Science.gov

Sample records for pain knowledge questionnaire

  1. A comprehensive Fabry-related pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Magg, Barbara; Thomas, Phillip; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Pain may be the earliest symptom in Fabry disease and presents with a distinct phenotype including triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and chronic pain. Current pain questionnaires do not reflect the special phenotype of Fabry disease-associated pain, which hampers its systematic evaluation as the basis of correct diagnosis and effective treatment. A questionnaire specifically designed to assess Fabry disease-associated pain is thus urgently needed. At the Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy (FAZIT), Germany, we developed and validated the first face-to-face Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. The initial version of the FPQ was tested in a pilot study with 20 consecutive Fabry disease patients. The performance of the revised FPQ was assessed in a first (n=56) and second (n=20) validation phase in consecutive Fabry disease patients. For this, patients were interviewed at baseline and 2 weeks later. We determined the test-retest reliability and validity of the FPQ in comparison to data obtained with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the 4 pain phenotypes of Fabry disease (pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain, chronic pain) in childhood and adulthood, on pain development during life with and without enzyme replacement therapy, and on everyday life impairment due to pain. This first disease-specific questionnaire is a valuable tool for baseline and follow-up assessment of pain in Fabry disease patients and may guide treatment in this distinct pain phenotype.

  2. Lumbar Disc Screening Using Back Pain Questionnaires: Oswestry Low Back Pain Score, Aberdeen Low Back Pain Scale, and Acute Low Back Pain Screening Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Yeon; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyung Chun; Park, Chong Oon

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the usefulness of back pain questionnaires for lumbar disc screening among Korean young males. Methods We carried out a survey for lumbar disc screening through back pain questionnaires among the volunteers with or without back pain. Three types of back pain questionnaire (Oswestry Low Back Pain Score, Aberdeen Low Back Pain Scale, and Acute Low Back Pain Screeing Questionnaire) were randomly assigned to the examinees. The authors reviewed lumbar imaging studies (simple lumbar radiographs, lumbar computed tomography, and magnetic resolutional images), and the severity of lumbar disc herniation was categorized according to the guidelines issued by the Korean military directorate. We calculated the relationship between the back pain questionnaire scores and the severity of lumbar disc herniation. Results The scores of back pain questionnaires increased according to the severity of lumbar disc herniation. But, the range of scores was very vague, so it is less predictable to detect lumbar disc herniation using only back pain questionnaires. The sensitivity between the back pain questionnaires and the presence of lumbar disc herniation was low (16-64%). Conclusion Screening of lumbar disc herniation using only back pain questionnaires has limited value. PMID:25983807

  3. Pediatric nurses' knowledge and practice related to infant pain.

    PubMed

    McCain, G C; Morwessel, N J

    1995-01-01

    A convenience sample of 181 registered nurses completed questionnaires about their knowledge, attitudes, and clinical practice related to infant pain. The majority of respondents thought infants felt pain with the same intensity as adults and were comfortable administering narcotic and nonnarcotic pain medications. The most frequently identified infant pain cues were: crying, irritability, and inability to be consoled. There were associations between greater numbers of pain cues and higher pain severity ratings and between postlicensure education about pain and number of strategies proposed to relieve pain. There were no associations for noncritical versus critical care unit assignment or participation in postlicensure education about pain with number of assessment cues. There were no associations for pain severity or noncritical versus critical care unit assignment with pain management strategies. Until the research base about management of infant pain is expanded, nurses should continue to use and evaluate a variety of pain management interventions on a case-by-case basis.

  4. Development of the Geop-Pain questionnaire for multidisciplinary assessment of pain sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Su-Hwan; Lee, Mi-Soon; Koo, Bon-Sung; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Chae, Won Seok; Jin, Hee Cheol; Lee, Jeong Seok; Kim, Yong-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the multidisciplinary aspects of pain, various self-rating questionnaires have been developed, but there have not been sufficient relevant studies on this topic in South Korea. The aim of this study was to develop a new pain sensitivity-related questionnaire in the Korean language that would be simple and would well reflect Koreans' senses. Methods A new pain assessment questionnaire was developed through a pre-survey on "geop", which is the Korean word expressing fear, anxiety, or catastrophizing. We named the new assessment questionnaire the Geop-Pain Questionnaire (GPQ). The GPQ was composed of 15 items divided into three categories and rated on a 5-point scale. As a preliminary study, internal consistency and test-retest reliability analyses were conducted. Subsequently, 109 individuals completed the GPQ along with three pain-related questionnaires translated into Korean (Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire [PSQ], Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale [PASS], and Pain Catastrophizing Scale [PCS]), and the correlations were analyzed. Results All items in the GPQ showed appropriate internal consistency, and the test-retest reliability analysis showed no statistically significant differences. The correlations between the GPQ and the existing questionnaires revealed that the GPQ scores had mid-positive correlations with the PSQ scores and strong positive correlations with the PASS and PCS scores. Conclusions This study attempted to develop a questionnaire assessing pain sensitivity multidimensionally using the Korean word geop for the first time. The self-rating GPQ showed high correlations with the existing questionnaires and demonstrated potential to be utilized as a pain prediction index in clinical practice. PMID:27703631

  5. Norming Clinical Questionnaires with Multiple Regression: The Pain Cognition List

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Vlaeyen, Johan W. S.

    2005-01-01

    Questionnaires for measuring patients' feelings or beliefs are commonly used in clinical settings for diagnostic purposes, clinical decision making, or treatment evaluation. Raw scores of a patient can be evaluated by comparing them with norms based on a reference population. Using the Pain Cognition List (PCL-2003) as an example, this article…

  6. Questionnaire for low back pain in the garment industry workers.

    PubMed

    Bindra, Supreet; Sinha, A G K; Benjamin, A I

    2013-05-01

    Low back pain affects up to 90% of the world's population at some point in their lives. Until date no questionnaire has been designed for back pain in the garment industry workers. Therefore, the objective of this study is to design a questionnaire to determine the prevalence, risk factors, impact, health care service utilization and back pain features in the garment industry workers and gain preliminary experience of its use. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaire was established. Items showing acceptable internal consistency and moderate to high test re-test reliability were retained in the questionnaire. Items showing unacceptable internal consistency, low test re-test reliability or poor differentiation were reworded, redrafted and re-tested on the workers. It took 20 min to complete one interview schedule. Environmental factors such as the absence of the garment industry owner/supervisor or co-workers at the time of the interview and interview during leisure hours need to be standardized. Thus, final questionnaire is ready for use after necessary amendments and will be used on the larger sample size in the main study.

  7. Questionnaire for low back pain in the garment industry workers

    PubMed Central

    Bindra, Supreet; Sinha, A. G. K.; Benjamin, A. I.

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain affects up to 90% of the world's population at some point in their lives. Until date no questionnaire has been designed for back pain in the garment industry workers. Therefore, the objective of this study is to design a questionnaire to determine the prevalence, risk factors, impact, health care service utilization and back pain features in the garment industry workers and gain preliminary experience of its use. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaire was established. Items showing acceptable internal consistency and moderate to high test re-test reliability were retained in the questionnaire. Items showing unacceptable internal consistency, low test re-test reliability or poor differentiation were reworded, redrafted and re-tested on the workers. It took 20 min to complete one interview schedule. Environmental factors such as the absence of the garment industry owner/supervisor or co-workers at the time of the interview and interview during leisure hours need to be standardized. Thus, final questionnaire is ready for use after necessary amendments and will be used on the larger sample size in the main study. PMID:24421591

  8. Living in fear of your child's pain: the Parent Fear of Pain Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Simons, Laura E; Smith, Allison; Kaczynski, Karen; Basch, Molly

    2015-04-01

    Fear and avoidance have been consistently associated with poor pain-related outcomes in children. In the context of the pediatric pain experience, parent distress and behaviors can be highly influential. This study validated the Parent Fear of Pain Questionnaire (PFOPQ) to assess a parent's fears and avoidance behaviors associated with their child's pain. Using the PFOPQ in conjunction with measures of parent and child pain-related variables, we tested the interpersonal fear-avoidance model (IFAM). The sample comprised 321 parents and their child with chronic or new-onset pain who presented to a multidisciplinary outpatient pain clinic. An exploratory factor analysis yielded a 4-factor structure for the PFOPQ consisting of Fear of Pain, Fear of Movement, Fear of School, and Avoidance. As hypothesized, Fear of Pain was most closely related to parent pain catastrophizing and child fear of pain, whereas Avoidance was most closely related to parent protective behaviors and child avoidance of activities. In testing the IFAM, parent behavior contributed directly and indirectly to child avoidance, whereas parent fear and catastrophizing contributed indirectly to child avoidance through parent behavior and child fear and catastrophizing, in turn, influencing child functional disability levels. This study provides the first measure of parent pain-related fears and avoidance behaviors and evaluates the theorized IFAM. These results underscore the important influence of parents on child pain-related outcomes and put forth a psychometrically sound measure to assess parent fear and avoidance in the context of their child's pain. PMID:25630026

  9. Living in fear of your child's pain: the Parent Fear of Pain Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Simons, Laura E; Smith, Allison; Kaczynski, Karen; Basch, Molly

    2015-04-01

    Fear and avoidance have been consistently associated with poor pain-related outcomes in children. In the context of the pediatric pain experience, parent distress and behaviors can be highly influential. This study validated the Parent Fear of Pain Questionnaire (PFOPQ) to assess a parent's fears and avoidance behaviors associated with their child's pain. Using the PFOPQ in conjunction with measures of parent and child pain-related variables, we tested the interpersonal fear-avoidance model (IFAM). The sample comprised 321 parents and their child with chronic or new-onset pain who presented to a multidisciplinary outpatient pain clinic. An exploratory factor analysis yielded a 4-factor structure for the PFOPQ consisting of Fear of Pain, Fear of Movement, Fear of School, and Avoidance. As hypothesized, Fear of Pain was most closely related to parent pain catastrophizing and child fear of pain, whereas Avoidance was most closely related to parent protective behaviors and child avoidance of activities. In testing the IFAM, parent behavior contributed directly and indirectly to child avoidance, whereas parent fear and catastrophizing contributed indirectly to child avoidance through parent behavior and child fear and catastrophizing, in turn, influencing child functional disability levels. This study provides the first measure of parent pain-related fears and avoidance behaviors and evaluates the theorized IFAM. These results underscore the important influence of parents on child pain-related outcomes and put forth a psychometrically sound measure to assess parent fear and avoidance in the context of their child's pain.

  10. Understanding Ocular Discomfort and Dryness Using the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wing; Graham, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To utilize the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ) to assess the influence of pain sensitivity on perceptions of ocular discomfort and dryness. Methods Subjects completed a battery of questionnaires, including history of ocular and general health, contact lens wear history, the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire, visual analog scale (VAS) 100-point rating scales to assess severity and frequency of average and end of day (EOD) discomfort and dryness, and the PSQ to assess pain sensitivity level. Masked subjects were then instructed to wear one inverted and one normally oriented soft contact lens contralaterally for 30 minutes to induce an inter-eye difference in comfort and dryness sensations. Subjects rated comfort and dryness in each eye on VAS every 5 minutes during contact lens wear. A slit lamp examination was performed to evaluate ocular surface health and to assess contact lens fit. Results One hundred and fifty-three subjects (111 females, 42 males) completed the study. In separate models, a higher PSQ score was significantly associated with higher OSDI score (p = 0.002), lower average and EOD comfort (p = 0.005 and 0.001, respectively), and greater EOD dryness (p = 0.04). The minimum (0.14) and maximum (7.14) PSQ scores observed in our subject cohort (i.e., from the subjects who were the least and most sensitive to pain, respectively) corresponded to an estimated difference of 11 points on the OSDI, 20 points on the VAS scale for average comfort, 31 points for EOD comfort and 17 points for EOD dryness. In a mixed effects model, a higher PSQ score was significantly associated with a greater inter-eye difference in comfort (p = 0.013) and dryness (p = 0.010) during CL wear. Conclusions Pain sensitivity influences perceptions of ocular discomfort and dryness, and should be taken into account when evaluating subjective assessments of these symptoms. PMID:27137908

  11. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Mario I.; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A.; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C.; O'Brien, Jessica P.; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  12. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas.

  13. Nurses' and Nursing Students' Knowledge and Attitudes regarding Pediatric Pain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Mario I; Ponce-Monter, Héctor A; Rangel-Flores, Eduardo; Castro-Gamez, Blanca; Romero-Quezada, Luis C; O'Brien, Jessica P; Romo-Hernández, Georgina; Escamilla-Acosta, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff spend more time with patients with pain than any other health staff member. For this reason, the nurse must possess the basic knowledge to identify the presence of pain in patients, to measure its intensity and make the steps necessary for treatment. Therefore, a prospective, descriptive, analytical, and cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the knowledge and attitudes regarding pediatric pain in two different populations. The questionnaire, Pediatric Nurses Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (PKNAS), was applied to 111 hospital pediatric nurses and 300 university nursing students. The final scores for pediatric nurses and nursing students were 40.1 ± 7.9 and 40.3 ± 7.5, respectively. None of the sociodemographic variables predicted the scores obtained by the participants (P > 0.05). There was a high correlation between the PKNAS scores of pediatric nurses and nursing students (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). It was observed that the degree of knowledge about pain and its treatment was very low in both groups. Due to this deficiency, pain in children remains inadequately managed, which leads to suffering in this population. It is necessary to increase the continued training in this subject in both areas. PMID:26543643

  14. [Hypnosis and pain: current and perspective knowledge].

    PubMed

    Bioy, Antoine

    2012-06-27

    After further controversies, the definition of hypnosis is to be at the same time a modified state of consciousness and a particular intersubjective relation between a practitioner and his patient. In a synthetic way, we can say that mechanisms of hypnosis on acute pain are now well known, and its efficiency is particularly proved in the pain provoked by the care. On the other hand, the knowledge concerning the action of the hypnosis on chronic pain is much more complex to understand. If the hypnosis allows connoting differently pain and to decrease its implication in patient's life, otherWise the long-term reorganizations of hypnosis on chronic pain are still for the study. In practice, the field which his particularly in development is the analogical processes of the speech, because they are particularly present in pain medicine, and easy to use in hypnotic method. PMID:22872940

  15. Development of a Comprehensive Heart Disease Knowledge Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Hannah E.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Moser, Richard P.; Scholl, Sarah; Klein, William M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Heart disease is the number one killer of both men and women in the United States, yet a comprehensive and evidence-based heart disease knowledge assessment is currently not available. Purpose: This paper describes the two-phase development of a novel heart disease knowledge questionnaire. Methods: After review and critique of the…

  16. Validation of Malay Brief Pain Inventory Questionnaire to Measure Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Aisyaturridha, A; Naing, L; Nizar, AJ

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to translate and validate the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) questionnaire in the Malay language. The psychometric properties in terms of construct and concurrent validity of the Malay version of BPI were evaluated. The internal consistency and test-retest stability were also evaluated. Methodology: The original version of BPI was translated into a Malay version by the standard procedure and piloted among 35 cancer patients with pain. A total of 113 (95.0%) agreed to participate in this study out of 119 eligible patients with an age ranging from 18 to 76 years. They were interviewed between August and November 2004 for the main study to evaluate the psychometric properties of Malay version of BPI. Results: The pain intensity items demonstrated high loading with a factor whereas the pain interference items were loaded on the other factor in factor analysis. Two factors explained 62% of the variance. With Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS), pain intensity scale had a moderate negative (Pearson’s) correlation (r=−0.520, p<0.001) and pain interference scale had a good negative correlation (r=−0.732, p<0.001), showing an appropriate concurrent validity. The coefficient alpha of both scales demonstrated a good internal consistency of the items. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the test-retest stability was 0.61 for the pain intensity scale and 0.88 for the pain interference scale. Conclusion: Overall, the Malay version of the BPI is a reliable and valid instrument for cancer pain assessment and it is comparable with the original version of the BPI in terms of structure and psychometric properties.

  17. Knowledge, Practices, and Perceived Barriers Regarding Cancer Pain Management Among Physicians and Nurses In Korea: A Nationwide Multicenter Survey

    PubMed Central

    Jho, Hyun Jung; Kim, Yeol; Kong, Kyung Ae; Kim, Dae Hyun; Choi, Jin Young; Nam, Eun Jeong; Choi, Jin Young; Koh, Sujin; Hwang, Kwan Ok; Baek, Sun Kyung; Park, Eun Jung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Medical professionals’ practices and knowledge regarding cancer pain management have often been cited as inadequate. This study aimed to evaluate knowledge, practices and perceived barriers regarding cancer pain management among physicians and nurses in Korea. Methods A nationwide questionnaire survey was administered to physicians and nurses involved in the care of cancer patients. Questionnaire items covered pain assessment and documentation practices, knowledge regarding cancer pain management, the perceived barriers to cancer pain control, and processes perceived as the major causes of delay in opioid administration. Results A total of 333 questionnaires (149 physicians and 284 nurses) were analyzed. Nurses performed pain assessment and documentation more regularly than physicians did. Although physicians had better knowledge of pain management than did nurses, both groups lacked knowledge regarding the side effects and pharmacology of opioids. Physicians working in the palliative care ward and nurses who had received pain management education obtained higher scores on knowledge. Physicians perceived patients’ reluctance to take opioids as a barrier to pain control, more so than did nurses, while nurses perceived patients’ tendency to under-report of pain as a barrier, more so than did physicians. Physicians and nurses held different perceptions regarding major cause of delay during opioid administration. Conclusions There were differences between physicians and nurses in knowledge and practices for cancer pain management. An effective educational strategy for cancer pain management is needed in order to improve medical professionals’ knowledge and clinical practices. PMID:25144641

  18. Pain Management Practices by Nurses: An Application of the Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) Model.

    PubMed

    Alzghoul, Bashar I; Abdullah, Nor Azimah Chew

    2015-10-26

    Pain is one of the most common reasons that drive people to go to hospitals. It has been found that several factors affect the practices of pain management. In this regard, this study aimed at investigating the underlying determinants in terms of pain management practices. Based on reviewing the previous studies and the suggestions of the KAP model, it was hypothesized that the main elements of the KAP model (attitudes and knowledge) significantly predict the variation in the practices of nurses regarding pain management. A questionnaire comprising the KAP model' s constructs, i.e. knowledge and attitude towards pain management, as well as pain management practices, was used to collect data from 266 registered nurses (n=266) who are deemed competent in the management of patients' pain in the Jordanian public hospitals. The two constructs, attitude and knowledge, which are the main determinants of the KAP model were found to independently predict nurses' practices of managing patients' pain. Knowledge of pain management was found to be the strongest predictor. Additionally, it was found that about 69% of the variance in pain management could be explained by the constructs of the KAP model. Therefore, it is recommended that the Jordanian hospitals and universities focus on nurses' knowledge and attitude towards pain management in order to enhance their practices in the field of pain management.

  19. Brief Opioid Overdose Knowledge (BOOK): A Questionnaire to Assess Overdose Knowledge in Individuals Who Use Illicit or Prescribed Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kelly E.; Barrett, Frederick S.; Yepez-Laubach, Claudia; Meyer, Andrew C.; Hruska, Bryce J.; Sigmon, Stacey C.; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Opioid overdose is a public health crisis. This study describes efforts to develop and validate the Brief Opioid Overdose Knowledge (BOOK) questionnaire to assess patient knowledge gaps related to opioid overdose risks. Methods: Two samples of illicit opioid users and a third sample of patients receiving an opioid for the treatment of chronic pain (total N = 848) completed self-report items pertaining to opioid overdose risks. Results: A 3-factor scale was established, representing Opioid Knowledge (4 items), Opioid Overdose Knowledge (4 items), and Opioid Overdose Response Knowledge (4 items). The scale had strong internal and face validity. Patients with chronic pain performed worse than illicit drug users in almost all items assessed, highlighting the need to increase knowledge of opioid overdose risk to this population. Conclusions: This study sought to develop a brief, internally valid method for quickly assessing deficits in opioid overdose risk areas within users of illicit and prescribed opioids, to provide an efficient metric for assessing and comparing educational interventions, facilitate conversations between physicians and patients about overdose risks, and help formally identify knowledge deficits in other patient populations. PMID:27504923

  20. Validation of the Wisconsin Brief Pain Questionnaire in a multilingual South African population.

    PubMed

    Mphahlele, Noko; Mitchell, Duncan; Kamerman, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Assessment of pain intensity and its effect on quality of life is important for proper management of pain, but no validated pain assessment tools that assess pain intensity and the interference pain has on daily life are available in indigenous South African languages. Therefore, the aim of this study was to validate translated versions of the Wisconsin Brief Pain Questionnaire (WBPQ) in South African HIV-positive patients. The WBPQ was translated into three indigenous South African languages, Setswana, isiZulu, and Xitsonga. We interviewed 452 ambulatory HIV-positive patients (327 urban and 125 rural patients) between the ages of 20 and 76 years old. Factor analysis to assess construct validity identified a two-factor structure (pain intensity and pain interference) for the isiZulu (n=132), Xitsonga (n=125), and Setswana (n=66) versions of the WBPQ, whereas a three-factor structure (pain intensity, mood interference, and activity interference) was identified for the English (completed by English second-language speakers, n=129) version of the WBPQ. Cronbach alphas, calculated to assess the reliability of the pain intensity and pain interference scales, were greater than 0.70 for all scales in all four versions of the WBPQ, showing internal consistency within the dimensions. These results provide evidence of validity for an easily administered questionnaire, which assesses pain intensity and pain interference, in three indigenous South African languages, and for English second-language speakers, in a population of South African HIV-positive patients.

  1. Evaluation of a diabetes knowledge and behaviour (DKB) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Simmons, D; Mandell, C; Fleming, C; Gatland, B; Leakehe, L

    1994-12-01

    The primary prevention of type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes is now considered possible through adopting lifestyle changes. Population strategies for preventing diabetes are now being developed. The South Auckland Diabetes Project has developed a questionnaire to assess the impact of a diabetes awareness, exercise/healthy eating programme in the local communities. The questionnaire was evaluated among local adult Europeans (n=127), Maori (n=103) and Pacific Islands people (n =167). The questionnaire is interviewer-directed and takes approximately 30 min to administer. Diabetes knowledge was assessed using four open questions and 31 closed true/false questions which had good reliability (Cronbach's a range: 0.59-0.90), reproducibility (Pearson's r range: 0.39-0.74) and external validity (r range: 0.28-0.56) among all ethnic groups. Median scores increased by 7-13% on re-testing. The open and closed question scores were 7-13% and l0-26% higher respectively among those with diabetes or a family history of diabetes (n = 78). Important dietary habits were assessed using four tools: (1) a seven-item food preparation/fat content 'fat index'; (2) a four-item high-fat/high-refined-carbohydrate score had good reliability (Cronbach's α 0.51-0.74), reproducibility (r = 0.37-0.70) and external validity when compared with a dietetic assessment (total fat r = 0.44-0.90); (3) a 12-item food frequency questionnaire based on standard portion sizes also shared good reproducibility (Pearson's r = 0.45-0.52) and correlated well with the dietetic assessment of total calories (r = 0.48 0.64) and of calories due to fat (r = 0.41-0.65), and (4) a simple question related to the frequency of fruit consumption correlated negatively with the fat index in Europeans (r = 0.25, P<0.05) and Maori (r = -0.33, P<0.01). While the questionnaire does not give a quantitative assessment of nutritional habits, it does offer a speedy tool for evaluating population-based lifestyle and diabetes

  2. Emotional Intelligence, Pain Knowledge, and Attitudes of Nursing Students in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chan, Joanne C Y; Hamamura, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    Research on nursing students' pain knowledge and attitudes is limited. Although emotions play a role in pain assessment, no study has examined the associations between emotional intelligence and pain knowledge and the attitudes of nursing students. This cross-sectional quantitative study aimed to address this research gap by assessing the pain knowledge and attitudes of nursing students in Hong Kong and examining associations between emotional intelligence and the pain knowledge and attitudes of nursing students. A total of 104 postgraduate nursing students (45 Year 1 students and 59 Year 3 students) completed a questionnaire that included demographic information, the Schutte Emotional Intelligence Scale (SEIS) and the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP). Data analyses included descriptive statistics, correlational analyses, chi-square test and t-tests. The pain knowledge and attitudes of both Year 1 students (M = 20.40, SD = 3.78) and Year 3 students (M = 21.36, SD = 3.15) were suboptimal, t(102) = -1.41, p = .16. Year 1 students had higher emotional intelligence (M = 122.44, SD = 8.90) than Year 3 students (M = 117.71, SD = 14.34), t(98.35) = 2.07, p = .04. For Year 1 students, emotional intelligence was negatively correlated with pain knowledge and attitudes, but the correlation was not significant (r = -.15, p = .33). For Year 3 students, emotional intelligence, pain knowledge and attitudes were negatively correlated, but the correlation was significant (r = -.31, p = .02). These results suggest that nursing students' pain knowledge and attitudes could be improved. Implications for nurse educators to enhance emotional intelligence and pain education for nursing students are discussed. PMID:27108083

  3. Emotional Intelligence, Pain Knowledge, and Attitudes of Nursing Students in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chan, Joanne C Y; Hamamura, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    Research on nursing students' pain knowledge and attitudes is limited. Although emotions play a role in pain assessment, no study has examined the associations between emotional intelligence and pain knowledge and the attitudes of nursing students. This cross-sectional quantitative study aimed to address this research gap by assessing the pain knowledge and attitudes of nursing students in Hong Kong and examining associations between emotional intelligence and the pain knowledge and attitudes of nursing students. A total of 104 postgraduate nursing students (45 Year 1 students and 59 Year 3 students) completed a questionnaire that included demographic information, the Schutte Emotional Intelligence Scale (SEIS) and the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP). Data analyses included descriptive statistics, correlational analyses, chi-square test and t-tests. The pain knowledge and attitudes of both Year 1 students (M = 20.40, SD = 3.78) and Year 3 students (M = 21.36, SD = 3.15) were suboptimal, t(102) = -1.41, p = .16. Year 1 students had higher emotional intelligence (M = 122.44, SD = 8.90) than Year 3 students (M = 117.71, SD = 14.34), t(98.35) = 2.07, p = .04. For Year 1 students, emotional intelligence was negatively correlated with pain knowledge and attitudes, but the correlation was not significant (r = -.15, p = .33). For Year 3 students, emotional intelligence, pain knowledge and attitudes were negatively correlated, but the correlation was significant (r = -.31, p = .02). These results suggest that nursing students' pain knowledge and attitudes could be improved. Implications for nurse educators to enhance emotional intelligence and pain education for nursing students are discussed.

  4. The relationship between knowledge of pain neurophysiology and fear avoidance in people with chronic pain: A point in time, observational study.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Claire; Bradnam, Lynley; Barr, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pain is prevalent in the western world; however fear of pain often has a greater impact than the degree of initial injury. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between knowledge of the neurophysiology of pain and fear avoidance in individuals diagnosed with chronic pain. Twenty-nine people with chronic musculoskeletal pain were recruited and completed questionnaires to determine their understanding of pain neurophysiology and the degree of their fear avoidance beliefs. There was an inverse relationship between knowledge of pain neurophysiology and the level of fear avoidance. Patients with higher pain knowledge reported less fear avoidance and lower perceived disability due to pain. There was no relationship with the educational level or compensable status for either variable. The findings suggest that fear avoidance is positively influenced by neurophysiology of pain education, so that a higher level of pain knowledge is associated with less activity-related fear. The clinical implication is that reducing fear avoidance/kinesiophobia using neurophysiology of pain education in people with chronic pain may provide an effective strategy to help manage fear avoidance and related disability in the chronic pain population in order to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27049810

  5. The relationship between knowledge of pain neurophysiology and fear avoidance in people with chronic pain: A point in time, observational study.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Claire; Bradnam, Lynley; Barr, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pain is prevalent in the western world; however fear of pain often has a greater impact than the degree of initial injury. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between knowledge of the neurophysiology of pain and fear avoidance in individuals diagnosed with chronic pain. Twenty-nine people with chronic musculoskeletal pain were recruited and completed questionnaires to determine their understanding of pain neurophysiology and the degree of their fear avoidance beliefs. There was an inverse relationship between knowledge of pain neurophysiology and the level of fear avoidance. Patients with higher pain knowledge reported less fear avoidance and lower perceived disability due to pain. There was no relationship with the educational level or compensable status for either variable. The findings suggest that fear avoidance is positively influenced by neurophysiology of pain education, so that a higher level of pain knowledge is associated with less activity-related fear. The clinical implication is that reducing fear avoidance/kinesiophobia using neurophysiology of pain education in people with chronic pain may provide an effective strategy to help manage fear avoidance and related disability in the chronic pain population in order to improve treatment outcomes.

  6. Turkish pediatric surgical nurses' knowledge and attitudes regarding pain assessment and nonpharmacological and environmental methods in newborns' pain relief.

    PubMed

    Efe, Emine; Dikmen, Sevkiye; Altaş, Nuray; Boneval, Cem

    2013-12-01

    Effective pain management requires accurate knowledge, attitudes, and assessment skills. The purpose of the present study was to describe Turkish pediatric surgical nurses' knowledge and use of pain assessment and nonpharmacologic and environmental methods in relieving newborn's pain in hospital. The sample consisted of 111 pediatric surgical nurses employed in pediatric surgical unit in 15 university hospitals located in Turkey. A questionnaire was used to measure the nurses' knowledge and use of pain assessment, nonpharmacologic, and environmental methods. Data were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics. Of the nurses that participated in the study, 83.8% were between the ages of 20 and 35 years, 54.1% had a bachelor degree, and 75.7% had a nursing experience ≤10 years. 50.5% stated that physiologic and behavioral indicators used in the assessment of pain in infants. The most commonly used nonpharmacologic methods were giving nonnutritive sucking, skin-to-skin contact, and holding. The most commonly used environmental methods were avoiding talking loudly close to the baby, minimal holding, care when opening and closing of the incubator, avoiding making noise when using wardrobe, drawers, trash, or nearby devices, such as radio and television, avoiding sharp fragrances, such as alcohol, perfume, near the baby, and reducing light sources. Although Turkish pediatric surgical nurses used some of the nonpharmacological and environmental methods in infant's pain relief, there remains a need for more education about pain management and for more frequent use of these methods in clinical care.

  7. Enhancing knowledge and attitudes in pain management: a pain management education program for nursing home staff.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Ho, Suki S K

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of a pain management program (PMP) in enhancing the knowledge and attitudes of health care workers in pain management. Many nursing home residents suffer from pain, and treatment of pain is often inadequate. Failure of health care workers to assess pain and their insufficient knowledge of pain management are barriers to adequate treatment. It was a quasiexperimental pretest and posttest study. Four nursing homes were approached, and 88 staff joined the 8-week PMP. Demographics and the knowledge and attitudes regarding pain were collected with the use of the Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain-Chinese version (NKASRP-C) before and after the PMP. A deficit in knowledge and attitudes related to pain management was prominent before the PMP, and there was a significant increase in pain knowledge and attitudes from 7.9 ± SD 3.52 to 19.2 ± SD4.4 (p < .05) after the 8-week PMP. A PMP can improve the knowledge and attitudes of nursing staff and enable them to provide adequate and appropriate care to older persons in pain. PMPs for nurses and all health care professionals are important in enhancing care for older adults and to inform policy on the provision of pain management.

  8. Improving Nursing Home Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Katherine R.; Fink, Regina; Pepper, Ginny; Hutt, Eveyln; Vojir, Carol P.; Scott, Jill; Clark, Lauren; Mellis, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Effective pain management remains a serious problem in the nursing home setting. Barriers to achieving optimal pain practices include staff knowledge deficits, biases, and attitudes that influence assessment and management of the residents' pain. Design and Methods: Twelve nursing homes participated in this intervention study: six…

  9. Chronic pain therapy with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: predictive value of questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, A C; Abram, S E; Anderson, R A; Vasudevan, S V; Lynch, N T

    1983-07-01

    A retrospective study of 200 chronic pain patients was conducted to determine whether preexisting physical or social factors influence treatment success with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Responses to 30 questions from a preadmission questionnaire were analyzed against short-term treatment success. Patients with pain of more than a year's duration, who had undergone multiple surgical operations for pain control, who used tranquilizers, or who were not working because of pain, demonstrated a generally lower rate of treatment success, although the differences were not statistically significant. Treatment success rate was significantly higher for retired patients than for those with blue-collar jobs or those who were unemployed. There was no association between treatment success rate and site, frequency, character or severity of pain, age, sex, use of narcotic analgesics, or the presence of financial compensation or litigation. The value of TENS for chronic pain remains largely empirical.

  10. Nursing Students' Knowledge of and Views about Children in Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salantera, Sanna; Lauri, Sirkka

    2000-01-01

    Finnish nursing students (n=85) specializing in child nursing had mainly positive attitudes about caring for children in pain, but lacked knowledge of medications and pain assessment. There were no knowledge differences between older and younger students or those with more or less work experience. (SK)

  11. A Multidisciplinary Work-Related Low Back Pain Predictor Questionnaire: Psychometric Evaluation of Iranian Patient-Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Sarallah, Shojaei; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Joan, Wagner

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Psychometric evaluation design. Purpose Psychometric evaluation of a multidisciplinary work-related low back pain predictor questionnaire (MWRLBPPQ) of Iranians patient-care workers based on the social cognitive theory. Overview of Literature Healthcare is one of the professions in which work-related musculoskeletal disorders are prevalent. The chronic low back pain experienced by patient caregivers can negatively impact their professional performance, and patient handling in a hospital is the main cause of low back pain in this population. Methods This was a cross-sectional study carried out in Qom, Iran from July 2014 to November 2014. A MWRLBPPQ based on nine concepts of the social cognitive theory and existing literature regarding chronic low back pain was developed. Ten patient-care workers first completed the questionnaire as a pilot test, allowing the ambiguities of the instrument to be resolved. Exploratory factor analysis was used to confirm construct validity. This questionnaire was distributed among 452 patient-care workers in hospitals located in different geographically areas in Qom, Iran. Cronbach's Alpha was calculated to assess reliability. Results In all, 452 caregivers of patients with mean age of 37.71 (standard deviation=8.3) years participated in the study. An exploratory factor analysis loaded seven concepts of self-efficacy, knowledge, outcome perception, self-control, emotional coping, and self-efficacy in overcoming impediments and challenges in the environment. All concepts were jointly accounted for 50.08% of variance of behavior change. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient showed favorable internal consistency (alpha=0.83), and test-retest of the scale with 2-week intervals indicated an appropriate stability for the MWRLBPPQ. Conclusions The MWRLBPPQ is a reliable and valid theory-based instrument that can be used to predict factors influencing work-related low back pain among workers who lift and transfer patients in hospitals

  12. Use of the McGill pain questionnaire in the assessment of cancer pain: replicability and consistency.

    PubMed

    Graham, C; Bond, S S; Gerkovich, M M; Cook, M R

    1980-06-01

    The McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) is a recent empirically derived instrument designed to provide quantitative information on major dimensions of pain. Although widely used as an outcome measure in clinical research, little attention has been directed specifically at the instrument itself. The present study addressed this need. Detailed findings were obtained for both single and multiple administrations of the MPQ in two subject samples, each composed of 18 cancer outpatients in pain. These data were compared to similar, but less extensive, data reported by Melzack [6]. MPQ indices proved highly replicable over the two subject samples tested and were remarkably similar to the findings reported by Melzack for a different cancer pain patient sample. No differences were found between the written form of MPQ administration used in the present study and the oral procedure followed by Melzack. The consistency of pain descriptor subclass choice in the present samples was high, ranging from 66% to 80.4% over 4 administrations, and these values compare well with the value of 70.3% reported earlier by Melzack. However, the present subjects selected a larger set of pain descriptor words compared to the word set reported to be characteristic of cancer pain by Dubuisson and Melzack [2]. Both individual and group analyses indicated the MPQ is best used as a measure of immediate pain, and not as a summary measure of past pain over a defined period of time. These findings support the use of the MPQ as a reliable, multi-dimensional measure of immediate pain, and suggest the potential value of future research aimed at refining the psychometric properties of the instrument. PMID:7402695

  13. Knowledge and attitudes regarding neonatal pain among nursing staff of pediatric department: an Indian experience.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Archana S; Dongara, Ashish R; Phatak, Ajay G; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M

    2014-03-01

    Neonates receiving care in intensive care units are highly likely to experience pain due to investigations and/or treatments carried out by the health care providers. Neonates are a vulnerable population because they are unable to vocalize their pain. Unaddressed and mismanaged pain can not only affect the child's comfort, but also may alter the development and cognitive abilities of the child in a later part of his/her life. Therefore it is entirely the caregiver's responsibility to accurately assess and manage neonatal pain. We assessed and compared the knowledge and attitudes regarding neonatal pain among the nurses posted in the various units of a pediatric department [pediatric ward, pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)]. An appropriately modified Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain questionnaire was consensually validated, pretested, and then administered to the nursing staff of the pediatric department at a department at a hospital in Gujarat. Data were entered in Epi-Info and analyzed with the use of SPSS 14.0. The questionnaire was administered to 41 nurses working in the Department of Pediatrics, and the response rate was 97.5%. Mean age of the nurses in the study sample was 25.75 years (SD 5.513). The mean total score of the participants was 8.75 out of 17 (SD 2.549), which was unsatisfactory. The mean correct answer rate was 49.67% among the staff of NICU and 48.67% among the pediatric ward and PICU staff. The attitudes among the nurses were assessed. It was concluded that the nurses lack knowledge and that their attitudes also were hindering pain management. One of the barriers identified by the nurses was that physicians do not prescribe analgesics for managing neonatal pain. So not only the nursing staff, but all of the caregivers involved in neonatal care may be lacking in knowledge and hold perceptions and attitudes that hamper neonatal pain management.

  14. [Labor pain from the viewpoint of the modern knowledge of pain physiology].

    PubMed

    Frahm, R; Mundt, A

    1986-01-01

    The valuation and treatment of labor pains require complete morphological and anatomical informations about the neuronal systems concerned. A review is given about modern model conceptions in perception, modulation and transmission of pain, based on the latest knowledges in the pain research. The identification of central control- and modulation systems is very important for the actual theory of pain. Pains and also labor pains are caused as a result of complicated nerval connective principles with slim relation to endocrinological system and are also connected with a lot of individual psychical influences. Essentially, four functional stages are passed from the place of nociceptive perception to the registration in the telencephalon. These are depicted in consideration of numerous afferent and efferent, biochemical and hormonal, stimulated and inhibited modulation effects. Various pain inhibitory mechanisms, such as biogenic amines and endogenous opioids are discussed by reference to interesting aspects in new therapeutical possibilities in treatment of pain and also of labor pains.

  15. Cancer pain: knowledge and attitudes of physicians in Israel.

    PubMed

    Sapir, R; Catane, R; Strauss-Liviatan, N; Cherny, N I

    1999-04-01

    The effectiveness of cancer pain therapy is influenced by the attitudes and knowledge of the treating physicians. As part of a quality improvement project in the management of cancer pain, a survey of 236 medical practitioners was conducted. One hundred seventy-six respondents (74.5%) completed the survey. Fifty-two percent treated patients with cancer pain several times a week or more. Whereas 57.7% of physicians stated that 76-100% of patients could achieve a satisfactory outcome from analgesic therapy, only 17.2% of respondents reported that > 75% actually achieve a satisfactory outcome in their own experience. Unsatisfactory outcome was ascribed to inadequate pain relief (59.7%), or excessive central nervous system (CNS) side effects (43.3%). According to the responding physicians, the major barriers to effective relief include inadequate assessment of the pain and pain relief (65.3%), inadequate knowledge of pain therapy (57.9%), and physician reluctance to prescribe opioids (49.1%). Questions evaluating physician knowledge identified widely prevalent knowledge deficits in pain physiology, risk of addiction, use of adjuvant analgesics, opioid dosing, and treatment of side effects. Specialists in oncology tended to evaluate their knowledge more highly than others (P < 0.05). Despite this, there was no significant knowledge difference between oncologists and noncancer specialists. The data highlight some of the barriers to the successful management of cancer pain in Israel, the prevalence of knowledge deficits, and the common disparity between clinicians' self-assessment of clinical competence and their ability to respond correctly to questions on the management of cancer pain. PMID:10203879

  16. The development of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire. An assessment of the impact of spinal pain on behavior.

    PubMed

    Lawlis, G F; Cuencas, R; Selby, D; McCoy, C E

    1989-05-01

    The Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ) was developed to assess the amount of chronic spinal pain that affects four aspects (daily and work-leisure activities, anxiety-depression, and social interest) of the patients' lives. Results of the DPQ's statistical properties suggest that the DPQ is an externally reliable instrument as well as internally consistent. Two factors emerged from factor structure analysis. Factor 1 represents functional activities and Factor 2 represents emotional capacities. A correlation analysis suggests the concurrent validity of the psychological functional factors of the DPQ. A t test demonstrated that chronic pain patients have significantly higher DPQ scores than normals. Because these findings support its statistical properties, the DPQ appears to have utility for clinical and research purposes. The findings, limitations, and implications of this study are detailed, as are suggestions for future research.

  17. Validation of a Chinese version of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CAPQ) and CPAQ-8 in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqun; Wang, Lei; Wei, Yibo; Wang, Xiaolin; Xu, Tianming; Sun, Jinhai

    2016-08-01

    Acceptance of chronic pain has increasingly become a significant issue in the field of pain management. Many researchers have suggested that patients with better acceptance of pain are more likely to have better functioning both in physical and psychological status. In many countries, the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) and CPAQ-8 have been validated and utilized frequently to measure the pain acceptance of patients with chronic pain. However, the CPAQ and CPAQ-8 yet have not been introduced and validated in Mainland China.In this study, we aimed to translate the English version of the CPAQ into simplified Chinese, make proper cross-cultural adaptations, and validate the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the CPAQ and the CPAQ-8.The English version of the CPAQ was first linguistically translated and cross-culturally adapted to formulate a Chinese version. Then, we recruited 224 patients from a pain clinic and every participant was asked to finish a series of questionnaires. Finally, statistical analysis was performed to test the psychometric properties of the CPAQ and the CPAQ-8.Both confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and principal component analysis (PCA) confirmed a 2-factor structure for the CPAQ and the CPAQ-8. Nine out of 10 of the hypotheses were validated for construct validity. The overall intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) value for the CPAQ and CPAQ-8 were 0.92 and 0.89, respectively. In addition, the Cronbach α values for both the CPAQ and the CPAQ-8 showed excellent test-retest reliability.In conclusion, the original CPAQ was successfully developed into the Chinese version of the CPAQ and CPAQ-8 with excellent validity and reliability. The scores of the CPAQ or CPAQ-8 might be a strong predictor for the physical and psychological function of chronic pain patients. In addition, to improve the satisfaction of surgery patients, we recommend measuring patients' pain acceptance using the CPAQ or CPAQ-8 before and after the

  18. Validation of the Spanish version of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) for the assessment of acceptance in fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to validate a Spanish version of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ). Pain acceptance is the process of giving up the struggle with pain and learning to live a worthwhile life despite it. The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) is the questionnaire most often used to measure pain acceptance in chronic pain populations. Methods A total of 205 Spanish patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome who attended our pain clinic were asked to complete a battery of psychometric instruments: the Pain Visual Analogue Scale (PVAS) for pain intensity, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36), the Pain Catastrophising Scale (PCS) and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). Results Analysis of results showed that the Spanish CPAQ had good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.83) and internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α: 0.83). The Spanish CPAQ score significantly correlated with pain intensity, anxiety, depression, pain catastrophising, health status and physical and psychosocial disability. The Scree plot and a Principal Components Factor analysis confirmed the same two-factor construct as the original English CPAQ. Conclusion The Spanish CPAQ is a reliable clinical assessment tool with valid construct validity for the acceptance measurement among a sample of Spanish fibromyalgia patients. This study will make it easier to assess pain acceptance in Spanish populations with fibromyalgia. PMID:20385016

  19. Musculoskeletal pain after stopping tyrosine kinase inhibitor in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Seiichiro; Tauchi, Tetsuzo; Saito, Yuu; Suguro, Tamiko; Asano, Michiyo; Yoshizawa, Seiichiro; Sakuta, Juri; Akahane, Daigo; Tanaka, Yuko; Furuya, Nahoko; Ando, Keiko; Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Okabe, Seiichi; Gotoh, Moritaka; Ito, Yoshikazu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey to assess the state of patients with CML after discontinuation of TKI therapy. Nine of 27 patients developed musculoskeletal pain after TKI discontinuation. One had discontinued nilotinib and eight had discontinued imatinib therapy. Median time to symptom development after discontinuation was 2 weeks. Four experienced grade 3 symptoms as per the CTCAE ver. 4.0. One had pain persisting over a period of 21 months. There was a significant difference between patients with and without symptoms as regards female gender and the probability of persistent MMR. Awareness of this withdrawal syndrome after TKI discontinuation is imperative. PMID:27498732

  20. Further Development of the Multidimensional Pain Readiness to Change Questionnaire: The MPRCQ2

    PubMed Central

    Nielson, Warren R.; Jensen, Mark P.; Ehde, Dawn M.; Kerns, Robert D.; Molton, Ivan R.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes further development of the Multidimensional Pain Readiness to Change Questionnaire (MPRCQ2), a measure of readiness to adopt a variety of pain management and coping strategies commonly taught in multidisciplinary treatment programs. Clinical samples were recruited from a Fibromyalgia Day Program (n = 139) and an Arthritis Day Program (n = 51) as well as 2 survey samples with pain resulting from either a spinal cord injury (n = 127) or an amputation (n = 120). The results indicate preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the MPRCQ2. The MPRCQ2 may be helpful in future research investigating the relationship between readiness to change pain-related coping and adoption of coping behaviors and adjustment to chronic pain. Perspective This study describes the development of a revised version of the MPRCQ, the MPRCQ2, in 4 patient samples. The results support the reliability and validity of the MPRCQ2 in individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome, arthritis, acquired amputation, and spinal cord injury and improve on some aspects of the instrument. PMID:18337183

  1. Determinants of nurses' knowledge gap on pain management in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Aziato, Lydia; Adejumo, Oluyinka

    2014-03-01

    There are concerns about adequacy of nurses' knowledge and skill in effective pain management since effective pain management promotes early recovery after surgery. This study explores factors that accounted for Ghanaian nurses' inadequate knowledge of postoperative pain management using a focused ethnographic design for data collection at a tertiary teaching hospital in Ghana. Fourteen nurses designated as key informants with different backgrounds as nurse educators and leaders were purposively sampled to participate. Data were collected through in-depth individual interviews; all interviews were conducted in English, audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The study revealed that nurses' inadequate pain management knowledge might have resulted from curriculum gaps during training; inadequate clinical supervision, study days, and workshops for practising nurses; lack of funding for organising regular workshops; and, negative attitudes of nurses whereby new information learned at workshops was not readily applied in clinical practice. It was concluded that nursing curricula at all levels of training in Ghana should incorporate credit-bearing courses on pain management, and appropriate pain management education programmes should be instituted for practising nurses. Regular monitoring and evaluation of the impact of such education programs is required.

  2. The McGill Pain Questionnaire as a Multidimensional Measure in People with Cancer: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Ngamkham, Srisuda; Vincent, Catherine; Finnegan, Lorna; Holden, Janean E.; Wang, Zaijie Jim; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2010-01-01

    First published in 1975, the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) is an often cited pain measure but there have been no systematic reviews of the MPQ in cancer populations. The objective is to evaluate the MPQ as a multidimensional measure of pain in people with cancer. A systematic search of research that used the MPQ in adults with cancer and published in English from 1975 to 2009 was conducted. Twenty-one articles retrieved through computerized searches and nine studies from manual searches met the criteria. Review of the 30 studies demonstrated that pain intensity (n=29 studies) and pain quality (n=27 studies) were measured more frequently than pain location, pattern, and behavior parameters. Measuring cancer pain using the MPQ provided insights about disease sites, magnitude of pain and the effectiveness of treatment and intervention. Additionally, the MPQ data informed speculations about pain mechanisms, emotional status, overall sensory pain experience, changes in pain over time, and alleviating and aggravating behaviors/factors. Findings supported that the MPQ was an effective multidimensional measure with good stability, content, construct, and criterion validity and showed sensitivity to treatment or known-group effects. The MPQ is a valid, reliable, and sensitive multidimensional measure of cancer pain. Cancer pain is a subjective, complex experience consisting of multiple dimensions, and measuring cancer pain with the MPQ may help clinicians to more fully understand if those dimensions of cancer pain influence each other. As a result, clinicians can provide better and effective cancer pain management. PMID:22341138

  3. Psychometric properties of the pain stages of change questionnaire as evaluated by rasch analysis in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Our objective was to evaluate the measurement properties of the Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire (PSOCQ) and its four subscales Precontemplation, Contemplation, Action and Maintenance. Methods A total of 231 patients, median age 42 years, with chronic musculoskeletal pain responded to the 30 items in PSOCQ. Thresholds for item scores, and unidimensionality and invariance of the PSOCQ and its four subscales were evaluated by Rasch analysis, partial credit model. Results The items had disordered threshold and needed to be rescored. The 30 items in the PSOCQ did not fit the Rasch model Chi- square item trait statistics. All subscales fitted the Rasch models. The associations to pain (11 point numeric rating scale), emotional distress (Hopkins symptom check list v 25) and self-efficacy (Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale) were highest for the Precontemplation subscale. Conclusion The present analysis revealed that all four subscales in PSOCQ fitted the Rasch model. No common construct for all subscales were identified, but the Action and Maintenance subscales were closely related. PMID:24646065

  4. Outcome Measure of Pain in Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation: Validation Study of the Iranian version of Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Azhari, Shirzad; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Nayeb Aghaei, Hossain; Mohammadi, Hassan Reza; Montazeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional. Purpose To translate and culturally adapt an Iranian version of the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ) in Iran. Overview of Literature Instruments measuring patient reported outcomes should satisfy certain psychometric properties. Methods The PSQ was translated following cross-cultural adaptation guidelines. A total of 101 patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH), and 39 healthy cases were included in the study. All participants completed the PSQ and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, known group comparison, criterion validity and item-scale correlations were assessed. Results The mean age of participants was 51.7 years. Reliability, validity and correlation of PSQ and PCS showed satisfactory results. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.81 for PSQ-total, 0.82 for PSQ-minor, and 0.82 for PSQ-moderate. The intraclass correlation coefficients value was 0.84 (0.616–0.932) indicating an excellent test-retest reliability. The instrument discriminated well between sub-groups of patients who differed in a standard predictive measure of LDH surgery (the Finneson–Cooper score). Total PSQ were also significantly correlated with the total scores of the PCS, lending support to its good convergent validity. Additionally, the correlation of each item with its hypothesized domain on the PSQ indicated acceptable results, suggesting that the items had a substantial relationship with their own domains. Conclusions The adapted Iranian PSQ is a valid and reliable questionnaire for the assessment of pain in patients with LDH. PMID:27340527

  5. TCM Pattern Questionnaire for Lateral Elbow Pain: Development of an Instrument via a Delphi Process.

    PubMed

    Gadau, Marcus; Zhang, Shi-Ping; Yeung, Wing-Fai; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Lu, Ai-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Individualized acupuncture treatment has been practiced for pain therapy. This study used acupuncture treatment for lateral elbow pain (LEP) as an example to study the diagnostic practice of individualized acupuncture treatment. A provisional version of LEP pattern questionnaire was developed based on a recent systematic review on TCM pattern diagnosis for LEP. A Delphi panel of 33 clinical experts from seven different countries was formed, and the Delphi survey was conducted in Chinese and English language for two rounds. Consensus was achieved from all 26 panelists who responded to the second round on 243 items of the instrument, which included a 72-question-long questionnaire. The mean level of expert consensus on the items of the final questionnaire was 85%. Consensus was found on four TCM patterns that could underlie LEP, namely, the wind-cold-dampness pattern, the qi stagnation and blood stasis pattern, the dual deficiency of qi and blood pattern, and the retained dampness-heat pattern. A list of signs and symptoms indicating one of the four TCM patterns and a list of preferred treatment modalities for each pattern were also generated. Our instrument shows considerable content validity. Further validity and reliability studies are under way.

  6. TCM Pattern Questionnaire for Lateral Elbow Pain: Development of an Instrument via a Delphi Process.

    PubMed

    Gadau, Marcus; Zhang, Shi-Ping; Yeung, Wing-Fai; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Lu, Ai-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Individualized acupuncture treatment has been practiced for pain therapy. This study used acupuncture treatment for lateral elbow pain (LEP) as an example to study the diagnostic practice of individualized acupuncture treatment. A provisional version of LEP pattern questionnaire was developed based on a recent systematic review on TCM pattern diagnosis for LEP. A Delphi panel of 33 clinical experts from seven different countries was formed, and the Delphi survey was conducted in Chinese and English language for two rounds. Consensus was achieved from all 26 panelists who responded to the second round on 243 items of the instrument, which included a 72-question-long questionnaire. The mean level of expert consensus on the items of the final questionnaire was 85%. Consensus was found on four TCM patterns that could underlie LEP, namely, the wind-cold-dampness pattern, the qi stagnation and blood stasis pattern, the dual deficiency of qi and blood pattern, and the retained dampness-heat pattern. A list of signs and symptoms indicating one of the four TCM patterns and a list of preferred treatment modalities for each pattern were also generated. Our instrument shows considerable content validity. Further validity and reliability studies are under way. PMID:27525024

  7. TCM Pattern Questionnaire for Lateral Elbow Pain: Development of an Instrument via a Delphi Process

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Individualized acupuncture treatment has been practiced for pain therapy. This study used acupuncture treatment for lateral elbow pain (LEP) as an example to study the diagnostic practice of individualized acupuncture treatment. A provisional version of LEP pattern questionnaire was developed based on a recent systematic review on TCM pattern diagnosis for LEP. A Delphi panel of 33 clinical experts from seven different countries was formed, and the Delphi survey was conducted in Chinese and English language for two rounds. Consensus was achieved from all 26 panelists who responded to the second round on 243 items of the instrument, which included a 72-question-long questionnaire. The mean level of expert consensus on the items of the final questionnaire was 85%. Consensus was found on four TCM patterns that could underlie LEP, namely, the wind-cold-dampness pattern, the qi stagnation and blood stasis pattern, the dual deficiency of qi and blood pattern, and the retained dampness-heat pattern. A list of signs and symptoms indicating one of the four TCM patterns and a list of preferred treatment modalities for each pattern were also generated. Our instrument shows considerable content validity. Further validity and reliability studies are under way. PMID:27525024

  8. Validation of the Korean Version of the DN4 Diagnostic Questionnaire for Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Lumbar or Lumbar-Radicular Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Park, Joon-Hee; Bouhassira, Didier; Shin, Jae-Hoon; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Baek, Chang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic value of the Korean version of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) questionnaire and to validate this questionnaire in terms of psychometric properties in patients with chronic pain due to degenerative spinal disease. Materials and Methods The Korean version of the DN4 questionnaire, which was translated and linguistically validated by the MAPI Research Group, was tested on 83 patients with lumbar or lumbar-radicular pain. Test-retest reliability was evaluated in a subsample of 40 patients who completed two assessments with an interval of 2 weeks. Nociceptive pain and neuropathic component pain were diagnosed in 40 and 43 patients, respectively. Results The Cronbach's α coefficient of internal consistency was 0.819, and the test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient (3, 1) (95% confidence interval) was 0.813 (0.776–0.847) (n=40). The area under the receiver-operator characteristics curve was 0.953 (p<0.001), with 95% confidence interval between 0.869 and 0.990. The Korean version of the DN4 questionnaire showed a sensitivity of 100% and 87.1%, and a specificity of 88.2% and 94.1% at the cutoff value of 3/10 and 4/10, respectively, for discriminating neuropathic component pain. Conclusion The present study demonstrated the good discriminatory power of DN4 between nociceptive pain and neuropathic component pain in patients with lumbar or lumbar-radicular pain. PMID:26847299

  9. The need for knowledge translation in chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Henry, James L

    2008-01-01

    One in five Canadians suffers from some form of persistent or chronic pain. The impact on individual lives, families and friends, the health services sector and the economy is huge. Reliable evidence is available that the burden of persistent pain can be markedly reduced when available knowledge is applied. Bridging the quality chasm between chronic pain and the care process will require a unique confluence of opinion from all stakeholders committed within a focused community of practice to address the impact of pain. Various levels of success in this regard have been demonstrated when there is exchange, synthesis and ethically sound application of research findings within a complex set of interactions among researchers and knowledge users. It is now critical to accelerate the capture of the benefits of research for Canadians through improved health, more effective and responsive services and products, and a strengthened health care system to bring about health reform and health care reform across Canada as it pertains to the one in five Canadians living with chronic, disabling pain. The overarching outcome of such an initiative needs to be promoted to sustain a balanced portfolio of curiosity-and needs-based research, which along with existing knowledge, can be mobilized and applied for the benefit of Canadians, the health care system and the economy. PMID:19225603

  10. The Quantitative Analgesic Questionnaire: A Tool to Capture Patient-Reported Chronic Pain Medication Use

    PubMed Central

    Robinson-Papp, Jessica; George, Mary Catherine; Wongmek, Arada; Nmashie, Alexandra; Merlin, Jessica S.; Ali, Yousaf; Epstein, Lawrence; Green, Mark; Serban, Stelian; Sheth, Parag; Simpson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Context The extent to which patients take chronic pain medications as prescribed is not well studied, and there are no generally agreed-upon measures. The Quantitative Analgesic Questionnaire (QAQ) is a new instrument designed to comprehensively document patient-reported medication use, generate scores to quantify it (by individual drug, class, and/or overall), and compare it (qualitatively and/or quantitatively) to the regimen as prescribed. Objectives The aim of this study was to describe the development and preliminary validation of the QAQ. Methods The QAQ was studied in a convenience sample of 149 HIV-infected participants. Results We found that the QAQ scores computed for participants’ chronic pain medication regimens were valid based on their correlation with: 1) patient-reported pain intensity (r=0.38, P<0.001); and 2) experienced pain management physicians’ independent quantification of the regimens (r=0.89; P<0.001). The QAQ also demonstrated high inter-rater reliability (r=0.957; P<0.001). Detailed examination of the QAQ data in a subset of 34 participants demonstrated that the QAQ revealed suboptimal adherence in 44% of participants, and contained information that would not have been gleaned from review of the medical record alone in 94%, including use of over-the-counter medications, and quantification of “as needed” dosing. The QAQ also was found to be useful in quantifying change in the medication regimen over time, capturing a change in 50% of the participants from baseline to eight-week follow-up. Conclusion The QAQ is a simple tool that can facilitate understanding of patient-reported chronic pain medication regimens, including calculation of percent adherence and generation of quantitative scores suitable for estimating and tracking change in medication use over time. PMID:25912277

  11. German translation and external validation of the Radboud Skills Questionnaire in patients suffering from Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from Complex Regional Pain Syndrome commonly complain of substantial limitations in their activities of daily living. The Radboud Skills Questionnaire measures alterations in the level of disability of patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, but this instrument is currently not available in German. The goals of our study were to translate the Dutch Radboud Skills Questionnaire into German and to assess its external criterion validity with the German version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire. Methods We translated the Radboud Skills Questionnaire according to published guidelines. Demographic data and validity were assessed in 57 consecutive patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1 of the upper extremity. Information on age, duration of symptoms, type of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1 and type of initiating event was obtained. We assessed the external criterion validity by comparing the German Radboud Skills Questionnaire and the German Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire and calculated the prediction intervals. Results Score values ranged from 55.4 ± 22.0 for the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire score and 140.1 ± 39.2 for the Radboud Skills Questionnaire. We found a high correlation between the Radboud Skills Questionnaire and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (R2 = 0.83). Conclusion This validation of the Radboud Skills Questionnaire demonstrates that this German version is a simple and accurate instrument to assess and quantify disabilities of patients suffering from Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1 of the upper extremity for clinical and research purposes PMID:20515455

  12. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and validity of the Korean version of the pain sensitivity questionnaire in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Yeo, Ji-Hyun; Cho, Hyeon-Guk; Yi, Je-Min; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Yeom, Jin S

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate pain sensitivity questionnaires (PSQ) into the Korean language, perform a cross-cultural adaption of the PSQ, and validate the Korean version of PSQ in patients with degenerative spinal disease. The PSQ was translated forward and backward, cross-culturally adapted by 2 independent translators, and approved by an expert committee. The final Korean version of the PSQ was tested on 72 patients with degenerative spinal disease. Test-retest reliability was evaluated for 60 patients (83%) who completed the second assessment in an interval of 4 weeks. The mean PSQ-minor, PSQ-moderate, and PSQ-total (standard deviation [SD]) were 5.40 (2.02), 6.46 (1.98), and 5.93 (1.93), respectively. The PSQ-total, PSQ-minor, and PSQ-moderate of the Korean version showed very good internal consistencies determined by the Cronbach's α of 0.926, 0.869, and 0.877, respectively. For convergent validity, the PSQ scores of the Korean version showed significant correlations with pain catastrophizing scale (PCS) (r = 0.377, P = 0.002; r = 0.365, P = 0.003; r = 0.362, P = 0.003 for PSQ-total, PSQ-minor, and PSQ-moderate of the Korean version, respectively). For test-retest reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.782 for PSQ-total, 0.752 for PSQ-minor, and 0.793 for PSQ-moderate. In conclusion, the validated Korean version of PSQ is a transculturally equivalent, reliable, and valid tool to assess individual pain sensitivity.

  13. Development of a brief and effective temporomandibular disorder pain screening questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Yoly M.; Schiffman, Eric; Gordon, Sharon M.; Seago, Bradley; Truelove, Edmond L.; Slade, Gary; Ohrbach, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background Available screening instruments for identifying temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) exhibit methodological or logistic limitations. The authors conducted a study to develop and assess the validity of a self-report instrument in screening patients for pain-related TMDs. Methods By using psychometric methods for item selection, the authors developed short (three-item) and long (six-item) versions of the questionnaire and evaluated them for validity among 504 participants. Results Internal reliability was excellent, with coefficient α values of 0.87 and 0.93 for the short and long versions, respectively. When the authors dichotomized instrument scores at optimal thresholds, both versions had a sensitivity of 99 percent and a specificity of 97 percent for correct classification of the presence or absence of TMD. The specificity was at least 95 percent in the correct identification of people with nonpainful TMJ disorders or headahce without TMD pain. Conclusions With use of appropriate psychometric methodology, the selected items exhibited excellent content validity. The excellent levels of reliability, sensitivity and specificity demonstrate the validity and usefulness of this instrument. Clinical Implications Using this instrument will allow clinicians to identify more readily—and cost-effectively—most patients with painful TMD conditions for whom early and reliable identification would have a significant effect on diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. PMID:21965492

  14. Patients' treatment beliefs in low back pain: development and validation of a questionnaire in primary care.

    PubMed

    Dima, Alexandra; Lewith, George T; Little, Paul; Moss-Morris, Rona; Foster, Nadine E; Hankins, Matthew; Surtees, George; Bishop, Felicity L

    2015-08-01

    Choosing the most appropriate treatment for individual patients with low back pain (LBP) can be challenging, and clinical guidelines recommend taking into account patients' preferences. However, no tools exist to assess or compare patients' views about LBP treatments. We report the development and validation of the Low Back Pain Treatment Beliefs Questionnaire (LBP-TBQ) for use across different treatments in clinical practice and research. Using qualitative data, we developed a pool of items assessing perceived credibility, effectiveness, concerns about, and individual "fit" of specific treatments. These items were included in a survey completed by 429 primary care patients with LBP, of whom 115 completed it again 1 to 2 weeks later. We performed psychometric analyses using nonparametric item response theory and classical test theory. The 4 subscales of the resulting 16-item LBP-TBQ showed good homogeneity (H = 0.46-0.76), internal consistency (α = 0.73-0.94), and stability (r = 0.63-0.83), confirmed most convergent and discriminant validity hypotheses, and had acceptable structural validity for 4 guideline-recommended treatments: pain medication, exercise, manual therapy, and acupuncture. Participants with stronger positive treatment beliefs were more likely to rank that treatment as their first choice, indicating good criterion validity (t values = 3.11-9.80, all P < 0.01, except pain medication effectiveness beliefs, t(339) = 1.35; P = 0.18). A short 4-item version also displayed good homogeneity (H = 0.43-0.66), internal consistency (α = 0.70-0.86), and stability (r = 0.82-0.85) and was significantly related to treatment choice (t values = 4.33-9.25, all P < 0.01). The LBP-TBQ can be used to assess treatment beliefs in primary care patients with LBP and to investigate the effects of treatment beliefs on treatment uptake and adherence.

  15. Patients' treatment beliefs in low back pain: development and validation of a questionnaire in primary care.

    PubMed

    Dima, Alexandra; Lewith, George T; Little, Paul; Moss-Morris, Rona; Foster, Nadine E; Hankins, Matthew; Surtees, George; Bishop, Felicity L

    2015-08-01

    Choosing the most appropriate treatment for individual patients with low back pain (LBP) can be challenging, and clinical guidelines recommend taking into account patients' preferences. However, no tools exist to assess or compare patients' views about LBP treatments. We report the development and validation of the Low Back Pain Treatment Beliefs Questionnaire (LBP-TBQ) for use across different treatments in clinical practice and research. Using qualitative data, we developed a pool of items assessing perceived credibility, effectiveness, concerns about, and individual "fit" of specific treatments. These items were included in a survey completed by 429 primary care patients with LBP, of whom 115 completed it again 1 to 2 weeks later. We performed psychometric analyses using nonparametric item response theory and classical test theory. The 4 subscales of the resulting 16-item LBP-TBQ showed good homogeneity (H = 0.46-0.76), internal consistency (α = 0.73-0.94), and stability (r = 0.63-0.83), confirmed most convergent and discriminant validity hypotheses, and had acceptable structural validity for 4 guideline-recommended treatments: pain medication, exercise, manual therapy, and acupuncture. Participants with stronger positive treatment beliefs were more likely to rank that treatment as their first choice, indicating good criterion validity (t values = 3.11-9.80, all P < 0.01, except pain medication effectiveness beliefs, t(339) = 1.35; P = 0.18). A short 4-item version also displayed good homogeneity (H = 0.43-0.66), internal consistency (α = 0.70-0.86), and stability (r = 0.82-0.85) and was significantly related to treatment choice (t values = 4.33-9.25, all P < 0.01). The LBP-TBQ can be used to assess treatment beliefs in primary care patients with LBP and to investigate the effects of treatment beliefs on treatment uptake and adherence. PMID:25906346

  16. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of Nursing Low Back Pain Predictor Questionnaire Focusing on Nurses Suffering from Chronic Low Back Pain in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghadyani, Leila; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Wagner, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Development and psychometric evaluation. Purpose Design and psychometric assessment of the Nursing Low Back Pain Predictor Questionnaire addressing nurses suffering from chronic low back pain in Iran. Overview of Literature Low back pain is the most prevalent behavior-related health problem among nurses, and it needs to be assessed through a validated multi-factorial questionnaire, using the premises of the social cognitive theory. Methods This was a cross-sectional study carried out in Tehran, Iran from April 17, 2014 to July 16, 2014. A 50-item questionnaire based on the social cognitive theory was generated. The questionnaire was distributed among 500 nurses working in hospitals located in different geographically areas in Tehran. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine the factors and their related items. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to assess reliability. Results The exploratory factor analysis loaded six factors, named observational learning, outcome expectations, self-efficacy, self-regulation, and self-efficacy in overcoming impediments in the working environment and emotional coping. All factors were jointly accounted for 67.12% of behavior change variance. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient showed excellent internal consistency (alpha=0.91). Test and retest analysis with 2-week intervals indicated an appropriate stability for the questionnaire (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.94). Conclusions According the results, the developed questionnaire is a reliable and validated theory-based instrument, which can be used to predict the work, related factors for low back pain among nurses. PMID:27559450

  17. Symptom profiles in the painDETECT Questionnaire in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain stratified according to sensory loss in quantitative sensory testing.

    PubMed

    Vollert, Jan; Kramer, Martin; Barroso, Alejandro; Freynhagen, Rainer; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Jensen, Troels S; Kuehler, Bianca M; Maier, Christoph; Mainka, Tina; Reimer, Maren; Segerdahl, Märta; Serra, Jordi; Solà, Romà; Tölle, Thomas R; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Baron, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    The painDETECT Questionnaire (PDQ) is commonly used as a screening tool to discriminate between neuropathic pain (NP) and nociceptive pain, based on the self-report of symptoms, including pain qualities, numbness, and pain to touch, cold, or heat. However, there are minimal data about whether the PDQ is differentially sensitive to different sensory phenotypes in NP. The aim of the study was to analyze whether the overall PDQ score or its items reflect phenotypes of sensory loss in NP as determined by quantitative sensory testing. An exploratory analysis in the Innovative Medicines Initiative Europain and Neuropain database was performed. Data records of 336 patients identified with NP were grouped into sensory profiles characterized by (1) no loss of sensation, (2) loss of thermal sensation, (3) loss of mechanical sensation, and (4) loss of thermal and mechanical sensation. painDETECT Questionnaire profiles were analyzed in a 2-factor analysis of variance. Patients with loss of thermal sensation (2 and 4) significantly more often reported pain evoked by light touch, and patients with loss of mechanical sensation (3 and 4) significantly more often reported numbness and significantly less often burning sensations and pain evoked by light touch. Although the PDQ was not designed to assess sensory loss, single items reflect thermal and/or mechanical sensory loss at group level, but because of substantial variability, the PDQ does not allow for individual allocation of patients into sensory profiles. It will be useful to develop screening tools according to the current definition of NP.

  18. Construction and Validation of a Questionnaire about Heart Failure Patients' Knowledge of Their Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Christiani Decker Batista; dos Santos, Rafaella Zulianello; Ghisi, Gabriela Lima de Melo; Vieira, Ariany Marques; Amboni, Ricardo; Benetti, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background The lack of tools to measure heart failure patients' knowledge about their syndrome when participating in rehabilitation programs demonstrates the need for specific recommendations regarding the amount or content of information required. Objectives To develop and validate a questionnaire to assess heart failure patients' knowledge about their syndrome when participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs. Methods The tool was developed based on the Coronary Artery Disease Education Questionnaire and applied to 96 patients with heart failure, with a mean age of 60.22 ± 11.6 years, 64% being men. Reproducibility was obtained via the intraclass correlation coefficient, using the test-retest method. Internal consistency was assessed by use of Cronbach's alpha, and construct validity, by use of exploratory factor analysis. Results The final version of the tool had 19 questions arranged in ten areas of importance for patient education. The proposed questionnaire had a clarity index of 8.94 ± 0.83. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.856, and Cronbach's alpha, 0.749. Factor analysis revealed five factors associated with the knowledge areas. Comparing the final scores with the characteristics of the population evidenced that low educational level and low income are significantly associated with low levels of knowledge. Conclusion The instrument has satisfactory clarity and validity indices, and can be used to assess the heart failure patients' knowledge about their syndrome when participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs. PMID:24652054

  19. Consumers’ Perception and Knowledge of Food Safety: Results of Questionnaires Accessible on IZSalimenTO Website

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Astegiano, Sara; Barbaro, Antonio; Bona, Maria Cristina; Baioni, Elisa; Rubinetti, Francesca; Aliberti, Enrico; Palazzo, Carlo; Gallina, Silvia; Decastelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The present survey was undertaken to investigate consumers’ knowledge of the main foodborne agents and dietary regimen during pregnancy. Data were collected using monthly questionnaires available on IZSalimenTO website between March 2013 and January 2014. Hepatitis A virus questionnaire: 20 respondents (77%) recognized berries as foodstuff linked to the outbreak of hepatitis A. The majority correctly indicated as precautionary advice to boil berries before consumption. Botulism questionnaire: 29 respondents (62%) indicated pesto as food involved in botulism alert in July 2013. The risk of infant botulism in infant less than 1 year old due to honey consumption is known by 24 respondents (51%). Main foodborne disease questionnaire: the risk of infection by Salmonella after the consumption of foods made with raw eggs is known by the majority (94%; N=17) as well as the treatments to be applied in order to make fresh fish safe from parasites (76%). Pregnancy questionnaire: 20 respondents (74%) believed that washing vegetables and fruits with sodium bicarbonate or chlorate solution is able to inactivate Toxoplasma; only 4 (15%) reported both raw meat and vegetables washed with sodium bicarbonate as food at risk. Results indicate that all consumers should be trained on behaviour and dietary regimen to be adopted in pregnancy and in infant <1 year old. The website may be considered as a useful tool to assess consumers’ knowledge: both the news section and the contents published may be a source of information and education for consumers on food safety. PMID:27800380

  20. Measurement Structure of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire-24 in a Sample of Individuals with Musculoskeletal Pain: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Chung-Yi; Jochman, Joseph; Fujikawa, Mayu; Strand, David; Cheing, Gladys; Lee, Gloria; Chan, Fong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the factorial structure of the "Coping Strategy Questionnaire"-24 (CSQ-24) in a sample of Canadians with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Method: The sample included 171 workers' compensation clients (50.9% men) recruited from outpatient rehabilitation facilities in Canada. Mean age of participants was 42.45 years…

  1. Assessment of the quality of life through the SF-36 questionnaire in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Adorno, Marta Lúcia Guimarães Resende; Brasil-Neto, Joaquim Pereira

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of life (QL) with the use of the SF-36 Questionnaire in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain (CNLBP). Thirty patients with CNLBP were randomly assigned to one of three groups (Iso group (Isostretching), GPR group (Global Postural Reeducation), and the Iso+GPR group. Patients underwent physical therapy assessment with the use of the Vertebral Spine Assessment, the Visual Analog Scale of Pain (VASP), and the SF-36 life quality questionnaire before the first session (first assessment), after three months of treatment (second assessment) and reassessed two months after the final session in the follow-up (third assessment). The results indicated that both physical therapy techniques reduced pain (p<0.001); when the techniques (Iso+GPR) were combined, the reduction in pain was significantly greater; and, in the follow-up assessment, the GPR method was more efficient. As for the QL, physical therapy techniques were effective after the interventions (p<0.001), and the Iso method was more effective when patients were reassessed in the follow-up. We conclude that the physical therapy techniques used in this study were efficient to treat CNLBP in the patients since they reduced pain and increased QL according to the results of the SF-36 questionnaire. Level of Evidence II, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial. PMID:24453669

  2. Assessment of the quality of life through the SF-36 questionnaire in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Adorno, Marta Lúcia Guimarães Resende; Brasil-Neto, Joaquim Pereira

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of life (QL) with the use of the SF-36 Questionnaire in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain (CNLBP). Thirty patients with CNLBP were randomly assigned to one of three groups (Iso group (Isostretching), GPR group (Global Postural Reeducation), and the Iso+GPR group. Patients underwent physical therapy assessment with the use of the Vertebral Spine Assessment, the Visual Analog Scale of Pain (VASP), and the SF-36 life quality questionnaire before the first session (first assessment), after three months of treatment (second assessment) and reassessed two months after the final session in the follow-up (third assessment). The results indicated that both physical therapy techniques reduced pain (p<0.001); when the techniques (Iso+GPR) were combined, the reduction in pain was significantly greater; and, in the follow-up assessment, the GPR method was more efficient. As for the QL, physical therapy techniques were effective after the interventions (p<0.001), and the Iso method was more effective when patients were reassessed in the follow-up. We conclude that the physical therapy techniques used in this study were efficient to treat CNLBP in the patients since they reduced pain and increased QL according to the results of the SF-36 questionnaire. Level of Evidence II, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

  3. Evaluating Resident Physicians' Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Regarding the Pain Control in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Masoud; Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Saadat-Niaki, Asadollah; Hoseini Khameneh, Seyed Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain has been one of the most debilitating symptoms of cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate residents' knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding pain control in cancer patients. Methods In a descriptive study, 69 randomly selected third-year various residents practicing in teaching hospitals of Shahid Beheshti School of medicine participated in this study. They have provided their demographic characteristics and completed a questionnaire, based on their “knowledge”, “attitude” and “practice” regarding cancer pain and its management. Data analysis has performed using SPSS v.19. A p value of less than 0.05 has considered as significant. Results Obtained Data from 69 participants including 32 anesthesiology residents has included to our study. The average scores were 35.8±6.1 (ranging from 20 to 49) for the residents' attitude, 25.1±9.1 (ranging from 0 to 53) for their knowledge and 11.2±4.1 (ranging from 0 to 17) for their practice. The overall scores of the questions have related to attitude and knowledge were higher for residents of anesthesiology but the difference was not statistically significant (A: 37.1±4.9 vs. 34.7±6.8, p=0.106, K: 27.2±11.8 vs. 23.3±5.6, p=0.076). The average score for questions on physician' practice was significantly higher in residents of anesthesiology (P: 12.8±3.2 vs. 9.7±4.2, p=0.001). Conclusion In order to provide patients with adequate pain relief, it has seemed advisable for medical schools to focus on improving the educational curriculum and integrating it into clinical practice. PMID:25821565

  4. Symptom profiles in the painDETECT Questionnaire in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain stratified according to sensory loss in quantitative sensory testing.

    PubMed

    Vollert, Jan; Kramer, Martin; Barroso, Alejandro; Freynhagen, Rainer; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Jensen, Troels S; Kuehler, Bianca M; Maier, Christoph; Mainka, Tina; Reimer, Maren; Segerdahl, Märta; Serra, Jordi; Solà, Romà; Tölle, Thomas R; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Baron, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    The painDETECT Questionnaire (PDQ) is commonly used as a screening tool to discriminate between neuropathic pain (NP) and nociceptive pain, based on the self-report of symptoms, including pain qualities, numbness, and pain to touch, cold, or heat. However, there are minimal data about whether the PDQ is differentially sensitive to different sensory phenotypes in NP. The aim of the study was to analyze whether the overall PDQ score or its items reflect phenotypes of sensory loss in NP as determined by quantitative sensory testing. An exploratory analysis in the Innovative Medicines Initiative Europain and Neuropain database was performed. Data records of 336 patients identified with NP were grouped into sensory profiles characterized by (1) no loss of sensation, (2) loss of thermal sensation, (3) loss of mechanical sensation, and (4) loss of thermal and mechanical sensation. painDETECT Questionnaire profiles were analyzed in a 2-factor analysis of variance. Patients with loss of thermal sensation (2 and 4) significantly more often reported pain evoked by light touch, and patients with loss of mechanical sensation (3 and 4) significantly more often reported numbness and significantly less often burning sensations and pain evoked by light touch. Although the PDQ was not designed to assess sensory loss, single items reflect thermal and/or mechanical sensory loss at group level, but because of substantial variability, the PDQ does not allow for individual allocation of patients into sensory profiles. It will be useful to develop screening tools according to the current definition of NP. PMID:27093432

  5. Measuring teachers' knowledge of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: the MAE-TDAH Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Soroa, Marian; Balluerka, Nekane; Gorostiaga, Arantxa

    2014-10-28

    The lack of methodological rigor is frequent in most of instruments developed to assess the knowledge of teachers regarding Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The aim of this study was to develop a questionnaire, namely Questionnaire for the evaluation of teachers' knowledge of ADHD (MAE-TDAH), for measuring the level of knowledge about ADHD of infant and primary school teachers. A random sample of 526 teachers from 57 schools in the Autonomous Community of the Basque Country and Navarre was used for the analysis of the psychometric properties of the instrument. The participant teachers age range was between 22 and 65 (M = 42.59; SD = 10.89), and there were both generalist and specialized teachers. The measure showed a 4 factor structure (Etiology of ADHD, Symptoms/Diagnosis of ADHD, General information about ADHD and Treatment of ADHD) with adequate internal consistency (Omega values ranged between .83 and .91) and temporal stability indices (Spearman's Rho correlation values ranged between .62 and .79). Furthermore, evidence of convergent and external validity was obtained. Results suggest that the MAE-TDAH is a valid and reliable measure when it comes to evaluating teachers' level of knowledge of ADHD.

  6. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice toward Infant Oral Healthcare among the Pediatricians of Mysore: A Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Indira, MD; Nandlal, B

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The aim of this study was to study the knowledge, attitude and practice of the pediatricians toward infant oral healthcare and the objective was to determine what can improve the knowledge, attitude and practice toward infant oral healthcare. Materials and methods: A systematic random survey of pediatricians in Mysore received a questionnaire pertaining to individual details, knowledge level and approach toward infant oral healthcare. Results: Most of pediatricians acknowledged the importance of pediatric dentistry. Pediatricians agree that it is important to do dental examination before 1 year. The importance of initiating oral hygiene practice before the eruption of first tooth was not seen to be prevalent among the pediatricians. Most of them were less aware of the first dental visit including early childhood caries (ECC). All pediatricians agree that both medical and dental professionals together are responsible for infant oral healthcare. They should work together to appropriately educate and train themselves to be able to provide risk assessment and to provide preventive oral health services. How to cite this article: Indira MD, Dhull KS, Nandlal B. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice toward Infant Oral Healthcare among the Pediatricians of Mysore: A Questionnaire Survey. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):211-214. PMID:26604540

  7. Measuring teachers' knowledge of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: the MAE-TDAH Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Soroa, Marian; Balluerka, Nekane; Gorostiaga, Arantxa

    2014-01-01

    The lack of methodological rigor is frequent in most of instruments developed to assess the knowledge of teachers regarding Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The aim of this study was to develop a questionnaire, namely Questionnaire for the evaluation of teachers' knowledge of ADHD (MAE-TDAH), for measuring the level of knowledge about ADHD of infant and primary school teachers. A random sample of 526 teachers from 57 schools in the Autonomous Community of the Basque Country and Navarre was used for the analysis of the psychometric properties of the instrument. The participant teachers age range was between 22 and 65 (M = 42.59; SD = 10.89), and there were both generalist and specialized teachers. The measure showed a 4 factor structure (Etiology of ADHD, Symptoms/Diagnosis of ADHD, General information about ADHD and Treatment of ADHD) with adequate internal consistency (Omega values ranged between .83 and .91) and temporal stability indices (Spearman's Rho correlation values ranged between .62 and .79). Furthermore, evidence of convergent and external validity was obtained. Results suggest that the MAE-TDAH is a valid and reliable measure when it comes to evaluating teachers' level of knowledge of ADHD. PMID:26055541

  8. Psychometric properties of the Tampa Scale for kinesiophobia and the fear-avoidance beliefs questionnaire in acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Swinkels-Meewisse, E J C M; Swinkels, R A H M; Verbeek, A L M; Vlaeyen, J W S; Oostendorp, R A B

    2003-02-01

    The transition from acute to chronic low back pain (LBP) is influenced by many interacting factors. Pain-related fear, as measured by the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ), is one of these factors. The objectives of this study were to investigate, in a population with acute LBP, the reliability of TSK and FABQ through evaluation of the internal consistency, the test-retest reliability, and the concurrent validity between TSK and FABQ. One hundred and Seventy-Six patients suffering LBP for no longer than 4 weeks completed a Visual Analogue Scale for pain (VAS), the TSK, the FABQ, and a socio-demographic questionnaire. Each patient completed the VAS, TSK, and FABQ twice within 24 h. Internal consistency of TSK and FABQ scores range from alpha=0.70 to 0.83. Test-retest reliability ranges from r(s)=0.64 to 0.80 (P<0.01). Concurrent validity is moderate, ranging from r(s) =0.33 to 0.59 (P<0.01). It may be concluded that in a population with acute LBP, both the TSK and the FABQ are reliable measures of pain-related fear. In the clinical setting they may provide the practitioner a means of identifying pain-related fear in a patient with acute LBP. PMID:12586559

  9. The Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire: Factor Structure and Correlates in a Lifespan Sample

    PubMed Central

    Calamia, Matthew; Reese-Melancon, Celinda; Cherry, Katie E.; Hawley, Karri S.; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the factor structure of the Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire (KMAQ) [1] using confirmatory factor analysis in a lifespan sample of 933 individuals who ranged in age from 18 to 101. Participants were college students at Louisiana State University and adults from the community enrolled in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS). A two-factor solution was expected, consistent with the normal and pathological memory aging dimensions that comprise the KMAQ. A bi-factor solution with items loading on a general response bias factor and either a normal or pathological knowledge-specific factor showed good model fit. Knowledge scores were correlated with demographic and cognitive performance variables. Implications of these data for clinical settings and research are considered. PMID:27505021

  10. The Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire: Factor Structure and Correlates in a Lifespan Sample.

    PubMed

    Calamia, Matthew; Reese-Melancon, Celinda; Cherry, Katie E; Hawley, Karri S; Jazwinski, S Michal

    2016-03-01

    The authors examined the factor structure of the Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire (KMAQ) [1] using confirmatory factor analysis in a lifespan sample of 933 individuals who ranged in age from 18 to 101. Participants were college students at Louisiana State University and adults from the community enrolled in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS). A two-factor solution was expected, consistent with the normal and pathological memory aging dimensions that comprise the KMAQ. A bi-factor solution with items loading on a general response bias factor and either a normal or pathological knowledge-specific factor showed good model fit. Knowledge scores were correlated with demographic and cognitive performance variables. Implications of these data for clinical settings and research are considered. PMID:27505021

  11. The Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire: Cross-Cultural Adaptation into Italian and Assessment of Its Measurement Properties.

    PubMed

    Chiarotto, Alessandro; Vanti, Carla; Ostelo, Raymond W; Ferrari, Silvano; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Rocca, Barbara; Pillastrini, Paolo; Monticone, Marco

    2015-11-01

    The Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) is a patient self-reported measurement instrument that evaluates pain self-efficacy beliefs in patients with chronic pain. The measurement properties of the PSEQ have been tested in its original and translated versions, showing satisfactory results for validity and reliability. The aims of this study were 2 fold as follows: (1) to translate the PSEQ into Italian through a process of cross-cultural adaptation, (2) to test the measurement properties of the Italian PSEQ (PSEQ-I). The cross-cultural adaptation was completed in 5 months without omitting any item of the original PSEQ. Measurement properties were tested in 165 patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) (65% women, mean age 49.9 years). Factor analysis confirmed the one-factor structure of the questionnaire. Internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.94) and test-retest reliability (ICCagreement  = 0.82) of the PSEQ-I showed good results. The smallest detectable change was equal to 15.69 scale points. The PSEQ-I displayed a high construct validity by meeting more than 75% of a priori hypotheses on correlations with measurement instruments assessing pain intensity, disability, anxiety, depression, pain catastrophizing, fear of movement, and coping strategies. Additionally, the PSEQ-I differentiated patients taking pain medication or not. The results of this study suggest that the PSEQ-I can be used as a valid and reliable tool in Italian patients with CLBP.

  12. Pain in hospitalized children: Effect of a multidimensional knowledge translation strategy on pain process and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Bonnie J; Yamada, Janet; Estabrooks, Carole A; Stinson, Jennifer; Campbell, Fiona; Scott, Shannon D; Cummings, Greta

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalized children frequently receive inadequate pain assessment and management despite substantial evidence to support effective pediatric pain practices. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a multidimensional knowledge translation intervention, Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality (EPIQ), on procedural pain practices and clinical outcomes for children hospitalized in medical, surgical and critical care units. A prospective cohort study compared 16 interventions using EPIQ and 16 standard care (SC) units in 8 Canadian pediatric hospitals. Chart reviews at baseline (time 1) and intervention completion (time 2) determined the nature and frequency of painful procedures and of pain assessment and pain management practices. Trained pain experts evaluated pain intensity 6 months post-intervention (time 3) during routine, scheduled painful procedures. Generalized estimating equation models compared changes in outcomes between EPIQ and SC units over time. EPIQ units used significantly more validated pain assessment tools (P<0.001) and had a greater proportion of patients who received analgesics (P=0.03) and physical pain management strategies (P=0.02). Mean pain intensity scores were significantly lower in the EPIQ group (P=0.03). Comparisons of moderate (4-6/10) and severe (7-10/10) pain, controlling for child and unit level factors, indicated that the odds of having severe pain were 51% less for children in the EPIQ group (adjusted OR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.26-0.83; P=0.009). EPIQ was effective in improving practice and clinical outcomes for hospitalized children. Additional exploration of the influence of contextual factors on research use in hospital settings is required to explain the variability in pain processes and clinical outcomes.

  13. Knowledge, attitudes and barriers of physicians, policy makers/regulators regarding use of opioids for cancer pain management in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srisawang, Pornsuree; Harun-Or-Rashid, Md; Hirosawa, Tomoya; Sakamoto, Junichi

    2013-08-01

    The efficacy of opioids for cancer pain has been proven and the World Health Organization (WHO) three-step ladder has been recommended for cancer pain relief. However, undertreatment of cancer pain has still been reported in Thailand. Identification of barriers to opioid use by the physicians and policy makers/regulators, and their level of knowledge and attitudes concerning its use are influential factors for cancer pain management (CPM). This study was performed to assess the knowledge and attitudes physicians and policy makers/regulators have regarding use of opioids for CPM. Barriers to opioid availability were also studied. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to 300 physicians and distributed to 58 policy makers/regulators from September to October 2011. A total of 219 physicians and 47 policy makers/ regulators completed the questionnaire. Of the physicians 62.1% had inadequate knowledge and 33.8% had negative attitudes. Physicians who did not know the WHO three-step ladder were more likely to have less knowledge than those having used the WHO three-step ladder (OR = 13.0, p < 0.001). Policy makers/regulators also had inadequate knowledge (74.5%) and negative attitudes (66.0%). Policy makers/ regulators who never had CPM training were likely to have more negative attitudes than those having had training within less than one year (OR = 35.0, p = 0.005). Lack of training opportunities and periodic shortages of opioids were the greatest barriers to opioid availability for physicians and policy makers/ regulators, respectively. The strengthening of ongoing educational programs regarding opioid use for CPM, and cooperation among key groups are needed.

  14. Spanish version of the Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire: psychometric properties in a sample of women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Pilar Martínez, M; Miró, Elena; Sánchez, Ana I; Lami, María J; Prados, Germán; Ávila, Daniela

    2015-01-08

    Excessive attention to pain is a common psychological characteristic among people who suffer from chronic pain. The Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire (PVAQ) is an internationally accepted tool to assess this feature, although there is no validated version of this measure for Spanish people with fibromyalgia. Since this pain syndrome mainly affects women, the aim of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the PVAQ in Spanish women with fibromyalgia. A group of 242 women diagnosed with fibromyalgia aged between 20 and 66 years participated in the study. The goodness of fit of several structures of the PVAQ reported in previous studies was compared via confirmatory factor analysis. A two-factor solution (active vigilance and passive awareness) of the 9-item shortened version (PVAQ-9) was identified as the most appropriate (RMSEA = .08, NNFI = .96, CFI = .97, GFI = .87). It showed good reliability (internal consistency α = .82), convergent validity and divergent validity (p < .01). The optimal cutoff point for identifying fibromyalgia women with worse daily functioning was a score of 24.5, with a sensitivity of .71 and a specificity of .75. The relevance of vigilance to pain for clinical research in fibromyalgia is discussed.

  15. Reliability and Validity of a Questionnaire to Measure Consumer Knowledge regarding Safe Practices to Prevent Microbiological Contamination in Restaurants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uggioni, Paula Lazzarin; Salay, Elisabette

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to develop a validated and reliable questionnaire to measure consumer knowledge regarding safe practices to prevent microbiological contamination in restaurants and commercial kitchens. Methods: Non-probabilistic samples of individuals were interviewed in the city of Campinas, Brazil. Questionnaire items…

  16. Pain in Neurodegenerative Disease: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    de Tommaso, Marina; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Defrin, Ruth; Kunz, Miriam; Pickering, Gisele; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are going to increase as the life expectancy is getting longer. The management of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias, Parkinson's disease (PD) and PD related disorders, motor neuron diseases (MND), Huntington's disease (HD), spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), is mainly addressed to motor and cognitive impairment, with special care to vital functions as breathing and feeding. Many of these patients complain of painful symptoms though their origin is variable, and their presence is frequently not considered in the treatment guidelines, leaving their management to the decision of the clinicians alone. However, studies focusing on pain frequency in such disorders suggest a high prevalence of pain in selected populations from 38 to 75% in AD, 40% to 86% in PD, and 19 to 85% in MND. The methods of pain assessment vary between studies so the type of pain has been rarely reported. However, a prevalent nonneuropathic origin of pain emerged for MND and PD. In AD, no data on pain features are available. No controlled therapeutic trials and guidelines are currently available. Given the relevance of pain in neurodegenerative disorders, the comprehensive understanding of mechanisms and predisposing factors, the application and validation of specific scales, and new specific therapeutic trials are needed. PMID:27313396

  17. Reliability and validity of a revised version of the General Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Kliemann, N; Wardle, J; Johnson, F; Croker, H

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: The General Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire (GNKQ) was developed in the 1990s and has been widely used. Since then advances in understanding of associations between diet and disease have led to changes in dietary recommendations. This study reports the validity and reliability of an updated version of the GNKQ, bringing it into line with current nutritional advice. Methods/Subjects: Following a review of current recommendations, the revised version of the GNKQ (GNKQ-R) was created, consisting of 88 items and four sections. Reliability and validity of the GNKQ-R were determined in four validation studies: (1) reliability was examined using an online sample (n=266), (2) construct validity was assessed with 96 Dietetics students and 89 english students using the ‘known-groups' method, (3) associations between nutrition knowledge and socio-demographic characteristics were examined using the previously described samples and (4) sensitivity to change was tested by measuring GNKQ-R scores pre- and post-exposure to online nutrition information in written (n=65) and video (n=41) formats. Results: The reliability was >0.7 in all sections. Dietetics students scored significantly higher than english students. As predicted, GNKQ-R scores were significantly higher among females vs males, people with a degree vs without, and people with very good vs poor or good health status. They were lower in those older than 50 years vs younger adults. GNKQ-R scores were significantly greater after the nutrition interventions in both written and video formats. Conclusions: The GNKQ-R is a valid measure of nutrition knowledge that is consistent, reliable and sensitive to change. PMID:27245211

  18. Knowledge sharing for pediatric pain management via a Web 2.0 framework.

    PubMed

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza; Hussini, Salah; Sriraj, Wimorat; Thienthong, Somboon; Finley, G Allen

    2009-01-01

    The experiential knowledge of pediatric health practitioners encompasses vital insights into the clinical efficacy of diagnostic and therapeutic methods for pediatric pain management. Yet, this knowledge is not readily disseminated to other practitioners and translated into practice guidelines. We argue that a peer-to-peer knowledge sharing mechanism can serve as a key change agent to improve the attitudes, beliefs and methods for pediatric pain management. We are using collaborative technologies, in the realm of Web 2.0, to develop a web-based knowledge sharing medium for fostering a community of pediatric pain practitioners that engages in collaborative learning and problem solving. We present the design and use of a web portal featuring a discussion forum to facilitate experiential knowledge sharing based on our LINKS knowledge sharing model.

  19. Knowledge and Apprehension of Dental Patients about MERS-A Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Nipun; Rodrigues, Jean Clare; Azouni, Khalid; Darwish, Shorouk; Abuderman, Abdulwahab; Alkaabba, Abdul Aziz Fahad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a disease caused by beta corona virus. From April 11th to 9th June 2014, World Health Organization (WHO) reported a total of 402 laboratory confirmed cases of MERS from KSA, out of which 132 cases were reported from Riyadh alone. Aim The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and apprehension of patients about MERS visiting Al Farabi College of Dentistry, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire based survey was conducted which consisted of 10 self-prepared questions. A total of 404 patients participated in this study. Results Three hundred and forty patients had heard about MERS. Nearly a quarter of the patients (25.74%) were apprehensive about undergoing dental treatment because of MERS. A little more than half of the patients (50.99%) knew that camel was a source of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Corona virus. Most of the patients (80.72%) were aware of the infection control measures to be followed by dentist and 138 patients claimed they took some precaution when present inside the dental college. Conclusion Majority of the patients had heard about MERS and was aware of the infection control measures. However, some patients were apprehensive about undergoing dental treatment because of MERS. Further steps need to be taken to educate the patient’s about transmission of MERS and infection control measures in a dental hospital. PMID:27437361

  20. THE EFFECT OF EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON KNOWLEDGE AND SELF-EFFICACY FOR PAIN CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Daniali, Seyde Shahrbanoo; Shahnazi, Hossein; Kazemi, Samira; Marzbani, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases affecting the central nervous system. The prevalence of it is increasing in our country too. The pain from disorders can affect quality of life. Several studies have pointed to the improvement of patients through educational intervention. This study attempted to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention based on raising the awareness and self-efficacy for pain control among patients with multiple sclerosis during 2015 under the coverage of Isfahan MS Society (IMSS). Materials and methods: This was a quasi-experimental study involving pre-test, post-test and randomized control group conducted on 100 patients with MS referred to the Isfahan MS Society (IMSS). The educational intervention group learned the pain management self-care lesson during 4 weekly sessions. The data were collected through a self-structured questionnaire with adequate validity and reliability, containing demographic data, awareness and self-efficacy of pain control. The data were assessed through descriptive and analytical tests assisted by SPSS 17. The significant level was considered as P<0.05. Results: Concerning the questionnaire, 96% of the items were responded. Most participants were women. The frequency distribution of demographic variables was not significantly different between the two pre-test groups. After the intervention, the mean score of knowledge and efficacy among patients in the intervention group was significantly higher than the control group (P<0.001). Conclusions: Educational interventions can improve awareness and self-efficacy for pain control among patients with MS. Therefore, such interventions can be designed to reduce physical and psychological complications following multiple sclerosis. PMID:27698603

  1. THE EFFECT OF EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON KNOWLEDGE AND SELF-EFFICACY FOR PAIN CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Daniali, Seyde Shahrbanoo; Shahnazi, Hossein; Kazemi, Samira; Marzbani, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases affecting the central nervous system. The prevalence of it is increasing in our country too. The pain from disorders can affect quality of life. Several studies have pointed to the improvement of patients through educational intervention. This study attempted to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention based on raising the awareness and self-efficacy for pain control among patients with multiple sclerosis during 2015 under the coverage of Isfahan MS Society (IMSS). Materials and methods: This was a quasi-experimental study involving pre-test, post-test and randomized control group conducted on 100 patients with MS referred to the Isfahan MS Society (IMSS). The educational intervention group learned the pain management self-care lesson during 4 weekly sessions. The data were collected through a self-structured questionnaire with adequate validity and reliability, containing demographic data, awareness and self-efficacy of pain control. The data were assessed through descriptive and analytical tests assisted by SPSS 17. The significant level was considered as P<0.05. Results: Concerning the questionnaire, 96% of the items were responded. Most participants were women. The frequency distribution of demographic variables was not significantly different between the two pre-test groups. After the intervention, the mean score of knowledge and efficacy among patients in the intervention group was significantly higher than the control group (P<0.001). Conclusions: Educational interventions can improve awareness and self-efficacy for pain control among patients with MS. Therefore, such interventions can be designed to reduce physical and psychological complications following multiple sclerosis.

  2. Examination of knowledge about and nursing interventions for the care of patients in pain of nurses who work at Cukurova University medical faculty Balcali hospital.

    PubMed

    Akbaş, Meltem; Oztunç, Gürsel

    2008-09-01

    Pain is a concept that goes back into distant history and is something that is faced by every person in different degrees and at different times in their lives. A definition of pain, adopted by the International Association for the Study of Pain and the American Pain Society, is: "an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage." Although pain is one of the most common reasons for needing health care, it is not well understood and continues to be one of the most important health problems today. The pain experience is dynamic, and the nurse is responsible for understanding this. Nurses need to cooperate with the patient and other members of the health care team to be able to control pain. Nurses are ethically responsible for the management and easing of pain. This study was conducted to investigate what nurses know about the care of patients in pain and what nursing actions are used. There were 198 nurses working day shift at Cukurova University Balcali Hospital who were included. The data were collected using a questionnaire that described the nurses and measured the nurses' knowledge about care. The mean age of the nurses was 30.89 years, they had a mean 12.0 years of experience in the profession, 52.0% did not have experience with chronic pain, 42.4% stated that they frequently encountered patients in pain, 70.2% had received education about pain in school, 88.4% had not received education about pain outside of school and did not read about pain in journals, 88.9% used pharmacologic management, 85.4% evaluated patients' pain based on verbal statements, 96.5% knew the important points in the use of opioid analgesics, and 3% knew pain theory. As a result of this study, it is seen that nurses have inadequate knowledge about care of patients in pain and pain control methods. After evaluation of the conclusions, they will be used in education to increase the quality of the nursing

  3. Pediatric nurses' knowledge and attitudes survey regarding pain: a competency tool modification.

    PubMed

    Rieman, Mary T; Gordon, Mary; Marvin, Janet M

    2007-01-01

    Nurses' knowledge and attitudes about pain affect their ability to manage patients' pain. A mechanism was sought to evaluate nursing competency in pain management at eight pediatric hospitals. Several pain survey tools were reviewed, considering the patient population around which they were designed, the basis for survey content, and format. A survey with established validity and reliability, the Pediatric Nurses' Knowledge and Attitude Survey Regarding Pain (PNKAS) (Manworren 1999) was chosen as the most appropriate for this group. The tool was modified for applicability to the nurses caring for pediatric populations that do not include oncology. Revisions were made with the concurrence of Manworren to assure that neither the content being tested, nor the integrity of the tool, was affected. Stability of the modified tool (PNKAS-Shriners Version 2002) was verified by retesting 6-8 weeks after initial survey. PMID:17907730

  4. Improving Pain Management at the Nursing Education Level: Evaluating Knowledge and Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Latchman, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Unmanaged pain is a prevalent problem faced by many cancer patients. One part of this problem centers on a lack of emphasis on pain management in the undergraduate nursing curriculum. This study examined the knowledge and attitudes of 41 undergraduate nursing students regarding pain management. Students voluntarily completed a demographic data form, the Nurses’ Attitude Survey, and the Pain Management Principles Assessment Tool. A mean score of 19.4 out of a possible 31 was achieved on the knowledge test, whereas a mean score of 17.0 was achieved on the Nurses’ Attitude Survey. A weak-to-moderate relationship between knowledge and attitudes was found. Although students had positive attitudes regarding pain management, many still lacked the fundamental knowledge essential for adequately managing pain. The sample size was relatively small and not demographically diverse, but the response from the sample was sufficient to provide statistically meaningful data. In the quest to improve patient outcomes, these findings suggest the need to develop specific strategies to effectively teach undergraduate nursing students about pain management. PMID:25032029

  5. The psychometric properties of the Finnish Young Schema Questionnaire in chronic pain patients and a non-clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Saariaho, Tom; Saariaho, Anita; Karila, Irma; Joukamaa, Matti

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the latent factor structure of the Finnish Young Schema Questionnaire (YSQ-S2-extended; short form) in samples of chronic pain patients (n=271) and controls (n=331) with confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The data in the total sample supported the 18-factor structure as hypothesized by Young, J. E., Klosko, J., & Weishaar, M. E. (2003). Schema therapy: A practitioner's guide. New York: Guilford Press. The diagonally weighted least squares estimation method gave repeatable parameter estimates in successive confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). The internal consistency of the YSQ-S2-extended was adequate to high in both samples and the groups showed equal goodness-of-fit statistics in CFA. This study consisted of the oldest population so far (mean age 47 years) and supported the use of the Finnish version of the YSQ-S2-extended in clinical practice.

  6. Attitudes, knowledge and treatment of low back pain amongst nurses in the Eastern Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Maart, Soraya

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the high-risk professions for the development of musculoskeletal problems is nursing. Studies have reported that there is a high prevalence of low back pain (LBP) amongst South African nurses, but very little is known regarding the prevention and self-treatment principles for LBP in this group. Objectives The objective of this study is to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about the prevention and self-treatment principles for LBP amongst nursing staff in Cecilia Makiwane Hospital, Eastern Cape. Methods The study population consisted of all qualified nurses employed at the hospital. A cross-sectional survey with a purposive convenience sampling method was used. A questionnaire was designed using literature from established sources. The questionnaire was distributed manually and data obtained were analysed using EPI-INFO4. Results The study found that the majority of the participants experienced LBP on a regular basis. The participants could identify the most important physical risk factors associated with the development of LBP, but neglected the psychological risk factors. Action taken after the development of LBP included professional consultations as well as medication and bed rest. The participants identified the different components of a preventative exercise programme but only focused on the physical and not psychological components associated with LBP. Conclusions LBP is a serious problem amongst the nurses at the hospital, but no proactive approach is taken in order to address this problem. Policy guidelines and a comprehensive prevention and treatment programme need to be designed and implemented to address this issue.

  7. Nutrition and Physical Activity Knowledge Assessment: Development of Questionnaires and Evaluation of Reliability in African American and Latino Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Lindsay S.; Sharma, Sushma; Hudes, Mark L.; Fleming, Sharon E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: African-American and Latino children living in neighborhoods with a low-socioeconomic index are more at risk of obesity-associated metabolic disease than their higher socioeconomic index and/or white peers. Currently, consistent and reliable questionnaires to evaluate nutrition and physical activity knowledge in these children are…

  8. Validation of the Persian version of Functional Index Questionnaire (FIQ) and Modified FIQ in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Negahban, Hossein; Pouretezad, Mohammad; Sohani, Soheil Mansour; Mazaheri, Masood; Salavati, Mahyar; Mohammadi, Farshid

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this investigation was to culturally translate and validate the Functional Index Questionnaire (FIQ) and Modified FIQ (MFIQ) in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). A sample of 100 patients with PFPS completed the FIQ and MFIQ, and Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey in the first session. The FIQ and MFIQ were re-administered to a sample of 47 patients to evaluate test-retest reliability. Test-retest reliability and internal consistency were evaluated by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach's alpha coefficient, respectively. Corrected item-total correlations and construct validity were assessed by Spearman's rank correlation. Factor analysis was performed on all items of the Persian FIQ and MFIQ to determine the number of underlying factors and the items which load on each factor. An acceptable level of test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.84, 0.85) and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.79, 0.82) was obtained for both the Persian FIQ and MFIQ, respectively. Item-total correlations were greater than 0.40 for all but two questions of the Persian FIQ and all but four questions of the Persian MFIQ. A total of two factors were detected for each questionnaire. There were moderate to low correlations between the Persian FIQ/MFIQ and SF-36. Persian FIQ and MFIQ are two reliable and valid outcome measures of functional limitation and it seems that they are suitable for use in clinical practice of patients with chronic PFPS. PMID:23362844

  9. Validation of a questionnaire to measure sexual health knowledge and understanding (Sexual Health Questionnaire) in Nepalese secondary school: A psychometric process

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Dev Raj; Thomas, Malcolm; Cann, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Background: School-based sex education has the potential to prevent unwanted pregnancy and to promote positive sexual health at the individual, family and community level. Objectives: To develop and validate a sexual health questionnaire to measure young peoples’ sexual health knowledge and understanding (SHQ) in Nepalese secondary school. Materials and Methods: Secondary school students (n = 259, male = 43.63%, female = 56.37%) and local experts (n = 9, male = 90%, female = 10%) were participated in this study. Evaluation processes were; content validity (>0.89), plausibility check (>95), item-total correlation (>0.3), factor loading (>0.4), principal component analysis (4 factors Kaiser's criterion), Chronbach's alpha (>0.65), face validity and internal consistency using test-retest reliability (P > 0.05). Results: The principal component analysis revealed four factors to be extracted; sexual health norms and beliefs, source of sexual health information, sexual health knowledge and understanding, and level of sexual awareness. Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) measure of sampling adequacy demonstrated that the patterns of correlations are relatively compact (>0.80). Chronbach's alpha for each factors were above the cut-off point (0.65). Face validity indicated that the questions were clear to the majority of the respondent. Moreover, there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the responses to the items at two time points at seven weeks later. Conclusions: The finding suggests that SHQ is a valid and reliable instrument to be used in schools to measure sexual health knowledge and understanding. Further analysis such as structured equation modelling (SEM) and confirmatory factor analysis could make the questionnaire more robust and applicable to the wider school population. PMID:27500171

  10. Validity and reliability of the persian (Farsi) version of the DN4 (Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions) questionnaire for differential diagnosis of neuropathic from non-neuropathic pains.

    PubMed

    Madani, Seyed Pezhman; Fateh, Hamid R; Forogh, Bijan; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Ahadi, Tannaz; Ghaboussi, Pouya; Bouhassira, Didier; Raissi, Gholam Reza

    2014-06-01

    The aim of our study was translation and assessment of validity and reliability of the Persian version of DN4 questionnaire. The goal was to fill the gap caused by the absence of a validated instrument in Persian to facilitate discrimination of neuropathic pain. In this study, the adaptation and validation of the questionnaire was carried out in 4 steps, including translation, retranslation, semantic, and literal assessments, and a pilot study for practicability and potential perception difficulties of the final Persian version on 45 patient samples. The questionnaire validation performed on 175 patients, 112 (64%) females with the mean age of 52.53 (SD = 14.98) ranging from 22 to 87 years of age with neuropathic (N = 86) and non-neuropathic pain (NNP) (N = 89). Sensitivity, specificity, and Youden Index in cut-off point ≥ 4 were 90%, 95%, and 0.85, respectively, which are noteworthy findings among other validation studies. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the whole questionnaire was 0.852. Inter-rater agreement and test-retest reliability were significant intraclass coefficient (ICC = 0.957 and ICC = 0.918, respectively). The Persian version of DN4 questionnaire is a reliable, valid, feasible, and easily administered tool for precise discrimination neuropathic pain from NNP in Farsi. The characteristics of this test can assist practitioner to diagnose neuropathic pain accurately for both clinical and research purposes.

  11. The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ)-further validation including a confirmatory factor analysis and a comparison with the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia.

    PubMed

    Wicksell, Rikard K; Olsson, Gunnar L; Melin, Lennart

    2009-08-01

    Acceptance of pain and distress has lately appeared as an important factor in determining peoples' ability to restore functioning in the presence of chronic pain. Although treatments based on cognitive behaviour therapy are beginning to incorporate acceptance strategies, there is still a lack of reliable and valid instruments to assess relevant processes in such interventions. The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) was originally constructed as part of the development of an acceptance oriented treatment approach for pain patients. A revised 20-item version of the instrument with two subscales has shown adequate reliability and validity. In the present study, a Swedish translation of CPAQ was evaluated with 611 participants reporting chronic pain and symptoms of whiplash associated disorders. This study sought to further assess the psychometric properties of the instrument and to investigate its relation to another important measure of pain adjustment, the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia. Due to low intercorrelations with other items, item 16 was excluded. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported the previously suggested two-factor solution. Furthermore, the internal consistencies were good for the subscales (activities engagement and pain willingness) as well as the total scale. Hierarchical regression analyses illustrated strong relations with criteria variables (e.g. disability and life satisfaction). In general, the activities engagement subscale contributed more than pain willingness to the prediction of criteria variables. Furthermore, results illustrated that CPAQ explained more variance than the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia in pain intensity, disability, life satisfaction, and depression.

  12. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about chronic noncancer pain in primary care: A Canadian survey of physicians and pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, Lyne; Leroux-Lapointe, Vincent; Choinière, Manon; Martin, Elisabeth; Lussier, David; Berbiche, Djamal; Lamarre, Diane; Thiffault, Robert; Jouini, Ghaya; Perreault, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care providers’ knowledge, attitudes and beliefs (KAB) regarding chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) are a barrier to optimal management. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and identify the determinants of the KAB of primary care physicians and pharmacists, and to document clinician preferences regarding the content and format of a continuing education program (CEP). METHOD: Physicians and pharmacists of 486 CNCP patients participated. Physicians completed the original version of the KnowPain-50 questionnaire. Pharmacists completed a modified version. A multivariate linear regression model was developed to identify the determinants of their KAB. RESULTS: A total of 137 of 387 (35.4%) physicians and 110 of 278 (39.5%) pharmacists completed the survey. Compared with the physicians, the pharmacists surveyed included more women (64% versus 38%) and had less clinical experience (15 years versus 26 years). The mean KnowPain-50 score was 69.3% (95% CI 68.0% to 70.5%) for physicians and 63.8% (95% CI 62.5% to 65.1%) for pharmacists. Low scores were observed on all aspects of pain management: initial assessment (physicians, 68.3%; pharmacists, 65.4%); definition of treatment goals and expectations (76.1%; 61.6%); development of a treatment plan (66.4%; 59.0%); and reassessment and management of longitudinal care (64.3%; 53.1%). Ten hours of reported CEP sessions increased the KAB score by 0.3 points. All clinicians considered a CEP for CNCP to be essential. Physicians preferred an interactive format, while pharmacists had no clear preferences. CONCLUSION: A CEP to improve primary care providers’ knowledge and competency in managing CNCP, and to reduce false beliefs and inappropriate attitudes regarding CNCP is relevant and perceived as necessary by clinicians. PMID:25299473

  13. Evolving knowledge of opioid genetics in cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Droney, J; Riley, J; Ross, J R

    2011-08-01

    Inter-individual variation in response to opioids for cancer pain is a well-established phenomenon. Variation occurs in the dose of opioid required, the analgesic efficacy of the opioid and also in the side-effects experienced by the individual taking the drug. To date, no clinical factor has been identified that can reliably explain or predict such variation. In recent years there has been growing interest in the possibility that genetic factors may play a role in the variability in opioid response. The aims of this review are to present the evidence supporting pharmacogenetic research in this area, to evaluate some of the studies and results that have been published to date and to present some of the challenges for future research in this area. PMID:21612899

  14. Development and validity of a questionnaire to test the knowledge of primary care personnel regarding nutrition in obese adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In light of its epidemic proportions in developed and developing countries, obesity is considered a serious public health issue. In order to increase knowledge concerning the ability of health care professionals in caring for obese adolescents and adopt more efficient preventive and control measures, a questionnaire was developed and validated to assess non-dietitian health professionals regarding their Knowledge of Nutrition in Obese Adolescents (KNOA). Methods The development and evaluation of a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of primary care practitioners with respect to nutrition in obese adolescents was carried out in five phases, as follows: 1) definition of study dimensions 2) development of 42 questions and preliminary evaluation of the questionnaire by a panel of experts; 3) characterization and selection of primary care practitioners (35 dietitians and 265 non-dietitians) and measurement of questionnaire criteria by contrasting the responses of dietitians and non-dietitians; 4) reliability assessment by question exclusion based on item difficulty (too easy and too difficult for non-dietitian practitioners), item discrimination, internal consistency and reproducibility index determination; and 5) scoring the completed questionnaires. Results Dietitians obtained higher scores than non-dietitians (Mann–Whitney U test, P < 0.05), confirming the validity of the questionnaire criteria. Items were discriminated by correlating the score for each item with the total score, using a minimum of 0.2 as a correlation coefficient cutoff value. Item difficulty was controlled by excluding questions answered correctly by more than 90% of the non-dietitian subjects (too easy) or by less than 10% of them (too difficult). The final questionnaire contained 26 of the original 42 questions, increasing Cronbach’s α value from 0.788 to 0.807. Test-retest agreement between respondents was classified as good to very good (Kappa test, >0.60). Conclusion The

  15. The Development of a Questionnaire for Assessing Student Perception of Teachers' Knowledge in Taiwan and Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuan, Hsiao-Lin; And Others

    The goals of this study were to explore students' perceptions of how teachers' science teaching matched students' understanding and needs levels, report on the development and validation of a questionnaire to probe these perceptions, and compare junior high school students' perceptions from Taiwan and Australia. Descriptions of both the pilot…

  16. The Evaluation of Undergraduate Nursing Students' Knowledge of Post-op Pain Management after Participation in Simulation.

    PubMed

    Evans, Cecile B; Mixon, Diana K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to assess undergraduate nursing students' pain knowledge after participation in a simulation scenario. The Knowledge and Attitudes of Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP) was used to assess pain knowledge. In addition, reflective questions related to the simulation were examined. Student preferences for education method and reactions to the simulation (SIM) were described. Undergraduate nursing students' knowledge of pain management is reported as inadequate. An emerging pedagogy used to educate undergraduate nurses in a safe, controlled environment is simulation. Literature reports of simulation to educate students' about pain management are limited. As part of the undergraduate nursing student clinical coursework, a post-operative pain management simulation, the SIM was developed. Students were required to assess pain levels and then manage the pain for a late adolescent male whose mother's fear of addiction was a barrier to pain management. The students completed an anonymous written survey that included selected questions from the KASRP and an evaluation of the SIM experience. The students' mean KASRP percent correct was 70.4% ± 8.6%. Students scored the best on items specific to pain assessment and worst on items specific to opiate equivalents and decisions on PRN orders. The students' overall KASRP score post simulation was slightly better than previous studies of nursing students. These results suggest that educators should consider simulations to educate about pain assessment and patient/family education. Future pain simulations should include more opportunities for students to choose appropriate pain medications when provided PRN orders.

  17. Development and Validation of a Questionnaire to Measure Iranian Nurses’ Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Regarding Disaster Preparedness

    PubMed Central

    Tavan, Hamed; Menati, Waleyeh; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Sahebi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite the key role of Iranian nurses throughout disaster management, there is no instrument available to examine nurses’ current disaster preparation levels. Aim The aim of this study was to develop and analyse the reliability and validity of a questionnaire on the nurses’ knowledge, attitude and practice of disaster preparedness. Materials and Methods The scale was developed based on a comprehensive literature review and applied to 112 nurses in three public educational center affiliated to Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, Iran. Relibility was obtained using the test-retest method. Cronbach’s alpha was used to verify internal consistency. Exploratory factor analysis was used to assess the validity of the questionnaire. Results Explanatory factor analysis using varimax rotation revealed seven main factors associated with the nurses’ knowledge, attitude and practice regarding disaster preparedness. The questionnaire overall internal consistency using Cronbach’s alpha was 0.785, showing acceptable internal consistency. The intraclass correlation coefficient using Test-retest method was 0.82. Total variance was 67.57%. Conclusion The instrument has satisfactory reliability and validity indices and can be used to measure nurses’ knowledge, attitude and practice regarding disaster preparedness. PMID:27656465

  18. I like it when my partner holds my hand: development of the Responses and Attitudes to Support during Pain questionnaire (RASP)

    PubMed Central

    Krahé, Charlotte; Paloyelis, Yannis; Sambo, Chiara F.; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Social support can have beneficial effects on psychological and physiological well-being. During acute bodily pain, however, the effects of social support on pain are mixed. This variability may be due to the multifaceted nature of both pain and social support, as well as individual differences. In this paper, we present the development, psychometric assessment, and initial validation of the first self-report measure designed to address this variability in the general population; the Responses and Attitudes to Support during Pain questionnaire (RASP). The RASP includes questions on social support from the romantic partner as well as healthcare professionals (HCPs) and addresses different types of social support and pain responses. The development and validation of the RASP comprised four studies. In Study 1, a preliminary RASP version was completed by 179 healthy individuals regarding any type of acute pain. In Study 2, the reduced RASP was completed by 256 women with experiences of menstrual pain. Principal component analysis indicated a 22-item solution with five underlying dimensions reflecting General Partner Support, Emotional Support from HCPs, Anxiety in the Context of HCPs, Pain Behaviors during Partner Support, and Distraction by the Partner. Construct validity was assessed using a measure of adult attachment style. The RASP showed good validity and test-retest reliability. In Study 3, the 5-factor model received initial support through confirmatory factor analysis in a new sample of 120 individuals with recent musculoskeletal pain. Study 4 provided additional validation of the RASP in a sample of 180 individuals responding in reference to acute back pain. Overall, the RASP is a valid and reliable measure for assessing individual differences in attitudes and responses to social support in relation to acute pain. PMID:25285083

  19. Opioids for chronic pain: a knowledge assessment of nonpain specialty providers

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Amy CS; Eldrige, Jason S; Moeschler, Susan M; Hooten, W Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although the majority of opioids in the US are prescribed by nonpain specialists, these providers often report inadequate training in chronic pain management and opioid prescribing. The extent of health care providers’ knowledge of opioid prescribing for chronic pain has not been well established. The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge about the use of opioids for chronic pain among health care providers seeking pain-focused continuing medical education. Materials and methods The study participants (n=131) were recruited at a pain-focused continuing medical education conference for nonpain specialists. Upon commencement of the conference, the KnowPain-50 survey was completed. The survey comprised 50 questions, and 18 questions were related to opioid management. The focus of each opioid question was further categorized as either medicolegal (n=7) or clinical (n=11). Results The majority of study participants were male physicians with a mean age of 51.8 years. The proportion of correct responses to the 50-item survey was 72%. The proportion of correct responses to the 32 nonopioid questions was 74%, and the proportion of correct responses to the 18 opioid questions was 69% (P<0.001). Similarly, the proportion of correct responses to the seven medicolegal opioid questions was 74%, and the proportion of correct responses to the eleven clinical opioid questions was 67% (P<0.001). Conclusion Health care providers demonstrated gaps in knowledge about the use of opioids for chronic pain. Lower scores on clinically based opioid questions may indicate an opportunity to provide focused educational content about this area of practice. This information could be helpful in designing future educational modules for nonpain providers. PMID:27022300

  20. Knowledge, attitudes and behavior of Italian mothers towards oral health: questionnaire validation and results of a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, Gianna Maria; Giraldi, Guglielmo; Lastella, Paola; La Torre, Giuseppe; Saugo, Emilia; Ferri, Francesca; Pacifici, Luciano; Ottolenghi, Livia; Guerra, Fabrizio; Polimeni, Antonella

    2012-01-01

    Summary Aims The study is focused on the analysis of knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of Italian mothers in regards to their oral health, deepening the understanding of how the initiation of habits and behaviors for a healthy lifestyle may influence the empowerment process of their children. Methods The questionnaire was composed by 14 sections and has been conducted using an online questionnaire on the mothers association’s website. Reliability analysis was tested and content validity was evaluated using Cronbach’s alpha to check internal consistency with the intention to obtain no misunderstanding results. Statistical analysis was performed through SPSS 19.0. Results The total number of the compiled questionnaires was 192. The highest value of the Cronbach’s alpha is obtainable in Section 13 (Quality of Life in relation to dental health between 8–17 years old kids) with a value of 0.998 (on 5 items). The total value of the Cronbach’s alpha considering the part of questionnaire dedicated only to the mothers that have more than 18 years old children is 0.490 on 116 items. Considering all the sections of the questionnaire on 134 items and 127 questions, we get an alpha value of 0.784. Conclusions The questionnaire for the mothers showed a good reliability in the pilot study and it seems it made good results in terms of internal coherence and validity. The online administration allowed the opportunity to optimize the data collection avoiding complications with papers and it offers potentially, a tool able to rapidly gather a vast sample in which to perfect other studies. PMID:23087789

  1. Development of a questionnaire to evaluate practitioners’ confidence and knowledge in primary care in managing chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the UK, chronic disease, including chronic kidney disease (CKD) is largely managed in primary care. We developed a tool to assess practitioner confidence and knowledge in managing CKD compared to other chronic diseases. This questionnaire was part of a cluster randomised quality improvement interventions in chronic kidney disease (QICKD; ISRCTN56023731). Methods The questionnaire was developed by family physicians, primary care nurses, academics and renal specialists. We conducted three focus groups (n = 7, 6, and 8) to refine the questionnaire using groups of general practitioners, practice nurses and trainees in general practice. We used paper based versions to develop the questionnaire and online surveys to test it. Practitioners in a group of volunteer, trial practices received the questionnaire twice. We measured its reliability using Cohen’s Kappa (K). Results The practitioners in the focus groups reached a consensus as to the key elements to include in the instrument. We achieved a 73.1% (n = 57/78) initial response rate for our questionnaire; of these 57, 54 completed the questionnaire a second time. Family physicians made up the largest single group of respondents (47.4%, n = 27). Initial response showed more female (64.9%, n = 37) than male (35.1%, n = 20) respondents. The reliability results from retesting showed that there was moderate agreement (k > 0.4) on all questions; with many showing substantial agreement (k > 0.6). There was substantial agreement in the questions about loop diuretics (k = 0.608, CI 0.432-0.784, p < 0.001), confidence in managing hypertension (k = 0.628, 95%CI 0.452-0.804, p < 0.001), diastolic blood pressure treatment thresholds in CKD (k = 0.608, 95%CI 0.436-0.780, p < 0.001) and the rate of decline of eGFR that would prompt referral (k = 0.764, 95%CI 0.603-0.925, p < 0.001). Conclusion The QICKD-CCQ is a reliable instrument for measuring confidence and

  2. Knowledge and positions on bioethical dilemmas in a sample of Spanish nursing students: a questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Losa Iglesias, Marta Elena; Becerro de Bengoa Vallejo, Ricardo; Palacios Ceña, Domingo; Fuentes, Paloma Salvadores

    2011-01-01

    This study, performed in Madrid, Spain, evaluates nursing students' understanding and attitudes about bioethical dilemmas that they will likely confront as health care providers. We asked 86 juniors in the King Juan Carlos University Nursing baccalaureate program about their knowledge of and personal attitudes on five biomedical advances: eugenics, experimentation with unimplanted embryos, human cloning, abortion, and euthanasia. Students reported being most knowledgeable about abortion and euthanasia and least familiar with eugenics. Examining the data for a correlation between the two phenomenon (knowledge and position) with respect to each of these five biomedical issues, the students reported significantly Conversely, they held significantly neutral positions on eugenics, a virtually unfamiliar topic for them (r = 0.618, p < 0.0001). The data also revealed a significantly direct correlation between knowledge and position for experimentation with non-implanted embryos (correlation coefficient = 0.380, p < 0.0001), that is, little knowledge and neutral attitudes. The trend findings for abortion and cloning were not significant. Based on these data, we concluded that the nursing program would benefit from additional biomedical curriculum.

  3. Application of an oral health-related quality of life questionnaire in primary care patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Aguilera, Antonio; Biedma-Velázquez, Lourdes; Serrano-del-Rosal, Rafael; González-López, Laura; Blanco-Aguilera, Elena; Segura-Saint-Gerons, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether patients who report orofacial pain (OP) and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have a poorer perception of their oral health-related quality of life and, if so, to what extent, and to analyze the association between oral health perception, sociodemographic variables and reported pain duration. Study Design: 407 patients treated at the OP and TMD units in the Healthcare District of Cordoba, Spain, diagnosed following the standard criteria accepted by the scientific community – the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) – were administered the Spanish version of the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14). Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the degree of association between the patients’ OHIP-14 score and pain duration, pain intensity, and various sociodemographic variables. Results: The observed distribution was 89.4% women and 10.6% men. The mean OHIP-14 score was 20.57 ± 10.73 (mean ± standard deviation). A significant association (p<0.05) was found for gender, age, marital status, chronic pain grade, self-perceived oral health status and pain duration. Conclusions: The analysis of self-perceived oral health status in patients with OP and TMD, as measured by the OHIP-14, showed that oral health is perceived more negatively by women. Moreover, a one-point increase in the Chronic Pain Grade indicator increases the OHIP-14 indicator by 4.6 points, while chronic pain, defined as pain suffered by patients for one year or more, increases the OHIP-14 indicator by 3.2 points. Key words:Orofacial pain, temporomandibular disorders, Oral Health Impact Profile, sociodemographic variables, primary care, Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). PMID:24121906

  4. Knowledge regarding Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever among private dental practitioners in Tricity, India: A cross-sectional questionnaire study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nidhi; Mehta, Nishant; Gupta, Preety; Arora, Vikram; Setia, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ebola viral fever, a highly contagious haemorrhagic disease has today become a major public health concern in the developing countries worldwide. Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge among dental practitioners regarding Ebola Haemorrhagic Fever (Ebola HF) in Tricity, (Chandigarh, Panchkula and Mohali). Materials and Methods: A total of 500 private dental practitioners were randomly approached to participate in this cross-sectional survey. A self-structured, closed ended questionnaire was administered to each participant to record demographic and professional characteristics followed by their knowledge regarding Ebola HF. Knowledge section included questions related to communicability; symptomatology and diagnostics; at-risk individuals; prevention and treatment; and, virus characteristics of Ebola HF. Results: The results were expressed in percentages. Multivariable linear regression analysis was carried out to assess the association of participants's demographic and professional characteristics with the knowledge scores. Statistically significant difference was seen when mean knowledge scores were compared based on the locality and qualification of the participants (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Dental practitioners from urban areas with higher qualification had better knowledge yet there were notable deficiencies regarding the virus characteristics, diagnostics, elimination and treatment. PMID:25838631

  5. Cut-Off Value for Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire in Predicting Surgical Success in Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Various factors related to predict surgical success were studied; however, a standard cut-off point for the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ) measure has not yet been established for a favorable surgical outcome for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). This study was to find the optimal cut-off point on the PSQ to distinguish surgical success in patients with LDH. A total of 154 patients with LDH consecutively referred to our clinic were enrolled into this prospective study between February 2011 and January 2014. All participants completed the PSQ. Patients completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score before surgery, and at 2 years after surgery. Surgical success was defined as a 13-point improvement from the baseline ODI scores. The cut-off value for PSQ was determined by the receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC). The mean age of patients was 49.3±9.6 years, and there were 80 women. The mean time for follow-up assessment was 31±5 months (range 24–35). Post-surgical success was 79.9% (n = 123) at 2 years follow up. The mean score for the total PSQ, PSQ-minor, and PSQ-moderate were 6.0 (SD = 1.6), 5.4 (SD = 1.9) and 6.5 (SD = 1.7), respectively. Total PSQ score was also significantly correlated with the total scores of the ODI. The optimal total PSQ cut-off point was determined as > 5.2 to predict surgical success in LDH patients, with 80.0% sensitivity and 75.6% specificity (AUC-0.814, 95% CI 0.703–0.926). This study showed that the PSQ could be considered a parameter for predicting surgical success in patients with LDH, and can be useful in clinical practice. PMID:27494617

  6. The relationship of observed maternal behavior to questionnaire measures of parenting knowledge, attitudes, and emotional state in adolescent mothers.

    PubMed

    Leresche, L; Strobino, D; Parks, P; Fischer, P; Smeriglio, V

    1983-02-01

    Although relationships have been found between maternal psychological characteristics and cognitive and emotional outcomes in children, the behaviors which may mediate these relationships are seldom examined. This is especially true for adolescent mothers, whose children are thought to be at high risk for adverse outcomes. In this study, adolescent mothers in two special programs completed questionnaires measuring perception of the newborn (Neonatal Perception Inventory), knowledge of influences on child development (Infant Caregiving Inventory), and emotional state (General Health Questionnaire); they were also systematically observed while interacting with their infants in a naturalistic situation. Specific maternal behaviors were found to vary with the age of the mother and of the baby. Mothers with neutral or negative perceptions of their infants touched them less than did mothers with positive perceptions. Degree of emotional disturbance was inversely related to the amount of time that the mother looked at her infant while in physical contact.

  7. Development and preliminary psychometric evaluation of the parent report version of the Bath Adolescent Pain Questionnaire (BAPQ-P): A multidimensional parent report instrument to assess the impact of chronic pain on adolescents.

    PubMed

    Eccleston, Christopher; McCracken, Lance M; Jordan, Abbie; Sleed, Michelle

    2007-09-01

    Assessing the experience and impact of pain in adolescents with chronic pain is necessary to guide both individual treatment and to inform treatment development. Ideally, to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the impact of pain, assessment should be multidimensional, should be sensitive to contextual variables, and should allow for multiple informants (in particular, parents). The purpose of this study was to develop a standardized parent-report measure of chronic pain in adolescents, the Bath Adolescent Pain Questionnaire - Parent report (BAPQ-P). Participants included 222 adolescents with chronic pain and their parents recruited from two specialty clinics in the UK. The adolescents completed a battery of self-report inventories related to their pain and daily functioning whilst parents completed the BAPQ-P and additional measures of adolescent functioning. Scales of the BAPQ-P emerged to be internally consistent and temporally stable over a 17-day period. Validity was examined in relation to existing validated child report measures of anxiety, depression, catastrophizing, disability, family, and social functioning and parent report measures of disability and family functioning. Psychometric evaluation suggests that the BAPQ-P is a reliable and valid parental report tool for assessing the multidimensional impact of adolescent chronic pain. It can be used in conjunction with the previously established adolescent self-report measure, the BAPQ, alone where adolescent self report is not possible, in studies where parent report is the focus, or in studies where concordance between parent and adolescent reports is of interest.

  8. A systematic review of the effectiveness of knowledge translation interventions for chronic noncancer pain management

    PubMed Central

    Ospina, Maria B; Taenzer, Paul; Rashiq, Saifee; MacDermid, Joy C; Carr, Eloise; Chojecki, Dagmara; Harstall, Christa; Henry, James L

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reliable evidence detailing effective treatments and management practices for chronic noncancer pain exists. However, little is known about which knowledge translation (KT) interventions lead to the uptake of this evidence in practice. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a systematic review of the effectiveness of KT interventions for chronic noncancer pain management. METHODS: Comprehensive searches of electronic databases, the gray literature and manual searches of journals were undertaken. Randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and controlled before-and-after studies of KT interventions were included. Data regarding interventions and primary outcomes were categorized using a standard taxonomy; a risk-of-bias approach was adopted for study quality. A narrative synthesis of study results was conducted. RESULTS: More than 8500 titles and abstracts were screened, with 230 full-text articles reviewed for eligibility. Nineteen studies were included, of which only a small proportion were judged to be at low risk of bias. Interactive KT education for health care providers has a positive effect on patients’ function, but its benefits for other health provider- and patient-related outcomes are inconsistent. Interactive education for patients leads to improvements in knowledge and function. Little research evidence supports the effectiveness of structural changes in health systems and quality improvement processes or coordination of care. CONCLUSIONS: KT interventions incorporating interactive education in chronic noncancer pain led to positive effects on patients’ function and knowledge about pain. Future studies should provide implementation details and use consistent theoretical frameworks to better estimate the effectiveness of such interventions. PMID:24308029

  9. Psychiatrists' knowledge of the Human Rights Act and its relevance to mental health practice: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Passmore, Kirsty; Leung, Wai-Ching

    2003-04-01

    The recent implementation of the Human Rights Act 1998 has important implications for UK psychiatric practice but previous studies have demonstrated that psychiatrists generally have poor knowledge of mental health law. The aims of this study were to assess psychiatrists' knowledge of the Human Rights Act and to examine whether knowledge is related to seniority or experience. Questionnaires were sent to 154 psychiatrists in the Northern Region, testing both their factual knowledge of the Human Rights Act and their ability to apply it to clinical scenarios. Ninety-mix psychiatrists responded and they demonstrated good overall knowledge and ability to apply the Human Rights Act However, half of the respondents were not aware that the Act only imposes a duty on public authorities and that a lack of active treatment in itself does not constitute a breach of the Act Specialist registrars and consultants scored significantly higher than SHOs but there was no significant difference between the specialist registrars and consultants. The scores of psychiatrists who had detained at least one patient under the Mental Health Act 1983 over the last six months were significantly higher than those who had not. The implications of these findings are discussed. There is still a need for further training on relevant aspects of the Human Rights Act.

  10. Comparison of the Effect of Dry Cupping Therapy and Acupressure at BL23 Point on Intensity of Postpartum Perineal Pain Based on the Short Form of McGill Pain Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzade, Marzieh; Ghaemmaghami, Mehrnoush; Yazdanpanahi, Zahra; Zare, Najaf; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali; Azizi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perineal pain is a major morbidity in the first few days after delivery. This study aimed to investigate the effect of dry cupping therapy and acupressure at BL23 point on the intensity of postpartum perineal pain based on the short-form of McGill pain questionnaire (SMPQ). Methods: The present clinical trial was conducted on 150 subjects in 3 groups of 50 cases. After at least 4–8 hr of delivery, cupping therapy was performed for 15–20 min up to 3 times a week (once a day) and acupressure was performed for 15–20 min based on clockwise model. The short-form of McGill pain questionnaire was completed both before and after the intervention. The SPSS statistical software was used to analyze the data using repeated measures ANOVA. Besides, p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: In the cupping therapy group, mean of the perineal pain intensity reduced from 37.5±6.8 before the intervention to 11.1±6.1, 6.9±4.7, and 3.8±3.6 immediately, 24 hr, and 2 weeks after the intervention, respectively. The results of study showed that the differences between the intervention and control groups were statistically significant (p<0.01). Mean difference of the perineal pain intensity in the acupressure group reached from 35.6±8.1 before the intervention to 10.4±5.5 two weeks after the intervention, so the variation between intervention and control groups was statistically significant. Conclusion: The study findings showed that cupping therapy and acupressure reduced perineal pain. Therefore, they may be considered as effective treatments for reducing pain intensity of allowing delivery. PMID:26962482

  11. The Accuracy of the VISA-P Questionnaire, Single-Leg Decline Squat, and Tendon Pain History to Identify Patellar Tendon Abnormalities in Adult Athletes.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Luciana de Michelis; Ocarino, Juliana Melo; Bittencourt, Natália Franco Netto; Fernandes, Ludmila Maria Oliveira; Verhagen, Evert; Fonseca, Sérgio Teixeira

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional clinical assessment. Background Patellar tendinopathy is not always accompanied by patellar tendon abnormalities (PTAs). Thus, clinical screening tools to help identify patients with patellar tendon pain who have PTAs could enhance clinical decision making and patient prognosis. Objectives To test the diagnostic accuracy of the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) questionnaire, a single-leg decline squat (SLDS), tendon pain history, age, and years of sports participation to identify athletes with symptomatic patellar tendons who have PTAs confirmed on imaging. Methods Data provided by ultrasound examination, the VISA-P questionnaire, the SLDS, tendon pain history, age, and years of sport participation were collected in 43 athletes. A classification and regression tree (CART) model was developed to verify variables associated with PTA occurrence. Likelihood ratios (LRs) were computed for positive and negative tests. Results The SLDS, VISA-P questionnaire, and tendon pain history were associated with PTA occurrence. Athletes with negative results on all 3 tests (CART model) had a lower likelihood of having PTAs (negative LR = 0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.2, 0.5). The isolated use of the SLDS or tendon pain history (positive LR = 4.2; 95% CI: 2.3, 7.14 and 4.5; 95% CI: 1.8, 11.1, respectively) had similar influence on probability of PTA presence compared to the CART model (positive LR = 4.1; 95% CI: 2.5, 6.3). Conclusion Although the objective was to investigate a clinical test to identify PTAs, the combined use of the tests had greater accuracy to identify individuals without PTAs. Level of Evidence Diagnosis, level 3b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):673-680. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6192.

  12. Cross-Cultural Adaptation, Validation, and Reliability Testing of the Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire in Persian Population with Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Aslan; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H.; Birjandinejad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Purpose We aimed to validate the Persian version of the modified Oswestry disability questionnaire (MODQ) in patients with low back pain. Overview of Literature Modified Oswestry low back pain disability questionnaire is a well-known condition-specific outcome measure that helps quantify disability in patients with lumbar syndromes. Methods To test the validity in a pilot study, the Persian MODQ was administered to 25 individuals with low back pain. We then enrolled 200 consecutive patients with low back pain to fill the Persian MODQ as well as the short form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire. Convergent validity of the MODQ was tested using the Spearman's correlation coefficient between the MODQ and SF-36 subscales. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach's α coefficient were measured to test the reliability between test and retest and internal consistency of all items, respectively. Results ICC for individual items ranged from 0.43 to 0.80 showing good reliability and reproducibility of each individual item. Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.69 showing good internal consistency across all 10 items of the Persian MODQ. Total MODQ score showed moderate to strong correlation with the eight subscales and the two domains of the SF-36. The highest correlation was between the MODQ and the physical functioning subscale of the SF-36 (r=–0.54, p<0.001) and the physical component domain of the SF-36 (r=–0.55, p<0.001) showing that MODQ is measuring what it is supposed to measure in terms of disability and physical function. Conclusions Persian version of the MODQ is a valid and reliable tool for the assessment of the disability following low back pain. PMID:27114759

  13. The Accuracy of the VISA-P Questionnaire, Single-Leg Decline Squat, and Tendon Pain History to Identify Patellar Tendon Abnormalities in Adult Athletes.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Luciana de Michelis; Ocarino, Juliana Melo; Bittencourt, Natália Franco Netto; Fernandes, Ludmila Maria Oliveira; Verhagen, Evert; Fonseca, Sérgio Teixeira

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional clinical assessment. Background Patellar tendinopathy is not always accompanied by patellar tendon abnormalities (PTAs). Thus, clinical screening tools to help identify patients with patellar tendon pain who have PTAs could enhance clinical decision making and patient prognosis. Objectives To test the diagnostic accuracy of the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) questionnaire, a single-leg decline squat (SLDS), tendon pain history, age, and years of sports participation to identify athletes with symptomatic patellar tendons who have PTAs confirmed on imaging. Methods Data provided by ultrasound examination, the VISA-P questionnaire, the SLDS, tendon pain history, age, and years of sport participation were collected in 43 athletes. A classification and regression tree (CART) model was developed to verify variables associated with PTA occurrence. Likelihood ratios (LRs) were computed for positive and negative tests. Results The SLDS, VISA-P questionnaire, and tendon pain history were associated with PTA occurrence. Athletes with negative results on all 3 tests (CART model) had a lower likelihood of having PTAs (negative LR = 0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.2, 0.5). The isolated use of the SLDS or tendon pain history (positive LR = 4.2; 95% CI: 2.3, 7.14 and 4.5; 95% CI: 1.8, 11.1, respectively) had similar influence on probability of PTA presence compared to the CART model (positive LR = 4.1; 95% CI: 2.5, 6.3). Conclusion Although the objective was to investigate a clinical test to identify PTAs, the combined use of the tests had greater accuracy to identify individuals without PTAs. Level of Evidence Diagnosis, level 3b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):673-680. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6192. PMID:27374017

  14. The use of questionnaires for acquiring information on public perception of natural hazards and risk mitigation - a review of current knowledge and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, D. K.

    2009-07-01

    Questionnaires are popular and fundamental tools for acquiring information on public knowledge and perception of natural hazards. Questionnaires can provide valuable information to emergency management agencies for developing risk management procedures. Although many natural hazards researchers describe results generated from questionnaires, few explain the techniques used for their development and implementation. Methodological detail should include, as a minimum, response format (open/closed questions), mode of delivery, sampling technique, response rate and access to the questionnaire to allow reproduction of or comparison with similar studies. This article reviews current knowledge and practice for developing and implementing questionnaires. Key features include questionnaire design, delivery mode, sampling techniques and data analysis. In order to illustrate these aspects, a case study examines methods chosen for the development and implementation of questionnaires used to obtain information on knowledge and perception of volcanic hazards in a tourist region in southern Iceland. Face-to-face interviews highlighted certain issues with respect to question structure and sequence. Recommendations are made to overcome these problems before the questionnaires are applied in future research projects. In conclusion, basic steps that should be disclosed in the literature are provided as a checklist to ensure that reliable, replicable and valid results are produced from questionnaire based hazard knowledge and risk perception research.

  15. Designing and standardizing a questionnaire for evaluating knowledge, attitude, and practice of Iranian adults with cardiovascular diseases about oral health

    PubMed Central

    Rasouli-Ghahroudi, Amir Alireza; Rokn, Amir Reza; Khorsand, Afshin; Aghajani, Hasan; Amini, Afshin; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Rahimi, Hamed; Kabir, Ali

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in Iran. Moreover, periodontal diseases are very common in our country. In this study, we have designed a standardized questionnaire for evaluating knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of Iranian adult patients with cardiovascular diseases about oral health. METHODS For designing and standardizing a self-administered questionnaire, we performed a cross-sectional pilot study on 51 cases with periodontal complaints. A dentist carried out the physical examination to determine oral health indicators. Twelve experts and ten lay people of the target population answered questions about validity. Cronbach’s alpha, factor analysis, and Pearson correlation coefficients were used in the analysis. RESULTS The cases of this pilot study were middle aged, with moderate financial and health status, but low oral health and educational level. Debris score was correlated with all other physical exam findings except decay, missing, and filled (DMF). Reliability was 0.826 according to Cronbach’s alpha score. Face validity was higher than 80%. Content validities of the whole of the questionnaire were 85.98% for clarity, 78.05% for relevancy, 85.16% for simplicity, and 82.32% for consistency of each question with the question set. Factor analysis showed that 15 components explain 74% of the total variance. CONCLUSION This questionnaire is culturally adjusted and appropriate for our community, valid and reliable, and sufficiently estimates the variance of the oral health status. It can be used as a standard tool in further studies in adult population of the Iranian middle aged patients with low level of education and moderate socioeconomic status. PMID:24575138

  16. Knowledge Translation Tools are Emerging to Move Neck Pain Research into Practice

    PubMed Central

    MacDermid, Joy C.; Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita R.

    2013-01-01

    Development or synthesis of the best clinical research is in itself insufficient to change practice. Knowledge translation (KT) is an emerging field focused on moving knowledge into practice, which is a non-linear, dynamic process that involves knowledge synthesis, transfer, adoption, implementation, and sustained use. Successful implementation requires using KT strategies based on theory, evidence, and best practice, including tools and processes that engage knowledge developers and knowledge users. Tools can provide instrumental help in implementing evidence. A variety of theoretical frameworks underlie KT and provide guidance on how tools should be developed or implemented. A taxonomy that outlines different purposes for engaging in KT and target audiences can also be useful in developing or implementing tools. Theoretical frameworks that underlie KT typically take different perspectives on KT with differential focus on the characteristics of the knowledge, knowledge users, context/environment, or the cognitive and social processes that are involved in change. Knowledge users include consumers, clinicians, and policymakers. A variety of KT tools have supporting evidence, including: clinical practice guidelines, patient decision aids, and evidence summaries or toolkits. Exemplars are provided of two KT tools to implement best practice in management of neck pain—a clinician implementation guide (toolkit) and a patient decision aid. KT frameworks, taxonomies, clinical expertise, and evidence must be integrated to develop clinical tools that implement best evidence in the management of neck pain. PMID:24155807

  17. The 27-item Coping Strategies Questionnaire – Revised: Confirmatory factor analysis, reliability and validity in Italian-speaking subjects with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona; Giorgi, Ines; Galandra, Caterina; Rocca, Barbara; Foti, Calogero

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing attention is being devoted to cognitive-behavioural measures to improve interventions for chronic pain. OBJECTIVE: To develop an Italian version of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire – Revised (CSQ-R), and to validate it in a study involving 345 Italian subjects with chronic pain. METHODS: The questionnaire was developed following international recommendations. The psychometric analyses included confirmatory factor analysis; reliability, assessed by internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients); and construct validity, assessed by calculating the correlations between the subscales of the CSQ-R and measures of pain (numerical rating scale), disability (Sickness Impact Profile – Roland Scale), depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies – Depression Scale) and coping (Chronic Pain Coping Inventory) (Pearson’s correlation). RESULTS: Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the CSQ-R model had an acceptable data-model fit (comparative fit index and normed fit index ≤0.90, root mean square error of approximation ≥0.08). Cronbach’s alpha was satisfactory (CSQ-R 0.914 to 0.961), and the intraclass correlation coefficients were good/excellent (CSQ-R 0.850 to 0.918). As expected, the correlations with the numerical rating scale, Sickness Impact Profile – Roland Scale, Center for Epidemiological Studies – Depression Scale and Chronic Pain Coping Inventory highlighted the adaptive and maladaptive properties of most of the CSQ-R subscales. CONCLUSION: The CSQ-R was successfully translated into Italian. The translation proved to have good factorial structure, and its psychometric properties are similar to those of the original and other adapted versions. Its use is recommended for clinical and research purposes in Italy and abroad. PMID:24761430

  18. “Let’s Talk about OA Pain”: A Qualitative Analysis of the Perceptions of People Suffering from OA. Towards the Development of a Specific Pain OA-Related Questionnaire, the Osteoarthritis Symptom Inventory Scale (OASIS)

    PubMed Central

    Cedraschi, Christine; Delézay, Sylvie; Marty, Marc; Berenbaum, Francis; Bouhassira, Didier; Henrotin, Yves; Laroche, Françoise; Perrot, Serge

    2013-01-01

    questionnaire on osteoarthritis pain quality for osteoarthritis pain phenotyping: the OsteoArthritis Symptom Inventory Scale (OASIS). PMID:24244589

  19. The Bath Adolescent Pain--Parental Impact Questionnaire (BAP-PIQ): development and preliminary psychometric evaluation of an instrument to assess the impact of parenting an adolescent with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Abbie; Eccleston, Christopher; McCracken, Lance M; Connell, Hannah; Clinch, Jacqui

    2008-07-31

    When an adolescent has chronic pain many aspects of a parent's life can be affected, including their emotional and social functioning. The assessment of this multidimensional parental impact is an essential, yet often neglected, clinical task. This study reports on the development and psychometric evaluation of the Bath Adolescent Pain--Parental Impact Questionnaire (BAP-PIQ), an assessment tool comprising multiple scales thought to be relevant for better understanding changes in functioning and behavior associated with parenting an adolescent with chronic pain. A sample of 194 parents of adolescents with chronic pain, recruited from three UK clinics, completed the 94 item draft inventory. Frequency and item correlation analyses resulted in a final inventory of 62 items. Internal consistency of all eight scales was established based on Cronbach's alpha. Convergent validity was undertaken by comparison of individual scales with existing validated measures of parental stress, mood, parenting behavior, marital adjustment, and general functioning. The temporal reliability of each scale was established using a sub-sample of 46 participants over a 14-day period. Psychometric evaluation suggests that the inventory yields a reliable and valid assessment of the multiple impacts of parenting an adolescent with chronic pain. The BAP-PIQ may offer a comprehensive assessment of these impacts in both a research and a clinical setting. Further study of the validity of BAP-PIQ scales and their ability to detect clinically meaningful change would be of use. Additional data from samples comprising fathers of adolescents with chronic pain and parents of adolescents with non-musculoskeletal pain would be of benefit.

  20. Development of the Italian version of the Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire in patients with chronic low back pain: cross-cultural adaptation, confirmatory factor analysis, reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona; Ferrari, Silvano; Mugnai, Raffaele; Pillastrini, Paolo; Rocca, Barbara; Vanti, Carla; Foti, Calogero

    2014-09-01

    Translating, culturally adapting and validating the Italian version of the Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire (PSOCQ-I) to allow its use with Italian-speaking patients with low back pain. The PSOCQ-I was developed by forward-backward translation, a final review by an expert committee and a test of the prefinal version to establish its correspondence with the original English version. Psychometric testing included confirmatory factor analysis, reliability by internal consistency (Cronbach's α) and test-retest reliability (intraclass coefficient correlation), and construct validity by comparing PSOCQ-I with the Pain Catastrophising Scale (PCS), the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), the Roland Morris Disability Scale (RMDQ), a pain Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Pearson's correlation). The questionnaire was administered to 308 patients with chronic low back pain. Factor analysis confirmed a four-factor solution (namely, Precontemplation, Contemplation, Action, and Maintenance), achieving an acceptable data-model fit. Internal consistency (α=0.91-93) and test-retest reliability (intraclass coefficient correlation=0.74-0.81) were satisfactory. Construct validity showed moderate correlations between Precontemplation and PCS (r=0.318), TSK (r=0.385), RMDQ (r=0.320) and NRS (r=0.335); low correlations were found between the other PSOCQ subscales and PCS (r=-0.062; 0.039), TSK (r=-0.164; 0.024), RMDQ (r=-0.073; 0.004) and NRS (r=-0.170; 0.020). Low correlations were found between the PSOCQ-I subscales and anxiety (r=-0.132; 0.150) and depression (r=-0.113; 0.186). The PSOCQ was translated successfully into Italian, and proved to have a good factorial structure and psychometric properties that replicated the results of other versions. Its use is recommended for research purposes.

  1. [Linguistic adaptation of the Russian version of the Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire-2].

    PubMed

    Bakhtadze, M A; Bolotov, D A; Kuz'minov, K O; Padun, M P; Zakharova, O B

    2016-01-01

    Цель исследования. Лингвистическая адаптация русскоязычной версии Второй сокращенной формы Мак-Гилловского болевого опросника (The McGill Pain Questionnaire) (SF-MPQ-2), концептуально эквивалентной оригиналу. Материал и методы. Адаптацию русской версии SF-MPQ-2 проводили по установленным правилам в несколько этапов двумя независимыми переводчиками с выработкой общей предварительной русскоязычной версии и ее обратным переводом двумя независимыми переводчиками и выработкой общей английской версии. В итоге была выработана окончательная русскоязычная версия опросника. Результаты и заключение. Получена русскоязычная версия Второй сокращенной формы Мак-Гилловского болевого опросника — SF-MPQ-2-RU. Работа выполнена по установленным правилам, представленная русская версия официально зарегистрирована правообладателем — Институтом Mapi Research Trust и рекомендована для применения в научных исследованиях на территории Российской Федерации.

  2. Opinions on Dental Erosive Lesions, Knowledge of Diagnosis, and Treatment Strategies among Norwegian Dentists: A Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mulic, Aida; Vidnes-Kopperud, Simen; Skaare, Anne B.; Tveit, Anne Bjørg; Young, Alix

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate dentists' general experience, knowledge about diagnosis, and treatment of dental erosive wear in young adults. A questionnaire was sent to 1262 Norwegian public dental health-employed dentists. The response rate was 60%. Results indicated that most dentists recorded erosive wear, half of them used a specific scoring system, and half registered lesions at the tooth surface level. Lesions were reported most often on palatal surfaces of upper anterior teeth (79% of dentists), on occlusal surfaces of lower 1st molars (74%), and on upper 1st molars (32%). Half the dentists used clinical photographs for documentation and 60% made study models. While 40% reported more erosive lesions in males, 36% reported no gender differences. High intake of carbonated beverages and acidic juices were reported as the most common cause by 97% and 72% of the dentists, respectively. Only 21% of dentists recorded the patient's dietary history, and 73% never measured saliva secretion. The majority (78%) of the dentists treated patients with erosive wear themselves. In general, the survey suggests that the dentists are relatively up to date regarding the clinical recording, diagnosis, and treatment of dental erosive wear. However, dietary and salivary analyses were not given priority, and early, preventive treatment was lacking. PMID:22927855

  3. Translating the Dutch Walking Stairs, Walking Ability and Rising and Sitting Questionnaires into German and assessing their concurrent validity with VAS measures of pain and activities in daily living

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Dutch Walking Stairs, Walking Ability and Rising and Sitting Questionnaires are three validated instruments to measure physical activity and limitations in daily living in patients with lower extremity disorders living at home of which no German equivalents are available. Our scope was to translate the Walking Stairs, Walking Ability and Rising and Sitting Questionnaires into German and to verify its concurrent validity in the two domains pain and activities in daily living by comparing them with the corresponding measures on the Visual Analogue Scale. Methods We translated the Walking Stairs, Walking Ability and Rising and Sitting Questionnaires according to published guidelines. Demographic data and validity were assessed in 52 consecutive patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1 of the lower extremity. Information on age, duration of symptoms, type of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome 1 and type of initiating event were obtained. We assessed the concurrent validity in the two domains pain and activities in daily living by comparing them with the corresponding measures on the Visual Analogue Scale. Results We found that variability in the German Walking Stairs, Walking Ability and Rising and Sitting Questionnaires was largely explained by measures of pain and activities in daily living on the Visual Analogue Scale. Conclusion Our study shows that the domains pain and activities in daily living are properly represented in the German versions of the Walking Stairs, Walking Ability and Raising and Sitting Questionnaires. We would like to propagate their use in clinical practice and research alike. PMID:20515456

  4. Evaluating Physical Therapy Students' Knowledge of and Adherence to the Ambassador Low Back Pain Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Collinge, Wesley R.; Bostick, Geoff P.; Cutforth, Greg S.; Rutten, Geert M.; Maroun, Claude; Oostendorp, Rob A.B.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To examine a process for evaluating physiotherapy (PT) students' knowledge of and adherence to the Ambassador Low Back Pain (LBP) guideline using vignettes. Methods: The study used a cross-sectional survey design. Participants were PT students who had received information related to the guideline as part of their curriculum. Primary measures were responses to questions about the management of four clinical vignettes. Adherence to guideline recommendations was measured by comparing participant scores to a “guideline-based” set of responses from a physiotherapist involved in developing the Ambassador guideline, which was considered a criterion standard. Results: A total of 74 respondents provided complete data, for a response rate of 89%; 65 (88%) reported no knowledge of the guideline. Overall consistency with the criterion standard was high (>70%). Respondents demonstrated high adherence when identifying red flags and deciding whether to refer to another provider. Conclusion: Despite known exposure, knowledge of the guideline was low in this sample of Canadian PT students. Nevertheless, in several key areas, unconscious adherence was high relative to the guideline-based criterion standard. With minor modifications, the vignettes are suitable for evaluating the Ambassador LBP guidelines in a larger study. PMID:24396169

  5. Selective Impairment of Living Things and Musical Instruments on a Verbal "Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire" in a Case of Apperceptive Visual Agnosia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masullo, Carlo; Piccininni, Chiara; Quaranta, Davide; Vita, Maria Gabriella; Gaudino, Simona; Gainotti, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Semantic memory was investigated in a patient (MR) affected by a severe apperceptive visual agnosia, due to an ischemic cerebral lesion, bilaterally affecting the infero-mesial parts of the temporo-occipital cortices. The study was made by means of a Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire (Laiacona, Barbarotto, Trivelli, & Capitani, 1993), which takes…

  6. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  7. Establishing the Psychometric Properties of the ICOAP Questionnaire through Intra-Articular Treatment of Osteoarthritic Pain: Implementation for the Greek Version

    PubMed Central

    Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. In this prospective study, we intend to establish the psychometric properties of ICOAP for its use in studies involving the Hellenic population. Methods. SF-36 Health Survey was used as a standard against ICOAP scores from a sample of 89 patients (mean age: 71.07, 69 females) with hip and knee OA pain who underwent 2 treatment cycles of 4 intra-articular injections of sodium hyaluronate, separated by a 12-week medication-free time interval. Both questionnaires were filled twice with no missing data during follow-up. Results. ROC analysis accomplished ICOAP's criterion-related validation. Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test and paired samples t-test endorsed ICOAP's responsiveness along with Effect Size values, standard response mean, and Relative Efficiency. Comparisons between the areas under curves (AUC) on ROC plots established external responsiveness. Cronbach's-alpha value favored ICOAP's internal consistency. This, along with intraclass correlation, results in both advocated reliability and content validity. Interitem discrimination was demonstrated by the ease of completion of ICOAP as well as the degree of familiarity with it. These findings inaugurated construct validity in collaboration with Spearman's and One-Way ANOVA results. Conclusions. ICOAP is a valid, reliable, and responsive QoL instrument and suitable for studies of osteoarthritic joint pain in the Greek setting. PMID:27034832

  8. The Chronic Pain Myth Scale: Development and Validation of a French-Canadian Instrument Measuring Knowledge, Beliefs, and Attitudes of People in the Community towards Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. In order to better design awareness programs on chronic pain (CP), measurement of knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of people in the community towards this condition is most useful. Objectives. To develop and validate a French-Canadian scale that could be used for this purpose. Methods. Items of the Chronic Pain Myth Scale (CPMS) were developed based on different information sources, reviewed by pain experts, and pretested. The CPMS was administered to 1555 participants among the general Quebec population. Results. The final CPMS contained 26 items allowing the calculation of three subscales scores (knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes towards people suffering from CP, biopsychosocial impacts of CP, and treatment of CP) which showed adequate internal consistency (α = 0.72–0.82). There were statistically significant differences in subscales scores between participants who reported suffering versus not suffering from CP, reported knowing versus not knowing someone who suffers from CP, and reported being versus not being a healthcare professional, which supports the construct validity of the scale. Conclusions. Our results provide preliminary evidence supporting the psychometric qualities of the use of the CPMS for the measurement of knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes towards CP among French-speaking individuals of the Quebec general population. PMID:27746680

  9. Positive Traits Linked to Less Pain through Lower Pain Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Anna; Pulvers, Kim; Carrillo, Janet; Merchant, Gina; Thomas, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the association between positive traits, pain catastrophizing, and pain perceptions. We hypothesized that pain catastrophizing would mediate the relationship between positive traits and pain. First, participants (n = 114) completed the Trait Hope Scale, the Life Orientation Test- Revised, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Participants then completed the experimental pain stimulus, a cold pressor task, by submerging their hand in a circulating water bath (0º Celsius) for as long as tolerable. Immediately following the task, participants completed the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ-SF). Pearson correlation found associations between hope and pain catastrophizing (r = −.41, p < .01) and MPQ-SF scores (r = −.20, p < .05). Optimism was significantly associated with pain catastrophizing (r = −.44, p < .01) and MPQ-SF scores (r = −.19, p < .05). Bootstrapping, a non-parametric resampling procedure, tested for mediation and supported our hypothesis that pain catastrophizing mediated the relationship between positive traits and MPQ-SF pain report. To our knowledge, this investigation is the first to establish that the protective link between positive traits and experimental pain operates through lower pain catastrophizing. PMID:22199416

  10. Knowledge and attitudes of health-care providers toward cancer pain management: a comparison of physicians, nurses, and pharmacists in the state of New Hampshire.

    PubMed

    Furstenberg, C T; Ahles, T A; Whedon, M B; Pierce, K L; Dolan, M; Roberts, L; Silberfarb, P M

    1998-06-01

    The knowledge and attitudes toward cancer pain management of physicians, nurses, and pharmacists in the state of New Hampshire were examined through the use of a statewide survey. Many of the providers who completed the survey, and thus indicated that they treated patients with cancer pain on a regular basis, were not pain or oncology specialists. Most of these providers were quite well informed about the fundamentals of cancer pain management. Approximately 90% of providers in all three groups were not concerned about addiction among cancer patients. Yet, there was a small percentage of providers who responded in less than optimal ways to items dealing with opioid pharmacology, pain assessment, and the importance of pain relief. Comparison of responses among provider groups indicated that nurses were the most knowledgeable and pharmacists the least knowledgeable about pain assessment. Physicians were the most knowledgeable regarding opioid pharmacology but seemed the least committed to providing optimal pain relief. Further analysis identified a small group of physicians that included a disproportionately high percentage of family practitioners and surgeons who consistently responded in less than optimal ways to items dealing with the importance of pain relief. The results of this study indicate a continuing need for broad-based educational programs in cancer pain management and for new initiatives focused on practitioners who see relatively few cancer patients and may have difficulty accessing traditional educational programs.

  11. The adaptation of a Danish version of the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire: reliability and construct validity in a population of patients with fibromyalgia in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Marianne U; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan; Amris, Kirstine; Samsøe, Bente Danneskiold; Mortensen, Erik L

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to translate, culturally adapt and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) in a population of patients with fibromyalgia in Denmark. The study sample included 102 patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia referred to a specialist clinic. The PSEQ was translated and adapted to a Danish setting using a standard stepwise forward-backward translation procedure, followed by initial testing and focus group interview. Reliability was examined by analysing internal consistency and test-retest agreement. Construct validity was examined by investigating dimensionality, targeting, local independence, category functioning and differential item functioning (DIF). Reliability was high: Cronbach's alpha 0.88, test-retest correlation 0.93, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.89 and item-total correlations 0.44-0.70. Factor analyses and item response (IRT) models indicated unidimensionality, and the PSEQ-DK was well targeted to the sample. High interitem correlation was observed between two items, indicating local dependence, and item misfit and DIF were observed for a few items. However, the overall fit of the scale to a single-factor model and IRT models supported acceptable construct validity. The PSEQ-DK showed acceptable psychometric properties and can therefore represent a reliable and valid measure for evaluating self-efficacy in patients with fibromyalgia in Denmark.

  12. Knowledge of zoonoses among those affiliated with the ontario Swine industry: a questionnaire administered to selected producers, allied personnel, and veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Marvin, Dawn M; Dewey, Catherine E; Rajić, Andrijana; Poljak, Zvonimir; Young, Beth

    2010-02-01

    Zoonoses are diseases caused by infectious agents that are transmitted from animals to humans. Some zoonoses have been associated with the pig and pork industry. To ensure the safety of pigs and pork and to improve public health it is essential to understand the level of knowledge of those affiliated with the swine industry. The purpose of our study was to assess the knowledge of and attitude toward zoonotic and other microbial hazards among targeted groups of stakeholders associated with the Ontario swine industry. A postal questionnaire was sent to 409 individuals representing producers, veterinarians, and allied industry personnel. The questionnaire included seven dichotomous and Likert-scale type questions on microbial hazards, addressing topics on familiarity, concern, presence, antimicrobial resistance, and knowledge transfer. The overall response rate was 53% (218/409). More respondents were concerned about the zoonotic potential of Salmonella spp. (53-94%) and swine influenza virus (64-75%) than other hazards. The group of veterinarians were more familiar (>89%) with all microbial hazards than other occupation groups. Additionally, antimicrobial resistance was reported as a problem by more (60%) veterinarians than producers (20%). Educational efforts should focus on preferred methods of knowledge transfer (e.g., producer meetings, magazine) to update swine industry personnel about zoonoses in an attempt to improve food safety and public health. PMID:19895261

  13. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Portuguese version of "The assessment of knowledge in ankylosing spondylitis patients by a self-administered questionnaire".

    PubMed

    da Rocha Lopes, Sofia Manuela; Duarte, José Alberto; Mesquita, Cristina Teresa Torrão Carvalho

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge is an important factor in patients with ankylosing spondylitis regarding the adoption of appropriate behaviours and education. The aim of this study was to culturally adapt and validate "The assessment of knowledge in ankylosing spondylitis patients by a self-administered questionnaire" for the Portuguese population with ankylosing spondylitis. The Portuguese version of "The assessment of knowledge in ankylosing spondylitis patients by a self-administered questionnaire" was administered to a sample of 180 subjects, from which 63 individuals responded. The adaptation process involved translation, back-translation and submission to a committee of experts in the area, culminating with a Portuguese version of the instrument. Next, the scale reliability and validity were assessed. There was a statistically significant decrease from test to retest, although the intra-class correlation coefficient between test and retest was 0.76 (95 % CI 0.61-0.86), which was considered good. From 180 individuals, 63 (35.0 %) subjects were available for the present study. The proportion of individuals that correctly answered each item ranged from 19 to 92 %, corresponding to items 8 and 13, respectively. The mean number of correct answers was 8.5 [mean (SD) = 2.4] in 12 questions. The proposed Portuguese version of the ankylosing spondylitis knowledge scale showed good reliability, reproducibility and construct validity.

  14. HELPinKids&Adults Knowledge Synthesis of the Management of Vaccination Pain and High Levels of Needle Fear

    PubMed Central

    Taddio, Anna; McMurtry, C. Meghan; Chambers, Christine T.; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca; Shah, Vibhuti

    2015-01-01

    The HELPinKids&Adults knowledge synthesis for the management of vaccination-related pain and high levels of needle fear updated and expanded upon the 2010 HELPinKIDS knowledge synthesis and clinical practice guideline for pain mitigation during vaccine injections in childhood. Interventions for vaccine pain management in adults and treatment of individuals with high levels of needle fear, phobias, or both were included, thereby broadening the reach of this work. The present paper outlines the overarching limitations of this diverse evidence base and provides recommendations for future research. Consistent with the framing of clinical questions in the systematic reviews, the Participants, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome, Study design (PICOAS) framework was used to organize these predominant issues and research directions. The major limitations we identified across systematic reviews were an overall dearth of trials on vaccination, lack of methodological rigor, failure to incorporate important outcomes, poor study reporting, and various sources of heterogeneity. Future research directions in terms of conducting additional trials in the vaccination context, improving methodological quality and rigor, assessment of global acceptability and feasibility of interventions, and inclusion of outcomes that stakeholders consider to be important (eg, compliance) are recommended. Given concerns about pain and fear are known contributors to vaccine hesitancy, improving and expanding this evidence base will be integral to broader efforts to improve vaccine compliance and public health worldwide. PMID:26352918

  15. The Effect Dry Cupping Therapy at Acupoint BL23 on the Intensity of Postpartum Low Back Pain in Primiparous Women Based on Two Types of Questionnaires, 2012; A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Marzieh; Ghaemmaghami, Mehrnoush; Yazdanpanahi, Zahra; Zare, Najaf; Azizi, Amir; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Continuous low back pain is associated with the symptoms of the pregnancy period. In spite of the improvement of low back pain within 6 months after the delivery, some women may develop chronic problems. This study aimed to investigate the effect of dry cupping therapy at BL23 point on the intensity of low back pain in primiparous women.  Methods: In the present randomized clinical trial, 100 samples were randomly allocated to either the cupping therapy or the control group (each containing 50 subjects). Cupping therapy was performed for 15-20 minutes every day up to 4 consecutive times. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and short-form McGill pain questionnaire were completed by the two groups before the intervention and immediately, 24 hours, and 2 weeks after that. Then, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software (v. 16) and analyzed using chi-square test and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: According to VAS, the mean intensity of low back pain in the cupping therapy group decreased from 7.8±2.7 before the intervention to 3.7±1.8, 2.5±1.7, and 1.4±1.4 immediately, 24 hours, and 2 weeks after the intervention, respectively. Besides, these measures were respectively obtained as 31.8±10.8, 9.0±6.7, 7.5±6.6, and 3.6±4.1 in the short-form McGill pain questionnaire. According to repeated measures ANOVA, a significant difference was observed among the various stages of follow-up (P=0.01). Conclusion: The study results showed cupping therapy to be effective in sedation of pain. Thus, it can be used as an effective treatment for reducing the low back pain. Trial Registration Number: 2013072611944N3 PMID:25349852

  16. Validity and reliability of the Spanish version of the DN4 (Douleur Neuropathique 4 questions) questionnaire for differential diagnosis of pain syndromes associated to a neuropathic or somatic component

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Concepcion; Galvez, Rafael; Huelbes, Silvia; Insausti, Joaquin; Bouhassira, Didier; Diaz, Silvia; Rejas, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Background This study assesses the validity and reliability of the Spanish version of DN4 questionnaire as a tool for differential diagnosis of pain syndromes associated to a neuropathic (NP) or somatic component (non-neuropathic pain, NNP). Methods A study was conducted consisting of two phases: cultural adaptation into the Spanish language by means of conceptual equivalence, including forward and backward translations in duplicate and cognitive debriefing, and testing of psychometric properties in patients with NP (peripheral, central and mixed) and NNP. The analysis of psychometric properties included reliability (internal consistency, inter-rater agreement and test-retest reliability) and validity (ROC curve analysis, agreement with the reference diagnosis and determination of sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values in different subsamples according to type of NP). Results A sample of 164 subjects (99 women, 60.4%; age: 60.4 ± 16.0 years), 94 (57.3%) with NP (36 with peripheral, 32 with central, and 26 with mixed pain) and 70 with NNP was enrolled. The questionnaire was reliable [Cronbach's alpha coefficient: 0.71, inter-rater agreement coefficient: 0.80 (0.71–0.89), and test-retest intra-class correlation coefficient: 0.95 (0.92–0.97)] and valid for a cut-off value ≥ 4 points, which was the best value to discriminate between NP and NNP subjects. Discussion This study, representing the first validation of the DN4 questionnaire into another language different than the original, not only supported its high discriminatory value for identification of neuropathic pain, but also provided supplemental psychometric validation (i.e. test-retest reliability, influence of educational level and pain intensity) and showed its validity in mixed pain syndromes. PMID:18053212

  17. Quality assurance of the Applied Knowledge Test (AKT) of the MRCGP examination - an immediate post-test questionnaire evaluation of the candidates' views.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Hilton; Blow, Carol; Milne, Paul; Siriwardena, Niroshan; Milne, Heather; Elfes, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The Applied Knowledge Test (AKT) of the Membership of the Royal College of General Practitioners (MRCGP) examination is a computer-based assessment delivered three times a year. A computerised questionnaire, administered immediately after the test, sought candidates' views as part of the test evaluation. Of 1681 candidates taking the test 1418 (84%) responded. Most candidates believed that the test assessed their knowledge of problems relevant to general practice. Their feedback highlighted areas where improvements could be made. Candidates' views of postgraduate specialty medical examinations in the UK are rarely sought or published. We are not aware of other published evidence. The use of computer-based testing enables immediate candidate feedback and can be used routinely to evaluate the test validity and formats. The views of candidates are an important component of quality assurance in reviewing the content, format and educational experience of a high-stakes examination. PMID:26253057

  18. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies.

  19. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies. PMID:27108085

  20. The Depression Coping Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinke, Chris L.

    College students (N=396), chronic pain patients (N=319), and schizophrenic veterans (N=43) completed the Depression Coping Questionnaire (DCQ) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Factor analysis of the DCQ identified eleven coping responses: social support, problem solving, self-blame/escape, aggression, indulgence, activities, medication,…

  1. Tabula diptycha: Differential HIV knowledge, stigma, and intended behavioural outcomes amongst visitors at Vietnam's Pain and Hope exhibition

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Devaki; Nguyen, Mai Huong; Giang, Le Minh; Hirsch, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Stigma reduction efforts in Vietnam have been encumbered by contradictory and dynamic views of People Living With HIV (PLWH) and the epidemic over the past two decades. World AIDS Day 2010 saw the launch of Pain and Hope, a museum exhibition showcasing the lives and experiences of Vietnamese People Living with AIDS at the Vietnam Museum of Ethnology (VME). Between December 2010 and May 2011, a random sample of visitors completed exit surveys regarding attitudes towards the exhibition and Vietnamese living with HIV/AIDS. The survey sought to determine what kind of visitors the museum and exhibition attracted, and the stigma-related impacts of this kind of exposure and parasocial contact. Of 2,500 Vietnamese visitors randomly selected, 852 completed the computer surveys (response rate of 34.1%), 92.3% of whom had seen Pain and Hope. We found two sub-strata or types of visitors attending the exhibition, with varying demographic characteristics, HIV-related knowledge, some differences in stigma ideation, and clear differences in intended behaviours specifically attributable to the exhibition. Social desirability biases notwithstanding, there has emerged a diptych typology of visitors to the VME, for whom the experience of the exhibition is likely interacting with divergent prior knowledge, experiences, interests and motivations. PMID:22974183

  2. Development of a questionnaire to assess dentists' knowledge, opinion, education resources, physician cooperation, and clinical practice regarding obstructive sleep apnea (OSAQ-D).

    PubMed

    Bian, Hui; Smith, Charles L

    2006-06-01

    This report describes the construction of a questionnaire to assess dentists' knowledge, opinion, education resources, clinical practice, and physician cooperation regarding obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) based on the PRECEDE-PROCEED model. The scale development included such steps as generating an item pool, expert review of initial item pool, pilot test, and final test. After the expert review, a total of 78 items made up the pilot test instrument including five demographic (age, year graduated from dental school, gender, years in practice dentistry, and membership of the Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine), 22 knowledge, 15 opinion, 11 education resources, 10 physician cooperation, and 15 clinical practice questions. The pilot test samples were third or fourth year dental school students and dentists from the University of Florida. Nineteen dentists and 26 students returned the survey. Based on the results of item analysis and content review, a total of 70 questions were remained for the final test. The final questionnaire was mailed to 450 dentists who were randomly selected from a list of 10,838 dentists with a Florida license and also delivered to 65 dental school students and postgraduates of the University of Florida. A total of 163 participants including 112 dentists and 51 students and postgraduates responded. The average age was 42.87 years, and most of them are males (77.8%). Only one dentist was a current member of the Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine. The item analysis was performed for five scales. 8 items with poor item difficulty, lower item discrimination, or having big effect on the item consistency were removed from the instrument, and 62 questions were kept for the further evaluation. The reliability coefficient alpha of knowledge, opinion, education resources, physician cooperation, and clinical practice scales was 0.77, 0.86, 0.67, 0.75, and 0.86, respectively. According to the standard from DeVellis (Scale development: theory and applications

  3. University students' knowledge of, and attitudes towards, HIV and AIDS, homosexuality and sexual risk behaviour: a questionnaire survey in two Finnish universities.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Teija; Kylmä, Jari; Houtsonen, Jarmo; Välimäki, Maritta; Suominen, Tarja

    2012-11-01

    This study describes Finnish university students' knowledge and attitudes towards HIV and AIDS, homosexuality and sexual risk behaviour. Finnish-speaking students were randomly selected from all registered students at two universities in Finland (N = 9715, n = 950). The data were collected by using a modified version of the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Nursing AIDS Study Questionnaire on sexual risk behaviour developed by Held and Chng. The total response rate was 35% (n = 333). The data were analysed using quantitative statistical methods. Normally distributed data were analysed by t-test and one-way ANOVA, with Bonferroni corrections. Non-normally distributed data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by a post-hoc test. The majority of students were familiar with HIV and AIDS, including its mode of transmission. However, there were still some misconceptions concerning HIV and AIDS. The oldest students and women had a more positive attitude towards people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA). Of patients with HIV or AIDS, intravenous drug users were perceived most negatively. Male students had more homophobic attitudes. Students who reported that religion had an important role in their lives had significantly stricter attitudes towards sexual risk behaviour. Students' knowledge correlated positively with general attitudes towards HIV and AIDS. Knowledge about HIV and AIDS will lead to more positive attitudes towards HIV and AIDS as a disease, towards those infected as well as homosexual people. There is a need to focus on preventive health care and sexual health promotion by educating young people and changing their attitudes towards sexual risk behaviour.

  4. Oral health-related knowledge, attitude and practices among eunuchs (hijras) residing in Bhopal City, Madhya Pradesh, India: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Hongal, Sudhir; Torwane, Nilesh Arjun; Goel, Pankaj; Byarakele, Chandrashekar; Mishra, Priyesh; Jain, Shubham

    2014-01-01

    Background: The current cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted to assess the oral health-related knowledge, attitude and practices among eunuchs (hijras) residing in Bhopal city, Madhya Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: Based on a convenient non-probability snow ball sampling technique, all the self-identified eunuchs residing in the city of Bhopal who were present at the time of study and who fulfilled the selection criteria were approached. A cross section of the general population was also surveyed. An interviewer-based, predesigned, structured, close-ended 18-item questionnaire that had been designed based on the primary objective of the study was used. All the obtained data were analyzed using software, Statistical Package for Social Science version 20. Results: According to 188 (86.2%) males, 187 (87.4%) females and 168 (81.2%) eunuchs, good oral health can improve the general health. Most of the study participants including 211 (98.6%) females, 210 (96.3%) males and 205 (99%) eunuchs use either tooth paste or tooth powder to clean their teeth. While, a majority of eunuchs, i.e., 113 (54.6%), were having habit of chewing smokeless tobacco containing products such as betel nut, betel quid, gutkha, etc., The difference in use of tobacco products was statistically significant. Conclusion: The information presented in this study adds to our understanding of the common oral hygiene practices which are performed among eunuch population. Efforts to increase the awareness of oral effects of tobacco use and to eliminate the habit are needed to improve oral and general health of this population. PMID:25425825

  5. Border malaria in China: knowledge and use of personal protection by minority populations and implications for malaria control: a questionnaire-based survey

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sarah J; Min, Xia; Hill, Nigel; Jones, Caroline; Zaixing, Zhang; Cameron, Mary M

    2008-01-01

    Background Malaria control in remote, forested areas of the Mekong region relies on personal protection from mosquito bites. Uptake of these methods may be limited by knowledge of the link between mosquitoes and malaria as well as social and economic aspects. Understanding barriers to uptake will inform malaria control programmes on targets for improvement of delivery. Methods A total 748 key respondents: health providers and village heads, from 187 villages and 25 different ethnic groups, were interviewed using structured questionnaires. Differences in use of personal protection, and knowledge of malaria between groups were analysed using chi-square; and binary logistic regression used for multivariate analysis. Results Malaria knowledge was poor with 19.4% of women and 37.5% of men linking mosquitoes with malaria, although 95.6% knew one or more methods of mosquito control. Virtually all respondents used personal protection at some time during the year; and understanding of malaria transmission was strongly associated with bednet use. Those working in forest agriculture were significantly more likely to know that mosquitoes transmit malaria but this did not translate into a significantly greater likelihood of using bednets. Furthermore, use of personal protection while woing outdoors was rare, and less than 3% of respondents knew about the insecticide impregnation of bednets. The use of bednets, synthetic repellents and mosquito coils varied between ethnic groups, but was significantly more frequent among those with higher income, more years of education and permanent housing. The reported use of repellents and coils was also more common among women despite their low knowledge of malaria transmission, and low likelihood of having heard information on malaria within the last year. Conclusion The use of personal protection must be increased, particularly among outdoor workers that have higher malaria risk. However, personal protection is widely used and widely

  6. Knowledge, Perceptions and Attitudes toward Chronic Pain and Its Management: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Frontline Pharmacists in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tejal; Chang, Feng; Mohammed, Heba Tallah; Raman-Wilms, Lalitha; Jurcic, Jane; Khan, Ayesha; Sproule, Beth

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of chronic pain consumes a significant share of primary care. Community and family health team pharmacists frequently see patients with chronic pain, thus have the opportunity to improve their care. To assess the knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of Ontario pharmacists, we invited 5,324 Ontario pharmacists, to participate in an online survey we developed using Qualtrics. The 31-question survey gathered demographic information, assessed pharmacists' knowledge of three chronic pain conditions; chronic lower back pain (CLBP, eight true/false statements); chronic headache disorder (CHD, eight true/false statements) and painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN, seven true/false statements), and their attitudes toward and perceptions of patients with these conditions, and knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of opioids in pain management. We received 688 responses (12.9%) and 392 pharmacists completed the survey. The mean age of respondents was 48.5 years and 48.5% were male. More than 50% of respondents were in practice for more than 20 years and 58.7% worked 25-40 hours per week. The mean knowledge scores were 4.5/8, 5.5/8, and 5.3/8 for CBLP, CHD, and PDN respectively. While 95% of respondents were aware of the increasing death rates due to opioid use, only half were familiar with the Canadian guideline for safe opioid prescribing for non-cancer use. Responses were compared based on gender, time in practice and location of practice. Pharmacists with more than ten years of experience scored significantly higher than those with less experience. Fewer differences were found in comparisons of gender and location of practice. Safe and effective care of chronic pain patients, particularly with opioids, will require additional pharmacist education. PMID:27270723

  7. Selective impairment of living things and musical instruments on a verbal 'Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire' in a case of apperceptive visual agnosia.

    PubMed

    Masullo, Carlo; Piccininni, Chiara; Quaranta, Davide; Vita, Maria Gabriella; Gaudino, Simona; Gainotti, Guido

    2012-10-01

    Semantic memory was investigated in a patient (MR) affected by a severe apperceptive visual agnosia, due to an ischemic cerebral lesion, bilaterally affecting the infero-mesial parts of the temporo-occipital cortices. The study was made by means of a Semantic Knowledge Questionnaire (Laiacona, Barbarotto, Trivelli, & Capitani, 1993), which takes separately into account four categories of living beings (animals, fruits, vegetables and body parts) and of artefacts (furniture, tools, vehicles and musical instruments), does not require a visual analysis and allows to distinguish errors concerning super-ordinate categorization, perceptual features and functional/encyclopedic knowledge. When the total number of errors obtained on all the categories of living and non-living beings was considered, a non-significant trend toward a higher number of errors in living stimuli was observed. This difference, however, became significant when body parts and musical instruments were excluded from the analysis. Furthermore, the number of errors obtained on the musical instruments was similar to that obtained on the living categories of animals, fruits and vegetables and significantly higher of that obtained in the other artefact categories. This difference was still significant when familiarity, frequency of use and prototypicality of each stimulus entered into a logistic regression analysis. On the other hand, a separate analysis of errors obtained on questions exploring super-ordinate categorization, perceptual features and functional/encyclopedic attributes showed that the differences between living and non-living stimuli and between musical instruments and other artefact categories were mainly due to errors obtained on questions exploring perceptual features. All these data are at variance with the 'domains of knowledge' hypothesis', which assumes that the breakdown of different categories of living and non-living things respects the distinction between biological entities and

  8. Teacher Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN. Educational Research Center.

    The Teacher Questionnaire was designed to provide demographic information about the teacher, information on the school organizational climate, information about instructional and classroom management practices, and a measure of the teacher's verbal facility. Section 1 contains 23 items identifying specific teacher traits and characteristics (sex,…

  9. Using existing questionnaires in latent class analysis: should we use summary scores or single items as input? A methodological study using a cohort of patients with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Anne Molgaard; Vach, Werner; Kent, Peter; Hestbaek, Lise; Kongsted, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Background Latent class analysis (LCA) is increasingly being used in health research, but optimal approaches to handling complex clinical data are unclear. One issue is that commonly used questionnaires are multidimensional, but expressed as summary scores. Using the example of low back pain (LBP), the aim of this study was to explore and descriptively compare the application of LCA when using questionnaire summary scores and when using single items to subgrouping of patients based on multidimensional data. Materials and methods Baseline data from 928 LBP patients in an observational study were classified into four health domains (psychology, pain, activity, and participation) using the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health framework. LCA was performed within each health domain using the strategies of summary-score and single-item analyses. The resulting subgroups were descriptively compared using statistical measures and clinical interpretability. Results For each health domain, the preferred model solution ranged from five to seven subgroups for the summary-score strategy and seven to eight subgroups for the single-item strategy. There was considerable overlap between the results of the two strategies, indicating that they were reflecting the same underlying data structure. However, in three of the four health domains, the single-item strategy resulted in a more nuanced description, in terms of more subgroups and more distinct clinical characteristics. Conclusion In these data, application of both the summary-score strategy and the single-item strategy in the LCA subgrouping resulted in clinically interpretable subgroups, but the single-item strategy generally revealed more distinguishing characteristics. These results 1) warrant further analyses in other data sets to determine the consistency of this finding, and 2) warrant investigation in longitudinal data to test whether the finer detail provided by

  10. Pain in IBD Patients: Very Frequent and Frequently Insufficiently Taken into Account

    PubMed Central

    Ak, Melike; Müller-Mottet, Séverine; Scharl, Sylvie; Biedermann, Luc; Fournier, Nicolas; Frei, Pascal; Pittet, Valerie; Scharl, Michael; Fried, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain is a common symptom related to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition to abdominal pain, pain can also be an extraintestinal manifestation of IBD. Pain treatment is challenging and a substantial part of IBD patients are treated with opioids. Therefore, a better knowledge on pain symptoms is crucial for a better therapeutic approach to this clinical problem. Methods Patients of the Swiss IBD Cohort Study (SIBDCS) (n = 2152) received a questionnaire regarding pain intensity, pain localization and impact of pain on daily life and social activities. Furthermore, the questionnaire investigated the use of pain-specific medication. Results A vast majority of patients (71%) experienced pain during the disease course. For a substantial part of patients (49% in UC and 55% in CD) pain is a longstanding problem (>5 years). Pain in UC was of shorter duration compared to CD (p < 0.01). Abdominal pain (59.5%) and back pain (38.3%) were the main pain localizations. 67% of patients took pain medication; 24% received no pain treatment. The general quality of life was significantly lower in patients suffering of pain compared to those without pain (38 vs. 77; (-100 very bad; 100 very good) p<0.0001). Conclusions Prevalence of pain is high in patients of the SIBDCS. It is a longstanding problem for the majority of the patients affected. Pain was found to be undertreated in the SIBDCS and was significantly associated with health-related quality of life. Thus, an increased awareness is mandatory to address this frequent complication in the course of IBD. PMID:27332879

  11. Imaging Pain.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Katherine T; Mackey, Sean C

    2016-06-01

    The challenges and understanding of acute and chronic pain have been illuminated through the advancement of central neuroimaging. Through neuroimaging research, new technology and findings have allowed us to identify and understand the neural mechanisms contributing to chronic pain. Several regions of the brain are known to be of particular importance for the maintenance and amplification of chronic pain, and this knowledge provides novel targets for future research and treatment. This article reviews neuroimaging for the study of chronic pain, and in particular, the rapidly advancing and popular research tools of structural and functional MRI. PMID:27208709

  12. Pressure ulcer pain: a systematic literature review and national pressure ulcer advisory panel white paper.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Barbara; Langemo, Diane; Cuddigan, Janet

    2009-02-01

    Pain is an ever-present problem in patients with pressure ulcers. As an advocate for persons with pressure ulcers, the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) is concerned about pain. To synthesize available pressure ulcer pain literature, a systematic review was performed of English language literature, specific to human research, 1992 to April 2008, using PubMed and the Cumulative Index in Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Fifteen relevant papers were found; they examined pain assessment tools, topical analgesia for pain management, and/or descriptions of persons with pressure ulcer pain. Studies had small sample sizes and included only adults. The literature established that 1) pressure ulcers cause pain; 2) pain assessment was typically found to be self-reported using different versions of the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Faces Rating Scale, or Visual Analog Scale; 3) pain assessment instruments should be appropriate to patient cognitive level and medical challenges; 4) in some cases, topical medications can ease pain and although information on systemic medication is limited, pain medications have been found to negatively affect appetite; and 5) wound treatment is painful, particularly dressing changes. Research gaps include the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcer pain, the impact of pain on nutrition, and pressure ulcer pain considerations for special groups (eg, children, end-of-life patients, and bariatric patients). The NPUAP presents this white paper as the current scientific know-ledge base on the topic. Research regarding the multidimensional aspects of pressure ulcer pain is strongly recommended.

  13. Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on knowledge includes annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROMs and computer software, videos, books, and additional resources that deal with knowledge and differences between how animals and humans learn. Sidebars discuss animal intelligence, learning proper behavior, and getting news from the Internet. (LRW)

  14. Increasing the Frequency and Timeliness of Pain Assessment and Management in Long-Term Care: Knowledge Transfer and Sustained Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jaime; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Hunter, Paulette V.; Savoie, Maryse L.; Wickson-Griffiths, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although feasible protocols for pain assessment and management in long-term care (LTC) have been developed, these have not been implemented on a large-scale basis. Objective. To implement a program of regular pain assessment in two LTC facilities, using implementation science principles, and to evaluate the process and success of doing so. Methods. The implementation protocol included a pain assessment workshop and the establishment of a nurse Pain Champion. Quality indicators were tracked before and after implementation. Focus groups and interviews with staff were also conducted. Results. The implementation effort was successful in increasing and regularizing pain assessments. This was sustained during the follow-up period. Staff members reported enthusiasm about the protocol at baseline and positive results following its implementation. Despite the success in increasing assessments, we did not identify changes in the percentages of patients reported as having moderate-to-severe pain. Discussion. It is our hope that our feasibility demonstration will encourage more facilities to improve their pain assessment/management practices. Conclusions. It is feasible to implement regular and systematic pain assessment in LTC. Future research should focus on ensuring effective clinical practices in response to assessment results, and determination of longer-term sustainability. PMID:27445619

  15. Increasing the Frequency and Timeliness of Pain Assessment and Management in Long-Term Care: Knowledge Transfer and Sustained Implementation.

    PubMed

    Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Williams, Jaime; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Hunter, Paulette V; Savoie, Maryse L; Wickson-Griffiths, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although feasible protocols for pain assessment and management in long-term care (LTC) have been developed, these have not been implemented on a large-scale basis. Objective. To implement a program of regular pain assessment in two LTC facilities, using implementation science principles, and to evaluate the process and success of doing so. Methods. The implementation protocol included a pain assessment workshop and the establishment of a nurse Pain Champion. Quality indicators were tracked before and after implementation. Focus groups and interviews with staff were also conducted. Results. The implementation effort was successful in increasing and regularizing pain assessments. This was sustained during the follow-up period. Staff members reported enthusiasm about the protocol at baseline and positive results following its implementation. Despite the success in increasing assessments, we did not identify changes in the percentages of patients reported as having moderate-to-severe pain. Discussion. It is our hope that our feasibility demonstration will encourage more facilities to improve their pain assessment/management practices. Conclusions. It is feasible to implement regular and systematic pain assessment in LTC. Future research should focus on ensuring effective clinical practices in response to assessment results, and determination of longer-term sustainability. PMID:27445619

  16. Pain recognition and treatment in the horse: a survey of equine veterinarians in The Netherlands and Belgium.

    PubMed

    Dujardin, C L L; van Loon, J P A M

    2011-10-01

    This survey investigated the attitudes of equine veterinarians in The Netherlands and the Flemish region of Belgium towards pain management in the horse. Questionnaires were sent out to 771 equine veterinarians, all members of the Dutch or Flemish equine practitioners society. The return rate of completed questionnaires was 16.6%. The survey provided information about the use of analgesic drugs, factors influencing their prescription, pain scoring, analgesic therapy for specific clinical conditions, use of epidural analgesia, and appraisal of personal knowledge of pain management. The pain scores attributed to specific clinical conditions showed considerable variation. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) were the most-often prescribed analgesic drugs, with older drugs still having an important role in pain management. Butorphanol was the main opioid used. A substantial proportion of the respondents considered their knowledge of pain recognition and analgesic therapy to be insufficient or moderate. PMID:22026220

  17. Insecure attachment style is associated with chronic widespread pain.

    PubMed

    Davies, K A; Macfarlane, G J; McBeth, J; Morriss, R; Dickens, C

    2009-06-01

    Individuals with "insecure" adult attachment styles have been shown to experience more pain than people with secure attachment, though results of previous studies have been inconsistent. We performed a cross-sectional study on a large population-based sample to investigate whether, compared to pain free individuals, subjects with chronic widespread pain were more likely to report insecure adult attachment style. Subjects in a population-based cross-sectional study completed a self-rated assessment of adult attachment style. Attachment style was categorised as secure (i.e., normal attachment style); or preoccupied, dismissing or fearful (insecure attachment styles). Subjects completed a pain questionnaire from which three groups were identified: pain free; chronic widespread pain; and other pain. Subjects rated their pain intensity and pain-related disability on an 11 point Likert scale. Subjects (2509) returned a completed questionnaire (median age 49.9 years (IQR 41.2-50.0); 59.2% female). Subjects with CWP were more likely to report a preoccupied (RRR 2.6; 95%CI 1.8-3.7), dismissing (RRR 1.9; 95%CI 1.2-3.1) or fearful attachment style (RRR 1.4; 95%CI 1.1-1.8) than those free of pain. Among CWP subjects, insecure attachment style was associated with number of pain sites (Dismissing: RRR 2.8; 95%CI 1.2-2.3, Preoccupied: RRR=1.8, 95%CI 0.98-3.5) and degree of pain-related disability (Preoccupied: RRR=2.1, 95%CI 1.0-4.1), but not pain intensity. These findings suggest that treatment strategies based on knowledge of attachment style, possibly using support and education, may alleviate distress and disability in people at risk of, or affected by, chronic widespread pain. PMID:19345016

  18. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Back Pain information sheet compiled by ...

  19. Pain Coping Strategies in Osteoarthritis Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Investigated the relation of pain coping strategies to pain, health status, and psychological distress in a group of osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain. Patients completed various questionnaires. Medical status variables were also used. The Pain Control and Rational Thinking factor derived from the Coping Strategies Questionnaire proved to…

  20. Development of an objective questionnaire to assess perception, concern, and knowledge of, and attention and response to, the threat of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Kulman, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to the subject objective, the relationship of specified personality variables (i.e., trait anxiety, locus of control, response tendency towards threat, and denial) to behavioral and psychological responses to the threat of nuclear war were assessed. The quantitative questionnaire, titled the Nuclear Reaction Scale, was composed of items selected from issues discussed in the psychological literature on the threat of nuclear war. These issues included: psychic numbing, cognitive reality, perceptions of likelihood and survival, nuclear illusions, and attention to the threat of nuclear war. A standardization sample of 360 college students was administered the Nuclear Reaction Scale, Trait Anxiety Scale, Internal-External Locus of Control Scale, Facilitation-Inhibition Scale, and Haan Denial Scale. Three additional subsamples, identified as Military, Nuclear Freeze, and Church, were given the Nuclear Reaction Scale to assess the validity of the scale. A factor analysis of the Nuclear Reaction Scale indicated a nine-factor solution that described issues such as concern perceptions, likelihood, survivability, and control over the threat of nuclear war. A number of strong relationships existed between computed factors on the Nuclear Reaction Scale. Demographic comparisons found significant differences related to sex and political affiliation.

  1. Use of a multiple choice questionnaire to assess UK prescribing channels' knowledge of helminthology and best practice surrounding anthelmintic use in livestock and horses.

    PubMed

    Easton, Stephanie; Bartley, David J; Hotchkiss, Emily; Hodgkinson, Jane E; Pinchbeck, Gina L; Matthews, Jacqueline B

    2016-06-01

    Grazing livestock and equines are at risk of infection from a variety of helminths, for which the primary method of control has long been the use of anthelmintics. Anthelmintic resistance is now widespread in a number of helminth species across the globe so it is imperative that best practice control principles be adopted to delay the further spread of resistance. It is the responsibility of all who prescribe anthelmintics (in the UK, this being veterinarians, suitably qualified persons (SQPs) and pharmacists) to provide adequate information on best practice approaches to parasite control at the point of purchase. Poor uptake of best practice guidelines at farm level has been documented; this could be due to a lack of, or inappropriate, advice at the point of anthelmintics purchase. Therefore, the aim here was to evaluate levels of basic knowledge of helminthology, best practice guidelines and dispensing legislation among veterinarians and SQPs in the UK, through a Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) test, that was distributed online via targeted emails and social media sites. For each respondent, the percentage correct was determined (for the MCQ test overall and for subsections) and the results analysed initially using parametric and non-parametric statistics to compare differences between prescribing channels. The results showed that channels generally performed well; veterinarians achieved a mean total percentage correct of 79.7% (range 34.0-100%) and SQPs, a mean total percentage correct of 75.8% (range 38.5-100%) (p=0.051). The analysis indicated that veterinarians performed better in terms of knowledge of basic helminthology (p=0.001), whilst the SQP group performed better on legislation type questions (p=0.032). There was no significant difference in knowledge levels of best practice between the two channels. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that veterinarians and those answering equine questions only performed significantly better than those

  2. Finnish nurses' attitudes to pain in children.

    PubMed

    Salanterä, S

    1999-03-01

    This study measured the attitudes of Finnish paediatric nurses to children in pain and the connection between nurses' attitudes, nurses' attributes and nurses' own view of their knowledge and ability to take care of children in pain. The measurements were based on a purpose-designed instrument consisting of a 41-item Likert-type questionnaire and demographic data. The convenience sample consisted of paediatric nurses at all five university hospitals in Finland (n = 303). The response rate was 87%. ANOVA and non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA were used as statistical methods. The results show that, taken as a whole, the attitudes of these nurses do not hinder effective pain management but there are some misconceptions that need further attention. It also emerged that such attributes as nurses' age, education, experience, place of work and field of expertise do not have a significant effect on nurses' attitudes. Nurses working in operating theatres felt they had a limited scope to work together with parents and in some hospitals nurses felt they had limited scope to work together with other staff groups. The units differed significantly in nurses' views about the unit's possibilities to provide treatment for pain. The findings of this study indicate that although nurses' attitudes to pain management are mainly positive, there is much variation in how they feel they can actually provide quality care to control pain. More attention should be paid to training nurses and to providing knowledge about the treatment of pain in children. Future research should look at nurses' existing knowledge base as well as their activities in the assessment and management of pain. PMID:10210472

  3. The Brain in Pain

    PubMed Central

    AHMAD, Asma Hayati; ABDUL AZIZ, Che Badariah

    2014-01-01

    Pain, while salient, is highly subjective. A sensation perceived as painful by one person may be perceived as uncomfortable, not painful or even pleasant to others. Within the same person, pain may also be modulated according to its threat value and the context in which it is presented. Imaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, have identified a distributed network in the brain, the pain-relevant brain regions, that encode the sensory-discriminative aspect of pain, as well as its cognitive and affective/emotional factors. Current knowledge also implicates the prefrontal cortex as the modulatory area for pain, with its subdivisions forming the cortico-cortical pathway, an alternative pain modulatory pathway distinct from the descending modulatory pathway of pain. These findings from neuroimaging in human subjects have paved the way for the molecular mechanisms of pain modulation to be explored in animal studies. PMID:25941463

  4. A clinical contrast: physical therapists with low back pain treating patients with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J; Zimney, Kory

    2015-01-01

    Patients with low back pain (LBP) often display faulty beliefs and cognitions regarding their pain experience. Pain neuroscience education (PNE) aims to alter the pain experience by targeting these faulty beliefs and cognitions. One PNE strategy aims specifically to reframe commonly held beliefs about tissues by patients with LBP as the single source of pain. In line with this reasoning, it is hypothesized that physical therapists (PT) treating patients with LBP may indeed experience similar, if not worse, pain experiences while treating a patient with LBP. To date, this assumption has never been studied. A PT LBP questionnaire was developed, validated and distributed to a convenience sample of attendees of an international PT conference. One-hundred and ten PTs completed the questionnaire for a 71% response rate. Ninety percent of the PTs reported having experienced LBP, with 27% at the conference experiencing LBP at the time. Of the PTs that have experienced LBP 75% reported not having received any imaging; 81% no formal diagnoses, 58% no treatment and 86% not having missed work due to LBP. Eighty-six percent of therapists reported having experienced LBP while treating a patient with LBP, with 50% convinced their LBP was higher than the LBP experienced by the patient they were treating. The results from this study indicate PTs often treat patients with LBP while suffering LBP. It is suggested that this knowledge may potentially help patients with LBP reconceptualize their LBP experience leading to expedited recovery.

  5. Surveys and questionnaires in nursing research.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Fiona

    2015-06-17

    Surveys and questionnaires are often used in nursing research to elicit the views of large groups of people to develop the nursing knowledge base. This article provides an overview of survey and questionnaire use in nursing research, clarifies the place of the questionnaire as a data collection tool in quantitative research design and provides information and advice about best practice in the development of quantitative surveys and questionnaires.

  6. Avicenna's concept of pain

    PubMed Central

    Tashani, Osama A.; Johnson, Mark I.

    2010-01-01

    Ibn Sina (Latin name – Avicenna, 980–1037) is a famous Muslim physician who wrote The Canon of Medicine. Pain-related writings within The Canon were identified and analysed and compared to Galen and Modern Pain Theory. We found evidence in The Canon that Avicenna challenged Galen's concept of pain. Galen insisted that injuries (breach of continuity) were the only cause of pain. In contrast, Avicenna suggested that the true cause of pain was a change of the physical condition (temperament change) of the organ whether there was an injury present or not. Avicenna extended Galen's descriptions of 4 to 15 types of pain and used a terminology that is remarkably similar to that used in the McGill Pain Questionnaire. PMID:21483573

  7. Avicenna's concept of pain.

    PubMed

    Tashani, Osama A; Johnson, Mark I

    2010-09-08

    Ibn Sina (Latin name - Avicenna, 980-1037) is a famous Muslim physician who wrote The Canon of Medicine. Pain-related writings within The Canon were identified and analysed and compared to Galen and Modern Pain Theory. We found evidence in The Canon that Avicenna challenged Galen's concept of pain. Galen insisted that injuries (breach of continuity) were the only cause of pain. In contrast, Avicenna suggested that the true cause of pain was a change of the physical condition (temperament change) of the organ whether there was an injury present or not. Avicenna extended Galen's descriptions of 4 to 15 types of pain and used a terminology that is remarkably similar to that used in the McGill Pain Questionnaire.

  8. Narcotics Center Questionnaire (Spring 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, John B.; And Others

    This questionnaire assesses drug knowledge, drug use practices, and attitudes in junior high school, senior high school, and college students. The 115 items (multiple choice, yes/no, agree/disagree, or completion) deal with personal and demographic data, general attitudes, attitudes toward institutions (police, American business, Army, etc.),…

  9. Low back pain: pharmacologic management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan M

    2012-09-01

    Adequate treatment of low back pain is essential, but has been challenging for many primary care physicians. Most patients with low back pain can be treated in the primary care environment, provided the physician has enough knowledge of the medications used to treat low back pain. The main treatment goal for acute low back pain is to control the pain and maintain function. For patients with chronic back pain, the goal is continual pain management and prevention of future exacerbations. This article reviews current pharmacological options for the treatment of low back pain, and possible future innovations. PMID:22958559

  10. A study of patient experience and perception regarding postoperative pain management in Chinese hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Weiran, Liu; Lei, Zhang; Woo, Stephanie Mu-Lian; Anliu, Tang; Shumin, Xie; Jing, Zhang; Kai, Zhang; Zhen, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aims to analyze the current status of postoperative pain management in the People’s Republic of China’s provincial-level hospitals, and the existing knowledge and opinions held by patients regarding these methods. Methods The 128 participants in this study were urology and hepatobiliary patients from three provincial-level hospitals in Hunan. The questionnaire assessing postoperative pain was designed using the typical pain assessment scales and pain management guidelines as references. Results 82.8% of study participants claimed that their postoperative pain was relieved within 3 days of their operations. However, while 91.4% of surveyed patients experienced moderate to severe pain, 51.6% received no treatment for their postoperative pain, and 14.9% complained that medical personnel failed to manage their pain. 20.2% were unsatisfied with their pain management, indicating that treatment did not meet their expectations. Furthermore, participants demonstrated a great misunderstanding of pain and analgesics, as 72.6% of patients were unfamiliar with morphine, 51.6% of patients believed only certain types of pain required management, and 18.5% refused to use morphine. Conclusion In most Chinese provincial-level hospitals, current postoperative pain management methods are able to alleviate the pain experienced by the majority of patients, though pain assessment and therapy procedures are still not standardized. Furthermore, most patients lack a proper understanding of postoperative pain and analgesics. Therefore, pain management education for doctors and patients and their relatives should be implemented in order to improve the quality of postoperative pain management. PMID:24235819

  11. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  12. The Survey Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A. Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Internet-based surveys are still relatively new, and researchers are just beginning to articulate best practices for questionnaire design. Online questionnaire design has generally been guided by the principles applying to other self-administered instruments, such as paper-based questionnaires. Web-based questionnaires, however, have the potential…

  13. Chronic intraoral pain--assessment of diagnostic methods and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Pigg, Maria

    2011-01-01

    . Thresholds for cold, warmth and painful heat were measured in four intraoral and two extraoral sites. Measurements were repeated 3 times over 6 weeks, using four sizes of stimulation area (0.125-0.81 cm2). The threshold levels were highly dependent on location but less dependent on measuring probe size and time variability was small, and this knowledge is important for the interpretation of QST results. Study II applied a recently developed standardized QST examination protocol (intended for use on skin) inside the oral cavity. Two trained examiners evaluated 21 pain-free subjects on three occasions over 1-3 weeks, at four sites-three intraoral and one extraoral. Most tests had acceptable reliability and the original test instruments and techniques could be applied intraorally with only minor adjustments. Study III examined the value of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in pain investigations. Twenty patients with AO and 5 with symptomatic apical periodontitis (inflammatory tooth pain) participated. The results indicate that when AO is suspected, addition of CBCT can improve the diagnostic certainty compared to sole use of periapical and panoramic radiographs, especially because of the superior ability of CBCT to exclude inflammation as the pain cause. Study IV assessed the long-term prognosis of AO, and analyzed potential outcome predictors. A comprehensive questionnaire including validated and reliable instruments was used to gather data on patient and pain characteristics and pain consequences from 37 patients in 2002 and 2009. Thirty-five percent of the patients reported substantial overall improvement at follow-up, but almost all still had pain of some degree after many years. The initial high level of emotional distress was unchanged. Low baseline pain intensity predicted improvement over time. PMID:22338784

  14. Comfort over Pain in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Charles, Niamh A; Yount, Susan; Morgan, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Pregnancy is often a time when chronic pain is exacerbated, or when acute pain appears. Frequently the easiest intervention within reach, for both chronic and acute pain, is a prescription. However, medication cannot correct the cause of the pain; instead it alters the person's experiential perception of the pain. In addition, medication exposes both mother and fetus to risks. To provide simple, evidence-based, holistic/alternative remedies for women who experienced nonemergent pain during pregnancy. Holistic/alternative techniques for increasing comfort were taught to the participants and individualized during three sessions. Levels of pain and comfort were measured before and after the treatment, using the validated General Comfort Questionnaire and Pain Outcomes Profile. Pain scores decreased from an average of 5.8/10 to 3.5/10 (p = .00). Comfort scores increased from an average of 17.5 to 30 (p = .00). PMID:27105573

  15. Development and Validation of the Athlete Fear Avoidance Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Dover, Geoffrey; Amar, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Context The fear-avoidance model was developed in an attempt to explain the process by which “pain experience” and “pain behavior” become dissociated from the actual pain sensation in individuals who manifest the phenomenon of exaggerated pain perception. High levels of fear avoidance can lead to chronic pain and disability and have successfully predicted rehabilitation time in the work-related–injury population. Existing fear-avoidance questionnaires have all been developed for the general population, but these questionnaires may not be specific enough to fully assess fear avoidance in an athletic population that copes with pain differently than the general population. Objective To develop and validate the Athlete Fear Avoidance Questionnaire (AFAQ). Design Qualitative research to develop the AFAQ and a cross-sectional study to validate the scale. Patients or Other Participants For questionnaire development, a total of 8 experts in the fields of athletic therapy, sport psychology, and fear avoidance were called upon to generate and rate items for the AFAQ. For determining concurrent validity, 99 varsity athletes from various sports participated. Data Collection and Analysis A total of 99 varsity athletes completed the AFAQ, the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. We used Pearson correlations to establish concurrent validity. Results Concurrent validity was established with significant correlations between the AFAQ and the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity (r = 0.352, P > .001) as well as with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (r = 0.587, P > .001). High internal consistency of our questionnaire was established with a Cronbach α coefficient of 0.805. The final version of the questionnaire includes 10 items with good internal validity (P < .05). Conclusions We developed a questionnaire with good internal and external validity. The AFAQ is a scale that measures sport-injury–related fear avoidance in

  16. The Alcoholism Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferneau, E.; Mueller, S.

    The alcoholism questionnaire used to survey college student attitudes on the subject is provided. It is identical to the drug-abuse questionnaire except for word changes appropriate to the subject matter. The questionnaire consists of 40 statements about alcoholics and alcoholism, with 7 possible responses: (1) completely disagree; (2) mostly…

  17. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  18. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  19. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. However, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: Swelling and pain in the Achilles tendon ...

  20. The individual and societal burden of chronic pain in Europe: the case for strategic prioritisation and action to improve knowledge and availability of appropriate care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is common in Europe and elsewhere and its under treatment confers a substantial burden on individuals, employers, healthcare systems and society in general. Indeed, the personal and socioeconomic impact of chronic pain is as great as, or greater, than that of other established healthcare priorities. In light of review of recently published data confirming its clinical and socioeconomic impact, this paper argues that chronic pain should be ranked alongside other conditions of established priority in Europe. We outline strategies to help overcome barriers to effective pain care resulting in particular from deficiencies in education and access to interdisciplinary pain management services. We also address the confusion that exists between proper clinical and scientific uses of opioid medications and their potential for misuse and diversion, as reflected in international variations in the access to, and availability of, these agents. Discussion As the economic costs are driven in part by the costs of lost productivity, absenteeism and early retirement, pain management should aim to fully rehabilitate patients, rather than merely to relieve pain. Accredited education of physicians and allied health professionals regarding state-of-the-art pain management is crucial. Some progress has been made in this area, but further provision and incentivization is required. We support a tiered approach to pain management, whereby patients with pain uncontrolled by non-specialists are able to consult a physician with a pain competency or a specialist in pain medicine, who in turn can recruit the services of other professionals on a case-by-case basis. A fully integrated interdisciplinary pain service should ideally be available to patients with refractory pain. Governments and healthcare systems should ensure that their policies on controlled medications are balanced, safeguarding public health without undue restrictions that compromise patient care, and that

  1. Hypnosis for pain management.

    PubMed

    Valente, Sharon M

    2006-02-01

    Nurses are in a key position to learn and use hypnosis with patients to reduce pain and enhance self-esteem. However, most nurses lack knowledge about the clinical effectiveness of hypnosis and may seek continuing education to become skilled in its use. Painful procedures, treatments, or diseases remain a major nursing challenge, and nurses need complementary ways to relieve pain from surgery, tumors, injuries, and chemotherapy. This article examines the evidence base related to hypnosis for pain management, as well as how to assess and educate patients about hypnosis. PMID:16526529

  2. Individual and gender differences in subjective and objective indices of pain: gender, fear of pain, pain catastrophizing and cardiovascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Etherton, Joseph; Lawson, Marci; Graham, Reiko

    2014-06-01

    According to fear-avoidance models of pain perception, heightened fear of pain may increase disruptive effects of pain; however, the extent to which this affects self-reported pain severity versus physiological indices of pain is not well delineated. The current study examined self-report measures and physiological indices of pain during a cold pressor (CP) task. Individual differences in fear of pain and pain catastrophizing were also assessed via questionnaire. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the extent to which individual differences associated with fear and catastrophizing in response to pain influences subjective and physiological measures of pain. A secondary aim was to examine gender differences associated with response to pain. Average subjective pain ratings were higher for females than males. In contrast, males exhibited higher systolic and diastolic reactivity in response to the CP task relative to females, as well as failure to fully recover to baseline levels. Follow-up correlational analyses revealed that subjective pain ratings were positively associated with fear of pain in both sexes, but were not associated with cardiovascular indices. These results suggest that fear of pain and pain catastrophizing do not influence cardiovascular responses to induced pain. Further research is necessary in order to determine whether these gender differences in blood pressure and heart rate response profiles are due to biological or psychosocial influences. Results support the notion that fear of pain increases subjective pain ratings, but does not influence cardiovascular responses during CP pain-induction. PMID:24696322

  3. The genetics of pain and pain inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Mogil, J S; Sternberg, W F; Marek, P; Sadowski, B; Belknap, J K; Liebeskind, J C

    1996-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the genetics of pain-related phenomena and illustrates the scope and power of genetic approaches to the study of pain. We focus on work performed in our laboratories in Jastrzebiec, Poland; Portland, OR; and Los Angeles, which we feel demonstrates the continuing usefulness of classical genetic approaches, especially when used in combination with newly available molecular genetic techniques. PMID:8610166

  4. [Pain - a neglected neurological issue].

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Baron, R; Gaul, C; Maihöfner, C; Rommel, O; Straube, A; Tölle, T; Wasner, G

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain represents a great challenge; according to epidemiological data increasing numbers of patients should be expected. Based on recent advances, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic pain has been achieved and neurologists have made a major contribution to this understanding. Chronic pain is accompanied by substantial maladaptive plastic alterations in both the peripheral and central nervous systems; therefore, neurological knowledge is of paramount importance for pain therapists but this contrasts with the current treatment situation of pain patients in Germany. There are basically too few departments and practices undertaking treatment, and neurologists are an exception in most pain centers. Furthermore, due to economic reasons neurological hospitals are currently experiencing a dearth of inpatients suffering from chronic pain. Diagnostic and/or treatment procedures for neurological pain entities (e.g. headaches or neuropathic pain) are insufficiently represented in the German diagnosis-related groups (DRG) reimbursement system and the obstacles for an efficient pain therapy in neurological practices are too high. Finally, there are too few academic positions for pain medicine in neurological hospitals; therefore, career opportunities for motivated young neurologists with an interest in pain are lacking. In order to address the unmet therapeutic needs of patients with chronic pain there is a high demand for (i) establishment of departments for neurological pain medicine, (ii) modification of the German DRG system and (iii) education of young neurologists with expertise in pain. Pain medicine in particular should be especially appealing to neurologists .

  5. [Pain - a neglected neurological issue].

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Baron, R; Gaul, C; Maihöfner, C; Rommel, O; Straube, A; Tölle, T; Wasner, G

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain represents a great challenge; according to epidemiological data increasing numbers of patients should be expected. Based on recent advances, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic pain has been achieved and neurologists have made a major contribution to this understanding. Chronic pain is accompanied by substantial maladaptive plastic alterations in both the peripheral and central nervous systems; therefore, neurological knowledge is of paramount importance for pain therapists but this contrasts with the current treatment situation of pain patients in Germany. There are basically too few departments and practices undertaking treatment, and neurologists are an exception in most pain centers. Furthermore, due to economic reasons neurological hospitals are currently experiencing a dearth of inpatients suffering from chronic pain. Diagnostic and/or treatment procedures for neurological pain entities (e.g. headaches or neuropathic pain) are insufficiently represented in the German diagnosis-related groups (DRG) reimbursement system and the obstacles for an efficient pain therapy in neurological practices are too high. Finally, there are too few academic positions for pain medicine in neurological hospitals; therefore, career opportunities for motivated young neurologists with an interest in pain are lacking. In order to address the unmet therapeutic needs of patients with chronic pain there is a high demand for (i) establishment of departments for neurological pain medicine, (ii) modification of the German DRG system and (iii) education of young neurologists with expertise in pain. Pain medicine in particular should be especially appealing to neurologists . PMID:27167885

  6. Wesleyan University Student Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haagen, C. Hess

    This questionnaire assesses marijuana use practices in college students. The 30 items (multiple choice or free response) are concerned with personal and demographic data, marijuana smoking practices, use history, effects from smoking marijuana, present attitude toward the substance, and use of other drugs. The Questionnaire is untimed and…

  7. Questionnaire for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN. Educational Research Center.

    The 116-item parent questionnaire is designed for parents of elementary school children. It is intended to be used with the child's mother, or the person acting as the child's mother. The questionnaire consists of a section devoted to demographic variables and scales measuring 14 parent variables: (1) parent's achievement aspirations for the…

  8. Write Your Own Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, David I.

    1975-01-01

    Contends that student evaluative questionnaires should be designed by instructors themselves to help improve their classroom performance and therefore should contain only questions that students are capable of answering objectively and not, for instance, questions about the relevancy of the course. Contains a sample questionnaire. (GH)

  9. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain March 2015 Handout on Health: Back Pain This publication is for people who have back ... to discuss them with your doctor. What Is Back Pain? Back pain is an all-too-familiar problem ...

  10. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider may ask questions such as: Is the pain between the shoulder blades? Under the breast bone? Does the pain ... How long does the pain last? Does the pain go from your chest into your shoulder, arm, neck, jaw, or back? Is the pain ...

  11. Pain Relievers

    MedlinePlus

    Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There ... also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for ...

  12. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  13. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  14. Ankle pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  15. Foot pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, ...

  16. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  17. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  18. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... BACK PAIN? There are many possible causes of low back pain, including stretched (strained) muscles, torn or stretched (sprained) ... appear to be at an increased risk for low back pain in comparison to the general population (estimates range ...

  19. Leg pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - leg; Aches - leg; Cramps - leg ... Leg pain can be due to a muscle cramp (also called a charley horse ). Common causes of ... a long time An injury can also cause leg pain from: A torn or overstretched muscle ( strain ) ...

  20. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  1. Parental authority questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Buri, J R

    1991-08-01

    A questionnaire was developed for the purpose of measuring Baumrind's (1971) permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative parental authority prototypes. It consists of 30 items per parent and yields permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative scores for both the mother and the father; each of these scores is derived from the phenomenological appraisals of the parents' authority by their son or daughter. The results of several studies have supported the Parental Authority Questionnaire as a psychometrically sound and valid measure of Baumrind's parental authority prototypes, and they have suggested that this questionnaire has considerable potential as a valuable tool in the investigation of correlates of parental permissiveness, authoritarianism, and authoritativeness.

  2. Parental authority questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Buri, J R

    1991-08-01

    A questionnaire was developed for the purpose of measuring Baumrind's (1971) permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative parental authority prototypes. It consists of 30 items per parent and yields permissive, authoritarian, and authoritative scores for both the mother and the father; each of these scores is derived from the phenomenological appraisals of the parents' authority by their son or daughter. The results of several studies have supported the Parental Authority Questionnaire as a psychometrically sound and valid measure of Baumrind's parental authority prototypes, and they have suggested that this questionnaire has considerable potential as a valuable tool in the investigation of correlates of parental permissiveness, authoritarianism, and authoritativeness. PMID:16370893

  3. Patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Kay M; Callaghan, Michael J; van Linschoten, Robbart

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain refers to pain behind or around the patella (also known as patellofemoral pain syndrome, anterior knee pain, runner's knee, and, formerly, chondromalacia patellae). Patellofemoral pain is common, accounting for 11-17% of all knee pain presentations to general practice.(1 2) While it typically occurs in physically active people aged <40 years, it also affects people of all activity levels and ages.(1 2) Patellofemoral pain can be diagnosed in the clinic, and evidence based treatments can reduce pain and improve function, allowing patients to maintain a physically active lifestyle. PMID:26834209

  4. Myofascial pain syndrome: a treatment review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mehul J; Saini, Vikramjeet; Saini, Shawnjeet

    2013-06-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is defined as pain that originates from myofascial trigger points in skeletal muscle. It is prevalent in regional musculoskeletal pain syndromes, either alone or in combination with other pain generators. The appropriate evaluation and management of myofascial pain is an important part of musculoskeletal rehabilitation, and regional axial and limb pain syndromes. This article reviews the current hypotheses regarding the treatment modalities for myofascial trigger points and muscle pain. Through a critical evidence-based review of the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments, the authors aim to provide clinicians with a more comprehensive knowledge of the interventions for myofascial pain.

  5. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  6. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  7. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Back Pain Information Page Condensed from Low Back Pain Fact ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Back Pain? Acute or short-term low back pain generally ...

  8. Hypnosis and pain in children.

    PubMed

    Wood, Chantal; Bioy, Antoine

    2008-04-01

    The development of studies on neuroimaging applied to hypnosis and to the study of pain not only helps to validate the existence of a hypnotic state but also to ratify its therapeutic effects. These studies also enable us to understand how hypnosis is effective on the cortical level. It also helps us see, from another perspective, the mechanisms of pain leading perhaps to a different definition of pain. This article develops the latest knowledge in the domain of hypnosis and pain, and approaches the clinical practices and their applications in the management of pain in children. PMID:18243640

  9. Nurses' beliefs and self-reported practices related to pain assessment in nonverbal patients.

    PubMed

    Wysong, Peggy Rupp

    2014-03-01

    This study explored the beliefs and self-reported practices of nurses related to pain assessment in nonverbal patients. A convenience sample of 74 nurses from one Midwestern community hospital responded to a researcher-developed questionnaire based on established pain standards and clinical practice recommendations. Areas of nonverbal pain assessment beliefs and practices with low scores were identified. One-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc tests showed a significant difference in belief scores based on unit worked. No significant differences in beliefs or practices were found based on age, years of experience, or degree. Paired t tests showed significant differences between general pain beliefs and nonverbal pain beliefs, between general pain beliefs and practices, and between nonverbal pain beliefs and practices. Additional testing using Pearson correlation coefficients demonstrated that only three out of seven questions relating to beliefs were significantly correlated with similar questions related to practices. Good reliability of the instrument was demonstrated by Cronbach alpha coefficient α = 0.82. Recommendations include further education for hospital nurses related to pain assessment standards in nonverbal patients, as well as utilization of techniques to integrate this knowledge into nurses' belief systems and practice environment. PMID:24602435

  10. Nurses' beliefs and self-reported practices related to pain assessment in nonverbal patients.

    PubMed

    Wysong, Peggy Rupp

    2014-03-01

    This study explored the beliefs and self-reported practices of nurses related to pain assessment in nonverbal patients. A convenience sample of 74 nurses from one Midwestern community hospital responded to a researcher-developed questionnaire based on established pain standards and clinical practice recommendations. Areas of nonverbal pain assessment beliefs and practices with low scores were identified. One-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc tests showed a significant difference in belief scores based on unit worked. No significant differences in beliefs or practices were found based on age, years of experience, or degree. Paired t tests showed significant differences between general pain beliefs and nonverbal pain beliefs, between general pain beliefs and practices, and between nonverbal pain beliefs and practices. Additional testing using Pearson correlation coefficients demonstrated that only three out of seven questions relating to beliefs were significantly correlated with similar questions related to practices. Good reliability of the instrument was demonstrated by Cronbach alpha coefficient α = 0.82. Recommendations include further education for hospital nurses related to pain assessment standards in nonverbal patients, as well as utilization of techniques to integrate this knowledge into nurses' belief systems and practice environment.

  11. New advances in musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Susan E.; Flatters, Sarah J.L.; Inglis, Julia J.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    Non-malignant musculoskeletal pain is the most common clinical symptom that causes patients to seek medical attention and is a major cause of disability in the world. Musculoskeletal pain can arise from a variety of common conditions including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, surgery, low back pain and bone fracture. A major problem in designing new therapies to treat musculoskeletal pain is that the underlying mechanisms driving musculoskeletal pain are not well understood. This lack of knowledge is largely due to the scarcity of animal models that closely mirror the human condition which would allow the development of a mechanistic understanding and novel therapies to treat this pain. To begin to develop a mechanism-based understanding of the factors involved in generating musculoskeletal pain, in this review we present recent advances in preclinical models of osteoarthritis, post-surgical pain and bone fracture pain. The models discussed appear to offer an attractive platform for understanding the factors that drive this pain and the preclinical screening of novel therapies to treat musculoskeletal pain. Developing both an understanding of the mechanisms that drive persistent musculoskeletal pain and novel mechanism-based therapies to treat these unique pain states would address a major unmet clinical need and have significant clinical, economic and societal benefits. PMID:19166876

  12. Pain characteristics in fibromyalgia: understanding the multiple dimensions of pain.

    PubMed

    Plazier, Mark; Ost, Jan; Stassijns, Gaëtane; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common disease with a high economic burden. The etiology of this disease remains unclear, as there are no specific abnormalities on clinical or technical examinations. Evidence suggests that central pain sensitization at the brain pain matrix might be involved. Understanding the pain characteristics of this disease is of importance both for diagnosis and treatment. The authors present their findings of pain characteristics in a Belgium population of fibromyalgia patients. Data of 65 patients (57 male and 8 female patients) were analyzed in this study (mean age 46.86, SD = +8.79). Patients filled out the following questionnaires: visual analogue scale, fibromyalgia impact questionnaire, pain-catastrophizing scale, pain vigilance and awareness questionnaire, modified fatigue impact scale, the Beck depression inventory, the short form 36 and the Dutch shortened profile of mood states. Statistical analysis was performed making use of a factor analysis and a hierarchical cluster analysis. We were able to define pain characteristics in this group of patients. The reciprocal effects of mood and fatigue on pain experience could be identified within the data, catastrophizing scores show a high correlation with overall life quality and pain experience. We have performed a cluster analysis on the fibromyalgia patients, based on the four main principal components defining the overall disease burden. Mood explained most of the variance in symptoms, followed by mental health state, fatigue, and catastrophizing. Three clusters of patients could be revealed by these components. Clusters: 1 high scores on mood disorders, pain, and decreased mental health, 2 high scores on fatigue and physical health, and 3 a mixture of these two groups. This data suggest that different subgroups of fibromyalgia patients could be identified and based on that, treatment strategies and results might be adapted.

  13. Pain characteristics in fibromyalgia: understanding the multiple dimensions of pain.

    PubMed

    Plazier, Mark; Ost, Jan; Stassijns, Gaëtane; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-04-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common disease with a high economic burden. The etiology of this disease remains unclear, as there are no specific abnormalities on clinical or technical examinations. Evidence suggests that central pain sensitization at the brain pain matrix might be involved. Understanding the pain characteristics of this disease is of importance both for diagnosis and treatment. The authors present their findings of pain characteristics in a Belgium population of fibromyalgia patients. Data of 65 patients (57 male and 8 female patients) were analyzed in this study (mean age 46.86, SD = +8.79). Patients filled out the following questionnaires: visual analogue scale, fibromyalgia impact questionnaire, pain-catastrophizing scale, pain vigilance and awareness questionnaire, modified fatigue impact scale, the Beck depression inventory, the short form 36 and the Dutch shortened profile of mood states. Statistical analysis was performed making use of a factor analysis and a hierarchical cluster analysis. We were able to define pain characteristics in this group of patients. The reciprocal effects of mood and fatigue on pain experience could be identified within the data, catastrophizing scores show a high correlation with overall life quality and pain experience. We have performed a cluster analysis on the fibromyalgia patients, based on the four main principal components defining the overall disease burden. Mood explained most of the variance in symptoms, followed by mental health state, fatigue, and catastrophizing. Three clusters of patients could be revealed by these components. Clusters: 1 high scores on mood disorders, pain, and decreased mental health, 2 high scores on fatigue and physical health, and 3 a mixture of these two groups. This data suggest that different subgroups of fibromyalgia patients could be identified and based on that, treatment strategies and results might be adapted. PMID:25048743

  14. Pain following hysterectomy: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Brandsborg, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that different surgical procedures like amputation, thoracotomy, inguinal herniotomy, and mastectomy are associated with a risk of developing chronic postsurgical pain. Hysterectomy is the most frequent gynecological procedure with an annual frequency of 5000 hysterectomies for a benign indication in Denmark, but is has not previously been documented in detail to what extent this procedure leads to chronic pain. The aim of this PhD thesis was therefore to describe the epidemiology, type of pain, risk factors, and predictive factors associated with chronic pain after hysterectomy for a benign indication. The thesis includes four papers, of which one is based on a questionnaire study, two are based on a prospective clinical study, and one is a review of chronic pain after hysterectomy. The questionnaire paper included 1135 women one year after hysterectomy. A postal questionnaire about pain before and after hysterectomy was combined with data from the Danish Hysterectomy Database. Chronic postoperative pain was described by 32%, and the identified risk factors were preoperative pelvic pain, previous cesarean section, other pain problems and pain as an indication for hysterectomy. Spinal anesthesia was associated with a decreased risk of having pain after one year. The type of surgery (i.e. abdominal or vaginal hysterectomy) did not influence chronic pain. The prospective paper included 90 women referred for a hysterectomy on benign indication. The tests were performed before, on day 1, and 4 months after surgery and included questionnaires about pain, coping, and quality of life together with quantitative sensory testing of pain thresholds. Seventeen percent had pain after 4 months, and the risk factors were preoperative pain problems elsewhere and a high intensity of acute postoperative pain. Type of surgery was not a risk factor. Preoperative brush-evoked allodynia, pinprick hyperalgesia, and vaginal pain threshold were associated with a high

  15. Heightened cold pain and pressure pain sensitivity in young female adults with moderate-to-severe menstrual pain.

    PubMed

    Slater, Helen; Paananen, Markus; Smith, Anne J; OʼSullivan, Peter; Briggs, Andrew M; Hickey, Martha; Mountain, Jenny; Karppinen, Jaro; Beales, Darren

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the association between menstrual pain severity and psychophysical measures of cold and pressure pain sensitivity. A cross-sectional design was used with young women (n = 432) from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Menstrual pain severity and oral contraception use was obtained from questionnaires at 20 and 22-year follow-ups. A visual analog scale (VAS; range from 0 [none] to 10 [unbearable]) was used to measure menstrual pain severity at both 20 and 22 years over the 3-year period, with 3 groups created: (1) no pain or mild pain (VAS 0-3), (2) at least moderate pain at a minimum of 1 of the 2 time points (hereafter named "mixed)", and (3) severe pain (VAS 8-10). Cold pain sensitivity (dorsal wrist) and pressure pain sensitivity (lumbar spine, upper trapezius, dorsal wrist, and tibialis anterior) were assessed using standardised quantitative sensory testing protocols. Confounding variables included number of musculoskeletal pain sites, oral contraceptive use, smoking, physical activity, body mass index, psychological distress, and sleep. Severe menstrual pain and mixed menstrual pain were positively associated with heightened cold pain sensitivity (distant from menstrual pain referral site) and pressure pain sensitivity (local to menstrual pain referral site). These associations remained significant after adjusting for potential confounding variables including multisite musculoskeletal pain. Our findings suggest peripheral and central neurophysiological mechanisms contributing to heightened pain sensitivity in young women with moderate and severe menstrual pain. These data highlight the need for innovative management approaches to attenuate the negative impact of severe menstrual pain in young women. PMID:26262827

  16. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  17. [Oral pain].

    PubMed

    Benslama, Lotfi

    2002-02-15

    Pain, a major symptom of stomatological disease, usually leads to a specialist consultation. Most commonly it is caused by dental caries and differs in nature and in intensity according to the stage of disease: dentinitis, pulpitis, desmodontitis and dental abscess. Added to this is peridental pain and the pre- and post-operative pains related to these diseases. Almost all oral-maxillary pathology is painful, be it boney such as in osteomyelitis and fractures, mucosal in gingivo-stomatitis and aphthous ulcers, or tumourous. However, besides the "multidisciplinary" facial pains such as facial neuralgia and vascular pain, two pain syndromes are specific to stomatology: pain of the tempero-mandibular joint associated with problems of the bite and glossodynia, a very common somatic expression of psychological problems.

  18. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain played a role in producing the perception of pain. In the 19th century, physician-scientists ... they are experiencing. Discoveries of differences in pain perceptions and responses to treatment by gender has have ...

  19. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  20. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a result of the pain, and the nature of other medical and psychiatric problems, should be ... information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of ...

  1. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  2. Parenting in the context of chronic pain: A controlled study of parents with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Anna C.; Fales, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to describe what adults with chronic pain experience in their role as parents, utilizing quantitative and qualitative methods. The first aim is to compare parents with chronic pain to parents without chronic pain on perceptions of their adolescent’s pain, parental response to pain, and catastrophizing beliefs about pain. The study also examined predictors of parental protective behaviors, and examined whether these associations differed by study group. Methods Parents with chronic pain (n=58) and parents without chronic pain (n=72) participated, and completed questionnaire measures of pain characteristics and pain interference, as well as measures of parental catastrophizing and protective pain responses. Parents with chronic pain also completed a structured interview about their experience of being a parent. Interview responses were videotaped and subsequently coded for content. Results Compared to controls, parents with chronic pain endorsed more pain in their adolescents, and were more likely to catastrophize about their adolescent’s pain and respond with protective behaviors. Parent’s own pain interference and the perception of higher pain in their adolescent was associated with increased protective parenting in the chronic pain group. Qualitative coding revealed a number of areas of common impact of chronic pain on parenting. Discussion Chronic pain impacts everyday parenting activities and emotions, and impacts pain-specific parent responses that are known to be related to increased pain and pain catastrophizing in children and adolescents. Parents with chronic pain might benefit from interventions that address potential parenting difficulties, and might improve outcomes for their children. PMID:25232862

  3. The menstrual attitude questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Brooks-Gunn, J; Ruble, D N

    1980-09-01

    In order to examine the relationship of attitudes about menstruation to self-reports of menstrual-related symptomatology as well as to other aspects of behavior, an instrument to measure attitudes concerning menstruation was developed. After constructing the Menstrual Attitude Questionnaire (MAQ), the factor analytic structure of the original MAQ sample was replicated on a second sample. Summary statistics are presented for college women, college men, and adolescent girls, and the relationship between menstrual-related attitudes, expectations, and experience is examined.

  4. Food frequency questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Pérez Rodrigo, Carmen; Aranceta, Javier; Salvador, Gemma; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2015-02-26

    Food Frequency Questionnaires are dietary assessment tools widely used in epidemiological studies investigating the relationship between dietary intake and disease or risk factors since the early '90s. The three main components of these questionnaires are the list of foods, frequency of consumption and the portion size consumed. The food list should reflect the food habits of the study population at the time the data is collected. The frequency of consumption may be asked by open ended questions or by presenting frequency categories. Qualitative Food Frequency Questionnaires do not ask about the consumed portions; semi-quantitative include standard portions and quantitative questionnaires ask respondents to estimate the portion size consumed either in household measures or grams. The latter implies a greater participant burden. Some versions include only close-ended questions in a standardized format, while others add an open section with questions about some specific food habits and practices and admit additions to the food list for foods and beverages consumed which are not included. The method can be self-administered, on paper or web-based, or interview administered either face-to-face or by telephone. Due to the standard format, especially closed-ended versions, and method of administration, FFQs are highly cost-effective thus encouraging its widespread use in large scale epidemiological cohort studies and also in other study designs. Coding and processing data collected is also less costly and requires less nutrition expertise compared to other dietary intake assessment methods. However, the main limitations are systematic errors and biases in estimates. Important efforts are being developed to improve the quality of the information. It has been recommended the use of FFQs with other methods thus enabling the adjustments required.

  5. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26616176

  6. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain.

  7. Pain control.

    PubMed

    Boey, W K

    1991-01-01

    There are two components to the perception of pain; the 'sensory' and the 'reactive'. Psychological factors control the latter. Pain research is rapidly advancing: the discovery of endorphins and opioid receptors, the appreciation of the psychological component of pain and the multidisciplinary approach to chronic pain are major advances. Pain can be classified as acute or chronic. Acute pain is easy to diagnose, the cause of pain obvious and the treatment logical, chronic pain has a greater psychological component, is difficult to diagnose and treatment is often empirical. Methods of pain control include drugs, injection techniques, electro stimulation, non invasive therapies, denervation procedures and palliative procedures. A multidisciplinary approach and a combination of methods is necessary to treat chronic pain. Spinal opioids, radiofrequency thermocoagulation, intrapleural bupivacaine, cryoanalgesia and patient controlled analgesia are recent advances in pain control. However, most pain can be controlled adequately with simple methods; what is essential is the interest and commitment of the physician towards achieving optimum therapeutics. PMID:1674199

  8. Chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Russo, C M; Brose, W G

    1998-01-01

    Chronic pain is an emotional experience and is defined as pain lasting greater than six months. It is important to understand the neurophysiology of pain in order to treat it. Nociceptors in the periphery travel to the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord while secondary and tertiary afferents transmit information from the dorsal horn to the brain. Modification of pain information may take place in these ascending pathways or in descending pathways. Treatment of chronic pain is most successful when it is approached in a multidisciplinary fashion with the focus not only on treatment of underlying etiology, but also on the secondary impacts of pain on the patient's life. The management of chronic pain requires special expertise. Most of the experts in chronic pain assessment and management organize themselves into pain treatment centers. These centers vary widely in their approach to the problem. The most sophisticated is a multidisciplinary center that is university-based and includes teaching and research. Treatment of chronic pain includes a variety of medications, psychological support, and rehabilitation. Multidisciplinary pain management is also an integral part of the palliative care and hospice concept used to treat cancer pain.

  9. Barriers to Pediatric Pain Management in Children Undergoing Surgery: A Survey of Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Bawa, Monika; Mahajan, Jai K; Aggerwal, Neel; Sundaram, Jegadeesh; Rao, K L N

    2015-01-01

    The appropriate pain management in neonates and children is lacking. Factors that prevent the execution of proper pain relief vary from center to center. We studied the factors responsible for it in a surgical unit. We conducted a survey at a tertiary-level institute among the resident doctors and nursing staff by means of an informal questionnaire analyzing their basic knowledge. The questions pertained mainly to pain assessment, analgesic usage, role of opioids, and formal training, and the responses so obtained were analyzed under these four headings. Seventy-three percent (22/30) of the residents and 74% (26/35) of the nursing staff knew about pain assessment scoring system in pediatric patients. However, assessment of pain in emergency cases was always done by only 6.6% of the residents. Effect of analgesia on severity of pain was never recorded by 33% (10/30) of the residents. Eighty-six percent (26/30) of the residents and 91% (32/35) of the nursing staff had adequate knowledge about analgesic dosage and interval for routine use. Ten of the 30 (33%) residents believed that analgesic administration in an acute abdomen, before definitive diagnosis, will always mask the symptoms. During a minor procedure, 56% (17/30) of the residents always used analgesia. Only 3.3% (1/30) of residents and 2.8% (1/35) of the nursing staff had received a structured training for pain management. Although, 93% (28/30) of the residents claimed to know about the safety of use of opioids, only 46% (14/30) used them routinely as analgesics. Pain management in surgical neonates and children is often ignored. Lack of formal training, inadequate knowledge, and standard protocols are the barriers in our setup, which may in turn be due to overwhelming attention given to the surgical condition. PMID:26654407

  10. Barriers to Pediatric Pain Management in Children Undergoing Surgery: A Survey of Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Bawa, Monika; Mahajan, Jai K; Aggerwal, Neel; Sundaram, Jegadeesh; Rao, K L N

    2015-01-01

    The appropriate pain management in neonates and children is lacking. Factors that prevent the execution of proper pain relief vary from center to center. We studied the factors responsible for it in a surgical unit. We conducted a survey at a tertiary-level institute among the resident doctors and nursing staff by means of an informal questionnaire analyzing their basic knowledge. The questions pertained mainly to pain assessment, analgesic usage, role of opioids, and formal training, and the responses so obtained were analyzed under these four headings. Seventy-three percent (22/30) of the residents and 74% (26/35) of the nursing staff knew about pain assessment scoring system in pediatric patients. However, assessment of pain in emergency cases was always done by only 6.6% of the residents. Effect of analgesia on severity of pain was never recorded by 33% (10/30) of the residents. Eighty-six percent (26/30) of the residents and 91% (32/35) of the nursing staff had adequate knowledge about analgesic dosage and interval for routine use. Ten of the 30 (33%) residents believed that analgesic administration in an acute abdomen, before definitive diagnosis, will always mask the symptoms. During a minor procedure, 56% (17/30) of the residents always used analgesia. Only 3.3% (1/30) of residents and 2.8% (1/35) of the nursing staff had received a structured training for pain management. Although, 93% (28/30) of the residents claimed to know about the safety of use of opioids, only 46% (14/30) used them routinely as analgesics. Pain management in surgical neonates and children is often ignored. Lack of formal training, inadequate knowledge, and standard protocols are the barriers in our setup, which may in turn be due to overwhelming attention given to the surgical condition.

  11. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  12. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view.

  13. Temporomandibular pain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, H R; Kalavathi, S D

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  14. Pain treatment in a palliative unit or team of a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Scott, J F

    1982-01-01

    A Palliative Care Unit and Team provides a model for delivering care, in which narcotic analgesics can be optimally effective in the treatment of cancer pain. Our rapidly expanding knowledge of pain physiology and narcotic pharmacokinetics will not benefit patients unless we design more appropriate organizational structures to implement therapy and to teach symptom control. The Palliative Care Service model, as developed at several university hospitals in Canada, is designed to assist and complement oncology departments. Its primary role is to provide a consultation service to cancer patients wherever they may be in the health care system (home, O.P.D., hospital). A multi-specialty and interdisciplinary team offers assessment and therapy of pain and other symptoms. The McGill Pain Questionnaire is one useful tool in evaluating pain treatment. The Service also provides the university with a Palliative Care Unit designed for patients with advanced cancer who have complex symptomatology. Hospital organization must reflect the fact that environmental and psychosocial factors alter pain perception and response. Oral morphine is more effective when administered in a Palliative Care Unit than when it is given to patients in other settings. The Unit provides personnel skilled in analgesic titration and a supportive environment in which psychological, social and spiritual components of the pain experience can be evaluated and treated. PMID:6953724

  15. Conversion of Questionnaire Data

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC&A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC&A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC&A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC&A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC&A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A.D. Swain and H.E. Guttmann

  16. Characterizing neuropathic pain profiles: enriching interpretation of painDETECT

    PubMed Central

    Cappelleri, Joseph C; Koduru, Vijaya; Bienen, E Jay; Sadosky, Alesia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To psychometrically evaluate painDETECT, a patient-reported screening questionnaire for neuropathic pain (NeP), for discriminating among sensory pain symptoms (burning, tingling/prickling, light touching, sudden pain attacks/electric shock-type pain, cold/heat, numbness, and slight pressure). Methods The seven-item version of painDETECT provides an overall score that targets only sensory symptoms, while the nine-item version adds responses on two items to the overall score, covering pain course pattern and pain radiation. Both versions have relevance in terms of characterizing broad NeP. The nine- and seven-item versions of painDETECT were administered to subjects with confirmed NeP across six conditions identified during office visits to US community-based physicians. Responses on the sensory symptom items were dichotomized into “at least moderate” (ie, moderate, strongly, very strongly) relative to the combined other responses (never, hardly noticed, slightly). Logistic regression of dichotomized variables on the total painDETECT score provided probabilities of experiencing each symptom across the range of painDETECT scores. Results Both painDETECT versions discriminated among the symptoms with similar probabilities across the score ranges. Using these data, the probability of moderately experiencing each pain sensory item was estimated for a particular score, providing a pain profile. Additionally, the likelihood of experiencing each sensation was determined for a discrete increase in score, ie, the odds of at least a moderate sensation of burning (versus less than a moderate sensation) was 1.29 for a 1-point increase, 3.52 for a 5-point increase, and 12.42 for every 10-point increase in the nine-item painDETECT score. Conclusion painDETECT differentiates pain profiles across the range of scores such that, for a particular score, the probability of experiencing at least a moderate sensation of each symptom was determined and compared. These results

  17. Psychosomatic group treatment helps women with chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Albert, H

    1999-12-01

    This study evaluates group treatment for women suffering from chronic pelvic pain. The concept of group treatment was based on psychosomatic and physio-therapeutical principles and on cognitive and operant behavioral therapy. Each group was composed of up to six women suffering from chronic pelvic pain, and two physiotherapists. Each group treatment session lasted 2.5 h per week for a period of 10 weeks. The women completed questionnaires and pain drawings four times during the treatment period from the beginning of the period till 15 months later. During 13 group treatment periods 53 women accomplished the treatment. Before the treatment the women had experienced pain for an average period of 5 years and 9 months (ranging from 6 months to 22 years). The women's descriptions of the changes derived from group treatment were analyzed according to the Grounded Theory Method. A methodical triangulation of quantitative and qualitative data as well as analyzes of the drawings were applied. One year after the end of the treatment, 39% of the women were pain-free. The average level of pain measured according to the Visual Analog Scale was reduced from 2.8 to 0.9 (p < 0.01). The intake rate of analgesics was reduced from an average of 8.5 units to 0.9 units per week (p < 0.01). Furthermore a reduction in the use of the National Health Service and increases in gainful employment were registered. By means of the Grounded Theory Analysis a model of the development process was elaborated. The process begins with the development of self-knowledge, followed by the woman assuming self responsibility for her own life and performing self-activeness. During the process the woman increases her feeling of self-control and personal mastery of her emotions. The women's pain drawings improved, resulting in more detailed drawings, the color intensity abating, the extent of pains declining, and the outlines blurring. In conclusion this kind of group treatment brings the women relief from

  18. Gender role expectations of pain is associated with pain tolerance limit but not with pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Defrin, Ruth; Shramm, Libby; Eli, Ilana

    2009-09-01

    Gender role expectations of pain (GREP) was suggested to predict sex differences in pain perception. Our aim was to explore sex differences in GREP and investigate its relationship with heat-pain threshold (HPT) and heat-pain tolerance limit (HPTL). University students (115 males, 134 females) filled the GREP questionnaire. HPT and HPTL were measured in a sample of 72 students. Additionally, GREP values of the present sample were compared with those of the original, American sample to explore possible cultural effects. Both males and females perceive themselves (and their own sex in general) to be less sensitive to pain and less willing to report of pain than the opposite sex. Males perceived themselves and other men, to endure pain relatively similar to women whereas females perceived themselves and other women as less endurable to pain than men. HPT was similar for the two sexes but males had higher HPTL than females. Within each sex, HPTL correlated mainly with self's perception of pain sensitivity. The American and Israeli samples differed in that Israeli males and females presented stronger stereotypical views towards same and opposite sexes. Both males and females held stereotypical "macho" attitude towards themselves with regard to pain sensitivity and willingness to report of pain however only females held stereotypical, "macho" attitude towards themselves with regard to pain endurance. The sex differences in GREP and in HPTL and the correlations between GREP items and experimental thresholds suggest that the relationship between GREP and experimental pain is complex and sex-specific. It also appears that GREP is affected by culture.

  19. Placebo manipulations reduce hyperalgesia in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Gitte Laue; Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Nørskov, Kathrine Næsted; Grosen, Kasper; Pilegaard, Hans K; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Price, Donald D; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Vase, Lene

    2012-06-01

    Several studies have shown that placebo analgesia effects can be obtained in healthy volunteers, as well as patients suffering from acute postoperative pain and chronic pain conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome. However, it is unknown whether placebo analgesia effects can be elicited in chronic pain conditions with a known pathophysiology such as a nerve injury. Nineteen patients who had developed neuropathic pain after thoracotomy were exposed to a placebo manipulation in which they received either open or hidden administrations of lidocaine. Before the treatment, the patients rated their levels of spontaneous pain and expected pain and completed a questionnaire on their emotional feelings (Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule) and went through quantitative sensory testing of evoked pain (brush and cold allodynia, heat pain tolerance, area of pinprick hyperalgesia, wind-up-like pain after pinprick stimulation). The placebo manipulation significantly reduced the area of pinprick hyperalgesia (P=.027), and this placebo effect was significantly related to low levels of negative affect (P=.008; R(2)=0.362) but not to positive affect or expected pain levels. No placebo effect was observed in relation to spontaneous pain or evoked pain, which is most likely due to low pain levels resulting in floor effects. This is the first study to demonstrate a placebo effect in neuropathic pain. The possible mechanisms underlying the placebo effects in hyperalgesia are discussed, and implications for treatment are outlined.

  20. Mindfulness, Acceptance and Catastrophizing in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Maaike J.; Steinhagen, Hannemike E.; Versteegen, Gerbrig J.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Sanderman, Robbert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Catastrophizing is often the primary target of the cognitive-behavioral treatment of chronic pain. Recent literature on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) suggests an important role in the pain experience for the concepts mindfulness and acceptance. The aim of this study is to examine the influence of mindfulness and general psychological acceptance on pain-related catastrophizing in patients with chronic pain. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted, including 87 chronic pain patients from an academic outpatient pain center. Results The results show that general psychological acceptance (measured with the AAQ-II) is a strong predictor of pain-related catastrophizing, independent of gender, age and pain intensity. Mindfulness (measured with the MAAS) did not predict levels of pain-related catastrophizing. Discussion Acceptance of psychological experiences outside of pain itself is related to catastrophizing. Thus, acceptance seems to play a role in the pain experience and should be part of the treatment of chronic pain. The focus of the ACT treatment of chronic pain does not necessarily have to be on acceptance of pain per se, but may be aimed at acceptance of unwanted experiences in general. Mindfulness in the sense of “acting with awareness” is however not related to catastrophizing. Based on our research findings in comparisons with those of other authors, we recommend a broader conceptualization of mindfulness and the use of a multifaceted questionnaire for mindfulness instead of the unidimensional MAAS. PMID:24489915

  1. Improvement of pain-related self-management for cancer patients through a modular transitional nursing intervention: a cluster-randomized multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Patrick; Kuss, Oliver; Schmidt, Heike; Bauer, Alexander; Kitzmantel, Maria; Jordan, Karin; Krasemann, Susann; Landenberger, Margarete

    2014-04-01

    Patients' self-management skills are affected by their knowledge, activities, and attitudes toward pain management. This trial aimed to test the Self Care Improvement through Oncology Nursing (SCION)-PAIN program, a multimodular structured intervention to reduce patients' barriers to self-management of cancer pain. Two hundred sixty-three patients with diagnosed malignancy, pain>3 days, and average pain > or = 3/10 participated in a cluster-randomized trial on 18 wards in 2 German university hospitals. Patients on the intervention wards received, in addition to standard pain treatment, the SCION-PAIN program consisting of 3 modules: pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic pain management, and discharge management. The intervention was conducted by specially trained cancer nurses and included components of patient education, skills training, and counseling. Starting with admission, patients received booster sessions every third day and one follow-up telephone counseling session within 2 to 3 days after discharge. Patients in the control group received standard care. Primary end point was the group difference in patient-related barriers to self-management of cancer pain (Barriers Questionnaire-BQ II) 7 days after discharge. The SCION-PAIN program resulted in a significant reduction of patient-related barriers to pain management 1 week after discharge from the hospital: mean difference on BQ II was -0.49 points (95% confidence interval -0.87 points to -0.12 points; P=0.02). Furthermore, patients showed improved adherence to pain medication; odds ratio 8.58 (95% confidence interval 1.66-44.40; P=0.02). A post hoc analysis indicated reduced average and worst pain intensity as well as improved quality of life. This trial reveals the positive impact of a nursing intervention to improve patients' self-management of cancer pain.

  2. Differential pain modulation properties in central neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gruener, Hila; Zeilig, Gabi; Laufer, Yocheved; Blumen, Nava; Defrin, Ruth

    2016-07-01

    It seems that central neuropathic pain (CNP) is associated with altered abilities to modulate pain; whereas dysfunction in descending pain inhibition is associated with the extent of chronic pain distribution, enhanced pain excitation is associated with the intensity of chronic pain. We investigated the hypothesis that CNP is associated with decreased descending pain inhibition along with increased neuronal excitability and that both traits are associated with spinothalamic tract (STT) damage. Chronic spinal cord injury subjects with CNP (n = 27) and without CNP (n = 23) and healthy controls (n = 20) underwent the measurement of pain adaptation, conditioned pain modulation (CPM), tonic suprathreshold pain (TSP), and spatial summation of pain above injury level. Central neuropathic pain subjects also underwent at and below-lesion STT evaluation and completed the questionnaires. Central neuropathic pain subjects showed decreased CPM and increased enhancement of TSP compared with controls. Among CNP subjects, the dysfunction of CPM and pain adaptation correlated positively with the number of painful body regions. The magnitude of TSP and spatial summation of pain correlated positively with CNP intensity. STT scores correlated with CNP intensity and with TSP, so that the more affected the STT below injury level, the greater the CNP and TSP magnitude. It seems that CNP is associated with altered abilities to modulate pain, whereas dysfunction in descending pain inhibition is associated with the extent of chronic pain distribution and enhanced pain excitation is associated with the intensity of chronic pain. Thus, top-down processes may determine the spread of CNP, whereas bottom-up processes may determine CNP intensity. It also seems that the mechanisms of CNP may involve STT-induced hyperexcitability. Future, longitudinal studies may investigate the timeline of this scenario. PMID:26894913

  3. Diet History Questionnaire: Suggested Citations

    Cancer.gov

    Use of the Diet History Questionnaire and Diet*Calc Analysis Software for publication purposes should contain a citation which includes version information for the software, questionnaire, and nutrient database.

  4. Diet History Questionnaire: International Applications

    Cancer.gov

    ARP staff adapted the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) for use by Canadian populations in collaboration with the Alberta Cancer Board. This questionnaire takes into account the different food fortification polices of the U.S. and Canada.

  5. Web-Based Study of Risk Factors for Pain Exacerbation in Osteoarthritis of the Knee (SPARK-Web): Design and Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Ben; Zhang, Yuqing; Bennell, Kim; March, Lyn; Hunter, David J

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent cause of limited mobility and diminished quality of life. Pain is the main symptom that drives individuals with knee OA to seek medical care and a recognized antecedent to disability and eventually joint replacement. Many persons with symptomatic knee OA experience recurrent pain exacerbations. Knowledge and clarification of risk factors for pain exacerbation may allow those affected to minimize reoccurrence of these episodes. Objective The aim of this study is to use a Web-based case-crossover design to identify risk factors for knee pain exacerbations in persons with symptomatic knee OA. Methods Web-based case-crossover design is used to study persons with symptomatic knee OA. Participants with knee pain and radiographic knee OA will be recruited and followed for 90 days. Participants will complete an online questionnaire at the baseline and every 10 days thereafter (totaling up to 10 control-period questionnaires); participants will also be asked to report online when they experience an episode of increased knee pain. Pain exacerbation will be defined as an increase in knee pain severity of two points from baseline on a numeric rating scale (NRS 0-10). Physical activity, footwear, knee injury, medication use, climate, psychological factors, and their possible interactions will be assessed as potential triggers for pain exacerbation using conditional logistic regression models. Results This project has been funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). The enrollment for the study has started. So far, 343 participants have been enrolled. The study is expected to be finished in October 2015. Conclusions This study will identify risk factors for pain exacerbations in knee OA. The identification and possible modification/elimination of such risk factors will help to prevent the reoccurrence of pain exacerbation episodes and therefore improve knee OA management. PMID:26156210

  6. Placebo, nocebo, and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Skyt, Ina; Hall, Kathryn T

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, the apparent increase in placebo responses in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropathic pain have complicated and potentially limited development and availability of new effective pain medication. Placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia effects are well described in nociceptive and idiopathic pain conditions, but less is known about the magnitude and mechanisms of placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, placebo treatments have primarily been used as control conditions for active agents under investigation in RCTs and these placebo responses are typically not controlled for the natural history of pain and other confounding factors. Recently, mechanistic studies that control for the natural history of pain have investigated placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain in their own right. Large placebo analgesia but no nocebo hyperalgesic effects have been found, and the underlying mechanisms are beginning to be elucidated. Here we review placebo and nocebo effects and the underlying mechanisms in neuropathic pain and compare them with those of nociceptive and idiopathic pain. This allows for a novel discussion on how knowledge of psychological, neurobiological, and genetic factors underlying well-controlled placebo effects may help improve the information that can be obtained from and potentially restore the utility of RCTs.

  7. HPV vaccination syndrome. A questionnaire-based study.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lavín, Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Laura-Aline; Reyes-Loyola, Paola

    2015-11-01

    Isolated cases and small series have described the development of complex regional pain syndrome, postural orthostatic tachycardia, and fibromyalgia after human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. These illnesses are difficult to diagnose and have overlapping clinical features. Small fiber neuropathy and dysautonomia may play a major role in the pathogenesis of these entities. We used the following validated questionnaires to appraise the chronic illness that might appear after HPV vaccination: The 2010 American College of Rheumatology Fibromyalgia Diagnostic Criteria, COMPASS 31 dysautonomia questionnaire, and S-LANSS neuropathic pain form. These questionnaires and a "present illness" survey were e-mailed to persons who had the onset of a chronic ailment soon after HPV vaccination. Forty-five filled questionnaires from individuals living in 13 different countries were collected in a month's period. Mean (±SD) age at vaccination time was 14 ± 5 years. Twenty-nine percent of the cases had immediate (within 24 h) post-vaccination illness onset. The most common presenting complaints were musculoskeletal pain (66%), fatigue (57%), headache (57%), dizziness/vertigo (43%), and paresthesias/allodynia (36%). Fifty-three percent of affected individuals fulfill the fibromyalgia criteria. COMPASS-31 score was 43 ± 21, implying advanced autonomic dysfunction. Eighty-three percent of the patients who had ongoing pain displayed S-LANSS values >12, suggesting a neuropathic component in their pain experience. After a mean period of 4.2 ± 2.5 years post-vaccination, 93% of patients continue to have incapacitating symptoms and remain unable to attend school or work. In conclusion, a disabling syndrome of chronic neuropathic pain, fatigue, and autonomic dysfunction may appear after HPV vaccination.

  8. Comparison of pain, kinesiophobia and quality of life in patients with low back and neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Uluğ, Naime; Yakut, Yavuz; Alemdaroğlu, İpek; Yılmaz, Öznur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare patients with low back and neck pain with respect to kinesiophobia, pain, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Three-hundred patients with low back (mean age 43.2±11 years) and 300 with neck pain (mean age 42.8±10.2 years) were included in this study. Pain severity was evaluated by using the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, which includes a Visual Analogue Scale, quality of life by the Nottingham Health Profile, and kinesiophobia by the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia. [Results] Pain severity was similar in both groups, with a Visual Analogue Scale score of 6.7±2 in the low back pain and 6.8±2 in the neck pain group. Nottingham Health Profile pain [z=−4.132] and physical activity scores [z=−5.640] in the low back pain group were significantly higher. Kinesiophobia was also more severe in the low back pain group, with a mean 42.05±5.91 versus 39.7±6.0 Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia score [z=−4.732]. [Conclusion] Patients with low back pain developed more severe kinesiophobia, regardless of the pain severity, and had greater pain perception and lower physical activity levels. Kinesiophobia adversely affects the quality of life and requires effective management of low back pain. PMID:27064399

  9. Comparison of pain, kinesiophobia and quality of life in patients with low back and neck pain.

    PubMed

    Uluğ, Naime; Yakut, Yavuz; Alemdaroğlu, İpek; Yılmaz, Öznur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare patients with low back and neck pain with respect to kinesiophobia, pain, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Three-hundred patients with low back (mean age 43.2±11 years) and 300 with neck pain (mean age 42.8±10.2 years) were included in this study. Pain severity was evaluated by using the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, which includes a Visual Analogue Scale, quality of life by the Nottingham Health Profile, and kinesiophobia by the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia. [Results] Pain severity was similar in both groups, with a Visual Analogue Scale score of 6.7±2 in the low back pain and 6.8±2 in the neck pain group. Nottingham Health Profile pain [z=-4.132] and physical activity scores [z=-5.640] in the low back pain group were significantly higher. Kinesiophobia was also more severe in the low back pain group, with a mean 42.05±5.91 versus 39.7±6.0 Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia score [z=-4.732]. [Conclusion] Patients with low back pain developed more severe kinesiophobia, regardless of the pain severity, and had greater pain perception and lower physical activity levels. Kinesiophobia adversely affects the quality of life and requires effective management of low back pain.

  10. Psychological Factors That Influence Self-Reported Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jerry C.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Explored the relationship among the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), the Beck Depression Inventory, and the pain dimensions from the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Instruments were administered to 30 male VA patients with histories of pain for longer than three months. No statistically significant correlations were found between…

  11. Nociception, pain, negative moods and behavior selection

    PubMed Central

    Baliki, Marwan N.; Apkarian, A. Vania

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that the brain adapts with pain, as well as imparts risk for developing chronic pain. Within this context we revisit the concepts for nociception, acute and chronic pain, and negative moods relative to behavior selection. We redefine nociception as the mechanism protecting the organism from injury; while acute pain as failure of avoidant behavior; and a mesolimbic threshold process that gates the transformation of nociceptive activity to conscious pain. Adaptations in this threshold process are envisioned to be critical for development of chronic pain. We deconstruct chronic pain into four distinct phases, each with specific mechanisms; and outline current state of knowledge regarding these mechanisms: The limbic brain imparting risk, while mesolimbic learning processes reorganizing the neocortex into a chronic pain state. Moreover, pain and negative moods are envisioned as a continuum of aversive behavioral learning, which enhance survival by protecting against threats. PMID:26247858

  12. Culturally Conscientious Pain Measurement in Older African Americans.

    PubMed

    Booker, Staja Q; Herr, Keela A; Tripp-Reimer, Toni

    2016-10-01

    Despite considerable pain disparities across the care continuum, pain is an understudied health problem in older ethnic minority groups, such as African Americans. Quality pain measurement is a core task in pain management and a mechanism by which pain disparities may be reduced. Pain measurement includes the methods (e.g., assessment approaches, tools) and metrics that researchers and clinicians use to understand the characteristics of pain. However, there are significant issues and gaps that negatively affect pain measurement in older African Americans. Of concern is insufficient representation in pain research, which impedes the testing and refinement of many standardized self-report, behavioral and surrogate report, physiological, and composite measures of pain. The purposes for this article are to discuss the status of pain measurement and factors that affect our knowledge on pain measurement in older African Americans, and to provide guidance for culturally conscientious pain measurement using the available literature. PMID:27174228

  13. Culturally Conscientious Pain Measurement in Older African Americans.

    PubMed

    Booker, Staja Q; Herr, Keela A; Tripp-Reimer, Toni

    2016-10-01

    Despite considerable pain disparities across the care continuum, pain is an understudied health problem in older ethnic minority groups, such as African Americans. Quality pain measurement is a core task in pain management and a mechanism by which pain disparities may be reduced. Pain measurement includes the methods (e.g., assessment approaches, tools) and metrics that researchers and clinicians use to understand the characteristics of pain. However, there are significant issues and gaps that negatively affect pain measurement in older African Americans. Of concern is insufficient representation in pain research, which impedes the testing and refinement of many standardized self-report, behavioral and surrogate report, physiological, and composite measures of pain. The purposes for this article are to discuss the status of pain measurement and factors that affect our knowledge on pain measurement in older African Americans, and to provide guidance for culturally conscientious pain measurement using the available literature.

  14. Prevalence and Characteristics of Phantom Limb Pain and Residual Limb Pain in the Long Term after Upper Limb Amputation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmond, Deirdre M.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe the prevalence and characteristics of phantom limb pain and residual limb pain after upper limb amputation. One-hundred and forty-one participants (139 males; mean age 74.8 years; mean time since amputation 50.1 years) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing residual and phantom limb pain experience. Prevalence…

  15. The Perceived Deficits Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Allison; Nikelshpur, Olga M.; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; DeLuca, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cognitive dysfunction affects approximately 43% to 70% of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) and is an important determinant of several functional outcomes in MS and quality of life. Brief neuropsychological test batteries have been developed specifically for use in MS and are widely used to aid clinicians in assessing levels of cognitive impairment in MS. Neuropsychologists and neurologists also frequently use briefer screening measures, such as the Perceived Deficits Questionnaire (PDQ), to assist in determining whether a more extensive neuropsychological evaluation is warranted. However, despite the ease of such measures, the relationship between self-report and objective cognitive impairment has been inconsistent, at best. Moreover, factors such as depression, fatigue, anxiety, and personality have been found to be more related to reports of cognitive difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the relationship between subjective cognitive concerns and objective cognitive impairment while accounting for related symptoms. Methods: We examined the association of self-reported cognitive concerns on the PDQ with objective cognitive measures, as well as depression, anxiety, fatigue, and self-efficacy. Results: There was no relationship between self-reported cognitive concerns and objective performance. Rather, reports on the PDQ were more correlated with reports of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and self-efficacy. Conclusions: Depression and poor self-efficacy can contribute to reports of cognitive difficulties. Effective treatment to improve these factors seems warranted given the impact of perceived cognitive impairment on outcomes in MS and the potential for more accurate self-reports. PMID:27551243

  16. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better. No 7. Did you have a whiplash-type injury in the past, or do you have pain and/or stiffness every day in your neck, hands, knees, hips or other joints? Yes Your pain may be from DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL ARTHRITIS, a disorder that affects the bones and ...

  17. Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandow, Amanda M.; Farley, Rebecca A.; Panepinto, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the suggestion of a neuropathic component to sickle cell disease (SCD) pain, there are minimal data on the systematic assessment of neuropathic pain in patients with SCD. Neuropathic pain is defined as pain primarily initiated by dysfunction of the peripheral or central nervous system. Procedure In a cross-sectional study, we used the painDETECT questionnaire, a one-page validated neuropathic pain screening tool, to determine the presence of neuropathic pain in patients with SCD and to evaluate the relationship between neuropathic pain, age, and gender. We hypothesized that 20% of patients with SCD will experience neuropathic pain and that neuropathic pain will be associated with older age and female gender. The completed painDETECT questionnaire yields a total score between 0–38 (≥19=definite neuropathic pain, 13–18=probable neuropathic pain, ≤12=no neuropathic pain). Scores ≥13 were designated as having evidence of neuropathic pain. Results A total of 56 patients participated. Median age was 20.3 years and 77% were female. We found 37% of patients had evidence of neuropathic pain. Age was positively correlated with total score [r=0.43; p=0.001] suggesting older patients experience more neuropathic pain. Females had higher mean total scores [13 vs 8.4; p=0.04]. Significantly more patients with neuropathic pain were taking hydroxyurea [90% vs 59%; p=0.015]. Despite 37% of patients experiencing neuropathic pain, only 5% were taking a neuropathic pain drug. Conclusions Neuropathic pain exists in SCD. Valid screening tools can identify patients that would benefit from existing and future neuropathic pain therapies and could determine the impact of these therapies. PMID:24167104

  18. [Drug therapy of pain].

    PubMed

    Meier, P J; Ziegler, W H

    1989-08-01

    Pain represents the most frequent complaint for which patients ask for medical help. Successful treatment of acute and chronic pain syndromes largely depends on the knowledge and the therapy of the underlying disease process and on the rational use of analgesics, such as the nonnarcotic analgesic-antipyretics, the anti-inflammatory agents and the opioid analgesics. In addition, so-called 'adjuvant' analgesics of different chemical structures can be used in special clinical conditions to increase the efficacy of the common analgesics. For optimal therapy, the selection and dosing of a specific agent has to be tailored to the individual needs of the patient. For this purpose it is important to follow some general principles of pain management and to consider the relevant pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the various analgesics. This overview summarizes the most important pharmacological properties of the widely used analgetic drugs, with special emphasis on their risk-benefit ratio in various clinical situations.

  19. Chronic stress in myofascial pain patients.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, Marc; Keller, Livia; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Although myofascial pain has often been described as being associated with psychosocial stress, detailed evidence in support of this assumption, either from standardized clinical examination or from validated chronic stress questionnaires, is absent. The hypothesis of the present study was that some stressors lead to higher scores in patients suffering from chronic myofascial pain than in pain-free controls and in patients suffering from chronic facial pain. One hundred and fifty subjects were included in the study, and depending on clinical findings, divided into three groups: exclusively chronic myofascial pain group, controls with chronic facial pain but without temporomandibular disorders (TMD), and controls without pain or TMD. Chronic stress was assessed on nine subscales by use of a validated questionnaire. Myofascial pain patients have a significantly higher stress score for "social isolation" than pain-free controls (t-test, p = 0.003). However, they do not have higher scores than patients suffering from facial pain (t test, p = 0.169). Thus, the hypothesis of this study could not be completely rejected. PMID:19705168

  20. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach α = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = −0.67; 95% CI −0.78 to −0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research. PMID:26889507

  1. Spinal pain.

    PubMed

    Izzo, R; Popolizio, T; D'Aprile, P; Muto, M

    2015-05-01

    The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic pain, much more difficult to treat. The clinical assessment of pain source can be a challenge because of the complex anatomy and function of the spine; the advanced imaging methods are often not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis because similar findings could be present in either asymptomatic and symptomatic subjects: a clinical correlation is always mandatory and the therapy cannot rely uniquely upon any imaging abnormalities. Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally

  2. Persistent Pain and Sensory Abnormalities after Abdominoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Finnerup, Kenneth; Andresen, Sven R.; Nikolajsen, Lone; Finnerup, Nanna B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Persistent postsurgical pain is a well-recognized problem after a number of common surgical procedures, such as amputation, thoracotomy, and inguinal hernia repair. Less is known about persistent pain after cosmetic surgical procedures. We, therefore, decided to study the incidence and characteristics of persistent pain after abdominoplasty, which is one of the most frequent cosmetic surgical procedures. Methods: In September 2014, a link to a web-based questionnaire was mailed to 217 patients who had undergone abdominoplasty between 2006 and 2014 at the Department of Plastic Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire included questions about pain and sensory abnormalities located to the abdominal skin, and physical and psychological function; patient satisfaction with surgery was rated on a 4-point scale. Results: One hundred seventy patients answered the questionnaire. Fourteen patients (8.2%) reported pain within the past 7 days related to the abdominoplasty. Abnormal abdominal skin sensation was common and reported by 138 patients (81%). Sensory hypersensitivity was associated with the presence of persistent pain. Satisfaction with the procedure was reported by 149 (88%) patients. The majority of patients reported improvement on all physical and psychological factors. Patients with pain were more often disappointed with the surgery and unwilling to recommend the surgery. Conclusions: Overall, patients were satisfied with the procedure, although abnormal abdominal skin sensation was common. However, there is a risk of developing persistent neuropathic pain after abdominoplasty, and patients should be informed about this before surgery. PMID:26893986

  3. Pain charts (body maps or manikins) in assessment of the location of pediatric pain.

    PubMed

    von Baeyer, Carl L; Lin, Vivian; Seidman, Laura C; Tsao, Jennie Ci; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2011-01-01

    This article surveys the use of pain charts or pain drawings in eliciting information about the location of pain symptoms from children and adolescents. While pain charts are widely used and have been incorporated in multidimensional pediatric pain questionnaires and diaries, they present a number of issues requiring further study. These include, in particular, the number and size of different locations or areas of pain that need to be differentiated; the age at which children are able to complete pain charts unassisted; and whether the intensity and other qualities of pain can be accurately recorded on pain charts by children and adolescents. Based on data currently available, it is suggested that the unassisted use of pain charts be restricted to children aged 8 years or over, while for clinical purposes many younger children can complete pain charts with adult support. Where the investigator's interest is restricted to a few areas of the body, checklists of body parts may have greater utility than pain charts. A new pain chart adapted for use in studies of pediatric recurrent and chronic pain is presented.

  4. Alexithymia and Early Maladaptive Schemas in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Saariaho, Anita S; Saariaho, Tom H; Mattila, Aino K; Karukivi, Max; Joukamaa, Matti I

    2015-08-01

    Psychological factors have an impact on subjective pain experience. The aim of this study was to explore the occurrence of alexithymia and Early Maladaptive Schemas in a sample of 271 first visit chronic pain patients of six pain clinics. The patients completed the study questionnaire consisting of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20, the Finnish version of the Young Schema Questionnaire short form-extended, the Beck Depression Inventory-II, and pain variables. Alexithymic patients scored higher on Early Maladaptive Schemas and had more pain intensity, pain disability and depression than nonalexithymic patients. Both alexithymia and depression correlated significantly with most Early Maladaptive Schemas. The co-occurrence of alexithymia, Early Maladaptive Schemas and depression seems to worsen the pain experience. Screening of alexithymia, depression and Early Maladaptive Schemas may help to plan psychological treatment interventions for chronic pain patients. PMID:26040835

  5. GENESIS OF PAIN IN ARTHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Imamura, Marta; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Advances in knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of pain among patients with knee osteoarthritis suggest that the central nervous system is involved as a source that maintains and amplifies the painful condition such that it is refractory to conventional orthopedic and rheumatological treatment. Initially, hyperalgesia is observed only at the affected site. However, when the pain becomes refractory, peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms contribute towards maintaining and amplifying the painful conditions, regardless of the peripheral process that originated the pain. At this stage, even removal of the etiological agent may no longer be enough to relieve the painful symptoms. It then becomes necessary to envisage that other factors, distant from the affected joint, may be responsible for the disabling painful condition in such patients. At present, osteoarthrosis does not have any known cure, and the aim of treatment is to lessen the pain while improving function and health-related quality of life, and whenever possible, to minimize the toxicity of the therapy. In the light of emerging evidence suggesting that the central nervous system has a role in the physiopathology of pain in patients with knee arthrosis, the central nervous system should be taken into consideration as a therapeutic target, instead of only administering local treatment using ordinary analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs and non-pharmacological measures. Thus, methods that modulate the spinal cord and cerebral cortex, including the use of antidepressants, may have a role in managing these patients. PMID:27026978

  6. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  7. Prevent Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Print This Topic En español Prevent Back Pain Browse Sections The Basics Overview Am I at ... Health: Back Pain . There are different types of back pain. Back pain can be acute or chronic. It ...

  8. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  9. A comparison of pain measures used with patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Bigatti, Silvia M; Cronan, Terry A

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate instruments used to assess pain in patients with fibromyalgia (FMS). Participants were 602 patients with FMS. Pain was measured with five scales: a visual analog scale (VAS), the Pain Rating, Present Pain, and Number of Words Chosen Indexes from the McGill Pain Questionnaire; and intensity of pain obtained from a manual tender point exam. The VAS had the highest correlations with other measures of pain and with self-efficacy for pain, physical functioning, fatigue, and stiffness. The correlations between the VAS and fatigue and stiffness were significantly higher than those of other pain measures (p < .01). Our findings suggest that the easy-to-administer VAS may be the most useful measure of pain with patients with FMS. PMID:12048970

  10. Predictive Factors of Postoperative Pain and Postoperative Anxiety in Children Undergoing Elective Circumcision: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsamoudaki, Stella; Ntomi, Vasileia; Yiannopoulos, Ioannis; Christianakis, Efstratios; Pikoulis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Although circumcision for phimosis in children is a minor surgical procedure, it is followed by pain and carries the risk of increased postoperative anxiety. This study examined predictive factors of postoperative pain and anxiety in children undergoing circumcision. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children scheduled for elective circumcision. Circumcision was performed applying one of the following surgical techniques: sutureless prepuceplasty (SP), preputial plasty technique (PP), and conventional circumcision (CC). Demographics and base-line clinical characteristics were collected, and assessment of the level of preoperative anxiety was performed. Subsequently, a statistical model was designed in order to examine predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Assessment of postoperative pain was performed using the Faces Pain Scale (FPS). The Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire study was used to assess negative behavioral manifestations. Results A total of 301 children with a mean age of 7.56 ± 2.61 years were included in the study. Predictive factors of postoperative pain measured with the FPS included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the absence of siblings, and c) the presence of postoperative complications. Predictive factors of postoperative anxiety included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the level of education of mothers, c) the presence of preoperative anxiety, and d) a history of previous surgery. Conclusions Although our study was not without its limitations, it expands current knowledge by adding new predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Clearly, further randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm its results. PMID:26495079

  11. Pain Perception in Buddhism Perspective.

    PubMed

    Waikakul, Waraporn; Waikakul, Saranatra

    2016-08-01

    Dhamma, which Lord Buddha has presented to people after his enlightenment, analyzes every phenomenon and objects into their ultimate elements. The explanation of sensory system is also found in a part of Dhamma named Abhidhammapitaka, the Book of the Higher Doctrine in Buddhism. To find out the relationship between explanation of pain in the present neuroscience and the explanation of pain in Abhidhamma, the study was carried out by the use of a comprehensive review. The comparisons were in terms of peripheral stimulation, signal transmission, modulation, perception, suffering, determination and decision making for the responding to pain. We found that details of the explanation on pain mechanism and perception in Abhidhamma could associate well with our present scientific knowledge. Furthermore, more refinement information about the process and its function in particular aspects of pain perception were provided in Abhidhammapitaka. PMID:26112611

  12. Orofacial Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. Signs that may indicate a headache of dental origin include: ; Pain behind the eyes Sore jaw muscles or "tired" ... t Sleep? Check Your Bite What Causes a Toothache? Your Posture May Be the Cause of Jaw ...

  13. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  14. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Update Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  15. Pain Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... have tried to find relief from cancer pain. ■■ Physical Therapy. Exercises or methods used to help restore strength, ... that you see a licensed expert when trying physical therapy, massage, hypnosis, or acupuncture. 25 To learn more ...

  16. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    A common cause of neck pain is muscle strain or tension. Most often, everyday activities are to blame. Such activities include: Bending over a desk for hours Having poor posture while watching TV or ...

  17. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... gets worse when you bend forward) Tic douloureux Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome Sometimes the reason for the face pain ... is persistent, unexplained, or accompanied by other unexplained symptoms. Call your primary provider. What to Expect at ...

  18. The re-evaluation of the measurement of pain in population-based epidemiological studies: The SHAMA study

    PubMed Central

    Flüß, Elisa; Bond, Christine M; Jones, Gareth T

    2015-01-01

    Background: While many pain patients rely on pain-relieving treatments to manage their pain, pain-related research commonly quantifies pain status using validated questionnaires without taking into account that information. This will lead to an underestimate of the burden of pain in the community. To ensure a more accurate assessment of the prevalence and severity of pain, this study aimed to develop a pain management questionnaire and to assess how much population-based pain estimates change when pain management is considered. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional population-based study in Grampian, north-east Scotland. A total of 4600 people, aged 25 years and over, were randomly selected from a population sample frame and sent a questionnaire on pain and pain management. Population estimates of pain were determined twice: with the use of standard pain status questionnaires (‘current pain’) and with the use of a newly developed enhanced pain status questionnaire to determine patients’ estimated pain without pain management (‘all pain’). Results: The prevalence of current pain was 50.5% (95% CI = 48.0, 52.9). Of those who reported no current pain, 11.6% (95% CI = 9.4, 13.8) reported that they would have had pain had they not managed their pain. Thus, the all pain prevalence was 56.2% (95% CI = 53.7, 58.7). This difference in prevalence rates was statistically significant (difference = 5.7%; 95% CI = 2.2, 9.2). Likewise, participants’ pain severity significantly increased when they estimated their pain without pain management (p < 0.001, Wilcoxon-signed rank test). Conclusions: Failure to assess pain management information results in an underestimation of pain prevalence and severity. This should be considered in future epidemiological studies. Summary points Pain management information is currently not considered for the assessment of pain in epidemiological population-based studies. Since pain management can affect

  19. Chronic Pain in People with an Intellectual Disability: Under-Recognised and Under-Treated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, B. E.; Daly, P.; Smyth, F.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To examine the nature, prevalence and impact of chronic pain in adults with an intellectual disability (ID) based on carer report. Methods: Postal questionnaires were sent to 250 care-givers and 157 responses were received (63%). Results: Chronic pain was reported in 13% of the sample (n = 21), 6.3% had pain in two sites and 2% had pain in…

  20. Paper to Electronic Questionnaires: Effects on Structured Questionnaire Forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    2009-01-01

    With the use of computers, paper questionnaires are being replaced by electronic questionnaires. The formats of traditional paper questionnaires have been found to effect a subject's rating. Consequently, the transition from paper to electronic format can subtly change results. The research presented begins to determine how electronic questionnaire formats change subjective ratings. For formats where subjects used a flow chart to arrive at their rating, starting at the worst and middle ratings of the flow charts were the most accurate but subjects took slightly more time to arrive at their answers. Except for the electronic paper format, starting at the worst rating was the most preferred. The paper and electronic paper versions had the worst accuracy. Therefore, for flowchart type of questionnaires, flowcharts should start at the worst rating and work their way up to better ratings.

  1. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  2. A questionnaire to assess social stigma.

    PubMed

    Tavormina, Maurilio Giuseppe Maria; Tavormina, Romina; Nemoianni, Eugenio; Tavormina, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    Psychiatric patients often suffer for two reasons: due to the illness and due to the social stigma of mental illness, that increases the uneasiness and psychic pain of the person suffering from serious psychiatric disorder. This unwell person is often the object of stigma because he is "different" from others, and he also can be margenalised by society. In this study we intend to assess whether these margenalising attitudes might be also present among mental health professionals who have presented psychic problems in a previous period of their life, against sick persons suffering of the same illness even if he is a mental health professional. Two questionnaires have been developed, one for professionals and another for the patients, with the aim of identifying these marginalising attitudes. We intend that this study shall be a multicenter, observational and international study, promoted by the Mental Health Dept. of Naples (ASL Naples 3 South, Italy).

  3. Is HIV Painful? An Epidemiologic Study of the Prevalence and Risk Factors for Pain in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Edwina; Sabin, Caroline; Perry, Nicky; Richardson, Daniel; Gilleece, Yvonne; Churchill, Duncan; Dean, Gill; Williams, Debbie; Fisher, Martin; Walker-Bone, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the prevalence, impact and risk factors for pain among a cohort of HIV-infected adults treated with combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) if indicated according to current guidelines. Methods This was a cross-sectional epidemiological observational study. All patients attending one HIV-outpatient centre in the UK in a 10-month period were eligible. Patients completed a validated questionnaire enquiring about demographics, HIV factors and symptoms of pain. Results Of 1050 eligible participants, 859 (82%) completed a questionnaire. The 1-month period prevalence of pain lasting > 1 day was 62.8% amongst whom 63% reported current pain. The prevalence of pain at most anatomical sites was broadly similar to that observed in population studies using the same questionnaires except that we found considerably higher rates of foot/ankle pain. The median duration of pain was 3 years (range 0-51 years) and the median pain score was 5.0 on an 11-point visual analogue score. Over 40% of people in pain had consulted their primary care physician and > 20% were taking analgesics daily. Independent risk factors for current pain were older age (p=0.001), time since diagnosis of HIV infection (p=0.001) and receipt of a protease inhibitor-based regimen (p=0.04). Discussion Pain, and notably foot/ankle pain, is common among adults living with prevalent HIV and is associated with substantial morbidity and healthcare utilisation. PMID:25329144

  4. Painful Issues in Pain Prediction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Li; Iannetti, Gian Domenico

    2016-04-01

    How perception of pain emerges from neural activity is largely unknown. Identifying a neural 'pain signature' and deriving a way to predict perceived pain from brain activity would have enormous basic and clinical implications. Researchers are increasingly turning to functional brain imaging, often applying machine-learning algorithms to infer that pain perception occurred. Yet, such sophisticated analyses are fraught with interpretive difficulties. Here, we highlight some common and troublesome problems in the literature, and suggest methods to ensure researchers draw accurate conclusions from their results. Since functional brain imaging is increasingly finding practical applications with real-world consequences, it is critical to interpret brain scans accurately, because decisions based on neural data will only be as good as the science behind them. PMID:26898163

  5. Understanding factors that facilitate the inclusion of pain education in undergraduate curricula: Perspectives from a UK survey

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Eloise CJ; Briggs, Emma V; Briggs, Michelle; Allcock, Nick; Black, Pauline; Jones, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies in Europe, North America and Australasia suggest that one in five adults suffer from pain. There is increasing recognition that pain, particularly chronic pain, represents a global health burden. Many studies, including two national surveys exploring the content of undergraduate curricula for pain education, identify that documented pain education in curricula was limited and fragmentary. Methods: The study design used a questionnaire which included an open text comment box for respondents to add ‘further comments’ as part of larger study previously published. The sample consisted of 19 UK universities that offered 108 undergraduate programmes in the following: dentistry, medicine, midwifery, nursing (adult, child, learning disabilities and mental health branches), occupational therapy (OT), pharmacy, physiotherapy and veterinary science. An inductive content analysis was performed, and the data were managed using NVivo 10 software for data management. Results: A total of 57 participants across seven disciplines (dentistry, medicine, midwifery, nursing, pharmacy, physiotherapy and OT) completed the open text comment box (none were received from veterinary science). Analysis revealed two major themes of successes and challenges. Successes included expansion (extending coverage and/or increased student access), multidimensional curriculum content and diversity of teaching methods. Challenges included difficulties in identifying where pain is taught in the curriculum, biomedical versus biopsychosocial definitions of pain, perceived importance, time, resources and staff knowledge, and finally a diffusion of responsibility for pain education. Conclusion: This study identifies new insights of the factors attributed to successful implementation of pain education in undergraduate education. Many of the challenges previously reported were also identified. This is one of the first studies to identify a broad range of approaches, for pain education

  6. Validating the Street Survival Skills Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Janniro, F; Sapp, G L; Kohler, M P

    1994-02-01

    The utility of the Street Survival Skills Questionnaire was investigated using a sample of 18 trainable mentally retarded males attending public schools. Pearson product-moment correlations were computed among the total scores, four standard scores on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-Survey Form, and three Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised IQs. The Street Skills scores correlated significantly with Vineland Daily Living scores and WISC-R Full Scale and Performance IQs; however, nonsignificant relationships were obtained with WISC-R Verbal IQs, Vineland Composite scores, Communication Domain scores, and Socialization Domain scores. The use of the questionnaire in assessment of adaptive behavior was supported but within a narrow scope, i.e., daily or functional living knowledge.

  7. [Myofascial pain syndrome--fascial muscle pain].

    PubMed

    Partanen, Juhani; Ojala, Tuula; Arokoski, Jari P A

    2010-01-01

    Symptoms of myofascial pain syndrome, i.e. fascial muscle pain may occur in several areas of the body, particularly in the neck-shoulder region. The muscle pain symptom in the neck-shoulder region is commonly termed tension neck pain or nonspecific neck pain, but myofascial pain syndrome can also be distinguished into its own diagnosis. This review deals with the clinical picture of myofascial pain syndrome along with pathophysiological hypotheses and treatment options.

  8. Imaging Biomarkers and the Role of Neuroinflammation in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Linda; Cooper, Mark S.; Clark, Vincent P.

    2013-01-01

    The papers from this thematic issue followed a translational research workshop, Imaging Neuroinflammation and Neuropathic Pain, that focused on the search for neuroimaging biomarkers to assess neuroinflammation associated with neuropathic pain. The topics covered in this issue include overviews of the historical and current knowledge regarding neuropathic pain, the potential mechanisms involved, the often under-recognized clinical presentations that can delay diagnosis, the various neuroimaging techniques that have been applied to evaluate neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation, to case series illustrating novel treatments of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, the use of telemedicine to disseminate knowledge and improve the diagnosis and treatment of pain syndromes is also discussed. PMID:23666404

  9. [Recommendations for a basic functional assessment of low back pain].

    PubMed

    Demoulin, C; Fauconnier, C; Vanderthommen, M; Henrotin, Y

    2005-01-01

    This article aims to recommend easy, reproducible and valid physical tests and questionnaires to allow a functional and physical assessment of sub-acute and chronic low back pain patients. We recommend the pain visual analogue scale, the French translation of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (EIFEL) and the Dallas questionnaire to appreciate pain intensity and its influence on patients' quality of life. Sorensen's test is recommended in order to assess trunk extensor muscles endurance. We suggest to measure pelvic and lumbar flexion mobility by means of the inclinometer technique. The test described by McQuade is recommended to assess abdominal muscles static endurance. PMID:16184742

  10. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  11. [Forefoot pain].

    PubMed

    Damiano, Joël

    2010-03-20

    Forefoot chronic pain is a frequent problem in daily clinical practice. Mechanical pathology of the forefoot, usually called static metatarsalgia, represents the most frequent reason for consultation in pathology of the foot. The cause is a functionnal disorder or anatomic derangement of the forefoot architecture. Metatarsalgia can originate from a wide range of affections. Etiologies of chronic pain are described from medial to lateral with first ray pathologies (hallux valgus, hallux rigidus and sesamoid pathology) and first ray insufficiency, pathologies of the second, third and fourth ray and intermetatarsal spaces (second ray syndrome, Freiberg's disease, Morton neuroma, stress or bone insufficiency metatarsal fractures, intermetatarsal bursitis) and fifth ray pathology (lateral bursitis, quintus varus). Sometimes forefoot pain could also be caused by chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis) with a risk of structural metatarsophalangeal joints alteration. The pathology of the toes can, more rarely, explain a forefoot pain. So, several pathologic conditions can produce forefoot pain and the diagnostic approach must always be based on the anamnesis and clinical examination. In a second time if the cause is difficult to establish based solely on clinical findings, radiography and ultrasonography are today the most usefull auxiliary investigations.

  12. [Principles of pain therapy with local anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Klaus, E

    1996-04-01

    The treatment of chronic pain consists of four basic concepts: Drugs (analgetic drugs, TAD, etc.), treatment by physicians (chiropraxis, massage, TENS, etc.), injection with local anesthetics and autosuggestion. Necessary for diagnosis and treatment of chronical pain is the knowledge of pathophysiology and anatomy of nerves, ligaments, muscles and the sympathetic nervous system. Diagnosis of chronical pain rarely includes roentgenograms or other technical procedures, mainly to exclude tumors, fractures or specific infections. The knowledge of pathophysiology means the knowledge of sympathetic and motoric efferences on one side and the functional examination of the anatomic structures on the other side.

  13. Chronic Pain Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of chronic pain usually involves medicines and therapy. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ...

  14. Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force Outcomes: Clinical Measures of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Shana; Gilchrist, Laura; Sander, Antoinette

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is one of the most commonly reported impairments after breast cancer treatment affecting anywhere from 16-73% of breast cancer survivors Despite the high reported incidence of pain from cancer and its treatments, the ability to evaluate cancer pain continues to be difficult due to the complexity of the disease and the subjective experience of pain. The Oncology Section Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force was created to evaluate the evidence behind clinical outcome measures of pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods The authors systematically reviewed the literature for pain outcome measures published in the research involving women diagnosed with breast cancer. The goal was to examine the reported psychometric properties that are reported in the literature in order to determine clinical utility. Results Visual Analog Scale, Numeric Rating Scale, Pressure Pain Threshold, McGill Pain Questionnaire, McGill Pain Questionnaire – Short Form, Brief Pain Inventory and Brief Pain Inventory – Short Form were highly recommended by the Task Force. The Task Force was unable to recommend two measures for use in the breast cancer population at the present time. Conclusions A variety of outcome measures were used to measure pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. When assessing pain in women with breast cancer, researchers and clinicians need to determine whether a unidimensional or multidimensional tool is most appropriate as well as whether the tool has strong psychometric properties. PMID:25346950

  15. Prevalence of somatoform pain complaints in the German population

    PubMed Central

    Hessel, Aike; Beutel, Manfred; Geyer, Michael; Schumacher, Jörg; Brähler, Elmar

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of somatoform pain complaints was assessed in a representative sample of 2050 persons in Germany in the age range from 18 to 92 years by the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms questionnaire [57]. A high percentage of the study participants turned out to complain of serious somatoform pains. Most frequently, back pain (30.5%), joint pain, pain in the arms and/or legs (19.9%) and headache or facial pain (19.5%) were reported. Women complained of more somatoform pain symptoms than men. Pain was higher with an increasing age, lower education, lower income, rural residency, and residency in Eastern Germany. While the prevalence of somatoform pain is high, the majority of patients does not receive adequate psychotherapeutic care but is inadequately treated by somatic treatments. PMID:19742064

  16. Parental attitudes and experiences of dental care in children and adolescents with ADHD--a questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Staberg, Marie; Norén, Jörgen G; Johnson, Mats; Kopp, Svenny; Robertson, Agneta

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common psychiatric condition characterized by age-inappropriate levels of inattention, hyperactivity-impulsiveness or a combination of these. The aim of this study was to analyze parental attitudes to and experience of dental care, oral hygiene and dietary habits in children/adolescents with ADHD. Twenty- six parents of 31 subjects, 20 boys and 11 girls, aged 5-19 years with ADHD registered at the Gothenburg Child Neuropsychiatric Clinic, were invited. The parents answered a questionnaire regarding different oral problems when visiting the Clinic of Pediatric Dentistry, Gothenburg, for an oral examination of their child. The parents felt the dental care at the Public Dental Service was good, but noted a lack of knowledge regarding child neuropsychiatry among the dental staff which may influence the dental treatment. Fifteen parents reported their children had experienced mouth pain and 15 reported their child had suffered from both discomfort and pain from local anesthesia. Thirteen of the children had a dental trauma and 12 parents reported pain in connection to the dental treatment. Pain related to filling therapy was stated by 11 parents. According to the parents, five children suffered from dental fear but 15 reported the child had a general fear. Pursuant to the parents, the beverage for dinner was mainly milk or water, while sweet drinks were more frequent when thirsty. Seventeen parents reported their children had poor oral hygiene or could not manage to brush their teeth and 14 of the 31 children only brushed once a day or less. The results show that the parents experience a lack of child neuropsychiatric knowledge, care and patience from the dental staff, which may influence the treatment. Oral hygiene/tooth brushing is neglected and the frequent consumption of sugar is difficult for the parents to handle. PMID:25102720

  17. Interventional pain management in the palliative care patient.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Marlene E; Miller-Saultz, Debbie; Wuhrman, Elsa; Kosharskyy, Boleslav

    2012-09-01

    For the majority of patients, cancer pain can be treated using the World Health Organization cancer pain guidelines; however, for 10-20% of patients with advanced cancer, adequate pain control cannot be achieved using these methods owing to disease pathophysiology preventing administration/absorption of pain medications or intolerance due to opioid toxicities. The need to expand analgesic treatment when oral, transdermal, and intravenous therapies fail requires exploration of interventional pain management techniques such as neuraxial (e.g. epidural and intrathecal) infusion therapies and neurolytic interventions. Nurses caring for patients with cancer pain should develop their knowledge of these multimodal approaches to cancer pain management.

  18. Using a structured questionnaire improves seizure description by medical students

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Saher; Shah, Hemang; McNair, Nancy; Pruitt, J. Ned; Murro, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate a structured questionnaire for improving a medical students’ ability to identify, describe and interpret a witnessed seizure. Methods Ninety two 3rd year medical students, blinded to seizure diagnosis, viewed videos of a primary generalized seizure and a complex partial seizure.  Students next completed an unstructured questionnaire that asked the students to describe the seizure video recordings. The students then completed a structured questionnaire that asked the student to respond to 17 questions regarding specific features occurring during the seizures.  We determined the number and types of correct responses for each questionnaire. Results Overall, the structured questionnaire was more effective in eliciting an average of 9.25 correct responses compared to the unstructured questionnaire eliciting an average of 5.30 correct responses (p < 0.001). Additionally, 10 of the 17 seizure features were identified more effectively with the structured questionnaire. Potentially confounding factors, prior knowledge of someone with epilepsy or a prior experience of viewing a seizure, did not predict the student’s ability to correctly identify any of the 17 features. Conclusions A structured questionnaire significantly improves a medical student’s ability to provide an accurate clinical description of primary generalized and complex partial witnessed seizures. Our analysis identified the 10 specific features improved by using the structured questionnaire. PMID:26752118

  19. A comprehensive examination of the model underlying acceptance and commitment therapy for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Vowles, Kevin E; Sowden, Gail; Ashworth, Julie

    2014-05-01

    The therapeutic model underlying Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is reasonably well-established as it applies to chronic pain. Several studies have examined measures of single ACT processes, or subsets of processes, and have almost uniformly indicated reliable relations with patient functioning. To date, however, no study has performed a comprehensive examination of the entire ACT model, including all of its component processes, as it relates to functioning. The present study performed this examination in 274 individuals with chronic pain presenting for an assessment appointment. Participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires, assessing multiple aspects of the ACT model, as well as pain intensity, disability, and emotional distress. Initial exploratory factor analyses examined measures of the ACT model and measures of patient functioning separately with each analysis identifying three factors. Next, the fit of a model including ACT processes on the one hand and patient functioning on the other was examined using Structural Equation Modeling. Overall model fit was acceptable and indicated moderate correlations among the ACT processes themselves, as well as significant relations with pain intensity, emotional distress, and disability. These analyses build on the existing literature by providing, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive evaluation of the ACT theoretical model in chronic pain to date.

  20. Multidimensional Pain Inventory derived classifications of chronic pain: evidence for maladaptive pain-related coping within the dysfunctional group.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Adina C; Hasenbring, Monika

    2008-01-01

    This study examines maladaptive pain-related fear-avoidance and endurance coping in subgroups of patients with chronic back pain. Hypotheses were derived from the avoidance-endurance model of pain [Hasenbring M. Attentional control of pain and the process of chronification. In: Sandkühler J, Bromm B, Gebhart GF, editors. Progress in pain research, vol. 129. New York: Elsevier; 2000. p. 525-34.], which assumes that endurance coping (cognitive, behavioral tendency to endure severe pain to finish current activities irrespective of pain increases) leads to overuse of muscles, joints, and discs with an increase of pain as long-term consequence. Participants were 120 patients referred for treatment of chronic pain to General Practices. They were classified as 'dysfunctional-DYS' (15.8%), 'interpersonally distressed-ID' (10.8%), and 'adaptive copers-AC' (61.7%) based on the Multidimensional Pain Inventory [Kerns RD, Turk DC, Rudy TE. The West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI). Pain 1985;23:345-56.] and compared on measures of pain-related fear-avoidance coping (anxiety/depression; help-/hopelessness; catastrophizing; avoidance of social/physical activity) and endurance coping (positive mood; thought suppression; endurance behavior) using the Kiel Pain Inventory [Hasenbring M. The Kiel Pain Inventory-Manual. Three questionnaire scales for assessment of pain-related cognitions, emotions and copying strategies. Bern:Huber; 1994.]. Multivariate analysis of variance indicated that groups differed significantly for pain-related fear-avoidance and endurance coping, even after control for pain intensity and depression. Univariate effects revealed that patients classified as DYS reported more anxiety/depression, help-/hopelessness, and catastrophizing than did those classified as AC. Furthermore, the DYS group showed more thought suppression compared to AC; however, subgroups did not differ significantly with regard to avoidance of social and physical activity

  1. Facts and Figures on Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Health Statistics survey indicated that low back pain was the most common (27%), followed by severe ...

  2. Fundamental issues in questionnaire design.

    PubMed

    Murray, P

    1999-07-01

    The questionnaire is probably the most common form of data collection tool used in nursing research. There is a misconception that anyone with a clear grasp of English and a modicum of common sense can design an effective questionnaire. Contrary to such common belief, this article will demonstrate that questionnaire design is a complex and time consuming process, but a necessary labour to ensure valid and reliable data is collected. In addition, meticulous construction is more likely to yield data that can be utilized in the pursuit of objective, quantitative and generalizable truths, upon which practice and policy decisions can be formulated. This article examines a myriad of fundamental issues surrounding questionnaire design, which encompass question wording, question order, presentation, administration and data collection, amongst other issues.

  3. A General Questionnaire Analysis Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Lewis R.

    1978-01-01

    A general FORTRAN computer program for analyzing categorical or frequency data obtained from questionnaires is described. A variety of descriptive statistics, chi square, Kendall's tau and Cramer's statistic are provided. (Author/JKS)

  4. Towards a theory of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Apkarian, A. Vania; Baliki, Marwan N.; Geha, Paul Y.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we integrate recent human and animal studies from the viewpoint of chronic pain. First, we briefly review the impact of chronic pain on society and address current pitfalls of its definition and clinical management. Second, we examine pain mechanisms via nociceptive information transmission cephalad and its impact and interaction with the cortex. Third, we present recent discoveries on the active role of the cortex in chronic pain, with findings indicating that the human cortex continuously reorganizes as it lives in chronic pain. We also introduce data emphasizing that distinct chronic pain conditions impact on the cortex in unique patterns. Fourth, animal studies regarding nociceptive transmission, recent evidence for supraspinal reorganization during pain, the necessity of descending modulation for maintenance of neuropathic behavior, and the impact of cortical manipulations on neuropathic pain is also reviewed. We further expound on the notion that chronic pain can be reformulated within the context of learning and memory, and demonstrate the relevance of the idea in the design of novel pharmacotherapies. Lastly, we integrate the human and animal data into a unified working model outlining the mechanism by which acute pain transitions into a chronic state. It incorporates knowledge of underlying brain structures and their reorganization, and also includes specific variations as a function of pain persistence and injury type, thereby providing mechanistic descriptions of several unique chronic pain conditions within a single model. PMID:18952143

  5. Managing Pediatric Pain in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Benoit; Trottier, Evelyne D

    2016-08-01

    Far more attention is now given to pain management in children in the emergency department (ED). When a child arrives, pain must be recognized and evaluated using a pain scale that is appropriate to the child's development and regularly assessed to determine whether the pain intervention was effective. At triage, both analgesics and non-pharmacological strategies, such as distraction, immobilization, and dressing should be started. For mild pain, oral ibuprofen can be administered if the child has not received it at home, whereas ibuprofen and paracetamol are suitable for moderate pain. For patients who still require pain relief, oral opioids could be considered; however, many EDs have now replaced this with intranasal fentanyl, which allows faster onset of pain relief and can be administered on arrival pending either intravenous access or definitive care. Intravenous opioids are often required for severe pain, and paracetamol or ibuprofen can still be considered for their likely opioid-sparing effects. Specific treatment should be used for patients with migraine. In children requiring intravenous access or venipuncture, non-pharmacological and pharmacological strategies to decrease pain and anxiety associated with needle punctures are mandatory. These strategies can also be used for laceration repairs and other painful procedures. Despite the gaps in knowledge, pain should be treated with the most up-to-date evidence in children seen in EDs. PMID:27260499

  6. Hypersensitivity to pain in congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Slimani, Hocine; Danti, Sabrina; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Pietrini, Pietro; Ptito, Maurice; Kupers, Ron

    2013-10-01

    Vision is important for avoiding encounters with objects in the environment that may imperil physical integrity. We tested whether, in the absence of vision, a lower pain threshold would arise from an adaptive shift to other sensory channels. We therefore measured heat and cold pain thresholds and responses to suprathreshold heat stimuli in 2 groups of congenitally blind and matched normal-sighted participants. We also assessed detection thresholds for innocuous warmth and cold, and participants' attitude toward painful encounters in daily life. Our results show that, compared to sighted subjects, congenitally blind subjects have lower heat pain thresholds, rate suprathreshold heat pain stimuli as more painful, and have increased sensitivity for cold pain stimuli. Thresholds for nonpainful thermal stimulation did not differ between groups. The results of the pain questionnaires further indicated that blind subjects are more attentive to signals of external threats. These findings indicate that the absence of vision from birth induces a hypersensitivity to painful stimuli, lending new support to a model of sensory integration of vision and pain processing. PMID:24040972

  7. Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Ernest; Clauw, Daniel J.; Goldenberg, Don L.; Harris, Richard E.; Helfenstein, Milton; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Noguchi, Koichi; Silverman, Stuart L.; Ushida, Takahiro; Wang, Guochun

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript, developed by a group of chronic pain researchers and clinicians from around the world, aims to address the state of knowledge about fibromyalgia (FM) and identify ongoing challenges in the field of FM and other chronic pain syndromes that may be characterized by pain centralization/amplification/hypersensitivity. There have been many exciting developments in research studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of FM and related syndromes that have the potential to improve the recognition and management of patients with FM and other conditions with FM-like pain. However, much of the new information has not reached all clinicians, especially primary care clinicians, who have the greatest potential to use this new knowledge to positively impact their patients’ lives. Furthermore, there are persistent misconceptions about FM and a lack of consensus regarding the diagnosis and treatment of FM. This paper presents a framework for future global efforts to improve the understanding and treatment of FM and other associated chronic pain syndromes, disseminate research findings, identify ways to enhance advocacy for these patients, and improve global efforts to collaborate and reach consensus about key issues related to FM and chronic pain in general. PMID:27022674

  8. The MPC&A Questionnaire

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    The questionnaire is the instrument used for recording performance data on the nuclear material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system at a nuclear facility. The performance information provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the MPC&A system. The goal for the questionnaire is to provide an accurate representation of the performance of the MPC&A system as it currently exists in the facility. Performance grades for all basic MPC&A functions should realistically reflect the actual level of performance at the time the survey is conducted. The questionnaire was developed after testing and benchmarking the material control and accountability (MC&A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) in the United States. The benchmarking exercise at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) proved extremely valuable for improving the content and quality of the early versions of the questionnaire. Members of the INL benchmark team identified many areas of the questionnaire where questions should be clarified and areas where additional questions should be incorporated. The questionnaire addresses all elements of the MC&A system. Specific parts pertain to the foundation for the facility's overall MPC&A system, and other parts pertain to the specific functions of the operational MPC&A system. The questionnaire includes performance metrics for each of the basic functions or tasks performed in the operational MPC&A system. All of those basic functions or tasks are represented as basic events in the MPC&A fault tree. Performance metrics are to be used during completion of the questionnaire to report what is actually being done in relation to what should be done in the performance of MPC&A functions.

  9. [Social pain].

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Naohito; Shimoyama, Megumi

    2011-09-01

    This chapter focuses on what social pain is and how it should be managed. In order to understand social pain in a cancer patient, it is necessary to recognize the change in the patient's daily life after the diagnosis of cancer. Because the degree of suffering and the relationships with family members and the people he or she worked with differ from patient to patient, it is important to note that the context of social pain is different in each patient. Five points shown below are essential in managing social pain. 1. Economical suffering may be alleviated by utilization of the social security system while taking into account each patient's standard of living. 2. Burdens on family members should be lessened, such as by not having them stay at the patient's bedside every day and letting them go home occasionally. 3. The normal patterns of communication, support, and conflict in the family should be identified, and the extent to which they have been disrupted by the illness should be assessed. 4. It is important to understand the ethnic, cultural, and religious background of the patient and the potential impact of their influence on the individual and the illness. 5. Practical or emotional unfinished business that the patient has needs to be identified, and efforts should be made to support fulfillment.

  10. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20-30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 22 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: a low-fat diet, antibiotics, bromocriptine, danazol, diuretics, evening primrose oil, gestrinone, gonadorelin analogues, hormone replacement therapy, lisuride, progestogens, pyridoxine, tamoxifen, tibolone, topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, toremifene, and vitamin E. PMID:19454068

  11. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20% to 30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 24 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, bromocriptine, combined oral contraceptive pill, danazol, diuretics, evening primrose oil, gestrinone, gonadorelin analogues, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), lisuride, low-fat diet, progestogens, pyridoxine, tamoxifen, tibolone, topical or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), toremifene, and vitamin E. PMID:21477394

  12. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20% to 30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to February 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 11 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: bra wearing, combined oral contraceptive pill, danazol, gonadorelin analogues, progestogens, tamoxifen, and topical or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

  13. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  14. Pain biology education and exercise classes compared to pain biology education alone for individuals with chronic low back pain: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Cormac G; Gray, Heather G; Newton, Mary; Granat, Malcolm H

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this single-blind pilot RCT was to investigate the effect of pain biology education and group exercise classes compared to pain biology education alone for individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Participants with CLBP were randomised to a pain biology education and group exercise classes group (EDEX) [n = 20] or a pain biology education only group (ED) [n = 18]. The primary outcome was pain (0-100 numerical rating scale), and self-reported function assessed using the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, measured at pre-intervention, post-intervention and three month follow up. Secondary outcome measures were pain self-efficacy, pain related fear, physical performance testing and free-living activity monitoring. Using a linear mixed model analysis, there was a statistically significant interaction effect between time and intervention for both pain (F[2,49] = 3.975, p < 0.05) and pain self-efficacy (F[2,51] = 4.011, p < 0.05) with more favourable results for the ED group. The effects levelled off at the three month follow up point. In the short term, pain biology education alone was more effective for pain and pain self-efficacy than a combination of pain biology education and group exercise classes. This pilot study highlights the need to investigate the combined effects of different interventions.

  15. Nephrology quiz and questionnaire: renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Golper, Thomas A; Glassock, Richard J; Bleyer, Anthony J

    2012-08-01

    Presentation of the Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire has become an annual "tradition" at the meetings of the American Society of Nephrology. It is a very popular session judged by consistently large attendance. Members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. They can also compare their answers in real time, using audience response devices, with those of program directors of nephrology training programs in the United States, acquired through an Internet-based questionnaire. Topics presented here include fluid and electrolyte disorders, transplantation, and ESRD and dialysis. Cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared by a panel of experts (Drs. Palmer, Hricik, and Golper, respectively). After the audience responses, the "correct" and "incorrect" answers then were briefly discussed and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. This article aims to recapitulate the session and reproduce its educational value for a larger audience-readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Have fun.

  16. Congenital insensitivity to pain with neuroparalytic keratitis.

    PubMed

    Biedner, B; Dagan, M; Gedalia, A; David, R

    1990-08-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain is a well-defined entity in the group of sensory deficiency syndromes. To the best of our knowledge, unilateral neuroparalytic keratitis associated with congenital insensitivity to pain has not been reported. We report such a case to alert clinicians to this potentially blinding problem.

  17. Painful menstrual periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... related activities for a few days during each menstrual cycle. Painful menstruation is the leading cause of lost ... when did the pain begin? When in your menstrual cycle do you experience the pain? Is the pain ...

  18. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  19. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back ... Pain During Pregnancy FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during ...

  20. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  1. Epigenetic regulation of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lingli; Lutz, Brianna Marie; Bekker, Alex; Tao, Yuan-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain arising from peripheral inflammation and tissue or nerve injury is a common clinical symptom. Although intensive research on the neurobiological mechanisms of chronic pain has been carried out during previous decades, this disorder is still poorly managed by current drugs such as opioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Inflammation-, tissue injury-, and/or nerve injury-induced changes in gene expression in sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), spinal cord dorsal horn, and pain-associated brain regions are thought to participate in chronic pain genesis; however, how these changes occur is still elusive. Epigenetic modifications including DNA methylation and covalent histone modifications control gene expression. Recent studies have shown that peripheral noxious stimulation changes DNA methylation and histone modifications and that these changes may be related to the induction of pain hypersensitivity under chronic pain conditions. This review summarizes the current knowledge and progress in epigenetic research in chronic pain and discusses the potential role of epigenetic modifications as therapeutic antinociceptive targets in this disorder. PMID:25942533

  2. Attitudes and concerns of Canadian animal health technologists toward postoperative pain management in dogs and cats.

    PubMed Central

    Dohoo, S E; Dohoo, I R

    1998-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty-two Canadian animal health technologists (AHTs) were surveyed to determine their attitudes toward postoperative pain management in dogs and cats following 6 surgical procedures, their concerns regarding the use of opioid analgesics, and their role within veterinary practices with respect to postoperative pain control. Two hundred and sixty-four (82%) returned the questionnaire. Pain perception was defined as the average of pain rankings for dogs and cats (on a scale of 1 to 10) following abdominal surgery, or the value for dogs or cats if the AHT worked with only 1 of the 2 species. Maximum concern about the risks associated with the postoperative use of morphine or oxymorphone was defined as the highest rating assigned to any of the 6 risks evaluated in either dogs or cats. Animal health technologists reported significantly higher pain perception scores than did veterinarians who completed a similar survey 2 years previously. Higher pain perception scores were associated with decreased satisfaction with the adequacy of analgesic therapy in their practice, higher pain control goals, and attendance at continuing education within the previous 12 months. The majority of AHTs (55%) agreed that one or more risks associated with the use of morphine or oxymorphone outweighed the benefits. The 3 issues that were perceived to pose the greatest risk were respiratory depression, bradycardia, and sedation and excitement, for dogs and cats, respectively. Most AHTs (68%) considered their knowledge related to the recognition and control of pain to be adequate, compared with 24% of veterinarians who responded to a similar previous survey. As for veterinarians, experience gained while in practice was ranked as the most important source of knowledge, while the technical program attended was ranked as least important. Over 88% of the AHTs provided nursing care during the postoperative period, monitored animals for side effects of postoperative analgesic

  3. Prevalence and determinants of pain and pain-related disability in urban and rural settings in southeastern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Dean A; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G; McAlister, Margo

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Canadian chronic pain prevalence estimates range from 11% to 66%, are affected by sampling and measurement bias, and largely represent urban settings. OBJECTIVES: To estimate chronic pain prevalence and factors associated with pain in southeastern Ontario, a region with a larger rural than urban residence. METHODS: A systematic sampling with a random start was used to contact households. A telephone-administered questionnaire using the Graded Chronic Pain Scale, with questions on health care and medication use, health status, depression and demographics, was administered to consenting adults (18 to 94 years of age; mean age 50.2±16.6 years). RESULTS: The response rate was 49% (1067 of 2167), with 76% reporting some pain over the past six months. Low pain intensity with low pain interference prevalence was 34% (grade I), high pain intensity with low pain interference was 26% (grade II), and high pain intensity with high pain interference was 17% (grades III and IV). Of those reporting pain, 49% reported chronic pain (ie, pain for a minimum of 90 days over the past six months) representing 37% of the sample. Being female, unmarried, lower income, poorer self-reported health status and rural residence were associated with increasing pain. Once depression was considered in this pain analysis, residence was no longer significant. Lower rates of health care utilization were reported by rural residents. In those reporting the highest pain grades, poor health, greater medication and health care use, depression and more pain sites were associated with higher odds for pain-related disability. CONCLUSION: There is an elevated prevalence of pain in this almost equally split rural/urban region. Further examination of health care utilization and depression is suggested in chronic pain prevalence research. PMID:17149455

  4. Randomized controlled trial of an educational booklet for patients presenting with back pain in general practice.

    PubMed

    Roland, M; Dixon, M

    1989-06-01

    A randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate an educational booklet on back pain for patients presenting to five group practices during one calendar year. The booklet had no immediate effect on consultations for back pain, but in the period from two weeks to one year after presentation significantly fewer patients in the group receiving the booklet consulted with back pain (35.6%) than in the control group (42.2%) (P less than 0.05). There were no significant differences between the booklet and control groups in certified absence from work owing to back pain. Referral to hospital, referral to physiotherapy, admissions to hospital and laminectomies were all less common in the booklet group. The reduction in the combined referral rate to physiotherapy and hospital, and the reduction in laminectomy rate almost reached statistical significance at the 5% level. In replying to a questionnaire sent one year after entry to the study 94.1% of respondents in the booklet group said that they had read the book, 84.0% said that they found it useful, and 68.0% said that they still had a copy. Scores on a 15-item test of knowledge about back pain were significantly higher in the group of patients who had received the booklet than in the control group. The results suggest that the booklet had some effect in altering both the knowledge and behaviour of patients with back pain. The provision of an educational booklet was a method of giving information which was appreciated by both patients and doctors.

  5. Development of an Empirically Based Questionnaire to Investigate Young Students' Ideas about Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Sufen; Chang, Wen-Hua; Lieu, Sang-Chong; Kao, Huey-Lien; Huang, Mao-Tsai; Lin, Shu-Fen

    2013-01-01

    This study developed an empirically based questionnaire to monitor young learners' conceptions of nature of science (NOS). The questionnaire, entitled Students' Ideas about Nature of Science (SINOS), measured views on theory-ladenness, use of creativity and imagination, tentativeness of scientific knowledge, durability of scientific knowledge,…

  6. Understanding pain, part 2: pain management.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Helen

    This article is the second in a two-part series which explores pain and its management from a physiological perspective. Nurses play an important role in assessing and managing pain. Effective pain management by nurses requires them to have an understanding of the biological basis of the pain interventions which may be used to control pain. This article emphasizes the importance of pain assessment as a precursor for effective pain management and explores the biological basis of pain interventions which contribute to pain control. The role of non-pharmacological approaches in alleviating pain and their actions which contribute to pain relief are explored. The three main types of pharmaceutical agents used, non-opioids, opioids and adjuvant drugs, are introduced and their mechanisms of actions discussed. PMID:16224328

  7. Central poststroke pain: somatosensory abnormalities and the presence of associated myofascial pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is a neuropathic pain syndrome associated with somatosensory abnormalities due to central nervous system lesion following a cerebrovascular insult. Post-stroke pain (PSP) refers to a broader range of clinical conditions leading to pain after stroke, but not restricted to CPSP, including other types of pain such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), painful shoulder, lumbar and dorsal pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and spasticity-related pain. Despite its recognition as part of the general PSP diagnostic possibilities, the prevalence of MPS has never been characterized in patients with CPSP patients. We performed a cross-sectional standardized clinical and radiological evaluation of patients with definite CPSP in order to assess the presence of other non-neuropathic pain syndromes, and in particular, the role of myofascial pain syndrome in these patients. Methods CPSP patients underwent a standardized sensory and motor neurological evaluation, and were classified according to stroke mechanism, neurological deficits, presence and profile of MPS. The Visual Analogic Scale (VAS), McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), and Beck Depression Scale (BDS) were filled out by all participants. Results Forty CPSP patients were included. Thirty-six (90.0%) had one single ischemic stroke. Pain presented during the first three months after stroke in 75.0%. Median pain intensity was 10 (5 to 10). There was no difference in pain intensity among the different lesion site groups. Neuropathic pain was continuous-ongoing in 34 (85.0%) patients and intermittent in the remainder. Burning was the most common descriptor (70%). Main aggravating factors were contact to cold (62.5%). Thermo-sensory abnormalities were universal. MPS was diagnosed in 27 (67.5%) patients and was more common in the supratentorial extra-thalamic group (P <0.001). No significant differences were observed among the different stroke location groups and pain questionnaires and

  8. Knowledge Acquisition in Observational Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vosniadou, Stella

    This paper presents findings from research on knowledge acquisition in observational astronomy to demonstrate the kinds of intuitive models children form and to show how these models influence the acquisition of science knowledge. Sixty children of approximate ages 6, 9, and 12 were given a questionnaire to investigate their knowledge of the size,…

  9. [Ice application for reducing pain associated with goserelin acetate injection].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kaname; Nagata, Chika; Koshizaki, Eiko; Nishiuchi, Satoko

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of using an ice pack for reducing the pain associated with goserelin acetate injection. In this study, 39 patients with prostate cancer and 1 patient with breast cancer receiving hormonal therapy with goserelin acetate were enrolled. All patients completed a questionnaire regarding the use of ice application. We used the numerical rating scale (NRS) to assess the pain associated with injection. The NRS scores indicated that the pain was significantly less with ice application than with the usual method (p < 0.001). Further, ice application could decrease the duration of pain sensation. Ice application at the injection site is safe and effective for reducing pain.

  10. Canadian Orofacial Pain Team workshop report on the global year against orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Gilles J; Sessle, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    The year 2013-2014 has been designated the Global Year Against Orofacial Pain by the International Association for the Study of Pain. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary Canadian and international group of clinical, research and knowledge-transfer experts attended a workshop in Montreal, Quebec. The workshop had two aims: to identify new pathways for innovative diagnosis and management of chronic orofacial pain states; and to identify opportunities for further collaborative orofacial pain research and education in Canada. Three topics related to chronic orofacial pain were explored: biomarkers and pain signatures for chronic orofacial pain; misuse of analgesic and opioid pain medications for managing chronic orofacial pain; and complementary alternative medicine, topical agents and the role of stress in chronic orofacial pain. It was determined that further research is needed to: identify biomarkers of chronic orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain, with a focus on psychosocial, physiological and chemical-genetic factors; validate the short- and long-term safety (i.e., no harm to health, and avoidance of misuse and addiction) of opioid use for two distinct conditions (acute and chronic orofacial pain, respectively); and promote the use of topical medications as an alternative treatment in dentistry, and further document the benefits and safety of complementary and alternative medicine, including stress management, in dentistry. It was proposed that burning mouth syndrome, a painful condition that is not uncommon and affects mainly postmenopausal women, should receive particular attention. PMID:25522352

  11. Canadian Orofacial Pain Team workshop report on the Global Year Against Orofacial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lavigne, Gilles J; Sessle, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    The year 2013–2014 has been designated the Global Year Against Orofacial Pain by the International Association for the Study of Pain. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary Canadian and international group of clinical, research and knowledge-transfer experts attended a workshop in Montreal, Quebec. The workshop had two aims: to identify new pathways for innovative diagnosis and management of chronic orofacial pain states; and to identify opportunities for further collaborative orofacial pain research and education in Canada. Three topics related to chronic orofacial pain were explored: biomarkers and pain signatures for chronic orofacial pain; misuse of analgesic and opioid pain medications for managing chronic orofacial pain; and complementary alternative medicine, topical agents and the role of stress in chronic orofacial pain. It was determined that further research is needed to: identify biomarkers of chronic orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain, with a focus on psychosocial, physiological and chemical-genetic factors; validate the short-and long-term safety (ie, no harm to health, and avoidance of misuse and addiction) of opioid use for two distinct conditions (acute and chronic orofacial pain, respectively); and promote the use of topical medications as an alternative treatment in dentistry, and further document the benefits and safety of complementary and alternative medicine, including stress management, in dentistry. It was proposed that burning mouth syndrome, a painful condition that is not uncommon and affects mainly postmenopausal women, should receive particular attention. PMID:25522352

  12. Chronic pain management as a barrier to pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lindsay A; Meinert, Elizabeth; Baker, Kimberly; Knapp, Caprice

    2013-12-01

    Pain is common as a presenting complaint to outpatient and emergency departments for children, yet pain management represents one of the children's largest unmet needs. A child may present with acute pain for an intermittent issue or may have acute or chronic pain in the setting of chronic illness. The mainstay of treatment for pain uses a stepwise approach for pain management, such as set up by the World Health Organization. For children with life-limiting illnesses, the Institute of Medicine guidelines recommends referral upon diagnosis for palliative care, meaning that the child receives comprehensive services that include pain control in coordination with curative therapies; yet barriers remain. From the provider perspective, pain can be better addressed through a careful assessment of one's own knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The key components of pain management in children are multimodal, regardless of the cause of the pain. PMID:23329083

  13. Chronic pain management as a barrier to pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lindsay A; Meinert, Elizabeth; Baker, Kimberly; Knapp, Caprice

    2013-12-01

    Pain is common as a presenting complaint to outpatient and emergency departments for children, yet pain management represents one of the children's largest unmet needs. A child may present with acute pain for an intermittent issue or may have acute or chronic pain in the setting of chronic illness. The mainstay of treatment for pain uses a stepwise approach for pain management, such as set up by the World Health Organization. For children with life-limiting illnesses, the Institute of Medicine guidelines recommends referral upon diagnosis for palliative care, meaning that the child receives comprehensive services that include pain control in coordination with curative therapies; yet barriers remain. From the provider perspective, pain can be better addressed through a careful assessment of one's own knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The key components of pain management in children are multimodal, regardless of the cause of the pain.

  14. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0-10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0-10), and perceived analgesic needs (0-10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = -0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R (2) = 0.443, p < 0.0001); expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R (2) = 0.421, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements.

  15. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0–10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0–10), and perceived analgesic needs (0–10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = −0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R2 = 0.443, p < 0.0001); expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R2 = 0.421, p < 0.0001). Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements. PMID:27143966

  16. The relationship between the fear-avoidance model of pain and personality traits in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Pilar; Sánchez, Ana Isabel; Miró, Elena; Medina, Ana; Lami, María José

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between several cognitive-affective factors of the fear-avoidance model of pain, the big five model of personality, and functional impairment in fibromyalgia (FM). Seventy-four FM patients completed the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale-20, the Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire, and the Impairment and Functioning Inventory. Results indicated that the cognitive-affective factors of pain are differentially associated with personality traits. Neuroticism and conscientiousness were significant predictors of pain catastrophizing, and neuroticism, openness, and agreeableness were significant predictors of pain anxiety. Personality traits did not contribute significantly to vigilance to pain. The effect of neuroticism upon pain anxiety was mediated by pain catastrophizing, and neuroticism showed a trend to moderate the relationship between impairment and pain anxiety. Results support the fear-avoidance model of pain. Implications of the findings for the understanding and management of FM are discussed. PMID:21964824

  17. Pain. Part 10: Headaches.

    PubMed

    Chong, M S; Renton, Tara

    2016-06-01

    This last in a series of 10 papers aims to provide the dental and medical teams with an update in headache conditions relevant to dentistry and medicine. Headache is the most common presenting symptom for patients presenting to A&E departments. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Most of the dental team take for granted their knowledge and ability to manage acute dental pain. However, the education and preparation in managing patients with headache conditions remains poor. Dentists are in a privileged position to be able to advise their patients about common conditions including headaches. PMID:27529913

  18. [Group therapy of patients with chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Rosén, G; Kvåle, A; Husebø, S

    1990-11-20

    51 patients suffering chronic pain, with different diagnoses, were treated in groups as outpatients using a cognitive behavioural approach. Groups of 7-8 patients met for two hours a week for six weeks. The groups were led by a team consisting of a clinical psychologist, a physiotherapist and a doctor. The patients learned about different aspects of pain, self-exercise and relaxation by selfhypnosis. Group dynamics was used to strengthen self-esteem, facilitate learning and encourage a change of attitude towards pain. Each patient answered a questionnaire about activities, level of pain, drugs and psychological symptoms before and immediately after treatment, and at follow-up one year later. At follow-up, 43% were less depressed, 70% felt less pain and 50% were more active and used less drugs.

  19. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  20. Shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Shoulder pain covers a wide range of problems and affects up to 20% of the population. It is not a specific diagnosis. Shoulder pain can be caused by problems with the acromioclavicular joint, shoulder muscles, or referred pain from the neck. Rotator cuff problems account for 65-70% of cases of shoulder pain. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral drug treatment; topical drug treatment; local injections; non-drug treatment; and surgical treatment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to February 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 53 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: arthroscopic laser subacromial decompression, corticosteroid injections (intra-articular), corticosteroids (oral, subacromial injection), electrical stimulation, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, guanethidine (intra-articular), ice, laser treatment, manipulation under anaesthesia (plus intra-articular injection in people with frozen shoulder), multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation, nerve block, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (oral, topical or intra-articular injection), opioid analgesics, paracetamol, phonophoresis, physiotherapy (manual treatment, exercises), surgical arthroscopic decompression, transdermal glyceryl trinitrate, ultrasound.

  1. Shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Shoulder pain is a common problem with an estimated prevalence of 4% to 26%. About 1% of adults aged over 45 years consult their GP with a new presentation of shoulder pain every year in the UK. The aetiology of shoulder pain is diverse and includes pathology originating from the neck, glenohumeral joint, acromioclavicular joint, rotator cuff, and other soft tissues around the shoulder girdle. The most common source of shoulder pain is the rotator cuff, accounting for over two-thirds of cases. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral drug treatment, topical drug treatment, local injections, non-drug treatment, and surgical treatment? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, arthroscopic subacromial decompression, autologous whole blood injection, corticosteroids (oral, subacromial injection, or intra-articular injection), electrical stimulation, excision of distal clavicle, extracorporeal shock wave therapy, ice, laser treatment, manipulation under anaesthesia, suprascapular nerve block, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (oral, topical or intra-articular injection), opioid analgesics, paracetamol, physiotherapy (manual treatment, exercises), platelet-rich plasma injection

  2. Fluoroscopy-guided Sacroiliac Joint Steroid Injection for Low Back Pain in a Patient with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, PUA; Rose, REC; Wade, NA

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as ‘brittle bone disease’, is a genetic connective tissue disease. It is characterized by bone fragility and osteopenia (low bone density). In this case, a 57-year old female presented to the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic with left low back pain rated 6/10 on the numeric rating scale (NRS). Clinically, the patient had sacroiliac joint-mediated pain although X-rays did not show the sacroiliac joint changes. Fluoroscopy-guided left sacroiliac joint steroid injection was done. Methods: Numeric rating scale and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire were used to evaluate outcome. This was completed at baseline, one week follow-up and at eight weeks post fluoroscopy-guided sacroiliac joint steroid injection. Results: Numeric rating scale improved from 6/10 before the procedure to 0/10 post procedure, and ODI questionnaire score improved from a moderate disability score of 40% to a minimal disability score of 13%. Up to eight weeks, the NRS was 0/10 and ODI remained at minimal disability of 15%. Conclusion: Fluoroscopy-guided sacroiliac joint injection is a known diagnostic and treatment method for sacroiliac joint mediated pain. To our knowledge, this is the first case published on the use of fluoroscopy-guided sacroiliac joint steroid injection in the treatment of sacroiliac joint mediated low back pain in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta. PMID:26624601

  3. Assessment of visceral pain associated with metritis in dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metritis is a common disease in dairy cattle but to our knowledge no work has assessed pain associated with this disease. Tissue palpation is commonly used to assess pain in human and veterinary medicine. The objective of this study was to evaluate visceral pain responses during rectal and uterine p...

  4. Social influence and pain response in women and men.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Laura E; McCubbin, James A

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of social influence on responses to acute pain in women and men in a randomized experimental design. Sixty-eight undergraduates (32 women; 36 men) were randomly assigned to perform a cold pressor task either alone or in the presence of a same-sex friend. Expressions of pain were assessed with the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Overall social support was measured using the Krause social support assessment scale. The presence of a same-sex friend significantly increased pain reports in women, but not in men. Persons who reported high levels of social support on the Krause scale also reported greater cold pressor pain. Results suggest that the presence of a friend can increase pain report to an acute laboratory pain stimulus in women. These findings are consistent with models of social reinforcement in chronic pain syndromes. PMID:18587638

  5. The assessment of persistent pain after joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, V.; Jeffery, A.; Dieppe, P.; Gooberman-Hill, R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY This study used ‘think aloud’ to explore issues around using a standardised questionnaire to assess persistent pain after joint replacement. Twenty participants with moderate–extreme persistent pain in their replaced hip or knee completed the Chronic Pain Grade (CPG) while ‘thinking aloud’. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Completion of the CPG by patients was influenced by four issues: challenges with the question wording or response options on the CPG items; the fluctuating nature of pain and functional limitations; the need to account for co-morbidities and pain elsewhere; and adjustment to pain. These issues reflect those that have arisen previously in patients with musculoskeletal pain, and need to be considered when assessing persistent joint pain, both before and after joint replacement. PMID:22178464

  6. Gender role expectations of pain: relationship to sex differences in pain.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M E; Riley, J L; Myers, C D; Papas, R K; Wise, E A; Waxenberg, L B; Fillingim, R B

    2001-10-01

    Empirical research supports the existence of sex differences in pain; yet these differences are poorly understood. Although biological mechanisms have been posited to explain variability, results of pain modeling manipulations suggest social learning may be a stronger influence on pain response. In this report we use the term sex to refer to the biological category of male or female. We use the term gender to refer to the socially acquired aspects of being male or female sometimes referred to as femininity and masculinity. This study investigated a new measure, the Gender Role Expectations of Pain questionnaire (GREP), which was designed to measure sex-related stereotypic attributions of pain sensitivity, endurance, and willingness to report pain. Subjects were 156 male and 235 female undergraduates at a southeastern university. Psychometric investigation of the questionnaire revealed a 5-factor solution that closely mirrored the theoretical construction of the items. Test-retest reliability was also shown for individual items on a separate sample of 28 subjects. Results supported hypotheses about gender role: both men and women rated men as less willing to report pain than women (F(1,389) = 336, P <.001); both men and women rated women more sensitive (F(1,389) = 9.5, P <.05) and less enduring of pain (F(1,389) = 65.7, P <.001) than men; and men rated their own endurance as higher than the typical man (F(1,389) = 65.7, P <.001). Sex accounted for 46% of the variance in willingness to report pain. Results suggest that the GREP distinguished between the socially learned reactions to pain for men and women. It is recommended that the influence of gender-related expectations for pain be assessed in all studies investigating human sex differences in pain. PMID:14622803

  7. Health professionals identify components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in questionnaires for the upper limb

    PubMed Central

    Philbois, Stella V.; Martins, Jaqueline; Souza, Cesário S.; Sampaio, Rosana F.; Oliveira, Anamaria S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several Brazilian studies have addressed the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), but few have analyzed the knowledge of the health professionals with regards to the ICF. OBJECTIVE: To verify whether the classification of the items in the Brazilian-Portuguese versions of The Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and The Disabilities Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaires, obtained from health professionals who worked with patients having upper limb injuries, could be related to ICF components as defined by others studies. METHOD: There were 4 participants for the group "professionals with high familiarity of the ICF (PHF)" and 19 for the group of "professionals with some or no familiarity of the ICF (PSNF)". The participants judged whether the items on the two questionnaires belonged to the ICF body function, body structure or activity-participation component, and marked a confidence level for each trial using a numerical scale ranging from zero to 10. The items were classified by the discriminant content validity method using the Student'st-test and the Hochberg correction. The ratings were compared to the literature by the percentage of agreement and Kappa coefficient. RESULTS: The percentage of agreement of the rating from the PSNF and the PHF groups with the literature was equal to or greater than 77%. For the DASH, the agreement of the PSNF and PHF groups with the literature were, respectively, moderate (Kappa=0.46 to 0.48) and substantial (Kappa=0.62 to 0.70). CONCLUSIONS: Health professionals were able to correlate the three components of the ICF for most items on the 2 questionnaires, demonstrating some ease of understanding the ICF components. However, the relation of concept of pain with body function component is not clear for professional and deserves a more attentive approach. PMID:26786076

  8. Occurrence, Characteristics, and Predictors of Pain in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Vivi Lycke; Holm, Are Martin; Kongerud, Johny; Bentsen, Signe Berit; Paul, Steven M; Miaskowski, Christine; Rustøen, Tone

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have provided a detailed characterization of pain in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aims of this cross-sectional study were to describe the occurrence, intensity, locations, and level of interference associated with pain, as well as pain relief; to identify differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics between COPD patients with and without pain; and to determine which demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics were associated with average pain, worst pain, and pain interference. A total of 258 patients with COPD provided information on demographic characteristics; comorbidities; respiratory parameters including dyspnea; body mass index; and symptom characteristics (i.e., anxiety, depression, sleep disturbance, and fatigue). Pain was measured using the Brief Pain Inventory. Of these 258 COPD patients, 157 (61%) reported pain. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to determine which demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics were associated with average pain severity, worst pain severity, and mean pain interference. Lower stages of COPD were associated with higher worst pain and higher pain interference scores. Higher depression scores were associated with higher average pain and higher pain interference scores. In addition, higher number of pain locations was associated with higher average and higher worst pain severity scores. Findings from this study confirm that pain is a significant problem and highlights the need for specific pain management interventions for patients with COPD. More research is needed about specific pain characteristics and symptoms to gain an increased knowledge about the causes of pain in these patients. PMID:27095390

  9. Phantom limb pain: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Virani, Anila; Green, Theresa; Turin, Tanvir C

    2014-09-01

    Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a neuropathic pain condition occurring after amputation of a limb. PLP affects amputees' quality of life and results in loss of productivity and psychological distress. The origin of pain from a non-existing limb creates a challenging situation for both patients and nurses. It is imperative to provide patients and nurses with the knowledge that PLP is a real phenomenon that requires care and treatment. This knowledge will lead to reduced problems for patients by allowing them to talk about PLP and ask for help when needed. Understanding of this phenomenon will enable nurses to appreciate the unique features of this form of neuropathic pain and apply appropriate techniques to promote effective pain management. Performing accurate and frequent assessments to understand the unique characteristics of PLP, displaying a non-judgemental attitude towards patients and teaching throughout the peri-operative process are significant nursing interventions.

  10. Parent Questionnaire on Bilingual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vineland School District, NJ.

    This document provides a questionnaire to be used to determine the attitudes and influence of parents who have children in bilingual education programs. Thirty seven questions are listed, covering such factors as family background, language usage at home, and aspirations for the education of the children. Techniques for administering the…

  11. Questionnaire Research in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inoue, Yukiko

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the survey as a research method based on three questionnaire surveys developed and administered in educational settings: (1) a survey exploring the status aspiration and gender awareness of undergraduate women completed by 62 respondents; (2) a survey of computer-assisted instruction completed by 111…

  12. College Student Services Accreditation Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1979-01-01

    This questionnaire is intended for use as one aspect in accrediting the "Student Personnel Services" which an institution of higher learning provides for students. Areas in question include personal development, health fostering, vocational preparation, effective personalized learning, economic viability, transpersonal offerings, and satisfactory…

  13. Diet History Questionnaire: Canadian Version

    Cancer.gov

    The Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and the DHQ nutrient database were modified for use in Canada through the collaborative efforts of Dr. Amy Subar and staff at the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch, and Dr. Ilona Csizmadi and colleagues in the Division of Population Health and Information at the Alberta Cancer Board in Canada.

  14. Pain and Hand Function.

    PubMed

    Howland, Nicholas; Lopez, Mariela; Zhang, Andrew Y

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a unique somatosensory perception that can dramatically affect our ability to function. It is also a necessary perception, without which we would do irreparable damage to ourselves. In this article, the authors assess the impact of pain on function of the hand. Pain can be categorized into acute pain, chronic pain, and neuropathic pain. Hand function and objective measurements of hand function are analyzed as well as the impact of different types of pain on each of these areas.

  15. Neuropathic pain phenotyping by international consensus (NeuroPPIC) for genetic studies: a NeuPSIG systematic review, Delphi survey, and expert panel recommendations.

    PubMed

    van Hecke, Oliver; Kamerman, Peter R; Attal, Nadine; Baron, Ralf; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Bennett, David L H; Bennett, Michael I; Bouhassira, Didier; Diatchenko, Luda; Freeman, Roy; Freynhagen, Rainer; Haanpää, Maija; Jensen, Troels S; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rice, Andrew S C; Seltzer, Zeʼev; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E; Yarnitsky, David; Smith, Blair H

    2015-11-01

    For genetic research to contribute more fully to furthering our knowledge of neuropathic pain, we require an agreed, valid, and feasible approach to phenotyping, to allow collaboration and replication in samples of sufficient size. Results from genetic studies on neuropathic pain have been inconsistent and have met with replication difficulties, in part because of differences in phenotypes used for case ascertainment. Because there is no consensus on the nature of these phenotypes, nor on the methods of collecting them, this study aimed to provide guidelines on collecting and reporting phenotypes in cases and controls for genetic studies. Consensus was achieved through a staged approach: (1) systematic literature review to identify all neuropathic pain phenotypes used in previous genetic studies; (2) Delphi survey to identify the most useful neuropathic pain phenotypes and their validity and feasibility; and (3) meeting of experts to reach consensus on the optimal phenotype(s) to be collected from patients with neuropathic pain for genetic studies. A basic "entry level" set of phenotypes was identified for any genetic study of neuropathic pain. This set identifies cases of "possible" neuropathic pain, and controls, and includes: (1) a validated symptom-based questionnaire to determine whether any pain is likely to be neuropathic; (2) body chart or checklist to identify whether the area of pain distribution is neuroanatomically logical; and (3) details of pain history (intensity, duration, any formal diagnosis). This NeuroPPIC "entry level" set of phenotypes can be expanded by more extensive and specific measures, as determined by scientific requirements and resource availability.

  16. Parents' Knowledge of Emergent Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Ellen

    This study investigated parents' knowledge of their child's emergent literacy development by administering parent questionnaires that examined parents' beliefs of literacy learning and the early writing and reading experiences of preschool children in their home. A total of 115 questionnaires were administered to parents with children enrolled in…

  17. Pain in Youths With Neuromuscular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Joyce M.; Kartin, Deborah; Carter, Gregory T.; Jensen, Mark P.; Jaffe, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    To examine the prevalence and characteristics of pain in children with neuromuscular disease (NMD), 42 youths with NMD underwent a comprehensive evaluation including a detailed intake interview and structured questionnaire that included demographic and functional data. Youths who reported chronic pain were further queried about pain characteristics, locations, and intensity using an 11-point numerical rating scale and a modified Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). The sample consisted of 24 males (57%) and 18 females (43%), ages ranging from 9 to 20 years (M = 14.8, SD = 2.96). Participants included 14 (37%) with Duchenne-muscular dystrophy, 6 (14%) with myotonic dystrophy, 2 (5%) with Becker dystrophy, 2 (5%) with limb-girdle dystrophy, 2 (5%) with congenital muscular dystrophy, 1 (2%) facioscapulohumeral, and 15 (36%) were classified as “other NMD.” Twenty-one (50%) were ambulatory; 26 (62%) used power wheelchairs/scooters, 9 (2%) used manual wheelchairs, 3 (.07%) used crutches/canes, and 1 (2%) used a walker. A total of 23 (55%) of the youths reported having chronic pain. Current pain intensity was 1.30(range=0–6), mean pain intensity over the past week was 2.39 (range = 0–7), mean pain duration was 8.75 hours (SD=12.84). Pain in the legs was most commonly reported and 83% reported using pain medications. This study indicates that chronic pain is a significant problem in youths with NMD. These data strongly support making comprehensive pain assessment and management an integral part of the standard of care for youths with NMD. PMID:19820205

  18. Preoperative Pain, Symptoms, and Psychological Factors related to Higher Acute Pain Trajectories during Hospitalization for Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Maren Falch; Miaskowski, Christine; Rustøen, Tone; Rosseland, Leiv Arne; Paul, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Unrelieved postoperative pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a significant problem. This longitudinal study investigated how preoperative pain intensity, as well as a comprehensive list of preoperative and perioperative factors, influenced the severity of acute average and worst pain after TKA. Methods Prior to surgery, 203 patients completed a demographic questionnaire, Lee Fatigue Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Brief Pain Inventory was completed prior to surgery as well as through postoperative days (POD) 0 to 4. Clinical data were extracted from medical records. Results Several factors were associated with higher levels of preoperative and postoperative pain. Lower preoperative average and worst pain intensity scores were associated with increases in average and worst postoperative pain from POD1 to POD4. A higher number of comorbidities, higher C-reactive protein values, and higher pain interference with function were associated with higher preoperative levels of average pain. Older age, higher fatigue levels, and higher scores on identity and emotional responses to osteoarthritis (OA) were associated with higher preoperative levels of worst pain. Lower perceived consequences of OA were associated with higher pain from POD1 to POD4. Males and patients with lower preoperative scores for average pain had higher worst pain following surgery. Discussion Patients at higher risk for more severe postoperative pain can be identified through an assessment of pain and other risk factors identified in this study. Future research needs to test the efficacy of interventions that modify patients’ perceptions of living with OA and pain intensity before surgery on short and long term postoperative outcomes. PMID:27583551

  19. Using hypnosis with children for pain management.

    PubMed

    Valente, S M

    1991-01-01

    Although nurses are in a strategic position to use hypnosis to manage a child's cancer pain, many lack the knowledge, the skill, or the exposure to the clinical effectiveness of hypnosis. Hypnosis has been a potent analgesic and anesthetic agent for more than 100 years; it reduces a child's cancer pain and the pain associated with painful procedures. Nurses can use hypnosis to help children diminish pain and cope with lumbar punctures (LPs), bone marrow aspirations (BMAs), and nausea or vomiting from chemotherapy. This article's purpose is to discuss myths, contraindications, research, processes, and effectiveness of hypnosis as a strategy for managing the cancer pain of school-age children. Vignettes from the author's clinical practice illustrate concepts and procedures. PMID:2067959

  20. Using hypnosis with children for pain management.

    PubMed

    Valente, S M

    1991-01-01

    Although nurses are in a strategic position to use hypnosis to manage a child's cancer pain, many lack the knowledge, the skill, or the exposure to the clinical effectiveness of hypnosis. Hypnosis has been a potent analgesic and anesthetic agent for more than 100 years; it reduces a child's cancer pain and the pain associated with painful procedures. Nurses can use hypnosis to help children diminish pain and cope with lumbar punctures (LPs), bone marrow aspirations (BMAs), and nausea or vomiting from chemotherapy. This article's purpose is to discuss myths, contraindications, research, processes, and effectiveness of hypnosis as a strategy for managing the cancer pain of school-age children. Vignettes from the author's clinical practice illustrate concepts and procedures.

  1. Predictive factors for the outcome of multidisciplinary treatments in chronic low back pain at the first multidisciplinary pain center of Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kazuhiro; Arai, Young-Chang P.; Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Nishihara, Makoto; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Hirakawa, Tomoe; Matsuo, Shingo; Kobayashi, Mami; Haruta, Midori; Kawabata, Yuka; Togo, Hiroki; Noguchi, Taiji; Hase, Toshiyuki; Hatano, Genki; Ushida, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Multidisciplinary treatments are recommended for treatment of chronic low back pain. The aim of this study was to show the associations among multidisciplinary treatment outcomes, pretreatment psychological factors, self-reported pain levels, and history of pain in chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 221 chronic low back pain patients were chosen for the study. The pretreatment scores for the 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, Pain Disability Assessment Scale, pain drawings, and history of pain were collected. The patients were divided into two treatment outcome groups a year later: a good outcome group and a poor outcome group. [Results] One-hundred eighteen patients were allocated to the good outcome group. The scores for the Visual Analogue Scale, Pain Disability Assessment Scale, and affective subscale of the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire and number of nonorganic pain drawings in the good outcome group were significantly lower than those in the poor outcome group. Duration of pain in the good outcome group was significantly shorter than in the poor outcome group. [Conclusion] These findings help better predict the efficacy of multidisciplinary treatments in chronic low back pain patients. PMID:26504321

  2. Codification and Validation of Professional Development Questionnaire of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayyoobi, Fatemah; Pourshafei, Hadi; Asgari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Teacher in the educational system and the teaching-learning process, as a main leading should need to knowledge and professional skills. Therefore, evaluation of professional development is important. This study aims to design and modify Construction and Validation of professional development questionnaire of teachers. This research based on…

  3. Chronic Widespread Pain Drawn on a Body Diagram is a Screening Tool for Increased Pain Sensitization, Psycho-Social Load, and Utilization of Pain Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Visser, Eric J; Ramachenderan, Jonathan; Davies, Stephanie J; Parsons, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that chronic widespread pain, (CWP) drawn by patients on a body diagram, could be used as a screening tool for increased pain sensitization, psycho-social load, and utilization of pain management strategies. The triage questionnaires of 144 adults attending a chronic pain outpatients' clinic were audited and the percentage pain surface area (PPSA) drawn on their body diagrams was calculated using the "rule of nines" (RON) method for burns area assessment. Outcomes were measured using the painDETECT Questionnaire (PD-Q) and other indices and compared using a nonrandomized, case-control method. It was found that significantly more subjects with CWP (defined as a PPSA ≥ 20%) reported high (≥ 19) PD-Q scores (suggesting pain "sensitization" or neuropathic pain) (P = 0.0002), "severe" or "extremely severe" anxiety scores on the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 Items Questionnaire (P = 0.0270), ≥ 5 psycho-social stressors (P = 0.0022), ≥ 5 significant life events (P = 0.0098), and used ≥ 7 pain management strategies (PMS) (P < 00001), compared to control subjects with a lower PPSA. A Widespread Pain Index score ≥ 7 (OR = 11.36), PD-Q score ≥ 19 (OR = 4.46) and use of ≥ 7 PMS (OR = 5.49) were independently associated with CWP. This study demonstrates that calculating PPSA on a body diagram (using the RON method) is a valid and convenient "snapshot" screening tool to identify patients with an increased likelihood of pain sensitization, psycho-social load, and utilizing pain management resources.

  4. Efficacy of epidural analgesia for pain management of critically ill patients and the implications for nursing care.

    PubMed

    Slack, J F; Faut-Callahan, M

    1991-11-01

    Management of pain for critically ill patients has been shown to be inadequately controlled and can have serious deleterious effects on a patient's recovery. Continuous epidural analgesia can be used to control pain in critical care patients. This mode of analgesia administration provides pain relief without the delays inherent in the as-needed administration of analgesics. Fifteen critical care unit patients were part of a multidisciplinary, prospective, randomized, double-blind study of various epidural analgesic agents in 43 thoracic and 66 abdominal surgery patients. The purpose of the study was to identify the benefits and problems associated with continuous epidural analgesia administration and the implications for the nursing care of critically ill patients. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the analgesia was based on the following measures: 1) pain measured at regular intervals in the 72-hour period with a visual analog; 2) pain as measured after 72 hours with the word descriptor section of the McGill pain questionnaire; 3) amount of supplemental systemic narcotic analgesic needed; 4) recovery of ambulatory and respiratory function, including ability to perform coughing and deep-breathing exercises; 5) occurrence of adverse effects, and 6) the type and distribution of nursing care problems associated with continuous epidural infusions. The results of this study showed that the level of pain relief and recovery of postoperative function was superior to that provided by the more widely used as-needed systemic administration of narcotics. Although some nursing care problems were identified, continuous epidural analgesia can be used for pain relief in critical care patients, if the analgesia is administered by accurate reliable infusion systems and carefully monitored by nursing staff who are knowledgeable about the pharmacologic considerations of epidural analgesic agents and the management of patient care. PMID:1954060

  5. The Latvian version of the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) and the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ).

    PubMed

    Rumba, I; Ruperto, N; Bikis, E; Remberga, S; Saulite, I; Plotkina, N; Viksna, A; Krauca, M; Breca, I; Vikmanis, U

    2001-01-01

    We report herein the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation into the Latvian language of the parent's version of two health related quality of life instruments. The Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) is a disease specific health instrument that measures functional ability in daily living activities in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ) is a generic health instrument designed to capture the physical and psychosocial well-being of children independently from the underlying disease. The Latvian CHAQ CHQ were fully validated with 1 forward and 1 backward translations. A total of 141 subjects were enrolled: 80 patients with JIA (16% systemic onset, 32.5% polyarticular onset, 19% extended oligoarticular subtype, and 32.5% persistent oligoarticular subtype) and 61 healthy children. The CHAQ clinically discriminated between healthy subjects and JIA patients, with the systemic, polyarticular and extended oligoarticular subtypes having a higher degree of disability, pain, and a lower overall well-being when compared to their healthy peers. Also the CHQ clinically discriminated between healthy subjects and JIA patients, with the systemic onset, polyarticular onset and extended oligoarticular subtypes having a lower physical and psychosocial well-being when compared to their healthy peers. In conclusion the Latvian version of the CHAQ-CHQ is a reliable, and valid tool for the functional, physical and psychosocial assessment of children with JIA.

  6. Postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Lovich-Sapola, Jessica; Smith, Charles E; Brandt, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Prevention and control of postoperative pain are essential. Inadequate treatment of postoperative pain continues to be a major problem after many surgeries and leads to worse outcomes, including chronic postsurgical pain. Optimal management of postoperative pain requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of pain, methods available to reduce pain, invasiveness of the procedure, and patient factors associated with increased pain, such as anxiety, depression, catastrophizing, and neuroticism. Use of a procedure-specific, multimodal perioperative pain management provides a rational basis for enhanced postoperative pain control, optimization of analgesia, decrease in adverse effects, and improved patient satisfaction.

  7. Pain Part 3: Acute Orofacial Pain.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Nadine; Renton, Tara

    2015-06-01

    Acute trigeminal pain is a common presentation in the dental surgery, with a reported 22% of the US adult population experiencing orofacial pain more than once during a 6-month period. This article discusses the mechanisms underlying the pain experience, diagnosis and subsequent management of acute trigeminal pain, encompassing pre-, peri- and post-operative analgesia. The dental team spend most of their working lives managing patients and acute pain. The patient may present to the clinician in existing pain, which may often provide a diagnostic challenge. Prevention and managing intra-operative and post-surgical pain are implicit in providing your patient with optimum care. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This paper aims to provide an overview of conditions that may present with acute orofacial pain and their management using the most recent evidence base. Intra-operative and post-surgical pain management are also scrutinized and evidence based treatment is recommended.

  8. Pain and the ethics of pain management.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R B

    1984-01-01

    In this article I clarify the concepts of 'pain', 'suffering', 'pains of body', 'pains of soul'. I explore the relevance of an ethic to the clinical setting which gives patients a strong prima facie right to freedom from unnecessary and unwanted pain and which places upon medical professionals two concomitant moral obligations to patients. First, there is the duty not to inflict pain and suffering beyond what is necessary for effective diagnosis, treatment and research. Next, there is the duty to do all that can be done to relieve all the pain and suffering which can be alleviated. I develop in some detail that individuality of pain sensitivity must be taken into account in fulfilling these obligations. I explore the issue of the relevance of informed consent and the right to refuse treatment to the matter of pain relief. And I raise the question of what conditions, if any, should override the right to refuse treatment where pain relief is of paramount concern.

  9. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Low Back Pain Overview What is low back pain? Low back pain is a common problem for many people. It can be caused by many ... lift and exercise correctly. Symptoms When is low back pain serious? Call your family doctor if: Pain goes ...

  10. Pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain: prevalence and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Michele; Müller, Monika; Ashraf, Aroosiah; Neziri, Alban Y; Streitberger, Konrad; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Hypersensitivity of pain pathways is considered a relevant determinant of symptoms in chronic pain patients, but data on its prevalence are very limited. To our knowledge, no data on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity are available. We studied the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in 961 consecutive patients with various chronic pain conditions. Pain threshold and nociceptive withdrawal reflex threshold to electrical stimulation were used to assess pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity, respectively. Using 10th percentile cutoff of previously determined reference values, the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity (95% confidence interval) was 71.2 (68.3-74.0) and 80.0 (77.0-82.6), respectively. As a secondary aim, we analyzed demographic, psychosocial, and clinical characteristics as factors potentially associated with pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity using logistic regression models. Both hypersensitivity parameters were unaffected by most factors analyzed. Depression, catastrophizing, pain-related sleep interference, and average pain intensity were significantly associated with hypersensitivity. However, none of them was significant for both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Furthermore, the odds ratios were very low, indicating modest quantitative impact. To our knowledge, this is the largest prevalence study on central hypersensitivity and the first one on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain patients. The results revealed an impressively high prevalence, supporting a high clinical relevance of this phenomenon. Electrical pain thresholds and nociceptive withdrawal reflex explore aspects of pain processing that are mostly independent of sociodemographic, psychological, and clinical pain-related characteristics.

  11. Development of a "Steps Questionnaire".

    PubMed

    Gilbert, F S

    1991-07-01

    Thousands of men and women have begun their recovery from alcoholism through the support of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and its well-known "12-Step" program. The purpose of the present study was to develop a scale to measure alcoholics' levels of agreement with the first three of AA's 12 Steps and to test the relationship between sobriety and belief in these three steps. Using both factor analysis and Rasch analysis, two versions of a "Steps Questionnaire" were developed. A 96-member subset of the original subject pool was assessed quarterly for 1 year following inpatient treatment to determine the predictive validity of the questionnaire. The results of this study suggested that agreement with AA's first three steps can be measured and that agreement with AA's first step correlates with number of sober days posttreatment. The dichotomization of Steps Questionnaire scores into total agreement versus partial agreement with Step 1, and from this the reduction of uncertainty in the prediction of abstention over a lengthy follow-up period, provides support for AA's contention that total surrender to one's powerlessness over alcohol is part of the process of achieving abstention.

  12. The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Spilsbury, James C.; Drotar, Dennis; Rosen, Carol L.; Redline, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: Developed the Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire (CASQ), a brief, self-completed instrument to measure excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Participants: A subsample of 411 adolescents 11–17 years of age recruited from area schools, churches, and “control” participants in a sleep disordered breathing cohort study; a second subsample of 62 adolescents with diagnosed sleep disordered breathing also participating in the sleep disordered breathing study. Measurements: Participants completed the CASQ along with two other available measures of daytime sleepiness and other sleep parameters (sleep duration on school nights, sleep duration on non-school nights, and sleep debt, defined as non-school night sleep duration minus school-night sleep duration). Demographic information was obtained from a caregiver-completed questionnaire. The CASQ was developed using exploratory factor analysis, followed by confirmatory factor analysis using structural equation modeling techniques. Results: Goodness-of-fit measures for the final 16-item scale structure ranged from good to excellent. The CASQ's internal consistency was good (α = 0.89). Correlations between the CASQ, two other measures of daytime sleepiness, and sleep parameters gave preliminary evidence of the CASQ's construct validity. Conclusion: The CASQ shows promise as a valid measure of daytime sleepiness in adolescents. Citation: Spilsbury JC; Drotar D; Rosen CL et al. The cleveland adolescent sleepiness questionnaire: a new measure to assess excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents. PMID:17993042

  13. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerable bursts of sharp pain similar to the pain caused by a dental probe on an exposed nerve. Individuals may have numbness in the areas affected by the pain. The burning and loss of touch sensations are ...

  14. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... focuses on their pain as well as their perception of its severity. Pain that becomes chronic also ... that stimulating the nervous system can modify the perception of pain. Early studies of TENS suggested that ...

  15. Pain: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... illness, our very lives. Pain is a complex perception that differs enormously among individual patients, even those ... that the two peptides are involved in the perception of pain sensations, especially moderate-to-severe pain. ...

  16. Pain medications - narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    Painkillers; Drugs for pain; Analgesics; Opioids ... Narcotics are also called opioid pain relievers. They are used only for pain that is severe and is not helped by other types of painkillers. When used ...

  17. What Is Back Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain PDF Version Size: 127 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 12.5 MB November 2014 What Is Back Pain? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  18. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... leg pain from clogged arteries Stomach/Digestive: Gallstones, intestinal obstruction, diverticulitis, ulcers, severe indigestion, severe gas pain, inflammatory bowel disease, colitis Urinary/Reproductive: Kidney stones, pelvic pain, vulvodynia, ...

  19. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... doses of these medicines can help with chronic low back pain , even if the person does not feel sad ... notices pain. Antidepressants most commonly used for chronic low back pain also help you sleep. Antidepressants most often used ...

  20. Relationship between self-reported pain sensitivity and pain after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study of 71 patients 8 weeks after a standardized fast-track program

    PubMed Central

    Valeberg, Berit T; Høvik, Lise H; Gjeilo, Kari H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose This was a prospective cohort study assessing data from 71 adult patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) following a standardized fast-track program between January and July 2013. The objective was to examine the relationship between self-rated pain sensitivity, as measured by the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ), and postoperative pain after TKA. Methods The baseline questionnaires, PSQ and Brief Pain Inventory, were given to the patients for self-administration at the presurgical evaluation (1–2 weeks prior to surgery). The follow-up questionnaire, Brief Pain Inventory, was administered at the first follow-up, 8 weeks after surgery. Results A statistically significant association was found between average preoperative pain and average pain 8 weeks after surgery (P=0.001). The PSQ-minor was statistically significantly associated with average pain only for patients younger than 70 years (P=0.03). Interpretation This is the first study to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity measured by PSQ and postoperative pain in patients after TKA. We found that a lower score on the PSQ-minor was statistically significantly associated with patients’ pain 8 weeks after TKA surgery, but only for younger patients. Further research is needed to explore whether the PSQ could be a useful screening tool for patients’ pain sensitivity in clinical settings.

  1. Relationship between self-reported pain sensitivity and pain after total knee arthroplasty: a prospective study of 71 patients 8 weeks after a standardized fast-track program

    PubMed Central

    Valeberg, Berit T; Høvik, Lise H; Gjeilo, Kari H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose This was a prospective cohort study assessing data from 71 adult patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) following a standardized fast-track program between January and July 2013. The objective was to examine the relationship between self-rated pain sensitivity, as measured by the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ), and postoperative pain after TKA. Methods The baseline questionnaires, PSQ and Brief Pain Inventory, were given to the patients for self-administration at the presurgical evaluation (1–2 weeks prior to surgery). The follow-up questionnaire, Brief Pain Inventory, was administered at the first follow-up, 8 weeks after surgery. Results A statistically significant association was found between average preoperative pain and average pain 8 weeks after surgery (P=0.001). The PSQ-minor was statistically significantly associated with average pain only for patients younger than 70 years (P=0.03). Interpretation This is the first study to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity measured by PSQ and postoperative pain in patients after TKA. We found that a lower score on the PSQ-minor was statistically significantly associated with patients’ pain 8 weeks after TKA surgery, but only for younger patients. Further research is needed to explore whether the PSQ could be a useful screening tool for patients’ pain sensitivity in clinical settings. PMID:27660489

  2. The Relationship between Neck Pain and Cervical Alignment in Young Female Nursing Staff

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jang-Hun; Kim, Joo Han; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kwon, Taek-Hyun; Park, Yoon-Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Degenerative changes in the cervical spine are commonly accompanied by cervical kyphosis which can cause neck pain. This study examined the relationship between neck pain and cervical alignment. Methods A total of 323 female nursing staff from our hospital were enrolled. Sagittal radiographs of the cervical spine, Body Mass Index (BMI), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) measures of neck and arm pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI) and the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36 scores) were obtained and reviewed retrospectively. Global lordosis (GL) of the cervical spine was measured on radiograph images. Correlations between GL and questionnaire scores were investigated using the following three methods : 1) correlation between GL and questionnaire scores among the entire sample; 2) subgroup analysis of patients with "kyphosis (KYP) : GL scores<0" vs. those with "lordosis (LOR) : GL scores>0" on questionnaire measures; and 3) subgroup analysis of patients with pain vs. those without pain, on GL and questionnaire measures. Results There was no significant correlation between GL and any questionnaire measure. There was a significant difference between the mean GLs of the KYP and LOR groups, but there were no group differences in BMI, age or any questionnaire measures. There was no difference between the pain (n=92) and pain-free (n=231) groups in age, BMI or GL, but there were differences in neck, and arm pain, and physical function and NDI scores. Conclusions Our data suggest that kyphotic deformity was not associated with neck pain. PMID:26539266

  3. Pain management in trauma: A review study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Alireza; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Heidari Zadie, Zahra; Euasobhon, Pramote; Ketumarn, Penkae; Karbasfrushan, Ali; Amini-Saman, Javad; Mohammadi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Pain in trauma has a role similar to the double-edged sword. On the one hand, pain is a good indicator to determine the severity and type of injury. On the other hand, pain can induce sever complications and it may lead to further deterioration of the patient. Therefore, knowing how to manage pain in trauma patients is an important part of systemic approach in trauma. The aim of this manuscript is to provide information about pain management in trauma in the Emergency Room settings. Methods: In this review we searched among electronic and manual documents covering a 15-yr period between 2000 and 2016. Our electronic search included Pub Med, Google scholar, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases. We looked for articles in English and in peer-reviewed journals using the following keywords: acute pain management, trauma, emergency room and injury. Results: More than 3200 documents were identified. After screening based on the study inclusion criteria, 560 studies that had direct linkage to the study aim were considered for evaluation based World Health Organization (WHO) pain ladder chart. Conclusions: To provide adequate pain management in trauma patients require: adequate assessment of age-specific pharmacologic pain management; identification of adequate analgesic to relieve moderate to severe pain; cognizance of serious adverse effects of pain medications and weighting medications against their benefits, and regularly reassessing patients and reevaluating their pain management regimen. Patient-centered trauma care will also require having knowledge of barriers to pain management and discussing them with the patient and his/her family to identify solutions. PMID:27414816

  4. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  5. Development of A Questionnaire to Measure Attitude toward Oocyte Donation

    PubMed Central

    Omani Samani, Reza; Mounesan, Leila; Ezabadi, Zahra; Vesali, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, there is no valid and comprehensive questionnaire that considers attitude toward oocyte donation (OD). Therefore this study has aimed to design and develop a tool entitled attitude toward donation-oocyte (ATOD-O) to measure attitude toward OD. Materials and Methods This methodological, qualitative research was undertaken on 15 infertile cases. In addition, we performed a literature review and search of various databases. Validity of this questionnaire was conducted by knowledgeable experts who determined indices such as relevancy, clarity, and comprehensiveness. Reliability of the questionnaire was assessed based on the opinions of experts and infertile couples referred to Royan Institute. Results ATOD-O was designed in 52 statements that covered various issues such as the OD process, donor and recipient characteristics, as well as family, emotional, psychological, legal, religious, and socio-economic dimensions. Results were scored as five points: 1 (strongly disagree), 2 (disagree), 3 (somewhat), 4 (agree), and 5 (strongly agree). The overall relevancy of the questionnaire was 97% and clarity was 96%. Overall comprehensiveness was 100%. Conclusion The findings from this preliminary validation study have indicated that ATOD-O is a valid measure for measuring and assessing attitude toward donated oocytes. This questionnaire can be used in studies regarding different groups of a society. PMID:26644863

  6. Surgeons' aims and pain assessment strategies when managing paediatric post-operative pain: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Twycross, Alison M; Williams, Anna M; Finley, G Allen

    2015-12-01

    Children experience moderate to severe pain post-operatively. Nurses have been found to have a variety of aims in this context. Surgeons' aims when managing post-operative pain have not been explored. This qualitative study set out to explore paediatric surgeons' aims when managing post-operative pain in one paediatric hospital in Canada. Consultant surgeons (n = 8) across various specialities took part in semi-structured interviews. Surgeons' overarching aim was to keep the child comfortable. Various definitions of comfortable were given, relating to the child's experience of pain itself and their ability to undertake activities of daily living. Children's behavioural pain cues seem to be a primary consideration when making treatment decisions. Parents' views regarding their child's pain were also seen as important, suggesting children may not be seen as competent to make decisions on their own behalf. The need to maintain a realistic approach was emphasised and pain management described as a balancing act. Surgeons may draw on both tacit and explicit knowledge when assessing children's pain. There appears to be an expectation among surgeons that some pain is to be expected post-operatively and that the diagnostic value of pain may, in some cases, supersede concerns for the child's pain experience. PMID:24728398

  7. Surgeons' aims and pain assessment strategies when managing paediatric post-operative pain: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Twycross, Alison M; Williams, Anna M; Finley, G Allen

    2015-12-01

    Children experience moderate to severe pain post-operatively. Nurses have been found to have a variety of aims in this context. Surgeons' aims when managing post-operative pain have not been explored. This qualitative study set out to explore paediatric surgeons' aims when managing post-operative pain in one paediatric hospital in Canada. Consultant surgeons (n = 8) across various specialities took part in semi-structured interviews. Surgeons' overarching aim was to keep the child comfortable. Various definitions of comfortable were given, relating to the child's experience of pain itself and their ability to undertake activities of daily living. Children's behavioural pain cues seem to be a primary consideration when making treatment decisions. Parents' views regarding their child's pain were also seen as important, suggesting children may not be seen as competent to make decisions on their own behalf. The need to maintain a realistic approach was emphasised and pain management described as a balancing act. Surgeons may draw on both tacit and explicit knowledge when assessing children's pain. There appears to be an expectation among surgeons that some pain is to be expected post-operatively and that the diagnostic value of pain may, in some cases, supersede concerns for the child's pain experience.

  8. Which Pain Coping Strategies and Cognitions Are Associated with Outcomes of a Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Neuropathic Pain after Spinal Cord Injury?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic neuropathic pain is one of the most difficult problems to manage after spinal cord injury (SCI). Pain coping and pain cognitions are known to be associated with the patient’s experience of neuropathic pain, but they have not been studied in the context of a cognitive behavioral treatment program for coping with neuropathic pain after SCI. Objective: To explore associations of pain coping strategies and cognitions with pain intensity and pain-related disability and changes in pain coping strategies and cognitions with changes in pain intensity and pain-related disability. Methods: Forty-seven persons who participated in the CONECSI (COping with NEuropathiC Spinal cord Injury pain) trial completed questionnaires before the intervention (baseline) and 3 months after of the intervention (follow-up). Results: Compared to baseline, participants showed more favorable scores on 2 pain coping scales (Pain Transformation and Worrying), the subtotal score Active Coping, and 3 pain cognitions scales (Catastrophizing, Optimism, and Reliance on Health Care) at follow-up. Baseline Reliance on Health Care was associated with change in pain intensity and pain-related disability. Change in Catastrophizing and change in Restriction cognitions were associated with change in pain-related disability. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that modifying pain coping strategies and cognitions by a cognitive behavioral intervention for chronic neuropathic pain after SCI may have some beneficial effects on pain intensity and pain-related disability. Further research should show how dysfunctional pain coping strategies and cognitions can be most effectively modified. PMID:24244098

  9. Orofacial pain: a primer.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Scott S

    2013-07-01

    Orofacial pain refers to pain associated with the soft and hard tissues of the head, face, and neck. It is a common experience in the population that has profound sociologic effects and impact on quality of life. New scientific evidence is constantly providing insight into the cause and pathophysiology of orofacial pain including temporomandibular disorders, cranial neuralgias, persistent idiopathic facial pains, headache, and dental pain. An evidence-based approach to the management of orofacial pain is imperative for the general clinician. This article reviews the basics of pain epidemiology and neurophysiology and sets the stage for in-depth discussions of various painful conditions of the head and neck.

  10. Obesity in children and adolescents with chronic pain: Associations with pain and activity limitations

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Anna C.; Samuelson, Bethany; Palermo, Tonya M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Obesity is associated with functional disability in adults with chronic pain, but less is known about obesity among youth with chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to 1) identify the prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents receiving treatment for chronic pain, and 2) examine associations between Body Mass Index (BMI), pain intensity, and activity limitations in this population. Methods Data was obtained from records of 118 patients, ages 8 to 18, seen in a multidisciplinary pediatric pain clinic. Information about age, gender, pain problem, duration and severity, medical diagnoses, medications, height and weight were collected from medical records and intake questionnaires. The CDC’s pediatric BMI calculator was used to obtain percentile and category (underweight, healthy weight, overweight, obese). Children and parents completed the Child Activity Limitations Interview-21 (CALI-21), a self-report measure of activity limitations. Results A significantly higher rate of overweight and obesity was observed among youth with chronic pain compared to a normative sample. BMI percentile was predictive of concurrent limitations in vigorous activities, according to parent report. Discussion BMI percentile and weight status may contribute to activity limitations among children and adolescents with chronic pain. Weight status is an important factor to consider in the context of treatment of chronic pain and disability in children and adolescents. PMID:20664337

  11. PAIN--perception and assessment of painful procedures in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Britto, Carl Denis; Rao Pn, Suman; Nesargi, Saudamini; Nair, Sitara; Rao, Shashidhar; Thilagavathy, Theradian; Ramesh, Armugam; Bhat, Swarnarekha

    2014-12-01

    This prospective cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine the frequency of procedural pain among 101 neonates in the first 14 days of admission to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in South India and to study the perception of health-care professionals (HCP) about newborn procedural pain. The total number of painful procedures was 8.09 ± 5.53 per baby per day and 68.32 ± 64.78 per baby during hospital stay. The most common procedure was heel prick (30%). The HCP were administered a questionnaire to assess their perception of pain for various procedures. Procedures were perceived as more painful by nurses than by doctors. Chest tube placements and lumbar puncture were considered most painful. This study shows that the neonates in the NICU in developing countries experience many painful procedures. The awareness about this intensity of pain should provide a valuable tool in formulating pain-reduction protocols for management in low resource settings.

  12. Acute pain services in Europe: a 17-nation survey of 105 hospitals. The EuroPain Acute Pain Working Party.

    PubMed

    Rawal, N; Allvin, R

    1998-05-01

    A 17-nation survey was undertaken with the aim of studying the availability of acute pain services (APS) and the use of newer analgesic techniques, such as epidural and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). A questionnaire was mailed to selected anaesthesiologists in 105 European hospitals from 17 countries. Depending on the population, between five and ten representative hospitals from each country were selected by a country coordinator. A total of 101 (96.2%) completed questionnaires were returned. A majority of respondents were dissatisfied with pain management on surgical wards. Pain management was better in post-anaesthesia care units (PACUs); however, 27% of participating hospitals did not have PACUs. There were no organized APS in 64% of hospitals, although anaesthesiologists from chronic pain centres were available for consultation. In the hospitals that had APS, the responsible person for the APS was either: (1) a junior anaesthesiologist (senior anaesthesiologist available for consultation); or (2) a specially trained nurse (supervised by consultant anaesthesiologists). Many anaesthesiologists were unable to introduce techniques such as PCA on wards because of the high equipment costs. Although 40% of hospitals used a visual analogue scale (VAS) or other methods for assessment of pain intensity, routine pain assessment and documenting on a vital sign chart was rarely practised. There was a great variation in routines for opioid prescription and documentation procedures. Nursing regulations regarding injection of drugs into epidural and intrathecal catheters also varied considerably between countries. This survey of 105 hospitals from 17 European countries showed that over 50% of anaesthesiologists were dissatisfied with post-operative pain management on surgical wards. Only 34% of hospitals had an organized APS, and very few hospitals used quality assurance measures such as frequent pain assessment and documentation. There is a need to establish organized

  13. Adolescents' approach-avoidance behaviour in the context of pain.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Emma; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents who experience pain often face competing goals and have to choose whether to approach (confront) or avoid pain. This study investigates the decisions adolescents make when their pain conflicts with a valued goal. Adolescents between the ages of 15 and 18 years (N = 170) completed questionnaires on general and pain-specific anxiety, courage, and dispositional avoidance. Adolescents were presented with 16 vignettes (8 high pain intensity, 8 low pain intensity), which described pain conflicting with a goal (eg, doing well at school, seeing friends). Adolescents rated goals for importance and reported how likely they would be to approach or avoid each pain. Adolescents were more likely to avoid and were more fearful of high pain intensity than low pain intensity vignettes. Pain anxiety predicted higher levels of avoidance for both pain intensities. General anxiety was not a significant predictor of avoidance for either pain intensity. Goal importance promoted approach of goals, but only when pain was described as intense. However, pain anxiety predicted avoidance beyond the importance of goals for high pain intensity vignettes. In addition, we compared approach-avoidance of adolescents with and without chronic pain; analyses revealed no differences in approach-avoidance behaviour. We also found that behavioural endurance was predictive of approach and dispositional avoidance predicted higher avoidance, but courage was not predictive of behaviour in this task. We adopt a motivational perspective when interpreting the findings and consider whether the fear-avoidance model should be extended to include the function of avoidance or approach in the pursuit of a desired goal.

  14. Diagnosis and medical treatment of neuropathic pain in leprosy 1

    PubMed Central

    Arco, Rogerio Del; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Bassi, Thiago Gasperini; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the difficulties in diagnosing and treating neuropathic pain caused by leprosy and to understand the main characteristics of this situation. Methods: 85 patients were treated in outpatient units with reference to leprosy and the accompanying pain. We used a questionnaire known as the Douleur Neuropathic 4 test and we conducted detailed neurological exams. As a result, 42 patients were excluded from the study for not having proved their pain. Results: Out of the 37 patients that experienced pain, 22 (59.5%) had neuropathic pain (or a mixture of this pain and their existing pain) and of these 90.8% considered this pain to be moderate or severe. 81.8% of the sample suffered with this pain for more than 6 months. Only 12 (54.5%) of the patients had been diagnosed with neuropathic pain and in almost half of these cases, this pain had not been diagnosed. With reference to medical treatment (n=12) for neuropathic pain, 5 (41.6%) responded that they became better. For the other 7 (58.4%) there were no changes in relation to the pain or in some cases the pain worsened in comparison to their previous state. Statistical analysis comparing improvements in relation to the pain amongst the patients that were treated (n=12) and those that were not, showed significant differences (value p=0.020). Conclusion: we noted difficulties in diagnosing neuropathic pain for leprosy in that almost half of the patients that were studied had not had their pain diagnosed. We attributed this to some factors such as the non-adoption of the appropriate protocols which led to inadequate diagnosis and treatment that overlooked the true picture. PMID:27508904

  15. Fetal pain perception and pain management.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; Jani, Jacques; De Buck, Frederik; Deprest, J

    2006-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of current science related to the concept of fetal pain. We have answered three important questions: (1) does fetal pain exist? (2) does management of fetal pain benefit the unborn child? and (3) which techniques are available to provide good fetal analgesia?

  16. Pain and musculoskeletal pain syndromes in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Aura Ligia; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Leone, Claudio; Doria-Filho, Ulysses; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2006-06-01

    The presence of musculoskeletal pain was evaluated in adolescents. Pain was reported by 40% of respondents, benign joint hypermobility syndrome by 10%, myofascial syndrome by 5%, tendonitis by 2%, and fibromialgia by 1%. Logistical regression analysis indicated that sex and age were predictive of pain.

  17. Validation of the Tunisian version of the Roland-Morris questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Bejia, Ismail; Younes, Mohamed; Kamel, Ben Sallem; Letaief, Mondher; Touzi, Mongi; Soltani, Mohamed; Bergaoui, Naceur

    2005-03-01

    Our aim was to validate a culturally adapted, Tunisian-language version of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), which is a reliable evaluation instrument for low-back-pain disability. A total of 62 patients with low back pain were assessed by the questionnaire. Reliability for the 1-week test/re-test was assessed by a construction of a Bland Altman plot. Internal construct validity was assessed by Cronbach's alphatest. External construct validity was assessed by association with pain, the Schober test and the General Function Score. Sensitivity to change was determined using a t-test for paired data to compare RMDQ scores at inclusion and at completion of the therapeutic sequence of local corticosteroid injections. We also compared the questionnaire score with the General Function Score, both taken after completion of the therapeutic sequence. The constructed Bland Altman plot showed good reliability. Internal consistency of the RMDQ was found to be very good and the Cronbach's alpha test was 0.94, indicating a good internal construct validity. The questionnaire is correlated with the pain visual analogue scale (r=33; p=0.0001), with the Schober test (r=0.27; p=0.0001) and the General Function Score (r=56; p=0.0001) indicating an adequate external construct validity. The RMDQ administered after the therapeutic sequence is sensitive to change (r=0.83; p=0.000). Comparison of the questionnaire score to the General Function Score, after completion of the therapeutic sequence, was satisfactory (r=0.75; p=0.000). We conclude that the Tunisian version of the Roland-Morris questionnaire has good reliability and internal consistency. Furthermore, it has a good internal- and external construct validity and high sensitivity to change. It is an adequate and useful tool for assessing low-back-pain disability.

  18. Low back pain beliefs are associated to age, location of work, education and pain-related disability in Chinese healthcare professionals working in China: a cross sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Evidence pointing towards a more efficacious model of care using a biopsychosocial approach for LBP management highlights the need to understand the pain-related beliefs of patients and those who treat them. The beliefs held by healthcare professionals (HCPs) are known to influence the treatment advice given to patients and consequently management outcomes. Back pain beliefs are known to be influenced by factors such as culture, education, health literacy, place of work, personal experience of LBP and the sequelae of LBP such as disability. There is currently a knowledge gap among these relationships in non-western countries. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between LBP-related beliefs among Chinese HCPs and characteristics of these HCPs. Methods A convenience sample of 432 HCPs working in various health settings in Shanghai, China, completed a series of questionnaires assessing their demographic characteristics, LBP status, pain-related disability and their beliefs about their own LBP experience, using the Back beliefs Questionnaire (BBQ) and the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ). Results Younger Chinese HCPs (20–29 years) held more negative beliefs and attitudes related to LBP compared to older HCPs (>40years; BBQ mean difference [95% CI]: 2.4 [0.9 - 3.9], p = 0.001). HCPs working outside tertiary hospitals had poorer beliefs concerning the inevitable consequences of LBP (BBQ mean difference [95% CI]: −2.4 [−3.8 - −1.0], p = 0.001). HCPs who experienced LBP had higher level of fear avoidance beliefs when experiencing high LBP-related disability (FABQ-physical mean difference [95% CI]: 2.8 [1.5 - 4.1], p < 0.001; FABQ-work mean difference [95% CI]: 6.2 [4.0 - 8.4], p < 0.001)) and had lower level of fear avoidance beliefs if they had completed postgraduate study (FABQ-physical mean difference [95% CI]: 2.9 [−5.8 - 0.0], p = 0

  19. Improving pain management: breaking down the invisible barrier.

    PubMed

    Mann, E; Redwood, S

    There is compelling evidence that despite growing research into the complex neurophysiology of pain, the development of acute pain services, increasing educational interest in pain management and the proliferation of literature, many patients continue to suffer from unrelieved acute pain while in hospital. Educational efforts to bring about a change in practice have been relatively unsuccessful or slow to have real impact. Although it is still recognized that poor knowledge of pain control by all healthcare professionals is the major barrier to improving pain management, contemporary studies show that other, more subtle barriers can just as effectively inhibit a timely and effective response to patients' reports of pain. These barriers are not just the ones created by poor knowledge, myth and misconception; the most powerful barriers to change may be the invisible institutional barriers that can be entrenched within hospital policies and nursing rituals.

  20. Psychological aspects of acute low back pain in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Iain C.

    1983-01-01

    A prospective controlled study of acute low back pain in general practice was carried out. The presence of psychiatric illness was measured by use of the general health questionnaire (GHQ), by clinical assessment, and personality factors by use of the Eysenck personality inventory (EPI). It was found that overall the amount of psychiatric illness did not differ between patients with back pain and their controls at the time of presentation, although there was a higher prevalence of previous psychiatric illness in the back-pain group. The only difference in the personality factors measured was a higher degree of extraversion in the back-pain patients. PMID:6224930

  1. Sickle cell disease pain management in adolescents: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bridget H; Nelson, Jessica

    2015-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) pain continues to emerge in adolescents. More than 98,000 individuals are believed to have SCD in the United States. In fact, 1 in 500 Black infants will be affected by SCD. Identifying standards of care for this unique population can improve pain management and treatment. A significant effect of vaso-occlusive crisis is a decrease in the quality of life in children. Therefore, pain management is multidimensional and includes pharmacologic, physical, and psychological strategies. A review of the literature was conducted to identify best practices regarding pain management in adolescents with sickle cell anemia. Key words such as pain, pain management, adolescent sickle cell anemia, and acute sickle cell pain were entered into databases to reveal qualitative and quantitative studies from 2009 to the present. Many of the research articles identified poor SCD pain management. Studies showed that acute SCD pain management is essential and should be evaluated and robustly managed to achieve optimum pain relief for patients. Acute SCD pain usually occurs as a result of vaso-occlusive crisis. Untreated acute SCD pain can result in morbidity and mortality in adolescents. Nursing knowledge is critical to reducing the stigma and improving management of SCD pain. Nurses play a vital role in the introduction of evidence-based practice within the clinical setting. In an effort to educate nurses and other health care professionals about SCD, this article is a literature review of studies concerning SCD and pain management in emergency rooms.

  2. Risk factors for opioid overdose and awareness of overdose risk among veterans prescribed chronic opioids for addiction or pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilder, Christine M.; Miller, Shannon C.; Tiffany, Elizabeth; Winhusen, Theresa; Winstanley, Erin L.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rising overdose fatalities among US veterans suggest veterans taking prescription opioids may be at risk for overdose. However, it is unclear whether veterans prescribed chronic opioids are aware of this risk. Objectives The objective of this study was to identify risk factors and determine awareness of risk for opioid overdose in veterans treated with opioids for chronic pain, using veterans treated with methadone or buprenorphine for opioid use disorder as a high-risk comparator group. Methods Ninety veterans on chronic opioid medication for either opioid use disorder or pain management completed a questionnaire assessing risk factors, knowledge, and self-estimate of risk for overdose. Results Nearly all veterans in both groups had multiple overdose risk factors although individuals in the pain management group had on average a significantly lower total number of risk factors than did individuals in the opioid use disorder group (5.9 v. 8.5, p<0.0001). On average, participants treated for pain management scored slightly but significantly lower on knowledge of opioid overdose risk factors (12.1 v. 13.5, p<0.01). About 70% of participants, regardless of group, believed their overdose risk was below that of the average American adult. There was no significant relationship between self-estimate of overdose risk and either number or knowledge of opioid overdose risk factors. Discussion Our results suggest that veterans in both groups underestimated their risk for opioid overdose. Expansion of overdose education to include individuals on chronic opioids for pain management and a shift in educational approaches to overdose prevention may be indicated. PMID:26566771

  3. Normalizing suffering: A meta-synthesis of experiences of and perspectives on pain and pain management in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv; Bondas, Terese E

    2016-01-01

    Older people who live in nursing homes commonly suffer from pain. Therefore, relieving suffering among older people that stems from pain demands knowledge improvement through an integration of international knowledge. This study aimed to integrate current international findings and strengthen the understanding of older people's experiences of and perspectives on pain and pain management in nursing homes. A meta-synthesis study using Noblit and Hare's interpretative meta-ethnography approach was conducted. Empirical research papers from journals were collected from various databases. The search process and appraisal determined six articles for inclusion. Two studies were conducted in the US and one each in Iceland, Norway, the UK, and Australia. The older people's experiences of pain as well as perspectives on pain management from all involved (older people, their family members, and healthcare staff) were integrated into a theoretical model using three themes of "identity of pain," "recognition of pain," and "response to pain." The metaphor of "normalizing suffering" was devised to illustrate the meaning of pain experiences and pain management in nursing homes. Society's common attitude that pain is unavoidable and therefore acceptable in old age in society-among older people themselves as well as those who are responsible for reporting, acknowledging, and relieving pain-must change. The article emphasizes that pain as a primary source of suffering can be relieved, provided that older people are encouraged to report their pain. In addition, healthcare staff require sufficient training to take a person-centered approach towards assessment and management of pain that considers all elements of pain. PMID:27173102

  4. Myofascial pain syndromes and their evaluation.

    PubMed

    Giamberardino, Maria Adele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Fabrizio, Alessandra; Costantini, Raffaele

    2011-04-01

    This article reviews the available published knowledge about the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of myofascial pain syndromes from trigger points. Furthermore, epidemiologic data and clinical characteristics of these syndromes are described, including a detailed account of sensory changes that occur at both painful and nonpainful sites and their utility for diagnosis and differential diagnosis; the identification/diagnostic criteria available so far are critically reviewed. The key role played by myofascial trigger points as activating factors of pain symptoms in other algogenic conditions--headache, fibromyalgia and visceral disease--is also addressed. Current hypotheses on the pathophysiology of myofascial pain syndromes are presented, including mechanisms of formation and persistence of primary and secondary trigger points as well as mechanisms beyond referred pain and hyperalgesia from trigger points. Conventional and most recent therapeutic options for these syndromes are described, and their validity is discussed on the basis of results from clinical controlled studies.

  5. Recent Advances in Postoperative Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Mitra, Sukanya; Narayan, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Good pain control after surgery is important to prevent negative outcomes such as tachycardia, hypertension, myocardial ischemia, decrease in alveolar ventilation, and poor wound healing. Exacerbations of acute pain can lead to neural sensitization and release of mediators both peripherally and centrally. Clinical wind up occurs from the processes of N-Methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA) activation, wind up central sensitization, long-term potentiation of pain (LTP), and transcription-dependent sensitization. Advances in the knowledge of molecular mechanisms have led to the development of multimodal analgesia and new pharmaceutical products to treat postoperative pain. The new pharmacological products to treat postoperative pain include extended-release epidural morphine and analgesic adjuvants such as capsaicin, ketamine, gabapentin, pregabalin dexmetomidine, and tapentadol. Newer postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in modes such as intranasal, regional, transdermal, and pulmonary presents another interesting avenue of development. PMID:20351978

  6. Hypnosis: adjunct therapy for cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Kravits, Kathy

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a symptom associated with prolonged recovery from illness and procedures, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care costs. While there have been advances in the management of cancer pain, there is a need for therapeutic strategies that complement pharmaceutical management without significantly contributing to the side-effect profile of these agents. Hypnosis provides a safe and efficacious supplement to pharmaceutical management of cancer pain. One barrier to the regular use of hypnosis is health-care providers' lack of current knowledge of the efficacy and safety of hypnosis. Advanced practitioners who are well-informed about hypnosis have an opportunity to increase the treatment options for patients who are suffering with cancer pain by suggesting to the health-care team that hypnosis be incorporated into the plan of care. Integration of hypnosis into the standard of care will benefit patients, caregivers, and survivors by reducing pain and the suffering associated with it. PMID:25031986

  7. Hypnosis: Adjunct Therapy for Cancer Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Kravits, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a symptom associated with prolonged recovery from illness and procedures, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care costs. While there have been advances in the management of cancer pain, there is a need for therapeutic strategies that complement pharmaceutical management without significantly contributing to the side-effect profile of these agents. Hypnosis provides a safe and efficacious supplement to pharmaceutical management of cancer pain. One barrier to the regular use of hypnosis is health-care providers’ lack of current knowledge of the efficacy and safety of hypnosis. Advanced practitioners who are well-informed about hypnosis have an opportunity to increase the treatment options for patients who are suffering with cancer pain by suggesting to the health-care team that hypnosis be incorporated into the plan of care. Integration of hypnosis into the standard of care will benefit patients, caregivers, and survivors by reducing pain and the suffering associated with it. PMID:25031986

  8. [Management of chronic pain after inguinal hernioplasty].

    PubMed

    Minossi, José Guilherme; Minossi, Vinícius Vendites; Silva, Alcino Lázaro da

    2011-01-01

    Chronic groin pain after herniorrhaphy is a concern, as approximately 10% of patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair have symptoms, which often limit physical ability. The etiopathogenesis is related to periostitis pubis (somatic pain) and more often to nerve injury (neuropathic pain). It is clinically important to distinguish between these two types of pain because treatment can be different. The physician should establish a routine diagnosis and treatment, and most patients will need surgical approach. Prevention of this condition is of great importance and can lead to a lower incidence of the syndrome. Some measures are key, such as how to avoid application of stitches or clips to the pubis periosteum, using the prosthesis carefully and identifying the nerves in the groin. This last measure is certainly the most important in the prevention of chronic pain and involves thorough knowledge of anatomy and the use of refined technique.

  9. A questionnaire survey on attitudes and understanding towards mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Siu, B W M; Chow, K K W; Lam, L C W; Chan, W C; Tang, V W K; Chui, W W H

    2012-03-01

    OBJECTIVES. To obtain information about basic knowledge towards mental disorders and to evaluate public attitudes towards mental disorders in the Hong Kong Chinese population. METHODS. Questionnaires which collected basic demographic information, opinions about potential stigmas and myths, and knowledge on case vignettes depicting fictional characters with symptoms of mental illness were delivered to subjects in a secondary school, 2 homes for the elderly, a private housing estate, and a public housing estate in Hong Kong. RESULTS. Completed questionnaires were collected from 1035 subjects. In general, the participants' acceptance of mental illness was good. Regular contacts with such patients were associated with better knowledge (t = -2.71, p < 0.01) and better acceptance (t = 2.77, p < 0.01) of mental illness. Younger participants aged 15 to 19 years had a lower level of knowledge about mental health problems compared with other age-groups (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS. Personal contact with people with mental illness may help to improve knowledge and acceptance. Younger people in secondary school should be the target and prioritised group for mental health education. Apart from the delivery of mental health knowledge, strategies to increase social contact of the public with people having mental illness could be considered in the design and implementation of anti-stigma programmes.

  10. Orofacial pain syndromes: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Klasser, Gary D

    2014-11-01

    Patients will often visit their primary medical practitioner with orofacial pain complaints. Hence, it is important to recognize and have an understanding of these conditions to properly evaluate and potentially manage these disorders. If the practitioner is uncertain or uncomfortable with these conditions, then patient referral to a knowledgeable health care practitioner should be considered for further evaluation and management. In this article, the evaluation and management of various neuropathic, neurovascular, and vascular pains are discussed. PMID:25443681

  11. The cerebral signature for pain perception and its modulation.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Irene; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2007-08-01

    Our understanding of the neural correlates of pain perception in humans has increased significantly since the advent of neuroimaging. Relating neural activity changes to the varied pain experiences has led to an increased awareness of how factors (e.g., cognition, emotion, context, injury) can separately influence pain perception. Tying this body of knowledge in humans to work in animal models of pain provides an opportunity to determine common features that reliably contribute to pain perception and its modulation. One key system that underpins the ability to change pain intensity is the brainstem's descending modulatory network with its pro- and antinociceptive components. We discuss not only the latest data describing the cerebral signature of pain and its modulation in humans, but also suggest that the brainstem plays a pivotal role in gating the degree of nociceptive transmission so that the resultant pain experienced is appropriate for the particular situation of the individual. PMID:17678852

  12. Advances in clinical research methodology for pain clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Farrar, John T

    2010-11-01

    Pain is a ubiquitous phenomenon, but the experience of pain varies considerably from person to person. Advances in understanding of the growing number of pathophysiologic mechanisms that underlie the generation of pain and the influence of the brain on the experience of pain led to the investigation of numerous compounds for treating pain. Improved knowledge of the subjective nature of pain, the variations in the measurement of pain, the mind-body placebo effect and the impact of differences in the conduct of a clinical trial on the outcome have changed approaches to design and implement studies. Careful consideration of how these concepts affect the choice of study population, the randomization and blinding process, the measurement and collection of data, and the analysis and interpretation of results should improve the quality of clinical trials for potential pain therapies.

  13. Pain Management in Four-Limb Amputation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Warner, Nafisseh S; Warner, Matthew A; Moeschler, Susan M; Hoelzer, Bryan C

    2015-09-01

    Acute pain following amputation can be challenging to treat due to multiple underlying mechanisms and variable clinical responses to treatment. Furthermore, poorly controlled preoperative pain is a risk factor for developing chronic pain. Evidence suggests that epidural analgesia and peripheral nerve blockade may decrease the severity of residual limb pain and the prevalence of phantom pain after lower extremity amputation. We present the perioperative analgesic management of a patient with gangrene of the bilateral upper and lower extremities as a result of septic shock and prolonged vasopressor administration who underwent four-limb amputation in a single procedure. A multimodal analgesic regimen was utilized, including titration of preoperative opioid and neuropathic pain agents, perioperative intravenous, epidural and peripheral nerve catheter infusions, and postoperative oral medication titration. More than 8 months postoperatively, the patient has satisfactory pain control with no evidence for phantom limb pain. To our knowledge, there have been no publications to date concerning analgesic regimens in four-limb amputation.

  14. An Insight Into Neurophysiology of Pulpal Pain: Facts and Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Abhishek; N., Meena

    2013-01-01

    Pain and pain control are important to the dental profession because the general perception of the public is that dental treatment and pain go hand in hand. Successful dental treatment requires that the source of pain be detected. If the origin of pain is not found, inappropriate dental care and, ultimately, extraction may result. Pain experienced before, during, or after endodontic therapy is a serious concern to both patients and endodontists, and the variability of discomfort presents a challenge in terms of diagnostic methods, endodontic therapy, and endodontic knowledge. This review will help clinicians understand the basic neurophysiology of pulpal pain and other painful conditions of the dental pulp that are not well understood. PMID:24156000

  15. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions.

  16. Pain syndromes in children.

    PubMed

    Malleson, Pete; Clinch, Jacqui

    2003-09-01

    This review discusses the recent literature on pain conditions in children that should be of interest to rheumatologists. The focus of the review is therefore on musculoskeletal pains in children, particularly chronic or recurrent musculoskeletal pain. Articles that have a broader focus on pain are discussed when these are likely to be of general interest to rheumatologists. Chronic or recurrent pain in childhood is common and can be caused by a wide variety of conditions, several of which are discussed here. The importance of being able to measure pain in children has been emphasized repeatedly in the recent literature. With increased understanding of how to evaluate pain in children has come the recognition that pain in children is multifactorial and that even when there are obvious "organic" causes of the pain (such as arthritis), psychosocial factors are critical in how pain is perceived, and they influence the extent to which pain leads to dysfunction. There is also increasing evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapies are effective in managing chronic pain in children. The frequency of back pain in children is increasingly recognized, and the role of children's work and play, carrying heavy backpacks, and sitting for long periods of time at computers in causing back pain is of interest. The studies reviewed here add to an increasingly rich and informative literature on musculoskeletal and other chronic pain in children, and they help emphasize the importance of proper evaluation and management of pain in children. PMID:12960483

  17. Physical, lifestyle, psychological, and social determinants of pain intensity, pain disability, and the number of pain locations in depressed older adults.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, Denise J C; Naarding, Paul; Collard, Rose M; Comijs, Hannie C; Oude Voshaar, Richard C

    2014-10-01

    Late-life depression and pain more often co-occur than can be explained by chance. Determinants of pain in late-life depression are unknown, even though knowledge on possible determinants of pain in depression is important for clinical practice. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were 1) to describe pain characteristics of depressed older adults and a nondepressed comparison group, and 2) to explore physical, lifestyle, psychological, and social determinants of acute and chronic pain intensity, disability, and multisite pain in depressed older adults. Data from the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons cohort, consisting of 378 depressed persons, diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition criteria, and 132 nondepressed persons aged 60 years and older, were used in a cross-sectional design. Pain characteristics were measured by the Chronic Graded Pain Scale. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to explore the contribution of physical, lifestyle, psychological, and social determinants to outcomes pain intensity, disability, and the number of pain locations. Depressed older adults more often reported chronic pain and experienced their pain as more intense and disabling compared to nondepressed older adults. Adjusted for demographic, physical, and lifestyle characteristics, multinomial logistic regression analyses showed increased odds ratios (OR) for depression in acute pain (OR 3.010; P=0.005) and chronic pain (OR 4.544, P<0.001). In addition, linear regression analyses showed that acute and chronic pain intensity, disability, and multisite pain were associated with several biopsychosocial determinants, of which anxiety was most pronounced. Further research could focus on the temporal relationship between anxiety, late-life depression, and pain.

  18. Pain-Related Fear: A Critical Review of the Related Measures

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, M.; Grimby-Ekman, A.; Verbunt, J.; Simmonds, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: In regards to pain-related fear, this study aimed to: (1) identify existing measures and review their measurement properties, and (2) identify the optimum measure for specific constructs of fear-avoidance, pain-related fear, fear of movement, and kinesiophobia. Design: Systematic literature search for instruments designed to measure fear of pain in patients with persistent musculoskeletal pain. Psychometric properties were evaluated by adjusted Wind criteria. Results: Five questionnaires (Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ), Fear-Avoidance of Pain Scale (FAPS), Fear of Pain Questionnaire (FPQ), Pain and Anxiety Symptoms Scale (PASS), and the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK)) were included in the review. The main findings were that for most questionnaires, there was no underlying conceptual model to support the questionnaire's construct. Psychometric properties were evaluated by diverse methods, which complicated comparisons of different versions of the same questionnaires. Construct validity and responsiveness was generally not supported and/or untested. Conclusion: The weak construct validity implies that no measure can currently identify who is fearful. The lack of evidence for responsiveness restricts the current use of the instruments to identify clinically relevant change from treatment. Finally, more theoretically driven research is needed to support the construct and thus the measurement of pain-related fear. PMID:22191022

  19. Brain morphological alternation in chronic pain patients with neuropathic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sugimine, Satomi; Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Obata, Hideaki; Saito, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathic characteristics are highly involved in the development of chronic pain both physically and psychologically. However, little is known about the relationship between neuropathic characteristics and brain morphological alteration. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms of chronic pain development by examining the above-mentioned relationships by voxel-based morphometry in patients with chronic pain. Methods First, we assessed neuropathic characteristics using the painDETECT Questionnaire in 12 chronic pain patients. Second, to assess the gray matter volume changes by voxel-based morphometry, we conducted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. We applied multiregression analysis of these two assessment methods. Results There were significant positive correlations between painDETECT Questionnaire scores and the gray matter volume in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex and right posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions Our findings suggest that neuropathic characteristics strongly affect the brain regions related to modulation of pain in patients with chronic pain and, therefore, contribute to the severity of chronic pain. PMID:27284013

  20. A Pain Management Decision Support System for Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Heriot, Cathy; Graves, Judith; Bouhaddou, Omar; Armstrong, Margaret; Wigertz, Gudrun; Ben Said, Mohamed

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the development and uses of the Nursing Pain Management Consultation System, a prototype demonstration project for Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) at the University of Utah. A knowledge base representing the best current thinking regarding management of acute pain secondary to total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the knowledge core of the expert system. The decisions modeled range from assessment of the severity of pain to decisions related to both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches to the alleviation of pain. The system also advises the nurses on measures to assess and prevent complications of the treatments.

  1. Pharmacogenetics of Chronic Pain and Its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Světlík, Svatopluk; Hronová, Karolína; Bakhouche, Hana; Matoušková, Olga; Slanař, Ondřej

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the impact of genetic variability of drug metabolizing enzymes, transporters, receptors, and pathways involved in chronic pain perception on the efficacy and safety of analgesics and other drugs used for chronic pain treatment. Several candidate genes have been identified in the literature, while there is usually only limited clinical evidence substantiating for the penetration of the testing for these candidate biomarkers into the clinical practice. Further, the pain-perception regulation and modulation are still not fully understood, and thus more complex knowledge of genetic and epigenetic background for analgesia will be needed prior to the clinical use of the candidate genetic biomarkers. PMID:23766564

  2. An Exploratory Study into Objective and Reported Characteristics of Neuropathic Pain in Women with Chronic Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Lucy H. R.; Reid, Jen; Choa, Alex; McFee, Stuart; Seretny, Marta; Wilson, John; Elton, Rob A.; Vincent, Katy; Horne, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) affects 5.7–26.6% women worldwide. 55% have no obvious pathology and 40% have associated endometriosis. Neuropathic pain (NeP) is pain arising as a consequence of a lesion/disease affecting the somatosensory system. The prevalence of NeP in women with CPP is not known. The diagnosis of NeP is challenging because there is no gold-standard assessment. Questionnaires have been used in the clinical setting to diagnose NeP in other chronic pain conditions and quantitative sensory testing (QST) has been used in a research setting to identify abnormal sensory function. We aimed to determine if women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) have a neuropathic pain (NeP) component to their painful symptoms and how this is best assessed. We performed an exploratory prospective cohort study of 72 pre-menopausal women with a diagnosis of CPP. They underwent a clinician completed questionnaire (DN4) and completed the S-LANSS and PainDETECT™ questionnaires. Additionally QST testing was performed by a clinician. They also completed a patient acceptability questionnaire. Clinical features of NeP were identified by both questionnaires and QST. Of the women who were NeP positive, 56%, 35% and 26% were identified by the S-LANSS, DN4 and PainDETECT™ respectively. When NeP was identified by questionnaire, the associated laparoscopy findings were similar irrespective of which questionnaire was used. No subject had entirely unchanged QST parameters. There were distinct loss and gain subgroups, as well as mixed alteration in function, but this was not necessarily clinically significant in all patients. 80% of patients were confident that questionnaires could diagnose NeP, and 90% found them easy to complete. Early identification of NeP in women with CPP with a simple questionnaire could facilitate targeted therapy with neuromodulators, which are cheap, readily available, and have good safety profiles. This approach could prevent unnecessary or fertility

  3. Development and testing of nurses' perceptions of the use of hydrotherapy in labor questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Stark, Mary Ann; Miller, Michael G

    2010-01-01

    While effective for labor pain, hydrotherapy is not often used. The purpose of this study was to develop and test an instrument of nurses' perceptions of the barriers to the use of hydrotherapy in labor. Following generation of items and review by content experts, the Nurses' Perceptions of the Use of Hydrotherapy in Labor (NPUHL) questionnaire was administered to 65 intrapartum nurses (phase I) and to 401 nurses (phase II). In phase I, the mean score of the NPUHL was significantly and negatively correlated with the Labor Support Scale (r = -.30, p = .016), indicating that nurses who demonstrated more labor-supportive behaviors also perceived fewer barriers to the use of hydrotherapy in labor. In phase II, exploratory factor analysis revealed five factors: Health Care Environment, Knowledge and Beliefs, Personal Concerns, Effort Required for Hydrotherapy, and Technology. There was a significant negative correlation (r = -.61) between use of hydrotherapy and the total NPUHL score and those of its subscales (r = -.12 to -.61); nurses with access to hydrotherapy tubs perceived fewer barriers to hydrotherapy than nurses without (t = 9.71, df= 387, p < .01). For the revised 30-item NPUHL, Cronbach's alpha was .93, and subscale alphas ranged from .58 to .93. The 30-item NPUHL scale demonstrated evidence of good initial reliability and validity.

  4. Synergistic effect of a rehabilitation program and treadmill exercise on pain and dysfunction in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Ki; Kim, Dae-Young; Jung, Sun-Young; Seong, Jun-Hyuk

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The present study examined the influence of treadmill exercise added to a low back pain rehabilitation program on low back extensor strength, pain, and dysfunction in chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty men aged 22-36 years with chronic low back pain were randomly divided into experimental and control groups of 10 patients each. Both groups underwent a low back pain rehabilitation program lasting 30 min each, thrice/week for 8 weeks. The experimental group was prescribed an additional 30 min of treadmill exercise without a slope at a speed of 3.0-3.5 km/h, at which patients could walk comfortably. Low back extensor strength was tested using the Medx lumbar extension machine, pain level was tested, using the visual analog scale, and dysfunction was tested, using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire. [Results] Changes in low back extensor strength by angle showed significant interaction effects between measurement time and group at 12°, 24°, and 36°. The results of the visual analog scale and Oswestry Questionnaire showed a decreasing trend after the experiment in both groups. However, there was no interaction effect of the additional treadmill exercise in the experimental group. [Conclusion] The combination of a low back pain rehabilitation program and treadmill exercise has a synergistic effect, to some extent, on the improvement of low back extensor strength and should be considered for treatment and rehabilitation of low back pain patients.

  5. The Validation of a Food Label Literacy Questionnaire for Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Jesse S.; Treu, Judith A.; Njike, Valentine; Walker, Jennifer; Smith, Erica; Katz, Catherine S.; Katz, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the reliability and validity of a 10-item questionnaire, the Food Label Literacy for Applied Nutrition Knowledge questionnaire. Methods: Participants were elementary school children exposed to a 90-minute school-based nutrition program. Reliability was assessed via Cronbach alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient…

  6. Development of a Questionnaire to Measure Secondary School Pupils' Attitudes to Computers and Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The development, testing, and characteristics of an instrument--Computers and Robots Attitude Questionnaire--that can be used to measure the attitudes of secondary students towards computers and robots are described. Individual questionnaire items are largely content-free and may be answered by students with no specialist knowledge of…

  7. Chronic Low Back Pain: Perception and Coping With Pain in the Presence of Psychiatric Comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Ciaramella, Antonella; Poli, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    This retrospective study investigated the influence of psychiatric comorbidity on pain perception and coping with pain in tertiary pain clinic patients, 427 treated for chronic low back pain (CLBP) and 629 for other forms of chronic pain (CG). No differences in psychosomatic dimensions were found between the two groups, but Italian Pain Questionnaire dimensions and intensity scores (t = 7.35; p < 0.0001) were higher in CLBP than in CG subjects. According to the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, CLBP patients also had a higher prevalence of lifetime major depressive episodes (χ2 = 4.96; p < 0.05), dysthymic disorder (χ2 = 4.64; p < 0.05), suicide risk (χ2 = 10.43; p < 0.01), and agoraphobia (χ2 = 6.31; p < 0.05) than CG patients did. The Multidimensional Pain Inventory showed a close association between CLBP and both agoraphobia (χ2 = 3.74; p < 0.05) and dysfunctional coping style (χ2 = 8.25; p < 0.01), which increased disability. Both agoraphobia and lifetime depression were associated with an overall increase in dimensions and pain intensity in CLBP, but not in CG. PMID:26153889

  8. The relationship between pain severity and patient-reported outcomes among patients with chronic low back pain in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, William; Vietri, Jeffrey; Shi, Jing; Ogawa, Kei; Kariyasu, Sawako; Alev, Levent; Nakamura, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of pain severity on patient-reported outcomes among individuals diagnosed with chronic low back pain in Japan. Methods Data were provided by the 2012 Japan National Health and Wellness Survey (N=29,997), a web-based survey of individuals in Japan aged ≥18 years. This analysis included respondents diagnosed with low back pain of ≥3-month duration. Measures included the revised Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Survey Instrument, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scale, the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment: General Health questionnaire, and self-reported all-cause health care visits (6 months). Generalized linear models were used to assess the relationship between outcomes and severity of pain in the past week as reported on a numeric rating scale ranging from 0 (no pain) to 10 (pain as bad as you can imagine), controlling for length of diagnosis, sociodemographics, and general health characteristics. Results A total of 290 respondents were included in the analysis; mean age was 56 years, 41% were females, and 56% were employed. Pain severity was 3/10 for the first quartile, 5/10 for the median, and 7/10 for the third quartile of this sample. Increasing severity was associated with lower scores for mental and physical component summaries and Short-Form 6D health utility, higher depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9) and anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7) scores, greater absenteeism and presenteeism, greater activity impairment, and more health care provider visits (all P<0.0001). Conclusion The impact of chronic low back pain on health-related quality of life, depression and anxiety symptoms, impairment to work and daily activities, and health care use increases with the severity of pain. Interventions reducing the severity of pain may improve numerous health outcomes even if the pain cannot be eliminated. PMID:27330326

  9. Database of Standardized Questionnaires About Walking & Bicycling

    Cancer.gov

    This database contains questionnaire items and a list of validation studies for standardized items related to walking and biking. The items come from multiple national and international physical activity questionnaires.

  10. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Pain in Construction Workers in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find out the prevalence, characteristics, and distribution of musculoskeletal pain among construction workers in Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire about musculoskeletal pain in different parts of the body was completed by 165 construction workers from the construction industries in Dammam and Riyadh cities. The descriptive data were analyzed using chi-square test. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Eighty (48.5%) of the responding workers had pain in neck, shoulders, lower back, hand, knee, or ankle. The majority of respondents had low back pain (50%) followed by knee pain (20%). The average intensity of pain at all sites during activity and rest was 6.65 and 3.59, respectively. Thirty-four (42.5%) respondents had dull aching pain and 24 (30%) had cramping pain. There was an association between years of experience, duration of break during work, and use of protective equipment with the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in construction workers (P < 0.05). Most of the workers complaining of pain got medical treatment (62.5%) and only 25% received physical therapy. It can be concluded from this study that the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among construction workers in Saudi Arabia is high. PMID:25811043

  11. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in construction workers in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to find out the prevalence, characteristics, and distribution of musculoskeletal pain among construction workers in Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire about musculoskeletal pain in different parts of the body was completed by 165 construction workers from the construction industries in Dammam and Riyadh cities. The descriptive data were analyzed using chi-square test. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Eighty (48.5%) of the responding workers had pain in neck, shoulders, lower back, hand, knee, or ankle. The majority of respondents had low back pain (50%) followed by knee pain (20%). The average intensity of pain at all sites during activity and rest was 6.65 and 3.59, respectively. Thirty-four (42.5%) respondents had dull aching pain and 24 (30%) had cramping pain. There was an association between years of experience, duration of break during work, and use of protective equipment with the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in construction workers (P < 0.05). Most of the workers complaining of pain got medical treatment (62.5%) and only 25% received physical therapy. It can be concluded from this study that the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among construction workers in Saudi Arabia is high.

  12. The application of conditioning paradigms in the measurement of pain.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Xu

    2013-09-15

    Pain is a private experience that involves both sensory and emotional components. Animal studies of pain can only be inferred by their responses, and therefore the measurement of reflexive responses dominates the pain literature for nearly a century. It has been argued that although reflexive responses are important to unveil the sensory nature of pain in organisms, pain affect is equally important but largely ignored in pain studies primarily due to the lack of validated animal models. One strategy to begin to understand pain affect is to use conditioning principles to indirectly reveal the affective condition of pain. This review critically analyzed several procedures that are thought to measure affective learning of pain. The procedures regarding the current knowledge, the applications, and their advantages and disadvantages in pain research are discussed. It is proposed that these procedures should be combined with traditional reflex-based pain measurements in future studies of pain, which could greatly benefit both the understanding of neural underpinnings of pain and preclinical assessment of novel analgesics.

  13. The application of conditioning paradigms in the measurement of pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Xu

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a private experience that involves both sensory and emotional components. Animal studies of pain can only be inferred by their responses, and therefore the measurement of reflexive responses dominate the pain literature for nearly a century. It has been argued that although reflexive responses are important to unveil the sensory nature of pain in organisms, pain affect is equally important but largely ignored in pain studies primarily due to the lack of validated animal models. One strategy to begin to understand pain affect is to use conditioning principles to indirectly reveal the affective condition of pain. This review critically analyzed several procedures that are thought to measure affective learning of pain. The procedures regarding the current knowledge, the applications, and their advantages and disadvantages in pain research are discussed. It is proposed that these procedures should be combined with traditional reflex-based pain measurements in future studies of pain, which could greatly benefit both the understanding of neural underpinnings of pain and preclinical assessment of novel analgesics. PMID:23500202

  14. Normalizing suffering: A meta-synthesis of experiences of and perspectives on pain and pain management in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv; Bondas, Terese E.

    2016-01-01

    Older people who live in nursing homes commonly suffer from pain. Therefore, relieving suffering among older people that stems from pain demands knowledge improvement through an integration of international knowledge. This study aimed to integrate current international findings and strengthen the understanding of older people's experiences of and perspectives on pain and pain management in nursing homes. A meta-synthesis study using Noblit and Hare's interpretative meta-ethnography approach was conducted. Empirical research papers from journals were collected from various databases. The search process and appraisal determined six articles for inclusion. Two studies were conducted in the US and one each in Iceland, Norway, the UK, and Australia. The older people's experiences of pain as well as perspectives on pain management from all involved (older people, their family members, and healthcare staff) were integrated into a theoretical model using three themes of “identity of pain,” “recognition of pain,” and “response to pain.” The metaphor of “normalizing suffering” was devised to illustrate the meaning of pain experiences and pain management in nursing homes. Society's common attitude that pain is unavoidable and therefore acceptable in old age in society—among older people themselves as well as those who are responsible for reporting, acknowledging, and relieving pain—must change. The article emphasizes that pain as a primary source of suffering can be relieved, provided that older people are encouraged to report their pain. In addition, healthcare staff require sufficient training to take a person-centered approach towards assessment and management of pain that considers all elements of pain. PMID:27173102

  15. The Relationship between Pain Beliefs and Physical and Mental Health Outcome Measures in Chronic Low Back Pain: Direct and Indirect Effects.

    PubMed

    Baird, Andrew; Sheffield, David

    2016-08-19

    Low back pain remains a major health problem with huge societal cost. Biomedical models fail to explain the disability seen in response to reported back pain and therefore patients' beliefs, cognitions and related behaviours have become a focus for both research and practice. This study used the Pain Beliefs Questionnaire and had two aims: To examine the extent to which pain beliefs are related to disability, anxiety and depression; and to assess whether those relationships are mediated by pain self-efficacy and locus of control. In a sample of 341 chronic low back pain patients, organic and psychological pain beliefs were related to disability, anxiety and depression. However, organic pain beliefs were more strongly related to disability and depression than psychological pain beliefs. Regression analyses revealed that these relationships were in part independent of pain self-efficacy and locus of control. Further, mediation analyses revealed indirect pathways involving self-efficacy and, to a lesser extent chance locus of control, between organic pain beliefs, on the one hand, and disability, anxiety and depression, on the other. In contrast, psychological pain beliefs were only directly related to disability, anxiety and depression. Although longitudinal data are needed to corroborate our findings, this study illustrates the importance of beliefs about the nature of pain and beliefs in one's ability to cope with pain in determining both physical and mental health outcomes in chronic low back pain patients.

  16. The Relationship between Pain Beliefs and Physical and Mental Health Outcome Measures in Chronic Low Back Pain: Direct and Indirect Effects

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Andrew; Sheffield, David

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain remains a major health problem with huge societal cost. Biomedical models fail to explain the disability seen in response to reported back pain and therefore patients’ beliefs, cognitions and related behaviours have become a focus for both research and practice. This study used the Pain Beliefs Questionnaire and had two aims: To examine the extent to which pain beliefs are related to disability, anxiety and depression; and to assess whether those relationships are mediated by pain self-efficacy and locus of control. In a sample of 341 chronic low back pain patients, organic and psychological pain beliefs were related to disability, anxiety and depression. However, organic pain beliefs were more strongly related to disability and depression than psychological pain beliefs. Regression analyses revealed that these relationships were in part independent of pain self-efficacy and locus of control. Further, mediation analyses revealed indirect pathways involving self-efficacy and, to a lesser extent chance locus of control, between organic pain beliefs, on the one hand, and disability, anxiety and depression, on the other. In contrast, psychological pain beliefs were only directly related to disability, anxiety and depression. Although longitudinal data are needed to corroborate our findings, this study illustrates the importance of beliefs about the nature of pain and beliefs in one’s ability to cope with pain in determining both physical and mental health outcomes in chronic low back pain patients. PMID:27548244

  17. The Relationship between Pain Beliefs and Physical and Mental Health Outcome Measures in Chronic Low Back Pain: Direct and Indirect Effects.

    PubMed

    Baird, Andrew; Sheffield, David

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain remains a major health problem with huge societal cost. Biomedical models fail to explain the disability seen in response to reported back pain and therefore patients' beliefs, cognitions and related behaviours have become a focus for both research and practice. This study used the Pain Beliefs Questionnaire and had two aims: To examine the extent to which pain beliefs are related to disability, anxiety and depression; and to assess whether those relationships are mediated by pain self-efficacy and locus of control. In a sample of 341 chronic low back pain patients, organic and psychological pain beliefs were related to disability, anxiety and depression. However, organic pain beliefs were more strongly related to disability and depression than psychological pain beliefs. Regression analyses revealed that these relationships were in part independent of pain self-efficacy and locus of control. Further, mediation analyses revealed indirect pathways involving self-efficacy and, to a lesser extent chance locus of control, between organic pain beliefs, on the one hand, and disability, anxiety and depression, on the other. In contrast, psychological pain beliefs were only directly related to disability, anxiety and depression. Although longitudinal data are needed to corroborate our findings, this study illustrates the importance of beliefs about the nature of pain and beliefs in one's ability to cope with pain in determining both physical and mental health outcomes in chronic low back pain patients. PMID:27548244

  18. The Stages of Mailed Questionnaire Returning Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockhart, Daniel C.

    1984-01-01

    Six stages are hypothesized that define the behavior of returning mailed questionnaires: receiving the questionnaire, opening the mail, forming an overall impression, answering the questions, returning the questionnaire, and dealing with nonrespondents. The researcher must provide incentives at each stage if potential respondents are to complete a…

  19. 19 CFR 357.105 - Questionnaires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Questionnaires. 357.105 Section 357.105 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SHORT SUPPLY PROCEDURES § 357.105 Questionnaires. For reviews conducted under section 106(b)(2), the Secretary normally will send questionnaires...

  20. 19 CFR 357.105 - Questionnaires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Questionnaires. 357.105 Section 357.105 Customs... Questionnaires. For reviews conducted under section 106(b)(2), the Secretary normally will send questionnaires to potential producers/suppliers of the product to determine whether it is in short supply....

  1. [Low back pain in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Majchrzycki, Marian; Mrozikiewicz, Przemysław M; Kocur, Piotr; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Hoffmann, Marcin; Stryła, Wanda; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2010-11-01

    Pain of lumbosacral segment of the vertebral column and the pelvis concerns about 45% of all pregnant women. The change of the body posture during pregnancy is the result of gravity centre relocation, which affects the musculosceletal system. Development of the joint, ligament and myofascial dysfunctions, as well as the pain in the lumbosacral segment and the pelvis, are the most common reasons of spine pain. The aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge about lumbar spine pain in pregnant women with special focus on the pain connected with muscular, joint and ligament disorders. Pregnancy is a serious burden for the female osteo-skeletal system. Lumbar pain with different location and intensification is the negative consequence of the position changes during pregnancy. Pharmacotherapy could be useful only in cases of intensive low back pain, with possible application of small spectrum of drugs that are safe during pregnancy. Physical therapy including manual therapy exercises, massage and techniques of local anesthesia are alternative methods in case of low back pain in pregnant women.

  2. Pelvic pain after childbirth: a longitudinal population study.

    PubMed

    Bjelland, Elisabeth Krefting; Owe, Katrine Mari; Pingel, Ronnie; Kristiansson, Per; Vangen, Siri; Eberhard-Gran, Malin

    2016-03-01

    In this longitudinal population study, the aims were to study associations of mode of delivery with new onset of pelvic pain and changes in pelvic pain scores up to 7 to 18 months after childbirth. We included 20,248 participants enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (1999-2008) without preexisting pelvic pain in pregnancy. Data were obtained by 4 self-administered questionnaires and linked to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. A total of 4.5% of the women reported new onset of pelvic pain 0 to 3 months postpartum. Compared to unassisted vaginal delivery, operative vaginal delivery was associated with increased odds of pelvic pain (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.59). Planned and emergency cesarean deliveries were associated with reduced odds of pelvic pain (adjusted OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.74 and adjusted OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.49-0.87, respectively). Planned cesarean delivery, young maternal age, and low Symptom Checklist-8 scores were associated with low pelvic pain scores after childbirth. A history of pain was the only factor associated with increased pelvic pain scores over time (P = 0.047). We conclude that new onset of pelvic pain after childbirth was not commonly reported, particularly following cesarean delivery. Overall, pelvic pain scores were rather low at all time points and women with a history of pain reported increased pelvic pain scores over time. Hence, clinicians should follow up women with pelvic pain after a difficult childbirth experience, particularly if they have a history of pain. PMID:26588694

  3. Pelvic pain after childbirth: a longitudinal population study.

    PubMed

    Bjelland, Elisabeth Krefting; Owe, Katrine Mari; Pingel, Ronnie; Kristiansson, Per; Vangen, Siri; Eberhard-Gran, Malin

    2016-03-01

    In this longitudinal population study, the aims were to study associations of mode of delivery with new onset of pelvic pain and changes in pelvic pain scores up to 7 to 18 months after childbirth. We included 20,248 participants enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (1999-2008) without preexisting pelvic pain in pregnancy. Data were obtained by 4 self-administered questionnaires and linked to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. A total of 4.5% of the women reported new onset of pelvic pain 0 to 3 months postpartum. Compared to unassisted vaginal delivery, operative vaginal delivery was associated with increased odds of pelvic pain (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.59). Planned and emergency cesarean deliveries were associated with reduced odds of pelvic pain (adjusted OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.74 and adjusted OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.49-0.87, respectively). Planned cesarean delivery, young maternal age, and low Symptom Checklist-8 scores were associated with low pelvic pain scores after childbirth. A history of pain was the only factor associated with increased pelvic pain scores over time (P = 0.047). We conclude that new onset of pelvic pain after childbirth was not commonly reported, particularly following cesarean delivery. Overall, pelvic pain scores were rather low at all time points and women with a history of pain reported increased pelvic pain scores over time. Hence, clinicians should follow up women with pelvic pain after a difficult childbirth experience, particularly if they have a history of pain.

  4. Examining the ecological validity of the Talent Development Environment Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Russell J J; Collins, Dave; Douglas, Carl; Whike, Ally

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that high class expertise and effective practice exists within many talent development environments across the world. However, there is also a general consensus that widespread evidence-based policy and practice is lacking. As such, it is crucial to develop solutions which can facilitate effective dissemination of knowledge and promotion of evidence-based talent development systems. While the Talent Development Environment Questionnaire (Martindale et al., 2010 ) provides a method through which this could be facilitated, its ecological validity has remained untested. As such, this study aimed to investigate the real world applicability of the questionnaire through discriminant function analysis. Athletes across ten distinct regional squads and academies were identified and separated into two broad levels, 'higher quality' (n = 48) and 'lower quality' (n = 51) environments, based on their process quality and productivity. Results revealed that the Talent Development Environment Questionnaire was able to discriminate with 77.8% accuracy. Furthermore, in addition to the questionnaire as a whole, two individual features, 'quality preparation' (P < 0.01) and 'understanding the athlete' (P < 0.01), were found to be significant discriminators. In conclusion, the results indicate robust structural properties and sound ecological validity, allowing the questionnaire to be used with more confidence in applied and research settings.

  5. The effect of perinatal education on Iranian mothers' stress and labor pain.

    PubMed

    Firouzbakht, Mozhgan; Nikpour, Maryam; Salmalian, Hajar; Ledari, Farideh Mohsenzadeh; Khafri, Sorya

    2014-01-01

    Lack of sufficient knowledge about the unknowns of pregnancy increases stress and requires more medical interventions. This study was conducted to assess the effects of prenatal education on mothers' stress and labor. This clinical trial was conducted to study 195 women (132 in the control group and 63 in the experimental group) who had attended healthcare centers in the city of Amol after their 16th gestational week. The experimental group participated in educational classes to learn how to experience a safe childbirth for 6-8 sessions of 1.5 hours almost every three weeks. The control group received only a routine care, pain assessment scales like Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and McGill questionnaire, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were employed to collect data. The data were analyzed using SPSS software through t-test and Chi Square test to compare the groups. The results of the t-test showed a meaningful difference in levels of stress felt by the experimental group compared to control group (p=0.002). The Visual Analogue Scale suggested that in the transitional stages (8-10 cm cervical dilation), the level of pain felt by the experimental group was meaningfully lower than that felt by the control group (p=0.03). However, this was not significantly different between the two groups at 3-4 cm cervical dilation and the second stage of childbirth. The McGill scale's results for measuring pain levels, proved a meaningful difference between the experimental group and the control group (p=0.018).Educational and supportive interventions increased mothers' knowledge during pregnancy and reduced their fear of unknown environment and people. These trained women learned how to effectively overcome their problems and labor pain.

  6. The effect of cushioning insoles on back and lower extremity pain in an industrial setting.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, John R

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between low back pain and lower extremity pain in a group of factory workers and determine the effect of cushioning insoles on low back pain and lower extremity pain. Data were gathered via questionnaire from 306 employees of an aircraft engine assembly factory. A subset of 40 workers who had reported significant levels of back or lower extremity pain were sampled for four consecutive 12-hour shifts wearing their normal footwear and then a week later for four consecutive shifts wearing cushioning insoles. High levels of low back pain and lower extremity pain were reported by workers on the plant floor, but low back pain was poorly correlated to lower extremity pain (r = 0.371). The effect of insoles on the subset of 40 workers was to lower low back pain by 38%, foot pain by 37%, and knee pain by 38% (p < .001). The reduction in low back pain, however, was not correlated to the reduction in lower extremity pain; workers reporting a decrease in low back pain differed from those reporting less lower extremity pain.

  7. Correlates of satisfaction with pain treatment in the acute postoperative period: results from the international PAIN OUT registry.

    PubMed

    Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Gerbershagen, Hans J; Taylor, Rod S; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Komann, Marcus; Rothaug, Judith; Volk, Thomas; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Zaslansky, Ruth; Brill, Silviu; Ullrich, Kristin; Gordon, Debra B; Meissner, Winfried

    2014-07-01

    Patient ratings of satisfaction with their postoperative pain treatment tend to be high even in those with substantial pain. Determinants are poorly understood and have not previously been studied in large-scale, international datasets. PAIN OUT, a European Union-funded acute pain registry and research project, collects patient-reported outcome data on postoperative day 1 using the self-reported International Pain Outcome Questionnaire (IPO), and patient, clinical, and treatment characteristics. We investigated correlates of satisfaction and consistency of effects across centres and countries using multilevel regression modelling. Our sample comprised 16,868 patients (median age 55 years; 55% female) from 42 centres in 11 European countries plus Israel, USA, and Malaysia, who underwent a wide range of surgical procedures, for example, joint, limb, and digestive tract surgeries. Median satisfaction was 9 (interquartile range 7-10) on a 0-10 scale. Three IPO items showed strong associations and explained 35% of the variability present in the satisfaction variable: more pain relief received, higher allowed participation in pain treatment decisions, and no desire to have received more pain treatment. Patient factors and additional IPO items reflecting pain experience (eg, worst pain intensity), pain-related impairment, and information on pain treatment added little explanatory value, partially due to covariate correlations. Effects were highly consistent across centres and countries. We conclude that satisfaction with postoperative pain treatment is associated with the patients' actual pain experience, but more strongly with impressions of improvement and appropriateness of care. To the degree they desire, patients should be provided with information and involved in pain treatment decisions. PMID:24785269

  8. Assessment and Treatment of Pain during Treatment of Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Barogui, Yves T.; Sopoh, Ghislain; Phillips, Richard O.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Loth, Susanne; Molenbuur, Bouwe; Plantinga, Mirjam; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is described as a relatively painless condition; however clinical observations reveal that patients do experience pain during their treatment. Knowledge on current pain assessment and treatment in BU is necessary to develop and implement a future guideline on pain management in BU. Methodology A mixed methods approach was used, consisting of information retrieved from medical records on prescribed pain medication from Ghana and Benin, and semi-structured interviews with health care personnel (HCP) from Ghana on pain perceptions, assessment and treatment. Medical records (n = 149) of patients treated between 2008 and 2012 were collected between November 2012 and August 2013. Interviews (n = 11) were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and qualitatively analyzed. Principal Findings In 113 (84%) of the 135 included records, pain medication, mostly simple analgesics, was prescribed. In 48% of the prescriptions, an indication was not documented. HCP reported that advanced BU could be painful, especially after wound care and after a skin graft. They reported not be trained in the assessment of mild pain. Pain recognition was perceived as difficult, as patients were said to suppress or to exaggerate pain, and to have different expectations regarding acceptable pain levels. HCP reported a fear of side effects of pain medication, shortage and irregularities in the supply of pain medication, and time constraints among medical doctors for pain management. Conclusions Professionals perceived BU disease as potentially painful, and predominantly focused on severe pain. Our study suggests that pain in BU deserves attention and should be integrated in current treatment. PMID:26402069

  9. The Biochemical Origin of Pain – Proposing a new law of Pain: The origin of all Pain is Inflammation and the Inflammatory Response PART 1 of 3 – A unifying law of pain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We are proposing a unifying theory or law of pain, which states: The origin of all pain is inflammation and the inflammatory response. The biochemical mediators of inflammation include cytokines, neuropeptides, growth factors and neurotransmitters. Irrespective of the type of pain whether it is acute or chronic pain, peripheral or central pain, nociceptive or neuropathic pain, the underlying origin is inflammation and the inflammatory response. Activation of pain receptors, transmission and modulation of pain signals, neuro plasticity and central sensitization are all one continuum of inflammation and the inflammatory response. Irrespective of the characteristic of the pain, whether it is sharp, dull, aching, burning, stabbing, numbing or tingling, all pain arise from inflammation and the inflammatory response. We are proposing a re-classification and treatment of pain syndromes based upon their inflammatory profile. Treatment of pain syndromes should be based on these principles: Determination of the inflammatory profile of the pain syndromeInhibition or suppression of production of the appropriate inflammatory mediators e.g. with inflammatory mediator blockers or surgical intervention where appropriateInhibition or suppression of neuronal afferent and efferent (motor) transmission e.g. with anti-seizure drugs or local anesthetic blocksModulation of neuronal transmission e.g. with opioid medication At the L.A. Pain Clinic, we have successfully treated a variety of pain syndromes by utilizing these principles. This theory of the biochemical origin of pain is compatible with, inclusive of, and unifies existing theories and knowledge of the mechanism of pain including the gate control theory, and theories of pre-emptive analgesia, windup and central sensitization. PMID:17240081

  10. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated.

  11. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated. PMID:9037997

  12. Chiropractic care for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  13. Managing your chronic back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  14. Assessment of pain and agitation in critically ill infants.

    PubMed

    Ramelet, A S

    1999-09-01

    Critically ill infants are subjected to many painful experiences that, if inadequately treated, can have severe physiological and psychological consequences. Optimal management of pain relies on the adequacy of nurses' assessment; this, however, is complicated by another common condition, agitation. A multidimensional assessment is therefore necessary to adequately identify pain and agitation. The aim of this descriptive study was to identify the cues that nurses caring for critically ill infants use to assess pain and agitation. A questionnaire, developed from the literature, was distributed to all registered nurses (85) working in the neonatal and paediatric intensive care units of an Australian teaching hospital. Questionnaires were completed by 41 nurses (a 57 per cent response rate). Results revealed that, except for diagnosis, there were no significant differences between the cues participants used to assess pain and those to assess agitation. Nurses used numerous cues from various sources: most importantly, their own judgement (99 per cent); the parents' judgement (90 per cent); the infant's environment; documentation (78 per cent), and the infant's cues (70 per cent). These findings demonstrate the relevance of the nurse's role in assessment of pain and agitation in critically ill infants. Nurses used cues specific to the critically ill rather than the less sick infant. Results of this study also show the difficulty of differentiating between pain and agitation. Further research on ways of distinguishing between the construct of pain and agitation needs to be undertaken.

  15. Cognitive Biases Questionnaire for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Emmanuelle R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The Cognitive Biases Questionnaire for psychosis (CBQp) was developed to capture 5 cognitive distortions (jumping to conclusions, intentionalising, catastrophising, emotional reasoning, and dichotomous thinking), which are considered important for the pathogenesis of psychosis. Vignettes were adapted from the Cognitive Style Test (CST),1 relating to “Anomalous Perceptions” and “Threatening Events” themes. Method: Scale structure, reliability, and validity were investigated in a psychosis group, and CBQp scores were compared with those of depressed and healthy control samples. Results: The CBQp showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The 5 biases were not independent, with a 2-related factor scale providing the best fit. This structure suggests that the CBQp assesses a general thinking bias rather than distinct cognitive errors, while Anomalous Perception and Threatening Events theme scores can be used separately. Total CBQp scores showed good convergent validity with the CST, but individual biases were not related to existing tasks purporting to assess similar reasoning biases. Psychotic and depressed populations scored higher than healthy controls, and symptomatic psychosis patients scored higher than their nonsymptomatic counterparts, with modest relationships between CBQp scores and symptom severity once emotional disorders were partialled out. Anomalous Perception theme and Intentionalising bias scores showed some specificity to psychosis. Conclusions: Overall, the CBQp has good psychometric properties, although it is likely that it measures a different construct to existing tasks, tentatively suggested to represent a bias of interpretation rather than reasoning, judgment or decision-making processes. It is a potentially useful tool in both research and clinical arenas. PMID:23413104

  16. Can a back pain screening tool help classify patients with acute pain into risk levels for chronic pain?

    PubMed Central

    Mehling, W.E.; Avins, A.L.; Acree, M.C.; Carey, T.S.; Hecht, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The 9-item STarT-Back screening tool was developed in primary care patients with low back pain (LBP) to identify those at greatest risk for chronic pain and requiring targeted treatment. We conducted a secondary data analysis study to examine the performance of comparable questionnaire items in a sample of primary care patients with well-defined acute LBP. Methods In a prospective cohort study, 605 primary care patients with LBP of less than 30 days answered a questionnaire with 6 items identical and 3 items analogous to the 9-item STarT-Back. Participants were followed up at 6 months and 2 years. STarT-Back rules were applied to classify participant's risk of chronic LBP, and the performance of the screening items in predicting outcomes was assessed using likelihood ratios. Results The proportion of patients with chronic pain at follow-up was considerably lower (6 months: 22%; 2 years: 25%) than in the STarT-Back validation cohort (40%) of patients with pain of any duration. The probability of developing chronic pain given a high-risk designation by items similar to the STarT-Back increased the pre-test probability to 31% and 35%. Likelihood ratios were close to 1. Conclusions A risk classification schema using the recommended cut-off scores with items similar to the STarT-Back in a primary care population with strictly defined acute LBP had limited ability to identify persons who progressed to chronic pain. The results suggest caution when applying the STarT-Back in patients with acute LBP and a need to consider a modification of its cut-offs. PMID:25381748

  17. 78 FR 45259 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Federal Labor Standards Questionnaire(s...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Questionnaire(s); Complaint Intake Form AGENCY: Office of Labor Relations, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HUD is... Standards Questionnaire; Complaint Intake Form. OMB Approval Number: 2501-0018. Type of Request: Extension... 4730SP, Federal Labor Standards Questionnaires, will be used by HUD and agencies administering...

  18. 75 FR 41876 - Federal Labor Standards Questionnaire(s); Complaint Intake Form

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Federal Labor Standards Questionnaire(s); Complaint Intake Form AGENCY: Office of the...: Federal Labor Standards Questionnaire(s); Complaint Intake Form. OMB Approval Number: 2501-0018....

  19. A magnetoencephalography study of visual processing of pain anticipation.

    PubMed

    Machado, Andre G; Gopalakrishnan, Raghavan; Plow, Ela B; Burgess, Richard C; Mosher, John C

    2014-07-15

    Anticipating pain is important for avoiding injury; however, in chronic pain patients, anticipatory behavior can become maladaptive, leading to sensitization and limiting function. Knowledge of networks involved in pain anticipation and conditioning over time could help devise novel, better-targeted therapies. With the use of magnetoencephalography, we evaluated in 10 healthy subjects the neural processing of pain anticipation. Anticipatory cortical activity elicited by consecutive visual cues that signified imminent painful stimulus was compared with cues signifying nonpainful and no stimulus. We found that the neural processing of visually evoked pain anticipation involves the primary visual cortex along with cingulate and frontal regions. Visual cortex could quickly and independently encode and discriminate between visual cues associated with pain anticipation and no pain during preconscious phases following object presentation. When evaluating the effect of task repetition on participating cortical areas, we found that activity of prefrontal and cingulate regions was mostly prominent early on when subjects were still naive to a cue's contextual meaning. Visual cortical activity was significant throughout later phases. Although visual cortex may precisely and time efficiently decode cues anticipating pain or no pain, prefrontal areas establish the context associated with each cue. These findings have important implications toward processes involved in pain anticipation and maladaptive pain conditioning.

  20. A magnetoencephalography study of visual processing of pain anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Raghavan; Plow, Ela B.; Burgess, Richard C.; Mosher, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Anticipating pain is important for avoiding injury; however, in chronic pain patients, anticipatory behavior can become maladaptive, leading to sensitization and limiting function. Knowledge of networks involved in pain anticipation and conditioning over time could help devise novel, better-targeted therapies. With the use of magnetoencephalography, we evaluated in 10 healthy subjects the neural processing of pain anticipation. Anticipatory cortical activity elicited by consecutive visual cues that signified imminent painful stimulus was compared with cues signifying nonpainful and no stimulus. We found that the neural processing of visually evoked pain anticipation involves the primary visual cortex along with cingulate and frontal regions. Visual cortex could quickly and independently encode and discriminate between visual cues associated with pain anticipation and no pain during preconscious phases following object presentation. When evaluating the effect of task repetition on participating cortical areas, we found that activity of prefrontal and cingulate regions was mostly prominent early on when subjects were still naive to a cue's contextual meaning. Visual cortical activity was significant throughout later phases. Although visual cortex may precisely and time efficiently decode cues anticipating pain or no pain, prefrontal areas establish the context associated with each cue. These findings have important implications toward processes involved in pain anticipation and maladaptive pain conditioning. PMID:24790165

  1. A novel human surrogate model of noninjurious sharp mechanical pain.

    PubMed

    Shabes, Polina; Schloss, Natalie; Magerl, Walter; Schmahl, Christian; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Baumgärtner, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    We propose a blade as a noninjurious nociceptive stimulus modeling sharp mechanical pain and yielding acute pain and hyperalgesia responses with closer proximity to incision-induced pain/hyperalgesia than punctate or blunt pressure mechanical pain models. Twenty-six healthy men and women were investigated to compare a small incision in the left forearm with noninvasive stimuli of different shapes and modalities to the right forearm. The magnitude and time course of incisional and blade-induced pain were assessed by numerical rating scales. Affective vs sensory components of pain experience were differentiated using a pain sensation questionnaire. The magnitude and time course of the axon reflex vasodilator response and of secondary hyperalgesia following a 7-second blade application were assessed. The maximum blade or incisional pain was similar (visual analogue scale [mean ± SD]: 32.9 ± 22.5 [blade] vs. 33.6 ± 29.8 [incision]), and both time courses matched closely in the first 10 seconds (paired t test; P = 0.5-1.0), whereas incision but not blade was followed by a second phase of pain, probably related to the tissue injury (decrease to half maximum pain 8 ± 2 vs. 33 ± 35 seconds; P < 0.01). Affective pain scores were significantly lower than sensory scores for all stimuli (P < 0.001). Comparing blade and incision, patterns of affective and sensory pain descriptors exhibited a remarkably similar pattern. Hence, we suggest the blade as novel model of sharp mechanical pain, which will be useful in investigating postoperative/mechanical pain and the role of self-injurious behavior in, eg, patients with borderline personality disorder.

  2. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472

  3. Pain in Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... for increased overall health care costs. A person’s perception of pain can be affected by emotional factors. ... medications such as levodopa can affect a person’s perception of pain. People with Parkinson’s who are in ...

  4. Rib cage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply) Home ...

  5. Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    SIJ pain - aftercare; SIJ dysfunction - aftercare; SIJ strain - aftercare; SIJ subluxation -aftercare; SIJ syndrome - aftercare ... little movement at the SIJ. Major reasons for pain around the SIJ include: Muscle tightness Pregnancy: the ...

  6. Pain in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew Rd; Ramirez, Juan D; Farquhar-Smith, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Cancer and its treatment exert a heavy psychological and physical toll. Of the myriad symptoms which result, pain is common, encountered in between 30% and 60% of cancer survivors. Pain in cancer survivors is a major and growing problem, impeding the recovery and rehabilitation of patients who have beaten cancer and negatively impacting on cancer patients' quality of life, work prospects and mental health. Persistent pain in cancer survivors remains challenging to treat successfully. Pain can arise both due to the underlying disease and the various treatments the patient has been subjected to. Chemotherapy causes painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), radiotherapy can produce late effect radiation toxicity and surgery may lead to the development of persistent post-surgical pain syndromes. This review explores a selection of the common causes of persistent pain in cancer survivors, detailing our current understanding of the pathophysiology and outlining both the clinical manifestations of individual pain states and the treatment options available. PMID:26516548

  7. Eldercare at Home: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pain, and may be best treated with physical therapy without taking any medicine at all. Pain can ... medicine and non-medicine strategies. Treatments such as physical therapy, massage, heat and/or cold packs, exercise, and ...

  8. Lower Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor. Get plenty of rest and use an anti-inflammatory medicine to relieve pain. If your pain is ... or a HERNIATED DISK. Apply heat, use an anti-inflammatory medicine and get rest. If you don't ...

  9. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve pain due to: Cancer Carpal tunnel syndrome Fibromyalgia Childbirth (labor) Musculoskeletal injuries (such as the neck, ... pain for: After surgery or labor Arthritis Cancer Fibromyalgia Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine headache Tension headache Both ...

  10. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described. PMID:9298380

  11. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... block. This is an injection of an anesthetic (pain reliever) into certain nerves to block the pain signals. If the injection works, it may be repeated. Physical therapy and psychological counseling are also helpful. However, a ...

  12. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... related, condition. Chronic Pain and the Americans with Disabilities Act Is chronic pain a disability under the ADA? The ADA does not contain a list of medical conditions that constitute disabilities. Instead, the ADA has a general definition of ...

  13. The "self" in pain: the role of psychological inflexibility in chronic pain adjustment.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Silvia Sze Wai; Chan, Esther Chin Chi; Chen, Phoon Ping; Lo, Barbara Chuen Yee

    2016-10-01

    Self-discrepancy occurs when a person feels the failure to fulfill one's hopes or responsibilities. Although self-discrepancy has been widely examined to elucidate patients' chronic pain adjustment, the underlying mechanism is unclear. The present study proposes that the effect of self-discrepancy on pain outcomes is accounted for by psychological inflexibility, which involves the psychological processes that guide behaviors in the pursuit of goals and values. One-hundred patients with chronic pain were recruited from a public hospital. They were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview regarding their self-discrepancy and complete self-reported questionnaires regarding their psychological inflexibility and pain outcomes. The results confirmed that psychological inflexibility partly accounts for the variance observed between self-discrepancy and pain outcomes. The current study provides additional insight into the mechanism underpinning the impact of self-discrepancy on patients' pain adjustment and offers clinical implications regarding the use of acceptance commitment therapy for chronic pain management. PMID:27278752

  14. The Effects of Exercise on Decreasing Pain and Increasing Function in Patients With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Jamie L.; Ramey, Lindsay N.; Hart, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Exercise or rest is commonly prescribed as treatment for patellofemoral pain syndrome. Study Selection: This study is based on Level I or II research studies examining the effects of exercise and rest on decreasing pain (visual analog scale) and increasing function (Kujala Scoring Questionnaire) using human participants. Articles were limited to those printed in English from PubMed (1966–September 2010), CINAHL (1982–September 2010), and SPORTDiscus (1972–September 2010). Data Extraction: Weighted aggregate effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals were calculated from means and standard deviations extracted from 10 studies, resulting in an analysis of 433 patients. Results: A very large effect for exercise was found for patient-reported functional outcomes (d = 2.19) and perceived pain (d = −1.24) in treated patients, which were larger than functional outcomes (d = 0.77) and pain (d = −0.14) in controls. Short-term follow-up of 191 patients from 4 data sets in 2 studies revealed a large effect for functional outcomes (d = 1.04) and pain (d = −0.82) in patients who performed an exercise intervention. One study reported moderate effect sizes for functional outcomes (d = 0.59) and pain (d = −0.35) at 3 months postintervention. Conclusions: Exercise is the more effective treatment for immediate decrease in pain and increase in function although these differences appear to be less distinguishable over time. PMID:23016088

  15. The "self" in pain: the role of psychological inflexibility in chronic pain adjustment.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Silvia Sze Wai; Chan, Esther Chin Chi; Chen, Phoon Ping; Lo, Barbara Chuen Yee

    2016-10-01

    Self-discrepancy occurs when a person feels the failure to fulfill one's hopes or responsibilities. Although self-discrepancy has been widely examined to elucidate patients' chronic pain adjustment, the underlying mechanism is unclear. The present study proposes that the effect of self-discrepancy on pain outcomes is accounted for by psychological inflexibility, which involves the psychological processes that guide behaviors in the pursuit of goals and values. One-hundred patients with chronic pain were recruited from a public hospital. They were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview regarding their self-discrepancy and complete self-reported questionnaires regarding their psychological inflexibility and pain outcomes. The results confirmed that psychological inflexibility partly accounts for the variance observed between self-discrepancy and pain outcomes. The current study provides additional insight into the mechanism underpinning the impact of self-discrepancy on patients' pain adjustment and offers clinical implications regarding the use of acceptance commitment therapy for chronic pain management.

  16. Pain intensity, disability and depression in individuals with chronic back pain1

    PubMed Central

    Garbi, Márcia de Oliveira Sakamoto Silva; Hortense, Priscilla; Gomez, Rodrigo Ramon Falconi; da Silva, Talita de Cássia Raminelli; Castanho, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Sousa, Fátima Aparecida Emm Faleiros

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to measure the pain intensity, identify the disability and depression levels in people with chronic back pain and to correlate these variables. A cross-sectional, descriptive and exploratory study was undertaken at the Pain Treatment Clinic of the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto Hospital das Clínicas, between February and June 2012, after receiving approval from the Ethics Committee at the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing. METHOD: sixty subjects with chronic back pain participated. The instruments used were: the 11-point Numerical Category Scale, the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. To analyze the data, the arithmetic means, standard deviations and Spearman's correlation coefficient were calculated. RESULTS: the findings show that the participants presented high pain, disability and depression levels. The correlation between pain intensity and disability and between pain intensity and depression was positive and weak and, between disability and depression, positive and moderate. CONCLUSION: the study variables showed moderate and weak indices and the mutual correlations were positive. PMID:25296139

  17. Breakthrough Cancer Pain: Ten Commandments.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Cuomo, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    The term "breakthrough cancer pain" (BTcP) was introduced about 25 years ago. Peaks of pain intensity reported in patients with cancer had been invariably examined in the past years, providing relevant information for a better knowledge of this phenomenon and its treatment. The aim of this critical review was to provide the golden rules, namely, the 10 commandments, for a correct diagnostic pathway of BTcP and a consequent personalized pharmacological treatment. These are as follows: 1) assessment of background analgesia, 2) drugs used for background analgesia, 3) BTcP is a frequent phenomenon, 4) characteristics of BTcP, 5) diagnosis of BTcP, 6) continuous assessment, 7) tailored pharmacological treatment of BTcP, 8) selection of BTcP medication, 9) dosing BTcP medications, and 10) education. These steps may help clinicians to recognize and treat BTcP adequately. PMID:27565269

  18. Self-Reported Spousal Support Modifies the Negative Impact of Pain on Disability in Men with Chronic Prostatitis / Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ginting, Jessica V.; Tripp, Dean A.; Nickel, J. Curtis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine changes in the association between pain and patient quality of life (QoL), depressive symptoms, and disability in men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) at varying levels of spouse responses to pain. METHODS One-hundred and eighty-eight men with CP/CPPS completed a questionnaire including demographic information. The outcome variables were mental QoL (SF-12 MCS), physical QoL (SF-12 PCS), depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale), and disability (Pain Disability Index). Patients also reported on the types of responses they experienced from their spouses (Multidimensional Pain Inventory), and pain (Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire). RESULTS The association between pain and disability was stronger at higher levels of solicitous responses (e.g., “does some of my chores) (β = 0.66, p<.05) than it was at moderate (β = 0.44, p<.05) and lower (β = 0.23, ns) levels. In contrast, the association between pain and disability was stronger at lower levels (β = 0.64, p<.05) of distracting responses (e.g., “tries to get me involved in some activity”) than it was at moderate (β = 0.44, p<.05) and higher (β = 0.25, p<.05) levels. CONCLUSIONS Solicitous responses to pain increased the negative impact of pain on disability, while distracting responses to pain decreased the negative impact of pain on disability in men with CP/CPPS. Solicitous responses may be a reaction to patient pain and associated disability, or may help create or maintain the patient’s pain and disability. In either case, distracting rather than solicitous responses to patient pain are to be encouraged in symptom management. PMID:22054388

  19. Ketogenic Diets and Pain

    PubMed Central

    Masino, Susan A.; Ruskin, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Ketogenic diets are well-established as a successful anticonvulsant therapy. Based on overlap between mechanisms postulated to underlie pain and inflammation, and mechanisms postulated to underlie therapeutic effects of ketogenic diets, recent studies have explored the ability for ketogenic diets to reduce pain. Here we review clinical and basic research thus far exploring the impact of a ketogenic diet on thermal pain, inflammation, and neuropathic pain. PMID:23680946

  20. Back pain: osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bandilla, K K

    1977-02-01

    Back pain is one of the chief complaints of the elderly. It may be either a chronic deep skeletal muscular pain or an acute circumscribed pain arising from nerve-root irritation. The main causes of back pain in older people are: 1) degenerative changes (spondylosis, osteoarthritis, ankylosing hyperostosis); 2) malignancy (multiple myeloma, metastases from carcinoma or lymphoma); and 3) metabolic disorders (osteoporosis, osteomalacia, chondrocalcinosis, Paget's disease). Mechanisms and variations are discussed in detail.

  1. Low back pain, radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Selkirk, Stephen M; Ruff, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is a pervasive problem in the adult population. Most patients with low back pain will not require imaging as spontaneous recovery within 12 weeks is the rule. However, a small percentage of patients with low back pain will have serious underlying pathology requiring more intensive investigation. This chapter delineates the signs and symptoms related to potential serious underlying causes and discusses appropriate imaging modalities that should be utilized in patients with low back pain. PMID:27430456

  2. Knowledge Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The first of the four papers in this symposium, "Knowledge Management and Knowledge Dissemination" (Wim J. Nijhof), presents two case studies exploring the strategies companies use in sharing and disseminating knowledge and expertise among employees. "A Theory of Knowledge Management" (Richard J. Torraco), develops a conceptual framework for…

  3. Problems in the Differential Diagnosis of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Kenneth L.

    1990-01-01

    Differential diagnosis is the systematic consideration of the possible cause of signs and symptoms. It requires establishing an anatomic diagnosis, in which the site of pathology is identified, and then an etiiologic diagnosis of the causal pathologic agent. The differential diagnosis is based on a knowledge of the pathophysiology of 1) the presenting signs and symptoms, and 2) the natural history of various diseases and their causative agents. Consequently, the accuracy and reliability of the differential diagnosis is limited by a lack of knowledge about the pathophysiology of various diseases that produce chronic pain. Most painful conditions affecting ectodermally derived tissues are relatively easily localized; the major problems are in the diagnosis of central nervous system pain syndromes and in our knowledge about the pathophysiology of painful neurologic disorders. The anatomic diagnosis of painful diseases of mesodermal and endodermal tissues may be difficult because of the phenomena of referred pain and tenderness. The etiologic diagnosis is made difficult by our lack of knowledge about how various pathologic processes activate nociceptors in these tissues. Finally, the differential diagnosis of chronic pain requires information about the psychological characteristics of the patient and how emotional and higher cognitive functions influence the perception of pain. PMID:2085198

  4. Caregiver Experiences of Supporting Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, Laura; Williams, Amanda C. de C.; Baum, Sandra; Scior, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Caregivers have an intimate knowledge of the individuals they care for and are therefore an important source of information on pain experiences. They are often relied upon to recognize pain-related behaviours and report them, but little is known as to how they experience their role. Methods: Information was collected from 11 caregivers…

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain: design of a multi-purpose trial

    PubMed Central

    Stochkendahl, Mette J; Christensen, Henrik W; Vach, Werner; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Haghfelt, Torben; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Background Acute chest pain is a major health problem all over the western world. Active approaches are directed towards diagnosis and treatment of potentially life threatening conditions, especially acute coronary syndrome/ischemic heart disease. However, according to the literature, chest pain may also be due to a variety of extra-cardiac disorders including dysfunction of muscles and joints of the chest wall or the cervical and thoracic part of the spine. The diagnostic approaches and treatment options for this group of patients are scarce and formal clinical studies addressing the effect of various treatments are lacking. Methods/Design We present an ongoing trial on the potential usefulness of chiropractic diagnosis and treatment in patients dismissed from an acute chest pain clinic without a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. The aims are to determine the proportion of patients in whom chest pain may be of musculoskeletal rather than cardiac origin and to investigate the decision process of a chiropractor in diagnosing these patients; further, to examine whether chiropractic treatment can reduce pain and improve physical function when compared to advice directed towards promoting self-management, and, finally, to estimate the cost-effectiveness of these procedures. This study will include 300 patients discharged from a university hospital acute chest pain clinic without a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome or any other obvious cardiac or non-cardiac disease. After completion of the clinic's standard cardiovascular diagnostic procedures, trial patients will be examined according to a standardized protocol including a) a self-report questionnaire; b) a semi-structured interview; c) a general health examination; and d) a specific manual examination of the muscles and joints of the neck, thoracic spine, and thorax in order to determine whether the pain is likely to be of musculoskeletal origin. To describe the patients status with regards to ischemic heart

  6. Changes in willingness to self-manage pain among children and adolescents and their parents enrolled in an intensive interdisciplinary pediatric pain treatment program.

    PubMed

    Logan, Deirdre E; Conroy, Caitlin; Sieberg, Christine B; Simons, Laura E

    2012-09-01

    The importance of willingness to adopt a self-management approach to chronic pain has been demonstrated in the context of cognitive-behaviorally oriented interdisciplinary pain treatment programs for adults, both as a treatment outcome and as a process that facilitates functional improvements. Willingness to self-manage pain has not been studied in pediatric interdisciplinary pain treatment settings. Study aims were (1) to investigate willingness to self-manage pain among children and parents undergoing intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment and (2) to determine whether increased willingness to self-manage pain influenced functional treatment outcomes. A total of 157 children ages 10 to 18 and their parents enrolled in a pediatric pain rehabilitation program completed the Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire (PSOCQ youth and parent versions) at pretreatment, posttreatment, and short-term follow-up. They also reported on pain, functional disability, depressive symptoms, fear of pain, and use of passive and accommodative coping strategies. Results show that willingness to self-manage pain increased during treatment among both children and parents, with gains maintained at follow-up. Increases in children's readiness to self-manage pain from pretreatment to posttreatment were associated with decreases in functional disability, depressive symptoms, fear of pain, and use of adaptive coping strategies. Increases in parents' readiness to adopt a pain self-management approach were associated with changes in parent-reported fear of pain but not with other child outcomes. Few associations emerged between pretreatment willingness to self-manage pain and posttreatment outcomes. Findings suggest that interdisciplinary pediatric pain rehabilitation may facilitate increased willingness to self-manage pain, which is associated with improvements in function and psychological well-being.

  7. Definitions and Types of Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Pain Defining Pain Pain is a perception that signals the individual that tissue damage has ... in the body that are involved in the perception of pain are called "nociception." Basic and clinical ...

  8. Back Pain Facts and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pain and Depression Preventing Travel Aches and Strains Back Pain Facts and Statistics Although doctors of chiropractic (DCs) ... time. 1 A few interesting facts about back pain: Low back pain is the single leading cause of disability ...

  9. Taking narcotics for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain - chronic - narcotics; Pain - back - chronic - narcotics; Chronic back pain - low - narcotics ... compared to placebo or other treatments for chronic low-back pain: an update of the Cochrane Review. Spine . 2014;( ...

  10. Forebrain Pain Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Galhardo, Vasco; Maione, Sabatino; Mackey, Sean C.

    2009-01-01

    Emotional-affective and cognitive dimensions of pain are less well understood than nociceptive and nocifensive components, but the forebrain is believed to play an important role. Recent evidence suggests subcortical and cortical brain areas outside the traditional pain processing network contribute critically to emotional-affective responses and cognitive deficits related to pain. These brain areas include different nuclei of the amygdala and certain prefrontal cortical areas. Their roles in various aspects of pain will be discussed. Biomarkers of cortical dysfunction are being identified that may evolve into therapeutic targets to modulate pain experience and improve pain-related cognitive impairment. Supporting data from preclinical studies in neuropathic pain models will be presented. Neuroimaging analysis provides evidence for plastic changes in the pain processing brain network. Results of clinical studies in neuropathic pain patients suggest that neuroimaging may help determine mechanisms of altered brain functions in pain as well as monitor the effects of pharmacologic interventions to optimize treatment in individual patients. Recent progress in the analysis of higher brain functions emphasizes the concept of pain as a multidimensional experience and the need for integrative approaches to determine the full spectrum of harmful or protective neurobiological changes in pain. PMID:19162070

  11. [Myofascial pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kehler, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    It is unable to identify any kind of structural abnormalities in about 85% patients affected with muscle pain. Sometimes is one mucle received with pains, commonly because of stress or fatigue (epecially after intensive training process). It is called myfascial pain syndrom (MPS). When more muscles are affected it is called fibromyalgia.

  12. [Neuropathic pain: pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy].

    PubMed

    Sommer, C

    2013-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by lesions in the somatosensory system. Characteristic but not exclusive features are spontaneous burning pain, electrifying and shooting pain, hyperalgesia, and allodynia. The basic concept of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is the combination of peripheral and central sensitization. Knowledge on the molecular mechanisms has grown exponentially in recent years. The problem lies in identifying the individual mechanisms and in determining a comprehensive concept. Progress has also been made in assessment, e.g., methods for detecting dysfunction of nociceptors have significantly improved. In addition, there are many more therapeutic options available than 15 years ago. The drugs available include antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, and topical medications. Data from controlled trials and recommendations from guidelines are available. PMID:24217854

  13. Mechanisms of cancer-induced bone pain

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Ondoua, AN; Symons-Liguori, AM; Vanderah, TW

    2013-01-01

    Cancerous cells can originate in a number of different tissues such as prostate, breast and lung, yet often go undetected and are non-painful. Many types of cancers will metastasize toward the bone microenvironment first. Tumor burden within the bone causes excruciating breakthrough pain with properties of continual pain inadequately managed with current analgesics. Part of this failure is due to the poor understanding of the etiology of cancer pain. Animal models of cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) have revealed that the neurochemistry of cancer has features distinctive from other chronic pain states. For example, preclinical models of metastatic cancer often result in the upregulation of neurotrophins, such as NGF and BDNF that can lead to nociceptive sensitization. Preclinical cancer models demonstrate nociceptive neuronal expression of acid sensing receptors, such as ASIC1 and TRPV1 that respond to a significant increase in an acidic cancer-induced environment within the bone. CIBP is correlated with a significant increase in pro-inflammatory mediators acting peripherally and centrally, contributing to neuronal hypersensitive states. And finally, cancer cells generate high levels of oxidative molecules that are thought to significantly increase extracellular glutamate, thus activating primary afferent neurons. Knowledge of the unique neuro-molecular profile of cancer pain will ultimately lead to the development of novel and superior therapeutics for CIBP. PMID:24076008

  14. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (p<0.05, small volume correction). The expression of analgesia was associated with reduction in signal intensity increases during each test stimulus in the presence of the conditioning stimulus in three brainstem regions: the caudalis subdivision of the spinal trigeminal nucleus, i.e., the primary synapse, the region of the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis and in the

  15. The effects of emotion regulation strategies on the pain experience: a structured laboratory investigation.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Amy J D; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Gagnon, Michelle M; Williams, Jaime; Clark, David

    2015-05-01

    Although emotion regulation modulates the pain experience, inconsistencies have been identified regarding the impact of specific regulation strategies on pain. Our goal was to examine the effects of emotion suppression and cognitive reappraisal on automatic (ie, nonverbal) and cognitively mediated (ie, verbal) pain expressions. Nonclinical participants were randomized into either a suppression (n = 58), reappraisal (n = 51), or monitoring control (n = 42) condition. Upon arrival to the laboratory, participants completed the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, to quantify self-reported suppression and reappraisal tendencies. Subsequently, they completed a thermal pain threshold and tolerance task. They were then provided with instructions to use, depending on their experimental condition, suppression, reappraisal, or monitoring strategies. Afterward, they were exposed to experimentally induced pain. Self-report measures of pain, anxiety, and tension were administered, and facial expressions, heart rate, and galvanic skin response were recorded. The Facial Action Coding System was used to quantify general and pain-related facial activity (ie, we defined facial actions that occurred during at least 5% of pain stimulation periods as "pain-related actions"). Reappraisal and suppression induction led to reductions in nonverbal and verbal indices of pain. Moreover, self-reported tendencies to use suppression and reappraisal (as measured by the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire) did not interact with experimental condition in the determination of participants' responses. Results suggest that consciously applying emotion regulation strategies during a painful task can moderate both cognitively mediated (e.g., verbal) and automatic (e.g., facial activity) expressions of pain.

  16. Ethnic differences in pain and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Claudia M; Edwards, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Considerable evidence demonstrates substantial ethnic disparities in the prevalence, treatment, progression and outcomes of pain-related conditions. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying these group differences is of crucial importance in reducing and eliminating disparities in the pain experience. Over recent years, accumulating evidence has identified a variety of processes, from neurophysiological factors to structural elements of the healthcare system, that may contribute to shaping individual differences in pain. For example, the experience of pain differentially activates stress-related physiological responses across various ethnic groups, members of different ethnic groups appear to use differing coping strategies in managing pain complaints, providers’ treatment decisions vary as a function of patient ethnicity and pharmacies in predominantly minority neighborhoods are far less likely to stock potent analgesics. These diverse factors, and others may all play a role in facilitating elevated levels of pain-related suffering among individuals from ethnic minority backgrounds. Here, we present a brief, nonexhaustive review of the recent literature and potential physiological and sociocultural mechanisms underlying these ethnic group disparities in pain outcomes. PMID:23687518

  17. The influence of children's pain memories on subsequent pain experience.

    PubMed

    Noel, Melanie; Chambers, Christine T; McGrath, Patrick J; Klein, Raymond M; Stewart, Sherry H

    2012-08-01

    Healthy children are often required to repeatedly undergo painful medical procedures (eg, immunizations). Although memory is often implicated in children's reactions to future pain, there is a dearth of research directly examining the relationship between the 2. The current study investigated the influence of children's memories for a novel pain stimulus on their subsequent pain experience. One hundred ten healthy children (60 boys) between the ages of 8 and 12 years completed a laboratory pain task and provided pain ratings. Two weeks later, children provided pain ratings based on their memories as well as their expectancies about future pain. One month following the initial laboratory visit, children again completed the pain task and provided pain ratings. Results showed that children's memory of pain intensity was a better predictor of subsequent pain reporting than their actual initial reporting of pain intensity, and mediated the relationship between initial and subsequent pain reporting. Children who had negatively estimated pain memories developed expectations of greater pain prior to a subsequent pain experience and showed greater increases in pain ratings over time than children who had accurate or positively estimated pain memories. These findings highlight the influence of pain memories on healthy children's expectations of future pain and subsequent pain experiences and extend predictive models of subsequent pain reporting.

  18. The influence of children's pain memories on subsequent pain experience.

    PubMed

    Noel, Melanie; Chambers, Christine T; McGrath, Patrick J; Klein, Raymond M; Stewart, Sherry H

    2012-08-01

    Healthy children are often required to repeatedly undergo painful medical procedures (eg, immunizations). Although memory is often implicated in children's reactions to future pain, there is a dearth of research directly examining the relationship between the 2. The current study investigated the influence of children's memories for a novel pain stimulus on their subsequent pain experience. One hundred ten healthy children (60 boys) between the ages of 8 and 12 years completed a laboratory pain task and provided pain ratings. Two weeks later, children provided pain ratings based on their memories as well as their expectancies about future pain. One month following the initial laboratory visit, children again completed the pain task and provided pain ratings. Results showed that children's memory of pain intensity was a better predictor of subsequent pain reporting than their actual initial reporting of pain intensity, and mediated the relationship between initial and subsequent pain reporting. Children who had negatively estimated pain memories developed expectations of greater pain prior to a subsequent pain experience and showed greater increases in pain ratings over time than children who had accurate or positively estimated pain memories. These findings highlight the influence of pain memories on healthy children's expectations of future pain and subsequent pain experiences and extend predictive models of subsequent pain reporting. PMID:22560288

  19. The painDETECT project - far more than a screening tool on neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Freynhagen, Rainer; Tölle, Thomas R; Gockel, Ulrich; Baron, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Background and objectives The painDETECT questionnaire (PD-Q), a simple and reliable screening questionnaire of neuropathic pain, was developed in 2004 in cooperation with the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain. The initial aim was to implement quality management and to improve the situation of neuropathic pain (NeP) patients in Germany. The PD-Q proved immediately successful and was translated into and validated in multiple languages. Subsequently a comprehensive electronic system (PD) comprising various validated questionnaires with regard to pain typical comorbidities, such as function, sleep, mood or anxiety, was implemented Germany wide. We aimed to provide a comprehensive overview about the development and validation as well as the application of the PD-Q in various clinical conditions. Methods This overview is based on a literature search on English full-text papers using the term 'painDETECT' in Medline and PubMed covering the time period from 2006 to September 2015, amended with further publications cited in the retrieved publications or provided by the questionnaire developers. Results PD-Q as screening tool for NeP described in patients with lower back pain (8 studies), rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis (10), thoracotomy (2 studies), tumor diseases (4 studies), fibromyalgia (4 studies), diverse musculoskeletal conditions (12 studies) and diverse other conditions (10 studies). In addition, the PD-Q was used in 9 studies that investigated the effect of drugs for the treatment of patients with a NeP component. Conclusion To date more than 300,000 patients were assessed, providing the basis for one of the world's largest datasets for chronic pain. Among others the extensive pool of PD-Q data triggered the idea of subgrouping patients on the basis of their individual sensory profiles which might in the future lead to a stratified treatment approach and ultimately to personalized therapy. Started as a healthcare utilization project in Germany

  20. Pain in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Ho, R C

    1994-01-01

    In summary, the ACS has acknowledged the magnitude and severity of the cancer pain problem nationally and recognized that cancer pain can be relieved. It has identified cancer pain control as a priority and has devised programs that emphasize the importance of pain assessment, recognize the availability of pain relief programs, and encourage treatment to achieve optimum pain relief for the cancer patient.