Science.gov

Sample records for paediatric practice impact

  1. Therapeutic clowning in paediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Fiona; Baverstock, Anna; Lenton, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Over the past 30 years, there has been much research into the health benefits of humour and laughter. Although often viewed very positively, rigorous evaluation of the therapeutic effect of clowning is complex. Clowning is a multi-modal intervention, which may have an impact on medical conditions, procedures, family functioning and health care teams. Clowns help children to adapt to their hospital surroundings and can distract from, and demystify, painful or frightening procedures through 'doses of fun' to complement traditional clinical interventions. This paper provides a review of the paediatric literature and reveals studies looking at the effect of clown interventions on various practical procedures and individual medical conditions, and the effects of clowning within clinical teams.

  2. Diagnostic omission errors in acute paediatric practice: impact of a reminder system on decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Ramnarayan, Padmanabhan; Winrow, Andrew; Coren, Michael; Nanduri, Vasanta; Buchdahl, Roger; Jacobs, Benjamin; Fisher, Helen; Taylor, Paul M; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Britto, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Background Diagnostic error is a significant problem in specialities characterised by diagnostic uncertainty such as primary care, emergency medicine and paediatrics. Despite wide-spread availability, computerised aids have not been shown to significantly improve diagnostic decision-making in a real world environment, mainly due to the need for prolonged system consultation. In this study performed in the clinical environment, we used a Web-based diagnostic reminder system that provided rapid advice with free text data entry to examine its impact on clinicians' decisions in an acute paediatric setting during assessments characterised by diagnostic uncertainty. Methods Junior doctors working over a 5-month period at four paediatric ambulatory units consulted the Web-based diagnostic aid when they felt the need for diagnostic assistance. Subjects recorded their clinical decisions for patients (differential diagnosis, test-ordering and treatment) before and after system consultation. An expert panel of four paediatric consultants independently suggested clinically significant decisions indicating an appropriate and 'safe' assessment. The primary outcome measure was change in the proportion of 'unsafe' workups by subjects during patient assessment. A more sensitive evaluation of impact was performed using specific validated quality scores. Adverse effects of consultation on decision-making, as well as the additional time spent on system use were examined. Results Subjects attempted to access the diagnostic aid on 595 occasions during the study period (8.6% of all medical assessments); subjects examined diagnostic advice only in 177 episodes (30%). Senior House Officers at hospitals with greater number of available computer workstations in the clinical area were most likely to consult the system, especially out of working hours. Diagnostic workups construed as 'unsafe' occurred in 47/104 cases (45.2%); this reduced to 32.7% following system consultation (McNemar test, p

  3. Azithromycin use in paediatrics: A practical overview.

    PubMed

    Ovetchkine, Philippe; Rieder, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Azithromycin is an antibiotic that is commonly prescribed for upper and lower respiratory tract infections in children. While it has proven benefits, some concerns regarding azithromycin use have arisen in recent years. This practice point considers azithromycin therapy for acute respiratory infections in otherwise healthy children. Pharmacokinetics, spectrum of activity, the problem of resistant bacteria and clinical aspects are considered, along with recommendations for use and contraindications. Azithromycin should be avoided in patients with a significant risk of bacteremia. It is associated with pneumococcal resistance and, with stated exceptions, is generally not recommended for the treatment of acute pharyngitis, acute otitis media or pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia in the paediatric population.

  4. The training paths and practice patterns of Canadian paediatric residency graduates, 2004–2010

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Tahir; Lawrence, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Paediatric Chairs of Canada have been proactive in workforce planning, anticipating paediatric job opportunities in academic centres. To complement this, it is important to characterize the practice profiles of paediatricians exiting training, including those working outside of tertiary care centres. OBJECTIVE: To describe the training paths and the practice patterns of Canadian paediatric residency graduates. METHODS: A survey was completed in 2010 to 2011 by Canadian program directors regarding residents completing core paediatrics training between 2004 and 2010. Data collection included training path after completing core paediatrics training and practice type after graduation. RESULTS: Of 699 residents completing their core training in paediatrics, training path data were available for 685 (98%). Overall, 430 (63%) residents completed subspecialty training while 255 (37%) completed general paediatrics training only. There was a significant increase in subspecialty training, from 59% in earlier graduates (2004 to 2007) to 67% in later graduates (2008 to 2010) (P=0.037). Practice pattern data after completion of training were available for 245 general paediatricians and 205 subspecialists. Sixty-nine percent of general paediatricians were community based while 85% of subspecialists were hospital based in tertiary or quaternary centres. Of all residents currently in practice, only 36 (8%) were working in rural, remote or underserviced areas. CONCLUSIONS: Almost two-thirds of recent Canadian paediatric graduates pursued subspecialty training. There was a significant increase in the frequency of subspecialty training among later-year graduates. Few graduates are practicing in rural or underserviced areas. Further studies are needed to determine whether these trends continue and their impact on the future paediatric workforce in Canada. PMID:27398047

  5. Impact of the European paediatric legislation in paediatric rheumatology: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Vesely, Richard; Saint-Raymond, Agnes; Martini, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Conducting clinical trials in paediatric rheumatology has been difficult mainly because of the lack of funding for academic studies and the lack of interest by pharmaceutical companies in the small and non-rewarding paediatric market. The situation changed dramatically a few years ago with the introduction of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act in the USA and of specific legislation for the development of paediatric medicines (Paediatric Regulation) in the European Union (EU). The EU Paediatric Regulation had a positive impact in paediatric rheumatology-in particular, on the development of new treatments for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Some problems remain, however, such as greater harmonisation of the regulatory aspects of medicines, how to handle me-too agents, how to conduct adequate pharmacokinetic studies and develop age-appropriate formulations, ethical problems in study review and implementation, and a change in the current JIA classification. The introduction of specific legislation, coupled with the existence of large international networks such as the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG at http://www.prcsg.org), covering North America, and the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO at http://www.printo.it), covering more than 50 countries, has led to great advances in paediatric rheumatology. Future changes might increase the possibility of conducting trials with similar approaches in other paediatric rheumatological conditions and provide evidence-based treatments for children affected by rheumatic diseases.

  6. Advanced practice in paediatric intensive care: a review.

    PubMed

    Heward, Yvonne

    2009-02-01

    Advanced nursing roles are one way of encouraging experienced nurses to stay in clinical practice so they can provide expert care, develop practice and be role models for junior staff. A search for literature about advanced nurse practice in paediatric intensive care units in the UK identified just four articles, including one survey, but no reports of empirical research. There is some consensus on the nature and educational requirements for advanced practice but delays in agreeing a regulatory framework and failure to recognise the potential contribution of advanced roles mean that development is hindered. Although several UK units have developed or are developing the role, more insight and better evidence is needed on how nursing can be advanced in paediatric intensive care settings.

  7. Assessing quality of life in paediatric clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Angela M; Quine, Susan; Heaton, Maria D; Craig, Jonathan C

    2010-06-01

    The rising prevalence of children with chronic conditions has made quality of life an increasingly important outcome measure in paediatric practice. The discrepancy between doctors' and patients' perceptions of quality of life makes formal assessment necessary. In this paper we use a case scenario to answer commonly asked questions. What is quality of life and who can assess it? Why assess quality of life in the clinical setting? Is it feasible to measure in routine clinical practice? How is quality of life formally assessed? We provide a basic outline of the language and methods of quality of life assessment and use the case scenario to discuss the process of choosing an appropriate instrument. We conclude that quality of life assessment in clinical practice is feasible and provides benefits for both patients and doctors. The benefits include better informed doctors, improved patient doctor communication and a means to effectively monitor quality of life as a treatment outcome.

  8. Social paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Nick; Colomer, Concha; Alperstein, Garth; Bouvier, Paul; Colomer, Julia; Duperrex, Olivier; Gokcay, Gulbin; Julien, Gilles; Kohler, Lennart; Lindström, Bengt; Macfarlane, Aidan; Mercer, Raul; Panagiotopoulos, Takis; Schulpen, Tom

    2005-02-01

    Social paediatrics is an approach to child health that focuses on the child, in illness and in health, within the context of their society, environment, school, and family. The glossary clarifies the range of terms used to describe aspects of paediatric practice that overlap or are subsumed under social paediatrics and defines key social paediatric concepts. The glossary was compiled by a process of consultation and consensus building among the authors who are all members of the European Society for Social Paediatrics. Social paediatricians from outside Europe were included giving a more international perspective.

  9. Social paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, N.; Colomer, C.; Alperstein, G.; Bouvier, P.; Colomer, J.; Duperrex, O.; Gokcay, G.; Julien, G.; Kohler, L.; Lindstrom, B.; Macfarlane, A.; Mercer, R.; Panagiotopoulos, T.; Schulpen, T.; on, b

    2005-01-01

    Social paediatrics is an approach to child health that focuses on the child, in illness and in health, within the context of their society, environment, school, and family. The glossary clarifies the range of terms used to describe aspects of paediatric practice that overlap or are subsumed under social paediatrics and defines key social paediatric concepts. The glossary was compiled by a process of consultation and consensus building among the authors who are all members of the European Society for Social Paediatrics. Social paediatricians from outside Europe were included giving a more international perspective. PMID:15650140

  10. The relevance of the Goudge inquiry to the practice of child protection/forensic paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Skellern, Catherine; Donald, Terence

    2014-10-01

    In 2008 Ontario, Canada the Goudge Inquiry arose following increasing concerns about practices surrounding forensic pathology and the investigation of paediatric deaths. Some of the considerations and recommendations have relevance to child protection/forensic paediatricians, particularly in relation to their responsibilities in opinion formulation and as expert witnesses. By examining the Inquiry recommendations, this paper applies them in relation to child protection/forensic paediatrics by discussing forensic medicine and its legal context, how interpretation of published reports and data should be used in opinion formulation; issues of 'diagnosis' versus 'opinion'; issues specific to child protection paediatrics; quality control; aspects of report writing and terminological considerations. It concludes with an adaptation of key recommendations directly from those of Goudge, applied to the context of paediatric forensic medicine undertaken in child protection assessments.

  11. The EU paediatric regulation: effects on paediatric psychopharmacology in Europe.

    PubMed

    Stoyanova-Beninska, Violeta V; Wohlfarth, Tamar; Isaac, Maria; Kalverdijk, Luuk J; van den Berg, Henk; Gispen-de Wied, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Child and adolescent psychiatry is a relatively young field and the recognition, classification, and treatment of disorders in children and adolescents lag behind those in adults. In recent years there is an increasing awareness of the differences between children and adults in psychopathology and pharmacology. Related to this new paediatric regulations have been introduced. This article reviews the regulatory and legislative measures that were adopted in the EU in 2007 and the subsequent impact of these measures on the field of paediatric psychopharmacology. The consequences of the paediatric regulation in the EU are reflected in several domains: regulatory, research aimed at drug development and clinical practices. In the regulatory domain, the consequences include: new paediatric indications, inclusion of special (class) warnings, specification of dose regimens, and information on safety specific to children and adolescents, and development of new medicinal formulations. The paediatric regulation leads to timely development of paediatric friendly formulations and better quality of the clinical evidence. In clinical practices, an increased awareness of the uniqueness of paediatric pharmacology is emerging among medical professionals, and subsequent improvement of medical care (i.e. correct doses, appropriate formulation, monitoring for expected adverse events). In addition, clinical guidelines will have to be revised more frequently in order to integrate the recently acquired knowledge. The new regulations stimulate transparency and discussions between academia, pharmaceutical industry, and regulators. The purpose is to optimize clinical research and obtain evidence for paediatric psychopharmacology, thereby providing adequate support for treatment.

  12. Paediatric Interventional Uroradiology

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M.; Wilkinson, A. Graham; Roebuck, Derek J.

    2011-04-15

    Paediatric interventional uroradiology lies at the intersection of the disciplines of paediatric interventional radiology and paediatric endourology. Interdisciplinary collaboration has led to the development of new techniques and refinement of procedures adopted from adult practice. This article reviews the major procedures used in paediatric interventional uroradiology, with emphasis on nephrostomy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, balloon-burst pyeloplasty, and antegrade ureteric stenting.

  13. Good practice guidelines for clinical psychologists working in paediatric cochlear implant teams.

    PubMed

    Bathgate, Fionna; Bennett, Emily; Cropper, Jenny; Edwards, Lindsey; Emond, Alice; Gamble, Caroline; Kentish, Rosie; Samuel, Victoria

    2013-11-01

    There are relatively few clinical psychologists working in paediatric cochlear implant centres in the UK and in this respect we lag behind other countries such as the USA and The Netherlands. In an effort to promote the added value our profession can offer teams, the clinical psychologists working in paediatric CI centres have put together good practice guidelines. This article outlines the rationale for putting together the guidelines, highlights the unique contribution clinical psychologists can offer, outlines the evidence base for psychological input in this clinical population, and offers a fictional case study for illustration.

  14. Epigenetics: What does it mean for paediatric practice?

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Judith G

    2014-01-01

    ‘Epigenetics’ involves the study of gene expression and the environmental exposures that influence expression. In paediatrics, it is recognized that different physiological and developmental stages of the young individual are affected by both genetic control and environmental influence. It appears that changes in gene expression – not changes in the DNA itself – can be passed on from one generation to another. The importance for paediatricians is recognizing disorders involving epigenetics, recording events during childhood that could affect epigenetic control of gene expression, and being aware of new therapies as they become available. Paediatricians need to be able to recognize the relevant risk factors. PMID:24627653

  15. Practical approach to catheter-related bloodstream infections in paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBIs) are a common problem in paediatrics. Sterile insertion and proper care of the catheter is likely more important than the type of catheter in determining the rate of CRBIs. The accuracy of the diagnosis of CRBIs can be improved by comparing the time to positivity or the concentration of organisms in blood drawn through the catheter with blood drawn from other sites, or by changing the catheter over a guidewire and culturing the removed catheter. When a CRBI is suspected, the catheter should be removed if it is no longer required, the child is hemodynamically unstable, there are metastatic foci of infection, the infecting organism is Candida or a mycobacterium, or there is a tunnel infection. The necessity for catheter removal is controversial if the infecting organism is Staphylococcus aureus or a Gram-negative organism. In most other situations, the catheter only needs to be removed if bacteremia persists despite appropriate antibiotic use. PMID:19668658

  16. Professional and organizational commitment in paediatric occupational therapists: the influence of practice setting.

    PubMed

    Seruya, Francine M; Hinojosa, Jim

    2010-09-01

    The professional and organizational commitment of paediatric occupational therapists working in two distinct practice settings, schools and medically based settings, was investigated. A web-based survey program was used to administer a questionnaire to occupational therapists employed in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. The study employed social identity theory as a guiding perspective in understanding therapists' professional and organizational commitment. One hundred and fifty-seven paediatric therapists responded to the Professional Commitment Questionnaire and the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire to gauge their commitment to both the profession and their employing organizations. Results indicated that paediatric therapists, regardless of employment setting, have high professional commitment. Paediatric occupational therapists employed in medically based settings indicated statistically significant higher organizational commitment than their school-based counterparts. For therapists that work in school settings, the presence of a professional cohort did not influence professional commitment scores. As the study employed a web-based survey methodology, only individuals who were members of associations and had access to a computer and the Internet were able to participate. Further study might include widening the participant pool as well as adding additional instruments to explore both professional and organizational commitment on a more national scale.

  17. Model-Driven Paediatric Cardiomyopathy Pathways - A Clinical Impact Assessment.

    PubMed

    Stroetmann, Karl A; Thiel, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate results from an ongoing health technology assessment exercise of a simulation model of paediatric cardiomyopathy are reported. Comprehensive data on paediatric cardiomyopathy/heart failure, treatment options, incidence and prevalence, prognoses for different outcomes to be expected were collected. Based on this knowledge, a detailed clinical pathway model was developed and validated against the clinical workflow in a tertiary paediatric care hospital. It combines three disease stages and various treatment options with estimates of the probabilities of a child moving from one stage to another. To reflect the complexity of initial decision taking by clinicians, a three-stage Markov model was combined with a decision tree approach - a Markov decision process. A Markov Chain simulation tool was applied to compare estimates of transition probabilities and cost data of present standard of care treatment options for a cohort of children over ten years with expected improvements from using a clinical decision support tool based on the disease model under development. Early results indicate a slight increase of overall costs resulting from the extra cost of using such a tool in spite of some savings to be expected from improved care. However, the intangible benefits in life years saved of severely ill children and the improvement in QoL to be expected for moderately ill ones should more than compensate for this.

  18. Discussing patient management online: the impact of roles on knowledge construction for students interning at the paediatric ward.

    PubMed

    De Wever, Bram; Van Winckel, Myriam; Valcke, Martin

    2008-03-01

    The objectives of this study are to explore the use of asynchronous discussion groups during medical students' clinical rotation in paediatrics. In particular, the impact of role assignment on the level of knowledge construction through social negotiation is studied. Case-based asynchronous discussion groups were introduced to enhance reflection and critical thinking on patient management and treatment, and to offer an exercise in evidence-based medical practice. Groups of approximately 4-5 students were asked to discuss 4 authentic cases during clinical rotation in paediatrics. 49 students interning at the paediatric ward participated in this study. With respect to role assignment, differences between groups (1) with a student or an instructor as moderator and (2) with or without a developer of alternatives for patient management were explored. A content analysis was performed to explore the different levels of social construction of knowledge. The results of multilevel logit analyses show a significant difference in knowledge construction through social negotiation between conditions with a student moderator and conditions where the instructor is moderating, but only when a developer of alternatives is involved. No significant difference was revealed between student-moderated and instructor-moderator groups without a developer of alternatives. It can be concluded that when both the moderator and developer role are assigned to students, their contributions are more likely to reflect a high level of knowledge construction.

  19. Beyond counting cases: public health impacts of national Paediatric Surveillance Units

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, D; Elliott, E J; Zurynski, Y; Pereira, R Rodrigues; Preece, M; Lynn, R; von Kries, R; Zimmermann, H; Dickson, N P; Virella, D

    2007-01-01

    Paediatric Surveillance Units (PSUs) have been established in 14 countries and facilitate national, prospective, active surveillance for a range of conditions, with monthly reporting by child health specialists. The International Network of Paediatric Surveillance Units (INoPSU) was established in 1998 and facilitates international collaboration among member PSUs and allows for sharing of resources, simultaneous data collection and hence comparison of data from different geographical regions. The impact of data collected by PSUs, both individually and collectively as members of INoPSU, on public health outcomes, clinical care and research is described. PMID:17158859

  20. Clinical value of stool culture in paediatric oncology patients: hospital evaluation and UK survey of practice.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, O; Cooke, R P D; Cunliffe, N A; Pizer, B

    2017-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a frequently occurring symptom in paediatric oncology patients. The role of routine testing for enteric bacteria in hospitalized patients with diarrhoea is considered limited, but the diagnostic value of testing in children with oncological conditions has not been reported. Therefore, we conducted a five-year retrospective service evaluation in our tertiary paediatric oncology unit together with a national survey of 21 centres to estimate the utility of stool cultures in oncology patients with diarrhoea and the national approach to testing. Our local survey demonstrated very low diagnostic yield using routine enteric stool cultures with only one sample out of 842 (0.1%) testing positive. The national survey demonstrated considerable variation in practice. There is little evidence to support the use of conventional stool culture for enteric bacteria in children with cancer in our centre. These findings should inform national testing policies.

  1. The Clinical Impact of Chromosomal Microarray on Paediatric Care in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Victoria Q.; Chan, Kelvin Y. K.; Chu, Yoyo W. Y.; Mok, Gary T. K.; Tan, Tiong Y.; Yang, Wanling; Lee, So Lun; Tang, Wing Fai; Tso, Winnie W. Y.; Lau, Elizabeth T.; Kan, Anita S. Y.; Tang, Mary H.; Lau, Yu-lung; Chung, Brian H. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical impact of chromosomal microarray (CMA) on the management of paediatric patients in Hong Kong. Methods We performed NimbleGen 135k oligonucleotide array on 327 children with intellectual disability (ID)/developmental delay (DD), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and/or multiple congenital anomalies (MCAs) in a university-affiliated paediatric unit from January 2011 to May 2013. The medical records of patients were reviewed in September 2013, focusing on the pathogenic/likely pathogenic CMA findings and their “clinical actionability” based on established criteria. Results Thirty-seven patients were reported to have pathogenic/likely pathogenic results, while 40 had findings of unknown significance. This gives a detection rate of 11% for clinically significant (pathogenic/likely pathogenic) findings. The significant findings have prompted clinical actions in 28 out of 37 patients (75.7%), while the findings with unknown significance have led to further management recommendation in only 1 patient (p<0.001). Nineteen out of the 28 management recommendations are “evidence-based” on either practice guidelines endorsed by a professional society (n = 9, Level 1) or peer-reviewed publications making medical management recommendation (n = 10, Level 2). CMA results impact medical management by precipitating referral to a specialist (n = 24); diagnostic testing (n = 25), surveillance of complications (n = 19), interventional procedure (n = 7), medication (n = 15) or lifestyle modification (n = 12). Conclusion The application of CMA in children with ID/DD, ASD, and/or MCAs in Hong Kong results in a diagnostic yield of ∼11% for pathogenic/likely pathogenic results. Importantly the yield for clinically actionable results is 8.6%. We advocate using diagnostic yield of clinically actionable results to evaluate CMA as it provides information of both clinical validity and clinical utility. Furthermore, it

  2. [Aims and methodology of the Polish National programme for Standardisation of Clinical Practices in Neonatology and Paediatric Intensive Care. Edition 2007/2008].

    PubMed

    Swietliński, Janusz; Zejda, Jan E; Piróg, Maciej; Dobrzańska, Anna; Helwich, Ewa; Ksiazyk, Janusz; Migdał, Marek; Szczapa, Jerzy; Brozek, Grzegorz; Musialik-Swietlińska, Ewa

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we outline the aims and methods of the Polish National Programme for Standardisation of Clinical Practice in Neonatology and Paediatric Intensive Care, with special reference to infants with low and extremely low birth weight. The aim of this Programme is to adjust the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures to the latest guide lines and recommendations. The first stage consisted of a national level survey in order to identify the diversity of procedures implemented in Medical University Clinical Departments, Neonatology Units and Paediatric Intensive Care Units. The survey also served to confront the legitimacy of the used procedures with the current clinical knowledge and research. It is planned to repeat the survey 24 months after the implementation of the latest recommendations with the aim to assess the impact of the Programme on clinical practice. Partial stages of the Programme were started since 2006. The survey is coordinated by an independent statistics unit. The recommendations are developed on published standards.

  3. Paediatric day-case neurosurgery in a resource challenged setting: Pattern and practice

    PubMed Central

    Owojuyigbe, Afolabi Muyiwa; Komolafe, Edward O.; Adenekan, Anthony T.; Dada, Muyiwa A.; Onyia, Chiazor U.; Ogunbameru, Ibironke O.; Owagbemi, Oluwafemi F.; Talabi, Ademola O.; Faponle, Fola A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been generally observed that children achieve better convalescence in the home environment especially if discharged same day after surgery. This is probably due to the fact that children generally tend to feel more at ease in the home environment than in the hospital setting. Only few tertiary health institutions provide routine day-case surgery for paediatric neurosurgical patients in our sub-region. Objective: To review the pattern and practice of paediatric neurosurgical day-cases at our hospital. Patients and Methods: A prospective study of all paediatric day-case neurosurgeries carried out between June 2011 and June 2014. Results: A total of 53 patients (34 males and 19 females) with age ranging from 2 days to 14 years were seen. Majority of the patients (77.4%) presented with congenital lesions, and the most common procedure carried out was spina bifida repair (32%) followed by ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion (26.4%) for hydrocephalus. Sixty-eight percentage belonged to the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class 2, whereas the rest (32%) belonged to class 1. General anaesthesia was employed in 83% of cases. Parenteral paracetamol was used for intra-operative analgesia for most of the patients. Two patients had post-operative nausea and vomiting and were successfully managed. There was no case of emergency re-operation, unplanned admission, cancellation or mortality. Conclusion: Paediatric day-case neurosurgery is feasible in our environment. With careful patient selection and adequate pre-operative preparation, good outcome can be achieved. PMID:27251657

  4. Developing a policy for paediatric biobanks: principles for good practice

    PubMed Central

    Hens, Kristien; Van El, Carla E; Borry, Pascal; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Cornel, Martina C; Forzano, Francesca; Lucassen, Anneke; Patch, Christine; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Vermeulen, Eric; Salvaterra, Elena; Tibben, Aad; Dierickx, Kris

    2013-01-01

    The participation of minors in biobank research can offer great benefits for science and health care. However, as minors are a vulnerable population they are also in need of adequate protective measures when they are enrolled in research. Research using biobanked biological samples from children poses additional ethical issues to those raised by research using adult biobanks. For example, small children have only limited capacity, if any, to understand the meaning and implications of the research and to give a documented agreement to it. Older minors are gradually acquiring this capacity. We describe principles for good practice related to the inclusion of minors in biobank research, focusing on issues related to benefits and subsidiarity, consent, proportionality and return of results. Some of these issues are currently heavily debated, and we conclude by providing principles for good practice for policy makers of biobanks, researchers and anyone involved in dealing with stored tissue samples from children. Actual implementation of the principles will vary according to different jurisdictions. PMID:22713814

  5. A clinical audit on the practice of platelet transfusions at a tertiary paediatric referral centre.

    PubMed

    Jamal, R; Hoe, T S; Ong, L C; Afifah, I; Khuzaiah, R; Doraisamy, G

    1998-06-01

    Platelet transfusions are indicated in a wide variety of clinical conditions especially those with thrombocytopenia. However, without proper clinical practice guidelines, inappropriate transfusions are bound to happen. To ascertain the provision of a quality and appropriate practice of platelet transfusions, an audit study was carried out over a period of one month at the Paediatric Institute, Kuala Lumpur Hospital. A prospective audit was performed during that period whilst a retrospective collection of data was carried out for the previous month for comparison. Based on a set of criteria agreed upon by the audit committee, it was found that in 18.5% (22 of 119) of the cases, the indications for platelet transfusions were inappropriate. The audit committee concluded that there is a need for a more detailed clinical practice guideline for local use to reduce or lower the incidence of inappropriate transfusions of platelets.

  6. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice among Dental Practitioners Pertaining to Preventive Measures in Paediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Amitkumar; Kambalimath, Halaswamy V; Panchakshari, Bharath Kashetty; Jain, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prevention at primary level is of great value in Paediatric Dentistry. Since use of preventive measures can prevent future complications, dental professionals share an important responsibility toward early screening, prompt referral and treatment and this knowledge must transfer into the practice of dentistry. Aim To evaluate Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP) among dental practitioners in Bhopal city (central part of India) pertaining to sealants, topical fluorides usage and orthodontic consideration in paediatric patients. Materials and Methods A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted using a 20-item self-administered, closed ended, structured questionnaire. A total of 200 available private dental practitioners of Bhopal city made up the sampling frame of study. Results Out of 200 practicing dentists, 147 participated with response rate of 73.5% in which 69.4% were males and 30.6% were females. A total of 83% dentists were less than 35 years of age, while 17% were equal to or more than 35 years of age. Qualification distribution revealed 67.3% dental graduate and 32.6% dental specialist. A highly significant difference in knowledge in relation to age was observed. The mean±SD were found for Knowledge as 8.46±1.82, Attitude as 2.65±0.780, and Practice as 1.66±1.57. Statistically significant correlations were found between attitude and practice (r=0.58, p<0.001). Conclusion Dentists in Bhopal city have vast knowledge towards preventive dentistry. The attitude is highly commendable but underutilized in practice, which needs to be improved. PMID:28209009

  7. Interventional Radiology in Paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Chippington, Samantha J; Goodwin, Susie J

    2015-01-01

    As in adult practice, there is a growing role for paediatric interventional radiology expertise in the management of paediatric pathologies. This review is targeted for clinicians who may refer their patients to paediatric interventional radiology services, or who are responsible for patients who are undergoing paediatric interventional radiology procedures. The article includes a brief overview of the indications for intervention, techniques involved and the commonest complications. Although some of the procedures described are most commonly performed in a tertiary paediatric centre, many are performed in most Children's hospitals.

  8. Five challenges to ethical communication for interprofessional paediatric practice: A social work perspective.

    PubMed

    Delany, Clare; Richards, Angela; Stewart, Helen; Kosta, Lauren

    2017-03-13

    In paediatric clinical care, what is said to a parent or carer as well as when, where, and how it is said, directly advances or diminishes parents' capacities to understand available options and to contribute to decisions about treatment for their child. This makes interprofessional and patient communication an ethical endeavour. Social workers are uniquely situated to observe, participate in, and provide an active link in the communication between families and other health team members. This article reports phenomenological research exploring ethical issues encountered by social workers in their everyday practice communicating with families and other health professionals in a paediatric hospital context in Australia. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews with nine social workers and analysed thematically. Participants described two main communication-based roles: to support families through information provision and to contribute collaboratively to the interprofessional team involved in caring for a child and family. We grouped participants' descriptions of conflict between these roles into five main "communication challenges": (1) holding troublesome knowledge; (2) the need for diplomacy; (3) conciliation; (4) every man and his dog in family meetings; and (5) systems and processes presenting a brick wall. The five communication challenges provide empirically derived examples of how communication occurring within interprofessional health teams and between individual clinicians and parents can act to diminish or enhance parents' experience of care for their hospitalised child. Identifying these challenges may help to inform how communication within interprofessional teams and between clinicians and patients can benefit children and their parents.

  9. Ethical principles and operational guidelines for good clinical practice in paediatric research. Recommendations of the Ethics Working Group of the Confederation of European Specialists in Paediatrics (CESP).

    PubMed

    Gill, Denis

    2004-02-01

    A child has the full right of protection of his/her life by provision of optional medical care. There is a need in paediatrics for better evidence based practice founded on quality research into efficacy and safety of children's medications. To protect the best interests of the child one must balance the ethical demand to do clinical studies with the necessity to avoid doing harm. To achieve this end good clinical practice in paediatric research demands that studies comply with the Declaration of Helsinki, ICH topic E11, EU Directives and other relevant international guidelines. Evident differences in physiology, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics between children of differing ages and between children and adults demand properly constructed and conducted studies that respect the special somatic, emotional and mental needs of children. To justify any research project one must balance the benefit/risk ratio, provide experienced, competent personnel and infracture, obtain adequate informed consent/assent, and have the study evaluated and approved by an ethics committee containing expertise on the rights and needs of children.

  10. Early impact of rotavirus vaccination in a large paediatric hospital in the UK.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, D; Read, J M; Cooke, R P D; Vivancos, R; Iturriza-Gómara, M; Allen, D J; French, N; Cunliffe, N

    2016-06-01

    The impact of routine rotavirus vaccination on community-acquired (CA) and healthcare-associated (HA) rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at a large paediatric hospital, UK, was investigated over a 13-year period. A total of 1644 hospitalized children aged 0-15 years tested positive for rotavirus between July 2002 and June 2015. Interrupted time-series analysis demonstrated that, post vaccine introduction (July 2013 to June 2015), CA- and HA-RVGE hospitalizations were 83% [95% confidence interval (CI): 72-90%) and 83% (95% CI: 66-92%] lower than expected, respectively. Rotavirus vaccination has rapidly reduced the hospital rotavirus disease burden among both CA- and HA-RVGE cases.

  11. The Working Practices and Clinical Experiences of Paediatric Speech and Language Therapists: A National UK Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Tim; Flood, Emma; Dodd, Barbara; Joffe, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background: The majority of speech and language therapists (SLTs) work with children who have speech, language and communication needs. There is limited information about their working practices and clinical experience and their views of how changes to healthcare may impact upon their practice. Aims: To investigate the working practices and…

  12. Organisation of workplace learning: a case study of paediatric residents' and consultants' beliefs and practices.

    PubMed

    Skipper, Mads; Nøhr, Susanne Backman; Jacobsen, Tine Klitgaard; Musaeus, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have examined how doctors learn in the workplace, but research is needed linking workplace learning with the organisation of doctors' daily work. This study examined residents' and consultants' attitudes and beliefs regarding workplace learning and contextual and organisational factors influencing the organisation and planning of medical specialist training. An explorative case study in three paediatric departments in Denmark including 9 days of field observations and focus group interviews with 9 consultants responsible for medical education and 16 residents. The study aimed to identify factors in work organisation facilitating and hindering residents' learning. Data were coded through an iterative process guided by thematic analysis. Findings illustrate three main themes: (1) Learning beliefs about patient care and apprenticeship learning as inseparable in medical practice. Beliefs about training and patient care expressed in terms of training versus production caused a potential conflict. (2) Learning context. Continuity over time in tasks and care for patients is important, but continuity is challenged by the organisation of daily work routines. (3) Organisational culture and regulations were found to be encouraging as well inhibiting to a successful organisation of the work in regards to learning. Our findings stress the importance of consultants' and residents' beliefs about workplace learning as these agents handle the potential conflict between patient care and training of health professionals. The structuring of daily work tasks is a key factor in workplace learning as is an understanding of underlying relations and organisational culture in the clinical departments.

  13. What Evidence Underlies Clinical Practice in Paediatric Surgery? A Systematic Review Assessing Choice of Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Allin, Benjamin; Knight, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Objective Identify every paediatric surgical article published in 1998 and every paediatric surgical article published in 2013, and determine which study designs were used and whether they were appropriate for robustly assessing interventions in surgical conditions. Methods A systematic review was conducted according to a pre-specified protocol (CRD42014007629), using EMBASE and Medline. Non-English language studies were excluded. Studies were included if meeting population criteria and either condition or intervention criteria. Population: Children under the age of 18, or adults who underwent intervention for a condition managed by paediatric surgeons when they were under 18 years of age. Condition: One managed by general paediatric surgeons. Intervention: Used for treatment of a condition managed by general paediatric surgeons. Main Outcome Measure Studies were classified according to whether the IDEAL collaboration recommended their design for assessing surgical interventions or not. Change in proportions between 1998 and 2013 was calculated. Results 1581 paediatric surgical articles were published in 1998, and 3453 in 2013. The most commonly used design, accounting for 45% of studies in 1998 and 46.8% in 2013, was the retrospective case series. Only 1.8% of studies were RCTs in 1998, and 1.9% in 2013. Overall, in 1998, 9.8% of studies used a recommended design. In 2013, 11.9% used a recommended design (proportion increase 2.3%, 95% confidence interval 0.5% increase to 4% increase, p = 0.017). Conclusions and Relevance A low proportion of published paediatric surgical manuscripts utilise a design that is recommended for assessing surgical interventions. RCTs represent fewer than 1 in 50 studies. In 2013, 88.1% of studies used a less robust design, suggesting the need for a new way of approaching paediatric surgical research. PMID:26959824

  14. Off-label use of maraviroc in HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Claudia; Gómez, María Luisa Navarro; Soler-Palacín, Pere; González-Tomé, María Isabel; De Ory, Santiago J; Espiau, María; Hoyos, Santiago Pérez; León-Leal, Juan Antonio; Méndez, María; Moreno-Pérez, David; Guasch, Claudia Fortuny; Sierra, Antoni Mur; Guruceta, Itziar Pocheville; Guillén, Santiago Moreno; Briz, Verónica

    2015-10-23

    Maraviroc (MVC) is not approved for HIV-1-infected paediatric patients. This is the first assessment of the use of MVC-based salvage therapy in vertically HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical settings. The results suggest that MVC-based salvage therapy is useful in children and adolescents with extensive resistance profile leading to maintained virological suppression in up to 88% of the patients with CCR5-tropic virus. The likelihood of treatment success might increase when MVC is combined with other active drugs.

  15. The impact of parental accompaniment in paediatric trauma: a helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Major trauma remains a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in young people and adolescents throughout the western world. Both the physical and psychological consequences of trauma are well documented and it is shown that peri-traumatic factors play a large part in the emotional recovery of children involved in trauma. Indeed, parental anxiety levels may play one of the biggest roles. There are no publically available guidelines on pre-hospital accompaniment, and where research has been done on parental presence it often focuses primarily on the parents or staff, rather than the child themselves. Whilst acknowledging the impact on parents and staff, the importance of the emotional wellbeing of the child should be reinforced, to reduce the likelihood of developing symptoms in keeping with post-traumatic stress disorder. This non-systematic literature review, aims to examine the impact of parental accompaniment to hospital, following paediatric trauma, and to help pre-hospital clinicians decide whether accompaniment would be of benefit to their patient population. The lack of published data does not enable a formal recommendation of parental accompaniment in the helicopter to be mandated, though it should be the preference in land based conveyance. Future research is needed into the emotional recovery of children after trauma, as well as the experiences of patient, parent and staff during conveyance. PMID:24887082

  16. Good practice recommendations for paediatric outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (p-OPAT) in the UK: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjay; Abrahamson, Ed; Goldring, Stephen; Green, Helen; Wickens, Hayley; Laundy, Matt

    2015-02-01

    There is compelling evidence to support the rationale for managing children on intravenous antimicrobial therapy at home whenever possible, including parent and patient satisfaction, psychological well-being, return to school/employment, reductions in healthcare-associated infection and cost savings. As a joint collaboration between the BSAC and the British Paediatric Allergy, Immunity and Infection Group, we have developed good practice recommendations to highlight good clinical practice and governance within paediatric outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (p-OPAT) services across the UK. These guidelines provide a practical approach for safely delivering a p-OPAT service in both secondary care and tertiary care settings, in terms of the roles and responsibilities of members of the p-OPAT team, the structure required to deliver the service, identifying patients and pathologies that are suitable for p-OPAT, ensuring appropriate vascular access, antimicrobial choice and delivery and the clinical governance aspects of delivering a p-OPAT service. The process of writing a business case to support the introduction of a p-OPAT service is also addressed.

  17. [Restraint in paediatric care].

    PubMed

    Estrade, Marie; Tessier-Levêque, Mélanie; Wanquet-Thibault, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Restraint in general, and particularly when giving paediatric care, is a sensitive subject. This practice continues to appear often as a solution when children are disorientated or struggle during care. However, it is generally traumatic for the different care agents: the child, the parent and the care-giver. Reflection on this subject has been carried out after exchanges with professionals about the use of restraint with children aged 2-4 during paediatric emergency care.

  18. Impact of a Virtual Clinic in a Paediatric Cardiology Network on Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Juliana Sousa Soares; Dias Filho, Adalberto Vieira; Silva Gomes, Renata Grigório; Regis, Cláudio Teixeira; Rodrigues, Klecida Nunes; Siqueira, Nicoly Negreiros; Albuquerque, Fernanda Cruz de Lira; Mourato, Felipe Alves; Mattos, Sandra da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Congenital heart diseases (CHD) affect approximately 1% of live births and is an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Despite that, there is a shortage of paediatric cardiologists in Brazil, mainly in the northern and northeastern regions. In this context, the implementation of virtual outpatient clinics with the aid of different telemedicine resources may help in the care of children with heart defects. Methods. Patients under 18 years of age treated in virtual outpatient clinics between January 2013 and May 2014 were selected. They were divided into 2 groups: those who had and those who had not undergone a screening process for CHD in the neonatal period. Clinical and demographic characteristics were collected for further statistical analysis. Results. A total of 653 children and teenagers were treated in the virtual outpatient clinics. From these, 229 had undergone a neonatal screening process. Fewer abnormalities were observed on the physical examination of the screened patients. Conclusion. The implementation of pediatric cardiology virtual outpatient clinics can have a positive impact in the care provided to people in areas with lack of skilled professionals.

  19. Impact of a Virtual Clinic in a Paediatric Cardiology Network on Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Juliana Sousa Soares; Dias Filho, Adalberto Vieira; Silva Gomes, Renata Grigório; Regis, Cláudio Teixeira; Rodrigues, Klecida Nunes; Siqueira, Nicoly Negreiros; Albuquerque, Fernanda Cruz de Lira; Mourato, Felipe Alves; Mattos, Sandra da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Congenital heart diseases (CHD) affect approximately 1% of live births and is an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Despite that, there is a shortage of paediatric cardiologists in Brazil, mainly in the northern and northeastern regions. In this context, the implementation of virtual outpatient clinics with the aid of different telemedicine resources may help in the care of children with heart defects. Methods. Patients under 18 years of age treated in virtual outpatient clinics between January 2013 and May 2014 were selected. They were divided into 2 groups: those who had and those who had not undergone a screening process for CHD in the neonatal period. Clinical and demographic characteristics were collected for further statistical analysis. Results. A total of 653 children and teenagers were treated in the virtual outpatient clinics. From these, 229 had undergone a neonatal screening process. Fewer abnormalities were observed on the physical examination of the screened patients. Conclusion. The implementation of pediatric cardiology virtual outpatient clinics can have a positive impact in the care provided to people in areas with lack of skilled professionals. PMID:26265913

  20. Paediatric biobanking: Dutch experts reflecting on appropriate legal standards for practice.

    PubMed

    Kranendonk, Elcke J; Hennekam, Raoul C; Ploem, M Corrette

    2017-01-01

    Large sets of data and human specimens, such as blood, tumour tissue and DNA, are deposited in biobanks for research purposes, preferably for long periods of time and with broadly defined research aims. Our research focuses on the retention of data and biological materials obtained from children. However important such paediatric biobanks may be, the privacy interests of the children involved and the related risks may not be ignored. The privacy issues arising from paediatric biobanks are the central focus of this article. We first review the international regulations that apply to biobanks and then summarise viewpoints expressed by experts in a round-table discussion. We confine ourselves here to two normative questions: (1) How much control should children's parents or legal representatives, and later the children themselves, have over the stored materials and data? (2) What should be done if research findings emerge that have serious implications for a child's health?

  1. Medical professionals convicted of accessing child pornography--presumptive lifetime prohibition on paediatric practice? Health Care Complaints Commission v Wingate.

    PubMed

    Shats, Kathy; Faunce, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    Health Care Complaints Commission v Wingate [2007] NSWCA 326 concerns an appeal from the New South Wales Medical Tribunal regarding its findings on professional misconduct outside the practice of medicine in relation to a doctor convicted of possessing child pornography. The latest in a number of cases on this issue in Australia, it highlights the complexity of such decisions before medical tribunals and boards, as well as the diversity of approaches taken. Considering both this case and the recent Medical Practitioners Board of Victoria case of Re Stephanopoulos [2006] MPBV 12, this column argues that Australian tribunals and medical boards may not yet have achieved the right balance here in terms of protecting public safety and the reputation of the profession as a whole. It makes the case for a position statement from Australian professional bodies to create a presumption of a lifetime prohibition on paediatric practice after a medical professional has been convicted of accessing child pornography.

  2. The aetiology and impact of malnutrition in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gerasimidis, K; McGrogan, P; Edwards, C A

    2011-08-01

    Disease-associated undernutrition of all types is very common in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent weight loss remains one of the triad of clinical manifestations and a cornerstone for the diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD), although significantly fewer patients now present as being underweight. Recent evidence suggests that the introduction of medical treatment will quickly restore body weight, although this does not reflect concomitant changes in body composition. CD children present with features of nutritional cachexia with normal fat stores but depleted lean mass. Poor bone health, delayed puberty and growth failure are additional features that further complicate clinical management. Suboptimal nutritional intake is a main determinant of undernutrition, although activation of the immune system and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines exert additional independent effects. Biochemically low concentrations of plasma micronutrients are commonly reported in IBD patients, although their interpretation is difficult in the presence of an acute phase response and other indices of body stores adequacy are needed. Anaemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of the IBD child. Iron-deficient anaemia is the predominant type, with anaemia of chronic disease second. Decreased dietary intake, as a result of decreased appetite and food aversion, is the major cause of undernutrition in paediatric IBD. Altered energy and nutrient requirements, malabsorption and increased gastrointestinal losses are additional factors, although their contribution to undernutrition in paediatric CD needs to be studied further.

  3. Paediatrics in Amsterdam.

    PubMed

    Eber, Ernst; Aurora, Paul; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C; Lindblad, Anders; Dankert-Roelse, Jeannette E; Ross-Russell, Robert I; Turner, Steve W; Midulla, Fabio; Hedlin, Gunilla

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this update is to describe the paediatric highlights from the 2011 European Respiratory Society (ERS) Annual Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Abstracts from all seven groups of the ERS Paediatric Assembly (Paediatric Respiratory Physiology, Paediatric Asthma and Allergy, Cystic Fibrosis, Paediatric Respiratory Infection and Immunology, Neonatology and Paediatric Intensive Care, Paediatric Respiratory Epidemiology, and Paediatric Bronchology) are presented in the context of current literature.

  4. The impact of 12 months treatment with ivacaftor on Scottish paediatric patients with cystic fibrosis with the G551D mutation: a review.

    PubMed

    Dryden, Carol; Wilkinson, Jane; Young, David; Brooker, Richard John

    2016-06-10

    We reviewed the impact of ivacaftor on Scottish paediatric patients with cystic fibrosis ≥6 years of age after 12 months of treatment. Statistically significant improvements in FEV1 and body mass index and a reduction in sweat chloride, all comparable with previously published data were observed. The findings also suggested reduced use of intravenous antibiotics and oral antibiotics. No significant adverse effects were observed but a possible association with cataract formation could not be excluded. This review suggests that, in the short term at least, ivacaftor is effective and safe in paediatric patients ≥6 years of age with G551D.

  5. Medical literature search practice in paediatric junior medical staff: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Shirkhedkar, P; Day, A S

    2008-03-01

    With increasing medical knowledge and emphasis upon evidence-based medicine, it is essential for practitioners to have optimal literature searching skills. There are limited data regarding the use of online information retrieval (IR) systems by paediatric junior medical officers (JMO). The aims of this questionnaire-based study of a group of JMO were to assess the accessibility, frequency of use and preferences for electronic information resources, and to ascertain their perceived adequacy of training and expertise in online searching. Questionnaires were distributed to 319 JMO at two Australian children's hospitals. A total of 106 questionnaires were returned (33.2% response rate). Twenty-four-hour access to electronic medical databases was available to almost 90% of respondents at work or home. Five or less online searches per month were performed by 53.7% of respondents. Previous formal training in database searching was reported by 72.4% of respondents, but over half felt it had been inadequate. Most JMO (91.5%) acknowledged a need for further training in search skills. In spite of widespread availability of online resources, use of these resources was sub-optimal in this group of trainee doctors. Most respondents reported a need for further training in electronic searching. Continuing targeted education in electronic database searching is required to ensure that future doctors develop skills to ensure optimal use of medical literature.

  6. Listening to paediatric primary care nurses: a qualitative study of the potential for interprofessional oral health practice in six federally qualified health centres in Massachusetts and Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Judith; Gebel, Christina; Vargas, Clemencia; Geltman, Paul; Walter, Ashley; Garcia, Raul; Tinanoff, Norman

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To explore the opportunities for interprofessional collaboration (IPC) to improve paediatric oral health in federally qualified health centres (FQHCs), to identify challenges to IPC-led integration of oral health prevention into the well-child visit and to suggest strategies to overcome barriers. Sample Nurse managers (NMs), nurse practitioners (NPs), paediatric clinical staff and administrators in six FQHCs in two states were interviewed using a semistructured format. Design Grounded theory research. Topics included feasibility of integration, perceived barriers and strategies for incorporating oral health into paediatric primary care. Measurements Qualitative data were coded and analysed using NVivo 10 to generate themes iteratively. Results Nurses in diverse roles recognised the importance of oral health prevention but were unaware of professional guidelines for incorporating oral health into paediatric encounters. They valued collaborative care, specifically internal communication, joint initiatives and training and partnering with dental schools or community dental practices. Barriers to IPC included inadequate training, few opportunities for cross-communication and absence of charting templates in electronic health records. Conclusions NMs, NPs and paediatric nursing staff all value IPC to improve patients' oral health, yet are constrained by lack of oral health training and supportive charting and referral systems. With supports, they are willing to take on responsibility for introducing oral health preventive measures into the well-child visit, but will require IPC approaches to training and systems changes. IPC teams in the health centre setting can work together, if policy and administrative supports are in place, to provide oral health assessments, education, fluoride varnish application and dental referrals, decrease the prevalence of early childhood caries and increase access to a dental home for low-income children. PMID:28360245

  7. Impacted Sharp Oesophageal Foreign Bodies—A Novel Technique of Removal with the Paediatric Bronchoscope

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Minu

    2016-01-01

    Sharp foreign bodies in the oesophagus may present as an entirely asymptomatic child with only radiological evidence but require emergent surgical management. Safety pins, razor blades and needles are a few of the commonly ingested sharp objects in developing countries. The open safety pin is a particularly interesting clinical problem, as the management depends on its location and orientation. Many methods and instruments have been used over the years to remove them from the upper digestive tract. We present a novel method using the rigid paediatric bronchoscope and alligator forceps for the extraction of this unusual foreign body from the oesophagus of a 6 year old girl. PMID:26851436

  8. Impacted Sharp Oesophageal Foreign Bodies--A Novel Technique of Removal with the Paediatric Bronchoscope.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Aparajita; Bajpai, Minu

    2016-04-01

    Sharp foreign bodies in the oesophagus may present as an entirely asymptomatic child with only radiological evidence but require emergent surgical management. Safety pins, razor blades and needles are a few of the commonly ingested sharp objects in developing countries. The open safety pin is a particularly interesting clinical problem, as the management depends on its location and orientation. Many methods and instruments have been used over the years to remove them from the upper digestive tract. We present a novel method using the rigid paediatric bronchoscope and alligator forceps for the extraction of this unusual foreign body from the oesophagus of a 6 year old girl.

  9. Emergency readmissions to paediatric surgery and urology: The impact of inappropriate coding.

    PubMed

    Peeraully, R; Henderson, K; Davies, B

    2016-04-01

    Introduction In England, emergency readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge after an elective admission are not reimbursed if they do not meet Payment by Results (PbR) exclusion criteria. However, coding errors could inappropriately penalise hospitals. We aimed to assess the accuracy of coding for emergency readmissions. Methods Emergency readmissions attributed to paediatric surgery and urology between September 2012 and August 2014 to our tertiary referral centre were retrospectively reviewed. Payment by Results (PbR) coding data were obtained from the hospital's Family Health Directorate. Clinical details were obtained from contemporaneous records. All readmissions were categorised as appropriately coded (postoperative or nonoperative) or inappropriately coded (planned surgical readmission, unrelated surgical admission, unrelated medical admission or coding error). Results Over the 24-month period, 241 patients were coded as 30-day readmissions, with 143 (59%) meeting the PbR exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 98 (41%) patients, 24 (25%) were inappropriately coded as emergency readmissions. These readmissions resulted in 352 extra bed days, of which 117 (33%) were attributable to inappropriately coded cases. Conclusions One-quarter of non-excluded emergency readmissions were inappropriately coded, accounting for one-third of additional bed days. As a stay on a paediatric ward costs up to £500 a day, the potential cost to our institution due to inappropriate readmission coding was over £50,000. Diagnoses and the reason for admission for each care episode should be accurately documented and coded, and readmission data should be reviewed at a senior clinician level.

  10. Editorial: cardiovascular drug therapy in paediatric age: from metabolomics to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bassareo, Pier Paolo; Fanos, Vassilios

    2014-01-01

    In adult patients, cardiovascular drugs are widely administered in the treatment of numerous diseases. The indications and doses are strictly codified by international Guidelines, which are periodically updated by the American and European Societies of Cardiology. In paediatric patients, however, the situation is substantially different. The lack of large interventional studies on the use of these compounds has led to a greater uncertainty, with a less extensive administration and more limited indications. Furthermore, some important differences in therapeutic approach for the same diseases are present between the U.S. and Europe. The purpose of this Special Issue is to review the pharmacological treatment of certain heart diseases, such as heart failure, and arterial blood pressure, which can result in both adult and pediatric patients [1, 2]. Differences and similarities have been highlighted. Regarding the differences in medical treatment for the same disease in the U.S. and Europe, it has been emphasized that the regulation of drugs is largely determined not only by scientific considerations, but also by other concerns - legal, cultural - which vary in different parts of the world. Such discrepancies are found even in the informational documents provided by pharmaceutical companies (different in USA and Europe for the same drug) and drug agencies (different between FDA and equivalent agencies in Europe). In this issue of Current Medicinal Chemistry, a specific paper is dedicated to the pharmacological treatment of the patency of ductus arteriosus in neonates, which is still a controversial issue. In fact, notwithstanding ibuprofen appears to be lesser dangerous for newborns than indomethacin, with a similar efficacy in closing the ductus; in a number of countries the latter is still administered to all preterm subjects as a prophylactic tool [3]. An unusual case report is the interesting starting point to perform an extensive literature review about the new

  11. Emergency readmissions to paediatric surgery and urology: The impact of inappropriate coding

    PubMed Central

    Peeraully, R; Henderson, K; Davies, B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In England, emergency readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge after an elective admission are not reimbursed if they do not meet Payment by Results (PbR) exclusion criteria. However, coding errors could inappropriately penalise hospitals. We aimed to assess the accuracy of coding for emergency readmissions. Methods Emergency readmissions attributed to paediatric surgery and urology between September 2012 and August 2014 to our tertiary referral centre were retrospectively reviewed. Payment by Results (PbR) coding data were obtained from the hospital’s Family Health Directorate. Clinical details were obtained from contemporaneous records. All readmissions were categorised as appropriately coded (postoperative or nonoperative) or inappropriately coded (planned surgical readmission, unrelated surgical admission, unrelated medical admission or coding error). Results Over the 24-month period, 241 patients were coded as 30-day readmissions, with 143 (59%) meeting the PbR exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 98 (41%) patients, 24 (25%) were inappropriately coded as emergency readmissions. These readmissions resulted in 352 extra bed days, of which 117 (33%) were attributable to inappropriately coded cases. Conclusions One-quarter of non-excluded emergency readmissions were inappropriately coded, accounting for one-third of additional bed days. As a stay on a paediatric ward costs up to £500 a day, the potential cost to our institution due to inappropriate readmission coding was over £50,000. Diagnoses and the reason for admission for each care episode should be accurately documented and coded, and readmission data should be reviewed at a senior clinician level. PMID:26924486

  12. Impact of Prominent Themes in Clinician-Patient Conversations on Caregiver's Perceived Quality of Communication with Paediatric Dental Visits.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hai Ming; Bridges, Susan Margaret; McGrath, Colman Patrick; Yiu, Cynthia Kar Yung; Zayts, Olga A; Au, Terry Kit Fong

    2017-01-01

    Patients' perceived satisfaction is a key performance index of the quality health care service. Good communication has been found to increase patient's perceived satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of the prominent themes arising from clinician-patient conversations on the caregiver's perceived quality of communication during paediatric dental visits. 162 video recordings of clinical dental consultations for 62 cases attending the Paediatric Dentistry Clinic of The Prince Philip Dental Hospital in Hong Kong were captured and transcribed. The patients' demographic information and the caregiver's perceived quality of communication with the clinicians were recorded using the 16-item Dental Patient Feedback on Consultation skills questionnaires. Visual text analytics (Leximancer™) indicated five prominent themes 'disease / treatment', 'treatment procedure related instructions', 'preparation for examination', 'positive reinforcement / reassurance', and 'family / social history' from the clinician-patient conversation of the recorded videos, with 60.2% of the total variance in concept words in this study explained through principal components analysis. Significant variation in perceived quality of communication was noted in five variables regarding the prominent theme 'Positive reinforcement / reassurance': 'number of related words' (p = 0.002), 'number of related utterances' (p = 0.001), 'percentage of the related words in total number of words' (p = 0.005), 'percentage of the related utterances in total number of utterances' (p = 0.035) and 'percentage of time spent in total time duration' (p = 0.023). Clinicians were perceived to be more patient-centered and empathetic if a larger proportion of their conversation showed positive reinforcement and reassurance via using related key words. Care-giver's involvement, such as clinicians' mention of the parent, was also seen as critical to perceptions of quality clinical experience. The study

  13. Interleukins for the paediatric pulmonologist.

    PubMed

    Rozycki, Henry J; Zhao, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Interleukins are critical immune modulators and since their first description in 1977, there has been a steady increase in the recognition of their roles in many paediatric respiratory diseases. This basic and clinical knowledge is now maturing into both approved and investigational therapies aimed at blocking or modifying the interleukin response. The purpose of this review is to bring up to date what is known about interleukin function in paediatric pulmonology, focusing on nine important lung conditions. This is followed by summaries about 18 interleukins which have been associated with these paediatric pulmonary conditions. Throughout, emphasis is placed on where interventions have been tested. Over the next several years, it is likely that many more treatments based on interleukin biology and function will become available and understanding the basis for these therapies will allow the practicing paediatric pulmonologist to take appropriate advantage of them.

  14. A survey of paediatric HIV programmatic and clinical management practices in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa—the International epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are limited data on paediatric HIV care and treatment programmes in low-resource settings. Methods A standardized survey was completed by International epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS paediatric cohort sites in the regions of Asia-Pacific (AP), Central Africa (CA), East Africa (EA), Southern Africa (SA) and West Africa (WA) to understand operational resource availability and paediatric management practices. Data were collected through January 2010 using a secure, web-based software program (REDCap). Results A total of 64,552 children were under care at 63 clinics (AP, N=10; CA, N=4; EA, N=29; SA, N=10; WA, N=10). Most were in urban settings (N=41, 65%) and received funding from governments (N=51, 81%), PEPFAR (N=34, 54%), and/or the Global Fund (N=15, 24%). The majority were combined adult–paediatric clinics (N=36, 57%). Prevention of mother-to-child transmission was integrated at 35 (56%) sites; 89% (N=56) had access to DNA PCR for infant diagnosis. African (N=40/53) but not Asian sites recommended exclusive breastfeeding up until 4–6 months. Regular laboratory monitoring included CD4 (N=60, 95%), and viral load (N=24, 38%). Although 42 (67%) sites had the ability to conduct acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smears, 23 (37%) sites could conduct AFB cultures and 18 (29%) sites could conduct tuberculosis drug susceptibility testing. Loss to follow-up was defined as >3 months of lost contact for 25 (40%) sites, >6 months for 27 sites (43%) and >12 months for 6 sites (10%). Telephone calls (N=52, 83%) and outreach worker home visits to trace children lost to follow-up (N=45, 71%) were common. Conclusions In general, there was a high level of patient and laboratory monitoring within this multiregional paediatric cohort consortium that will facilitate detailed observational research studies. Practices will continue to be monitored as the WHO/UNAIDS Treatment 2.0 framework is implemented. PMID:23336728

  15. Fifty years of paediatric ethics.

    PubMed

    Gillam, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    In 1965, when the first issue of Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health appeared, medical ethics was just becoming established as a discipline. The sub-speciality of paediatric ethics did not make an appearance until the late 1980s, with the first key texts appearing in the 1990s. Professional concern to practice ethically in paediatrics obviously goes much further back than that, even if not named as such. In clinical areas of paediatrics, the story of the last 50 years is essentially a story of progress - better understanding of disease, better diagnosis, more effective treatment, better outcomes. In paediatric ethics, the story of the last 50 years is a bit more complicated. In ethics, the idea of progress, rather than just change, is not so straightforward and is sometimes hotly contested. There has certainly been change, including some quite radical shifts in attitudes and practices, but on some issues, the ethical debate now looks remarkably similar to that of 40-50 years ago. This is the story of some things that have changed in paediatric ethics, some things that have stayed the same and the key ethical ideas lying beneath the surface.

  16. A systematic review of the use of dosage form manipulation to obtain required doses to inform use of manipulation in paediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Richey, Roberta H; Hughes, Clare; Craig, Jean V; Shah, Utpal U; Ford, James L; Barker, Catrin E; Peak, Matthew; Nunn, Anthony J; Turner, Mark A

    2017-02-25

    This study sought to determine whether there is an evidence base for drug manipulation to obtain the required dose, a common feature of paediatric clinical practice. A systematic review of the data sources, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, IPA and the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, was used. Studies that considered the dose accuracy of manipulated medicines of any dosage form, evidence of safety or harm, bioavailability, patient experience, tolerability, contamination and comparison of methods of manipulation were included. Case studies and letters were excluded. Fifty studies were eligible for inclusion, 49 of which involved tablets being cut, split, crushed or dispersed. The remaining one study involved the manipulation of suppositories of one drug. No eligible studies concerning manipulation of oral capsules or liquids, rectal enemas, nebuliser solutions, injections or transdermal patches were identified. Twenty four of the tablet studies considered dose accuracy using weight and/or drug content. In studies that considered weight using adapted pharmacopoeial specifications, the percentage of halved tablets meeting these specifications ranged from 30% to 100%. Eighteen studies investigated bioavailability, pharmacokinetics or clinical outcomes following manipulations which included nine delayed or modified release formulations. In each of these nine studies the entirety of the dosage form was administered. Only one of the 18 studies was identified where drugs were manipulated to obtain a proportion of the dosage form, and that proportion administered. The five studies that considered patient perception found that having to manipulate the tablets did not have a negative impact on adherence. Of the 49 studies only two studies reported investigating children. This review yielded limited evidence to support manipulation of medicines for children. The results cannot be extrapolated between dosage forms, methods of manipulation or between different brands of the same

  17. Child sexual abuse and sexually transmitted infections: review of joint genitourinary medicine and paediatric examination practice.

    PubMed

    Kawsar, M; Long, S; Srivastava, O P

    2008-05-01

    Joint examination by doctors with complementary skills and screening for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are recommended in children who may have been sexually abused or have been found to have an STI. Our study showed that criminal proceedings were more likely to be brought in cases with physical signs of sexual abuse. It could be difficult to prove whether sexual abuse had taken place or not with microbiological evidence alone, in the absence of other evidence. Significance of viral STIs in the context of sexual abuse should be evaluated carefully. The review of our practice re-enforced the importance of joint examination of children with suspected STIs.

  18. Impact of a modified Broviac maintenance care bundle on bloodstream infections in paediatric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Laux, Carolin; Graf, Norbert; Simon, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Background: During intensive chemotherapy, bloodstream infection (BSI) represents an important complication in paediatric cancer patients. Most patients carry a long-term central venous access device (CVAD). Improved maintenance care of these vascular catheters may decrease the risk of BSI. Methods: Intervention study (adapted CVAD prevention protocol) with two observation periods (P1: 09-2009 until 05-2011; P2: 09-2011 until 05-2013); prospective surveillance of all laboratory confirmed BSIs. In P2, ready to use sterile NaCl 0.9% syringes were used for CVAD flushing and octenidine/isopropanol for the disinfection of catheter hubs and 3-way stopcocks. Results: During P1, 84 patients were included versus 81 patients during P2. There were no significant differences between the two patient populations in terms of median age, gender, underlying malignancy or disease status (first illness or relapse). Nearly all CVADs were Broviac catheters. The median duration from implantation to removal of the CVAD was 192 days (Inter-quartile-range (IQR); 110–288 days) in P1 and 191 days (IQR; 103–270 days) in P2. 28 BSI were diagnosed in 22 patients in P1 (26% of all patients experienced at least one BSI) and 15 BSI in 12 patients in P2 (15% of all patients). The corresponding results for incidence density (ID) were 0.44 (CI95 0.29–0.62) for P1 vs. 0.34 (0.19–0.53) BSI per 100 inpatient days for P2 and for incidence rate (IR) 7.76 (5.16–10.86) in P1 vs. 4.75 (2.66–7.43) BSI per 1,000 inpatient CVAD utilization days. In P1, 9 BSI were caused by CoNS vs. only 2 in P2 (IR 2.49; CI95 0.17–4.17 vs. 0.63; CI95 0.08–1.72). In P1 two BSI (7%) lead to early removal of the device. During P2 one CVAD was prematurely removed due to a Broviac-related BSI (6.7%). Conclusion: The preventive protocol investigated in this study led to a reduction of BSI in paediatric cancer patients. This result was clinically relevant but – due to insufficient power in a single centre observation

  19. THE IMPACT OF MODE OF ACQUISITION ON BIOLOGICAL MARKERS OF PAEDIATRIC HEPATITIS C VIRUS INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    England, Kirsty; Thorne, Claire; Harris, Helen; Ramsay, Mary; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the introduction of blood donor screening, worldwide, children continue to become infected with HCV via un-sterile medical injections, receipt of unscreened blood and isolated hospital contamination outbreaks. It is plausible that the natural history and disease progression in these children might differ from that of their vertically infected counterparts. Materials and Methods Vertically and parenterally HCV infected children were prospectively followed within the European Paediatric HCV Network and the UK National HCV Register respectively. Biological profiles were compared. Results Vertically and parenterally HCV infected children differed in terms of some key characteristics including the male:female ratio and the proportion of children receiving therapy. Parenterally infected children were more likely to have at least one hepatomegaly event during follow-up, 20% vs. 10%. Parenteral infection did not significantly affect the odds of being consistently viraemic, AOR 1.14 p=0.703 and there was no significant difference in the odds of having consistently elevated ALT levels and mode of acquisition, AOR 0.83 p=0.748. The proportion of children with 2 or more markers of HCV infection did not differ significantly by mode of acquisition, χ21.13 p=0.288. Conclusions This analysis does not support substantial differences between vertically and parenterally infected groups but there are specific mechanisms identified requiring further investigation. Given the continued parenteral infection of children worldwide it is vital that knowledge of disease progression in this group is accurate and that the differences in comparison to vertically infected children are clarified to inform more accurate and individualised clinical management. PMID:21762285

  20. [The Appointment of Paediatric Professorships in the Soviet Occupation Zone and the early GDR. The Impact of the Political System Change after 1945].

    PubMed

    Hinz-Wessels, Annette

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of the political system change after 1945 on the appointment of paediatric professorships in the Soviet Occupation Zone and the GDR up until the time the Wall was built in 1961. It can be demonstrated that the political purge in the post-war period had only minor impact on the appointment of professorships and the National Socialist past no longer mattered after the conclusion of denazification. In 1957, the proportion of former NSDAP members among East German university professors of paediatrics was 100 per cent. When it came to new appointments, both members of the "bourgeois" academic non-professorial teaching staff from the GDR as well as paediatricians from West Germany, who had largely gained their scientifically qualifications under National Socialism, were in the running. A politically-controlled elite exchange did not take place until the construction of the Wall. State and party organs generally followed the personnel proposals of the universities since an insufficient number of qualified candidates was available for the systematic appointment of ,,progressive" paediatricians. Given the lack of staff, the SED personnel policy was aimed at the integration of previous elites, as long as they behaved loyally towards the new state. Since the East German faculties continued to make the questioning of the professionally competent professors in West Germany and East Germany the basis for their appointment lists, West German university paediatricians were able to exert considerable influence on the appointment of East German paediatric professorship until 1960s.

  1. Age-appropriate and acceptable paediatric dosage forms: Insights into end-user perceptions, preferences and practices from the Children's Acceptability of Oral Formulations (CALF) Study.

    PubMed

    Ranmal, Sejal R; Cram, Anne; Tuleu, Catherine

    2016-11-30

    A lack of evidence to guide the design of age-appropriate and acceptable dosage forms has been a longstanding knowledge gap in paediatric formulation development. The Children's Acceptability of Oral Formulations (CALF) study captured end-user perceptions and practices with a focus on solid oral dosage forms, namely tablets, capsules, chewables, orodispersibles, multiparticulates (administered with food) and mini-tablets (administered directly into the mouth). A rigorous development and testing phase produced age-adapted questionnaires as measurement tools with strong evidence of validity and reliability. Overall, 590 school children and adolescents, and 428 adult caregivers were surveyed across hospitals and various community settings. Attitudes towards dosage forms primarily differed based on age and prior use. Positive attitudes to tablets and capsules increased with age until around 14 years. Preference was seen for chewable and orodispersible preparations across ages, while multiparticulates were seemingly less favourable. Overall, 59.6% of school children reported willingness to take 10mm diameter tablets, although only 32.1% of caregivers perceived this size to be suitable. While not to be taken as prescriptive guidance, the results of this study provide some evidence towards rational dosage form design, as well as methodological approaches to help design tools for further evaluation of acceptability within paediatric studies.

  2. Current management of paediatric urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Gnessin, Ehud; Chertin, Leonid; Chertin, Boris

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to review a current management of paediatric nephrolithiasis. The current literature, including our own experience on the treatment of paediatric nephrolithiasis was reviewed by MEDLINE/PubMed search. We have used in our search following keywords: urolithiasis, nephrolithiasis, paediatrics, surgical treatment, conservative management, ESWL, ureteroscopy, and open renal surgery. The search was limited to the English language literature during the period of time from 1990 to 2011. All papers were reviewed independently by all co-authors and only the manuscripts directly related to the reviewed subjects were included into the current review. Due to the high incidence of predisposing factors for urolithiasis in children and high stone recurrence rates, every child with urinary stone should be given a complete metabolic evaluation. Most stones in children can be managed by ESWL and endoscopic techniques. Paediatric stone disease is an important clinical problem in paediatric urology practice. Because of its recurrent nature, every effort should be made to discover the underlying metabolic abnormality so that it can be treated appropriately. Obtaining a stone-free state with interventional management and close follow-up are of utmost importance.

  3. Sweat testing for the detection of atomoxetine from paediatric patients with attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder: application to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Marchei, Emilia; Papaseit, Esther; Garcia-Algar, Oscar; Bilbao, Amaia; Farré, Magí; Pacifici, Roberta; Pichini, Simona

    2013-03-01

    Atomoxetine (ATX) is a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved since 2002 for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, adolescents, and adults as an alternative treatment to methylphenidate. Within the framework of a project evaluating the use of alternative biological matrices for therapeutic monitoring of psychoactive drugs in paediatric and non-paediatric individuals, the excretion of ATX and its principal metabolites has been recently studied in oral fluid and hair. The aim of this study was to describe the excretion profile of ATX and its metabolites 4-hydroxyatomoxetine (4-OH-ATX) and N-desmethylatomoxetine (N-des-ATX) in sweat following the administration of different dosage regimens (60, 40, 35, and 18 mg/day) of ATX to six paediatric patients. Sweat patches were applied to the back of each participant and removed at timed intervals. ATX and its metabolites were measured in patches using a previously validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method. Independently from the administered dose, ATX appeared in the sweat patches 1 h post administration and reached its maximum concentration generally at 24 h. Peak ATX concentrations ranged between 2.31 and 40.4 ng/patch and did not correlate with the administered drug dose, or with body surface area. Total ATX excreted in sweat ranged between 0.008 and 0.121 mg, corresponding to 0.02 and 0.3% of the administered drug. Neither 4-OH-ATX, nor N-des-ATX was detected in either of the collected sweat patches. Measuring ATX in sweat patches can provide information on cumulative drug use from patch application until removal.

  4. The impact of recent legislation on paediatric fireworks injuries in the Newcastle upon Tyne region.

    PubMed

    Edwin, Alexandra F L; Cubison, Tania C S; Pape, Sarah A

    2008-11-01

    Despite the changes to the UK fireworks laws and considerable efforts in prevention, children are still being injured by fireworks. The UK is one of many countries that have altered their firework laws in recent years. We reviewed 54 firework-injured children over the last 10 years and assessed the impact of the two recent UK law changes. Our study outlines past British firework legislation and reviews the literature. In November 1996, there were three deaths in England, Wales and Scotland due to fireworks. The British Government introduced the Fireworks (Safety) Regulations of 1996/1997, primarily banning banger fireworks (known as bangers). We have not seen banger injuries in Newcastle since then. The Fireworks Act 2003 and the Fireworks Regulations 2004 limited the sale of fireworks to the 3 weeks surrounding bonfire night, and banned under 18s from purchasing or possessing fireworks. In our series, we noticed that, in 2004, 83% of children's firework injuries happened in the 3 weeks surrounding Bonfire Night. We conclude that legislation has had an impact, but stricter enforcement of the existing laws and further education of children and the general public into the dangers of fireworks is needed, as children are still being injured.

  5. Impact of the Hall technique for preformed metal crown placement on undergraduate paediatric dentistry experience.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, F; Morgan, A G; Farman, M; Rodd, H D

    2013-02-01

    The Hall technique, a novel method of placing preformed metal crowns (PMCs) without local anaesthesia or tooth preparation, was introduced to our undergraduate dental curriculum in 2009. This study aimed to describe student experience of, and attitudes towards, PMCs before and after exposure to this new technique. Clinical data were extracted from student logbooks to determine the number of PMCs placed for cohorts graduating in 2005 (n = 55), 2009 (n = 61) and 2010 (n = 75). Five focus groups were also conducted with 29 final-year dental students. Students graduating in 2005, 2009 and 2010 had placed a mean (range) of 0.03 (0-1), 0.63 (0-5) and 1.15 (0-9) PMCs, respectively. The proportion of students who had placed a PMC increased significantly from only 1.9% in 2005 to 75% in 2010 (P < 0.05, ANOVA). Students reported some positive experiences of the Hall technique. However, concern over perceived lack of future clinical support, an anticipated increase in time and financial pressures, and the ease of use of glass-ionomer cement as an alternative were described as potential barriers to PMC use. Findings suggest that the introduction of the Hall technique has had a marked impact on the use of PMCs as a treatment modality for carious primary teeth.

  6. PAEDIATRIC CT EXPOSURE PRACTICE IN THE COUNTY OF RIO DE JANEIRO: THE NEED TO ESTABLISH DIAGNOSTIC REFERENCE LEVELS.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Fillipe M; Magalhães, Luis A G; Kodlulovich, Simone

    2016-11-01

    A pilot study of dose indicators in paediatric computed tomography (CT) was conducted to prove the need to establish diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for the county of Rio de Janeiro. The dose descriptors were estimated from the beam dosimetry by applying the protocols used in each examination. The total patient sample included 279 children. Regarding the comparison of the dose-length product values among the hospitals, the high-resolution chest CT scans were distinguished among the three types of examinations, due to the discrepancies of 1148 % (1-5 y age group) and 2248 % (5-10 y age group) presented in Hospital A's dose-length product values relative to Hospital D's dose-length product values. The results showed that without DRL, the dose variation can be significant between hospitals in the same county for the same age group in the same examination.

  7. Surgical strategies in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Colin T; Smith, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises two distinct but related chronic relapsing inflammatory conditions affecting different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Crohn’s disease is characterised by a patchy transmural inflammation affecting both small and large bowel segments with several distinct phenotypic presentations. Ulcerative colitis classically presents as mucosal inflammation of the rectosigmoid (distal colitis), variably extending in a contiguous manner more proximally through the colon but not beyond the caecum (pancolitis). This article highlights aspects of the presentation, diagnosis, and management of IBD that have relevance for paediatric practice with particular emphasis on surgical considerations. Since 25% of IBD cases present in childhood or teenage years, the unique considerations and challenges of paediatric management should be widely appreciated. Conversely, we argue that the organizational separation of the paediatric and adult healthcare worlds has often resulted in late adoption of new approaches particularly in paediatric surgical practice. PMID:26034347

  8. Practical Collaborations for Positive Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Andrew R.; Maher, Michelle A.; Smith, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment has assumed an increasingly prominent place in academic and student affairs practice. Yet, in smaller student affairs departments with limited staffing and resources, how might a department identify the resources or time to thoroughly assess student learning outcomes? This Notes in Brief details the partnership between the University of…

  9. Paediatric cardiac nursing education: a national collaboration.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kerry; Daniels, Amanda; Sheehan, Karen; Langton, Helen

    2006-02-01

    Educational courses for staff working in paediatric specialties may not be financially viable because of the small numbers involved and the difficulties that potential students have in getting released from their units. The UK Paediatric Cardiac Nurses Association worked with other groups to explore the feasibility of a national multi-professional paediatric cardiac education pathway. Three options were identified, including the continuation of local in-house provision with its associated variation in standards. The relative benefits and resource implications of each option were explored and approaches made to educational institutions for support in developing the pathway. A university with an established reputation for e-learning undertook this development and a post graduate certificate in Paediatric Cardiothoracic Practice will soon be available.

  10. Diagnostic paediatric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C.M.; Lingam, S.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a case study teaching manual presenting radiographs and examples of other imaging modalities from 100 paediatric patients. The material comes from the radiological teaching collection at the Hospital for Sick Children at Great Ormond Street in London and was compiled over a ten year period. With each case a short clinical history is given and a series of questions posed, similar to those encountered in postgraduate medical examinations. Sample answers with comments and more illustrations are presented on the following page. The last decade has seen a rapid expansion in the range and sophistication of diagnostic imaging modalities which are available to clinicians. Since it is impossible to achieve comprehensive coverage in a book of this size, the authors have selected examples of cases which illustrate the range of imaging modalities currently available and which may be encountered in both clinical practice and in examinations.

  11. [Off-label use of drugs in paediatrics causes uncertainty].

    PubMed

    Hart, Dieter; Mühlbauer, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    The off-label use of drugs in paediatrics is a common practice casting doubts on the adequate safety of drug therapy. Regulatory initiatives of European and national legislators aim to address this paucity of clinical drug trials in paediatrics through clarifying regulations and incentives in pharmaceutical law, thereby promoting an increase in the approval of paediatric drugs, the improvement of drug and thus treatment safety. This paper describes the present situation in paediatrics and the legal status of off-label use in pharmaceutical law, medical malpractice law and statutory health insurance law.

  12. Paediatrics: messages from Munich

    PubMed Central

    Midulla, Fabio; Lombardi, Enrico; Pijnenburg, Marielle; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M.; Grigg, Jonathan; Bohlin, Kajsa; Rusconi, Franca; Pohunek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe paediatric highlights from the 2014 European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in Munich, Germany. Abstracts from the seven groups of the ERS Paediatric Assembly (Respiratory Physiology and Sleep, Asthma and Allergy, Cystic Fibrosis, Respiratory Infection and Immunology, Neonatology and Paediatric Intensive Care, Respiratory Epidemiology, and Bronchology) are presented in the context of the current literature. PMID:27730136

  13. What's new in paediatric dentistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Since the early 80's, the use of laser has been introduced in the daily dental practice and the technological development has also provided over time to optimize its use. Various types of lasers with different wavelengths have been developed for use in a handy, easy and ergonomic manner. In daily paediatric dentistry, laser could be a very useful medical device which can completely replace the traditional high hand-piece and bur to realize a "micro-invasive" dentistry and a "clean" surgery, without bleeding and sutures. According to the international literature and in the light of recent researches, this work could give an overview on assisted laser therapy in paediatric dentistry, highlighting advantages and disadvantages of this new technology and pointing out the high compliance of the young patient.

  14. Paediatric surgery in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Sekabira, John

    2015-02-01

    The Hugh Greenwood Lecture acknowledges the extremely generous support from Mr Greenwood that has enabled the BAPS to establish funds to advance paediatric surgical training in developing countries. In this Inaugural Lecture, Dr. Sekabira, the first Hugh Greenwood Fellow, describes the influence that this has had on his career and reviews the state of paediatric surgery in Uganda.

  15. Paediatrics in Berlin.

    PubMed

    Barbato, A; Bertuola, F; Kuehni, C; Korppi, M; Kotecha, S; Pijnenburg, M W; Ratjen, F; Seddon, P; Bush, A

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this report is to describe the highlights of the European Respiratory Society annual congress in Berlin, Germany. The best abstracts in asthma and allergy, cystic fibrosis, respiratory infection, paediatric and neonatal intensive care, paediatric investigative techniques (in particular respiratory physiology and bronchoscopy) and respiratory epidemiology are presented and set in the context of the current literature.

  16. Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV and Paediatric HIV Care and Treatment Monitoring: From Measuring Process to Impact and Elimination of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV.

    PubMed

    Idele, Priscilla; Hayashi, Chika; Porth, Tyler; Mamahit, Awandha; Mahy, Mary

    2017-01-06

    Progress towards achievement of global targets for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) and paediatric HIV care and treatment is an integral part of global and national HIV and AIDS responses. This paper documents the development of the global and national monitoring and reporting systems for PMTCT and paediatric HIV care and treatment programmes, achievements and remaining challenges. A review of the development of the monitoring and reporting process since 2002-2016 was conducted using existing published literature and taking into account changes in WHO HIV treatment guidelines, global HIV goals and targets, programmatic and methodological developments, and increased need for interagency partnerships, coordination and harmonization of global monitoring and reporting mechanisms. The number and type of indicators reported increased and evolved from monitoring of existence of national policies and guidelines, service delivery sites and trained health workers and coverage of PMTCT and paediatric HIV interventions to measuring outcomes and impact in reducing new HIV infections and AIDS related deaths, including efforts to validate elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. These changes were required to mirror changes in WHO and national PMTCT and HIV treatment guidelines. The number of countries reporting PMTCT coverage increased from 53 in 2003 to over 130 in 2015. National monitoring processes have also expanded in scope and the capacity to report on disaggregated data by type of ARV regimen and for paediatric HIV care and treatment has increased. Monitoring of PMTCT and paediatric HIV programmes has contributed a rich body of evidence that helped monitor how quickly countries were adopting and implementing the latest WHO HIV treatment guidelines for pregnant and breastfeeding women and children. The reported data and experiences were instrumental in shaping global policies, national programmes, and investment choices.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in paediatric psychoneuroendocrinology: a new frontier for understanding the impact of hormones on emotion and cognition.

    PubMed

    Mueller, S C

    2013-08-01

    Mounting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research is characterising the neurobiological trajectories of healthy human brain development. In parallel, studies increasingly acknowledge the relevance of perturbations of these trajectories for adolescent and adult psychopathology. Although an influence of steroid hormones on mood and anxiety disorders has been demonstrated in adults, very little is known about how steroid hormones alter human brain development and contribute to adolescent psychopathology. This review focuses on recent evidence obtained from structural and functional MRI in children and adolescents with genetic endocrine disorders and with characteristic fluctuations in androgen or oestrogen levels (familial male precocious puberty, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, Klinefelter syndrome and Turner syndrome). It aims to highlight how neurobiological findings from these paediatric endocrine disorders can provide insight into the contribution of sex steroids with respect to the development of neurocircuitry involved in affective processing (amygdala, hippocampus) and cognitive control (prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, striatum). In addition, findings from these populations may also provide important information on aberrant psychological processes relevant for the clinical care and management of these populations. Finally, the findings are discussed within the context of current frameworks in animal models, such as the organisational-activational hypothesis or the aromatisation hypothesis. The review ends with a discussion of open questions for future enquiry with the goal of integrating translational models with current knowledge of endocrine disorders and developmental studies in healthy populations.

  18. The clinical impact of hip joint centre regression equation error on kinematics and kinetics during paediatric gait.

    PubMed

    Kiernan, D; Malone, A; O'Brien, T; Simms, C K

    2015-01-01

    Regression equations based on pelvic anatomy are routinely used to estimate the hip joint centre during gait analysis. While the associated errors have been well documented, the clinical significance of these errors has not been reported. This study investigated the clinical agreement of three commonly used regression equation sets (Bell et al., Davis et al. and Orthotrak software) against the equations of Harrington et al. Full 3-dimensional gait analysis was performed on 18 healthy paediatric subjects. Kinematic and kinetic data were calculated using each set of regression equations and compared to Harrington et al. In addition, the Gait Profile Score and GDI-Kinetic were used to assess clinical significance. Bell et al. was the best performing set with differences in Gait Profile Score (0.13°) and GDI-Kinetic (0.84 points) falling below the clinical significance threshold. Small deviations were present for the Orthotrak set for hip abduction moment (0.1 Nm/kg), however differences in Gait Profile Score (0.27°) and GDI-Kinetic (2.26 points) remained below the clinical threshold. Davis et al. showed least agreement with a clinically significant difference in GDI-Kinetic score (4.36 points). It is proposed that Harrington et al. or Bell et al. regression equation sets are used during gait analysis especially where inverse dynamic data are calculated. Orthotrak is a clinically acceptable alternative however clinicians must be aware of the effects of error on hip abduction moment. The Davis et al. set should be used with caution for inverse dynamic analysis as error could be considered clinically meaningful.

  19. Relationship between paediatric CT scans and subsequent risk of leukaemia and brain tumours: assessment of the impact of underlying conditions

    PubMed Central

    de Gonzalez, Amy Berrington; Salotti, Jane A; McHugh, Kieran; Little, Mark P; Harbron, Richard W; Lee, Choonsik; Ntowe, Estelle; Braganza, Melissa Z; Parker, Louise; Rajaraman, Preetha; Stiller, Charles; Stewart, Douglas R; Craft, Alan W; Pearce, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Background: We previously reported evidence of a dose–response relationship between ionising-radiation exposure from paediatric computed tomography (CT) scans and the risk of leukaemia and brain tumours in a large UK cohort. Underlying unreported conditions could have introduced bias into these findings. Methods: We collected and reviewed additional clinical information from radiology information systems (RIS) databases, underlying cause of death and pathology reports. We conducted sensitivity analyses excluding participants with cancer-predisposing conditions or previous unreported cancers and compared the dose–response analyses with our original results. Results: We obtained information from the RIS and death certificates for about 40% of the cohort (n∼180 000) and found cancer-predisposing conditions in 4 out of 74 leukaemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cases and 13 out of 135 brain tumour cases. As these conditions were unrelated to CT exposure, exclusion of these participants did not alter the dose–response relationships. We found evidence of previous unreported cancers in 2 leukaemia/MDS cases, 7 brain tumour cases and 232 in non-cases. These previous cancers were related to increased number of CTs. Exclusion of these cancers reduced the excess relative risk per mGy by 15% from 0.036 to 0.033 for leukaemia/MDS (P-trend=0.02) and by 30% from 0.023 to 0.016 (P-trend<0.0001) for brain tumours. When we included pathology reports we had additional clinical information for 90% of the cases. Additional exclusions from these reports further reduced the risk estimates, but this sensitivity analysis may have underestimated risks as reports were only available for cases. Conclusions: Although there was evidence of some bias in our original risk estimates, re-analysis of the cohort with additional clinical data still showed an increased cancer risk after low-dose radiation exposure from CT scans in young patients. PMID:26882064

  20. Where should paediatric surgery be performed?

    PubMed

    Arul, G S; Spicer, R D

    1998-07-01

    evidence that all neonatal surgery and anaesthesia should be conducted only by specialists. The debate now centres around the number of complex surgical cases a unit should treat to maintain its specialist status. The NHS executive, in its guidelines on contracting for specialist services, emphasises that "Sensible contracting needs to take into account the optimum population size not only for the stability of contracted referrals but also to give sufficient 'critical mass' for clinical effectiveness." Achieving this balance has consequences, not just for the maintenance of surgical expertise, but for the essential ancilliary services. There is clear evidence in anaesthesia that anaesthetists doing small numbers of neonatal procedures had significantly worse results. The same seems to be true in the fields of oncology, radiology, pathology, and intensive care. The reasons why the results of management of certain paediatric conditions are better at specialist centres are open to speculation. Presumably greater exposure to rare complex cases, concentration of expertise, more peer review, and a trickle down effect of the multidisciplinary approach all help to keep health care workers up to date with current world practice. In addition, it allows for appropriate specialist on call rotas and dedicated junior staff. If insufficient numbers of specialist surgical cases are being treated at a centre then the whole multidisciplinary team suffers. The 1989 NCEPOD report states "that paediatricians and general surgeons must recognise that small babies differ from other patients not only in size, and that they pose quite separate problems of pathology and management." The need for large centres of paediatric surgical expertise is now accepted by the Royal College of Surgeons of England, the British Association of Paediatric Surgeons, the Senate of Surgery of Great Britain and Ireland, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Royal College of Anaesthetists, the Audit

  1. From office tools to community supports: The need for infrastructure to address the social determinants of health in paediatric practice

    PubMed Central

    Fazalullasha, Fatima; Taras, Jillian; Morinis, Julia; Levin, Leo; Karmali, Karima; Neilson, Barbara; Muskat, Barbara; Bloch, Gary; Chan, Kevin; McDonald, Maureen; Makin, Sue; Ford-Jones, E Lee

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has highlighted the importance of addressing the social determinants of health to improve child health outcomes. However, significant barriers exist that limit the paediatrician’s ability to properly address these issues. Barriers include a lack of clinical time, resources, training and education with regard to the social determinants of health; awareness of community resources; and case-management capacity. General practice recommendations to help the health care provider link patients to the community are insufficient. The objective of the current article was to present options for improving the link between the office and the community, using screening questions incorporating physician-based tools that link community resources. Simple interventions, such as routine referral to early-year centres and selected referral to public health home-visiting programs, may help to address populations with the greatest needs. PMID:24855416

  2. From office tools to community supports: The need for infrastructure to address the social determinants of health in paediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Fazalullasha, Fatima; Taras, Jillian; Morinis, Julia; Levin, Leo; Karmali, Karima; Neilson, Barbara; Muskat, Barbara; Bloch, Gary; Chan, Kevin; McDonald, Maureen; Makin, Sue; Ford-Jones, E Lee

    2014-04-01

    Previous research has highlighted the importance of addressing the social determinants of health to improve child health outcomes. However, significant barriers exist that limit the paediatrician's ability to properly address these issues. Barriers include a lack of clinical time, resources, training and education with regard to the social determinants of health; awareness of community resources; and case-management capacity. General practice recommendations to help the health care provider link patients to the community are insufficient. The objective of the current article was to present options for improving the link between the office and the community, using screening questions incorporating physician-based tools that link community resources. Simple interventions, such as routine referral to early-year centres and selected referral to public health home-visiting programs, may help to address populations with the greatest needs.

  3. Measuring the Expertise of Paediatric Rehabilitation Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Gillian; Bartlett, Doreen J.; Currie, Melissa; Gilpin, Michelle; Baxter, Donna; Willoughby, Colleen; Tucker, Mary Ann; Strachan, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the development of a classification system to measure the expertise levels of practicing paediatric rehabilitation therapists. Seventy-five therapists from five disciplines (physical, occupational, speech-language, behaviour, and recreational therapy) were involved, along with 170 peers, and 188 parents of children with…

  4. Impact of Prominent Themes in Clinician-Patient Conversations on Caregiver’s Perceived Quality of Communication with Paediatric Dental Visits

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Susan Margaret; McGrath, Colman Patrick; Yiu, Cynthia Kar Yung; Zayts, Olga A.; Au, Terry Kit Fong

    2017-01-01

    Patients’ perceived satisfaction is a key performance index of the quality health care service. Good communication has been found to increase patient’s perceived satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of the prominent themes arising from clinician-patient conversations on the caregiver’s perceived quality of communication during paediatric dental visits. 162 video recordings of clinical dental consultations for 62 cases attending the Paediatric Dentistry Clinic of The Prince Philip Dental Hospital in Hong Kong were captured and transcribed. The patients’ demographic information and the caregiver’s perceived quality of communication with the clinicians were recorded using the 16-item Dental Patient Feedback on Consultation skills questionnaires. Visual text analytics (Leximancer™) indicated five prominent themes ‘disease / treatment’, ‘treatment procedure related instructions’, ‘preparation for examination’, ‘positive reinforcement / reassurance’, and ‘family / social history’ from the clinician-patient conversation of the recorded videos, with 60.2% of the total variance in concept words in this study explained through principal components analysis. Significant variation in perceived quality of communication was noted in five variables regarding the prominent theme ‘Positive reinforcement / reassurance’: ‘number of related words’ (p = 0.002), ‘number of related utterances’ (p = 0.001), ‘percentage of the related words in total number of words’ (p = 0.005), ‘percentage of the related utterances in total number of utterances’ (p = 0.035) and ‘percentage of time spent in total time duration’ (p = 0.023). Clinicians were perceived to be more patient-centered and empathetic if a larger proportion of their conversation showed positive reinforcement and reassurance via using related key words. Care-giver’s involvement, such as clinicians’ mention of the parent, was also seen as critical

  5. The clinical impact of IKZF1 deletions in paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is independent of minimal residual disease stratification in Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology treatment protocols used between 1992 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Linda; Ivanov Öfverholm, Ingegerd; Norén-Nyström, Ulrika; Zachariadis, Vasilios; Nordlund, Jessica; Sjögren, Helene; Golovleva, Irina; Nordgren, Ann; Paulsson, Kajsa; Heyman, Mats; Barbany, Gisela; Johansson, Bertil

    2015-09-01

    Paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (BCP ALL) with IKZF1 deletions (∆IKZF1) are associated with a poor outcome. However, there are conflicting data as to whether ∆IKZF1 is an independent risk factor if minimal residual disease (MRD) and other copy number alterations also are taken into account. We investigated 334 paediatric BCP ALL, diagnosed 1992-2013 and treated according to Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology ALL protocols, with known IKZF1 status based on either single nucleotide polymorphism array (N = 218) or multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (N = 116) analyses. ∆IKZF1, found in 15%, was associated with inferior 10-year probabilities of event-free (60% vs. 83%; P < 0·001) and overall survival (pOS; 73% vs. 89%; P = 0·001). Adjusting for known risk factors, including white blood cell (WBC) count and MRD, ∆IKZF1 was the strongest independent factor for relapse and death. ∆IKZF1 was present in 27% of cases with non-informative cytogenetics ('BCP-other') and a poor 10-year pOS was particularly pronounced in this group (58% vs. 90%; P < 0·001). Importantly, neither MRD nor WBC count predicted events in the ∆IKZF1-positive cases. Co-occurrence of pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1) deletions in Xp22.33/Yp11.32 (P2RY8-CRLF2) and ∆IKZF1 increased the risk of relapse (75% vs. 30% for cases with only ∆IKZF1; P = 0·045), indicating that BCP-other ALL with both P2RY8-CRLF2 and ∆IKZF1 constitutes a particularly high-risk group.

  6. Evaluation of the health promotion activities of paediatric nurses: is the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion a useful framework?

    PubMed

    Roden, Janet; Jarvis, Lynda

    2012-06-01

    Researchers were involved in an evaluative approach to examine the health promotion activities of paediatric nurses from a paediatric tertiary hospital centre (N = 83) and five paediatric non-tertiary hospital centres (N = 48) from Sydney, Australia. The aims of this study were to understand the nature of heath promotion in paediatric nursing practice by examining nurses' attitudes, investigating paediatric nurses' involvement in the five action area of the Ottawa Charter, and identifying barriers to the implementation of health promotion in practice. The researchers developed a health promotion survey based around the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion (World Health Organisation, 1986a), and a literature review of nurses' involvement in health promotion. Results showed that tertiary paediatric nurses undertook more varied health promotion activities such as creating supportive environments (CSE), reorienting health services (RHS) and building healthy public policy (BHPP) than did non-tertiary paediatric nurses who were involved in only one action area of the Charter, that of developing personal skills (DPS). This research revealed that within paediatric nursing practice the action areas of the Ottawa Charter of BHPP and CSE were important; and that there is support for the advocacy role of paediatric nurses. There is also evidence that paediatric nurses may have health promotion knowledge deficits associated with the Ottawa Charter, and that the environment of multidisciplinary allied health professionals in a tertiary paediatric centre may positively influence senior paediatric nurses and their capacity to be involved in varied health promotion activities associated with the Ottawa Charter.

  7. [What's new in paediatric dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Plantin, P

    2014-12-01

    Regular analysis of the major journals in dermatology and paediatrics has been used to select forty articles which are representative of the past year in paediatric dermatology. This selection is not exhaustive but rather reflects the interests of the author and also the dominant topics in paediatric dermatology in 2013-2014.

  8. Paediatric musculoskeletal interventional radiology

    PubMed Central

    Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Fruhwirth, Rodolfo; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Parapatt, George K; Toma', Paolo; Rollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Interventional radiology technique is now well established and widely used in the adult population. Through minimally invasive procedures, it increasingly replaces surgical interventions that involve higher percentages of invasiveness and, consequently, of morbidity and mortality. For these advantageous reasons, interventional radiology in recent years has spread to the paediatric age as well. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the development, use and perspectives of these procedures in the paediatric musculoskeletal field. Several topics are covered: osteomuscle neoplastic malignant and benign pathologies treated with invasive diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures such as radiofrequency ablation in the osteoid osteoma; invasive and non-invasive procedures in vascular malformations; treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts; and role of interventional radiology in paediatric inflammatory and rheumatic inflammations. The positive results that have been generated with interventional radiology procedures in the paediatric field highly encourage both the development of new ad hoc materials, obviously adapted to young patients, as well as the improvement of such techniques, in consideration of the fact that childrens' pathologies do not always correspond to those of adults. In conclusion, as these interventional procedures have proven to be less invasive, with lower morbidity and mortality rates as well, they are becoming a viable and valid alternative to surgery in the paediatric population. PMID:26235144

  9. Cardiac arrhythmias in paediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Chan, K Y; Loke, K Y; Yip, W C; Tay, J S

    1989-01-01

    Clinical data of patients with cardiac arrhythmias managed between May 1986 and March 1988 were reviewed to determine their mode of presentation and clinical course. Of the 5,768 admissions, 62 (1.07%) patients had arrhythmias. During the same period, 21 patients were managed as outpatients with 13 being new referrals. Thirty-eight patients had undergone corrective cardiac procedures, 8 others had congenital heart lesions, 3 were associated with acquired cardiac pathology and the remaining had isolated arrhythmias. The cardiac arrhythmias were: right bundle branch block 36, premature atrial and ventricular contractions 15, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) 15, atrioventricular (AV) block 7, sinus bradycardia 3, atrial fibrillation 2, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation 2, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome without SVT 2, bradytachyarrhythmia 1. There were 3 patients with foetal SVT, one persisting till day 1. High grade AV block occurred in 2 patients post-surgically and needed pacing. Only 2 others were symptomatic. Other than the 38 patients who underwent corrective procedures (2 had balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary stenosis), 8 others had structural heart disease. There was 1 sudden death and 5 died from their primary heart disease.

  10. Generalisability and Cost-Impact of Antibiotic-Impregnated Central Venous Catheters for Reducing Risk of Bloodstream Infection in Paediatric Intensive Care Units in England

    PubMed Central

    Harron, Katie; Mok, Quen; Hughes, Dyfrig; Muller-Pebody, Berit; Parslow, Roger; Ramnarayan, Padmanabhan; Gilbert, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background We determined the generalisability and cost-impact of adopting antibiotic-impregnated CVCs in all paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) in England, based on results from a large randomised controlled trial (the CATCH trial; ISRCTN34884569). Methods BSI rates using standard CVCs were estimated through linkage of national PICU audit data (PICANet) with laboratory surveillance data. We estimated the number of BSI averted if PICUs switched from standard to antibiotic-impregnated CVCs by applying the CATCH trial rate-ratio (0.40; 95% CI 0.17,0.97) to the BSI rate using standard CVCs. The value of healthcare resources made available by averting one BSI as estimated from the trial economic analysis was £10,975; 95% CI -£2,801,£24,751. Results The BSI rate using standard CVCs was 4.58 (95% CI 4.42,4.74) per 1000 CVC-days in 2012. Applying the rate-ratio gave 232 BSI averted using antibiotic CVCs. The additional cost of purchasing antibiotic-impregnated compared with standard CVCs was £36 for each child, corresponding to additional costs of £317,916 for an estimated 8831 CVCs required in PICUs in 2012. Based on 2012 BSI rates, management of BSI in PICUs cost £2.5 million annually (95% uncertainty interval: -£160,986, £5,603,005). The additional cost of antibiotic CVCs would be less than the value of resources associated with managing BSI in PICUs with standard BSI rates >1.2 per 1000 CVC-days. Conclusions The cost of introducing antibiotic-impregnated CVCs is less than the cost associated with managing BSIs occurring with standard CVCs. The long-term benefits of preventing BSI could mean that antibiotic CVCs are cost-effective even in PICUs with extremely low BSI rates. PMID:26999045

  11. Key paediatric messages from Amsterdam

    PubMed Central

    Barben, Jürg; Bohlin, Kajsa; Everard, Mark L.; Hall, Graham; Pijnenburg, Mariëlle; Priftis, Kostas N.; Rusconi, Franca; Midulla, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The Paediatric Assembly of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) maintained its high profile at the 2015 ERS International Congress in Amsterdam. There were symposia on preschool wheeze, respiratory sounds and cystic fibrosis; an educational skills workshop on paediatric respiratory resuscitation; a hot topic session on risk factors and early origins of respiratory diseases; a meet the expert session on paediatric lung function test reference values; and the annual paediatric grand round. In this report the Chairs of the Paediatric Assembly's Groups highlight the key messages from the abstracts presented at the Congress. PMID:27730186

  12. Improving quality in paediatric respiratory disease management.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Michele; Amegavie, Laweh

    2003-11-01

    Throughout the development, implementation and dissemination of the Paediatric Respiratory Newsletter, effective channels of communication between healthcare professionals have been established, highlighting the importance of collaboration. Promoting education, training, audit and research, the newsletter has nurtured both professional and practice development. The work begun during this project, and the outcomes it has achieved, have been developed into an ethos that recognises effective clinical practice and organisational development as central to the delivery of a quality service. This work informs and is informed by strategic developments, in particular, research and development, clinical audit, quality, practice development and clinical risk, all of which are observed to be the key elements of clinical governance. On a personal level, the project has provided me with an opportunity to consolidate information, forge links with the multidisciplinary team and establish a framework for the development of paediatric respiratory services. We hope it will continue to respond to, and be influenced by, changing health and social care demands.

  13. Developmental paediatrics in primary care: what should we teach?

    PubMed Central

    Baird, G; Hall, D M

    1985-01-01

    There is little agreement about what constitutes good developmental paediatric practice at the level of primary care. Many of the available screening tests are intrinsically unsatisfactory or badly performed, but screening is only a small part of developmental paediatrics. Every primary care doctor should be familiar with the scientific basis of the subject even if a decision is made not to embark on a formal screening programme. PMID:2412629

  14. The paediatric story of human papillomavirus (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MAMMAS, IOANNIS N.; SOURVINOS, GEORGE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is composed of a particularly heterogeneous family of DNA viruses, which has gained much attention in recent years due to the discoveries of Professor Harald zur Hausen, who first identified a connection between HPV and cervical cancer. Professor Harald zur Hausen, the ‘Father of HPV Virology’, was the recipient of the 2008 Nobel Prize. HPV can be transmitted through physical contact via autoinoculation or fomites, sexual contact, as well as vertically from the HPV-positive mother to her newborn, causing subclinical or clinical infections. In infancy and childhood, HPV-associated clinical infections include skin warts, genital warts and juvenile recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, while cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions have also been reported among adolescent girls. To date, several research teams, worldwide, have extensively investigated HPV from the paediatric point of view. This primitive effort has been performed before the recent great expansion of paediatric HPV research due to the vaccination programmes against HPV, which were introduced into clinical practice in 2006. In this review article, we present a brief overview of paediatric HPV research after the first report in 1978 involving children in the research of HPV until the time point of this great expansion. In the future, it is expected that further unresolved issues will be addressed and clarified, as the paediatric story of HPV remains a challenging research target. PMID:25013461

  15. Paediatric psychological problems.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Allan; Harrison, Christopher; Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena

    2014-04-01

    A 2011 BEACH-based study showed that over the past 40 years there has been increasing general practitioner (GP) involvement in the management of paediatric mental health in Australia. There has also been a changing mix of psychological conditions managed, including increased management of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

  16. Safe paediatric intensive care. Part 2: workplace organisation, critical incident monitoring and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Frey, Bernhard; Argent, Andrew

    2004-07-01

    In order to optimise safety within the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU), it is essential to optimise organisation, identify problem areas and implement standards and guidelines for safe practice (with appropriate monitoring). Organisational issues have a major impact on safety: the introduction and-recently-centralisation of paediatric intensive care, the appointment of dedicated paediatric intensivists, nursing staffing, handovers, rounds, the number of work hours and night shifts with the associated problems of disturbed circadian rhythms. The technique of voluntary, anonymous, non-punitive critical incident reporting has the potential to identify incidents and latent errors before they become self-evident through a major incident. This systems approach focuses on organisational and communication problems. Standards and guidelines may help in weighing up the benefits and risks of invasive procedures, and interventional studies have shown that implementation of standards and guidelines can improve outcome. Mortality prediction models enable us to monitor quality of care and, thus, to investigate the best ways of organising intensive care and monitoring the effects of changes in practice.

  17. The impact of post-registration education on midwifery practice.

    PubMed

    Webster-Benwell, Frances

    2014-09-01

    National guidelines require midwives to undertake effective post-registration education which is relevant to practice. However, there is minimal research investigating the impact of education on practice, most of which originates from nursing and allied professions. A small-scale phenomenological pilot study, involving four experienced midwives, was undertaken to explore their experiences and opinions regarding the impact of midwifery post-registration educational courses upon practice. The research highlighted two key areas: practical engagement in continuing professional development (CPD) and midwives' reasons for their educational choices. The midwives valued the practical relevance and applicability of CPD to practice and the use of interprofessional learning in narrowing the theory-practice gap; educational choices were affected by accessibility, flexibility, mandatory attendance, cost and conflict with employers' objectives. The study suggests further research into the impact of CPD upon midwifery practice and what factors would better engage and motivate midwives to undertake more clinically effective post-registration education.

  18. Effects of anaesthesia on paediatric lung function.

    PubMed

    Trachsel, D; Svendsen, J; Erb, T O; von Ungern-Sternberg, B S

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory adverse events are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in paediatric anaesthesia. Aside from predisposing conditions associated with an increased risk of respiratory incidents in children such as concurrent infections and chronic airway irritation, there are adverse respiratory events directly attributable to the impact of anaesthesia on the respiratory system. Anaesthesia can negatively affect respiratory drive, ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) matching and tidal breathing, all resulting in potentially devastating hypoxaemia. Understanding paediatric respiratory physiology and its changes during anaesthesia will enable anaesthetists to anticipate, recognize and prevent deterioration that can lead to respiratory failure. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview of the effects of anaesthesia on respiration in children. It focuses on the impact of the different components of anaesthesia, patient positioning and procedure-related changes on respiratory physiology.

  19. Report from The International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease: cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease (Part 1 - Procedural nomenclature).

    PubMed

    Bergersen, Lisa; Everett, Allen Dale; Giroud, Jorge Manuel; Martin, Gerard R; Franklin, Rodney Cyril George; Béland, Marie Josée; Krogmann, Otto Nils; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; Colan, Steven D; Elliott, Martin J; Gaynor, J William; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Walters, Henry Lane; Weinberg, Paul; Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip

    2011-06-01

    Interventional cardiology for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease is a relatively young and rapidly evolving field. As the profession begins to establish multi-institutional databases, a universal system of nomenclature is necessary for the field of interventional cardiology for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the efforts of The International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease to establish a system of nomenclature for cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease, focusing both on procedural nomenclature and on the nomenclature of complications associated with interventional cardiology. This system of nomenclature for cardiovascular catheterisation for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease is a component of The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code. This manuscript is the first part of a two-part series. Part 1 will cover the procedural nomenclature associated with interventional cardiology as treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease. This procedural nomenclature of The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code will be used in the IMPACT Registry™ (IMproving Pediatric and Adult Congenital Treatment) of the National Cardiovascular Data Registry® of The American College of Cardiology. Part 2 will cover the nomenclature of complications associated with interventional cardiology as treatment for paediatric and congenital cardiac disease.

  20. How small is small enough? Role of robotics in paediatric urology.

    PubMed

    Ganpule, Arvind P; Sripathi, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    The well-known advantages of robotic surgery include improved dexterity, three-dimensional operating view and an improved degree of freedom. Robotic surgery is performed for a wide range of surgeries in urology, which include radical prostatectomy, radical cystectomy, and ureteric reimplantation. Robotic paediatric urology is evolving. The major hindrance in the development of paediatric robotics is, first, the differences in practice patterns in paediatric urology compared with adult urology thereby making development of expertise difficult and secondly it is challenging to conduct proper studies in the paediatric population because of the paucity of cases. The difficulties in conducting these studies include difficulty in designing a proper randomised study, difficulties with blinding, and finally, the ethical issues involved, finally the instruments although in the phase of evolution require a lot of improvement. In this article, we review the relevant articles for paediatric robotic surgery. We emphasise on the technical aspects and results in contemporary paediatric robotic case series.

  1. Drill-specific head impact exposure in youth football practice

    PubMed Central

    Campolettano, Eamon T.; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although 70% of football players in the United States are youth players (6–14 years old), most research on head impacts in football has focused on high school, collegiate, or professional populations. The objective of this study was to identify the specific activities associated with high-magnitude (acceleration > 40g) head impacts in youth football practices. METHODS A total of 34 players (mean age 9.9 ± 0.6 years) on 2 youth teams were equipped with helmet-mounted accelerometer arrays that recorded head accelerations associated with impacts in practices and games. Videos of practices and games were used to verify all head impacts and identify specific drills associated with each head impact. RESULTS A total of 6813 impacts were recorded, of which 408 had accelerations exceeding 40g (6.0%). For each type of practice drill, impact rates were computed that accounted for the length of time that teams spent on each drill. The tackling drill King of the Circle had the highest impact rate (95% CI 25.6–68.3 impacts/hr). Impact rates for tackling drills (those conducted without a blocker [95% CI 14.7–21.9 impacts/hr] and those with a blocker [95% CI 10.5–23.1 impacts/hr]) did not differ from game impact rates (95% CI 14.2–21.6 impacts/hr). Tackling drills were observed to have a greater proportion (between 40% and 50%) of impacts exceeding 60g than games (25%). The teams in this study participated in tackling or blocking drills for only 22% of their overall practice times, but these drills were responsible for 86% of all practice impacts exceeding 40g. CONCLUSIONS In youth football, high-magnitude impacts occur more often in practices than games, and some practice drills are associated with higher impact rates and accelerations than others. To mitigate high-magnitude head impact exposure in youth football, practices should be modified to decrease the time spent in drills with high impact rates, potentially eliminating a drill such as King of the

  2. Drill-specific head impact exposure in youth football practice.

    PubMed

    Campolettano, Eamon T; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Although 70% of football players in the United States are youth players (6-14 years old), most research on head impacts in football has focused on high school, collegiate, or professional populations. The objective of this study was to identify the specific activities associated with high-magnitude (acceleration > 40g) head impacts in youth football practices. METHODS A total of 34 players (mean age 9.9 ± 0.6 years) on 2 youth teams were equipped with helmet-mounted accelerometer arrays that recorded head accelerations associated with impacts in practices and games. Videos of practices and games were used to verify all head impacts and identify specific drills associated with each head impact. RESULTS A total of 6813 impacts were recorded, of which 408 had accelerations exceeding 40g (6.0%). For each type of practice drill, impact rates were computed that accounted for the length of time that teams spent on each drill. The tackling drill King of the Circle had the highest impact rate (95% CI 25.6-68.3 impacts/hr). Impact rates for tackling drills (those conducted without a blocker [95% CI 14.7-21.9 impacts/hr] and those with a blocker [95% CI 10.5-23.1 impacts/hr]) did not differ from game impact rates (95% CI 14.2-21.6 impacts/hr). Tackling drills were observed to have a greater proportion (between 40% and 50%) of impacts exceeding 60g than games (25%). The teams in this study participated in tackling or blocking drills for only 22% of their overall practice times, but these drills were responsible for 86% of all practice impacts exceeding 40g. CONCLUSIONS In youth football, high-magnitude impacts occur more often in practices than games, and some practice drills are associated with higher impact rates and accelerations than others. To mitigate high-magnitude head impact exposure in youth football, practices should be modified to decrease the time spent in drills with high impact rates, potentially eliminating a drill such as King of the Circle

  3. Swearing: its prevalence in healthcare settings and impact on nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Stone, T E; McMillan, M; Hazelton, M

    2010-08-01

    Despite its prevalence there has been little academic research into swearing, and certainly none on its impact on nurses and nursing practice. Nurses are, of all health workers, most likely to be targets of verbal aggression, and up to 100% of nurses in mental health settings report verbal abuse. The literature contains no reference to the effects on nurses of exposure to swearing. This paper reports the findings of a questionnaire study of 107 nurses working in three clinical settings, which used a mixed methods approach. Participants reported high levels of swearing by patients, 32% citing its occurrence from one to five times per week and 7% 'continuously'; a similar incidence arose across the nursing teams at all sites, but being sworn at in anger by another staff member happened rarely. The study failed to show significant differences in the frequency of swearing between mental health and paediatric settings, but did find gender-based differences in both frequency of use and offendedness. High degrees of distress among nurses subjected to swearing were evident; moreover, respondents appeared to have only a limited range of interventions to draw upon in dealing with exposure to such treatment.

  4. [Diagnosis of tuberculosis in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Altet Gómez, N; Baquero-Artigao, F; Escribano Montaner, A; Gómez-Pastrana Durán, D; González Montero, R; Mellado Peña, M J; Rodrigo-Gonzalo-de-Liria, C; Ruiz Serrano, M J

    2010-04-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important health problems worldwide. There are an increasing number of cases, including children, due to different reasons in developed countries. The most likely determining cause is immigration from highly endemic areas. Measures to optimise early and appropriate diagnosis of the different forms of tuberculosis in children are a real priority. Two Societies of the Spanish Paediatric Association (Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectology and Spanish Society of Paediatric Pneumology) have agreed this Consensus Document in order to homogenise diagnostic criteria in paediatric patients.

  5. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  6. Population approaches in paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Chatelut, Etienne

    2008-12-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (PK) approach is now often used to evaluate PK characteristics of a new compound during its clinical development. Recently, new legislation governing the development and authorization of medicines for use in children aged 0-17 years was introduced in the European Union. Among the strategies proposed in relation to clinical aspects, use of population PKs is stated. In this manuscript, comparison between standard PK and population PK methods will be briefly addressed to understand why the second is particularly adapted to perform PK studies in paediatrics. Then, specific patients' characteristics (covariates) in paediatrics will be presented. Examples of PK and PK-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) studies will be finally given. The number of population PK studies published still exceeds largely those of PK-PD.

  7. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-03-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials.

  8. [New analgesics in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Avez-Couturier, Justine; Wood, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of different types of analgesics in paediatrics. They must be used in accordance with the situation, the type of pain and the characteristics of the child. In all cases, strict compliance with the posology and the instructions for use is essential to avoid any risk of error. Finally, pharmacological, physical and psychological treatments are employed in a complementary manner, for the biopsychosocial management of the child's care.

  9. Alternative diagnoses at paediatric appendicitis MRI.

    PubMed

    Moore, M M; Kulaylat, A N; Brian, J M; Khaku, A; Hulse, M A; Engbrecht, B W; Methratta, S T; Boal, D K B

    2015-08-01

    As the utilization of MRI in the assessment for paediatric appendicitis increases in clinical practice, it is important to recognize alternative diagnoses as the cause of abdominal pain. The purpose of this review is to share our institution's experience using MRI in the evaluation of 510 paediatric patients presenting with suspected appendicitis over a 30 month interval (July 2011 to December 2013). An alternative diagnosis was documented in 98/510 (19.2%) patients; adnexal pathology (6.3%, n = 32), enteritis-colitis (6.3%, n = 32), and mesenteric adenitis (2.2%, n = 11) comprised the majority of cases. These common entities and other less frequent illustrative cases obtained during our overall institutional experience with MRI for suspected appendicitis are reviewed.

  10. Five High-Impact Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, L. Dee

    2016-01-01

    If we want our teaching to have a major impact on student learning, what are some ideas that can help us do that? Since 1990, the scholars of teaching and learning have been generating a wealth of new ideas about college-level teaching. All of these are good ideas, but which ones have the most potential to have a high impact on student engagement…

  11. The Impact of a Staff Development Offering on Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foglesong, Dianne H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a problem-focused audit used to measure the impact of a staff development offering on pain relief. Concludes that the audit provided concrete evidence that the class on pain did influence nursing practice and affected patients directly. (NRJ)

  12. Training Research: Practical Recommendations for Maximum Impact

    PubMed Central

    Beidas, Rinad S.; Koerner, Kelly; Weingardt, Kenneth R.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This review offers practical recommendations regarding research on training in evidence-based practices for mental health and substance abuse treatment. When designing training research, we recommend: (a) aligning with the larger dissemination and implementation literature to consider contextual variables and clearly defining terminology, (b) critically examining the implicit assumptions underlying the stage model of psychotherapy development, (c) incorporating research methods from other disciplines that embrace the principles of formative evaluation and iterative review, and (d) thinking about how technology can be used to take training to scale throughout all stages of a training research project. An example demonstrates the implementation of these recommendations. PMID:21380792

  13. Impact of Biotechnology on Pharmacy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Curtis D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the role of schools of pharmacy in (1) preparing future practitioners to assimilate and shape the impact of biotechnology; (2) establish graduate and research programs to enhance and apply products of biotechnology; and (3) identify manpower needs to fully realize potential advances caused by biotechnology. (DB)

  14. Examining Internships as a High-Impact Educational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Kerri Day

    2012-01-01

    Colleges and universities across the United States seek new, creative, and impactful ways to enhance student engagement. The study of student engagement has led to the identification of several "high-impact" educational practices that appear to generate higher levels of student performance, learning, and development than the traditional…

  15. Environmental impact assessment in practice: A gender critique

    SciTech Connect

    Kurian, P.A. |

    1995-06-01

    The author evaluates the extent to which environmental impact assessment (EIA) as conceptualized by EIA systems is a gendered process. Through a discourse analysis of in-depth interviews with bureaucrats, technocrats, and activists involved with the Sardar Sarovar dam project in India, the author examines the practice of EIA in a Third World country. She uses a theoretical framework, informed by a theory of gender, to evaluate the interviews. In practice, EIA is marked by gender biases that ignore the gender-specific nature of impacts. Such biases distort the impact assessment process, making environmental sustainability difficult, if not impossible, to achieve.

  16. The impact of globalisation on teleradiology practice.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Yao Y; Tsai, Fong Y; Shieh, Mengkai

    2008-01-01

    Some advocates of globalisation argue that a free market with little regulation is the best approach for achieving cost-effective healthcare. Healthcare, however, is different from other business activities in that it is typically less profit-driven; instead, it often involves the goal of providing equitable care to the underprivileged. Traditionally, the government has subsidised the expenses of delivering affordable healthcare to underserved communities. Because of the many recent advances in telecommunications technology, telemedicine has gained increasing attention. Teleradiology, in particular, is by far the maturest of all telemedicine disciplines and, thus, it may serve as a pivotal indicator of whether telemedicine on a global scale is feasible or not. In this paper, a prediction of the future landscape of globalised teleradiology operations is attempted based on the extrapolation of the historical trends in teleradiology practice as well as the growing pressure on federal and local governments to reduce their regulatory power under the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS).

  17. Patient doses in paediatric CT: feasibility of setting diagnostic reference levels.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, H; Merimaa, K; Seuri, R; Tyrväinen, E; Perhomaa, M; Savikurki-Heikkilä, P; Svedström, E; Ziliukas, J; Lintrop, M

    2011-09-01

    Despite the fact that doses to paediatric patients from computed tomography (CT) examinations are of special concern, only few data or studies for setting of paediatric diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) have been published. In this study, doses to children were estimated from chest and head CT, in order to study the feasibility of DRLs for these examinations. It is shown that for the DRLs, patient dose data from different CT scanners should be collected in age or weight groups, possibly for different indications. For practical reasons, the DRLs for paediatric chest CT should be given as a continuous DRL curve as a function of patient weight. For paediatric head CT, DRLs for a few age groups could be given. The users of the DRLs should be aware of the calibration phantom applied in the console calibration for different paediatric scanning protocols. The feasibility of DRLs should be re-evaluated every 2-3 y.

  18. [Teamwork in a paediatric mobile emergency and intensive care service].

    PubMed

    Tison-Chambellan, Camille; Daussac, Élisabeth; Barnet, Lucile; Sirven, Sabine; Bambou, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    A paediatric mobile emergency and intensive care service team comprises several professionals with complementary skills. The cohesion of a team, as well as the listening and communication skills of each of its members, allow it to respond in the best possible way to emergency situations. Feedback sessions on practice and simulation exercises enhance teamwork.

  19. Infection control in paediatric office settings

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Transmission of infection in the paediatric office is of increasing concern. The present document discusses routes of transmission of infection and the principles of current infection control measures. Prevention includes appropriate office design and administrative policies, triage, routine practices for the care of all patients (eg, hand hygiene; use of gloves, masks, eye protection and gowns for specific procedures; adequate cleaning, disinfection and sterilization of surfaces and equipment including toys, and aseptic technique for invasive procedures), and additional precautions for specific infections. Personnel should be adequately immunized, and those infected should follow work-restriction policies. PMID:19412374

  20. Paediatric cardiovascular clinical trials: an analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov and the Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Drug Labeling Database.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kevin D; Henderson, Heather T; Hornik, Christoph P; Li, Jennifer S

    2015-08-01

    Recent regulatory initiatives in the United States of America and Europe have transformed the paediatric clinical trials landscape by significantly increasing capital investment and paediatric trial volume. The purpose of this manuscript was to review the impact of these initiatives on the paediatric cardiovascular trials landscape when compared with other paediatric sub-specialties. We also evaluate factors that may have contributed to the success or failure of recent major paediatric cardiovascular trials so as to inform the optimal design and conduct of future trials in the field.

  1. An overview of genetics of paediatric rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patricia; Colbert, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    The evidence so far suggests that the paediatric inflammatory diseases encountered in rheumatology practice may be largely genetic in origin, where common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in multiple genes contribute to risk, with real but variable environmental components. As far as genetic susceptibility to common paediatric rheumatic diseases is concerned, only juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has been investigated in any substantial way so far. This article discusses susceptibility for different types of JIA, the different methods used and their advantages and disadvantages. The genetic code is also modifiable by epigenetic mechanisms and examples of these in immunity and rheumatoid arthritis are given to indicate another area of research in the elucidation of the genetics of paediatric rheumatic diseases. PMID:19853825

  2. [Toxicology screening in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Algar, Óscar; Cuadrado González, Ainoha; Falcon, María

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of acute or chronic exposure to substances of abuse in paediatric patients, from the neonatal period to adolescence, is not well established as most cases go unnoticed. Regardless of clinical cases of acute poisoning leading to visits to emergency room, the exposure is usually detected by a questionnaire to the parents or children. In the last few years, new validated analytical methodologies have been developed in order to detect parent drugs and their metabolites in different biological matrices. These biological matrices have different time windows for detection of the exposure: acute (i.e., urine, blood, oral fluid), and chronic (i.e., hair, meconium or teeth). The aim of this paper was to review the scenarios where the use of biological matrices is indicated for the detection of acute or chronic exposure to substances of abuse.

  3. Possible global environmental impacts of solid waste practices

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.M.; Holter, G.M.; DeForest, T.J.; Stapp, D.C.; Dibari, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Pollutants resulting from the management of solid waste have been shown to affect the air, land, oceans, and waterways. In addition, solid wastes have other, more indirect impacts such as reduction in feedstocks of natural resources, because useful materials are disposed of rather than recycled. The objective of this study is to evaluate solid waste management practices that have negative implications on the global environment and develop recommendations for reducing such impacts. Recommendations identifying needed changes are identified that will reduce global impacts of solid waste practices in the future. The scope of this study includes the range of non-hazardous solid wastes produced within our society, including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial solid waste (ISW), as well as industry-specific wastes from activities such as construction, demolition, and landclearing. Most solid waste management decisions continue to be made and implemented at very local levels, predominantly with a short-term focus to respond to relatively immediate pressures of landfill shortages, funding problems, political considerations, and the like. In this rush to address immediate local problems, little consideration is being given to potential impacts, either short- or long-term, at the national or global level resulting from solid waste management practices. More and more, the cumulative impacts from local decisions concerning solid waste management are beginning to manifest themselves in broader, longer-term impacts than are being addressed by the decision-makers or, at the very least, are presenting a greater and greater potential for such impacts.

  4. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  5. Cost Impact Assessment of Cost Accounting Practice Changes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    7A0-A092 434 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA F/0 5/1 COST IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF COST ACCOUNTING PRACTICE CHANGES.(UlNL S EP 80 J S ANDERSONUN CL...MNGER 4. TITLE (mod Su&CEI* I. Tyss[ of REPORT & 11.1110 Coyenea Cost Impact Assessment of Cost Accounting Master’ s Thesis; September Practice Chages... Accounting ," IICASB,’I "Audits," IV"DCASŕ "Decision Models." 20. ASTMAC T (CO.COuMMO 10 GW 0ewr 0 Ite 00404.....VI 0114 id..CEF of 001111 inmb,) *This

  6. The Impact of Action Learning Experience on Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Nicole S.

    2012-01-01

    This case study examines the changes that occur with respect to reflective practices as a result of participating in an action learning group through the identification of aspects/activities of action learning that contribute to such changes and the impact these aspects/activities had on the program participants at a department of the federal…

  7. The Impact of Postgraduate Studies on the Teachers' Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ion, Georgeta; Iucu, Romita

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the perceptions of teachers involved in postgraduate studies of the importance of their study programme for their profession, describes the benefits of postgraduate studies for their practice and examines the strategies used to enhance the impact research they undertake on their teaching. A questionnaire was administered to 161…

  8. High-Impact Practices and the First-Year Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tukibayeva, Malika; Gonyea, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    High-impact practices, programs, and activities where students commit considerable time and effort in different settings can help to define the first-year college experience and are likely to increase success in areas like persistence, deep learning, and self-reported gains.

  9. Paediatric Autoimmune Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    In paediatrics, there are 2 liver disorders in which liver damage most likely stems from an autoimmune attack: 'classical' autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and the AIH/sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome (also known as autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, ASC). The presentation of childhood autoimmune liver disease (AILD) is non-specific and can mimic most other liver disorders. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to prevent rapid deterioration and promote remission and long-term survival. Difficult-to-treat or non-responsive patients should be treated with mycophenolate mofetil; if this fails then calcineurin inhibitors can be tried. Persistent failure to respond or lack of adherence to treatment result in end-stage liver disease. These patients, and those with fulminant liver failure at diagnosis, will require liver transplantation. ASC responds to the same immunosuppressive treatment used for AIH when treatment is initiated early. Abnormal liver function tests often resolve within a few months of treatment, although medium- to long-term prognosis is worse than that of AIH because bile duct disease continues to progress despite treatment in approximately 50% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid is usually added to conventional treatment regimen in ASC, but whether this actually helps arrest the progression of bile duct disease remains to be established. The pathogenesis of paediatric-onset AILD is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4pos T-cells. While Th1 effector cells are associated with hepatocyte damage in both AIH and ASC, Th17 immune responses predominate in the latter where they correlate with biochemical indices of cholestasis, indicating that IL-17 is involved in the

  10. Lessons Learned from IMPACTing Technology Integration Practices: Four IMPACT Model Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar, William; Kester, Diane D.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the efforts of four North Carolina schools that implemented the state's IMPACT model into their respective schools. The primary emphasis of this IMPACT model focuses on the efforts of a technology facilitator in facilitating effective technology integration practices with public school teachers. Outcomes of this evaluation…

  11. Bizarre paediatric facial burns.

    PubMed

    Ho, W S; Ying, S Y; Wong, T W

    2000-08-01

    Child abuse and neglect account for a significant number of paediatric burn injuries. It is of great importance because of the high mortality, high frequency of repeated abuse, as well as the physical, psychological and social sequelae that it causes. Burn abuse is often under-recognized and under-reported because it is difficult to define non-accidental injury. On the other hand, false accusation of burn abuse is extremely damaging to the family. Bizarre and unusual burn injuries can be caused by accident and should not automatically be assumed to be deliberate injury. Three boys of age 1-7 years with bizarre facial burns were admitted to the Burns Unit at the Prince of Wales Hospital between February 1995 and July 1999. One was burned by his baby-sitter with hot water steam and the other two were burned by their mothers with hot boiled eggs. The unusual causes of their burns raised the suspicion of child abuse and formal investigations were carried out by the Social Services Department. Detail assessment including a developmental history of the child and the psychosocial assessment of the family revealed that these three boys were burned because of poor medical advice and innocent cultural belief.

  12. Collaborative practice and patient satisfaction: impact and selected outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koerner, B L; Cohen, J R

    1985-09-01

    The Collaborative Practice was a demonstration project sponsored by the Hartford Hospital Administration, and the Departments of Medicine and Nursing. A prospective evaluative study was established to measure the impact of collaborative practice on increased patient and family satisfaction with health care, as well as the impact on selected outcome variables. A specific 27-bed medical unit and a comparison unit with identical structural characteristics were chosen for study from March 31, 1982, to March 31, 1983. Results of the study indicate that significant differences in patients' perceptions of care existed between the Collaborative Practice Unit (CPU) and the comparison unit under a traditional team nursing system. More positive ratings from patients on the CPU were found for all selected dimensions: patient-provider interaction; quality of care; health education; knowledge of practitioners; and the environment. In order to assess the impact of collaborative practice on outcome variables, a retrospective audit of randomly selected patient records was done. No significant differences for selected variables were found except for the number of health teaching plans. More documented health teaching was recorded on the Team Nursing Unit.

  13. Computer aided learning to link evidence to paediatric learning and practice: a pilot in a medical school in a low income setting

    PubMed Central

    Senga, John; Ndiritu, Moses; Osundwa, Juliana; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Bridging the gap between research evidence and practice is problematic in low income settings. Wereport medical students' experience with a pilot computer aided learning (CAL) program developed to enable students to explore research evidence supporting national guidelines. We asked 50 students to enter data from pre-set clinical scenarios, diagnose the severity of pneumonia/asthma and suggest treatment and then compare their diagnosis and treatment with that suggested by a computer algorithm based on the guidelines. Links to evidence supporting the guideline-suggested diagnosis and treatment were provided. Brief evidence summaries and video clips were accessed by 92% of students and full text articles by 86%. The majority of the students showed an interest in the CAL approach and suggested the scope of the approach be expanded to other illnesses. Such a system might provide one means to help students understand the link between research and policy and ultimately influence practice. PMID:21151759

  14. Aetiological factors in paediatric urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    van't Hoff, William G

    2004-01-01

    The aetiology of stones in children differs from that in adults. Young children, especially boys, are prone to infective stones, although this type of calculi is decreasing in frequency over time in prosperous countries. Two monogenic causes, cystinuria and hyperoxaluria, each account for 5-15% of paediatric stones. Increased factors for stone formation in children include prematurity, neurological problems, ketogenic diet and reconstructed or augmented bladders. Hypercalciuria is commonly found in paediatric stone formers, is usually idiopathic and is only rarely associated with hypercalcaemia. All children with stones should undergo a metabolic evaluation.

  15. The organisation of paediatric renal care in different European countries: results of the PAC project.

    PubMed

    Knoll, J; Demol, A; Elseviers, M; Harrington, M; De Vos, J Y; Zampieron, A; Ormandy, P; Kafkia, T

    2006-01-01

    The Paediatric Access Care (PAC) project, organised by the Research Board of EDTNA/ERCA, aimed to study the organisation of paediatric renal care in Europe and to investigate the practice of access care for both haemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) paediatric patients. This paper reports on the organisation of paediatric renal care. The majority of paediatric renal care units were located in specific paediatric units of university hospitals. Most of the centres had offered HD, PD and transplantation (Tx) for more than 20 years. Half of nursing staff had qualifications in paediatric and renal nursing. Most of the centres offered an extended multidisciplinary team approach with the family actively involved in the care of the patient. PD and HD were equally used. Automatic Peritoneal Dialysis (APD) was offered as the standard PD treatment in 2 out of 3 centres. The HD schedule mostly utilised was 3 x 4 hours a week. Half of the patients were on the Tx waiting list and one third of registered patients were transplanted in 2004.

  16. A paediatric X-ray exposure chart

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Stephen P

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this review was to develop a radiographic optimisation strategy to make use of digital radiography (DR) and needle phosphor computerised radiography (CR) detectors, in order to lower radiation dose and improve image quality for paediatrics. This review was based on evidence-based practice, of which a component was a review of the relevant literature. The resulting exposure chart was developed with two distinct groups of exposure optimisation strategies – body exposures (for head, trunk, humerus, femur) and distal extremity exposures (elbow to finger, knee to toe). Exposure variables manipulated included kilovoltage peak (kVp), target detector exposure and milli-ampere-seconds (mAs), automatic exposure control (AEC), additional beam filtration, and use of antiscatter grid. Mean dose area product (DAP) reductions of up to 83% for anterior–posterior (AP)/posterior–anterior (PA) abdomen projections were recorded postoptimisation due to manipulation of multiple-exposure variables. For body exposures, the target EI and detector exposure, and thus the required mAs were typically 20% less postoptimisation. Image quality for some distal extremity exposures was improved by lowering kVp and increasing mAs around constant entrance skin dose. It is recommended that purchasing digital X-ray equipment with high detective quantum efficiency detectors, and then optimising the exposure chart for use with these detectors is of high importance for sites performing paediatric imaging. Multiple-exposure variables may need to be manipulated to achieve optimal outcomes.

  17. A paediatric X-ray exposure chart

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to develop a radiographic optimisation strategy to make use of digital radiography (DR) and needle phosphor computerised radiography (CR) detectors, in order to lower radiation dose and improve image quality for paediatrics. This review was based on evidence-based practice, of which a component was a review of the relevant literature. The resulting exposure chart was developed with two distinct groups of exposure optimisation strategies – body exposures (for head, trunk, humerus, femur) and distal extremity exposures (elbow to finger, knee to toe). Exposure variables manipulated included kilovoltage peak (kVp), target detector exposure and milli-ampere-seconds (mAs), automatic exposure control (AEC), additional beam filtration, and use of antiscatter grid. Mean dose area product (DAP) reductions of up to 83% for anterior–posterior (AP)/posterior–anterior (PA) abdomen projections were recorded postoptimisation due to manipulation of multiple-exposure variables. For body exposures, the target EI and detector exposure, and thus the required mAs were typically 20% less postoptimisation. Image quality for some distal extremity exposures was improved by lowering kVp and increasing mAs around constant entrance skin dose. It is recommended that purchasing digital X-ray equipment with high detective quantum efficiency detectors, and then optimising the exposure chart for use with these detectors is of high importance for sites performing paediatric imaging. Multiple-exposure variables may need to be manipulated to achieve optimal outcomes. PMID:26229655

  18. How Policy Impacts on Practice and How Practice Does Not Impact on Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffield, Frank; Edward, Sheila; Finlay, Ian; Hodgson, Ann; Spours, Ken; Steer, Richard; Gregson, Maggie

    2007-01-01

    The TLRP project reported on in this article attempts to understand how the Learning and Skills sector functions. It traces how education and training policy percolates down through many levels in the English system and how these levels interact, or fail to interact. The authors first focus upon how policy impacts upon the interests of three…

  19. Impact of human resource management practices on nursing home performance.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, K V; Wagar, T H

    2001-08-01

    Management scholars and practitioners alike have become increasingly interested in learning more about the ability of certain 'progressive' or 'high-performance' human resource management (HRM) practices to enhance organizational effectiveness. There is growing evidence to suggest that the contribution of various HRM practices to impact firm performance may be synergistic in effect yet contingent on a number of contextual factors, including workplace climate. A contingency theory perspective suggests that in order to be effective, HMR policies and practices must be consistent with other aspects of the organization, including its environment. This paper reports on empirical findings from research that examines the relationship between HRM practices, workplace climate and perceptions of organizational performance, in a large sample of Canadian nursing homes. Data from 283 nursing homes were collected by means of a mail survey that included questions on HRM practices, programmes, and policies, on human resource aspects of workplace climate, as well as a variety of indicators that include employee, customer/resident and facility measures of organizational performance. Results derived from ordered probit analysis suggest that nursing homes in our sample which had implemented more 'progressive' HRM practices and which reported a workplace climate that strongly values employee participation, empowerment and accountability tended to be perceived to generally perform better on a number of valued organizational outcomes. Nursing homes in our sample that performed best overall were found to be more likely to not only have implemented more of these HRM practices, but also to report having a workplace climate that reflects the seminal value that it places on its human resources. This finding is consistent with the conclusion that simply introducing HRM practices or programmes, in the absence of an appropriately supportive workplace climate, will be insufficient to attain

  20. Optimizing treatment in paediatric rheumatology--lessons from oncology.

    PubMed

    Niehues, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of children with cancer, in particular with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), has been highly successful in the past two decades owing to the implementation of treatment optimization studies. Study centres appointed by scientific societies design treatment optimization study protocols (TOSPs) that address an investigator-initiated research question and detail treatment procedures according to these aims. Nearly all children with malignant diseases are treated within TOSPs, whereas children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and other common paediatric rheumatic diseases are mostly treated outside TOSPs and clinical trials. Despite the differences in natural course and prognosis between malignant and inflammatory diseases, aiming for the recruitment of all children with defined rheumatic diseases into TOSPs or similar protocols would enable the longitudinal collection of crucial clinical data and improve evidence-based approaches. Successful research networks already exist in paediatric rheumatology that could facilitate the implementation of this approach. Paediatric rheumatic diseases have a considerable impact on patients and their families; thus, I propose that research networks in paediatric rheumatology should recruit most--if not all--children with rheumatic diseases into study protocols with standardized treatment and outcome measures.

  1. Unmet needs in paediatric psychopharmacology: Present scenario and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Persico, Antonio M; Arango, Celso; Buitelaar, Jan K; Correll, Christoph U; Glennon, Jeffrey C; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Moreno, Carmen; Vitiello, Benedetto; Vorstman, Jacob; Zuddas, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Paediatric psychopharmacology holds great promise in two equally important areas of enormous biomedical and social impact, namely the treatment of behavioural abnormalities in children and adolescents, and the prevention of psychiatric disorders with adolescent- or adult-onset. Yet, in striking contrast, pharmacological treatment options presently available in child and adolescent psychiatry are dramatically limited. The most important currently unmet needs in paediatric psychopharmacology are: the frequent off-label prescription of medications to children and adolescents based exclusively on data from randomized controlled studies involving adult patients; the frequent lack of age-specific dose, long-term efficacy and tolerability/safety data; the lack of effective medications for many paediatric psychiatric disorders, most critically autism spectrum disorder; the scarcity and limitations of randomized placebo-controlled trials in paediatric psychopharmacology; the unexplored potential for the prevention of psychiatric disorders with adolescent- and adult-onset; the current lack of biomarkers to predict treatment response and severe adverse effects; the need for better preclinical data to foster the successful development of novel drug therapies; and the effective dissemination of evidence-based treatments to the general public, to better inform patients and families of the benefits and risks of pharmacological interventions during development. Priorities and strategies are proposed to overcome some of these limitations, including the European Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychopharmacology Network, as an overarching Pan-European infrastructure aimed at reliably carrying out much needed psychopharmacological trials in children and adolescents, in order to fill the identified gaps and improve overall outcomes.

  2. Targeted detection of genetic alterations reveal the prognostic impact of H3K27M and MAPK pathway aberrations in paediatric thalamic glioma.

    PubMed

    Ryall, Scott; Krishnatry, Rahul; Arnoldo, Anthony; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Mistry, Matthew; Siddaway, Robert; Ling, Cino; Pajovic, Sanja; Yu, Man; Rubin, Joshua B; Hukin, Juliette; Steinbok, Paul; Bartels, Ute; Bouffet, Eric; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2016-08-31

    Paediatric brain tumours arising in the thalamus present significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to physicians due to their sensitive midline location. As such, genetic analysis for biomarkers to aid in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of these tumours is needed. Here, we identified 64 thalamic gliomas with clinical follow-up and characterized targeted genomic alterations using newly optimized droplet digital and NanoString-based assays. The median age at diagnosis was 9.25 years (range, 0.63-17.55) and median survival was 6.43 (range, 0.01-27.63) years. Our cohort contained 42 and 22 tumours reviewed as low and high grade gliomas, respectively. Five (12 %) low grade and 11 (50 %) high grade gliomas were positive for the H3F3A/HIST1H3B K27M (H3K27M) mutation. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed significantly worse overall survival for patients harbouring the H3K27M mutation versus H3F3A/HIST1H3B wild type (H3WT) samples (log-rank p < 0.0001) with a median survival of 1.02 vs. 9.12 years. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation via BRAF or FGFR1 hotspot mutations or fusion events were detected in 44 % of patients, and was associated with long-term survival in the absence of H3K27M (log-rank p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated H3K27M status and high grade histology to be the most significant independent predictors of poor overall survival with hazard ratios of 6.945 and 7.721 (p < 0.0001), respectively. In contrast, MAPK pathway activation is a predictor of favourable patient outcome, although not independent of other clinical factors. Importantly, we show that low grade malignancies may harbour H3K27M mutations and that these tumours show a dismal survival compared to low grade H3WT cases. Our data strongly supports the inclusion of targeted genetic testing in childhood thalamic tumours to most accurately stratify patients into appropriate risk groups.

  3. Does receiving genetic counseling impact genetic counselor practice?

    PubMed

    Peters, Elizabeth; McCarthy Veach, Patricia; Ward, Erin E; LeRoy, Bonnie S

    2004-10-01

    This study was an investigation of whether genetic counselors have received genetic counseling and if so, how they believe it affects their practice. One thousand genetic counselors were mailed surveys about the nature of genetic counseling services received, impact on their clinical practice, frequency and reasons for disclosing about their receipt of counseling to their clients, and demographics. Ninety-three of the 510 respondents reported receiving genetic counseling. Of these, almost three-fourths were practicing genetic counselors while receiving services. Reasons for services include prenatal concerns, family history of cancer, and history/risk of other genetic conditions. Frequently endorsed effects on practice include increased empathy and understanding of client decisions, feeling more connected with clients, greater emphasis on psychosocial support, and sympathy. Forty-six respondents disclosed to clients about their receipt of genetic counseling. Prevalent reasons include client asked, help clients feel they are not alone, demonstrate counselor understanding, decrease client anxiety, build rapport, and normalize client feelings. Practice and research recommendations are given.

  4. Redefining perioperative advanced practice. Scope of practice: measuring impact and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Radford, Mark; Abbassi, Ann; Williamson, Alastair; Johnston, Paul

    2003-12-01

    There are increasing demands placed upon the modern NHS, particularly in emergency care. In combating these demands, new approaches to practice will form an overall strategy for improving care delivered to patients. This is the second in a series by authors from the Good Hope Hospital NHS Trust and explains their experience of developing an innovative approach to the management of surgical emergencies through the specialist nurse role in anaesthesia and emergency surgery. It examines the scope of practice, clinical and operational impact of the role, and future developments.

  5. Essentials of paediatric infection control

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Dorothy L

    2001-01-01

    Young children readily transmit and acquire nosocomial infections. Children are also vulnerable to endogenous infections as a result of the breakdown of their normal defences by disease, invasive procedures or therapy. The increasing acuity of illness in hospitalized children and therapeutic advances have resulted in a patient population that is increasingly at higher risk for nosocomial infections. Antibiotic resistance has emerged as a problem in some paediatric hospitals, usually in intensive care and oncology units. Infection rates are the highest in neonatal and paediatric intensive care units (where bloodstream infections are the most frequent), and are usually associated with intravascular devices. On general paediatric wards, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections predominate, reflecting the occurrence in the community. The surveillance of nosocomial infections identifies priorities for infection control activities and permits evaluation of interventions. The prevention of transmission between patients and to personnel requires that certain measures be taken with all patients, and that additional precautions be taken with some infections, based on the route of transmission. The prevention of transmission from personnel involves ensuring that personnel are appropriately immunized and counselled about working with infections. The prevention of nosocomial infection also involves control of visitors, appropriate management of invasive procedures and devices, sterilization and disinfection of equipment, provision of a clean environment and adequate staffing. Severely immunocompromised children require extra protection, including ventilation systems that reduce the risk of exposure to filamentous fungi. Infection control in paediatrics is an evolving field that must adapt to changes in the paediatric patient population and in health care technology. PMID:20084127

  6. Medical thermography (digital infrared thermal imaging - DITI) in paediatric forearm fractures - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ćurković, S; Antabak, A; Halužan, D; Luetić, T; Prlić, I; Šiško, J

    2015-11-01

    Trauma is the most common cause of hospitalisation in children, and forearm fractures comprise 35% of all paediatric fractures. One-third of forearm fractures are distal forearm fractures, which are the most common fractures in the paediatric population. This type of fracture represents an everyday problem for the paediatric surgeon. The three phases of fracture healing in paediatric trauma are associated with skin temperature changes that can be measured and then compared with standard plain radiographs of visible callus formation, and eventually these methods can be used in everyday practice. Thermographic assessment of temperature distribution within the examined tissues enables a quick, non-contact, non-invasive measurement of their temperature. Medical thermography is used as a screening method in other parts of medicine, but the use of this method in traumatology has still not been researched.

  7. Permeation studies through porcine small intestine of furosemide solutions for personalised paediatric administration.

    PubMed

    Provenza, N; Calpena, A C; Mallandrich, M; Sánchez, A; Egea, M A; Clares, B

    2014-11-20

    Personalized medicine is a challenging research area in paediatric drug design since no suitable pharmaceutical forms are currently available. Furosemide is an anthranilic acid derivative used in paediatric practice to treat cardiac and pulmonary disorders in premature infants and neonates. However, it is not commercialized in suitable dosage forms for paediatrics. Elaborating new paediatric formulations when no commercial forms are available is a common practice in pharmacy laboratories; amongst these, oral liquid formulations are the most common. We developed two extemporaneous paediatric oral solutions of furosemide (pure powder). The characterization and stability study were also performed. Parameters such as organoleptic characteristics, rheology, pH, content of active substance, and microbial stability were evaluated at three temperatures for two months. Evaluation of all these parameters showed that both solutions were stable for 60 days at 4 and 25 °C. Moreover, ex vivo studies were performed to evaluate the permeation behaviour of developed solutions through porcine small intestine to evaluate the potential paediatric biological parameters influencing the bioavailability and efficacy. A validated spectrofluorometric method was also used for this purpose. Our results guarantee a correct dosification, administration and potential efficacy of furosemide when is formulated in liquid oral forms for the treatment of cardiac and pulmonary disorders in children.

  8. Impact of the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative on Clinical Pharmacy Specialist Practice.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Judith; Ray, Shaunta'; Danelich, Ilya; Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth; Eckel, Stephen; Guharoy, Roy; Militello, Michael; O'Donnell, Paul; Sam, Teena; Crist, Stephanie M; Smidt, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the goals of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) and its recommendations for health-system pharmacy practice transformation to meet future patient care needs and elevate the role of pharmacists as patient care providers. PPMI envisions a future in which pharmacists have greater responsibility for medication-related outcomes and technicians assume greater responsibility for product-related activities. Although the PPMI recommendations have elevated the level of practice in many settings, they also potentially affect existing clinical pharmacists, in general, and clinical pharmacy specialists, in particular. Moreover, although more consistent patient care can be achieved with an expanded team of pharmacist providers, the role of clinical pharmacy specialists must not be diminished, especially in the care of complex patients and populations. Specialist practitioners with advanced training and credentials must be available to model and train pharmacists in generalist positions, residents, and students. Indeed, specialist practitioners are often the innovators and practice leaders. Negotiation between hospitals and pharmacy schools is needed to ensure a continuing role for academic clinical pharmacists and their contributions as educators and researchers. Lessons can be applied from disciplines such as nursing and medicine, which have developed new models of care involving effective collaboration between generalists and specialists. Several different pharmacy practice models have been described to meet the PPMI goals, based on available personnel and local goals. Studies measuring the impact of these new practice models are needed.

  9. ESPR Uroradiology Task Force and ESUR Paediatric Working Group--Imaging recommendations in paediatric uroradiology, part V: childhood cystic kidney disease, childhood renal transplantation and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in children.

    PubMed

    Riccabona, Michael; Avni, Fred Efraim; Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Ording-Müller, Lil-Sofie; Blickman, Johan G; Darge, Kassa; Lobo, Maria Luisa; Papadopoulou, Frederica; Vivier, Pierre-Hugues; Willi, Ullrich

    2012-10-01

    The ESPR Uroradiology Task Force and the ESUR Paediatric Working Group present two new recommendations on imaging in childhood cystic kidney disease and in childhood renal transplantation, and address the presently restricted availability of contrast-enhanced (ce) US in children. New insights into the genetics require an updated classification of paediatric cystic kidney disease along with a new concept of diagnostic imaging. Characteristic imaging features are key to the new classification. Available recommendations for imaging renal transplantation in children are not satisfactory. The following consensus-based algorithm proposes a more effective and more uniform imaging concept, reducing invasiveness, enhancing diagnostic accuracy, and facilitating future multicentre studies and meta-analysis. At present, ce-US in children can only be performed off-license, since the only approved US contrast agent (CA) for children has been taken off the market. Nevertheless, paediatric ce-US is practiced at multiple places using Sonovue (Bracco, Milan, Italy), a generally available agent in Europe. From a medical and scientific perspective, paediatric ce-US should be promoted, and efforts are undertaken to collect data on paediatric US-CA applications. Routine paediatric imaging depends on local expertise and availability of equipment. The imaging recommendations and supportive data are intended to ease the physicians' difficult task of dealing with the specific diagnostic demands of paediatric paediatric cystic kidney disease and transplantation.

  10. Therapeutic upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in Paediatric Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Imdadur; Patel, Praful; Boger, Philip; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Thomson, Mike; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report of use of endoscopy in children in the 1970s, there has seen an exponential growth in published experience and innovation in the field. In this review article we focus on modern age therapeutic endoscopy practice, explaining use of traditional as well as new and innovative techniques, for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the paediatric upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25789087

  11. Paediatric entrance doses from exposure index in computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Martinez, D.; Fernandez, J. M.; Ordiales, J. M.; Prieto, C.; Floriano, A.; Ten, J. I.

    2008-06-01

    Over the last two years we have evaluated paediatric patient doses in projection radiography derived from exposure level (EL) in computed radiography (CR) in a large university hospital. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for 3501 paediatric examinations was calculated from the EL, which is a dose index parameter related to the light emitted by the phosphor-stimulable plate, archived in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) header of the images and automatically transferred to a database using custom-built dedicated software. Typical mean thicknesses for several age bands of paediatric patients was estimated to calculate ESAK from the EL values, using results of experimental measurements with phantoms for the typical x-ray beam qualities used in paediatric examinations. Mean/median ESAK values (in µGy) for the age bands of <1 year, 1-5 years, 6-10 years and 11-15 years have been obtained for chest without a bucky: 51/41, 57/34, 91/54 and 122/109; chest with a bucky (for only the last three age bands): 114/87, 129/105 and 219/170; abdomen: 119/91, 291/225, 756/600 and 1960/1508 and pelvis: 65/48, 455/314, 943/707 and 2261/1595. Sample sizes of clinical images used for the (indirect) measurements were 1724 for chest without a bucky, 799 for chest with a bucky, 337 for abdomen and 641 for pelvis. The methodology we describe could be applicable to other centres using CR as an imaging modality for paediatrics. Presently, this method is the only practical approach to automatically extract parameters contained in the DICOM header, for the calculation of patient dose values for the CR modality.

  12. The impact of the `Getting Practical: Improving Practical Work in Science' continuing professional development programme on teachers' ideas and practice in science practical work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahams, Ian; Reiss, Michael J.; Sharpe, Rachael

    2014-09-01

    Background:Despite the widespread use of practical work in school it has been recognised that more needs to be done to improve its effectiveness in developing conceptual understanding. The 'Getting Practical' CPD (Continuing Professional Development) programme was designed to contribute towards an improvement in the effectiveness of practical work through initiating changes in teachers' predominantly 'hands-on' approach to practical work to one which manifests a more equitable balance between 'hands-on' and 'minds-on'. Purpose:To evaluate the impact of the Getting Practical: Improving Practical Work in Science CPD programme on teachers' ideas and practice in science practical work in primary and secondary schools in England. Programme description:The CPD programme was designed to improve the effectiveness of science practical work in developing conceptual understanding in primary and secondary schools in England. Sample:Ten teachers of primary science and 20 secondary science teachers. Design and methods:The study employed a condensed fieldwork strategy with data collected using interviews, observational field notes and pre- and post-CPD training observations in practical lessons within 30 schools. Results:Whilst the CPD programme was effective in getting teachers to reflect on the ideas associated with the Getting Practical programme, it was much less effective in bringing about changes in actual teaching practice. Conclusion:The findings suggest that if change, rather than only an enhanced awareness of the issues, is to be brought about in established teaching <span class="hlt">practice</span> then there is a need for ongoing support over an extended period of time. Furthermore, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of such CPD is more likely to be effective if it is undertaken by a senior member of a department or school with the full support of the SMT.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15051247','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15051247"><span>Life cycle assessment part 2: current <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pennington, D W; Potting, J; Finnveden, G; Lindeijer, E; Jolliet, O; Rydberg, T; Rebitzer, G</p> <p>2004-07-01</p> <p>Providing our society with goods and services contributes to a wide range of environmental <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. Waste generation, emissions and the consumption of resources occur at many stages in a product's life cycle-from raw material extraction, energy acquisition, production and manufacturing, use, reuse, recycling, through to ultimate disposal. These all contribute to <span class="hlt">impacts</span> such as climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, photooxidant formation (smog), eutrophication, acidification, toxicological stress on human health and ecosystems, the depletion of resources and noise-among others. The need exists to address these product-related contributions more holistically and in an integrated manner, providing complimentary insights to those of regulatory/process-oriented methodologies. A previous article (Part 1, Rebitzer et al., 2004) outlined how to define and model a product's life cycle in current <span class="hlt">practice</span>, as well as the methods and tools that are available for compiling the associated waste, emissions and resource consumption data into a life cycle inventory. This article highlights how practitioners and researchers from many domains have come together to provide indicators for the different <span class="hlt">impacts</span> attributable to products in the life cycle <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment (LCIA) phase of life cycle assessment (LCA).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4962244','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4962244"><span>Inequality of <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Workforce Distribution in China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Song, Peige; Ren, Zhenghong; Chang, Xinlei; Liu, Xuebei; An, Lin</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Child health has been addressed as a priority at both global and national levels for many decades. In China, difficulty of accessing paediatricians has been of debate for a long time, however, there is limited evidence to assess the population- and geography-related inequality of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> workforce distribution. This study aimed to analyse the inequality of the distributions of the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> workforce (including paediatricians and <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> nurses) in China by using Lorenz curve, Gini coefficient, and Theil L index, data were obtained from the national maternal and child health human resource sampling survey conducted in 2010. In this study, we found that the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> workforce was the most inequitable regarding the distribution of children <7 years, the geographic distribution of the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> workforce highlighted very severe inequality across the nation, except the Central region. For different professional types, we found that, except the Central region, the level of inequality of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> nurses was higher than that of the paediatricians regarding both the demographic and geographic distributions. The inner-regional inequalities were the main sources of the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> workforce distribution inequality. To conclude, this study revealed the inadequate distribution of the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> workforce in China for the first time, substantial inequality of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> workforce distribution still existed across the nation in 2010, more research is still needed to explore the in-depth sources of inequality, especially the urban-rural variance and the inner- and inter-provincial differences, and to guide national and local health policy-making and resource allocation. PMID:27420083</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4237943','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4237943"><span>The influence of the European <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> regulation on marketing authorisation of orphan drugs for children</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background Drug development for rare diseases is challenging, especially when these orphan drugs (OD) are intended for children. In 2007 the EU <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Drug Regulation was enacted to improve the development of high quality and ethically researched medicines for children through the establishment of <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Investigation Plans (PIPs). The effect of the EU <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Drug Regulation on the marketing authorisation (MA) of drugs for children with rare diseases was studied. Methods Data on all designated orphan drugs, their indication, MA, PIPs and indication group (adult or child) were obtained from the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The outcome and duration of the process from orphan drug designation (ODD) to MA, was compared, per indication, by age group. The effect of the <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Drug Regulation, implemented in 2007, on the application process was assessed with survival analysis. Results Eighty-one orphan drugs obtained MA since 2000 and half are authorised for (a subgroup of) children; another 34 are currently undergoing further investigations in children through agreed PIPs. The <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Drug Regulation did not significantly increase the number of ODDs with potential <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> indications (58% before vs 64% after 2007 of ODDs, p = 0.1) and did not lead to more MAs for ODs with <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> indications (60% vs 43%, p = 0.22). ODs authorised after 2007 had a longer time to MA than those authorised before 2007 (Hazard ratio (95% CI) 2.80 (1.84-4.28), p < 0.001); potential <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> use did not influence the time to MA (Hazard ratio (95% CI) 1.14 (0.77-1.70), p = 0.52). Conclusions The EU <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Drug Regulation had a minor <span class="hlt">impact</span> on development and availability of ODs for children, was associated with a longer time to MA, but ensured the further <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> development of drugs still off-label to children. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Drug Regulation on research quantity and quality in children through PIPs is not yet clear. PMID</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24534116','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24534116"><span>Hypnosis in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> respiratory medicine.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McBride, Joshua J; Vlieger, Arine M; Anbar, Ran D</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Hypnotherapy is an often misunderstood yet effective therapy. It has been reported to be useful within the field of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> respiratory medicine as both a primary and an adjunctive therapy. This article gives a brief overview of how hypnotherapy is performed followed by a review of its applications in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, dyspnea, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction, and those requiring non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. As the available literature is comprised mostly of case series, retrospective studies, and only a single small randomized study, the field would be strengthened by additional randomized, controlled trials in order to better establish the effectiveness of hypnosis as a treatment, and to identify the processes leading to hypnosis-induced physiologic changes. As examples of the utility of hypnosis and how it can be taught to children with respiratory disease, the article includes videos that demonstrate its use for patients with cystic fibrosis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2703266','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2703266"><span>Forty years of research--its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on dental <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mandel, I D</p> <p>1989-03-01</p> <p>With the multiple use of fluorides the philosophical basis of dental <span class="hlt">practice</span> shifted from the restoration of the dentition to the prevention of the initiation of dental disease. In the United States, the profound <span class="hlt">impact</span> on caries in children, with 50 per cent of the 5-17 year olds caries-free, has changed the relative distribution of the various dental services and the pattern of dental care. The child orientation has been superceded by greater attention to the restorative and other needs of the middle-aged and geriatric population. The research-generated insights into the role of plaque in the periodontal diseases and the wide-scale efforts to improve oral hygiene via plaque control have resulted in a marked reduction in gingivitis and manageable levels of periodontis in the employed population below the age of 65. More advanced disease can be treated more effectively because of new diagnostic procedures and new technologies as well as the use of anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory agents. Major research advances in oral biology, oral medicine and oral diagnosis have extended both the depth and breadth of preventive dental <span class="hlt">practice</span>. The scope of preventive dentistry now goes well beyond caries and periodontal disease to include: (1) injury, oro-facial defects, malocclusion and temporomandibular joint dysfunction; (2) oral mucosal lesions; (3) systemic diseases with oral manifestations and (4) hazards associated with dental <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Dentistry is now being practised with an ordered set of priorities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8461171','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8461171"><span>Priorities and <span class="hlt">practice</span> in tropical <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Biddulph, J</p> <p>1993-02-01</p> <p>More than 14 million children under 5 years of age die annually in the Third World, mainly due to diarrhoea, pneumonia, malaria and immunizable diseases. The problems of poverty, malnutrition, poor sanitation, illiteracy and high fertility that traditionally are associated with underdevelopment are now being compounded by social disruption due to rapid changes in lifestyle, new diseases such as AIDS and Third World debt. A vital part of the solution is provision of basic medical and education services to all, with emphasis on female literacy and improving the status of women. Key elements in providing basic medical services are delegation and empowerment. Doctors must delegate the delivery of essential child health services to appropriately trained and adequately supported auxiliaries. Parents, especially mothers, need to be empowered with the knowledge and resources to recognize and manage, or assist in the management of, their children's health problems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1647651','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1647651"><span>Medium Chain Triglycerides in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gracey, Michael; Burke, Valerie; Anderson, Charlotte M.</p> <p>1970-01-01</p> <p>Medium chain triglycerides (MCT) bypass the steps necessary for the absorption of long chain fats (LCT), and so have theoretical grounds for their use in various disease states, particularly malabsorptive disorders. In childhood, MCT have particular advantages since they allow restriction of dietary long chain fats without limiting the intake of protein necessary for growth while providing adequate calories. In malabsorptive states, MCT have been used mostly in cystic fibrosis, where they may reduce steatorrhoea. However, the long-term growth patterns of these children are dependent on the extent and severity of their chest disease. MCT may be a useful source of calories for those with anorexia due to infection or liver disease and in babies recovering from meconium ileus. The decrease in offensive stools, flatus, and abdominal discomfort improves well-being and social acceptability which is important for many schoolchildren and adolescents. Rectal prolapse may be helped. Where there is loss of the small intestinal absorptive surface, particularly after massive small bowel resection, MCT can help to maintain weight and nutrition. They may also be a useful supplementary nutritional measure in patients severely affected with coeliac disease while awaiting response to a gluten-free diet, and in patients with regional enteritis. In children with liver disease, MCT provide a ready source of calories while avoiding the loss of fat in their stools. Infants with neonatal hepatitis or biliary atresia remain well nourished, and some older children with liver disease grow more rapidly and have fewer and less offensive stools and less abdominal discomfort. Where an abnormal number of faecal organisms colonize the small intestine (`contaminated small bowel syndrome' or `blind loop syndrome') intraluminal bile salts become deconjugated and cause steatorrhoea. A combination of antibiotic and surgical treatment is usually indicated, but MCT can be used to improve nutrition before operation and may be indicated for associated conditions, such as massive intestinal resection. MCT have also been helpful in patients with defective chylomicron formation due to a-β-lipoproteinaemia. In the congenital and less commonly encountered acquired lymphatic disorders in childhood, MCT have given encouraging results. This group includes patients with gross protein and fat loss due to intestinal lymphangiectasia and others with lymphatic anomalies at other sites. Hyperchylomicronaemia (familial fat-induced hypertriglyceridaemia) responds well to dietary treatment with MCT. PMID:4918706</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18808544','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18808544"><span>UK National Clinical Guidelines in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Dentistry: stainless steel preformed crowns for primary molars.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kindelan, S A; Day, P; Nichol, R; Willmott, N; Fayle, S A</p> <p>2008-11-01</p> <p>This revised Clinical Guideline in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Dentistry replaces the previously published sixth guideline (Fayle SA. Int J <span class="hlt">Paediatr</span> Dent 1999; 9: 311-314). The process of guideline production began in 1994, resulting in first publication in 1997. Each guideline has been circulated widely for consultation to all UK consultants in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> dentistry, council members of the British Society of <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Dentistry (BSPD), and to people of related specialities recognized to have expertise in the subject. The final version of this guideline is produced from a combination of this input and thorough review of the published literature. The intention is to encourage improvement in clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> and to stimulate research and clinical audit in areas where scientific evidence is inadequate. Evidence underlying recommendations is scored according to the SIGN classification and guidelines should be read in this context. Further details regarding the process of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> dentistry guideline production in the UK is described in the Int J <span class="hlt">Paediatr</span> Dent 1997; 7: 267-268.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PMB....59.1165X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PMB....59.1165X"><span>Evaluation of radiation dose to anthropomorphic <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> models from positron-emitting labelled tracers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>PET uses specific molecules labelled with positron-emitting radionuclides to provide valuable biochemical and physiological information. However, the administration of radiotracers to patients exposes them to low-dose ionizing radiation, which is a concern in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population since children are at a higher cancer risk from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore, radiation dosimety calculations for commonly used positron-emitting radiotracers in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population are highly desired. We evaluate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 19 positron-emitting labelled radiotracers in anthropomorphic <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old male and female. This is achieved using pre-calculated S-values of positron-emitting radionuclides of UF-NCI <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> phantoms and published biokinetic data for various radiotracers. The influence of the type of anthropomorphic model, tissue weight factors and direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data on the effective dose for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> phantoms was also evaluated. In the case of 18F-FDG, dosimetry calculations of reference <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients from various dose regimens were also calculated. Among the considered radiotracers, 18F-FBPA and 15O-water resulted in the highest and lowest effective dose in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> phantoms, respectively. The ICRP 103 updated tissue-weighting factors decrease the effective dose in most cases. Substantial differences of radiation dose were observed between direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data. Moreover, the effect of using voxel- versus MIRD-type models on the calculation of the effective dose was also studied. The generated database of absorbed organ dose and effective dose for various positron-emitting labelled radiotracers using new generation computational models and the new ICRP tissue-weighting factors can be used for the assessment of radiation risks to <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients in clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This work also contributes</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2829139','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2829139"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of an Introductory Pharmacy <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Experience on Students' Performance in an Advanced <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Experience</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Johnson, Thomas J.; Hedge, Dennis D.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Objective To determine the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of an introductory pharmacy <span class="hlt">practice</span> experience (IPPE) on students' clinical skills during their initial advanced pharmacy <span class="hlt">practice</span> experience (APPE). Design A 4-week First Steps course that focused on students developing pharmacy <span class="hlt">practice</span> skills, clinical communications skills, and effective use of reference materials was introduced in 2006 at the end of the third-year curriculum, prior to students beginning their APPEs. Assessment During the third week of the first APPE, faculty members rated students' demonstration of 9 clinical skills on a 5-point Likert scale (1 being always and 5 being never). The evaluation was performed in 2005 prior to implementation of the course (control group) and again in 2006 after implementation of the course. Students who completed the First Steps course scored better on all 9 skills and had a better average clinical skills value (2.3) compared to the control group (2.6, p < 0.01). Conclusion Completion of an IPPE course that focused on critical pharmacy <span class="hlt">practice</span> aspects, clinical communication skills, and use of reference materials resulted in increased frequency of desired clinical behaviors on a subsequent APPE. PMID:20221362</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21983004','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21983004"><span>From pharmacovigilance to therapy amelioration in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients: the role of the clinical pharmacologists and family paediatricians. Part of a series on <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Pharmacology, guest edited by Gianvincenzo Zuccotti, Emilio Clementi, and Massimo Molteni.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Napoleone, Ettore; Radice, Sonia</p> <p>2012-02-01</p> <p>An active pharmacovigilance approach is advisable in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> pharmacotherapy as it contributes to generate knowledge promptly and to enhance the estimation of true risk in clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Reports and studies from the scientific community and regulatory agencies have shown that effective methods for early detection of adverse drug reaction and pharmacoepidemiological studies are a primary need since they increase drug safety in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population. In this perspective article we describe how pharmacologists and paediatricians may actively synergise to optimise drug therapies and their management in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1166033','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1166033"><span>Resilient Control Systems <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Metrics Basis for Defining Mission <span class="hlt">Impact</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Craig G. Rieger</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>"Resilience” describes how systems operate at an acceptable level of normalcy despite disturbances or threats. In this paper we first consider the cognitive, cyber-physical interdependencies inherent in critical infrastructure systems and how resilience differs from reliability to mitigate these risks. Terminology and metrics basis are provided to integrate the cognitive, cyber-physical aspects that should be considered when defining solutions for resilience. A <span class="hlt">practical</span> approach is taken to roll this metrics basis up to system integrity and business case metrics that establish “proper operation” and “<span class="hlt">impact</span>.” A notional chemical processing plant is the use case for demonstrating how the system integrity metrics can be applied to establish performance, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3500799','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3500799"><span>Sedation/anaesthesia in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> radiology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Arlachov, Y; Ganatra, R H</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Objectives In this article we will give a comprehensive literature review on sedation/general anaesthesia (S/GA) and discuss the international variations in <span class="hlt">practice</span> and options available for S/GA for imaging children. Methods The key articles were obtained primarily from PubMed, MEDLINE, ERIC, NHS Evidence and The Cochrane Library. Results Recently, <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> radiology has seen a surge of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, some of which require children to be still and compliant for up to 1 h. It is difficult and sometimes even impossible to obtain quick and high-quality images without employing sedating techniques in certain children. As with any medical procedure, S/GA in radiological <span class="hlt">practice</span> is not without risks and can have potentially disastrous consequences if mismanaged. In order to reduce any complications and <span class="hlt">practice</span> safety in radiological units, it is imperative to carry out pre-sedation assessments of children, obtain parental/guardian consent, monitor them closely before, during and after the procedure and have adequate equipment, a safe environment and a well-trained personnel. Conclusion Although the S/GA techniques, sedative drugs and personnel involved vary from country to country, the ultimate goal of S/GA in radiology remains the same; namely, to provide safety and comfort for the patients. Advances in knowledge Imaging children under general anaesthesia is becoming routine and preferred by operators because it ensures patient conformity and provides a more controlled environment. PMID:22898157</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21848349','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21848349"><span>Healthy buildings: <span class="hlt">impact</span> on nurses and nursing <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guenther, Robin; Hall, Anna Gilmore</p> <p>2007-05-31</p> <p>Mounting evidence indicates that buildings can be a significant cause of human illness and environmental degradation. According to the United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency, indoor air pollution is one of the top five environmental risks to public health in the US. This may be related, to a large extent, to the fact that US citizens spend as much as 95% of their time indoors. Health care leaders, designers, and architects, recognizing the connection between health and the buildings in which much time is spent, are engaging in sustainable design and construction for healthy, 'green' buildings. The purpose of this article is to assist nurses in understanding the <span class="hlt">impact</span> that unhealthy buildings can have on nurses and nursing <span class="hlt">practice</span> and to provide tools and resources to assist nurses in transforming the health care industry with the goal of creating healing environments and reducing the negative environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the health care industry. First definitions, current initiatives, and motivations related to sustainable designs will be presented. Next sustainable health care design strategies, such as site planning, clean transportation, water conservation, healthy materials selection, indoor environmental quality, and also the benefits of sustainable design will be discussed. The article will conclude by sharing a variety of resources nurses can use to create healing environments in health care settings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25586844','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25586844"><span>In the beginning, there was general <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> ….</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gunasekera, Hasantha; Kilham, Henry</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In this article, we address how general <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> has evolved and adapted to change over the past 50 years and speculate on its future directions. We compare the state of general <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> with that of general adult medicine. We argue that general <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> must continue to have a strong role both in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> teaching hospitals and the community.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24321359','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24321359"><span>Management of adults with <span class="hlt">paediatric</span>-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with <span class="hlt">paediatric</span>-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult <span class="hlt">practice</span> requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main <span class="hlt">paediatric</span>-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> to adult patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15850142','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15850142"><span>Acute pancreatitis in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> age group: a personal experience.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cosentini, A; Stranieri, G; Capillo, S; Notarangelo, L; Madonna, L; Iannini, S; Ferro, V; Defilippo, V; Defilippo, R G; Rubino, R</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Although relatively rare, acute pancreatitis is the most common disease complex involving the pancreas in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> age group. The etiology of the disease is often unknown, and Italian epidemiological data on the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population and, in particular, on the etiology of the disease are not available (except for studies of prevalence). Within the field of the most frequently encountered pancreatitis in the age range of our interest (i.e. 0-18 years), not only the commonly observed forms whose etiopathogenesis is ascribable to cholelithiasis must be mentioned but also those forms due to proteic-caloric malnutrition that are becoming increasingly common. The presenting clinical symptoms and signs may not be typical and the laboratory tests may not always be sensitive enough. In such age range chronic recurrent pancreatitis plays a very important epidemiologic role. Approximately 40% of children and teenagers admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of pancreatitis report a previous episode of the disease. Irreversible changes in pancreatic parenchyma develop in those patients in whom the disease progresses, leading to pancreatic insufficiency. Such a morbid condition (chronic pancreatitis) is more often observed in adolescents, in whom the disease manifests itself with a vague repetitive dyspeptic symptomatology, after alternating remissions and recrudescences, not always clinically evident. In children, the clinical picture most commonly encountered is represented by recurrent abdominal pains, in view of the fact that the patients are frequently affected by thalassaemia. The pseudocystic evolution of the disease is the most common organic damage resulting from the chronic progression of the pancreatic impairment. A few differences have been found with respect to severity, etiology, and mortality of pancreatitis in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> age group as compared with older age groups. Both the general practitioner with a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> and the paediatrician</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24282901','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24282901"><span>Economics and ethics of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> respiratory extra corporeal life support.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Callaghan, M; Doyle, Y; O'Hare, B; Healy, M; Nölke, L</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>Extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a form of life support, which facilitates gas exchange outside the body via an oxygenator and a centrifugal pumping system. A <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiac ECMO programme was established in 2005 at Our Lady's Children's Hospital, Crumlin (OLCHC) and to date 75 patients have received ECMO, the majority being post operative cardiac patients. The outcome data compares favourably with international figures. ECMO has been most successful in the treatment of newborn infants with life threatening respiratory failure from conditions such as meconium aspiration, respiratory distress syndrome and respiratory infections. There is no formal <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> respiratory ECMO programme at OLCHC, or anywhere else in Ireland. Currently, neonates requiring respiratory ECMO are transferred to centres in Sweden or the UK at an average cost of 133,000 Euros/infant, funded by the Health Service Executive E112 treatment abroad scheme. There is considerable morbidity associated with the transfer of critically ill infants, as well as significant psycho-social <span class="hlt">impact</span> on families. OLCHC is not funded to provide respiratory ECMO, although the equipment and expertise required are similar to cardiac ECMO and are currently in place. The average cost of an ECMO run at OLCHC is 65,000 Euros. There is now a strong argument for a fully funded single national cardiac and respiratory <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> ECMO centre, similar to that for adult patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=success&pg=5&id=EJ1112730','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=success&pg=5&id=EJ1112730"><span>What's in a Name? The Challenge and Utility of Defining Promising and High-<span class="hlt">Impact</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hatch, Deryl K.; Crisp, Gloria; Wesley, Katherine</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This chapter reviews multiple complementary and divergent descriptions of <span class="hlt">practices</span> that have been identified as holding particular promise for high <span class="hlt">impact</span> on college student success and offers a possible map of <span class="hlt">practices</span> to illustrate key features and relationships.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4717424','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4717424"><span>Varicella <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> hospitalisations in Belgium: a 1-year national survey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Blumental, Sophie; Sabbe, Martine; Lepage, Philippe</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background Varicella universal vaccination (UV) has been implemented in many countries for several years. Nevertheless, varicella UV remains debated in Europe and few data are available on the real burden of infection. We assessed the burden of varicella in Belgium through analysis of hospitalised cases during a 1-year period. Methods Data on children admitted to hospital with varicella were collected through a national network from November 2011 to October 2012. Inclusion criteria were either acute varicella or related complications up to 3 weeks after the rash. Results Participation of 101 hospitals was obtained, covering 97.7% of the total <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> beds in Belgium. 552 children were included with a median age of 2.1 years. Incidence of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> varicella hospitalisations reached 29.5/105 person-years, with the highest <span class="hlt">impact</span> among those 0–4 years old (global incidence and odds of hospitalisation: 79/105 person-years and 1.6/100 varicella cases, respectively). Only 14% (79/552) of the cohort had an underlying chronic condition. 65% (357/552) of children had ≥1 complication justifying their admission, 49% were bacterial superinfections and 10% neurological disorders. Only a quarter of children (141/552) received acyclovir. Incidence of complicated hospitalised cases was 19/105 person-years. <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> intensive care unit admission and surgery were required in 4% and 3% of hospitalised cases, respectively. Mortality among Belgian <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population was 0.5/106 and fatality ratio 0.2% among our cohort. Conclusions Varicella demonstrated a substantial burden of disease in Belgian children, especially among the youngest. Our thorough nationwide study, run in a country without varicella UV, offers data to support varicella UV in Belgium. PMID:26130380</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011epsc.conf.1775H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011epsc.conf.1775H"><span>Teacher Workshops in the US: Goals, Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> and <span class="hlt">Impact</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hörst, S. M.</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>The goal of the workshop is to educate the teachers on a few focused topics so that they can transfer the knowledge they gain to their students. We will recruit scientists who are attending the meeting to participate in the workshops and will also pair the teachers with scientists in the field who can serve as a resource for the teacher and their class throughout the school year. The scientists can answer questions the teachers may have, be available to do video lectures or interactive question and answer sessions over skype, and work with the teachers to develop hands-on classroom activities. We will partner closely with EPO professionals in NASA's Science Mission Directorate to ensure that best <span class="hlt">practices</span> for the workshops are employed, including ensuring that the workshop and workshop materials are designed within the framework of the state standards, surveying participating teachers before the workshops about their needs and goals, assessing the participants pre-workshop knowledge, and engaging participants as learners during the workshop [1]. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the workshop will be increased by providing the teachers and students with a scientist who will serve as a long-term resource. We will maintain contact with the teachers after the workshop to ensure that the scientists are still actively engaged in their classroom and to collect feedback. References [1] Shupla C, et al. (2011) Lessons Learned: Best <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Educator Workshops. 42nd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, no. 2828. EPSC Abstracts Vol. 6, EPSC-DPS2011-1775, 2011 EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting 2011 c Author(s) 2011</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27762188','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27762188"><span>Information technology in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> rheumatology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Consolaro, Alessandro; Morgan, Esi M; Giancane, Gabriella; Rosina, Silvia; Lanni, Stefano; Ravelli, Angelo</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Information technology in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> rheumatology has seen several exciting developments in recent years. The new multidimensional questionnaires for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile dermatomyositis, and juvenile autoinflammatory diseases integrate all major parent- and child-reported outcomes (PCROs) used in these diseases into a single tool, and provide an effective guide to manage, document change in health, assess effectiveness of therapeutic interventions, and verify the parent and child satisfaction with illness outcome. The Pharmachild registry is aimed to gain information concerning the long-term effectiveness and safety of the medications currently used in juvenile idiopathic arthritis, particularly biologic agents, through collection of prospective data in a large, multinational sample of patients. Children and their parents are directly involved in the data collection by means of the regular completion of a digital version of a multidimensional questionnaire. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) employs modern measurement science to advance assessment of PCROs, particularly HRQL, and offers multidimensional profile measures. The conceptual link of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> PROMIS with adult instruments facilitates harmonisation of assessments made in children and adolescents with those carried out in young adults in the process of transition of medical care. Development of electronic versions of questionnaires that permit their completion through smartphones or touch-screen devices will revolutionise information collection from parents and children, foster the regular collection of PCROs in routine care, and ultimately improve the quality of self-reported health data, and patient outcomes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15556822','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15556822"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of transesophageal echocardiography on daily clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kühl, H P; Hanrath, P</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>The development of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) almost 20 years ago has tremendously widened the diagnostic potential of cardiac ultrasound and has, without doubt, strongly improved our pathophysiological understanding of many cardiovascular diseases such as aortic dissection, mitral valve disease or ischemic stroke. Especially the introduction of multiplane transducers that allow imaging of the cardiac structures from various scan plane orientations has yielded a level of diagnostic accuracy that is seldom attained by other imaging modalities. The outstanding image quality as well as the high temporal and spatial resolution provided by TEE renders the method especially suited to visualize small and rapidly moving structures, such as left atrial thrombus formation and valvular vegetations. In addition, TEE is exceptional in its capability to scan the heart from perspectives that cannot be easily attained by any other modality, thus enhancing its diagnostic yield. In the last few years the clinical application of TEE has been extended from a pure diagnostic tool to an indispensable monitoring adjunct for percutaneous interventional procedures as well as for the intra- and peri-operative monitoring in the operating theatre and on the intensive care unit. In the surroundings of emerging sophisticated technologies to image the heart and the great vessels within the thorax such as multi-slice computed tomography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging TEE asserts a firm place in the diagnostic armamentarium for the cardiologist. This review will focus the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of TEE in daily clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> and on possible future applications of the technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24351606','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24351606"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> exercise training in prevention and treatment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pieles, Guido E; Horn, Richard; Williams, Craig A; Stuart, A Graham</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>Exercise training is an underused intervention in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> healthcare. This is surprising, since initial evidence demonstrates its effectiveness and safety; furthermore it confers socioeconomic benefits for healthcare systems. Pilot studies have assessed and confirmed the feasibility of exercise training in many <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> disease settings. However, more research is needed to understand the pathophysiology, quantify treatment effects and monitor outcomes. A concerted effort from researchers, health professionals and police makers will be necessary to make exercise training an evidence-based and cost-effective intervention in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> care.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24907888','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24907888"><span>[The electrocardiogram in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> age group].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sanches, M; Coelho, A; Oliveira, E; Lopes, A</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>A properly interpreted electrocardiogram (ECG) provides important information and is an inexpensive and easy test to perform. It continues to be the method of choice for the diagnosis of arrhythmias. Although the principles of cardiac electrophysiology are the same, there are anatomical and physiological age-dependent changes which produce specific alterations in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> ECG, and which may be misinterpreted as pathological. The intention of this article is to address in a systematic way the most relevant aspects of the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> ECG, to propose a possible reading scheme of the ECG and to review the electrocardiograph tracings most frequently found in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> age group.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ECSS..136...53G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ECSS..136...53G"><span><span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of docks on seagrass and effects of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> to ameliorate these <span class="hlt">impacts</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gladstone, William; Courtenay, Glenn</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Seagrasses have high conservation and human-use values, but around the world they are being damaged by human activities. Compared to the larger spatial scale at which some human activities affect estuaries and their seagrasses (e.g. catchment disturbance, dredging, pollution, trawling), recreational boating and infrastructure of moorings and docks act at smaller scales. However, the cumulative effects contribute to stresses acting on seagrass beds. This study assessed the effects of docks on the native seagrass Zostera muelleri subsp. capricorni in an estuary in south-east Australia and of current management <span class="hlt">practices</span> designed to reduce dock <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on this seagrass. A field survey found that seagrass biomass was significantly reduced below docks, and the effects were not influenced by dock orientation. Management <span class="hlt">practices</span> requiring the use of a mesh decking to provide greater light penetration reduced, but did not eliminate, the reduction in seagrass biomass caused by docks. A modified beyond BACI experiment provided evidence for a causal link between the installation of wooden or mesh docks and reductions in biomass of seagrass. The reduction in biomass was apparent 6 mo after dock installation, and by 26 mo seagrass biomass had declined by at least 90%. Faced with increasing coastal populations, increases in recreational use, and continued pressures from other human activities, alternative management <span class="hlt">practices</span> that further minimize the effects of docks are needed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26255394','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26255394"><span>Hippocratic views on <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Dentistry and Ancient Greek origins of Orthodontics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tsoucalas, G; Kousoulis, A A; Karamanou, M; Marineli, F; Tsoucalas, I; Androutsos, G</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Hippocrates, the father of medicine, expressed some very interesting ideas on dentistry. His remarks on <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> dentistry and orthodontics are quite impressive and influenced its <span class="hlt">practice</span> in ancient Greece. Here we examine his writings in order to find the most important dental references.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22089055','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22089055"><span>Imaging in chronic cough in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brown, S; Davies, P</p> <p>2011-11-01</p> <p>Chronic cough is a common presentation in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>. We describe a case which highlights the need for careful history taking and summarize the key clinical features which should prompt a clinician to perform a chest X-ray.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1717052','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1717052"><span>Evidence-based surgery: interventions in a regional <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> surgical unit</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kenny, S; Shankar, K; Rintala, R; Lamont, G; Lloyd, D</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Accepted 18 September 1996
 OBJECTIVES—To determine the proportion of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> surgical interventions that are evidence-based and to identify areas where randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or further research are required.
DESIGN—Prospective review of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> general surgical inpatients.
SETTING—A regional <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> surgical unit.
SUBJECTS—All consecutive <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> general surgical patients admitted in November, 1995.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Each patient on whom a diagnosis had been made was allocated a primary diagnosis and primary intervention (n=281). On the basis of expert knowledge, Plusnet Medline, and ISI Science Citation database searches, each intervention was categorised according to the level of supporting evidence: category 1, intervention based on RCT evidence; category 2, intervention with convincing non-experimental evidence such that an RCT would be unethical and unjustified; category 3, intervention without substantial supportive evidence.
RESULTS—Of 281 patient interventions, 31 (11%) were based on controlled trials and 185 (66%) on convincing non-experimental evidence. Only 23% of interventions were category 3.
CONCLUSIONS—In common with other medical specialties, the majority of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> surgical interventions are based on sound evidence. However, only 11% of interventions are based on RCT data, perhaps reflecting the nature of surgical <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Further RCTs or research is indicated in a proportion of category 3interventions.

 PMID:9059162</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=art+AND+evaluation&pg=5&id=EJ1033982','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=art+AND+evaluation&pg=5&id=EJ1033982"><span>The Conditional Nature of High <span class="hlt">Impact</span>/Good <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Student Learning Outcomes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Seifert, Tricia A.; Gillig, Benjamin; Hanson, Jana M.; Pascarella, Ernest T.; Blaich, Charles F.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Using a multi-institutional sample of undergraduate students, this study found that the relationships between engaging in high <span class="hlt">impact</span>/good <span class="hlt">practices</span> and liberal arts outcomes differ based on students' precollege and background characteristics. Findings suggest that high <span class="hlt">impact</span>/good <span class="hlt">practices</span> are not a panacea and require a greater degree of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=elementary+AND+school&pg=6&id=ED571977','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=elementary+AND+school&pg=6&id=ED571977"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Servant Leadership <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in an Urban Focus Elementary School</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Davis-Elenis, Sharon V.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This study examined the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of servant leadership <span class="hlt">practices</span> as perceived by faculty and staff in an urban Focus elementary school. A mixed-methods design was used to explore the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the school leader's servant leadership <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the behavior and perceptions of the faculty and staff, and the challenges a school leader faces as a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22512386','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22512386"><span>Off-label drug use in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>: a world-wide problem.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lenk, Christian</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>Since more than 35 years, the international medical scientific community tries to solve the problem of the off-label use of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> drugs. The aim is simple, but ambitious: to supply children and adolescents with effective drugs, as safe as possible, with known and well-documented side effects, and with accurate and up-to-date information on dosage and administration form. However, despite the significant efforts of paediatricians, researchers and international health politics, a number of severe obstacles for the optimal supply of children and adolescents with safe drugs remain. The detailed analysis of the problem shows not only a still remaining lack of medical knowledge, but also persistent weaknesses in the ethical, legal, medical, pharmacological, and political <span class="hlt">practices</span> that surround the phenomenon of off-label use in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>. The article gives an overview about the remaining difficulties in the field of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> off-label medication with special consideration to ethical and regulatory questions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21274330','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21274330"><span>Steroid assays in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> endocrinology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Honour, John W</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Most steroid disorders of the adrenal cortex come to clinical attention in childhood and in order to investigate these problems, there are many challenges to the laboratory which need to be appreciated to a certain extent by clinicians. The analysis of sex steroids in biological fluids from neonates, over adrenarche and puberty present challenges of specificities and concentrations often in small sample sizes. Different reference ranges are also needed for interpretations. For around 40 years, quantitative assays for the steroids and their regulatory peptide hormones have been possible using immunoassay techniques. Problems are recognised and this review aims to summarise the benefits and failings of immunoassays and introduce where tandem mass spectrometry is anticipated to meet the clinical needs for steroid analysis in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> endocrine investigations. It is important to keep a dialogue between clinicians and the laboratory, especially when any laboratory result does not make sense in the clinical investigation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3005666','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3005666"><span>Steroid Assays in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Endocrinology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Most steroid disorders of the adrenal cortex come to clinical attention in childhood and in order to investigate these problems, there are many challenges to the laboratory which need to be appreciated to a certain extent by clinicians. The analysis of sex steroids in biological fluids from neonates, over adrenarche and puberty present challenges of specificities and concentrations often in small sample sizes. Different reference ranges are also needed for interpretations. For around 40 years, quantitative assays for the steroids and their regulatory peptide hormones have been possible using immunoassay techniques. Problems are recognised and this review aims to summarise the benefits and failings of immunoassays and introduce where tandem mass spectrometry is anticipated to meet the clinical needs for steroid analysis in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> endocrine investigations. It is important to keep a dialogue between clinicians and the laboratory, especially when any laboratory result does not make sense in the clinical investigation. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274330</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2701425','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2701425"><span>Parental knowledge of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> vaccination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Borràs, Eva; Domínguez, Àngela; Fuentes, Miriam; Batalla, Joan; Cardeñosa, Neus; Plasencia, Antoni</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Background Although routine vaccination is a major tool in the primary prevention of some infectious diseases, there is some reluctance in a proportion of the population. Negative parental perceptions of vaccination are an important barrier to <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> vaccination. The aim of this study was to investigate parental knowledge of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> vaccines and vaccination in Catalonia. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional study was carried out in children aged < 3 years recruited by random sampling from municipal districts of all health regions of Catalonia. The total sample was 630 children. Parents completed a standard questionnaire for each child, which included vaccination coverage and knowledge about vaccination. The level of knowledge of vaccination was scored according to parental answers. Results An association was observed between greater vaccination coverage of the 4:4:4:3:1 schedule (defined as: 4 DTPa/w doses, 4 Hib doses, 4 OPV doses, 3 MenC doses and 1 MMR dose) and maternal age >30 years (OR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.20–4.43) and with a knowledge of vaccination score greater than the mean (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.28–0.72). The score increased with maternal educational level and in parents of vaccinated children. A total of 20.47% of parents stated that vaccines could have undesirable consequences for their children. Of these, 23.26% had no specific information and 17.83% stated that vaccines can cause adverse reactions and the same percentage stated that vaccines cause allergies and asthma. Conclusion Higher vaccination coverage is associated with older maternal age and greater knowledge of vaccination. Vaccination coverage could be raised by improving information on vaccines and vaccination. PMID:19473498</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19807776','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19807776"><span>Parental involvement in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cancer treatment decisions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McKenna, K; Collier, J; Hewitt, M; Blake, H</p> <p>2010-09-01</p> <p>This study investigated parents' information needs and involvement in decision-making processes affecting the care of children diagnosed with cancer. Interviews and questionnaires were used to assess parental satisfaction in 50 mothers and 16 fathers responsible for 58 children in an English <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Oncology Unit. Parents reported that doctors contributed almost twice as much to the decision-making process as they did, but parental satisfaction was positively correlated with the amount of information provided when giving informed consent. Satisfaction about their involvement in this process relied heavily upon the level of support received from others. Parents consenting to their child's involvement in non-randomised trials perceived themselves to be under greater pressure from others during the decision-making process while those whose children were further along the treatment trajectory were more uncertain about decisions previously made. Findings indicate that the accessibility, support, information and degree of control afforded to parents by healthcare professionals <span class="hlt">impacts</span> upon their satisfaction with both the decision-making process and their confidence in the decisions thus made. Information and support tailored to parents' specific needs may therefore enhance satisfaction with clinical decision making and reassure parents about decisions made in the long-term interest of their child's health.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7833573','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7833573"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> AIDS: a new child abuse.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Oletto, S; Giaquinto, C; Seefried, M; Ruga, E; Cozzani, S; Mazza, A; De Manzini, A; D'Elia, R; Zacchello, F</p> <p>1994-08-01</p> <p>In relation to youth rights, a new view has been created in recent decades that is included in the fundamental law of the child: the recognition of the right to education and the chance to develop a mature personality capable of creativity and liberty. Because of HIV infection it is very important to pay particular attention to the rights of the seropositive child and children born to seropositive mothers, which may be hampered not only in developing countries but also in the industrial world. HIV-affected children and their families are becoming abused and at high risk of becoming abused and this encroaches upon youth rights. As a consequence, in 1991 the Italian Society of <span class="hlt">Paediatrics</span> issued a "Charter for the rights of seropositive children", which became an important document for all health care and social workers who deal with HIV-affected children. In this paper, we also consider the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of HIV infection on the three main rights of children: the right to live, the rights of security and the rights of socialization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=stroke&pg=2&id=EJ1032116','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=stroke&pg=2&id=EJ1032116"><span>The Self-Directed Learning Experience of Mothers Whose Child Has Had a <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Stroke</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Grover, Kenda S.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This study employed qualitative research methodology to explore the experiences of mothers who self-directed their learning following their child's stroke diagnosis. <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> stroke, although rare, is among the top 10 causes of death in children in the USA, but information about the cause, treatment and long-term <span class="hlt">impact</span> are difficult to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5078733','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5078733"><span>Accelerated oral nanomedicine discovery from miniaturized screening to clinical production exemplified by <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV nanotherapies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Giardiello, Marco; Liptrott, Neill J.; McDonald, Tom O.; Moss, Darren; Siccardi, Marco; Martin, Phil; Smith, Darren; Gurjar, Rohan; Rannard, Steve P.; Owen, Andrew</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Considerable scope exists to vary the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles, with subsequent <span class="hlt">impact</span> on biological interactions; however, no accelerated process to access large nanoparticle material space is currently available, hampering the development of new nanomedicines. In particular, no clinically available nanotherapies exist for HIV populations and conventional <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV medicines are poorly available; one current <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> formulation utilizes high ethanol concentrations to solubilize lopinavir, a poorly soluble antiretroviral. Here we apply accelerated nanomedicine discovery to generate a potential aqueous <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV nanotherapy, with clinical translation and regulatory approval for human evaluation. Our rapid small-scale screening approach yields large libraries of solid drug nanoparticles (160 individual components) targeting oral dose. Screening uses 1 mg of drug compound per library member and iterative pharmacological and chemical evaluation establishes potential candidates for progression through to clinical manufacture. The wide applicability of our strategy has implications for multiple therapy development programmes. PMID:27767027</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatCo...713184G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatCo...713184G"><span>Accelerated oral nanomedicine discovery from miniaturized screening to clinical production exemplified by <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV nanotherapies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Giardiello, Marco; Liptrott, Neill J.; McDonald, Tom O.; Moss, Darren; Siccardi, Marco; Martin, Phil; Smith, Darren; Gurjar, Rohan; Rannard, Steve P.; Owen, Andrew</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Considerable scope exists to vary the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles, with subsequent <span class="hlt">impact</span> on biological interactions; however, no accelerated process to access large nanoparticle material space is currently available, hampering the development of new nanomedicines. In particular, no clinically available nanotherapies exist for HIV populations and conventional <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV medicines are poorly available; one current <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> formulation utilizes high ethanol concentrations to solubilize lopinavir, a poorly soluble antiretroviral. Here we apply accelerated nanomedicine discovery to generate a potential aqueous <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV nanotherapy, with clinical translation and regulatory approval for human evaluation. Our rapid small-scale screening approach yields large libraries of solid drug nanoparticles (160 individual components) targeting oral dose. Screening uses 1 mg of drug compound per library member and iterative pharmacological and chemical evaluation establishes potential candidates for progression through to clinical manufacture. The wide applicability of our strategy has implications for multiple therapy development programmes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21317432','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21317432"><span>Networking in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>: the example of the <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ruperto, Nicolino; Martini, Alberto</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>Networking is key to overcoming the logistical, methodological and ethical problems related to the implementation of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> studies. The adoption of legislation to encourage <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> clinical trials by the American and European regulatory agencies has opened a new era in the assessment of drug safety and efficacy in children. Two very large international trial networks--the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG) and the <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO)--have played a critical role in the implementation of this legislation and have facilitated several successful controlled studies on the safety and the efficacy of new and old drugs in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> rheumatic diseases. The PRINTO and PRCSG networks can be seen as a model for international co-operation in other <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> subspecialties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579287','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25579287"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of conversion from an open ward design <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care unit environment to all isolated rooms environment on incidence of bloodstream infections and antibiotic resistance in Southern Israel (2000 to 2008).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lazar, I; Abukaf, H; Sofer, S; Peled, N; Leibovitz, E</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We studied the epidemiology, microbiology, clinical aspects and outcome of bloodstream infections (BSI) in a tertiary <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care unit. All BSI episodes were prospectively identified and analysed. The <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care unit moved in 2006 from an open-plan unit to a new (all single room) unit. Three hundred and fifty-three BSI episodes occurred in 299 of 4162 patients. Overall, BSI incidence was 85 per 1000 hospitalised children. Fewer BSI episodes occurred during the last two years of the study (2007 to 2008), compared with 2000 to 2006 (70 of 1061 admissions, 6.5% versus 283 of 3101 admissions, 9.1%, respectively, P=0.01). There were 127 of 340 (37.4%) community-acquired and 213 of 340 (62.6%) nosocomial BSI episodes (31 of 1000 and 51 of 1000, respectively). Nosocomial BSI episodes decreased during 2007 to 2008 versus 2000 to 2006 (37.7% versus 55.8%, P=0.03). In 448 instances, pathogens were isolated, 231 (52%) Gram-positive and 188 (42%) Gram-negative. Coagulase-negative Staphylococci, S. pneumoniae and S. aureus (41.1%, 19.9% and 11.7%, respectively) were the most common Gram-positive and Enterobacteriaceae spp. the most frequent Gram-negative organisms (45.2%, of them Klebsiella spp. and E. coli 40% and 29.4%, respectively). A significant decrease was recorded during 2007 to 2008 in Enterobacteriaceae resistance to piperacillin, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. Thirty of 299 (10%, 9 with S. pneumoniae-BSI) patients died. A significant decrease in BSI and nosocomial incidence and Enterobacteriaceae spp. antibiotic resistance was recorded following the conversion of the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care unit from an open ward to an all isolated rooms environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22monitoring+and+evaluation%22&pg=6&id=EJ833060','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22monitoring+and+evaluation%22&pg=6&id=EJ833060"><span>Evidence-Based <span class="hlt">Practice</span> and Evaluation: From Insight to <span class="hlt">Impact</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dunsmuir, Sandra; Brown, Emma; Iyadurai, Suzi; Monsen, Jeremy</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>With the growing emphasis on accountability and evidence-based <span class="hlt">practice</span>, evaluation has become increasingly important in the contexts in which educational psychologists (EPs) <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This paper describes a Target Monitoring and Evaluation (TME) system, derived from Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) which was developed to evaluate outcomes of a wide…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=soler&pg=5&id=EJ638986','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=soler&pg=5&id=EJ638986"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Authentic Adult Literacy Instruction on Adult Literacy <span class="hlt">Practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Purcell-Gates, Victoria; Degener, Sophie C.; Jacobson, Erik; Soler, Marta</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Investigates relationships between two dimensions of adult literacy instruction and change in the literacy <span class="hlt">practices</span> of adult literacy students. Finds that authenticity of class literacy activities and texts had a statistically significant effect on change in student literacy <span class="hlt">practices</span>; and increases in types of texts involved reading and writing…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=self+AND+perception+AND+competencies+AND+higher+AND+education&pg=4&id=EJ1011563','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=self+AND+perception+AND+competencies+AND+higher+AND+education&pg=4&id=EJ1011563"><span>National Board Certification and Developmentally Appropriate <span class="hlt">Practices</span>: Perceptions of <span class="hlt">Impact</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McKenzie, Ellen Nancy</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The study investigated a relationship between National Board certification and perceived use of developmentally appropriate <span class="hlt">practices</span> (DAP). A self-developed survey, the Early-childhood Teacher Inventory of <span class="hlt">Practices</span>, was e-mailed to participants. Participants included 246 non-National Board-certified (non-NBCT) and 135 National Board-certified…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25486164','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25486164"><span>Community psychology <span class="hlt">practice</span>: expanding the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of psychology's work.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wolff, Tom</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>This article introduces the reader to community psychology <span class="hlt">practice</span> by defining the field and its key principles and then illustrating through brief case stories what community psychology <span class="hlt">practice</span> looks like in various employment settings. An exploration of the development of the field includes a review of the competencies of community psychology <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Finally, the emerging opportunities for community psychology <span class="hlt">practice</span> for psychologists are outlined. Well-publicized issues such as health disparities give psychologists an opportunity to bring social problems such as racism, sexism, homophobia, and income inequality to the forefront and to create community-wide efforts to improve the ways in which people live. Community psychology <span class="hlt">practice</span> offers psychologists a format and a set of competencies for moving forward on this work by focusing on approaches that are ecological, community centered, population based, preventive, focused on systems change and empowerment, and multidisciplinary and that bring those most affected by the issues to the heart of the decision making.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24138725','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24138725"><span>Fine needle biopsy with cytology in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>: the importance of a multidisciplinary approach and the role of ancillary techniques.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barroca, H; Bom-Sucesso, M</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>Fine needle biopsy (FNB) with cytology has long been regarded as an excellent technique as the first choice for diagnosing adult tumours. Being an inexpensive minimally invasive technique with high accuracy and diagnostic immediacy through rapid on-site evaluation, it is also ideal for implementation in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> setting, particularly in developing countries. Furthermore, it allows complementary and advanced procedures such as flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), among others, which enhances the diagnostic capacity of this technique and gives it a key role in risk stratification and therapeutic decision-making for several tumours. The advantages of FNB are optimized in the setting of a multidisciplinary team where cytologist, clinician and radiologist play leading roles. <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> tumours are rare and most ancillary techniques are cost-effective but complex to be implemented in small centres with limited experience in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> pathology. Therefore reference centres are essential, in order to establish teams with extensive experience and expertise. Hence, any child with a suspected malignancy should be directly referred to a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> oncology unit. Focusing on a <span class="hlt">practical</span> approach to the assessment of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> lymphadenopathies and non-central nervous system solid tumours we review the effectiveness of FNB as applied concurrently with ancillary techniques in a multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic decisions of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> tumours and tumour-like lesions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1083261.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1083261.pdf"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of OER on Teaching and Learning <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Weller, Martin; de los Arcos, Bea; Farrow, Rob; Pitt, Beck; McAndrew, Patrick</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The OER Research Hub has been investigating the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of OER, using eleven hypotheses, and a mixed methods approach to establish an evidence base. This paper explores the findings relating to teaching and learning. The findings reveal a set of direct <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, including an increase in factors relating to student performance, increased reflection…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28097438','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28097438"><span>Attitudes towards fever amongst UK <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care staff.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brick, Thomas; Agbeko, Rachel S; Davies, Patrick; Davis, Peter J; Deep, Akash; Fortune, Peter-Marc; Inwald, David P; Jones, Amy; Levin, Richard; Morris, Kevin P; Pappachan, John; Ray, Samiran; Tibby, Shane M; Tume, Lyvonne N; Peters, Mark J</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>The role played by fever in the outcome of critical illness in children is unclear. This survey of medical and nursing staff in 35 <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care units and transport teams in the United Kingdom and Ireland established attitudes towards the management of children with fever. Four hundred sixty-two medical and nursing staff responded to a web-based survey request. Respondents answered eight questions regarding thresholds for temperature control in usual clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>, indications for paracetamol use, and readiness to participate in a clinical trial of permissive temperature control. The median reported threshold for treating fever in clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> was 38 °C (IQR 38-38.5 °C). Paracetamol was reported to be used as an analgesic and antipyretic but also for non-specific comfort indications. There was a widespread support for a clinical trial of a permissive versus a conservative approach to fever in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care units. Within a trial, 58% of the respondents considered a temperature of 39 °C acceptable without treatment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hyperbolic&pg=7&id=EJ410764','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=hyperbolic&pg=7&id=EJ410764"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of <span class="hlt">Practice</span> on Speed of Mental Rotation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kail, Robert; Park, Young-Shin</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Massive <span class="hlt">practice</span> on mental rotation of letters resulted in substantial change in speed of mental rotation of 11 and 20 year olds. Change in rate of mental rotation was characterized by hyperbolic and power functions. (RH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20828075','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20828075"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of pastors' spiritual <span class="hlt">practices</span> on burnout.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chandler, Diane J</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This qualitative study addressed two research questions (a) what spiritual <span class="hlt">practices</span> contribute to pastors' emotional and spiritual well-being?, and (b) what factors contribute to pastoral burnout? Based on an inductive analysis of eight pastoral interviews, the study revealed that these spiritual leaders engage in specific spiritual disciplines that contribute to their sense of well-being. The implications of this study prompt further research into the relationship between leaders' spiritual <span class="hlt">practices</span> and burnout.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22855590','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22855590"><span>Economic <span class="hlt">impact</span> of dental hygienists on solo dental <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Beazoglou, Tryfon J</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>The fact that a significant percentage of dentists employ dental hygienists raises an important question: Are dental <span class="hlt">practices</span> that utilize a dental hygienist structurally and operationally different from <span class="hlt">practices</span> that do not? This article explores differences among dental <span class="hlt">practices</span> that operate with and without dental hygienists. Using data from the American Dental Association's 2003 Survey of Dental <span class="hlt">Practice</span>, a random sample survey of U.S. dentists, descriptive statistics were used to compare selected characteristics of solo general practitioners with and without dental hygienists. Multivariate regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of dental hygienists on the gross billings and net incomes of solo general practitioners. Differences in <span class="hlt">practice</span> characteristics--such as hours spent in the <span class="hlt">practice</span> and hours spent treating patients, wait time for a recall visit, number of operatories, square feet of office space, net income, and gross billings--were found between solo general practitioners who had dental hygienists and those who did not. Solo general practitioners with dental hygienists had higher gross billings. Higher gross billings would be expected, as would higher expenses. However, net incomes of those with dental hygienists were also higher. In contrast, the mean waiting time for a recall visit was higher among dentists who employed dental hygienists. Depending on personal preferences, availability of qualified personnel, etc., dentists who do not employ dental hygienists but have been contemplating that path may want to further research the benefits and opportunities that may be realized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24164537','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24164537"><span>No <span class="hlt">impact</span> of high-dose cytarabine and asparaginase as early intensification with intermediate-risk <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: results of randomized trial TCCSG study L99-15.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kato, Motohiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Saito, Tomohiro; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Isoyama, Keiichi; Kinoshita, Akitoshi; Maeda, Miho; Okimoto, Yuri; Kajiwara, Michiko; Kaneko, Takashi; Sugita, Kanji; Kikuchi, Akira; Tsuchida, Masahiro; Ohara, Akira</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>The Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group conducted a randomized controlled study to evaluate the effect of experimental early intensification using high-dose cytarabine and L-asparaginase in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intermediate-risk (IR) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A total of 310 IR ALL patients were randomized to receive either experimental early intensification (n = 156) or standard early intensification including standard-dose cytarabine arm (n = 154) after induction therapy. The experimental arm consisted of high-dose cytarabine and L-asparaginase, while the standard arm consisted of standard-dose cytarabine, oral 6-mercaptopurine and cyclophosphamide. The probabilities of event-free survival at 8 years in the experimental and standard arms were 72·3 ± 3·7% and 77·5 ± 3·5%, respectively (P = 0·32). The 8-year overall survival rates for these two arms were 85·0 ± 3·0% and 86·9 ± 2·8%, respectively (P = 0·72). The frequency of infectious events was significantly higher in the experimental arm (66·4%) than in the standard arm (24·6%) (P < 0·001). In conclusion, experimental early intensification including high-dose cytarabine followed by L-asparaginase had no advantage over standard early intensification in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> IR ALL patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=systematic+AND+review&id=EJ1098870','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=systematic+AND+review&id=EJ1098870"><span>Beyond Synthesis: Augmenting Systematic Review Procedures with <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Principles to Optimise <span class="hlt">Impact</span> and Uptake in Educational Policy and <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Green, Chris; Taylor, Celia; Buckley, Sharon; Hean, Sarah</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Whilst systematic reviews, meta-analyses and other forms of synthesis are considered amongst the most valuable forms of research evidence, their limited <span class="hlt">impact</span> on educational policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span> has been criticised. In this article, we analyse why systematic reviews do not benefit users of evidence more consistently and suggest how review teams…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25429914','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25429914"><span>Abnormal bone marrow histopathology in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> mastocytosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carter, Melody C; Metcalfe, Dean D; Clark, Alicia S; Wayne, Alan S; Maric, Irina</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>The diagnostic criteria for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> mastocytosis are largely based on adult studies and bone marrow findings are not well described in children. We evaluated use of the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for the diagnosis of systemic disease in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> mastocytosis. In addition, we identified unique clinico-histopathological features within the biopsies. One hundred and thirteen children with <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> mastocytosis were evaluated at the National Institutes of Health between 1986 and 2013. Complete bone marrow evaluations were performed in 50 cases. Seven children had repeat procedures. Bone marrows were analysed by histopathology, flow cytometry and for KIT D816V. Bone marrow biopsies displayed mild atypical haematopoietic maturation, increased haematogones and hypocellularity in a sub-set of patients with urticaria pigmentosa, diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis and indolent systemic mastocytosis. Hypocellularity was most pronounced in those with urticaria pigmentosa. Haematogones were highest, on average, in patients with diffuse cutaneous mastocytosis or mastocytomas. There was no evidence of peripheral blood cytopenias, myelodysplastic syndrome, myeloproliferative neoplasm or leukaemia within this cohort. The WHO criteria are applicable for the diagnosis of systemic mastocytosis in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>. Although unsuspected bone marrow findings typically seen in myeloproliferative disorders are frequent in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> mastocytosis, patients within this study remained clinically stable without progression to a more aggressive variant.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2039787','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2039787"><span>Outcome of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care survivors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Bos, Albert P.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The development of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care has contributed to the improved survival of critically ill children. Physical and psychological sequelae and consequences for quality of life (QoL) in survivors might be significant, as has been determined in adult intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Awareness of sequelae due to the original illness and its treatment may result in changes in treatment and support during and after the acute phase. To determine the current knowledge on physical and psychological sequelae and the quality of life in survivors of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care, we undertook a computerised comprehensive search of online databases for studies reporting sequelae in survivors of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care. Studies reporting sequelae in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> survivors of cardiothoracic surgery and trauma were excluded, as were studies reporting only mortality. All other studies reporting aspects of physical and psychological sequelae were analysed. Twenty-seven studies consisting of 3,444 survivors met the selection criteria. Distinct physical and psychological sequelae in patients have been determined and seemed to interfere with quality of life. Psychological sequelae in parents seem to be common. Small numbers, methodological limitations and quantitative and qualitative heterogeneity hamper the interpretation of data. We conclude that <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care survivors and their parents have physical and psychological sequelae affecting quality of life. Further well-designed prospective studies evaluating sequelae of the original illness and its treatment are warranted. PMID:17823815</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23591487','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23591487"><span>Causes, mechanisms and management of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> osteoporosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mäkitie, Outi</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>Osteoporosis, a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength and an increased risk of fractures, is an important <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> disorder that involves almost all <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> subspecialties. Osteogenesis imperfecta is the most common form of childhood-onset primary osteoporosis, but several other forms are also known. Secondary osteoporosis is caused by an underlying chronic illness or its treatment. The most common causes of secondary osteoporosis include chronic systemic inflammation, glucocorticoid use and neuromuscular disabilities. The skeletal sequelae can present in childhood as low-energy peripheral and vertebral fractures, or become evident in adulthood as low bone mass and an increased propensity to develop osteoporosis. Management should aim at prevention, as interventions to treat symptomatic osteoporosis in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> age group are scarce. Bisphosphonates are the principal pharmacological agents that can be used in this setting, but data on their efficacy and safety in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> populations remain inadequate, especially in patients with secondary osteoporosis. Consequently, it is important to understand the potential skeletal effects of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> illnesses and their therapies in order to institute effective and timely prevention of skeletal complications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5348700','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5348700"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology: A rapidly increasing educational challenge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mammas, Ioannis N.; Theodoridou, Maria; Kramvis, Anna; Thiagarajan, Prakash; Gardner, Sharryn; Papaioannou, Georgia; Melidou, Angeliki; Koutsaki, Maria; Kostagianni, Georgia; Achtsidis, Vassilis; Koutsaftiki, Chryssie; Calachanis, Marcos; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Greenough, Anne; Spandidos, Demetrios A.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The ‘2nd Workshop on <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology’, which took place on Saturday the 8th of October 2016 in Athens, Greece, provided an overview on recent views and advances on <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology. Emphasis was given to HIV-1 management in Greece, a country under continuous financial crisis, hepatitis B vaccination in Africa, treatment options for hepatitis C virus in childhood, Zika virus in pregnancy and infancy, the burden of influenza on childhood, hand-foot-mouth disease and myocarditis associated with Coxsackie viruses. Other general topics covered included a critical evaluation of <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Accident and Emergency viral infections, multimodality imaging of viral infections in children, surgical approaches of otolaryngologists to complex viral infections, new advances in the diagnosis and treatment of viral conjunctivitis and novel molecular diagnostic methods for HPV in childhood. A brief historical overview of the anti-vaccination movement was also provided, as well as presentations on the educational challenge of <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology as a new subspecialty of <span class="hlt">Paediatrics</span>. This review highlights selected lectures and discussions of the workshop. PMID:28352303</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11119197','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11119197"><span>Vomiting and common <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> surgery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Busoni, P; Crescioli, M; Agostino, R; Sestini, G</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Postoperative vomiting is a common and unpleasant complication. The purpose of the present study was to verify if dexamethasone reduces the incidence of vomiting when injected IV in children anaesthetized with halothane for common <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> operations. We also studied the incidence of vomiting when sevoflurane was used instead. Five hundred and 69 boys, aged 2-12 years (ASA physical status I, II), scheduled for inguinal field surgery were randomly assigned to receive halothane, halothane and dexamethasone and sevoflurane in three groups: halothane (n=180), halothane and IV dexamethasone (n=188) and sevoflurane (n=201). Anaesthesia was induced by inhalation of halothane or sevoflurane in oxygen and nitrous oxide and was maintained at minimum alveolar concentration of each agent throughout the surgery. For intra- and postoperative pain control iliac crest block was used in all the boys. Vomiting was defined as any expulsion of liquid gastric contents. The incidence of postoperative vomiting was 23% in the halothane group, which was significantly greater than that in the other groups (halothane and dexamethasone group, 9%; sevoflurane group, 13%). In conclusion, dexamethasone reduces the incidence and frequency of multiple emetic episodes when administered intravenously after halothane anaesthesia; sevoflurane reduces the overall incidence of vomiting, but not multiple emetic episodes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28176639','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28176639"><span>Personalized medicine in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population: the balance between pharmacogenetics progress and bioethics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schiavone, Stefania; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Riezzo, Irene; Trabace, Luigia; Turillazzi, Emanuela</p> <p>2017-02-07</p> <p>Personalized medicine (PM) is becoming increasingly important in contemporary clinical and research scenarios. In the context of PM, pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics are aimed at the genetic personalization of drug response. Extrinsic and intrinsic factors may explain inter-individual variability in drug response. Among such factors, age seems to specifically intervene to modulate drug response since normal developmental changes may influence the exposure-response relation. Consequently, the potential benefit of pharmacogenomics (PGx) in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population is considerable. However, many challenges still exist in incorporating PGx into clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>. In fact, drug prescribing in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population is often based on extrapolation from clinical trials conducted on adults as there is often a lack of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> data. Children are not just 'small adults', as they have their own pharmacological characteristics in terms of drug metabolism and efficacy, adverse drug reactions and toxicity. Although children might potentially benefit from such research, many ethical concerns arise at the intersection of the spheres of drug development and genetic testing. Children require particular attention because of their vulnerability both in research and the clinical applications of PGx; furthermore, children range from preterm newborns and neonates to infants and toddlers and to adolescents, thus forming a further heterogeneous target group. In this paper, we focus on some ethically relevant concerns (i.e., informed consent, stigmatization, ancillary information) that might arise as a result of the possible application of PGx tests in both <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span> and research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26036205','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26036205"><span>Evaluating an outreach service for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> burns follow up.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cubitt, Jonathan J; Chesney, Amy; Brown, Liz; Nguyen, Dai Q</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Complications following <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> burns are well documented and care needs to be taken to ensure the appropriate follow up of these patients. Historically this has meant follow up into adulthood however this is often not necessary. The centralisation of burns services in the UK means that patients and their parents may have to travel significant distances to receive this follow up care. To optimise our burns service we have introduced a burns outreach service to enable the patients to be treated closer to home. The aim of this study is to investigate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the introduction of the burns outreach service and within this environment define the optimum length of time needed to follow up these patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 100 consecutive <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> burns patients who underwent surgical management of their burn. During the follow up period there were 43 complications in 32 patients (32%). These included adverse scarring (either hypertrophic or keloid), delayed healing (taking >1 month to heal) and contractures (utilising either splinting or surgical correction). Fifty-nine percent of these complications occurred within 6 months of injury and all occurred within 18 months. Size of burn was directly correlated to the risk of developing a complication. The outreach service reduced the distance the patient needs to travel for follow up by more than 50%. There was also a significant financial benefit for the service as the follow up clinics were on average 50% cheaper with burns outreach than burns physician. Burns outreach is a feasible service that not only benefits the patients but also is cheaper for the burns service. The optimum length of follow up for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> burns in 18 months, after which if there have not been any complications they can be discharged.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25439093','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25439093"><span><span class="hlt">Practical</span> management of cumulative anthropogenic <span class="hlt">impacts</span> with working marine examples.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wright, Andrew J; Kyhn, Line A</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Human pressure on the environment is expanding and intensifying, especially in coastal and offshore areas. Major contributors to this are the current push for offshore renewable energy sources, which are thought of as environmentally friendly sources of power, as well as the continued demand for petroleum. Human disturbances, including the noise almost ubiquitously associated with human activity, are likely to increase the incidence, magnitude, and duration of adverse effects on marine life, including stress responses. Stress responses have the potential to induce fitness consequences for individuals, which add to more obvious directed takes (e.g., hunting or fishing) to increase the overall population-level <span class="hlt">impact</span>. To meet the requirements of marine spatial planning and ecosystem-based management, many efforts are ongoing to quantify the cumulative <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of all human actions on marine species or populations. Meanwhile, regulators face the challenge of managing these accumulating and interacting <span class="hlt">impacts</span> with limited scientific guidance. We believe there is scientific support for capping the level of <span class="hlt">impact</span> for (at a minimum) populations in decline or with unknown statuses. This cap on <span class="hlt">impact</span> can be facilitated through implementation of regular application cycles for project authorization or improved programmatic and aggregated <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessments that simultaneously consider multiple projects. Cross-company collaborations and a better incorporation of uncertainty into decision making could also help limit, if not reduce, cumulative <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of multiple human activities. These simple management steps may also form the basis of a rudimentary form of marine spatial planning and could be used in support of future ecosystem-based management efforts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27117211','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27117211"><span>[<span class="hlt">Impact</span> of digital technology on clinical <span class="hlt">practices</span>: perspectives from surgery].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Y; Liu, X J</p> <p>2016-04-09</p> <p>Digital medical technologies or computer aided medical procedures, refer to imaging, 3D reconstruction, virtual design, 3D printing, navigation guided surgery and robotic assisted surgery techniques. These techniques are integrated into conventional surgical procedures to create new clinical protocols that are known as "digital surgical techniques". Conventional health care is characterized by subjective experiences, while digital medical technologies bring quantifiable information, transferable data, repeatable methods and predictable outcomes into clinical <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Being integrated into clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>, digital techniques facilitate surgical care by improving outcomes and reducing risks. Digital techniques are becoming increasingly popular in trauma surgery, orthopedics, neurosurgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, imaging and anatomic sciences. Robotic assisted surgery is also evolving and being applied in general surgery, cardiovascular surgery and orthopedic surgery. Rapid development of digital medical technologies is changing healthcare and clinical <span class="hlt">practices</span>. It is therefore important for all clinicians to purposefully adapt to these technologies and improve their clinical outcomes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=226386&keyword=civil+AND+engineering&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=79986326&CFTOKEN=50040645','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=226386&keyword=civil+AND+engineering&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=79986326&CFTOKEN=50040645"><span>Novel Use of Time Domain Reflectometry in Infiltration-based Low <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Development <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Low <span class="hlt">impact</span> development (LID) <span class="hlt">practices</span> are structures that intercept stormwater runoff and infiltrate it through a range of media types, including aggregate, rain garden media, and underlying soils. Hydrologic performance is typically evaluated by comparing inlet and underdrain o...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.epa.gov/research-grants/presentation-human-and-ecological-health-impacts-associated-water-reuse-and','PESTICIDES'); return false;" href="https://www.epa.gov/research-grants/presentation-human-and-ecological-health-impacts-associated-water-reuse-and"><span>Presentation: Human and Ecological Health <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> Associated with Water Reuse and Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/search.htm">EPA Pesticide Factsheets</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This presentation was given by Dr. James Johnson at the STAR Human and Ecological Health <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> Associated with Water Reuse and Conservation <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Kick-off Meeting and Webinar held on Oct. 26-27, 2016.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2083691','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2083691"><span>An evaluation of Medline published <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> audits from 1966 to 1999</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>O'Gorman, Clodagh Sheila; Ziedan, Yasir; O'Neill, Michael Brendan</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Aim To evaluate the quality of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> audits from 1966 to 1999. Methods A Medline search was performed using the MeSH terms audit, child, <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> (and pediatric). Predefined core elements of audit were used as inclusion criteria for entry of an article into this study. These criteria were as follows: (1) an article deals with a healthcare topic; (2) a standard is predefined; (3) actual <span class="hlt">practice</span> is evaluated; (4) actual <span class="hlt">practice</span> is compared with the standard. The fifth criterion of audit, dissemination of information and reaudit, was not an inclusion criterion, as it was not used in the early years covered by this study. Empirical grading of standards was used. Results The search yielded 442 articles, of which 303 (100%) were related to <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> healthcare and were reviewed. Standards were defined in 115 (38%) articles. Audit against the standard was performed in 92 (30.4%) articles, of which 42 (45.6%) were published before, and 50 (54.3%) after, 1990. 18 (5.9%) articles were re‐audited: 6 (14.3%) were published before, and 12 (24%) after, 1990. Of the 188 <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> studies rejected, 119 (63.3%) described <span class="hlt">practice</span> observations. Conclusion Many articles in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> are published as “audits”, but they do not contain the core elements of audit. Although audit is a potentially valuable tool in clinical medicine, the publication of poor‐quality audits may lead to the decline of the audit concept. Suggestions on ways to improve the quality of published audits are made. PMID:16738000</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24567497','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24567497"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> CT optimisation utilising Catphan® 600 and age-specific anthropomorphic phantoms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Santos, Joana; Batista, Maria do Carmo; Foley, Shane; Paulo, Graciano; McEntee, Mark F; Rainford, Louise</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The purpose of the study is to perform phantom-based optimisation of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> computed tomography (CT) protocols and quantify the <span class="hlt">impact</span> upon radiation dose and image noise levels. The study involved three Portuguese <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> centres. Currently employed scanning protocols for head and chest examinations and combinations of exposure parameters were applied to a Catphan(®)600 phantom to review the CT dose <span class="hlt">impact</span>. Contrast-noise ratio (CNR) was quantified using Radia Diagnostic(®) tool. Imaging parameters, returning similar CNRs (<1) and dose savings were applied to three <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> anthropomorphic phantoms. OsiriX software based on standard deviation pixel values facilitated image noise analysis. Currently employed protocols and age categorisation varied between centres. Manipulation of exposure parameters facilitated mean dose reductions of 33 and 28 % for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> head and chest CT examinations, respectively. The majority of the optimised CT examinations resulted in image noise similar to currently employed protocols. Dose reductions of up to 33 % were achieved with image quality maintained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2540224','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2540224"><span>Guidelines for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> life support. <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Life Support Working Party of the European Resuscitation Council.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> life support working party of the European Resuscitation Council was set up in 1992 with the aim of producing guidelines for basic and advanced <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> resuscitation that would be acceptable throughout Europe. The commonest cause of cardiac arrest in children is problems with the airway. The resulting difficulties in breathing and the associated hypoxia rapidly cause a severe bradycardia or asystole. In contrast, adults have primary cardiac events resulting in ventricular fibrillation. This important difference in the pathogenesis of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> and adult cardiac arrest is reflected in these European Resuscitation Council guidelines, which complement those already published for adults. PMID:8019227</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24395374','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24395374"><span>Diagnostic radiology in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> palliative care.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Patel, Preena; Koh, Michelle; Carr, Lucinda; McHugh, Kieran</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Palliative care is an expanding specialty within <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>, which has attracted little attention in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> radiological literature. <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28109621','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28109621"><span>[The latest in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> resuscitation recommendations].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>López-Herce, Jesús; Rodríguez, Antonio; Carrillo, Angel; de Lucas, Nieves; Calvo, Custodio; Civantos, Eva; Suárez, Eva; Pons, Sara; Manrique, Ignacio</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Cardiac arrest has a high mortality in children. To improve the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, it is essential to disseminate the international recommendations and the training of health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article summarises the 2015 European <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, which are based on a review of the advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and consensus in the science and treatment by the International Council on Resuscitation. The Spanish <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation recommendations, developed by the Spanish Group of <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> and Neonatal Resuscitation, are an adaptation of the European recommendations, and will be used for training health professionals and the general population in resuscitation. This article highlights the main changes from the previous 2010 recommendations on prevention of cardiac arrest, the diagnosis of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and post-resuscitation care, as well as reviewing the algorithms of treatment of basic life support, obstruction of the airway and advanced life support.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4081767','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4081767"><span>The HOPE (Helping to Outline <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Eating Disorders) Project: development and debut of a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> clinical eating disorder registry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background The HOPE (Helping to Outline <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Eating Disorders) Project is an ongoing registry study made up of a sequential cross-sectional sample prospectively recruited over 17 years, and is designed to answer empirical questions about <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> eating disorders. This paper introduces the HOPE Project, describes the registry sample to-date, and discusses future directions and challenges and accomplishments. The project and clinical service were established in a tertiary academic hospital in Western Australia in 1996 with a service development grant. Research processes were inbuilt into the initial protocols and data collection was maintained in the following years. Recognisable progress with the research agenda accelerated only when dedicated research resources were obtained. The registry sample consists of consecutive children and adolescents assessed at the eating disorder program from 1996 onward. Standardised multidisciplinary data collected from family intake interview, parent and child clinical interviews, medical review, parent, child and teacher psychometric assessments, and inpatient admission records populate the HOPE Project database. Results The registry database to-date contains 941 assessments, of whom 685 met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for an eating disorder at admission. The majority of the sample were females (91%) from metropolitan Perth (83%). The cases with eating disorders consist of eating disorders not otherwise specified (68%), anorexia nervosa (25%) and bulimia nervosa (7%). Among those with eating disorders, a history of weight loss since illness onset was almost universal (96%) with fear of weight gain (71%) common, and the median duration of illness was 8 months. Conclusions Over the next five years and more, we expect that the HOPE Project will make a strong scientific contribution to <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> eating disorders research and will have important real-world applications to clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> and policy as the research unfolds</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24700271','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24700271"><span>Changes in individual drug-independent system parameters during virtual <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> pharmacokinetic trials: introducing time-varying physiology into a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> PBPK model.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abduljalil, Khaled; Jamei, Masoud; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Johnson, Trevor N</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Although both POPPK and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can account for age and other covariates within a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population, they generally do not account for real-time growth and maturation of the individuals through the time course of drug exposure; this may be significant in prolonged neonatal studies. The major objective of this study was to introduce age progression into a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> PBPK model, to allow for continuous updating of anatomical, physiological and biological processes in each individual subject over time. The Simcyp <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> PBPK model simulator system parameters were reanalysed to assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of re-defining the individual over the study period. A schedule for re-defining parameters within the Simcyp <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> simulator, for each subject, over a prolonged study period, was devised to allow seamless prediction of pharmacokinetics (PK). The model was applied to predict concentration-time data from multiday studies on sildenafil and phenytoin performed in neonates. Among PBPK system parameters, CYP3A4 abundance was one of the fastest changing covariates and a 1-h re-sampling schedule was needed for babies below age 3.5 days in order to seamlessly predict PK (<5% change in abundance) with subject maturation. The re-sampling frequency decreased as age increased, reaching biweekly by 6 months of age. The PK of both sildenafil and phenytoin were predicted better at the end of a prolonged study period using the time varying vs fixed PBPK models. <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> PBPK models which account for time-varying system parameters during prolonged studies may provide more mechanistic PK predictions in neonates and infants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=measure+AND+commitment&pg=4&id=ED564992','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=measure+AND+commitment&pg=4&id=ED564992"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of University Religious Affiliation on Presidential Leadership <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Savior, Richard David</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Colleges and universities in the United States face a set of significant and progressive challenges requiring exemplary senior leadership. The purpose of this study was to measure and analyze the senior leadership <span class="hlt">practices</span> at private/secular and private/religious affiliated colleges and universities to identify differences in leadership practices…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25695118','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25695118"><span>How can radio frequency identification technology <span class="hlt">impact</span> nursing <span class="hlt">practice</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Billingsley, Luanne; Wyld, David</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology can save nurses time, improve quality of care, en hance patient and staff safety, and decrease costs. However, without a better understanding of these systems and their benefits to patients and hospitals, nurses may be slower to recommend, implement, or adopt RFID technology into <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23513431','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23513431"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of unit <span class="hlt">practice</span> councils on culture and outcomes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wessel, Susan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This article describes positive outcomes in culture, Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores, employee engagement, and clinical quality as a result of using shared governance, specifically unit <span class="hlt">practice</span> councils (UPC) or staff councils, to implement Relationship-Based Care (RBC).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=socio-economic+AND+impact+AND+assessment&pg=3&id=ED553081','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=socio-economic+AND+impact+AND+assessment&pg=3&id=ED553081"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of RTI <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Student Reading Achievement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gleason, Tara Lynn</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether elementary schools that endorse implementing core components of Response to Intervention (RTI) differ in student outcomes on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) Reading Assessment when compared to schools that do not endorse implementing RTI <span class="hlt">practices</span>. This study also explored…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Human+AND+experimentation&pg=4&id=EJ926393','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Human+AND+experimentation&pg=4&id=EJ926393"><span>Evidence and <span class="hlt">Impact</span>: How Scholarship Can Improve Policy and <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lingenfelter, Paul E.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Researchers, policy makers, and practitioners share a sincere interest in improving the human condition. Academics may be tempted to fault irrationality, ideology, or ignorance for the failure of research to inform policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span> more powerfully, but policy makers and practitioners want academics to tell them "what works" in order to find a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70157273','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70157273"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of fishing and stocking <span class="hlt">practices</span> on Coregonid diversity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Anneville, Orlane; Lasne, Emilien; Guillard, Jean; Eckmann, Reiner; Stockwell, Jason D.; Gillet, Christian; Yule, Daniel</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Fish species diversity can be lost through interacting stressors including habitat loss, stocking and overfishing. Although a multitude of stressors have played a role in the global decline of coregonid (Coregonus spp.) diversity, a number of contemporary studies have identified habitat loss stemming from eutrophication as the primary cause. Unfortunately, reconstructing the role of fishing and stocking <span class="hlt">practices</span> can be difficult, because these records are incomplete or appear only in hard-to-access historic grey literature. Based on an illustrative set of historic and contemporary studies, we describe how fisheries management <span class="hlt">practices</span> may have contributed to coregonid diversity loss in European and North American lakes. We provide case studies examining how fishing and stocking may reduce coregonid diversity through demographic decline and introgressive hybridization. In some lakes, fisheries management <span class="hlt">practices</span> may have led to a loss of coregonid diversity well before issues with habitat degradation manifested. Our review suggests that fish conservation policies could beneficially consider the relative importance of all stressors, including management <span class="hlt">practices</span>, as potential drivers of diversity loss.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8466242','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8466242"><span>Evaluation and audit in a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> disability service.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cass, H D; Kugler, B T</p> <p>1993-03-01</p> <p>Parental and professional responses to questionnaires evaluating a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> disability service are reported and the viability of auditing structural, process, and outcome aspects of clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> are discussed. Expectations of waiting time to first appointment (met for only 52% of consumers) illustrate structural issues. Process issues are reflected in consumer reactions to outreach work (for example, 94% of parents and 84% of professionals found this supportive). Outcome measures such as consumer satisfaction with the service (76% of consumers reported being 'very satisfied' and 20% 'fairly satisfied') suggest that service aims are being met. Good concurrence of service aims with consumer needs is indicated by parental reasons for referral (for example, 75% for diagnostic help, 73% for a better understanding of the disorder, 88% for <span class="hlt">practical</span> help), referrers' reasons (for example, 55% for a second diagnostic opinion, 45% due to lack of local expertise), and reports from most other professionals involved with the case that a similar service was not provided locally.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25631597','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25631597"><span>Australian <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Surveillance Unit annual report, 2013.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Deverell, Marie; Zurynski, Yvonne A; Elliott, Elizabeth J</p> <p>2014-12-31</p> <p>This report provides an update on the surveillance conducted by the Australian <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Surveillance Unit (APSU) during the period January to December 2013. The APSU facilitates national active surveillance of uncommon diseases of childhood including selected communicable diseases. This report includes data on the following conditions: acute flaccid paralysis (AFP), congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV), congenital rubella, perinatal exposure to HIV and <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV infection, neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV), congenital varicella, neonatal varicella, severe complications of varicella and juvenile onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (JoRRP). Surveillance of severe complications of influenza was undertaken during the influenza season (July to September 2013).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17119078','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17119078"><span>Resuscitation of general <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> in the UK.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wacogne, I; Scott-Jupp, R; Chambers, T</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>"The report of my death was an exaggeration", said Mark Twain. For a dying specialty, general <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> has certainly been looking very healthy recently. It is timely to examine why our specialty was thought to be at such risk, and to explore why, although in many cases shocked and confused, it is well on the way to recovery. This article explores what is needed to keep it healthy to ensure that the general paediatrician is at the centre of the delivery of <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> in the UK.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19007736','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19007736"><span>Genetic testing for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> neurological disorders.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Valente, Enza Maria; Ferraris, Alessandro; Dallapiccola, Bruno</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> neurological disorders encompass a large group of clinically heterogeneous diseases, of which some are known to have a genetic cause. Over the past few years, advances in nosological classifications and in strategies for molecular testing have substantially improved the diagnosis, genetic counselling, and clinical management of many patients, and have facilitated the possibility of prenatal diagnoses for future pregnancies. However, the increasing availability of genetic tests for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> neurological disorders is raising important questions with regard to the appropriateness, choice of protocols, interpretation of results, and ethical and social concerns of these services. In this Review, we discuss these topics and how these concerns affect genetic counselling.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED472070.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED472070.pdf"><span>Form or Flesh: Social Factors That <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Women's <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of Breast Self-Examination.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>London, Patricia A.</p> <p></p> <p>The social factors that <span class="hlt">impact</span> Caucasian middle-class women's <span class="hlt">practice</span> of breast self-examination (BSE) were examined through in-depth interviews with 15 women who were selected to represent a mix of women who <span class="hlt">practiced</span> BSE monthly, occasionally, or never. The meaning of BSE was analyzed in relation to body image and the social definition of being…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED446220.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED446220.pdf"><span>How Does Education and Training <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span>? CRLRA Discussion Paper Series.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kilpatrick, Sue</p> <p></p> <p>A study examined the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of agricultural education and training on farm business <span class="hlt">practice</span> and the influence of training on changes to farming <span class="hlt">practice</span> in Australia. Data were from an additional set of questions on the Australian Bureau of Statistics' 1993-94 Agricultural Financial Survey and an interview survey of 65 Tasmanian farmers. Findings…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED568367.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED568367.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Organisational Factors on the Knowledge Sharing <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of Teachers Working in Higher Education Sector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Areekkuzhiyil, Santhosh</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The current study aims to explore the various organizational factors that influence the knowledge sharing <span class="hlt">practices</span> of teachers working in higher education sector. The study hypothesized the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of various organizational factors on the knowledge sharing <span class="hlt">practices</span> of teachers working in higher education sector. The data required for the study…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22learning+communities%22&pg=4&id=ED551459','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22learning+communities%22&pg=4&id=ED551459"><span>Professional Learning Communities' <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Science Teacher Classroom <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in a Midwestern Urban School District</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Carpenter, Dan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this reputation-based, multiple-site case study was to explore professional learning communities' <span class="hlt">impact</span> on teacher classroom <span class="hlt">practice</span>. The goal of this research was to describe the administrator and teachers' perceptions with respect to professional learning communities as it related to teacher <span class="hlt">practice</span> in their school. Educators…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Plc&pg=4&id=EJ1104427','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Plc&pg=4&id=EJ1104427"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of Professional Learning Communities on Science Teachers' Knowledge, <span class="hlt">Practice</span> and Student Learning: A Review</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dogan, Selcuk; Pringle, Rose; Mesa, Jennifer</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this article is to provide a review of empirical studies investigating the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of professional learning communities (PLCs) on science teachers' <span class="hlt">practices</span> and knowledge. Across 14 articles that satisfied the definition we embraced, most were devoted to the change in science teaching <span class="hlt">practices</span>, disciplinary content knowledge (DCK)…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Eris&pg=2&id=ED508108','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Eris&pg=2&id=ED508108"><span>Capturing Research <span class="hlt">Impacts</span>: A Review of International <span class="hlt">Practice</span>. Documented Briefing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Grant, Jonathan; Brutscher, Philipp-Bastian; Kirk, Susan Ella; Butler, Linda; Wooding, Steven</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>In February 2009, the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) commissioned RAND Europe to review approaches to evaluating the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of research as part of their wider work programme to develop new arrangements for the assessment and funding of research--referred to as the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The objectives were 1) to…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Low+AND+Impact+AND+Development%ef%bc%88&id=EJ1034755','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Low+AND+Impact+AND+Development%ef%bc%88&id=EJ1034755"><span>Modeling Instruction: The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Professional Development on Instructional <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Barlow, Angela T.; Frick, Tasha M.; Barker, Heather L.; Phelps, Amy J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Modeling Instruction holds the potential for transforming science instruction and improving student achievement. Key to the success of Modeling Instruction, however, is the fidelity of implementation of its curriculum. This qualitative study examined the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of Modeling Instruction professional development on participating teachers'…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=instructional+AND+coaching&pg=3&id=ED551480','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=instructional+AND+coaching&pg=3&id=ED551480"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Instructional Coaching on Teaching <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Barry, Pamela K.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The challenges facing today's schools are greater than ever. The impetus to improve educational outcomes for all students and compete with the rest of the world has become one of the country's most important endeavors. Several important factors have been identified in research as supporting improved teaching in today's schools, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Bibliographic+AND+review&pg=3&id=EJ950091','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Bibliographic+AND+review&pg=3&id=EJ950091"><span>Safety Education <span class="hlt">Impact</span> and Good <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: A Review</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mulvaney, Caroline A.; Watson, Michael C.; Errington, Gail</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The aim of this literature review was to examine recent evidence of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of safety education for children and young people on unintentional injury rates and to update an earlier review. Evidence was sought that linked safety education for children and young people in schools, centres and other settings with changes in knowledge,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=curriculum+AND+vitae&id=EJ1005039','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=curriculum+AND+vitae&id=EJ1005039"><span>Exploring the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of a Professional <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Education Doctorate in Educational Environments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kumar, Swapna; Dawson, Kara</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This article presents one approach to assessing the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of an online professional <span class="hlt">practice</span> doctorate in education on participants' work environments. It is unique in that it explored <span class="hlt">impact</span> during the doctoral program, before participants began their dissertation research, and it focused on how participants apply learning from the program…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=impact+AND+Information+AND+Communication+AND+Technologies&pg=2&id=EJ731454','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=impact+AND+Information+AND+Communication+AND+Technologies&pg=2&id=EJ731454"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on the Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> of Malaysian Smart Schools</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Zain, Muhammad Z. M.; Atan, Hanafi; Idrus, Rozhan M.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on the management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the Malaysian Smart Schools was investigated. The analysis revealed that the <span class="hlt">impact</span> has resulted in changes that include the enrichment of the ICT culture among students and teachers, more efficient student and teacher administration, better accessibility…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Manufacturing+AND+papers&pg=3&id=EJ941445','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Manufacturing+AND+papers&pg=3&id=EJ941445"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Knowledge Management on Learning Organization <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in India: An Exploratory Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chawla, Deepak; Joshi, Himanshu</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: This paper aims to report the preliminary findings of the difference in learning organization (LO) <span class="hlt">practices</span> across industries. It also reports the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of knowledge management (KM) dimensions on LO and whether this <span class="hlt">impact</span> is different across manufacturing, IT and IT-enabled services (ITES) and power generation and distribution in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17984000','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17984000"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of birthing <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the breastfeeding dyad.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Smith, Linda J</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>For breastfeeding to start and continue, the newborn must be able to suck, swallow, and breathe; the mother must be able and willing to let her infant breastfeed; and surroundings must support the biological unit: the mother-baby dyad. This article reviews how birth <span class="hlt">practices</span>, including epidural anesthesia, cesarean surgery, forceps, and vacuum extraction, can affect the newborn's ability to feed, the mother's motivation and lactation capacity, and the mother-baby relationship.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3627201','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3627201"><span>National Board Certification and Developmentally Appropriate <span class="hlt">Practices</span>: Perceptions of <span class="hlt">Impact</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>McKenzie, Ellen Nancy</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The study investigated a relationship between National Board certification and perceived use of developmentally appropriate <span class="hlt">practices</span> (DAP). A self-developed survey, the Early-childhood Teacher Inventory of <span class="hlt">Practices</span>, was e-mailed to participants. Participants included 246 non-National Board-certified (non-NBCT) and 135 National Board-certified (NBCT) early childhood teachers. Descriptives were reported for age, years of teaching experience, grade level currently teaching, ethnicity, degree type, certification type, and degree level. Inferential statistics were used to understand the differences between perceived use of DAP. NBCTs scored significantly higher than non-NBCTs in three of the four target areas and on the total of the scale. Pearson product-moment corelations were used to determine a relationship between years of experience or level of education and NBCTs’ perceived use of DAP. Years of experience were significantly related, but level of education was not. The findings indicate that NBCT teachers perceive they incorporate more developmentally appropriate <span class="hlt">practices</span> into their teaching than do non-NBCT teachers. PMID:23626399</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23899732','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23899732"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> inpatient setting: an evaluation of parental perspectives.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Elisabeth Williams, Geraint Williams Metin Nizamoglu And</p> <p></p> <p>The Nursing and Midwifery Council (2008) define the standards of conduct, ethics and performance for nurses and midwives of nursing currently <span class="hlt">practicing</span> in the UK. The Code places emphasis on the core nursing principles of kindness, respect, dignity and support for patients and relatives while under nursing care. A prospective study was conducted using a validated questionnaire to assess adherence to these core nursing principles on the basis of parental assessment in an orthopaedic <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> inpatient unit at University Hospital Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW). Core nursing standards were highest in respect to kindness' and 'respect' shown for patients (96% and 98% positive scores) and lowest for 'support' offered to their parents (89% positive scores). Lower 'support' scores possibly relate to information provision or emotional support. Improvement may be achieved via provision of additional time to identify parental concerns, which may be non-medical. The results demonstrate that parents perceive core nursing principles to be strongly adhered to on the orthopaedic <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> unit at UHCW.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2151619','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2151619"><span>[<span class="hlt">Impact</span> of HIV infection and AIDS on dental <span class="hlt">practice</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kielbassa, A M</p> <p>1990-11-01</p> <p>Describing the results of a study on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of HIV on practitional dentistry, the author finds out a considerable uncertainty of knowledge among elder practitioners. While 62% are willing to treat HIV-infected persons, a big part of the participants is looking on AIDS as an occupational risk. Regarding infection control procedures, the results show a limited compliance with the generally accepted recommendations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1733071','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1733071"><span>Quantitative health <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment: current <span class="hlt">practice</span> and future directions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Veerman, J; Barendregt, J; Mackenbach, J</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Study objective: To assess what methods are used in quantitative health <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment (HIA), and to identify areas for future research and development. Design: HIA reports were assessed for (1) methods used to quantify effects of policy on determinants of health (exposure <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment) and (2) methods used to quantify health outcomes resulting from changes in exposure to determinants (outcome assessment). Main results: Of 98 prospective HIA studies, 17 reported quantitative estimates of change in exposure to determinants, and 16 gave quantified health outcomes. Eleven (categories of) determinants were quantified up to the level of health outcomes. Methods for exposure <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment were: estimation on the basis of routine data and measurements, and various kinds of modelling of traffic related and environmental factors, supplemented with experts' estimates and author's assumptions. Some studies used estimates from other documents pertaining to the policy. For the calculation of health outcomes, variants of epidemiological and toxicological risk assessment were used, in some cases in mathematical models. Conclusions: Quantification is comparatively rare in HIA. Methods are available in the areas of environmental health and, to a lesser extent, traffic accidents, infectious diseases, and behavioural factors. The methods are diverse and their reliability and validity are uncertain. Research and development in the following areas could benefit quantitative HIA: methods to quantify the effect of socioeconomic and behavioural determinants; user friendly simulation models; the use of summary measures of public health, expert opinion and scenario building; and empirical research into validity and reliability. PMID:15831683</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24480724','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24480724"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> human metapneumovirus infection: epidemiology, prevention and therapy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Since its discovery in 2001, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been identified as one of the most frequent causes of upper and lower respiratory tract infections. Although a considerable number of hMPV infections are diagnosed in adults and the elderly, the highest incidence of infection is among children as seropositivity for hMPV approaches 100% by 5-10 years of age. Most of the diseases due to hMPV are mild or moderate, tend to resolve spontaneously, and only require outpatient treatment. However, some may be severe enough to require hospitalisation or, albeit rarely, admission to a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care unit because of acute respiratory failure. Mortality is exceptional, but may occur. The most severe diseases generally affect younger patients, prematurely born children, and children who acquire nosocomial hMPV infection and those with a severe chronic underlying disease. Global hMPV infection has a major <span class="hlt">impact</span> on national health systems, which is why various attempts have recently been made to introduce effective preventive and therapeutic measures; however, although some are already in the phase of development (including vaccines and monoclonal antibodies), there is currently no substantial possibility of prevention and, despite its limitations, ribavirin is still the only possible treatment. Given the risk of severe disease in various groups of high-risk children and the frequency of infection in the otherwise healthy <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population, there is an urgent need for further research aimed at developing effective preventive and therapeutic measures against hMPV.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4020520','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4020520"><span>Guidelines on Vaccinations in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Haematology and Oncology Patients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cesaro, Simone; Giacchino, Mareva; Fioredda, Francesca; Barone, Angelica; Battisti, Laura; Bezzio, Stefania; Frenos, Stefano; De Santis, Raffaella; Livadiotti, Susanna; Marinello, Serena; Zanazzo, Andrea Giulio; Caselli, Désirée</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Objective. Vaccinations are the most important tool to prevent infectious diseases. Chemotherapy-induced immune depression may <span class="hlt">impact</span> the efficacy of vaccinations in children. Patients and Methods. A panel of experts of the supportive care working group of the Italian Association <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Haematology Oncology (AIEOP) addressed this issue by guidelines on vaccinations in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cancer patients. The literature published between 1980 and 2013 was reviewed. Results and Conclusion. During intensive chemotherapy, vaccination turned out to be effective for hepatitis A and B, whilst vaccinations with toxoid, protein subunits, or bacterial antigens should be postponed to the less intensive phases, to achieve an adequate immune response. Apart from varicella, the administration of live-attenuated-virus vaccines is not recommended during this phase. Family members should remain on recommended vaccination schedules, including toxoid, inactivated vaccine (also poliomyelitis), and live-attenuated vaccines (varicella, measles, mumps, and rubella). By the time of completion of chemotherapy, insufficient serum antibody levels for vaccine-preventable diseases have been reported, while immunological memory appears to be preserved. Once immunological recovery is completed, usually after 6 months, response to booster or vaccination is generally good and allows patients to be protected and also to contribute to herd immunity. PMID:24868544</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23362893','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23362893"><span>Australian <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> hyperbaric oxygen therapy 1998-2011.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Frawley, G; Bennett, M; Thistlethwaite, K; Banham, N</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>For a large number of ischaemic, infective, inflammatory or traumatic conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is either the only treatment or an adjunct that significantly reduces morbidity and mortality. The primary aim of this review is to identify clinical conditions treated in a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population referred to Australian hyperbaric units. Secondary aims are to describe outcomes of treatment and detail any complications occurring during treatment or during transfer between units. This was a retrospective cohort study (January 1998-December 2011) of children treated at four Australian hyperbaric medical units. A total of 112 children underwent 1099 hyperbaric treatments for 14 indications. Ages were not normally distributed with a median age of 14 years (interquartile range 11-16; range 0.25-16 years). Treatments were completed as planned in 81.5% of cases with 25 patients' treatment terminated at the request of physicians, parents or patients. Complications relating to hyperbaric oxygen therapy occurred in 58 treatments (5.3%). Central nervous system oxygen toxicity occurred in 1:366 treatments. Our findings indicate that provision of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to children is feasible in major regional hyperbaric units and is associated with low complication rates. Management of children in an adult hyperbaric facility, however, requires significant cooperation between <span class="hlt">paediatric</span>, intensive care and hyperbaric consultants, as the need for transfer to another hospital and prolonged transports often <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on optimal ongoing surgical and intensive care management.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27878086','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27878086"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of urbanization and gardening <span class="hlt">practices</span> on common butterfly communities in France.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fontaine, Benoît; Bergerot, Benjamin; Le Viol, Isabelle; Julliard, Romain</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>We investigated the interacting <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of urban landscape and gardening <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the species richness and total abundance of communities of common butterfly communities across France, using data from a nationwide monitoring scheme. We show that urbanization has a strong negative <span class="hlt">impact</span> on butterfly richness and abundance but that at a local scale, such <span class="hlt">impact</span> could be mitigated by gardening <span class="hlt">practices</span> favoring nectar offer. We found few interactions among these landscape and local scale effects, indicating that butterfly-friendly gardening <span class="hlt">practices</span> are efficient whatever the level of surrounding urbanization. We further highlight that species being the most negatively affected by urbanization are the most sensitive to gardening <span class="hlt">practices</span>: Garden management can thus partly counterbalance the deleterious effect of urbanization for butterfly communities. This holds a strong message for park managers and private gardeners, as gardens may act as potential refuge for butterflies when the overall landscape is largely unsuitable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4727591','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4727591"><span>Listening to food workers: Factors that <span class="hlt">impact</span> proper health and hygiene <span class="hlt">practice</span> in food service</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Clegg Smith, Katherine; Neff, Roni A.; Pollack, Keshia M.; Ensminger, Margaret</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Foodborne disease is a significant problem worldwide. Research exploring sources of outbreaks indicates a pronounced role for food workers' improper health and hygiene <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Objective To investigate food workers' perceptions of factors that <span class="hlt">impact</span> proper food safety <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Method Interviews with food service workers in Baltimore, MD, USA discussing food safety <span class="hlt">practices</span> and factors that <span class="hlt">impact</span> implementation in the workplace. A social ecological model organizes multiple levels of influence on health and hygiene behavior. Results Issues raised by interviewees include factors across the five levels of the social ecological model, and confirm findings from previous work. Interviews also reveal many factors not highlighted in prior work, including issues with food service policies and procedures, working conditions (e.g., pay and benefits), community resources, and state and federal policies. Conclusion Food safety interventions should adopt an ecological orientation that accounts for factors at multiple levels, including workers' social and structural context, that <span class="hlt">impact</span> food safety <span class="hlt">practice</span>. PMID:26243248</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27833170','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27833170"><span>Ischemic stroke in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> - narrative review of the literature and two cases.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Klucka, Jozef; Stourac, Petr; Stoudek, Roman; Toukalkova, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinova, Martina; Stouracova, Alena; Mrlian, Andrej; Suk, Petr; Malaska, Jan</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Stroke is a rare condition in childhood with an estimated incidence of between 1.3-13/100.000 patients. Clinical manifestation and risk factors for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> stroke are different from those of adults. The uncommon incidence, age-associated difference and plethora of clinical symptoms make the diagnosis of such strokes extremely difficult and often delayed. The history and clinical examination should point to diseases or predisposing factors. Neuroimaging (DWI MR) is the golden standard for diagnosis of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> stroke and other investigations can be considered according to the clinical condition. Despite advances in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> stroke research and clinical care, questions remain unanswered regarding acute treatment, secondary prevention and rehabilitation. The treatment recommendations are mainly extrapolated from studies on adult populations. In the review authors summarized the clinical characteristics and diagnostic steps for stroke in children/adolescents based on the most recent international guidelines and <span class="hlt">practical</span> directions for recognising and managing the child/adolescent with stroke in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> emergency. In the two case reports, we describe the clinical course in both stroke patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19106326','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19106326"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of infant feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> on childhood obesity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Butte, Nancy F</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>Childhood obesity is a complex disease influenced by genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. The current surge in childhood obesity in the United States is attributable to an interaction between a genetic predisposition toward obesity and a permissive environment. Several recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses have been published on the association between breast-feeding and childhood obesity. In these analyses, adjustment for confounding factors attenuated or nullified the protective effect of breast-feeding on later obesity. The Viva La Familia Study was designed to identify genetic and environmental factors affecting obesity and its comorbidities in 1030 Hispanic children from 319 families. Odds ratios for potential risk factors associated with childhood overweight were computed using binary logistic regression for panel data. Early infant-feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> were not significant. Salient independent risk factors for childhood obesity in this cohort of Hispanic children were age, birth weight, maternal obesity, paternal obesity, number of children in the family, and the percentage of awake time spent in sedentary activity. Breast-feeding may have a small protective effect against childhood obesity, although residual confounding may exist. Human milk is exquisitely fitted for optimal infant growth and development and may uniquely modulate neuroendocrine and immunologic pathways involved in the regulation of body weight. Nevertheless, other genetic and environmental determinants such as socioeconomic status, parental obesity, smoking, birth weight, and rapid infancy weight gain far supersede infant-feeding <span class="hlt">practices</span> as risk factors for childhood obesity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20724795','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20724795"><span>ISAR--a story of trials with <span class="hlt">impact</span> on <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schulz, Stefanie; Mehilli, Julinda; Schömig, Albert; Kastrati, Adnan</p> <p>2010-09-01</p> <p>Since its inception approximately 15 years ago, the ISAResearch group has completed more than 40 randomized controlled trials (RCT) in the field of interventional cardiology, including more than 40,000 patients. Three main principles have characterized the ISAR trials: first, simplicity: 1 question 1 answer; second, a focus on issues that are relevant for <span class="hlt">practice</span> at the given moment and third, a strong spirit of performing industry-independent studies. The seamless integration of clinical trials into everyday <span class="hlt">practice</span> and a stringent study discipline allowed inclusion of more than 90% of the patients in 1 of the device or drug trials, the prerequisite for fast recruitment and evaluation of an all-comers population. Moreover, the early setup and maintenance of a comprehensive database with routine follow-up of all patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention made it possible to build up a large registry to answer questions beyond clinical trials. Finally, the close collaboration with basic research working groups within the department has triggered new innovations and facilitated translational research from bench to bedside.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21702200','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21702200"><span>[<span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> palliative care, definition and regulations].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gioia, Martine</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The implementation of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> palliative care aims to fulfil objectives regarding the support provided for the child and his/her family in all aspects of care. It is guided by regulations and recommendations relating to pain relief, quality of life and support for families.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18693815','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18693815"><span>Predicting the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of an electronic health record on <span class="hlt">practice</span> patterns using computational modeling and simulation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Clancy, Thomas R; Delaney, Connie White; Segre, Alberto; Carley, Kathleen; Kuziak, Andrew; Yu, Hwanjo</p> <p>2007-10-11</p> <p>The overall purpose of this research study is to discover and apply new knowledge regarding methods to predict the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of an electronic health record (EHR) on clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> guidelines in complex systems such as hospitals. Specifically, the aims of this study are: 1) to build, simulate and validate the accuracy of a computational model representing the current <span class="hlt">practice</span> patterns in a sample of patients diagnosed with heart failure (HF) and treated in a community hospital; and 2) using computational modeling and simulation, develop a method to predict the effects of best <span class="hlt">practice</span> guidelines on <span class="hlt">practice</span> patterns after implementation of an EHR.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22892018','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22892018"><span>Conducting a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> multi-centre RCT with an industry partner: challenges and lessons learned.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maskell, Jessica; Newcombe, Peter; Martin, Graham; Kimble, Roy</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>There are many benefits of multi-centred research including large sample sizes, statistical power, timely recruitment and generalisability of results. However, there are numerous considerations when planning and implementing a multi-centred study. This article reviews the challenges and successes of planning and implementing a multi-centred prospective randomised control trial involving an industry partner. The research investigated the <span class="hlt">impact</span> on psychosocial functioning of a cosmetic camouflage product for children and adolescents with burn scarring. Multi-centred studies commonly have many stakeholders. Within this study, six Australian and New Zealand <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> burn units as well as an industry partner were involved. The inclusion of an industry partner added complexities as they brought different priorities and expectations to the research. Further, multifaceted ethical and institutional approval processes needed to be negotiated. The challenges, successes, lessons learned and recommendations from this study regarding Australian and New Zealand ethics and research governance approval processes, collaboration with industry partners and the management of differing expectations will be outlined. Recommendations for future multi-centred research with industry partners include provision of regular written reports for the industry partner; continual monitoring and prompt resolution of concerns; basic research <span class="hlt">practices</span> education for industry partners; minimisation of industry partner contact with participants; clear roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders and utilisation of single ethical review if available.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23377951','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23377951"><span>Herbal medicinal products in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population--status quo and perspectives.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wegener, Tankred</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>The limited extent of data available for herbal medicinal products (HMPs) in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population is related to missing documentation of their use in <span class="hlt">practice</span> and in literature. Therefore, information for properly evaluating indications, posology, length of treatment and safety in children is often lacking. Frequently, these documentation gaps are reflected in the product information of HMPs as final result of regulatory decisions. On the other hand, there is long-term experience of HMPs as well established and traditionally used medicinal products, which also covers the use in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population, as applied by parents themselves, and the recommendations of physicians, other health practitioners and pharmacists. The methodology of pharmaco-epidemiologic studies is a valuable tool to evaluate data of the <span class="hlt">practical</span> use of HMPs in children. The documentation gap may be closed by such methodologies, and HMPs may be applied prospectively on the basis of well-documented empirical knowledge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22479770','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22479770"><span>Putting social <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment to the test as a method for implementing responsible tourism <span class="hlt">practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>McCombes, Lucy; Vanclay, Frank; Evers, Yvette</p> <p>2015-11-15</p> <p>The discourse on the social <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of tourism needs to shift from the current descriptive critique of tourism to considering what can be done in actual <span class="hlt">practice</span> to embed the management of tourism's social <span class="hlt">impacts</span> into the existing planning, product development and operational processes of tourism businesses. A pragmatic approach for designing research methodologies, social management systems and initial actions, which is shaped by the real world operational constraints and existing systems used in the tourism industry, is needed. Our pilot study with a small Bulgarian travel company put social <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment (SIA) to the test to see if it could provide this desired approach and assist in implementing responsible tourism development <span class="hlt">practice</span>, especially in small tourism businesses. Our findings showed that our adapted SIA method has value as a <span class="hlt">practical</span> method for embedding a responsible tourism approach. While there were some challenges, SIA proved to be effective in assisting the staff of our test case tourism business to better understand their social <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on their local communities and to identify actions to take. - Highlights: • Pragmatic approach is needed for the responsible management of social <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of tourism. • Our adapted Social <span class="hlt">impact</span> Assessment (SIA) method has value as a <span class="hlt">practical</span> method. • SIA can be embedded into tourism businesses existing ‘ways of doing things’. • We identified challenges and ways to improve our method to better suit small tourism business context.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JHyd..367..228G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JHyd..367..228G"><span>Spatio-temporal effects of low <span class="hlt">impact</span> development <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gilroy, Kristin L.; McCuen, Richard H.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>SummaryThe increase in land development and urbanization experienced in the US and worldwide is causing environmental degradation. Traditional off-site stormwater management does not protect small streams. To mitigate the negative effects of land development, best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) are being implemented into stormwater management policies for the purposes of controlling minor flooding and improving water quality. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of BMPs has not been extensively studied. The purpose of this research was to analyze the effects of both location and quantity of two types of BMPs: cisterns and bioretention pits. A spatio-temporal model of a microwatershed was developed to determine the effects of BMPs on single-family, townhome, and commercial lots. The effects of development and the BMPs on peak runoff rates and volumes were compared to pre-development conditions. The results show that cisterns alone are capable of controlling rooftop runoff for small storms. Both the spatial location and the volume of BMP storage on a microwatershed influences the effectiveness of BMPs. The volume of BMP storage is positively correlated to the percent reduction in the peak discharge rate and total runoff volume; however, location is a factor in the peak reduction and a maximum volume of effective storage for both hydrologic metrics does exist. These results provide guidelines for developing stormwater management policies that can potentially reduce pollution of first-order streams, lower the cost and maintenance requirements, enhance aesthetics, and increase safety.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996SPIE.2711..168D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996SPIE.2711..168D"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of ultrasound video transfer on the <span class="hlt">practice</span> of ultrasound</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Duerinckx, Andre J.; Hayrapetian, Alek S.; Grant, Edward G.; Valentino, Daniel J.; Rahbar, Darius; Kiszonas, Mike; Franco, Ricky; Melany, Michelle; Narin, Sherelle L.; Ragavendra, Nagesh</p> <p>1996-05-01</p> <p>Sonography can be highly dependent on real-time imaging and as such is highly physician intensive. Such situations arise mostly during complicated ultrasound radiology studies or echocardiology examinations. Under those circumstances it would be of benefit to transmit real-time images beyond the immediate area of the ultrasound laboratory when a physician is not on location. We undertook this study to determine if both static and dynamic image transfer to remote locations might be accomplished using an ultrafast ATM network and PACS. Image management of the local image files was performed by a commercial PACS from AGFA corporation. The local network was Ethernet based, and the global network was based on Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM, rates up to 100 Mbits/sec). Real-time image transfer involved two teaching hospitals, one of which had 2 separate ultrasound facilities. Radiologists consulted with technologists via telephone while the examinations were being performed. The applications of ATM network providing real time video for ultrasound imaging in a clinical environment and its potential <span class="hlt">impact</span> on health delivery and clinical teaching. This technology increased technologist and physician productivity due to the elimination of commute time for physicians and waiting time for technologists and patients. Physician confidence in diagnosis increased compared to reviewing static images alone. This system provided instant access for radiologists to real-time scans from remote sites. Image quality and frame rate were equivalent to the original. The system increased productivity by allowing physicians to monitor studies at multiple sites simultaneously.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3425877','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3425877"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of spinal cord injury on sexuality: Broad-based clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> intervention and <span class="hlt">practical</span> application</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hess, Marika J.; Hough, Sigmund</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This study focuses on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> a spinal cord injury may have on achieving physical and emotional intimacy, and potential to maximize sexual ability and quality of life. Spinal cord injury is a traumatic, life-altering event that is usually associated with loss of motor and sensory function, as well as sexual impairment. At the time of injury, the individual is faced with devastating loss and an abundance of new information in a setting of extreme stress and challenge. In the acute rehabilitation setting, there is often a considerable void in providing education and resources regarding sexual concerns and needs. There is a positive relationship between sexual education and sexual activity. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of inadequate sexual counseling and education as a part of rehabilitation can be deleterious. PMID:22925747</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26675599','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26675599"><span>Stress echocardiography in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>: implications for the evaluation of anomalous aortic origin of the coronary arteries.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thompson, W Reid</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Stress echocardiography in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> is used to evaluate pre- and post-operative coronary artery conditions, as well as to gain haemodynamic information for a variety of diagnoses, although evidence regarding sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value is lacking. This review will consider the available literature with a focus on anomalous aortic origin of the coronary arteries and discuss a <span class="hlt">practical</span> approach to test selection and use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3954187','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3954187"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> admissions to the British military hospital at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Arul, GS; Reynolds, J; DiRusso, S; Scott, A; Bree, S; Templeton, P; Midwinter, MJ</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>INTRODUCTION International humanitarian law requires emergency medical support for both military personnel and civilians, including children. Here we present a detailed review of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> admissions with the pattern of injury and the resources they consume. METHODS All <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> admissions to the hospital at Camp Bastion between 1 January and 29 April 2011 were analysed prospectively. Data collected included time and date of admission, patient age and weight, mechanism of injury, extent of wounding, treatment, length of hospital stay and discharge destination. RESULTS Eighty-five children (65 boys and 17 girls, median age: 8 years, median weight: 20kg) were admitted. In 63% of cases the indication for admission was battle related trauma and in 31% non-battle trauma. Of the blast injuries, 51% were due to improvised explosive devices. Non-battle emergencies were mainly due to domestic burns (46%) and road traffic accidents (29%). The most affected anatomical area was the extremities (44% of injuries). Over 30% of patients had critical injuries. Operative intervention was required in 74% of cases. The median time to theatre for all patients was 52 minutes; 3 patients with critical injuries went straight to theatre in a median of 7 minutes. A blood transfusion was required in 27 patients; 6 patients needed a massive transfusion. Computed tomography was performed on 62% of all trauma admissions and 40% of patients went to the intensive care unit. The mean length of stay was 2 days (range: 1–26 days) and there were 7 deaths. CONCLUSIONS <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> admissions make up a small but significant part of admissions to the hospital at Camp Bastion. The proportion of serious injuries is very high in comparison with admissions to a UK <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> emergency department. The concentration of major injuries means that lessons learnt in terms of teamwork, the speed of transfer to theatre and massive transfusion protocols could be applied to UK <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span>. PMID:22524930</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5027784','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5027784"><span>PET/CT in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> malignancies - An update</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga; Tewari, Anshu</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging modality in adult oncological <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Its role in childhood malignancies needs to be discussed as <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> malignancies differ from adults in tumor subtypes and they have different tumor biology and FDG uptake patterns. This is also compounded by smaller body mass, dosimetric restrictions, and physiological factors that can affect the FDG uptake. It calls for careful planning of the PET study, preparing the child, the parents, and expertise of nuclear physicians in reporting pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies. In a broad perspective, FDG-PET/CT has been used in staging, assessment of therapy response, identifying metastases and as a follow-up tool in a wide variety of pediatric malignancies. This review outlines the role of PET/CT in childhood malignancies other than hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and leukemia. PMID:27688605</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4664207','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4664207"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Advertising on Tampon Wear-time <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Woeller, Kara E.; Miller, Kenneth W.; Robertson-Smith, Amy L.; Bohman, Lisa C.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVES (1) To determine whether advertising nighttime tampon use for up to eight hours was understood to be consistent with label recommendations and (2) to determine whether television and print advertising with this message affected tampon wear times in adults and teens. METHODS (1) A comprehension study (online advertising and follow-up questionnaire) among women aged 14–49 years (300 per group) who viewed either the test or a control advertising message; (2) Diary-based surveys of tampon wear times performed prior to (n = 292 adults, 18–49 years, 74 teens, 12–17 years) and after (n = 287 adults, 104 teens) the launch of national advertising. RESULTS Significantly more test message viewers than controls stated tampons should be worn less than or equal to eight hours (93.6% vs. 88.6%, respectively, P = 0.049). A directionally higher percentage of test message viewers said they would use a pad if sleeping longer than eight hours (52% vs. 42% of controls). Among the women who used tampons longer than eight hours when sleeping, 52% reported they would wake up and change compared with 45% of controls. No significant difference between baseline and follow-up diary surveys was found among teens or adults in various measures of tampon wear time (mean wear times; usage intervals from less than two hours to more than 10 hours; percentage of tampons used for more than or equal to eight hours; frequency of wearing at least one tampon more than eight hours). CONCLUSIONS Advertising nighttime tampon wear for up to eight hours effectively communicated label recommendations but did not alter tampon wear times. The informational intervention had limited <span class="hlt">impact</span> on established habits. PMID:26688668</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27698504','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27698504"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Medication Dose Tracking Technology on Nursing <span class="hlt">Practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Peek, Grayson; Campbell, Udobi; Kelm, Matthew</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Objective: The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of providing nursing staff access to data collected through a medication dose tracking technology (MDTT) web portal was investigated. Methods: A quasi-experimental, nonrandomized, pre-post intervention study was conducted in the Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (CTICU) at Duke University Hospital. The change in the number of medication requests per dispense routed to the pharmacy electronic health record (EHR) in-basket was analyzed pre and post web portal access. Other endpoints included the number of MDTT web portal queries per day by nursing staff, change in nursing satisfaction survey scores, and technician time associated with processing medication requests pre and post web portal access. The pre web portal access phase of the study occurred from June 1, 2014 to August 31, 2014. The post web portal access phase occurred from October 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014. Results: An 11.4% decrease in the number of medication requests per dispense was exhibited between the pre and post web portal access phases of the study (0.0579 vs 0.0513, respectively; p < .001). Pre and post surveys showed a significant improvement in nurses' satisfaction regarding access to information on the location of medications (p = .009). Additionally, CTICU nursing staff utilized the MDTT web portal for 3.21 queries per day from October 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014. Conclusion: Providing nurses access to data collected via an MDTT decreased the number of communications between nursing and pharmacy staff regarding medication availability and led to statistically significant improvements in nursing satisfaction for certain aspects of the medication distribution process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26856027','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26856027"><span>Focus On <span class="hlt">Impact</span> for a Profit-Driven Medical <span class="hlt">Practice</span>. Part II: Six Processes You Can Use to Maximize and Capitalize on the Uniqueness of Your <span class="hlt">Practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lipton-Dibner, Wendy</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This article presents the second part of the proven Focus on <span class="hlt">Impact</span> strategic model for <span class="hlt">practice</span> growth. It spotlights six specific processes you can use to maximize and capitalize on the uniqueness of your <span class="hlt">practice</span> to increase revenues, enhance patient care and service, improve executive team alignment and intra- and interdepartmental teamwork, and dramatically reduce conflict and stress among <span class="hlt">practice</span> personnel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19395313','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19395313"><span>A systematic review evaluating the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of post-registration nursing and midwifery education on <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gijbels, Harry; O'Connell, Rhona; Dalton-O'Connor, Caroline; O'Donovan, Moira</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>Given the current focus on evidence-based <span class="hlt">practice</span>, it is surprising that there is a dearth of systematic evidence of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> on <span class="hlt">practice</span> of post-registration nursing and midwifery education. The systematic review presented here formed part of a national review of post-registration nursing and midwifery education in Ireland [Health Service Executive, 2008. Report of the Post-registration Nursing and Midwifery Education Review Group: Changing <span class="hlt">practice</span> to support service delivery. Health Service Executive, Dublin]. The review focuses specifically on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> on <span class="hlt">practice</span> from the perspective of nurses, midwives, patients, carers, education and health service providers. Sixty-one (61) studies met the criteria set. These studies were mainly of a retrospective and descriptive nature, often with small cohorts, set within one educational setting. The findings indicate that students benefit from post-registration programmes in relation to changes in attitudes, perceptions, knowledge and in skill acquisition. There is also some evidence that students apply their newly acquired attitudes, knowledge and skills. There is however limited evidence of the direct <span class="hlt">impact</span> on organisational and service delivery changes, and on benefits to patients and carers. It can be concluded that the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of post-registration nursing and midwifery education on <span class="hlt">practice</span> has yet to be fully explored through a more systematic and coherent programme evaluation approach.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25529375','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25529375"><span>[Child health and international cooperation: A <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> approach].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sobrino Toro, M; Riaño Galan, I; Bassat, Q; Perez-Lescure Picarzo, J; de Aranzabal Agudo, M; Krauel Vidal, X; Rivera Cuello, M</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>The international development cooperation in child health arouses special interest in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> settings. In the last 10 10 years or so, new evidence has been presented on factors associated with morbidity and mortality in the first years of life in the least developed countries. This greater knowledge on the causes of health problems and possible responses in the form of interventions with <span class="hlt">impact</span>, leads to the need to disseminate this information among concerned professional pediatricians. Serious efforts are needed to get a deeper insight into matters related to global child health and encourage pediatricians to be aware and participate in these processes. This article aims to provide a social pediatric approach towards international cooperation and child health-related matters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23543250','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23543250"><span>Iron's role in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> restless legs syndrome - a review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dosman, Cara; Witmans, Manisha; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> restless legs syndrome (RLS) treatment is important because RLS's associated sleep disturbance causes significant developmental-behavioural morbidity and <span class="hlt">impacts</span> family well-being. RLS is associated with brain iron insufficiency and dopaminergic dysfunction. Diagnosis requires fulfillment of diagnostic criteria, which for children are currently in evolution, and have limitations, especially in preschoolers. The community physician needs to recognize the possibility of RLS to refer to a sleep specialist for diagnostic confirmation and management recommendations, which include oral iron therapy, even though there is currently no definitive research evidence for iron efficacy in most children with RLS. A 3 mg to 6 mg elemental iron/kg/day dose for three months could be tried if the ferritin level is <50 ug/L. Sleep hygiene and behavioural strategies are also recommended. Iron supplementation should be safe in the absence of iron metabolism disorders, provided that transferrin saturation and ferritin levels are monitored pre-and post-treatment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA200597','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA200597"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Group Technology-Based Shipbuilding Methods on Naval Ship Design and Acquisition <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1988-05-01</p> <p>7~~ne ~lECOPY THE <span class="hlt">IMPACT</span> OF GROUP TECHNOLOGY-BASED SHIPBUILDING METHODS ON NAVAL SHIP DESIGN AND ACQUISITION <span class="hlt">PRACTICES</span> by JOHN SUTHERLAND HEFFRON B...Chairman Departmental Graduate Committee ,. Department of-Ocean Engineering 1* ___•___ _____ _____ THE <span class="hlt">IMPACT</span> OF GROUP TECHNOLOGY-BASED SHIPBUILDING METHODS...stimulated their se rch for more efficient and productive ship constructio methods. As a result, group technology-based shipbuildi g methods havebeen</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26889211','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26889211"><span>Current views and advances on <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology: An update for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> trainees.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mammas, Ioannis N; Greenough, Anne; Theodoridou, Maria; Kramvis, Anna; Christaki, Iliana; Koutsaftiki, Chryssie; Koutsaki, Maria; Portaliou, Dimitra M; Kostagianni, Georgia; Panagopoulou, Paraskevi; Sourvinos, George; Spandidos, Demetrios A</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology is a bold new scientific field, which combines <span class="hlt">Paediatrics</span> with Virology, Epidemiology, Molecular Medicine, Evidence-based Medicine, Clinical Governance, Quality Improvement, Pharmacology and Immunology. The Workshop on <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology, which took place on Saturday October 10, 2015 in Athens, Greece, provided an overview of recent views and advances on viral infections occurring in neonates and children. It was included in the official programme of the 20th World Congress on Advances in Oncology and the 18th International Symposium on Molecular Medicine, which attracted over 500 delegates from the five continents. During the Workshop, the topics covered included the challenges of vaccine implementation against human papillomaviruses in countries under financial crisis, strategies for eradicating poliomyelitis and its 60th vaccine anniversary, as well as the debate on the association between autism and vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. Among the non-vaccine related topics, emphasis was given to viral infections in prematurely born infants and their long-term outcomes, new <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care management options for bronchiolitis related to respiratory syncytial virus, the clinical implications of hepatitis B virus and cytomegalovirus genotyping, the Ebola virus threat and preparedness in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Emergency Departments, oral, oropharynx, laryngeal, nasal and ocular viral infections and Merkel cell polyomavirus as a novel emerging virus of infancy and childhood. In this review, we provide selected presentations and reports discussed at the Workshop.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4726865','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4726865"><span>Current views and advances on <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology: An update for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> trainees</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>MAMMAS, IOANNIS N.; GREENOUGH, ANNE; THEODORIDOU, MARIA; KRAMVIS, ANNA; CHRISTAKI, ILIANA; KOUTSAFTIKI, CHRYSSIE; KOUTSAKI, MARIA; PORTALIOU, DIMITRA M.; KOSTAGIANNI, GEORGIA; PANAGOPOULOU, PARASKEVI; SOURVINOS, GEORGE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology is a bold new scientific field, which combines <span class="hlt">Paediatrics</span> with Virology, Epidemiology, Molecular Medicine, Evidence-based Medicine, Clinical Governance, Quality Improvement, Pharmacology and Immunology. The Workshop on <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology, which took place on Saturday October 10, 2015 in Athens, Greece, provided an overview of recent views and advances on viral infections occurring in neonates and children. It was included in the official programme of the 20th World Congress on Advances in Oncology and the 18th International Symposium on Molecular Medicine, which attracted over 500 delegates from the five continents. During the Workshop, the topics covered included the challenges of vaccine implementation against human papillomaviruses in countries under financial crisis, strategies for eradicating poliomyelitis and its 60th vaccine anniversary, as well as the debate on the association between autism and vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. Among the non-vaccine related topics, emphasis was given to viral infections in prematurely born infants and their long-term outcomes, new <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care management options for bronchiolitis related to respiratory syncytial virus, the clinical implications of hepatitis B virus and cytomegalovirus genotyping, the Ebola virus threat and preparedness in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Emergency Departments, oral, oropharynx, laryngeal, nasal and ocular viral infections and Merkel cell polyomavirus as a novel emerging virus of infancy and childhood. In this review, we provide selected presentations and reports discussed at the Workshop. PMID:26889211</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28375454','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28375454"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> systemic lupus erythematosus: insights from translational research.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wright, Tracey B; Punaro, Marilynn</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Investigations in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> SLE contributed significantly to the discovery of the association of type I IFNs with lupus and underscored the potential application of this knowledge by informing the use of glucocorticoid therapy. Recent, promising research reveals biomarkers that may yield more focused clinical monitoring and assessment of response to treatment. This article reviews unique features of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> SLE and details important developments in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> lupus research.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT........11Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT........11Y"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a professional development program on teachers' <span class="hlt">practice</span> and how context variables influenced such <span class="hlt">practice</span>: a case study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yarema, Sandra Lynn</p> <p></p> <p>This case study investigated how context variables influenced the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a state-funded longitudinal professional development (PD) program on the participant teachers' <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Data was collected to compare differences in Science Content Knowledge, Science Pedagogical Content Knowledge, and the teachers' <span class="hlt">practice</span> over the course of the PD program. Contextual variables related to district restructuring and school implementation of district policy evidence a direct effect on time spent on science instruction, specific instructional strategies used, and on the development of a professional community among the participants. This case study substantiates the implication that districts and school policies must provide adequate support for teachers to implement what is learned in professional development to enact any effective science education reform at the elementary school level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=231482&keyword=Corn+AND+production&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=89972991&CFTOKEN=94298238','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=231482&keyword=Corn+AND+production&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=89972991&CFTOKEN=94298238"><span>Of birds, carbon and water: integrating multiple ecosystem service <span class="hlt">impacts</span> to identify locations for agricultural conservation <span class="hlt">practice</span> adoption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Human use of the landscape for crop production can degrade ecosystem services. A number of agricultural conservation <span class="hlt">practices</span> are touted as mitigating these <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. Many of these <span class="hlt">practices</span> are encouraged by incentive programs such as the Conservation Reserve Program administere...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5376824','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5376824"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Post-Traumatic Bladder Neck Distraction Injury: Case Series</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sawant, Ajit S.; Kumar, Vikash; Pawar, Prakash; Tamhankar, Ashwin S.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The bladder neck distraction is a rare posterior urethral injury in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> age group. It mostly occurs secondary to road traffic accidents. We report three cases of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> bladder neck distraction injury. Three <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients aged between 4 to 7 years (mean 5 year), who presented with post traumatic bladder neck distraction injury but no other major injury, they were treated with early urethro-vesical anastomosis. Postoperatively all patients were continent and with good urine flow rates. In <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> bladder neck distraction injury, immediate urethro-vesical anastomosis gives good results. PMID:28384935</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24091699','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24091699"><span>Fitting and flailing: recognition of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> antiphospholipid syndrome.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Freeman, H; Patel, J; Fernandez, D; Sharples, P; Ramanan, A V</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune condition where the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies is thought to predispose to thrombotic events. It is uncommon in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population, but current diagnostic criteria are based on adult population studies, making assessment of its true <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> prevalence difficult. We present two cases of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> APS, who presented with primary neurological events, and discuss approaches to diagnosis, interpretation of screening investigations, including antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) antibodies and lupus anticoagulant. Possible approaches to the management of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> APS are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22762970','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22762970"><span>Multi-detector CT in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> urinary tract.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Damasio, M B; Darge, K; Riccabona, M</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>The use of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> multi-slice CT (MSCT) is rapidly increasing worldwide. As technology advances its application in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> care is constantly expanding with an increasing need for radiation dose control and appropriate utilization. Recommendations on how and when to use CT for assessment of the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> urinary tract appear to be an important issue. Therefore the European Society of <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Radiology (ESPR) uroradiology task force and European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> working groups created a proposal for performing renal CT in children that has recently been published. The objective of this paper is to discuss <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> urinary tract CT (uro-CT) in more detail and depth. The specific aim is not only to offer general recommendations on clinical indications and optimization processes of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> CT examination, but also to address various childhood characteristics and phenomena that facilitate understanding the different approach and use of uro-CT in children compared to adults. According to ALARA principles, <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> uro-CT should only be considered for selected indications provided high-level comprehensive US is not conclusive and alternative non-ionizing techniques such as MR are not available or appropriate. Optimization of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> uro-CT protocols (considering lower age-adapted kV and mAs) is mandatory, and the number of phases and acquisition series should be kept as few as possible.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25537024','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25537024"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> nephrology: the last 50 years.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kausman, Joshua Y; Powell, Harley R</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In 1965, the specialty of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> nephrology was in its infancy. Following the development of a landmark collaborative research study, the International Study of Kidney Disease in Childhood in the mid-1960s, the first specialist societies were formed: the European Society of Pediatric Nephrology in 1967 and the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology in 1969. The extraordinary improvements in care delivered to children with kidney disease over the past 50 years are too broad to cover in any one paper. They traverse the spectrum of diagnosis, classification, therapeutics, social well-being and transition to adult care. We have selected four case scenarios to highlight these changes in key areas of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> nephrology: post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome, haemolytic uraemic syndrome and neonatal dialysis and childhood transplantation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1747440','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1747440"><span>Sleep · 8: <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> obstructive sleep apnoea</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nixon, G; Brouillette, R</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>In the past 25 years there has been increasing recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as a common condition of childhood. Morbidity includes impairment of growth, cardiovascular complications, learning impairment, and behavioural problems. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition in children differs in many respects from that in adults. We review here the key features of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> OSA, highlighting differences from adult OSA, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:15923253</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3641117','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3641117"><span>Potential of Best <span class="hlt">Practice</span> to Reduce <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> from Oil and Gas Projects in the Amazon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N.; Powers, Bill</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The western Amazon continues to be an active and controversial zone of hydrocarbon exploration and production. We argue for the urgent need to implement best <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce the negative environmental and social <span class="hlt">impacts</span> associated with the sector. Here, we present a three-part study aimed at resolving the major obstacles impeding the advancement of best <span class="hlt">practice</span> in the region. Our focus is on Loreto, Peru, one of the largest and most dynamic hydrocarbon zones in the Amazon. First, we develop a set of specific best <span class="hlt">practice</span> guidelines to address the lack of clarity surrounding the issue. These guidelines incorporate both engineering-based criteria and key ecological and social factors. Second, we provide a detailed analysis of existing and planned hydrocarbon activities and infrastructure, overcoming the lack of information that typically hampers large-scale <span class="hlt">impact</span> analysis. Third, we evaluate the planned activities and infrastructure with respect to the best <span class="hlt">practice</span> guidelines. We show that Loreto is an extremely active hydrocarbon front, highlighted by a number of recent oil and gas discoveries and a sustained government push for increased exploration. Our analyses reveal that the use of technical best <span class="hlt">practice</span> could minimize future <span class="hlt">impacts</span> by greatly reducing the amount of required infrastructure such as drilling platforms and access roads. We also document a critical need to consider more fully the ecological and social factors, as the vast majority of planned infrastructure overlaps sensitive areas such as protected areas, indigenous territories, and key ecosystems and watersheds. Lastly, our cost analysis indicates that following best <span class="hlt">practice</span> does not impose substantially greater costs than conventional <span class="hlt">practice</span>, and may in fact reduce overall costs. Barriers to the widespread implementation of best <span class="hlt">practice</span> in the Amazon clearly exist, but our findings show that there can be great benefits to its implementation. PMID:23650541</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23650541','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23650541"><span>Potential of best <span class="hlt">practice</span> to reduce <span class="hlt">impacts</span> from oil and gas projects in the Amazon.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N; Powers, Bill</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The western Amazon continues to be an active and controversial zone of hydrocarbon exploration and production. We argue for the urgent need to implement best <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce the negative environmental and social <span class="hlt">impacts</span> associated with the sector. Here, we present a three-part study aimed at resolving the major obstacles impeding the advancement of best <span class="hlt">practice</span> in the region. Our focus is on Loreto, Peru, one of the largest and most dynamic hydrocarbon zones in the Amazon. First, we develop a set of specific best <span class="hlt">practice</span> guidelines to address the lack of clarity surrounding the issue. These guidelines incorporate both engineering-based criteria and key ecological and social factors. Second, we provide a detailed analysis of existing and planned hydrocarbon activities and infrastructure, overcoming the lack of information that typically hampers large-scale <span class="hlt">impact</span> analysis. Third, we evaluate the planned activities and infrastructure with respect to the best <span class="hlt">practice</span> guidelines. We show that Loreto is an extremely active hydrocarbon front, highlighted by a number of recent oil and gas discoveries and a sustained government push for increased exploration. Our analyses reveal that the use of technical best <span class="hlt">practice</span> could minimize future <span class="hlt">impacts</span> by greatly reducing the amount of required infrastructure such as drilling platforms and access roads. We also document a critical need to consider more fully the ecological and social factors, as the vast majority of planned infrastructure overlaps sensitive areas such as protected areas, indigenous territories, and key ecosystems and watersheds. Lastly, our cost analysis indicates that following best <span class="hlt">practice</span> does not impose substantially greater costs than conventional <span class="hlt">practice</span>, and may in fact reduce overall costs. Barriers to the widespread implementation of best <span class="hlt">practice</span> in the Amazon clearly exist, but our findings show that there can be great benefits to its implementation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28191198','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28191198"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Iliopsoas abscess: A case report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Elliott, Carla</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>Introduction: Iliopsoas abscess is an uncommon condition in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population. The clinical presentation is variable and may be confused with other conditions such as septic arthritis, osteomyelitis and appendicular abscess. A suspicion of iliopsoas abscess requires a prompt diagnosis so that rapid management and treatment can be undertaken. Discussion: This case describes the presence of an iliopsoas abscess in a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patient presenting to the emergency department within a rural community. Due to the variability in clinical presentation imaging studies are necessary to distinguish an iliopsoas abscess from other inflammatory processes. Ultrasound is often the modality of choice. Imaging guided percutaneous drainage and/or aspiration and the administration of intravenous antibiotics are minimally invasive modern techniques providing a safe treatment options in the presence of an iliopsoas abscess. Conclusion: Iliopsoas abscess is an uncommon condition in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population. Due to the variability in clinical presentation, imaging, and in particular, ultrasound play a vital role in the diagnosis of cases with a high suspicion of abscess formation. Accurate diagnosis leads to a rapid treatment plan, avoiding further insult.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4950906','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4950906"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology in the Hippocratic Corpus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mammas, Ioannis N.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Hippocrates (Island of Kos, 460 B.C.-Larissa, 370 B.C.) is the founder of the most famous Medical School of the classical antiquity. In acknowledgement of his pioneering contribution to the new scientific field of <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology, this article provides a systematic analysis of the Hippocratic Corpus, with particular focus on viral infections predominating in neonates and children. A mumps epidemic, affecting the island of Thasos in the 5th century B.C., is described in detail. ‘Herpes’, a medical term derived from the ancient Greek word ‘ἕρπειν’, meaning ‘to creep’ or ‘crawl’, is used to describe the spreading of cutaneous lesions in both childhood and adulthood. Cases of children with exanthema ‘resembling mosquito bites’ are presented in reference to varicella or smallpox infection. A variety of upper and lower respiratory tract viral infections are described with impressive accuracy, including rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis, bronchiolitis and bronchitis. The ‘cough of Perinthos’ epidemic, an influenza-like outbreak in the 5th century B.C., is also recorded and several cases complicated with pneumonia or fatal outcomes are discussed. Hippocrates, moreover, describes conjunctivitis, otitis, lymphadenitis, meningoencephalitis, febrile convulsions, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, poliomyelitis and skin warts, along with proposed treatment directions. Almost 2,400 years later, Hippocrates' systematic approach and methodical innovations can inspire <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> trainees and future <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Virology subspecialists. PMID:27446241</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cameroon&pg=7&id=EJ638416','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Cameroon&pg=7&id=EJ638416"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of a Community Mobilization Project on Health-Related Knowledge and <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Cameroon.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Babalola, Stella; Sakolsky, Natasha; Vondrasek, Claudia; Mounlom, Damaris; Brown, Jane; Tchupo, Jean-Paul</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Evaluated the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a reproductive health community mobilization initiative in Cameroon. Baseline and followup survey data indicated that at a rural site, the intervention positively influenced family planning knowledge and <span class="hlt">practices</span>, HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted disease knowledge and attitudes, and use of health services. At an urban…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED431041.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED431041.pdf"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Mandated Statewide Testing on Teachers' Classroom Assessment and Instructional <span class="hlt">Practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McMillan, James H.; Myran, Steve; Workman, Daryl</p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the new Virginia statewide Standards of Learning (SOL) testing program on classroom instructional and assessment <span class="hlt">practices</span> was studied through surveys before and after implementation of the testing program. The sample represented responses from 570 secondary school teachers (of mathematics, social studies, English, and science) and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=medical+AND+debates&pg=6&id=EJ808530','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=medical+AND+debates&pg=6&id=EJ808530"><span>New ACGME Work-Hour Guidelines and Their <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Current Residency Training <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sattar, S. Pirzada; Basith, Fatima; Madison, James; Bhatia, Subhash C.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Objective: Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has introduced new work-hour guidelines for residents in ACGME accredited programs that were implemented in July 2003. The new ACGME policies <span class="hlt">impact</span> several <span class="hlt">practices</span> in various psychiatry residency programs across the U.S., even though psychiatry has not been at the forefront…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=labor+AND+delivery+AND+nurse+AND+salary&id=ED255739','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=labor+AND+delivery+AND+nurse+AND+salary&id=ED255739"><span>Assessment of the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of the Bureau of Vocational Education's <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Nurse Program. Final Report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Iwler, Irvin H.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>A study assessed the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the Pennsylvania Bureau of Vocational Education's <span class="hlt">practical</span> nurse program for funding years 1979-1980 (38 programs), 1980-1981 (40 programs), and 1981-1982 (41 programs). Researchers reviewed literature pertaining to the state of the art of health care both in Pennsylvania and across the Nation. Next, they…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=coaching+AND+orientation&id=EJ943856','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=coaching+AND+orientation&id=EJ943856"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Occupational Socialization on the Perspectives and <span class="hlt">Practices</span> of Sport Pedagogy Doctoral Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lee, Hong-Min; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to examine the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of occupational socialization on the perspectives and <span class="hlt">practices</span> of sport pedagogy doctoral students in terms of physical education (PE) teaching and physical education teacher education (PETE). Participants were 12 students. Data were collected through formal and informal interviews,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17266007','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17266007"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of disease management programs on hospital and community nursing <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Goldstein, Perry C</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of disease management progrmms on the role of the nursing profession in the evolving U.S. health care system is reviewed. Needed changes in educational and training programs are discussed in relation to demands for changing clinical and administrative skills in nursing with an emphasis on increasing demand for advanced <span class="hlt">practice</span> nurses.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25276214','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25276214"><span>"Budget <span class="hlt">impact</span> analyses": a <span class="hlt">practical</span> policy making tool for drug reimbursement decisions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jamshidi, Hamid Reza; Foroutan, Naghmeh; Salamzadeh, Jamshid</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In the present article, Budget <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Analysis as an effective, <span class="hlt">practical</span> financial tool has been introduced to the policy makers for improving drug formulary and reimbursement decision making. In Iran, Ministry of Health (MOH), health insurance organizations, and health care providers such as hospitals could take the most advantage of the BIAs reports.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=service+AND+design+AND+thinking&pg=4&id=EJ1054257','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=service+AND+design+AND+thinking&pg=4&id=EJ1054257"><span>The Link between High-<span class="hlt">Impact</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> and Student Learning: Some Longitudinal Evidence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kilgo, Cindy A.; Ezell Sheets, Jessica K.; Pascarella, Ernest T.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The current paper used data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education--a longitudinal, pretest/posttest design--to estimate the effects of participation in the ten "high-<span class="hlt">impact</span>" educational <span class="hlt">practices</span> put forth and endorsed by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) on a variety of liberal arts…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Michael+AND+Brown&pg=3&id=EJ695646','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Michael+AND+Brown&pg=3&id=EJ695646"><span>Examining the Legacy of "Brown": The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Special Education and Teacher <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shealey, Monikawilliams; Lue, Marthascott; Brooks, Michael; McCray, Erica</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The "Brown v. Board of Education" (1954) case has left a lasting <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the way children are educated in this country. Much has been written about the legacy of "Brown" as it relates to current desegregation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, academic achievement for students of color, and school reform. This paper will examine the implications of the "Brown" decision…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=base+AND+51&pg=2&id=EJ777049','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=base+AND+51&pg=2&id=EJ777049"><span>Changing Classroom <span class="hlt">Practice</span> at Key Stage 2: The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of New Labour's National Strategies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Webb, Rosemary; Vulliamy, Graham</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The article examines the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of New Labour policies--particularly the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies and the subsequent Primary National Strategy--on classroom <span class="hlt">practice</span> at Key Stage 2 in England. Evidence is drawn from fieldwork conducted in 2003-2005 from a sample of 50 schools, replicating a study conducted a decade previously in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1053724.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1053724.pdf"><span>Accounting Practitioners Reflect on Faculty <span class="hlt">Impact</span>: Bridging the Gap between Theory and <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Johnson, Ryan</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>A gap exists between the perception of accounting education in the classroom and accounting as it is <span class="hlt">practiced</span>. This study explores qualitatively the perceptions and experiences of mid-career accounting professionals with respect to the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of academic faculty on their careers in accounting. The study identifies a perception gap in the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=271677','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=271677"><span>Topographic placement of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce water quality <span class="hlt">impacts</span> from pastures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) such as streambank fencing and vegetative buffers lessen environmental <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on streams from pasture-based agriculture by limiting livestock time in streams and intercepting sediment and nutrients in overland flow. Placing streamside BMPs at the closest point to th...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=315219','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=315219"><span>Kitchen <span class="hlt">practices</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> on volatile flavors in ripe tomatoes: effects of refrigeration and blanching</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Both blanching and refrigeration of ripe tomatoes are common <span class="hlt">practices</span> in kitchen and food service prior to being sliced. However, little is reported on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of such treatments on volatile profiles in tomato fruit. In this study, ‘FL 47’ tomatoes at full red stage were dipped in 52 °C hot wate...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=impacts+AND+training+AND+development&id=EJ918770','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=impacts+AND+training+AND+development&id=EJ918770"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Child Development Associate Training on the Beliefs and <span class="hlt">Practices</span> of Preschool Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Heisner, Mary Jane; Lederberg, Amy R.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This study examined the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of Child Development Associate (CDA) training on the beliefs and <span class="hlt">practices</span> of early childhood teachers who did not have college degrees or early childhood college coursework. Preschool teachers who were enrolled in CDA classes (n = 76) and a comparison group of teachers (n = 50) completed two surveys of beliefs and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=climb&pg=5&id=ED552833','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=climb&pg=5&id=ED552833"><span>Teaching Strategies and <span class="hlt">Practices</span> That <span class="hlt">Impact</span> English Language Learners' Vocabulary and Language Proficiency in Reading</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Blackwell, Jacqueline Rushin</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this research is to identify teaching strategies and <span class="hlt">practices</span> that <span class="hlt">impact</span> the vocabulary and language development for English Language Learners. Today, there are over 3.5 million non-English speaking students enrolled in public classrooms and the number has continued to climb over the past decade. Many ELL students live in poverty…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Dentistry&pg=3&id=EJ879861','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Dentistry&pg=3&id=EJ879861"><span>Using Dentistry as a Case Study to Examine Continuing Education and Its <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bullock, Alison; Firmstone, Vickie; Frame, John; Thomas, Hywel</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Continuing education is a defining characteristic of work in the professions. Yet the approach various professional groups take to continuing professional development (CPD) differs widely in terms of regulatory frameworks and requirements, modes of delivery and funding. Importantly, little is understood about how CPD <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ939937.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ939937.pdf"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of <span class="hlt">Practicing</span> Autonomy on the Writing Proficiency of Iranian Intermediate EFL Learners</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bagheri, Mohammad Sadegh; Aeen, Laleh</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The present study examined the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of <span class="hlt">practicing</span> autonomy on the writing proficiency of Iranian intermediate EFL learners. To this end, Preliminary English Test (PET) by Thomas and Sharon (2006) was administered to 92 intermediate language learners as a pre-test. Accordingly, 60 homogeneous learners comprised the research sample. The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED545597.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED545597.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Professional Learning Community <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Morale of Urban High School Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Almanzar, Angel</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This applied dissertation was designed to determine the <span class="hlt">impact</span> a planned intervention, or participants' engagement in lesson study <span class="hlt">practices</span>, had on teacher morale and professional learning communities within a public high school located in the Southeastern part of the United States. A review of a yearly teacher survey conducted by the district's…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=professional+AND+orientation+AND+school+AND+performance&pg=4&id=ED530459','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=professional+AND+orientation+AND+school+AND+performance&pg=4&id=ED530459"><span>A Secondary Analysis of the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of School Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on School Performance</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Talbert, Dale A.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to conduct a secondary analysis of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of school management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on school performance utilizing a survey design of School and Staffing (SASS) data collected by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) of the U.S. Department of Education, 1999-2000. The study identifies those school management…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1058165.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1058165.pdf"><span>Creating a Model for High <span class="hlt">Impact</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> at a Large, Regional, Comprehensive University: A Case Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McMahan, Shari</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Student engagement in High <span class="hlt">Impact</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> (HIPs) has been gaining the attention of higher education leaders and researchers. When students are actively engaged in the learning process they report greater gains in learning and personal development. Students involved in HIPs show better retention, higher GPA and succeed in graduating college in a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=current+AND+ratio+AND+analysis&pg=3&id=EJ1070957','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=current+AND+ratio+AND+analysis&pg=3&id=EJ1070957"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Dictation <span class="hlt">Practice</span> on Turkish as a Foreign Language Learners' Writing Skills</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Büyükikiz, K. Kaan</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study is to learn about the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of dictation <span class="hlt">practice</span> on B1 level Turkish as a foreign language learners' writing skills. In this study, a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design with control group was used. The study was carried out with 24 B1 level students enrolled in Gaziantep University Turkish and Foreign Languages…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22334155','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22334155"><span>Health <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment in the United States: Has <span class="hlt">practice</span> followed standards?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Schuchter, Joseph; Bhatia, Rajiv; Corburn, Jason; Seto, Edmund</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>As an emerging <span class="hlt">practice</span>, Health <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Assessment is heterogeneous in purpose, form, and scope and applied in a wide range of decision contexts. This heterogeneity challenges efforts to evaluate the quality and <span class="hlt">impact</span> of <span class="hlt">practice</span>. We examined whether information in completed HIA reports reflected objectively-evaluable criteria proposed by the North American HIA <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Standards Working Group in 2009. From publically-available reports of HIAs conducted in the U.S. and published from 2009 to 2011, we excluded those that were components of, or comment letters on, Environmental <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Assessments (5) or were demonstration projects or student exercises (8). For the remaining 23 reports, we used <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards as a template to abstract data on the steps of HIA, including details on the rationale, authorship, funding, decision and decision-makers, participation, pathways and methods, quality of evidence, and recommendations. Most reports described screening, scoping, and assessment processes, but there was substantial variation in the extent of these processes and the degree of stakeholder participation. Community stakeholders participated in screening or scoping in just two-thirds of the HIAs (16). On average, these HIAs analyzed 5.5 determinants related to 10.6 health <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. Most HIA reports did not include evaluation or monitoring plans. This study identifies issues for field development and improvement. The standards might be adapted to better account for variability in resources, produce fit-for-purpose HIAs, and facilitate innovation guided by the principles. - Highlights: • Our study examined reported HIAs in the U.S. against published <span class="hlt">practice</span> standards. • Most HIAs used some screening, scoping and assessment elements from the standards. • The extent of these processes and stakeholder participation varied widely. • The average HIA considered multiple health determinants and <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. • Evaluation or monitoring plans were generally not included in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Practical&pg=2&id=EJ1041694','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Practical&pg=2&id=EJ1041694"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of the "Getting <span class="hlt">Practical</span>: Improving <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Work in Science" Continuing Professional Development Programme on Teachers' Ideas and <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in Science <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Work</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Abrahams, Ian; Reiss, Michael J.; Sharpe, Rachael</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background: Despite the widespread use of <span class="hlt">practical</span> work in school it has been recognised that more needs to be done to improve its effectiveness in developing conceptual understanding. The "Getting <span class="hlt">Practical</span>" CPD (Continuing Professional Development) programme was designed to contribute towards an improvement in the effectiveness of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4770863','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4770863"><span>The path to <span class="hlt">impact</span> of operational research on tuberculosis control policies and <span class="hlt">practices</span> in Indonesia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Probandari, Ari; Widjanarko, Bagoes; Mahendradhata, Yodi; Sanjoto, Hary; Cerisha, Ancila; Nungky, Saverina; Riono, Pandu; Simon, Sumanto; Farid, Muhammad Noor; Giriputra, Sardikin; Putra, Artawan Eka; Burhan, Erlina; Wahyuni, Chatarina U.; Mustikawati, Dyah; Widianingrum, Christina; Tiemersma, Edine W.; Alisjahbana, Bachti</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background Operational research is currently one of the pillars of the global strategy to control tuberculosis. Indonesia initiated capacity building for operational research on tuberculosis over the last decade. Although publication of the research in peer-reviewed journals is an important indicator for measuring the success of this endeavor, the influence of operational research on policy and <span class="hlt">practices</span> is considered even more important. However, little is known about the process by which operational research influences tuberculosis control policy and <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Objective We aimed to investigate the influence of operational research on tuberculosis control policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span> in Indonesia between 2004 and 2014. Design Using a qualitative study design, we conducted in-depth interviews of 50 researchers and 30 policy makers/program managers and performed document reviews. Transcripts of these interviews were evaluated while applying content analysis. Results Operational research contributed to tuberculosis control policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span> improvements, including development of new policies, introduction of new <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and reinforcement of current program policies and <span class="hlt">practices</span>. However, most of these developments had limited sustainability. The path from the dissemination of research results and recommendations to policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span> changes was long and complex. The skills, interests, and political power of researchers and policy makers, as well as health system response, could influence the process. Conclusions Operational research contributed to improving tuberculosis control policy and <span class="hlt">practices</span>. A systematic approach to improve the sustainability of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of operational research should be explored. PMID:26928217</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28156966','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28156966"><span>The path to <span class="hlt">impact</span> of operational research on tuberculosis control policies and <span class="hlt">practices</span> in Indonesia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Probandari, Ari; Widjanarko, Bagoes; Mahendradhata, Yodi; Sanjoto, Hary; Cerisha, Ancila; Nungky, Saverina; Riono, Pandu; Simon, Sumanto; Noor Farid, Muhammad; Giriputra, Sardikin; Putra, Artawan Eka; Burhan, Erlina; Wahyuni, Chatarina U; Mustikawati, Dyah; Widianingrum, Christina; Tiemersma, Edine W; Alisjahbana, Bachti; On Behalf Of The Tuberculosis Operational Research Group Torg</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background Operational research is currently one of the pillars of the global strategy to control tuberculosis. Indonesia initiated capacity building for operational research on tuberculosis over the last decade. Although publication of the research in peer-reviewed journals is an important indicator for measuring the success of this endeavor, the influence of operational research on policy and <span class="hlt">practices</span> is considered even more important. However, little is known about the process by which operational research influences tuberculosis control policy and <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Objective We aimed to investigate the influence of operational research on tuberculosis control policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span> in Indonesia between 2004 and 2014. Design Using a qualitative study design, we conducted in-depth interviews of 50 researchers and 30 policy makers/program managers and performed document reviews. Transcripts of these interviews were evaluated while applying content analysis. Results Operational research contributed to tuberculosis control policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span> improvements, including development of new policies, introduction of new <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and reinforcement of current program policies and <span class="hlt">practices</span>. However, most of these developments had limited sustainability. The path from the dissemination of research results and recommendations to policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span> changes was long and complex. The skills, interests, and political power of researchers and policy makers, as well as health system response, could influence the process. Conclusions Operational research contributed to improving tuberculosis control policy and <span class="hlt">practices</span>. A systematic approach to improve the sustainability of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of operational research should be explored.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18497121','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18497121"><span>Air quality <span class="hlt">impacts</span> from prescribed forest fires under different management <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tian, Di; Wang, Yuhang; Bergin, Michelle; Hu, Yongtao; Liu, Yongqiang; Russell, Armistead G</p> <p>2008-04-15</p> <p>Large amounts of air pollutants are emitted during prescribed forest fires. Such emissions and corresponding air quality <span class="hlt">impacts</span> can be modulated by different forest management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of changing burning seasons and frequencies and of controlling emissions during smoldering on regional air quality in Georgia are quantified using source-oriented air quality modeling, with modified emissions from prescribed fires reflecting effects of each <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Equivalent fires in the spring and winter are found to have a greater <span class="hlt">impact</span> on PM2.5 than those in summer, though ozone <span class="hlt">impacts</span> are larger from spring and summer fires. If prescribed fires are less frequent more biofuel is burnt in each fire, leading to larger emissions and air quality <span class="hlt">impacts</span> per fire. For example, emissions from a fire with a 5-year fire return interval (FRI) are 72% larger than those from a fire of the same acreage with a 2-year FRI. However, corresponding long-term regional <span class="hlt">impacts</span> are reduced with the longer FRI since the annual burned area is reduced. Total emissions for fires in Georgia with a 5-year FRI are 32% less than those with a 2-year FRI. Smoldering emissions can lead to approximately 1.0 or 1.9 microg/m3 of PM2.5 in the Atlanta PM2.5 nonattainment area during March 2002.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22479750','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22479750"><span>Life cycle thinking in <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment—Current <span class="hlt">practice</span> and LCA gains</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bidstrup, Morten</p> <p>2015-09-15</p> <p>It has been advocated that life cycle thinking (LCT) should be applied in <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment (IA) to a greater extent, since some development proposals pose a risk of significant <span class="hlt">impacts</span> throughout the interconnected activities of product systems. Multiple authors have proposed the usage of life cycle assessment (LCA) for such analytical advancement, but little to no research on this tool application has been founded in IA <span class="hlt">practice</span> so far. The aim of this article is to elaborate further on the gains assigned to application of LCA. The research builds on a review of 85 Danish IA reports, which were analysed for analytical appropriateness and application of LCT. Through a focus on the non-technical summary, the conclusion and the use of specific search words, passages containing LCT were searched for in each IA report. These passages were then analysed with a generic framework. The results reveal that LCT is appropriate for most of the IAs, but that LCA is rarely applied to provide such a perspective. Without LCA, the IAs show mixed performance in regard to LCT. Most IAs do consider the product provision of development proposals, but they rarely relate <span class="hlt">impacts</span> to this function explicitly. Many IAs do consider downstream <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, but assessments of upstream, distant <span class="hlt">impacts</span> are generally absent. It is concluded that multiple analytical gains can be attributed to greater application of LCA in IA <span class="hlt">practice</span>, though some level of LCT already exists. - Highlights: • Life cycle thinking is appropriate across the types and topics of <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment. • Yet, life cycle assessment is rarely used for adding such perspective. • <span class="hlt">Impact</span> assessment <span class="hlt">practice</span> does apply some degree of life cycle thinking. • However, application of life cycle assessment could bring analytical gains.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15718593','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15718593"><span>Establishing an internet-based <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cancer registration and communication system for the Hungarian <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> oncology network.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Borgulya, Gábor; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Schuler, Dezso; Garami, Miklós</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Cancer registration has developed in Europe over the last 50 years, and in the last decade intensive joint activities between the European Cancer Registries, in response to the need of pan-European harmonization of registration <span class="hlt">practices</span>, have taken place. The Hungarian <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Cancer Registry has been functioning as the database of the Hungarian <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Oncology Network since 1971, aiming to follow the incidence and the treatment efficacy of malignant diseases. The goals of this globally unique open source information system are the following: 1) to raise the quality of the registration system to the European level by developing an Internet-based registration and communication system, modernizing the database, establishing automatic statistical analyses and adding an Internet website, 2) to support clinical epidemiological studies that we conduct with international collaborators on detailed analyses of the characteristics of patients and their diseases, evaluation of new diagnostic and therapeutic methods, prevention programs, and long-term quality of life and side effects. The benefits of the development of the Internet-based registration and communication system are as follows: a) introduction of an Internet-based case reporting system, b) modernization of the registry database according to international recommendations, c) automatic statistical summaries, encrypted mail systems, document repository, d) application of data security and privacy standards, e) establishment of a website and compilation of educational materials. The overall objective of this scientific project is to contribute towards the improvement of cancer prevention and cancer care for the benefit of the public in general and of cancer patients in particular.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5055947','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5055947"><span>Use of Zoledronic Acid in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Craniofacial Fibrous Dysplasia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rossin, Sara; Divisic, Antuan; De Gregorio, Alesandra; Agosto, Caterina; Catalano, Igor; Mazza, Alessandro; Sartori, Leonardo; Benini, Franca</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We describe a case of a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patient affected by mandibular fibrous dysplasia (FD) with severe and chronic pain who was successfully treated with zoledronic acid (ZOL): a third-generation bisphosphonate. Further research is needed to assess its safety and efficacy as a treatment option for FD in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population. PMID:27747122</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/249771','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/249771"><span>An assessment of alternative agricultural management <span class="hlt">practice</span> <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on soil carbon in the corn belt</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Barnwell, T.O. Jr.; Jackson, R.B.; Mulkey, L.A.</p> <p>1993-12-31</p> <p>This <span class="hlt">impact</span> of alternative management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on agricultural soil C is estimated by a soil C mass balance modeling study that incorporates policy considerations in the analysis. A literature review of soil C modeling and <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> has been completed. The models selected for use and/or modification to meet the needs of representing soil C cycles in agroecosystems and <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of management <span class="hlt">practices</span> are CENTURY and DNDC. These models share a common ability to examine the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of alternative management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil organic C, and are readily accessible. An important aspect of this effort is the development of the modeling framework and methodology that define the agricultural production systems and scenarios (i.e., crop-soil-climate combinations) to be assessed in terms of national policy, the integration of the model needs with available databases, and the operational mechanics of evaluating C sequestration potential with the integrated model/database system. We are working closely with EPA`s Office of Policy and Program Evaluation to define a reasonable set of policy alternatives for this assessment focusing on policy that might be affected through a revised Farm Bill, such as incentives to selectively promote conservation tillage, crop rotations, and/or good stewardship of the conservation reserve. Policy alternatives are translated into basic data for use in soil C models through economic models. These data, including such elements as agricultural <span class="hlt">practices</span>, fertilization rates, and production levels are used in the soil C models to produce net carbon changes on a per unit area basis. The unit-area emissions are combined with areal-extent data in a GIS to produce an estimate of total carbon and nitrogen changes and thus estimate greenhouse benefits.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23881111','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23881111"><span>Head <span class="hlt">impact</span> exposure in youth football: elementary school ages 9-12 years and the effect of <span class="hlt">practice</span> structure.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cobb, Bryan R; Urban, Jillian E; Davenport, Elizabeth M; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M; Maldjian, Joseph A; Whitlow, Christopher T; Powers, Alexander K; Stitzel, Joel D</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Head <span class="hlt">impact</span> exposure in youth football has not been well-documented, despite children under the age of 14 accounting for 70% of all football players in the United States. The objective of this study was to quantify the head <span class="hlt">impact</span> exposure of youth football players, age 9-12, for all <span class="hlt">practices</span> and games over the course of single season. A total of 50 players (age = 11.0 ± 1.1 years) on three teams were equipped with helmet mounted accelerometer arrays, which monitored each <span class="hlt">impact</span> players sustained during <span class="hlt">practices</span> and games. During the season, 11,978 <span class="hlt">impacts</span> were recorded for this age group. Players averaged 240 ± 147 <span class="hlt">impacts</span> for the season with linear and rotational 95th percentile magnitudes of 43 ± 7 g and 2034 ± 361 rad/s(2). Overall, <span class="hlt">practice</span> and game sessions involved similar <span class="hlt">impact</span> frequencies and magnitudes. One of the three teams however, had substantially fewer <span class="hlt">impacts</span> per <span class="hlt">practice</span> and lower 95th percentile magnitudes in <span class="hlt">practices</span> due to a concerted effort to limit contact in <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The same team also participated in fewer <span class="hlt">practices</span>, further reducing the number of <span class="hlt">impacts</span> each player experienced in <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Head <span class="hlt">impact</span> exposures in games showed no statistical difference. While the acceleration magnitudes among 9-12 year old players tended to be lower than those reported for older players, some recorded high magnitude <span class="hlt">impacts</span> were similar to those seen at the high school and college level. Head <span class="hlt">impact</span> exposure in youth football may be appreciably reduced by limiting contact in <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Further research is required to assess whether such a reduction in head <span class="hlt">impact</span> exposure will result in a reduction in concussion incidence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23218172','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23218172"><span>ICRP publication 121: radiological protection in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> diagnostic and interventional radiology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Khong, P-L; Ringertz, H; Donoghue, V; Frush, D; Rehani, M; Appelgate, K; Sanchez, R</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p> of protective shielding, optimisation of exposure factors, use of pulsed fluoroscopy, limiting fluoroscopy time, etc. Major <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> interventional procedures should be performed by experienced <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> interventional operators, and a second, specific level of training in radiological protection is desirable (in some countries, this is mandatory). For computed tomography, dose reduction should be optimised by the adjustment of scan parameters (such as mA, kVp, and pitch) according to patient weight or age, region scanned, and study indication (e.g. images with greater noise should be accepted if they are of sufficient diagnostic quality). Other strategies include restricting multiphase examination protocols, avoiding overlapping of scan regions, and only scanning the area in question. Up-to-date dose reduction technology such as tube current modulation, organ-based dose modulation, auto kV technology, and iterative reconstruction should be utilised when appropriate. It is anticipated that this publication will assist institutions in encouraging the standardisation of procedures, and that it may help increase awareness and ultimately improve <span class="hlt">practices</span> for the benefit of patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24681710','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24681710"><span>Oenological prefermentation <span class="hlt">practices</span> strongly <span class="hlt">impact</span> yeast population dynamics and alcoholic fermentation kinetics in Chardonnay grape must.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Albertin, Warren; Miot-Sertier, Cécile; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe; Coulon, Joana; Moine, Virginie; Colonna-Ceccaldi, Benoit; Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle</p> <p>2014-05-16</p> <p>Yeast species of Hanseniaspora and Candida genus are predominant during the early stages of winemaking, while species of Metschnikowia, Pichia, Zygoascus, Issatchenkia, Torulaspora and other genera are present at lower population levels. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of common oenological <span class="hlt">practices</span> on yeast dynamics during the prefermentative stage and the early stage of alcoholic fermentation (AF) remains elusive. In this work, the effect of four prefermentative oenological <span class="hlt">practices</span> (clarification degree, temperature, sulphite and starter yeast addition) on yeast dynamics was evaluated in a Chardonnay grape must. The growth curves of four genus or species, namely Saccharomyces spp., Hanseniaspora spp., Candida zemplinina and Torulaspora delbrueckii, were followed by quantitative PCR. The fermentation kinetics were also recorded, as well as the production of acetic acid. Variance analysis allowed determining the effect of each <span class="hlt">practice</span> and their interaction factors, as well as their relative importance on yeast dynamics and fermentation kinetics. Our experimental design showed that the population dynamics of the four species were differently <span class="hlt">impacted</span> by the oenological <span class="hlt">practices</span>, with some species being more sensitive than others to the clarification degree (C. zemplinina), sulphite addition (Saccharomyces spp.), starter yeast inoculation (Hanseniaspora spp.) or prefermentation temperature (T. delbrueckii). Significant interaction effects between <span class="hlt">practices</span> were revealed, highlighting the interest of experimental design allowing interaction analysis, as some factors may buffer the effect of other ones. Hanseniaspora genus showed atypical behaviour: growth dynamics showed a decrease during AF that we interpreted as early cellular lysis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of common oenological <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the dynamics of non-Saccharomyces yeast that will be useful for a better management of mixed fermentation between S. cerevisiae and non</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22005489','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22005489"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of general <span class="hlt">practice</span> attachments on foundation doctors: achieving the goals of Modernising Medical Careers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Firth, Adam; Wass, Val</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>Modernising Medical Careers saw the introduction of four-month attachments in primary care during the second Foundation Year, to foster a broader understanding of healthcare settings. The North West Deanery offered this opportunity to virtually all trainees. Previous work had captured poor impressions of undergraduate experience in general <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This study aimed to explore Foundation Doctors' perceptions of Foundation primary care attachments before and after the experience. Qualitative methodology was used. Two focus groups were held with 12 trainees at the end of their first Foundation Year to explore their expectations of pending rotation in general <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Eighteen individual interviews were conducted with Foundation Doctors after the attachment. Themed analysis of transcripts revealed a striking contrast between trainees' perceptions of general <span class="hlt">practice</span> before and after undertaking F2 rotations. Undergraduate exposure and secondary care bias in training had a significant negative <span class="hlt">impact</span> on trainees' perceptions of general <span class="hlt">practice</span>. The one-to-one opportunities for educational supervision, the range of patients seen and the opportunity to understand communication at the primary/secondary interface dispelled these concerns. The findings highlighted the beneficial <span class="hlt">impact</span> of foundation posts in general <span class="hlt">practice</span> for training, career planning in general and, as outlined in the initial goals of the programme, the interaction between primary and secondary care.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22479765','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22479765"><span>Advancing the <span class="hlt">practice</span> of health <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment in Canada: Obstacles and opportunities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>McCallum, Lindsay C.; Ollson, Christopher A.; Stefanovic, Ingrid L.</p> <p>2015-11-15</p> <p>Health <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Assessment (HIA) is recognized as a useful tool that can identify potential health <span class="hlt">impacts</span> resulting from projects or policy initiatives. Although HIA has become an established <span class="hlt">practice</span> in some countries, it is not yet an established <span class="hlt">practice</span> in Canada. In order to enable broader support for HIA, this study provides a comprehensive review and analysis of the peer-reviewed and gray literature on the state of HIA <span class="hlt">practice</span>. The results of this review revealed that, although there is an abundance of publications relating to HIA, there remains a lack of transparent, consistent and reproducible approaches and methods throughout the process. Findings indicate a need for further research and development on a number of fronts, including: 1) the nature of HIA triggers; 2) consistent scoping and stakeholder engagement approaches; 3) use of evidence and transparency of decision-making; 4) reproducibility of assessment methods; 5) monitoring and evaluation protocols; and, 6) integration within existing regulatory frameworks. Addressing these issues will aid in advancing the more widespread use of HIA in Canada. - Highlights: • Reviewed current state of <span class="hlt">practice</span> in the field of HIA • Identified key obstacles and opportunities for HIA advancement • Major issues include lack of consistent approach and methodology. • No national regulatory driver hinders opportunity for widespread use of HIA. • Identified research opportunities vital to developing HIA <span class="hlt">practice</span> in Canada.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5055615','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5055615"><span>A systematic review of measures of HIV/AIDS stigma in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV-infected and HIV-affected populations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>McAteer, Carole Ian; Truong, Nhan-Ai Thi; Aluoch, Josephine; Deathe, Andrew Roland; Nyandiko, Winstone M; Marete, Irene; Vreeman, Rachel Christine</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Introduction HIV-related stigma <span class="hlt">impacts</span> the quality of life and care management of HIV-infected and HIV-affected individuals, but how we measure stigma and its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on children and adolescents has less often been described. Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies that measured HIV-related stigma with a quantitative tool in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV-infected and HIV-affected populations. Results and discussion Varying measures have been used to assess stigma in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> populations, with most studies utilizing the full or variant form of the HIV Stigma Scale that has been validated in adult populations and utilized with <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> populations in Africa, Asia and the United States. Other common measures included the Perceived Public Stigma Against Children Affected by HIV, primarily utilized and validated in China. Few studies implored item validation techniques with the population of interest, although scales were used in a different cultural context from the origin of the scale. Conclusions Many stigma measures have been used to assess HIV stigma in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> populations, globally, but few have implored methods for cultural adaptation and content validity. PMID:27717409</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20298629','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20298629"><span>[Primary management and treatment of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> septic shock].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kneyber, Martin C J; van Heerde, Marc; Henneveld, Hetty Th</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> shock is common. Hypovolaemic and septic shock are the main forms. Early and rapid results-oriented therapy of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> septic shock has a favourable effect on survival. There is an international guideline for the primary management of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> shock during the first hour after presentation of the patient. The goal of treatment is to prevent oxygen debt and consequently organ failure. The main symptoms of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> shock are tachycardia and reduced consciousness. In a child in shock, the clinical picture should be recognized within 15 minutes and an attempt should be made to reverse the situation by rapid fluid infusion. If the shock persists after 15 minutes, vasoactive medication should be given and the child should be transferred to a local <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care unit. Intubation and mechanical ventilation are then also required.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28334875','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28334875"><span>White matter changes in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> multiple sclerosis and monophasic demyelinating disorders.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Longoni, Giulia; Brown, Robert A; MomayyezSiahkal, Parya; Elliott, Colm; Narayanan, Sridar; Bar-Or, Amit; Ann Marrie, Ruth; Ann Yeh, E; Filippi, Massimo; Banwell, Brenda; Arnold, Douglas L</p> <p>2017-03-14</p> <p> patients with non-acute disseminated encephalomyelitis presentations associated with lesions in the brain at onset. Patients with monofocal syndromes such as optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, or isolated brainstem syndromes in whom multifocal brain lesions were absent, showed trajectories more closely approximating normal-appearing white matter development. Our findings also suggest the existence of sexual dimorphism in the effects of demyelinating syndromes on normal-appearing white matter development. Overall, we demonstrate failure of white matter maturational changes and progressive loss of white matter integrity in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span>-onset multiple sclerosis, but also show that even a single demyelinating attack-when associated with white matter lesions in the brain-negatively <span class="hlt">impacts</span> subsequent normal-appearing white matter development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22447510','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22447510"><span>Is the ecosystem service concept improving <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment? Evidence from recent international <span class="hlt">practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rosa, Josianne Claudia Sales Sánchez, Luis E.</p> <p>2015-01-15</p> <p>Considering ecosystem services (ES) could foster innovation and improve environmental and social <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment (ESIA) <span class="hlt">practice</span>, but is the potential being fulfilled? In order to investigate how ES have been treated in recent international <span class="hlt">practice</span>, three questions are asked: (i) were the tasks of an ES analysis carried out? (ii) how is such analysis integrated with other analysis presented in the ESIA? (iii) does ES analysis result in additional or improved mitigation or enhancement measures? These research questions were unfolded into 15 auxiliary questions for reviewing five ESIA reports prepared for mining, hydroelectric and transportation infrastructure projects in Africa, Asia and South America. All cases incorporated ES into ESIA to meet a requirement of the International Finance Corporation's Performance Standards on Environmental and Social Sustainability. It was found that: (i) in only three cases most tasks recommended by current guidance were adopted (ii) all reports feature a dedicated ES chapter or section, but in three of them no evidence was found that the ES analysis was integrated within <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment (iii) in the two ESIAs that followed guidance, ES analysis resulted in specific mitigation measures. Few evidence was found that the ES concept is improving current ESIA <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Key challenges are: (i) integrating ES analysis in such a way that it does not duplicate other analysis; (ii) adequately characterizing the beneficiaries of ES; and (iii) quantifying ES supply for <span class="hlt">impact</span> prediction. - Highlights: • Incorporating ecosystem services analysis in <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment can improve results. • Additional <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and mitigation were identified. • Challenges include developing appropriate indicators for <span class="hlt">impact</span> prediction. • A key challenge is integrating the concept in such a way that it does not duplicate other analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22246880','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22246880"><span>Advancing the theory and <span class="hlt">practice</span> of <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment: Setting the research agenda</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pope, Jenny; Bond, Alan; Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Retief, Francois</p> <p>2013-07-15</p> <p><span class="hlt">Impact</span> assessment has been in place for over 40 years and is now practised in some form in all but two of the world's nations. In this paper we reflect on the state of the art of <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment theory and <span class="hlt">practice</span>, focusing on six well-established forms: EIA, SEA, policy assessment, SIA, HIA and sustainability assessment. We note that although the fundamentals of <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment have their roots in the US National Environmental Policy Act 1969 (NEPA) each branch of the field is distinct in also drawing on other theoretical and conceptual bases that in turn shape the prevailing discourse in each case, generating increasing degrees of specialisation within each sub-field. Against this backdrop, we consider the strengths and weaknesses of collective <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment <span class="hlt">practice</span>, concluding that although there are substantial strengths, the plethora of specialist branches is generating a somewhat confusing picture and lack of clarity regarding how the pieces of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment jigsaw puzzle fit together. We use this review to suggest an overarching research agenda that will enable <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment to evolve in line with changing expectations for what it should deliver. -- Highlights: ► Strengths, weakness, opportunities and threats for IA are explored in this paper ► EIA, SEA, policy assessment, SIA, HIA and sustainability assessment are reviewed ► Diversity of <span class="hlt">practice</span> is both a strength and weakness in the current economic climate ► There are opportunities to simplify IA by focusing on common and fundamental elements ► Continued research into theory related to IA effectiveness is also essential.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2580282','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2580282"><span>The Financial <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Using TMR in a Private Group <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Templeton, Joan; Bernes, Marshall; Ostrowski, Maureen</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The installation of a computerized financial system is usually preceded by a cost-benefit analysis showing a positive <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the facility's financial picture. The administration expects reduction in some operating costs (exclusive of the system and the installation costs) and an improvement in collecting accounts receivable. When California Primary Physicians installed TMR, certain costs were reduced, and the business office did become more efficient. However, because TMR is an integrated medical/financial system, other financial benefits accrued to the <span class="hlt">practice</span> that billing systems would never be able to provide. This paper discusses the financial <span class="hlt">impact</span> of TMR on cost reduction, accounts receivable collection, revenue tracking, and program development and marketing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=191282&keyword=united+AND+nations&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=90682136&CFTOKEN=92685028','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=191282&keyword=united+AND+nations&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=90682136&CFTOKEN=92685028"><span>Guidance on How to Move from Current <span class="hlt">Practice</span> to Recommended <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in Life Cycle <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Assessment (UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative Publication)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The report provides guidance on how to move from current <span class="hlt">practice</span> to recommended <span class="hlt">practice</span> in Life Cycle <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Assessment. It is composed of three complementary parts elaborated in the first task force (TFI) of the LCIA programme, with contribution of the other three task forces:</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4928186','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4928186"><span>Cost-effectiveness analysis of the direct and indirect <span class="hlt">impact</span> of intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccination strategies in children: alternative country profiles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gibson, Edward; Begum, Najida; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Safadi, Marco Aurélio; Sackeyfio, Alfred; Hackett, Judith; Rajaram, Sankarasubramanian</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background Influenza poses a significant burden on healthcare systems and society, with under-recognition in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population. Existing vaccination policies (largely) target the elderly and other risk groups where complications may arise. Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of annual <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> vaccination (in 2–17-year-olds) with live attenuated influenza vaccination (LAIV), as well as the protective effect on the wider population in England and Wales (base). The study aimed to demonstrate broad applications of the model in countries where epidemiological and transmission data is limited and that have sophisticated vaccination policies (Brazil, Spain, and Taiwan). Methods The direct and indirect <span class="hlt">impact</span> of LAIV in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cohort was simulated using an age-stratified dynamic transmission model over a 5-year time horizon of daily cycles and applying discounting of 3.5% in the base case. Pre-existing immunity structure was based on a 1-year model run. Sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results In the base case for England and Wales, the annual <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> strategy with LAIV was associated with improvements in influenza-related events and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) lost, yielding an incremental cost per QALY of £6,208. The model was robust to change in the key input parameters. The probabilistic analysis demonstrated LAIV to be cost effective in more than 99% of iterations, assuming a willingness-to-pay threshold of £30,000. Incremental costs per QALY for Brazil were £2,817, and for the cases of Spain and Taiwan the proposed strategy was dominant over the current <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Conclusion In addition to existing policies, annual <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> vaccination using LAIV provides a cost-effective strategy that offers direct and indirect protection in the wider community. <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> vaccination strategies using LAIV demonstrated clinical and economic benefits over alternative (current vaccination) strategies in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=induction&pg=3&id=EJ1112880','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=induction&pg=3&id=EJ1112880"><span>Does Research Degree Supervisor Training Work? The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of a Professional Development Induction Workshop on Supervision <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McCulloch, Alistair; Loeser, Cassandra</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Supervisor induction and continued professional development programmes constitute good <span class="hlt">practice</span> and are enshrined in institutional policies and national codes of <span class="hlt">practice</span>. However, there is little evidence about whether they have an <span class="hlt">impact</span> on either supervisors' learning or day-to-day <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Set in a discussion of previous literature, this…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20050486','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20050486"><span>The Clinical Nurse Leader: <span class="hlt">impact</span> on <span class="hlt">practice</span> outcomes in the Veterans Health Administration.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ott, Karen M; Haddock, K Sue; Fox, Sandra E; Shinn, Julie K; Walters, Sandra E; Hardin, James W; Durand, Kerri; Harris, James L</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) role was designed to meet an identified need for expert clinical leadership at the point of care. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) became early adopters of the CNL role, foreseeing the value of this pivotal clinical leader at the point of care to meet the complex health care needs of America's veterans and shape health care delivery. <span class="hlt">Impact</span> data were collected and assimilated from seven Veterans Administration Medical Centers to support how CNLs <span class="hlt">impact</span> the delivery of quality and safe patient care and how <span class="hlt">practice</span> changes could be sustained. Data collection and analyses resulted in many lessons learned. The new CNL role was implemented in a variety of settings in the VHA system. Integration of the CNL role in all areas of <span class="hlt">practice</span> in every care setting has the promise of streamlining coordination of care for veterans across all spectrums in the provision of care.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28336223','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28336223"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> idiopathic limbal stem cell deficiency.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vincent, Stephen J; Lee, Graham A</p> <p>2017-03-20</p> <p>Acquired limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) describes a condition in which the corneal limbal stem cells are altered or destroyed, typically due to ocular trauma, chronic allergy or inflammation. Idiopathic LSCD is a term used to describe limbal stem cell failure in the absence of any identifiable causative factor. While several cases of adult-onset LSCD have been identified previously, this case report describes a rare presentation of bilateral asymmetric idiopathic <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> limbal stem cell deficiency in a sixteen-year-old male with an otherwise unremarkable ocular history.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27664303','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27664303"><span>[Emergency medical aid in a <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> context].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Branchard, Delphine; Tentillier, Éric; Gillet, Stéphane; Naud, Julien</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In France, the organisation of aid involves the intervention of the emergency medical services (Samu), which coordinate the medical regulation platforms for site 15 and the mobile emergency and intensive care services (Smur). Since they were created, the Samu have been tirelessly adapting their response to the various characteristics of pre-hospital assignments. Pre- and inter-hospital <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> has seen the development of specialised teams with the aim of providing effective aid which is adapted to the youngest and most vulnerable patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3690101','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3690101"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> travel medicine: vaccines and medications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Starr, Mike</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> aspects of travel medicine can be complex, and individual advice is often required. Nonetheless, children are much more likely to acquire common infections than exotic tropical diseases whilst travelling. Important exceptions are malaria and tuberculosis, which are more frequent and severe in children. Overall, travellers' diarrhoea is the most common illness affecting travellers. This review discusses vaccines and medications that may be indicated for children who are travelling overseas. It focuses on immunizations that are given as part of the routine schedule, as well as those that are more specific to travel. Malaria and travellers' diarrhoea are also discussed. PMID:23163285</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3505102','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3505102"><span>MIH: epidemiologic clinic study in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patient</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>CONDÒ, R.; PERUGIA, C.; MATURO, P.; DOCIMO, R.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>SUMMARY The Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is a qualitative and quantitative defect of the enamel structure of the first permanent molars, which may vary from 1 to 4 with involvement of maxillary and jaw permanent incisors. Aim. Aim of this study is that to evaluate, among 1500 <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients chosen at random aged between 0 and 14 years, afferent by the <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Dentistry of the Azienda Ospedialiera Policlinico Tor Vergata of Rome from 1996 to 2011, the incidents and the prevalence of the MIH distribution, and furthermore to ascertain the possible relationship with the data described in the literature. Results and discussion. From the sample of 1500 <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients, the number of those affections from MIH has turned out to be pairs to 110 (7.3%) aged between 4 and 15 years, and an average age equal to 9.7. The incidence of the hypoplastic defects is greater in the elements of the permanents series in which the functional class mainly interested is that of the first molars, with a percentage of 39.8%. Regarding the elements of the deciduous series affections from hypoplasia, they turn out to be in all in number of 20 represented in 80% of the cases from the seconds molars while in the remaining 20% of the cases the items involved are the central incisors. About the percentage of elements involved in the MIH: the molars, involved with a frequency of 56%, turn out to be more hit regarding incisors (44%). As reported in the literature, it can be asserted that the MIH can hit in equal measure both the male sex that feminine one. Conclusions. MIH represents a condition quite frequent in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population. In managing this anomaly takes an essential role in the early diagnosis and in the differential one. The study done underlined the importance of a correct application of the therapeutic protocol which, starting from a careful diagnosis and articulating themselves in the execution of preventive treatments and in severe cases restorative and</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24070789','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24070789"><span>The STEP (Safety and Toxicity of Excipients for <span class="hlt">Paediatrics</span>) database: part 2 - the pilot version.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Salunke, Smita; Brandys, Barbara; Giacoia, George; Tuleu, Catherine</p> <p>2013-11-30</p> <p>The screening and careful selection of excipients is a critical step in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> formulation development as certain excipients acceptable in adult formulations, may not be appropriate for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> use. While there is extensive toxicity data that could help in better understanding and highlighting the gaps in toxicity studies, the data are often scattered around the information sources and saddled with incompatible data types and formats. This paper is the second in a series that presents the update on the Safety and Toxicity of Excipients for <span class="hlt">Paediatrics</span> ("STEP") database being developed by Eu-US PFIs, and describes the architecture data fields and functions of the database. The STEP database is a user designed resource that compiles the safety and toxicity data of excipients that is scattered over various sources and presents it in one freely accessible source. Currently, in the pilot database data from over 2000 references/10 excipients presenting preclinical, clinical, regulatory information and toxicological reviews, with references and source links. The STEP database allows searching "FOR" excipients and "BY" excipients. This dual nature of the STEP database, in which toxicity and safety information can be searched in both directions, makes it unique from existing sources. If the pilot is successful, the aim is to increase the number of excipients in the existing database so that a database large enough to be of <span class="hlt">practical</span> research use will be available. It is anticipated that this source will prove to be a useful platform for data management and data exchange of excipient safety information.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17684076','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17684076"><span>Diagnostic reference levels for thorax X-ray examinations of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kiljunen, T; Järvinen, H; Savolainen, S</p> <p>2007-06-01</p> <p>Based on the Medical Exposure Directive of the European Commission, 97/43/Euratom, The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) in Finland has the responsibility for setting national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for the most common radiological examinations. <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> patients deserve special attention because of the higher radiation risk compared with adults. The purpose of this paper is to present a method that takes into account patient size when setting DRLs in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients. The overall data consisted of patient doses collected from six hospitals during the years 1994-2001, and new measurements in two hospitals in 2004. In total, there were 700 chest examinations. The method established by the National Radiological Protection Board (UK) for setting DRLs was not considered feasible in Finnish <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Patient doses correlated exponentially with the projection thickness, which was measured directly for each patient. Since 1 January 2006, <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> DRLs for conventional chest examinations have been specified in Finland as a DRL curve by using both dose quantities (entrance surface doses (ESD) and dose-area product (DAP)) as a function of patient projection thickness.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22058872','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22058872"><span>Walking the sustainability assessment talk - Progressing the <span class="hlt">practice</span> of environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment (EIA)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Retief, Francois</p> <p>2012-09-15</p> <p>Internationally there is a growing demand for environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment (EIA) to move away from its traditional focus towards delivering more sustainable outcomes. South Africa is an example of a country where the EIA system seems to have embraced the concept of sustainability. In this paper we test the existing objectives for EIA in South Africa against sustainability principles and then critique the effectiveness of EIA <span class="hlt">practice</span> in delivering these objectives. The outcome of the research suggests that notwithstanding a strong and explicit sustainability mandate through policy and legislation, the effectiveness of EIA <span class="hlt">practice</span> falls far short of what is mandated. This shows that further legislative reform is not required to improve effectiveness but rather a focus on changing the behaviour of individual professionals. We conclude by inviting further debate on what exactly practitioners can do to give effect to sustainability in EIA <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2560634','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2560634"><span>Epidemiology of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> surgical admissions to a government referral hospital in the Gambia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bickler, S. W.; Sanno-Duanda, B.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>INTRODUCTION: There is a paucity of published data on the type of conditions that require surgery among children in sub-Saharan Africa. Such information is necessary for assessing the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of such conditions on child health and for setting priorities to improve <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> surgical care. METHODS: Described in the article is a 29-month prospective study of all children aged < 15 years who were admitted to a government referral hospital in the Gambia from January 1996 to May 1998. RESULTS: A total of 1726 children were admitted with surgical problems. Surgical patients accounted for 11.3% of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> admissions and 34,625 total inpatient days. The most common admission diagnoses were injuries (46.9%), congenital anomalies (24.3%), and infections requiring surgery (14.5%). The diagnoses that accounted for the greatest number of inpatient days were burns (18.8%), osteomyelitis (15.4%), fractures (12.7%), soft tissue injuries (3.9%), and head injuries (3.4%). Gambian children were rarely admitted for appendicitis and never admitted for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. The leading causes of surgical deaths were burns, congenital anomalies, and injuries other than burns. DISCUSSION: Prevention of childhood injuries and better trauma management, especially at the primary and secondary health care levels, should be the priorities for improving <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> surgical care in sub-Saharan Africa. Surgical care of children should be considered an essential component of child health programmes in developing countries. PMID:11143193</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5192547','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5192547"><span>The prevalence and <span class="hlt">practice</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> of weight bias amongst Australian dietitians</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hughes, R.; Burke, K. J.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Summary Objectives This study explored weight bias amongst Australian Accredited Practising Dietitians (APDs) and the effect of client weight status on dietetic <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Methods Participants were 201 APDs, recruited using purposive sampling. A self‐administered questionnaire, the fat phobia scale (FPS), was completed to assess explicit weight bias. Participants were then randomized to receive either a female within the healthy weight range or female with obesity, accompanied by an identical case study for a condition unrelated to weight. Participants assessed the client based on data provided, provided recommendations and rated their perception of the client. Results Mean FPS scores indicated mild fat phobia. However, dietetic <span class="hlt">practice</span> was significantly affected by the client's weight status. Dietitians presented with the female with obesity assessed the client to have significantly lower health and were more likely to provide unsolicited weight management recommendations. In addition, dietitians rated the client as less receptive, less motivated and as having a lower ability to understand and sustain recommendations. Conclusions The contribution of this study is the exploration of how weight status may <span class="hlt">impact</span> dietetic <span class="hlt">practice</span> including assessment, recommendations and perceptions of the client. Dietitians may <span class="hlt">practice</span> in a manner that represents or could be perceived as negative implicit weight bias, despite the explicit FPS assessing only mild fat phobia. Further research to understand the extent of the problem and how it <span class="hlt">impacts</span> client outcomes and to test possible solutions is required. PMID:28090351</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21499659','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21499659"><span>Environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment by means of a procedure based on fuzzy logic: A <span class="hlt">practical</span> application</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Peche, Roberto Rodriguez, Esther</p> <p>2011-03-15</p> <p>This study shows the <span class="hlt">practical</span> application of the EIA method based on fuzzy logic proposed by the authors (Peche and Rodriguez, 2009) to a simplified case of study-the activity of a petrol station throughout its exploitation. The intensity (p{sub 1}), the extent (p{sub 2}) and the persistence (p{sub 3}) were the properties selected to describe the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and their respective assessment functions v-bar{sub i}=f(p-bar{sub i}) were determined. The main actions (A) and potentially affected environmental factors (F) were selected. Every <span class="hlt">impact</span> was identified by a pair A-F and the values of the three <span class="hlt">impact</span> properties were estimated for each of them by means of triangular fuzzy numbers. Subsequently, the fuzzy estimation of every <span class="hlt">impact</span> was carried out, the estimation of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> A{sub 1}-F{sub 2} (V-bar{sub 1}) being explained in detail. Every <span class="hlt">impact</span> was simultaneously represented by its corresponding generalised confidence interval and membership function. Since the membership functions of all <span class="hlt">impacts</span> were similar to triangular fuzzy numbers, a triangular approach (TA) was used to describe every <span class="hlt">impact</span>. A triangular approach coefficient (TAC) was introduced to quantify the similarity of each fuzzy number and its corresponding triangular approach, where TAC (V-bar) element of (0, 1] and TAC being 1 when the fuzzy number is triangular. The TACs-ranging from 0.96 to 0.99-proved that TAs were valid in all cases. Next, the total positive and negative <span class="hlt">impacts</span>-TV-bar{sup +} and TV-bar{sup -} were calculated and later, the fuzzy value of the total environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> TV-bar was determined from them. Finally, the defuzzification of TV-bar led to the punctual <span class="hlt">impact</span> estimator TV{sup (1)} = -88.50 and its corresponding uncertainty interval [{delta}{sub l}(TV-bar),{delta}{sub r}(TV-bar)]=[6.52,6.96], which represent the total value of the EI. In conclusion, the EIA method enabled the integration of heterogeneous <span class="hlt">impacts</span>, which exerted influence on environmental factors of a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/554756','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/554756"><span>Development of a <span class="hlt">practical</span> modeling framework for estimating the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of wind technology on bird populations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Morrison, M.L.; Pollock, K.H.</p> <p>1997-11-01</p> <p>One of the most pressing environmental concerns related to wind project development is the potential for avian fatalities caused by the turbines. The goal of this project is to develop a useful, <span class="hlt">practical</span> modeling framework for evaluating potential wind power plant <span class="hlt">impacts</span> that can be generalized to most bird species. This modeling framework could be used to get a preliminary understanding of the likelihood of significant <span class="hlt">impacts</span> to birds, in a cost-effective way. The authors accomplish this by (1) reviewing the major factors that can influence the persistence of a wild population; (2) briefly reviewing various models that can aid in estimating population status and trend, including methods of evaluating model structure and performance; (3) reviewing survivorship and population projections; and (4) developing a framework for using models to evaluate the potential <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of wind development on birds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18190484','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18190484"><span>Fasting in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> ambulatory surgery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Klemetti, Seija; Suominen, Tarja</p> <p>2008-02-01</p> <p>The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine how preoperative fasting and postoperative termination of the fast was experienced in ambulatory surgery by child patients and their mothers. The target group consisted of children (n = 12, age 2-10 years) who had undergone tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, and their mothers. In the interviews, the mothers were asked to describe the problems connected with their child's preoperative fast and postoperative termination of the fast, as well as the things that went well in the process. Content analysis was carried out inductively. Preoperatively, the children were thirsty and anxious, but understood the fasting situation well. In some cases, there were conflicts between the child and his/her parent if fasting was prolonged. Parents also had doubts about their ability to implement the child's fast. Postoperatively, children had pains in their throats and stomachs, suffered from nausea, and had difficulty taking in nutrition and medication. Parents had worries about their child's home care, such as food intake and administration of pain medication. The possibility of postoperative bleeding and exacerbation of the child's condition was also worrying for the parents. The most evident result of the study was that parents need more information before their child's operation. Preparing the child for the operation by giving him/her nutrition as long as permitted enhances postoperative recovery and improves parents' control over the ambulatory surgical experience. Nurses should take a more active part in children's perioperative fasting and preoperative preparation of children and their parents. In further research, experimental studies should be designed in order to receive more evidence-based information for clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3240921','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3240921"><span>Osteoporosis in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients with spina bifida</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Marreiros, Humberto Filipe; Loff, Clara; Calado, Eulalia</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The prevalence and morbidity associated with osteoporosis and fractures in patients with spina bifida (SB) highlight the importance of osteoporosis prevention and treatment in early childhood; however, the issue has received little attention. The method for the selection of appropriate patients for drug treatment has not been clarified. Objective To review the literature concerning fracture risks and low bone density in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients with SB. We looked for studies describing state-of-the-art treatments and for prevention of secondary osteoporosis. Methods Articles were identified through a search in the electronic database (PUBMED) supplemented with reviews of the reference lists of selected papers. The main outcome measures were incidence of fractures and risk factors for fracture, an association between bone mineral density (BMD) and occurrence of fracture, risk factors of low BMD, and effects of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments on BMD and on the incidence of fractures. We considered as a secondary outcome the occurrence of fractures in relation to the mechanism of injury. Results Results indicated that patients with SB are at increased risk for fractures and low BMD. Risk factors that may predispose patients to fractures include higher levels of neurological involvement, non-ambulatory status, physical inactivity, hypercalciuria, higher body fat levels, contractures, and a previous spontaneous fracture. Limitations were observed in the number and quality of studies concerning osteoporosis prevention and treatment in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients with SB. The safety and efficiency of drugs to treat osteoporosis in adults have not been evaluated satisfactorily in children with SB. PMID:22330186</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25261748','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25261748"><span>Enhancing a rainfall-runoff model to assess the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of BMPs and LID <span class="hlt">practices</span> on storm runoff.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Yaoze; Ahiablame, Laurent M; Bralts, Vincent F; Engel, Bernard A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Best management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (BMPs) and low <span class="hlt">impact</span> development (LID) <span class="hlt">practices</span> are increasingly being used as stormwater management techniques to reduce the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of urban development on hydrology and water quality. To assist planners and decision-makers at various stages of development projects (planning, implementation, and evaluation), user-friendly tools are needed to assess the effectiveness of BMPs and LID <span class="hlt">practices</span>. This study describes a simple tool, the Long-Term Hydrologic <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Assessment-LID (L-THIA-LID), which is enhanced with additional BMPs and LID <span class="hlt">practices</span>, improved approaches to estimate hydrology and water quality, and representation of <span class="hlt">practices</span> in series (meaning combined implementation). The tool was used to evaluate the performance of BMPs and LID <span class="hlt">practices</span> individually and in series with 30 years of daily rainfall data in four types of idealized land use units and watersheds (low density residential, high density residential, industrial, and commercial). Simulation results were compared with the results of other published studies. The simulated results showed that reductions in runoff volume and pollutant loads after implementing BMPs and LID <span class="hlt">practices</span>, both individually and in series, were comparable with the observed <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of these <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The L-THIA-LID 2.0 model is capable of assisting decision makers in evaluating environmental <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of BMPs and LID <span class="hlt">practices</span>, thereby improving the effectiveness of stormwater management decisions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhDT........82P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002PhDT........82P"><span>Communities of <span class="hlt">practice</span>: Participation patterns and professional <span class="hlt">impact</span> for high school mathematics and science teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Printy, Susan M.</p> <p></p> <p>Improving the quality of teachers in schools is a keystone to educational improvement. New and veteran teachers alike need to enhance their content knowledge and pedagogical skills, but they must also examine, and often change, their underlying attitudes, beliefs, and values about the nature of knowledge and the abilities of students. Best accomplished collectively rather than individually, the interactions between teachers as they undertake the process of collaborative inquiry create "communities of <span class="hlt">practice</span>." This dissertation investigates the importance of science and mathematics teachers' participation in communities of <span class="hlt">practice</span> to their professional capabilities. The study tests the hypothesis that the social learning inherent in community of <span class="hlt">practice</span> participation encourages teachers to learn from others with expertise, enhances teachers' sense of competence, and increases the likelihood that teachers' will use student-centered, problem-based instructional techniques aligned with national disciplinary standards. The researcher conceptualizes communities of <span class="hlt">practice</span> along two dimensions that affect social learning: legitimate participation in activities and span of engagement with school members. Differences in teachers' subject area and the curricular track of their teaching assignment contribute to variation in teachers' participation in communities of <span class="hlt">practice</span> along those dimensions. Using data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study, first and second follow-up, the study has two stages of multi-level analysis. The first stage examines factors that contribute to teachers' participation in communities of <span class="hlt">practice</span>, including teachers' social and professional characteristics and school demographic and organizational characteristics. The second stage investigates the professional <span class="hlt">impact</span> of such participation on the three outcome variables: teacher learning, teacher competence, and use of standards-based pedagogy. Hierarchical linear models provide</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24602991','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24602991"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> biopharmaceutics classification system: current status and future decisions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Batchelor, Hannah</p> <p>2014-08-05</p> <p>Biopharmaceutical methods are routinely used in the design of medicines to predict in vivo absorption and hence guide the development of new products. Differences in anatomy and physiology of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients require adaptation of existing biopharmaceutical methods to ensure that in vivo predictions are relevant for this population. The biopharmaceutics classification system is a tool used in drug development to guide formulation selection and manufacture from early clinical studies through to product launch. The applicability of the biopharmaceutics system to <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> product development has yet to be explored; this note brings together some key issues in direct extrapolation from adults into <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> populations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20229049','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20229049"><span>Assessing the burden of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> influenza in Europe: the European <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Paget, W John; Balderston, Catherine; Casas, Inmaculada; Donker, Gé; Edelman, Laurel; Fleming, Douglas; Larrauri, Amparo; Meijer, Adam; Puzelli, Simona; Rizzo, Caterina; Simonsen, Lone</p> <p>2010-08-01</p> <p>The European <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project is a multi-country project that was created to collect, analyse and present data regarding the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> influenza burden in European countries, with the purpose of providing the necessary information to make evidence-based decisions regarding influenza immunisation recommendations for children. The initial approach taken is based on existing weekly virological and age-specific influenza-like illness (ILI) data from surveillance networks across Europe. We use a multiple regression model guided by longitudinal weekly patterns of influenza virus to attribute the weekly ILI consultation incidence pattern to each influenza (sub)type, while controlling for the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemics. Modelling the ILI consultation incidence during 2002/2003-2008 revealed that influenza infections that presented for medical attention as ILI affected between 0.3% and 9.8% of children aged 0-4 and 5-14 years in England, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain in an average season. With the exception of Spain, these rates were always higher in children aged 0-4 years. Across the six seasons analysed (five seasons were analysed from the Italian data), the model attributed 47-83% of the ILI burden in primary care to influenza virus infection in the various countries, with the A(H3N2) virus playing the most important role, followed by influenza viruses B and A(H1N1). National season averages from the four countries studied indicated that between 0.4% and 18% of children consulted a physician for ILI, with the percentage depending on the country and health care system. Influenza virus infections explained the majority of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> ILI consultations in all countries. The next step will be to apply the EPIA modelling approach to severe outcomes indicators (i.e. hospitalisations and mortality data) to generate a complete range of mild and severe influenza burden estimates needed for decision making concerning</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IJEEP..14..245L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013IJEEP..14..245L"><span>Commercial <span class="hlt">Impact</span> and Optimum Capacity Determination of Pumped Storage Hydro Plant for a <span class="hlt">Practical</span> Power System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Latha, P. G.; Anand, S. R.; Imthias, Ahamed T. P.; Sreejith, P. S., Dr.</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>This paper attempts to study the commercial <span class="hlt">impact</span> of pumped storage hydro plant on the operation of a stressed power system. The paper further attempts to compute the optimum capacity of the pumped storage scheme that can be provided on commercial basis for a <span class="hlt">practical</span> power system. Unlike the analysis of commercial aspects of pumped storage scheme attempted in several papers, this paper is presented from the point of view of power system management of a <span class="hlt">practical</span> system considering the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the scheme on the economic operation of the system. A realistic case study is presented as the many factors that influence the pumped storage operation vary widely from one system to another. The suitability of pumped storage for the particular generation mix of a system is well explored in the paper. To substantiate the economic <span class="hlt">impact</span> of pumped storage on the system, the problem is formulated as a short-term hydrothermal scheduling problem involving power purchase which optimizes the quantum of power to be scheduled and the duration of operation. The optimization model is formulated using an algebraic modeling language, AMPL, which is then solved using the advanced MILP solver CPLEX.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27920378','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27920378"><span>The eco-evolutionary <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of domestication and agricultural <span class="hlt">practices</span> on wild species.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Turcotte, Martin M; Araki, Hitoshi; Karp, Daniel S; Poveda, Katja; Whitehead, Susan R</p> <p>2017-01-19</p> <p>Agriculture is a dominant evolutionary force that drives the evolution of both domesticated and wild species. However, the various mechanisms of agriculture-induced evolution and their socio-ecological consequences are not often synthetically discussed. Here, we explore how agricultural <span class="hlt">practices</span> and evolutionary changes in domesticated species cause evolution in wild species. We do so by examining three processes by which agriculture drives evolution. First, differences in the traits of domesticated species, compared with their wild ancestors, alter the selective environment and create opportunities for wild species to specialize. Second, selection caused by agricultural <span class="hlt">practices</span>, including both those meant to maximize productivity and those meant to control pest species, can lead to pest adaptation. Third, agriculture can cause non-selective changes in patterns of gene flow in wild species. We review evidence for these processes and then discuss their ecological and sociological <span class="hlt">impacts</span>. We finish by identifying important knowledge gaps and future directions related to the eco-evolutionary <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of agriculture including their extent, how to prevent the detrimental evolution of wild species, and finally, how to use evolution to minimize the ecological <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of agriculture.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human influences on evolution, and the ecological and societal consequences'.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4259013','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4259013"><span>Arts <span class="hlt">practice</span> and disconnected youth in Australia: <span class="hlt">Impact</span> and domains of change</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wright, Peter; Davies, Christina; Haseman, Brad; Down, Barry; White, Mike; Rankin, Scott</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background: This paper describes research conducted with Big hART, Australia's most awarded participatory arts company. It considers three projects, LUCKY, GOLD and NGAPARTJI NGAPARTJI across separate sites in Tasmania, Western NSW and Northern Territory, respectively, in order to understand project <span class="hlt">impact</span> from the perspective of project participants, Arts workers, community members and funders. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 29 respondents. The data were coded thematically and analysed using the constant comparative method of qualitative data analysis. Results: Seven broad domains of change were identified: psychosocial health; community; agency and behavioural change; the Art; economic effect; learning and identity. Conclusions: Experiences of participatory arts are interrelated in an ecology of <span class="hlt">practice</span> that is iterative, relational, developmental, temporal and contextually bound. This means that questions of <span class="hlt">impact</span> are contingent, and there is no one path that participants travel or single measure that can adequately capture the richness and diversity of experience. Consequently, it is the productive tensions between the domains of change that are important and the way they are animated through Arts <span class="hlt">practice</span> that provides sign posts towards the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of Big hART projects. PMID:25530802</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3495402','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3495402"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of childhood acute rotavirus gastroenteritis on the parents’ quality of life: prospective observational study in European primary care medical <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background Rotavirus (RV) is the commonest cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide. A Quality of Life study was conducted in primary care in three European countries as part of a larger epidemiological study (SPRIK) to investigate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) on affected children and their parents. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was linguistically validated in Spanish, Italian and Polish. The questionnaire was included in an observational multicentre prospective study of 302 children aged <5 years presenting to a general practitioner or paediatrician for RVGE at centres in Spain, Italy or Poland. RV infection was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing (n = 264). The questionnaire was validated and used to assess the emotional <span class="hlt">impact</span> of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> RVGE on the parents. Results Questionnaire responses showed that acute RVGE in a child adversely affects the parents’ daily life as well as the child. Parents of children with RVGE experience worry, distress and <span class="hlt">impact</span> on their daily activities. RVGE of greater clinical severity (assessed by the Vesikari scale) was associated with higher parental worries due to symptoms and greater changes in the child’s behaviour, and a trend to higher <span class="hlt">impact</span> on parents’ daily activities and higher parental distress, together with a higher score on the symptom severity scale of the questionnaire. Conclusions Parents of a child with acute RVGE presenting to primary care experience worry, distress and disruptions to daily life as a result of the child’s illness. Prevention of this disease through prophylactic vaccination will improve the daily lives of parents and children. PMID:22650611</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=308412&keyword=GIS+AND+Sustainable&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78720145&CFTOKEN=67571992','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=308412&keyword=GIS+AND+Sustainable&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=78720145&CFTOKEN=67571992"><span>Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA): Applications for Assessing the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Urban Growth and the use of Low <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Development <span class="hlt">Practices</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>New tools and functionality have been incorporated into the Automated Geospatial Watershed Assessment Tool (AGWA) to assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of urban growth and evaluate the effects of low <span class="hlt">impact</span> development (LID) <span class="hlt">practices</span>. AGWA (see: www.tucson.ars.ag.gov/agwa or http://www.epa.gov...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=obsessive+AND+compulsive+AND+disorder&pg=6&id=EJ945092','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=obsessive+AND+compulsive+AND+disorder&pg=6&id=EJ945092"><span>Randomized Controlled Trial of Full and Brief Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy and Wait-List for <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bolton, Derek; Williams, Tim; Perrin, Sean; Atkinson, Linda; Gallop, Catherine; Waite, Polly; Salkovskis, Paul</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background: Reviews and <span class="hlt">practice</span> guidelines for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) recommend cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) as the psychological treatment of choice, but note that it has not been sufficiently evaluated for children and adolescents and that more randomized controlled trials are needed. The aim of this trial was to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20050488','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20050488"><span>New graduate burnout: the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of professional <span class="hlt">practice</span> environment, workplace civility, and empowerment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Finegan, Joan; Wilk, Piotr</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The future of professional nursing depends on finding ways to create high-quality work environments that retain newcomers to the profession. The purpose of this study was to examine the combined effect of supportive professional <span class="hlt">practice</span> environments, civil working relationships, and empowerment on new graduates' experiences of burnout at work. The results support previous evidence of the importance of working environments that enable new graduates to <span class="hlt">practice</span> according to professional standards learned in their educational programs. Further, the results provide a more comprehensive understanding of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of workplace conditions on new graduate burnout by demonstrating the additive value of working in collegial work settings in which nurses respected others and refrain from incivility behaviors in their day to day work. Given the current nursing shortage, every effort must be made to ensure that new graduates are exposed to high-quality work environments that engage them with their work.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2443242','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2443242"><span>Cities of Consumption: The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Corporate <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on the Health of Urban Populations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Galea, Sandro</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The increasing concentration of the world’s population in cities and the growing accumulation of political and economic power by corporations create new threats to health and opportunities for improving global health. By considering the intersection of these two fundamental social determinants of well-being, we elucidate some of the mechanisms by which they influence the health of urban populations. After reviewing the changing historical <span class="hlt">impact</span> of corporations on cities, we focus on the growth of consumption as a leading cause of mortality and morbidity and describe how the food, tobacco, automobile, and other industries promote unhealthy behaviors and lifestyles in urban settings. Cities are also sites for developing alternatives to unhealthy corporate <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and we assess strategies used to modify <span class="hlt">practices</span> that harm health. PMID:18437582</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18437582','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18437582"><span>Cities of consumption: the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of corporate <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the health of urban populations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Freudenberg, Nicholas; Galea, Sandro</p> <p>2008-07-01</p> <p>The increasing concentration of the world's population in cities and the growing accumulation of political and economic power by corporations create new threats to health and opportunities for improving global health. By considering the intersection of these two fundamental social determinants of well-being, we elucidate some of the mechanisms by which they influence the health of urban populations. After reviewing the changing historical <span class="hlt">impact</span> of corporations on cities, we focus on the growth of consumption as a leading cause of mortality and morbidity and describe how the food, tobacco, automobile, and other industries promote unhealthy behaviors and lifestyles in urban settings. Cities are also sites for developing alternatives to unhealthy corporate <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and we assess strategies used to modify <span class="hlt">practices</span> that harm health.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25658974','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25658974"><span>Mindfulness and False-Memories: The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Mindfulness <span class="hlt">Practice</span> on the DRM Paradigm.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rosenstreich, Eyal</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Mindfulness <span class="hlt">practice</span> is the cultivation of awareness to the present moment and has been shown in recent years to have beneficial effects on cognition. However, to date, the data regarding the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of mindfulness on memory--and specifically on memory distortions--is scarce and incomplete. The present study was aimed to examine whether mindfulness <span class="hlt">practice</span> would have an effect on true and false memories. To this end, the effect of mindfulness meditation <span class="hlt">practice</span> on memory performance was examined in two experiments in which false memories were provoked using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm (Roediger & McDermott, 1995). In Experiment 1, college students were randomly divided into either a 5-week mindfulness-<span class="hlt">practice</span> group (n = 29) or a waitlist control group (n = 22). In Experiment 2, college students were randomly divided into either a brief mindfulness session (n = 21) or a mind-wandering control group (n = 19). The results indicated that mindfulness increased the recognition of true memories with no effect on spontaneous false-memories, yet increased the rate of provoked false-memories. These findings are discussed in terms of memory sensitivity and response bias, and it is argued that mindfulness may have a lesser effect on encoding processes than previously suggested.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19085609','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19085609"><span>A 3D digital medical photography system in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> medicine.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Williams, Susanne K; Ellis, Lloyd A; Williams, Gigi</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>In 2004, traditional clinical photography services at the Educational Resource Centre were extended using new technology. This paper describes the establishment of a 3D digital imaging system in a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> setting at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28242113','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28242113"><span>Evaluating the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of agricultural land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on water resources: A probabilistic hydrologic modeling approach.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Prada, A F; Chu, M L; Guzman, J A; Moriasi, D N</p> <p>2017-02-24</p> <p>Evaluating the effectiveness of agricultural land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> in minimizing environmental <span class="hlt">impacts</span> using models is challenged by the presence of inherent uncertainties during the model development stage. One issue faced during the model development stage is the uncertainty involved in model parameterization. Using a single optimized set of parameters (one snapshot) to represent baseline conditions of the system limits the applicability and robustness of the model to properly represent future or alternative scenarios. The objective of this study was to develop a framework that facilitates model parameter selection while evaluating uncertainty to assess the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> at the watershed scale. The model framework was applied to the Lake Creek watershed located in southwestern Oklahoma, USA. A two-step probabilistic approach was implemented to parameterize the Agricultural Policy/Environmental eXtender (APEX) model using global uncertainty and sensitivity analysis to estimate the full spectrum of total monthly water yield (WYLD) and total monthly Nitrogen loads (N) in the watershed under different land management <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Twenty-seven models were found to represent the baseline scenario in which uncertainty of up to 29% and 400% in WYLD and N, respectively, is plausible. Changing the land cover to pasture manifested the highest decrease in N to up to 30% for a full pasture coverage while changing to full winter wheat cover can increase the N up to 11%. The methodology developed in this study was able to quantify the full spectrum of system responses, the uncertainty associated with them, and the most important parameters that drive their variability. Results from this study can be used to develop strategic decisions on the risks and tradeoffs associated with different management alternatives that aim to increase productivity while also minimizing their environmental <span class="hlt">impacts</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26215296','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26215296"><span>Spirituality and Aging in Place: The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Extreme Climatic Conditions on Domestic Gardening <span class="hlt">Practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Adams, Joanne; Pascal, Jan; Dickson-Swift, Virginia</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>There is limited research exploring how domestic water restrictions imposed as a result of drought conditions <span class="hlt">impact</span> upon the lives of independently living older people. Within this age group (60 years plus), the domestic garden frequently forms an intrinsic component of ongoing health and well-being. Gardening <span class="hlt">practice</span> offers components of both mental and physical activity and, for many older people, leads to emotional and spiritual connection on a number of levels. The capacity of older people to maintain a garden during a period of water restrictions is greatly reduced, and the resulting <span class="hlt">impact</span> on health and well-being is considerable. A recent study, conducted in south-eastern Australia, aimed to determine the benefits to health and well-being of maintaining a domestic garden for older people and the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of water restrictions on garden <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This occurred at a time following a prolonged period of drought and, in central Victoria, a complete ban on outside watering. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 gardeners aged between 60 and 83 who had tended their garden over an extended period. The lived experience of gardening was explored through hermeneutic phenomenological analysis. Clear benefits to health and well-being were established, and yet, the essence of this experience lay in the capacity of gardeners to remain connected to their garden despite change. The crisis imposed by ongoing drought and restricted use of water generated a strong impetus for adaptation, resilience and acceptance of change. The spiritual nature of gardening <span class="hlt">practice</span> clearly emerged and appeared to intensify the experience of gardening and consolidate adaption to change on a number of levels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25347193','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25347193"><span>Advancing efforts to achieve health equity: equity metrics for health <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Heller, Jonathan; Givens, Marjory L; Yuen, Tina K; Gould, Solange; Jandu, Maria Benkhalti; Bourcier, Emily; Choi, Tim</p> <p>2014-10-24</p> <p>Equity is a core value of Health <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Assessment (HIA). Many compelling moral, economic, and health arguments exist for prioritizing and incorporating equity considerations in HIA <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Decision-makers, stakeholders, and HIA practitioners see the value of HIAs in uncovering the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of policy and planning decisions on various population subgroups, developing and prioritizing specific actions that promote or protect health equity, and using the process to empower marginalized communities. There have been several HIA frameworks developed to guide the inclusion of equity considerations. However, the field lacks clear indicators for measuring whether an HIA advanced equity. This article describes the development of a set of equity metrics that aim to guide and evaluate progress toward equity in HIA <span class="hlt">practice</span>. These metrics also intend to further push the field to deepen its <span class="hlt">practice</span> and commitment to equity in each phase of an HIA. Over the course of a year, the Society of Practitioners of Health <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Assessment (SOPHIA) Equity Working Group took part in a consensus process to develop these process and outcome metrics. The metrics were piloted, reviewed, and refined based on feedback from reviewers. The Equity Metrics are comprised of 23 measures of equity organized into four outcomes: (1) the HIA process and products focused on equity; (2) the HIA process built the capacity and ability of communities facing health inequities to engage in future HIAs and in decision-making more generally; (3) the HIA resulted in a shift in power benefiting communities facing inequities; and (4) the HIA contributed to changes that reduced health inequities and inequities in the social and environmental determinants of health. The metrics are comprised of a measurement scale, examples of high scoring activities, potential data sources, and example interview questions to gather data and guide evaluators on scoring each metric.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4817522','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4817522"><span>Highlights of Children with Cancer UK’s Workshop on Drug Delivery in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Brain Tumours</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nailor, Audrey; Walker, David A; Jacques, Thomas S; Warren, Kathy E; Brem, Henry; Kearns, Pamela R; Greenwood, John; Penny, Jeffrey I; Pilkington, Geoffrey J; Carcaboso, Angel M; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Macarthur, Donald; Slavc, Irene; Meijer, Lisethe; Gill, Steven; Lowis, Stephen; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Pearl, Monica S; Clifford, Steven C; Morrissy, Sorana; Ivanov, Delyan P; Beccaria, Kévin; Gilbertson, Richard J; Straathof, Karin; Green, Jordan J; Smith, Stuart; Rahman, Ruman; Kilday, John-Paul</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The first Workshop on Drug Delivery in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Brain Tumours was hosted in London by the charity Children with Cancer UK. The goals of the workshop were to break down the barriers to treating central nervous system (CNS) tumours in children, leading to new collaborations and further innovations in this under-represented and emotive field. These barriers include the physical delivery challenges presented by the blood–brain barrier, the underpinning reasons for the intractability of CNS cancers, and the <span class="hlt">practical</span> difficulties of delivering cancer treatment to the brains of children. Novel techniques for overcoming these problems were discussed, new models brought forth, and experiences compared. PMID:27110286</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22690197','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22690197"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> obesity research in early childhood and the primary care setting: the TARGet Kids! research network.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Morinis, Julia; Maguire, Jonathon; Khovratovich, Marina; McCrindle, Brian W; Parkin, Patricia C; Birken, Catherine S</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Primary <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> health care is the foundation for preventative child health. In light of the recent obesity epidemic, paediatricians find themselves at the frontline of identification and management of childhood obesity. However, it is well recognized that evidence based approaches to obesity prevention and subsequent translation of this evidence into <span class="hlt">practice</span> are critically needed. This paper explores the role of primary care in obesity prevention and introduces a novel application and development of a primary care research network in Canada--TARGet Kids!--to develop and translate an evidence-base on effective screening and prevention of childhood obesity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3366615','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3366615"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Obesity Research in Early Childhood and the Primary Care Setting: The TARGet Kids! Research Network</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Morinis, Julia; Maguire, Jonathon; Khovratovich, Marina; McCrindle, Brian W.; Parkin, Patricia C.; Birken, Catherine S.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Primary <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> health care is the foundation for preventative child health. In light of the recent obesity epidemic, paediatricians find themselves at the frontline of identification and management of childhood obesity. However, it is well recognized that evidence based approaches to obesity prevention and subsequent translation of this evidence into <span class="hlt">practice</span> are critically needed. This paper explores the role of primary care in obesity prevention and introduces a novel application and development of a primary care research network in Canada—TARGet Kids!—to develop and translate an evidence-base on effective screening and prevention of childhood obesity. PMID:22690197</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27569017','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27569017"><span>[The Moral Deliberation: The Clinical Ethics Method. Presentation of a <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Case].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Atuesta, Juana; Vásquez, Pablo; Roa, Juan David; Acuña, Hilda</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Decision-making is one of the most difficult tasks of medical judgment, especially when cases involve <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients with different cultural characteristics. It is the obligation of clinical ethics, taking the interdisciplinary approach as a tool to comprehensively analyse the clinical, social, cultural and legal aspects, among other topics, when choosing the treatment options that will be more beneficial for the patient. A clinical case, should enable this process of analysis and teamwork to be understood in <span class="hlt">practical</span> way in order to address difficult medical problems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28013256','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28013256"><span>From training to <span class="hlt">practice</span>: the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of ENGAGE, Ireland's national men's health training programme.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Osborne, Aoife; Carroll, Paula; Richardson, Noel; Doheny, Martin; Brennan, Lorcan; Lambe, Barry</p> <p>2016-12-24</p> <p>Ireland's National Men's Health Policy recommended developing training programmes tailored to the needs of those working in health and allied health professionals and ENGAGE was developed to meet that recommendation. This study evaluated the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of ENGAGE on frontline service providers' self-reported knowledge, skills, capacity and <span class="hlt">practice</span> up to 5-months post training. Between 2012 and 2015, ENGAGE Trainers (n = 57) delivered 62 1-day training programmes to 810 participants. This study was conducted on a subset of those training days (n = 26) and participants. Quantitative methodologies were used to collect pre (n = 295), post (n = 295) and 5-month post (n = 128) training questionnaire data. Overall, participants were highly satisfied with the training immediately post training (8.60 ± 1.60 out of 10) and at 5-month follow up (8.06 ± 1.43 out of 10). Participants' self-reported level of knowledge, skill and capacity in identifying priorities, engaging men and influencing <span class="hlt">practice</span> beyond their own organisation increased immediately following training (P < 0.001) and, with the exception of improving capacity to engage men and influencing <span class="hlt">practice</span> beyond their organisation, these improvements were sustained at 5-month post training (P < 0.001). The vast majority of service providers (93.4%) reported that ENGAGE had <span class="hlt">impacted</span> their work <span class="hlt">practice</span> up to 5-month post training. The findings suggest that ENGAGE has succeeded in improving service providers' capacity to engage and work with men; improving gender competency in the delivery of health and health related services may increase the utilisation of such services by men and thereby improve health outcomes for men.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3960675','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3960675"><span>Simulating the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of change: implementing best <span class="hlt">practice</span> in stroke care</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This article presents the experience of healthcare decision-makers who used simulation to better understand the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of adopting best <span class="hlt">practice</span> in stroke care, as outlined in the National Stroke Strategy. It describes the process of developing a simulation model and how stakeholders were involved in testing the key questions, which they needed to answer in order to adopt a new commissioning strategy for stroke care. It outlines what simulation is and discusses how it can be used to support evidenced-based decision-making. PMID:25949645</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3061104','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3061104"><span>Clinical and experimental advances in congenital and <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cataracts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Churchill, Amanda; Graw, Jochen</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Cataracts (opacities of the lens) are frequent in the elderly, but rare in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Congenital cataracts (in industrialized countries) are mainly caused by mutations affecting lens development. Much of our knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of cataractogenesis has come from the genetic analysis of affected families: there are contributions from genes coding for transcription factors (such as FoxE3, Maf, Pitx3) and structural proteins such as crystallins or connexins. In addition, there are contributions from enzymes affecting sugar pathways (particularly the galactose pathway) and from a quite unexpected area: axon guidance molecules like ephrins and their receptors. Cataractous mouse lenses can be identified easily by visual inspection, and a remarkable number of mutant lines have now been characterized. Generally, most of the mouse mutants show a similar phenotype to their human counterparts; however, there are some remarkable differences. It should be noted that many mutations affect genes that are expressed not only in the lens, but also in tissues and organs outside the eye. There is increasing evidence for pleiotropic effects of these genes, and increasing consideration that cataracts may act as early and readily detectable biomarkers for a number of systemic syndromes. PMID:21402583</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25239008','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25239008"><span>What can volunteer co-providers contribute to health systems? The role of people living with HIV in the Thai <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV programme.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tulloch, Olivia; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Chasombat, Sanchai; Kosalaraksa, Pope; Theobald, Sally</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>In Thailand people living with HIV (PLHIV) have played a major role in shaping policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span>. They have acted as volunteer co-providers, although their potential in terms of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> service provision has seldom been explored from a health systems perspective. We describe the Thai <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV care system and use both demand- and supply-side perspectives to explore the <span class="hlt">impact</span>, opportunities and challenges of PLHIV acting as volunteer co-providers. We employed qualitative methods to assess experiences and perceptions and triangulate stakeholder perspectives. Data were collected in Khon Kaen province, in the poorest Northeastern region of Thailand: three focus group discussions and two workshops (total participants n = 31) with co-providers and hospital staff; interviews with ART service-users (n = 35). Nationally, key informant interviews were conducted with policy actors (n = 20). Volunteer co-providers were found to be ideally placed to broker the link between clinic and communities for HIV infected children and played an important part in the vital psychosocial support component of HIV care. As co-providers they were recognized as having multiple roles linking and delivering services in clinics and communities. Clear emerging needs include strengthened coordination and training as well as strategies to support funding. Using motivated volunteers with a shared HIV status as co-providers for specific clinical services can contribute to strengthening health systems in Asia; they are critical players in delivering care (supply side) and being responsive to service-users needs (demand side). Co-providers blur the boundaries between these two spheres. Sustaining and optimising co-providers' contribution to health systems strengthening requires a health systems approach. Our findings help to guide policy makers and service providers on how to balance clinical priorities with psycho-social responsiveness and on how best to integrate the views and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12468850','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12468850"><span>Review article: <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> bone and joint infection.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Stott, N Susan</p> <p>2001-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> musculoskeletal infection remains an important cause of morbidity. Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus is still the most common organism although the incidence of methicillin resistant S. aureus in the community is rising. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis due to Haemophilus influenzae is decreasing in incidence secondary to immunisation and in some units has been replaced by infections with the gram negative bacillus, Kingella kingae. Recent prospective studies indicate that uncomplicated osteomyelitis can be treated by three to four weeks of antibiotics. However, there is still a small group of children who will have overwhelming disseminated infection. These children require aggressive surgical and medical intervention. Two recent reports have identified an increased incidence of septic arthritis in children who have hemophilia and are HIV positive.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28213779','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28213779"><span>Adenoid bacterial colonization in a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Subtil, João; Rodrigues, João Carlos; Reis, Lúcia; Freitas, Luís; Filipe, Joana; Santos, Alberto; Macor, Carlos; Duarte, Aida; Jordao, Luisa</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Adenoids play a key role in both respiratory and ear infection in children. It has also been shown that adenoidectomy improves these symptoms in this population. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate adenoid bacterial colonization and document a possible relation with infectious respiratory disease. A prospective observational study was designed to evaluate the proposed hypothesis in a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population submitted to adenoidectomy by either infectious or non-infectious indications and compare these two cohorts. A total of 62 patients with ages ranging from 1 to 12 years old were enrolled in the study. Adenoid surface, adenoid core and middle meatus microbiota were compared. A close association between adenoid colonization and nasal infection was found, supporting that adenoids may function as bacterial reservoir for upper airway infection. The obtained results also contribute to explain the success of adenoidectomy in patients with infectious indications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22876405','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22876405"><span>Role of advanced <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> nurse practitioners.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lisa, Egerton</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>Children's attendance at emergency departments (EDs) is increasing every year, yet many children present with minor, self-limiting illnesses that could be managed at home. In light of Williams et al (2009) suggestion that healthcare professionals should improve the care available to patients at point of contact rather than try to change their health-seeking behaviours, this article describes how Tameside and Glossop Primary Care Trust has developed an advanced <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> nurse practitioner (APNP) service in the ED to improve the care of children, and to reduce the number of admissions. The APNPs treat children in the ED then divert them to more appropriate services where support is given to the families to care for their children at home. The role contributes to meeting ED clinical quality indicators, frees up medical staff to deal with more seriously ill patients, and makes financial savings for the trust.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27664304','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27664304"><span>[<span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> mobile emergency and intensive care services, objectives and missions].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Julliand, Sébastien; Lodé, Noëlla</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> mobile emergency and intensive care service care teams have expertise in taking care of children in life-threatening circumstances. At the Robert-Debré Hospital in Paris, the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> Smur is multi-skilled, specialising particularly in transporting neonates and infants with severe cardiac or respiratory difficulties. The pathologies handled are very varied and include both neonatal pathologies and trauma pathologies in older children.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5123116','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5123116"><span>Sixth Nerve Palsy in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Intracranial Hypertension</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Reid, Julia E.; Reem, Rachel E.; Aylward, Shawn C.; Rogers, David L.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3–18) were found to have a unilateral (n = 2) or bilateral (n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (n = 2) and infection (n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H2O (range: 21–65 cm H2O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension. PMID:27928378</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24396167','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24396167"><span>Cardiopulmonary physical therapy <span class="hlt">practice</span> in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care unit.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McCord, Jennifer; Krull, Nelin; Kraiker, Jennifer; Ryan, Rachelle; Duczeminski, Erica; Hassall, Alison; Lati, Jamil; Mathur, Sunita</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Objet : Les physiothérapeutes jouent un rôle important dans le contexte des soins intensifs en pédiatrie. Cette étude visait à décrire les pratiques courantes en physiothérapie cardiopulmonaire (PTC) dans une unité des soins intensifs cardiaques (USIC) en pédiatrie et une unité des soins intensifs en pédiatrie (USIP), ainsi qu'à déterminer s'il était possible d'obtenir des mesures de résultats pertinentes sur le plan clinique dans ce contexte. Méthodes : On a réuni des données sur les motifs de l'admission, les tendances des traitements de PTC et la disponibilité d'interprétations de radiographies pulmonaires en procédant à un examen rétrospectif des dossiers d'enfants qui ont reçu des traitements de PTC pendant qu'ils étaient à l'USIP et à l'USIC (n=111). Résultats : Les problèmes cardiaques congénitaux (34,2 %) et la détérioration respiratoire primitive (27,9 %) constituaient les motifs d'admission les plus courants; 50 % des enfants avaient reçu un diagnostic connexe (p. ex., retard du développement). L'hyperinflation manuelle combinée à une vibration expiratoire constituait le traitement de PTC le plus courant. Une interprétation de radiographies pulmonaires était disponible dans 72 % des dossiers. Conclusions : On a utilisé l'hyperinflation manuelle combinée à la vibration expiratoire dans tous les groupes de diagnostics à l'USIC et à l'USIP et c'est pourquoi une étude plus poussée de son efficacité s'impose. La radiographie pulmonaire constitue un résultat clinique important et il faut donc la consigner d'une façon normalisée pour qu'elle soit utile à de futures études de recherche clinique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5209465','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5209465"><span>Medium chain triglycerides (MCT) formulas in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> and allergological <span class="hlt">practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Łoś-Rycharska, Ewa; Kieraszewicz, Zuzanna</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Fats constitute the most significant nutritional source of energy. Their proper use by the body conditions a number of complex mechanisms of digestion, absorption, distribution, and metabolism. These mechanisms are facilitated by fats made of medium chain fatty acids; therefore, they are an easy and quick source of energy. Thus, an increased supply of medium chain triglycerides (MCT) is particularly important in patients with disturbances of digestion and absorption such as disturbed bile secretion, classic coeliac disease, short bowel syndrome, inflammatory diseases of the intestines, disturbed outflow of lymph, some metabolic disease, and severe food allergies, as well as in prematurely born neonates. Use of preparations containing an additive of MCT is limited, especially if they are to be used for a longer period of time. With a large quantity of MCT in a diet, there is a risk of deficiency of necessary unsaturated fatty acids and some fat-soluble vitamins. The caloricity of MTC compared to long-chain triglycerides is lower, and formulas with MCT are characterised by higher osmolality. Medium chain triglycerides is not recommended as an additive to standard formulas for healthy children. The use of MCT should be limited to strictly specified medical indications. PMID:28053676</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5136704','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5136704"><span>Informed consent for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> clinical trials in Europe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lepola, Pirkko; Needham, Allison; Mendum, Jo; Sallabank, Peter; Neubauer, David; de Wildt, Saskia</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objective <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> clinical trials are often conducted as multinational trials. Informed consent or assent is part of the ethics committee approval for clinical trials. The consent requirements vary between countries due to national laws and regulations, which are not harmonised in Europe. These discrepancies can present challenges for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> clinical trials. The aim of this study was to assemble these consent and assent requirements across the European Economic Area. The collated national requirements have not been publicly available before, despite a real need for this data. Methods National consent and assent requirements for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> clinical trials were analysed and collated for 25 European Union Member States and 2 European Free Trade Association countries until the end of 2014. The data were retrieved from existing databases and through communication with the competent authorities and selected ethics committees. Results from a literature search for international or national guidelines, declarations and conventions and academic societies' publications served as comparison material. Results Consent and assent requirements are heterogeneous across these countries. We compiled our findings in ‘The Informed Consent and Assent Tool Kit’, a table including 27 national consent and assent requirements listed by individual country. Conclusions Wide variation in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> consents and assents presents challenges for multinational <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> trials in Europe. The toolkit is available for all those involved in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> clinical trials and ethics committees, providing a new platform for proactive feedback on informed consent requirements, and may finally lead to a needed harmonisation process, including uniform standards accepted across Europe. PMID:27226526</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H51O1615K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H51O1615K"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Uncertainty in SWAT Model Simulations on Consequent Decisions on Optimal Crop Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krishnan, N.; Sudheer, K. P.; Raj, C.; Chaubey, I.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The diminishing quantities of non-renewable forms of energy have caused an increasing interest in the renewable sources of energy, such as biofuel, in the recent years. However, the demand for biofuel has created a concern for allocating grain between the fuel and food industry. Consequently, appropriate regulations that limit grain based ethanol production have been developed and are put to <span class="hlt">practice</span>, which resulted in cultivating perennial grasses like Switch grass and Miscanthus to meet the additional cellulose demand. A change in cropping and management <span class="hlt">practice</span>, therefore, is essential to cater the conflicting requirement for food and biofuel, which has a long-term <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the downstream water quality. Therefore it is essential to implement optimal cropping <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce the pollutant loadings. Simulation models in conjunction with optimization procedures are useful in developing efficient cropping <span class="hlt">practices</span> in such situations. One such model is the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), which can simulate both the water and the nutrient cycle, as well as quantify long-term <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of changes in management <span class="hlt">practice</span> in the watershed. It is envisaged that the SWAT model, along with an optimization algorithm, can be used to identify the optimal cropping pattern that achieves the minimum guaranteed grain production with less downstream pollution, while maximizing the biomass production for biofuel generation. However, the SWAT simulations do have a certain level of uncertainty that needs to be accounted for before making decisions. Therefore, the objectives of this study are twofold: (i) to understand how model uncertainties influence decision-making, and (ii) to develop appropriate management scenarios that account the uncertainty. The simulation uncertainty of the SWAT model is assessed using Shuffled Complex Evolutionary Metropolis Algorithm (SCEM). With the data collected from St. Joseph basin, IN, USA, the preliminary results indicate that model</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........98G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011PhDT........98G"><span>Assessing the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Lesson Study on the Teaching <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of Middle School Science Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Grove, Michael C.</p> <p></p> <p>Despite wave after wave of educational reform in the United States our students continue to lag behind their peers in other industrialized countries on virtually all measures of academic achievement. Effective professional development (PD) is seen as a key to improving instructional <span class="hlt">practice</span> and therefore student learning, but traditional forms of PD have been wholly unsuccessful in changing teaching <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Over the last two decades an emerging body of research has identified some key features of effective PD that seem to create meaningful change and improvement in instructional <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Some of this research highlights the promise of adapting Japanese lesson study (LS) to the American context as a means of incrementally improving instruction. Much of the existing research around LS is descriptive in nature and offers little insight into if and how participation in LS <span class="hlt">impacts</span> subsequent instructional <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This study utilized case study methodology to examine the instructional <span class="hlt">practice</span> of one group of four middle school science teachers before, during, and after participation in LS. The study attempted to identify specific learning outcomes of a LS process, to identify influences on teacher learning during LS, and to identify subsequent changes in the instructional <span class="hlt">practice</span> of participants resulting from participation in LS. Key findings from the study include significant teacher learning derived from the LS process, the identification of influences that enhanced or inhibited teacher learning, and clear evidence that participants successfully integrated learning from the LS into subsequent instructional <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Learning outcomes included deepening of subject matter knowledge, increased understanding of student thinking and abilities, clarity of expectations for student performance, recognition of the ineffectiveness of past instructional <span class="hlt">practice</span>, specific instructional strategies, shared student learning goals, and an increased commitment to future</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=climate+AND+data&pg=5&id=ED520555','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=climate+AND+data&pg=5&id=ED520555"><span>Principals' Perceptions of Superintendents' Leadership <span class="hlt">Practices</span> and Its <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on School Climate in Selected South Florida Public School District Areas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McFarlane, Donovan A.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: This research study sought to determine the leadership <span class="hlt">practices</span> of area superintendents in selected South Florida public school district areas based on principals' perceptions and assess school climate <span class="hlt">impact</span> using descriptive and inferential approaches. Methodology: The "Leadership <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Inventory" ("LPI") 360…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=music+AND+talent&pg=4&id=EJ1016884','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=music+AND+talent&pg=4&id=EJ1016884"><span>Broken Voices or a Broken Curriculum? The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Research on UK School Choral <span class="hlt">Practice</span> with Boys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ashley, Martin R.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Work such as that of John Cooksey on boys' changing voices has influenced choral <span class="hlt">practice</span> in the USA and in certain UK youth choirs, but has hitherto had little <span class="hlt">impact</span> in UK schools where many teachers continue to believe that boys' voices "break". Different <span class="hlt">practices</span> are found across the independent and maintained sectors of secondary…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=child+AND+neglect+AND+effects&pg=7&id=EJ833348','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=child+AND+neglect+AND+effects&pg=7&id=EJ833348"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Evidence-Based <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Implementation and Fidelity Monitoring on Staff Turnover: Evidence for a Protective Effect</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Aarons, Gregory A.; Sommerfeld, David H.; Hecht, Debra B.; Silovsky, Jane F.; Chaffin, Mark J.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Staff retention is an ongoing challenge in mental health and community-based service organizations. Little is known about the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of evidence-based <span class="hlt">practice</span> implementation on the mental health and social service workforce. The present study examined the effect of evidence-based <span class="hlt">practice</span> implementation and ongoing fidelity monitoring on staff…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=provider+AND+China&pg=3&id=EJ892172','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=provider+AND+China&pg=3&id=EJ892172"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Training on Change in <span class="hlt">Practice</span> for Education Assistants in a Group of International Private Schools in Hong Kong</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rose, Richard; Forlin, Chris</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This paper reports research that evaluated the efficacy of training for education assistants and its <span class="hlt">impact</span> upon changing <span class="hlt">practices</span> in a group of private international schools in Hong Kong, China. Two cohorts of education assistants received training through an education institute. The focus was on supporting and fostering inclusive <span class="hlt">practices</span> in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1125456.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1125456.pdf"><span>Designing for Engagement: Using the ADDIE Model to Integrate High-<span class="hlt">Impact</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> into an Online Information Literacy Course</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Nichols Hess, Amanda Kathryn; Greer, Katie</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In this article, the authors share how a team of librarians used the ADDIE instructional design model to incorporate best <span class="hlt">practices</span> in teaching and learning into an online, four-credit information literacy course. In this redesign process, the Association of American Colleges and Universities' high-<span class="hlt">impact</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span> and e-learning best practices…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=definition&pg=3&id=EJ1129812','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=definition&pg=3&id=EJ1129812"><span>When Outcome Definition Determines the Result in <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Evaluations: An Illustration Using the Swedish Work-<span class="hlt">Practice</span> Programme</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Månsson, Jonas; Lundin, Christofer</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>In this paper we investigate the effect of difference in outcome definitions on the result of <span class="hlt">impact</span> evaluations. The Swedish workplace <span class="hlt">practice</span> programme is evaluated, using matching methods. The key findings are that changing how the outcome is defined has a considerable influence on the results of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment. From the results of this…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Introduction+AND+research+AND+project&pg=4&id=EJ953720','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Introduction+AND+research+AND+project&pg=4&id=EJ953720"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Research Training and Research Codes of <span class="hlt">Practice</span> on Submission of Doctoral Degrees: An Exploratory Cohort Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Humphrey, Robin; Marshall, Neill; Leonardo, Laura</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The paper examines the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the transformations in doctoral education in the arts, humanities and social sciences in the United Kingdom over the past decade. It focuses on the introduction of formal research training and codes of research <span class="hlt">practice</span> and in the first longitudinal candidate cohort study examines their <span class="hlt">impact</span> on doctoral outcomes,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhDT........23A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhDT........23A"><span>Energy Market Transparency: Analyzing the <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of Constraint Relaxation and Out-of-Market Correction <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in Electric Energy Markets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Al-Abdullah, Yousef Mohammad</p> <p></p> <p>This work presents research on <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the day-ahead electric energy market, including replication <span class="hlt">practices</span> and reliability coordinators used by some market operators to demonstrate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> these <span class="hlt">practices</span> have on market outcomes. The <span class="hlt">practice</span> of constraint relaxations similar to those an Independent System Operator (ISO) might perform in day-ahead market models is implemented. The benefits of these <span class="hlt">practices</span> are well understood by the industry; however, the implications these <span class="hlt">practices</span> have on market outcomes and system security have not been thoroughly investigated. By solving a day-ahead market model with and without select constraint relaxations and comparing the resulting market outcomes and possible effects on system security, the effect of these constraint relaxation <span class="hlt">practices</span> is demonstrated. Proposed market solutions are often infeasible because constraint relaxation <span class="hlt">practices</span> and approximations that are incorporated into market models. Therefore, the dispatch solution must be corrected to ensure its feasibility. The <span class="hlt">practice</span> of correcting the proposed dispatch solution after the market is solved is known as out-of-market corrections (OMCs), defined as any action an operator takes that modifies a proposed day-ahead dispatch solution to ensure operating and reliability requirements. The way in which OMCs affect market outcomes is illustrated through the use of different corrective procedures. The objective of the work presented is to demonstrate the implications of these industry <span class="hlt">practices</span> and assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> these <span class="hlt">practices</span> have on market outcomes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27249372','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27249372"><span>Rh Nanoparticle Anchoring on Metal Phosphates: Fundamental Aspects and <span class="hlt">Practical</span> <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> on Catalysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Machida, Masato</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Metal phosphates stabilize Rh nanoparticles on their surface via Rh-O-P bonds, in contrast to the Rh-O-M bonds formed on metal oxides (MOx ). The local structure, electronic structure, and redox properties of Rh nanoparticles anchored on metal phosphates, and their <span class="hlt">practical</span> <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on catalysis, are reviewed based on recent publications from the author's research group. Because of the covalency of the Rh-O-P bond, Rh oxide is readily reduced to metallic Rh having a higher catalytic activity, whereas Rh oxide on metal oxide supports is more difficult to reduce with an increase of the anchoring strength. Furthermore, Rh metal shows a higher tolerance to reoxidation when supported on metal phosphates because the Rh-O-P bond is preserved under reducing atmospheres. The electron deficiency of Rh metal is another feature that affects its catalytic properties, and the extent of the electron deficiency can be tuned by replacing the metal in the metal phosphate with one of higher basicity. Further <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on <span class="hlt">practical</span> performance (thermal stability, poisoning stability, and lean NOx purification) in automobile catalyst applications are also described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4294079','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4294079"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> models in motion: requirements for model-based decision support at the bedside</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Barrett, Jeffrey S</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Optimal <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> pharmacotherapy is reliant on a detailed understanding of the individual patient including their developmental status and disease state as well as the pharmaceutical agents he/she is receiving for treatment or management of side effects. Our appreciation for size and maturation effects on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) phenomenon has improved to the point that we can develop predictive models that permit us to individualize therapy, especially in the situation where we are monitoring drug effects or therapeutic concentrations. The growth of efforts to guide <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> pharmacotherapy via model-based decision support necessitates a coordinated and systematic approach to ensuring reliable and robust output to caregivers that represents the current standard of care and adheres to governance imposed by the host institution or coalition responsible. Model-based systems which guide caregivers on dosing <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients in a more comprehensive manner are in development at several institutions. Care must be taken that these systems provide robust guidance with the current best <span class="hlt">practice</span>. These systems must evolve as new information becomes available and ultimately are best constructed from diverse data representing global input on demographics, ethnic / racial diversity, diet and other lifestyle factors. Multidisciplinary involvement at the project team level is key to the ultimate clinical valuation. Likewise, early engagement of clinical champions is also critical for the success of model-based tools. Adherence to regulatory requirements as well as best <span class="hlt">practices</span> with respect to software development and testing are essential if these tools are to be used as part of the routine standard of care. PMID:24251868</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21130968','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21130968"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> cardiac intensive care unit: current setting and organization in 2010.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fraisse, Alain; Le Bel, Stéphane; Mas, Bertrand; Macrae, Duncan</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>Over recent decades, specialized <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiac intensive care has emerged as a central component in the management of critically ill, neonatal, <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> and adult patients with congenital and acquired heart disease. The majority of high-volume centres (dealing with over 300 surgical cases per year) have dedicated <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiac intensive care units, with the smallest programmes more likely to care for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiac patients in mixed <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> or adult intensive care units. Specialized nursing staff are also a crucial presence at the patient's bedside for quality of care. A <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiac intensive care programme should have patients (preoperative and postoperative) grouped together geographically, and should provide proximity to the operating theatre, catheterization laboratory and radiology department, as well as to the regular ward. Age-appropriate medical equipment must be provided. An optimal strategy for running a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiac intensive care programme should include: multidisciplinary collaboration and involvement with <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiology, anaesthesia, cardiac surgery and many other subspecialties; a risk-stratification strategy for quantifying perioperative risk; a personalized patient approach; and anticipatory care. Finally, progressive withdrawal from heavy <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiac intensive care management should be institutionalized. Although the countries of the European Union do not share any common legislation on the structure and organization of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care or <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiac intensive care, any <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiac surgery programme in France that is agreed by the French Health Ministry must perform at least '150 major procedures per year in children' and must provide a 'specialized <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> intensive care unit'.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16826336','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16826336"><span>Picture archiving and communication system and its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on image viewing in physical therapy <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wilcox, Reg B; Fallano, Joel; Shannon, Kenneth J; Carrino, John A; Sinclair, Jacquelyn; Khorasani, Ramin</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>Imaging plays an increasing role in physical therapy (PT) <span class="hlt">practice</span>. We sought to determine if picture archiving and communication system (PACS) deployment would increase the proportion of imaging studies viewed by physical therapists (PTs) at the point of care and to assess PTs' perception of the value of access to imaging information. The study was performed in a 720-bed urban teaching hospital where an average of 2,000 rehabilitation visits per month are performed by 12 PTs. We compared the proportion of imaging studies viewed by PTs before and after PACS implementation. We surveyed PTs to assess their perception on the value of access to imaging studies. Film library records pre-PACS and web server audit trail post-PACS implementation were reviewed to measure access. Chi-square was used to compare proportions and trends. During the 3-month period before PACS usage, PTs viewed 1% (6/505) of imaging studies, citing time as the primary barrier. Post-PACS, the proportion of imaging studies viewed rose from 28% (95/344, second month) to 84% (163/192, fifth month) (p < 0.0001, chi-square). Most PTs believed that access to imaging studies has high value and has a positive <span class="hlt">impact</span> on clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Physical therapists rarely viewed imaging studies before PACS due to time barriers. They viewed more imaging studies (84%) post-PACS and felt that access to imaging studies has a positive <span class="hlt">impact</span> on clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Further studies are needed to assess whether PACS enhances PTs' clinical decision making and improves patient outcomes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28353377','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28353377"><span>New Developments in Breast Cancer and Their <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Daily <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in Pathology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Xiaoxian; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela M; Krishnamurti, Uma</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Advances in research have transformed our understanding of breast cancers and have altered the daily <span class="hlt">practice</span> of pathology. Theranostic evaluations performed by pathologists are now critical in triaging the patients into appropriate treatment groups, as are new guidelines that were recently established for the evaluation of HER2/neu gene amplification. Emerging molecular classifications of breast cancers bring novel perspectives to the assessment of individual cases, and opportunities for better treatments. Molecular studies have particularly shed light on distinct biological subsets of triple-negative breast cancers, for which new targeted therapies are being developed. The prognostic and therapeutic utility of new histopathologic parameters, such as tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, are also being elucidated, and new protocols have been devised for the pathologic evaluation of breast specimens that have undergone neoadjuvant treatment. Novel clinical <span class="hlt">practices</span>, such as radioactive seed localization, also affect the way breast specimens are processed and evaluated. In this brief review, we highlight the developments that are most relevant to pathology and are changing or could potentially <span class="hlt">impact</span> our daily <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847793','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4847793"><span>Novelty, Challenge, and <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Intensive Language Learning on Attentional Functions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bak, Thomas H.; Long, Madeleine R.; Vega-Mendoza, Mariana; Sorace, Antonella</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We investigated the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a short intensive language course on attentional functions. We examined 33 participants of a one-week Scottish Gaelic course and compared them to 34 controls: 16 active controls who participated in courses of comparable duration and intensity but not involving foreign language learning and 18 passive controls who followed their usual routines. Participants completed auditory tests of attentional inhibition and switching. There was no difference between the groups in any measures at the beginning of the course. At the end of the course, a significant improvement in attention switching was observed in the language group (p < .001) but not the control group (p = .127), independent of the age of participants (18–78 years). Half of the language participants (n = 17) were retested nine months after their course. All those who <span class="hlt">practiced</span> Gaelic 5 hours or more per week improved from their baseline performance. In contrast, those who <span class="hlt">practiced</span> 4 hours or fewer showed an inconsistent pattern: some improved while others stayed the same or deteriorated. Our results suggest that even a short period of intensive language learning can modulate attentional functions and that all age groups can benefit from this effect. Moreover, these short-term effects can be maintained through continuous <span class="hlt">practice</span>. PMID:27120179</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27120179','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27120179"><span>Novelty, Challenge, and <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Intensive Language Learning on Attentional Functions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bak, Thomas H; Long, Madeleine R; Vega-Mendoza, Mariana; Sorace, Antonella</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We investigated the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a short intensive language course on attentional functions. We examined 33 participants of a one-week Scottish Gaelic course and compared them to 34 controls: 16 active controls who participated in courses of comparable duration and intensity but not involving foreign language learning and 18 passive controls who followed their usual routines. Participants completed auditory tests of attentional inhibition and switching. There was no difference between the groups in any measures at the beginning of the course. At the end of the course, a significant improvement in attention switching was observed in the language group (p < .001) but not the control group (p = .127), independent of the age of participants (18-78 years). Half of the language participants (n = 17) were retested nine months after their course. All those who <span class="hlt">practiced</span> Gaelic 5 hours or more per week improved from their baseline performance. In contrast, those who <span class="hlt">practiced</span> 4 hours or fewer showed an inconsistent pattern: some improved while others stayed the same or deteriorated. Our results suggest that even a short period of intensive language learning can modulate attentional functions and that all age groups can benefit from this effect. Moreover, these short-term effects can be maintained through continuous <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4988676','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4988676"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of the Nursing <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Environment on Missed Nursing Care</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hessels, Amanda J.; Flynn, Linda; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Cadmus, Edna; Gershon, Robyn R.M.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objectives Missed nursing care is an emerging problem negatively <span class="hlt">impacting</span> patient outcomes. There are gaps in our knowledge of factors associated with missed nursing care. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the nursing <span class="hlt">practice</span> environment and missed nursing care in acute care hospitals. Methods This is a secondary analysis of cross sectional data from a survey of over 7.000 nurses from 70 hospitals on workplace and process of care. Ordinary least squares and multiple regression models were constructed to examine the relationship between the nursing <span class="hlt">practice</span> environment and missed nursing care while controlling for characteristics of nurses and hospitals. Results Nurses missed delivering a significant amount of necessary patient care (10–27%). Inadequate staffing and inadequate resources were the <span class="hlt">practice</span> environment factors most strongly associated with missed nursing care events. Conclusions This multi-site study examined the risk and risk factors associated with missed nursing care. Improvements targeting modifiable risk factors may reduce the risk of missed nursing care. PMID:27547768</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21823046','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21823046"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of intensive horticulture <span class="hlt">practices</span> on groundwater content of nitrates, sodium, potassium, and pesticides.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Melo, Armindo; Pinto, Edgar; Aguiar, Ana; Mansilha, Catarina; Pinho, Olívia; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>A monitoring program of nitrate, nitrite, potassium, sodium, and pesticides was carried out in water samples from an intensive horticulture area in a vulnerable zone from north of Portugal. Eight collecting points were selected and water-analyzed in five sampling campaigns, during 1 year. Chemometric techniques, such as cluster analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and discriminant analysis, were used in order to understand the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of intensive horticulture <span class="hlt">practices</span> on dug and drilled wells groundwater and to study variations in the hydrochemistry of groundwater. PCA performed on pesticide data matrix yielded seven significant PCs explaining 77.67% of the data variance. Although PCA rendered considerable data reduction, it could not clearly group and distinguish the sample types. However, a visible differentiation between the water samples was obtained. Cluster and discriminant analysis grouped the eight collecting points into three clusters of similar characteristics pertaining to water contamination, indicating that it is necessary to improve the use of water, fertilizers, and pesticides. Inorganic fertilizers such as potassium nitrate were suspected to be the most important factors for nitrate contamination since highly significant Pearson correlation (r = 0.691, P < 0.01) was obtained between groundwater nitrate and potassium contents. Water from dug wells is especially prone to contamination from the grower and their closer neighbor's <span class="hlt">practices</span>. Water from drilled wells is also contaminated from distant <span class="hlt">practices</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4073542','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4073542"><span>Management <span class="hlt">practices</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> vine carbohydrate status to a greater extent than vine productivity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pellegrino, Anne; Clingeleffer, Peter; Cooley, Nicola; Walker, Rob</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Light pruning and deficit irrigation regimes are <span class="hlt">practices</span> which are widely used in high yielding commercial vineyards in the warm climate regions of Australia. Little information is available on their <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on carbohydrate dynamics in vegetative organs within and between seasons, and on the resulting plant capacity to maintain productivity and ripen fruits. This study was conducted to address this gap in knowledge over five vintages on Vitis vinifera L. cv. Cabernet Franc, Shiraz, and Cabernet Sauvignon in the Sunraysia region of Victoria, Australia. Lighter pruning did not change the total carbohydrates concentration and composition in wood and roots within seasons in Cabernet Franc and Shiraz. However, the total carbohydrate pool (starch and soluble sugars) at the end of dormancy increased under lighter pruning, due to higher vine size, associated with retention and growth of old-wood (trunk and cordons). Water deficit negatively <span class="hlt">impacted</span> trunk and leaf starch concentrations, over the day and within seasons in Cabernet Sauvignon. Soluble sugars concentrations in these tissues tended to be higher under limited water supply, possibly due to higher sugar mobilization as photosynthesis decreased. Trunk carbohydrate concentrations markedly varied within and between seasons, highlighting the importance of interactive factors such as crop load and climate on carbon status. The period between fruit-set and véraison was shown to be critical for its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the balance between carbon accretion and depletion, especially under water deficit. The lower leaf and trunk starch concentration under water deficit resulted in a decrease of yield components at harvest, while similar yields were reached for all pruning systems. The sugar allocated to berries at harvest remained remarkably stable for all <span class="hlt">practices</span> and seasons, irrespective of vine yield and carbohydrate status in vegetative organs in Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon. PMID:25018758</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25018758','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25018758"><span>Management <span class="hlt">practices</span> <span class="hlt">impact</span> vine carbohydrate status to a greater extent than vine productivity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pellegrino, Anne; Clingeleffer, Peter; Cooley, Nicola; Walker, Rob</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Light pruning and deficit irrigation regimes are <span class="hlt">practices</span> which are widely used in high yielding commercial vineyards in the warm climate regions of Australia. Little information is available on their <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on carbohydrate dynamics in vegetative organs within and between seasons, and on the resulting plant capacity to maintain productivity and ripen fruits. This study was conducted to address this gap in knowledge over five vintages on Vitis vinifera L. cv. Cabernet Franc, Shiraz, and Cabernet Sauvignon in the Sunraysia region of Victoria, Australia. Lighter pruning did not change the total carbohydrates concentration and composition in wood and roots within seasons in Cabernet Franc and Shiraz. However, the total carbohydrate pool (starch and soluble sugars) at the end of dormancy increased under lighter pruning, due to higher vine size, associated with retention and growth of old-wood (trunk and cordons). Water deficit negatively <span class="hlt">impacted</span> trunk and leaf starch concentrations, over the day and within seasons in Cabernet Sauvignon. Soluble sugars concentrations in these tissues tended to be higher under limited water supply, possibly due to higher sugar mobilization as photosynthesis decreased. Trunk carbohydrate concentrations markedly varied within and between seasons, highlighting the importance of interactive factors such as crop load and climate on carbon status. The period between fruit-set and véraison was shown to be critical for its <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the balance between carbon accretion and depletion, especially under water deficit. The lower leaf and trunk starch concentration under water deficit resulted in a decrease of yield components at harvest, while similar yields were reached for all pruning systems. The sugar allocated to berries at harvest remained remarkably stable for all <span class="hlt">practices</span> and seasons, irrespective of vine yield and carbohydrate status in vegetative organs in Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=price+AND+discrimination&pg=4&id=EJ797670','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=price+AND+discrimination&pg=4&id=EJ797670"><span>How Do Dyslexic Nursing Students Cope with Clinical <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Placements? The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of the Dyslexic Profile on the Clinical <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of Dyslexic Nursing Students: Pedagogical Issues and Considerations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Price, Geraldine A.; Gale, Anne</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The safety of dyslexic nurses, and whether they are a danger to their patients, has been widely discussed. This empirical study sought to discover the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the dyslexic profile on clinical <span class="hlt">practice</span> for nursing students. Two focus groups of third-year nursing students in higher education were set up: a control group and a dyslexic group. The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25301176','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25301176"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Depressive Symptoms: Clinical Correlates and CBT Treatment Outcomes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brown, H M; Lester, K J; Jassi, A; Heyman, I; Krebs, G</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Depression frequently co-occurs with <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), yet the clinical correlates and <span class="hlt">impact</span> of depression on CBT outcomes remain unclear. The prevalence and clinical correlates of depression were examined in a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> specialist OCD-clinic sample (N = 295; Mean = 15 [7 - 18] years, 42 % female), using both dimensional (Beck Depression Inventory-youth; n = 261) and diagnostic (Development and Wellbeing Assessment; n = 127) measures of depression. The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of depressive symptoms and suspected disorders on post-treatment OCD severity was examined in a sub-sample who received CBT, with or without SSRI medication (N = 100). Fifty-one per-cent of patients reported moderately or extremely elevated depressive symptoms and 26 % (95 % CI: 18 - 34) met criteria for a suspected depressive disorder. Depressive symptoms and depressive disorders were associated with worse OCD symptom severity and global functioning prior to CBT. Individuals with depression were more likely to be female, have had a psychiatric inpatient admission and less likely to be attending school (ps < 0.01). OCD and depressive symptom severity significantly decreased after CBT. Depressive symptoms and depressive disorders predicted worse post-treatment OCD severity (βs = 0.19 and 0.26, ps < 0.05) but became non-significant when controlling for pre-treatment OCD severity (βs = 0.05 and 0.13, ns). Depression is common in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> OCD and is associated with more severe OCD and poorer functioning. However, depression severity decreases over the course of CBT for OCD and is not independently associated with worse outcomes, supporting the recommendation for treatment as usual in the presence of depressive symptoms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2645434','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2645434"><span>Investigating the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of extraneous distractions on consultations in general <span class="hlt">practice</span>: Lessons learned</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Background Extraneous distractions may influence the flow of general <span class="hlt">practice</span> consultations. This study piloted a methodology to examine the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of interrupting general practitioners (GPs) while consulting actor-patients. Methods Six GPs were video recorded consulting six actor-patients each presenting a different clinical scenario in a simulated surgery. Five cases presented red flag cancer symptoms. Half the consultations were interrupted. Two independent assessors, blinded to the occurrence of interruptions, assessed consultation performance using the Leicester Assessment Package (LAP) for clinical competence. Results 24 of 36 consultations were video recorded with sufficient audio-visual clarity to allow scoring. The association between LAP score and three variables could be studied: a variety of interruptions, different GPs and various scenarios. Agreement between assessors on GP performance was poor and showed an increased bias with increasing LAP score. Despite this, the interruption did not significantly <span class="hlt">impact</span> on assessor LAP scores (Mean difference: 0.22, P = 0.83) even after controlling for assessor, different GPs and scenarios. Conclusion Extraneous distractions had no <span class="hlt">impact</span> on GP performance in this underpowered pilot study, a conclusion which needs to be confirmed in a larger study. However several important lessons were learned. Recorded actor-patient clinical sessions are logistically challenging. GPs whose skills were not previously assessed were working in unfamiliar surroundings dealing with relatively straight forward diagnostic challenges and may have anticipated the interruptions. In a redesign of this experiment it may be possible to eliminate some of these limitations. PMID:19193246</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EnMan..56.1295W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EnMan..56.1295W"><span>Bioenergy Development Policy and <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Must Recognize Potential Hydrologic <span class="hlt">Impacts</span>: Lessons from the Americas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Watkins, David W.; de Moraes, Márcia M. G. Alcoforado; Asbjornsen, Heidi; Mayer, Alex S.; Licata, Julian; Lopez, Jose Gutierrez; Pypker, Thomas G.; Molina, Vivianna Gamez; Marques, Guilherme Fernandes; Carneiro, Ana Cristina Guimaraes; Nuñez, Hector M.; Önal, Hayri; da Nobrega Germano, Bruna</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Large-scale bioenergy production will affect the hydrologic cycle in multiple ways, including changes in canopy interception, evapotranspiration, infiltration, and the quantity and quality of surface runoff and groundwater recharge. As such, the water footprints of bioenergy sources vary significantly by type of feedstock, soil characteristics, cultivation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and hydro-climatic regime. Furthermore, water management implications of bioenergy production depend on existing land use, relative water availability, and competing water uses at a watershed scale. This paper reviews previous research on the water resource <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of bioenergy production—from plot-scale hydrologic and nutrient cycling <span class="hlt">impacts</span> to watershed and regional scale hydro-economic systems relationships. Primary gaps in knowledge that hinder policy development for integrated management of water-bioenergy systems are highlighted. Four case studies in the Americas are analyzed to illustrate relevant spatial and temporal scales for <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment, along with unique aspects of biofuel production compared to other agroforestry systems, such as energy-related conflicts and tradeoffs. Based on the case studies, the potential benefits of integrated resource management are assessed, as is the need for further case-specific research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25813630','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25813630"><span>Bioenergy Development Policy and <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Must Recognize Potential Hydrologic <span class="hlt">Impacts</span>: Lessons from the Americas.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Watkins, David W; de Moraes, Márcia M G Alcoforado; Asbjornsen, Heidi; Mayer, Alex S; Licata, Julian; Lopez, Jose Gutierrez; Pypker, Thomas G; Molina, Vivianna Gamez; Marques, Guilherme Fernandes; Carneiro, Ana Cristina Guimaraes; Nuñez, Hector M; Önal, Hayri; da Nobrega Germano, Bruna</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Large-scale bioenergy production will affect the hydrologic cycle in multiple ways, including changes in canopy interception, evapotranspiration, infiltration, and the quantity and quality of surface runoff and groundwater recharge. As such, the water footprints of bioenergy sources vary significantly by type of feedstock, soil characteristics, cultivation <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and hydro-climatic regime. Furthermore, water management implications of bioenergy production depend on existing land use, relative water availability, and competing water uses at a watershed scale. This paper reviews previous research on the water resource <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of bioenergy production-from plot-scale hydrologic and nutrient cycling <span class="hlt">impacts</span> to watershed and regional scale hydro-economic systems relationships. Primary gaps in knowledge that hinder policy development for integrated management of water-bioenergy systems are highlighted. Four case studies in the Americas are analyzed to illustrate relevant spatial and temporal scales for <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment, along with unique aspects of biofuel production compared to other agroforestry systems, such as energy-related conflicts and tradeoffs. Based on the case studies, the potential benefits of integrated resource management are assessed, as is the need for further case-specific research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22352308','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22352308"><span>Biological <span class="hlt">impact</span> of divergent land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on tomato crop health.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chellemi, Dan O; Wu, Tiehang; Graham, Jim H; Church, Greg</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>Development of sustainable food systems is contingent upon the adoption of land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> that can mitigate damage from soilborne pests. Five diverse land management <span class="hlt">practices</span> were studied for their <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici), galling of roots by Meloidogyne spp. and marketable yield of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and to identify associations between the severity of pest damage and the corresponding soil microbial community structure. The incidence of Fusarium wilt was >14% when tomato was cultivated following 3 to 4 years of an undisturbed weed fallow or continuous tillage disk fallow rotation and was >4% after 3 to 4 years of bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) rotation or organic production <span class="hlt">practices</span> that included soil amendments and cover crops. The incidence of Fusarium wilt under conventional tomato production with soil fumigation varied from 2% in 2003 to 15% in 2004. Repeated tomato cultivation increased Fusarium wilt by 20% or more except when tomato was grown using organic <span class="hlt">practices</span>, where disease remained less than 3%. The percent of tomato roots with galls from Meloidogyne spp. ranged from 18 to 82% in soil previously subjected to a weed fallow rotation and 7 to 15% in soil managed previously as a bahiagrass pasture. Repeated tomato cultivation increased the severity of root galling in plots previously subjected to a conventional or disk fallow rotation but not in plots managed using organic <span class="hlt">practices</span>, where the percentage of tomato roots with galls remained below 1%. Marketable yield of tomato exceeded 35 Mg ha(-1) following all land management strategies except the strip-tillage/bahiagrass program. Marketable yield declined by 11, 14, and 19% when tomato was grown in consecutive years following a bahiagrass, weed fallow, and disk rotation. The composition of fungal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and bacterial 16S rDNA amplicons isolated from soil fungal and bacterial communities corresponded with</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.9860V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.9860V"><span>Long term <span class="hlt">impact</span> of different tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil C sequestration potential</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Valboa, Giuseppe; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Papini, Rossella; Brandi, Giorgio; Elio Agnelli, Alessandro; Simoncini, Stefania; Vignozzi, Nadia; Pellegrini, Sergio</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Long-term experiments provide important information on the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of agricultural management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on soil quality. In 1994, a trial was started to investigate the effects of four different tillage systems on organic carbon and physical properties of a Calcari Fluvic Cambisol loam soil under continuous maize. The tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span> compared were: conventional tillage by mould-board ploughing to 40 cm depth (DP); ripper sub-soiling to 40-45 cm (RS); shallow tillage by mould-board ploughing to 20 cm depth (SP); minimum tillage by disk harrowing to 10-15 cm (DH). Soil carbon pool, bulk density, macroporosity and aggregate stability were studied at different depth increments (0-10, 10-20, 20-30 and 30-40 cm) and by two repeated samplings (in 1999 and 2011), in order to evaluate their temporal evolution under the different tillage systems. For a better understanding of mechanisms leading to C sequestration, a qualitative characterization of soil organic matter (OM) was performed by acid hydrolysis (HCl 6N), in order to separate the labile and the recalcitrant fractions. After 18 years of treatments we hypothesized changes in OM content and quality, as well as in its vertical distribution, due to tillage <span class="hlt">practices</span>. At the end of the trial, soil total organic carbon (TOC) stock increased in the surface layers under DH (to 10 cm depth), RS (to 20 cm depth) and SP (to 10 cm depth), while it was unchanged under DP. When considering the whole 0-40 cm layer, all tillage treatments resulted in no significant variation in TOC stock. OM quality and its evolution over time showed well defined differences among treatments: the OM recalcitrant fraction increased under RS (up to 30 cm depth), decreased under DP (up to 40 cm depth) and showed no significant changes under DH and SP. The negative <span class="hlt">impact</span> of DP on C stabilization was confirmed by a significant decrease of the recalcitrant to TOC ratio in the whole sampled layer. In conclusion, DP showed the worst <span class="hlt">impact</span> on C storage</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28140494','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28140494"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of water management <span class="hlt">practices</span> on subtropical pasture methane emissions and ecosystem service payments.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chamberlain, Samuel D; Groffman, Peter M; Boughton, Elizabeth H; Gomez-Casanovas, Nuria; DeLucia, Evan H; Bernacchi, Carl J; Sparks, Jed P</p> <p>2017-01-31</p> <p>Pastures are an extensive land cover type; however, patterns in pasture greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange vary widely depending on climate and land management. Understanding this variation is important, as pastures may be a net GHG source or sink depending on these factors. We quantified carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and methane (CH4 ) fluxes from subtropical pastures in south Florida for three wet-dry seasonal cycles using eddy covariance, and estimated two annual budgets of CO2 , CH4 , and GHG equivalent emissions. We also estimated the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of water retention <span class="hlt">practices</span> on pasture GHG emissions and assessed the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of these emissions on stakeholder payments for water retention services in a carbon market framework. The pastures were net CO2 sinks sequestering up to 163 ± 54 g CO2 -C·m(-2) ·yr(-1) (mean ± 95% CI), but were also strong CH4 sources emitting up to 23.5 ± 2.1 g CH4 -C·m(-2) ·yr(-1) . Accounting for the increased global warming potential of CH4 , the pastures were strong net GHG sources emitting up to 584 ± 78 g CO2 -C eq.·m(-2) ·yr(-1) , and all CO2 uptake was offset by wet season CH4 emissions from the flooded landscape. Our analysis suggests that CH4 emissions due to increased flooding from water management <span class="hlt">practices</span> is a small component of the pasture GHG budget, and water retention likely contributes 2-11% of net pasture GHG emissions. These emissions could reduce water retention payments by up to ~12% if stakeholders were required to pay for current GHG emissions in a carbon market. It would require at least 93.7 kg CH4 -C emissions per acre-foot water storage (1 acre-foot = 1233.48 m(3) ) for carbon market costs to exceed water retention payments, and this scenario is highly unlikely as we estimate current <span class="hlt">practices</span> are responsible for 11.3 ± 7.2 kg CH4 -C emissions per acre-foot of water storage. Our results demonstrate that water retention <span class="hlt">practices</span> aimed at reducing nutrient loading to the Everglades are likely only</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5122312','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5122312"><span>Development of a validated algorithm for the diagnosis of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> asthma in electronic medical records</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Cave, Andrew J; Davey, Christina; Ahmadi, Elaheh; Drummond, Neil; Fuentes, Sonia; Kazemi-Bajestani, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Sharpe, Heather; Taylor, Matt</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>An accurate estimation of the prevalence of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> asthma in Alberta and elsewhere is hampered by uncertainty regarding disease definition and diagnosis. Electronic medical records (EMRs) provide a rich source of clinical data from primary-care <span class="hlt">practices</span> that can be used in better understanding the occurrence of the disease. The Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN) database includes cleaned data extracted from the EMRs of primary-care practitioners. The purpose of the study was to develop and validate a case definition of asthma in children 1–17 who consult family physicians, in order to provide primary-care estimates of childhood asthma in Alberta as accurately as possible. The validation involved the comparison of the application of a theoretical algorithm (to identify patients with asthma) to a physician review of records included in the CPCSSN database (to confirm an accurate diagnosis). The comparison yielded 87.4% sensitivity, 98.6% specificity and a positive and negative predictive value of 91.2% and 97.9%, respectively, in the age group 1–17 years. The algorithm was also run for ages 3–17 and 6–17 years, and was found to have comparable statistical values. Overall, the case definition and algorithm yielded strong sensitivity and specificity metrics and was found valid for use in research in CPCSSN primary-care <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The use of the validated asthma algorithm may improve insight into the prevalence, diagnosis, and management of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> asthma in Alberta and Canada. PMID:27882997</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5319376','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5319376"><span>Upper extremity sarcoma: <span class="hlt">impact</span> of current <span class="hlt">practice</span> guidelines and controversies on reconstructive approaches</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dobke, Marek; Mackert, Gina A.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The goals of sarcoma management include both a cure and the functional preservation of involved tissues and adjacent critical structures with common opinions favoring immediate reconstruction. The question arises whether these goals are contradictory. This paper discusses the question based on the experience of 28 patients with different types of extremity sarcoma, with 24 surgically treated by the University of California San Diego (UCSD) orthopedic and plastic surgery team (2011–2016) and the collection of evidence from published <span class="hlt">practice</span> guidelines, reviews, case studies, and clinical trials. Included are the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of limb-sparing and functional reconstructive concepts, efforts regarding the adequacy of surgical margins, and the rationale of immediate versus delayed reconstructive approaches, and the disease-free status of sarcoma management. PMID:28220751</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24773366','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24773366"><span>A review of echocardiography in anaesthetic and peri-operative <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Part 1: <span class="hlt">impact</span> and utility.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barber, R L; Fletcher, S N</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Echocardiography is migrating rapidly across speciality boundaries and clinical demand is expanding. Echocardiography shows promise for evolving applications in the peri-operative assessment and therapeutic management of patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, whether it be elective or emergency. Although evidence is limited with regard to significant <span class="hlt">impact</span> on outcomes from anaesthesia and surgery, there is little doubt about the validity and power of two-dimensional real-time viewing of cardiac anatomy and function. Echocardiography can be used to assist in decision-making along the entire peri-operative pathway, and is increasingly delivered by the previously referring physicians. The discussion around more widespread incorporation of cardiac ultrasound into anaesthetic <span class="hlt">practice</span> must take into account competency, training and governance. Failure to do so adequately may mean that the use of echocardiography is poorly applied and costly.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ChJOL..30..388Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ChJOL..30..388Z"><span><span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of mariculture <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the temporal distribution of macrobenthos in Sandu Bay, South China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhou, Jin</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>Sandu Bay is located in the East China Sea and is characterized by high-density fish farming and kelp culture. Despite this, little is known about the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of these different mariculture <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the local environment. We investigated the temporal variation in macrobenthos and environmental conditions at three sites in the bay (fish farming site, kelp culture site, and a control site). We collected water and sediment samples during nine cruises between May 2009 and February 2010. The density of macrobenthos peaked at the fish farming site in July (655 ind./m2) whereas density did not fluctuate as widely at the other two sites. Biomass varied significantly at both the control and kelp culture sites, but had only a single peak at the fish farming site in June (21.90 g/m2). The dominant species varied throughout the study period at the control and kelp culture sites, whereas a single terebellid species ( Lysilla pacifica) dominated the macrobenthos at the fish farming site. The diversity index H' increased at the control site beginning in February then decreased after May, whereas H' was low at the other sites in December. The mean dissolved oxygen level was highest at the control site (6.59 mg/L) and lowest at the fish farming site (5.54 mg/L). DO levels were lowest at all sites in summer (July and August). The sediment acid volatile sulfide content was higher at the fish farming site (1.46 mg/g dry weight) than those at the kelp culture and control sites (1.22 and 0.14 mg/g, respectively). Our results suggest that mariculture <span class="hlt">practices</span> have a clear <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the benthic environment/community in Sandu Bay.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25617786','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25617786"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of water management <span class="hlt">practice</span> scenarios on wastewater flow and contaminant concentration.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marleni, N; Gray, S; Sharma, A; Burn, S; Muttil, N</p> <p>2015-03-15</p> <p>Due to frequent droughts and rapid population growth in urban areas, the adoption of <span class="hlt">practices</span> to reduce the usage of fresh water is on the rise. Reduction in usage of fresh water can be achieved through various local water management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (WMP) such as Water Demand Management (WDM) and use of alternative water sources such as Greywater Recycling (GR) and Rainwater Harvesting (RH). While the positive effects of WMPs have been widely acknowledged, the implementation of WMPs is also likely to lower the wastewater flow and increase the concentration of contaminants in sewage. These in turn can lead to increases in sewer problems such as odour and corrosion. This paper analyses <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of various WMP scenarios on wastewater flow and contaminant load. The Urban Volume and Quality (UVQ) model was used to simulate wastewater flow and the associated wastewater contaminants from different WMP scenarios. The wastewater parameters investigated were those which influence odour and corrosion problems in sewerage networks due to the formation of hydrogen sulphide. These parameters are: chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrate (NO3(-)), sulphate (SO4(2-)), sulphide (S(2-)) and iron (Fe) that were contributed by the households (not including the biochemical process in sewer pipe). The results will help to quantify the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of WMP scenarios on odour and corrosion in sewerage pipe networks. Results show that the implementation of a combination of WDM and GR had highly increased the concentration of all selected contaminant that triggered the formation of hydrogen sulphide, namely COD, sulphate and sulphide. On the other hand, the RH scenario had the least increase in the concentration of the contaminants, except iron concentrations. The increase in iron concentrations is actually beneficial because it inhibits the formation of hydrogen sulphide.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23958601','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23958601"><span>Advances in the medical management of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> IBD.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aloi, Marina; Nuti, Federica; Stronati, Laura; Cucchiara, Salvatore</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>IBD includes two classic entities, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and a third undetermined form (IBD-U), characterized by a chronic relapsing course resulting in a high rate of morbidity and impaired quality of life. Children with IBD are vulnerable in terms of growth failure, malnutrition and emotional effects. The aims of therapy have now transitioned from symptomatic control to the achievement of mucosal healing and deep remission. This type of therapy has been made possible by the advent of disease-modifying drugs, such as biologic agents, which are capable of interrupting the inflammatory cascade underlying IBD. Biologic agents are generally administered in patients who are refractory to conventional therapies. However, there is growing support that such agents could be used in the initial phases of the disease, typically in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients, to interrupt and cease the inflammatory process. Until several years ago, most therapeutic programmes in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients with IBD were borrowed from adult trials, whereas <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> studies were often retrospective and uncontrolled. However, guidelines on therapeutic management of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> IBD and controlled, prospective, randomized trials including children with IBD have now been published. Here, the current knowledge concerning treatment options for children with IBD are reported. We also highlight the effectiveness and safety of new therapeutic advances in these <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22917543','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22917543"><span>Management of bone tumours in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> oncology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bölling, T; Hardes, J; Dirksen, U</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The management of bone tumours in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> oncology requires careful multidisciplinary planning due to the need for multimodal therapy approaches. The non-specific symptoms often lead to a delayed definitive diagnosis of a bone tumour. Imaging procedures are of major importance for an individualised and optimised treatment planning. They have to be carried out before any surgery, including biopsies. The introduction of multi-agent chemotherapy has led to a significant improvement in survival rates in patients suffering from Ewing's sarcomas and osteosarcomas. However, local therapy still remains indispensable in order to achieve long-term survival. For osteosarcoma, surgery remains the only adequate local therapy modality. Radiotherapy may be considered if surgery is not feasible. In these cases, high radiation doses need to be applied. The choice for local therapy modality is not as clear in patients with Ewing's sarcoma. Today, surgery is often preferred if a wide or at least marginal resection can be carried out. Additional radiotherapy is advised in patients with marginal/intralesional resection or poor histological response to induction chemotherapy. Definitive radiotherapy is recommended for inoperable lesions. In the future, new radiotherapy approaches, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy or proton therapy, may yield better results with minor risks of late effects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20018580','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20018580"><span>Secondary surgery in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> facial paralysis reanimation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Terzis, Julia K; Olivares, Fatima S</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>Ninety-two children, the entire series of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> facial reanimation by a single surgeon over thirty years, are presented. The objective is to analyse the incidence and value of secondary revisions for functional and aesthetic refinements following the two main stages of reanimation. The reconstructive strategy varied according to the denervation time, the aetiology, and whether the paralysis was uni- or bilateral, complete or partial. Irrespective of these variables, 89% of the patients required secondary surgery. Post-operative videos were available in seventy-two cases. Four independent observers graded patients' videos using a scale from poor to excellent. The effect of diverse secondary procedures was measured computing a mean-percent-gain score. Statistical differences between treatment groups means were tested by the t-test and one-way ANOVA. Two-thirds of the corrective and ancillary techniques utilized granted significantly higher mean-scores post-secondary surgery. A comparison of pre- and post-operative data found valuable improvements in all three facial zones after secondary surgery. In conclusion, inherent to dynamic procedures is the need for secondary revisions. Secondary surgery builds in the potential of reanimation surgery, effectively augmenting functional faculties and aesthesis.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26797004','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26797004"><span>Amputation and prosthesis fitting in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Griffet, J</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Amputation of a limb is always perceived as a catastrophe. The principles underlying creation of a stump adapted to modern prosthetic fittings must be fully understood and the patient managed by a multidisciplinary team. In <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients, preserving residual limb length is a crucial point that should be assessed according to the expected growth potential. Advances in prosthetic fittings have led to changes in the overall concept of socket design, which seeks to achieve three objectives: to maximise the weight-bearing surface area, to eliminate friction of the skin on the socket, and to eliminate lever-arm effects. The introduction on the market of new materials has contributed substantially to advances in prosthetic fittings. These advances require the use of new criteria for stump quality and optimisation, which exert a considerable influence on prosthesis function. Prosthetic fitting and specific management of psychological and social problems are provided during an inpatient stay in a physical medicine department, by a team of physicians, other healthcare professionals, social workers, and educators. Three-dimensional imaging and gait analysis provide valuable information.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2723251','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2723251"><span>Harvesting organs for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> transplantation: medical features.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nivet, H</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The progress in organ transplantation has led to a rise in the demand for organs. <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> intensive care units are the main source for obtaining organs. Every "brain dead" patient should be regarded as a potential donor. General contraindications to organ donation are: systemic viral or bacterial infections and extra-cerebral malignancy. They are also organ-specific contraindications. The criteria for the diagnosis of "brain death" have been widely studied and defined. Care of brain dead donors consists of maintenance of cardiac, pulmonary and renal function. Monitoring requires control of central venous and arterial blood pressure, core temperature, urine flow, heart rate and biological data on both urine and blood. A 5% dextrose infusion is maintained with added potassium and sodium chloride according to the urine flow, detectable water loss, and blood and urine composition. Hypotension due to hypovolaemia requires immediate treatment with blood, colloid or albumin infusion. Persistent hypotension with cardiac pump failure is treated with inotropic agents: dopamine and/or dobutamine. Raised urine flow due to diabetes insipidus requires desmopressin (dDAVP). Progress in organ collection requires the consent of the parents and highly motivated medical teams.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5330359','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5330359"><span>A collaborative approach to improving patient access in general <span class="hlt">practice</span>: <span class="hlt">impact</span> of three different pilot schemes in 12 general <span class="hlt">practices</span> in Greenwich</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lawless, Melanie; Wright, Ellen; Davidson, Jackie</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Abstract Background With rising patient demand and expectations, many <span class="hlt">practices</span> are struggling to respond to the demand for appointments. Objective To investigate different approaches to improving access to general <span class="hlt">practice</span> and assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> on (i) patient experience, (ii) <span class="hlt">practice</span> staff experience and (iii) activity in A&E and walk-in centres. Method Greenwich CCG piloted three approaches in 12 volunteer <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The schemes were:(1) Systematic GP telephone triage of all appointment requests.(2) Analysis and comparison of <span class="hlt">practice</span> data including demand and capacity to identify opportunities for improvement.(3) Online consultations. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation was undertaken. Results Overall results were inconclusive and no one pilot scheme was overwhelmingly successful in improving patient experience of access or reducing <span class="hlt">practice</span> workload. Scheme 1 telephone triage: In some cases, overall demand on clinician time through the day reduced as face-to-face consultations were replaced with shorter telephone consultations. However, in other <span class="hlt">practices</span>, total consulting time went up when telephone consultations took longer than the suggested average 5 min. Scheme 2 <span class="hlt">practice</span> analysis and benchmarking: The pilot <span class="hlt">practices</span> implemented no significant changes. Scheme 3 online consultations: Take up was low, with users as a percentage of total list size dropping significantly to even lower levels in the second half of the pilot – from 3.13% in the first three months to 1.20% in the second three months. Conclusion As the pilots did not improve the overall patient experience of access or <span class="hlt">practice</span> workload, the pilot schemes were not rolled out by the CCG. From the CCG’s point of view, it was valuable to test out the effect of a scheme before committing further resources. PMID:28250835</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4452752','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4452752"><span>The design of a multicentre Canadian surveillance study of sedation safety in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> emergency department</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bhatt, Maala; Roback, Mark G; Joubert, Gary; Farion, Ken J; Ali, Samina; Beno, Suzanne; McTimoney, C Michelle; Dixon, Andrew; Dubrovsky, Alexander Sasha; Barrowman, Nick; Johnson, David W</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Procedural sedation and analgesia have become standard <span class="hlt">practice</span> in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> emergency departments worldwide. Although generally regarded as safe, serious adverse events such as bradycardia, asystole, pulmonary aspiration, permanent neurological injury and death have been reported, but their incidence is unknown due to the infrequency of their occurrence and lack of surveillance of sedation safety. To improve our understanding of the safety, comparative effectiveness and variation in care in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> procedural sedation, we are establishing a multicentre patient registry with the goal of conducting regular and ongoing surveillance for adverse events in procedural sedation. Methods This multicentre, prospective cohort study is enrolling patients under 18 years of age from six <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> emergency departments across Canada. Data collection is fully integrated into clinical care and is performed electronically in real time by the healthcare professionals caring for the patient. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients who experience a serious adverse event as a result of their sedation. Secondary outcomes include the proportion of patients who experience an adverse event that could lead to a serious adverse event, proportion of patients who receive a significant intervention in response to an adverse event, proportion of patients who experience a successful sedation, and proportion of patients who experience a paradoxical reaction to sedation. There is no predetermined end date for data collection. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been obtained from participating sites. Results will be disseminated using a multifaceted knowledge translation strategy by presenting at international conferences, publication in peer-reviewed journals, and through established networks. PMID:26024999</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3851858','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3851858"><span>Clowning as a supportive measure in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> - a survey of clowns, parents and nursing staff</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background Hospital clowns, also known as clown doctors, can help <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients with the stress of a hospitalization and to circumvent the accompanying feelings of fear, helplessness and sadness, thus supporting the healing process. The objectives of the present study were to clarify the structural and procedural conditions of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> clowning in Germany and to document the evaluations of hospital clowns, parents and hospital staff. Methods A nationwide online survey of hospital clowns currently active in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> departments and an accompanying field evaluation in Hamburg hospitals with surveys of parents and hospital staff were conducted. In addition to items developed specifically for the study regarding general conditions, procedures, assessments of effects and attitudes, the Work Satisfaction Scale was used. The sample included n = 87 hospital clowns, 37 parents and 43 hospital staff members. Results The online survey showed that the hospital clowns are well-trained, motivated and generally satisfied with their work. By their own estimate, they primarily boost morale and promote imagination in the patients. However, hospital clowns also desire better interdisciplinary collaboration and financial security as well as more recognition of their work. The Hamburg field study confirmed the positive results of the clown survey. According to the data, a clown intervention boosts morale and reduces stress in the patients. Moreover, there are <span class="hlt">practically</span> no side effects. Both parents and hospital staff stated that the patients as well as they themselves benefited from the intervention. Conclusions The results match those of previous studies and give a very positive picture of hospital clowning, so that its routine use and expansion thereof can be recommended. Furthermore, the intervention should be subject to the rules of evidence-based medicine like other medical treatments. PMID:24112744</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24423967','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24423967"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> dilated cardiomyopathy: clinical profile and outcome. The experience of a tertiary centre for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miranda, Joana O; Costa, Liane; Rodrigues, Esmeralda; Teles, Elisa L; Baptista, Maria J; Areias, José C</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most common form of cardiomyopathy in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> population and an important cause of heart transplantation in children. The clinical profile and course of dilated cardiomyopathy in children have been poorly characterised. A retrospective review of 61 patients (37 female; 24 male) diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy from January, 2005 to June, 2012 at a single institution was performed. The median age at diagnosis was 15 months. Heart failure was present in 83.6% of patients and 44.3% required intensive care. The most prevalent causes were idiopathic (47.5%), viral myocarditis (18.0%) and inherited metabolic diseases (11.5%). In viral myocarditis, Parvovirus B19 was the most common identified agent, in concurrence with the increasing incidence documented recently. Inherited metabolic diseases were responsible for 11.5% of dilated cardiomyopathy cases compared with the 4-6% described in the literature, which reinforces the importance of considering this aetiology in differential diagnosis of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> dilated cardiomyopathy. The overall mortality rate was 16.1% and five patients underwent heart transplantation. In our series, age at diagnosis and aetiology were the most important prognosis factors. We report no mortality in the five patients who underwent heart transplantation, after 2 years of follow-up.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18366570','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18366570"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of Māori cultural values on forensic science <span class="hlt">practice</span> in New Zealand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hudson, Maui L; Allan, Christine A; Bedford, Keith R; Buckleton, John S; Stuart, Keriata</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>Forensic science aims to serve society by advancing justice. It is accepted that some actions taken by the state in the interests of advancing justice, such as postmortem examinations, may impinge on values held by members of groups within society. Such actions have the potential to cause cultural offense. It is important that forensic scientists are aware of these issues and that as a profession we should take actions, where possible, to reduce any potential offense and consequently reduce unnecessary distress. This paper examines the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of these issues on forensic <span class="hlt">practice</span> in New Zealand, and, in particular, in relation to the cultural values of Māori, the indigenous people of New Zealand. Interviews and workshops were used to identify forensic <span class="hlt">practices</span> involving a risk of cultural offense. Particular issues were identified in regard to crime scene attendance and examination, postmortem attendance and sample storage, disposal, and return. This paper describes the response developed by the Institute of Environmental Science and Research Limited (ESR) to address these issues, including a cultural awareness training package and reference brochure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1761b0059L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AIPC.1761b0059L"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of preventive maintenance <span class="hlt">practices</span> on manufacturing performance: A proposed model for SMEs in Malaysia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lazim, Halim Mad; Taib, Che Azlan; Lamsali, Hendrik; Saleh, Mohamed Najib; Subramaniam, Chandrakantan</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Preventive maintenance (PM) plays important role to avoid or mitigate potential stoppages and disruptions of equipment or machinery from occurring in daily operations. PM emphasized total employee involvement and it is important for companies as well as Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs). SME sectors contribution to the Malaysian economy makes up 95% of the total manufacturers, however PM remain relatively lacking. The ability, reliability and effective maintenance management is highly important in order to achieve desired manufacturing performance. Therefore, organizational capability in planning, controlling, implementing and monitoring PM activities is important. Furthermore, empirical evidence on the potential <span class="hlt">impact</span> of PM <span class="hlt">practices</span> towards manufacturing performance with organizational capability as a moderating effect is still limited and indecisive. Henceforth, this paper aims to explore and investigate potential relationships between PM <span class="hlt">practices</span> and manufacturing performance moderated by organizational capability in the contact of Malaysian SMEs in the manufacturing sector. Correspondently, the study intends to propose a new research framework and hypotheses to examine the abovementioned relationships. The proposed framework includes PM team, PM strategy and planned maintenance as the determinants, while organizational capability serves as the moderating variable. Manufacturing performance will be viewed in terms of innovation and financial factors. Proposed research direction and conclusion are discussed at the end of the study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22058851','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22058851"><span>Health <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment research and <span class="hlt">practice</span>: A place for paradigm positioning?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Haigh, Fiona; Harris, Patrick; Haigh, Neil</p> <p>2012-02-15</p> <p>In this article, we provide a critical review of the place of paradigm in health <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment (HIA) research and <span class="hlt">practice</span>. We contend that most HIA practitioners have given insufficient attention to paradigm positioning when developing and applying HIA methodologies and that some concerns about current HIA <span class="hlt">practice</span> can be attributed to this. We review HIA literature to assess the extent and nature of attention given to paradigm positioning and these related concerns. We then respond to our critique by exploring the implications, opportunities and challenges of adopting a critical realist paradigm, which we believe has the potential to help HIA practitioners to develop HIA methodology in a way that addresses these issues. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a critical review of the place of paradigm in HIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that HIA practitioners give insufficient attention to paradigm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The implications, opportunities and challenges of adopting a critical realist paradigm are explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first paper, to our knowledge, that discusses a critical realist approach to HIA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27591225','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27591225"><span>Printed Educational Materials' <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Tobacco Cessation Brief Interventions in CAM <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: Patient and Practitioner Experiences.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Eaves, Emery R; Nichter, Mark; Howerter, Amy; Floden, Lysbeth; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Gordon, Judith S; Muramoto, Myra L</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Printed educational materials (PEMs) have long demonstrated their usefulness as economical and effective media for health communication. In this article, we evaluate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of targeted tobacco cessation PEMS for use along with a brief intervention training designed for three types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners: chiropractic, acupuncture, and massage. We describe how PEMs in CAM practitioners' offices were perceived and used by practitioners and by patients. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 53 practitioners and 38 of their patients. This analysis specifically focused on developing and distributing project-related posters and pamphlets in CAM <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Our findings indicate that materials (1) legitimated tobacco-related expertise among CAM practitioners and tobacco-related conversations as part of routine CAM <span class="hlt">practice</span>, (2) increased practitioners' willingness to approach the topic of tobacco with patients, (3) created an effective way to communicate tobacco-related information and broaden the reach of brief intervention initiatives, and (4) were given to patients who were not willing to engage in direct discussion of tobacco use with practitioners.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27011477','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27011477"><span>Social Media <span class="hlt">Impact</span>: Utility of Reflective Approach in the <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of Surgery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mohiuddin, Zia; Shahid, Hassan; Shuaib, Waqas</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Social media is rapidly being incorporated into medical education. We created a small group, reflective <span class="hlt">practice</span> sessions by integrating specific medical cases to improve awareness about professionalism on social media. Medical scenarios were generated for reflective <span class="hlt">practice</span> sessions on social media professionalism. Anonymous pre/post-session surveys evaluated residents' use of social media and gathered their opinions on the session. Thirty-eight of 48 (79 %) residents replied to the presession survey with 50 % (19/38) reporting daily digital media use, 76 % (29/38) witnessed unprofessional postings on social media, and 21 % (8/38) posted unprofessional content themselves. Of the 79 % (30/38) residents who attended the session, 74 % (28/38) completed the post-session survey. Residents reported the session added to the longevity of their professional career 4.11, 95 % CI (3.89-4.36). As a result of the session, they were more conscious of using the social media more professionally 3.47, 95 % CI (2.88-3.96) and would be proactive in protecting patient privacy and confidentiality on social media sites 3.96, 95 % CI (3.50-4.37). In summary, reflective <span class="hlt">practice</span>-based sessions regarding the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of social media on professionalism in surgery was well favored by the residents. The majority agreed that it had important implications for the longevity of their professional career. Participants reported having an increased awareness to protect patient privacy and utilize social media more professionally.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18847107','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18847107"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of an interprofessional rural health care <span class="hlt">practice</span> education experience on students and communities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Charles, Grant; Bainbridge, Lesley; Copeman-Stewart, Kathy; Kassam, Rosemin; Tiffin, Shelly</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The Interprofessional Rural Program of British Columbia (IRPBC) was established in 2003 as a pilot program aimed at supporting the recruitment of health and human service professionals to rural communities in British Columbia, Canada. The program was designed to expose students in the health and human service professions to rural communities and to assess whether this exposure increased the likelihood of their return to work in nonurban settings once they completed their studies. The initial qualitative evaluation of IRPBC was conducted via individual interviews in the first year and written questionnaires in the second year. In general, IRPBC was perceived by the participants to have had a significant <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the students and communities. The students who participated in it benefited not only from the chance to engage in rural <span class="hlt">practice</span> but also from the opportunity to interact within an interprofessional context; and the communities participating in the program profited from enhanced health care and the possibility of attracting new practitioners from these students. Exposure to new ways of providing service and the <span class="hlt">impact</span> that the introduction of teams of passionate students can have on both practitioners and small communities have greatly enriched the broader communities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014E%26ES...18a2092H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014E%26ES...18a2092H"><span>Road-networks, a <span class="hlt">practical</span> indicator of human <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on biodiversity in Tropical forests</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hosaka, T.; Yamada, T.; Okuda, T.</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>Tropical forests sustain the most diverse plants and animals in the world, but are also being lost most rapidly. Rapid assessment and monitoring using remote sensing on biodiversity of tropical forests is needed to predict and evaluate biodiversity loss by human activities. Identification of reliable indicators of forest biodiversity and/or its loss is an urgent issue. In the present paper, we propose the density of road networks in tropical forests can be a good and <span class="hlt">practical</span> indicator of human <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on biodiversity in tropical forests through reviewing papers and introducing our preliminary survey in peninsular Malaysia. Many previous studies suggest a strong negative <span class="hlt">impact</span> of forest roads on biodiversity in tropical rainforests since they changes microclimate, soil properties, drainage patterns, canopy openness and forest accessibility. Moreover, our preliminary survey also showed that even a narrow logging road (6 m wide) significantly lowered abundance of dung beetles (well-known bio-indicator in biodiversity survey in tropical forests) near the road. Since these road networks are readily to be detected with remote sensing approach such as aerial photographs and Lider, regulation and monitoring of the road networks using remote sensing techniques is a key to slow down the rate of biodiversity loss due to forest degradation in tropical forests.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2720361','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2720361"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Advanced Pharmacy <span class="hlt">Practice</span> Experiences on Students' Readiness for Self-directed Learning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Haines, Stuart T.; Plaza, Cecilia M.; Sturpe, Deborah A.; Williams, Greg; Rodriguez de Bittner, Magaly A.; Roffman, David S.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Objective To evaluate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of advanced pharmacy <span class="hlt">practice</span> experiences (APPEs) on doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students' readiness for self-directed learning. Methods The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS) was administered to students prior to and after completing their APPEs. SDLRS is a validated instrument that determines the relative degree to which students have the attitudes and motivation to engage in self-directed learning. Results Seventy-seven (64%) students completed the SDLRS prior to starting their APPEs and 80 (67%) students completed the instrument after completing their APPEs. Forty-six (38%) students completed both. Prior to starting their APPEs, 74% of students scored greater than 150 on the SDLRS, indicating a high level of readiness for self-directed learning. No significant difference was found between the mean scores of students who took the SDLRS both prior to (159 ± 20) and after completing their APPEs (159 ± 24; p > 0.05). Conclusion Students at our institution appear to be ready for self-directed learning but APPEs had a minimal <span class="hlt">impact</span> on their readiness for self-directed learning. PMID:19657498</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20618385','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20618385"><span>Health and social <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of a flood disaster: responding to needs and implications for <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carroll, Bob; Balogh, Ruth; Morbey, Hazel; Araoz, Gonzalo</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>Carlisle in northwest England suffered its worse floods for more than 180 years in 2005. A study, reported here, was undertaken to assess the health and social <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of these floods via in-depth, taped individual and focus-group interviews with people whose homes had been flooded and with agency workers who helped them. Respondents spoke of physical health ailments, psychological stress, water health-and-safety issues related to the floods, and disputes with insurance and construction companies, which they felt had caused and exacerbated psychological health problems. Support workers also suffered from psychological stress. Furthermore, it was found that people had low expectations of a flood and were not prepared. The findings are presented in five sections covering flood risk awareness, water contamination issues, physical health, mental health, and <span class="hlt">impact</span> on frontline support workers. The discussion focuses on the implications of the findings for policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span> vis-à-vis psychological health provision, contamination issues, training and support for frontline support workers, matters relating to restoration, and preparation for flooding.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21499664','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21499664"><span>An evaluation of the environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment system in Vietnam: The gap between theory and <span class="hlt">practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Clausen, Alison; Vu, Hoang Hoa; Pedrono, Miguel</p> <p>2011-03-15</p> <p>Vietnam has one of the fastest growing economies in the world and has achieved significant socio-economic development in recent years. However this growth is placing increased pressure on an already depleted natural environment. Environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment (EIA) is recognised by the Government and international organizations as an important tool in the management of the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of future development on the country's natural resource base. The Government's commitment to EIA has been demonstrated through the development and adoption of the Law on Environment Protection (Revised) in 2005 which sets out the requirements for EIA and which represents a major step in the development of a robust legislative framework for EIA in Vietnam. The Law on Environment Protection (Revised) 2005 has now been operational for several years and we have undertaken an evaluation of the resulting EIA system in Vietnam. We argue that while significant improvements have been achieved in the EIA policy framework, an important gap remains between EIA theory and <span class="hlt">practice</span>. We contend that the basis of the current EIA legislation is strong and that future developments of the EIA system in Vietnam should focus on improving capacity of EIA practitioners rather than further substantial legislative change. Such improvements would allow the Vietnamese EIA system to emerge as an effective and efficient tool for environmental management in Vietnam and as a model EIA framework for other developing countries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27350522','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27350522"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Twitter and Facebook on Nursing <span class="hlt">Practice</span> and Education: A Systematic Review of the Literature.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Asiri, Hanan; Househ, Mowafa</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This systematic review aims to answer the following question: What is the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of Twitter and Facebook on nursing <span class="hlt">practice</span> and education? Any article that was written in English and was published in PubMed and Computers Informatics Nursing (CIN) journal from 2011 up to 2016 and discussed the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of Twitter and Facebook on nursing <span class="hlt">practice</span> and education was included, while any opinion and review articles were excluded. The results show three themes that are covered by the literature: (1) using social media to enhance students' confidence and /or self-efficacy, (2) characteristics of nurses who use social media, and (3) preferred modes of communication. Further research is still needed to reveal the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of Twitter and Facebook on nursing education as well as other specialties of nursing <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27179812','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27179812"><span>Cosmet'eau-Changes in the personal care product consumption <span class="hlt">practices</span>: from whistle-blowers to <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on aquatic environments.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bressy, Adèle; Carré, Catherine; Caupos, Émilie; de Gouvello, Bernard; Deroubaix, José-Frédéric; Deutsch, Jean-Claude; Mailler, Romain; Marconi, Anthony; Neveu, Pascale; Paulic, Laurent; Pichon, Sébastien; Rocher, Vincent; Severin, Irina; Soyer, Mathilde; Moilleron, Régis</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>The Cosmet'eau project (2015-2018) investigates the "changes in the personal care product (PCP) consumption <span class="hlt">practices</span>: from whistle-blowers to <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on aquatic environments." In this project, the example of PCPs will be used to understand how public health concerns related to micropollutants can be addressed by public authorities-including local authorities, industries, and consumers. The project aims to characterize the possible changes in PCP consumption <span class="hlt">practices</span> and to evaluate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of their implementation on aquatic contamination. Our goals are to study the whistle-blowers, the risk perception of consumers linked with their <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and the contamination in parabens and their substitutes, triclosan, and triclocarban from wastewater to surface water. The project investigates the following potential solutions: modifications of industrial formulation or changes in consumption <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The final purpose is to provide policy instruments for local authorities aiming at building effective strategies to fight against micropollutants in receiving waters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22826516','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22826516"><span>Informing policy and programme decisions for scaling up the PMTCT and <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV response through joint technical missions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jashi, Mariam; Viswanathan, Rekha; Ekpini, Rene; Chandan, Upjeet; Idele, Priscilla; Luo, Chewe; Legins, Ken; Chatterjee, Anirban</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>In 2005, due to slow global progress in the scale-up of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV programmes, the Inter-agency Task Team (IATT) on the Prevention of HIV infection among Pregnant Women, Mothers, and their Children initiated joint technical missions (JTMs) to countries of high HIV disease burden. The JTMs were intended to galvanize country actions for a more comprehensive response to PMTCT and <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV by bringing national and global stakeholders together to review national policies and programmes and develop country-specific recommendations for accelerating scale-up. Between 2005 and 2010, the IATT conducted JTMs in 18 low- and middle-income countries. In 2007, to assess the role played by the missions, a review in the first eight countries (Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, India, Malawi, Rwanda, Tanzania and Zambia) that hosted JTMs was undertaken. Country progress was assessed through desk review and key informant interviews. For each country, documents reviewed included JTM reports, baseline data for PMTCT and <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV care and treatment, and 2004 to 2007 trend data on key PMTCT and <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV indicators. Drawing upon the findings, this paper posits that JTMs contributed to national scale-up of PMTCT and <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV programmes through strengthening governance and co-ordination mechanisms for the programmes, promoting enabling policy environments, and supporting the development of national scale-up plans, which have been critical for leveraging additional financial resources for scale-up. Although the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the JTMs could be enhanced through greater follow-up and continued targeted assistance in technical areas such as infant and young child feeding, community-based programming and supply chain management, findings indicate that the JTMs are a useful mechanism for informing policy and programme decisions necessary for scaling up PMTCT and <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> HIV responses. Moreover, by bringing</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28148321','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28148321"><span>Training residents and fellows in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiac anaesthesia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Andropoulos, Dean B</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The significant increase in complex anaesthetic care for infants, children, adolescents, and adults with CHD has given rise to specialized fellowship training programs. Specialized <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiac anaesthesia training for residents and fellows has advanced significantly since the 1970's, when there a handful of programs. With the advent of formal <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> anaesthesia fellowship programs in the U.S., more specialized training became available in the 1990's and early 2000's. In the past decade, increasing numbers of second year advanced fellowships in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> cardiac anaesthesia have been organized; today in North America there are 18 programs with 25 positions. Standardized recommendations for case numbers and curriculum have been devised and are widely available via journal publications.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26525515','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26525515"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K</p> <p>2008-09-01</p> <p>Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> pain.Although research is limited for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24932845','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24932845"><span>Basics, principles, techniques and modern methods in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> ultrasonography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Riccabona, Michael</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Ultrasonography (US) is the mainstay of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> Radiology. This review aims at revisiting basic US principles, to list specific needs throughout childhood, and to discuss the application of new and modern US methods. The various sections elude to basic US physics, technical requisites and tips for handling, diagnostically valuable applications of modern techniques, and how to properly address hazards, risks and limitations. In conclusion, US holds vast potential throughout childhood in almost all body regions and many childhood specific queries - helping to reduce the need for or to optimize more invasive or irradiating imaging. Make the most of US and offerings a dedicated <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> US service throughout the day, the week and the year thus is and will stay a major task of <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Radiology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25555270','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25555270"><span>Intima media thickness measurement in children: A statement from the Association for European <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Cardiology (AEPC) Working Group on Cardiovascular Prevention endorsed by the Association for European <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Cardiology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dalla Pozza, Robert; Ehringer-Schetitska, Doris; Fritsch, Peter; Jokinen, Eero; Petropoulos, Andreas; Oberhoffer, Renate</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Atherosclerosis causing cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in the developed world. Early precursors of vascular changes - subclinical atherosclerosis - warrant special attention as this process can be stabilized or even reversed if treated in time. Sonographic Intima Media Thickness measurement of the carotid artery (cIMT: carotid Intima-Media-Thickness) is considered a valid surrogate marker for cardiovascular risk allowing assessment of atherosclerotic changes at a very early stage. It is easy to apply due to its non-invasive character. Moreover, cIMT has been proven to provide reliable and reproducible results both in adult and adolescent patients. For the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> age group, several characteristics deserve special consideration. The heterogeneity of techniques of scanning, measurement and interpretation impede the comparison and interpretation of IMT values so far. Also, age- and sex-dependent normative data have to be considered for interpretation. Thus, the Association for European <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Cardiology (AEPC) Working Group on Cardiovascular Prevention concludes to refer a statement on cIMT scanning, measurement and interpretation with special focus on <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patients. This statement includes an overview on normative data available as well as a <span class="hlt">practical</span> guideline for the setting, scanning, measurement and interpretation of IMT values. Synchronizing different measurement methods will allow for comparing the results of several research centers. By that, in a large patient number, sufficient information may be given to assess the long-term endpoints of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.H33F1090I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.H33F1090I"><span>Environmental <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Assessment of Shrimp Culture <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in Southwest Coastal Region of Bangladesh</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Islam, M. M.; Rouf, M. A.; Hambrey, J.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p> nutrients through supply water was slightly higher than nutrient discharged through water outlet, which indicates a net retention of nutrients in the pond ecosystems. A large portion of this sediment nutrient eventually finds its routes into the wider aquatic system every year during pond preparation. Though the aquatic environment is able to accommodate the load from the present level of aquaculture <span class="hlt">practice</span>, the assimilative power of aquatic environment is in danger of being degraded with the unplanned intensification of shrimp culture areas. In planning aquaculture and future development all the issues and <span class="hlt">impacts</span> must be considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5293203','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5293203"><span><span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of human-related <span class="hlt">practices</span> on Ommatissus lybicus infestations of date palm in Oman</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Al-Kindi, Khalifa M.; Andrew, Nigel R.; Welch, Mitchell</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Date palm cultivation is economically important in the Sultanate of Oman, with significant financial investments coming from both the government and private individuals. However, a widespread Dubas bug (DB) (Ommatissus lybicus Bergevin) infestation has <span class="hlt">impacted</span> regions including the Middle East, North Africa, Southeast Russia, and Spain, resulting in widespread damages to date palms. In this study, techniques in spatial statistics including ordinary least squares (OLS), geographically weighted regression (GRW), and exploratory regression (ER) were applied to (a) model the correlation between DB infestations and human-related <span class="hlt">practices</span> that include irrigation methods, row spacing, palm tree density, and management of undercover and intercropped vegetation, and (b) predict the locations of future DB infestations in northern Oman. Firstly, we extracted row spacing and palm tree density information from remote sensed satellite images. Secondly, we collected data on irrigation <span class="hlt">practices</span> and management by using a simple questionnaire, augmented with spatial data. Thirdly, we conducted our statistical analyses using all possible combinations of values over a given set of candidate variables using the chosen predictive modelling and regression techniques. Lastly, we identified the combination of human-related <span class="hlt">practices</span> that are most conducive to the survival and spread of DB. Our results show that there was a strong correlation between DB infestations and several human-related <span class="hlt">practices</span> parameters (R2 = 0.70). Variables including palm tree density, spacing between trees (less than 5 x 5 m), insecticide application, date palm and farm service (pruning, dethroning, remove weeds, and thinning), irrigation systems, offshoots removal, fertilisation and labour (non-educated) issues, were all found to significantly influence the degree of DB infestations. This study is expected to help reduce the extent and cost of aerial and ground sprayings, while facilitating the allocation of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3040127','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3040127"><span>Supporting work <span class="hlt">practices</span> through telehealth: <span class="hlt">impact</span> on nurses in peripheral regions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background In Canada, workforce shortages in the health care sector constrain the ability of the health care system to meet the needs of its population and of its health care professionals. This issue is of particular importance in peripheral regions of Quebec, where significant inequalities in workforce distribution between regions has lead to acute nursing shortages and increased workloads. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are innovative solutions that can be used to develop strategies to optimise the use of available resources and to design new nursing work <span class="hlt">practices</span>. However, current knowledge is still limited about the real <span class="hlt">impact</span> of ICTs on nursing recruitment and retention. Our aim is to better understand how work <span class="hlt">practice</span> reorganization, supported by ICTs, and particularly by telehealth, may influence professional, educational, and organizational factors relating to Quebec nurses, notably those working in peripheral regions. Methods/Design First, we will conduct a descriptive study on the issue of nursing recruitment. Stratified sampling will be used to select approximately twenty innovative projects relating to the reorganization of work <span class="hlt">practices</span> based upon ICTs. Semi-structured interviews with key informants will determine professional, educational, and organizational recruitment factors. The results will be used to create a questionnaire which, using a convenience sampling method, will be mailed to 600 third year students and recent graduates of two Quebec university nursing faculties. Descriptive, correlation, and hierarchical regression analyses will be performed to identify factors influencing nursing graduates' intentions to <span class="hlt">practice</span> in peripheral regions. Secondly, we will conduct five case studies pertaining to the issue of nursing retention. Five ICT projects in semi-urban, rural, and isolated regions have been identified. Qualitative data will be collected through field observation and approximately fifty semi</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT........33E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT........33E"><span>Mathematics education <span class="hlt">practice</span> in Nigeria: Its <span class="hlt">impact</span> in a post-colonial era</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Enime, Noble O. J.</p> <p></p> <p>This qualitative research method of study examined the <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of the Nigerian pre-independence era Mathematics Education <span class="hlt">Practice</span> on the Post-Colonial era Mathematics Education <span class="hlt">Practice</span>. The study was designed to gather qualitative information related to Pre-independence and Postcolonial era data related to Mathematics Education <span class="hlt">Practice</span> in Nigeria (Western, Eastern and the Middle Belt) using interview questions. Data was collected through face to face interviews. Over ten themes emerged from these qualitative interview questions when data was analyzed. Some of the themes emerging from the sub questions were as follows. "Mentally mature to understand the mathematics" and "Not mentally mature to understand the mathematics", "mentally mature to understand the mathematics, with the help of others" and "Not Sure". Others were "Contented with Age of Enrollment" and "Not contented with Age of Enrollment". From the questions of type of school attended and liking of mathematics the following themes emerged: "Attended UPE (Universal Primary Education) and understood Mathematics", and "Attended Standard Education System and did not like Mathematics". Connections between the liking of mathematics and the respondents' eventual careers were seen through the following themes that emerged. "Biological Sciences based career and enjoyed High School Mathematics Experience", "Economics and Business Education based career and enjoyed High School Mathematics Experience" and five more themes. The themes, "Very helpful" and "Unhelpful" emerged from the question concerning parents and students' homework. Some of the themes emerging from the interviews were as follows: "Awesome because of method of Instruction of Mathematics", "Awesome because Mathematics was easy", "Awesome because I had a Good Teacher or Teachers" and four other themes, "Like and dislike of Mathematics", "Heavy work load", "Subject matter content" and "Rigor of instruction". More emerging themes are presented in this</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28166300','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28166300"><span><span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of human-related <span class="hlt">practices</span> on Ommatissus lybicus infestations of date palm in Oman.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al-Kindi, Khalifa M; Kwan, Paul; Andrew, Nigel R; Welch, Mitchell</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Date palm cultivation is economically important in the Sultanate of Oman, with significant financial investments coming from both the government and private individuals. However, a widespread Dubas bug (DB) (Ommatissus lybicus Bergevin) infestation has <span class="hlt">impacted</span> regions including the Middle East, North Africa, Southeast Russia, and Spain, resulting in widespread damages to date palms. In this study, techniques in spatial statistics including ordinary least squares (OLS), geographically weighted regression (GRW), and exploratory regression (ER) were applied to (a) model the correlation between DB infestations and human-related <span class="hlt">practices</span> that include irrigation methods, row spacing, palm tree density, and management of undercover and intercropped vegetation, and (b) predict the locations of future DB infestations in northern Oman. Firstly, we extracted row spacing and palm tree density information from remote sensed satellite images. Secondly, we collected data on irrigation <span class="hlt">practices</span> and management by using a simple questionnaire, augmented with spatial data. Thirdly, we conducted our statistical analyses using all possible combinations of values over a given set of candidate variables using the chosen predictive modelling and regression techniques. Lastly, we identified the combination of human-related <span class="hlt">practices</span> that are most conducive to the survival and spread of DB. Our results show that there was a strong correlation between DB infestations and several human-related <span class="hlt">practices</span> parameters (R2 = 0.70). Variables including palm tree density, spacing between trees (less than 5 x 5 m), insecticide application, date palm and farm service (pruning, dethroning, remove weeds, and thinning), irrigation systems, offshoots removal, fertilisation and labour (non-educated) issues, were all found to significantly influence the degree of DB infestations. This study is expected to help reduce the extent and cost of aerial and ground sprayings, while facilitating the allocation of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23077863','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23077863"><span>Modelling seasonal variations in presentations at a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> emergency department.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Takase, Miyuki; Carlin, John</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>Overcrowding is a phenomenon commonly observed at emergency departments (EDs) in many hospitals, and negatively <span class="hlt">impacts</span> patients, healthcare professionals and organisations. Health care organisations are expected to act proactively to cope with a high patient volume by understanding and predicting the patterns of ED presentations. The aim of this study was, therefore, to identify the patterns of patient flow at a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> ED in order to assist the management of EDs. Data for ED presentations were collected from the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, with the time-frame of July 2003 to June 2008. A linear regression analysis with trigonometric functions was used to identify the pattern of patient flow at the ED. The results showed that a logarithm of the daily average ED presentations was increasing exponentially (as explained by 0.004t + 0.00005t2 with t representing time, p<0.001). The model also indicated that there was a yearly oscillation in the frequency of ED presentations, in which lower frequencies were observed in summer and higher frequencies during winter (as explained by -0.046 sin(2(pi)t/12)-0.083 cos(2(pi)t/12), p<0.001). In addition, the variation of the oscillations was increasing over time (as explained by -0.002t*sin(2(pi)t/12)-0.001t*cos(2(pi)t/12), p<0.05). The identified regression model explained a total of 96% of the variance in the pattern of ED presentations. This model can be used to understand the trend of the current patient flow as well as to predict the future flow at the ED. Such an understanding will assist health care managers to prepare resources and environment more effectively to cope with overcrowding.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27270905','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27270905"><span><span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Drug Development and Formulation Design-a European Perspective.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Van Riet-Nales, Diana A; Kozarewicz, Piotr; Aylward, Brian; de Vries, Rutger; Egberts, Toine C G; Rademaker, Carin M A; Schobben, Alfred F A M</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>The availability of licensed <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> drugs is lagging behind those for adults, and there is a lack of safe formulations in suitable doses that children are able and willing to take. As a consequence, children are commonly treated with off-label or unlicensed drugs. As off-label and unlicensed drug use are associated with a greater risk for harm than on-label drug use, a range of global initiatives have been developed to realize "better" medicines for children. This review describes the challenges and achievements of the European Union to realize this goal, with a focus on <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> drug development and formulation design. In 2007, a European <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Regulation was installed enforcing companies to consider children in the early development of drugs with a new drug substance, for a new indication or with a new route of administration. The Regulation, e.g. requires companies to develop a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> investigation plan discussing the proposed clinical trials in children of different ages and the formulations for future marketing. Since 2013, the pharmaceutical design of any newly marketed <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> drug should comply with the "Guideline on the Pharmaceutical Development of Medicines for <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Use." Companies should, e.g. justify the route of administration, dosage form, formulation characteristics, safety of excipients, dosing frequency, container closure system, administration device, patient acceptability and user information. In this review, the guideline's key aspects are discussed with a focus on novel formulations such as mini-tablets and orodispersible films, excipients with a potential risk for harm such as azo dyes and adequate user instructions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4045729','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4045729"><span>Oral Medicines for Children in the European <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Investigation Plans</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>van Riet – Nales, Diana A.; Römkens, Erwin G. A. W.; Saint-Raymond, Agnes; Kozarewicz, Piotr; Schobben, Alfred F. A. M.; Egberts, Toine C. G.; Rademaker, Carin M. A.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Pharmaceutical industry is no longer allowed to develop new medicines for use in adults only, as the 2007 <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Regulation requires children to be considered also. The plans for such <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> development called <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Investigation Plans (PIPs) are subject to agreement by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and its <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Committee (PDCO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the key characteristics of oral <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> medicines in the PIPs and the changes implemented as a result of the EMA/PDCO review. Methods All PIPs agreed by 31 December 2011 were identified through a proprietary EMA-database. PIPs were included if they contained an agreed proposal to develop an oral medicine for children 0 to 11 years. Information on the therapeutic area (EMA classification system); target age range (as defined by industry) and pharmaceutical characteristics (active substance, dosage form(s) as listed in the PIP, strength of each dosage form, excipients in each strength of each dosage form) was extracted from the EMA website or the EMA/PDCO assessment reports. Results A hundred and fifty PIPs were included corresponding to 16 therapeutic areas and 220 oral dosage forms in 431 strengths/compositions. Eighty-two PIPs (37%) included tablets, 44 (20%) liquids and 35 (16%) dosage forms with a specific composition/strength that were stored as a solid but swallowed as a liquid e.g. dispersible tablets. The EMA/PDCO review resulted in an increase of 13 (207 to 220) oral <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> dosage forms and 44 (387 to 431) dosage forms with a specific composition/strength. For many PIPs, the target age range was widened and the excipient composition and usability aspects modified. Conclusion The EMA/PDCO review realized an increase in the number of requirements for the development of oral dosage forms and a larger increase in the number of dosage forms with a specific composition/strength, both targeting younger children. Changes to their pharmaceutical design were</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1487803','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1487803"><span>Neonatal circumcision revisited. Fetus and Newborn Committee, Canadian <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Society.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>OBJECTIVE: To assist physicians in providing guidance to parents regarding neonatal circumcision. OPTIONS: Whether to recommend the routine circumcision of newborn male infants. OUTCOMES: Costs and complications of neonatal circumcision, the incidence of urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases and cancer of the penis in circumcised and uncircumcised males, and of cervical cancer in their partners, and the costs of treating these diseases. EVIDENCE: The literature on circumcision was reviewed by the Fetus and Newborn Committee of the Canadian <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Society. During extensive discussion at meetings of the committee over a 24-month period, the strength of the evidence was carefully weighed and the perspective of the committee developed. VALUES: The literature was assessed to determine whether neonatal circumcision improves the health of boys and men and is a cost-effective approach to preventing penile problems and associated urinary tract conditions. Religious and personal values were not included in the assessment. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The effect of neonatal circumcision on the incidence of urinary tract infection, sexually transmitted diseases, cancer of the penis, cervical cancer and penile problems; the complications of circumcision; and estimates of the costs of neonatal circumcision and of the treatment of later penile conditions, urinary tract infections and complications of circumcision. RECOMMENDATION: Circumcision of newborns should not be routinely performed. VALIDATION: This recommendation is in keeping with previous statements on neonatal circumcision by the Canadian <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The statement was reviewed by the Infectious Disease Committee of the Canadian <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Society. The Board of Directors of the Canadian <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Society has reviewed its content and approved it for publication. SPONSOR: This is an official statement of the Canadian <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Society. No external</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19244940','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19244940"><span>European survey on ethical and legal framework of clinical trials in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>: results and perspectives.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Altavilla, Annagrazia; Giaquinto, Carlo; Ceci, Adriana</p> <p>2008-09-01</p> <p>This article constitutes a synthesis and analysis of the results of the "Survey on the ethical and legal frameworks existing in Europe for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> clinical trials" carried out by the European network TEDDY. TEDDY is a "Network of Excellence" funded by the Sixth EU Framework Programme (FP6). It began its activities in June 2005 and it is scheduled to run until 2010. It involves 19 partners in 11 countries. The overall goal of TEDDY is to promote the availability of safe and effective medicines to children in Europe by integrating existing expertise and the good <span class="hlt">practices</span>. In the domain of ethics, the main aim of TEDDY is raise the awareness of the public and researchers concerning issues linked to biomedical research in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>, by contributing to developing the debate on the ethical and legal stakes, as well as the potential deviations, in order to ensure the best possible protection of children participating in clinical trials. This study, with twenty-seven participating countries (23 EU Member States and 4 countries associated to the Fifth and Sixth EU Framework Programme), proposes to highlight the existing differences in the legislation of European countries concerning the procedure of consent, as well as the guarantee of the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> expertise within the Ethics Committees which are in charge of evaluating research protocols. The study shows that, even though the Directive 2001/20/EC has been transposed, the value attributed to the consent of minors who participate in clinical trials is different depending on the European state. Despite the general rule of having the written consent of the legal representative of the minor, over a certain age (different in relation to each state) and under certain conditions, to give the consent alone to participate in biomedical research. Furthermore, there is an Ethics Committee for minors in only four countries. In addition, we illustrate the lack of information and in-depth debate in Europe concerning the ethical</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27799154','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27799154"><span>Developing a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> drug formulary for the Netherlands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>van der Zanden, Tjitske M; de Wildt, Saskia N; Liem, Yves; Offringa, Martin; de Hoog, Matthijs</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>As many drugs in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span> are used off-label, prescribers face a lack of evidence-based dosing guidelines. A Dutch framework was developed to provide dosing guidelines based on best available evidence from registration data, investigator-initiated research, professional guidelines, clinical experience and consensus. This has clarified the scientific grounds of drug use for children and encouraged uniformity in prescribing habits in the Netherlands. The developed framework and the current content of the Dutch <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Formulary could be used as basis for similar initiatives worldwide, preferably in a concerted effort to ultimately provide children with effective and safe drug therapy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10139624','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10139624"><span>A customer focus to <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> health care: John Hunter Hospital.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Keatinge, D</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The Department of <span class="hlt">Paediatrics</span> at John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, was invited to represent <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> services in the New South Wales Department of Health's customer focus initiative. Six health care organisations were selected to be pathfinder centres in customer focus under this initiative. The aim of these pathfinder centres was to trial customer-oriented projects that would be applicable to other health care organisations. This article will discuss the process through which three customer-focused projects were identified and implemented, and discuss some of the outcomes of these projects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28351833','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28351833"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of total knee replacement <span class="hlt">practice</span>: cost effectiveness analysis of data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ferket, Bart S; Feldman, Zachary; Zhou, Jing; Oei, Edwin H; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Mazumdar, Madhu</p> <p>2017-03-28</p> <p>Objectives To evaluate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of total knee replacement on quality of life in people with knee osteoarthritis and to estimate associated differences in lifetime costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) according to use by level of symptoms.Design Marginal structural modeling and cost effectiveness analysis based on lifetime predictions for total knee replacement and death from population based cohort data.Setting Data from two studies-Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) and the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST)-within the US health system.Participants 4498 participants with or at high risk for knee osteoarthritis aged 45-79 from the OAI with no previous knee replacement (confirmed by baseline radiography) followed up for nine years. Validation cohort comprised 2907 patients from MOST with two year follow-up.Intervention Scenarios ranging from current <span class="hlt">practice</span>, defined as total knee replacement <span class="hlt">practice</span> as performed in the OAI (with procedural rates estimated by a prediction model), to <span class="hlt">practice</span> limited to patients with severe symptoms to no surgery.Main outcome measures Generic (SF-12) and osteoarthritis specific quality of life measured over 96 months, model based QALYs, costs, and incremental cost effectiveness ratios over a lifetime horizon.Results In the OAI, total knee replacement showed improvements in quality of life with small absolute changes when averaged across levels of confounding variables: 1.70 (95% uncertainty interval 0.26 to 3.57) for SF-12 physical component summary (PCS); -10.69 (-13.39 to -8.01) for Western Ontario and McMaster Universities arthritis index (WOMAC); and 9.16 (6.35 to 12.49) for knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) quality of life subscale. These improvements became larger with decreasing functional status at baseline. Provision of total knee replacement to patients with SF-12 PCS scores <35 was the optimal scenario given a cost effectiveness threshold of $200 000/QALY, with cost savings of $6974</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26227314','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26227314"><span>[Blood cultures in the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> emergency department. Guidelines and recommendations on their indications, collection, processing and interpretation].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hernández-Bou, S; Álvarez Álvarez, C; Campo Fernández, M N; García Herrero, M A; Gené Giralt, A; Giménez Pérez, M; Piñeiro Pérez, R; Gómez Cortés, B; Velasco, R; Menasalvas Ruiz, A I; García García, J J; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Liria, C</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Blood culture (BC) is the gold standard when a bacteraemia is suspected, and is one of the most requested microbiological tests in <span class="hlt">paediatrics</span>. Some changes have occurred in recent years: the introduction of new vaccines, the increasing number of patients with central vascular catheters, as well as the introduction of continuous monitoring BC systems. These changes have led to the review and update of different factors related to this technique in order to optimise its use. A <span class="hlt">practice</span> guideline is presented with recommendations on BC, established by the Spanish Society of <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Emergency Care and the Spanish Society for <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Infectious Diseases. After reviewing the available scientific evidence, several recommendations for each of the following aspects are presented: BC indications in the Emergency Department, how to obtain, transport and process cultures, special situations (indications and interpretation of results in immunosuppressed patients and/or central vascular catheter carriers, indications for anaerobic BC), differentiation between bacteraemia and contamination when a BC shows bacterial growth and actions to take with a positive BC in patients with fever of unknown origin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Vision&pg=4&id=EJ972718','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Vision&pg=4&id=EJ972718"><span>From Philosophy to <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: An Investigation of the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of a School's Philosophy on Policy and Classroom <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Scouller, Dianne L.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Recent research in two New Zealand Christian schools found that despite biblical vision and mission statements and declarations of pedagogy built on biblical foundations, actual classroom <span class="hlt">practice</span> frequently differed little from that in secular schools. Teachers could clearly articulate their respective school's vision and goals but all except one…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4746047','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4746047"><span>Prevalence of and Reasons for Patients Leaving Against Medical Advice from <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Wards in Oman</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Al-Ghafri, Mohamed; Al-Bulushi, Abdullah; Al-Qasmi, Ahmed</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of and reasons for patients leaving against medical advice (LAMA) in a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> setting in Oman. This retrospective study was carried out between January 2007 and December 2009 and assessed patients who left the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> wards at the Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman, against medical advice. Of 11,482 regular discharges, there were 183 cases of LAMA (prevalence: 1.6%). Dissatisfaction with treatment and a desire to seek a second opinion were collectively the most cited reasons for LAMA according to data from the hospital’s electronic system (27.9%) and telephone conversations with patients’ parents (55.0%). No reasons for LAMA were documented in the hospital’s electronic system for 109 patients (59.6%). The low observed prevalence of LAMA suggests good medical <span class="hlt">practice</span> at the Royal Hospital. This study indicates the need for thorough documentation of all LAMA cases to ensure the availability of high-quality data for healthcare workers involved in preventing LAMA. PMID:26909217</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24231050','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24231050"><span>Design and physicochemical stability studies of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> oral formulations of sildenafil.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Provenza, N; Calpena, A C; Mallandrich, M; Halbaut, L; Clares, B</p> <p>2014-01-02</p> <p>Personalized medicine is a challenging research area in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> treatments. Elaborating new <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> formulations when no commercial forms are available is a common <span class="hlt">practice</span> in pharmacy laboratories; among these, oral liquid formulations are the most common. But due to the lack of specialized equipment, frequently studies to assure the efficiency and safety of the final medicine cannot be carried out. Thus the purpose of this work was the development, characterization and stability evaluation of two oral formulations of sildenafil for the treatment of neonatal persistent pulmonary hypertension. After the establishment of a standard operating procedure (SOP) and elaboration, the physicochemical stability parameters appearance, pH, particle size, rheological behaviour and drug content of formulations were evaluated at three different temperatures for 90 days. Equally, prediction of long term stability, as well as, microbiological stability was performed. Formulations resulted in a suspension and a solution slightly coloured exhibiting fruity odour. Formulation I (suspension) exhibited the best physicochemical properties including Newtonian behaviour and uniformity of API content above 90% to assure an exact dosification process.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5124635','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5124635"><span>Piloting Psychology Annual Reviews as a Method of Measuring Psychological Distress and Quality of Life in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Renal Transplant Patients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Psychosocial distress and poorer quality of life after renal transplantation are common in children and young people. This has implications for medication adherence and survival. Posttransplant psychology annual reviews were introduced in one <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Renal Service in the UK as a means of measuring psychological distress and quality of life, as well as facilitating identification of patients and parents/carers who would benefit from psychological intervention. The process of completing posttransplant psychology annual reviews is discussed within this paper. The posttransplant psychology annual review appointments identified patients experiencing depression and/or anxiety and problems in quality of life. These assessments have led to appropriate referrals to, and engagement with, the renal psychology service as well as with community tier 3 child and adolescent mental health services. The posttransplant psychology annual review will continue to be completed at this UK site and discussions will be undertaken with other <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> renal transplant services to consider whether these could be introduced at a national level to facilitate collection of longitudinal data regarding long-term psychosocial <span class="hlt">impact</span> of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> renal transplantation and its effect on quality of life. PMID:27965973</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=eps&pg=5&id=EJ1035704','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=eps&pg=5&id=EJ1035704"><span>2014 Code of <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: How Research Evidence on the Role and <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Teaching Assistants Can Inform Professional <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Webster, Rob</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In this article, the author reflects on findings from research on the role and <span class="hlt">impact</span> of teaching assistants and experience of working as a special educational needs (SEN) officer. Research evidence suggests the reliance on teaching assistants to include pupils with Statements of SEN in mainstream settings masks a collective, though unintentional,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19000859','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19000859"><span>[Osteoarticular infections: therapeutic proposals of the <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Infectious Diseases Group of the French Society of <span class="hlt">Paediatrics</span> (GPIP)].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Grimprel, E; Lorrot, M; Haas, H; Pinquier, D; Parez, N; Ferroni, A; Cohen, R</p> <p>2008-10-01</p> <p>The empiric choice of initial antibiotherapy in osteoarticular infections in infants and children must take into consideration the actual epidemiology of principal pathogens, their respective antibiotic sensitivity profile, their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and the results of efficacy clinical studies. After a review of recent data concerning these four major points, the <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Infectious Diseases Group of the French Society of <span class="hlt">Paediatrics</span> (GPIP) has proposed guidelines for initial recommended schemes of antimicrobial therapy in acute and non complicated osteoarticular infections in infants and children.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24606122','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24606122"><span>Metabolic risk factors and long-term graft function after <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> renal transplantation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tainio, Juuso; Qvist, Erik; Hölttä, Tuula; Pakarinen, Mikko; Jahnukainen, Timo; Jalanko, Hannu</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to evaluate metabolic risk factors and their <span class="hlt">impact</span> on long-term allograft function in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> renal transplant (RTx) patients. We reviewed the medical records of 210 RTx patients who underwent transplantation at a median age of 4.5 years (range 0.7-18.2) and a median follow-up of 7.0 years (range 1.5-18.0). Data on lipid and glucose metabolism, uric acid levels, weight and blood pressure were collected up to 13 years post-RTx, and the findings were correlated with the measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Beyond the first year, GFR showed gradual deterioration with a mean decline of 2.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year. Metabolic syndrome, overweight, hypertension and type 2 diabetes were diagnosed in 14-19%, 20-23%, 62-87% and 3-5% of the patients, respectively. These entities showed only mild association with the concomitant or long-term GFR values. Dyslipidaemia was common and hypertriglyceridaemia associated with a lower GFR at 1.5 and 5 years post-RTx (P = 0.008 and P = 0.017, respectively). Similarly, hyperuricaemia was frequent and associated significantly with GFR (P < 0.001). Except for hyperuricaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia, metabolic risk factors beyond the first postoperative year associated modestly with the long-term kidney graft function in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> RTx patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22990300','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22990300"><span>Dose conversion coefficients for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> CT examinations with automatic tube current modulation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schlattl, H; Zankl, M; Becker, J; Hoeschen, C</p> <p>2012-10-21</p> <p>A common dose-saving technique used in modern CT devices is automatic tube current modulation (TCM), which was originally designed to also reduce the dose in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> CT patients. In order to be able to deduce detailed organ doses of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> models, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDI(vol) for an eight-week-old baby and seven- and eight-year-old children have been computed accounting for TCM. The relative difference in organ dose conversion coefficients with and without TCM is for many organs and examinations less than 10%, but can in some cases amount up to 30%, e.g., for the thyroid in the chest CT of the seven-year-old child. Overall, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of TCM on the conversion coefficients increases with increasing age. Besides TCM, also the effect of collimation and tube voltage on organ dose conversion coefficients has been investigated. It could be shown that the normalization to CTDI(vol) leads to conversion coefficients that can in most cases be considered to be independent of collimation and tube voltage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26970680','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26970680"><span>Sex bias in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> autoimmune disease - Not just about sex hormones?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chiaroni-Clarke, Rachel C; Munro, Jane E; Ellis, Justine A</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>Autoimmune diseases affect up to 10% of the world's population, and approximately 80% of those affected are female. The majority of autoimmune diseases occur more commonly in females, although some are more frequent in males, while others show no bias by sex. The mechanisms leading to sex biased disease prevalence are not well understood. However, for adult-onset autoimmune disease, at least some of the cause is usually ascribed to sex hormones. This is because levels of sex hormones are one of the most obvious physiological differences between adult males and females, and their <span class="hlt">impact</span> on immune system function is well recognised. While for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span>-onset autoimmune diseases a sex bias is not as common, there are several such diseases for which one sex predominates. For example, the oligoarticular subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) occurs in approximately three times more girls than boys, with a peak age of onset well before the onset of puberty, and at a time when levels of androgen and oestrogen are low and not strikingly different between the sexes. Here, we review potential explanations for autoimmune disease sex bias with a particular focus on <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> autoimmune disease, and biological mechanisms outside of sex hormone differences.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PMB....57.6309S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PMB....57.6309S"><span>Dose conversion coefficients for <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> CT examinations with automatic tube current modulation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schlattl, H.; Zankl, M.; Becker, J.; Hoeschen, C.</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>A common dose-saving technique used in modern CT devices is automatic tube current modulation (TCM), which was originally designed to also reduce the dose in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> CT patients. In order to be able to deduce detailed organ doses of <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> models, dose conversion coefficients normalized to CTDIvol for an eight-week-old baby and seven- and eight-year-old children have been computed accounting for TCM. The relative difference in organ dose conversion coefficients with and without TCM is for many organs and examinations less than 10%, but can in some cases amount up to 30%, e.g., for the thyroid in the chest CT of the seven-year-old child. Overall, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of TCM on the conversion coefficients increases with increasing age. Besides TCM, also the effect of collimation and tube voltage on organ dose conversion coefficients has been investigated. It could be shown that the normalization to CTDIvol leads to conversion coefficients that can in most cases be considered to be independent of collimation and tube voltage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhDT.......110B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhDT.......110B"><span><span class="hlt">Practicing</span> biology: Undergraduate laboratory research, persistence in science, and the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of self-efficacy beliefs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Berkes, Elizabeth</p> <p></p> <p>As undergraduate laboratory research internships become more popular and universities devote considerable resources towards promoting them, it is important to clarify what students specifically gain through involvement in these experiences and it is important to understand their <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the science pipeline. By examining recent findings describing the primary benefits of undergraduate research participation, along with self-efficacy theory, this study aims to provide more explanatory power to the anecdotal and descriptive accounts regarding the relationship between undergraduate research experiences and interest in continuing in science. Furthermore, this study characterizes <span class="hlt">practices</span> that foster students' confidence in doing scientific work with detailed description and analysis of the interactions of researchers in a laboratory. Phase 1 of the study, a survey of undergraduate biology majors (n=71) at a major research university, investigates the relationships among participation in biology laboratory research internships, biology laboratory self-efficacy strength, and interest in persisting in science. Phase 2 of the study, a two-year investigation of a university biology research laboratory, investigates how scientific communities of <span class="hlt">practice</span> develop self-efficacy beliefs. The findings suggest that participation in lab internships results in increased interest in continuing in life science/biology graduate school and careers. They also suggest that a significant proportion of that interest is related to the students' biology laboratory self-efficacy. The findings of this study point to two primary ways that undergraduate research participation might work to raise self-efficacy strength. First, university research laboratory communities can provide students with a variety of resources that scaffold them into biology laboratory mastery experiences. Second, university research laboratory communities can provide students with coping and mastery Discourse models</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT.......248C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhDT.......248C"><span>The <span class="hlt">impacts</span> and "best <span class="hlt">practices</span>" of undergraduate - graduate student mentoring relationships in undergraduate research experiences</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Campanile, Megan Faurot</p> <p></p> <p>With the growth of undergraduate research in the U.S., over the past two decades, faculty are more often assigning graduate students to mentor undergraduate students than providing the one-on-one mentoring themselves. A critical gap that exists in the literature is how undergraduate -- graduate student mentoring relationships in undergraduate research influences both students' academic and career paths. The research questions that framed this study were: (1) What, if any, changes occur in the academic and career paths of undergraduate and graduate students who participate in undergraduate research experiences? and (2) Are there variables that constitute "best <span class="hlt">practices</span>" in the mentoring relationships in undergraduate research experiences and, if so, what are they? The study context was the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program at Illinois Institute of Technology and the 113 undergraduate researchers and 31 graduate student mentors who participated from 2006 -- 2014. Surveys and interviews were administered to collect pre- and post-program data and follow-up data during the 2014 -- 2015 academic year. Descriptive statistics, content analysis method, and constant comparative method were used to analyze the data. Key findings on the undergraduate researchers were their actual earned graduate degree types (Ph.D. 20%, M.D. 20%, M.S. 48%, other 12%) and fields (STEM 57%, medical 35%, other 8%) and the careers they were pursuing or working in. All the graduate student mentors were pursuing or working in the STEM fields (academia 50%, industry 40%, government 10%). More than 75% of both the undergraduate and graduate students reported that their mentoring relationships had a somewhat to extremely influential <span class="hlt">impact</span> on their academic and career paths. A set of "best <span class="hlt">practices</span>" of mentoring were developed for both the undergraduate and graduate students and focused on the mentoring experiences related to learning and teaching about</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=forecasting&pg=6&id=EJ908089','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=forecasting&pg=6&id=EJ908089"><span>Developing Indicators of Classroom <span class="hlt">Practice</span> to Evaluate the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of District Mathematics Reform Initiative: A Generalizability Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Newton, Xiaoxia A.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This paper reported results from a generalizability study that examined the process of developing classroom <span class="hlt">practice</span> indicators used to evaluate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a school district's mathematics reform initiative. The study utilized classroom observational data from 32 second, fourth, eighth, and tenth grade teachers. The study addresses important…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pesticides&pg=6&id=EJ1085739','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pesticides&pg=6&id=EJ1085739"><span>Environmental <span class="hlt">Impact</span> Assessment: Teaching the Principles and <span class="hlt">Practices</span> by Means of a Role-Playing Case Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Crittenden, Barry D.; England, Richard</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The principles and <span class="hlt">practices</span> of environmental <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment are best taught to chemical engineering undergraduate students by means of a role­-playing case study. Many suitable examples are available from public sources. The planning appeal process has been selected so as to introduce an adversarial style involving cross-­examination on…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mechanical+AND+design&pg=7&id=EJ920310','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mechanical+AND+design&pg=7&id=EJ920310"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of the Script in a Supplemental Reading Program on Instructional Opportunities for Student <span class="hlt">Practice</span> of Specified Skills</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cooke, Nancy L.; Galloway, Tara W.; Kretlow, Allison G.; Helf, Shawnna</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Many educators are reluctant to use scripted instruction, reporting that scripts are mechanical in nature and only appropriate for low-level skills. This study sought to investigate the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a supplemental program's script on the rate of on-task and off-task instructional opportunities offered by the instructor for students to <span class="hlt">practice</span> the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=job+AND+regulation&pg=5&id=EJ804873','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=job+AND+regulation&pg=5&id=EJ804873"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Regulatory Environments on Early Childhood Professional <span class="hlt">Practice</span> and Job Satisfaction: A Review of Conflicting Discourses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fenech, Marianne</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This article juxtaposes contrasting discourses concerning the that <span class="hlt">impact</span> regulatory systems--such as the NSW Children's Services Regulation and the National Quality Improvement and Accreditation System--have on the professional <span class="hlt">practice</span> and job satisfaction of early childhood professionals in NSW. Juxtaposing dominant government discourses with…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Meditation+AND+classroom&id=ED561855','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Meditation+AND+classroom&id=ED561855"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Classroom-Based Meditation <span class="hlt">Practice</span> on Cognitive Engagement, Mindfulness and Academic Performance of Undergraduate College Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Napora, Lisa</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This study explored the potential of classroom-based meditation <span class="hlt">practice</span> as a tool to facilitate learning. Moreover, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of meditation on cognitive engagement, mindfulness and academic performance of undergraduate college students was investigated. Additionally, the relationships between mindfulness and cognitive engagement, and between…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED502232.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED502232.pdf"><span>The Ripple Effect of Virginia Tech: Assessing the Nationwide <span class="hlt">Impact</span> on Campus Safety and Security Policy and <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rasmussen, Chris; Johnson, Gina</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>This report is the result of a nationwide survey conducted in March 2008 of student life officers and campus safety directors to assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the April 2007 shootings at Virginia Tech on campus safety and security policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span>. Discussion areas include: (1) Student Privacy vs. Need-to-Know; (2) Prevention, Mitigation and Recovery;…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nunan&pg=4&id=EJ822400','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=nunan&pg=4&id=EJ822400"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of English as a Global Language on Educational Policies and <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in the Asia-Pacific Region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Nunan, David</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>This article presents the results of an investigation into the place of English in the curriculum in several countries in the Asia-Pacific region. The study indicates that the emergence of English as a global language is having considerable <span class="hlt">impact</span> on policies and <span class="hlt">practices</span> in all countries surveyed. However, it also reveals significant problems,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1124283.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1124283.pdf"><span>The Residential Learning Community as a Platform for High-<span class="hlt">Impact</span> Educational <span class="hlt">Practices</span> Aimed at At-Risk Student Success</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hall, Bryan; O'Neal, Tom</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper examines a pilot residential learning community (RLC) project at Indiana University Southeast. The RLC targeted first-generation students who were academically at-risk. The purpose of the project was to see whether the combination of several high-<span class="hlt">impact</span> educational <span class="hlt">practices</span> within the context of an RLC would improve 1) student…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=recursive+AND+sequence&pg=2&id=ED553251','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=recursive+AND+sequence&pg=2&id=ED553251"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Teachers' Characteristics and Self-Reported <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Students' Algebra Achievement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cope, Liza M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This study examined the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of teachers' characteristics and self-reported <span class="hlt">practices</span> on students' Algebra achievement while controlling for students' characteristics. This study is based on the secondary analysis of data collected from a nationally representative sample of 9 th grade students and their mathematics teachers during…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=LIFE+AND+EXTENSION&pg=5&id=EJ1124514','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=LIFE+AND+EXTENSION&pg=5&id=EJ1124514"><span>The Idea of Calling Presented in Light of High-<span class="hlt">Impact</span> <span class="hlt">Practices</span> in a General Education Course and Beyond</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bechtold, John I.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>This article describes a course taught at a U.S. Christian college located in Pennsylvania that uses "high <span class="hlt">impact</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>," as described by Kuh and O'Donnell (2013), to educate students about calling. The course, titled "Created and Called for Community," is required for all incoming first-year students in their second…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=concept%2banalysis%2bof%2bcontinuing%2bprofessional%2bdevelopment&pg=2&id=EJ1129493','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=concept%2banalysis%2bof%2bcontinuing%2bprofessional%2bdevelopment&pg=2&id=EJ1129493"><span>Exploring the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Professional Development and Professional <span class="hlt">Practice</span> on School Leaders' Self-Efficacy: A Quasi-Experimental Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Petridou, Alexandra; Nicolaidou, Maria; Karagiorgi, Yiasemina</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Self-efficacy is extensively discussed within social cognitive theory. This study aimed to explore the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of professional development and <span class="hlt">practice</span> on school leaders' self-efficacy in Cyprus. A quasi-experimental design involving 2 groups of novice secondary deputy head teachers was employed. All participants practised leadership at the time,…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Content+AND+management+AND+PRos&pg=4&id=ED524973','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Content+AND+management+AND+PRos&pg=4&id=ED524973"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Mathematics Professional Development on Elementary Teachers' Mathematics Content Knowledge for Teaching and Implementation of Innovative Pedagogical <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Oleson, Vicki</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This study sought to understand the process of change elementary teachers experienced as they participated in mathematics professional development. This investigation explored the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of mathematics professional development on teachers' content knowledge for teaching, their ability to implement innovative pedagogical <span class="hlt">practices</span>, and the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gps&pg=3&id=EJ827148','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gps&pg=3&id=EJ827148"><span>An Exploratory Study of GP Perceptions of the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of a Primary Care Counselling Service on Their <span class="hlt">Practice</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Schafer, Tim; Amoateng, Geoffrey; Wrycraft, Nick</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents the results of research into GP perceptions of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of on-site counselling on general <span class="hlt">practice</span>. The research is part of a larger evaluation of a local enhanced primary care mental service. The initial survey and in-depth interviews with GPs reported here focused on the pre-existing counselling service. The results suggest…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Hugo&pg=7&id=EJ1032480','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Hugo&pg=7&id=EJ1032480"><span>The <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Self-Perceived Subject Matter Knowledge on Pedagogical Decisions in EFL Grammar Teaching <span class="hlt">Practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sanchez, Hugo Santiago</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Recent developments in language teacher cognition research highlight the need to explore subject matter knowledge in relation to classroom <span class="hlt">practice</span>. This study examines the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of two foreign language teachers' knowledge about grammar upon their pedagogical decisions. The primary database consisted of classroom observations and post-lesson…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Success+AND+rates+AND+college&pg=4&id=EJ1110793','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Success+AND+rates+AND+college&pg=4&id=EJ1110793"><span>Implementation of an Evidence-Based, High-<span class="hlt">Impact</span> <span class="hlt">Practice</span>: An Integrated Learning Community Model in Action</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fuller, Karla S.; King, Claire; Moore, Randolph; Saint-Louis, Nicole; Tyner-Mullings, Alia R.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Community colleges continue to grapple with low rates of degree completion and transfer issues, with a national three-year completion rate of 22 percent (Community College Research Center). However, through the implementation of high-<span class="hlt">impact</span> <span class="hlt">practices</span>, many schools and programs have found levels of success. The City University of New York's (CUNY)…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4928427','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4928427"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of waste management training intervention on knowledge, attitude and <span class="hlt">practices</span> of teaching hospital workers in Pakistan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kumar, Ramesh; Somrongthong, Ratana; Ahmed, Jamil</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objective: To evaluate the sustainability and effectiveness of training as an intervention to improve the knowledge, attitude and <span class="hlt">practices</span> of hospital workers on health care waste management. Method: We conducted this quasi-experimental study in two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Rawalpindi in October 2013. Training, <span class="hlt">practical</span> demonstrations and reminders on standard waste management were given to 138 hospital workers in one hospital and compared with 137 workers from the control hospital. We collected data 18 months after intervention through a structured questionnaire to assess the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the intervention. We used paired t-test to compare the scores on knowledge, attitude and <span class="hlt">practices</span> at baseline and first follow up and final <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment. Chi square test was used to compare group variables between intervention and control groups. Results: After 18 months since intervention the mean scores on knowledge attitude and <span class="hlt">practices</span> differed statistically significantly since baseline and intervention group had statistically significantly better knowledge positive attitudes and good health care waste management <span class="hlt">practices</span> (p < 0.001). Health care and sanitary workers in intervention group scored statistically significantly higher (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Trainings of health and sanitary workers on health care waste management guidelines were sustainable among the intervention group after 18 months which shows the positive <span class="hlt">impact</span> of our intervention. It is recommended that the trainings as intervention be included in the overall policies of the public and private sector hospitals in Pakistan and other similar settings. PMID:27375718</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.3023K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.3023K"><span>Connecting the cycles: <span class="hlt">impact</span> of farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>, Carbon and nutrient erosion on GHG emissions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kuhn, N. J.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p> balance of soil erosion on agricultural land are identified. A first analysis of the data available on a full account of erosion-related emissions is presented. Apart from identifying a potentially significant source of GHG emissions associated with soil erosion that has not been considered for <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment so far, the study also shows that separating emission accounting between the industry producing the fertilizer and the agricultural sector, i.e. the grey emissions associated with farming, does not reflect the actual mechanism between erosion, farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> and emissions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.7637K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.7637K"><span>Connecting the cycles: <span class="hlt">impact</span> of farming <span class="hlt">practices</span>, Carbon and nutrient erosion on GHG emissions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kuhn, Nikolaus J.</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p> balance of soil erosion on agricultural land are identified. A first analysis of the data available on a full account of erosion-related emissions is presented. Apart from identifying a potentially significant source of GHG emissions associated with soil erosion that has not been considered for <span class="hlt">impact</span> assessment so far, the study also shows that separating emission accounting between the industry producing the fertilizer and the agricultural sector, i.e. the grey emissions associated with farming, does not reflect the actual mechanism between erosion, farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> and emissions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhDT........49H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhDT........49H"><span>The <span class="hlt">impact</span> of federal policy on teachers' use of science manipulatives: A survey of teacher philosophy and <span class="hlt">practices</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Helgoe, Catherine A.</p> <p></p> <p>Recently, educators in public K-12 schools have added testing of science knowledge to the measures of Adequate Yearly Progress required by the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation. Research of the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of NCLB policy on general teaching <span class="hlt">practices</span> had credited the policy with improving instruction; however, negative <span class="hlt">impacts</span> noted included the concern that teachers "teach to the test," narrowing the curriculum. Testing as an assessment strategy was not advocated by the professional educators and scientists responsible for the National Science Education Standards (NSES). Results from previous studies pointed to a potential conflict between the NCLB reforms and the National Science Education Standards science standards, in which teachers might reduce or eliminate hands-on activities and other constructivist <span class="hlt">practices</span> in order to focus class time on other topics and tasks. Most research on NCLB policy, however, had not evaluated instructional <span class="hlt">practices</span> regarding science education. This study examined the relationship among teacher beliefs, specifically the strength of their constructivist versus traditional beliefs, teachers' responses to NCLB policy, and teachers' use of constructivist <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the form of manipulatives. This study showed that national policy did have an <span class="hlt">impact</span> on teachers; however, that <span class="hlt">impact</span> was not specific to the hands-on <span class="hlt">practices</span> in science education. Teachers who responded to this survey had found many benefits in student learning using manipulatives and those positive <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on their students justified the increased use of manipulatives in the classroom. The strength of teachers' constructivist beliefs showed a weak positive correlation to choices related to curriculum priorities, learning goals and advantages in using manipulatives. However, a relationship to beliefs was not found in the changes teachers made to various instructional <span class="hlt">practices</span>, or in how they viewed certain manipulative materials, or in how they viewed</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964814','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27964814"><span>Examining the <span class="hlt">Impact</span> of Critical Multicultural Education Training on the Multicultural Attitudes, Awareness, and <span class="hlt">Practices</span> of Nurse Educators.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Beard, Kenya V</p> <p></p> <p>Some nurse educators lack training in the educational methods that facilitate learning among underrepresented groups. Limited awareness of equitable pedagogical <span class="hlt">practices</span> could threaten the academic achievement of underrepresented groups and hinder efforts to make the nursing profession more heterogeneous. Training in multicultural education could strengthen the capacity of educators to create culturally responsive learning environments. This quasi-experimental study examined the <span class="hlt">impact</span> that training in critical multicultural education had on the multicultural attitudes, awareness, and <span class="hlt">practices</span> of 37 nurse educators. A pre-posttest design without a control group found that the training was an effective way to strengthen the multicultural awareness and attitudes of nurse educators, although there was little <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the multicultural <span class="hlt">practices</span>. The nation's capacity to improve the quality of health care hinges upon educators who can create inclusive learning environments and graduate diverse nurses. The findings could inform policies seeking to promote diversity and inclusion in nursing education.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2011/5165/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="https://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2011/5165/"><span>Hydraulic characteristics of low-<span class="hlt">impact</span> development <span class="hlt">practices</span> in northeastern Ohio, 2008–2010</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Darner, Robert A.; Dumouchelle, Denise H.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Low-<span class="hlt">impact</span> development (LID) is an approach to managing stormwater as near to its source as possible; this is accomplished by minimizing impervious surfaces and promoting more natural infiltration and evapotranspiration than is typically associated with developed areas. Two newly constructed LID sites in northeastern Ohio were studied to document their hydraulic characteristics. A roadside best-management <span class="hlt">practice</span> (BMP) was constructed by replacing about 1,400 linear feet of existing ditches with a bioswale/rain garden BMP consisting of a grassed swale interspersed with rain-garden/overflow structures. The site was monitored in 2008, 2009, and 2010. Although some overflows occurred, numerous precipitation events exceeding the 0.75-inch design storm did not result in overflows. A second study site consists of an 8,200-square-foot parking lot made of a pervious pavers and a rain garden that receives runoff from the roof of a nearby commercial building. A comparison of data from 2009 and 2010 indicates that the median runoff volume in 2010 decreased relative to 2009. The centroid lag times (time difference between centroid of precipitation and centroid of flow) decreased in 2010, most likely due to more intense, shorter duration precipitation events and maturation of the rain garden. Additional data could help quantify the relation between meteorological variables and BMP efficiency.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27281525','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27281525"><span>Retail food environments in Canada: Maximizing the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of research, policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Minaker, Leia M</p> <p>2016-06-09</p> <p>Retail food environments are gaining national and international attention as important determinants of population dietary intake. Communities across Canada are beginning to discuss and implement programs and policies to create supportive retail food environments. Three considerations should drive the selection of food environment assessment methods: relevance (What is the problem, and how is it related to dietary outcomes?); resources (What human, time and financial resources are required to undertake an assessment?); and response (How will policy-makers find meaning out of and act on the information gained through the food environment assessment?). Ultimately, food environment assessments should be conducted in the context of stakeholder buy-in and multi-sectoral partnerships, since food environment solutions require multi-sectoral action. Partnerships between public health actors and the food and beverage industry can be challenging, especially when mandates are not aligned. Clarifying the motivations, expectations and roles of all stakeholders takes time but is important if the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of food environment research, policy and <span class="hlt">practice</span> is to be maximized. The articles contained in this special supplementary issue describe ongoing food environments research across Canada and fill some of the important gaps in the current body of Canadian food environments literature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27983518','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27983518"><span><span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of curatorial and research <span class="hlt">practices</span> on the preservation of fossil hominid remains.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Le Cabec, Adeline; Toussaint, Michel</p> <p>2016-12-13</p> <p>Fossil remains are the only physical evidence of past forms of life which researchers can use to study the evolutionary biology of a species, especially regarding the human lineage. We review and consider the way in which the conditions surrounding a fossil's discovery and its use for scientific research <span class="hlt">impacts</span> its long-term preservation. The deterioration of the body starts soon after death, continues in the sediments and only a subsample of the anatomical elements will persist and may finally be unearthed by archeologists. From their recovery onwards, fossil remains are exposed to many sources of further damage: from handling, restoration, measuring to invasive sampling. On the one hand, curators are faced with the inherent challenge of balancing their responsibility to protect fossil specimens with allowing researchers to perform specific analyses or invasive sampling detrimental to the preservation of the fossil. On the other hand, scientists may find their analyses complicated by multiple factors including taphonomy, or restoration techniques (e.g., consolidants, cleaning chemicals). We provide several historical examples illustrating the complex nature of the factors acting on fossil preservation. We discuss concerns about producing and sharing (digital) data from fossils. Finally, we also suggest and support some curatorial <span class="hlt">practices</span> which maximize the traceability of treatments underwent by a fossil.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EnMan..44..408K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EnMan..44..408K"><span>Ecological <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of Revegetation and Management <span class="hlt">Practices</span> of Ski Slopes in Northern Finland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kangas, Katja; Tolvanen, Anne; Kälkäjä, Tarja; Siikamäki, Pirkko</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>Outdoor recreation and nature-based tourism represent an increasingly intensive form of land use that has considerable <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on native ecosystems. The aim of this paper is to investigate how revegetation and management of ski runs influence soil nutrients, vegetation characteristics, and the possible invasion of nonnative plant species used in revegetation into native ecosystems. A soil and vegetation survey at ski runs and nearby forests, and a factorial experiment simulating ski run construction and management (factors: soil removal, fertilization, and seed sowing) were conducted at Ruka ski resort, in northern Finland, during 2003-2008. According to the survey, management <span class="hlt">practices</span> had caused considerable changes in the vegetation structure and increased soil nutrient concentrations, pH, and conductivity on the ski runs relative to nearby forests. Seed mixture species sown during the revegetation of ski runs had not spread to adjacent forests. The experimental study showed that the germination of seed mixture species was favored by treatments simulating the management of ski runs, but none of them could eventually establish in the study forest. As nutrient leaching causes both environmental deterioration and changes in vegetation structure, it may eventually pose a greater environmental risk than the spread of seed mixture species alone. Machine grading and fertilization, which have the most drastic effects on soils and vegetation, should, therefore, be minimized when constructing and managing ski runs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25362694','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25362694"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of pedagogical method on Brazilian dental students' waste management <span class="hlt">practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Victorelli, Gabriela; Flório, Flávia Martão; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; Motta, Rogério Heládio Lopes; de Souza Fonseca Silva, Almenara</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to conduct a qualitative analysis of waste management <span class="hlt">practices</span> among a group of Brazilian dental students (n=64) before and after implementing two different pedagogical methods: 1) the students attended a two-hour lecture based on World Health Organization standards; and 2) the students applied the lessons learned in an organized group setting aimed toward raising their awareness about socioenvironmental issues related to waste. All eligible students participated, and the students' learning was evaluated through their answers to a series of essay questions, which were quantitatively measured. Afterwards, the <span class="hlt">impact</span> of the pedagogical approaches was compared by means of qualitative categorization of wastes generated in clinical activities. Waste categorization was performed for a period of eight consecutive days, both before and thirty days after the pedagogical strategies. In the written evaluation, 80 to 90 percent of the students' answers were correct. The qualitative assessment revealed a high frequency of incorrect waste disposal with a significant increase of incorrect disposal inside general and infectious waste containers (p<0.05). Although the students' theoretical learning improved, it was not enough to change behaviors established by cultural values or to encourage the students to adequately segregate and package waste material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28215371','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28215371"><span><span class="hlt">Impact</span> of the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network: Accelerating the Translation of Research Into <span class="hlt">Practice</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ribisl, Kurt M; Fernandez, Maria E; Friedman, Daniela B; Hannon, Peggy A; Leeman, Jennifer; Moore, Alexis; Olson, Lindsay; Ory, Marcia; Risendal, Betsy; Sheble, Laura; Taylor, Vicky M; Williams, Rebecca S; Weiner, Bryan J</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (CPCRN) is a thematic network dedicated to accelerating the adoption of evidence-based cancer prevention and control <span class="hlt">practices</span> in communities by advancing dissemination and implementation science. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Cancer Institute, CPCRN has operated at two levels: Each participating network center conducts research projects with primarily local partners as well as multicenter collaborative research projects with state and national partners. Through multicenter collaboration, thematic networks leverage the expertise, resources, and partnerships of participating centers to conduct research projects collectively that might not be feasible individually. Although multicenter collaboration is often advocated, it is challenging to promote and assess. Using bibliometric network analysis and other graphical methods, this paper describes CPCRN's multicenter publication progression from 2004 to 2014. Searching PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science in 2014 identified 249 peer-reviewed CPCRN publications involving two or more centers out of 6,534 total. The research and public health <span class="hlt">impact</span> of these multicenter collaborative projects initiated by CPCRN during that 10-year period were then examined. CPCRN established numerous workgroups around topics such as: 2-1-1, training and technical assistance, colorectal cancer control, federally qualified health centers, cancer survivorship, and human papillomavirus. This paper discusses the challenges that arise in promoting multicenter collaboration and the strategies that CPCRN uses to address those challenges. The lessons learned should broadly interest those seeking to promote multisite collaboration to address public health problems, such as cancer prevention and control.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19609601','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19609601"><span>Ecological <span class="hlt">impacts</span> of revegetation and management <span class="hlt">practices</span> of ski slopes in northern Finland.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kangas, Katja; Tolvanen, Anne; Kälkäjä, Tarja; Siikamäki, Pirkko</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>Outdoor recreation and nature-based tourism represent an increasingly intensive form of land use that has considerable <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on native ecosystems. The aim of this paper is to investigate how revegetation and management of ski runs influence soil nutrients, vegetation characteristics, and the possible invasion of nonnative plant species used in revegetation into native ecosystems. A soil and vegetation survey at ski runs and nearby forests, and a factorial experiment simulating ski run construction and management (factors: soil removal, fertilization, and seed sowing) were conducted at Ruka ski resort, in northern Finland, during 2003-2008. According to the survey, management <span class="hlt">practices</span> had caused considerable changes in the vegetation structure and increased soil nutrient concentrations, pH, and conductivity on the ski runs relative to nearby forests. Seed mixture species sown during the revegetation of ski runs had not spread to adjacent forests. The experimental study showed that the germination of seed mixture species was favored by treatments simulating the management of ski runs, but none of them could eventually establish in the study forest. As nutrient leaching causes both environmental deterioration and changes in vegetation structure, it may eventually pose a greater environmental risk than the spread of seed mixture species alone. Machine grading and fertilization, which have the most drastic effects on soils and vegetation, should, therefore, be minimized when constructing and managing ski runs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27242862','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27242862"><span>Understanding the <span class="hlt">Impacts</span> of Soil, Climate, and Farming <span class="hlt">Practices</span> on Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration: A Simulation Study in Australia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Godde, Cécile M; Thorburn, Peter J; Biggs, Jody S; Meier, Elizabeth A</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils has the capacity to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, as well as to improve soil biological, physical, and chemical properties. The review of literature pertaining to soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics within Australian grain farming systems does not enable us to conclude on the best farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> to increase or maintain SOC for a specific combination of soil and climate. This study aimed to further explore the complex interactions of soil, climate, and farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> on SOC. We undertook a modeling study with the Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator modeling framework, by combining contrasting Australian soils, climates, and farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> (crop rotations, and management within rotations, such as fertilization, tillage, and residue management) in a factorial design. This design resulted in the transposition of contrasting soils and climates in our simulations, giving soil-climate combinations that do not occur in the study area to help provide insights into the importance of the climate constraints on SOC. We statistically analyzed the model's outputs to determinate the relative contributions of soil parameters, climate, and farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> on SOC. The initial SOC content had the largest <span class="hlt">impact</span> on the value of SOC, followed by the climate and the fertilization <span class="hlt">practices</span>. These factors explained 66, 18, and 15% of SOC variations, respectively, after 80 years of constant farming <span class="hlt">practices</span> in the simulation. Tillage and stubble management had the lowest <span class="hlt">impacts</span> on SOC. This study highlighted the possible negative <span class="hlt">impact</span> on SOC of a chickpea phase in a wheat-chickpea rotation and the potential positive <span class="hlt">impact</span> of a cover crop in a sub-tropical climate (QLD, Australia) on SOC. It also showed the complexities in managing to achieve increased SOC, while simultaneously aiming to minimize nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and nitrate leaching in farming systems. The transposition of contrasting soils and climates in</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27306873','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27306873"><span>Surveillance biopsies after <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> kidney transplantation: A review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rose, Edward M; Kennedy, Sean E; Mackie, Fiona E</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Kidney transplantation is the most effective means of treating children with end-stage kidney disease, and yet, there continues to be a limited "life span" of transplanted kidneys in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> recipients. Early graft monitoring, using the surveillance biopsy, has the potential to extend renal allograft survival in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> recipients. The surveillance biopsy provides important and timely information about acute and chronic graft pathology, particularly SCR and calcineurin inhibitor-induced nephrotoxicity, which can subsequently guide management decisions and improve long-term graft survival. The ostensible value of the surveillance biopsy is furthered by the limitations of conventional renal functional studies. However, there is still much debate surrounding the surveillance biopsy in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> recipients, particularly in regard to its overall utility, safety and timing. This review discusses the current literature regarding the utility, safety, and potential predictive value of surveillance biopsies for guiding post-transplant management in <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> renal allograft recipients, as well as the viability of other potentially newer non-invasive strategies for renal allograft monitoring.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Neurological+AND+Assessment+AND+First+AND+Year&id=EJ928486','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Neurological+AND+Assessment+AND+First+AND+Year&id=EJ928486"><span>Aetiology of Intellectual Disability in <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Outpatients in Northern India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jauhari, Prashant; Boggula, Raju; Bhave, Anupama; Bhargava, Roli; Singh, Chandrakanta; Kohli, Neera; Yadav, Rajesh; Kumar, Rashmi</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Aim: To study the aetiology of intellectual disability in patients presenting to hospital and the diagnostic yield of a standardized examination. Method: Over a 1-year period, the first three children presenting to the <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> outpatients department (OPD) on 2 selected weekdays with developmental delay, suspected intellectual disability, or…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5107833','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5107833"><span>Cardiac Arrest after Local Anaesthetic Toxicity in a <span class="hlt">Paediatric</span> Patient</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Figueroa, Diego Grimaldi; Simas, Ana Amélia Souza</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We report a case of a <span class="hlt">paediatric</span> patient undergoing urological procedure in which a possible inadvertent intravascular or intraosseous injection of bupivacaine with adrenaline in usual doses caused subsequent cardiac arrest, completely reversed after administration of 20% intravenous lipid emulsion. Early diagnosis of local anaesthetics toxicity and adequate cardiovascular resuscitation manoeuvres contribute to the favourable outcome. PMID:27872765</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.</small> </div> </center> <div id="footer-wrapper"> <div class="footer-content"> <div id="footerOSTI" class=""> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-4 text-center col-md-push-4 footer-content-center"><small><a href="http://www.science.gov/disclaimer.html">Privacy and Security</a></small> <div class="visible-sm visible-xs push_footer"></div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 text-center col-md-pull-4 footer-content-left"> <img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/DOE_SC31.png" alt="U.S. Department of Energy" usemap="#doe" height="31" width="177"><map style="display:none;" name="doe" id="doe"><area shape="rect" coords="1,3,107,30" href="http://www.energy.gov" alt="U.S. Deparment of Energy"><area shape="rect" coords="114,3,165,30" href="http://www.science.energy.gov" alt="Office of Science"></map> <a ref="http://www.osti.gov" style="margin-left: 15px;"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/ostigov53.png" alt="Office of Scientific and Technical Information" height="31" width="53"></a> <div class="visible-sm visible-xs push_footer"></div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 text-center footer-content-right"> <a href="http://www.science.gov"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/scigov77.png" alt="science.gov" height="31" width="98"></a> <a href="http://worldwidescience.org"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/wws82.png" alt="WorldWideScience.org" height="31" width="90"></a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><br></p> </div><!-- container --> <script type="text/javascript"><!-- // var lastDiv = ""; function showDiv(divName) { // hide last div if (lastDiv) { document.getElementById(lastDiv).className = "hiddenDiv"; } //if value of the box is not nothing and an object with that name exists, then change the class if (divName && document.getElementById(divName)) { document.getElementById(divName).className = "visibleDiv"; lastDiv = divName; } } //--> </script> <script> /** * Function that tracks a click on an outbound link in Google Analytics. * This function takes a valid URL string as an argument, and uses that URL string * as the event label. */ var trackOutboundLink = function(url,collectionCode) { try { h = window.open(url); setTimeout(function() { ga('send', 'event', 'topic-page-click-through', collectionCode, url); }, 1000); } catch(err){} }; </script> <!-- Google Analytics --> <script> (function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function(){ (i[r].q=i[r].q||[]).push(arguments)},i[r].l=1*new Date();a=s.createElement(o), m=s.getElementsByTagName(o)[0];a.async=1;a.src=g;m.parentNode.insertBefore(a,m) })(window,document,'script','//www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js','ga'); ga('create', 'UA-1122789-34', 'auto'); ga('send', 'pageview'); </script> <!-- End Google Analytics --> <script> showDiv('page_1') </script> </body> </html>