscale coatings for erosion and corrosion protection of copper microchannel coolers for high powered laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flannery, Matthew; Fan, Angie; Desai, Tapan G.

    2014-03-01

    High powered laser diodes are used in a wide variety of applications ranging from telecommunications to industrial applications. Copper microchannel coolers (MCCs) utilizing high velocity, de-ionized water coolant are used to maintain diode temperatures in the recommended range to produce stable optical power output and control output wavelength. However, aggressive erosion and corrosion attack from the coolant limits the lifetime of the cooler to only 6 months of operation. Currently, gold plating is the industry standard for corrosion and erosion protection in MCCs. However, this technique cannot perform a pin-hole free coating and furthermore cannot uniformly cover the complex geometries of current MCCs involving small diameter primary and secondary channels. Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc., presents a corrosion and erosion resistant coating (ANCERTM) applied by a vapor phase deposition process for enhanced protection of MCCs. To optimize the coating formation and thickness, coated copper samples were tested in 0.125% NaCl solution and high purity de-ionized (DIW) flow loop. The effects of DIW flow rates and qualities on erosion and corrosion of the ANCERTM coated samples were evaluated in long-term erosion and corrosion testing. The robustness of the coating was also evaluated in thermal cycles between 30°C - 75°C. After 1000 hours flow testing and 30 thermal cycles, the ANCERTM coated copper MCCs showed a corrosion rate 100 times lower than the gold plated ones and furthermore were barely affected by flow rates or temperatures thus demonstrating superior corrosion and erosion protection and long term reliability.

  4. A polyaniline based intrinsically conducting coating for corrosion protection of structural steels.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tongyan; Wang, Zhaoyang

    2013-11-01

    Among the various corrosion protection strategies for structural steels, coating techniques provide the most cost-effective protection and have been used as the primary mode of corrosion protection. Existing coating techniques however have been used mainly for their barrier capability and therefore all have a limited service life due to oxidation aging, electrolytic degradation, or various inadvertent defects and flaws occurred in and after coating applications. This work investigated the anti-corrosion potential of a π-conjugated polymer-polyaniline (PANi), which was doped into an intrinsically conducting polymer and then included in a two-layer coating system as a primer layer. To achieve a long service life, the primer layer was made by mixing the conductive PANi in a waterborne poly-vinyl butyral solution to provide strong adhesion to steel surface, and then topcoated with a layer of elastomer-modified polyethylene to obtain extra mechanical and barrier protections. Two ASTM standard tests were conducted to evaluate the corrosion durability and tensile adhesion of the two-layer system, in which the system demonstrated superior performance. The Scanning Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (SKPFM) was used to provide the microscopic evidences for the outstanding performance.

  5. Investigation of nickel- and cobalt-based superalloys with protective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Yu. G.; Mal'tseva, L. A.; Pastukhov, M. V.

    2015-03-01

    The structure and composition of the surface layers of MAR-M247 and MAR-M509 superalloys are studied after the formation of protective coatings by gas-circulation aluminizing and a high-energy ion-plasma technology.

  6. Thermal stability of ceramic coated thermal protection materials in a simulated high-speed earth entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Leiser, Daniel B.

    1988-01-01

    The dimensional stability of ceramic coated thermal protection materials developed for use on advanced entry vehicles is evaluated. Dimensional stability of these ceramic materials were studied as a function of temperature and pressure during exposure to simulated atmospheric entry in an arc-jet facility.

  7. Pharmaceutical applications of shellac: moisture-protective and taste-masking coatings and extended-release matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Pearnchob, N; Siepmann, J; Bodmeier, R

    2003-09-01

    Shellac is a natural polymer, which is used as enteric coating material in pharmaceutical applications. The major objective of the present study was to investigate the potential of shellac for other purposes, namely to provide moisture-protective and taste-masking coatings as well as extended-release matrix tablets. The efficiency of shellac to achieve moisture protection and taste masking was compared with that of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), which is most frequently used for these purposes. Shellac-coated tablets showed lower water uptake rates than HPMC-coated systems at the same coating level. The stability of acetylsalicylic acid was higher in tablets coated with shellac compared with HPMC-coated systems, irrespective of the storage humidity. Therefore, lower shellac coating levels were required to achieve the same degree of drug protection. Shellac coatings effectively masked the unpleasant taste of acetaminophen tablets. Compared to HPMC, again lower coating levels were required to achieve similar effects. The resulting drug release in simulated gastric fluid was not significantly altered by the thin shellac coatings, which rapidly ruptured due to the swelling of the coated tablet core. In addition, shellac was found to be a suitable matrix former for extended-release tablets. The latter could be prepared by direct compression or via wet granulation using ethanolic or ammoniated aqueous shellac binder solutions. The resulting drug-release patterns could effectively be altered by varying different formulation and processing parameters.

  8. Oxide Protective Coats for Ir/Re Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, Arthur; Tuffias, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    An improved material system has been developed for rocket engine combustion chambers for burning oxygen/ hydrogen mixtures or novel monopropellants, which are highly oxidizing at operating temperatures. The baseline for developing the improved material system is a prior iridium/rhenium system for chambers burning nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine mixtures, which are less oxidizing. The baseline combustion chamber comprises an outer layer of rhenium that provides structural support, plus an inner layer of iridium that acts as a barrier to oxidation of the rhenium. In the improved material system, the layer of iridium is thin and is coated with a thermal fatigue-resistant refractory oxide (specifically, hafnium oxide) that serves partly as a thermal barrier to decrease the temperature and thus the rate of oxidation of the rhenium. The oxide layer also acts as a barrier against the transport of oxidizing species to the surface of the iridium. Tests in which various oxygen/hydrogen mixtures were burned in iridium/rhenium combustion chambers lined with hafnium oxide showed that the operational lifetimes of combustion chambers of the improved material system are an order of magnitude greater than those of the baseline combustion chambers.

  9. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    indicators, inhibitors and self-healing agents. This allows the incorporation of autonomous corrosion control functionalities, such as corrosion detection and inhibition as well as the self-healing of mechanical damage, into coatings. This paper presents technical details on the characterization of inhibitor-containing particles and their corrosion inhibitive effects using electrochemical and mass loss methods.Three organic environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic microparticles that are compatible with desired coatings. The release of the inhibitors from the microparticles in basic solution was studied. Fast release, for immediate corrosion protection, as well as long-term release for continued protection, was observed.The inhibition efficacy of the inhibitors, incorporated directly and in microparticles, on carbon steel was evaluated. Polarization curves and mass loss measurements showed that, in the case of 2MBT, its corrosion inhibition effectiveness was greater when it was delivered from microparticles.

  10. METHOD OF FORMING A PROTECTIVE COATING ON FERROUS METAL SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Weeks, J.R.; Kammerer, O.F.; Gurinsky, D.H.

    1960-02-23

    A method is described of protecting ferrous metal surfaces from corrosive attack by liquid metals, such as liquid bismuth or lead-bismuth alloys. The nitrogen content of the ferrous metal surface is first reduced by reacting the metal surface with a metal which forms a stable nitride. Thereafter, the surface is contacted with liquid metal containing at least 2 ppm zirconium at a temperature in the range of 550 to 1100 deg C to form an adherent zirconium carbide layer on the ferrous surface.

  11. Microcapsule-Type Self-Healing Protective Coating for Cementitious Composites with Secondary Crack Preventing Ability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Min; Yu, Hwan-Chul; Yang, Hye-In; Cho, Yu-Jin; Lee, Kwang-Myong; Chung, Chan-Moon

    2017-01-01

    A microcapsule-type self-healing protective coating with secondary crack preventing capability has been developed using a silanol-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (STP)/dibutyltin dilaurate (DD) healing agent. STP undergoes condensation reaction in the presence of DD to give a viscoelastic substance. STP- and DD-containing microcapsules were prepared by in-situ polymerization and interfacial polymerization methods, respectively. The microcapsules were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microcapsules were integrated into commercial enamel paint or epoxy coating formulations, which were applied on silicon wafers, steel panels, and mortar specimens to make dual-capsule self-healing protective coatings. When the STP/DD-based coating was scratched, self-healing of the damaged region occurred, which was demonstrated by SEM, electrochemical test, and water permeability test. It was also confirmed that secondary crack did not occur in the healed region upon application of vigorous vibration to the self-healing coating. PMID:28772475

  12. Development and Application of HVOF Sprayed Spinel Protective Coating for SOFC Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, O.; Pihlatie, M.; Rautanen, M.; Himanen, O.; Lagerbom, J.; Mäkinen, M.; Varis, T.; Suhonen, T.; Kiviaho, J.

    2013-06-01

    Protective coatings are needed for metallic interconnects used in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks to prevent excessive high-temperature oxidation and evaporation of chromium species. These phenomena affect the lifetime of the stacks by increasing the area-specific resistance (ASR) and poisoning of the cathode. Protective MnCo2O4 and MnCo1.8Fe0.2O4 coatings were applied on ferritic steel interconnect material (Crofer 22 APU) by high velocity oxy fuel spraying. The substrate-coating systems were tested in long-term exposure tests to investigate their high-temperature oxidation behavior. Additionally, the ASRs were measured at 700 °C for 1000 h. Finally, a real coated interconnect was used in a SOFC single-cell stack for 6000 h. Post-mortem analysis was carried out with scanning electron microscopy. The deposited coatings reduced significantly the oxidation of the metal, exhibited low and stable ASR and reduced effectively the migration of chromium.

  13. High Temperature Resistant Organopolysiloxane Coating for Protecting and Repairing Rigid Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Ceramics are protected from high temperature degradation, including high temperature, oxidative, aeroconvective degradation by a high temperature and oxidation resistant coating of a room temperature curing, hydrolyzed and partially condensed liquid polyorganosiloxane to the surface of the ceramic. The liquid polyorganosiloxane is formed by the hydrolysis and partial condensation of an alkyltrialkoxysilane with water or a mixture of an alkyltrialkoxysilane and a dialkyldialkoxysilane with water. The liquid polyorganosiloxane cures at room temperature on the surface of the ceramic to form a hard, protective, solid coating which forms a high temperature environment, and is also used as an adhesive for adhering a repair plug in major damage to the ceramic. This has been found useful for protecting and repairing porous, rigid ceramics of a type used on reentry space vehicles.

  14. Protective coatings on stainless steel bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago, A. S.; Ansar, S. A.; Saruhan, B.; Schulz, U.; Lettenmeier, P.; Cañas, N. A.; Gazdzicki, P.; Morawietz, T.; Hiesgen, R.; Arnold, J.; Friedrich, K. A.

    2016-03-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is a promising technology for large H2 production from surplus electricity from renewable sources. However, the electrolyser stack is costly due to the manufacture of bipolar plates (BPP). Stainless steel can be used as an alternative, but it must be coated. Herein, dense titanium coatings are produced on stainless steel substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS). Further surface modification of the Ti coating with Pt (8 wt% Pt/Ti) deposited by physical vapour deposition (PVD) magnetron sputtering reduces the interfacial contact resistance (ICR). The Ti and Pt/Ti coatings are characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). Subsequently, the coatings are evaluated in simulated and real PEM electrolyser environments, and they managed to fully protect the stainless steel substrate. In contrast, the absence of the thermally sprayed Ti layer between Pt and stainless steel leads to pitting corrosion. The Pt/Ti coating is tested in a PEM electrolyser cell for almost 200 h, exhibiting an average degradation rate of 26.5 μV h-1. The results reported here demonstrate the possibility of using stainless steel as a base material for the stack of a PEM electrolyser.

  15. Functionalized hexagonal boron nitride nano-coatings for protection of transparent plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tran, Thu; Usta, Aybala; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Nanocoating is the result of a coating application of nanomaterials to build a consistent network of molecules in a paint to protect the surfaces of various materials and devices. Hexagonal Boron Nitride (h-BN) is in two dimensional form with excellent thermal, mechanical and chemical properties. These BN nanocoatings are also a thermally insulating material for heat management. After adding functionalized h-BNs into paints or other coatings, they will absorb the harmful UV part of sunlight and prevent coating against the environmental degradations. The impacts of the environmental factors on the coatings can be substantially eliminated. In the present study, h-BNs were modified with [2-(2-Aminoethylamino) propyl] trimethoxysilane and uniformly dispersed into the polyurethane coatings with different amounts, such as 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8wt% to increase hardness and water resistance, and decrease the UV degradation level of coatings and transparent plastics. The prepared samples were characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-Vis Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Water Contact Angle, and Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The test results showed that the nanocoatings with functionalized h-BN provided excellent physical and chemical behaviors against the UV and other physical degradations on the substrates.

  16. Ceramic coatings of LA141 alloy formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation for corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijun; Yuan, Yi; Sun, Pengpeng; Jing, Xiaoyan

    2011-09-01

    Superlight Mg-Li alloy is a promising structural materials in aerospace, automobile, and electronics because of its excellent properties such as low density, high ductility, superior strength-to-weight ratio, and good damping ability. The fabrication of compact plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings with excellent corrosion resistance is valuable for the widespread application of Mg-Li alloy. Here we present a ceramic coating on the surface of Mg-14Li-1Al (LA141) alloy for corrosion protection via plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in an alkaline silicate electrolyte with tungstate as an additive. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thin film-X-ray diffraction analysis of coatings show that the surface coating is mainly comprised of Mg(2)SiO(4), MgO and WO(3). Scanning electron microscopy observations have revealed that the dense and compact coating formed in the presence of tungstate has less structural imperfections in comparison to the control one fabricated without use of tungstate. The effect of oxidation time on the morphology and phase composition of coatings is also examined in detail.

  17. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2015-01-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  18. Electrochemical characterization of plasma polymer coatings in corrosion protection of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yenfong; Yu, Qingsong

    2005-07-01

    Low-temperature plasma polymerization is a promising pretreatment technique to create environmentally friendly coating systems for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys. In this study, the pretreatment effects of plasma treatment and plasma polymerization on corrosion properties of alclad aluminum alloy 2024-T3 ([2A]) were investigated using electrochemical characterization techniques, including cyclic polarization (CP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The [2A] panels were coated with an ultrathin layer (~50 nm) of plasma polymers in a direct current (dc) glow discharge of trimethylsilane or its mixtures with one of two diatomic gases (O2 and N2). The CP measurement results showed that the plasma polymer coated [2A] panels exhibited more negative corrosion potentials (Ecorr), smaller corrosion currents (Icorr), and no surface passivation when compared with uncoated [2A] control panels. The lower values of Icorr imply a higher corrosion resistance on the plasma polymer coated [2A]. When investigated using EIS, these plasma polymer coated [2A] panels exhibited higher impedance (|Z|) at lower frequency when first immersed in electrolyte solution, yet degraded quickly to a similar level as uncoated controls within 1 day of immersion. These results illustrated that thin plasma polymer films provided a certain but very limited corrosion resistance to [2A] substrate; their dominant role in plasma interface engineered coating systems still relied mostly on their adhesion enhancement at metal/paint interface as observed in our previous studies.

  19. Invitro Evaluation of Fluoride Release from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer with or without Protective Coating

    PubMed Central

    Nandlal, Bhojraj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) is well known for its fluoride releasing property but has its own drawbacks of poor mechanical properties, sensitivity to initial desiccation and moisture contamination. To overcome these, search led to the reinforcement of hydroxyapatite and application of surface coating agent but their effect on fluoride release is still not clear. Aim To evaluate and compare the release of fluoride from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer (HA-GIC) with and without protective coating. Materials and Methods Specimens were prepared as follows- Eight percent by weight conventional glass ionomer was replaced by hydroxyapatite powder (HA) and an indigenous product was prepared (HA-GIC). This powder was mixed with liquid of conventional GIC and allowed to set, then G coat plus coating agent was applied in surface coated group and light cured. Fluoride release of the sample was measured every 24 hrs for seven days and weekly from 7th to 21st day using combination ion selective electrode. Results Mean values clearly reveal a significant decrease in the fluoride release from day 1 to day 21 for both the groups. Results of repeated measure ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference between two groups (p <0.001). Conclusion Coating the hydroxyapatite reinforced glass ionomer will allow for slow and steady release of fluoride for a long period of time into oral environment. PMID:27190957

  20. Invitro Evaluation of Fluoride Release from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer with or without Protective Coating.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shilpi; Nandlal, Bhojraj

    2016-04-01

    Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) is well known for its fluoride releasing property but has its own drawbacks of poor mechanical properties, sensitivity to initial desiccation and moisture contamination. To overcome these, search led to the reinforcement of hydroxyapatite and application of surface coating agent but their effect on fluoride release is still not clear. To evaluate and compare the release of fluoride from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer (HA-GIC) with and without protective coating. Specimens were prepared as follows- Eight percent by weight conventional glass ionomer was replaced by hydroxyapatite powder (HA) and an indigenous product was prepared (HA-GIC). This powder was mixed with liquid of conventional GIC and allowed to set, then G coat plus coating agent was applied in surface coated group and light cured. Fluoride release of the sample was measured every 24 hrs for seven days and weekly from 7(th) to 21(st) day using combination ion selective electrode. Mean values clearly reveal a significant decrease in the fluoride release from day 1 to day 21 for both the groups. Results of repeated measure ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference between two groups (p <0.001). Coating the hydroxyapatite reinforced glass ionomer will allow for slow and steady release of fluoride for a long period of time into oral environment.

  1. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2014-09-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  2. Development of self-healing coatings for corrosion protection on metallic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Alicja; Barker, Michael B.

    2016-08-01

    Inspired by biological systems, artificial self-healing materials are designed for repairing local damage caused by external factors. The rapidly expanding field of self-healing systems contains, among others, materials with well-defined surface properties. Undoubtedly, enhancing surface functionalisation, by applying smart coatings, enjoys an extensive interest. The self-healing ability is particularly essential property for corrosion protection strategies, especially when the use of one of the most effective corrosion systems, based on chromium(VI) compounds, is now banned by the current registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals legislation. Self-healing protective coatings are produced using macromolecular compounds, ceramics, metals and composites. Considering the wide range of available materials, the number of potential combinations seems to be unlimited. The self-healing action of such coatings is activated by appropriate stimuli: temperature changes, radiation, pH changes, pressure changes and mechanical action. In this paper, the research and practical implications of the various approaches to achieving self-healing functionality of protective coatings, as well as potential developments in this area, are explored.

  3. Polymer-Silica nanoparticles composite films as protective coatings for stone-based monuments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoudis, P.; Papadopoulou, S.; Karapanagiotis, I.; Tsakalof, A.; Zuburtikudis, I.; Panayiotou, C.

    2007-04-01

    The decrease of surface energy of mineral substrates similar to those used in many stone monuments of cultural heritage by the application of protective polymer coatings along with the simultaneous increase of their surface roughness can increase their ability to repel water substantially. In this work, the effect of artificially induced roughness on the water repellency of mineral substrates coated with protective polymer films was investigated. Natural marble samples or home made calcium carbonate blocks were tried as the mineral substrates. The roughness increase was achieved by mineral chemical etching or by creation of nanoscale binary composition film on the substrate surface. PMMA and PFPE were the polymers used, while different-sized silica nanoparticles were employed for the production of the nanocomposite films. Examination of the coated and uncoated surfaces with profilometry and AFM and measurements of water contact angles reveal a pronounced effect of the surface roughness on water repellency. Especially in the case of nanocomposite coatings, the surfaces become super-hydrophobic. This result indicates that the nanoscale binary composition film scheme, which is characterized by its simplicity and low cost, is a suitable candidate for the water protection of stone-based monuments on large scale.

  4. Protection of 2024-T3 aluminium alloy by corrosion resistant phytic acid conversion coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongwei; Han, En-Hou; Liu, Fuchun; Kallip, Silvar

    2013-09-01

    The corrosion protection properties of environmentally friendly phytic acid conversion coatings were studied on 2024-T3 aluminium alloy. The films were prepared under acidic conditions with various pH values and characterised by SEM, EDS, ATR-FTIR and electrochemical techniques. The results indicate that the conversion coatings obtained by immersing the alloy in phytic acid solutions at pH from 3 to 5.5 provide excellent corrosion resistance. ATR-FTIR confirms that the film is formed by deposition of reaction products between Al3+ and phosphate groups in phytic acid molecules. The conformation models of the deposition film are proposed.

  5. About properties of ZrO2 thermal protective coatings obtained from spherical powder mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnik, O. B.; Tsareva, I. N.; Tarasenko, Yu P.

    2017-05-01

    It is developed the technology of high-energy plasma spraying of the zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) thermal protective coating on the basis of ZrO2 tetragonal and cubic phases with the spheroidal grain shape and the columnar substructure, with the total porosity P = 4 %, the hardness HV = 12 GPa, the roughness parameter R a ˜ 6 μm, the thickness 0.3-3 mm. As a sublayer it is used the heat-resistant coating of “Ni-Co-Cr-Al-Y” system with an intermetallic phase composition and the layered microstructure of the grains.

  6. Vacuum Sputtered and Ion-Plated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1982-01-01

    The plasma or ion-assisted coating techniques such as sputtering and ion plating are discussed in view of wear and corrosion protection. The basic processes and the unique features of the technique are discussed in regard to the synthesis and development of high reliability wear and corrosion resistant films. The ions of the plasma which transfer energy, momentum, and charge to the substrate and the growing films can be beneficially used. As a result, coating adherence and cohesion is improved. Favorable morphological growth such as high density and porosity-free films can be developed, and residual stresses can be reduced.

  7. Coatings for protection of equipment for biochemical processing of geothermal residues: Progress report FY`97

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.

  8. Development of a permeation panel to test dermal protective clothing against sprayed coatings.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Diana M; Yost, Michael G; Whittaker, Stephen G; Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn; Camp, Janice; Dills, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Design, construct, and characterize an apparatus to evaluate dermal protective clothing for resistance to polymerizing materials. Specifically, we evaluated the permeation of the most common glove material used in automotive collision repair (0.10-0.13 mm or 4-5 mil latex) with representative isocyanate-containing clear coats. Our ultimate goal is to make informed recommendations on dermal protective materials to prevent isocyanate exposures and reduce the likelihood of occupational illness in automotive collision repair and other industries. A novel permeation panel was developed to assess dermal protective clothing. With this apparatus, up to eight test materials may be evaluated under typical-spray application conditions. Solid collection media comprised of 1-(2-pyridyl)-piperazine (2-PP)-coated fiberglass filters or colorimetric SWYPE™ pads were placed behind test materials to capture permeants. The 2-PP-coated filters were subsequently analyzed using a modified OSHA42/PV2034 method. Color change in the SWYPEs provided an immediate field estimate of breakthrough time. In addition, Teflon filters were mounted proximal to the permeation cells to measure the mass of clear coat applied to the panel and to evaluate loading homogeneity. This study evaluated the permeation of isocyanates through 0.10-0.13 mm latex glove material at a fixed time (30 min post-spraying) and over a time course (6-91 min post-spraying). Monomers 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) permeated through (0.10-0.13 mm) latex glove material under typical glove use conditions (30 min). The latex glove material exhibited immediate breakthrough, with a permeation rate of 2.9 ng min(-1) cm(-2). The oligomeric forms of HDI and IPDI did not permeate the latex glove material. The spray application at 71 ± 5 °F was fairly homogeneous (33.7 ± 8 mg weight of dry clear coat per 5 cm(2)). The permeation panel is a viable method to assess dermal protective clothing

  9. Sunlight-induced self-healing of a microcapsule-type protective coating.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Kyu; Jo, Ye-Hyun; Lim, Ye-Ji; Cho, Sung-Youl; Yu, Hwan-Chul; Ryu, Byung-Cheol; Lee, Sang-In; Chung, Chan-Moon

    2013-02-01

    Photopolymerization behavior of a methacryloxypropyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (MAT-PDMS) healing agent was investigated in the presence of benzoin isobutyl ether (BIE) photoinitiator by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. MAT-PDMS and BIE were microencapsulated with urea-formaldehyde polymer. The surface and shell morphology of the microcapsules was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Mean diameter and size distribution of the microcapsules could be controlled by agitation rate. A coating matrix formulation was prepared by sol-gel reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in the presence of a polysiloxane and by subsequent addition of an adhesion promoter. The formulation and microcapsules were mixed to give a self-healing coating formulation, which was then sprayed to surface of cellulose-fiber-reinforced-cement (CRC) board or mortar. Contact angle measurements showed that both the polymerized MAT-PDMS and the prepared coating matrix are hydrophobic, and the coating matrix has good wettability with MAT-PDMS. It was confirmed by optical microscopy and SEM that, when the self-healing coating is damaged, the healing agent is released from ruptured microcapsules and fills the damaged region. The self-healing coating was evaluated as protective coating for mortar, and it was demonstrated by water permeability and chloride ion penetration tests that our system has sunlight-induced self-healing capability. Our self-healing coating is the first example of capsule-type photoinduced self-healing system, and offers the advantages of catalyst-free, environmentally friendly, inexpensive, practical healing.

  10. Protective Bauxite-Based Coatings and Their Anti-decarburization Performance in Spring Steel at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Wei, Lianqi; Zhou, Xun; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Ye, Shufeng; Chen, Yunfa

    2013-03-01

    A decarburization protective coating was fabricated onto spring steel by using bauxite with functional additives. Metalloscope, XRD, and TG-DTA thermal analysis revealed that, at <1050 °C, the depth of the ferrite layer of the coated specimen decreased because of the shield effect and carbon concentration of the coating. The protective effect increased to 100% above 1050 °C, because Na2Al6P2O15 formed by the sintering process pulled the solid phase closer and filled the void through wetting power and surface tension between the liquid and solid phases and made the coating more compact.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Zinc/Polypyrrole Nanotube as a Protective Pigment in Organic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, Mohammad Reza; Alias, Yatimah; Basirun, Wan Jefrey; Yousefi, Ramin

    2013-07-01

    This study deals with the synthesis and characterization of zinc/polypyrrole nanotube (Zn/PPy) as a protective pigment in organic coatings. The PPy nanotube is synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization, and zinc nanoparticles are deposited onto the surface of the synthesized PPy nanotube in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction results confirm the existence of the nanotube morphology and the zinc nanoparticles. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization are performed on steel plates coated with polyvinyl butyral incorporated with the Zn/PPy nanotube. The results show that the existence of zinc can improve the protective properties of the pigment. The existence of zinc leads to a cathodic protection and the main product of zinc corrosion is the stale zinc hydroxide which can block the pores in the coating. In addition, the zinc nanoparticles can increase conductivity of the PPy nanotube leading to increasing nanotube's ability to form protective layers of metal oxides on the steel surface.

  12. The effect of protective coatings on the high temperature properties of a gamma prime-strengthened Ni-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, R.; Willett, K.P.

    1984-01-01

    This study examined the influence of chrome-aluminide coatings on the creep and stress rupture properties of wrought Udimet-520 used in gas turbine blade applications. Creep and stress rupture tests were conducted at 802/sup 0/C (1475/sup 0/F) on coated and uncoated wrought bars in the fully heat treated condition. Coatings caused a deterioration in rupture strength and ductility. Masking procedures used to protect the blade roots during coating also affected rupture strength or rupture ductility. Mechanical behavior in the coated creep resistant alloy correlated with microstructure and discussed in terms of possible controlling processes.

  13. Optical coherence tomography complemented by hyperspectral imaging for the study of protective wood coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingemans, L. M.; Papadakis, V. M.; Liu, P.; Adam, A. J. L.; Groves, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a contactless and non-destructive testing (NDT) technique based on low-coherence interferometry. It has recently become a popular NDT-tool for evaluating cultural heritage. In this study, protective coatings on wood and their penetration into the wood structure were measured with a customized infrared fiber optic OCT instrument. In order to enhance the understanding of the OCT measurements of coatings on real wooden samples, an optimization of the measuring and analyzing methodology was performed by developing an averaging approach and by post-processing the data. The collected information was complemented by data obtained with hyperspectral imaging to allow data from local OCT A-scans to be used in mapping the coating thicknesses over larger areas.

  14. Semiconductor with protective surface coating and method of manufacture thereof. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

    1980-09-19

    Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices is provided for by a surface coating of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices, which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device against future impregnation with impurities.

  15. Space Plasma Testing of High-Voltage Thin-Film Solar Arrays with Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlomak, Pawel; Hausgen, Paul E.; Merrill, John; Senft, Donna; Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the space plasma test program for thin-film photovoltaics (TFPV) technologies developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The main objective of this program is to simulate the effects of space plasma characteristic of LEO and MEO environments on TFPV. Two types of TFPV, amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS), coated with two types of thin-film, multifunctional coatings were used for these studies. This paper reports the results of the first phase of this program, namely the results of preliminary electrostatic charging, arcing, dielectric breakdown, and collection current measurements carried out with a series of TFPV exposed to simulated space plasma at the NASA Glenn Plasma Interaction Facility. The experimental data demonstrate that multifunctional coatings developed for this program provide effective protection against the plasma environment while minimizing impact on power generation performance. This effort is part of an ongoing program led by the Space Vehicles Directorate at the AFRL devoted to the development and space qualification of TFPV and their protective coatings.

  16. Atomic Layer Deposited Coatings on Nanowires for High Temperature Water Corrosion Protection.

    PubMed

    Yersak, Alexander S; Lewis, Ryan J; Liew, Li-Anne; Wen, Rongfu; Yang, Ronggui; Lee, Yung-Cheng

    2016-11-30

    Two-phase liquid-cooling technologies incorporating micro/nanostructured copper or silicon surfaces have been established as a promising thermal management solution to keep up with the increasing power demands of high power electronics. However, the reliability of nanometer-scale features of copper and silicon in these devices has not been well investigated. In this work, accelerated corrosion testing reveals that copper nanowires are not immune to corrosion in deaerated pure hot water. To solve this problem, we investigate atomic layer deposition (ALD) TiO2 coatings grown at 150 and 175 °C. We measured no difference in coating thickness for a duration of 12 days. Using a core/shell approach, we grow ALD TiO2/Al2O3 protective coatings on copper nanowires and demonstrate a preservation of nanoengineered copper features. These studies have identified a critical reliability problem of nanoscale copper and silicon surfaces in deaerated, pure, hot water and have successfully demonstrated a reliable solution using ALD TiO2/Al2O3 protective coatings.

  17. Protection against virus infection in tobacco plants expressing the coat protein of grapevine fanleaf nepovirus.

    PubMed

    Bardonnet, N; Hans, F; Serghini, M A; Pinck, L

    1994-03-01

    Grapevine fanleaf nepovirus (GFLV) is responsible for the economically significant "court-noué" disease in vineyards. Its genome is made up of two single-stranded RNA molecules (RNA1 and RNA2) which direct the synthesis of polyproteins P1 and P2 respectively. A chimeric coat protein gene derived from the C-terminal part of P2 was constructed and subsequently introduced into a binary transformation vector. Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants expressing the coat protein under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter were engineered by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Protection against infection with virions or viral RNA was tested in coat protein-expressing plants. A significant delay of systemic invasion was observed in transgenic plants inoculated with virus compared to control plants. This effect was also observed when plants were inoculated with viral RNA. No coat protein-mediated cross-protection was observed when transgenic plants were infected with arabis mosaic virus (ArMV), a closely related nepovirus also responsible for a "court-noué" disease.

  18. Electroless nickel and ion-plated protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, M.A.; Chaudiere, D.A.; Dake, L.S.; Stewart, T.L.

    1982-04-01

    A preliminary examination of two methods of protecting second surface silvered glass mirrors from environmental degradation is presented. One method employed silver mirrors overcoated with Al, Ni, 304 stainless steel, Cr, or an Al/Cu alloy prepared by ion-plating. The other method used conventional wet process silver mirrors protected with a thin electroless nickel coating. No attempt was made to optimize the coatings for either method. These experimental mirrors were compared with conventional paint backed silver/copper mirrors after exposure to elevated temperatures and water vapor in order to estimate their relative environmental stability. The electroless nickel mirrors showed consistently more resistance to these stresses than either the conventional or ion-plated mirrors, suggesting that they may provide more durable field service.

  19. Evaluation of atomic oxygen resistant protective coatings for fiberglass-epoxy composites in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Brady, Joyce A.

    1989-01-01

    Fiberglass-epoxy composite masts are the prime structural members for the Space Station Freedom solar array. At the altitude where Space Station Freedom will operate, atomic oxygen atoms are the most predominant species. Atomic oxygen is highly reactive and has been shown to oxidize organic and some metallic materials. Tests with random and directed atomic oxygen exposure have shown that the epoxy is removed from the composite exposing brittle glass fibers which could be easily removed from the surface where they could contaminate Space Station Freedom Systems. Protection or fiber containment systems; inorganic based paints, aluminum braid, and a metal coating; were evaluated for resistance to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and mechanical flexing. All appeared to protect well against atomic oxygen and provide fiber containment except for the single aluminum braid covering. UV radiation resistance was acceptable and in general, thermal cycling and flexure had little to no effect on the mass loss rate for most coatings.

  20. Plasma Sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) Coatings for Corrosion Protection and Adhesion Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Groff, G. B.; Rooney, M.; Cooke, A. V.; Boothe, R.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) coatings are being developed under the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program's (SPIP) Bondlines Package. These coatings are designed as a steel case preparation treatment prior to insulation lay-up. Other uses include the exterior of steel cases and bonding surfaces of nozzle components. They provide excellent bondability - rubber insulation and epoxy bonds fail cohesively within the polymer - for both fresh surfaces and surfaces having undergone natural and accelerated environmental aging. They have passed the MSFC requirements for protection of inland and sea coast environment. Because BOSS coatings are inherently corrosion resistant, they do not require preservation by greases or oils. The reduction/elimination of greases and oils, known bondline degraders, can increase SRM reliability, decrease costs by reducing the number of process steps, and decrease environmental pollution by reducing the amount of methyl chloroform used for degreasing and thus reduce release of the ozone-depleting chemical in accordance with the Clean Air Act and the Montreal Protocol. The coatings can potential extend the life of RSRM case segments and nozzle components by eliminating erosion due to multiple grit blasting during each use cycle and corrosion damage during marine recovery. Concurrent work for the Air Force show that other BOSS coatings give excellent bondline strength and durability for high-performance structures of aluminum and titanium.

  1. Plasma Sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) Coatings for Corrosion Protection and Adhesion Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Groff, G. B.; Rooney, M.; Cooke, A. V.; Boothe, R.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) coatings are being developed under the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program's (SPIP) Bondlines Package. These coatings are designed as a steel case preparation treatment prior to insulation lay-up. Other uses include the exterior of steel cases and bonding surfaces of nozzle components. They provide excellent bondability - rubber insulation and epoxy bonds fail cohesively within the polymer - for both fresh surfaces and surfaces having undergone natural and accelerated environmental aging. They have passed the MSFC requirements for protection of inland and sea coast environment. Because BOSS coatings are inherently corrosion resistant, they do not require preservation by greases or oils. The reduction/elimination of greases and oils, known bondline degraders, can increase SRM reliability, decrease costs by reducing the number of process steps, and decrease environmental pollution by reducing the amount of methyl chloroform used for degreasing and thus reduce release of the ozone-depleting chemical in accordance with the Clean Air Act and the Montreal Protocol. The coatings can potential extend the life of RSRM case segments and nozzle components by eliminating erosion due to multiple grit blasting during each use cycle and corrosion damage during marine recovery. Concurrent work for the Air Force show that other BOSS coatings give excellent bondline strength and durability for high-performance structures of aluminum and titanium.

  2. Deposition and Evaluation of Protective PVD Coatings on Ferritic Stainless Steel SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Gannon, Paul; Deibert, Max; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; Kopczyk, M.; Van Vorous, D.; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Visco, s.; jacobson, c.; Kurokawa, H.; Sofie, Stephen W.

    2006-09-21

    Reduced operating temperatures (600-800°C) of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) may enable the use of inexpensive ferritic steels as interconnects. Due to the demanding SOFC interconnect operating environment, protective coatings are gaining attention to increase longterm stability. In this study, large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) and hybrid filtered arc assisted electron beam physical vapor deposition (FA-EBPVD) technologies were used for deposition of two-segment coatings with Cr-Co-Al-O-N based sublayer and Mn-Co-O top layer. Coatings were deposited on ferritic steel and subsequently annealed in air for various time intervals. Surface oxidation was investigated using RBS, SEM and EDS analyses. Cr volatilization was evaluated using a transpiration apparatus and ICP-MS analysis of the resultant condensate. Electrical conductivity (Area Specific Resistance) was studied as a function of time using the four-point technique with Ag electrodes. The oxidation behavior, Cr volatilization rate, and electrical conductivity of the coated and uncoated samples are reported. Transport mechanisms for various oxidizing species and coating diffusion barrier properties are discussed.

  3. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V.; Mulpuri, R.; Auger, M.

    1996-04-20

    SiC based ceramics have been identified as the leading candidate materials for elevated temperature applications in harsh oxidation/corrosion environments. It has been established that a protective coating can be effectively used to avoid problems with excessive oxidation and hot corrosion. However, to date, no coating configuration has been developed that can withstand the rigorous requirements imposed by such applications. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) mullite coatings due to their desirable properties of toughness, corrosion resistance, and good coefficient of thermal expansion match with SiC are being developed as a potential solution. Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}- SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  4. Disruption of the protective properties of the polyvinyl chloride coating under the effect of microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Mogil'nitskii, G.M.; Sagatelyan, R.T.; Kutishcheva, T.N.; Zhukova, S.V.; Kerimov, S.I.; Parfenova, T.B.

    1987-09-01

    The presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria results in a reduction of the protective properties of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) film coatings. The authors examine the effect of other types of soil microorganisms. Investigations were carried out with the cultures of bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens B-22 and fungus Aspergillus niger van Tieghem F-1119 which are almost always present in corrosion regions in the routes of transmission pipelines. The microorganisms were grown in a mineral medium with glucose (Ps. fluorescens) and sucrose (A. niger).

  5. Bibliography of information on mechanics of structural failure (hydrogen embrittlement, protective coatings, composite materials, NDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This bibliography is comprised of approximately 1,600 reference citations related to four problem areas in the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the period 1962-1976, the effort being largely limited to documents published in the United States. Listings are subdivided into the four problem areas: Hydrogen Embrittlement; Protective Coatings; Composite Materials; and Nondestructive Evaluation. An author index is included.

  6. Atomic oxygen interaction at defect sights in protective coatings on polymers flown on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Auer, Bruce M.; Gebauer, Linda; Lamoreaux, Cynthia

    1993-01-01

    Although the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has exposed materials with a fixed orientation relative to the ambient low-Earth-orbital environment, arrival of atomic oxygen is angularly distributed as a result of the atomic oxygen's high temperature Maxwellian velocity distribution and the LDEF's orbital inclination. Thus, atomic oxygen entering defects in protective coatings on polymeric surfaces can cause wider undercut cavities than the size of the defect in the protective coating. Because only a small fraction of atomic oxygen reacts upon first impact with most polymeric materials, secondary reactions with lower energy thermally accommodated atomic oxygen can occur. The secondary reactions of scattered and/or thermally accommodated atomic oxygen also contribute to widening the undercut cavity beneath the protective coating defect. As the undercut cavity enlarges, exposing more polymer, the probability of atomic oxygen reacting with underlying polymeric material increases because of multiple opportunities for reaction. Thus, the effective atomic oxygen erosion yield for atoms entering defects increases above that of the unprotected material. Based on the results of analytical modeling and computational modeling, aluminized Kapton multilayer insulation exposed to atomic oxygen on row 9 lost the entire externally exposed layer of polyimide Kapton, yet based on the results of this investigation, the bottom surface aluminum film must have remained in place, but crazed. Atomic oxygen undercutting at defect sites in protective coatings on graphite epoxy composites indicates that between 40 to 100 percent of the atomic oxygen thermally accommodates upon impact, and that the reaction probability of thermally accommodated atomic oxygen may range from 7.7 x 10(exp -6) to 2.1 x 10(exp -3), depending upon the degree of thermal accommodation upon each impact.

  7. Electroless nickel and ion-plated protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, M.A.; Chaudiere, D.A.; Stewart, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Two methods of protecting second surface silvered glass mirrors from environmental degradation have been evaluated. One method employed silver mirrors overcoated with Al, Ni, 304 stainless steel, Cr, and an Al/Cu alloy prepared by ion-plating. The other method used conventional wet process silver mirrors protected with a thin electroless nickel coating. These mirrors were compared with conventional paint backed silver/copper mirrors after exposure to elevated temperatures and water vapor. The electroless nickel mirrors showed consistently more resistance to these stresses than either the conventional or ion-plated mirrors suggesting that they may provide more durable field service.

  8. Multifunctional Toxin Decontamination Coatings for Sustained Protection of People and the Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-17

    barriers are hazardous and cause disposal problem • Impermeable barriers cause heat and perspiration ● Selective Adsorption - Activated charcoal...aprons • Easy-breath masks 3. Surface Protection: • Appliqué • Paper Towel/Wipes 11.17.2004 SINGH_NRL 10 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION: Poly-β- Cyclodextrin ...0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 0 50 100 150 200 Bed Volumes C a / C a o 11.17.2004 SINGH_NRL 11 ENZYME COATED POLY-β- CYCLODEXTRIN BEADS Toxic Medium o o oo o o o

  9. Recession Curve Generation for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Thermal Protection System Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanner, Howard S.; Stuckey, C. Irvin; Davis, Darrell W.; Davis, Darrell (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ablatable Thermal Protection System (TPS) coatings are used on the Space Shuttle Vehicle Solid Rocket Boosters in order to protect the aluminum structure from experiencing excessive temperatures. The methodology used to characterize the recession of such materials is outlined. Details of the tests, including the facility, test articles and test article processing are also presented. The recession rates are collapsed into an empirical power-law relation. A design curve is defined using a 95-percentile student-t distribution. based on the nominal results. Actual test results are presented for the current acreage TPS material used.

  10. [Durability of protective effect of resin-based coating material on root surface].

    PubMed

    Tian, H Y; Yu, P; Yuan, C Y; Zhang, W; Qiu, Y X; Li, D H; Liang, X J; Wang, X Y

    2016-10-18

    . The wear depths of PRG and CS3 increased along with the numbers of brushing cycles. PRG wore at a significant lower pace than CS3 did (P<0.05). PRG coating resin had similar performances as CS3 on protecting root dentin from demineralization after water aging. What's more, PRG demonstrated a higher toothbrush wear resistance than CS3. We concluded that PRG Barrier Coat contained S-PRG filler may be an effective coating material for protecting exposed root from both chemical and mechanical challenges. Further studies should be carried out to evaluate the long-term reliability of the rootsurface coating materials under the clinical setting.

  11. Atomic Oxygen Treatment for Non-Contact Removal of Organic Protective Coatings from Painting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Cales, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Current techniques for removal of varnish (lacquer) and other organic protective coatings from paintings involve contact with the surface. This contact can remove pigment, or alter the shape and location of paint on the canvas surface. A thermal energy atomic oxygen plasma, developed to simulate the space environment in low Earth orbit, easily removes these organic materials. Uniform removal of organic protective coatings from the surfaces of paintings is accomplished through chemical reaction. Atomic oxygen will not react with oxides so that most paint pigments will not be affected by the reaction. For paintings containing organic pigments, the exposure can be carefully timed so that the removal stops just short of the pigment. Color samples of Alizarin Crimson, Sap Green, and Zinc White coated with Damar lacquer were exposed to atomic oxygen. The lacquer was easily removed from all of the samples. Additionally, no noticeable change in appearance was observed after the lacquer was reapplied. The same observations were made on a painted canvas test sample obtained from the Cleveland Museum of Art. Scanning electron microscope photographs showed a slight microscopic texturing of the vehicle after exposure. However, there was no removal or disturbance of the paint pigment on the surface. It appears that noncontact cleaning using atomic oxygen may provide a viable alternative to other cleaning techniques. It is especially attractive in cases where the organic protective surface cannot be acceptably or safely removed by conventional techniques.

  12. Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer in Fire-Protective Coatings Deformable upon Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzinsky, V. P.; Garashchenko, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    Numerical studies of heat transfer in fire-protective coatings deformable (intumescent) upon heating have been conducted. The optimum combination of the computation-scheme parameters providing stability, convergence and satisfactory accuracy of solutions has been determined. An effect of basic characteristics of materials in real range of their change that made it possible to estimate the degree of influence of properties on the fire-protective efficiency of coatings and the level of warm-up (flame resistance) of structures to be protected with them has been studied. The possibility of using developed models and techniques to estimate and provide the required level of fire safety of polymer-based materials (in particular, elastomers and structures and products on their basis) is considered. The results of estimating the mass rate of evolving gaseous thermal-decomposition products that determine, in a considerable extent, the material combustibility have been presented. The numerical analysis results have demonstrated the potentiality of reducing the combustibility of such materials and increasing limits of their fire resistance at the expense of organizing the intumescence of a material upon heating by means of modification of their initial formulations as well as with the aid of an additional layer made of the intumescent coating compatible with an elastomer.

  13. Effect of chelating agent acetylacetone on corrosion protection properties of silane-zirconium sol-gel coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Mei; Liang, Min; Liu, Jianhua; Li, Songmei; Xue, Bing; Zhao, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The hybrid sol-gel coatings on AA2024-T3 were prepared with a silane coupling agent 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) and a metal alkoxide tetra-n-propoxyzirconium (TPOZ) as precursors. The effect of acetylacetone (AcAc) as a chelating agent on the corrosion protection properties of sol-gel coatings were evaluated and the optimal AcAc/TPOZ molar ratio was obtained. The sol-gel coatings were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The corrosion protection properties of the coatings were evaluated by means of potentiodynamic polarization study (PDS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). It is demonstrated that AcAc avoids fast hydrolysis of TPOZ and benefits to form stable sols. The coating with AcAc/TPOZ molar ratio of 3 shows the best corrosion protection performance in 0.05 M NaCl solution.

  14. Atomic oxygen interaction with solar array blankets at protective coating defect sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Auer, Bruce M.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hill, Carol M.

    1991-01-01

    Atomic oxygen in the low-Earth-orbital environment oxidizes SiOx protected polyimide Kapton solar array blankets at sites which are not protected such as pin windows or scratches in the protective coatings. The magnitude and shape of the atomic oxygen undercutting which occurs at these sites is dependent upon the exposure environment details such as arrival direction and reaction probability. The geometry of atomic oxygen undercutting at defect sites exposed to atomic oxygen in plasma asher was used to develop a Monte Carlo model to simulate atomic oxygen erosion processes at defect sites in protected Kapton. Comparisons of Monte Carlo predictions and experimental results are presented for plasma asher atomic oxygen exposures for large and small defects as well as for protective coatings on one or both sides of Kapton. The model is used to predict in-space exposure results at defect sites for both directed and sweeping atomic oxygen exposure. A comparison of surface textures predicted by the Monte Carlo model and those experimentally observed from both directed space ram and laboratory plasma asher atomic oxygen exposure indicate substantial agreement.

  15. A novel perfluorinated AR (antireflective) and protective coating for KDP (potassium dihydrogen phosphate) and other optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, I.M.; Campbell, J.H.

    1990-12-17

    A new commercially available perfluorinated organic polymer has been used to prepare a combined quarterwave AR and protective coating for KDP and other optical materials. Coatings are applied from solution at room temperature by spin or dip, they are fully dense and have a refractive index of 1.29. The laser damage threshold at 1064 nm and 355 nm is the highest that we have ever measured for an AR coating material. 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  17. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  18. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  19. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones...

  20. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones or...

  1. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones or...

  2. 49 CFR 195.581 - Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating material may I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... corrosion and what coating material may I use? 195.581 Section 195.581 Transportation Other Regulations... Corrosion Control § 195.581 Which pipelines must I protect against atmospheric corrosion and what coating... the prevention of atmospheric corrosion. (c) Except portions of pipelines in offshore splash zones or...

  3. Electrochemical synthesis of polypyrrole-Al2O3 composite coating on 316 stainless steel for corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qun; Li, Chuanxian; Huang, Tingting; Yang, Fei

    2017-03-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy)-Al2O3 composite coating was electrochemically deposited on 316 stainless steel (316 SS) by cyclic voltammetry technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were employed to understand the morphology and composition of the PPy-Al2O3 coated SS. The corrosion protection ability of the PPy-Al2O3 coating was studied using open circuit potential (Eocp)-time measurements, polarization curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) after the electrodes had been immersed in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution as the corrosive media. The results showed that PPy-Al2O3 composite coatings have a homogeneous and smooth surface without detectable cracks. Anodic polarization analysis revealed that the hybrid films provided an exceptional barrier and corrosion protection in comparison with PPy coating. The EIS studies indicated that the charge transfer resistance increases with the presence of PPy-Al2O3. PPy-Al2O3 composite coating provides better corrosion protection and can be considered as a coating material to protect 316SS. With increase in Al2O3/Py mole ratio, PPy-Al2O3 coatings tend to exhibit a better corrosion resistance ability.

  4. Development of nanostructured coatings for protecting the surface of aluminum alloys against corrosion and ice accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Shahram

    Ice and wet snow accretion on outdoor structures is a severe challenge for cold climate countries. A variety of de-icing and anti-icing techniques have been developed so far to counter this problem. Passive approaches such as anti-icing or icephobic coatings that inhibit or retard ice accumulation on the surfaces are gaining in popularity. Metal corrosion should also be taken into account as metallic substrates are subject to corrosion problems when placed in humid or aggressive environments. Development of any ice-releasing coatings on aluminum structures, as they must be durable enough, is therefore closely related to anti-corrosive protection of that metal. Accordingly, series of experiments have been carried out to combine reduced ice adhesion and improved corrosion resistance on flat AA2024 substrates via thin films of single and double layer alkyl-terminated SAMs coatings. More precisely, alkyl-terminated aluminum substrates were prepared by depositing layer(s) of 18C-SAMs on BTSE-grafted AA2024 or mirror-polished AA2024 surfaces. This alloy is among the most widely used aluminum alloys in transportation systems (including aircraft), the military, etc. The stability of the coatings in an aggressive environment, their overall ice-repellent performance as well as their corrosion resistance was systematically studied. The stability of one-layer and two-layer coatings in different media was tested by means of CA measurements, demonstrating gradual loss of the hydrophobic property after ~1100-h-long immersion in water, associated by decrease in water CA. Surface corrosion was observed in all cases, except that the double-layer coating system provided improved anti-corrosive protection. All single layer coatings showed initial shear stress of ice detachment values of ~1.68 to 2 times lower than as-received aluminum surfaces and about ~1.22 to 1.5 times lower than those observed on mirror-polished surfaces. These values gradually increased after as many as 5 to 9

  5. Investigations of the hydrophobic and scratch resistance behavior of polystyrene films deposited on bell metal using RF-PACVD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A. J.; Barve, S. A.; Chutia, Joyanti; Pal, A. R.; Chowdhury, D.; Kishore, R.; Jagannath; Mithal, N.; Pandey, M.; Patil, D. S.

    2011-02-01

    Polystyrene films are deposited on bell metal substrates using radiofrequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (RF-PACVD) process. The deposition of polystyrene film is carried out at working pressure of 1.6 × 10-1 mbar and in the RF power range of 20-110 W. The hydrophobic and mechanical behaviors of the polystyrene films are studied as a function of RF power. The chemical compositions and surface chemistry of the polystyrene films are investigated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is revealed that enhanced cross-linked chemical structure and higher loss of oxygen by peroxy polystyryl radical with increasing RF power results in the formation of polystyrene films with more hydrophobic and scratch resistance behavior. However, extensive destruction of cross-linked chemical structure due to high energetic ion bombardment tends to decrease the hydrophobic and scratch resistance behavior of the polystyrene film deposited at RF power of 110 W. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show quite uniform and crack free surfaces of the polystyrene films having rms roughness in the range of 0.35-0.87 nm. Attempts are made to correlate the characterization results with the parameters that are used for thin film depositions.

  6. Interfaces of high-protection performance polyaryls-coated zinc phosphated steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate the ability of polyaryl thermoplastic coatings such as polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) and polyphenyletheretherketone (PEEK), to protect zinc phosphate (Zn{center_dot}Ph)-treated steels from corrosion in a wet, harsh environment (1.0 wt % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, 3.0 wt % NaCl and 96.0 wt % water at temperature from 250 to 200 C), we exposed them in autoclave to determine performance in heating-cooling cyclic fatigue tests (1 cycle = 12 hr at 200 C + 12 hr at 25 C) for up to 90 cycles. Although no changes in appearance were seen in the PEEK specimens after 60 cycles, extension to 90 cycles caused delamination of the coating film from the Zn{center_dot}Ph; the major reason was the degradation of the PEEK polymer caused by its hydrothermalcatalyzed esterification. In urea hydrogen peroxide (UHP)-modified PPS-coating systems, chemical reactions at the interfaces between the PPS and Zn in the Zn{center_dot}Ph layer led to the formation of a ZnS reaction product, which enhanced the Zn{center_dot}Ph-to-PPS adhesive bond; correspondingly, there were no signs of peeling nor separation of the coating after 90 cycles. In addition, because these intermediate reaction products are insoluble at high pH, they minimized the rate of delamination of the PPS coating caused by the cathodic reaction, H{sub 2}O + 1/2O{sub 2} + 2e{sup {minus}} {yields} 2OH{sup {minus}}, at the corrosion side of a defect in the film. In contrast, PEEK coatings containing non-reactive Zn{center_dot}Ph underwent cathodic delamination because of the susceptibility of Zn{center_dot}Ph to alkali dissolution.

  7. Application experience of gas-thermal aluminum coatings to protect the pipes for underground construction and repair of heat networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpakov, A. S.

    2013-11-01

    Questions of sacrificial protection for pipes of underground heat networks with aluminum against the external corrosion are considered. The description of pilot production of pipes with a plasma aluminum coating and the deposition of a sacrificial gas-plasma aluminum coating on weld joints of pipelines and the zone of their thermal influence during assemblage is presented. Examples of repairing the segments of distribution heat networks by the pipes with the tread protection are presented.

  8. Development of Spray Coating Methods and Materials to Replace Aluminum Cladding of Aging Aircraft for Corrosion Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Replace FA9550-06-C-0113 Aluminum Cladding of Aging Aircraft for Corrosion Protection 5b. GRANTNUMBER [AF STTR Phase I Final Technical Report] 5c. PROGRAM...development of glassy coatings is limited by non-availability of aluminum based BMG powder feedstock for spraying. 15. SUBJECT TERMS STTR Report Corrosion ... aluminum cladding of aging aircraft for corrosion protection ABSTRACT The objective of this AF STTR Phase I work was to develop spray coating methods and new

  9. Morphological characterisation of complex powder used for protective coatings for geothermal plant components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csaki, I.; Karlsdottir, S. N.; Buzaianu, A.; Serghiuta, S.; Popescu, G.; Motoiu, V. A.; Ragnarstottir, K. R.; Guðlaugsson, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper aims to review the morphological characteristics, microstructures, physical and chemical properties of two complex composite powders: Ni18Cr5Si2B and Ni21Cr11Al2.5Y. These powders will be used as an option for coating geothermal turbine blades to prevent corrosion. The corrosion process in the steam turbine results in damages being recognized as the leading cause of reduced availability in geothermal power plants and is depends on temperature, mechanical and vaporous carryover of impurities and water treatment. Thermal spraying is a suitable technique for coating layers with wear and corrosion resistance. Therefore this technique could be successfully used in geothermal applications for obtaining coatings layers from new complex composite powders protecting the turbine blades from corrosions and good control of steam chemistry. The composite powders were investigated using X-ray diffraction and electronic microscopy to provide detailed information about composites morphological modifications. The results obtained after morphological evaluation are encouraging for using these composite powders as an option for coating geothermal components using thermal spraying technique.

  10. POLYPHENYLENESULFIED/MONTOMORILLONITE CLAY NANOCOMPOSITE COATINGS: THEIR EFFICACY IN PROTECTING STEEL AGAINST CORROSION.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA, T.; GAWLIK, K.

    2006-06-01

    Nanoscale montomorillonite (MMT) clay fillers became dispersed in a polyphenylenesulfied (PPS) matrix through the processes of octadecylamine (ODA) intercalation {yields} molten PPS co-intercalation {yields} exfoliation. Cooling this molten exfoliated material led to the formation of a PPS/MMT nanocomposite. The MMT nanofiller conferred three advanced properties on the semi-crystalline PPS: First, it raised its melting point by nearly 40 C to 290 C; second, it increased its crystallization energy, implying that an excellent adherence of the nanofillers surfaces to PPS in terms of a good interfacial bond; and, third, it abated the degree of its hydrothermal oxidation due to sulfide {yields} sulfite linkage transformations. When this advanced PPS nanocomposite was used as a corrosion-preventing coating for carbon steel in a simulated geothermal environment at 300 C, a coating of {approx}150 {micro}m thickness adequately protected the steel against hot brine-caused corrosion. In contrast, an MMT-free PPS coating of similar thickness was not nearly as effective in mitigating corrosion as was the nanocompsite; in fact, the uptake of corrosive ionic electrolyte by the unmodified coating increased with an extending exposure time.

  11. Coating fabrics with gold nanorods for colouring, UV-protection, and antibacterial functions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yidan; Xiao, Manda; Jiang, Shouxiang; Ding, Feng; Wang, Jianfang

    2013-01-21

    Gold nanorods exhibit rich colours owing to the nearly linear dependence of the longitudinal plasmon resonance wavelength on the length-to-diameter aspect ratio. This property of Au nanorods has been utilized in this work for dyeing fabrics. Au nanorods of different aspect ratios were deposited on both cotton and silk fabrics by immersing them in Au nanorod solutions. The coating of Au nanorods makes the fabrics exhibit a broad range of colours varying from brownish red through green to purplish red, which are essentially determined by the longitudinal plasmon wavelength of the deposited Au nanorods. The colorimetric values of the coated fabrics were carefully measured for examining the colouring effects. The nanorod-coated cotton fabrics were found to be commercially acceptable in washing fastness to laundering tests and colour fastness to dry cleaning tests. Moreover, the nanorod-coated cotton and silk fabrics show significant improvements on both UV-protection and antibacterial functions. Our study therefore points out a promising approach for the use of noble metal nanocrystals as dyeing materials for textile applications on the basis of their inherent localized plasmon resonance properties.

  12. Oxidation behavior of niobium aluminide intermetallics protected by aluminide and silicide diffusion coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Soboyejo, W.; Rapp, R.A.

    1999-06-01

    The isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of a new class of damage-tolerant niobium aluminide (Nb{sub 3}Al-xTi-yCr) intermetallics is studied between 650 C and 850 C. Protective diffusion coatings were deposited by pack cementation to achieve the siliciding or aluminizing of substrates with or without intervening Mo or Ni layers, respectively. The compositions and microstructures of the resulting coatings and oxidized surfaces were characterized. The isothermal and cyclic oxidation kinetics indicate that uncoated Nb-40Ti-15Al-based intermetallics may be used up to {approximately}750 C. Alloying with Cr improves the isothermal oxidation resistance between 650 C and 850 C. The most significant improvement in oxidation resistance is achieved by the aluminization of electroplated Ni interlayers. The results suggest that the high-temperature limit of niobium aluminide-based alloys may be increased to 800 C to 850 C by aluminide-based diffusion coatings on ductile Ni interlayers. Indentation fracture experiments also indicate that the ductile nickel interlayers are resistant to crack propagation in multilayered aluminide-based coatings.

  13. Corrosion protection performance of waterborne epoxy coatings containing self-doped polyaniline nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Shihui; Chen, Cheng; Cui, Mingjun; Li, Wei; Zhao, Haichao; Wang, Liping

    2017-06-01

    Self-doped sulfonated polyaniline (SPANi) nanofiber was synthesized by the copolymerization of 2-aminobenzenesulfonic acid (ASA) and aniline via a rapid mixing polymerization approach. The chemical structure of SPANi was investigated by the Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern. The as-prepared SPANi nanofibers had 45 nm average diameter and length up to 750 nm as measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The self-doped SPANi nanofiber possessed excellent aqueous solubility, good conductivity (0.11 S/cm) and reversible redox activity, making it suitable as a corrosion inhibitor for waterborne coatings. The prepared SPANi/waterborne epoxy composite coatings exhibited remarkably improved corrosion protection compared with pure waterborne epoxy coating as proved by the polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The passivation effect of SPANi nanofiber and the corrosion products beneath the epoxy coatings immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution as a function of time were also investigated in this study.

  14. Coating fabrics with gold nanorods for colouring, UV-protection, and antibacterial functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yidan; Xiao, Manda; Jiang, Shouxiang; Ding, Feng; Wang, Jianfang

    2012-12-01

    Gold nanorods exhibit rich colours owing to the nearly linear dependence of the longitudinal plasmon resonance wavelength on the length-to-diameter aspect ratio. This property of Au nanorods has been utilized in this work for dyeing fabrics. Au nanorods of different aspect ratios were deposited on both cotton and silk fabrics by immersing them in Au nanorod solutions. The coating of Au nanorods makes the fabrics exhibit a broad range of colours varying from brownish red through green to purplish red, which are essentially determined by the longitudinal plasmon wavelength of the deposited Au nanorods. The colorimetric values of the coated fabrics were carefully measured for examining the colouring effects. The nanorod-coated cotton fabrics were found to be commercially acceptable in washing fastness to laundering tests and colour fastness to dry cleaning tests. Moreover, the nanorod-coated cotton and silk fabrics show significant improvements on both UV-protection and antibacterial functions. Our study therefore points out a promising approach for the use of noble metal nanocrystals as dyeing materials for textile applications on the basis of their inherent localized plasmon resonance properties.

  15. Structural transformations in heat-resistant protective coatings on nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Veksler, Yu.G.; Lesnikov, V.P.; Paleeva, S.Ya.; Lesnikova, E.G.; Myal'nitsa, G.F.

    1987-09-01

    In this work a comprehensive metallophysical study was carried out for two aluminosilicide slip coatings of the systems Al-Si and Al-Nb-Si and an electron-beam Co-Cr-Al-Y coating on alloy EP-539 (17...19% Cr, 4...6% Co, 2.5...4% W, 4.5...6.5% Mo, 2...3% Ti, 3...4% Al, 1.4...2% Nb, balance Ni) after high-temperature testing. The protective properties of the coatings were evaluated from the results of laboratory tests for heat resistance at 1000/sup 0/C in the combustion products of diesel fuel with added sulfur at 970, 1000, and 1060/sup 0/C for 100 h and after full-scale tests for 150, 250, 400, and 700 h. Metallographic, hardness, x-ray, and micro x-ray studies of the coating were carried out. Layer-by-layer phase composition and the lattice spacing of the main phases were determined. X-ray analysis was carried out in an a DRON-1 diffractometer in copper K/sub ..-->../-radiation, and x-ray microanalysis was carried out in a MS-46 Cameca microanalyzer

  16. The Development and Application of Nondestructive Testing Techniques for Evaluating High Temperature Protective Coatings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    TURBINE BLADES, REFRACTORY COATINGS), (*REFRACTORY COATINGS, NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING), GAS TURBINES, SLURRY COATING, REFRACTORY METAL ALLOYS, NIOBIUM, SILICIDES, DEFECTS(MATERIALS), EROSIVE BURNING, SEEBECK EFFECT , TOLERANCES(MECHANICS), RADIOGRAPHY.

  17. On the role of hydrophobic Si-based protective coatings in limiting mortar deterioration.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, G; Fermo, P; Pino, F; Pargoletti, E; Pecchioni, E; Fratini, F; Ruffolo, S A; La Russa, M F

    2015-11-01

    In order to avoid both natural and artificial stone decay, mainly due to the interaction with atmospheric pollutants (both gases such as NOx and SO2 and particulate matter), polymeric materials have been widely studied as protective coatings enable to limit the penetration of fluids into the bulk material. In the current work, an air hardening calcic lime mortar (ALM) and a natural hydraulic lime mortar (HLM) were used as substrates, and commercially available Si-based resins (Alpha®SI30 and Silres®BS16) were adopted as protective agents to give hydrophobicity features to the artificial stones. Surface properties of coatings and their performance as hydrophobic agents were studied using different techniques such as contact angle measurements, capillary absorption test, mercury intrusion porosimetry, surface free energy, colorimetric measurements and water vapour permeability tests. Finally, some exposure tests to UV radiation and to real polluted atmospheric environments (a city centre and an urban background site) were carried out during a wintertime period (when the concentrations of the main atmospheric pollutants are higher) in order to study the durability of the coating systems applied. The effectiveness of the two commercial resins in reducing salt formation (sulphate and nitrate), induced by the interaction of the mortars with the atmospheric pollutants, was demonstrated in the case of the HLM mortar. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Plasma technology for creation of protective and decorative coatings for building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, Oleg; Volokitin, Gennady; Skripnikova, Nelli; Shekhovtsov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    An experimental setup is developed to create a protective and decorative coating on the surface of building materials. Experimental study is conducted to create a protective coating using low-temperature plasma. The properties of the surface before and after the plasma treatment are investigated. At the increase of the plasma generator power (56-75 kW) the rate of the vitreous coating formation is significantly reduced, and the destruction of hydrous calcium silicates occurs at a lower depth (0.5-2.0 mm). In this case, the adhesive strength increases up to 2.34 MPa. At the increase of the exposure time at 56 kW (0.045 m/s melting rate) plasma generation power, the melt formation is observed not only at the surface but at depth of 0.7 mm and deeper. Also, a deep degradation of the material occurs and the adhesive strength decreases. The optimal heat flux density of plasma generator was established at 1.8-2.6 . 106 W/m2, which allows the achievement of the uniform layer formation on the wood surface that preserves its natural pattern visible.

  19. Smart Contact Lenses with Graphene Coating for Electromagnetic Interference Shielding and Dehydration Protection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangkyu; Jo, Insu; Kang, Sangmin; Jang, Bongchul; Moon, Joonhee; Park, Jong Bo; Lee, Soochang; Rho, Sichul; Kim, Youngsoo; Hong, Byung Hee

    2017-02-21

    Recently, smart contact lenses with electronic circuits have been proposed for various sensor and display applications where the use of flexible and biologically stable electrode materials is essential. Graphene is an atomically thin carbon material with a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice that shows outstanding electrical and mechanical properties as well as excellent biocompatibility. In addition, graphene is capable of protecting eyes from electromagnectic (EM) waves that may cause eye diseases such as cataracts. Here, we report a graphene-based highly conducting contact lens platform that reduces the exposure to EM waves and dehydration. The sheet resistance of the graphene on the contact lens is as low as 593 Ω/sq (±9.3%), which persists in an wet environment. The EM wave shielding function of the graphene-coated contact lens was tested on egg whites exposed to strong EM waves inside a microwave oven. The results show that the EM energy is absorbed by graphene and dissipated in the form of thermal radiation so that the damage on the egg whites can be minimized. We also demonstrated the enhanced dehydration protection effect of the graphene-coated lens by monitoring the change in water evaporation rate from the vial capped with the contact lens. Thus, we believe that the graphene-coated contact lens would provide a healthcare and bionic platform for wearable technologies in the future.

  20. Fundamental studies to elucidate the protection mechanism (s) for making intelligent choices of coatings used in oil and gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljassem, Nasser Ashoor

    Considerable attention has been given by the industries and researchers to develop the organic coating systems because of their importance in protecting and maintaining the integrity of the internal surfaces of oil and gas pipelines against corrosive solutions. Oil and natural gas pipelines mostly encounter both corrosion and wear degradations. The current study focuses on the development of coating systems by incorporating various types and amounts of fillers that are improving its barrier function to ward off the internal pipeline surfaces from the corrosive constituents. Simultaneously, fillers enhance the mechanical property of the coating systems that are capable of resisting a physical wear damage. The coating systems ranged in thickness and with micro to nano-size fillers. The pin-ball wear process, with two loads (100 N and 200 N), were applied on the surfaces of the coating systems. The hardness and reduced Young's modulus of the coated surfaces were characterized. The effect of the wear process with different loads were evaluated by employing a three dimensions (3D)-image profile-meter. A simulation of the sweet (CO2) and sour (CO2 and H2S) environments, with 2000 ppm Cl - ions, pH 4, at (60 °C and 1 bar), and (100 °C and 100 bar), respectively, used in the oil and gas industry were used to immerse and evaluate the coating systems. The coating system surface topographies, after the exposure to corrosive solutions, were evaluated by the 3-D profile-meter, stereoscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The intentional defects imposed on the coating systems were exposed to corrosive solutions and their performance were periodically studied by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. The electrochemical actions and coating system degradations due to the exposure to the corrosive solution were studied by the equivalent circuit models. The calculated EIS parameters were used to understand the interactions between the coating systems

  1. Sputter-ion plating of coatings for protection of gas-turbine blades against high-temperature oxidation and corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coad, J. P.; Restall, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Considerable effort is being devoted to the development of overlay coatings for protecting critical components such as turbine blades against high-temperature oxidation, corrosion, and erosion damage in service. The most commercially advanced methods for depositing coatings are electron-beam evaporation and plasma spraying. Sputter-ion plating (SIP) offers a potentially cheaper and simpler alternative method for depositing overlays. Experimental work on SIP of Co-Cr-Al-Y and Ni-Cr-Al-Ti alloy coatings is described. Results are presented of metallographic assessment of these coatings, and of the results obtained from high-velocity testing using a gas-turbine simulator rig.

  2. The development of an environmentally friendly protective coating for the depleted uranium-0.75 wt.% titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeper, Donald F.

    This study has been directed towards developing environmentally friendly protective coatings for the depleted uranium (DU)-0.75 wt.% titanium alloy. The surface of the alloy was studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The acicular martensitic microstructure is revealed after chemical etching. Several impurities have been identified and their prevalence has been found to vary from sample to sample. The electrochemistry of the alloy was studied using open circuit potential measurements and potentiodynamic polarization techniques. The effect of various oxyanions, MoO42-, PO43-, VO43-, MnO4-, SiO 44- and WO42-, on the electrochemical behavior of the DU alloy in nitric acid has been explored and MoO4 2- was chosen for further studies. Surface activation has been examined using fluorine compounds or concentrated nitric acid. Residual fluoride from the activation process was found to interfere with coating formation. Surface activation by nitric acid yields a more robust coating. The corrosion protection of the coatings was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization testing in quiescent 0.05 M NaCl. The coatings were studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and optical microscopy. The acid-activated surface forms a coating that offers corrosion protection after a period of aging. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the protective coating is primarily a polymolybdate bound to a uranyl ion. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy on the acid-activated coatings shows uranium dioxide migrating to the surface. The coatings on the fluoride-activated samples have been found to contain molybdenum trioxide and a minor component of an Mo(V) oxide. Raman and Infrared spectroscopies have been performed to examine the chemistry during aging. Raman indicates that the coating has an octamolybdate structure and FTIR shows that uranyl hydroxide is present in the as-made coating but no

  3. Biomimetic mineralization of metal-organic frameworks as protective coatings for biomacromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kang; Ricco, Raffaele; Doherty, Cara M.; Styles, Mark J.; Bell, Stephen; Kirby, Nigel; Mudie, Stephen; Haylock, David; Hill, Anita J.; Doonan, Christian J.; Falcaro, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the robustness of functional biomacromolecules is a critical challenge in biotechnology, which if addressed would enhance their use in pharmaceuticals, chemical processing and biostorage. Here we report a novel method, inspired by natural biomineralization processes, which provides unprecedented protection of biomacromolecules by encapsulating them within a class of porous materials termed metal-organic frameworks. We show that proteins, enzymes and DNA rapidly induce the formation of protective metal-organic framework coatings under physiological conditions by concentrating the framework building blocks and facilitating crystallization around the biomacromolecules. The resulting biocomposite is stable under conditions that would normally decompose many biological macromolecules. For example, urease and horseradish peroxidase protected within a metal-organic framework shell are found to retain bioactivity after being treated at 80 °C and boiled in dimethylformamide (153 °C), respectively. This rapid, low-cost biomimetic mineralization process gives rise to new possibilities for the exploitation of biomacromolecules. PMID:26041070

  4. Biomimetic mineralization of metal-organic frameworks as protective coatings for biomacromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Kang; Ricco, Raffaele; Doherty, Cara M.; Styles, Mark J.; Bell, Stephen; Kirby, Nigel; Mudie, Stephen; Haylock, David; Hill, Anita J.; Doonan, Christian J.; Falcaro, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    Enhancing the robustness of functional biomacromolecules is a critical challenge in biotechnology, which if addressed would enhance their use in pharmaceuticals, chemical processing and biostorage. Here we report a novel method, inspired by natural biomineralization processes, which provides unprecedented protection of biomacromolecules by encapsulating them within a class of porous materials termed metal-organic frameworks. We show that proteins, enzymes and DNA rapidly induce the formation of protective metal-organic framework coatings under physiological conditions by concentrating the framework building blocks and facilitating crystallization around the biomacromolecules. The resulting biocomposite is stable under conditions that would normally decompose many biological macromolecules. For example, urease and horseradish peroxidase protected within a metal-organic framework shell are found to retain bioactivity after being treated at 80 °C and boiled in dimethylformamide (153 °C), respectively. This rapid, low-cost biomimetic mineralization process gives rise to new possibilities for the exploitation of biomacromolecules.

  5. Multilayer Protective Coatings for High-Level Nuclear Waste Storage Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, Michael

    Corrosion-based failures of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) storage containers are potentially hazardous due to a possible release of radionuclides through cracks in the canister due to corrosion, especially for above-ground storage (i.e. dry casks). Protective coatings have been proposed to combat these premature failures, which include stress-corrosion cracking and hydrogen-diffusion cracking, among others. The coatings are to be deposited in multiple thin layers as thin films on the outer surface of the stainless steel waste basket canister. Coating materials include: TiN, ZrO2, TiO2, Al 2O3, and MoS2, which together may provide increased resistances to corrosion and mechanical wear, as well as act as a barrier to hydrogen diffusion. The focus of this research is on the corrosion resistance and characterization of single layer coatings to determine the possible benefit from the use of the proposed coating materials. Experimental methods involve electrochemical polarization, both DC and AC techniques, and corrosion in circulating salt brines of varying pH. DC polarization allows for estimation of corrosion rates, passivation behavior, and a qualitative survey of localized corrosion, whereas AC electrochemistry has the benefit of revealing information about kinetics and interfacial reactions that is not obtainable using DC techniques. Circulation in salt brines for nearly 150 days revealed sustained adhesion of the coatings and minimal weight change of the steel samples. One-inch diameter steel coupons composed of stainless steel types 304 and 316 and A36 low alloy carbon steel were coated with single layers using magnetron sputtering with compound targets in an inert argon atmosphere. This resulted in very thin films for the metal-oxides based on low sputter rates. DC polarization showed that corrosion rates were very similar between bare and coated stainless steel samples, whereas a statistically significant decrease in uniform corrosion was measured on coated

  6. Study of Chromium-Frit-Type Coatings for High-Temperature Protection of Molybdenum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D G; Bolz, L H; Pitts, J W; Harrison, W N

    1951-01-01

    The achievement of more compact and efficient power plants for aircraft is dependent, among other factors, on the perfection of heat-resisting materials that are superior to those in current use. Molybdenum is one of the high-melting metals (melting point, 4750 F). It is fairly abundant and also can be worked into many of the shapes required in modern power plants. To permit its widespread use at elevated temperatures, however, some means must first be found to prevent its rapid oxidation. The application of a protective coating is one method that might be used to achieve this goal. In the present work, a number of chromium-frit-type coatings were studied. These were bonded to molybdenum specimens by firing in controlled atmospheres to temperatures in the range of 2400 to 2700 F.

  7. [beta]-silicon carbide protective coating and method for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.

    1994-11-01

    A polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide film or coating and method for forming same on components, such as the top of solar cells, to act as an extremely hard protective surface, and as an anti-reflective coating are disclosed. This is achieved by DC magnetron co-sputtering of amorphous silicon and carbon to form a SiC thin film onto a surface, such as a solar cell. The thin film is then irradiated by a pulsed energy source, such as an excimer laser, to synthesize the poly- or [mu]c-SiC film on the surface and produce [beta]-SiC. While the method of this invention has primary application in solar cell manufacturing, it has application wherever there is a requirement for an extremely hard surface. 3 figs.

  8. .beta.-silicon carbide protective coating and method for fabricating same

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.

    1994-01-01

    A polycrystalline beta-silicon carbide film or coating and method for forming same on components, such as the top of solar cells, to act as an extremely hard protective surface, and as an anti-reflective coating. This is achieved by DC magnetron co-sputtering of amorphous silicon and carbon to form a SiC thin film onto a surface, such as a solar cell. The thin film is then irradiated by a pulsed energy source, such as an excimer laser, to synthesize the poly- or .mu.c-SiC film on the surface and produce .beta.--SiC. While the method of this invention has primary application in solar cell manufacturing, it has application wherever there is a requirement for an extremely hard surface.

  9. A Study on Effects of Mechanical Stress and Cathodic Protection on Marine Coatings on Mild Steel in Artificial Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Qi; Zhang, Qi; Tu, San-Shan; Li, Yi-Min; Wang, You; Huang, Yi

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the separate and combined effects of elastic stress and cathodic protection (CP) potential on barrier properties of two marine coating systems applied on Q235 steel plates in artificial seawater were investigated through measurements of electrochemical impedance spectra. The obtained results indicated that elastic stress could have a significant influence on coating barrier property, and the extent of this influence depends on both the magnitude and direction of elastic stress. Meanwhile, it was shown that the separate application of CP could also promote coating degradation, and for both coating systems, the more negative the applied CP potential, the more quickly and more seriously the coatings deteriorated. Furthermore, compared with the sample with only stress or CP, the results showed that the interaction between mechanical stress and CP could reduce their respective impact on coating barrier property, and the combined effect depends on the predominant factor.

  10. Smart epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites for corrosion protection of Mg-Li alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Zhu, Yanhao; Li, Chao; Song, Dalei; Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Xinran; Yan, Yongde; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Jun; Shchukin, Dmitry G.

    2016-04-01

    The epoxy coatings containing MCM-22 and Ce-MCM-22 zeolites were prepared by coating method on the Mg-Li alloy surface. The influence of MCM-22 and Ce-MCM-22 zeolites on corrosion protection of the epoxy coating was studied. The epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites showed high corrosion resistance. Artificial defects in the epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites on the Mg-Li surface were produced by the needle punching. The results show that the epoxy coating containing Ce-MCM-22 zeolites exhibits self-healing corrosion inhibition capabilities. It is ascribed to the fact that the Ce3+ ions are released from MCM-22 zeolites based on ion exchange of zeolite in the corrosion process of the Mg-Li alloy substrate. MCM-22 zeolites as reservoirs provided a prolonged release of cerium ions.

  11. Passivation of the surface of aluminum nanopowders by protective coatings of the different chemical origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young-Soon; Gromov, Alexander A.; Strokova, Julia I.

    2007-04-01

    The results of investigation and analysis of electro-exploded aluminum nanopowders, whose surface were passivated with the following substances: liquids - nitrocellulose (NC), oleic acid (C 17H 33COOH) and stearic acid (C 17H 35COOH), suspended in kerosene and ethanol, fluoropolymer; solids - boron and nickel; gases - N 2, CO 2 and air (for a comparison) are discussed. The surface protection for the aluminum nanopowders by coatings of different chemical origins leads to the some advantages of the powders properties for an application in energetic systems, e.g. solid propellants and "green" propellants (Al-H 2O). Aluminum nanopowders with a protected surface showed the increased stability to oxidation in air during the storage period and higher reactivity by heating. The TEM-visual diagram of the formation and stabilization of the coatings on the particles has been proposed on the basis of experimental results. The kinetics of the interaction of aluminum nanopowders with air has been discussed. The recommendations concerning an efficiency of the protective "non-Al 2O 3" layers on aluminum nanoparticles were proposed.

  12. History of the Development of Liquid-Applied Coatings for Protection of Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph J.; Hansen, marlin H.

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem for structures at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). KSC is located on the coast of Florida in a highly corrosive atmosphere. Launch pads, highway bridge infrastructure, and buildings are strongly affected. To mitigate these problems, NASA initiated a development program for a Galvanic Liquid-Applied Coating System (GLACS). A breakthrough in this area would have great commercial value in transportation, marine and construction industry infrastructures. The patented NASA GLACS system has undergone considerable testing to meet the needs of commercialization. A moisture-cure coating gives excellent adhesion with ease of application compared to existing galvanic products on the market. The latest development, GalvaCori; can be sprayed or hand applied to almost any structure shape. A self-adhesive conductive tape system has been devised to simplify current collection within the coating areas. In testing programs, millivolt potential and milliamp output per square foot of anode have been closely studied at actual test sites. These two parameters are probably the most challenging items of a resin-based, room-temperature-applied, galvanic coating. Extensive re-formulation has resulted in a system that provides the needed polarization for catholic protection of reinforcing steel in concrete in a variety of structure environments. The rate of corrosion of rebar in concrete is greatly affected by the environment of the structure. In addition to this, for any given concrete structure; moisture level, carbonization, and chloride contamination influences the rate of rebar corrosion. Similarly, the cathodic protection level of galvanic systems is also dependent on the moisture level of the concrete. GalvaCorr is formulated to maintain galvanic activity as the moisture level of the structure declines. GalvaCorr is available as a three-part kit. The mixing step requires about ten minutes. The viscosity can be easily

  13. Robust Slippery Coating with Superior Corrosion Resistance and Anti-Icing Performance for AZ31B Mg Alloy Protection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jialei; Gu, Changdong; Tu, Jiangping

    2017-03-29

    Biomimetic slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPSs) are developed as a potential alternative to superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) to resolve the issues of poor durability in corrosion protection and susceptibility to frosting. Herein, we fabricated a double-layered SLIPS coating on the AZ31 Mg alloy for corrosion protection and anti-icing application. The porous top layer was infused by lubricant, and the compact underlayer was utilized as a corrosion barrier. The water-repellent SLIPS coating exhibits a small sliding angle and durable corrosion resistance compared with the SHS coating. Moreover, the SLIPS coating delivers durable anti-icing performance for the Mg alloy substrate, which is obviously superior to the SHS coating. Multiple barriers in the SLIPS coating, including the infused water-repellent lubricant, the self-assembled monolayers coated porous top layer, and the compact layered double hydroxide-carbonate composite underlayer, are suggested as being responsible for the enhanced corrosion resistance and anti-icing performance. The robust double-layered SLIPS coating should be of great importance to expanding the potential applications of light metals and their alloys.

  14. Fatigue behavior of superferritic stainless steel laser shock treated without protective coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spadaro, L.; Gomez-Rosas, G.; Rubio-González, C.; Bolmaro, R.; Chavez-Chavez, A.; Hereñú, S.

    2017-08-01

    The laser shock peening (LSP) is a new technique that improves the fatigue life of metallic components by inducing deep compressive residual stresses through the surface. However, the beneficial effects of LSP depend on the persistence and stability of such residual stress fields under cyclic loading and temperature. Moreover, if no absorbent coating is used in LSP operation, thermal effects can occur on the metallic substrate. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of LSP, without protective coating and with different pulse densities, on the low cyclic fatigue behavior of a superferritic stainless steel UNS S 44600. These results are correlated with observations performed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with electron diffraction spectroscopy (EDS). The hole-drilling method is used to measure residual stresses. The micro-hardness and roughness profiles are also presented. This paper shows that LSP without coating produces beneficial compression residual stresses. However, in the first 10 μm beneath the surface, thermal effects occur that induce intergranular corrosion. This intergranular corrosion deteriorates the fatigue properties of a superferritic stainless steel UNS S 44600.

  15. The mussel thread cuticle: A protective coating of an extensible bio-fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holten-Andersen, Niels

    Mussel holdfast threads have attracted much scientific scrutiny due to their impressive mechanical properties and underwater adhesion. One component of the byssus, however, has so far largely escaped study: the outer protective cuticle of the threads. Considering the rough environment this coating material is build to withstand, as well as the repeated strains it accommodates during wave absorption, further inspections are worthwhile. Here I report on my investigations of the mechanical properties of the mussel thread cuticle as well as its composition and assembly. The cuticle material from inter-tidal mussel species was found to display a unique combination of hardness and extensibility superior to manmade coatings. The mechanical properties were demonstrated to be attributable to the presence of deformable micro-particles in the cuticles limiting crack propagation and enhancing material damage tolerance. Evidence is furthermore presented indicating that the cross-linking chemistry of the cuticle is uniquely tailored to enhance the performance of the composite structure. Finally, studies were performed to introduce the unique cross-linking chemistry found in the cuticle in synthetic materials. As predicted, we found that the mussel thread cuticle is a material that deserves further study to elucidate the design principles underlying its unique mechanical properties. Design strategies discovered in these studies could potentially be applied in future synthetic coating materials with significant impact in the field of technology and medicine.

  16. Improvement of the Thermal and Optical Performances of Protective Polydimethylsiloxane Space Coatings with Cellulose Nanocrystal Additives.

    PubMed

    Planes, Mikael; Brand, Jérémie; Lewandowski, Simon; Remaury, Stéphanie; Solé, Stéphane; Le Coz, Cédric; Carlotti, Stéphane; Sèbe, Gilles

    2016-10-07

    This work investigates the possibility of using cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as biobased nanoadditives in protective polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) space coatings, to improve the thermal and optical performances of the material. CNCs produced from wood pulp were functionalized in different conditions with the objective to improve their dispersibility in the PDMS matrix, increase their thermal stability and provide photoactive functions. Polysiloxane, cinnamate, chloroacetate and trifluoroacetate moieties were accordingly anchored at the CNCs surface by silylation, using two different approaches, or acylation with different functional vinyl esters. The modified CNCs were thoroughly characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, before being incorporated into a PDMS space coating formulation in low concentration (0.5 to 4 wt %). The cross-linked PDMS films were subsequently investigated with regards to their mechanical behavior, thermal stability and optical properties after photoaging. Results revealed that the CNC additives could significantly improve the thermal stability of the PDMS coating, up to 140 °C, depending on the treatment and CNC concentration, without affecting the mechanical properties and transparency of the material. In addition, the PDMS films loaded with as low as 1 wt % halogenated nanoparticles, exhibited an improved UV-stability after irradiation in geostationary conditions.

  17. Corrosion Protection Performance of Nano-SiO2/Epoxy Composite Coatings in Acidic Desulfurized Flue Gas Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. B.; Wang, Z. Y.; Hu, H. X.; Liu, C. B.; Zheng, Y. G.

    2016-09-01

    Five kinds of nano-SiO2/epoxy composite coatings were prepared on mild steels, and their corrosion protection performance was evaluated at room temperature (RT) and 50 °C (HT) using electrochemical methods combined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of preparation and sealing processes on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coatings were specially focused on. The results showed that it was favorable for the corrosion protection and durable performance to add the modified nano-SiO2 during rather than after the synthesis of epoxy coatings. Furthermore, the employment of sealer varnish also had beneficial effects. The two better coatings still exhibited higher impedance values even after immersion tests for up to 1000 h at RT and 500 h at HT. SEM revealed that the improvement of corrosion protection performance mainly resulted from the enhancement of coating density. Moreover, the evolution of electrochemical behavior of the two better coatings with immersion time was also discussed by means of fitting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results using equivalent circuits with different physical meanings.

  18. Evaluation of atomic oxygen resistant protective coatings for fiberglass-epoxy composites in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Brady, Joyce A.

    1989-01-01

    Fiberglass-epoxy composite masts are the prime structural members for the Space Station Freedom solar array. At the altitude where Space Station Freedom will operate, atomic oxygen atoms are the most predominant species. Atomic oxygen is highly reactive and has been shown to oxidize organic and some metallic materials. Tests with random and directed atomic oxygen exposure have shown that the epoxy is removed from the composite exposing brittle glass fibers which could be easily removed from the surface where they could contaminate space Station Freedom Systems. Protection or fiber containment systems, inorganic based paints, aluminum braid, and a metal coatinsg, were evaluated for resistance to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and mechanical flexing. All appeared to protect well against atomic oxygen and provide fiber containment except for the single aluminum braid covering. UV radiation resistance was acceptable and in general, thermal cycling and flexure had little to no effect on the mass loss rate for most coatings.

  19. Use of Coating to Protect Lyophilized Bacillus popilliae from Moisture1

    PubMed Central

    Cloran, Jean; McMahon, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    Lyophilized cells of Bacillus popilliae were protected from moisture when suspended in pellets of tung oil polymer which were then coated with paraffin wax. The survival of the protected cells at various levels of relative humidity (RH) and under various storage conditions was determined. During 6 months of storage, moisture appeared to have little effect on survival of the cells when the RH level was 22% or less; but, at higher RH levels, survival declined upon storage. Viable cells were recovered when pellets were stored for 3 months at 33% RH, 2 months at 42% RH, 1 month at 50% RH, and 4 days in distilled water. Under field conditions, some cells survived at least 1 week of storage. PMID:4751798

  20. Plasma polymerized thin coating as a protective layer of carbon nanotubes grafted on carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einig, A.; Rumeau, P.; Desrousseaux, S.; Magga, Y.; Bai, J. B.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles addition is widely studied to improve properties of carbon fiber reinforced composites. Here, hybrid carbon fiber results from grafting of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) on the carbon fiber for mechanical reinforcement and conductive properties. Both tows and woven fabrics made of the hybrid fibers are added to the matrix for composite processing. However handling hybrid fibers may induce unwilling health risk due to eventual CNT release and a protective layer is required. A thin coating layer is deposited homogeneously by low pressure plasma polymerization of an organic monomer without modifying the morphology and the organization of grafted CNTs. The polymeric layer effect on the electrical behavior of hybrid fiber is assessed by conductivity measurements. Its influence on the mechanical properties is also studied regarding the interface adhesion between fiber and matrix. The protective role of layer is demonstrated by means of friction constraints applied to the hybrid fiber.

  1. Preparation and characterization of polymeric nanocomposite films for application as protective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, S.; Rondino, F.; D'Erme, C.; Persia, F.; Menchini, F.; Santarelli, M. L.; Paulke, B.-R.; Enayati, A. L.; Falconieri, M.

    2017-08-01

    marbles before and after coating evidenced the good transparency of the nanocomposites. Accelerated aging tests permitted to demonstrate that, on the historical marbles, the presence of the nanoparticles has a protective action against UV-induced damage of the underlying polymer film, preventing photodegradation.

  2. SiC multi-layer protective coating on carbon obtained by thermionic vacuum arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciupina, V.; Lungu, C. P.; Vladoiu, R.; Epure, T.-D.; Prodan, G.; Roşca, C.; Porosnicu, C.; Jepu, I.; Belc, M.; Prodan, M.; Stanescu, I. M.; Stefanov, C.; Contulov, M.; Mandes, A.; Dinca, V.; Vasile, E.; Zarovschi, V.; Nicolescu, V.

    2013-09-01

    SiC single-layer or multi-layer on C used to improve the oxidation resistance and tribological properties of C have been obtained by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) method. The 200nm thickness carbon thin films was deposed on glass or Si substrate and then 100÷500 nm thickness SiC successively layers on carbon thin film was deposed. The microstructure and mechanical characteristics of as-prepared SiC coating were investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, STEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Electron Scattering Chemical Analysis (ESCA) and tribological techniques. Samples containing SiC single-layer or multi-layer coating on carbon were investigated up to 1000°C. The results of thermal treatments reveals the increase of oxidation resistance with increase of the number of SiC layers. The mechanism of oxidation protection is based on the reaction between SiC and elemental oxygen resulting SiO2 and CO. The tribological behavior of SiC coatings was evaluated with a tribometer with ball-on-disk configuration from CSM device with 6mm diameter sapphire ball, sliding speed in dry conditions being 0.2m/s, with normal contact loads of 0.5N, 1N, 1.5N and 2N, under unlubricated conditions. The friction coefficient on SiC was compared with the friction coefficient on uncoated carbon layer. Electrical surface resistance of SiC coating on carbon at different temperatures was measured comparing the potential drop on the sample with the potential drop on a series standard resistance in constant mode.

  3. Oligolysine-based coating protects DNA nanostructures from low-salt denaturation and nuclease degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ponnuswamy, Nandhini; Bastings, Maartje M. C.; Nathwani, Bhavik; Ryu, Ju Hee; Chou, Leo Y. T.; Vinther, Mathias; Li, Weiwei Aileen; Anastassacos, Frances M.; Mooney, David J.; Shih, William M.

    2017-01-01

    DNA nanostructures have evoked great interest as potential therapeutics and diagnostics due to ease and robustness of programming their shapes, site-specific functionalizations and responsive behaviours. However, their utility in biological fluids can be compromised through denaturation induced by physiological salt concentrations and degradation mediated by nucleases. Here we demonstrate that DNA nanostructures coated by oligolysines to 0.5:1 N:P (ratio of nitrogen in lysine to phosphorus in DNA), are stable in low salt and up to tenfold more resistant to DNase I digestion than when uncoated. Higher N:P ratios can lead to aggregation, but this can be circumvented by coating instead with an oligolysine-PEG copolymer, enabling up to a 1,000-fold protection against digestion by serum nucleases. Oligolysine-PEG-stabilized DNA nanostructures survive uptake into endosomal compartments and, in a mouse model, exhibit a modest increase in pharmacokinetic bioavailability. Thus, oligolysine-PEG is a one-step, structure-independent approach that provides low-cost and effective protection of DNA nanostructures for in vivo applications. PMID:28561045

  4. Oligolysine-based coating protects DNA nanostructures from low-salt denaturation and nuclease degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnuswamy, Nandhini; Bastings, Maartje M. C.; Nathwani, Bhavik; Ryu, Ju Hee; Chou, Leo Y. T.; Vinther, Mathias; Li, Weiwei Aileen; Anastassacos, Frances M.; Mooney, David J.; Shih, William M.

    2017-05-01

    DNA nanostructures have evoked great interest as potential therapeutics and diagnostics due to ease and robustness of programming their shapes, site-specific functionalizations and responsive behaviours. However, their utility in biological fluids can be compromised through denaturation induced by physiological salt concentrations and degradation mediated by nucleases. Here we demonstrate that DNA nanostructures coated by oligolysines to 0.5:1 N:P (ratio of nitrogen in lysine to phosphorus in DNA), are stable in low salt and up to tenfold more resistant to DNase I digestion than when uncoated. Higher N:P ratios can lead to aggregation, but this can be circumvented by coating instead with an oligolysine-PEG copolymer, enabling up to a 1,000-fold protection against digestion by serum nucleases. Oligolysine-PEG-stabilized DNA nanostructures survive uptake into endosomal compartments and, in a mouse model, exhibit a modest increase in pharmacokinetic bioavailability. Thus, oligolysine-PEG is a one-step, structure-independent approach that provides low-cost and effective protection of DNA nanostructures for in vivo applications.

  5. Protective radiolucent aluminium oxide coatings for beryllium X-ray optics.

    PubMed

    Yurkevich, Oksana; Maksimova, Ksenia; Goikhman, Alexander; Grunin, Alexey; Prokopovich, Pavel; Tyurin, Alexander; Medvedskaya, Polina; Lyatun, Ivan; Snigireva, Irina; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2017-07-01

    Beryllium, being one of the most transparent materials to X-ray radiation, has become the material of choice for X-ray optics instrumentation at synchrotron radiation sources and free-electron laser facilities. However, there are concerns due to its high toxicity and, consequently, there is a need for special safety regulations. The authors propose to apply protective coatings in order to seal off beryllium from the ambient atmosphere, thus preventing degradation processes providing additional protection for users and prolonging the service time of the optical elements. This paper presents durability test results for Be windows coated with atomic-layer-deposition alumina layers run at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Expositions were performed under monochromatic, pink and white beams, establishing conditions that the samples could tolerate without radiation damage. X-ray treatment was implemented in various environments, i.e. vacuum, helium, nitrogen, argon and dry air at different pressures. Post-process analysis revealed their efficiency for monochromatic and pink beams.

  6. Oligolysine-based coating protects DNA nanostructures from low-salt denaturation and nuclease degradation.

    PubMed

    Ponnuswamy, Nandhini; Bastings, Maartje M C; Nathwani, Bhavik; Ryu, Ju Hee; Chou, Leo Y T; Vinther, Mathias; Li, Weiwei Aileen; Anastassacos, Frances M; Mooney, David J; Shih, William M

    2017-05-31

    DNA nanostructures have evoked great interest as potential therapeutics and diagnostics due to ease and robustness of programming their shapes, site-specific functionalizations and responsive behaviours. However, their utility in biological fluids can be compromised through denaturation induced by physiological salt concentrations and degradation mediated by nucleases. Here we demonstrate that DNA nanostructures coated by oligolysines to 0.5:1 N:P (ratio of nitrogen in lysine to phosphorus in DNA), are stable in low salt and up to tenfold more resistant to DNase I digestion than when uncoated. Higher N:P ratios can lead to aggregation, but this can be circumvented by coating instead with an oligolysine-PEG copolymer, enabling up to a 1,000-fold protection against digestion by serum nucleases. Oligolysine-PEG-stabilized DNA nanostructures survive uptake into endosomal compartments and, in a mouse model, exhibit a modest increase in pharmacokinetic bioavailability. Thus, oligolysine-PEG is a one-step, structure-independent approach that provides low-cost and effective protection of DNA nanostructures for in vivo applications.

  7. HIGH-TEMPERATURE OXIDATION PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR VANADIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SILICIDES , SILICON COATINGS , THIN FILM STORAGE DEVICES, TITANIUM ALLOYS, VAPOR PLATING, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS, ZINC ALLOYS, ZINC COATINGS ....ANTIOXIDANTS, *METAL COATINGS , *REFRACTORY COATINGS , *VANADIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, CERAMIC COATINGS , CHROMIUM ALLOYS, CLADDING, FLAME SPRAYING...HIGH TEMPERATURE, INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, IODINE COMPOUNDS, IRON ALLOYS, MAGNESIUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, NICKEL COMPOUNDS, NIOBIUM ALLOYS, OXIDES

  8. The effect of protective coatings on the high temperature properties of a gamma prime-strengthened Ni-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, R.; Willett, K. P.

    1984-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of chrome-aluminide coatings on the creep and stress rupture properties of a wrought Udimet-520 nickel-base superalloy used in gas turbine blade applications. Creep and stress rupture tests were conducted at 802 °C (1475 °F) on coated and uncoated wrought bars in the fully heat treated condition. The tests showed that the application of the chrome-aluminide coatings caused a marked deterioration in rupture strength and ductility. Masking procedures used to protect the turbine blade roots during coating of the Ni-base superalloy also affected the rupture strength or rupture ductility. The mechanical behavior in the coated creep resistant alloy was correlated with the microstructure and is discussed in terms of possible controlling processes.

  9. Effects of weathering on performance of intumescent coatings for structure fire protection in the wildland-urban interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrani, Babak

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of weathering on the performance of intumescent fire-retardant coatings on wooden products. The weathering effects included primary (solar irradiation, moisture, and temperature) and secondary (environmental contaminants) parameters at various time intervals. Wildland urban interface (WUI) fires have been an increasing threat to lives and properties. Existing solutions to mitigate the damages caused by WUI fires include protecting the structures from ignition and minimizing the fire spread from one structure to another. These solutions can be divided into two general categories: active fire protection systems and passive fire protection systems. Passive systems are either using pre-applied wetting agents (water, gel, or foam) or adding an extra layer (composite wraps or coatings). Fire-retardant coating treatment methods can be divided into impregnated (penetrant) and intumescent categories. Intumescent coatings are easy to apply, economical, and have a better appearance in comparison to other passive fire protection methods, and are the main focus of this study. There have been limited studies conducted on the application of intumescent coatings on wooden structures and their performance after long-term weathering exposure. The main concerns of weathering effects are: 1) the reduction of ignition resistance of the coating layer after weathering; and 2) the fire properties of coatings after weathering since coatings might contribute as a combustible fuel and assist the fire growth after ignition. Three intumescent coatings were selected and exposed to natural weathering conditions in three different time intervals. Two types of tests were performed on the specimens: a combustibility test consisted of a bench-scale performance evaluation using a Cone Calorimeter, and a thermal decomposition test using Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) method (also known

  10. The role of surface preparation in corrosion protection of copper with nanometer-thick ALD alumina coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhashemihaghighi, Shadi; Światowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Seyeux, Antoine; Klein, Lorena H.; Salmi, Emma; Ritala, Mikko; Marcus, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    Surface smoothening by substrate annealing was studied as a pre-treatment for improving the corrosion protection provided to copper by 10, 20 and 50 nm thick alumina coatings deposited by atomic layer deposition. The interplay between substrate surface state and deposited film thickness for controlling the corrosion protection provided by ultrathin barrier films is demonstrated. Pre-annealing at 750 °C heals out the dispersed surface heterogeneities left by electropolishing and reduces the surface roughness to less than 2 nm independently of the deposited film thickness. For 10 nm coatings, substrate surface smoothening promotes the corrosion resistance. However, for 20 and 50 nm coatings, it is detrimental to the corrosion protection due to local detachment of the deposited films. The weaker adherence of the thicker coatings is assigned to the stresses accumulated in the films with increasing deposited thickness. Healing out the local heterogeneities on the substrate surface diminishes the interfacial strength that is bearing the stresses of the deposited films, thereby increasing adhesion failure for the thicker films. Pitting corrosion occurs at the local sites of adhesion failure. Intergranular corrosion occurs at the initially well coated substrate grain boundaries because of the growth of a more defective and permeable coating at grain boundaries.

  11. Development of improved LACV-30 propeller blade coatings for protection against sand and rain erosion and marine environment corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1983-05-01

    An investigation was conducted of candidate systems offering potential erosion and corrsion protection when applied as coatings to Aluminum 7075 alloy propeller blades used to propel air cushioned vehicles operating in severe environments such as offshore and marine beach logistics missions. Blade lifespans are significantly abbreviated by erosion from sand and water impingement. This work focused on special hard anodized and hard nickel electroplated coatings as candidate protective systems with sand/rain erosion testing to evaluate their merits. Results indicated that anodized coatings did not provide suitable erosion protection to Aluminum 7075 in sand/rain environments, even with dry film lubricant supplemental films. Electroplated hard nickel coatings, Vickers hardnesses in the range of 380 to 440, appeared better for combined sand/rain erosion resistance based on comparisons with prior work. Dilute phosphoric anodizing the aluminum substrates led to excellent bonds and improved corrosion resistance when subsequently plated with ductile nickel from a low pH bath, followed by hard nickel electroplate. Electrodeposited sacrificial corrosion coatings degraded the overall coating bond integrity.

  12. Evaluation of protective coatings under thermal insulation at high temperatures by the use of an innovative design

    SciTech Connect

    Lasarte, C.; Rincon, O.T. de; Montiel, A.

    1994-12-31

    In order to disseminate the existing information on protective systems that have given good performance results, NACE published Document 6H-189 through its technical groups working on coatings for carbon and stainless steels under insulation and corrosion under thermal insulation. This report is unique in its kind and, in the opinion of the authors of this paper, the next step should be the characterization of each of these systems in combination with different insulating materials. Based on NACE Document No. 6H-189, the design of a probe was developed to evaluate, in a salt chamber, the protective coatings which were supposed to work under thermal insulation at high temperatures (30--1,500 C) . This paper describes the results obtained with different combinations of protective coatings (Silicone-Aluminum, Zinc-Rich and Aluminum Metallizing), and thermal insulators (mineral wool, fiber glass and calcium silicate).

  13. The development of chemically vapor deposited mullite coatings for the corrosion protection of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M.; Hou, P.; Sengupta, A.; Basu, S.; Sarin, V.

    1998-05-01

    Crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance the corrosion and oxidation resistance of the substrate. Current research has been divided into three distinct areas: (1) Development of the deposition processing conditions for increased control over coating`s growth rate, microstructure, and morphology; (2) Analysis of the coating`s crystal structure and stability; (3) The corrosion resistance of the CVD mullite coating on SiC.

  14. Self-generated concentration and modulus gradient coating design to protect Si nano-wire electrodes during lithiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Yup; Ostadhossein, Alireza; van Duin, Adri C T; Xiao, Xingcheng; Gao, Huajian; Qi, Yue

    2016-02-07

    Surface coatings as artificial solid electrolyte interphases have been actively pursued as an effective way to improve the cycle efficiency of nanostructured Si electrodes for high energy density lithium ion batteries, where the mechanical stability of the surface coatings on Si is as critical as Si itself. However, the chemical composition and mechanical property change of coating materials during the lithiation and delithiation process imposed a grand challenge to design coating/Si nanostructure as an integrated electrode system. In our work, we first developed reactive force field (ReaxFF) parameters for Li-Si-Al-O materials to simulate the lithiation process of Si-core/Al2O3-shell and Si-core/SiO2-shell nanostructures. With reactive dynamics simulations, we were able to simultaneously track and correlate the lithiation rate, compositional change, mechanical property evolution, stress distributions, and fracture. A new mechanics model based on these varying properties was developed to determine how to stabilize the coating with a critical size ratio. Furthermore, we discovered that the self-accelerating Li diffusion in Al2O3 coating forms a well-defined Li concentration gradient, leading to an elastic modulus gradient, which effectively avoids local stress concentration and mitigates crack propagation. Based on these results, we propose a modulus gradient coating, softer outside, harder inside, as the most efficient coating to protect the Si electrode surface and improve its current efficiency.

  15. Synthesis and analysis of Mo-Si-B based coatings for high temperature oxidation protection of ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, Patrick J.

    The use of Ni-based superalloys in turbine engines has all but been exhausted, with operating temperatures nearing the melting point of these materials. The use of ceramics in turbine engines, particularly ceramic matrix composites such as SiC/C and SiC/SiC, is of interest due to their low density and attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. The same materials are also in consideration for leading edges on hypersonic vehicles. However, SiC-based composites degrade in high temperature environments with low partial pressures of oxygen due to active oxidation, as well as high temperature environments containing water or sand. The need for a protective external coating for SiC-based composites in service is obvious. To date, no coating investigated for SiC/C or SiC/SiC has been proven to be resistant to oxidation and corrosion at intermediate and high temperatures, as well as in environments deficient in oxygen. The Mo-Si-B coating shows great promise in this area, having been proven resistant to attack from oxidation at extreme temperatures, from water vapor and from calcia-magnesia-aluminosilicate (CMAS). The adaptation of the Mo-Si-B coating for ceramic materials is presented in detail here. Evaluation of the coating under a range of oxidation conditions as well as simulated re-entry conditions confirms the efficacy of the Mo-Si-B based coating as protection from catastrophic failure. The key to the oxidation and corrosion resistance is a robust external aluminoborosilica glass layer that forms and flows quickly to cover the substrate, even under the extreme simulated re-entry conditions. Suppression of active oxidation of SiC, which may occur during atmospheric re-entry and hypersonic flight trajectories, has also been examined. In order to adapt the Mo-Si-B based coating to low partial pressures of oxygen and elevated temperatures, controlled amounts of Al were added to the Mo-Si-B based coating. The resulting coating decreased the inward

  16. Performance of solvent-borne intumescent fire protective coating with Palm oil clinker as novel bio-filler on steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapa, S. A. S.; Ramli Sulong, N. H.

    2017-06-01

    This research deals with contribution of hybrid fillers with palm oil clinker (POC) as a novel bio-filler in solvent-borne intumescent fire protective coating for steel. The hybrid fillers with POC were mixed in appropriate amount of additives and acrylic binder to produce the intumescent coatings. The intumescent coatings were characterized by using Bunsen burner test, surface spread of flame, thermogravimetric analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy, static immersion and Instron micro tester equipment. Specimen with POC as a single filler has significantly enhanced the fire protection performances of the intumescent coating due to the high thermal stability of POC, where less than 10% of temperature different when compared to specimens with hybrid fillers. From the flame spread classification, class 1 is the best classification while Class 4 is the worst and considered high risk. All specimens was classified as class 1 since the final spread of flame was less than 165 mm. For hybrid fillers composition, specimen consist of POC/Al(OH)3/TiO2 has significantly improved the water resistance of the coating due to the low solubility of Al(OH)3 in water, while specimen contain of Mg(OH)2 had higher mechanical strength due to the strong bonding between the metal surface and acrylic binder/Mg(OH)2 filler. It was found that coating with the incorporation of all hybrid fillers gives excellent fire protection performance with good thermal stability, water resistance and mechanical properties. It can be concluded that, the selection of appropriate composition of fillers and binder in intumescent coating was highly influence the intumescent coating performance.

  17. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-04-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  18. ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2002-04-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  19. ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2003-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can, therefore, accelerate the degradation of substrate component materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical components and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  20. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2004-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land -based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems; a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization.

  1. ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2003-07-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can, therefore, accelerate the degradation of substrate component materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical components and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  2. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Power Generation, Inc proposed a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  3. Au/Cr Sputter Coating for the Protection of Alumina During Sliding at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoy, Patricia A.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    A sputter deposited bilayer coating of gold and chromium was investigated as a potential solid lubricant to protect alumina substrates in applications involving sliding at high temperature. The proposed lubricant was tested in a pin-on-disk tribometer with coated alumina disks sliding against uncoated alumina pins. Three test parameters; temperature, load, and sliding velocity were varied over a wide range in order to determine the performance envelope on the gold/chromium (Au/Cr) solid lubricant film. The tribo-tests were run in an air atmosphere at temperatures of 25 to 1000 C, under loads of 4.9 to 49.0 N and at sliding velocities from 1 to 15 m/sec. Post test analyses included surface profilometry, wear factor determination and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) examination of worn surfaces. Compared to unlubricated Al2O3 sliding, the use of the Au/Cr film reduced friction by 30 to 50 percent and wear by one to two orders of magnitude. Increases in test temperature resulted in lower friction and the Au/Cr film continued to provide low friction, about 0.3, even at 1000 C. Pin wear factors and friction were largely unaffected by increasing loads up to 29.4 N. Sliding velocity had essentially no effect on friction, however, increased velocity reduced coating life (total sliding distance). Based upon these research results, the Au/Cr film is a promising lubricant for moderately loaded, low speed applications operating at temperatures as high as 1000 C.

  4. Aluminide coatings

    DOEpatents

    Henager, Jr; Charles, H [Kennewick, WA; Shin, Yongsoon [Richland, WA; Samuels, William D [Richland, WA

    2009-08-18

    Disclosed herein are aluminide coatings. In one embodiment coatings are used as a barrier coating to protect a metal substrate, such as a steel or a superalloy, from various chemical environments, including oxidizing, reducing and/or sulfidizing conditions. In addition, the disclosed coatings can be used, for example, to prevent the substantial diffusion of various elements, such as chromium, at elevated service temperatures. Related methods for preparing protective coatings on metal substrates are also described.

  5. Protective Coatings for Steel Structures: Laboratory and Field Evaluation and Development of a Model Coating Guide Specification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    developed as a part of this project, will help coatings specifiers select proper coat-. FORM, , DD I JAN 73 1473 EDITION O I NOV S5 IS OBSOLETE JNCLASSIFICi...inspection, both of materials and workmanship, will be closely monitored. Failure to comply with any phase of the material application could result in the...contractor reworking and reapplying the material. Upon completion of the contract, the contractor will furnish a written unconditional 20 g arantee

  6. Multi-layer light-weight protective coating and method for application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, Karl E. (Inventor); Clark, Ronald K. (Inventor); Taylor, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A thin, light-weight, multi-layer coating is provided for protecting metals and their alloys from environmental attack at high temperatures. A reaction barrier is applied to the metal substrate and a diffusion barrier is then applied to the reaction barrier. A sealant layer may also be applied to the diffusion barrier if desired. The reaction barrier is either non-reactive or passivating with respect to the metal substrate and the diffusion barrier. The diffusion barrier is either non-reactive or passivating with respect to the reaction barrier and the sealant layer. The sealant layer is immiscible with the diffusion barrier and has a softening point below the expected use temperature of the metal.

  7. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Coatings Systems Literature Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Whitten, Mary; Perisich, Steven; hide

    2009-01-01

    When space vehicles are launched, extreme heat, exhaust, and chemicals are produced and these form a very aggressive exposure environment at the launch complex. The facilities in the launch complex are exposed to this aggressive environment. The vehicle exhaust directly impacts the flame deflectors, making these systems very susceptible to high wear and potential failure. A project was formulated to develop or identify new materials or systems such that the wear and/or damage to the flame deflector system, as a result of the severe environmental exposure conditions during launches, can be mitigated. This report provides a survey of potential protective coatings for the refractory concrete lining on the steel base structure on the flame deflectors at Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

  8. Optimization of multi-tip-shaped field emitters with bilayer protective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sominskii, G. G.; Taradaev, E. P.

    2017-06-01

    The calculations needed to optimize the ordered multi-tip-shaped silicon field emitters with the two-layer protective metal-fullerene coatings intended for use in high voltage electronic devices operating in technical vacuum have been performed. The calculations are fulfilled using the COMSOL program. The influence of the morphology of the surface on the emission characteristics of the emitters is determined, including the needles height and radius of their vertices, and also the distance between needles. It has been shown that the emitters with an area of 0.2 cm2, operating under the conditions of partial mutual screening, can provide currents of several hundred milliamps for fairly high voltages.

  9. Diamond Composite Films for Protective Coatings on Metals and Method of Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Composite films consisting of diamond crystallites and hard amorphous films such as diamond-like carbon, titanium nitride, and titanium oxide are provided as protective coatings for metal substrates against extremely harsh environments. A composite layer having diamond crystallites and a hard amorphous film is affixed to a metal substrate via an interlayer including a bottom metal silicide film and a top silicon carbide film. The interlayer is formed either by depositing metal silicide and silicon carbide directly onto the metal substrate, or by first depositing an amorphous silicon film, then allowing top and bottom portions of the amorphous silicon to react during deposition of the diamond crystallites, to yield the desired interlayer structure.

  10. Protective coating and hyperthermal atomic oxygen texturing of optical fibers used for blood glucose monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of producing cones and pillars on polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) optical fibers for glucose monitoring. The method, in one embodiment, consists of using electron beam evaporation to deposit a non-contiguous thin film of aluminum on the distal ends of the PMMA fibers. The partial coverage of aluminum on the fibers is randomly, but rather uniformly distributed across the end of the optical fibers. After the aluminum deposition, the ends of the fibers are then exposed to hyperthermal atomic oxygen, which oxidizes the areas that are not protected by aluminum. The resulting PMMA fibers have a greatly increased surface area and the cones or pillars are sufficiently close together that the cellular components in blood are excluded from passing into the valleys between the cones and pillars. The optical fibers are then coated with appropriated surface chemistry so that they can optically sense the glucose level in the blood sample than that with conventional glucose monitoring.

  11. HIGH-TEMPERATURE OXIDATION PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR VANADIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SILICIDES , SILICON COATINGS , TENSILE PROPERTIES, TITANIUM ALLOYS, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS....CERAMIC COATINGS , *METAL COATINGS , *VANADIUM ALLOYS, ALLOYS, ANTIOXIDANTS, BORON COMPOUNDS, COATINGS , DEFORMATION, ELECTRODEPOSITION, FLAME SPRAYING...HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HIGH TEMPERATURE, INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, NICKEL, NICKEL COMPOUNDS, NIOBIUM ALLOYS, OXIDES, PLATING

  12. Microstructure and Properties of Ultra-Thin Amorphous Silicon Nitride Protective Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, Michael F

    2003-06-25

    The effect of N content on the structure and properties of rf reactively sputtered a-SiN{sub x} has been studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), x-ray reflectivity (XRR), ellipsometry, and nano-indentation. The N content in the film increased with the N{sub 2} concentration in the sputtering gas until the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} stoichiometry was reached. The hardness of a-SiN, increased with density, which in turn increased with the N content. The maximum hardness of 25 GPa and density of 3.2 g/cm{sup 3} were attained at the stoichiometric Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composition. With the application of protective overcoat for magnetic disks in mind, thin a-SiN{sub x} films were deposited on CoPtCr media to examine their coverage, pinhole density, and wear resistance. According to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the minimum thickness of a-SiN{sub x} required to protect the CoPtCr alloy from oxidation was 10 {angstrom}, which was 10 {angstrom} thinner than that of the reference a-CN{sub x}. A statistic model showed the lower coverage limit of a-SiN{sub x} can be attributed to its high density, which corresponds to 93% bulk density of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Compared with 45 {angstrom} a-CN{sub x} coated disks, 15 {angstrom} a-SiN{sub x} coated disks had lower pinhole defect density and superior wear resistance.

  13. Biocompatibility and Corrosion Protection Behaviour of Hydroxyapatite Sol-Gel-Derived Coatings on Ti6Al4V Alloy.

    PubMed

    El Hadad, Amir A; Peón, Eduardo; García-Galván, Federico R; Barranco, Violeta; Parra, Juan; Jiménez-Morales, Antonia; Galván, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-24

    The aim of this work was to prepare hydroxyapatite coatings (HAp) by a sol-gel method on Ti6Al4V alloy and to study the bioactivity, biocompatibility and corrosion protection behaviour of these coatings in presence of simulated body fluids (SBFs). Thermogravimetric/Differential Thermal Analyses (TG/DTA) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) have been applied to obtain information about the phase transformations, mass loss, identification of the phases developed, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained HAp powders. Fourier Transformer Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) has been utilized for studying the functional groups of the prepared structures. The surface morphology of the resulting HAp coatings was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The bioactivity was evaluated by soaking the HAp-coatings/Ti6Al4V system in Kokubo's Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) applying Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectrometry. 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Alamar blue cell viability assays were used to study the biocompatibility. Finally, the corrosion behaviour of HAp-coatings/Ti6Al4V system was researched by means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The obtained results showed that the prepared powders were nanocrystalline HAp with little deviations from that present in the human bone. All the prepared HAp coatings deposited on Ti6Al4V showed well-behaved biocompatibility, good bioactivity and corrosion protection properties.

  14. Biocompatibility and Corrosion Protection Behaviour of Hydroxyapatite Sol-Gel-Derived Coatings on Ti6Al4V Alloy

    PubMed Central

    El Hadad, Amir A.; Peón, Eduardo; García-Galván, Federico R.; Barranco, Violeta; Parra, Juan; Jiménez-Morales, Antonia; Galván, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare hydroxyapatite coatings (HAp) by a sol-gel method on Ti6Al4V alloy and to study the bioactivity, biocompatibility and corrosion protection behaviour of these coatings in presence of simulated body fluids (SBFs). Thermogravimetric/Differential Thermal Analyses (TG/DTA) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) have been applied to obtain information about the phase transformations, mass loss, identification of the phases developed, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained HAp powders. Fourier Transformer Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) has been utilized for studying the functional groups of the prepared structures. The surface morphology of the resulting HAp coatings was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The bioactivity was evaluated by soaking the HAp-coatings/Ti6Al4V system in Kokubo’s Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) applying Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectrometry. 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Alamar blue cell viability assays were used to study the biocompatibility. Finally, the corrosion behaviour of HAp-coatings/Ti6Al4V system was researched by means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The obtained results showed that the prepared powders were nanocrystalline HAp with little deviations from that present in the human bone. All the prepared HAp coatings deposited on Ti6Al4V showed well-behaved biocompatibility, good bioactivity and corrosion protection properties. PMID:28772455

  15. Enhancing the Lifetime of Welded Joints Using the Protective Coating and Causes the Formation of Defects in Them*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezborodov, V. P.; Saraev, Yu N.

    2016-08-01

    The paper shows the efficacy of eutectic Nickel coatings for protecting welded joints of steels against corrosion. It increases with increasing content of the eutectic and chemical compounds at the grain boundaries γ-solid solution based on Nickel. Refinement of the structure of the coatings and reduce their heterogeneity allows to increase the protective properties and durability of welded joints against corrosion. It is established that the probability of formation of cracks in the coatings increases with their thickness, intensity of heating and cooling after reflow, and also with increasing content of the eutectic and chemical compounds at the grain boundaries γ-solid solution based on Nickel. Shown to prevent the formation of cracks in the coatings when they are melt you can use optimal modes of heating and cooling of the composition. Modification of the structure of the coatings by grinding them and reducing heterogeneity allows to improve the resistance to crack formation and protective properties of welded joints against corrosion.

  16. Corrosion protection of metallic waste packages using thermal sprayed ceramic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Hopper, R W; Shell, T E; Wilfinger, K R

    1998-11-01

    Ceramic coated carbon steel coupons were corrosion tested in water with dissolved salts to simulate exposure to evaporation concentrated groundwater in an underground nuclear repository. Metallography revealed no corrosion at the ceramic metal interface of dense coatings, even though electrical measurements demonstrated that the coatings were slightly porous. Experimental results and a model to predict corrosion rates influenced by a porous ceramic coating and coating lifetimes are presented

  17. Effects of alpha-zirconium phosphate on thermal degradation and flame retardancy of transparent intumescent fire protective coating

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Weiyi; Zhang, Ping; Song, Lei; Wang, Xin; Hu, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A transparent intumescent fire protective coating was obtained by UV-cured technology. • OZrP could enhance the thermal stability and anti-oxidation of the coating. • OZrP could reduce the combustion properties of the coatings. - Abstract: Organophilic alpha-zirconium phosphate (OZrP) was used to improve the thermal and fire retardant behaviors of the phenyl di(acryloyloxyethyl)phosphate (PDHA)-triglycidyl isocyanurate acrylate (TGICA)-2-phenoxyethyl acrylate (PHEA) (PDHA-TGICA-PHEA) coating. The morphology of nanocomposite coating was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of OZrP on the flame retardancy, thermal stability, fireproofing time and char formation of the coatings was investigated by microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) and scanning electric microscope (SEM). The results showed that by adding OZrP, the peak heat release rate and total heat of combustion were significantly reduced. The highest improvement was achieved with 0.5 wt% OZrP. XPS analysis indicated that the performance of anti-oxidation of the coating was improved with the addition of OZrP, and SEM images showed that a good synergistic effect was obtained through a ceramic-like layer produced by OZrP covered on the surface of char.

  18. Ion beam sputter-deposited thin film coatings for protection of spacecraft polymers in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Rutledge, S. K.; Swec, D. M.; Nahra, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposited thin films at Al2O3, SiO2, and a codeposited mixture of predominantly SiO2 with small amounts of fluoropolymer were evaluated both in laboratory plasma ashing tests and in space on board Shuttle flight STS-8 for effectiveness in preventing oxidation of polyimide Kapton. Measurements of mass loss and optical performance of coated and uncoated polyimide samples exposed to the low earth orbital environment are presented. Optical techniques were used to measure loss rates of protective films exposed to atomic oxygen. Results of the analysis of the space flight exposed samples indicate that thin film metal oxide coatings are very effective in protecting the polyimide. Metal oxide coatings with a small amount of fluoropolymer codeposited have the additional benefit of great flexibility.

  19. Ion beam sputter-deposited thin film coatings for protection of spacecraft polymers in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Rutledge, S. K.; Swec, D. M.; Nahra, H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Ion beam sputter-deposited thin films of Al2O3, SiO2, and a codeposited mixture of predominantly SiO2 with small amounts of a fluoropolymer were evaluated both in laboratory plasma ashing tests and in space on board shuttle flight STS-8 for effectiveness in preventing oxidation of polyimide Kapton. Measurements of mass loss and optical performance of coated and uncoated polyimide samples exposed to the low Earth orbital environment are presented. Optical techniques were used to measure loss rates of protective films exposed to atomic oxygen. Results of the analysis of the space flight exposed samples indicate that thin film metal oxide coatings are very effective in protecting the polyimide. Metal oxide coatings with a small amount of fluoropolymer codeposited have the additional benefit of great flexibility.

  20. Protection efficacy of gloves against components of the solvent in a sprayed isocyanate coating utilizing a reciprocating permeation panel.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Diana M; Reeb-Whitaker, Carolyn; Sasakura, Miyoko; Dills, Russell; Yost, Michael G

    2015-04-01

    Determine protection effectiveness of 5-mil natural rubber latex (0.13-mm), 5-mil nitrile rubber (0.13-mm), and 13-mil butyl rubber (0.33-mm) glove materials against solvents present in a commonly used automotive clear coat formulation using a novel permeation panel. The latex and nitrile gloves were the type commonly used by local autobody spray painters. Glove materials were tested by spraying an automotive clear coat onto an automated reciprocating permeation panel (permeation panel II). Temperature, relative humidity, and spray conditions were controlled to optimize clear coat loading homogeneity as evaluated by gravimetric analysis. Solvent permeation was measured using charcoal cloth analyzed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 1501 method. Natural rubber latex allowed 3-5 times the permeation of solvents relative to nitrile rubber for all 10 solvents evaluated: ethyl benzene, 2-heptanone, 1-methoxy-2-propyl acetate, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, n-butyl acetate, methyl isobutyl ketone, petroleum distillates, and toluene. There is a distinct behavior in solvent permeation before and after the coating dry time. Solvent permeation increased steadily before coating dry time and remained fairly constant after coating dry time. Butyl was not permeated by any of the solvents under the conditions tested. Commonly used 5-mil thick (0.13-mm) latex and nitrile gloves were ineffective barriers to solvents found in a commonly used clear coat formulation. Conversely, 13-mil (0.33-mm) butyl gloves were found to be protective against all solvents in the clear coat formulation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  1. Enteric coated spheres produced by extrusion/spheronization provide effective gastric protection and efficient release of live therapeutic bacteria.

    PubMed

    de Barros, João M S; Lechner, Tabea; Charalampopoulos, Dimitrios; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Edwards, Alexander D

    2015-09-30

    We present a novel but simple enteric coated sphere formulation containing probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus casei). Oral delivery of live bacterial cells (LBC) requires live cells to survive firstly manufacturing processes and secondly GI microbicidal defenses including gastric acid. We incorporated live L. casei directly in the granulation liquid, followed by granulation, extrusion, spheronization, drying and spray coating to produce dried live probiotic spheres. A blend of MCC, calcium-crosslinked alginate, and lactose was developed that gave improved live cell survival during manufacturing, and gave excellent protection from gastric acid plus rapid release in intestinal conditions. No significant loss of viability was observed in all steps except drying, which resulted in approximately 1 log loss of viable cells. Eudragit coating was used to protect dried live cells from acid, and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was combined with sodium alginate to achieve efficient sphere disintegration leading to rapid and complete bacterial cell release in intestinal conditions. Viability and release of L. casei was evaluated in vitro in simulated GI conditions. Uncoated spheres gave partial acid protection, but enteric coated spheres effectively protected dried probiotic LBC from acid for 2h, and subsequently released all viable cells within 1h of transfer into simulated intestinal fluid.

  2. Design of Inorganic Water Repellent Coatings for Thermal Protection Insulation on an Aerospace Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, D. W.; Ravikumar, R.

    1997-01-01

    In this report, thin film deposition of one of the model candidate materials for use as water repellent coating on the thermal protection systems (TPS) of an aerospace vehicle was investigated. The material tested was boron nitride (BN), the water-repellent properties of which was detailed in our other investigation. Two different methods, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pulsed laser deposition (PLD), were used to prepare the BN films on a fused quartz substrate (one of the components of thermal protection systems on aerospace vehicles). The deposited films were characterized by a variety of techniques including X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The BN films were observed to be amorphous in nature, and a CVD-deposited film yielded a contact angle of 60 degrees with water, similar to the pellet BN samples investigated previously. This demonstrates that it is possible to use the bulk sample wetting properties as a guideline to determine the candidate waterproofing material for the TPS.

  3. Protective coatings of hafnium dioxide by atomic layer deposition for microelectromechanical systems applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdova, Maria; Wiemer, Claudia; Lamperti, Alessio; Tallarida, Grazia; Cianci, Elena; Lamagna, Luca; Losa, Stefano; Rossini, Silvia; Somaschini, Roberto; Gioveni, Salvatore; Fanciulli, Marco; Franssila, Sami

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the investigation of HfO2 deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from either HfD-CO4 or TEMAHf and ozone for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications, in particular, for environmental protection of aluminum micromirrors. This work shows that HfO2 films successfully protect aluminum in moist environment and at the same time retain good reflectance properties of underlying material. In our experimental work, the chemical composition, crystal structure, electronic density and roughness of HfO2 films remained the same after one week of humidity treatment (relative humidity of 85%, 85 °C). The reflectance properties underwent only minor changes. The observed shift in reflectance was only from 80-90% to 76-85% in 400-800 nm spectral range when coated with ALD HfO2 films grown with Hf(NMeEt)4 and no shift (remained in the range of 68-83%) for films grown from (CpMe)2Hf(OMe)Me.

  4. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the emphasis in space research has been shifting from space exploration to commercialization of space. In order to utilize space for commercial purposes it is necessary to understand the low earth orbit (LEO) space environment where most of the activities will be carried out. The studies on the LEO environment are mainly focused towards understanding the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) on spacecraft materials. In the first few shuttle flights, materials looked frosty because they were actually being eroded and textured: AO reacts with organic materials on spacecraft exteriors, gradually damaging them. When a spacecraft travel in LEO (where crewed vehicles and the International Space Station fly), the AO formed from the residual atmosphere can react with the spacecraft surfaces, causing damage to the vehicle. Polymers are widely used in space vehicles and systems as structural materials, thermal blankets, thermal control coatings, conformal coatings, adhesives, lubricants, etc. Exposure of polymers and composites to the space environment may result in different detrimental effects via modification of their chemical, electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical properties as well as surface erosion. The major degradation effects in polymers are due to their exposure to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet and synergistic effects, which result in different damaging effects by modification of the polymer's chemical properties. In hydrocarbon containing polymers the main AO effect is the surface erosion via chemical reactions and the release of volatile reaction products associated with the mass loss. The application of a thin protective coating to the base materials is one of the most commonly used methods of preventing AO degradation. The purpose is to provide a barrier between base material and AO environment or, in some cases, to alter AO reactions to inhibit its diffusion. The effectiveness of a coating depends on its continuity, porosity, degree of

  5. Development of a Mo-Si-B coating for Nb-based Alloys and the Effects of Zr Additions to Mo-Si-B Coatings for Enhanced Oxidation Protection in Ultra-High Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu-Steffes, Otto John

    Higher efficiencies and reduced emissions performance of fossil fuel energy systems are achieved with increasing operation temperatures. This increase in operating temperature requires the use of materials with higher melting points such as refractory metal alloys. However, refractory metals suffer from catastrophic oxidation in this type of environment. Thus, oxidation protection for refractory metal alloys is a crucial step in developing next generation ultra-high temperature materials. To meet this challenge, an oxidation resistant coating for Nb based alloys has been designed as well as the incorporation of zirconium into the Mo-Si-B coating to provide further corrosion protection and a reduction in temperature for the underlying multi-layered structure. Niobium samples coated with a Mo-Si-B coating demonstrate enhanced oxidation protection compared to samples only coated with Si-B. Thermogravimetric analysis testing at 1300°C for 24 hours for both the Mo-Si-B coated Nb and Nb-based alloys show enhanced oxidation protection with mass changes of 0.44 mg/cm2 and 0.55 mg/cm2, respectively, compared to the uncoated alloy that had a mass change of 87.6 mg/cm2. To demonstrate the design concept for a coating with thermal barrier behavior, Zr is added to the Mo-Si-B coating through the pack cementation technique. The resulting coating shows that the Zr reacts with the aluminosilica top layer to form Zr silicides and ZrO2. Upon oxidation, the coating forms a mixed top layer composed of borosilica, ZrO2 and ZrSiO 4. Oxidation testing of the Zr modified Mo-Si-B coating exhibits low mass change indicating that the coating provides oxidation protection and that the Zr additions do not interfere with the oxidation protection of the Mo-Si-B coating. Finite element modeling using object oriented finite element analysis of the coating structures yielded an evaluation of the mechanical and thermal properties of the coatings, providing insight into the thermal performance and

  6. Anthocyanins extracted from black soybean seed coat protect primary cortical neurons against in vitro ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad Iqbal Hossain; Kim, Joo Youn; Ha, Tae Joung; Kim, Seong Yun; Cho, Kyung-Ok

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of anthocyanins extracted from black soybean (cv. Cheongja 3, Glycine max (L.) MERR.) seed coat against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and glutamate-induced cell death in rat primary cortical neurons. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assays were employed to assess cell membrane damage and viability of primary neurons, respectively. OGD-induced cell death in 7 d in vitro primary cortical neurons was found to be OGD duration-dependent, and approximately 3.5 h of OGD resulted in ≈60% cell death. Treatment with black soybean anthocyanins dose-dependently prevented membrane damage and increased the viability of primary neurons that were exposed to OGD. Glutamate-induced neuronal cell death was dependent on the glutamate concentration at relatively low concentrations and the number of days the cells remained in culture. Interestingly, black soybean anthocyanins did not protect against glutamate-induced neuronal cell death. They did, however, inhibit the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and preserve mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in primary neurons exposed to OGD. In agreement with the neuroprotective effect of crude black soybean anthocyanins, purified cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G), the major component of anthocyanins, also offered dose-dependent neuroprotection against OGD-induced neuronal cell death. Moreover, black soybean C3G markedly prevented excessive generation of ROS and preserved MMP in primary neurons that were exposed to OGD. Collectively, these results suggest that the neuroprotection of primary rat cortical neurons by anthocyanins that were extracted from black soybean seed coat might be mediated through oxidative stress inhibition and MMP preservation but not through glutamate-induced excitotoxicity attenuation.

  7. The Prospect of Y2SiO5-Based Materials as Protective Layer in Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, E.; Miranzo, P.; Osendi, M. I.

    2013-06-01

    Bulk yttrium monosilicate (Y2SiO5) possesses interesting properties, such as low thermal expansion coefficient and stability in water vapor atmospheres, which make it a promising protective layer for SiC-based composites, intended for the hottest parts in the future gas turbines. Because protective layers are commonly applied by thermal spraying techniques, it is important to analyze the changes in structure and properties that these methods may produce in yttrium silicate coatings. In this work, two SiO2-Y2O3 compositions were flame sprayed in the form of coatings and beads. In parallel, the beads were spark plasma sintered at relatively low temperature to obtain partially amorphous bulk specimens that are used as model bulk material. The thermal aging—air and water vapor atmosphere—caused extensive nucleation of Y2SiO5 and Y2Si2O7 in both the bulk and coating. The rich water vapor condition caused the selective volatilization of SiO2 from Y2Si2O7 at the specimen surface leaving a very characteristic micro-ridged Y2SiO5 zones—either in coatings or sintered bodies. An important increase in the thermal conductivity of the aged materials was measured. The results of this work may be used as a reference body for the production of Y2SiO5 coatings using thermal spraying techniques.

  8. Field Evaluation of Six Protective Coatings Applied to T56 Turbines after 1500 Hours Engine Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Six Coating Systems On First-stage Gas Turbine Blades In The Engines of a Long-Range Maritime Patrol Aircraft ", Surface and Coating Technology, 36...based coatings. They were applied to the first-stage turbine blades in the engines of two long range maritime patrol aircraft operated by the Royal...incorrect. These differently coated turbine - blades have in fact seen 1500 hours service in a T56 engine . The title and further reference in the text should

  9. A Robust Epoxy Resins @ Stearic Acid-Mg(OH)2 Micronanosheet Superhydrophobic Omnipotent Protective Coating for Real-Life Applications.

    PubMed

    Si, Yifan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2016-06-29

    Superhydrophobic coating has extremely high application value and practicability. However, some difficult problems such as weak mechanical strength, the need for expensive toxic reagents, and a complex preparation process are all hard to avoid, and these problems have impeded the superhydrophobic coating's real-life application for a long time. Here, we demonstrate one kind of omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating via a simple antideposition route and one-step superhydrophobization process. The whole preparation process is facile, and expensive toxic reagents needed. This omnipotent coating can be applied on any solid substrate with great waterproof ability, excellent mechanical stability, and chemical durability, which can be stored in a realistic environment for more than 1 month. More significantly, this superhydrophobic coating also has four protective abilities, antifouling, anticorrosion, anti-icing, and flame-retardancy, to cope with a variety of possible extreme natural environments. Therefore, this omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating not only satisfies real-life need but also has great application potential in many respects.

  10. Development and evaluation of two PVD-coated β-titanium orthodontic archwires for fluoride-induced corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vinod; Krishnan, Anand; Remya, R; Ravikumar, K K; Nair, S Asha; Shibli, S M A; Varma, H K; Sukumaran, K; Kumar, K Jyothindra

    2011-04-01

    The present research was aimed at developing surface coatings on β titanium orthodontic archwires capable of protection against fluoride-induced corrosion. Cathodic arc physical vapor deposition PVD (CA-PVD) and magnetron sputtering were utilized to deposit thin films of titanium aluminium nitride (TiAlN) and tungsten carbide/carbon (WC/C) coatings on β titanium orthodontic archwires. Uncoated and coated specimens were immersed in a high fluoride ion concentration mouth rinse, following a specially designed cycle simulating daily use. All specimens thus obtained were subjected to critical evaluation of parameters such as electrochemical corrosion behaviour, surface analysis, mechanical testing, microstructure, element release, and toxicology. The results confirm previous research that β titanium archwires undergo a degradation process when in contact with fluoride mouth rinses. The study confirmed the superior nature of the TiAlN coating, evident as many fewer changes in properties after fluoride treatment when compared with the WC/C coating. Thus, coating with TiAlN is recommended in order to reduce the corrosive effects of fluorides on β titanium orthodontic archwires.

  11. Enhanced protective properties of epoxy/polyaniline-camphorsulfonate nanocomposite coating on an ultrafine-grained metallic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour-Ali, Sadegh; Kiani-Rashid, Alireza; Babakhani, Abolfazl; Davoodi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    An ultrafine-grained surface layer on mild steel substrate with average grain size of 77 nm was produced through wire brushing process. Surface grain size was determined through transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. This substrate was coated with epoxy and an in situ synthesized epoxy/polyaniline-camphorsulfonate (epoxy/PANI-CSA) nanocomposite. The corrosion behavior was studied by open circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization and impedance measurements. Results of electrochemical tests evidenced the enhanced protective properties of epoxy/PANI-CSA coating on the substrate with ultrafine-grained surface.

  12. Electric power plants: protective coatings and corrosion inhibition. January, 1966-September, 1981 (citations from the Metals Abstracts data base). Report for Jan 66-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Protective coatings for power plants are discussed. Corrosion protection by means of applied coatings or the use of electrochemical inhibition is featured. Particular emphasis is placed on the effects of corrosion on the strength of materials used in various types of power plants, and includes stress corrosion cracking and erosion protection. The effects of cyclic loading and thermal expansion of heat exchanger tubes on corrosion are also included. (Contains 162 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  13. A Continued Study of Polymeric Materials for Protection Against Chemical and Biological Contaminants and Halogen Oxidants for Immobilization in Protective Materials and Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    laboratory testing of materials developed during the project, as well as to Dr. M. E. Shirtliff at the Center for Biofilm Engineering at Montana State...unlimited. 88ABW-2013-1126, 8 March 2013. Engineering at Montana State University coated polycarbonate slides with our material and tested them...AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2012-0027 A CONTINUED STUDY OF POLYMERIC MATERIALS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CONTAMINANTS AND HALOGEN

  14. Enhanced Erosion Protection of TWAS Coated Ti6Al4V Alloy Using Boride Bond Coat and Subsequent Laser Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.; Arya, Vivek; Pant, B. K.

    2011-08-01

    The material commonly used in low-pressure high-rating super critical/ultra super critical steam turbines as well as guide and moving blades of high speed aero compressors is Ti6Al4V alloy. These blades are severely affected owing to erosion which leads to drop in efficiency and increase in maintenance cost. This article deals with SHS 7170 coating on Ti6Al4V alloy using twin wire arc spraying (TWAS), enhancing its bonding by providing a thin bond coat and then treating with high-power diode laser (HPDL). Significant improvement in erosion resistance of this multilayer coating has been achieved because of the formation of fine-grained micro structure due to rapid heating and cooling rates associated with the laser surface treatment. After laser surface treatment, the fracture toughness of this multilayer has improved manifold. The water droplet and particulate erosion test results along with the damage mechanism are reported and discussed in this article.

  15. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The main objective of this research project is the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Mullite will be employed as the inner (base) layer and the composition of the film will be continuously changed to a layer of pure alumina, which will function as the actual protective coating of the component. Chemical vapor deposition reactions of silica, alumina, and aluminosilicates (mullite) through hydrolysis of aluminum and silicon chlorides in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} will be employed to deposit compositionally graded films of mullite and alumina. Our studies will include the kinetic investigation of the silica, alumina, and aluminosilicate deposition processes, characterization of the composition, microstructure, surface morphology, and mechanical behavior of the prepared films, and modeling of the various deposition processes. During this six-month reporting period, we continued the work on the development and construction of the thermogravimetric chemical vapor deposition system that we intend to employ for studying the deposition of alumina, silica, and aluminosilicates (such as mullite) from mixtures of metal chlorides in H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Specifically, we worked on the development of the tubular flow reactor that will be used for producing aluminum chloride for delivery to the chemical vapor deposition system and of the vapor and gas supply system. Various problems arising from condensation of aluminum chlorides in some sections of the supply line were resolved, and we expect to perform experiments using mixtures containing AlCl{sub 3} in the next reporting period. Preliminary experiments on the

  16. Investigation of Some Transparent Metal Oxides as Damp Heat Protective Coating for CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Yan, F.; Zaaunbrecher, B.; To, B.; Perkins, J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the protective effectiveness of some transparent metal oxides (TMO) on CIGS solar cell coupons against damp heat (DH) exposure at 85oC and 85% relative humidity (RH). Sputter-deposited bilayer ZnO (BZO) with up to 0.5-um Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer and 0.2-um bilayer InZnO were used as 'inherent' part of device structure on CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG. Sputter-deposited 0.2-um ZnSnO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) 0.1-um Al2O3 were used as overcoat on typical BZO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG solar cells. The results were all negative -- all TMO-coated CIGS cells exhibited substantial degradation in DH. Combining the optical photographs, PL and EL imaging, SEM surface micro-morphology, coupled with XRD, I-V and QE measurements, the causes of the device degradations are attributed to hydrolytic corrosion, flaking, micro-cracking, and delamination induced by the DH moisture. Mechanical stress and decrease in crystallinity (grain size effect) could be additional degrading factors for thicker AZO grown on CdS/CIGS.

  17. It Is Not Just Folklore: The Aqueous Extract of Mung Bean Coat Is Protective against Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu; Li, Wei; Li, Jianhua; Jundoria, Arvin; Sama, Andrew E.; Wang, Haichao

    2012-01-01

    Mung bean (Vigna Radiata) has been traditionally used in China both as nutritional food and herbal medicine against a number of inflammatory conditions since the 1050s. A nucleosomal protein, HMGB1, has recently been established as a late mediator of lethal systemic inflammation with a relatively wider therapeutic window for pharmacological interventions. Here we explored the HMGB1-inhibiting capacity and therapeutic potential of mung bean coat (MBC) extract in vitro and in vivo. We found that MBC extract dose-dependently attenuated LPS-induced release of HMGB1 and several chemokines in macrophage cultures. Oral administration of MBC extract significantly increased animal survival rates from 29.4% (in saline group, N = 17 mice) to 70% (in experimental MBC extract group, N = 17 mice, P < 0.05). In vitro, MBC extract stimulated HMGB1 protein aggregation and facilitated both the formation of microtubule-associatedprotein-1-light-chain-3-(LC3-)containing cytoplasmic vesicles, and the production of LC3-II in macrophage cultures. Consequently, MBC extract treatment led to reduction of cellular HMGB1 levels in macrophage cultures, which was impaired by coaddition of two autophagy inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 and 3-methyladenine). Conclusion. MBC extract is protective against lethal sepsis possibly by stimulating autophagic HMGB1 degradation. PMID:23193422

  18. Nested potassium hydroxide etching and protective coatings for silicon-based microreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mas, Nuria; Schmidt, Martin A.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a multilayer, multichannel silicon-based microreactor that uses elemental fluorine as a reagent and generates hydrogen fluoride as a byproduct. Nested potassium hydroxide etching (using silicon nitride and silicon oxide as masking materials) was developed to create a large number of channels (60 reaction channels connected to individual gas and liquid distributors) of significantly different depths (50-650 µm) with sloped walls (54.7° with respect to the (1 0 0) wafer surface) and precise control over their geometry. The wetted areas were coated with thermally grown silicon oxide and electron-beam evaporated nickel films to protect them from the corrosive fluorination environment. Up to four Pyrex layers were anodically bonded to three silicon layers in a total of six bonding steps to cap the microchannels and stack the reaction layers. The average pinhole density in as-evaporated films was 3 holes cm-2. Heating during anodic bonding (up to 350 °C for 4 min) did not significantly alter the film composition. Upon fluorine exposure, nickel films (160 nm thick) deposited on an adhesion layer of Cr (10 nm) over an oxidized silicon substrate (up to 500 nm thick SiO2) led to the formation of a nickel fluoride passivation layer. This microreactor was used to investigate direct fluorinations at room temperature over several hours without visible signs of film erosion.

  19. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  20. Alloy Films Deposited by Electroplating as Precursors for Protective Oxide Coatings on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Metallic Interconnect Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christopher; Gemmen, R.S.; Cross, Caleb

    2006-10-01

    The successful development of stainless steel interconnects for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) may be the materials breakthrough that makes SOFC technology truly commercial. Many of the ferritic stainless steels, however, suffer from a relatively high area specific resistance (ASR) after long exposure times at temperature and the Cr in the native oxide can evaporate and contaminate other cell components. Conductive coatings that resist oxide scale growth and chromium evaporation may prevent both of these problems. In the present study electrochemical deposition of binary alloys followed by oxidation of the alloy to form protective and conductive oxide layers is examined. Results are presented for the deposition of Mn/Co and Fe/Ni alloys via electroplating to form a precursor for spinel oxide coating formation. Analysis of the alloy coatings is done by SEM, EDS and XRD.

  1. Atmospheric pressure plasma-initiated chemical vapor deposition (AP-PiCVD) of poly(diethylallylphosphate) coating: a char-forming protective coating for cellulosic textile.

    PubMed

    Hilt, Florian; Boscher, Nicolas D; Duday, David; Desbenoit, Nicolas; Levalois-Grützmacher, Joëlle; Choquet, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    An innovative atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method toward the deposition of polymeric layers has been developed. This latter involves the use of a nanopulsed plasma discharge to initiate the free-radical polymerization of an allyl monomer containing phosphorus (diethylallylphosphate, DEAP) at atmospheric pressure. The polymeric structure of the film is evidence by mass spectrometry. The method, highly suitable for the treatment of natural biopolymer substrate, has been carried out on cotton textile to perform the deposition of an efficient and conformal protective coating.

  2. Sol-gel derived C-SiC composites and protective coatings for sustained durability in the space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruvy, Yair; Liedtke, Volker

    2003-09-01

    Composites and coatings were produced via the fast sol-gel process of a mixture of alkoxysilane precursors. The composites were comprised of carbon fibers, fabrics, or their precursors as reinforcement, and sol-gel-derived silicon carbide as matrix, aiming at high-temperature stable ceramics that can be utilized for re-entry structures. The protective coatings were comprised of fluorine-rich sol-gel derived resins, which exhibit high flexibility and coherence to provide sustained ATOX protection necessary for LEO space-exposed elements. For producing the composites, the sol-gel-derived resin is cast onto the reinforcement fibers/fabrics mat (carbon or its precursors) to produce a 'green' composite that is being cured. The 'green' composite is converted into a C-SiC composite via a gradual heat-pressure process under inert atmosphere, during which the organic substituents on the silicon atoms undergo internal oxidative pyrolysis via the schematic reaction: (SiRO3/2)n -> SiC + CO2 + H2O. The composition of the resultant silicon-oxi-carbide is tailorable via modifying the composition of the sol-gel reactants. The reinforcement, when made of carbon precursors, is converted into carbon during the heat-and-pressure processing as well. The C-SiC composites thus derived exhibit superior thermal stability and comparable thermal conductivity, combined with good mechanical strength features and failure resistance, which render them greatly applicable for re-entry shielding, heat-exchange pipes, and the like. Fluorine rich sol-gel derived coatings were developed as well, via the use of HF rich sol-gel process. These coatings provide oxidation-protection via the silica formation process, together with flexibility that allows 18,000 repetitive folding of the coating without cracking.

  3. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina; Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo; Österberg, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering ability and some UV protection, all achieved using an environmentally friendly coating process, which is beneficial to retain the natural appearance of wood and improve indoor air quality and comfort.

  4. Corrosion Protection of Nd-Fe Magnets via Phophatization, Silanization and Electrostatic Spraying with Organic Resin Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xia; Li, Jingjie; Li, Musen; Ge, Shengsong; Wang, Xiuchun; Ding, Kaihong; Cui, Shengli; Sun, Yongcong

    2014-09-01

    Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets possess excellent properties. However, they are highly sensitive to the attack of corrosive environment. The aim of this work is to improve the corrosion resistance of the magnets by phosphatization, silanization, and electrostatic spraying with organic resin composite coatings. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) tests showed that uniform phosphate conversion coatings and spray layers were formed on the surface of the Nd-Fe-B magnets. Neutral salt spray tests exhibited that, after treated by either phosphating, silanization or electrostatic spraying, the protectiveness of Nd-Fe-B alloys was apparently increased. And corrosion performance of magnets treated with silane only was slightly inferior to those of phosphatized ones. However, significant improvement in corrosion protection was achieved after two-step treatments, i.e. by top-coating spray layer with phosphate or silane films underneath. Grid test indicated that the phosphate and silane coating were strongly attached to the substrate while silane film was slightly weaker than the phosphate-treated ones. Magnetic property analysis revealed phosphatization, silanization, and electrostatic spraying caused decrease in magnetism, but silanization had the relatively smaller effect.

  5. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M.L.; Sarin, V.K.

    1997-12-01

    For the first time, crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited on SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion and oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments.

  6. Protection of nuclear graphite toward liquid fluoride salt by isotropic pyrolytic carbon coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiujie; Song, Jinliang; Xu, Li; Tan, Jie; Xia, Huihao; Zhang, Baoliang; He, Zhoutong; Gao, Lina; Zhou, Xingtai; Zhao, Mingwen; Zhu, Zhiyong; Bai, Shuo

    2013-11-01

    Infiltration studies were performed on uncoated nuclear graphite and isotropic pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coated graphite in molten FLiNaK salt at 650 °C under argon atmosphere at 1, 3 and 5 atm. Uncoated graphite shows weight gain more obviously than that of PyC coated graphite. Nuclear graphite with PyC coating exhibits excellent infiltration resistance in molten salt due to the small open porosity as conformed from scanning electron microscopy and mercury injection experiments.

  7. Ion Vapour Deposited (IVD) Aluminium Coatings for the Corrosion Protection of High Strength Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    4 ARL-MAT-R-123 AR-006-584 AD-A242 738 A ,- "" DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE DEFENCE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ORGANISATION AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY...SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ORGANISATION AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY Aircraft Materials Report 123 ION VAPOUR DEPOSITED (lVD) ALUMINIUM COATINGS FOR...the steel substrate provided the coating was sufficiently thick and its porosity low. Exposure of IID coated steel to aqzeous enviroments was found to

  8. Effect of protective coating on random birefringence variations in anisotropic optical fibres in response to temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshnev, S. K.; Gubin, V. P.; Starostin, N. I.; Przhiyalkovsky, Ya. V.; Sazonov, A. I.

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines for the first time the nature of an anomalous scatter in the birefringence beat length in an anisotropic silica fibre upon changes in its temperature. The effect has been studied by a conventional interferometric technique, using a spectrum analyser. The dispersion of the scatter in the beat length has been shown to be considerably higher at short fibre lengths, which is due to the effect of the protective coating. To interpret the observed effects, a physical model has been proposed which considers random centres, such as microbends, which form and disappear in the protective coating of the fibre in response to temperature changes. The random nature of such local centres may lead to unpredictable changes in the birefringence of anisotropic fibres and, hence, to changes in the sensitivity and accuracy of Faraday effect current sensors.

  9. Protection from high-velocity impact particles for quartz glass by coatings on the basis of Al-Si-N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhko, I. A.; Rybalko, E. V.; Fedorischeva, M. V.; Solntsev, V. L.; Cherniavsky, A. G.; Kaleri, A. Yu.; Psakhie, S. G.; Sergeev, V. P.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of the research of the phase composition and the mechanical properties of the coatings on the basis of Al-Si-N system produced by pulsed magnetron sputtering on the KV glass substrates. By the X-ray diffraction method, it has been discovered that the coatings contain AlN phase (hcp) with different thickness. The deposition of Al-Si-N coating system allows both increasing the microhardness of the surface layer of the quartz glass up to 29 GPa, and maintaining high elastic properties (We > 0.70). The laboratory tests have been carried out involving the impact of high-speed flows of iron particles on the Al-Si-N protective coating with different thicknesses produced by pulsed magnetron sputtering. The increase of Al-Si-N coating thickness from 1µm to 10µm decreases 4-fold the surface density of the craters on the samples caused by a high-speed flow of iron particles.

  10. Liquid uranium corrosion studies of protective yttria coatings on tantalum substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alangi, Nagaraj; Mukherjee, Jaya; Anupama, P.; Verma, M. K.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Padmanabhan, P. V. A.; Das, A. K.; Gantayet, L. M.

    2011-03-01

    Yttrium oxide has excellent thermodynamic and thermal stability, and also exhibits superior resistance to attack by various reactive metals, glass and slag at high temperature. Coupons with yttrium oxide coating on tantalum substrate with out bond coat were tested for compatibility against liquid uranium at 1573 K up to 80 h in vacuum. Optical microscopy and SEM/EDS investigations were done to evaluate the micro structural features of the coating and the liquid uranium attack. Experimental results show that yttrium oxide coating exhibits excellent corrosion resistance against liquid uranium at 1573 K.

  11. Preventing UV-light damage of light sensitive materials using a highly protective UV-absorbing coating.

    PubMed

    Zayat, Marcos; Garcia-Parejo, Pilar; Levy, David

    2007-08-01

    One of the most important drawbacks of classical and new advanced functional materials for applications outdoors, or in environments with high UV irradiation, is the light induced damage that reduces drastically their effective operation lifetime or durability. This makes protecting light sensitive materials against UV irradiation a nowadays important technological demand in almost every industrial field. This tutorial review incorporates the main aspects of UV damage to materials and describes the recently developed highly effective thin UV-protective coatings, based on UV-absorber molecules entrapped in a Sol-Gel derived ormosil matrix.

  12. Water-Dispersible Silica-Coated Upconverting Liposomes: Can a Thin Silica Layer Protect TTA-UC against Oxygen Quenching?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Light upconversion by triplet–triplet annihilation (TTA-UC) in nanoparticles has received considerable attention for bioimaging and light activation of prodrugs. However, the mechanism of TTA-UC is inherently sensitive for quenching by molecular oxygen. A potential oxygen protection strategy is the coating of TTA-UC nanoparticles with a layer of oxygen-impermeable material. In this work, we explore if (organo)silica can fulfill this protecting role. Three synthesis routes are described for preparing water-dispersible (organo)silica-coated red-to-blue upconverting liposomes. Their upconversion properties are investigated in solution and in A549 lung carcinoma cells. Although it was found that the silica offered no protection from oxygen in solution and after uptake in A549 cancer cells, upon drying of the silica-coated liposome dispersion in an excess of (organo)silica precursor, interesting liposome–silica nanocomposite materials were obtained that were capable of generating blue light upon red light excitation in air. PMID:28317022

  13. Corrosion Protection Of Front Surface Aluminum Mirror Coatings With Dielectric Thin Films Deposited By Reactive Ion Plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Karl H.; Penny, Iain; Willey, Ronald R.

    1990-01-01

    Front surface metal mirrors need protection of the inherently fragile metal film normally deposited by evaporation in high vacuum. Dielectric thin films, also deposited by thermal or electron beam evaporation in high vacuum, provide limited protection because of their less than dense packing. These films usually have a columnar structure with voids between the columns. The voids give access to the metal film for humidity and corrosive gases or liquids. Sainty et al. [Appl. Opt. 23, 1116 (1984)] made some progress in developing better protective coatings with ion assisted deposition. We manufactured protected front surface aluminum mirrors using reactive ion plating deposition. When immersed in 0.2M NaOH, our best mirror survived for 20 hours while only degrading to a transmission of 10%, exceeding the results of Sainty et al. by a factor of 5 under the same test conditions. Electron beam evaporated dielectric coatings provided protection for about 1.5 to 2 hours in the same solution. We will discuss the reason for the significant improvement brought about by low voltage reactive ion plating deposition, and its advantage for large scale production.

  14. The Development of HfO2-Rare Earth Based Oxide Materials and Barrier Coatings for Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan James

    2014-01-01

    Advanced hafnia-rare earth oxides, rare earth aluminates and silicates have been developed for thermal environmental barrier systems for aerospace propulsion engine and thermal protection applications. The high temperature stability, low thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of these oxide material systems make them attractive and potentially viable for thermal protection systems. This paper will focus on the development of the high performance and high temperature capable ZrO2HfO2-rare earth based alloy and compound oxide materials, processed as protective coating systems using state-or-the-art processing techniques. The emphasis has been in particular placed on assessing their temperature capability, stability and suitability for advanced space vehicle entry thermal protection systems. Fundamental thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of the material systems have been investigated at high temperatures. Laser high-heat-flux testing has also been developed to validate the material systems, and demonstrating durability under space entry high heat flux conditions.

  15. FUNCTIONALY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    PROF. STRATIS V. SOTIRCHOS

    1998-10-01

    The main objective of this research project is the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Mullite will be employed as the inner (base) layer and the composition of the film will be continuously changed to a layer of pure alumina, which will function as the actual protective coating of the component. Chemical vapor deposition reactions of silica, alumina, and aluminosilicates (mullite) through hydrolysis of aluminum and silicon chlorides in the presence of CO2 and H2 will be employed to deposit compositionally graded films of mullite and alumina. Our studies will include the kinetic investigation of the silica, alumina, and aluminosilicate deposition processes, characterization of the composition, microstructure, surface morphology, and mechanical behavior of the prepared films, and modeling of the various deposition processes. During this six-month reporting period, the experimental work on the investigation of the deposition of alumina, silica, and aluminosilicates from mixtures of methyltrichlorosilane (MTS), aluminum trichloride, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen was continued. Experiments were also conducted on the deposition processes of the simple oxides, alumina and silica, from mixtures containing only one chloride (AlCl3 and MTS, respectively). Deposition rate data were obtained in a relatively broad range of operating conditions: temperatures in the range 800-1000 o C, 100 Torr pressure, 0.006-0.015 AlCl3 feed mole fraction, 0.011- 0.027 CH3SiCl3 feed mole fraction, and 0.004-0.07 CO2 feed mole fraction, and various positions along the axis of the deposition reactor. Since the effect of temperature had been

  16. FUNCTIONALLY GRADED ALUMINA/MULLITE COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF SILICON CARBIDE CERAMIC COMPONENTS FROM CORROSION

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The main objective of this research project is the formulation of processes that can be used to prepare compositionally graded alumina/mullite coatings for protection from corrosion of silicon carbide components (monolithic or composite) used or proposed to be used in coal utilization systems (e.g., combustion chamber liners, heat exchanger tubes, particulate removal filters, and turbine components) and other energy-related applications. Mullite will be employed as the inner (base) layer and the composition of the film will be continuously changed to a layer of pure alumina, which will function as the actual protective coating of the component. Chemical vapor deposition reactions of silica, alumina, and aluminosilicates (mullite) through hydrolysis of aluminum and silicon chlorides in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} will be employed to deposit compositionally graded films of mullite and alumina. Our studies will include the kinetic investigation of the silica, alumina, and aluminosilicate deposition processes, characterization of the composition, microstructure, surface morphology, and mechanical behavior of the prepared films, and modeling of the various deposition processes. During this reporting period, the construction and development of the chemical vapor deposition system was completed, and experiments were conducted on the deposition of alumina, silica, and aluminosilicates (such as mullite) from mixtures of AlCl{sub 3} and CH{sub 3}SiCl{sub 3} in CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. Work was mainly done on the investigation of the effects of the reaction temperature on the deposition kinetics. It was found that the temperature had a positive effect on the single oxides deposition rates and the codeposition rate. The apparent activation energy values extracted from the deposition rate vs. temperature curves in the high temperature region were similar for the three deposition processes, having a value around 20 kcal/mol. The codeposition rates were higher, by a

  17. Method of protecting the surface of a substrate. [by applying aluminide coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedwill, M. A. (Inventor); Grisaffe, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    The surface of a metallic base system is initially coated with a metallic alloy layer that is ductile and oxidation resistant. An aluminide coating is then applied to the metallic alloy layer. The chemistry of the metallic alloy layer is such that the oxidation resistance of the subsequently aluminized outermost layer is not seriously degraded.

  18. The evaluation of the corrosion resistance of metallic substrates protected by a hydrophobic coating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.; Griffin, R.

    1996-11-01

    In order to ascertain the performance of hydrophobic materials in corrosion service, metallic substrates of aluminum, copper, and steel were coated with a hydrophobic coating termed conformal and subjected to a variety of intensive analytical examinations including Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, real-time field studies, and scanning electron microscopy. To be able to gage the relative performance of the conformal coat, it was necessary to test similar uncoated metallic substrates as well as similar substrates treated with a non-hydrophobic corrosion preventative coat. This allowed direct comparisons to be made between the conformal coat and other commercially available coating products while allowing for an uncoated substrate to act as a baseline reference (i.e., a control). The results of these experiments show that the performance of conformal as a preventative measure against corrosion were below expectations, especially in comparison to other commercially available non-hydrophobic coatings. This is most likely due to inadequate adhesion at the polymer-metal substrate interface. Preliminary results show that significant improvements in corrosion resistance occur through the use of a base coating though the cause for this improvement cannot be determined at this time.

  19. Waterborne firm coating for temporary protection of parts, providing controlled lubrication during assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hayner, R.E.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes a protective, emulsified oil in water, dispersible, lubricant coating composition having a pH in the range of about 7.0 to 10, and capable of application and flow on a threaded solid substrate consisting essentially of: A. about 65 to 99% by weight of a composition comprising: (1) about 0.5 to 30 parts by weight of organic wax components having a melting point above 50/sup 0/C, the wax container ester groups; (2) about 0.5 to 6 parts of a surfactant comprising 2 to 8% of carboxylic acid and about 1 to 5% of an amine, the acid and the amine forming a salt providing at least a portion of a surfactant; (3) about 10 to 30 parts of a coupling agent comprising a C/sub 5/-C/sub 30/ liquid hydrocarbon coupling component and a C/sub 2/-C/sub 20/ alcohol in the ratio of between 1:1 and 10:1 by weight respectively, selected from the group consisting of: mineral spirits, kerosene, ethylene glycol ether, butyl cellosolve, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol monopropyl ether, propyl cellosolve, ethyl cellosolve, diethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene glycol monoacetate, diethylene glycol monoproprionate, diethylene glycol monoacetate, propylene glycol monoacetate, ethanol, isopropanol and isobutanol; and (4) about 30 to 97 parts of water the sum of all parts being equal to 100; and (B) about 3.5 to 9% total pigment comprising about 0.4 to 4% by weight carbon black.

  20. Application of Surface Protective Coating to Enhance Environment-Withstanding Property of the MEMS 2D Wind Direction and Wind Speed Sensor.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyu-Sik; Lee, Dae-Sung; Song, Sang-Woo; Jung, Jae Pil

    2017-09-19

    In this study, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) two-dimensional (2D) wind direction and wind speed sensor consisting of a square heating source and four thermopiles was manufactured using the heat detection method. The heating source and thermopiles of the manufactured sensor must be exposed to air to detect wind speed and wind direction. Therefore, there are concerns that the sensor could be contaminated by deposition or adhesion of dust, sandy dust, snow, rain, and so forth, in the air, and that the membrane may be damaged by physical shock. Hence, there was a need to protect the heating source, thermopiles, and the membrane from environmental and physical shock. The upper protective coating to protect both the heating source and thermopiles and the lower protective coating to protect the membrane were formed by using high-molecular substances such as SU-8, Teflon and polyimide (PI). The sensor characteristics with the applied protective coatings were evaluated.

  1. Replacement of corrosion protection chromate primers and paints used in cryogenic applications on the Space Shuttle with wire arc sprayed aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, R. L.; Sanders, H. L.; Zimmerman, F. R.

    1995-01-01

    With the advent of new environmental laws restricting volatile organic compounds and hexavalent chrome emissions, 'environmentally safe' thermal spray coatings are being developed to replace the traditional corrosion protection chromate primers. A wire arc sprayed aluminum coating is being developed for corrosion protection of low pressure liquid hydrogen carrying ducts on the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Currently, this hardware utilizes a chromate primer to provide protection against corrosion pitting and stress corrosion cracking induced by the cryogenic operating environment. The wire are sprayed aluminum coating has been found to have good potential to provide corrosion protection for flight hardware in cryogenic applications. The coating development, adhesion test, corrosion test and cryogenic flexibility test results will be presented.

  2. Impact of Sn/F Pre-Treatments on the Durability of Protective Coatings against Dentine Erosion/Abrasion

    PubMed Central

    Ganss, Carolina; Lussi, Adrian; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Naguib Attia, Nader; Schlueter, Nadine

    2015-01-01

    For preventing erosive wear in dentine, coating with adhesives has been suggested as an alternative to fluoridation. However, clinical studies have revealed limited efficacy. As there is first evidence that Sn2+ increases bond strength of the adhesive Clearfil SE (Kuraray), the aim of the present study was to investigate whether pre-treatment with different Sn2+/F− solutions improves the durability of Clearfil SE coatings. Dentine samples (eight groups, n=16/group) were freed of smear layer (0.5% citric acid, 10 s), treated (15 s) either with no solution (control), aminefluoride (AmF, 500 ppm F−, pH 4.5), SnCl2 (800/1600 ppm Sn2+; pH 1.5), SnCl2/AmF (500 ppm F−, 800 ppm Sn2+, pH 1.5/3.0/4.5), or Elmex Erosion Protection Rinse (EP, 500 ppm F−, 800 ppm Sn2+, pH 4.5; GABA International), then rinsed with water (15 s) and individually covered with Clearfil SE. Subsequently the specimens were subjected to an erosion/abrasion protocol consisting of 1320 cycles of immersion in 0.5% citric acid (5°C/55°C; 2 min) and automated brushing (15 s, 200 g, NaF-toothpaste, RDA 80). As the coatings proved stable up to 1320 cycles, 60 modified cycles (brushing time 30 min/cycle) were added. Wear was measured profilometrically. After SnCl2/AmF, pH 4.5 or EP pre-treatment all except one coating survived. In the other groups, almost all coatings were lost and there was no significant difference to the control group. Pre-treatment with a Sn2+/F− solution at pH 4.5 seems able to improve the durability of adhesive coatings, rendering these an attractive option in preventing erosive wear in dentine. PMID:26075906

  3. Protection of carbon steel against hot corrosion using thermal spray Si- and Cr-base coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G.; Martinez, L.

    1998-02-01

    A Fe75Si thermal spray coating was applied on the surface of a plain carbon steel baffle plate. Beneath this coating, a Ni20Cr coating was applied to give better adherence to the silicon coating. The baffle was installed in the high-temperature, fireside, corrosion zone of a steam generator. At the same time, an uncoated 304 stainless steel baffle was installed nearby for comparison. For 13 months the boiler burned heavy fuel oil with high contents of vanadium. The samples were studied employing scanning electron microscopy, x-ray microanalysis, and x-ray diffraction techniques. After that, it was possible to inspect the structural state of the components, and it was found that the stainless steel baffle plates were destroyed almost completely by corrosion, whereas the carbon steel coated baffle plate did not suffer a significant attack, showing that the performance of the thermal spray coating was outstanding and that the coating was not attacked by vanadium salts of the molten slag.

  4. Development of protective coatings using fly ash premixed with metal powder on aluminium substrates.

    PubMed

    Satapathy, Alok; Sahu, Suvendu Prasad; Mishra, Debadutta

    2010-07-01

    Fly ash is a solid waste generated in huge quantities from coal-fired thermal power stations during the combustion of coal. Rich in metal oxides, it has tremendous potential as a coating material on structural and engineering components. This work aims at developing and characterizing a new class of such coatings made of fly ash by a novel technique - plasma spraying. Plasma spray technology has the advantage of being able to process various low-grade ore minerals to obtain value-added products and also to deposit ceramics, metals and a combination of these, generating near-homogeneous coatings with the desired microstructure on a range of substrates. In the present investigation, coatings are developed on aluminium substrates using fly ash premixed with aluminium powder in different weight proportions at various plasma torch input power levels ranging from 9- 18 kW DC. The coatings are characterized in terms of interface adhesion strength and deposition efficiency. Maximum adhesion strength of about 35 MPa is recorded with coatings deposited at 12 kW power level. It was noticed that the quality and properties are significantly affected by the operating power level of the plasma sprayer. This work identifies fly ash as a potential coating material, suitable for possible tribological applications.

  5. Improved Protection Properties by Using Nanostructured Ceramic Powders for HVOF Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varis, T.; Knuuttila, J.; Turunen, E.; Leivo, J.; Silvonen, J.; Oksa, M.

    2007-12-01

    The potential of the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process for reduced porosity in coatings compared to those produced by other ambient thermal spray processes is well known. The ability to produce high-density ceramic coatings offers potential in high-performance applications in the field of wear, corrosion resistance, and dielectric coatings. However, due to operational limit of the HVOF process to effectively melt the ceramic particles, the process—structure relationship must be well optimized. It has been also demonstrated that benefits from HVOF ceramic coatings can be obtained only if particles are melted enough and good lamella adhesion is produced. One strategy to improve melting of ceramic particles in relative low-flame temperatures of HVOF process is to modify particle crystal structure and composition. In this paper the effect of the powder manufacturing method and the composition on deposition efficiency of spray process as well as on the mechanical properties of the HVOF sprayed are studied. Effect of fuel gas, hydrogen vs. propane, was also demonstrated. Studied materials were alumina-, chromia-, and titania-based agglomerated powders. Coating properties such as microstructure, hardness, abrasive wear resistance, and relative fracture toughness were compared to the coating manufactured by using conventional fused and crushed powders. It can be concluded that powder size distribution and microstructure should be optimized to fulfill process requirements very carefully to produce coatings with high deposition efficiency, dense structure, improved fracture toughness, and adhesion.

  6. Electric power plants: protective coatings and corrosion inhibition. January, 1970-September, 1981 (citations from the Engineering Index data base). Report for Jan 70-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Protective coatings for power plants are discussed. Corrosion protection by means of applied coatings or the use of electrochemical inhibition is featured. Particular emphasis is placed on heat transfer problems associated with the formation of boiler scale on heat exchanger surfaces. Boiler water treatment for the inhibition of corrosion and the formation of deposits are also included, as is the removal of sulfur compounds to reduce high temperature sulfidation corrosion. (Contains 134 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  7. Photochemically induced deposition of protective alumina coatings onto UV emitting phosphors for Xe excimer discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Broxtermann, Mike Jüstel, Thomas

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A UV-reactor for the pH induced precipitation of inorganic material is described. • The photolysis of Azide (N{sub 3}{sup −}) leads to a steady pH increase used for precipitation. • A UV induced Al(OH){sub 3} precipitation is used to craft Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings onto YPO{sub 4}:Bi. • The influence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coated onto YPO{sub 4}:Bi with different thicknesses is discussed. • SEM, VUV-spectroscopy and ESA measurements were performed on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coated samples. - Abstract: This work concerns the particle coating of the UV-C emitting phosphor YPO{sub 4}:Bi, targeting a stability enhancement of the phosphor material for Xe excimer lamp operation. To this end, the material is coated by the wide band gap material Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In order to obtain a thin and homogeneous coating layer, a novel process based on the photochemical cleavage of NaN{sub 3} in water was developed. This results in a slow and continuous enhancement of the pH value due to ongoing NaOH formation, which results in the precipitation of Al(OH){sub 3} from an Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} {sub ×} 18H{sub 2}O solution. It turned out that the obtained particle coatings are of much better quality, i.e. homogeneity, compared to coatings made from a wet-chemical homogeneous precipitation process. The morphology and electrochemical properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coated YPO{sub 4}:Bi are discussed on the basis of optical spectroscopy, ESA measurements, and SEM/EDX investigations.

  8. Polysorbate 80-coated PLGA nanoparticles improve the permeability of acetylpuerarin and enhance its brain-protective effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Deqing; Xue, Aiying; Zhang, Bin; Lou, Haiyan; Shi, Huanying; Zhang, Xiumei

    2015-12-01

    Acetylpuerarin (AP) is an acetylated derivative of puerarin (PUE). The study aimed to prepare polysorbate 80-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles to improve the permeability of AP across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enhance its brain-protective effects. AP-loaded PLGA nanoparticles (AP-PLGA-NPs) were prepared using a solvent diffusion methodology. The NPs were characterized. The pharmacokinetics, tissue distributions and brain-protective effects of AP-PLGA-NPs were evaluated in animals. AP-PLGA-NPs were successfully prepared with a mean particle size of 145.0 nm and a zeta potential of -14.81 mV. The in-vitro release of AP from the PLGA-NPs showed a biphasic release profile. AP was metabolized into PUE in rats. The AUC0-∞ values of AP and PUE for AP-PLGA-NPs were 2.90- and 2.29-fold as great as those for AP solution, respectively. The values of the relative targeting efficiency in the brain were 2.40 and 2.58 for AP and PUE, and the ratios of peak concentration were 1.91 and 1.89 for AP and PUE, respectively. Compared with the crude drug, AP-PLGA-NPs showed better brain-protective effects in rats. Polysorbate 80-coated PLGA-NPs can improve the permeability of AP cross the BBB and enhance its brain-protective effects in rats. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. Glass-ceramic coating material for the CO2 laser based sintering of thin films as caries and erosion protection.

    PubMed

    Bilandžić, Marin Dean; Wollgarten, Susanne; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Poprawe, Reinhart; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; Fischer, Horst

    2017-09-01

    The established method of fissure-sealing using polymeric coating materials exhibits limitations on the long-term. Here, we present a novel technique with the potential to protect susceptible teeth against caries and erosion. We hypothesized that a tailored glass-ceramic material could be sprayed onto enamel-like substrates to create superior adhesion properties after sintering by a CO2 laser beam. A powdered dental glass-ceramic material from the system SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-Al2O3-MgO was adjusted with individual properties suitable for a spray coating process. The material was characterized using X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), heating microscopy, dilatometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), grain size analysis, biaxial flexural strength measurements, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and gas pycnometry. Three different groups of samples (each n=10) where prepared: Group A, powder pressed glass-ceramic coating material; Group B, sintered hydroxyapatite specimens; and Group C, enamel specimens (prepared from bovine teeth). Group B and C where spray coated with glass-ceramic powder. All specimens were heat treated using a CO2 laser beam process. Cross-sections of the laser-sintered specimens were analyzed using laser scanning microscopy (LSM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and SEM. The developed glass-ceramic material (grain size d50=13.1mm, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE)=13.310(-6)/K) could be spray coated on all tested substrates (mean thickness=160μm). FTIR analysis confirmed an absorption of the laser energy up to 95%. The powdered glass-ceramic material was successfully densely sintered in all sample groups. The coating interface investigation by SEM and EDX proved atomic diffusion and adhesion of the glass-ceramic material to hydroxyapatite and to dental enamel. A glass-ceramic material with suitable absorption properties was successfully sprayed and laser-sintered in thin films on hydroxyapatite as well as on bovine enamel

  10. Thermal Barrier and Protective Coatings to Improve the Durability of a Combustor Under a Pulse Detonation Engine Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2008-01-01

    Pulse detonation engine (PDE) concepts are receiving increasing attention for future aeronautic propulsion applications, due to their potential thermodynamic cycle efficiency and higher thrust to density ratio that lead to the decrease in fuel consumption. But the resulting high gas temperature and pressure fluctuation distributions at high frequency generated with every detonation are viewed to be detrimental to the combustor liner material. Experimental studies on a typical metal combustion material exposed to a laser simulated pulse heating showed extensive surface cracking. Coating of the combustor materials with low thermal conductivity ceramics is shown to protect the metal substrate, reduce the thermal stresses, and hence increase the durability of the PDE combustor liner material. Furthermore, the temperature fluctuation and depth of penetration is observed to decrease with increasing the detonation frequency. A crack propagation rate in the coating is deduced by monitoring the variation of the coating apparent thermal conductivity with time that can be utilized as a health monitoring technique for the coating system under a rapid fluctuating heat flux.

  11. Suppression of Aluminum Current Collector Dissolution by Protective Ceramic Coatings for Better High-Voltage Battery Performance.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Andreas; Krott, Manuel; Streipert, Benjamin; Uhlenbruck, Sven; Winter, Martin; Placke, Tobias

    2017-01-04

    Batteries based on cathode materials that operate at high cathode potentials, such as LiNi0.5 Mn1.5 O4 (LNMO), in lithium-ion batteries or graphitic carbons in dual-ion batteries suffer from anodic dissolution of the aluminum (Al) current collector in organic solvent-based electrolytes based on imide salts, such as lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (LiTFSI). In this work, we developed a protective surface modification for the Al current collector by applying ceramic coatings of chromium nitride (Crx N) and studied the anodic Al dissolution behavior. By magnetron sputter deposition, two different coating types, which differ in their composition according to the CrN and Cr2 N phases, were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and their electronic conductivity. Furthermore, the anodic dissolution behavior was studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronocoulometry measurements in two different electrolyte mixtures, that is, LiTFSI in ethyl methyl sulfone and LiTFSI in ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate 1:1 (by weight). These measurements showed a remarkably reduced current density or cumulative charge during the charge process, indicating an improved anodic stability of the protected Al current collector. The coating surfaces after electrochemical treatment were characterized by means of SEM and XPS, and the presence or lack of pit formation, as well as electrolyte degradation products could be well correlated to the electrochemical results.

  12. Analytical modeling of intumescent coating thermal protection system in a JP-5 fuel fire environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, K. J.; Shimizu, A. B.; Suchsland, K. E.; Moyer, C. B.

    1974-01-01

    The thermochemical response of Coating 313 when exposed to a fuel fire environment was studied to provide a tool for predicting the reaction time. The existing Aerotherm Charring Material Thermal Response and Ablation (CMA) computer program was modified to treat swelling materials. The modified code is now designated Aerotherm Transient Response of Intumescing Materials (TRIM) code. In addition, thermophysical property data for Coating 313 were analyzed and reduced for use in the TRIM code. An input data sensitivity study was performed, and performance tests of Coating 313/steel substrate models were carried out. The end product is a reliable computational model, the TRIM code, which was thoroughly validated for Coating 313. The tasks reported include: generation of input data, development of swell model and implementation in TRIM code, sensitivity study, acquisition of experimental data, comparisons of predictions with data, and predictions with intermediate insulation.

  13. Oleic acid-grafted chitosan/graphene oxide composite coating for corrosion protection of carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Fayyad, Eman M; Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Al-Maadeed, Mariam Al Ali

    2016-10-20

    An anticorrosion coating film based on the formation of nanocomposite coating is reported in this study. The composite consisted of chitosan (green matrix), oleic acid, and graphene oxide (nano filler). The nanocomposite coating was arranged on the surface of carbon steel, and the corrosion resistance was monitored using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization (PP). Compared to the pure chitosan (CS) coating, the corrosion resistance of oleic acid-modified chitosan/graphene oxide film (CS/GO-OA) is increased by 100 folds. Since the well-dispersed smart grafted nanolayers delayed the penetration rate of corrosive species and thus maintained long term anticorrosive stability which is correlated with hydrophobicity and permeability.

  14. Polarization compensating protective coatings for TPF-Coronagraph optics to control contrast degrading cross polarization leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis Z.; Marchen, Luis F.; Shaklan, Stuart B.

    2005-01-01

    We describe here the design approaches and performance analysis of the OTA in the wavelength band of interest. Coronagraph performance at 600nm wavelength based on a particular coating and occulting focal plane mask is also presented.

  15. Protective Properties of Various Coatings on CoSb3 Thermoelectric Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Degang; Wu, Di; Ning, Jiai; Zuo, Min

    2017-05-01

    In this study, various coatings including Mo, Ti, Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ)/Ti films were deposited on the CoSb3 substrate using magnetron sputtering to suppress the sublimation of antimony in CoSb3 during thermal aging tests. The microstructure and growth of films were observed using scanning electron and atomic force microscopes. The thermal aging behavior of CoSb3 coated with various films was investigated through an accelerated experiment at 923 K for 24 h. The weight loss of CoSb3 decreased with the thickness of coatings increasing. Among these films, the YSZ/Ti film can suppress the sublimation of antimony in CoSb3 more effectively. Compared with the uncoated CoSb3 material, the degradation of thermoelectric properties for coated CoSb3 samples decreased slowly after the accelerated thermal aging test.

  16. An intumescent coating for improved fuel fire protection of heat sensitive articles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Fontes, E. J.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Intumescent coating compositions have been prepared using the ammonium salt of 4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid and a copolymer of polysulfide-epoxy resin as the binder, into which have been dispersed various fillers. The fillers used in the study were low density microballoons for density control and fibers for controlled intumescence on contoured substrates. The filler effect on the thermal-physical efficiency of coatings has been measured. The coating utilizing short length silica fibers has been shown to have superior mechanical, environmental, and thermal properties. The coating applied to the exterior of loaded weapons has increased the time-to-detonation from three minutes for the unprotected weapon to 10-13 minutes.

  17. Protective lithium ion conducting ceramic coating for lithium metal anodes and associate method

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.

    1994-01-01

    A battery structure including a cathode, a lithium metal anode and an electrolyte disposed between the lithium anode and the cathode utilizes a thin-film layer of lithium phosphorus oxynitride overlying so as to coat the lithium anode and thereby separate the lithium anode from the electrolyte. If desired, a preliminary layer of lithium nitride may be coated upon the lithium anode before the lithium phosphorous oxynitride is, in turn, coated upon the lithium anode so that the separation of the anode and the electrolyte is further enhanced. By coating the lithium anode with this material lay-up, the life of the battery is lengthened and the performance of the battery is enhanced.

  18. Raising the shields: PCR in the presence of metallic surfaces protected by tailor-made coatings.

    PubMed

    Scherag, Frank D; Brandstetter, Thomas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    The implementation of PCR reactions in the presence of metallic surfaces is interesting for the generation of novel bioanalytical devices, because metals exhibit high mechanical stability, good thermal conductivity, and flexibility during deformation. However, metallic substrates are usually non-compatible with enzymatic reactions such as PCR due to poisoning of the active center of the enzyme or nonspecific adsorption of the enzymeto the metal surface, which could result in protein denaturation. We present a method for the generation of polymer coatings on metallic surfaces which are designed to minimize protein adsorption and also prevent the release of metal ions. These coatings consist of three layers covalently linked to each other; a self-assembled monolayer to promote adhesion, a photochemically generated barrier layer and a photochemically generated hydrogel. The coatings can be deposited onto aluminum, stainless steel, gold and copper surfaces. We compare PCR efficiencies in the presence of bare metallic surfaces with those of surfaces treated with the novel coating system.

  19. Hybrid nanostructured coatings for corrosion protection of base metals: a sustainability perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Robert V.; Patil, Vikas; Andrews, Justin L.; Aldinger, Jeffrey P.; Yadav, Ganapati D.; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2015-03-01

    In this topical review article, we attempt to capture recent advances in the development of sustainable hybrid nanocomposite coatings for the corrosion inhibition of structural metals. Spurred primarily by the urgent imperative of replacing hexavalent chromium but also driven by concerns regarding the environmental impact of organic solvents, materials criticality considerations, the need to maintain structural integrity and function under extreme environments, and a renewed impetus towards lightweighting, the design of new coating concepts has seen an explosion of activity. We discuss varying modes of corrosion inhibition and the drive towards multicomponent nanostructured coatings that synergistically unite multiple modes of corrosion inhibition within a single coating system. Nanocomposite coatings in which nanoparticles of one phase are dispersed within a continuous phase, usually a polymeric matrix, provide a modular design approach to multifunctional coatings provided fundamental challenges such as dispersion and compatibility can be resolved. By dint of their high surface-to-volume ratios, the incorporation of nanoparticles profoundly modifies the adjacent polymeric matrix, giving rise to an ‘interphase’ region with modified properties, at relatively low filler loadings. The implications of incorporating metallic, porous metal oxide, and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotubes) within polymeric matrices are explored with an emphasis on active corrosion inhibition. The availability of high-quality nanoparticles that are either electroactive (e.g., metals, graphene, carbon nanotubes, etc.) or are capable of serving as reservoirs for active corrosion inhibitors (e.g., porous silicon oxide, layered double hydroxides, halloysite) provides unprecedented functionality and opportunities for multifunctional coatings. The review emphasizes mechanistic considerations where these have been elucidated with a view towards developing systematic design

  20. PEGylated chitosan protected silver nanoparticles as water-borne coating for leather with antibacterial property.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gongyan; Li, Kaijun; Luo, Quanqing; Wang, Haibo; Zhang, Zongcai

    2017-03-15

    Development of eco-labeled and effectively antibacterial coatings for final leather products has been desiderated both by industry and by consumers. Herein, PEGylated chitosan modified silver nanoparticles (PEG-g-CS@AgNPs) were prepared and characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antimicrobial activity of such silver nanoparticles was investigated against Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), exhibiting much lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) than chitosan or PEG-g-CS. Water-borne coating was formed by immobilizing the PEG-g-CS@AgNPs onto the leather surface through the electrostatic interaction between amino groups of chitosan and carboxyl groups of leather collagen. Scanning electron microscopy and water contact angle were employed to study the coating's morphology and hydrophilicity, respectively. After coating, leather samples showed significantly high bactericidal efficiency with reusability after release of dead cells from the coating by simply water washing. The excellent antibacterial property of PEG-g-CS@AgNPs coating was ascribed to the combination of bacteria-resistance and bacteria-release by PEGylation, and dual bacteria-killing based on chitosan and Ag(+) release. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Properties of Thick Sputtered Ta used for Protective Gun Tube Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Matson, Dean W.; McClanahan, Edwin D.; Lee, Sabrina L.; Windover, Donald

    2001-10-01

    Thick tantalum coatings were deposited on the bore surfaces of 25 mm I.D. cylindrical gun steel substrates using a high-rate triode sputtering apparatus. Sputtering parameters affecting the tantalum phase and microstructure were investigated. Prior work has indicated that the sputtering gas species and substrate temperature during deposition affect the characteristics of the tantalum coatings. In the work presented here, we report on experimental studies aimed at evaluating additional phase and microstructural effects resulting from changes in sputtering gas species and substrate bias during the deposition. Tantalum deposits of 75 to 140 {mu}m thicknesses were evaluated using x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microindentation hardness measurements. Coatings deposited using krypton gas, a 200 C substrate temperature, and 3.5 mTorr gas pressure also showed little variation when deposited at substrate biases ranging from 50 to 150 V. However, the tantalum coatings produced under similar conditions with an unbiased (floating) substrate were found to be the beta phase of the material and had a columnar microstructure. Beta-phase tantalum was produced at low substrate biases (from 0 to 50 V) when using Xe as the sputtering gas. Both phase and microstructure of the tantalum coating could be altered in mid-run by adjusting the sputtering parameters and appeared independent of the phase and microstructure of the underlying coating.

  2. Investigation of thermal spray coatings on austenitic stainless steel substrate to enhance corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Daniel M.

    The research is aimed to evaluate thermal spray coatings to address material issues in supercritical and ultra-supercritical Rankine cycles. The primary purpose of the research is to test, evaluate, and eventually implement a coating to improve corrosion resistance and increase efficiency of coal fired power plants. The research is performed as part of a comprehensive project to evaluate the ability of titanium, titanium carbide, or titanium diboride powders to provide fireside corrosion resistance in supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam boilers, specifically, coal driven boilers in Illinois that must utilize high sulfur and high chlorine content coal. [1] The powder coatings that were tested are nano-sized titanium carbide (TiC) and titanium di-boride (TiB2) powders that were synthesized by a patented process at Southern Illinois University. The powders were then sent to Gas Technology Institute in Chicago to coat steel coupons by HVOF (High Velocity Oxy-Fuel) thermal spray technique. The powders were coated on an austenitic 304H stainless steel substrate which is commonly found in high temperature boilers, pipelines, and heat exchangers. The samples then went through various tests for various lengths of time under subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical conditions. The samples were examined using a scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction techniques to study microstructural changes and then determined which coating performed best.

  3. EXAMINATION OF THE OXIDATION PROTECTION OF ZINC COATINGS FORMED ON COPPER ALLOYS AND STEEL SUBSTRATES

    SciTech Connect

    Papazoglou, M.; Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Skolianos, S.

    2010-01-21

    The exposure of metallic components at aggressive high temperature environments, usually limit their usage at similar application because they suffer from severe oxidation attack. Copper alloys are used in a wide range of high-quality indoor and outdoor applications, statue parts, art hardware, high strength and high thermal conductivity applications. On the other hand, steel is commonly used as mechanical part of industrial set outs or in the construction sector due to its high mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is the examination of the oxidation resistance of pack cementation zinc coatings deposited on copper, leaded brass and steel substrates at elevated temperature conditions. Furthermore, an effort made to make a long-term evaluation of the coated samples durability. The oxidation results showed that bare substrates appear to have undergone severe damage comparing with the coated ones. Furthermore, the mass gain of the uncoated samples was higher than this of the zinc covered ones. Particularly zinc coated brass was found to be more resistant to oxidation conditions in which it was exposed as it has the lower mass gain as compared to the bare substrates and zinc coated copper. Zinc coated steel was also proved to be more resistive than the uncoated steel.

  4. Development of improved lacv-30 propeller blade coatings for protection against sand and rain erosion and marine environment corrosion. Final report 4 Jan 1982-4 Mar 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, G.A.

    1983-05-10

    An investigation was conducted of candidate systems offering potential erosion and corrosion protection when applied as coatings to Aluminum 7075 alloy propeller blades used to propel air cushioned vehicles operating in severe environments. This work focused on (1) special hard anodized and (2) hard nickel electroplated coatings as candidate protective systems with sand/rain erosion testing to evaluate their merits. Attributes of the coating systems developed and studied included: For (1) Ways and means to produce and control deposit hardness for optimum erosion resistance, methods of bonding to blades for high integrity adhesion, and inclusion of sacrificial corrosion protection electroplates in the coating systems (zinc and zinc-nickel alloy). For (2) Incorporation of dry film lubricant systems on sealed hardcoats of various anodic coating thicknesses to enhance erosion performance. Study results indicated that anodized coatings did not provide suitable erosion protection to Aluminum 7075 in sand/rain environments, even with dry film lubricant supplemental films. Electroplated hard nickel coatings, Vickers hardnesses in the range of 380 to 440, appeared better for combined sand/rain erosion resistance based on comparisons with prior work. Dilute phosphoric anodizing the aluminum substrates led to excellent bonds and improved corrosion resistance when subsequently plated with ductile nickel from a low pH bath, followed by hard nickel electroplate.

  5. Weldability of Fe-Al-Cr Overlay Coatings for CorrosionProtection in Oxidizing/Sulfidizing Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Regina, JR

    2003-03-04

    The effect of chromium additions to the weldability of Fe-Al based overlay claddings are currently being investigated for the corrosion protection of boiler tubes in Low NOx furnaces. The primary objective of this research is to identify weldable (crack-free) Fe-Al-Cr weld overlay coating compositions that provide corrosion resistance over long exposure times. During the current project phase, preliminary corrosion testing was conducted on several ternary Fe-Al-Cr alloys in two types of gaseous corrosion environments. These long-term corrosion tests were used to develop a target weld composition matrix and serve as a base line for future corrosion tests. Preliminary Fe-Al based welds with various aluminum concentrations and one ternary Fe-Al-Cr weld overlay were successfully deposited using a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process and cracking susceptibility was evaluated on these coatings.

  6. Protection of yttria-stabilized zirconia for dental applications by oxidic PVD coating.

    PubMed

    Hübsch, C; Dellinger, P; Maier, H J; Stemme, F; Bruns, M; Stiesch, M; Borchers, L

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the application of transparent physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings on zirconia ceramics was examined as an approach to retard the low-temperature degradation of zirconia for dental applications. Transparent monolayers of titanium oxide (TixOy) and multilayers consisting of titanium oxide-alumina-titanium oxide (TixOy-AlxOy-TixOy) were deposited onto standardized discs of 3Y-TZP using magnetron sputtering. Using X-ray photospectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry, the compositions of the coatings were verified, and an approximate thickness of 50 nm for each type of coating was ascertained. After aging the coated and uncoated samples in water vapor at 134°C and 3 bar for 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 and 128 h, the monoclinic phase content was determined using X-ray diffraction, and its impact on mechanical properties was assessed in biaxial flexural strength tests. In addition, the depth of the transformation zone was measured from scanning electron microscopy images of the fracture surfaces of hydrothermally aged samples. The results revealed that the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation of the zirconia ceramic was retarded by the application of PVD coatings. During the first stages of aging, the coated samples exhibited a significantly lower monoclinic phase content than the uncoated samples and, after 128 h of aging, showed a transformation zone which was only ∼12-15 μm thick compared to ∼30 μm in the control group. Biaxial flexural strength decreased by ∼10% during aging and was not influenced by the application of a PVD coating.

  7. Effect of protective coating on marginal integrity of nanohybrid composite during bleaching with carbamide peroxide: A microleakage study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A Ashok; Hariharavel, V P; Narayanan, Ashwin; Murali, S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the microleakage on the marginal integrity of nanohybrid composite during bleaching with carbamide peroxide after applying a protective coating of G-Coat plus (GC, Japan). Class V cavities were prepared and restored with nanohybrid composite restoration in 60 freshly extracted noncarious premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. Then they were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 - bleaching with carbamide peroxide without G coat plus (n = 20), Group 2 - bleaching with carbamide peroxide with G-Coat plus (n = 20), Group 3 - without bleaching procedure (n = 20) (control group). In Group 2, G coat plus was applied over the restorative surface and margins. Then all teeth in Groups 1 and 2 were taken and mounted in dental stone. Bleaching trays were custom fabricated over the cast with the help of a heated vacuum-forming machine. 10% carbamide peroxide (opalescence PF) was applied over the tooth, and the bleaching process was done for about 2 weeks. Then all samples underwent thermocycling and were then immersed in the 2% methylene blue solution for 24 h and observed under a stereomicroscope to evaluate the amount of dye penetration. Data were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test using SPSS Inc.; Chicago, IL, USA, Version 17.0. Mann-Whitney test shows that the difference in microleakage between Group 1-Group 2 and Group 2-Group 3 is statistically significant (P < 0.05). Significant reduction in microleakage was seen in Group 2 when compared to other groups.

  8. Fe-Al Weld Overlay and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Waterwalls in Fossil Fired Plants with Low NOx Burners

    SciTech Connect

    Regina, J.R.

    2002-02-08

    Iron-aluminum-chromium coatings were investigated to determine the best candidates for coatings of boiler tubes in Low NOx fossil fueled power plants. Ten iron-aluminum-chromium weld claddings with aluminum concentrations up to 10wt% were tested in a variety of environments to evaluate their high temperature corrosion resistance. The weld overlay claddings also contained titanium additions to investigate any beneficial effects from these ternary and quaternary alloying additions. Several High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with higher aluminum concentrations were investigated as well. Gaseous corrosion testing revealed that at least 10wt%Al is required for protection in the range of environments examined. Chromium additions were beneficial in all of the environments, but additions of titanium were beneficial only in sulfur rich atmospheres. Similar results were observed when weld claddings were in contact with corrosive slag while simultaneously, exposed to the corrosive environments. An aluminum concentration of 10wt% was required to prevent large amounts of corrosion to take place. Again chromium additions were beneficial with the greatest corrosion protection occurring for welds containing both 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr. The exposed thermal spray coatings showed either significant cracking within the coating, considerable thickness loss, or corrosion products at the coating substrate interface. Therefore, the thermal spray coatings provided the substrate very little protection. Overall, it was concluded that of the coatings studied weld overlay coatings provide superior protection in these Low NOx environments; specifically, the ternary weld composition of 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr provided the best corrosion protection in all of the environments tested.

  9. B{sub 4}C protective coating under irradiation by QSPA-T intensive plasma fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Buzhinskij, O. I.; Barsuk, V. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Klimov, N. S.; Otroshchenko, V. G.; Putric, A. B.

    2016-12-15

    The effect of the QSPA-T pulsed plasma irradiation on the crystalline boron carbide B{sub 4}C coating was examined. The duration of the rectangular plasma pulses was 0.5 ms with an interval of 5–10 min between pulses. The maximum power density in the central part of plasma stream was 1 GW/m{sup 2}. The coating thickness varied from 20 to 40 μm on different surface areas. Modification of the surface layers and transformation of the coating at elevated temperature under plasma pulse irradiation during four successive series of impulses are described. It is shown that the boron carbide coating withstood the full cycle of tests under irradiation with 100 plasma pulses with peak power density of 1GW/m{sup 2}. Constitutive surface deterioration was not detected and the boron carbide coating kept crystal structure B{sub 4}C throughout the irradiation zone at the surface depth no less 2 μm.

  10. Effect of zinc phosphate chemical conversion coating on corrosion behaviour of mild steel in alkaline medium: protection of rebars in reinforced concrete.

    PubMed

    Simescu, Florica; Idrissi, Hassane

    2008-12-01

    We outline the ability of zinc phosphate coatings, obtained by chemical conversion, to protect mild steel rebars against localized corrosion, generated by chloride ions in alkaline media. The corrosion resistance of coated steel, in comparison with uncoated rebars and coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar, were evaluated by open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, cronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The coated surfaces were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. First, coated mild steel rebars were studied in an alkaline solution with and without chloride simulating a concrete pore solution. The results showed that the slow dissolution of the coating generates hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. After a long immersion, the coating became dense and provided an effective corrosion resistance compared with the mild steel rebar. Secondly, the coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar and immersed in chloride solution showed no corrosion or deterioration of the coated steel. Corrosion rate is considerably lowered by this phosphate coating.

  11. Ultrananocrystalline diamond film as a wear resistant and protective coating for mechanical seal applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumant, A. V.; Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Auciello, O.; Erdemir, A.; Williams, M.; Artiles, A. F.; Adams, W.; Western Michigan Univ.; Flowserve Corp.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical shaft seals used in pumps are critically important to the safe operation of the paper, pulp, and chemical process industry, as well as petroleum and nuclear power plants. Specifically, these seals prevent the leakage of toxic gases and hazardous chemicals to the environment and final products from the rotating equipment used in manufacturing processes. Diamond coatings have the potential to provide negligible wear, ultralow friction, and high corrosion resistance for the sliding surfaces of mechanical seals, because diamond exhibits outstanding tribological, physical, and chemical properties. However, diamond coatings produced by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) exhibit high surface roughness (R{sub a} {>=} 1 {mu}m), which results in high wear of the seal counterface, leading to premature seal failure. To avoid this problem, we have developed an ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) film formed by a unique CH{sub 4}/Ar microwave plasma CVD method. This method yields extremely smooth diamond coatings with surface roughness R{sub a} = 20-30 nm and an average grain size of 2-5 nm. We report the results of a systematic test program involving uncoated and UNCD-coated SiC shaft seals. Results confirmed that the UNCD-coated seals exhibited neither measurable wear nor any leakage during long-duration tests that took 21 days to complete. In addition, the UNCD coatings reduced the frictional torque for seal rotation by five to six times compared with the uncoated seals. This work promises to lead to rotating shaft seals with much improved service life, reduced maintenance cost, reduced leakage of environmentally hazardous materials, and increased energy savings. This technology may also have many other tribological applications involving rolling or sliding contacts.

  12. Development of a protective decorative fire resistant low smoke emitting, thermally stable coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development of suitable electrocoatings and subsequent application to nonconductive substrates are discussed. Substrates investigated were plastics or resin-treated materials such as FX-resin (phenolic-type resin) impregnated fiberglass mat, polyphenylene sulfide, polyether sulfone and polyimide-impregnated unidirectional fiberglass. Efforts were aimed at formulating a fire-resistant, low smoke emitting, thermally stable, easily cleaned coating material. The coating is to be used for covering substrate panels, such as aluminum, silicate foam, polymeric structural entities, etc., all of which are applied in the aircraft cabin interior and thus subject to the spillages, scuffing, spotting and the general contaminants which prevail in aircraft passenger compartments.

  13. Hard protective waterproof coating for high-power laser optical elements.

    PubMed

    Murahara, Masataka; Sato, Nobuhiro; Ikadai, Akimitsu

    2005-12-15

    We developed a new method for making a waterproof coating by photooxidation of silicone oil. The silicone oil was spin coated onto the surfaces of optical elements, i.e., a plastic lens, a laser mirror, and a nonlinear optical crystal, and then irradiated with a xenon excimer lamp in air, which transformed the organic silicone oil into an amorphous glass film. This technique has enabled an optical thin film to transmit ultraviolet rays of wavelengths below 200 nm and to exhibit the characteristics of homogeneity, high density, and resistance to environmental effects and to corrosion by water, and a Mohs scale value of 5.

  14. Atomic oxygen protective coating with resistance to undercutting at defect sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Rutledge, Sharon K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Structures composed at least partially of an organic substrate may be protected from oxidation by applying a catalyst onto said substrate for promoting the combination of atomic oxygen to molecular oxygen. The structure may also be protected by applying both a catalyst and an atomic oxygen shielding layer onto the substrate. The structures to be protected include spacecraft surfaces.

  15. Surface modifications and surface-protective coatings analyzed by means of thermal waves (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bein, B. K.; Fotsing, J. L. N.; Gibkes, J.; Delgadillo-Holtfort, I.; Dietzel, D.; Pelzl, J.

    2003-01-01

    The depth profiles of the thermophysical properties of alloy systems, for example, shape memory alloys (NiTi), steel, and tool steel, can vary considerably due to rolling, surface machining, heat treatment, mechanical wear, and erosion. The same is true for coated tool steel samples, which show variations of the effective thermal depth profiles due to the effects of substrate preparation and deposition of the coatings, for example, plasma-etching, arc erosion, nitriding, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), physical vapor deposition (PVD), sputter deposition, and plasma spraying. In this work we present a large variety of measured effective thermal depth profiles. In a first step, we identify the effects of coating deposition and substrate preparation on the measured depth profiles. In a second step, we identify and try to quantify the effects of mechanical wear and erosion of both coated and uncoated surface. To this finality, the signals, which have been measured with the help of IR radiometry as a function of the modulation frequency, have been calibrated with reference signals measured for homogeneous samples of glassy carbon. The normalized amplitudes and phases have been approximated using layer models, mainly the two- and three-layer model with an opaque first layer, with respect to both the visible and the IR spectrum. Additionally, the signals measured for different coatings have been normalized against each other. By this latter calibration procedure, even smaller details and differences of coating deposition and substrate preparation can be identified, as well as the effects of wear and surface erosion. The virgin coated samples normally can well be described by the two-layer model, and the thermal transport parameters of the coatings as a whole can be determined quantitatively with rather good reliability (Ref. 1). The deviations from the two-layer model, which can be related to details of the deposition process, for example, to gradient layers or bond

  16. Novel biodegradable calcium phosphate/polymer composite coating with adjustable mechanical properties formed by hydrothermal process for corrosion protection of magnesium substrate.

    PubMed

    Kaabi Falahieh Asl, Sara; Nemeth, Sandor; Tan, Ming Jen

    2016-11-01

    Ceramic type coatings on metallic implants, such as calcium phosphate (Ca-P), are generally stiff and brittle, potentially leading to the early failure of the bone-implant interface. To reduce material brittleness, polyacrylic acid and carboxymethyl cellulose were used in this study to deposit two types of novel Ca-P/polymer composite coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy using a one-step hydrothermal process. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy showed that the deposited Ca-P crystal phase and morphology could be controlled by the type and concentration of polymer used. Incorporation of polymer in the Ca-P coatings reduced the coating elastic modulus bringing it close to that of magnesium and that of human bone. Nanoindentation test results revealed significantly decreased cracking tendency with the incorporation of polymer in the Ca-P coating. Apart from mechanical improvements, the protective composite layers had also enhanced the corrosion resistance of the substrate by a factor of 1000 which is sufficient for implant application. Cell proliferation studies indicated that the composite coatings induced better cell attachment compared with the purely inorganic Ca-P coating, confirming that the obtained composite materials could be promising candidates for surface protection of magnesium for implant application with the multiple functions of corrosion protection, interfacial stress reduction, and cell attachment/cell growth promotion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1643-1657, 2016.

  17. A Five-year Performance Study of Low VOC Coatings over Zinc Thermal Spray for the Protection of Carbon Steel at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    The launch facilities at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are located approximately 1000 feet from the Atlantic Ocean where they are exposed to salt deposits, high humidity, high UV degradation, and acidic exhaust from solid rocket boosters. These assets are constructed from carbon steel, which requires a suitable coating to provide long-term protection to reduce corrosion and its associated costs. While currently used coating systems provide excellent corrosion control performance, they are subject to occupational, safety, and environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their use. Many contain high volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants, and other hazardous materials. Hazardous waste from coating operations include vacuum filters, zinc dust, hazardous paint related material, and solid paint. There are also worker safety issues such as exposure to solvents and isocyanates. To address these issues, top-coated thermal spray zinc coating systems were investigated as a promising environmentally friendly corrosion protection for carbon steel in an acidic launch environment. Additional benefits of the combined coating system include a long service life, cathodic protection to the substrate, no volatile contaminants, and high service temperatures. This paper reports the results of a performance based study to evaluate low VOC topcoats (for thermal spray zinc coatings) on carbon steel for use in a space launch environment.

  18. Electrochemically assisted deposition of hydroxyapatite on Ti6Al4V substrates covered by CVD diamond films - Coating characterization and first cell biological results.

    PubMed

    Strąkowska, Paulina; Beutner, René; Gnyba, Marcin; Zielinski, Andrzej; Scharnweber, Dieter

    2016-02-01

    Although titanium and its alloys are widely used as implant material for orthopedic and dental applications they show only limited corrosion stability and osseointegration in different cases. The aim of the presented research was to develop and characterize a novel surface modification system from a thin diamond base layer and a hydroxyapatite (HAp) top coating deposited on the alloy Ti6Al4V widely used for implants in contact with bone. This coating system is expected to improve both the long-term corrosion behavior and the biocompatibility and bioactivity of respective surfaces. The diamond base films were obtained by Microwave Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PACVD); the HAp coatings were formed in aqueous solutions by electrochemically assisted deposition (ECAD) at varying polarization parameters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman microscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements were applied to characterize the generated surface states; the calcium phosphate coatings were additionally chemically analyzed for their composition. The biological properties of the coating system were assessed using hMSC cells analyzing for cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation. Varying MW-PACVD process conditions resulted in composite coatings containing microcrystalline diamond (MCD/Ti-C), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) with the NCD coatings being dense and homogeneous and the B-NCD coatings showing increased electrical conductivity. The ECAD process resulted in calcium phosphate coatings from stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric HAp. The deposition of HAp on the B-NCD films run at lower cathodic potentials and resulted both in the highest coating mass and the most homogenous appearance. Initial cell biological investigations showed an improved cell adhesion in the order B-NCD>HAp/B-NCD>uncoated substrate. Cell proliferation was improved for both investigated coatings whereas ALP

  19. A strategy to establish a gene-activated matrix on titanium using gene vectors protected in a polylactide coating.

    PubMed

    Kolk, Andreas; Haczek, Cornelia; Koch, Christian; Vogt, Stephan; Kullmer, Martin; Pautke, Christoph; Deppe, Herbert; Plank, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Bioactive implants are promising tools in regenerative medicine. Here we describe a versatile procedure for preparing a gene-activated matrix on titanium. Lyophilized copolymer-protected gene vectors (COPROGs) suspended in poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA) solutions in ethyl acetate were used to varnish solid surfaces. The gene-activated PDLLA surfaces were first established on polypropylene 96-well plates. Vector release from these surfaces in aqueous buffer, cell viability and gene transfer efficiency to NIH 3T3 fibroblasts was strongly dependent on the vector dose and its ratio to PDLLA film thickness. A detailed analysis of these relationships allowed establishing correlations which can be used to calculate suitable combinations of COPROGs and PDLLA yielding optimal gene transfer efficiency. This was verified with COPROG-activated PDLLA coatings on titanium foils. HEK 293 and mesenchymal stem cells expressed the BMP-2 gene comprised in the gene-activated surface in a manner that was consistent with the predicted dose-response and toxicity profiles found in NIH 3T3 cells. The systematic procedure presented here for identifying optimal coating compositions can be applied to any combination of vector type and coating material.

  20. Study on cerium-doped nano-TiO2 coatings for corrosion protection of 316 L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Li, Suning; Wang, Qian; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Zhihua; Wang, Ying; Fu, Jiajun

    2012-04-19

    Many methods have been reported on improving the photogenerated cathodic protection of nano-TiO2 coatings for metals. In this work, nano-TiO2 coatings doped with cerium nitrate have been developed by sol-gel method for corrosion protection of 316 L stainless steel. Surface morphology, structure, and properties of the prepared coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The corrosion protection performance of the prepared coatings was evaluated in 3 wt% NaCl solution by using electrochemical techniques in the presence and absence of simulated sunlight illumination. The results indicated that the 1.2% Ce-TiO2 coating with three layers exhibited an excellent photogenerated cathodic protection under illumination attributed to the higher separation efficiency of electron-hole pairs and higher photoelectric conversion efficiency. The results also showed that after doping with an appropriate concentration of cerium nitrate, the anti-corrosion performance of the TiO2 coating was improved even without irradiation due to the self-healing property of cerium ions.