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Sample records for pain mimicking appendicitis

  1. Missed Appendicitis: Mimicking Urologic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Akhavizadegan, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    Appendicitis, a common disease, has different presentations. This has made its diagnosis difficult. This paper aims to present two cases of missed appendicitis with completely urologic presentation and the way that helped us to reach the correct diagnosis. The first case with symptoms fully related to kidney and the second mimicking epididymorchitis hindered prompt diagnosis. Right site of the pain, relapsing fever, frequent physical examination, and resistance to medical treatment were main clues which help us to make correct diagnosis. PMID:23326748

  2. Recurrent epiploic appendagitis mimicking appendicitis and cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Hearne, Christopher B.; Taboada, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis (EA) is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain caused by inflammation of an epiploic appendage. It has a nonspecific clinical presentation that may mimic other acute abdominal pathologies on physical exam, such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, or cholecystitis. However, EA is usually benign and self-limiting and can be treated conservatively. We present the case of a patient with two episodes of EA, the first mimicking acute appendicitis and the second mimicking acute cholecystitis. Although recurrence of EA is rare, it should be part of the differential diagnosis of acute, localized abdominal pain. A correct diagnosis of EA will prevent unnecessary hospitalization, antibiotic use, and surgical procedures. PMID:28127129

  3. Appendicular sarcoidosis mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Hunjan, Tia; Chaudery, Muzzafer; Zaidi, Ahsan; Beggs, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Appendicular sarcoidosis is a very rare cause of acute abdominal pain, with only seven cases reported previously in the literature. A 45-year-old woman, known to have sarcoidosis, presented to the emergency department with a 1-week history of epigastric and right iliac fossa abdominal pain. At diagnostic laparoscopy, an acutely inflamed appendix was found and removed as well as an omental mass which was biopsied. Subsequent histopathological examination of the appendix demonstrated appendicular sarcoidosis without acute appendicitis and chronic inflammatory changes in the omental biopsy. The patients’ symptoms completely resolved postoperatively. It is important to undertake urgent operative intervention in patients with sarcoidosis who present with right iliac fossa pain, owing to the high risk of perforation. PMID:23162022

  4. Idiopathic Renal Infarction Mimicking Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Francesco; Scarano, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Renal infarction is a rare cause of referral to the emergency department, with very low estimated incidence (0.004%–0.007%). Usually, it manifests in patients aged 60–70 with risk factors for thromboembolism, mostly related to heart disease, atrial fibrillation in particular. We report a case of idiopathic segmental renal infarction in a 38-year-old patient, presenting with acute abdominal pain with no previous known history or risk factors for thromboembolic diseases. Because of its aspecific clinical presentation, this condition can mimic more frequent pathologies including pyelonephritis, nephrolithiasis, or as in our case appendicitis. Here we highlight the extremely ambiguous presentation of renal infarct and the importance for clinicians to be aware of this condition, particularly in patients without clear risk factors, as it usually has a good prognosis after appropriate anticoagulant therapy. PMID:28203466

  5. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Appendicitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Appendicitis Print A ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC What Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Hospital Belly Pain Are ...

  6. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your pain. Distraction can be especially effective with children. Guided imagery, such as closing your eyes and thinking about a favorite place. References Appendicitis. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney ...

  7. Laparoscopic 'sleeve' caecectomy for idiopathic solitary caecal ulcer mimicking appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Sran, Harkiran; Sebastian, Joseph; Doughan, Samer

    2015-08-04

    Idiopathic ulcer of the caecum is a rare condition of unknown aetiology. Its clinical presentation may mimic various pathologies, including appendicitis, inflammatory bowel disease and caecal malignancy. A definitive diagnosis is rarely established preoperatively, and is usually only confirmed histologically following surgical resection. We report a case of a young patient with caecal ulceration presenting with symptoms and signs of appendicitis, in whom laparoscopic anterior 'sleeve' caecectomy was performed to excise an inflammatory-looking mass involving the caecum. Histological examination demonstrated a deep mucosal ulcer and subsequent colonoscopy did not reveal any further pathology.

  8. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... function. A blockage inside of the appendix causes appendicitis. The blockage leads to increased pressure, problems with ... to pass gas Low fever Not everyone with appendicitis has all these symptoms. Appendicitis is a medical ...

  9. Acute primary haemorrhagic omental torsion mimicking perforated appendicitis: an unorthodox surgical paradox.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Abdul

    2014-08-01

    Acute primary haemorrhagic omental torsion is an atypical and deceptive cause of acute abdomen that could closely mimic a myriad of intra-abdominal catastrophes, especially perforated appendicitis. The author reports a 30 years man who had presented with gradually worsening right-sided abdominal pain of 2 days duration. Laboratory work-up and abdominal radiographs were inconclusive. Abdominal sonography detected presence of free fluid in the pelvic cul-de-sac. Based on clinical and sonographic findings, presumptive diagnosis of perforated appendicitis was made and the patient was explored through extended Rockey-Davis incision. About 500 - 700 ml of dark-coloured blood (haemoperitoneum) was present in the peritoneal cavity and the pelvis secondary to acute haemorrhagic omental torsion. The appendix was grossly normal. Omentectomy and prophylactic appendicectomy resulted in uneventful recovery of the patient. Acute primary omental torsion is an uncommon pathology that must be kept in mind during differential diagnosis of acute abdomen, especially acute or perforated appendicitis.

  10. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of lymph nodes in the intestines, or even parasites. Once the appendix is blocked, it becomes inflamed ... of appendicitis can happen in other illnesses (like kidney stones, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections). That's why ...

  11. Abdominal Pain in the Female Patient: A Case of Concurrent Acute Appendicitis and Ruptured Endometrioma

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Martine A.; Lin, Elizabeth; Baek, Ji Yoon; Andoni, Alda; Wang, Xiao Hui

    2016-01-01

    General surgeons are often asked to evaluate acute abdominal pain which has an expanded differential diagnosis in women of childbearing age. Acute appendicitis accounts for many surgical emergencies as a common cause of nongynecologic pelvic pain. In some rare instances, acute appendicitis has been shown to occur simultaneously with a variety of gynecologic diseases. We report a case of concurrent acute appendicitis and ruptured ovarian endometrioma. PMID:28097032

  12. Sonography of Abdominal Pain in Children: Appendicitis and Its Common Mimics.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Thomas Ray; Corwin, Michael T; Davoodian, Andrew; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is very common in the pediatric population (<18 years of age). Sonography is a safe modality that can often differentiate the frequently encountered causes of abdominal pain in children. This pictorial essay will discuss the sonographic findings of acute appendicitis, including the imaging appearance of a perforated appendicitis. It will also present the sonographic features of the relatively common mimics of appendicitis, such as mesenteric adenitis/gastroenteritis, intussusception, Meckel diverticulum, and ovarian torsion.

  13. Appendiceal Hemangioma, Mimicking Acute Appendicitis in a 17-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Niakan, Amin; Zolmadjdi, Nadjmeh; Marzban, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial tumors of appendix are not so common, and mesenchymal tumors of the appendix are even less common. Capillary hemangioma of the appendix is an extremely rare event and to the best of our knowledge only 4 cases have been reported in the English literature so far. In this case report we want to explain our experience with an extremely rare occurrence of capillary hemangioma of appendix in a 17-year-old girl presented with right lower quadrant pain that was operated with the clinical impression of acute appendicitis. The patient has been operated as a routine appendectomy with a completely uneventful postoperative period. PMID:27441077

  14. Diagnostic errors of right lower quadrant pain in children: beyond appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Patricia T; Schooler, Gary R; Lee, Edward Y

    2015-10-01

    Right lower quadrant pain in children can result from various underlying conditions other than acute appendicitis. The common mimics of acute appendicitis are related to acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary diseases. Diagnosis of right lower quadrant pain in the pediatric population can be challenging, especially when the symptoms are often nonspecific. This article reviews the currently available imaging techniques for evaluating a child with right lower quadrant pain and the spectrum of differential diagnoses with a focus on imaging clues to a specific diagnosis.

  15. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... exam. The doctor will usually order some blood tests and urine studies, and may recommend X-rays, a CAT scan, or an ultrasound. The doctor will decide whether you need surgery. Ask before taking any pain medicines (such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen) because your doctor will need to ...

  16. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain: Utility of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Eugene Mun Wai; Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur

    2009-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common surgical condition that is usually managed with early surgery, and is associated with low morbidity and mortality. However, some patients may have atypical symptoms and physical findings that may lead to a delay in diagnosis and increased complications. Atypical presentation may be related to the position of the appendix. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain may be clinically indistinguishable from acute pathology in the gallbladder, liver, biliary tree, right kidney and right urinary tract. We report a series of four patients with retrocecal appendicitis who presented with acute right upper abdominal pain. The clinical diagnoses at presentation were acute cholecystitis in two patients, pyelonephritis in one, and ureteric colic in one. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen at presentation showed subhepatic collections in two patients and normal findings in the other two. Computed tomography (CT) identified correctly retrocecal appendicitis and inflammation in the retroperitoneum in all cases. In addition, abscesses in the retrocecal space (n = 2) and subhepatic collections (n = 2) were also demonstrated. Emergency appendectomy was performed in two patients, interval appendectomy in one, and hemicolectomy in another. Surgical findings confirmed the presence of appendicitis and its retroperitoneal extensions. Our case series illustrates the usefulness of CT in diagnosing ascending retrocecal appendicitis and its extension, and excluding other inflammatory conditions that mimic appendicitis. PMID:19630119

  17. Co-infection with Enterobius vermicularis and Taenia saginata mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Saravi, Kasra H; Fakhar, Mahdi; Nematian, Javad; Ghasemi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we describe an unusual case of verminous appendicitis due to Enterobius vermicularis and Taenia saginata in a 29-year-old woman from Iran. The histopathological examinations and parasitological descriptions of both worms found in the appendix lumen are discussed. The removed appendix exhibited the macroscopic and microscopic features of acute appendicitis. Antihelminthic therapy was initiated with single doses of praziquantel for the taeniasis and mebendazole for the enterobiasis, and the patient was discharged.

  18. Pediatric Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Rentea, Rebecca M; St Peter, Shawn D

    2017-02-01

    Appendicitis is one of the most common surgical pathologies in children. It can present with right lower quadrant pain. Scoring systems in combination with selective imaging and surgical examination will diagnose most children with appendicitis. Clinical pathways should be used. Most surgical interventions for appendicitis are now almost exclusively laparoscopic, with trials demonstrating better outcomes for children who undergo index hospitalization appendectomies when perforated. Nonoperative management has a role in the treatment of both uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. This article discusses the workup and management, modes of treatment, and continued areas of controversy in pediatric appendicitis.

  19. Discriminative Accuracy of Novel and Traditional Biomarkers in Children with Suspected Appendicitis Adjusted for Duration of Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kharbanda, Anupam B.; Cosme, Yohaimi; Liu, Khin; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Dayan, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the accuracy of novel and traditional biomarkers in patients with suspected appendicitis as a function of duration of symptoms. Methods This was a prospective cohort study, conducted in a tertiary care emergency department (ED). The authors enrolled children 3 to 18 years old with acute abdominal pain of less than 96 hours, and measured serum levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-8 (IL-8), C - reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell count (WBC), and absolute neutrophil count (ANC). Final diagnosis was determined by histopathology or telephone follow-up. Trends in biomarker levels were examined based on duration of abdominal pain. The accuracy of biomarkers was assessed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Optimal cut-points and test performance characteristics were calculated for each biomarker. Results Of 280 patients enrolled, the median age was 11.3 years (IQR 8.6 to 14.8), 57% were male, and 33% had appendicitis. Median IL-6, median CRP, mean WBC, and mean ANC differed significantly (p < 0.001) between patients with non-perforated appendicitis and those without appendicitis; median IL-8 levels did not differ between groups. In non-perforated appendicitis, median IL-6, WBC, and ANC levels were maximal at less than 24 hrs of pain, while CRP peaked between 24 and 48 hours. In perforated appendicitis, median IL-8 levels were highest by 24 hours, WBC and IL-6 by 24 to 48 hours, and CRP after 48 hours of pain. The WBC appeared to be the most useful marker to predict appendicitis in those with fewer than 24 or more than 48 hours of pain, while CRP was the most useful in those with 24 to 48 hours of pain. Conclusions In this population, the serum levels and accuracy of novel and traditional biomarkers varies in relation to duration of abdominal pain. IL-6 shows promise as a novel biomarker to identify children with appendicitis. PMID:21676053

  20. Spontaneous splenic rupture and Anisakis appendicitis presenting as abdominal pain: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Anisakidosis, human infection with nematodes of the family Anisakidae, is caused most commonly by Anisakis simplex. Acquired by the consumption of raw or undercooked marine fish or squid, anisakidosis occurs where such dietary customs are practiced, including Japan, the coastal regions of Europe and the United States. Rupture of the spleen is a relatively common complication of trauma and many systemic disorders affecting the reticuloendothelial system, including infections and neoplasias. A rare subtype of rupture occurring spontaneously and arising from a normal spleen has been recognized as a distinct clinicopathologic entity. Herein we discuss the case of a woman who presented to our institution with appendicitis secondary to Anisakis and spontaneous spleen rupture. Case presentation We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with hemorrhagic shock and abdominal pain and was subsequently found to have spontaneous spleen rupture and appendicitis secondary to Anisakis simplex. She underwent open surgical resection of the splenic rupture and the appendicitis without any significant postoperative complications. Histopathologic examination revealed appendicitis secondary to Anisakis simplex and splenic rupture of undetermined etiology. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first of a woman with the diagnosis of spontaneous spleen rupture and appendicitis secondary to Anisakis simplex. Digestive anisakiasis may present as an acute abdomen. Emergency physicians should know and consider this diagnosis in patients with ileitis or colitis, especially if an antecedent of raw or undercooked fish ingestion is present. Spontaneous rupture of the spleen is an extremely rare event. Increased awareness of this condition will enhance early diagnosis and effective treatment. Further research is required to identify the possible risk factors associated with spontaneous rupture of the spleen. PMID:22524971

  1. Appendicitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Taking Your Child's Temperature What Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Hospital Belly Pain Word! Peritonitis Appendicitis Hernias What's It Like to Have Surgery? Appendicitis Digestive System Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  2. Gangrenous intrathoracic appendicitis, a rare cause of right-sided chest pain: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Schellhaas, Elisabeth; Döbler, Oliver; Kroesen, Anton-J; Buhr, Heinz-J; Hotz, Hubert G

    2010-09-01

    Diaphragmatic hernias are becoming increasingly common due to radiofrequency ablation of malignant liver tumors. Most patients eventually present with symptoms caused by bowel obstruction. A 54-year-old woman with pleuritic pain and fever had a right-sided enterothorax probably caused by hemihepatectomy several years before. The patient was diagnosed with perforated gangrenous intrathoracic appendicitis during an emergency laparotomy for suspected incarceration of her diaphragmatic hernia. She was treated with an appendectomy and suturing of her right hemidiaphragm. An acquired diaphragmatic hernia should therefore be surgically repaired as soon as it is diagnosed in order to avoid complications.

  3. Vacation Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Tempel, Michael B.; Harrison, Shannon; Zhu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: When someone plans a vacation, one of the last things taken into consideration is the possibility of contracting an illness while away. Unfortunately, if people develop abdominal pain while planning for a vacation, they usually proceed with the vacation and do not consider getting medical attention for their pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of being on vacation and its association with ruptured appendicitis. Methods: From January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008, the incidence of ruptured appendicitis cases at Florida Hospital–Celebration Health, located 5 miles from Walt Disney World, was compared with that of Florida Hospital–Orlando, approximately 30 miles away from Walt Disney World. We evaluated whether patients “on vacation” versus residents of Orlando have an increased incidence of ruptured appendicitis. Results: Of patients treated for presumed appendicitis, 60.59% at Florida Hospital–Celebration Health had ruptured appendicitis during this time versus 20.42% at Florida Hospital–Orlando. Of those 266 patients seen at Florida Hospital–Celebration Health, 155 were on vacation versus only 21 at Florida Hospital–Orlando. Conclusion: Although there is not a direct cause and effect, it is clear that there is a higher incidence of ruptured appendicitis in patients on vacation versus in the regular community in the Orlando, Florida area. PMID:23743367

  4. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Right Lower Quadrant Pain--Suspected Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Martin P; Katz, Douglas S; Lalani, Tasneem; Carucci, Laura R; Cash, Brooks D; Kim, David H; Piorkowski, Robert J; Small, William C; Spottswood, Stephanie E; Tulchinsky, Mark; Yaghmai, Vahid; Yee, Judy; Rosen, Max P

    2015-06-01

    The most common cause of acute right lower quadrant (RLQ) pain requiring surgery is acute appendicitis (AA). This narrative's focus is on imaging procedures in the diagnosis of AA, with consideration of other diseases causing RLQ pain. In general, Computed Tomography (CT) is the most accurate imaging study for evaluating suspected AA and alternative etiologies of RLQ pain. Data favor intravenous contrast use for CT, but the need for enteric contrast when intravenous contrast is used is not strongly favored. Radiation exposure concerns from CT have led to increased investigation in minimizing CT radiation dose while maintaining diagnostic accuracy and in using algorithms with ultrasound as a first imaging examination followed by CT in inconclusive cases. In children, ultrasound is the preferred initial examination, as it is nearly as accurate as CT for the diagnosis of AA in this population and without ionizing radiation exposure. In pregnant women, ultrasound is preferred initially with MRI as a second imaging examination in inconclusive cases, which is the majority.The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every three years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  5. IUD appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Goldman, J A; Peleg, D; Feldberg, D; Dicker, D; Samuel, N

    1983-07-01

    A case of uterine perforation by an IUD with acute and chronic irritation of the appendix is presented. The patient, a 30-year old gravida 4, para 4, was admitted to the hospital with severe abdominal pain, fever, and diarrhea. A Lippes loop IUD had been inserted 3 years previously. The device could not be visualized at laparoscopy. At laparotomy the IUD was palpable within a large inflammatory mass in the right lower abdomen . Dissection of the adhesions revealed the IUD twisted around the appendix, and appendectomy was performed. This is the 1st reported case of a perforated, nonmedicated IUD causing appendicitis. The 2 cases of IUD appendicitis previously described in the literature involved Copper-7 devices, which have been shown to cause considerable tissue response when placed in the peritoneal cavity. Abdominal signs and symptoms associated with a missing IUD string should alert physicians to the possibility of IUD appendicitis.

  6. Serum, Saliva, and Urine Irisin with and Without Acute Appendicitis and Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bakal, Unal; Aydin, Suleyman; Sarac, Mehmet; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Kalayci, Mehmet; Artas, Gokhan; Yardim, Meltem; Kazez, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    A 112-amino-acid protein irisin (IRI) is widely expressed in many organs, but we currently do not know whether appendix tissue and blood cells express it. If appendix tissue and neutrophil cells express IRI, measuring its concentration in biological fluids might be helpful in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis (AA), since neutrophil cells are the currently gold-standard laboratory parameters for the diagnosis of AA. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the suitability of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based measurements of the proposed myokine IRI for the discrimination of patients with AA from those with acute abdominal pain (AP) and healthy controls. Moreover, immunoreactivity to IRI was investigated in appendix tissues and blood cells. Samples were collected on admission (T1), 24 hours (T2), and 72 hours (T3) postoperatively from patients with suspected AA and from patients with AP corresponding to T1–T3, whereas control subject blood was once corresponding to T1. IRI was measured in serum, saliva, and urine by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas in appendix tissue and blood cells, IRI was detected by immunohistohcemistry. Appendix tissue and blood cells (except for erythrocytes) are new sources of IRI. Basal saliva, urine, and serum levels were higher in children with AA compared with postoperative levels (T2) that start to decline after surgery. This is in line with the finding that IRI levels are higher in children with AA when compared with those with AP or control subject levels, most likely due to a large infiltration of neutrophil cells in AA that release its IRI into body fluids. Measurement of IRI in children with AA parallels the increase or decrease in the neutrophil count. This new finding shows that the measurement of IRI and neutrophil count can together improve the diagnosis of AA, and it can distinguish it from AP. IRI can be a candidate marker for the diagnosis of AA and offers an additional parameter to

  7. Acoustic Neuroma Mimicking Orofacial Pain: A Unique Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Naveen; Mendigeri, Vijaylaxmi; Puranik, Surekha R.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic neuroma (AN), also called vestibular schwannoma, is a tumor composed of Schwann cells that most frequently involve the vestibular division of the VII cranial nerve. The most common symptoms include orofacial pain, facial paralysis, trigeminal neuralgia, tinnitus, hearing loss, and imbalance that result from compression of cranial nerves V–IX. Symptoms of acoustic neuromas can mimic and present as temporomandibular disorder. Therefore, a thorough medical and dental history, radiographic evaluation, and properly conducted diagnostic testing are essential in differentiating odontogenic pain from pain that is nonodontogenic in nature. This article reports a rare case of a young pregnant female patient diagnosed with an acoustic neuroma located in the cerebellopontine angle that was originally treated for musculoskeletal temporomandibular joint disorder. PMID:28053796

  8. Sacral perineural cyst mimicking inflammatory low back pain.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, P

    2015-02-01

    This case describes a 46-year-old woman with local pelvic and perineal pain, persisting for 2 years at presentation. The pain worsened during the night and morning and was alleviated during daily activities. Low back pain was associated with morning stiffness lasting longer than 2 h. Sometimes, she felt pain and numbness along her left S1 dermatome, without overt bladder or bowel incontinence. Lasegue's sign was negative. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were elevated (35 mm/h and 9.4, respectively) and Mennel's sign was present on both sides, indicating possible inflammation of the sacroiliac joints. However, radiographs of the lumbosacral spine and sacroiliac joints were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a large spinal meningeal cyst in the sacrum (60 × 37 × 22 mm) consisting of multiple perineural cysts. The cyst eroded the surrounding sacral bone structures, narrowed several sacral foramina, and compressed neighboring nerve fibers. MRI findings on sacroiliac and hip joints were normal.

  9. The child with bone pain: malignancies and mimickers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Bone pain in children is common. The cause may be as benign as growing pains or as life-threatening as a malignancy. When a cause cannot be established by laboratory tests, physical examination or patient history, imaging of the affected body part is often obtained. Distinguishing benign from malignant processes involving the bones of children, based on imaging findings, can be challenging. The most common benign conditions that mimic pediatric bone tumors on imaging are Langerhan's cell histiocytosis and osteomyelitis. In this review, the current literature regarding the pathology and imaging of these conditions is reviewed. Benign conditions are compared with the most common pediatric bone tumors, Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcoma, with an emphasis on clinical and imaging features that may aid in diagnosis. PMID:19965301

  10. Nanovesicle-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Structures Mimicking Mammalian Pain Sensory System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Youngtac; Jin, Hye Jun; An, Jeong Mi; Park, Juhun; Moon, Seok Jun; Hong, Seunghun

    2015-03-01

    We developed a ``chemical-pain sensor'' based on a single-walled carbon nanotube-based field effect transistor (SWNT-FET) functionalized with rat pain sensory receptor, rat transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (rTRPV1) mimicking a mammalian pain sensory system. The sensor can selectively detect chemical pain stimuli such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin with a sensitivity of a 1 pM detection limit. Since this sensor allows one to quantitatively measure the concentration of chemical pain stimuli just like animal sensory systems, it can be used for various practical applications such as food screening. In addition, TRP families including rTRPV1 protein used for the sensor are now suggested as potential drug targets related to nerve and circulation disorders. Thus, the capability of measuring TRP responses using our sensor platform should open up other applications such as drug screening and basic research related with nerve and circulation systems.

  11. Masturbation mimicking abdominal pain or seizures in young girls.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, D R; Morrison, A

    1990-05-01

    Five girls, 7 to 27 months of age, had masturbatory posturing that did not involve rubbing of the genitalia or copulatory movements. This activity was mistakenly attributed to abdominal pain or seizures, and prompted unnecessary diagnostic tests. The posturing began at 3 to 14 months and consisted of "leaning episodes" in which the suprapubic region was applied to a firm edge or the parent's knee in one patient, stiffening of the lower extremities in a standing or sitting position in the second patient, and stiffening of the lower extremities while lying on their sides or supine in three infant patients. The posturing was often accompanied by irregular breathing, facial flushing, and diaphoresis, and lasted less than a minute to hours at a time. Management consisted of convincing the parents of the harmless nature of the activity, which then lessened the reinforcing effect of their responses. The posturing subsided, in time, without medical or surgical treatment.

  12. Office evaluation of spine and limb pain: spondylotic radiculopathy and other nonstructural mimickers.

    PubMed

    Watson, James

    2011-02-01

    Low back and neck pain, with or without radiculopathy, are one of the most common reasons for referral to an outpatient neurology practice. Determining appropriate treatment relies on establishing an accurate diagnosis of the etiology of the spine or limb pain. The author reviews structural radiculopathies as a result of diskogenic and spondylotic etiologies with an emphasis on the clinical approach and evaluation of these patients (including imaging and electrodiagnostics), identifying management altering neurogenic mimickers of structural radiculopathies (such as infectious, inflammatory, and neoplastic myeloradiculitis and radiculoplexopathies), and stratifying patients for treatment.

  13. A comparison between modified Alvarado score and RIPASA score in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Singla, Anand; Singla, Satpaul; Singh, Mohinder; Singla, Deeksha

    2016-12-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common but elusive surgical condition and remains a diagnostic dilemma. It has many clinical mimickers and diagnosis is primarily made on clinical grounds, leading to the evolution of clinical scoring systems for pin pointing the right diagnosis. The modified Alvarado and RIPASA scoring systems are two important scoring systems, for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We prospectively compared the two scoring systems for diagnosing acute appendicitis in 50 patients presenting with right iliac fossa pain. The RIPASA score correctly classified 88 % of patients with histologically confirmed acute appendicitis compared with 48.0 % with modified Alvarado score, indicating that RIPASA score is more superior to Modified Alvarado score in our clinical settings.

  14. Fishbone-induced perforated appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Bababekov, Yanik J; Stanelle, Eric J; Abujudeh, Hani H; Kaafarani, Haytham M A

    2015-05-20

    We review the literature and describe a case of fishbone-induced appendicitis. A 63-year-old man presented with abdominal pain. Work up including a focused history and imaging revealed fishbone-induced perforated appendicitis. The patient was managed safely and successfully with laparoscopic removal of the foreign body and appendectomy.

  15. Snapshot quiz - recurrent right iliac fossa pain in the patient with a previous history of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Aris Chandran, Johan; Cobb, Will A; Keeler, Barrie D; Soin, Bob

    2015-06-01

    A low threshold for computed tomography (CT) scanning in patients with previous appendicectomy and right iliac fossa pain helps facilitate timely diagnosis and exclusion of other differential diagnoses. Here, we present a rare cause which has significant medicolegal ramifications and is accurately diagnosed with CT.

  16. [A case of stump appendicitis after appendectomy].

    PubMed

    Baek, Seong Kyu; Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, Yong Hoon; Chung, Woo Jin; Kwon, Jung Hyeok

    2008-01-01

    Stump appendicitis is an acute inflammation of the residual appendix and a rare complication after an appendectomy. Although the signs and symptoms do not differ from acute appendicitis, the diagnosis is often not considered because of the past surgical history. Only a small number of stump appendicitis cases have been reported, but there has been no report of stump appendicitis in Korea. Herein, we report a case of stump appendicitis. A 28-year-old female was admitted to our hospital due to right lower quadrant abdominal pain. Fifteen months ago, the patient had a laparoscopic appendectomy under the diagnosis of an acute appendicitis, but she subsequently suffered from intermittent abdominal pain and fever. Abdominal ultrasonography and CT scan showed an inflamed appendiceal stump. Laparoscopic stump appendectomy was done and the biopsy revealed stump appendicitis.

  17. Fishbone Perforated Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Beh, Joey Chan Yiing; Uppaluri, Anandswaroop Srinivas; Koh, Beatrice Fang Ju; Cheow, Peng-Chung

    2016-07-01

    Ingested foreign bodies tend to pass through the gastrointestinal tract without incidence, and vast majority of cases do not need intervention. Rarely, these foreign bodies drop into the appendix and not likely to re-enter the normal digestive tract. We describe a case of a 72-year-old male patient who presented with right iliac fossa pain of 3-day duration. Clinical examination suggested classic acute appendicitis. Blood test results revealed leukocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed evidence of acute appendicitis and a linear hyperdensity (foreign body) perforating the appendix. The patient was managed successfully with prompt laparoscopic appendectomy and removal of the foreign body which was confirmed to be a fish bone measuring about 10mm. While imaging diagnosis of fishbone in the appendix has been published, reports are few. To the best of the author's knowledge, fishbone induced perforated appendicitis has been described only in 2 cases (including this case) in the literature.

  18. [Appendicitis during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Estrada Altamirano, A; Bolaños Ancona, R; Juárez Garcia, L; Castelazo Morales, E

    1998-03-01

    Acute appendicitis es the most common cause of lapparotomy during pregnancy. The differential diagnosis in the pregnant woman becomes a challenge due to the anatomic changes that take place during the maternal adjustment to pregnancy. We have done a retrospective study between january 1989 and december 1994, at Instituto Nacional de Perinatologia. We found in that period of time 35,080 deliveries reported and 4 cases of acute appendicitis during pregnancy. The maternal age was between 16 and 42 years old, 26 years in average. Three patients were in the 3 trimester at the time of diagnosis, and the most important clinical sign was found to be diffuse abdominal pain. In 3 cases diagnosis was attributed to obstetric pathology rather than appendicitis in first place. Laparotomy and appendicectomy was done to all patients, with on block hysterectomy in only one case, having this particular patient an abscess as a postquirurgical complication. Just one case reported a healthy newborn delivered at term. It is obvious that early diagnosis and quirurgical treatment are important factors for the mother and the fetus prognosis. Appendicectomy as well as cholecystectomy are the two most common causes of laparotomy during pregnancy.

  19. Fishbone Perforated Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Joey Chan Yiing; Uppaluri, Anandswaroop Srinivas; Koh, Beatrice Fang Ju; Cheow, Peng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Ingested foreign bodies tend to pass through the gastrointestinal tract without incidence, and vast majority of cases do not need intervention. Rarely, these foreign bodies drop into the appendix and not likely to re-enter the normal digestive tract. We describe a case of a 72-year-old male patient who presented with right iliac fossa pain of 3-day duration. Clinical examination suggested classic acute appendicitis. Blood test results revealed leukocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed evidence of acute appendicitis and a linear hyperdensity (foreign body) perforating the appendix. The patient was managed successfully with prompt laparoscopic appendectomy and removal of the foreign body which was confirmed to be a fish bone measuring about 10mm. While imaging diagnosis of fishbone in the appendix has been published, reports are few. To the best of the author’s knowledge, fishbone induced perforated appendicitis has been described only in 2 cases (including this case) in the literature. PMID:27761185

  20. Traumatic appendicitis misdiagnosed as a case of haemoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Tausif; Ranjan, Rajeev; Saha, Subhendu Bikas; Singh, Balbodh

    2014-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common emergencies handled by a surgeon. Various aetiologies of acute appendicitis have been proposed but none have been proved. Trauma too has been proposed as a cause of acute appendicitis. Here we present a case of blunt trauma abdomen which was explored to rule out a perforation of hollow viscous organ and haemoperitoneum, but at the time of exploration a perforated appendicitis was found. The chronological order of events points towards blunt trauma as the probable cause of this appendicitis. This case also highlights the fact that even if trauma was not the cause of acute appendicitis, acute appendicitis should still be kept in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with pain in the right lower abdomen and a history of trauma. PMID:24759158

  1. Left Sided Appendicitis: Once Burned Twice Shy

    PubMed Central

    Spyridakis, Ioannis; Patoulias, Dimitrios; Tsioulas, Paschalis; Patoulias, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common surgical conditions that are diagnosed in children presenting with acute abdominal pain in the emergency department. An atypical presentation of symptoms is encountered in 30% of cases. Atypical localization of the appendix as in left sided appendicitis, although rare, has an increased risk of missed or delayed diagnosis. We present two consecutive cases of left sided appendicitis in order to describe how increased awareness in the second case helped us to avoid pitfalls in the management and diagnosis of this atypical and variant condition. Increased cautiousness and awareness of left sided appendicitis can assist emergency physicians to avoid pitfalls in the management and diagnosis of this atypical and variant condition. PMID:27042523

  2. The significance of urinary beta-2 microglobulin level for differential diagnosis of familial Mediterranean fever and acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Ugan, Yunus; Korkmaz, Hakan; Dogru, Atalay; Koca, Yavuz Savas; Balkarlı, Ayse; Aylak, Firdevs; Tunc, Sevket Ercan

    2016-07-01

    The clinical and laboratory parameters widely used are not specific to discriminate the abdominal pain due to FMF attack from that of acute appendicitis. The present study aims to investigate the urinary beta-2 microglobulin (U-β2M) level as a potential parameter to identify these two diseases mimicking each other. A total of 51 patients with established FMF diagnosis due to Tel Hashomer criteria on colchicine treatment (1-1.5 mg/day), 15 patients with acute appendicitis who had appropriate clinical picture and were also supported pathologically after the surgery, and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Of the 51 patients with FMF, 25 were at an attack period, while remaining 26 were not. For the diagnosis of acute attack, as well as physical examination, laboratory tests including white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were performed. From urine specimens U-β2M, microalbumin, and N-acetyl glucosaminidase (U-NAG) were measured. U-β2M levels were significantly higher in acute appendicitis group compared to FMF attack, FMF non-attack, and control groups (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). U-NAG and microalbuminuria were significantly higher in acute appendicitis, FMF attack, and FMF non-attack groups compared to controls (U-NAG p < 0.001, p = 0.016, p = 0.004, microalbuminuria p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively). Microalbuminuria was significantly higher in acute appendicitis group compared to the FMF attack group (p = 0.004). Determination of U-β2M levels may be helpful for differential diagnosis of peritonitis attacks of FMF patients on colchicine treatment and acute appendicitis. However, this finding should be substantiated with other studies.

  3. Gastric cancer in a pregnant woman presenting with low back pain and bilateral erythematous breast hypertrophy mimicking primary inflammatory breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mandato, Vincenzo Dario; Pirillo, Debora; Gelli, Maria Carolina; Cavina, Maurizio; La Sala, Giovanni Battista

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the first case of a pregnant woman presenting low-back pain and breast pain associated with bilateral erythematous breast hypertrophy, proving to be the result of metastatic disease from a gastric carcinoma. A 30-year-old pregnant woman was admitted complaining of persistent severe low back pain, breast pain and concomitant bilateral erythematous breast hypertrophy, mimicking primary inflammatory breast carcinoma. During the caesarean section, widespread disease was found and finally metastatic gastric cancer was detected. Pregnant women with gastric cancer may present symptoms that are considered common during pregnancy. Common symptoms that present warning characteristics, such as the persistent severe pain observed in the presented case, should be carefully investigated as they may be the only warning signs and symptoms of rare ominous conditions such as gastric cancer.

  4. Assessment of peritonism in appendicitis.

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, J.; Toms, A. P.; Franklin, I. J.; Scriven, M. W.; Galland, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of different methods of demonstrating right iliac fossa peritonism in appendicitis. The methods used were cat's eye symptom (pain on going over a bump in the road), cough sign, right iliac fossa tenderness, percussion tenderness, rebound tenderness and guarding. A series of 100 consecutive patients with a median age of 25 years (range 4-81 years), presenting with right iliac fossa pain were studied prospectively; the male:female ratio was 39:61. In all, 58 patients underwent operation, 44 had appendicitis confirmed on histology. Fourteen patients had a normal appendix removed; 11 were women aged between 16 and 45 years. Cat's eye symptom and cough sign were sensitive indicators of appendicitis (sensitivity 0.80 and 0.82, respectively), but were not specific (specificity 0.52 and 0.50, respectively) and therefore inaccurate (accuracy 64%). Percussion tenderness was less sensitive (sensitivity 0.57) but more specific (specificity 0.86). Rebound tenderness proved to be sensitive (sensitivity 0.82), specific (specificity 0.89) and accurate (accuracy 86%). Thus, rebound tenderness had a positive predictive value of 86% compared with 56% and 57% for cough sign and cat's eye symptom, respectively. In the difficult diagnostic group of young women, the positive predictive value of rebound tenderness was 88% compared with 58% and 56% for cat's eye symptom and cough sign. Appendicitis remains a difficult diagnosis, particularly in young women. Rebound tenderness still has an important role to play in clinical assessment. PMID:8659965

  5. Increased incidence of perforated appendicitis in children with obesity.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Felix C; Sandler, Anthony D; Nadler, Evan P

    2012-10-01

    Based on their clinical impression, the authors hypothesized that children with obesity may more commonly present with perforated appendicitis. Therefore, the authors reviewed their experience from 2008 to 2010 to determine whether obesity affected the clinical presentation of appendicitis. Variables studied were height, weight, use of diagnostic imaging, and clinical findings of appendicitis at presentation. Outcomes assessed were length of stay and complication rate. The study identified 319 patients with appendicitis. Children with obesity were more likely (P = .026) to present with perforation (28/62, 45%) than nonobese patients (78/257, 30%). Neither length of stay nor complication rate was affected by the presence of obesity. The data suggest that children with obesity are more likely to present with perforated appendicitis. This finding suggests that the diagnosis of appendicitis may be more difficult in obese patients or their presentation may be delayed. Practitioners should have heightened awareness in children with obesity and symptoms of abdominal pain.

  6. Appendicitis: a rare cause.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Muhammad; Simha, Shruti

    2011-07-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common acute surgical condition in children. Parasitic infestations are ubiquitous on a worldwide basis and are seen in the United States because of increasing international travel and emigration from developing countries. These infestations may produce symptoms of acute appendicitis, although the role of parasitic infestation in relation to appendicitis is controversial. Intestinal parasites may cause significant morbidity and mortality. We report a patient with symptoms of acute appendicitis in whom intramural parasites were found during laparoscopic surgery. Histology of the appendix specimen revealed a normal appendix. The pertinent literature is also reviewed.

  7. Appendicitis in Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tobacco Treatments Injuries & Emergencies Vaccine Preventable Diseases Healthy Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Abdominal > Appendicitis in Teens Health Issues Listen Español Text Size ...

  8. Ultrasonography for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Himeno, Shinji; Yasuda, Seiei; Oida, Yasuhisa; Mukoyama, Sayuri; Nishi, Takayuki; Mukai, Masaya; Nakasaki, Hisao; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2003-04-01

    Acute appendicitis is usually encountered clinically as acute abdomen. Typical cases are easy to diagnose, but it can sometimes be very difficult to make a diagnosis in atypical cases. We retrospectively studied patients who underwent ultrasonography for right-sided lower abdominal pain suggesting acute appendicitis, and assessed the accuracy of ultrasonic diagnosis. The subjects were 202 patients (100 males and 102 females) aged 6-89 years (mean: 33.3 years). From the ultrasonic findings, appendicitis was classified as follows: 1) catarrhal: a clear layer structure of the appendiceal wall and mucosal edema; 2) phlegmonous: an ill-defined layer structure of the appendiceal wall, moderate enlargement of the apendix, and maximum transverse dimension of > or = 10 mm; and 3) gangrenous: unidentifiable layer structure of the appendiceal wall and marked enlargement to form a mass. The appendix was visualized in 142 of the 202 patients (70.3 %). When the appendix was detected, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasound for making a diagnosis of appendicitis were 97.6%, 82.0 %, 91.5 %, respectively. With regard to assessment of the severity of inflammation, ultrasonic and histologic findings were concordant in 61.2 % of the patients. However, ultrasound was shown to possibly underestimate the extent of inflammation. On the other hand, 11 of the 60 patients with an undetectable appendix (18.3 %) were clinically diagnosed as having appendicitis. The pathologic diagnosis was catarrhal appendicitis in 3 patients and phlegmonous appendicitis in 8 patients. In patients with an undetectable appendix, the possibility of catarrhal or phlegmonous appendicitis should be kept in mind.

  9. Acute abdomen caused by both acute appendicitis and epididymitis.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hajime; Hamada, Shinichi; Okanoue, Toyotake; Kawamura, Akihiro; Inoue, Yuichiro; Yamamoto, Shinya; Chikai, Takashi; Hiroi, Makoto; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2011-08-01

    Acute appendicitis often presents as right lower quadrant (RLQ) pain, severe tenderness at the point of McBurny or Lanz, and Blumberg's sign. Scrotal events with appendicitis are very rare. In our case, a 63-year-old Japanese man presented with severe RLQ pain and high fever. Physical examination revealed severe tenderness (including both points of McBurny and Lanz) and Blumberg's sign. The scrotum was slightly swollen and showed local heat with severe testicular pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed ascites in a pelvic space and the right side of the spermatic cord was swollen. Emergency operation was performed and the final diagnosis was catarrhal appendicitis and acute epididymitis. This is the first report of acute appendicitis concomitant with acute epididymitis.

  10. A Case of Intussusception with Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Hyung Min; Park, Ji Young; Lim, In Seok

    2015-01-01

    In children presenting to hospital with gastrointestinal symptoms, diseases such as intussusception and acute appendicitis require particular attention and careful examination. Early diagnosis and proper treatment are important because of possible severe complications such as peritonitis and death. Intussusception and appendicitis share similar clinical manifestations. More importantly, the presence of acute appendicitis together with intussusception in children is very rare. We describe an interesting case of a 38-month-old boy who presented with abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant. His vital signs were stable and laboratory test findings showed no specific alterations. We detected tenderness in the right lower quadrant. A computed tomography scan showed an ileocolic intussusception with no strangulation and diffuse wall thickening of the appendix trapped within the intussusception. The patient underwent an appendectomy and manual reduction. PMID:26157700

  11. Alternative diagnoses at paediatric appendicitis MRI.

    PubMed

    Moore, M M; Kulaylat, A N; Brian, J M; Khaku, A; Hulse, M A; Engbrecht, B W; Methratta, S T; Boal, D K B

    2015-08-01

    As the utilization of MRI in the assessment for paediatric appendicitis increases in clinical practice, it is important to recognize alternative diagnoses as the cause of abdominal pain. The purpose of this review is to share our institution's experience using MRI in the evaluation of 510 paediatric patients presenting with suspected appendicitis over a 30 month interval (July 2011 to December 2013). An alternative diagnosis was documented in 98/510 (19.2%) patients; adnexal pathology (6.3%, n = 32), enteritis-colitis (6.3%, n = 32), and mesenteric adenitis (2.2%, n = 11) comprised the majority of cases. These common entities and other less frequent illustrative cases obtained during our overall institutional experience with MRI for suspected appendicitis are reviewed.

  12. Amoebiasis Presenting as Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Imai, Jin; Mizukami, Hajime; Uda, Shuji; Yamamoto, Soichiro; Nomura, Eiji; Tajiri, Takuma; Watanabe, Norihito; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2016-12-20

    We report a case of amoebic appendicitis without colitis symptoms. Acute appendicitis is commonly encountered by gastroenterologists in their daily practice. The number of cases of amoebiasis increases annually in Japan, and is thought to be associated with an increase in sexually transmitted disease or travel to endemic areas. However, acute amoebic appendicitis is rare and the prognosis is very poor compared to nonamoebic appendicitis. In our case, appendectomy was performed immediately after onset, and the patient was discharged without complications. It is difficult to differentiate between amoebic and nonamoebic appendicitis preoperatively, and the possibility of amoebic appendicitis should be kept in mind.

  13. A Gut Feeling: An Extremely Rare Case of Missed Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Pilgrim, Ashley; Russo, Rachel; Moulin, Aimee

    2014-01-01

    This case outlines the emergency department and surgical course of a 63-year-old male presenting with acute onset abdominal pain. Appendicitis was high on the differential for the treating physician, but after the computed tomography and laboratory evaluation were unremarkable, the patient was discharged only to return the next day. What ensued was one of the rarest cases of missed appendicitis documented in the medical literature. PMID:25493134

  14. Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Up; Kim, Jin Kyeung; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Dae Sik; Park, Hee Sook; Park, Kyeung Kyu

    1993-01-01

    The decision to operate for abdominal pain in patients with leukopenia can be exceedingly difficult. Surgical exploration may be the only effective way to differentiate acute appendicitis from other causes, but it involves considerable risk of infectious complications due to immunesuppression. Leukemic patients, who presented significant RLQ pain, had been indicated for operation, despite having advanced disease or having had received chemotherapy or steroids. Four adult leukemia patients, complicated by acute appendictis, were reviewed. Two patients were in induction chemotherapy, one receiving salvage chemotheapy due to relapse and the other was in conservative treatment. Two patients were acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), one had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and the other had aleukemic leukemia. All patients underwent appendectomy and recovered without complication. Our experience supports the theory that the surgical management of appendicitis in acute leukemia is the most effective way, in spite of leukopenia. PMID:8268146

  15. Fiber Intake and Childhood Appendicitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brender, Jean D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Parents of 135 children with appendicitis and of 212 comparison children were interviewed about their children's diet. Results suggest that a liberal intake of whole-grain breads and cereals may decrease the risk of appendicitis during childhood. (KH)

  16. [Schistosomiasis and acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Jacinta; Santos, Ângela; Clemente, Horácio; Lourenço, Augusto; Costa, Sandra; Grácio, Maria Amélia; Belo, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Acute appendicitis associated to Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni infection has been found in patients submitted to urgent appendectomy at the Hospital Américo Boavida in Luanda. Due to the high prevalence and morbidity caused by schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis) in the country, we suspect that the involvement of Schistosoma infection on appendicular pathology could be very frequent, in particular for those individuals more exposed to the parasite transmission. We report two clinical cases of acute appendicitis whose surgical specimens of the appendix revealed S. haematobium and S. mansoni eggs in histological samples. The reported patients live in endemic areas and have been exposed to schistosome during childhood, which may explain the infection's chronicity. Information of these clinical cases could be relevant, particularly for surgery specialists and clinical pathologists, due to the possibility of finding more patients with concurrent appendicitis and schistosomiasis.

  17. [Virological research on appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Stănescu, D; Sternberg, D; Chirilă, R; Teleguţă, L; Tănase, M; Copelovici, Y

    1988-01-01

    Investigations were conducted on groups of subjects hospitalized in surgery services with a clinical diagnosis of acute or chronic appendicitis, to detect the presence of inframicrobial antibodies and antigens, as well as that of the C reactive protein in these patients as compared with a control group. The results of serological tests and of the examination of pieces of appendix are also presented. The obtained data are used as arguments for the theory of an inframicrobial infection part in some acute and chronic forms of appendicitis.

  18. Novel mixed NOP/MOP agonist BU08070 alleviates pain and inhibits gastrointestinal motility in mouse models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Sobczak, Marta; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Sałaga, Maciej; Husbands, Stephen M.; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Background The opioid and nociceptin systems play a crucial role in the maintenance of homeostasis in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of BU08070, a novel mixed MOP/NOP agonist, on mouse intestinal contractility in vitro and GI motility in vivo in physiological conditions and in animal models mimicking symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), including diarrhea and abdominal pain. Methods The effect of BU08070 on muscle contractility in vitro was characterized in the ileum and colon. To assess the effect of BU08070 in vivo, the following parameters were assessed: whole GI transit, gastric emptying, geometric center, colonic bead expulsion, fecal pellet output and time to castor oil-induced diarrhea. The antinociceptive activity of BU08070 was characterized in the mustard oil (MO)-induced abdominal pain model and the writhing test, alone and in the presence of MOP and NOP antagonists. Results In vitro, BU08070 (10−10–10−6 M) inhibited colonic and ileal smooth muscle contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. In vivo, BU08070 prolonged the whole GI transit and inhibited colonic bead expulsion. The antitransit and antidiarrheal effect of BU08070 was observed already at the dose of 0.1 mg/kg (i.p.). BU08070 reversed hypermotility and reduced pain in mouse models mimicking IBS-D symptoms. Conclusion Our results suggest that BU08070 has a potential of becoming an efficient drug in IBS-D therapy. Here we also validate mixed NOP/MOP receptor targeting as possible future treatment of functional GI diseases. PMID:24815321

  19. Appendiceal diverticulum associated with chronic appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Zubieta-O’Farrill, Gregorio; Guerra-Mora, José Raúl; Gudiño-Chávez, Andrés; Gonzalez-Alvarado, Carlos; Cornejo-López, Gilberto Bernabe; Villanueva-Sáenz, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Appendiceal diverticulosis is a rare entity, with a global incidence between 0.004% and 2.1% of all appendectomies. It has been related with an elevated risk of perforation in comparison to acute appendicitis, as well as an increased risk for synchronic appendicular cancer in 48% of the cases, and colonic cancer in 43%. The incidence of chronic appendicitis has been reported in 1.5% of all appendicitis cases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a 73-year-old female, with no relevant familial history, who presented due to a four-month-long oppressive, moderate pain in the lower right abdominal quadrant without irradiation or any other accompanying symptoms. DISCUSSION The documented incidence of appendiceal diverticula and chronic appendicitis by themselves is low; therefore the presence of both entities at the same time is extremely rare. CONCLUSION We present a case in which both diagnoses concurred in the same patient. The relevance of this case relies on the importance of the adequate knowledge of these pathologies, so we can approach them correctly. Although it does not represent an absolute surgical emergency, appendectomy represents the first therapeutic option. PMID:25460447

  20. Stump appendicitis after laparoscopic appendectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Bu-Ali, Omaima; Al-Bashir, Mohamed; Samir, Hashim A; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2011-05-01

    Stump appendicitis is a rare delayed complication of appendectomy. The delay in diagnosis is usually because of a prior history of appendectomy. We report a case of stump appendicitis diagnosed pre-operatively with a computerized tomography (CT) scan after laparoscopic appendectomy. An 18-year-old male presented with a one-week history of lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. He had a history of laparoscopic appendectomy for acute appendicitis. Physical examination revealed tenderness and guarding in the lower abdomen. CT scan showed free pelvic fluid with a tubular structure of about 2.5 cm in length and 0.78 cm in diameter located posterior to the ileo-cecal junction. Laparoscopic exploration confirmed the findings. A residual appendiceal stump was found and dissected from the adhesion and removed. Histopathology showed a residual appendix with transmural neutrophilic infiltration associated with multifocal hemorrhagic necrosis. The postoperative period was uneventful. The diagnosis of stump appendicitis can be challenging. CT scan has proven to be a useful tool for the diagnosis of this rare condition.

  1. Novel orally available salvinorin A analog PR-38 inhibits gastrointestinal motility and reduces abdominal pain in mouse models mimicking irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sałaga, M; Polepally, P R; Sobczak, M; Grzywacz, D; Kamysz, W; Sibaev, A; Storr, M; Do Rego, J C; Zjawiony, J K; Fichna, J

    2014-07-01

    The opioid and cannabinoid systems play a crucial role in multiple physiological processes in the central nervous system and in the periphery. Selective opioid as well as cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonists exert a potent inhibitory action on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and pain. In this study, we examined (in vitro and in vivo) whether PR-38 (2-O-cinnamoylsalvinorin B), a novel analog of salvinorin A, can interact with both systems and demonstrate therapeutic effects. We used mouse models of hypermotility, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. We also assessed the influence of PR-38 on the central nervous system by measurement of motoric parameters and exploratory behaviors in mice. Subsequently, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of PR-38 in mouse blood samples after intraperitoneal and oral administration. PR-38 significantly inhibited mouse colonic motility in vitro and in vivo. Administration of PR-38 significantly prolonged the whole GI transit time, and this effect was mediated by µ- and κ-opioid receptors and the CB1 receptor. PR-38 reversed hypermotility and reduced pain in mouse models mimicking functional GI disorders. These data expand our understanding of the interactions between opioid and cannabinoid systems and their functions in the GI tract. We also provide a novel framework for the development of future potential treatments of functional GI disorders.

  2. Calcific Tendinopathy of the Gluteus Medius Mimicking Lumbar Radicular Pain Successfully Treated With Barbotage: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hannae; Kim, Gowun; Baek, Sora

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of calcific tendinopathy of the gluteus medius initially misdiagnosed as a lumbar herniated intervertebral disc. It was successfully treated with barbotage under ultrasonographic guidance finally. A 56-year-old woman was referred to interventional pain clinic for right hip pain due to an L5-S1 disc herniation. Serial L5 and S1 spinal nerve root blocks and epidural steroid injections were administered. However, pain relief was sustained only for a very short period. Plain radiography of the right hip revealed a solid calcific nodule at adjacent to the insertion site of the gluteus medius tendon. Physical modalities and extracorporeal shock wave therapy failed to improve the pain. Therefore, we attempted ultrasound-guided barbotage of the calcification. Barbotage was performed twice serially and her pain was considerably improved. At 6-month follow-up, the calcification was completely resolved. PMID:27152290

  3. Acute appendicitis caused by foreign body ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Heung; Lee, Dae Sup

    2015-01-01

    Foreign bodies usually do not cause complications and pass through the gastrointestinal tract spontaneously. Usually endoscopic intervention is recommended within 24 hours. Cases of acute appendicitis caused by foreign bodies are very rare. In our case, we experienced successful endoscopic and surgical treatment of a patient with ingestion of razor blade and some unrecognizable foreign bodies. A 22-year-old soldier was admitted with a small quantity of hematemesis and epigastric pain. We performed emergent endoscopy and successfully removed several foreign bodies. After 17 days, we performed appendectomy to remove the remaining foreign body and to relieve the symptoms. There is no doubt that endoscopic intervention is definitely useful method to remove foreign bodies. If there is no spontaneous drainage of the foreign body from the appendix, an appendectomy must be considered to remove the foreign body and prevent surgical complications such as appendicitis, periappendiceal abscess, and perforation. PMID:26366386

  4. Stump appendicitis is a rare delayed complication of appendectomy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Uludag, Mehmet; Isgor, Adnan; Basak, Muzaffer

    2006-09-07

    Stump appendicitis is an acute inflammation of the residual appendix and one of the rare complications after appendectomy. Paying attention to the possibility of stump appendicitis in patients with right lower abdominal pain after appendectomy can prevent the delay of diagnosis and treatment. In patients with stump appendicitis, CT scan not only assists in making an accurate preoperative diagnosis but also excludes other etiologies. We report a 47-year old man with preoperatively diagnosed stump appendicitis by CT, who underwent an open appendectomy 20 years ago.

  5. Appendicitis: changing perspectives.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Pedro G R; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2013-01-01

    Neoplasms are an uncommon finding after appendectomy, with malignant tumors occurring in less than 1% of the surgical specimens, and carcinoid being the most frequent malignancy. A negative or inconclusive ultrasound is not adequate to rule out appendicitis and should be followed by CT scan. For pregnant patients, MRI is a reasonable alternative to CT scan. Nonoperative treatment with antibiotics is safe as an initial treatment of uncomplicated appendicitis, with a significant decrease in complications but a high failure rate. Open and laparoscopic appendectomies for appendicitis provide similar results overall, although the laparoscopic technique may be advantageous for obese and elderly patients but may be associated with a higher incidence of intraabdominal abscess. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy is of utmost importance during pregnancy because a negative appendectomy is associated with a significant incidence of fetal loss. The increased morbidity associated with appendectomy delay suggests that prompt surgical intervention remains the safest approach. Routine incidental appendectomy should not be performed except in selected cases. Interval appendectomy is not indicated because of considerable risks of complications and lack of any clinical benefit. Patients older than 40 years with an appendiceal mass or abscess treated nonoperatively should routinely have a colonoscopy as part of their follow-up to rule out cancer or alternative diagnosis.

  6. Diagnostic value of C-reactive protein in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Albu, E; Miller, B M; Choi, Y; Lakhanpal, S; Murthy, R N; Gerst, P H

    1994-01-01

    Serum C-reactive protein was measured in 56 patients hospitalized with a suspected diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Based on these determinations, four groups of patients were defined: Group A = 26 patients with acute appendicitis who had a C-reactive protein level higher than 2.5 mg/dl. Group B = 4 patients with a C-reactive protein level lower than 2.5 mg/dl who, after surgery based on a presumed diagnosis of acute appendicitis, were found to have a normal appendix. Group C = 22 patients with nonspecific abdominal pain, 18 (72 percent) of whom had an elevated C-reactive protein level, although in only 4 (7.1 percent) were these levels higher than 2.5 percent mg/dl. Group D = 4 patients who had diseases other than acute appendicitis. It is concluded that an increase in C-reactive protein levels to more than 2.5 mg/dl is not a definite indicator of acute appendicitis. However, if the C-reactive protein level in blood drawn 12 hours after the onset of symptoms is less than 2.5 mg/dl, acute appendicitis can be excluded.

  7. Management of acute appendicitis: an imaging strategy in children.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, David; Vainrib, Michael; Buklan, Genady; Gutermacher, Michael; Paran, Haim; Werner, Myriam; Rathause, Valeria; Zissin, Rivka; Lazar, Ludwig; Erez, Ilan

    2010-02-01

    The pre-operative diagnosis of acute appendicitis (AA) has markedly changed during the last couple of decades due to the advent of modern imaging technology. Nowadays, the use of imaging has dramatically changed the way we approach children admitted to emergency room for abdominal pain with suspected AA. This change is mainly manifested in our diagnostic strategy.

  8. Primary Sacral Hydatid Cyst Mimicking a Neurogenic Tumor in Chronic Low Back Pain: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Segura-Trepichio, Manuel; Montoza-Nuñez, Jose Manuel; Candela-Zaplana, David; Herrero-Santacruz, Josefa; Pla-Mingorance, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease is caused by infection of Echinococcus granulosus. Bone hydatid cyst presentation without hepatic affectation is infrequent and occurs in 0,5-2% of cases. This rare condition makes clinicians not always aware of the disease, and as a result, misdiagnosis of spinal echinococcosis is common. We present a case of a 48-year-old female patient with primary sacral hydatidosis. Chronic low back pain radiating to the left buttock was the only symptom. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested a neurogenic tumor versus giant cell tumor. Biopsy and pathological study revealed a hydatid cyst. Anthelmintic and surgical treatment was performed. At 12 months after surgery, the patient is free of recurrence. In patients with chronic low back pain and a MR suggestive of neurogenic tumor, spinal hydatid cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis. It is recommended the assistance of an anesthesiologist during biopsy to avoid an anaphylactic shock. PMID:28163523

  9. Intra-abdominal bleeding in appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Thongprayoon, C; Pasa-Arj, S

    1991-08-01

    A 34-year-old woman, gravida 6 with 10 weeks of gestation was admitted because of abdominal pain and fainting. On physical examination she had hypotension, was pale with abdominal tenderness and guarding. Culdocentesis yielded unclotted blood. Immediate laparotomy was performed, because a diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy was made. About 2,500 ml of fresh blood was found in the abdominal cavity. Appendicular artery tear caused active arterial bleeding. The torn appendicular artery was observed to be the consequence of perforated appendicitis, which, in turn, was caused by a faecalith. Appendectomy was performed and she made a good recovery.

  10. Profiles of US and CT imaging features with a high probability of appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Laméris, W.; van Es, H. W.; ten Hove, W.; Bouma, W. H.; van Leeuwen, M. S.; van Keulen, E. M.; van der Hulst, V. P. M.; Henneman, O. D.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Boermeester, M. A.; Stoker, J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To identify and evaluate profiles of US and CT features associated with acute appendicitis. Methods Consecutive patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the emergency department were invited to participate in this study. All patients underwent US and CT. Imaging features known to be associated with appendicitis, and an imaging diagnosis were prospectively recorded by two independent radiologists. A final diagnosis was assigned after 6 months. Associations between appendiceal imaging features and a final diagnosis of appendicitis were evaluated with logistic regression analysis. Results Appendicitis was assigned to 284 of 942 evaluated patients (30%). All evaluated features were associated with appendicitis. Imaging profiles were created after multivariable logistic regression analysis. Of 147 patients with a thickened appendix, local transducer tenderness and peri-appendiceal fat infiltration on US, 139 (95%) had appendicitis. On CT, 119 patients in whom the appendix was completely visualised, thickened, with peri-appendiceal fat infiltration and appendiceal enhancement, 114 had a final diagnosis of appendicitis (96%). When at least two of these essential features were present on US or CT, sensitivity was 92% (95% CI 89–96%) and 96% (95% CI 93–98%), respectively. Conclusion Most patients with appendicitis can be categorised within a few imaging profiles on US and CT. When two of the essential features are present the diagnosis of appendicitis can be made accurately. PMID:20119730

  11. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  12. Laparoscopic appendectomy: treatment of choice for suspected appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Nowzaradan, Y; Barnes, J P; Westmoreland, J; Hojabri, M

    1993-10-01

    Results and complications in 100 patients treated over a 3-year period with the laparoscopic approach for clinically diagnosed acute appendicitis are evaluated. They are compared with results and complications in 100 patients with the same diagnosis who had been treated with the open technique performed by the same surgeon during the same 3 years. The results suggest that laparoscopy provides excellent exposure of the appendix regardless of its position. In the absence of pathology of the appendix, laparoscopy allows for a thorough examination of the entire abdomen and pelvis and good exposure and definitive treatment of most surgical conditions encountered. In the event of appendicitis, regardless of its severity, laparoscopic appendectomy results in less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stays, faster return to normal activities, fewer postoperative complications, and superior cosmetic results. Our experience suggests that the laparoscopic approach is the best approach to diagnosis and treatment of the conditions encountered in patients with suspected appendicitis.

  13. Seat Belt Compression Appendicitis following Motor Vehicle Collision

    PubMed Central

    Zia Ullah, Qazi

    2017-01-01

    Appendicitis and trauma both present in emergency department commonly but their presentation together in the same patient is unusual. We present a case of a middle-aged man brought by emergency medical services (EMS) to the emergency department with complaints of abdominal pain after he was involved in motor vehicle collision. He was perfectly fine before the accident. His primary survey was normal. Secondary survey revealed tenderness in right iliac fossa with seat belt mark overlying it. Computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis was performed which showed 8 mm thickening of appendix with minimal adjacent fat stranding. There is also subcutaneous fat stranding of anterior lower abdominal wall possibly due to bruising. Impression of posttraumatic seat belt compression appendicitis was made. Laparoscopic appendectomy was done and patient recovered uneventfully. Histopathology showed inflamed appendix, proving it to be a case of seat belt compression appendicitis. PMID:28337350

  14. Seat Belt Compression Appendicitis following Motor Vehicle Collision.

    PubMed

    Khilji, Muhammad Faisal; Zia Ullah, Qazi

    2017-01-01

    Appendicitis and trauma both present in emergency department commonly but their presentation together in the same patient is unusual. We present a case of a middle-aged man brought by emergency medical services (EMS) to the emergency department with complaints of abdominal pain after he was involved in motor vehicle collision. He was perfectly fine before the accident. His primary survey was normal. Secondary survey revealed tenderness in right iliac fossa with seat belt mark overlying it. Computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis was performed which showed 8 mm thickening of appendix with minimal adjacent fat stranding. There is also subcutaneous fat stranding of anterior lower abdominal wall possibly due to bruising. Impression of posttraumatic seat belt compression appendicitis was made. Laparoscopic appendectomy was done and patient recovered uneventfully. Histopathology showed inflamed appendix, proving it to be a case of seat belt compression appendicitis.

  15. Appendicitis near its centenary.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J; Malt, R A

    1984-01-01

    In an analysis of the first 72 cases treated after the formulation of the appendicitis syndrome in 1886 compared with the experience from 1929-1959 and with 307 randomly selected recent cases, the major therapeutic trend has been an emphasis on appendectomy before perforation and abscess formation occur. The rate of infection nonetheless remains approximately 17%. Although the overall mortality rate has declined from 26% overall (40% for surgery) to 0.8%, the current rate of perforation is 28%, with a diagnostic accuracy of 82%. Among 13,848 patients from several reports the perforation rate increases linearly with diagnostic accuracy; therefore, a balance must be sought. Delay awaiting a diagnosis is a major determinant of perforation, but diagnostic aids are of limited help. Clinical acuity and prudent decisiveness are the keys to proper action. Images FIGS. 1A and B. FIG. 2. PMID:6385879

  16. Obstructive Uropathy Secondary to Missed Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydronephrosis is a rare complication of acute appendicitis. We present a case of missed appendicitis in a 52-year-old female which presented as a right-sided hydronephrosis. 2 days after admission to the Department of Urology CT revealed acute appendicitis for what open appendectomy was performed. Acute appendicitis can lead to obstructive uropathy by periappendiceal inflammation due to adjacency. Urologists, surgeons, and emergency physicians should be aware of this rare complication of atypical acute appendicitis. PMID:27818827

  17. Massive ovarian edema, due to adjacent appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Callen, Andrew L; Illangasekare, Tushani; Poder, Liina

    2017-04-01

    Massive ovarian edema is a benign clinical entity, the imaging findings of which can mimic an adnexal mass or ovarian torsion. In the setting of acute abdominal pain, identifying massive ovarian edema is a key in avoiding potential fertility-threatening surgery in young women. In addition, it is important to consider other contributing pathology when ovarian edema is secondary to another process. We present a case of a young woman presenting with subacute abdominal pain, whose initial workup revealed marked enlarged right ovary. Further imaging, diagnostic tests, and eventually diagnostic laparoscopy revealed that the ovarian enlargement was secondary to subacute appendicitis, rather than a primary adnexal process. We review the classic ultrasound and MRI imaging findings and pitfalls that relate to this diagnosis.

  18. Acute Appendicitis and Pneumatosis in a Duplicated Appendix With Schistosoma Remnants.

    PubMed

    Handra-Luca, Adriana; Bisseret, Damien; Dragoescu, Ema

    2016-02-01

    Appendiceal pneumatosis is rare, reported either in the context of acute appendicitis or enterocolitis. Here, we report the case of an elderly adult in whom the acute appendicitis was associated with pneumatosis and occurred in the context of a malformed appendix with pathogenic organism remnants. A 72-year-old man presented with abdominal pain 3 weeks after posttraumatic dorsolumbar surgery. The computed tomography scan showed acute appendicitis and 2 diverticula. On microscopy, the appendix showed acute appendicitis along with a Cave-Wallbridge type A duplication. In addition, several optically clear spaces were observed in the entire appendiceal wall consistent with pneumatosis of the appendix. Focally, calcified structures suggesting pathogenic organisms such as Schistosoma were noted as well. In conclusion, we report a case of appendiceal pneumatosis occurring in the context of acute appendicitis in a duplicated appendix, with presence of calcified structures suggestive of pathogenic organisms.

  19. Necrotizing fasciitis due to appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Groth, D; Henderson, S O

    1999-10-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis, although rare, is one of the more serious, life-threatening complications of missed acute appendicitis. Patients who are predisposed to developing necrotizing fasciitis, regardless of the cause, are typically immunocompromised. We present a case of a 49-year-old immunocompetent female whose diagnosis of acute appendicitis was missed and who subsequently developed necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall and flank. She recovered 1 month after admission due to aggressive surgical and medical therapy.

  20. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jie; Yao, Le; He, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Bin; Song, Zhen-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common causes of acute abdominal pain. Accurate diagnosis is often hindered due to various presentations that differ from the typical signs of appendicitis, especially the position of the appendix. A delay in diagnosis or treatment may result in increased risks of complications, such as perforation, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis is extremely rare. We herein report a case of 50-year-old man presenting with an appendiceal abscess in local hospital. After ten days of conservative treatment with intravenous antibiotics, the patient complained about pain and swelling of the right lower limb and computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a perforated appendix and gas and fluid collection extending from his retroperitoneal cavity to the subcutaneous layer of his right loin and right lower limb. He was transferred to our hospital and was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis caused by perforated appendicitis. Emergency surgery including surgical debridement and appendectomy was performed. However, the patient died of severe sepsis and multiple organ failure two days after the operation. This case represents an unusual complication of a common disease and we should bear in mind that retroperitoneal inflammation and/or abscesses may cause necrotizing fasciitis through lumbar triangles.

  1. Are antibiotics a safe and effective treatment for acute uncomplicated appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Moraga, Felipe; Ahumada, Vanessa; Crovari, Fernando

    2016-01-26

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain and the most frequent cause of emergency abdominal surgery. In the last two decades, growing evidence has been published about the use of antibiotics as the exclusive treatment for acute appendicitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including one pertinent randomized trial. We generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of antibiotics to treat acute uncomplicated appendicitis may be less effective than appendectomy and probably increases major complications compared with appendectomy.

  2. Sacro-iliac osteomyelitis in a 13 year old boy following perforated appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Whelan-Johnson, Sophie; Isaacs, John; Pullan, Rupert D

    2013-05-01

    Appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain in children and is treated by an open or laparoscopic appendicectomy. Well documented post-operative complications include wound infection, intra-abdominal collection, and adhesional bowel obstruction. We present the rare case of right sacro-iliitis and iliac bone osteomyelitis in a 13 year old boy following an open appendicectomy for a perforated appendicitis.

  3. Characteristic clinical features of Aspergillus appendicitis: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gjeorgjievski, Mihajlo; Amin, Mitual B; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-11-28

    This work aims to facilitate diagnosing Aspergillus appendicitis, which can be missed clinically due to its rarity, by proposing a clinical pentad for Aspergillus appendicitis based on literature review and one new case. The currently reported case of pathologically-proven Aspergillus appendicitis was identified by computerized search of pathology database at William Beaumont Hospital, 1999-2014. Prior cases were identified by computerized literature search. Among 10980 pathology reports of pathologically-proven appendicitis, one case of Aspergillus appendicitis was identified (rate = 0.01%). A young boy with profound neutropenia, recent chemotherapy, and acute myelogenous leukemia presented with right lower quadrant pain, pyrexia, and generalized malaise. Abdominal computed tomography scan showed a thickened appendiceal wall and periappendiceal inflammation, suggesting appendicitis. Emergent laparotomy showed an inflamed, thickened appendix, which was resected. The patient did poorly postoperatively with low-grade-fevers while receiving antibacterial therapy, but rapidly improved after initiating amphotericin therapy. Microscopic examination of a silver stain of the appendectomy specimen revealed fungi with characteristic Aspergillus morphology, findings confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Primary Aspergillus appendicitis is exceptionally rare, with only 3 previously reported cases. All three cases presented with (1)-neutropenia, (2)-recent chemotherapy, (3)-acute leukemia, and (4)-suspected appendicitis; (5)-the two prior cases initially treated with antibacterial therapy, fared poorly before instituting anti-Aspergillus therapy. The current patient satisfied all these five criteria. Based on these four cases, a clinical pentad is proposed for Aspergillus appendicitis: clinically-suspected appendicitis, neutropenia, recent chemotherapy, acute leukemia, and poor clinical response if treated solely by antibacterial/anti-candidial therapy. Patients presenting with

  4. Characteristic clinical features of Aspergillus appendicitis: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gjeorgjievski, Mihajlo; Amin, Mitual B; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to facilitate diagnosing Aspergillus appendicitis, which can be missed clinically due to its rarity, by proposing a clinical pentad for Aspergillus appendicitis based on literature review and one new case. The currently reported case of pathologically-proven Aspergillus appendicitis was identified by computerized search of pathology database at William Beaumont Hospital, 1999-2014. Prior cases were identified by computerized literature search. Among 10980 pathology reports of pathologically-proven appendicitis, one case of Aspergillus appendicitis was identified (rate = 0.01%). A young boy with profound neutropenia, recent chemotherapy, and acute myelogenous leukemia presented with right lower quadrant pain, pyrexia, and generalized malaise. Abdominal computed tomography scan showed a thickened appendiceal wall and periappendiceal inflammation, suggesting appendicitis. Emergent laparotomy showed an inflamed, thickened appendix, which was resected. The patient did poorly postoperatively with low-grade-fevers while receiving antibacterial therapy, but rapidly improved after initiating amphotericin therapy. Microscopic examination of a silver stain of the appendectomy specimen revealed fungi with characteristic Aspergillus morphology, findings confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Primary Aspergillus appendicitis is exceptionally rare, with only 3 previously reported cases. All three cases presented with (1)-neutropenia, (2)-recent chemotherapy, (3)-acute leukemia, and (4)-suspected appendicitis; (5)-the two prior cases initially treated with antibacterial therapy, fared poorly before instituting anti-Aspergillus therapy. The current patient satisfied all these five criteria. Based on these four cases, a clinical pentad is proposed for Aspergillus appendicitis: clinically-suspected appendicitis, neutropenia, recent chemotherapy, acute leukemia, and poor clinical response if treated solely by antibacterial/anti-candidial therapy. Patients presenting with

  5. Unusual case of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Luke Nelson; Tsai, Alice Yi-Chien

    2016-06-30

    A teenage girl was admitted to the paediatric assessment unit with non-specific abdominal pain that gradually localised to the right iliac fossa (RIF). She remained systemically well; investigations including blood tests, urine sample and abdominal ultrasound were inconclusive. Surgical opinion was sought and the decision was made to perform a diagnostic laparoscopy due to the ongoing pain. Laparoscopy showed no evidence of any significant pathology, and appendicectomy was performed following the routine practice. Numerous pinworms came out while the appendix was resected. The RIF pain resolved and the patient made a full post-operative recovery. A stat dose of mebendazole and amoxicillin were given and the immediate family was also treated. Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm) causes significant morbidity worldwide and has a high prevalence among children in the UK. It can be easily treated and prompt recognition based on clinical symptoms can potentially prevent unnecessary surgery.

  6. UNDESCENDED TESTICLE COMPLICATING ACUTE APPENDICITIS*

    PubMed Central

    Herzig, Maximilian L.

    1924-01-01

    1. Symptoms referable to compression of the spermatic cord and incarceration of right testicle, obscure the underlying pathologic changes occurring in the vermiform appendix. 2. Testicular underdevelopment and resulting subnormal cerebration. 3. Operative technique: (a) Pre-operative diagnosis: Incarceration of right testicle and possible perforative appendicitis. (b) Descent of right incarcerated testicle. Bassini closure. (c) Exploratory laparotomy: Intramuscular gridiron incision. 4. Operative findings: (a) Strangulation and incarceration of undescended right testicle and spermatic cord in inguinal canal. (b) Copious pus, free in peritoneal cavity. An adherent, sloughing, perforative, retrocecal appendix identified, left undisturbed and free drainage established. 5. Progress: (a) Eventful recovery from acute suppurative appendicitis following drainage of appendical focus. (b) Marked development following the operative descent of an incarcerated testicle in a backward boy, age twelve, who had a bilateral cryptorchism. PMID:18739377

  7. WSES Jerusalem guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Birindelli, Arianna; Kelly, Micheal D; Catena, Fausto; Weber, Dieter G; Sartelli, Massimo; Sugrue, Michael; De Moya, Mark; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Bhangu, Aneel; Agresta, Ferdinando; Moore, Ernest E; Soreide, Kjetil; Griffiths, Ewen; De Castro, Steve; Kashuk, Jeffry; Kluger, Yoram; Leppaniemi, Ari; Ansaloni, Luca; Andersson, Manne; Coccolini, Federico; Coimbra, Raul; Gurusamy, Kurinchi S; Campanile, Fabio Cesare; Biffl, Walter; Chiara, Osvaldo; Moore, Fred; Peitzman, Andrew B; Fraga, Gustavo P; Costa, David; Maier, Ronald V; Rizoli, Sandro; Balogh, Zsolt J; Bendinelli, Cino; Cirocchi, Roberto; Tonini, Valeria; Piccinini, Alice; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Jovine, Elio; Persiani, Roberto; Biondi, Antonio; Scalea, Thomas; Stahel, Philip; Ivatury, Rao; Velmahos, George; Andersson, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is among the most common cause of acute abdominal pain. Diagnosis of AA is challenging; a variable combination of clinical signs and symptoms has been used together with laboratory findings in several scoring systems proposed for suggesting the probability of AA and the possible subsequent management pathway. The role of imaging in the diagnosis of AA is still debated, with variable use of US, CT and MRI in different settings worldwide. Up to date, comprehensive clinical guidelines for diagnosis and management of AA have never been issued. In July 2015, during the 3rd World Congress of the WSES, held in Jerusalem (Israel), a panel of experts including an Organizational Committee and Scientific Committee and Scientific Secretariat, participated to a Consensus Conference where eight panelists presented a number of statements developed for each of the eight main questions about diagnosis and management of AA. The statements were then voted, eventually modified and finally approved by the participants to The Consensus Conference and lately by the board of co-authors. The current paper is reporting the definitive Guidelines Statements on each of the following topics: 1) Diagnostic efficiency of clinical scoring systems, 2) Role of Imaging, 3) Non-operative treatment for uncomplicated appendicitis, 4) Timing of appendectomy and in-hospital delay, 5) Surgical treatment 6) Scoring systems for intra-operative grading of appendicitis and their clinical usefulness 7) Non-surgical treatment for complicated appendicitis: abscess or phlegmon 8) Pre-operative and post-operative antibiotics.

  8. Acute appendicitis following endoscopic mucosal resection of cecal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Yukako; Tokuhisa, Junya; Shimada, Nagasato; Gomi, Tatsuya; Maetani, Iruru

    2015-07-21

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) allows the removal of flat or sessile lesions, laterally spreading tumors, and carcinoma of the colon or the rectum limited to the mucosa or the superficial submucosa. Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery, and it is also a rare complication of diagnostic colonoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy, including EMR. In the case presented here, a 53-year-old female underwent colonoscopy due to a positive fecal occult blood test and was diagnosed with cecal adenoma. She was referred to our hospital and admitted for treatment. The patient had no other symptoms. EMR was performed, and 7 h after the surgery, the patient experienced right -lower abdominal pain. Laboratory tests performed the following day revealed a WBC count of 16000/mm(3), a neutrophil count of 14144/mm(3), and a C-reactive protein level of 2.20 mg/dL, indicating an inflammatory response. Computed tomography also revealed appendiceal wall thickening and swelling, so acute appendicitis following EMR was diagnosed. Antibiotics were initiated leading to total resolution of the symptoms, and the patient was discharged on the sixth post-operative day. Pathological analysis revealed a high-grade cecal tubular adenoma. Such acute appendicitis following EMR is extremely rare, and EMR of the cecum may be a rare cause of acute appendicitis.

  9. Diagnostic value of blood inflammatory markers for detection of acute appendicitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Ulrich; Biereder, Birgit; Elouahidi, Tino; Bauer, Katrin; Keller, Thomas; Tröbs, Ralf-Bodo

    2006-01-01

    Background Acute appendicitis (AA) is a common surgical problem that is associated with an acute-phase reaction. Previous studies have shown that cytokines and acute-phase proteins are activated and may serve as indicators for the severity of appendicitis. The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic value of different serum inflammatory markers in detection of phlegmonous or perforated appendicitis in children. Methods Data were collected prospectively on 211 consecutive children. Laparotomy was performed for suspected AA for 189 patients. Patients were subdivided into groups: nonsurgical abdominal pain, early appendicitis, phlegmonous or gangrenous appendicitis, perforated appendicitis. White blood cell count (WBC), serum C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), acid α1-glycoprotein (α1GP), endotoxin, and erythrocyte sedimentation reaction (ESR) were estimated ad the time of admission. The diagnostic performance was analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results WBC count, CRP and IL-6 correlated significantly with the severity of appendiceal inflammation. Identification of children with severe appendicitis was supported by IL-6 or CRP but not WBC. Between IL-6 and CRP, there were no significant differences in diagnostic use. Conclusion Laboratory results should be considered to be integrated within the clinical assessment. If used critically, CRP and IL-6 equally provide surgeons with complementary information in discerning the necessity for urgent operation. PMID:17132173

  10. Is acute appendicitis still misdiagnosed?

    PubMed Central

    Danys, Donatas; Poskus, Tomas; Mikalauskas, Saulius; Poskus, Eligijus; Jotautas, Valdemaras; Beisa, Virgilijus; Strupas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective The optimal diagnostics and treatment of acute appendicitis continues to be a challenge. A false positive diagnosis of appendicitis may lead to an unnecessary operation, which has been appropriately termed negative appendectomy. The aim of our study was to identify the effectiveness of preoperative investigations in preventing negative appendectomy. Methods A retrospective study was performed on adult patients who underwent operation for suspected acute appendicitis from 2008 to 2013 at Vilnius University Hospital Santariskiu Klinikos. Patients were divided into two groups: group A underwent an operation, where appendix was found to be normal (non-inflamed); group B underwent an appendectomy for inflamed appendix. Groups were compared for preoperative data, investigations, treatment results and pathology findings. Results 554 patients were included in the study. Preoperative laboratory tests results of hemoglobin, hematocrit concentrations and white blood cell count were significantly higher in group B (p<0.001). Ultrasonography was performed for 78 % of patients in group A and 74 % in group B and did not provide any statistically significant results. Comparing Alvarado score results, there were more patients with Alvarado score less than 7 in group A than in group B. In our large series we could find only four independent risk factors, and they could only account for 24 % of cases. Conclusions In summary, acute appendicitis is still often misdiagnosed and the ratio of negative appendectomies remains rather high. Additional investigations such as observation and computed tomography should be used to prevent this.

  11. Left-sided appendicitis in a patient with situs inversus totalis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Joo Suk; Kim, Ki Wook

    2012-01-01

    Situs inversus totalis is a rare inherent disease in which the thoracic and abdominal organs are transposed. Symptoms of appendicitis in situs inversus (SI) may appear in the left lower quadrant, and the diagnosis of appendicitis is very difficult. We report a case of left-sided appendicitis diagnosed preoperatively after dextrocardia that was detected by chest X-ray, although the chief complaint of the patient was left lower-quadrant pain. The patient underwent an emergent laparoscopic appendectomy under the diagnosis of appendicitis after abdominal computed tomography (CT). In patients with left lower quadrant pain, if the chest X-ray shows dextrocardia, one should suspect left-sided appendicitis. A strong suspicion of appendicitis and an emergency laparoscopic operation after confirmation of the diagnosis by imaging modalities including abdominal CT or sonography can reduce the likelihood of misdiagnosis and complications including perforation and abscess. Laparoscopic appendectomy in SI was technically more challenging because of the mirror nature of the anatomy. PMID:22977765

  12. Intestinal Schistosomiasis as Unusual Aetiology for Acute Appendicitis, Nowadays a Rising Disease in Western Countries

    PubMed Central

    López de Cenarruzabeitia, I.; Landolfi, S.; Armengol Carrasco, M.

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal schistosomiasis as unusual aetiology for acute appendicitis, nowadays a rising disease in western countries. Recent changes in global migration has led to an immigration growth in our scenario, upsurging people coming from endemic areas of schistosomiasis. Schistosomal appendicitis, seldom reported in developed countries, is now an expected incrising entity in our hospitals during the near future. Due to this circumstances, we believe that schistosomiasis should be consider as a rising source for acute appendicitis in western countries. In order to illustrate this point, we present a case of a 45-years-old black man, from Africa, was admitted via A&E because of acute abdominal pain, located in right lower quadrant. Acute appendicitis was suspected, and he underwent laparotomy and appendectomy. Pathological study by microscope revealed a gangrenous appendix with abscesses and parasitic ova into the submucosal layer of the appendix, suggesting Schistosomiasis. PMID:22792502

  13. [Current diagnostic-therapeutic trends in treatment of pediatric appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Malnati, R; Capasso, G; Stagni, S; Bua, L; Albisetti, A; Erenbourg, L; Paesano, P L

    1994-03-01

    Acute appendicitis is the first cause of emergency surgery in children. Actually, emergency abdominal sonography has evolved in differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children to differentiate it from other causes of acute abdomen as mesenteric lymphoadenitis, acute right pyelonephritis, acute diverticulitis in Meckel's diverticulum, intestinal intussusception, regional enterits, primary peritonitis, anaphylactoid purpura of Henoch-Schonlein. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the usefulness of abdominal sonography in diagnosing acute appendicitis in our current series of pediatric patients. We have operated 102 patients afflicted by appendicitis admitted to the pediatric department of Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano in a period of 5 years and operated on for appendectomy. In the last 2 years 36 patients were evaluated with abdominal sonography. This diagnostic tool showed in 34 (94.4%) a liquid effusion, sometimes thick of the right iliac fossa. In 2 patients the appendix had thickened layers, was edematous and the lumen was clearly filled with debris. Abdominal sonography has given a clear cut picture of the acute inflammatory process of the appendix. None of these patients has suffered from septic or obstructive complications. Mean duration of hospital stay was 6.35 days (3-15 days). Differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis can be extremely variable, from simple, paradigmatic situations to the most intriguing ones. This concept is well emphasized by William Silen when he says that "differential diagnosis of acute appendicits is an encyclopedic compendium of every abdominal disease that causes pain" in the 11th edition of Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. [Immunotherapy for the treatment of acute appendicitis in children].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, A A; Akhanzaripov, Z A

    1994-08-01

    The immune status was studied during the development of the disease in 182 children who were operated on for acute appendicitis. T lymphocytes and their subpopulations circulating in the blood, as well as B lymphocytes, immunoglobulins A, M, G, and immune complexes were determined. The character of changes of these values before the operation and in various postoperative periods were determined. The effect of complex treatment, including T-activin, on the clinical and immunological parameters in children with acute appendicitis was appraised. Analysis of the results showed that a transitory immunodepressive state forms in children with the disease, which is more marked in the destructive form, with normalization of the main values of cell-mediated and humoral immunity by the 7th day after appendectomy. In a complicated course of acute appendicitis the state of immunodeficiency is torpid in character and does not return to normal values even after clinical recovery, i.e. before discharge from the clinic. Inclusion of the immunostimulating agent T-activin into the complex treatment of patients with appendicitis ensures a more rapid involution of the main clinical manifestations of the disease. The therapeutic effect was most pronounced in destructive appendicitis: after 3 days of treatment the pain syndrome was encountered twice less frequently and intestinal paresis more than twice less frequently in these patients, and the term of hospital stay (8.8 +/- 0.4 days) was less shorter than for children of the control group (12.2 +/- 1.9 days) who did not receive T-activin in the therapeutic complex.

  15. Discovery and validation of urine markers of acute pediatric appendicitis using high accuracy mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kentsis, Alex; Lin, Yin Yin; Kurek, Kyle; Calicchio, Monica; Wang, Yan Yan; Monigatti, Flavio; Campagne, Fabien; Lee, Richard; Horwitz, Bruce; Steen, Hanno; Bachur, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective Molecular definition of disease has been changing all aspects of medical practice, from diagnosis and screening to understanding and treatment. Acute appendicitis is among many human conditions that are complicated by the heterogeneity of clinical presentation and shortage of diagnostic markers. Here, we sought to profile the urine of patients with appendicitis with the goal of identifying new diagnostic markers. Methods Candidate markers were identified from the urine of children with histologically proven appendicitis by using high accuracy mass spectrometry proteome profiling. These systemic and local markers were used to assess the probability of appendicitis in a blinded, prospective study of children being evaluated for acute abdominal pain in our emergency department. Tests of performance of the markers were evaluated against the pathologic diagnosis and histologic grade of appendicitis. Results Test performance of 57 identified candidate markers was studied in 67 patients, with median age of 11 years, 37% of whom had appendicitis. Several exhibited favorable diagnostic performance, including calgranulin A (S100-A8), α-1-acid glycoprotein 1 (orosomucoid), and leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein (LRG), with the ROC AUC and values of 0.84 (95 % CI 0.72-0.95), 0.84 (0.72-0.95), and 0.97 (0.93-1.0), respectively. LRG was enriched in diseased appendices and its abundance correlated with severity of appendicitis. Conclusions High accuracy mass spectrometry urine proteome profiling allowed identification of diagnostic markers of acute appendicitis. Usage of LRG and other identified biomarkers may improve the diagnostic accuracy of clinical evaluations of appendicitis. PMID:19556024

  16. Stump appendicitis 5 years after laparoscopic appendicectomy.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Andrew Phillip; Ibrahim, Hany; Franz, Robert; Iswariah, Harish

    2016-10-27

    A 31-year-old healthy man presented with right lower quadrant pain and tenderness, mild neutrophilia and clinical presentation consistent with appendicitis, despite undergoing a laparoscopic appendicectomy 5 years prior. CT scan demonstrated a caecal phlegmon, in the expected region of the appendiceal stump. The patient was taken for laparoscopy and a 2 cm inflamed appendiceal stump was encountered. A distal caecectomy was performed and the patient made an unremarkable recovery. Histological examination was consistent with acute inflammation of the appendiceal stump. Only a small number of case reports of stump appendicitis have been published so far. Correct identification and ligation of the appendiceal stump is crucial to prevent this complication. Although normally it is treated with completion appendicectomy, the optimal treatment approach for this condition has not been well established.

  17. Malrotated Subhepatic Caecum with Subhepatic Appendicitis: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hock Chin; Balakrishnan, Dhayal; Asilah, Siti Mohd Desa; Adila, Irene Nur Ibrahim; Syibrah, Khuzaimah Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Subhepatically located caecum and appendix is a very rare entity. It occurs due to the anomaly in fetal gut rotation that results in an incomplete rotation and fixation of the intestine. Appendicitis, which is a common surgical emergency, in combination with the abnormal subhepatic location, presents a great challenge in its diagnosis and management. Here, we describe a 42-year-old male with chronic dyspepsia who presented with sepsis and severe pain at his right hypochondriac and epigastric region. The final diagnosis was acute appendicitis of the subhepatic appendix. Our discussion focuses on the diagnostic approach and clinical and surgical management. We hope that our report will increase the awareness among the clinicians and hasten the management of such rare condition to avoid complications. PMID:27648337

  18. Paradigm Shifts in the Treatment of Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Grace Zee; Loeff, Deborah S

    2016-07-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of emergent surgery in children. Historically, surgical dogma dictated emergent appendectomy due to concern for impending perforation. Recently, however, there has been a paradigm shift in both the understanding of its pathophysiology as well as its treatment to more nonoperative management. No longer is it considered a spectrum from uncomplicated appendicitis inevitably progressing to complicated appendicitis over time. Rather, uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis are now considered two distinct pathophysiologic entities. This change requires not only educating the patients and their families but also the general practitioners who will be managing treatment expectations and caring for patients long term. In this article, we review the pathophysiology of appendicitis, including the differentiation between uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis, as well as the new treatment paradigms. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(7):e235-e240.].

  19. A young man with concurrent acute appendicitis and incarcerated right indirect inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Ditsatham, Chagkrit; Somwangprasert, Areewan; Watcharachan, Kirati; Wongmaneerung, Phanchaporn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute appendicitis and incarcerated hernia rarely present in the same episode. Our study reports patient presentation, diagnosis method, and treatment of an unusual case at the Chiang Mai University Hospital. Method Case report. Result A 20-year-old man visited the Chiang Mai University Hospital with right lower quadrant pain and a right groin mass which could not be reduced. The computerized tomography scan showed acute appendicitis and omentum in the hernia sac. Operative treatment was an appendectomy and herniorrhaphy. The treatment was successful, and the patient was discharged from our hospital without any complications. Conclusion Concurrent acute appendicitis and incarcerated hernia are very rare, but should be kept in mind if a patient presents with right lower quadrant pain and a right groin mass. Further investigation may be helpful if the diagnosis is uncertain. Operative priority treatment depends on each individual case. PMID:26834499

  20. Review article: appendicitis in groin hernias.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Alan K

    2007-10-01

    To review the clinical presentation, outcome and causes of acute appendicitis presenting within a groin hernia. A comprehensive review of the past 70 years of English language surgical literature was conducted pertaining to acute appendicitis presenting within an inguinal or femoral hernia. Thirty-four reports describing 45 patients were reviewed to determine age, position, gender, pathologic stage at presentation, causal suppositions, and clinical outcomes. Hernial appendicitis presented as an inguinal abscess or a tender inguinal mass, often in the femoral position, and most commonly at the extremes of age. It was almost never recognized preoperatively, and, because of the sequestered nature of the inflammatory process, presented with few classic systemic signs or symptoms suggestive of acute appendicitis. Advanced pathologic stage and death correlated with the patient's age, delay in presentation, and delay in recognition. Evaluation of an inguinal abscess or a nonreducible tender groin hernia presenting in a patient at the extremes of age, should include computed tomography to rule out an occult acute appendicitis within the hernia, as systemic signs and symptoms of appendicitis are rarely evident. The condition appears to be caused by inflammatory adhesions caused by appendicitis occurring within an enlarged hernial orifice rather than appendicitis caused by external compression of the appendix base. Early recognition of this unique presentation of appendicitis allows trans-hernial appendectomy and immediate herniorraphy. Delayed diagnosis requires drainage of abscess with appendectomy and interval hernia repair.

  1. Evaluation of a low-dose CT protocol with oral contrast for assessment of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Platon, Alexandra; Jlassi, Helmi; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Becker, Christoph D; Verdun, Francis R; Gervaz, Pascal; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a low-dose CT with oral contrast medium (LDCT) for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare its performance with standard-dose i.v. contrast-enhanced CT (standard CT) according to patients' BMIs. Eighty-six consecutive patients admitted with suspicion of acute appendicitis underwent LDCT (30 mAs), followed by standard CT (180 mAs). Both examinations were reviewed by two experienced radiologists for direct and indirect signs of appendicitis. Clinical and surgical follow-up was considered as the reference standard. Appendicitis was confirmed by surgery in 37 (43%) of the 86 patients. Twenty-nine (34%) patients eventually had an alternative discharge diagnosis to explain their abdominal pain. Clinical and biological follow-up was uneventful in 20 (23%) patients. LDCT and standard CT had the same sensitivity (100%, 33/33) and specificity (98%, 45/46) to diagnose appendicitis in patients with a body mass index (BMI) >or= 18.5. In slim patients (BMI<18.5), sensitivity to diagnose appendicitis was 50% (2/4) for LDCT and 100% (4/4) for standard CT, while specificity was identical for both techniques (67%, 2/3). LDCT may play a role in the diagnostic workup of patients with a BMI >or= 18.5.

  2. Abdominal CT Does Not Improve Outcome for Children with Suspected Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Miano, Danielle I.; Silvis, Renee M.; Popp, Jill M.; Culbertson, Marvin C.; Campbell, Brendan; Smith, Sharon R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis in children is a clinical diagnosis, which often requires preoperative confirmation with either ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) studies. CTs expose children to radiation, which may increase the lifetime risk of developing malignancy. US in the pediatric population with appropriate clinical follow up and serial exam may be an effective diagnostic modality for many children without incurring the risk of radiation. The objective of the study was to compare the rate of appendiceal rupture and negative appendectomies between children with and without abdominal CTs; and to evaluate the same outcomes for children with and without USs to determine if there were any associations between imaging modalities and outcomes. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review including emergency department (ED) and inpatient records from 1/1/2009–2/31/2010 and included patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Results 1,493 children, aged less than one year to 20 years, were identified in the ED with suspected appendicitis. These patients presented with abdominal pain who had either a surgical consult or an abdominal imaging study to evaluate for appendicitis, or were transferred from an outside hospital or primary care physician office with the stated suspicion of acute appendicitis. Of these patients, 739 were sent home following evaluation in the ED and did not return within the subsequent two weeks and were therefore presumed not to have appendicitis. A total of 754 were admitted and form the study population, of which 20% received a CT, 53% US, and 8% received both. Of these 57%, 95% CI [53.5,60.5] had pathology-proven appendicitis. Appendicitis rates were similar for children with a CT (57%, 95% CI [49.6,64.4]) compared to those without (57%, 95% CI [52.9,61.0]). Children with perforation were similar between those with a CT (18%, 95% CI [12.3,23.7]) and those without (13%, 95% CI [10.3,15.7]). The proportion of children with a

  3. Laparoscopic appendectomy for acute appendicitis: indications and current use.

    PubMed

    Nowzaradan, Y; Westmoreland, J; McCarver, C T; Harris, R J

    1991-10-01

    Laparoscopic evaluation was performed in 43 consecutive patients with right lower abdominal pain and preoperative diagnosis of possible appendicitis. Patients with generalized peritonitis and evidence of perforation of the appendix were not considered for laparoscopy. Visualization was sufficient for making a diagnosis in 97.7% of the cases. In 95%, laparoscopic findings were compatible with the pathology report. Thirty-five patients underwent successful laparoscopic appendectomy with neither intraoperative nor postoperative complications. No further surgery was required; slightly elevated temperatures in 6 patients responded to treatment with antibiotics, and there were no wound infections. Laparoscopic appendectomy is minimally invasive and results in less postoperative pain and morbidity and fewer adhesions and other long-term sequelae than conventional laparotomy. It is associated with superior cosmetic results, a shorter hospital stay, and faster return to normal activities. This experience suggests that if there is no evidence that the appendix is perforated or that generalized peritonitis exists and if qualified physicians and adequate facilities are available, patients presenting with right lower quadrant abdominal pain and possible appendicitis are best evaluated and treated with laparoscopic technique.

  4. Cytological diagnosis of xanthogranulomatous appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Rajni; Gulati, Anchana; Vedant, Deepak; Kaushal, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous reaction can occur in any organ but the most common sites are kidney and gallbladder. Xanthogranulomatous appendicitis (XA) is a rare clinical entity. There are a few case reports of XA diagnosed on histopathology but none on cytology. Here we report a case of a 47-year-old lady who presented with acute abdomen and was found to have a mass lesion in the right iliac fossa. She was diagnosed with XA intraoperatively on imprint cytology that was subsequently confirmed on histopathological examination. Due to the rarity of XA itself and the use of imprint cytology for intraoperative diagnosis the case is being presented. PMID:28182060

  5. Appendicitis, is it an emergency?

    PubMed

    Udgiri, Navalkishor; Curras, Ernesto; Kella, Venkata K; Nagpal, Kamal; Cosgrove, John

    2011-07-01

    Prompt appendectomy has always been a standard of care because of the risk of progression in pathology. This time honored practice has been recently challenged by studies, suggesting that appendicitis can be operated on electively. The aim of this study is to examine whether delayed intervention in acute appendicitis is safe by correlating the interval from presentation to operation with the operative and postoperative complications. Retrospective review of patients who underwent appendectomy for acute appendicitis in 2009 was done. The following parameters were recorded: demographics, duration from presentation to evaluation by emergency room attending, performing CT scan, surgical consult, and operation. The pathology, post operative complications, and length of stay were also recorded. Patients were divided into two groups: incision time < 10 hours (early group) and incision time > 10 hours (delayed group). The end points chosen for comparison were: 1) laparoscopic to open conversion rate, 2) complications, 3) readmissions, and 4) length of stay. Number of cases totaled 201, with 76 in the < 10 hours group and 125 in the > 10 hours group. The male to female ratio for the < 10 hours group was 54:22 and for the > 10 hours group was 59:66 (P < 0.001). Length of stay for the early group was 75.52 hours and for the delayed group, 89.15 hours (P = 0.04). There was one intra-abdominal abscess in the early group and 10 in the delayed group (P = 0.04). The early group had 0.2 (2.6%) open conversions, and the delayed group had five (4.1%) conversions (P = 0.58). There were six (4.8%) readmissions in the delayed group and none in the early group (P = 0.05). Our study reveals that the complication rate, length of stay, and readmissions are more in the delayed group. Conversion rate was more in the delayed group, but the difference was not significant. We conclude that early surgical intervention is beneficial in acute appendicitis.

  6. Eosinophilic acute appendicitis caused by Strongyloides stercoralis and Enterobius vermicularis in an HIV-positive patient

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Dennis Baroni; Friedrisch, Bruno Kras; Fontanive Junior, Vilmar; da Rocha, Vívian Wünderlich

    2012-01-01

    A 29 year old female HIV-positive patient presented in emergency with acute right lower quadrant abdominal pain, fever, tenderness and positive Blumberg sign. Laboratorial tests revealed eosinophilia, anaemia and leukocytosis. She underwent exploratory laparotomy followed by appendectomy. The pathological analysis of the appendix revealed acute appendicitis, accentuated eosinophilia and infestation by Strongyloides stercoralis and Enterobius vermicularis. She did well after surgery and adequate treatment. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of eosinophilic acute appendicitis caused by these two parasitic worms reported in the medical literature. PMID:22605801

  7. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blockage of the intestine Infection inside the abdomen (peritonitis) Infection of the wound after surgery When to ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2014:chap 93. Read More Peritonitis Point tenderness - abdomen Tumor Review Date 4/20/ ...

  8. Appendicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contacts Human Subjects Research Funding Process Research Training & Career Development Funded Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease ...

  9. Diagnostic Colonoscopy Leading to Perforated Appendicitis: A Case Report and Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, Antonios

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Intestinal perforation is a known complication after colonoscopy. However, appendiceal involvement with inflammation and perforation is extremely rare and only 37 cases of postcolonoscopy appendicitis have been reported so far. We describe a case of perforated appendicitis 24 hours after colonoscopy that was treated successfully in our Department. Case Report. A 60-year-old female patient underwent a colonoscopy during the investigation of nontypical abdominal pain without pathologic findings. 24 hours after the examination she presented gradually increased right lower quadrant abdominal pain and a CT scan was performed, showing an inflammation of the appendiceal area with free peritoneal air. Through laparotomy, perforated appendicitis was diagnosed and an appendectomy was performed. The patient was discharged on the tenth postoperative day in good health condition. Discussion. The characteristics of all cases reported in the literature are described, including our case. Perforated appendicitis soon after a colonoscopy is a rare, but serious complication; therefore, it is crucial to be included in the differential diagnosis of postcolonoscopy acute abdominal pain. PMID:27980869

  10. Left-sided appendicitis in children with congenital gastrointestinal malrotation: a diagnostic pitfall in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Taslakian, Bedros; Issa, Ghada; Hourani, Roula; Akel, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most common conditions requiring emergency surgery. However, acute appendicitis presenting with left lower quadrant abdominal pain is extremely rare. Imaging, particularly CT , plays an important role in establishing an accurate and prompt diagnosis, as delay in diagnosis may occur due to lack of uniformity in the clinical signs and symptoms. We report a rare case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with persistent left lower quadrant pain of several days duration, in which the CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was essential in establishing the correct diagnosis. The malpositioned inflamed appendix was clearly identified in the left side of the abdomen, with the characteristic CT findings of uncomplicated intestinal malrotation. Left-sided acute appendicitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of young patients presenting with left lower quadrant pain, in order to avoid delay in diagnosis and guide the surgical intervention. PMID:23761499

  11. Anatomic basis for delayed diagnosis of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Poole, G V

    1990-07-01

    Gangrene or perforation of the appendix is often caused by failure to make an early diagnosis of appendicitis. Variability in the anatomic location of the appendix can be responsible for atypical manifestations of appendicitis and diagnostic errors. Over a 52-month period, 125 appendectomies were done for suspected appendicitis at a military hospital. After excluding cases in which the location of the appendix was not provided, 106 cases were available for review. Fifteen patients (14%) did not have appendicitis. The appendix was found in the true pelvis, was behind the ileum or ileocolic mesentery, or was both retrocolic and retroperitoneal in 11 of 16 patients (69%) with gangrenous or perforative appendicitis. In contrast, the appendix was in one of these three sites in only four of 75 patients (5%) with simple appendicitis (P less than .001). Both physicians and patients were responsible for diagnostic delays, but the paucity of symptoms and signs in patients with a "hidden" appendix was the most likely cause of failure to diagnose appendicitis before perforation.

  12. Duodenal Obstruction Caused by Acute Appendicitis with Intestinal Malrotation in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Biçer, Şenol; Çelik, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 14 Final Diagnosis: Duodenal obstruction Symptoms: Bilious vomiting Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Laparotomy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: In patients with intestinal malrotation, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis can be difficult due to atypical presentation. Duodenal obstruction caused by acute appendicitis with the presence of malrotation has rarely been reported in children. Case Report: We report the case of a 14-year-old male patient with bilious vomiting and abdominal distension. A diagnosis could not be made by computed tomography, ultrasonography, or endoscopy. We observed a dilated stomach and malrotation in laparotomy. The caecum was in the right upper quadrant, and an inflamed appendix was located in the subhepatic region. After the appendectomy, the cecum was mobilized and fixed in the right lower quadrant. Conclusions: In children with intestinal malrotation, acute appendicitis can present as duodenal obstruction without abdominal pain, and standard imaging methods can miss the correct diagnosis. PMID:26317163

  13. [Appendicitis in the aged (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hupe, K

    1981-01-01

    In cases of partially uncharacteristic clinical symptoms with no typical leukocytosis and no ESR elevation, laparotomy reveals not seldom an acute phlegmonous appendix. As compared with the similar disease in younger people appendicitis of the aged presents more complications and a higher mortality rate which can partially explained by clinically meaningful secondary findings and a lesser degree of peritoneal inflammation. The mortality rate of appendicitis in the aged could be markedly reduced. This may be attributed to emergency operation of clinically diagnosed appendicitis in the aged, to improve anaesthetic technique, to infusion therapy and parenteral feeding and last not least postoperative administering of antibiotics.

  14. [13-Year old boy with abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Irene; Klinkhamer, Paul J J M; van de Poll, Marcel C G

    2012-01-01

    A 13-year old boy presents with pain in the lower right abdomen, showing clinical signs of appendicitis. During McBurney' incision an appendix sana was seen. Histologic examination showed penetrating enterobiasis. This was treated with mebendazol.

  15. AIR SCORE ASSESSMENT FOR ACUTE APPENDICITIS

    PubMed Central

    VON-MÜHLEN, Bruno; FRANZON, Orli; BEDUSCHI, Murilo Gamba; KRUEL, Nicolau; LUPSELO, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdomen. Approximately 7% of the population will be affected by this condition during full life. The development of AIR score may contribute to diagnosis associating easy clinical criteria and two simple laboratory tests. Aim: To evaluate the score AIR (Appendicitis Inflammatory Response score) as a tool for the diagnosis and prediction of severity of acute appendicitis. Method: Were evaluated all patients undergoing surgical appendectomy. From 273 patients, 126 were excluded due to exclusion criteria. All patients were submitted o AIR score. Results: The value of the C-reactive protein and the percentage of leukocytes segmented blood count showed a direct relationship with the phase of acute appendicitis. Conclusion: As for the laboratory criteria, serum C-reactive protein and assessment of the percentage of the polymorphonuclear leukocytes count were important to diagnosis and disease stratification. PMID:26537139

  16. Appendiceal taeniasis presenting like acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Sartorelli, Alesso Cervantes; da Silva, Márcia Guimarães; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida Marchesan; da Silva, Reinaldo José

    2005-09-01

    A case of parasitic appendicitis caused by Taenia sp. in a 28-year-old woman from Brazil is reported. Histopathological data and a description of the helminthe found in the appendix lumen are presented.

  17. [Enterobius vermicularis causing symptoms of acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Antal, András; Kocsis, Béla

    2008-08-01

    The authors present a case of enterobiasis of the appendix. Enterobius infection is an uncommon cause of acute appendicitis. Preoperative diagnosis of pinworm infestation is almost impossible unless there is a strong clinical suspicion. Parasites may produce symptoms which resemble acute appendicitis. Careful observation of the appendix stump may lead to intraoperative diagnosis of enterobiasis. A quick diagnosis and appropriate treatment may prevent future complications.

  18. A rare presentation of an acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kordzadeh, Ali; Lorenzi, Bruno; Kalyan, Jiten P.; Hanif, Muhammad A.; Charalabopoulos, Alexandros

    2017-01-01

    Paraumbilical hernia sac usually contains omentum, bowel loop and rarely appendicular epiploicae, metastatic deposits and vermiform appendix. Presentation of acute appendicitis in a paraumbilical hernia is rare and limited to few case reports in the literature. Herein, we would like to report a case of a successfully treated acute appendicitis presenting in a paraumbilical hernia in an 84-year-old lady with 6-month follow-up. PMID:28096326

  19. A serious conundrum for surgeons: Stump appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Mehmet Fatih; Bayhan, Zulfu; Zeren, Sezgin; Ucar, Bercis Imge; Korkmaz, Mehmet; Deger, Ayse Nur

    2016-01-01

    Stump appendicitis is an acute inflammation of remnant appendix, a rare complication of incomplete appendectomy. It may present as acute abdomen with history of appendectomy, which may cause delay in diagnosis. Therefore, incomplete appendectomy should be considered as a differential diagnosis of acute abdomen in patients with medical history of appendectomy. The present case is one of stump appendicitis 6 months after appendectomy. Stump appendectomy was performed and the patient was discharged 7 days after the operation without any complication.

  20. Stump appendicitis 10 years after appendectomy, a rare, but serious complication of appendectomy, a case report.

    PubMed

    Van Paesschen, Carl; Haenen, Filip; Bestman, Raymond; Van Cleemput, Marc

    2017-02-01

    We describe a case of stump appendicitis with the formation of abdominal abscesses in a 41-year-old patient 10 years prior appendectomy. The patient consulted with fever (38.1 °C) and abdominal pain, located at the right iliac fossa. Imaging studies showed signs of abscesses, located at the right iliac fossa, without clear origin of these abscesses. The abscesses were drained through diagnostic laparoscopy, no bowel perforation or clear origin of the abscedation was found during laparoscopy. During postoperative stay, the inflammatory parameters rose and the abscesses reoccurred. Re-laparoscopy was performed, the abscesses were drained and on careful inspection and adhesiolysis, a perforated stump appendicitis was revealed, covered underneath layers of fibrous tissue. Stump appendicitis is a rare complication seen after appendectomy and is generally not considered a possible etiology in patients presenting with fever and right iliac fossa abdominal pain with a history of appendectomy. This often delays the correct diagnosis and results in an associated increased incidence of complications. We describe a case of stump appendicitis occurring 10 years after initial appendectomy.

  1. [Acute appendicitis and coinfection with enterobiasis and taeniasis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Çallı, Gülhan; Özbilgin, Mücahit; Yapar, Nur; Sarıoğlu, Sülen; Özkoç, Soykan

    2014-01-01

    Parasites are rarely associated with inflammation of the appendix. Generally, parasites cause acute abdominal pain via blocking the gut lumen. In this article, we presented a case of appendicitis where Enterobius vermicularis was detected in the surgical specimen and Taenia was detected in the stool. A 31 year old male patient was admitted to the emergency room with severe abdominal pain, which has begun two days ago. On physical examination, tenderness was positive on palpation of the right lower abdominal quadrant and the patient was operated on with the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Histopathological examination of the patient's appendectomy material revealed numerous parts of parasites resembling Enterobius vermicularis and slight mucosal erosion. On parasitological examination of the patient's stool, Taenia eggs and adult forms were determined. Antiparasitic therapy was started with niclosamide for taeniasis and albendazole for enterobiasis. Parasitic infections can mimic acute appendicitis clinically. Radiological and laboratory findings do not help to distinguish the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. In the histopathological examination of the appendix, the findings of acute inflammation of the appendix wall may not be defined. For patients with normal histopathological examination, screening for parasites should be done, and anti-parasitic treatment should be started after appendectomy.

  2. Improving the Preoperative Diagnostic Accuracy of Acute Appendicitis. Can Fecal Calprotectin Be Helpful?

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Valerie; Gödde, Daniel; Zirngibl, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Background Is the patient really suffering from acute appendicitis? Right lower quadrant pain is the most common sign of acute appendicitis. However, many other bowels pathologies might mimic acute appendicitis. Due to fear of the consequences of delayed or missed diagnosis, the indication for emergency appendectomy is liberally made. This has been shown to be associated with high rates of negative appendectomy with risk of potentially serious or lethal complications. Thus there is need for a better preoperative screening of patients with suspected appendicitis. Methods This prospective single center single-blinded pilot study was conducted in the Department of surgery at the HELIOS Universitätsklinikum Wuppertal, Germany. Calprotectin was measured in pre-therapeutic stool samples of patients presenting in the emergency department with pain to the right lower quadrant. Fecal calprotectin (FC) values were analyzed using commercially available ELISA kits. Cut-off values for FC were studied using the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve. The Area under the curve (AUC) was reported for each ROC curve. Results The mean FC value was 51.4 ± 118.8 μg/g in patients with AA, 320.9 ± 416.6 μg/g in patients with infectious enteritis and 24.8 ± 27.4 μg/g in the control group. ROC curve showed a close to 80% specificity and sensitivity of FC for AA at a cut-off value of 51 μg/g, AUC = 0.7. The sensitivity of FC at this cut-off value is zero for enteritis with a specificity of 35%. Conclusion Fecal calprotectin could be helpful in screening patients with pain to the right lower quadrant for the presence of acute appendicitis or infectious enteritis with the aim of facilitating clinical decision-making and reducing the rate of negative appendectomy. PMID:28033410

  3. Berberine Improves Intestinal Motility and Visceral Pain in the Mouse Models Mimicking Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS-D) Symptoms in an Opioid-Receptor Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qiuhui; Fichna, Jakub; Zheng, Lijun; Wang, Kesheng; Yu, Zhen; Li, Yongyu; Li, Kun; Song, Aihong; Liu, Zhongchen; Song, Zhenshun; Kreis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Berberine and its derivatives display potent analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity. Here we aimed at characterizing the mechanism of action of berberine in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and cortical neurons using animal models and in vitro tests. Methods The effect of berberine was characterized in murine models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) symptoms. Then the opioidantagonists were used to identify the receptors involved. Furthermore, the effect of berberineon opioid receptors expression was established in the mouse intestine and rat fetal cortical neurons. Results In mouse models, berberine prolonged GI transit and time to diarrhea in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly reduced visceral pain. In physiological conditions the effects of berberine were mediated by mu- (MOR) and delta- (DOR) opioidreceptors; hypermotility, excessive secretion and nociception were reversed by berberine through MOR and DOR-dependent action. We also found that berberine increased the expression of MOR and DOR in the mouse bowel and rat fetal cortical neurons. Conclusion Berberine significantly improved IBS-D symptoms in animal models, possibly through mu- and delta- opioid receptors. Berberine may become a new drug candidate for the successful treatment of IBS-D in clinical conditions. PMID:26700862

  4. Minilaparoscopic Appendectomy for Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Manzelli, Antonio; Coscarella, Giorgio; Pietrantuono, Maurizio; Jarzembowski, Tomasz Marek; Fisichella, Piero Marco; Gaspari, Achille Lucio

    2006-01-01

    Background: Minilaparoscopic appendectomy for appendicitis is not a well-established procedure. This approach provides less abdominal wall trauma, fewer complications, and excellent cosmetic results. Our aim was to show the feasibility and safety of the minilaparoscopic approach. Methods: Minilaparoscopic appendectomy was performed in 37 patients. Two 2.2-mm trocars were used to manipulate a 2.2-mm, 0-degree laparoscope and for grasper access. A 5-mm trocar was used for the ultrasonic scalpel. Results: No deaths occurred. In 3 patients (8%), appendectomy was aborted due to pathology of the ovary. Conversion to the open approach occurred in 2.7% of patients. The average operating time was 34 minutes (range, 15 to 80), and the median length of hospital stay was 1.2 day (range, 1 to 5). Conclusions: The minilaparoscopic approach a) has the same advantages as the conventional laparoscopic approach in terms of better diagnostic accuracy and safety; b) a low incidence of complications; and c) yields excellent cosmetic results. PMID:16709358

  5. The role of neutrophil lymphocyte ratio to leverage the differential diagnosis of familial Mediterranean fever attack and acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kucuk, Adem; Erol, Mehmet Fatih; Senel, Soner; Eroler, Emir; Yumun, Havvanur Alparslan; Uslu, Ali Ugur; Erol, Asiye Mukaddes; Tihan, Deniz; Duman, Ugur; Kucukkartallar, Tevfik; Solak, Yalcin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by attacks of fever and diffuse abdominal pain. The primary concern with this presentation is to distinguish it from acute appendicitis promptly. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the role of neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR) to leverage the differential diagnosis of acute FMF attack with histologically proven appendicitis. Methods: Twenty-three patients with histologically confirmed acute appendicitis and 88 patients with acute attack of FMF were included in the study. NLR, C-reactive protein and other hematologic parameters were compared between the groups. Results: Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio was significantly higher in patients with acute appendicitis compared to the FMF attack group (8.24 ± 6.31 vs. 4.16 ± 2.44, p = 0.007). The performance of NLR in diagnosing acute appendicitis with receiver operating characteristic analysis with a cut-off value of 4.03 were; 78% sensitivity, 62% specificity, and area under the curve 0.760 (95% confidence interval, 0.655 to 0.8655; p < 0.001). Conclusions: This study showed that NLR, the simple and readily available inflammatory marker may have a useful role in distinguishing acute FMF attack from acute appendicitis. PMID:26864298

  6. Clinical and Laboratory Methods in Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Groselj-Grenc, Mojca; Repše, Stane; Vidmar, Dubravka; Derganc, Metka

    2007-01-01

    Aim To compare the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination, white blood cell and differential count, and C-reactive protein as routine tests for acute appendicitis with that of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and ultrasonography. Methods Eighty-two children were admitted to the Department of Pediatric Surgery and Intensive Care, Ljubljana, Slovenia because of suspected acute appendicitis. Among them, 49 children underwent surgery for acute appendicitis and 33 had abdominal pain but were not treated surgically and were diagnosed with non-specific abdominal pain or mesenteric lymphadenitis on sonography. Clinical signs of acute appendicitis were determined by surgeons on admission. White blood cell count and differential and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein and IL-6 were measured and abdominal ultrasonography was performed. Results Ultrasonography showed the highest diagnostic accuracy (92.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 84.5%-98.0%, Bayes’ theorem), followed by serum IL-6 concentration (77.6% [67.1-86.1%] receiver-operating characteristic [ROC] curve analysis), clinical signs (69.5% [59.5-79.0%] Bayes’ theorem), white blood cell count (68.4% [57.2-78.3%] ROC curve analysis), and serum C-reactive protein concentration (63.7% [52.1-74.3%] ROC curve analysis). Ultrasonography achieved also the highest specificity (95.2%) and positive (93.8%) and negative (93.3%) predictive values, whereas clinical signs showed the highest sensitivity (93.9%). Conclusion Ultrasonography was a more accurate diagnostic method than IL-6 serum concentration, laboratory marker with the highest diagnostic accuracy in our study, and hence it should be a part of the diagnostic procedure for acute appendicitis in children. PMID:17589979

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) Findings of a Diagnostic Dilemma: Atypically Located Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Evrimler, Sehnaz; Okumuser, Irfan; Unal, Nermin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Acute appendicitis is an emergent surgically treated disease generally represented by right lower abdominal pain. The most common location of the appendix is descending intraperitoneal. However, it can also show atypical locations such as inguinal canal, femoral canal, subhepatic, retrocecal, intraperitoneal abdominal midline and left side in situs inversus or intestinal malrotation patients. Atypical location can lead to atypical clinical presentations. Ultrasonography is the first choice modality for imaging. However, it can be insufficient for demonstration of the appendix. Therefore, computed tomography (CT) is needed for further examination. We aim to review the CT findings of atypically located acute appendicitis with cases and remind the clinicians and radiologists the importance of the prompt diagnosis. Case Report We presented five atypically-located appendix cases, including four with acute appendicitis that presented to our emergency department with acute abdominal pain. Two of the acute appendicitis cases had normal, the other two had elevated white blood cell count, but all of them had elevated CRP. Ultrasonography imaging was performed as a first-line imaging modality. Because of the inconclusive results of both clinical-laboratory findings and ultrasonography, CT imaging was performed. Abdominal CT demonstrated all of the atypically localised appendices successfully, which were left-sided in a malrotated patient, retrocecal, subhepatic, retrocecal ascending, intraperitoneal abdominal midline localised. Conclusıons Atypically located acute appendicitis can show atypical presentation and result in misdiagnosis. If ultrasonograpgy is inconclusive, we suggest abdominal CT in such confusing, complicated cases, because misdiagnosis or delay in the right diagnosis can result in complications and increased morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:28058072

  8. [Appendicitis in puerperium--case report].

    PubMed

    Milica, Berisavac; Biljan, Kastratović Kotlica; Tosić, V; Marković, N; Ljustina, S; Zizić, V; Maricić, Z

    2011-01-01

    Acute appendicitis in puerperium is often diagnosed too late, because clinical signs can be unrelaible. Abdominal wall rigidity is rarely noticed in puerpeium because of weak abdominal wall muscles, laboratory parameters are not enough relaible and atip cal appendix presentation makes dificulties in diagnosis. Knowing clinical signs and symptoms of appendicitis, possible complications and their early detection, make a chanse for a good surgical outcome. Measuring of axillar and rectal temperature can take confusion in, and prolong time until surgical treatment. Leucocytosis in puerperium is not valid for diagnosis. We report a case of patient in puerperium with high laboratory infection parameters. Diagnosis of appendicitis is made based on clinical signs and symptoms, that is proved intraoperatively and histologicaly. Appendectomy without perforation carries less risks for mother and fetus.

  9. Variation in rates of hospital admission for appendicitis in Wales.

    PubMed Central

    West, R R; Carey, M J

    1978-01-01

    In a study designed to investigate the variations in rates of admission to hospital for appendicitis in Wales Hospital Activity Analysis listings were analysed according to the sex and age of the patients and the month and day of the week of admission. The incidence of hospitalisation was greatest among boys aged 10-14 and girls aged 15-19. The number of admissions was higher on weekdays than at weekends, but there were no seasonal variations. Durations of stay differed between the 17 health districts. We conclude that admission rates vary mainly because of differing hospital admission policies. Admission is not wholly governed by the sudden onset of abdominal pain; other factors include the threshold of consultation of each patient, the referral habits of general practitioners, the availability of hospital beds, and the degree to which doctors and patients expect admission. PMID:656866

  10. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: case interpretation.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael M; Brian, James M; Methratta, Sosamma T; Hulse, Michael A; Choudhary, Arabinda K; Eggli, Kathleen D; Boal, Danielle K B

    2014-05-01

    As utilization of MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis becomes more common, there will be increased focus on case interpretation. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to share our institution's case interpretation experience. MRI findings of appendicitis include appendicoliths, tip appendicitis, intraluminal fluid-debris level, pitfalls of size measurements, and complications including abscesses. The normal appendix and inguinal appendix are also discussed.

  11. Evaluation of Clinical Alvarado Scoring System and CT Criteria in the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Gunes Tatar, Idil; Yilmaz, Kerim Bora; Sahin, Alpaslan; Aydin, Hasan; Akinci, Melih; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim was to evaluate the clinical Alvarado scoring system and computed tomography (CT) criteria for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Material and Methods. 117 patients with acute abdominal pain who underwent abdominal CT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patient demographics, clinical Alvarado scoring, CT images, and pathologic results of the patients were evaluated. Results. 39 of the 53 patients who were operated on had pathologically proven acute appendicitis. CT criteria of appendiceal diameter, presence of periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, appendicolith, and white blood cell (WBC) count were significantly correlated with the inflammation of the appendix. The best cut-off value for appendiceal diameter was 6.5 mm. The correlation between appendiceal diameter and WBC count was 80% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). The correlation between appendiceal diameter and Alvarado score was 78.7% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). Conclusion. Presence of CT criteria of appendiceal diameter above 6.5 mm, periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, and appendicolith should prompt the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Since patients with acute appendicitis may not always show the typical signs and symptoms, CT is a helpful imaging modality for patients with relatively low Alvarado score and leukocytosis and when physical examination is confusing.

  12. Necrotizing fasciitis: a rare complication of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Mazza, J F; Augenstein, J S; Kreis, D J

    1987-09-01

    The mortality of acute appendicitis increases sixfold if perforation occurs. We have reported a case of perforated appendix complicated by necrotizing fasciitis of the abdominal wall and retroperitoneum. We believe this complication has not been previously described in the English literature.

  13. Cytomegalovirus appendicitis in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Canterino, Joseph E; McCormack, Michael; Gurung, Ananta; Passarelli, James; Landry, Marie L; Golden, Marjorie

    2016-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common viral pathogen. Asymptomatic infection or a mononucleosis syndrome are the most common manifestations in otherwise healthy individuals. End-organ disease is rare in immunocompetent individuals. Here, we describe a case of CMV appendicitis in a patient without an immune-compromising condition.

  14. Role of non-operative management in pediatric appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Dani O; Deans, Katherine J; Minneci, Peter C

    2016-08-01

    Appendectomy is currently considered the standard of care for children with acute appendicitis. Although commonly performed and considered a safe procedure, appendectomy is not without complications. Non-operative management has a role in the treatment of both uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. In uncomplicated appendicitis, initial non-operative management appears to be safe, with an approximate 1-year success rate of 75%. Compared to surgery, non-operative management is associated with less disability and lower costs, with no increase in the rate of complicated appendicitis. In patients with complicated appendicitis, initial non-operative management with interval appendectomy has been shown to be safe with reported success rates between 66% and 95%. Several studies suggest that initial non-operative management with interval appendectomy may be beneficial in patients with perforated appendicitis with a well-formed abscess or inflammatory mass. Recent data suggest that interval appendectomy may not be necessary after initial non-operative management of complicated appendicitis.

  15. Evaluation of a Computer-Assisted Diagnosis Program for Acute Abdominal Pain with Physician-Collected Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-26

    Appendicitis Nonspecific Abdominal Pain Renal Colic Perforated Duodenal Ulcer Cholecystitis Small Bowel Obstruction APPY NONSAP* RCOLIC PERFDU CHOLE...Diagnostic Category Males Females Appendicitis Nonspecific Abdominal Pain Renal Colic Perforated Duodenal Ulcer Cholecystitis Small Bowel ... Obstruction .18 • TO ■ .03 .001** .05 .03 .12 • 75 .01 .001** .11 .02 *Rounded to nearest hundredth, except for PERFDU. **This is an

  16. Clinical Importance of the Heel Drop Test and a New Clinical Score for Adult Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Shin; Lee, Hyeji; Choi, Wookjin; Ahn, Ryeok; Hong, Jung-Suk; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Lee, Yoon-Seon; Lim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective We tried to evaluate the accuracy of the heel drop test in patients with suspected appendicitis and tried to develop a new clinical score, which incorporates the heel drop test and other parameters, for the diagnosis of this condition. Methods We performed a prospective observational study on adult patients with suspected appendicitis at two academic urban emergency departments between January and August 2015. The predictive characteristics of each parameter, along with heel drop test results were calculated. A composite score was generated by logistic regression analysis. The performance of the generated score was compared to that of the Alvarado score. Results Of the 292 enrolled patients, 165 (56.5%) had acute appendicitis. The heel drop test had a higher predictive value than rebound tenderness. Variables and their points included in the new (MESH) score were pain migration (2), elevated white blood cell (WBC) >10,000/μL (3), shift to left (2), and positive heel drop test (3). The MESH score had a higher AUC than the Alvarado score (0.805 vs. 0.701). Scores of 5 and 11 were chosen as cut-off values; a MESH score ≥5 compared to an Alvarado score ≥5, and a MESH score ≥8 compared to an Alvarado score ≥7 showed better performance in diagnosing appendicitis. Conclusion MESH (migration, elevated WBC, shift to left, and heel drop test) is a simple clinical scoring system for assessing patients with suspected appendicitis and is more accurate than the Alvarado score. Further validation studies are needed. PMID:27723842

  17. Role of serum C-reactive protein and leukocyte count in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in Nepalese population.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, C S; Adhikari, S; Kumar, M

    2008-03-01

    Various diagnostic modalities have been reported to influence the negative appendicectomy. C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute phase reactant, may improve the accuracy of diagnosing acute appendicitis. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the utility of CRP as a diagnostic tool among patients clinically suspected to have acute appendicitis. The role of total leukocyte (WBC) count was also studied. A total of 145 diagnosed cases of acute appendicitis were studied over a period of one and half years. CRP was raised in 91 cases and was normal in 54 cases. The sensitivity and specificity of CRP estimation in diagnosing appendicitis was 74.8% and 66.7% respectively and the sensitivity and specificity for total WBC count was 78.6 and 54.8% respectively. The present study suggests that we cannot rely wholly on CRP or on WBC count for operative decision. Clinical judgment is still the best modality for the diagnosis and operative management of acute appendicitis. It seems wiser to use active observation, which should identify most patients with non-specific pain and reserve operation for those who need it most.

  18. Characterisation of the local inflammatory response in appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, M; Puri, P; Reen, D J

    1993-01-01

    In this study we have characterised the local inflammatory response in acute suppurative appendicitis (S), focal appendicitis (F), and normal appendices (C). Enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations, cells expressing IL-2 receptor, natural killer (NK) cells, monocytes and plasma cell isotypes and subclasses infiltrating the lamina propria was carried out on all specimens using immunoperoxidase staining procedures. Total T cells were significantly increased in both acute suppurative appendicitis and focal appendicitis compared with controls (p < 0.001). Cells infiltrating the lamina propria expressed IL-2 receptor in all appendiceal specimens but were significantly increased in both acute and focal appendicitis (p < 0.01). IgG and IgA plasma cell isotypes were significantly increased in all S and F appendiceal specimens (p < 0.001). Monocyte and NK cell numbers, however, were only increased in acute suppurative appendiceal specimens. The increased lymphocyte and plasma cell isotypes seen in focal appendicitis occurred throughout the entire organ even through the inflammatory focus was confined to only three to seven serial sections. These results clearly show a differential pattern of cellular infiltration in focal appendicitis from that seen in acute suppurative appendicitis. The selective lymphocyte and plasma cell nature of the cellular infiltrate in the lamina propria of focal appendicitis may reflect the presence of a specific immune response to an as yet unidentified luminal antigen as a possible cause of appendicitis.

  19. Novel Serum and Urine Markers for Pediatric Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kharbanda, Anupam B.; Rai, Alex J.; Cosme, Yohaimi; Liu, Khin; Dayan, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To describe the association between two novel biomarkers, calprotectin and leucine-rich alpha glycoprotein-1 (LRG), and appendicitis in children. Methods This was a prospective, cohort study of children 3 to 18 years old presenting to a pediatric emergency department with possible appendicitis. Blood and urine samples were assayed for calprotectin and LRG via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Final diagnosis was determined by histopathology or telephone follow-up. Biomarker levels were compared for subjects with and without appendicitis. Recursive partitioning was used to identify thresholds that predicted appendicitis. Results Of 176 subjects, mean age was 11.6 years (SD ±4.0 years) and 52% were male. Fifty-eight patients (34%) were diagnosed with appendicitis. Median plasma calprotectin, serum LRG, and urine LRG levels were higher in appendicitis versus non-appendicitis (p < 0.008). When stratified by perforation status, median plasma calprotectin and serum LRG levels were higher in non-perforated appendicitis vs. non-appendicitis (p < 0.01). Median serum LRG, urine LRG, and plasma calprotectin levels were higher in perforated appendicitis as compared to non-perforated appendicitis (p < 0.05). Urine calprotectin did not differ among groups. A serum LRG < 40,150 ng/ml, a urine LRG < 42 ng/ml, and a plasma calprotectin < 159 ng/ml, each provided a sensitivity and negative predictive value of 100% to identify children at low risk for appendicitis, but with specificities ranging from 23% to 35%. The standard white blood cell (WBC) count achieved 100% sensitivity at a higher specificity than both novel biomarkers. Conclusions Plasma calprotectin and serum/urine LRG are elevated in pediatric appendicitis. No individual marker performed as well as the WBC. PMID:22221321

  20. Developing and evaluating an automated appendicitis risk stratification algorithm for pediatric patients in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Deleger, Louise; Brodzinski, Holly; Zhai, Haijun; Li, Qi; Lingren, Todd; Kirkendall, Eric S; Alessandrini, Evaline; Solti, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a proposed natural language processing (NLP) and machine-learning based automated method to risk stratify abdominal pain patients by analyzing the content of the electronic health record (EHR). Methods We analyzed the EHRs of a random sample of 2100 pediatric emergency department (ED) patients with abdominal pain, including all with a final diagnosis of appendicitis. We developed an automated system to extract relevant elements from ED physician notes and lab values and to automatically assign a risk category for acute appendicitis (high, equivocal, or low), based on the Pediatric Appendicitis Score. We evaluated the performance of the system against a manually created gold standard (chart reviews by ED physicians) for recall, specificity, and precision. Results The system achieved an average F-measure of 0.867 (0.869 recall and 0.863 precision) for risk classification, which was comparable to physician experts. Recall/precision were 0.897/0.952 in the low-risk category, 0.855/0.886 in the high-risk category, and 0.854/0.766 in the equivocal-risk category. The information that the system required as input to achieve high F-measure was available within the first 4 h of the ED visit. Conclusions Automated appendicitis risk categorization based on EHR content, including information from clinical notes, shows comparable performance to physician chart reviewers as measured by their inter-annotator agreement and represents a promising new approach for computerized decision support to promote application of evidence-based medicine at the point of care. PMID:24130231

  1. Minilaparoscopy without General Anesthesia for the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Palter, Steven F.; Rodas, Edgar B.; Prosst, Ruediger L.; Rosser, Ludie E.

    1998-01-01

    The timely diagnosis of intra-abdominal pathology continues to be an elusive problem. Delays in diagnosis and therapeutic decision making are continuing dilemmas in patients who are females of childbearing age, elderly, obese or immunosuppressed. Minilaparoscopy without general anesthesia potentially can provide an accurate, cost-effective method to assist in the evaluation of patients with acute abdominal pain. Laparoscopy without general anesthesia is not a new technique, but with the combination of two emerging factors— 1) the introduction of new technology with the development of improved, smaller laparoscopes and instruments, and 2) the shifting of emphasis on healthcare to a more cost-effective managed care environment--its value and widespread utilization is being reconsidered. We report the case of a 22 year old female with an acute onset of increasing abdominal and pelvic pain. Despite evaluation by general surgery, gynecology, emergency room staff, as well as, non-invasive testing, a clear diagnosis could not be made. In view of this, minilaparoscopy without general anesthesia was performed and revealed an acute, retrocecal appendicitis. The diagnosis was made with the assistance from the conscious patient. The utilization of this technique greatly expedited the treatment of this patient. Full-sized laparoscopic equipment was then used to minimally invasively remove the diseased appendix under general anesthesia. Both procedures were well tolerated by the patient. PMID:9876717

  2. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed. PMID:26091450

  3. Intramedullary cervical neurenteric cyst mimicking an abscess.

    PubMed

    Muzumdar, D; Bhatt, Y; Sheth, J

    2008-01-01

    We describe a cervical intramedullary neurenteric cyst in a 12-year-old male patient who presented with gradual onset and progressively worsening neck pain, spastic quadriparesis and impaired sensation in the C(2) dermatome. MR imaging revealed a well-defined peripherally enhancing cystic intramedullary lesion with a posteroinferior enhancing nodule at the C(2)-C(3) level mimicking an abscess. There was no evidence of spinal dysraphism. The lesion was completely resected through a posterior approach and the patient showed radical improvement in his symptomatology. At follow-up after 3 years, he was asymptomatic and the MR imaging showed no evidence of any residual or recurrent cyst. The case presented here is unique, since a spinal neurenteric cyst showing intense peripheral contrast enhancement mimicking an abscess is unusual. The radiological features, pathogenesis and surgical considerations in cervical intramedullary neurenteric cysts are discussed and the relevant literature is briefly reviewed.

  4. Barium appendicitis: A single institution review in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Hideki; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Kubota, Tadao; Mizokami, Ken

    2016-01-01

    AIM To review clinical experience with barium appendicitis at a single institution. METHODS A retrospective review of patients admitted with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis, from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2015 was performed. Age, gender, computed tomography (CT) scan findings if available, past history of barium studies, pathology, and the presence of perforation or the development of complications were reviewed. If the CT scan revealed high density material in the appendix, the maximum CT scan radiodensity of the material is measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Barium appendicitis is defined as: (1) patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis; (2) the patient has a history of a prior barium study; and (3) the CT scan shows high density material in the appendix. Patients who meet all three criteria are considered to have barium appendicitis. RESULTS In total, 396 patients were admitted with the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in the study period. Of these, 12 patients (3.0%) met the definition of barium appendicitis. Of these 12 patients, the median CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendix was 10000.8 HU, ranging from 3066 to 23423 HU (± 6288.2). In contrast, the median CT scan radiodensity of fecaliths in the appendix, excluding patients with barium appendicitis, was 393.1 HU, ranging from 98 to 2151 HU (± 382.0). The CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendices of patients with barium appendicitis was significantly higher than in patients with nonbarium fecaliths (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION Barium appendicitis is not rare in Japan. Measurement of the CT scan radiodensity of material in the appendix may differentiate barium appendicitis from routine appendicitis. PMID:27721929

  5. The importance of timely detection and management in neonatal appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Barrak Hani; Al Omran, Yasser; Hassan, Aziz; Al Hindi, Saeed

    2014-05-22

    The clinical presentation of cute appendicitis is rarely encountered in neonatology. When it does occur, it is thought to be due to prematurity or develops secondary to coexisting diseases. We present a case of appendicitis in a 10-day-old Middle-Eastern girl, who was born at term and who had no underlying conditions that are typically associated with neonatal appendicitis. This case highlights that certain causes and clinical signs are unreliable when coming to a working diagnosis of neonatal appendicitis, and that regardless of the cause, timely detection and management are necessary in achieving surgical success.

  6. Langerhans cell histiocytosis masquerading as acute appendicitis: Case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Karimzada, Mohammad M; Matthews, Michele N; French, Samuel W; DeUgarte, Daniel; Kim, Dennis Y

    2017-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare syndrome characterized by unifocal, multifocal unisystem, or disseminated/multi-system disease that commonly involves the bone, skin, lymph nodes, pituitary, or sometimes lung (almost exclusively in smokers) causing a variety of symptoms from rashes and bone lesions to diabetes insipidus or pulmonary infiltrates. We present a previously unreported case of gastrointestinal LCH as well as a novel characteristic lesion affecting the colon of a young woman who presented with signs and symptoms mimicking acute on chronic appendicitis. Immunohistochemical analysis of appendectomy specimen and nodular specimens on colonoscopy demonstrated S-100, CD1a, and langerin reactivity. The patient underwent systemic chemotherapy with cytarabine and demonstrated excellent response to therapy. PMID:28360976

  7. [Role of the Helicobacter pylori in the aetiology of acute appendicitis. Preliminary studies].

    PubMed

    Paredes Esteban, R M; Muñoz Villanueva, J R; Velasco Sánchez, B; González Mariscal, M; Rodríguez Vargas, J; Martínez Sánchez, M; García Ruiz, M

    2007-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been found in the upper gastrointestinal tract. It is incriminated as aetiological factor in various pathological conditions. This study was designed to determine whether H. pylori plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis. H.pylori was investigated in 40 patients divided in 2 groups. A: patients with abdominal pain and B: patients with acute appendicitis, confirmed by pathology studies. The Ag H.pylori was investigated in the faeces of both groups. In the group B, besides, appendix samples were tested for culture for H. pylori. Confirmation was made by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) analysis. Statistical analysis was made. The positivity for H. pylori infection in the faeces was found in Group A in 15% of the patients and in the group B in 35%. In the group B, besides, the culture of the appendix cecal was positive in 71.4%. Though was observed difference between both groups, this one was not significant. It seems that H. pylori colonizes the appendix in small proportion and is unlikely to be associated in direct correlation with acute appendicitis. However, seropositive patients with acute inflammation are likely to suffer from purulent o gangrenous form.

  8. Hepatobiliary scan with delayed gallbladder visualization in a case of acute appendicitis

    SciTech Connect

    Smathers, R.L.; Harman, P.K.; Wanebo, H.J.; Read, M.E.

    1982-05-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented with acute epigastric pain with vomiting. Within 24 hours, the pain spread to the right periumbilical region. /sup 99m/Tc disofenin hepatobiliary scan failed to demonstrate the gallbladder on a 60-minute view. The presumative diagnosis of acute cholecystitis was thought to be confirmed on this basis by the patient's physicians. However, a 75-minute view demonstrated filling of the gallbladder. In hepatobiliary scanning for acute abdominal pain, delayed views (2 to 24 hours) are recommended when the gallbladder is not visualized on the 60-minute view. If the gallbladder is visualized, cystic duct obstruction can be excluded and diagnoses such as pancreatitis, acalculous cholecystitis, and acute appendicitis should be investigated.

  9. Acute appendicitis complicated by pylephlebitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ricardo; Fernandes, Teresa; Oliveira, Maria I; Castro, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Pylephlebitis is defined as septic thrombophlebitis of the portal vein. It is a rare but serious complication of an intraabdominal infection, more commonly diverticulitis and appendicitis. It has an unspecific clinical presentation and the diagnosis is difficult. The authors report a case of a 21-year-old man with acute appendicitis complicated by pylephlebitis. The diagnosis was made with contrast enhanced CT.

  10. De Garengeot hernia: an uncommon presentation of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Vos, Cornelis G; Mollema, Robbert; Richir, Milan C

    2017-02-01

    We present a case of a 78-year-old female patient with an uncommon presentation of acute appendicitis. She was found to have a perforated appendicitis which developed in a femoral hernia sack. An appendix present in a femoral hernia is called a De Garengeot Hernia, which is a rare form of femoral hernia. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and management are discussed.

  11. Acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1998-01-01

    Abdominal pain is among the most frequent ailments reported in the office setting and can account for up to 40% of ailments in the ambulatory practice. Also, it is in the top three symptoms of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) and accounts for 5-10% of all ED primary presenting ailments. There are several common sources for acute abdominal pain and many for subacute and chronic abdominal pain. This article explores the history-taking, initial evaluation, and examination of the patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. The goal of this article is to help differentiate one source of pain from another. Discussion of acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, ectopic pregnancy, diverticulitis, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are undertaken. Additionally, there is discussion of common laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, and treatment of the patient with the above entities.

  12. Improving diagnosis of appendicitis. Early autologous leukocyte scanning.

    PubMed

    DeLaney, A R; Raviola, C A; Weber, P N; McDonald, P T; Navarro, D A; Jasko, I

    1989-10-01

    A prospective nonrandomized study investigating the accuracy and utility of autologous leukocyte scanning in the diagnosis of apendicitis was performed. One hundred patients in whom the clinical diagnosis of appendicitis was uncertain underwent indium 111 oxyquinoline labelling of autologous leukocytes and underwent scanning 2 hours following reinjection. Of 32 patients with proved appendicitis, three scans revealed normal results (false-negative rate, 0.09). Of 68 patients without appendicitis, three scans had positive results (false-positive rate, 0.03; sensitivity, 0.91; specificity, 0.97; predictive value of positive scan, 0.94; predictive value of negative scan, 0.96; and overall accuracy, 0.95). Scan results altered clinical decisions in 19 patients. In 13 cases, the scan produced images consistent with diagnoses other than appendicitis, expediting appropriate management. Early-imaging111 In oxyquinoline autologous leukocyte scanning is a practical and highly accurate adjunct for diagnosing appendicitis.

  13. Alvarado scoring in acute appendicitis-a clinicopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Dey, Subhajeet; Mohanta, Pradip K; Baruah, Anil K; Kharga, Bikram; Bhutia, Kincho L; Singh, Varun K

    2010-08-01

    Acute appendicitis is a clinical diagnosis, so it's impossible to have a definitive diagnosis by gold standard (histopathology) pre operatively. The treatment being surgical, negative appendicectomy rates are high. Present study was conducted to evaluate Alvarado scoring system for diagnosis of acute appendicitis and its co relation by histopathology. Retrospective study of consecutive patients admitted with suspected acute appendicitis during the period March 2005 to March 2007. The Alvarado scoring system was computed from admission notes and records and correlated with the histopathology reports. Out of 155 patients, 92 underwent appendicectomy with the intention to treat appendicitis and diagnosis was confirmed in 80 patients. Reliability of scoring system was assessed by calculating negative appendicectomy rate and positive predictive value. The normal appendicectomy frequency was 13% and positive predictive value was 86%. Alvarado scoring system is easy, simple, cheap, useful tool in pre operative diagnosis of acute appendicitis and can work effectively in routine practice.

  14. Primary closure of contaminated wounds in perforated appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Burnweit, C; Bilik, R; Shandling, B

    1991-12-01

    We studied the clinical course of 506 children consecutively admitted with appendicitis at The Hospital for Sick Children from 1985 to 1989. One hundred eighty-one children (35%), ranging in age from 1 to 17 years, presented with perforation verified by histological examination. Ninety-six of them (53%) had generalized peritonitis, 47 (26%) had localized peritonitis, and 38 (21%) had abscess formation. Usually, triple antibiotics were begun preoperatively if perforation was suspected; otherwise, cefoxitin was started. Triple antibiotics were used postoperatively for 5 to 7 days in almost all children in the perforated group. Neither abdominal nor subcutaneous drainage was routinely used even in cases of intraabdominal abscess. The skin was closed primarily with steri-strips (63%), staples (20%), subcutaneous Dexon (11%), or silk (4%). Postoperative wound infection arose in 20 children (11%). Wound infections were noted from 1 to 14 days postoperatively (mean, 5.9 days). Whereas 9 of these were treated with local therapy only, 11 delayed the child's discharge or necessitated readmission. No patient suffered major complications from wound infection in that there were no cases of necrotizing fasciitis, reoperation for debridement, sepsis, or death. The intraabdominal abscess rate in this group of 181 children was 6% (n = 11). The low rate of infective complications fully justifies the policy of primary closure in contaminated wounds. This policy eliminates the necessity for painful and time-consuming dressing changes, shortens hospitalization, and obviates the trauma of delayed suturing of wounds in children.

  15. Detection and diagnostic value of urine leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRG) in children with suspected acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kentsis, Alex; Ahmed, Saima; Kurek, Kyle; Brennan, Eileen; Bradwin, Gary; Steen, Hanno; Bachur, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective Previously, we used a proteomics approach for the discovery of new diagnostic markers of acute appendicitis (AA) and identified LRG that was elevated in the urine of children with AA and enriched in diseased appendices. Here, we sought to evaluate the diagnostic utility of enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) of urine LRG in a blinded, prospective, cohort study of children being evaluated for acute abdominal pain. Methods Urine LRG concentration was measured using a commercially available LRG ELISA, and selected ion monitoring (SIM) mass spectrometry (MS). Urine LRG test performance was evaluated blindly against the pathologic diagnosis and histologic grade of appendicitis. Results Urine LRG was measured in 49 patients. Mean urine LRG concentration measured using commercial LRG ELISA was significantly elevated in patients with AA, but exhibited an interference effect. Direct measurements using SIM MS demonstrated that LRG was elevated more than 100-fold in patients with AA as compared to those without, with the receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of 0.98 (95% CI = 0.96-1.0). Among patients with AA, elevations of urine LRG measured using ELISA and SIM MS correlated with the histologic severity of appendicitis. Conclusion Urine LRG ELISA allows for discrimination between patients with and without AA, but exhibits limited accuracy due to immunoassay interference. Direct measurements of urine LRG using SIM MS demonstrate superior diagnostic performance. Development of a clinical-grade urine LRG assay is needed to advance the diagnostic accuracy of clinical evaluations of appendicitis. PMID:22305331

  16. Incidence of Appendicitis over Time: A Comparative Analysis of an Administrative Healthcare Database and a Pathology-Proven Appendicitis Registry

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Fiona; Zimmer, Scott; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G.; Heitman, Steven J.; Swain, Mark; Ghosh, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Importance At the turn of the 21st century, studies evaluating the change in incidence of appendicitis over time have reported inconsistent findings. Objectives We compared the differences in the incidence of appendicitis derived from a pathology registry versus an administrative database in order to validate coding in administrative databases and establish temporal trends in the incidence of appendicitis. Design We conducted a population-based comparative cohort study to identify all individuals with appendicitis from 2000 to2008. Setting & Participants Two population-based data sources were used to identify cases of appendicitis: 1) a pathology registry (n = 8,822); and 2) a hospital discharge abstract database (n = 10,453). Intervention & Main Outcome The administrative database was compared to the pathology registry for the following a priori analyses: 1) to calculate the positive predictive value (PPV) of administrative codes; 2) to compare the annual incidence of appendicitis; and 3) to assess differences in temporal trends. Temporal trends were assessed using a generalized linear model that assumed a Poisson distribution and reported as an annual percent change (APC) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Analyses were stratified by perforated and non-perforated appendicitis. Results The administrative database (PPV = 83.0%) overestimated the incidence of appendicitis (100.3 per 100,000) when compared to the pathology registry (84.2 per 100,000). Codes for perforated appendicitis were not reliable (PPV = 52.4%) leading to overestimation in the incidence of perforated appendicitis in the administrative database (34.8 per 100,000) as compared to the pathology registry (19.4 per 100,000). The incidence of appendicitis significantly increased over time in both the administrative database (APC = 2.1%; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.8) and pathology registry (APC = 4.1; 95% CI: 3.1, 5.0). Conclusion & Relevance The administrative database overestimated the incidence of appendicitis

  17. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor Mimicking Apical Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Makoto; Kiho, Kazuki; Sekine, Genta; Ohta, Takahisa; Matsubara, Makoto; Yoshida, Takakazu; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Tanuma, Jun-ichi; Sumitomo, Shinichiro

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs) are rare. IMTs of the head and neck occur in all age groups, from neonates to old age, with the highest incidence occurring in childhood and early adulthood. An IMT has been defined as a histologically distinctive lesion of uncertain behavior. This article describes an unusual case of IMT mimicking apical periodontitis in the mandible of a 42-year-old man. At first presentation, the patient showed spontaneous pain and percussion pain at teeth #28 to 30, which continued after initial endodontic treatment. Panoramic radiography revealed a radiolucent lesion at the site. Cone-beam computed tomographic imaging showed osteolytic lesions, suggesting an aggressive neoplasm requiring incisional biopsy. Histopathological examination indicated an IMT. The lesion was removed en bloc under general anesthesia, and the patient manifested no clinical evidence of recurrence for 24 months. Lesions of nonendodontic origin should be included in the differential diagnosis of apical periodontitis. Every available diagnostic tool should be used to confirm the diagnosis. Cone-beam computed tomographic imaging is very helpful for differential diagnosis in IMTs mimicking apical periodontitis.

  18. Iliacus pyomyositis mimicking septic arthritis of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Chen W-S; Wan Y-L

    1996-01-01

    The iliacus muscle is closely associated with the psoas muscle, femoral nerve, hip joint, pelvic and intraabdominal structures; thus, its disorders may present as lower abdominal pain, hip pain, or femoral neuropathy. Iliacus pyomyositis, a primary bacterial infection of the skeletal muscle not secondary to a contiguous skin, bone, or soft-tissue infection, presenting as hip pain, femoral neuropathy, and sympathetic effusion of the hip joint in an 8-year-old boy mimicked septic arthritis of the hip joint. Computed tomography was helpful in delineating the accurate location of the lesion. Surgical drainage and appropriate antibiotic therapy led to complete resolution and full functional recovery.

  19. Trends in the Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Laura W; Dolgin, Stephen E

    2016-02-01

    • On the basis of class B evidence and consensus, acute appendicitis in children can often be diagnosed clinically with only selective use of imaging. (13)(14)(15)(16) • On the basis of class B evidence and consensus, ultrasonography is the test of choice when acute appendicitis is suspected but is unclear based on history, physical examination, and laboratory results. (17)(18)(19) • On the basis of class B evidence and consensus, the use of computed tomography scan should be limited to cases of suspected complex appendicitis with abscess or when there is clinical suspicion for acute appendicitis but ultrasonography results are not helpful. (16) • On the basis of class C evidence and consensus, children with possible appendicitis ideally should be treated in medical centers that have skilled sonographic personnel. (21) • On the basis of class B evidence and consensus, simple appendicitis should be treated by appendectomy during normal operating hours. Preoperative treatment with intravenous antibiotics and fluids during the overnight hours halts disease progression and allows for the safest surgery with the benefit of a full and rested staff. (24)(25)(26) • On the basis of class B evidence and consensus, complex appendicitis with a well-defined abscess can be treated nonoperatively initially, with the option of an interval appendectomy after recovery from the acute infection. (29)(30) (31)(32)(33)

  20. Evaluating conservative treatment for acute appendicitis with lump formation

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ajaz Ahmad; Wani, Mohd Lateef; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Parray, Fazl Qadir; Nayeem-Ul-Hassan; Irshad, Ifat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Interval appendectomy after acute appendicitis with lump formation (phlegmon) remains controversial. We conducted this study to determine the risk of recurrent appendicitis following initial non-operative treatment for appendicitis, and evaluate factors associated with recurrence. Secondarily, we evaluate the efficacy of interval appendectomy versus no appendectomy. Materials and Methods: Patients who received conservative treatment for appendicitis with lump formation were prospectively studied from June 2006 to June 2008. These patients were followed for recurrence of appendicitis. Results: Of 763 patients with acute appendicitis some 220 patients had lump formation (28.8%). Median age was 28 years. Conservative treatment was successful in 213 (96.8%) patients. The rate of recurrence was 13.1%, all occurring within six months after the index admission. Mean follow-up was 26±18 months. Conclusion: Conservative treatment of appendicitis with lump formation is efficient and the recurrence rate is low. Routine interval appendectomy after initial conservative treatment for lump formation is not a cost-effective intervention and not recommended. PMID:22416152

  1. Parasitic Appendicitis From Past to Present in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Engin, O; Calik, S; Calik, B; Yildirim, M; Coskun, G

    2010-01-01

    Background Understanding the etiology of appendicitis is important for developing effective treatments the relationship between parasitic appendicitis and various socio-cultural factors were examined, particularly with respect to the incidence of literacy. The aim of the article was to research the relations between parasitic appendicitis and literacy ratio in population. Methods Cases of parasitic appendicitis resulting in surgery performed at Buca Seyfi Demirsoy Large State Hospital Surgery Clinic between 2002 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and classified according to age, sex, type of parasite, morbidity, and mortality. Studies conducted in different regions of Turkey as well as in other countries were reviewed to determine if there was a relationship between parasitic appendicitis and literacy. Results Of the 1,969 appendectomy cases reviewed, nine were classified as parasitic appendicitis (0.45%). Enterobius vermicularis was observed in seven cases and Taenia spp. in two. The average age was 26.4 yr. No morbidity or mortality was found. Conclusion The data were compared with a retrospective review of studies conducted in the same regions and a decrease in the rate of parasitic appendicitis was observed during the period between the two reviews. It was determined that a low literacy rate was associated with an increase in the incidence of parasitic appendicitis. Observations made between different countries also produced similar results. In countries where the incidence of parasitic appendiciticis was greater than 1.5%, the literacy rate was less than 88%. To avoid appendectomy resulting from parasites, it is important to increase education and literacy. In some areas, individuals with appendicitis undergo surgery due to a lack of education or poor literacy. PMID:22347256

  2. Overview and diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children.

    PubMed

    Glass, Charity C; Rangel, Shawn J

    2016-08-01

    Appendicitis represents the most common abdominal surgical emergency in the pediatric age group. Despite being a relatively common condition, the diagnosis of appendicitis in children can prove to be challenging in many cases. The goal of this article is to review the predictive utility for presenting signs and symptoms, laboratory tests, and imaging studies in the diagnostic work-up of appendicitis. Furthermore, we sought to explore the predictive utility of composite measures based on multiple sources of diagnostic information, as well as the utility of clinical pathways as a means to streamline the diagnostic process.

  3. Does morphine change the physical examination in patients with acute appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Jeannette M; Smithline, Howard A; Phipen, Sherry; Montano, Gary; Garb, Jane L; Fiallo, Viriato

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if judicious dosing of morphine sulfate can provide pain relief without changing important physical examination findings in patients with acute appendicitis. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind crossover design. Patients scheduled for appendectomy were randomized to two groups. Group A received 0.075 mg/kg intravenous morphine sulfate and 30 minutes later received placebo. The sequence of medication was reversed in group B. Patients were examined by a surgical resident and an EM attending before and after receiving medication. Six explicit physical examination findings were documented as absent, indeterminate, or present. Physicians were also asked if they felt overall examination findings had changed after medication. Patient's visual analog scale (VAS) was recorded before each medication and at study completion. Thirty-four patients were enrolled and full data were available for 22 patients. Neither morphine nor placebo caused a significant change in individual examination findings. Three patients in both groups were judged to have a change in their examination after medication. The median change in VAS was 20 mm after morphine and 0 mm after placebo (P =.01). In this pilot study, patients with clinical signs of appendicitis were treated with morphine and had significant improvement of their pain without changes in their physical examination.

  4. Non-surgical contraindication for acute appendicitis with secondary thrombocytopenia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Hong; Gu, Guo-Li; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Fan, Qin; Wang, Xin-Yan; Wei, Xue-Ming

    2015-03-07

    A 26-year-old man presented with migrated right lower abdominal pain and without any history of hematological systemic diseases. Blood routine test showed a leukocyte count of 22.74 × 10(9)/L, with 91.4% neutrophils, and a platelet count of 4 × 10(9)/L before admission. The case question was whether the team should proceed with surgery. Obviously, a differential diagnosis is essential before making such a decision. Acute appendicitis was easily diagnosed based on clinical findings, including migrating abdominal pain, a leukocyte count of 22.74 × 10(9)/L and the result of abdominal computed tomography scan. However, it was not clear whether the severe thrombocytopenia was primary or secondary. So smear of peripheral blood and aspiration of bone marrow were ordered to exclude hematological diseases. Neither of the tests indicated obvious pathological hematological changes. There was no hepatosplenomegaly found by ultrasound examination of the liver and spleen. Therefore, operative intervention may be a unique clinical scenario in acute severe appendicitis patients with secondary thrombocytopenia.

  5. Suppurative appendicitis presenting as acute scrotum confounded by a testicular appendage

    PubMed Central

    Shumon, Syed; Bennett, John; Lawson, Geoffrey; Small, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Patients presenting with testicular pain and swelling mandate an urgent urology review and scrotal exploration to prevent testicle loss due to torsion. Other pathology masquerading as torsion is extremely rare but can occur. We present one such case. A 14-year-old male presented with a 1-day history of right testicular swelling and tenderness. He was apyrexial and denied any other symptoms. Blood tests demonstrated raised inflammatory markers. He had lower left-sided abdominal tenderness with a swollen, erythematous right hemiscrotum. During an urgent scrotal exploration for testicular torsion, a purulent hydrocele with a patent process vaginalis was noted, but no torsion. Post-operative abdominal pain mandated a general surgical review and subsequent appendicectomy. The patient made a full recovery. Acute suppurative appendicitis presenting as a urological emergency is extremely rare. To make a correct diagnosis and prevent multiple surgeries, a joint urological and general surgical assessment with a high index of suspicion is required. PMID:26966225

  6. Plasma D-lactate levels in diagnosis of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Cağlayan, Fatma; Cakmak, Murat; Cağlayan, Osman; Cavuşoglu, Turgut

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the possible use of D-lactate as a predictor in the diagnosis of appendicitis. C-reactive protein level (CRP) and leukocyte counts were also evaluated. Venous blood D-lactate, CRP, and leukocyte counts were measured preoperatively in 53 patients undergoing surgery for appendicitis, as well as in 20 healthy subjects. Levels of all three parameters in the surgical patients were significantly higher than in the control group (p <.05). Previous studies have shown that venous D-lactate is more specific to the intestine than CPR or leukocyte count. Based on our data, venous D-lactate, which had the lowest false-negative rate among these laboratory parameters, may be a useful diagnostic marker for appendicitis. None of these parameters were helpful in identifying the type of the appendicitis.

  7. New synthetic strategies for xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Milo; Darcsi, Andras; Balint, Mihaly; Benkovics, Gabor; Sohajda, Tamas; Beni, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Xanthene dyes can be appended to cyclodextrins via an ester or amide bridge in order to switch the fluorescence on or off. This is made possible through the formation of nonfluorescent lactones or lactams as the fluorophore can reversibly cyclize. In this context we report a green approach for the synthesis of switchable xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins based on the coupling agent 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM). By using 6-monoamino-β-cyclodextrin and commercially available inexpensive dyes, we prepared rhodamine- and fluorescein-appended cyclodextrins. The compounds were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy and MS spectrometry, their UV-vis spectra were recorded at various pH, and their purity was determined by capillary electrophoresis. Two potential models for the supramolecular assembly of the xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins were developed based on the set of data collected by the extensive NMR characterization.

  8. Underestimated Amoebic Appendicitis among HIV-1-Infected Individuals in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Taiichiro; Yano, Hideaki; Murata, Yukinori; Igari, Toru; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Yagita, Kenji; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Tsukada, Kunihisa; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entamoeba histolytica is not a common causative agent of acute appendicitis. However, amoebic appendicitis can sometimes be severe and life threatening, mainly due to a lack of awareness. Also, its frequency, clinical features, and pathogenesis remain unclear. The study subjects were HIV-1-infected individuals who presented with acute appendicitis and later underwent appendectomy at our hospital between 1996 and 2014. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded preserved appendix specimens were reexamined by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and PCR to identify undiagnosed amoebic appendicitis. Appendectomies were performed in 57 patients with acute appendicitis. The seroprevalence of E. histolytica was 33% (14/43) from the available stored sera. Based on the medical records, only 3 cases were clinically diagnosed as amoebic appendicitis, including 2 diagnosed at the time of appendectomy and 1 case diagnosed by rereview of the appendix after the development of postoperative complications. Retrospective analyses using PAS staining and PCR identified 3 and 3 more cases, respectively. Thus, E. histolytica infection was confirmed in 9 cases (15.8%) in the present study. Apart from a significantly higher leukocyte count in E. histolytica-positive patients than in negative patients (median, 13,760 versus 10,385 cells/μl, respectively, P = 0.02), there were no other differences in the clinical features of the PCR-positive and -negative groups. In conclusion, E. histolytica infection was confirmed in 9 (15.8%) of the appendicitis cases. However, only 3, including one diagnosed after intestinal perforation, were diagnosed before the present analyses. These results strongly suggest there is frequently a failure to detect trophozoites in routine examination, resulting in an underestimation of the incidence of amoebic appendicitis. PMID:27847377

  9. Stratified computed tomography findings improve diagnostic accuracy for appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geon; Lee, Sang Chul; Choi, Byung-Jo; Kim, Say-June

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To improve the diagnostic accuracy in patients with symptoms and signs of appendicitis, but without confirmative computed tomography (CT) findings. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the database of 224 patients who had been operated on for the suspicion of appendicitis, but whose CT findings were negative or equivocal for appendicitis. The patient population was divided into two groups: a pathologically proven appendicitis group (n = 177) and a non-appendicitis group (n = 47). The CT images of these patients were re-evaluated according to the characteristic CT features as described in the literature. The re-evaluations and baseline characteristics of the two groups were compared. RESULTS: The two groups showed significant differences with respect to appendiceal diameter, and the presence of periappendiceal fat stranding and intraluminal air in the appendix. A larger proportion of patients in the appendicitis group showed distended appendices larger than 6.0 mm (66.3% vs 37.0%; P < 0.001), periappendiceal fat stranding (34.1% vs 8.9%; P = 0.001), and the absence of intraluminal air (67.6% vs 48.9%; P = 0.024) compared to the non-appendicitis group. Furthermore, the presence of two or more of these factors increased the odds ratio to 6.8 times higher than baseline (95%CI: 3.013-15.454; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Appendiceal diameter and wall thickening, fat stranding, and absence of intraluminal air can be used to increased diagnostic accuracy for appendicitis with equivocal CT findings. PMID:25320531

  10. Immunocytochemical analysis of cellular infiltrates in human appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Kuga, T; Taniguchi, S; Inoue, T; Zempo, N; Esato, K

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the immunologic cellular composition in human appendicitis and its association with the development of perforated appendicitis. Appendiceal specimens from 27 patients with acute appendicitis were immunostained to detect lymphocyte surface markers. Moreover, the lymphocyte surface markers of peripheral blood were analyzed by laser flow cytometry in 12 patients. Helper T lymphocytes (CD4) were present in all the patients, while B lymphocytes (CD19), natural killer (NK) cells (CD56), and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CD8) were present in 7 (70%), 10 (100%), and 9 patients (90%) with perforated appendicitis, and in 12 (63.2%), 10 (58.8%), and 6 (54.5%) patients without perforation, respectively. There were significant differences between the patients with a perforated appendix and those without perforation, in the positivity rate for CD8 and CD56 cells (P < 0.05). The number of cells positive for CD56, being NK cells, in the blood from the patients with perforation was significantly lower than that in the blood from those without perforation (P < 0.05). The infiltration of a greater number of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells was observed in the appendices from patients with perforated appendicitis than in those from patients with nonperforated appendicitis.

  11. Intestinal Infarction Caused by Thrombophlebitis of the Portomesenteric Veins as a Complication of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis After Appendectomy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Tian, Xiaodong; Xie, Xuehai; Yang, Yinmo

    2015-06-01

    The clinical symptoms of pylephlebitis caused by acute appendicitis are varied and atypical, which leads to delayed diagnosis and poor outcomes. Here, we report a case of intestinal necrosis caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins as a complication of acute appendicitis after appendectomy. The patient had acute abdominal pain with tenderness and melena on the 3rd day after appendectomy for the treatment of gangrenous appendicitis. He was diagnosed with intestinal infarction caused by thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins based on enhanced CT and diagnostic abdominal paracentesis. The patient was treated by bowel excision anastomosis and thrombectomy. After postoperative antibiotic and anticoagulation treatments, the patient recovered well and was discharged 22 days after the 2nd operation. A follow-up CT scan showed no recurrence of portomesenteric veins thrombosis 3 months later. Thrombophlebitis of the portomesenteric veins is a rare but fatal complication of acute appendicitis. For all the cases with acute abdominal pain, the possibility of thrombophlebitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis. Once pylephlebitis is suspected, enhanced CT scan is helpful for early diagnosis, and sufficient control of inflammation as well as anticoagulant therapy should be performed.

  12. Myositis ossificans: the mimicker

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Arunkumar; Sarawagi, Radha; Prakash, Manikka Lakshmanan

    2013-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with upper backache and a painful swelling in the right paraspinal region for 7 days. He had no history of trauma. MRI showed a non-specific ill-defined heterogeneous lesion, which showed intense postcontrast enhancement. Ultrasonogram showed a peripheral sheet of calcification around the lesion. A CT scan showed a faint rim of calcification, which increased in thickness over weeks, confirming the diagnosis as myositis ossificans. We present our approach to the case and also review the imaging features of different stages of the disease process and their differentials. PMID:24326436

  13. Acute appendicitis complicated with necrotizing soft tissue infections in the elderly: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, H; Nomura, H; Yasuda, K; Kuroda, D; Kato, M; Ohyanagi, H

    1999-01-01

    A case of acute appendicitis complicated with necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs) in an extremely elderly woman (98 years-old) is reported. She was admitted to our hospital with a history of increasing pain localized in the right lower abdomen. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed appendicolithiasis and periappendiceal fluid. An appendectomy and closure of the perforated cecum was performed. On the 5th post-operative day, the patient developed skin erythemas and crepitation in the right lower quadrant. An exploration and drainage of the recent operative incision was performed under the diagnosis of NSTIs. Despite the declining overall incidence of appendicitis, it has been increasing among the elderly. The elderly patients are associated with underlying defects in immune function. NSTIs, which are characterized by rapidly progressing inflammation and necrosis of soft tissue, comprise a spectrum of disease ranging from necrosis of the skin to life-threatening infections. The most common etiology of NSTIs was post-operative infections of the abdominal wall, which primarily occurred after operations with extensive fecal contamination. NSTIs are no longer a rare post-operative complication in the elderly and initial treatment should be selected according to the condition of the patient.

  14. Parasitic Infestation in Pediatric and Adolescent Appendicitis: A Local Experience

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Ossama M.; Zakaria, Hazem M.; Daoud, Mohamed Yasser; Al Wadaani, Hamed; Al Buali, Waleed; Al-Mohammed, Hamdan; Al Mulhim, Abdulrahman S.; Zaki, Wafaa

    2013-01-01

    Objective The relationship between parasites and pediatric appendicitis is a highly debatable issue. This study aims to investigate the role of parasitic infestation in the etiology of acute pediatric appendicitis. Methods A retrospective study including 1600 pediatric and adolescent patients who had undergone surgical therapy for a diagnosis of acute appendicitis over a period of ten years from Jan 2001 to Dec 2010. Demographic data were retrieved including the patient's age, sex, clinical data, clinical presentations, laboratory investigations, operative data and pathological findings to identify the presence and type of parasites. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of parasites in the appendix lumen. In group I (n: 88), parasitic infestation was observed, whereas in group II (n: 1502), no parasitic infestation was present. Results Parasites were present in 5.5% (88 patients), and of those 88 parasitic infestations, 45 (51.1%) were Enterobaisis, 8 (9.1%) were Schistosomiasis, 23 (26.1%) were Ascariasis, 7 (8%) Trichuriasis, and 5 (5.7%) were Teania Saginata. The percentage of patients with suppurative, gangrenous or perforated appendicitis was similar in both groups with no statistical significance, irrespective of the presence or absence of parasitic infestation. Conclusion The low prevalence of parasites among the appendectomy specimens did not support the notion that parasites were a major cause of appendicitis in pediatric patients. PMID:23599875

  15. Enterobius vermicularis causing symptoms of appendicitis in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Sah, Shatrughan Prasad; Bhadani, Punam Prasad

    2006-07-01

    This study set out to determine the prevalence of Enterobius vermicularis in surgically removed appendices and to assess the possible relation of the parasite to acute appendicitis. All 624 surgically removed appendices received in the Department of Pathology, BPKIHS, Dharan, Nepal during 2(1/2) years (August 1999-January 2002) were examined. E. vermicularis was identified in nine (1.62%) appendices from the patients with a clinical diagnosis of appendicitis. The parasite was most frequently seen in histologically normal appendices (6/71) and was rarely associated with histological change of acute appendicitis (3/539). No cases of E. vermicularis infestation occurred in appendices showing chronic inflammation or removed during the course of other surgical procedures. E. vermicularis was found more frequently in uninflamed and histologically normal appendices (8.45%) than those which were inflamed with histopathologic changes of acute appendicitis (0.56%). It may be a cause of symptoms resembling acute appendicitis although the mechanism for this does not involve mucosal invasion by the parasite.

  16. Non-fecalith-induced appendicitis: etiology, imaging, and pathology.

    PubMed

    Swischuk, Leonard E; Chung, Dai H; Hawkins, Hal K; Jadhav, Siddharth P; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to document the imaging and pathology findings in non-fecalith-induced appendicitis. We reviewed the imaging and pathologic findings in 40 patients with histologically proven purulent appendicitis seen over a 2-year period. Findings documented were (1) total appendiceal involvement, (2) predominant appendiceal tip involvement, (3) presence of a fecalith, and (4) presence of lymphoid hyperplasia. There were a total of 40 patients, 28 males and 12 females. The age range was 2-18 years with a mean of 11.5 years. Twenty-two (55 %) patients demonstrated classic purulent appendicitis of the whole appendix, 20 (91 %) of these appendices had a fecalith. Eighteen (45 %) patients demonstrated purulent appendicitis confined to or predominately involving the tip of the appendix, and all 18 (100 %) patients demonstrated marked lymphoid hyperplasia. Only two (11 %) of these appendices had a fecalith. Overall, a fecalith was found in only 55 % of our cases, while 45 % demonstrated no fecalith, but rather marked lymphoid hyperplasia. Lymphoid hyperplasia appeared to be the underlying predisposing cause of purulent appendicitis in these cases.

  17. Ultrasound for Appendicitis: Performance and Integration with Clinical Parameters.

    PubMed

    Löfvenberg, Fanny; Salö, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the performance of ultrasound in pediatric appendicitis and the integration of US with the pediatric appendicitis score (PAS) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Method. An institution-based, retrospective study of children who underwent abdominal US for suspected appendicitis between 2012 and 2015 at a tertiary pediatric surgery center. US results were dichotomized, with a nonvisualized appendix considered as a negative examination. Results. In total, 438 children were included (mean 8.5 years, 54% boys), with an appendicitis rate of 29%. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for US were 82%, 97%, 92%, and 93%, respectively, without significant age or gender differences. Pediatric radiologists had significantly higher sensitivity compared to general radiologists, 88% and 71%, respectively (p < 0.01), but no differences were seen for specificity, PPV, and NPV. The sensitivity, NPV, and negative likelihood ratio for the combination of negative US, PAS < 5, and CRP < 5 mg/L were 98%, 98%, and 0.05 (95% CI 0.03-0.15). Conclusion. US may be a useful tool for evaluating children with suspected appendicitis, regardless of age or gender, and should be the first choice of imaging modalities. Combining US with PAS and CRP may reduce several unnecessary admissions for in-hospital observation.

  18. [Acute appendicitis. Surgical and non-surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Souza-Gallardo, Luis Manuel; Martínez-Ordaz, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Appendicitis represents a common disease for the surgeon with a relative risk between 7-8%. It was thought that if more time passed between diagnosis and treatment, the risk for complications, such as perforation or abscess formation, was higher; nevertheless; the evolution is variable, making necessary the development of different strategies such as antibiotic use only, interval surgery or endoscopic treatment. The purpose of this study is to make a revision in the management of appendicitis comparing conservative and surgical treatment. It is known that traditional management of appendicitis is appendectomy with a complication rate of 2.5% to 48%. Nowadays, laparoscopy is the approach of choice by many surgeons and there have proposed new invasive techniques such as endoscopic treatment with the use of prosthesis and ambulatory surgery. Antibiotic use is essential in the management of appendicitis. Its use as the only strategy to treat this disease has the purpose of lowering costs and diminishing complications related to surgery or the resection of the organ. We conclude that the ideal management of appendicitis remains controversial and it will depend of the clinical characteristics of each patient and the resources available.

  19. Ultrasound for Appendicitis: Performance and Integration with Clinical Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Löfvenberg, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the performance of ultrasound in pediatric appendicitis and the integration of US with the pediatric appendicitis score (PAS) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Method. An institution-based, retrospective study of children who underwent abdominal US for suspected appendicitis between 2012 and 2015 at a tertiary pediatric surgery center. US results were dichotomized, with a nonvisualized appendix considered as a negative examination. Results. In total, 438 children were included (mean 8.5 years, 54% boys), with an appendicitis rate of 29%. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for US were 82%, 97%, 92%, and 93%, respectively, without significant age or gender differences. Pediatric radiologists had significantly higher sensitivity compared to general radiologists, 88% and 71%, respectively (p < 0.01), but no differences were seen for specificity, PPV, and NPV. The sensitivity, NPV, and negative likelihood ratio for the combination of negative US, PAS < 5, and CRP < 5 mg/L were 98%, 98%, and 0.05 (95% CI 0.03–0.15). Conclusion. US may be a useful tool for evaluating children with suspected appendicitis, regardless of age or gender, and should be the first choice of imaging modalities. Combining US with PAS and CRP may reduce several unnecessary admissions for in-hospital observation. PMID:28044133

  20. Appendicitis in pregnancy: a case report and a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Chloptsios, C; Stamatiou, K; Kavouras, N; Moustakis, E; Ilias, G; Lebrun, F

    2007-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is the most common surgical problem in pregnancy. Antibiotic treatment does not always improve the outcome and emergency intervention is required. We present a case of appendicitis complicated by a plastron formation occurring during pregnancy and the outcome.

  1. Procalcitonin as a predictor of severe appendicitis in children.

    PubMed

    Kafetzis, D A; Velissariou, I M; Nikolaides, P; Sklavos, M; Maktabi, M; Spyridis, G; Kafetzis, D D; Androulakakis, E

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of procalcitonin (PCT) in 212 children with appendicitis and compare it with that of the standard diagnostic modalities, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, leukocyte count, and abdominal ultrasound findings, in relation to the surgical and histological findings of the appendix. A PCT value of >0.5 ng/ml was found to be indicative of perforation or gangrene with 73.4% sensitivity and 94.6% specificity, a CRP level of >50 mg/l and a leukocyte count of >10(4)/mm3 were useful diagnostic markers for perforation, while abdominal ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 82.8% and a specificity of 91.2% for detecting appendicitis with imaging findings. PCT measurement seems to be a useful adjunctive tool for diagnosing acute necrotizing appendicitis or perforation, and surgical exploration will probably be required in patients with PCT values >0.5 ng/ml.

  2. Simultaneous acute appendicitis and pseudomembranous colitis in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Vidrine, Steven R; Cortina, Chandler; Black, Marissa; Vidrine, Steven B

    2012-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause for pediatric surgery, with an increasing incidence as this population ages. Pseudomembranous colitis (PMC) from Clostridum difficle is being seen more frequently in pediatric patients, especially after treatment with antibiotics and in those with Hirschsprung's disease. Only three prior cases of appendicitis associated with PMC have been described in the literature, and all of them occurred in adult patients. Here, we describe the first documented pediatric case: a 16-year-old female who developed acute appendicitis while concomitantly being treated for suspected pseudomembranous colitis. We concur with previous authors that there may be an association between these two pathologies; furthermore, this association may not always be clinically apparent and may be both under-diagnosed and under-reported.

  3. Acute neonatal appendicitis: a diagnosis to consider in abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Arias-Llorente, R P; Flórez-Díez, P; Oviedo-Gutiérrez, M; Suárez-Rodríguez, M; Costa-Romero, M; Solís-Sánchez, G; García-López, E

    2014-01-01

    Appendicitis in the neonatal period is extremely rare. Its low incidence together with non-specific clinical symptoms often mean the diagnosis is delayed, leading to increased rates of peritonitis and mortality. We report the case of a 33-week premature infant, small for gestational age (1180 g at birth), clinically stable and receiving exclusive enteral feeding, who presented clinical manifestations of necrotizing enterocolitis at 14 days of life. Acute phase reactants were elevated and abdominal radiography showed pneumoperitoneum. Laparotomy revealed acute perforated appendicitis without intestinal involvement and purulent fluid in the peritoneum, for which appendectomy was performed. Neonatal acute appendicitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal sepsis since early diagnosis and treatment significantly reduce associated morbidity and mortality.

  4. Risk factors of delayed diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children: for early detection of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jea Yeon; Jo, Jeong Hyun; Hann, Tchah; Kim, Seong Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the risk factors of a delayed diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children undergoing an appendectomy. Methods This retrospective study involved children aged below 18 years, who underwent an appendectomy. After dividing them into a delayed diagnosis group and nondelayed diagnosis group according to the time interval between the initial hospital visit and final diagnosis, the risk factors of delayed diagnosis were identified using logistic regression analysis. Results Among 712 patients, 105 patients (14.7%) were classified in the delayed diagnosis group; 92 patients (12.9%) were diagnosed using ultrasonography (US), and both US and computed tomography were performed in 38 patients (5.3%). More patients in the delayed diagnosis group underwent US (P=0.03). Spring season and prior local clinic visit were significantly associated with a delayed diagnosis. Fever and diarrhea were more common in the delayed diagnosis group (fever: odds ratio [OR], 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.81; diarrhea: OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.08–3.46; P<0.05). These patients showed symptoms for a longer duration (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.78–3.78; P<0.05), and the admission course (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.11–1.44; P<0.05) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.19–1.82; P<0.05) were associated with the delayed diagnosis. Conclusion To decrease the rate of delayed diagnoses of acute appendicitis, symptoms such as fever and diarrhea, seasonal variations, admission course, and CRP levels should be considered and children with a longer duration of symptoms should be closely monitored. PMID:27721841

  5. Dirofilariasis Mimicking an Acute Scrotum.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi, Mirko; Rinaldi, Victoria Elisa; Prestipino, Marco; Giovenali, Paolo; Appignani, Antonino

    2015-10-01

    Human infections caused by Dirofilaria repens have been reported in many areas of the world. We describe a case of a 3-year-old child with an intrascrotal mass caused by D repens mimicking an acute scrotum. This represents the first case of scrotal dirofilariasis described in pediatric age with such an unusual presentation.

  6. Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis mimicking gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ewelukwa, Ofor; Ali, Omair; Akram, Salma

    2014-05-08

    Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) is a benign, uncommon variant of chronic cholecystitis characterised by focal or diffuse destructive inflammatory process of the gallbladder (GB). Macroscopically, it appears like yellowish tumour-like masses in the wall of the GB. This article reports on a 74-year-old woman with XGC mimicking GB cancer.

  7. Does breast feeding provide protection against acute appendicitis? A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; Figueiroa, José Natal; Barros, Isabela

    2008-10-01

    Breast feeding stimulates a more tolerant lymphoid tissue at the base of the appendix and this could provide protection against acute appendicitis. Two studies reported that children and adolescents with appendicitis were less likely to have been breast fed. In a case-control study of 200 children with histologically confirmed acute appendicitis matched by 200 siblings with the same sex and difference age - up to three-year-old - we found breast feeding in at least the first two months of life and for more than four months provides protection against acute appendicitis. These findings suggesting that breast feeding may possibly give protection against the development of appendicitis.

  8. Harms of CT scanning prior to surgery for suspected appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, William; Hoffman, Jerome; Noori, Naudereh

    2015-02-01

    In this brief analysis we compare the risks and benefits of performing a CT scan to confirm appendicitis prior to surgery instead of operating based on the surgeon's clinical diagnosis. We conclude that the benefit of universal imaging is to avoid 12 unnecessary appendectomies but the cost of those 12 avoided surgeries is one cancer death due to the imaging.

  9. New synthetic strategies for xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins

    PubMed Central

    Darcsi, Andras; Balint, Mihaly; Benkovics, Gabor; Sohajda, Tamas; Beni, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Summary Xanthene dyes can be appended to cyclodextrins via an ester or amide bridge in order to switch the fluorescence on or off. This is made possible through the formation of nonfluorescent lactones or lactams as the fluorophore can reversibly cyclize. In this context we report a green approach for the synthesis of switchable xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins based on the coupling agent 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM). By using 6-monoamino-β-cyclodextrin and commercially available inexpensive dyes, we prepared rhodamine- and fluorescein-appended cyclodextrins. The compounds were characterized by NMR and IR spectroscopy and MS spectrometry, their UV–vis spectra were recorded at various pH, and their purity was determined by capillary electrophoresis. Two potential models for the supramolecular assembly of the xanthene-dye-appended cyclodextrins were developed based on the set of data collected by the extensive NMR characterization. PMID:27340446

  10. Extensive retroperitoneal and right thigh abscess in a patient with ruptured retrocecal appendicitis: an extremely fulminant form of a common disease.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chi-Hsun; Wang, Yu-Chun; Yang, Horng-Ren; Chung, Ping-Kuei; Jeng, Long-Bin; Chen, Ray-Jade

    2006-01-21

    As a disease commonly encountered in daily practice, acute appendicitis is usually diagnosed and managed easily with a low mortality and morbidity rate. However, acute appendicitis may occasionally become extraordinarily complicated and life threatening. A 56-year-old man, healthy prior to this admission, was brought to the hospital due to spiking high fever, poor appetite, dysuria, progressive right flank and painful swelling of the thigh for 3 d. Significant inflammatory change of soft tissue was noted, involving the entire right trunk from the subcostal margin to the knee joint. Painful disability of the right lower extremity and apparent signs of peritonitis at the right lower abdomen were disclosed. Laboratory results revealed leukocytosis and an elevated C-reactive protein level. Abdominal CT revealed several communicated gas-containing abscesses at the right retroperitoneal region with mass effect, pushing the duodenum and the pancreatic head upward, compressing and encasing inferior vena cava, destroying psoas muscle and dissecting downward into the right thigh. Laparotomy and right thigh exploration were performed immediately and about 500 mL of frank pus was drained. A ruptured retrocecal appendix was the cause of the abscess. The patient fully recovered at the end of the third post-operation week. This case reminds us that acute appendicitis should be treated carefully on an emergency basis to avoid serious complications. CT scan is the diagnostic tool of choice, with rapid evaluation followed by adequate drainage as the key to the survival of the patient.

  11. A Review of the Predictive Role of Plasma D-Lactate Level in Acute Appendicitis: A Myth or Truth?

    PubMed Central

    Unverir, Pinar; Karcioglu, Ozgur

    2011-01-01

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is a common condition which warrants emergency surgery. Detailed history, physical exam, and laboratory findings are often nonspecific in suspected patients. There is substantial evidence to indicate that plasma levels of D-lactate were useful to establish a diagnosis of AA in the medical literature. It has been suggested that it is useful for patients with abdominal pain, especially patients with perforated AA. This paper is designed to highlight the value of D-lactate biomarker in establishing a diagnosis of AA. Based on the literature, it is not helpful for a decision of operation in patients with AA. According to the results of the studies, laboratory involvement was observed between plasma D-lactate level and the final diagnosis of AA, particularly in perforated appendices. It can be considered for routine use in patients with undifferentiated abdominal pain in the emergency department setting. PMID:23724288

  12. Health Outcomes in US Children with Abdominal Pain at Major Emergency Departments Associated with Race and Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Louise; Haberland, Corinna; Thurm, Cary; Bhattacharya, Jay; Park, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Over 9.6 million ED visits occur annually for abdominal pain in the US, but little is known about the medical outcomes of these patients based on demographics. We aimed to identify disparities in outcomes among children presenting to the ED with abdominal pain linked to race and SES. Methods Data from 4.2 million pediatric encounters of abdominal pain were analyzed from 43 tertiary US children’s hospitals, including 2.0 million encounters in the emergency department during 2004-2011. Abdominal pain was categorized as functional or organic abdominal pain. Appendicitis (with and without perforation) was used as a surrogate for abdominal pain requiring emergent care. Multivariate analysis estimated likelihood of hospitalizations, radiologic imaging, ICU admissions, appendicitis, appendicitis with perforation, and time to surgery and hospital discharge. Results Black and low income children had increased odds of perforated appendicitis (aOR, 1.42, 95% CI, 1.32- 1.53; aOR, 1.20, 95% CI 1.14 – 1.25). Blacks had increased odds of an ICU admission (aOR, 1.92, 95% CI 1.53 - 2.42) and longer lengths of stay (aHR, 0.91, 95% CI 0.86 – 0.96) than Whites. Minorities and low income also had lower rates of imaging for their appendicitis, including CT scans. The combined effect of race and income on perforated appendicitis, hospitalization, and time to surgery was greater than either separately. Conclusions Based on race and SES, disparity of health outcomes exists in the acute ED setting among children presenting with abdominal pain, with differences in appendicitis with perforation, length of stay, and time until surgery. PMID:26267816

  13. Ischaemic diverticular disease may mimic acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Kara Lee

    2013-01-01

    An 81-year-old man with a medical history significant for diverticulosis and irritable bowel syndrome presented to the emergency department with a 1-day history of periumbilical pain that woke him from sleep and ultimately localised to his right lower quadrant. He reported nausea, anorexia and chills but denied vomiting, diarrhoea, melena, hematochezia or fever. His physical exam was notable for focal tenderness at McBurney's point. Diagnostic information included a normal white blood cell count and an abdominal CT scan that demonstrated a normal appendix with no other pathology noted. The patient opted to proceed with laparoscopy where a normal appendix was found. The caecum, however, contained a large ischaemic diverticulum not noted on CT scan. Following laparoscopic ileocecectomy, pathology demonstrated haemorrhage, inflammation, oedema and full thickness necrosis of the caecal wall. Recovery was uneventful; the patient was discharged from the hospital 3 days following surgery. PMID:23893271

  14. Intimal Sarcoma of the Descending Aorta Mimicking Aortitis

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Angela; De Martino, Andrea; Levantino, Maurizio; Berchiolli, Raffaella; Basolo, Fulvio; Bortolotti, Uberto

    2016-01-01

    We describe a 74-year-old male patient with an intimal sarcoma of the descending aorta mimicking aortitis. The patient presented with lower back pain, fever, and increased C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) serum levels, together with Staphylococcus epidermidis-positive blood cultures. These findings, together with evidence of a 49-mm pseudoaneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta, caused us to suspect aortitis. However, postoperative histology and immunohistochemistry demonstrated the presence of an intimal aortic sarcoma. At the 8-month follow-up, local recurrence of the neoplasm and lung metastases were noted. PMID:28097198

  15. Abdominal Pain Caused by a Potentially Fatal Attraction.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Danielle Claire; Scace, Candace; Shah, Bhairav; Weiner, Evan; Prasad, Rajeev

    2016-11-19

    Abdominal pain is a challenging presentation in children. Examination findings and etiology vary greatly, spanning a vast spectrum from flatulence to frank peritonitis with septic shock. Here, we discuss a 10-year-old boy with 24 hours of progressively worsening lower abdominal pain, nausea, and subjective fevers. History and physical examination findings were consistent with appendicitis. However, physicians were surprised when the single-view abdominal radiograph showed an unanticipated, somewhat perplexing discovery.

  16. Stump appendicitis: surgical background, CT appearance, and imaging mimics.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jennifer; Myers, Daniel T; Williams, Todd R

    2015-02-01

    Stump appendicitis, also known as remnant appendicitis, is an uncommon entity with little radiologic literature. It is the result of unintentional incomplete appendectomy with subsequent inflammatory changes in the appendiceal remnant. A retrospective review of the radiology and pathology archives at our institution over an 8-year period yielded six surgically/pathologically confirmed cases. Imaging findings at presentation were evaluated, including appendiceal stump length, appendiceal stump diameter, presence or absence of surrounding stranding in the periappendiceal fat, and presence or absence of complication (perforation or abscess). The CT findings of the six cases had an average surgical specimen appendiceal stump length of 3.5 cm (range 2.0-5 cm) and an average appendiceal diameter of 12.3 mm (range 10-16 mm). All six cases demonstrated the presence of periappendiceal inflammatory fat stranding on the CT scan. Range of imaging presentation is reviewed with pictorial examples as well as examples of potential false-positive cases (mimics) including Crohn's disease, residual surgical drain tract, and epiploic appendagitis. Familiarity with stump appendicitis as well as its imaging mimics may lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment and prevent unnecessary complications.

  17. Norwegian scabies mimicking rupioid psoriasis*

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Juliana Bastos; de Sousa, Virna Lygia Lobo Rocha; da Trindade Neto, Pedro Bezerra; Paulo Filho, Thomás de Aquino; Cabral, Virgínia Célia Dias Florêncio; Pinheiro, Patrícia Moura Rossiter

    2012-01-01

    Norwegian scabies is a highly contagious skin infestation caused by an ectoparasite, Scarcoptes scabiei var. Hominis, which mainly affects immunosuppressed individuals. Clinically, it may simulate various dermatoses such as psoriasis, Darier's disease, seborrheic dermatitis, among others. This is a case report of a 33-year-old woman, immunocompetent, diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder (cancer phobia), who had erythematous, well-defined plaques, covered with rupioid crusts, on her neck, axillary folds, breast, periumbilical region, groin area, besides upper back and elbows, mimicking an extremely rare variant of psoriasis, denominated rupioid psoriasis. PMID:23197214

  18. Megakaryocytes mimicking metastatic breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hoda, Syed A; Resetkova, Erika; Yusuf, Yasmin; Cahan, Anthony; Rosen, Paul P

    2002-05-01

    False-positive diagnosis of lymph nodes occurs when a benign element in a lymph node, or in its capsule, is interpreted as metastatic carcinoma. This report describes a patient with breast carcinoma who had megakaryocytes in axillary sentinel lymph nodes mimicking metastatic carcinoma. The patient had no history of a hematologic disease, and we found no evidence of a concurrent hematopoietic disorder. The megakaryocytes were reactive for CD31, CD61, and von Willebrand factor, but not for cytokeratin (AE1/AE3). Megakaryocytes should be added to the list of benign histologic abnormalities that may simulate metastatic carcinoma in a sentinel lymph node.

  19. The great mimickers of rosacea.

    PubMed

    Olazagasti, Jeannette; Lynch, Peter; Fazel, Nasim

    2014-07-01

    Although rosacea is one of the most common conditions treated by dermatologists, it also is one of the most misunderstood. It is a chronic disorder affecting the central parts of the face and is characterized by frequent flushing; persistent erythema (ie, lasting for at least 3 months); telangiectasia; and interspersed episodes of inflammation with swelling, papules, and pustules. Understanding the clinical variants and disease course of rosacea is important to differentiate this entity from other conditions that can mimic rosacea. Herein we present several mimickers of rosacea that physicians should consider when diagnosing this condition.

  20. Simultaneous idiopathic segmental infarction of the great omentum and acute appendicitis: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Luigi; Belli, Filiberto; Vannelli, Alberto; Bonfanti, Giuliano; Gallino, Gianfrancesco; Poiasina, Elia; Rampa, Mario; Vitellaro, Marco; Leo, Ermanno

    2008-10-29

    Idiopathic segmental infarction of the greater omentum is an uncommon cause of acute abdomen. The etiology is still unclear and the symptoms mimic acute appendicitis. Its presentation simultaneously with acute appendicitis is still more infrequent. We present a case of a 47-year old woman without significant previous medical history, admitted with an acute abdomen, in which the clinical diagnosis was acute appendicitis and in whom an infarcted segment of right side of the greater omentum was also found at laparotomy. As the etiology is unknown, we highlighted some of the possible theories, and emphasize the importance of omental infarction even in the presence of acute appendicitis as a coincident intraperitoneal pathological condition.

  1. Accuracy of the new radiographic sign of fecal loading in the cecum for differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis in comparison with other inflammatory diseases of right abdomen: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Petroianu, A; Alberti, LR

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: To assess the importance of the new radiographic sign of faecal loading in the cecum for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, in comparison with other inflammatory diseases, and to verify the maintenance of this radiographic sign after surgical treatment of appendicitis. Methods: 470 consecutive patients admitted to the hospital due to acute abdomen were prospectively studied: Group 1 [n=170] – diagnosed with acute appendicitis, subdivided into: Subgroup 1A – [n=100] – submitted to an abdominal radiographic study before surgical treatment, Subgroup 1B – [n=70] – patients who had plain abdominal X-rays done before the surgical procedure and also the following day; Group 2 [n=100] – right nephrolithiasis; Group 3 [n=100] – right acute inflammatory pelvic disease; Group 4 [n=100] – acute cholecystitis. The patients of Groups 2,3 and 4 were submitted to abdominal radiography during the pain episode. Results: The sign of faecal loading in the cecum, characterized by hypo transparency interspersed with multiple small foci of hyper transparent images, was present in 97 patients of Subgroup 1A, in 68 patients of Subgroup 1B, in 19 patients of Group 2, in 12 patients of Group 3 and in 13 patients of Group 4. During the postoperative period the radiographic sign disappeared in 66 of the 68 cases that had presented with the sign. The sensitivity of the radiographic sign for acute appendicitis was 97.05% and its specificity was 85.33%. The positive predictive value for acute appendicitis was 78.94% and its negative predictive value was 98. 08%. Discussion: The radiographic image of faecal loading in the cecum is associated with acute appendicitis and disappears after appendectomy. This sign is uncommon in other acute inflammatory diseases of the right side of the abdomen. PMID:22574093

  2. Challenging mimickers of primary systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Miloslavsky, Eli M; Stone, John H; Unizony, Sebastian H

    2015-01-01

    The need to distinguish true primary systemic vasculitis from its multiple potential mimickers is one of the most challenging diagnostic conundrums in clinical medicine. This article reviews 9 challenging vasculitis mimickers: fibromuscular dysplasia, calciphylaxis, segmental arterial mediolysis, antiphospholipid syndrome, hypereosinophilic syndrome, lymphomatoid granulomatosis, malignant atrophic papulosis, livedoid vasculopathy, and immunoglobulin G4-related disease.

  3. Inverse heat mimicking of given objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwakil, Ahmed; Zerrad, Myriam; Bellieud, Michel; Amra, Claude

    2017-03-01

    We address a general inverse mimicking problem in heat conduction. The objects to cloak and mimic are chosen beforehand; these objects identify a specific set of space transformations. The shapes that can be mimicked are derived from the conductivity matrices. Numerical calculation confirms all of the analytical predictions. The technique provides key advantages for applications and can be extended to the field of waves.

  4. Black hole mimickers: Regular versus singular behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2008-07-15

    Black hole mimickers are possible alternatives to black holes; they would look observationally almost like black holes but would have no horizon. The properties in the near-horizon region where gravity is strong can be quite different for both types of objects, but at infinity it could be difficult to discern black holes from their mimickers. To disentangle this possible confusion, we examine the near-horizon properties, and their connection with far away asymptotic properties, of some candidates to black mimickers. We study spherically symmetric uncharged or charged but nonextremal objects, as well as spherically symmetric charged extremal objects. Within the uncharged or charged but nonextremal black hole mimickers, we study nonextremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, of which a subclass are called black foils, and gravastars. Within the charged extremal black hole mimickers we study extremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, quasi-black holes, and wormholes on the basis of quasi-black holes from Bonnor stars. We elucidate whether or not the objects belonging to these two classes remain regular in the near-horizon limit. The requirement of full regularity, i.e., finite curvature and absence of naked behavior, up to an arbitrary neighborhood of the gravitational radius of the object enables one to rule out potential mimickers in most of the cases. A list ranking the best black hole mimickers up to the worst, both nonextremal and extremal, is as follows: wormholes on the basis of extremal black holes or on the basis of quasi-black holes, quasi-black holes, wormholes on the basis of nonextremal black holes (black foils), and gravastars. Since in observational astrophysics it is difficult to find extremal configurations (the best mimickers in the ranking), whereas nonextremal configurations are really bad mimickers, the task of distinguishing black holes from their mimickers seems to

  5. New parameter in diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Platelet distribution width

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Bulent; Oskay, Alten; Dinc, Selcan Enver; Bas, Bilge; Tekin, Sabri

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of the mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width in acute appendicitis. METHODS: This retrospective, case-controlled study compared 295 patients with acute appendicitis (Group I), 100 patients with other intra-abdominal infections (Group II), and 100 healthy individuals (Group III) between January 2012 and January 2013. The age, gender, and white blood cell count, neutrophil percentage, mean platelet volume, and platelet distribution width values from blood samples were compared among the groups. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS for Windows 21.0 software. In addition, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and likelihood ratios, and diagnostic accuracy were calculated. RESULTS: The mean ages of patients were 29.9 ± 12.0 years for Group I, 31.5 ± 14.0 years for Group II, and 30.4 ± 13.0 years for Group III. Demographic features such as age and gender were not significantly different among the groups. White blood cell count, neutrophil percentage and platelet distribution width were significantly higher in Group I compared to groups II and III (P < 0.05). Diagnostically, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 73.1%, 94.0%, and 78% for white blood cell count, 70.0%, 96.0%, and 76.0% for neutrophil percentage, 29.5%, 49.0%, and 34.0% for mean platelet volume, and 97.1%, 93.0%, and 96.0% for platelet distribution width, respectively. The highest diagnostic accuracy detected was for platelet distribution width between Group I and Group III (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Platelet distribution width analysis can be used for diagnosis of acute appendicitis without requiring additional tests, thus reducing the cost and loss of time. PMID:25684947

  6. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  7. Acute tuberculous myopericarditis mimicking acute myocardial infarction: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    REN, MANYI; ZHANG, CHUNSHENG; ZHANG, XIAOJUAN; ZHONG, JINGQUAN

    2016-01-01

    A number of cases of acute myopericarditis mimicking acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have previously been reported in the literature. However, to the best of our knowledge, such a case resulting from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has not previously been described. The present study reports the case of a 21-year-old male patient presenting with acute chest pain, in whom focal ST-segment elevation and elevated cardiac enzymes mimicked a diagnosis of AMI. However, acute tuberculous myopericarditis was diagnosed on the basis of a variety of imaging examinations, laboratory tests, as well as the changes observed in electrocardiograms (ECGs) and in the cardiac enzyme levels. The case highlights the importance of a detailed collection of medical history, comprehensive explanations of serial ECGs, thoracic computed tomography, echocardiogram and coronary angiography in the diagnosis and differentiation of acute tuberculous myopericarditis mimicking AMI. PMID:27284323

  8. An unusual cause of acute abdomen–epiploic appendicitis: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Burcu, Busra; Ekinci, Ozgur; Inan, Ibrahim; Ozyalvac, Ferman Tevfik; Eren, Turgut Tunc; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    Epiploic appendices, first described in 1543 by Vesalius, are fatty structures which are attached through the length of the colon and consisted of visceral peritoneum. Epiploic appendicitis is an uncommon and self-limiting disease. In this report, we aimed to present two patients with epiploic appendicitis. PMID:28058362

  9. Unusual histopathological findings in appendectomy specimens from patients with suspected acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Akbulut, Sami; Kutluturk, Koray; Sahin, Nurhan; Arabaci, Ebru; Ara, Cengiz; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence and implications of unusual histopathological findings in appendectomy specimens from patients with suspected acute appendicitis. METHODS: The demographic and histopathological data of 1621 patients (≥ 16 years-old) who underwent appendectomy to treat an initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis between January 1999 and November 2011 were retrospectively assessed. Microscopic findings were used to classify the patients under six categories: appendix vermiformis, phlegmonous appendicitis, gangrenous appendicitis, perforated appendicitis, supurative appendicitis, and unusual histopathologic findings. The demographic and clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with unusual histopathologic findings were evaluated in detail, and re-analysis of archived resected appendix specimens was carried out. RESULTS: A total of 912 males and 709 females, from 16 to 94 years old, were included in the study and comprised 789 cases of suppurative appendicitis, 370 cases of appendix vermiformis, 243 cases of perforated gangrenous appendicitis, 53 cases of flegmaneous appendicitis, 32 cases of gangrenous appendicitis, and 134 (8.3%) cases of unusual histopathological findings. The unusual histopathological findings included fibrous obliteration (n = 62), enterobius vermicularis (n = 31), eosinophilic infiltration (n = 10), mucinous cystadenoma (n = 8), carcinoid tumor (n = 6), granulomatous inflammation (n = 5), adenocarcinoma (n = 4; one of them mucinous), and mucocele (n = 3), adenomatous polyp (n = 1), taenia sup (n = 1), ascaris lumbricoides (n = 1), appendiceal diverticula (n = 1), and B cell non-hodgkin lymphoma (n = 1). None of the 11 patients with subsequent diagnosis of tumor were suspected of cancer prior to the appendectomy. CONCLUSION: Even when the macroscopic appearance of appendectomy specimens is normal, histopathological assessment will allow early diagnosis of many unusual diseases. PMID:23840147

  10. Diagnosing Appendicitis: Evidence-Based Review of the Diagnostic Approach in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Shogilev, Daniel J.; Duus, Nicolaj; Odom, Stephen R.; Shapiro, Nathan I.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis is the most common abdominal emergency requiring emergency surgery. However, the diagnosis is often challenging and the decision to operate, observe or further work-up a patient is often unclear. The utility of clinical scoring systems (namely the Alvarado score), laboratory markers, and the development of novel markers in the diagnosis of appendicitis remains controversial. This article presents an update on the diagnostic approach to appendicitis through an evidence-based review. Methods We performed a broad Medline search of radiological imaging, the Alvarado score, common laboratory markers, and novel markers in patients with suspected appendicitis. Results Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate mode of imaging for suspected cases of appendicitis, but the associated increase in radiation exposure is problematic. The Alvarado score is a clinical scoring system that is used to predict the likelihood of appendicitis based on signs, symptoms and laboratory data. It can help risk stratify patients with suspected appendicitis and potentially decrease the use of CT imaging in patients with certain Alvarado scores. White blood cell (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), granulocyte count and proportion of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells are frequently elevated in patients with appendicitis, but are insufficient on their own as a diagnostic modality. When multiple markers are used in combination their diagnostic utility is greatly increased. Several novel markers have been proposed to aid in the diagnosis of appendicitis; however, while promising, most are only in the preliminary stages of being studied. Conclusion While CT is the most accurate mode of imaging in suspected appendicitis, the accompanying radiation is a concern. Ultrasound may help in the diagnosis while decreasing the need for CT in certain circumstances. The Alvarado Score has good diagnostic utility at specific cutoff points. Laboratory markers have very limited

  11. Efficacy of laparoscopic appendectomy in appendicitis with peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Gregory J; Mancini, Matthew L; Nelson, Henry S

    2005-01-01

    Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) is safe and effective in cases of peritonitis, perforation, and abscess. We investigated our conversion rate and clinical outcomes in this patient population, as well as preoperative factors that predict operative conversion. A retrospective nonrandomized cohort of 92 patients underwent LA for acute appendicitis with peritonitis, perforation, or abscess at our institution between 1997 and 2002. Thirty-six of the 92 were converted to open appendectomy (OA), yielding a conversion rate of 39 per cent. The presence of phlegmon (42%), nonvisualized appendix (44%), technical failures (8%), and bleeding (6%) were reasons for conversion. Preoperative data had no predictive value for conversion. CT scan findings of free fluid, phlegmon, and abscess did not correlate with findings at the time of surgery. Total complication rates were 8.9 per cent in the LA group as compared to 50 per cent in the converted cohort. Postoperative data showed LA patients stayed 3.2 days versus 6.9 days for converted patients (P = 0.01). LA patients had less pneumonia (P = 0.02), intra-abdominal abscess (P = 0.01), ileus (P = 0.01), and readmissions (P = 0.01). LA is safe and effective in patients with appendicitis with peritonitis, perforation, and abscess, resulting in shorter hospital stays and less complication.

  12. Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Mhuircheartaigh, Jennifer Ni; Lin, Yu-Ching; Wu, Jim S

    2014-01-01

    Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety. PMID:25114385

  13. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Tanrıverdi, Elif; Özgül, Mehmet Akif; Uzun, Oğuz; Gül, Şule; Çörtük, Mustafa; Yaşar, Zehra; Acat, Murat; Arda, Naciye; Çetinkaya, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important.

  14. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Özgül, Mehmet Akif; Uzun, Oğuz; Yaşar, Zehra; Acat, Murat; Arda, Naciye; Çetinkaya, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important. PMID:27594885

  15. Humanlike Robots - Synthetically Mimicking Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Nature inspired many inventions and the field of technology that is based on the mimicking or inspiration of nature is widely known as Biomimetics and it is increasingly leading to many new capabilities. There are numerous examples of biomimetic successes including the copying of fins for swimming, and the inspiration of the insects and birds flight. More and more commercial implementations of biomimetics are appearing and behaving lifelike and applications are emerging that are important to our daily life. Making humanlike robots is the ultimate challenge to biomimetics and, for many years, it was considered science fiction, but such robots are becoming an engineering reality. Advances in producing such robot are allowing them to perform impressive functions and tasks. The development of such robots involves addressing many challenges and is raising concerns that are related to fear of their application implications and potential ethical issues. In this paper, the state-of-the-art of humanlike robots, potential applications and challenges will be reviewed.

  16. Fibrosing mediastinitis mimicking bronchogenic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bayiz, Hulya; Mutluay, Neslihan; Koyuncu, Adem; Demirag, Funda; Dagli, Gulfidan; Berktas, Bahadir; Berkoglu, Mine

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosing mediastinitis is a rare but benign disorder characterized by an excessive fibrotic reaction in the mediastinum which can result in compromise of airways, great vessels, and other mediastinal structures. In this paper we presented a patient with fibrosing mediastinitis mimicking bronchogenic carcinoma. The patient was a 32-year-old diabetic male admitting with cough and hemoptysis. There was a right hilar mass and multiple mediastinal conglomerated lymph nodes on chest computed tomography. Positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) scan demonstrated increased fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake at the right hilar mass lesion and mediastinal lymph nodes. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy showed mucosal distortion of right upper lobe. Pathologic examination of the mucosal biopsy revealed inflammation. Endobronchial ultrasound guided transbronchial needle and cervical mediastinoscopic lymph node biopsies were undiagnostic. Diagnostic thoracotomy confirmed the diagnosis fibrosing mediastinitis. Administration of six months of systemic corticosteroid and antituberculous therapy was not beneficial. In conclusion, despite being a rare clinical entity, fibrosing mediastinitis should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of mediastinal mass lesions of unknown etiology. The diagnosis is exceptionally difficult in the presence of atypical radiological findings. The treatment is particularly challenging without any proven effective therapy. PMID:23372962

  17. Abdominal pain – learning when not to intervene!

    PubMed Central

    Tachamo, Niranjan; Timilsina, Bidhya; Nazir, Salik; Lohani, Saroj

    2016-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis (EA) is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain. It is a benign condition but may mimic other serious causes of acute abdomen such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, and gynecological emergency in severe cases. Knowledge of this condition in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain can save unnecessary hospital admission, antibiotics, and surgery. In this article, we present the case of a 43-year-old female who presented to our hospital with a 2-day history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain and diarrhea. She was diagnosed with EA with computed tomography of abdomen with contrast and was managed conservatively with good outcome. PMID:27987280

  18. Intestinal angioedema mimicking Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, A; Prather, C M

    1999-10-18

    Angioedema usually presents as episodic attacks of swelling of the face, airway and extremities, but it may also involve visceral tissues. A 58-year-old woman with repeated episodes of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting had two laparotomies and was treated for Crohn's disease for two years before a diagnosis of acquired intestinal angioedema was made. This case provides important insights into the presentation of intestinal angioedema.

  19. Inverse heat mimicking of given objects

    PubMed Central

    Alwakil, Ahmed; Zerrad, Myriam; Bellieud, Michel; Amra, Claude

    2017-01-01

    We address a general inverse mimicking problem in heat conduction. The objects to cloak and mimic are chosen beforehand; these objects identify a specific set of space transformations. The shapes that can be mimicked are derived from the conductivity matrices. Numerical calculation confirms all of the analytical predictions. The technique provides key advantages for applications and can be extended to the field of waves. PMID:28252031

  20. Plasma D-lactic acid level: a useful marker to distinguish perforated from acute simple appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Demircan, Mehmet; Cetin, Selma; Uguralp, Sema; Sezgin, Nurzen; Karaman, Abdurrahman; Gozukara, Engin M

    2004-10-01

    Early diagnosis of perforated appendicitis is important for reducing morbidity rates. The aim of this study was to determine the value and utility of plasma D-lactic acid levels in identifying the type of appendicitis. In this clinical study, plasma D-lactic acid levels were assessed in 44 consecutive paediatric patients (23 with acute appendicitis, 21 with perforated appendicitis) before laparotomy. D-lactic acid levels were determined by an enzymatic spectrophotometric technique using a D-lactic acid dehydrogenase kit. Patients with perforated appendicitis had higher D-lactic acid levels (3.970 +/- 0.687 mg/dL) than patients in the control group (0.478 +/- 0.149 mg/dL) and patients with acute appendicitis (1.409 +/- 0.324 mg/dL; p < 0.05). For a plasma D-lactic acid level greater than 2.5 mg/dL, the sensitivity and specificity of the D-lactic acid assay were 96% and 87%, respectively. The positive predictive value was 87%, the negative predictive value was 96%, and the diagnostic value was 91%. These results suggest that the measurement of plasma D-lactic acid levels may be a useful adjunct to clinical and radiological findings in distinguishing perforated from acute non-perforated appendicitis in children.

  1. Association between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Appendicitis: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Kao, Li-Ting; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-03-02

    Appendicitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are both prevalent diseases and might share similar pathological mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between GERD and appendicitis using a large population-based dataset. This study used administrative claims data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. We identified 7113 patients with appendicitis as cases, and 28452 matched patients without appendicitis as controls. This study revealed that GERD was found in 359 (5.05%) cases and 728 (2.56%) controls (p < 0.001). Conditional logistic regression shows that the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of GERD for cases was 2.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08~2.33) compared to controls. The adjusted ORs of prior GERD for patients aged 18~39, 40~59, and ≥60 years with appendicitis were 1.96 (95% CI: 1.56~2.47), 2.36 (95% CI: 1.94~2.88), and 1.71 (95% CI: 1.31~2.22) than controls, respectively. We concluded that patients with appendicitis had higher odds of prior GERD than those without appendicitis regardless of age group.

  2. Multidetector computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-06-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pediatric acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department (ED) due to its unclear clinical presentation and non-specific findings in physical examinations, laboratory data, and plain radiographs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) performed in the ED on pediatric patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective chart review of children aged <18 years with acute abdominal pain who visited the emergency department and underwent MDCT between September 2004 and June 2007 was conducted. Patients with a history of trauma were excluded. A total of 156 patients with acute abdominal pain (85 males and 71 females, age 1-17 years; mean age 10.9 ± 4.6 years) who underwent abdominal MDCT in the pediatric ED during this 3-year period were enrolled in the study. One hundred and eighteen patients with suspected appendicitis underwent abdominal MDCT. Sixty four (54.2%) of them had appendicitis, which was proven by histopathology. The sensitivity of abdominal MDCT for appendicitis was found to be 98.5% and the specificity was 84.9%. In this study, the other two common causes of nontraumatic abdominal emergencies were gastrointestinal tract (GI) infections and ovarian cysts. The most common etiology of abdominal pain in children that requires imaging with abdominal MDCT is appendicitis. MDCT has become a preferred and invaluable imaging modality in evaluating uncertain cases of pediatric acute abdominal pain in ED, in particular for suspected appendicitis, neoplasms, and gastrointestinal abnormalities.

  3. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on for ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis Pain ...

  4. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  5. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  6. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. However, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: Swelling and pain in the Achilles tendon ...

  7. On the Role of Ultrasonography and CT Scan in the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Jyotindu; Kumar, Rajesh; Mathur, Ankit; Sharma, Pawan; Kumar, Nikhilesh; Shridhar, Nagaraj; Shukla, Ashwani; Khanna, Shiv Pankaj

    2015-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to revisit the utility of ultrasonography (USG) as a primary imaging modality in acute appendicitis (AA) and to establish the role of CT scan as a second-line/problem-solving modality. All cases of suspected AA were referred for urgent USG. USG was done with standard protocol for appendicitis. Limited computed tomographic (CT) scan [NCCT ± CECT (IV contrast only)] was done for the lower abdomen and pelvis where sonographic findings were equivocal. One hundred and twenty-one patients were referred for USG for suspected appendicitis. Eight-four patients underwent surgery for AA based on clinical as well as imaging findings, of whom 76 had appendicitis confirmed at histopathology. Three patients were misdiagnosed (3.6 %) on USG as appendicitis. Of 76 patients of appendicitis confirmed histopathologically, 63 (82.8 %) had features of appendicitis on USG and did not require any additional imaging modality. Of 121 patients, 12 (10 %) needed CT scan because of atypical features on USG. Of these 12 patients, seven had retrocecal appendicitis, and three high-up paracolic appendicitis. USG alone had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of 81, 88, 92.6, 71.6, and 83 %, respectively. When combined with CT scan in select cases, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of combined USG + CT scan were 96 % (P = 0.0014), 89 %, 93 %, 93.5 % (P = 0.0001), and 93 % (P = 0.0484), respectively. Twenty-eight (23 %) patients were given alternative diagnosis on USG. Dedicated appendiceal USG should be used as a primary imaging modality in diagnosing or excluding AA. Appendiceal CT can serve as a problem-solving modality.

  8. Analysis of Recurrence Management in Patients Who Underwent Nonsurgical Treatment for Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tsung-Jung; Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Tsai, Chung-Yu; Kang, Chi-Hsiang; Huang, Wei-Chun; Chang, Hong-Tai; Chen, I-Shu

    2016-03-01

    The recurrence rate for acute appendicitis treated nonoperatively varies between studies. Few studies have adequately evaluated the management of these patients when appendicitis recurs. We aimed to explore the recurrence rate and management of patients with acute appendicitis that were first treated nonoperatively.We identified patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database who were hospitalized due to acute appendicitis for the first time between 2000 and 2010 and received nonsurgical treatment. The recurrence and its management were recorded. Data were analyzed to access the risk factors for recurrence and factors that influenced the management of recurrent appendicitis.Among the 239,821 patients hospitalized with acute appendicitis for the first time, 12,235 (5.1%) patients were managed nonoperatively. Of these, 864 (7.1%) had a recurrence during a median follow-up of 6.5 years. Appendectomy was performed by an open and laparoscopic approach in 483 (55.9%) and 258 (29.9%) patients, respectively. The remaining 123 (14.2%) patients were again treated nonsurgically. Recurrence was independently associated with young age, male sex, percutaneous abscess drainage, and medical center admission by multivariable analysis. In addition, age <18, a (CCI) <2, medical center admission, and a longer time to recurrence were correlated with using laparoscopy to treat recurrence. Neither type of appendicitis, percutaneous abscess drainage, nor length of first time hospital stay had an influence on the selection of surgical approach.In conclusion, a laparoscopic appendectomy can be performed in recurrent appendicitis cases, and its application may not be related to previous appendicitis severity.

  9. Huge uterine-cervical diverticulum mimicking as a cyst.

    PubMed

    Chufal, S; Thapliyal, Naveen; Gupta, Manoj; Pangtey, Nirmal

    2012-01-01

    Here we report an incidental huge uterine-cervical diverticulum from a total abdominal hysterectomy specimen in a perimenopausal woman who presented with acute abdominal pain. The diverticulum was mimicking with various cysts present in the lateral side of the female genital tract. Histopathological examination confirmed this to be a cervical diverticulum with communication to uterine cavity through two different openings. They can attain huge size if left ignored for long duration and present a diagnostic challenge to clinicians, radiologists, as well as pathologists because of its extreme rarity. Therefore, diverticula should also be included as a differential diagnosis. Its histopathological confirmation also highlights that diverticula can present as an acute abdomen, requiring early diagnosis with appropriate timely intervention. Immunohistochemistry CD 10 has also been used to differentiate it from a mesonephric cyst.

  10. [Guideline on diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis: imaging prior to appendectomy is recommended].

    PubMed

    Bakker, Olaf J; Go, Peter M N Y H; Puylaert, Julien B C M; Kazemier, Geert; Heij, Hugo A

    2010-01-01

    Every year, over 2500 unnecessary appendectomies are carried out in the Netherlands. At the initiative of the Dutch College of Surgeons, the evidence-based guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of acute appendicitis was developed. This guideline recommends that appendectomy should not be carried out without prior imaging. Ultrasonography is the recommended imaging technique in patients with suspected appendicitis. After negative or inconclusive ultrasonography, a CT scan can be carried out. Appendectomy is the standard treatment for acute appendicitis; this can be done either by open or laparoscopic surgery. The first choice treatment of appendicular infiltrate is conservative treatment.

  11. The current utility of ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Lourenco, Pedro; Brown, Jacquie; Leipsic, Jonathan; Hague, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the current performance of ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Retrospectively, patients who presented to a single institution between 2011 and 2012 were included. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated, with surgery considered gold-standard. Our data demonstrates that US relative to surgery-confirmed appendicitis has a sensitivity and specificity of 48.4% and 97.9%, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy was further increased when there was a low pre-test probability, with a NPV of up to 96.6%. Ultrasound has a strong PPV in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, and in equivocal cases, the NPV is reliable.

  12. [Nature of the relation of acute appendicitis morbidity to meteorological and heliogeophysical factors].

    PubMed

    Khaavel', A A; Birkenfeldt, R R

    1978-04-01

    The authors analyzed 2009 appendicitis case records for the period from 1964 to 1973. In a sea climate region an evident season distribution of the apendicitis morbidity was found, with the rise of the incidence rate in January, March and April. The rise of the appendicitis incidence rate during the periods of vast fluctuations of air temperature, increase of air humidity and decrease of actual duration of sun radiance was established. The rise of the incidence of acute appendicitis was also noted during the months of a great and extremely great magnetic storms.

  13. Restless legs syndrome mimicking S1 radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Zambelis, Th; Wolgamuth, B R; Papoutsi, S N; Economou, N T

    2016-01-01

    Α case of a chronic idiopathic form of a severe type of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS), which developed during pregnancy and persisted after this, misdiagnosed for 34 years as radiculopathy S1, is reported. In spite of the thorough clinical and laboratory investigation, in addition to constant changes of the therapeutic approach, the diagnosis of S1 radiculopathy could not be confirmed, resulting in a chronic clinical course; the latter was characterized by relapses and remissions not attributed or linked in any way to the treatment (various types of). In fact, it was due to a routine workup in a sleep clinic, where the patient was referred because of a coincident chronic insomnia (Restless Legs Syndrome is a known and important cause of insomnia/chronic insomnia), which resulted in a proper diagnosis and treatment of this case. With the use of Restless Legs Syndrome appropriate treatment (Pramipexole 0.18 mg taken at bedtime, a dopaminergic agent and Level A recommended drug for Restless Legs Syndrome) an excellent response and immediate elimination of symptoms was achieved. Restless Legs Syndrome may present with a variety of symptoms (with the most prominent shortly being reported with the acronym URGE: Urge to move the legs usually associated with unpleasant leg sensations, Rest induces symptoms, Getting active brings relief, Evening and night deteriorate symptoms); given the fact that Restless Legs Syndrome presents with a great variety and heterogeneity of symptoms (mostly pain, dysesthesia and paresthesia), which may occur in several other diseases (the so called "RLS mimics"), proper diagnosis of Restless Legs Syndrome usually fails. Restless Legs Syndrome misinterpreted as S1 radiculopathy, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported yet in the literature. Here, case history, clinical course and common RLS mimics are presented. Different forms of Restless Legs Syndrome manifestations, which are commonly -as in this case- misinterpreted due to their

  14. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2–4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7–10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7–10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed – hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in

  15. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G

    2015-07-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2-4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7-10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7-10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed - hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in the

  16. Appendicitis-like clinical image elicited by Enterobius vermicularis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vleeschouwers, W; Hofman, Ph; Gillardin, J P; Meert, V; Van Slycke, S

    2013-01-01

    A 17-year-old female patient presented with the clinical features of an acute appendicitis. During laparoscopic exploration a macroscopically normal appendix was found. Since there were no intra-abdominal abnormalities found, the appendix was resected. Anatomopathology demonstrated Enterobius vermicularis, a pinworm infecting only humans, and mostly living in the caecum. This parasite is responsible for possibly the most common helminthic infection in the developed world. Its role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis is controversial, but more recent studies indicate a stronger association between enterobiasis and appendicitis. Often, enterobius mimics appendicitis by obstructing the lumen of the appendix, thereby causing appendiceal colic. This case report stresses the importance of microscopic examination of all appendectomy resection specimens. In case of enterobius infestation, systemic therapy of patient and family is necessary.

  17. Simultaneous idiopathic segmental infarction of the great omentum and acute appendicitis: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Luigi; Belli, Filiberto; Vannelli, Alberto; Bonfanti, Giuliano; Gallino, Gianfrancesco; Poiasina, Elia; Rampa, Mario; Vitellaro, Marco; Leo, Ermanno

    2008-01-01

    Idiopathic segmental infarction of the greater omentum is an uncommon cause of acute abdomen. The etiology is still unclear and the symptoms mimic acute appendicitis. Its presentation simultaneously with acute appendicitis is still more infrequent. We present a case of a 47-year old woman without significant previous medical history, admitted with an acute abdomen, in which the clinical diagnosis was acute appendicitis and in whom an infarcted segment of right side of the greater omentum was also found at laparotomy. As the etiology is unknown, we highlighted some of the possible theories, and emphasize the importance of omental infarction even in the presence of acute appendicitis as a coincident intraperitoneal pathological condition. PMID:18959804

  18. May Ingestion of Leachate from Decomposed Corpses Cause Appendicitis? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Domingues-Ferreira, Maurício; Saddi-Rosa, Pedro; dos Santos, André Luis

    2011-01-01

    The general consensus is that appendicitis is basically provoked by fecaliths or lymphoid hyperplasic obstruction. Several studies based on histological diagnosis have not confirmed this hypothesis. On the contrary, obstruction has been proved in only a minority of cases. Diverse infections by parasites, bacteria, fungus, and noninfective agents have been associated with appendicitis in the medical literature. We describe a firefighter, who ingested a small quantity of leachate from decomposing corpses while working and developed enteritis a few hours later, which lasted several days and evolved to appendicitis. This case raises the possibility that the high quantity of bacteria concentration present in the leachate could have provoked enteritis and the subsequent appendicitis due to a direct effect of the bacteria on the appendix. PMID:21541232

  19. Use of Clinical Data to Predict Appendicitis in Patients with Equivocal US Findings.

    PubMed

    Athans, Brett S; Depinet, Holly E; Towbin, Alexander J; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Bin; Trout, Andrew T

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the incremental value of clinical data in patients with ultrasonographic (US) examinations that were interpreted as being equivocal for acute appendicitis. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval, with a waiver of informed consent, was obtained for this analysis of clinical and imaging data in patients younger than 18 years old who were evaluated for acute appendicitis. Findings from US examinations were reported in a structured fashion, including two possible equivocal impressions. Clinical data were captured as Pediatric Appendicitis (PAS) or Alvarado scores and considered as categoric (high, intermediate, or low likelihood) and continuous variables to simulate stratification of equivocal US examinations to predict appendicitis. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to define score cutoffs, and logistic regression was used to assess individual clinical variables as predictors of appendicitis. Results The study population was made up of 776 patients (mean age, 11.7 years ± 3.7), with 429 (55.2%) girls. A total of 203 (26%) patients had appendicitis. US had a negative predictive value of 96.2% and a positive predictive value of 93.3% for depicting appendicitis, with 89 of 782 (11.4%) equivocal examinations. Categoric PAS and Alvarado scores were equivocal for 59.5% (53 of 89) and 50.6% (45 of 89) of equivocal US examinations, respectively. Categoric low- and high-likelihood PAS and Alvarado scores correctly predicted the presence of appendicitis in 61.1% (22 of 36) and 77.3% (34 of 44) of equivocal US examinations, respectively. As continuous variables, a PAS or Alvarado score of 5 or lower could be used to exclude appendicitis, with a 80.8% (21 of 26) and 90% (18 of 20) negative predictive value, respectively. Conclusion The study confirms the excellent performance of US for depicting pediatric appendicitis. In the subset of equivocal US examinations, a low clinical score (≤5) may be used to identify patients

  20. Correlation between the serum and tissue levels of oxidative stress markers and the extent of inflammation in acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Dumlu, Ersin Gürkan; Tokaç, Mehmet; Bozkurt, Birkan; Yildirim, Murat Baki; Ergin, Merve; Yalçin, Abdussamed; Kiliç, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the serum and tissue levels of markers of impaired oxidative metabolism and correlate these levels with the histopathology and Alvarado score of acute appendicitis patients. METHOD: Sixty-five acute appendicitis patients (mean age, 31.4±12.06 years; male/female, 30/35) and 30 healthy control subjects were studied. The Alvarado score was recorded. Serum samples were obtained before surgery and 12 hours postoperatively to examine the total antioxidant status, total oxidant status, paraoxonase, stimulated paraoxonase, arylesterase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, ceruloplasmin, oxidative stress markers (advanced oxidized protein products and total thiol level) and ischemia-modified albumin. Surgical specimens were also evaluated. RESULTS: The diagnoses were acute appendicitis (n = 37), perforated appendicitis (n = 8), phlegmonous appendicitis (n = 12), perforated+phlegmonous appendicitis (n = 4), or no appendicitis (n = 4). The Alvarado score of the acute appendicitis group was significantly lower than that of the perforated+phlegmonous appendicitis group (p = 0.004). The serum total antioxidant status, total thiol level, advanced oxidized protein products, total oxidant status, catalase, arylesterase, and ischemia-modified albumin levels were significantly different between the acute appendicitis and control groups. There was no correlation between the pathological extent of acute appendicitis and the tissue levels of the markers; additionally, there was no correlation between the tissue and serum levels of any of the parameters. CONCLUSIONS: The imbalance of oxidant/antioxidant systems plays a role in the pathogenesis acute appendicitis. The Alvarado score can successfully predict the presence and extent of acute appendicitis. PMID:25518019

  1. Pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis: mimicker of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Mahima; Sahni, Ajay Kumar; Rajput, A K

    2013-01-01

    Infection caused by the lung fluke is endemic in north eastern parts of India. Paragonimus westermani and Paragonimus heterotremus are known to be endemic in eastern Indian states of Manipur and Nagaland. The infection is related to eating habits of the locals and is acquired by ingestion of raw, inadequately cooked crabs or crayfish containing encysted metacercariae which act as second intermediate hosts during the life cycle of the lung fluke. Diagnosis is generally delayed due to lack of suspicion and presentation similar to tuberculosis which is endemic in the population. We report pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis in a soldier from eastern India who presented with chest pain, haemoptysis, and eosinophilia. He gave history of consumption of raw crabs while on leave at his native village in Nagaland. Ova morphologically resembling Paragonimus heterotremus were detected in sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage specimen. Symptoms resolved with praziquantel treatment. PMID:23432864

  2. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculous Pleuritis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Wang, Mao-Yun; Liu, Dan; Zhu, Hui; Yang, Sai; Liang, Bin-Miao; Liang, Zong-An

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary paragonimiasis is a food-borne zoonosis with a wide variety of radiologic findings, which sometimes can be confused with tuberculosis and carcinoma. Therefore, differential diagnosis is always warranted. A 43-year-old male farmer, with productive cough, blood-tinged sputum and chest pain, as well as patchy consolidation and pleural effusions in chest computer tomography, was misdiagnosed of community-acquired pneumonia and tuberculosis. Complete blood cell count, sputum smear and culture, chest computer tomography, thoracoscopy, and biopsy. The diagnosis of pulmonary paragonimiasis was established due to the finding of Charcot–Leyden crystals in the pleural necrosis, and antibodies against Paragonimus westermani in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Paragonimiasis should be considered as a possibility in the differential diagnosis of tuberculosis. Thoracoscopy is an effective and valuable technology that can help make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:27082624

  3. Inflammatory stricture of the right ureter following perforated appendicitis: The first Indian report

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Janavikula Sankaran; Ganesh, Deepa; Rajkumar, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Perforated appendicitis leading to inflammatory stricture of the right ureter is a rarity. We present this fairly uncommon case of a patient who developed a stricture of the right ureter secondary to an ongoing inflammatory process in the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. A perforated appendicitis was operated upon, and on follow-up the mild hydronephrosis had worsened. Stenting of the right ureter completely solved the problem. PMID:27251819

  4. A Prospective Bicenter Study Investigating the Diagnostic Value of Procalcitonin in Patients with Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Sand, M.; Trullen, X.V.; Bechara, F.G.; Pala, X.F.; Sand, D.; Landgrafe, G.; Mann, B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Procalcitonin (PCT) is an established laboratory marker for disease severity in patients with infection and sepsis. In addition, PCT has been shown to be an effective marker for a limited number of localized infections. However, whether or not PCT has any diagnostic value for acute appendicitis, still remains unclear. The purpose of this prospective bicenter study was, therefore, to determine whether or not the PCT levels in the serum of patients with acute appendicitis have any diagnostic value. Methods This prospective study included 103 patients who received an appendectomy, based on the clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis, in a surgical department of an academic teaching hospital in Germany or in a county hospital in Spain. White blood cell count (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) values were determined preoperatively. All appendectomy specimens were sent for routine histopathological evaluation. Based on this information, the patients were assigned to 1 of 5 groups that reflected the severity of the appendicitis. Results Of the 103 patients who were included in the study, 98 had appendicitis. Fourteen (14.3%) showed an increase in PCT values. Of those 14, 4 had a serum PCT >0.5 ng/ml, 9 had a PCT value >2–10 ng/ml and 1 had a PCT value >10 ng/ml. The sensitivity of PCT was calculated to be 0.14. The mean WBC value was 13.0/nl (± 5.2, 3.4–31), and for CRP it was 8.8 mg/dl (± 13, 0–60.2). The values of CRP, WBC and PCT increased with the severity of the appendicitis. Conclusions PCT is potentially increased in rare cases of severe inflammation and, in particular, after appendiceal perforation or gangrenous appendicitis. However, its remarkably low sensitivity prohibits its routine use for the diagnosis of appendicitis. PMID:19672084

  5. Numerical Wake Prediction Methods for Submerged Appended Bodies, A Literature Survey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    of the axial Reynolds shear stress is shown in Figure 4 to illustrate this point. Analogous characteristics have also been observed in the near wake...APPENDED BODI ES Most of the theoretical and experimental investigations of flows around appended bodies were carried out in relation to the wing /fuselage...Navier-Stokes equationf;, a projection by Chapman 24 on a similar problem in aerodynamics is worthwhile mentioning. According to him the practical 3D

  6. Correlation between clinical presentation, peroperative finding and histopathological report in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Khan, S A; Gafur, M A; Islam, A; Rahman, M S

    2011-10-01

    Acute appendicitis is usually encountered clinically as acute abdomen. Typical cases are easy to diagnose, but sometimes it is very difficult to make a diagnosis in atypical cases. The objective of the study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy in patient of clinically diagnosed acute appendicitis. This prospective study conducted in Mymensingh medical college hospital on 1136 patients presented with acute abdomen and clinically diagnosed as acute appendicitis from July 2004 to June 2010. Emergency appendicectomy was done in all consecutive patients after relevant investigation. Intraoperative findings along with histopathological reports were compared with clinical diagnosis. On the basis of histopathological report, 85.65% were found to have acute appendicitis with misdiagnosis in rest of the subjects requiring unnecessary explorations. Negative exploration was more in emergency than office hour. This may be due to diagnostic inaccuracy and decision-making in the management of the acute appendicitis. Management errors can be significantly reduced by accurate preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis by improving clinical skill and appropriate investigations.

  7. Retrospective Multicenter Study on Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections after Appendectomy for Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Giesen, Louis J.X.; van den Boom, Anne Loes; van Rossem, Charles C.; den Hoed, P.T.; Wijnhoven, Bas P.L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSI) are seen in up to 5% of patients after appendectomy for acute appendicitis. SSI are associated with prolonged hospital stay and increased costs. The aim of this multicenter study was to identify factors associated with SSI after appendectomy for acute appendicitis. Methods Patients who underwent appendectomy for acute appendicitis between June 2014 and January 2015 in 6 teaching hospitals in the southwest of the Netherlands were included. Patient, diagnostic, intra-operative and disease-related factors were collected from the patients' charts. Primary outcome was surgical site infection. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify independent risk factors for SSI. Results Some 637 patients were included. Forty-two patients developed a SSI. In univariable analysis body temperature >38°C, CRP>65 and complex appendicitis were associated with SSI. After multivariable logistic regression with stepwise backwards elimination, complex appendicitis was significantly associated with SSI (OR 4.09; 95% CI 2.04-8.20). Appendiceal stump closure with a stapler device was inversely correlated with SSI (OR 0.40; 95% CI 0.24-0.97) Conclusions Complex appendicitis is a risk factor for SSI and warrants close monitoring postoperatively. The use of a stapler device for appendiceal stump closure is associated with a reduced risk of SSI. PMID:27631081

  8. Characteristics of mesenteric lymphadenitis in comparison with those of acute appendicitis in children.

    PubMed

    Gross, Itai; Siedner-Weintraub, Yael; Stibbe, Shir; Rekhtman, David; Weiss, Daniel; Simanovsky, Natalia; Arbell, Dan; Hashavya, Saar

    2017-02-01

    Mesenteric lymphadenitis (ML) is considered as one of the most common alternative diagnosis in a child with suspected acute appendicitis (AA). In this retrospective study, patients diagnosed with ML (n = 99) were compared in terms of demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings to patients diagnosed with AA (n = 102). This comparison was applied for both lymph nodes smaller and larger than 10 mm. When compared to patients with AA, patients with ML had significantly longer duration of symptoms prior to emergency department (ED) presentation (2.4 ± 2.6 vs 1.4 ± 1.4 days, P = 0.002) and multiple ED presentations (1.3 ± 0.7 vs 1.05 ± 0.3, P < 0.001) and had longer duration of stay in the ED (9.2 ± 5.9 vs 5.2 ± 4 h, P < 0.001), respectively. They also had significantly lower WBC (10.16 ± 4.7 × 10(3)/dl vs 15.8 ± 4.4 × 10(3)/dl, P < 0.001) with lymphocyte predominance (24.6 ± 14 vs 13 ± 8.7%, P < 0.001) and lower CRP levels (0.48 vs 1.6 mg/dl). Migration of pain (28 vs 7%), vomiting (62 vs 34%), and classic abdominal findings of AA (72 vs 20%) were all significantly more common for children with AA. When comparing lymph node size, no significant difference was found between those presenting with small and large nodes.

  9. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  10. Foetal pain?

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, Stuart W G

    2010-10-01

    The majority of commentary on foetal pain has looked at the maturation of neural pathways to decide a lower age limit for foetal pain. This approach is sensible because there must be a minimal necessary neural development that makes pain possible. Very broadly, it is generally agreed that the minimal necessary neural pathways for pain are in place by 24 weeks gestation. Arguments remain, however, as to the possibility of foetal pain before or after 24 weeks. Some argue that the foetus can feel pain earlier than 24 weeks because pain can be supported by subcortical structures. Others argue that the foetus cannot feel pain at any stage because it is maintained in a state of sedation in the womb and lacks further neural and conceptual development necessary for pain. Much of this argument rests on the definition of terms such as 'wakefulness' and 'pain'. If a behavioural and neural reaction to a noxious stimulus is considered sufficient for pain, then pain is possible from 24 weeks and probably much earlier. If a conceptual subjectivity is considered necessary for pain, however, then pain is not possible at any gestational age. Regardless of how pain is defined, it is clear that pain for conceptual beings is qualitatively different than pain for non-conceptual beings. It is therefore a mistake to draw an equivalence between foetal pain and pain in the older infant or adult.

  11. The Accuracy of Emergency Physicians in Ultrasonographic Screening of Acute Appendicitis; a Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Ebrahim; Aminianfar, Mohammad; Zarafshani, Keivan; Safaie, Arash

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Diagnostic values reported for ultrasonographic screening of acute appendicitis vary widely and are dependent on the operator’s skill, patient’s gender, weight, etc. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of operator skill on the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in detection of appendicitis by comparing the results of ultrasonography done by radiologists and emergency physicians. Methods: This prospective diagnostic accuracy was carried out on patients suspected to acute appendicitis presenting to EDs of 2 hospitals. After the initial clinical examinations, all the patients underwent ultrasonography for appendicitis by emergency physician and radiologist, respectively. The final diagnosis of appendicitis was based on either pathology report or 48-hour follow-up. Screening performance characteristics of appendix ultrasonography by emergency physician and radiologist were compared using STATA 11.0 software. Results: 108 patients with the mean age of 23.91 ± 7.46 years were studied (61.1% male). Appendicitis was confirmed for 37 (34.26%) cases. Cohen's kappa coefficient between ultrasonography by the radiologist and emergency physician in diagnosis of acute appendicitis was 0.51 (95% CI: 0.35 – 0.76). Area under the ROC curve of ultrasonography in appendicitis diagnosis was 0.78 (95% CI: 0.69 – 0.86) for emergency physician and 0.88 (95% CI: 0.81 – 0.94) for radiologist (p = 0.052). Sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography by radiologist and emergency physician in appendicitis diagnosis were 83.87% (95% CI: 67.32 – 93.23), 91.5% (95% CI: 81.89 – 96.52), 72.97% (95% CI: 55.61 – 85.63), and 83.10% (95% CI: 71.94 – 90.59), respectively. Conclusion: Findings of the present study showed that the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography carried out by radiologist (89%) is a little better compared to that of emergency physician (80%) in diagnosis of appendicitis, but none are excellent. PMID:28286829

  12. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries and conditions that cause pain and restrict motion. Neck pain causes include: Muscle strains. Overuse, such ... body then forms bone spurs that affect joint motion and cause pain. Nerve compression. Herniated disks or ...

  13. Ankle pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  14. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - knee ... Knee pain can have different causes. Being overweight puts you at greater risk for knee problems. Overusing your knee can trigger knee problems that cause pain. If you have a history of arthritis, it ...

  15. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  16. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  17. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  18. Foot pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - foot ... Foot pain may be due to: Aging Being on your feet for long periods of time Being overweight A ... sports activity Trauma The following can cause foot pain: Arthritis and gout . Common in the big toe, ...

  19. Phantom Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be an effective treatment for some types of chronic pain. In acupuncture, the practitioner inserts extremely fine, sterilized ... and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/chronic_pain/detail_chronic_pain.htm. Accessed Sept. 16, 2014. ...

  20. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain involves any pain in or around the hip joint. You may not feel pain from your hip ... 2012:chap 48. Read More Hip fracture surgery Hip joint replacement Patient Instructions Hip fracture - discharge Hip or ...

  1. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  2. Analytic investigation of helicopter rotor blade appended aeroelastic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Analytic evaluations of four different passive aeroelastic devices appended to helicopter rotor blades are presented. The devices consist of a passive tuned tab, a control coupled tab, an all-flying tip and a harmonic dilational airfoil tip. Each device was conceived for improving either aerodynamic performance or reducing vibratory control loads or hub shears. The evaluation was performed using a comprehensive rotor aeroelastic analysis (the G400PA code with appropriate modifications), together with data for a realistic helicopter rotor blade (the UH-60A Blackhawk), in high speed flight (90 m/s, 175 kts). The results of this study show that significant performance (L/(D sub e)) gains can be achieved with the all-flying free tip. Results from the harmonic dilational airfoil tip show the potential for moderate improvements in L/(D sub e). Finally, the results for the passive tuned tab and the control coupled tab, as configured for this study, show these devices to be impractical. Sections are included which describe the operation of each device, the required G400PA modifications, and the detailed results obtained for each device.

  3. Systemic sarcoidosis mimicking malignant metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Hammen, Irena; Sherson, David Lee; Davidsen, Jesper Roemhild

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of systemic sarcoidosis involving the liver, pancreas, lungs, mediastinal and intraabdominal lymph nodes and bones. Multiple organ system manifestations mimicked malignant metastatic disease. The diagnosis was established with clinical, radiological, and pathological findings after neoplasm was ruled out by pathological tests. The patient showed rapid symptom remission with systemic steroid treatment. PMID:26672956

  4. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis mimicking interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Braham, Emna; Ayadi-Kaddour, Aïda; Smati, Belhassen; Ben Mrad, Sonia; Besbes, Mohammed; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2008-11-01

    Lymphoid granulomatosis is a rare form of pulmonary angiitis. This case report presents a patient with lymphoid granulomatosis in whom the clinical presentation, radiological features and the partial response to corticosteroid therapy mimicked interstitial lung disease. Lymphoid granulomatosis was only diagnosed at post-mortem examination. The range of reported clinical presentations, diagnostic approaches and outcomes are described.

  5. The Use of Delta Neutrophil Index and Myeloperoxidase Index for Predicting Acute Complicated Appendicitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Oh Hyun; Cha, Yong Sung; Hwang, Sung Oh; Jang, Ji Young; Choi, Eun Hee; Kim, Hyung Il; Cha, KyoungChul; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background In children with acute appendicitis, 30% to 75% present with a complication, such as perforation, and the early diagnosis of complications is known to improve outcomes. Serum delta neutrophil index (DNI) and myeloperoxidase index (MPXI) are new inflammatory markers, and thus, in the present study, the authors evaluated the predictive values of these two markers for the presence of a complication in children with acute appendicitis. Methods This retrospective observational study was conducted on 105 consecutive children (<12 years old) with acute appendicitis treated over a 31-month period. DNI, MPXI, C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cells (WBCs) were measured in an emergency department and investigated with respect to their abilities to predict the presence of acute complicated appendicitis. Results Twenty-nine of the 105 patients (median age, 9 years) were allocated to the complicated group (27.6%) and 76 to the non-complicated group (72.4%). Median serum DNI and CRP were significantly higher in the complicated group [0% vs. 2.2%, p<0.001 and 0.65 mg/dL vs. 8.0 mg/dL, p<0.001], but median MPXI was not (p = 0.316). Area under curve (AUC) for the ability of serum DNI and CRP to predict the presence of acute complicated appendicitis were 0.738 and 0.840, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed initial CRP [odds ratio 1.301, 95% confidence interval (1.092–1.549), p = 0.003] significantly predicted the presence of a complication. The optimal cutoff for serum CRP was 4.0 mg/dL (sensitivity 69%, specificity 83%, AUC 0.840). Conclusions Although serum DNI values were significantly higher in children with acute complicated appendicitis, no evidence was obtained to support the notion that serum DNI or serum MPXI aid the differentiation of acute complicated and non-complicated appendicitis in the ED setting. PMID:26859663

  6. The Role of Serum Fibrinogen Level in the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Nyuwi, Kuotho T; Khumukcham, Sridartha; Rangaswamy, Raju; Ezung, Yibenthung S; Chittvolu, Sowdin Reddy; Sharma, A Barindra; Singh, H Manihar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis is the most common indication for emergent surgery and affects a wide range of patients at any age group. However, inspite of the presence of various imaging modalities, biochemical markers, and scoring systems the negative appendectomy rate remain high. Serum fibrinogen, an acute inflammatory mediator is usually raised in any acute inflammatory condition and the same is expected to rise in acute appendicitis, which may be used as a new inflammatory marker in the diagnosis and more importantly in decision making of management of acute appendicitis. Aim To determine the relationship between the rise in the level of serum fibrinogen and acute appendicitis and its role in reducing the negative appendectomy rate. Materials and Methods A total of 82 patients with clinical signs and symptoms of acute appendicitis who underwent emergency appendectomy were included in the study, the serum fibrinogen level were measured just before the operation and the sensitivity and the specificity was calculated. The final diagnosis was based on the histopathological examination. Results In our study, the Mean±SD of serum fibrinogen in mg/dl in those patient proved to be having acute appendicitis by histopathology was 436.6±40.6 while those with normal appendix was 391.91±66.54. The area under the curve was 0.697 i.e., it has an accuracy of around 70% and this is statistically significant (p=0.018). On further sub-analysis when the cut off level of fibrinogen level was reduced to 397, it resulted in a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 60% and if the level was further reduced to 375 it increased the sensitivity to 88% with a specificity of 55%. Conclusion In the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, use of fibrinogen blood level may be a new diagnostic acute-phase reactant with possible role in reducing negative appendectomy rate. PMID:28274001

  7. Retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix mimicking hydatid cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sikar, Hasan Ediz; Çetin, Kenan; Gündoğan, Ersin; Gündoğan, Gökçen Alinak; Kaptanoğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Appendiceal mucocele is a cystic dilatation of the appendix due to abnormal appendiceal mucinous secretion. Cystadenoma of the appendix is one of the most common causes and is encountered in 0.6% of all appendectomy specimens. The diagnosis may be difficult due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease; pain in the right lower quadrant may be the only symptom. Complex ovarian cyst, urolithiasis or cystic hydatid disease of the liver have been reported as mimicking appendiceal mucocele in the literature. In this study, we present a case of mucinous cystadenoma of the appendix mimicking retroperitoneal hydatid cyst in a 59-year-old woman. The patient was treated with laparoscopic appendectomy with partial resection of the caecum following laparoscopic exploration. PMID:27446577

  8. Diagnostic Performance of US for Differentiating Perforated from Nonperforated Pediatric Appendicitis: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Jennifer L; Orth, Robert C; Zhang, Wei; Lopez, Monica E; Mangona, Kate L; Guillerman, R Paul

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance of ultrasonography (US) for differentiating perforated from nonperforated pediatric appendicitis and to investigate the association between specific US findings and perforation. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval, and the need for informed consent was waived. All abdominal US studies performed for suspected pediatric appendicitis at one institution from July 1, 2013, to July 9, 2014, were examined prospectively. US studies were reported by using a risk-stratified scoring system (where a score of 1 indicated a normal appendix; a score of 2, an incompletely visualized normal appendix; a score of 3, a nonvisualized appendix; a score of 4, equivocal; a score of 5a, nonperforated appendicitis; and a score of 5b, perforated appendicitis). The diagnostic performance of US studies designated 5a and 5b was calculated. The following US findings were correlated with perforation at multivariate analysis: maximum appendiceal diameter, wall thickness, loss of mural stratification, hyperemia, periappendiceal fat inflammation, periappendiceal fluid, lumen contents, and appendicolith presence. The number of symptomatic days prior to presentation was recorded. Surgical diagnosis and clinical follow-up served as reference standards. Results A total of 577 patients with a diagnosis of appendicitis at US met the study criteria (468 with a score of 5a; 109 with a score of 5b). Appendicitis was correctly identified in 573 (99.3%) of 577 patients. US performance in the detection of perforated appendicitis (5b) was as follows: a sensitivity of 44.0% (80 of 182), a specificity of 93.1% (364 of 391), a positive predictive value of 74.8% (80 of 107), and a negative predictive value of 78.1% (364 of 466). Statistically significant associations with perforated appendicitis were longer duration of symptoms (odds ratio [OR] = 1.46, P < .0001), increased maximum diameter (OR = 1.29, P

  9. Evaluation of mean platelet volume as a diagnostic biomarker in acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Hasan; Aktimur, Recep; Cetinkunar, Suleyman; Reyhan, Enver; Gokler, Cihan; Irkorucu, Oktay; Sozen, Selim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of acute appendicitis remains to be challenging with up to 30% negative exploration rates. In addition to careful clinical history and physical examination, we still need easily applicable, cheap and effective biomarker. Patients and methods: A retrospective case-controlled study was designed in two groups, both containing 100 patients, acute appendicitis and control. Leukocyte count, neutrophil percentage, platelet count and meal platelet volume (MPV) were compared. Results: MPV values for acute appendicitis and control groups were 7.4 ± 0.9 fL (5.6-10.6) and 9.1 ± 1.6 fL (5.1-13.1). For the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, ROC analysis revealed 74% sensitivity and 75% specificity for a cut-off value of 7.95 fL of MPV, however, the diagnostic value of leukocyte count and/or neutrophil ratio was superior. Conclusion: Our results suggest that, MPV value is an important parameter in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, but in terms of sensitivity and specificity, leukocyte count and/or neutrophil percentage is superior. PMID:25785128

  10. An Imaging Diagnostic Protocol in Children with Clinically Suspected Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Epifanio, Matias; Antonio de Medeiros Lima, Marco; Corrêa, Patricia; Baldisserotto, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate a new diagnostic strategy using clinical findings followed by ultrasound (US) and, in selected cases, MRI. This study included 166 children presenting signs and symptoms suggesting acute appendicitis. Cases classified as suggesting appendicitis according to clinical exams had to be referred to surgery, whereas the other cases were discharged. Unclear cases were evaluated using US. If the US results were considered inconclusive, patients underwent MRI. Of the 166 patients, 78 (47%) had acute appendicitis and 88 (53%) had other diseases. The strategy under study had a sensitivity of 96 per cent, specificity of 100 per cent, positive predictive value of 100 per cent, negative predictive value of 97 per cent, and accuracy of 98 per cent. Eight patients remained undiagnosed and underwent MRI. After MRI two girls presented normal appendixes and were discharged. One girl had an enlarged appendix on MRI and appendicitis could have been confirmed by surgery. In the other five patients, no other sign of the disease was detected by MRI such as an inflammatory mass, free fluid or an abscess in the right iliac fossa. All of them were discharged after clinical observation. In the vast majority of cases the correct diagnosis was reached by clinical and US examinations. When clinical assessment and US findings were inconclusive, MRI was useful to detect normal and abnormal appendixes and valuable to rule out other abdominal pathologies that mimic appendicitis.

  11. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  12. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  13. Ambient Ozone Concentrations and the Risk of Perforated and Nonperforated Appendicitis: A Multicity Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanyingoh, Divine; Dixon, Elijah; Johnson, Markey; Wheeler, Amanda J.; Myers, Robert P.; Bertazzon, Stefania; Saini, Vineet; Madsen, Karen; Ghosh, Subrata; Villeneuve, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Environmental determinants of appendicitis are poorly understood. Past work suggests that air pollution may increase the risk of appendicitis. Objectives: We investigated whether ambient ground-level ozone (O3) concentrations were associated with appendicitis and whether these associations varied between perforated and nonperforated appendicitis. Methods: We based this time-stratified case-crossover study on 35,811 patients hospitalized with appendicitis from 2004 to 2008 in 12 Canadian cities. Data from a national network of fixed-site monitors were used to calculate daily maximum O3 concentrations for each city. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate city-specific odds ratios (ORs) relative to an interquartile range (IQR) increase in O3 adjusted for temperature and relative humidity. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to derive a pooled risk estimate. Stratified analyses were used to estimate associations separately for perforated and nonperforated appendicitis. Results: Overall, a 16-ppb increase in the 7-day cumulative average daily maximum O3 concentration was associated with all appendicitis cases across the 12 cities (pooled OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.13). The association was stronger among patients presenting with perforated appendicitis for the 7-day average (pooled OR = 1.22; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.36) when compared with the corresponding estimate for nonperforated appendicitis [7-day average (pooled OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.09)]. Heterogeneity was not statistically significant across cities for either perforated or nonperforated appendicitis (p > 0.20). Conclusions: Higher levels of ambient O3 exposure may increase the risk of perforated appendicitis. PMID:23842601

  14. Spherical boson stars as black hole mimickers

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F. S.; Rueda-Becerril, J. M.

    2009-10-15

    We present spherically symmetric boson stars as black hole mimickers based on the power spectrum of a simple accretion disk model. The free parameters of the boson star are the mass of the boson and the fourth-order self-interaction coefficient in the scalar field potential. We show that even if the mass of the boson is the only free parameter, it is possible to find a configuration that mimics the power spectrum of the disk due to a black hole of the same mass. We also show that for each value of the self-interaction a single boson star configuration can mimic a black hole at very different astrophysical scales in terms of the mass of the object and the accretion rate. In order to show that it is possible to distinguish one of our mimickers from a black hole, we also study the deflection of light.

  15. Isolated giant molluscum contagiosum mimicking epidermoid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Uzuncakmak, Tugba K.; Kuru, Burce C.; Zemheri, Ebru I.; Zindanci, Ilkin; Turkoglu, Zafer; Kavala, Mukaddes

    2016-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum is a benign cutaneous viral infection which is caused by double- stranded DNA poxvirus. It affects mainly children and young adults and usually presents with single or multiple umblicated papules or nodules on face, arms, legs and anogenital regions. It may present in atypical size and clinical appearance in patients with altered or impaired immunity and rarely in immuncompetent patients. Herein we present an immuncompetent young adult patient with isolated giant molluscum contagiosum, which was mimicking epidermoid cyst clinically. PMID:27648389

  16. A Pilocytic Astrocytoma Mimicking a Clinoidal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Christopher S.; Lehman, Norman L.; Sauvageau, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas and meningiomas are benign, primary brain tumors that may involve the optic tract. Classically, the presence of a dural “tail” sign may differentiate a meningioma from other intracranial lesions. In this report, we describe a mass with the typical appearance of a clinoidal meningioma on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but postoperatively diagnosed as a pilocytic astrocytoma. This case illustrates the rare occurrence of a pilocytic astrocytoma mimicking a meningioma on MRI. PMID:24744944

  17. Mad honey intoxication mimicking acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dur, Ali; Sonmez, Ertan; Civelek, Cemil; AhmetTurkdogan, Kenan; AkifVatankulu, Mehmet; Sogut, Ozgur

    2014-09-01

    Mad honey intoxication or grayanotoxin poisoning is caused by consumption of grayanotoxin-containing toxic honey produced from leaves and flowers of the Rhododendron family. Despite the rarity of intoxication cases, the correct diagnosis and treatment are required because of the significance of haemodynamic disturbance and confounding of symptoms for disease identification. We report herein a case of a patient with mad honey intoxication mimicking acute non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction and review the pathophysiology and diagnostic considerations.

  18. Pulmonary diseases with imaging findings mimicking aspergilloma.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Fernando Ferreira; Severo, Luiz Carlos; Marchiori, Edson; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Garcia, Tiago Severo; Irion, Klaus L; Camargo, José Jesus; Felicetti, José Carlos; de Mattos Oliveira, Flavio; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    Patients with preexisting lung cavities are at risk of developing intracavitary fungal colonization. Because Aspergillus spp. are the most commonly implicated fungi, these fungal masses are called aspergillomas. Their characteristic "ball-in-hole" appearance, however, may be found in a variety of other conditions that can produce radiologic findings mimicking aspergilloma. In this paper, we review the main diseases that may mimic the radiographic findings of aspergilloma, with brief descriptions of clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings.

  19. Rare Mimickers of Exostosis: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Perubhotla, Lakshmi Manasa

    2016-01-01

    Exophytic growths from bones are a common entity. Osteochondroma is the most common benign exophytic lesion and we tend to diagnose every benign looking exophytic lesion as osteochondroma. Here we reported two entities of cases, one was Nora’s lesion and another one was supracondylar process of humerus, both of which were mimickers of osteochondroma and their salient and differentiating features from osteochondromas. PMID:27630926

  20. Conventional single-port laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis in children: Efficient and cost-effective

    PubMed Central

    Karakuş, Osman Zeki; Ulusoy, Oktay; Ateş, Oğuz; Hakgüder, Gülce; Olguner, Mustafa; Akgür, Feza Miraç

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) is gradually gaining popularity among paediatric surgeons for complicated appendicitis. A retrospective study was conducted to compare conventional single port LA, multiport LA and open appendectomy (OA) for complicated appendicitis in children. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 1995 from December 2014, 1,408 patients (604 girls, 804 boys) underwent surgery for uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. The patient characteristics, operation times, duration of hospitalization, operative costs, and postoperative complications were recorded. A 10-mm 0° scope with a parallel eye piece and an integrated 6 mm working channel were inserted through an 11-mm “conventional umbilical port” for single port LA. RESULTS: A total of 314 patients with complicated appendicitis (128 girls, 186 boys) underwent appendectomy. Among these, 102 patients (32.4%) underwent single port LA, 17 patients (5.4%) underwent multiport LA and 195 patients (62.1%) underwent OA. The hospital stay of the single port LA group was significantly less (3.88 ± 1.1) compared with multiport LA (5.41 ± 1.2) and OA groups (6.14 ± 1.1) (P < 0.001). Drain usage, wound infection and adhesive intestinal obstruction rates were significantly high in the OA group. There was no significant difference between the groups in postoperative intraabdominal abscess formation. Single-port LA performed for complicated appendicitis was cheaper compared with the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: The present study has shown that single-port LA for complicated appendicitis can be conducted in a reasonable operative time; it shortens the hospitalization period, markedly reduces postoperative wound infection and adhesive intestinal obstruction rates and does not increase the operative cost. PMID:26917914

  1. Changes in appetite hormone (ghrelin) levels of saliva and serum in acute appendicitis cases before and after operation.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Ziya; Aydin, Suleyman; Cerrahoglu, Yusuf Z; Ayten, Refik; Erman, Fazilet; Aygen, Erhan

    2009-02-01

    This study was designed to measure the levels of serum and saliva ghrelin concentrations before and after surgery in an attempt to clarify whether this hormone plays any significant roles in acute appendicitis and cholelithiasis patients when compared with healthy controls. Samples were obtained from 20 patients with appendicitis, 10 patients with cholelithiasis before and after operation, and 16 healthy controls. The levels of ghrelin (acylated) were measured by means of a RIA assay. The results revealed that preoperative levels of ghrelin in saliva and serum were significantly decreased with respect to post-op in patients undergoing appendectomy, and control levels. This was also the case when the preoperative ghrelin concentrations in patients with appendicitis were compared with those having choelithiasis. Taken together, decreased ghrelin concentration in preoperative appendicitis might be a causative factor for the "loss of appetite" observed in an acute inflammatory condition such as acute appendicitis. However, further studies are necessary to reveal the exact mechanisms behind this observation.

  2. Decreasing incidence of acute appendicitis, with special reference to the consumption of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Arnbjörnsson, E; Asp, N G; Westin, S I

    1982-01-01

    The incidence of acute appendicitis and the total number of appendectomies performed in the adult population admitted to our medical center are both decreasing. The cause is not clear. Better nutrition and the wide-spread use of antibiotics are two possible factors which come to mind, but we know of no scientific evidence that these are responsible. There has been a slight decrease in the mean dietary fiber content in the Swedish diet during the last three decades. The decreased incidence of acute appendicitis cannot therefore be correlated with an increase in the mean dietary fiber intake.

  3. [Parasitic infection of the appendix and its possible relationship to acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Silva, Danielle Fernandes da; Silva, Reinaldo José da; Silva, Márcia Guimarães da; Sartorelli, Alesso Cervantes; Takegawa, Bonifácio Katsunori; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida Marchesan

    2008-01-01

    From 1,600 surgically removed appendices, 24 (1.5%) were found to have helminths. Enterobius vermicularis was observed in 23 of the 24 specimens (95.8%) and Taenia sp was detected in only 1 (4.2%) case. Sixteen patients (66.7%) were less than 10 year-old; 15 patients were male and 9 female. Pathologic analysis disclosed acute neutrophilic inflammation in 12 cases and lymphoid hyperplasia in 10 of the 24 appendices. Gangrenous appendicitis was diagnosed in 3 cases and peritonitis was found in 11 of the 24 infested appendices. Parasitic infection of the appendix is an uncommon cause of acute appendicitis in children and adolescents.

  4. Diagnostic Performance on Low Dose Computed Tomography For Acute Appendicitis Among Attending and Resident Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Chen; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Huan-Wu; Wang, Li-Jen; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Wu, Patricia Wanping; Irama, Wiwan; Chen, Wei Yuan; Chang, Chee-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) techniques can reduce exposure to radiation. Several previous studies have shown that radiation dose reduction in LDCT does not decrease the diagnostic performance for appendicitis among attending radiologists. But, the LDCT diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis in radiology residents with variable training levels has not been well discussed. Objectives To compare inter-observer and intra-observer differences of diagnostic performance on non-enhanced LDCT (NE-LDCT) and contrast-enhanced standard dose CT (CE-SDCT) for acute appendicitis among attending and resident radiologists. Patients and Methods This retrospective study included 101 patients with suspected acute appendicitis who underwent NE-LDCT and CE-SDCT. The CT examinations were interpreted and recorded on a five-point scale independently by three attending radiologists and three residents with 4, 1 and 1 years of training. Diagnostic performance for acute appendicitis of all readers on both examinations was represented by area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Inter-observer and intra-observer AUC values were compared using Jackknife FROC software on both modalities. The diagnostic accuracy of each reader on NE-LDCT was compared with body mass index (BMI) subgroups and noise using independent T test. Results Diagnostic performances for acute appendicitis were not statistically different for attending radiologists at both examinations. Better performance was noted on the CE-SDCT with a borderline significant difference (P = 0.05) for senior radiology resident. No statistical difference of AUC values was observed between attending radiologists and fourth year resident on both examinations. Statistically significant differences of AUC values were observed between attending radiologists and first year residents (P = 0.001 ~ 0.018) on NE-LDCT. Diagnostic accuracies of acute appendicitis on NE-LDCT for each reader were not significantly

  5. Case-based discussion: an unusual manifestation of diaphragmatic hernia mimicking pneumothorax in an adult male.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Pradeep Kumar; Godbole, Chintamani; Bindroo, Susheel Kumar; Mathur, Rajiv S; Akula, Bharathi; Doctor, Nilesh

    2016-12-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is an important cause of emergency hospital admission associated with significant morbidity. It usually results from congenital defect or rupture in the diaphragm due to trauma. Prompt and appropriate diagnosis is necessary in patients with this condition, as surgical intervention by either abdominal or thoracic approach may be necessary. Here, we report a case of left-sided diaphragmatic hernia presenting with sudden onset of breathlessness, respiratory distress and left-sided chest pain radiating to the abdomen, mimicking pneumothorax, treated successfully with surgical intervention.

  6. Sexual pain.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Lori A; Stockdale, Colleen K

    2009-12-01

    Sexual pain is an underrecognized and poorly treated constellation of disorders that significantly impact affected women and their partners. Recognized as a form of chronic pain, sexual pain disorders are heterogeneous and include dyspareunia (superficial and deep), vaginismus, vulvodynia, vestibulitis, and noncoital sexual pain disorder. Women too often tolerate pain in the belief that this will meet their partners' needs. This article provides a review of the terminology and definition of the condition, theories on the pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, and recommendations on the management of female sexual pain.

  7. Fishbone perforation through a Meckel's diverticulum: a rare laparoscopic diagnosis in acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Christensen, H

    1999-08-01

    The use of diagnostic laparoscopy in acute abdominal pain, especially when patients have been admitted for acute pain in the lower abdominal quadrants, improves the accuracy of diagnosis and leads to improvements in treatment procedures. A case is reported of a 24-year-old woman admitted under suspicion of appendicitis. The appendix was found to be normal, and a perforation caused by a fishbone was discovered in a Meckel's diverticulum. The diverticulum was resected by a combined laparoscopic and open procedure. Diagnostic laparoscopy should be performed routinely in cases of acute abdominal pain in the lower quadrants of suspected appendiceal origin to avoid overlooking other causes of the symptoms.

  8. Can serum interleukin-6 levels predict the outcome of patients with right iliac fossa pain?

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, A. T.; Swift, R. I.; Bartlett, M. J.; Fernando, B. S.; Chadwick, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    In patients with right iliac fossa (RIF) pain it can be difficult to distinguish between appendicitis and nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP). In this study we sought to determine whether serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels, an early marker of acute inflammation, taken at the time of admission could predict the outcome of patients admitted with RIF pain. Data were collected in a prospective manner on 53 consecutive patients (23 male, 30 female), mean age 22.1 years (range 10-79 years). Nineteen (36%) patients underwent surgery, of whom 16 had appendicitis (histologically proven). The mean (SEM) IL-6 levels (pg/ml) in patients undergoing operation vs those receiving non-operative management were 270.8 (106.3) vs 265.0 (80.4) (P = NS). The mean white blood cell (WBC) counts (x10(9)/l) in these patients were 14.28 (0.81) vs 9.66 (0.67), respectively (P = 0.0002). When patients with a confirmed diagnosis of appendicitis were compared with patients with a diagnosis of NSAP, the IL-6 levels were 149.4 (69.1) vs 363.6 (113.2), respectively (P = NS). In the same groups of patients, the WBC counts were 14.21 (0.81) vs 9.51 (0.68) (P = 0.004). We conclude that IL-6 levels taken at the time of admission are not useful in predicting the outcome of RIF pain. PMID:9135242

  9. Can serum interleukin-6 levels predict the outcome of patients with right iliac fossa pain?

    PubMed

    Goodwin, A T; Swift, R I; Bartlett, M J; Fernando, B S; Chadwick, S J

    1997-03-01

    In patients with right iliac fossa (RIF) pain it can be difficult to distinguish between appendicitis and nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP). In this study we sought to determine whether serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels, an early marker of acute inflammation, taken at the time of admission could predict the outcome of patients admitted with RIF pain. Data were collected in a prospective manner on 53 consecutive patients (23 male, 30 female), mean age 22.1 years (range 10-79 years). Nineteen (36%) patients underwent surgery, of whom 16 had appendicitis (histologically proven). The mean (SEM) IL-6 levels (pg/ml) in patients undergoing operation vs those receiving non-operative management were 270.8 (106.3) vs 265.0 (80.4) (P = NS). The mean white blood cell (WBC) counts (x10(9)/l) in these patients were 14.28 (0.81) vs 9.66 (0.67), respectively (P = 0.0002). When patients with a confirmed diagnosis of appendicitis were compared with patients with a diagnosis of NSAP, the IL-6 levels were 149.4 (69.1) vs 363.6 (113.2), respectively (P = NS). In the same groups of patients, the WBC counts were 14.21 (0.81) vs 9.51 (0.68) (P = 0.004). We conclude that IL-6 levels taken at the time of admission are not useful in predicting the outcome of RIF pain.

  10. Idiopathic Transverse Myelitis Mimicking an Intramedullary Spinal Cord Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Fanous, Andrew A.; Olszewski, Nathan P.; Lipinski, Lindsay J.; Qiu, Jingxin

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnoses for spinal cord lesions include spinal tumors and inflammatory processes. The distinction between these pathologies can be difficult if solely based on imaging. We report for the first time to our knowledge a case of idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM) mimicking a discrete cervical spinal lesion in a 66-year-old man who presented with gait instability and neck pain. The patient's symptoms failed to resolve after an initial course of steroid therapy. Surgical biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of ITM. Subsequent treatment with dexamethasone resulted in complete resolution of the symptoms as well as the intramedullary enhancement. ITM is most common in the cervical and thoracic spine, spanning 3-4 spinal segments. It usually occupies more than 50% of the cross-sectional area of the spinal cord and tends to be central, uniform, and symmetric. It exhibits patchy and peripheral contrast enhancement. These criteria are useful guidelines that help distinguish ITM from neoplastic spinal lesions. A decision to perform biopsy must take into consideration the patient's clinical symptoms, the rate of progression of neurological deficits, and the imaging characteristics of the lesion. Surgical biopsy for questionable lesions should be reserved for patients with progressive neurological deficits refractory to empirical medical therapy. PMID:27672469

  11. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... acupuncture, chiropractic care, massage or other manual therapies, yoga, herbal and nutritional therapies, or others. This information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of treatment. The goals of the comprehensive pain ...

  12. Anal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... change in bowel habit or rectal bleeding. A hemorrhoid that develops quickly or is particularly painful may ... your doctor. The blood clot of a thrombosed hemorrhoid, although painful, can't break loose and travel, ...

  13. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific points on the body. Some people with low back pain report that acupuncture helps relieve their symptoms. Massage. ... Accessed May 29, 2015. Adult acute and subacute low back pain. Bloomington, Minn.: Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. http:// ...

  14. Period Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may also have other symptoms, such as lower back pain, nausea, diarrhea, and headaches. Period pain is not ... Taking a hot bath Doing relaxation techniques, including yoga and meditation You might also try taking over- ...

  15. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  16. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  17. Breast Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... before your period and sometimes continuing through your menstrual cycle. The pain may be moderate or severe, and ... breasts. Throughout the month, not related to your menstrual cycle. Postmenopausal women sometimes have breast pain, but breast ...

  18. Hip Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... clues about the underlying cause. Problems within the hip joint itself tend to result in pain on the ... tendons and other soft tissues that surround your hip joint. Hip pain can sometimes be caused by diseases ...

  19. Faecal retention: a common cause in functional bowel disorders, appendicitis and haemorrhoids--with medical and surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Raahave, Dennis

    2015-03-01

    The present studies explored whether faecal retention in the colon is a causative factor in functional bowel disease, appendicitis, and haemorrhoids. Faecal retention was characterized by colon transit time (CTT) after radio-opaque marker ingestion and estimation of faecal loading on abdominal radiographs at 48 h and 96 h. Specific hypotheses were tested in patients (n = 251 plus 281) and in healthy random controls (n = 44). A questionnaire was completed for each patient, covering abdominal and anorectal symptoms and without a priori grouping. Patients with functional bowel disorders, predominantly women, had a significantly increased CTT and faecal load compared to controls. The CTT was significantly and positively correlated with segmental and total faecal loading. The faecal load was equal at 48 h and 96 h, mirroring the presence of permanent faecal reservoirs. In these first clinical studies to correlate bowel symptoms with CTT and colon faecal loading, abdominal bloating was significantly correlated with faecal loading in the right colon, total faecal load, and CTT. Abdominal pain was significantly and positively correlated to distal faecal loading and significantly associated with bloating. A new phenomenon with a high faecal load and a normal CTT was observed in a subset of patients (n = 90), proving faecal retention as hidden constipation. The CTT and faecal load were significantly higher in the right-side compared to the left and distal segments. Within the control group of healthy persons, the right-sided faecal load was significantly greater than the left and distal load. The CTT and faecal load significantly positively correlated with a palpable mass in the left iliac fossa and meteorism. Cluster analysis revealed that CTT and faecal load positively correlated with a symptom factor consisting of bloating, proctalgia and infrequent defecation of solid faeces. On the other hand, CTT and faecal load negatively correlated with a symptom factor comprising

  20. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain.

  1. [Facial and eye pain - Neurological differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kastrup, O; Diener, H-C; Gaul, C

    2011-12-01

    Head and facial pain are common in neurological practice and the pain often arises in the orbit or is referred into the eye. This is due to the autonomic innervation of the eye and orbit. There are acute and chronic pain syndromes. This review gives an overview of the differential diagnosis and treatment. Idiopathic headache syndromes, such as migraine and cluster headache are the most frequent and are often debilitating conditions. Trigemino-autonomic cephalalgias (SUNCT and SUNA) have to be taken into account, as well as trigeminal neuralgia. Trigemino-autonomic headache after eye operations can be puzzling and often responds well to triptans. Every new facial pain not fitting these categories must be considered symptomatic and a thorough investigation is mandatory including magnetic resonance imaging. Infiltrative and neoplastic conditions frequently lead to orbital pain. As a differential diagnosis Tolosa-Hunt syndrome and Raeder syndrome are inflammatory conditions sometimes mimicking neoplasms. Infections, such as herpes zoster ophthalmicus are extremely painful and require rapid therapy. It is important to consider carotid artery dissection as a cause for acute eye and neck pain in conjunction with Horner's syndrome and bear in mind that vascular oculomotor palsy is often painful. All of the above named conditions should be diagnosed by a neurologist with special experience in pain syndromes and many require an interdisciplinary approach.

  2. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Has a Close Association With Gangrenous Appendicitis in Patients Undergoing Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuka, Mitsuru; Shimizu, Takayuki; Kubota, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the clinical features most closely associated with gangrenous appendicitis. From among 314 patients who had undergone open appendectomy in our collected database, 222 for whom sufficient data were evaluable were enrolled. The results of univariate analysis revealed that age (≤40/>40 years), sex (female/male), fever (≤37°/>37°C), the serum levels of C-reactive protein and albumin, the Glasgow prognostic score (0, 1/2), and the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (≤8/>8) were associated with gangrenous appendicitis. Among these 7 clinical features, multivariate analysis disclosed that age (≤40/>40 years) (odds ratio, 3.435; 95% confidence interval 1.744–6.766; P < 0.001) and NLR (≤8/>8) (odds ratio, 3.016; 95% confidence interval 1.535–5.926; P  =  0.001) were associated with gangrenous appendicitis. The sensitivity and specificity of these two clinical features were 65% and 27%, and 73% and 39%, respectively. NLR (>8) shows a significant association with gangrenous appendicitis in patients undergoing appendectomy. PMID:23294069

  3. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio has a close association with gangrenous appendicitis in patients undergoing appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Mitsuru; Shimizu, Takayuki; Kubota, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the clinical features most closely associated with gangrenous appendicitis. From among 314 patients who had undergone open appendectomy in our collected database, 222 for whom sufficient data were evaluable were enrolled. The results of univariate analysis revealed that age (≤40/>40 years), sex (female/male), fever (≤37°/>37°C), the serum levels of C-reactive protein and albumin, the Glasgow prognostic score (0, 1/2), and the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) (≤8/>8) were associated with gangrenous appendicitis. Among these 7 clinical features, multivariate analysis disclosed that age (≤40/>40 years) (odds ratio, 3.435; 95% confidence interval 1.744-6.766; P < 0.001) and NLR (≤8/>8) (odds ratio, 3.016; 95% confidence interval 1.535-5.926; P = 0.001) were associated with gangrenous appendicitis. The sensitivity and specificity of these two clinical features were 65% and 27%, and 73% and 39%, respectively. NLR (>8) shows a significant association with gangrenous appendicitis in patients undergoing appendectomy.

  4. Acute appendicitis due to Cytomegalovirus in an apparently immunocompetent patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In healthy subjects, Cytomegalovirus infection can be asymptomatic or manifest as mononucleosis syndrome, but organ disease has also been reported. However, in immunocompromised patients this infection can lead to its most significant and severe disease and even mortality. When Cytomegalovirus causes a gastrointestinal tract infection, it more commonly manifests with luminal tract disease and is usually characterized by ulcerative lesions. Appendicitis is a rare manifestation, and has been reported mainly in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients or patients with other causes of immunocompromise. Case presentation The authors report on a case of acute primary Cytomegalovirus infection complicated with acute appendicitis due to Cytomegalovirus in an apparently immunocompetent 24-year-old Caucasian man also suffering from primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis. Diagnosis was based on clinical manifestations, serology results, as well as microbiological and histological findings. Treatment consisted of surgery and anti-Cytomegalovirus therapy. Conclusions Cytomegalovirus should be included among the etiologic agents of acute appendicitis in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and ulcerative colitis. Currently, there are no definitive data regarding the frequency of Cytomegalovirus appendicitis and the role of anti-Cytomegalovirus treatment in human immunodeficiency virus-negative and apparently immunocompetent subjects. PMID:24612821

  5. Congenital absence of appendix: A Surgeon's dilemma during surgery for acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Bikasha Bihary

    2016-01-01

    Congenital absence of the vermiform appendix is very rare in human beings with a reported incidence of 1 in 100,000 cases. Here, we report an incidence of a surgeon's dilemma to detect such a rare finding during surgery for a diagnosed case of acute appendicitis. PMID:27695217

  6. A rare cause of acute abdomen in adults: Parasitic infection-related acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Küpeli, Aydın Hakan; Özdemir, Murat; Topuz, Sezgin; Sözütek, Alper; Paksoy, Tuğba

    2015-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is a common parasitic disease all over the world, especially in less developed countries. Acute appendicitis related to parasitic infection is a rare condition. Parasitic infections should be kept in mind in patients who are admitted to the emergency department with acute abdomen, especially in endemic areas.

  7. Acute Appendicitis as Complication of Colon Transit Time Study; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghahramani, Leila; Roshanravan, Reza; Khodaei, Shahin; Rahimi Kazerooni, Salar; Moslemi, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Colon transit time study with radio opaque markers is a simple method for assessment of colon motility disorder in patients with chronic idiopathic constipation. We report a case of acute appendicitis that was induced by impaction of radio opaque markers after colon transit time study. We think that this case report is first significant complication of colon transit time study until now PMID:26396723

  8. Effect of surgeon’s judgement on the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Hasbahçeci, Mustafa; Erol, Cengiz; Törü, Mustafa; Şeker, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The accuracy of a surgeon’s judgement still remains to be controversial in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, which is a diagnosis usually based on laboratory data and imaging tests. Material and Methods: Patients with a possible diagnosis of acute appendicitis were reviewed retrospectively with regard to demographic variables, laboratory and imaging results, and treatment modalities. Results: There were 128 patients with a mean age of 31.2±14 years. The mean white blood cell count and the proportion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes were 11403±4669/mm3 and 75±11%, respectively. Appendectomy was performed on 66 (51.6%) patients. Conservative management was applied to 62 (48.4%) patients. Statistical analysis showed that patients with appendicitis have a higher white blood cell count (p=0.015) and a higher proportion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (p=0.023). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy rates were 84.6%, 63.7% and 74.3% for ultrasound and 100%, 86.7% and 92.2% for computed tomography, respectively. Conclusion: Diagnosis based on patients’ laboratory and imaging data, in combination with, the surgeon’s judgement appears to yield the best outcomes in patients with suspicion of acute appendicitis. PMID:25931886

  9. Appendicitis in Cancer Patients Is Often Observed and Can Represent Appendiceal Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Santos, David; Chiang, Yi-Ju; Badgwell, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Appendectomy is standard of care for uncomplicated appendicitis, but cancer patients may not be optimal surgical candidates. Interval appendectomy is controversial, and appendiceal malignancy is rare. Study objectives were to review the role of surgery, observation, and interventional radiology (IR)-guided drainage in patients with appendicitis and advanced malignancy. Retrospective review was performed on cancer patients presenting to a tertiary academic cancer center from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2014. Patients diagnosed with appendicitis were assigned to observation, surgery, and IR drainage after surgical evaluation. Success rates of initial treatment strategies were calculated. Rates of interval appendectomies and pathology were reviewed. Of 72 consults, 32 patients were included. Median age was 53 years, 50 per cent (16/32) were male, 50 per cent (16/32) had chemotherapy less than six weeks to presentation, and 63 per cent (20/32) had advanced stage malignancy. Of the 62.5 per cent (20/32) observed, 25 per cent (8/32) received immediate surgery, 12.5 per cent (4/32) required IR drainage, and 69 per cent (22/32) of patients were initially managed without surgery. Interval appendectomy rate was 19 per cent (6/32). Pathology confirmed appendiceal malignancies in 9.3 per cent (3/32). Cancer patients with acute appendicitis are frequently observed. High incidence of appendiceal malignancy may be due to the older median age. Interval appendectomy should be considered in this population.

  10. How to improve the clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis in resource limited settings.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    This article is a general review of the diagnostic tools that the clinician can use for the early diagnosis of acute appendicitis with emphasis on the Alvarado Score, and it is aimed principally to the medical practitioners in different parts of the world where the diagnostic facilities and technological resources are limited.

  11. Burkitt’s lymphoma masquerading as appendicitis – two case reports and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Two cases of Burkitt’s lymphoma masquerading as appendicitis are reported herein. The diagnoses were made post-operatively from the appendix specimen in one case and from an ileocecal resection specimen for cecal fistula complicating an appendicectomy in the second case. These cases highlight the importance of routine histological examination of appendicectomy specimens. PMID:24942062

  12. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease mimicking lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the features and clinical implications of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy (PCNB) in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease manifesting as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. Among a cohort of 388 patients with NTM pulmonary disease, 14 patients with clinically and radiologically suspected lung cancer were included in our study. Two chest radiologists evaluated CT features, including lesion type (nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation), morphologic features (margin, degree of enhancement, calcification), and presence of accompanying findings suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease (bronchiectasis with clustered centrilobular nodules or upper-lobe cavitary lesions) by consensus. Diagnostic procedures for microbiologic diagnosis of NTM disease and clinical outcome were reviewed. Incidence of NTM pulmonary disease presenting as solitary nodule/mass (n = 8) or mass-like consolidation (n = 6) was 3.6% (14 of 388). Most lesions were detected incidentally during routine health check-up or evaluation of other disease (11 of 14, 79%). Lesions typically showed poor contrast-enhancement (9 of 12) and internal calcification (6 of 14). No lesions had CT features suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease. All 4 lesions for which PET/CT imaging was performed showed strong fluorodeoxyglucose uptake simulating malignant lesions (mean, 4.9; range, 3.6–7.8). PCNB revealed mycobacterial histology in 6 of 11 specimens and positive culture results were obtained for 7 of 7 specimens. NTM pulmonary disease may present as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. CT features and PCNB are important to diagnose NTM disease mimicking lung cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:27367996

  13. Intradural Extramedullary Tuberculoma Mimicking En Plaque Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Dae Moo; Kim, Tae Kyun; Chae, Soo Uk

    2010-01-01

    A 24-year-old man with tuberculosis meningitis developed acute paraplegia and sensory disturbances 5 weeks after receiving conventional antituberculous therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural extramedullary long segmental mass mimicking en plaque meningioma at the T2-T6 vertebrae levels. Prompt surgical decompression was performed. A histology examination of the mass revealed a tuberculoma. After surgery, the patient showed improved motor power and a normal bladder function. Intradural extramedullary tuberculoma of the spinal cord is rare complication of tuberculosis meningitis, which can occur as a response to conventional antituberculous therapy. PMID:21119945

  14. Chondroblastoma of the acromion mimicking fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Gebert, Carsten; Hardes, Jendrik; Streitbürger, Arne; Vieth, Volker; Bürger, Horst; Winkelmann, Winfried; Gosheger, Georg

    2004-12-01

    The authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with an expansive osteolytic lesion in the right acromion, mimicking cystic fibrous dysplasia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a lesion with intermediate-signal intensity on T1-weighted images and a high-signal intensity on fat suppressed T2-weighted images. The biopsy led to the diagnosis of chondroblastoma. This tumour is rare in flat bones, and may mimic other benign or malignant lesions. It is therefore essential to perform a biopsy in order to obtain a definite diagnosis. The acromion was excised, and replaced with an iliac crest graft.

  15. Post-pancreatitis Fat Necrosis Mimicking Carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua P; Arnoletti, J Pablo; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Morgan, Desiree E

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis can result in retroperitoneal fat necrosis, typically occurring in the peripancreatic region, with extension into the transverse mesocolon, omentum and mesenteric root. When evaluated with contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT), acute peripancreatic post necrotic collections typically become lower in attenuation over time, and often appear as homogeneous fluid collections. Saponification as a complication of fat necrosis in patients with acute pancreatitis is a well recognized clinical entity. While retroperitonal fat necrosis is commonly seen on CECT, saponification is not a prominent imaging feature. We present a case of acute pancreatitis complicated by extensive saponification of fat throughout the retroperitoneum and peritoneal lining, mimicking carcinomatosis.

  16. Thymic Langerhans cell histiocytosis mimicking lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yağci, Begül; Varan, Ali; Uner, Aysegül; Akyüz, Canan; Büyükpamukçu, Münevver

    2008-12-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by clonal expansion of antigen presenting Langerhans cells. Different clinical features can be seen according to the involved organs and systems. Multisystem disease with organ dysfunction is more common in infants, whereas single system disease is usually observed in older children. The disease can affect any system or organ throughout the body. Thymus is a rarely involvement site reported in LCH and usually is accompanied by skin, bone or lung disease. Here we report a 12-year-old male with thymic involvement by LCH clinically mimicking lymphoma.

  17. Brucellosis in spondyloarthritis mimicking an exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Garip, Y; Eser, F; Erten, S; Yilmaz, O; Yildirim, P

    2014-01-01

    Spondyloarthritis are a group of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect the axial skeleton, entheses and peripheral joints and may have extraarticular manifestations such as uveitis, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease. Brucellosis is a systemic infectious disease, endemic in Middle East, Latin America, and Mediterranean countries, which may present manifestations that resemble other diseases posing serious problems of differential diagnosis. Some hallmarks of Brucellosis may mimic a spondyloarthritis flare. In this paper, authors present a clinical case of brucellosis occurring in a patient with spondyloarthritis. Clinical symptoms initially mimicked exacerbation of spondyloarthritis.

  18. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  19. A Pain in the Psoas.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Charlotte M H; Baker, Robert J

    General medical conditions are an important part of the differential diagnosis in athletes presenting with pain or injury. A psoas abscess is a collection of pus in the iliopsoas muscle compartment and is a rare cause of hip, low back, or groin pain. Psoas abscesses may have significant morbidity and mortality, as 20% progress to septic shock. Presenting symptoms are generally nonspecific and the onset may be subacute. Clinical presentation may have features suggestive of other diagnoses, including septic hip arthritis, iliopsoas bursitis, and retrocecal appendicitis. Proper diagnosis and management is critical to prevent complications of septic shock and death. In this unique case, a 19-year-old Division 1 collegiate football player presented to the emergency department 4 days following injury to his right groin during football practice. He complained of severe right groin pain accompanied by fatigue, fevers, nausea, and diarrhea. He later developed septic shock with multisystem organ dysfunction, requiring advanced life support. Imaging revealed an abscess located in the right iliopsoas compartment. After proper treatment, the athlete eventually made a complete recovery, returning to collegiate football 4 months postinjury. A literature review found no described cases of psoas abscess related to athletes with acute hip flexor strain. This athlete had no known risk factors for psoas abscess. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a broad differential in an athlete presenting with pain after injury. Making the diagnosis of psoas abscess often requires a high degree of suspicion and timely acquisition of imaging studies. In this particular case, imaging was key to making a proper diagnosis and tailoring treatment not only to return him to sport but also to save his life.

  20. Patients with Clinical Acute Appendicitis Should have Pre-operative Full Blood Count and C-Reactive Protein Assays

    PubMed Central

    Birchley, D

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The role of inflammatory markers in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis has not been clearly defined. The aims of this prospective audit were to define the role of the serum markers of inflammation total white cell count, neutrophil count and C-reactive protein in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis with particular reference to the discrimination between uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis, and the prediction of abscess. PATIENTS AND METHODS The author compiled a prospective database over a 13-month period of all appendicectomies performed. After five exclusions (three having no notes for review and two having confounding second morbidity in the presence of a normal appendix), the data relating to 75 patients were analysed. RESULTS In patients judged on clinical grounds to require laparotomy for suspected acute appendicitis, white cell count and neutrophil count distinguish acute appendicitis from normal appendices when used as categorical variables, though they do not reflect the presence of abscess. C-reactive protein neither distinguishes appendicitis from normal, nor predicts abscess when used as a categorical variable, though higher levels suggest abscess. CONCLUSIONS Laboratory tests of the white cell count, neutrophil count and C-reactive protein are more effective in supporting a clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis in patients with typical clinical features than in excluding the diagnosis. PMID:16460636

  1. Origin of chronic right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Kingham, J G; Dawson, A M

    1985-08-01

    We have studied 22 consecutive patients referred for investigation of severe chronic right upper quadrant pain. The majority were women whose symptoms had been present for many years. All had undergone repeated investigations of the pancreatico-biliary, gastro-intestinal, urinary, and even gynaecological systems without a satisfactory diagnosis. Most had undergone at least one abdominal operation in an unsuccessful attempt to cure their pain. In 21 of 22 patients the customary pain was completely and reproducibly mimicked by balloon distension of the small or large intestine in at least one site. The trigger sites were jejunum (15), ileum (12), right colon (nine), and duodenum (six). In 12 more than one trigger site was found. Close questioning revealed features of the irritable bowel syndrome in the majority and depression in many though the symptoms were not spontaneously volunteered. Reproduction of pain has provided a convincing demonstration to this difficult group of patients that they have a sensitive gut and allows appropriate management.

  2. Role of drains in laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis at a busy county hospital.

    PubMed

    Pakula, Andrea M; Skinner, Ruby; Jones, Amber; Chung, Ray; Martin, Maureen

    2014-10-01

    Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) has become the treatment of choice for acute appendicitis with equal or better outcomes than traditional open appendectomy (OA). LA in patients with a gangrenous or perforated appendicitis carries increased rate of pelvic abscess formation when compared with OA. We hypothesized routine placement of pelvic drains in gangrenous or perforated appendicitis decreases pelvic abscess formation after LA. Three hundred thirty-one patients undergoing LA between January 2007 and June 2011 were reviewed. Patients with perforated or gangrenous appendicitis were included. Group I had a Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain(s) placed and Group II had no JP drain. Data included patient demographics, emergency department laboratory values and vital signs, and computed axial tomography scan findings, intra-abdominal or pelvic abscess postoperatively, interventional radiology drainage, and length of stay. Clinic follow-up notes were reviewed. One hundred forty-eight patients were identified. Forty-three patients had placement of JP drains (Group I) and 105 patients had no JP drain (Group II). Three patients (three of 43 [6%]) in Group I developed pelvic abscess and 21 of 105 (20%) patients in Group II developed pelvic abscesses requiring subsequent drainage. This was statistically significant. Patient demographics, temperature, and mean white blood count before surgery were similar. Presurgery computed tomography (CT) with appendicolith and CT with abscess were more prevalent in Group I. The use of JP drainage in patients with perforated or gangrenous appendicitis during LA has decreased rates of pelvic abscess. This was demonstrated despite the drain group having appendicolith or abscess on preoperative CT.

  3. Appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip in the management of complicated acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Closure of appendicular stump has been performed in different ways; however, the use of the metal endoclip in complicated grades of acute appendicitis, has not been evaluated yet in a prospective way. Objective To establish the effectiveness of appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip for complicated appendicitis. Method From January 2009 to January 2011 were evaluated 131 consecutive patients who underwent a laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated acute appendicitis. From those, 118 underwent appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip. The patient’s age ranged from 12 to 75 years old (31.7 ± 13.3) and 52.7% were male. Complicated appendicitis refers to gangrenous and/or perforated appendix, which may lead to abscess formation and degrees of peritonitis. The outcomes viability, operative time, infection complication, operative complications, and conversion rate were chosen to evaluate the procedure. Results The appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip was used in 90% of cases. The presence of appendix base necrosis was the most important factor involved in failure of the procedure. Laparoscopic knot (1.5%), laparoscopic endo-suture (3.8%) and video assisted laparotomy (4.7%) were the alternatives used in difficult cases. The mean operative time was (67.54 ± 28.13 minutes). The wound and intra-abdominal infection rates were 2.54% and 5.08%, respectively. There were no operative complications and the conversion rate was 0.85%. Conclusion The appendiceal stump closure by metal endoclip, in complicated grades of acute appendicitis, is a safe and effective procedure. In patients with appendix base necrosis it should be avoided in favor of other alternatives. PMID:24047531

  4. Lessons Learned With Laparoscopic Management of Complicated Grades of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Junior, Cleber Soares; Costa, Evandro de Freitas Campos; Alves, Paula de Assis Pereira; de Faria, Carolina Vieira; Cangussu, Igor Vitoi; Costa, Luisa Pires; Gomes, Camila Couto; Gomes, Felipe Couto

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopy has not been consolidated as the approach of first choice in the management of complicated appendicitis. Methodological flaws and absence of disease stratification criteria have been implicated in that less evidence. The objective is to study the safe and effectiveness of laparoscopy in the management of complicated appendicitis according to laparoscopic grading system. Method From January 2008 to January 2011, 154 consecutive patients who underwent a laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis were evaluated in the prospective way. The patient’s age ranged from 12 to 75 years old (31.7 ± 13.3) and 58.3% were male. Complicated appendicitis refers to gangrenous and/or perforated appendix and were graded as 3A (segmental necrosis), 3B (base necrosis), 4A (abscess), 4B (regional peritonitis) and 5 (diffuse peritonitis). The outcomes including operative time, infection complication, operative complications and conversion rate were chosen to evaluate the procedure. Results The grade 3A was the most frequent with 50 (32.4%) patients. The mean operative time was 69.4 ± 26.3 minutes. The grade 4A showed the highest mean operative time (80.1 ± 26.7 minutes). The wound and intra-abdominal infection rates were 2.6 and 4.6%, respectively. The base necrosis was the most important factor associated with the conversion (5.2%). The grades 4A and 5 were associated with greater possibility of intra-abdominal collection. There were no operative complications. Conclusion The laparoscopic management of all complicated grades of acute appendicitis is safe and effective and should be the procedure of first choice. The laparoscopic grading system allows us to assess patients in the same disease stage. PMID:24883151

  5. Total Leucocyte Count, C-reactive Protein and Neutrophil Count: Diagnostic Aid in Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Shafi, Sheikh Muzamil; Afsheen, Misbha; Reshi, Farooq A.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aim: Acute appendicitis is one of the most common acute intraabdominal affections seen in surgical departments, which can be treated easily if an accurate diagnosis is made in time. Otherwise, delay in diagnosis and treatment can lead to diffuse peritonitis. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted on 110 patients who were operated for acute appendicitis to determine the role and predictive value of the total leucocyte count (TLC), C-reactive protein (CRP) and percentage of neutrophil count in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Preoperative TLC, CRP and percentage of neutrophil count were determined and were compared with the results of the histopathology of the removed appendix. Results: Of all the patients studied, 92 had histopathologically positive appendicitis. The TLC was found to be significantly high in 90 patients who proved to have acute appendicitis, whereas CRP was high in only 88 patients and neutrophil percentage was raised in 91; four had a normal CRP level. Thus, TLC had a sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of 97.82%, 55.55% and 91.8%, respectively. CRP had a sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of 95.6%, 77.77% and 95.6% respectively. Percentage of neutrophil count had a sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of 98.9%, 38.88% and 89.21%, respectively. When used in combination, there was a marked improvement in the specificity and the positive predictive value to 88.04% and 98.7%, respectively. Conclusion: The inflammatory markers, i.e., TLC, CRP and neutrophil count can be helpful in the diagnosis when measured together as this increases their specificity and positive predictive value. PMID:19568576

  6. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... myhealthfinder Immunization Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-termJust about everyone has had a " ... time or another. But sudden severe abdominal pain (stomach pain), also called acute pain, shouldn't be ...

  7. Appendiceal Crohn’s disease clinically presenting as acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hulin; Kim, Hyunsung; Rehman, Abdul; Jang, Se Min; Paik, Seung Sam

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the incidence of appendiceal Crohn’s disease (CD) and to summarize the characteristic histologic features of appendiceal CD. METHODS: We reviewed the pathology files of 2179 appendectomy specimens from January 2007 to May 2013. The computer-assisted retrieval search facility was utilized to collect specimens. We selected those cases that were diagnosed as CD or chronic granulomatous inflammation and defined the final diagnosis according to the histologic findings of CD, including transmural lymphocytic inflammation, non-caseating epithelioid granulomas, thickening of the appendiceal wall secondary to hypertrophy of muscularis mucosa, mucosal ulceration with crypt abscesses, mucosal fissures, and fistula formation. RESULTS: We found 12 cases (7 male and 5 female patients, with an average age of 29.8 years) of appendiceal CD. The incidence of appendiceal CD was 0.55%. The chief complaints were right lower quadrant pain, abdominal pain, lower abdominal pain, and diarrhea. The duration of symptom varied from 2 d to 5 mo. The histologic review revealed appendiceal wall thickening in 11 cases (92%), transmural inflammation in all cases (100%), lymphoid aggregates in all cases (100%), epithelioid granulomas in all cases (100%), mucosal ulceration in 11 cases (92%), crypt abscesses in 5 cases (42%), perforation in 2 cases (17%), muscular hypertrophy in 1 case (8%), neural hyperplasia in 5 cases (42%), and perpendicular serosal fibrosis in 8 cases (67%). CONCLUSION: A typical and protracted clinical course, unusual gross features of the appendix and the characteristic histologic features are a clue in the diagnosis of appendiceal CD. PMID:25516865

  8. Mimicking turf-toe: myofasopathy of the first dorsal interosseous muscle treated with ART®

    PubMed Central

    Pajaczkowski, Jason A

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To present the diagnostic features and response to treatment of an unreported clinical entity, first dorsal interosseous myofasopathy mimicking turf-toe. Clinical features: The salient features include an insidious onset of pain in the first MTP joint which compromises forceful propulsion in the absence of ecchymosis and joint effusion. Range of motion may be restricted in both instances, however muscular palpation and resisted manual muscle testing will reproduce the patient's complaints and isolate the first dorsal interosseous muscle as the culprit versus the fibrous plantar plate and joint capsule. Intervention and outcome: Treatment involves eliminating inflammation, reducing muscular hypertonicity, and restricting the offending activity. Active Release Technique® was utilized to remove adhesions and promote the restoration of normal tissue texture with excellent results. No other soft tissue treatment methods were implemented. Alternatively, other soft tissue techniques or modalities aimed at reducing inflammation and pain (i.e. ice, IFC, gentle stretching, etc. ...) may be useful. Conclusion: Although the etiology and epidemiology of first dorsal interosseous myofasopathy mimicking turf-toe has yet to be elucidated the clinical implications regarding misdiagnosis and treatment are extremely important to allopathic and chiropractic practitioners alike.

  9. Acute abdominal pain during an Antarctic cruise--a case report.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2012-01-01

    A 21-year-old female crew member experienced a number of medical conditions during a summer cruise to the Antarctic Peninsula. At one point symptoms and signs strongly suggested acute appendicitis. She was monitored and treated conservatively on board and recovered uneventfully without surgery. Later she had a biliary colic attack and then an allergic reaction to the pain medication given. The pre-employment medical fitness certificate cannot always be trusted regarding previous history of allergies and medical conditions.

  10. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause of ...

  11. Neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Ludman, Taylor; Bouhassira, Didier; Baron, Ralf; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Yarnitsky, David; Freeman, Roy; Truini, Andrea; Attal, Nadine; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Eccleston, Christopher; Kalso, Eija; Bennett, David L.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Raja, Srinivasa N.

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system, including peripheral fibres (Aβ, Aδ and C fibres) and central neurons, and affects 7–10% of the general population. Multiple causes of neuropathic pain have been described and its incidence is likely to increase owing to the ageing global population, increased incidence of diabetes mellitus and improved survival from cancer after chemotherapy. Indeed, imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory somatosensory signalling, alterations in ion channels and variability in the way that pain messages are modulated in the central nervous system all have been implicated in neuropathic pain. The burden of chronic neuropathic pain seems to be related to the complexity of neuropathic symptoms, poor outcomes and difficult treatment decisions. Importantly, quality of life is impaired in patients with neuropathic pain owing to increased drug prescriptions and visits to health care providers, as well as the morbidity from the pain itself and the inciting disease. Despite challenges, progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain is spurring the development of new diagnostic procedures and personalized interventions, which emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to the management of neuropathic pain. PMID:28205574

  12. Central pain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Supreet

    2014-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topic addressed in this issue is central pain, a neuropathic pain syndrome caused by a lesion in the brain or spinal cord that sensitizes one's perception of pain. It is a debilitating condition caused by various diseases such as multiple sclerosis, strokes, spinal cord injuries, or brain tumors. Varied symptoms and the use of pharmacological medicines and nonpharmacological therapies will be addressed.

  13. Appendicitis during pregnancy in a Greenlandic Inuit woman; antibiotic treatment as a bridge-to-surgery in a remote area.

    PubMed

    Dalsgaard Jensen, Trine; Penninga, Luit

    2016-05-18

    Appendicitis during pregnancy causes severe diagnostic problems, and is associated with an increase in perforation rate and morbidity compared to that in the normal population. In addition, it may cause preterm birth and fetal loss. In remote areas, appendicitis during pregnancy, besides presenting diagnostic problems, also creates treatment difficulties. In Northern Greenland, geographical distances are vast, and weather conditions can be extreme. We report a case of a Greenlandic Inuit woman who presented with appendicitis during pregnancy. The nearest hospital with surgical and anaesthetic care was located nearly 1200 km away, and, due to extreme weather conditions, she could not be transferred immediately. She was treated with intravenous antibiotic treatment, and after weather conditions had improved, she was transferred by aeroplane and underwent appendicectomy. She recovered without complications. Our case suggests that appendicitis during pregnancy may be treated with antibiotics in remote areas until surgical treatment is available.

  14. Inherited cardiomyopathies mimicking arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason D; Veinot, John P; Rutberg, Julie; Gollob, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) represents an inherited cardiomyopathy that manifests clinically with malignant ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, and less commonly heart failure. The condition is characterized by replacement of the myocardium, primarily of the right ventricle, with fibrofatty tissue. Extensive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium has been previously thought to be pathognomonic of ARVC; however, this report details two other forms of inherited cardiomyopathy, namely hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and the PRKAG2 cardiac syndrome, that were found to have significant fibrofatty myocardial replacement at pathologic examination. This report represents the first documentation of inherited cardiomyopathies mimicking ARVC and highlights the concept that other cardiac conditions can be associated with fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium.

  15. A subtle mimicker in emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Angelis, Maria Vittoria De; Giacomo, Roberta Di; Muzio, Antonio Di; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Movement disorder emergencies include any movement disorder which develops over hours to days, in which failure to appropriately diagnose and manage can result in patient morbidity or mortality. Movement disorder emergencies include acute dystonia: sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements. Acute dystonia is a serious challenge for emergency room doctors and neurologists, because of the high probability of misdiagnosis, due to the presence of several mimickers including partial seizures, meningitis, localized tetanus, serum electrolyte level abnormalities, strychnine poisoning, angioedema, malingering, catatonia, and conversion. Methods: We describe 2 examples, accompanied by videos, of acute drug-induced oro-mandibular dystonia, both subsequent to occasional haloperidol intake. Results: Management and treatment of this movement disorder are often difficult: neuroleptics withdrawal, treatment with benzodiazepines, and anticholinergics are recommended. Conclusion: Alternative treatment options are also discussed. PMID:27741141

  16. Tentorium schwannoma mimicking meningioma: an unusual location.

    PubMed

    Calişaneller, Tarkan; Ozen, Ozlem; Altinörs, Nur; Caner, Hakan

    2008-07-01

    A 60-year-old female was admitted to our clinic complaining of a long-lasting headache. Cranial magnetic resonance imagining examination of the patient revealed a 22x24 mm extra-axial, well-demarcated, mass lesion based on the left tentorium. The patient underwent a craniotomy and the tumor was totally excised with the adjacent tentorium. The histopathological examination of the tumor complied with the diagnosis of schwannoma. The rest of the clinical course was uneventful and the patient was released from the hospital without any neurological deficit. Intracranial schwannomas can rarely originate from atypical dural locations and radiological techniques are not always helpful in distinguishing tentorial schwannoma from tentorial meningioma. We presented a patient with a tentorium schwannoma mimicking meningioma and discussed the current literature.

  17. Pulmonary artery sarcoma mimicking pulmonary thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gökhan; Ciledağ, Aydin; Yüksel, Cabir; Yenigün, Bülent Mustafa; Kutlay, Hakan; Yazicıoğlu, Levent; Perçinel, Sibel; Kaya, Akin

    2011-01-01

    A 30 years old male patient was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of pulmonary thromboembolism due to thorax-computerized tomography (CT) angiography, revealing a thrombus totally occluding left main pulmonary artery. The lesion was evaluated as tumoural mass. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT revealed pathologic uptake at pulmonary artery mass. Due to localization of tumour, left pneumonectomy was performed. The pathological diagnosis revealed to be pulmonary artery sarcoma. The patient was presented because pulmonary artery sarcomas are very rare tumors and can mimick pulmonary thromboembolism. The true prevalence is underestimated as many pulmonary artery sarcomas are misdiagnosed as pulmonary thromboembolism. PET-CT may help to make a differential diagnosis.

  18. High-altitude cerebral oedema mimicking stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yanamandra, Uday; Gupta, Amul; Patyal, Sagarika; Varma, Prem Prakash

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude cerebral oedema (HACO) is the most fatal high-altitude illness seen by rural physicians practising in high-altitude areas. HACO presents clinically with cerebellar ataxia, features of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and coma. Early identification is important as delay in diagnosis can be fatal. We present two cases of HACO presenting with focal deficits mimicking stroke. The first patient presented with left-sided hemiplegia associated with the rapid deterioration in the sensorium. Neuroimaging revealed features suggestive of vasogenic oedema. The second patient presented with monoplegia of the lower limb. Neuroimaging revealed perfusion deficit in anterior cerebral artery territory. Both patients were managed with dexamethasone and they improved dramatically. Clinical picture and neuroimaging closely resembled acute ischaemic stroke in both cases. Thrombolysis in these patients would have been disastrous. Recent travel to high altitude, young age, absence of atherosclerotic risk factors and features of raised ICP concomitantly directed the diagnosis to HACO. PMID:24671373

  19. Infant botulism mimicking an acute abdomen.

    PubMed

    Pisanti, R; Vitiello, R; Formicola, S; Pisanti, A

    2009-12-01

    Botulism is the acute, flaccid paralysis caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum. In the infant, clinical symptoms are usually unspecific such as poor feeding, weak suck, feeble cry, drooling, followed by a symmetric, descending, flaccid paralysis beginning with the cranial nerve musculature. The initial symptoms of the disease are often similar to several diseases and therefore differential diagnosis is very difficult and rarely suspected by the physician. Since 2004 only 22 cases of infant botulism have been reported in Italy. Since most paediatricians are unfamiliar with the clinical manifestations of infant botulism, the diagnosis can be easily missed. Hence the disease may well be underestimated and underreported. We report a clinical case of botulism presenting initially with abdominal distention, thereby mimicking acute abdomen.

  20. Kawasaki disease mimicking a parapharyngeal abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qianyun; Luo, Rong; Gan, Jing; Zhang, Li; Qu, Yi; Mu, Dezhi

    2015-05-01

    Parapharyngeal abscess (PPA)-like lesion is a very rare manifestation of Kawasaki disease (KD). Here we report a Chinese case of KD initially mimicking PPA, which is the first one reported in Asia.A 3-year-old male patient presented with fever, drooling, and bilateral painful cervical lymphadenopathy for 3 days. Chest X-ray and echocardiogram were normal. With substantial elevation of white blood count and C-reactive protein, purulent cervical lymphadenitis was considered. Symptoms did not improve after treatment with vancomycin, and the patient further developed trismus and restricted neck movement. Neck CT revealed a 2 × 1.5 cm hypodense lesion in the right parapharyngeal space with peripheral enhancement. PPA was suspected and on the 3rd day following admission, the patient received surgical incision and drainage. One milliliter of serous fluid was drained without bacterial growth on cultures. Fever persisted after surgery. As the clinical course proceeded, additional major signs of KD gradually evolved, and on the 6th day following admission the patient completely fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for KD. Rapid clinical improvement was observed following treatment with high-dose immunoglobulin and aspirin. Due to the parapharyngeal operation, the patient was fed milk through a nasogastric tube for 15 days. His neck incision became infected but healed gradually following dressing change and antibiotic treatment. Currently he remains asymptomatic during regular follow-up and repeated echocardiograms are normal.Both pediatricians and otolaryngologists can learn from this case that KD may initially manifest as PPA. Careful observation for major signs of KD during the clinical course can help to achieve a prompt and correct diagnosis. Thus, unnecessary surgery and cardiac complications of KD may be avoided.

  1. Peritoneal tuberculosis in pregnancy mimicking advanced ovarian cancer: a plea to avoid hasty, radical and irreversible surgical decisions.

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, George H; Ntavatzikos, Anastasions; Konstantiadou, Ioanna; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Kavatha, Dimitra; Peros, George

    2009-09-01

    Tuberculous peritonitis is rare in most Western counties, and can cause significant diagnostic and therapeutic problems. A 28-year-old pregnant female presented with nausea and vomiting, right lower quadrant abdominal pain, fever and intra-abdominal fluid. During surgery for presumed complicated acute appendicitis, many small masses (considered to be 'implants') were found within the peritoneal cavity, with a larger mass in the pelvis, mainly on the right. The clinical intra-operative diagnosis was advanced ovarian cancer and multiple biopsies were taken. The histological diagnosis was peritoneal tuberculosis. The patient was successfully treated conservatively. Hasty decisions to undertake radical and irreversible surgery should be avoided; this type of surgery should be performed only after histological confirmation.

  2. [Facial pain].

    PubMed

    Makhinov, K A; Barinov, A N; Zhestikova, M G; Mingazova, L R; Parkhomenko, E V

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of facial pain is a problem for physicians of different specialties (neurologists, dentists, surgeons, oculists, otolaryngologists and psychiatrists). A classification of this pathology is far from ideal and an interdisciplinary comprehensive approach is needed. Current approaches to etiotropic, symptomatic and pathogenetic treatment of patients with most frequent variants of orofacial pain are presented.

  3. [Heel pain].

    PubMed

    Cizmár, I; Svizenská, I; Pilný, J; Repko, M; Ira, D

    2005-01-01

    Heel pain is quite frequent clinical symptom in our population. Successful therapy derives from the problem aetiology. The most frequent source of pain is the mechanical basis, both on dorsal and plantar side of calcaneum. Therapy includes a variety of procedures, from routine measures to surgical intervention.

  4. High mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB-1) as a new diagnostic marker in patients with acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this prospective study was therefore to evaluate the diagnostic value of preoperative serum High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) levels in patients with Acute Appendicitis (AA) who show normal white blood cell count (WBC) counts. Method Our study was carried out from October 2010 through November 2010 and included 20 healthy control group participants and 60 patients who presented at the emergency department of Erzurum Training and Research Hospital in Turkey with acute abdominal pain complaints, who were pathologically diagnosed with AA after laparotomy, and who agreed to participate in the study. Results Of the 60 patients who underwent appendectomies, 36 were male and 24 were female, and of the healthy group, 12 were male and 8 female. The age averages of the patients in Groups 1, 2 and 3 were, respectively, 31.3+15.4, 34.0+16.3 and 31.0+13.1 years. The WBC averages of Groups 1, 2 and 3 were, respectively, 7.41+2.02 (x109/L), 15.71+2.85 (x109/L) and 8.51+1.84 (x109/L). The HMGB-1 levels for Groups 1 (healthy persons), 2 (AA patients with high WBC counts ) and 3 (AA patients with normal WBC counts) were, respectively, 21.71 ± 11.36, 37.28+13.37 and 36.5 ± 17.73 ng/ml. The average HMGB-1 level of the patients with AA was 36.92 ± 15.43 ng/ml while the average HMGB-1 value of the healthy group was 21.71 ± 11.36 ng/ml. Conclusion The significantly higher levels of HMGB-1 in AA patients compared to healthy persons infer that HMGB-1 might be useful in the diagnosis of AA. Use of HMGB-1, especially in patients with normal WBC counts, will reduce the number of unnecessary explorations. PMID:21507210

  5. Pylephlebitis with Liver Abscess Secondary to Chronic Appendicitis: A Radiological Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Santosh, Divya; Low, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Septic thrombophlebitis of the portal vein and/or its intra-hepatic branches (pylephlebitis) with associated liver abscess formation is a rare and potentially fatal complication of intra-abdominal infection. We present such a case that was caused by missed chronic appendicitis. Imaging findings can be complex and mimic other diseases leading to a diagnostic conundrum. Radiologists need to be knowledgeable of this challenging condition to prevent misdiagnosis and because prompt treatment is often life-saving. PMID:27833779

  6. Diagnostic accuracy at several reduced radiation dose levels for CT imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun; Jude, Matilda; Zaragoza, Edward; Lee, Margaret; Patel, Maitraya; Poon, Cheryce; Douek, Michael; Andrews-Tang, Denise; Doepke, Laura; McNitt-Gray, Shawn; Cagnon, Chris; DeMarco, John; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: While several studies have investigated the tradeoffs between radiation dose and image quality (noise) in CT imaging, the purpose of this study was to take this analysis a step further by investigating the tradeoffs between patient radiation dose (including organ dose) and diagnostic accuracy in diagnosis of appendicitis using CT. Methods: This study was IRB approved and utilized data from 20 patients who underwent clinical CT exams for indications of appendicitis. Medical record review established true diagnosis of appendicitis, with 10 positives and 10 negatives. A validated software tool used raw projection data from each scan to create simulated images at lower dose levels (70%, 50%, 30%, 20% of original). An observer study was performed with 6 radiologists reviewing each case at each dose level in random order over several sessions. Readers assessed image quality and provided confidence in their diagnosis of appendicitis, each on a 5 point scale. Liver doses at each case and each dose level were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation based methods. Results: Overall diagnostic accuracy varies across dose levels: 92%, 93%, 91%, 90% and 90% across the 100%, 70%, 50%, 30% and 20% dose levels respectively. And it is 93%, 95%, 88%, 90% and 90% across the 13.5-22mGy, 9.6-13.5mGy, 6.4-9.6mGy, 4-6.4mGy, and 2-4mGy liver dose ranges respectively. Only 4 out of 600 observations were rated "unacceptable" for image quality. Conclusion: The results from this pilot study indicate that the diagnostic accuracy does not change dramatically even at significantly reduced radiation dose.

  7. Diagnosis and management of acute appendicitis. EAES consensus development conference 2015.

    PubMed

    Gorter, Ramon R; Eker, Hasan H; Gorter-Stam, Marguerite A W; Abis, Gabor S A; Acharya, Amish; Ankersmit, Marjolein; Antoniou, Stavros A; Arolfo, Simone; Babic, Benjamin; Boni, Luigi; Bruntink, Marlieke; van Dam, Dieuwertje A; Defoort, Barbara; Deijen, Charlotte L; DeLacy, F Borja; Go, Peter Mnyh; Harmsen, Annelieke M K; van den Helder, Rick S; Iordache, Florin; Ket, Johannes C F; Muysoms, Filip E; Ozmen, M Mahir; Papoulas, Michail; Rhodes, Michael; Straatman, Jennifer; Tenhagen, Mark; Turrado, Victor; Vereczkei, Andras; Vilallonga, Ramon; Deelder, Jort D; Bonjer, Jaap

    2016-11-01

    Unequivocal international guidelines regarding the diagnosis and management of patients with acute appendicitis are lacking. The aim of the consensus meeting 2015 of the EAES was to generate a European guideline based on best available evidence and expert opinions of a panel of EAES members. After a systematic review of the literature by an international group of surgical research fellows, an expert panel with extensive clinical experience in the management of appendicitis discussed statements and recommendations. Statements and recommendations with more than 70 % agreement by the experts were selected for a web survey and the consensus meeting of the EAES in Bucharest in June 2015. EAES members and attendees at the EAES meeting in Bucharest could vote on these statements and recommendations. In the case of more than 70 % agreement, the statement or recommendation was defined as supported by the scientific community. Results from both the web survey and the consensus meeting in Bucharest are presented as percentages. In total, 46 statements and recommendations were selected for the web survey and consensus meeting. More than 232 members and attendees voted on them. In 41 of 46 statements and recommendations, more than 70 % agreement was reached. All 46 statements and recommendations are presented in this paper. They comprise topics regarding the diagnostic work-up, treatment indications, procedural aspects and post-operative care. The consensus meeting produced 46 statements and recommendations on the diagnostic work-up and management of appendicitis. The majority of the EAES members supported these statements. These consensus proceedings provide additional guidance to surgeons and surgical residents providing care to patients with appendicitis.

  8. [Contribution of abdominal sonography in acute appendicitis diagnostics--our experience].

    PubMed

    Smíd, D; Skalický, T; Treska, V

    2009-08-01

    Acute apendicitis is the most frequent case of acute abdomen. During a two year period (2006-2007) it was performed in Department of Surgery of Faculty Hospital in Pilsen 678 appendectomies, 30 days post-operative mortality rate was 0%. Abdomen ultrasonography like helping method to clinic examination was performed in 313 patients, suspect of acute appendicitis was in 191 patients (61%), in remaining patients was normal ultrasound picture.

  9. Acute appendicitis: Epidemiology, treatment and outcomes- analysis of 16544 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Ceresoli, Marco; Zucchi, Alberto; Allievi, Niccolò; Harbi, Asaf; Pisano, Michele; Montori, Giulia; Heyer, Arianna; Nita, Gabriela E; Ansaloni, Luca; Coccolini, Federico

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the epidemiology, treatment and outcomes of acute appendicitis (AA) in a large population study. METHODS This is a retrospective cohort study derived from the administrative dataset of the Bergamo district healthcare system (more than 1 million inhabitants) from 1997 to 2013. Data about treatment, surgery, length of stay were collected. Moreover for each patients were registered data about relapse of appendicitis and hospital admission due to intestinal obstruction. RESULTS From 1997 to 2013 in the Bergamo district we collected 16544 cases of AA, with a crude incidence rate of 89/100000 inhabitants per year; mean age was 24.51 ± 16.17, 54.7% were male and the mean Charlson’s comorbidity index was 0.32 ± 0.92. Mortality was < 0.0001%. Appendectomy was performed in 94.7% of the patients and the mean length of stay was 5.08 ± 2.88 d; the cumulative hospital stay was 5.19 ± 3.36 d and 1.2% of patients had at least one further hospitalization due intestinal occlusion. Laparoscopic appendectomy was performed in 48% of cases. Percent of 5.34 the patients were treated conservatively with a mean length of stay of 3.98 ± 3.96 d; the relapse rate was 23.1% and the cumulative hospital stay during the study period was 5.46 ± 6.05 d. CONCLUSION The treatment of acute appendicitis in Northern Italy is slowly changing, with the large diffusion of laparoscopic approach; conservative treatment of non-complicated appendicitis is still a neglected option, but rich of promising results. PMID:27830041

  10. [Early oral feeding versus classic oral feeding after appendicectomy for acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Kassi Assamoi, B F; Yenon, K S; Lebeau, R; Traore, M; Akpa-Bedi, E; Kouassi, J C

    2010-01-01

    The appendectomies for acute appendicitis are the most frequent surgical interventions (43.6%) in our service. The recent studies demonstrated the feasibility and the economical gain of the early oral feeding vs. classic oral feeding, after elective digestive surgery. We wanted to spread these results therefore to the appendectomy for acute appendicitis. It is about a prospective survey carrying on 110 patients also left in two groups, and comparing the classic postoperative oral feeding vs. the early postoperative oral feeding on one year. The two groups were comparable and the studied parameters were : the length of the postoperative ileus, the hospitable morbidity, the length of the hospitalization and the cost of the hold in charge. The length of the postoperative ileus was not different in the two groups as well as the morbidity. The difference of the median length of hospitalization in the two groups was not meaningful. The cost of the hold in charge was meaningfully more elevated in the group with classic postoperative feeding. In conclusion, the early postoperative oral feeding in our survey doesn't reduce the length of the postoperative ileus and don't drag a morbidity anymore that the classic oral feeding. However if it doesn't shorten the length of the hospitalization, it drags a reduction of the cost of the hold in charge. There is a gain therefore precociously to nourish the patients after appendectomy for acute appendicitis.

  11. Acute appendicitis and carcinoid tumor in Meckel's diverticulum. Three pathologies in one: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mudatsakis, N; Paraskakis, S; Lasithiotakis, K; Andreadakis, E; Karatsis, P

    2011-10-01

    Incidental carcinoid tumor of the Meckel's diverticulum is an uncommon event. Herein, a case of a carcinoid tumor in Meckel's diverticulum that was incidentally found in a patient with acute appendicitis is presented. A 42-year-old Caucasian man presented with acute abdomen and clinical signs of acute appendicitis. A typical appendectomy was performed during which further abdominal exploration revealed a Meckel's diverticulum 60 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve, with an irregular and somewhat indurated serosal region on one side. A stapled diverticulectomy was performed. Pathology revealed an incidental carcinoid tumor measuring 1 cm within the Meckel's diverticulum. CT scan of the abdomen and 24-h urine 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid results were normal. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged at the 5th postoperative day. He is alive and without evidence of disease 23 months after the operation. Coexistence of acute appendicitis along with an incidental Meckel's diverticulum raises controversies in their surgical management. We discuss the issues in managing patients with two or more of these coexistent pathologies.

  12. The Frequency of Enterobius Vermicularis Infections in Patients Diagnosed With Acute Appendicitis in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Muhammad Umer; Bilal, Muhammad; Anis, Khurram; Khan, Ali Mahmood; Fatima, Kaneez; Ahmed, Iqbal; Khatri, Ali Mohammad; Shafiq-ur-Rehman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The main aim of this study was to determine the frequency of Enterobius Vermicularis infections and other unique histopathological findings in patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis. Materials: This retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of Karachi, Pakistan over a time period of 9 years from 2005 to 2013. The recorded demographic and histopathological data for the 2956 appendectomies performed during this time frame were extracted using a structured template form. Negative and incidental appendectomies were excluded from the study. Results: Out of the 2956 patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis, 84 (2.8%) patients had Enterobius Vermicularis infections. Malignancy (n=2, 0.1%) and infection with Ascaris (n=1, 0.1%) was found very rarely among the patients. Eggs in lumen (n=22, 0.7%), mucinous cystadenoma (n=28, 1.0%), mucocele (n=11, 0.4%), lymphoma (n=9, 0.3%), obstruction in lumen (n=17, 0.6%) and purulent exudate (n=37, 1.3%) were also seldom seen in the histopathological reports. Conclusion: Enterobius Vermicularis manifestation is a rare overall but a leading parasitic cause of appendicitis. Steps such as early diagnosis and regular de worming may help eradicate the need for surgeries. PMID:26156929

  13. Parasitic infection of the appendix as a cause of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Danielle Fernandes; da Silva, Reinaldo José; da Silva, Márcia Guimarães; Sartorelli, Alesso Cervantes; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida Marchesan

    2007-12-01

    The association between parasitic infection of the appendix and acute appendicitis has been widely investigated. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the prevalence of parasitic infection of the appendix in a tropical area at southeast Brazil and to assess its possible relation to acute appendicitis in surgically removed appendices. Of the 1,600 appendectomies performed during a 10-year period, 24 (1.5%) were found to have helminths within the appendix. Enterobius vermicularis was observed in 23 of the 24 specimens (95.8%), and Taenia sp. was detected in only one case. Sixteen patients (66.7%) were less than 10 years old; 15 patients were male and nine female; 21 patients were white, and three were nonwhites. Pathologic analysis disclosed acute neutrophilic inflammation in the appendix wall in 12 of the 24 specimens and lymphoid hyperplasia in 10 of the 24 appendices. Gangrenous appendicitis was diagnosed in three cases, and peritonitis was found in 11 of the 24 infected appendices. The results of the present study indicate that E. vermicularis is the commonest worm found in the appendix and that its presence can cause pathologic changes ranging from lymphoid hyperplasia to acute phlegmonous inflammation with life-threatening complications like gangrene and peritonitis.

  14. Pathologic findings suggest long-term abnormality after conservative management of complex acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Matthew; Chalupka, Andrew; Butler, Kathryn; Gupta, Alok; Odom, Stephen R

    2015-03-01

    Perforated or phlegmonous appendicitis is often treated with antibiotics and drainage as needed. The rationale, risk of recurrence, timing, or even the necessity of subsequent elective interval appendectomy (IA) is debated. We retrospectively reviewed all appendectomies performed at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center between 1997 and 2011. We determined if the appendix was removed emergently or as IA. Demographic characteristics, hospital length of stay, computed tomography (CT) results, and operation type (open or laparoscopic) were determined. In IA specimens, narrative pathology reports were assessed for evidence of anatomic, acute, or chronic abnormality. A total of 3562 patients had their appendix removed during this time period. Thirty-four patients were identified as having IA. Of these, only three (8.8%) had a pathologically normal appendix. All three patients were female and all had initially abnormal CT scans. Eight specimens (23.5%) had evidence of chronic and 10 (29.4%) had evidence of acute appendicitis. An additional 10 (29.4%) specimens contained a combination of acute and chronic inflammation. Mean time to operation in the IA group was 57.1 days (range, nine to 234 days) after index diagnosis by CT scan. Given the high percentage of IA specimens with acute or chronic appendicitis and the extremely high proportion (91%) of patients with pathologically abnormal specimens, it appears that IA may be justified in most cases.

  15. Diagnostic imaging of acute abdominal pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Sarah L; Knudson, Mark P

    2015-04-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presentation in the outpatient setting and can represent conditions ranging from benign to life-threatening. If the patient history, physical examination, and laboratory testing do not identify an underlying cause of pain and if serious pathology remains a clinical concern, diagnostic imaging is indicated. The American College of Radiology has developed clinical guidelines, the Appropriateness Criteria, based on the location of abdominal pain to help physicians choose the most appropriate imaging study. Ultrasonography is the initial imaging test of choice for patients presenting with right upper quadrant pain. Computed tomography (CT) is recommended for evaluating right or left lower quadrant pain. Conventional radiography has limited diagnostic value in the assessment of most patients with abdominal pain. The widespread use of CT raises concerns about patient exposure to ionizing radiation. Strategies to reduce exposure are currently being studied, such as using ultrasonography as an initial study for suspected appendicitis before obtaining CT and using low-dose CT rather than standard-dose CT. Magnetic resonance imaging is another emerging technique for the evaluation of abdominal pain that avoids ionizing radiation.

  16. [Musculoskeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Casser, H-R; Schaible, H-G

    2015-10-01

    Among the clinically relevant pain conditions, pain in the musculoskeletal system is most frequent. This article reports extensive epidemiological data on musculoskeletal system pain in Germany and worldwide. Since back pain is most frequent, the diagnostics and therapeutic algorithms of acute, recurring, and chronic lower back pain in Germany will be particularly addressed. The importance of the physiologic-organic, the cognitive-emotional, the behavioral, and the social level to diagnostics and treatment will be discussed. We will also focus on osteoarthritic pain and address its epidemiology, clinical importance, and significance for the health care system. This article will list some reasons why the musculoskeletal system in particular is frequently the site of chronic pain. The authors believe that these reasons are to be sought in the complex structures of the musculoskeletal system; in the particular sensitivity of the deep somatic nociceptive system for long-term sensitization processes, as well as the ensuing nervous system reactions; and in the interactions between the nervous and immune systems. The article will give some insights into the research carried out on this topic in Germany.

  17. Fetal pain?

    PubMed

    Vanhatalo, S; van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    2000-05-01

    During the last few years a vivid debate, both scientifically and emotionally, has risen in the medical literature as to whether a fetus is able to feel pain during abortion or intrauterine surgery. This debate has mainly been inspired by the demonstration of various hormonal or motor reactions to noxious stimuli at very early stages of fetal development. The aims of this paper are to review the literature on development of the pain system in the fetus, and to speculate about the relationship between "sensing" as opposed to "feeling" pain and the number of reactions associated with painful stimuli. While a cortical processing of pain theoretically becomes possible after development of the thalamo-cortical connections in the 26th week of gestation, noxious stimuli may trigger complex reflex reactions much earlier. However, more important than possible painfulness is the fact that the noxious stimuli, by triggering stress responses, most likely affect the development of an individual at very early stages. Hence, it is not reasonable to speculate on the possible emotional experiences of pain in fetuses or premature babies. A clinically relevant aim is rather to avoid and/or treat any possibly noxious stimuli, and thereby prevent their potential adverse effects on the subsequent development.

  18. [Validation of a diagnostic scoring system (Ohmann score) in acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Zielke, A; Sitter, H; Rampp, T A; Schäfer, E; Hasse, C; Lorenz, W; Rothmund, M

    1999-07-01

    A diagnostic scoring system, recently published by Ohmann et al. in this journal, was validated by analyzing the clinicopathological data of a consecutive series of 2,359 patients, admitted for suspicion of acute appendicitis. The results of the scoring system were compared to the results of clinical evaluation by junior (provisional) and senior surgeons (final clinical diagnosis). To assess the diagnostic ability of the score, the accuracy and positive predictive value were defined as the major diagnostic performance parameters; the rate of theoretical negative laparotomies and that of diagnostic errors served as the major procedural performance parameters. Of 2,359 patients admitted for suspected acute appendicitis, 662 were proven to have acute appendicitis by histology, for a prevalence of 28%. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the provisional clinical diagnosis were 0.50, 0.94, 0.77, 0.83, and 0.82; 0.93, for the score 0.63, 0.93, 0.77, 0.86 and 0.84, and for the final clinical diagnosis 0.90, 0.94, 0.85, 0.96, and 0.93, respectively. Of the main diagnostic performance parameter, the accuracy of the score was significantly better than that of provisional clinical diagnosis (P < 0.05, chi 2 test). The score yielded a rate of negative appendecomies and laparotomies of 14.3 and 12.3%. With respect to the rate of overlooked cases of acute apendicitis, the score demonstrated a superior performance, with only 6 cases missed (0.9%). However, the number of patients with acute appendicitis, including those with perforated disease, who were not identified by the score, was almost four times that of the final clinical diagnosis (245 vs 63). With regard to the main procedural performance parameter, the score resulted in a significantly smaller number of diagnostic errors than the provisional clinical investigator (P < 0.05, chi 2 test). The results of this study indicate that the diagnostic scoring

  19. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  20. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  1. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Chronic Pelvic Pain Home For Patients Search FAQs Chronic Pelvic Pain ... Pain FAQ099, August 2011 PDF Format Chronic Pelvic Pain Gynecologic Problems What is chronic pelvic pain? What ...

  2. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org National ...

  3. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... analgesia, identify new targets for analgesic drugs, and test the efficacy and adverse reactions of newly developed or currently used drugs to treat pain. Researchers are currently using these technologies to discover the mechanisms by which drugs such ...

  4. Urination - painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... and vagina Other causes of painful urination include: Interstitial cystitis Prostate infection ( prostatitis ) Radiation cystitis - damage to the ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Bladder ... Cystitis Prostate Diseases Sexually Transmitted Diseases Urinary Tract Infections ...

  5. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be done include: CBC or blood differential C-reactive protein Joint x-ray Sedimentation rate ... chap 256. Schaible H-G. Joint pain: basic mechanisms. In: McMahon SB, Koltzenburg M, Tracey I, Turk ...

  6. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Review Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  7. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes Chest pain can also be caused by: Panic attack. If you have periods of intense fear accompanied ... fear of dying, you may be experiencing a panic attack. Shingles. Caused by a reactivation of the chickenpox ...

  8. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Strategy Current Research Research Funded by NINDS Basic Neuroscience Clinical Research Translational Research Research at NINDS Focus ... pain has done. Scientists believe that advances in neuroscience will lead to more and better treatments for ...

  9. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  10. Fetal pain.

    PubMed

    Rokyta, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The fetus reacts to nociceptive stimulations through different motor, autonomic, vegetative, hormonal, and metabolic changes relatively early in the gestation period. With respect to the fact that the modulatory system does not yet exist, the first reactions are purely reflexive and without connection to the type of stimulus. While the fetal nervous system is able to react through protective reflexes to potentially harmful stimuli, there is no accurate evidence concerning pain sensations in this early period. Cortical processes occur only after thalamocortical connections and pathways have been completed at the 26th gestational week. Harmful (painful) stimuli, especially in fetuses have an adverse effect on the development of humans regardless of the processes in brain. Moreover, pain activates a number of subcortical mechanisms and a wide spectrum of stress responses influence the maturation of thalamocortical pathways and other cortical activation which are very important in pain processing.

  11. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... chocolate in your diet helps reduce breast pain. Vitamin E, thiamine, magnesium, and evening primrose oil are not harmful, but most studies have not shown any benefit. Talk to your health care provider before starting ...

  12. The Role of Digital Rectal Examination for Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Takada, Toshihiko; Nishiwaki, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Fukuma, Shingo; Yamazaki, Shin; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Digital rectal examination (DRE) has been traditionally recommended to evaluate acute appendicitis, although several reports indicate its lack of utility for this diagnosis. No meta-analysis has examined DRE for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Objectives To assess the role of DRE for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Data Sources Cochrane Library, PubMed, and SCOPUS from the earliest available date of indexing through November 23, 2014, with no language restrictions. Study Selection Clinical studies assessing DRE as an index test for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Data Extraction and Synthesis Two independent reviewers extracted study data and assessed the quality, using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 tool. Bivariate random-effects models were used for the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) as point estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Main Outcomes and Measures The main outcome measure was the diagnostic performance of DRE for diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Results We identified 19 studies with a total of 7511 patients. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.49 (95% CI 0.42–0.56) and 0.61 (95% CI 0.53–0.67), respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 1.24 (95% CI 0.97–1.58) and 0.85 (95% CI 0.70–1.02), respectively. The DOR was 1.46 (0.95–2.26). Conclusion and Relevance Acute appendicitis cannot be ruled in or out through the result of DRE. Reconsideration is needed for the traditional teaching that rectal examination should be performed routinely in all patients with suspected appendicitis. PMID:26332867

  13. Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma mimicking salivary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lindsay; Chiosea, Simion I

    2013-12-01

    Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described salivary gland tumor characterized by ETV6 translocation. It appears that prior studies have identified MASC by reviewing salivary gland carcinomas, such as acinic cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, not otherwise specified. To address the possibility of MASC mimicking benign salivary neoplasms we reviewed 12 salivary gland (cyst)adenomas diagnosed prior to the discovery of MASC. One encapsulated (cyst)adenoma of the parotid gland demonstrated features of MASC. The diagnosis was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with an ETV6 break-apart probe. An unusual complex pattern of ETV6 rearrangement with duplication of the telomeric/distal ETV6 probe was identified. This case illustrates that MASC may mimic salivary (cyst)adenomas. To more accurately assess true clinical and morphologic spectrum of MASC, future studies may have to include review of salivary (cyst)adenomas. The differential diagnosis of MASC may have to be expanded to include cases resembling salivary (cyst)adenomas.

  14. Vitamin D Deficiency Rickets Mimicking Pseudohypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Kurtoğlu, Selim; Yıldız, Aysel; Akın, Mustafa Ali; Kendirici, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency rickets (VDDR) is a disorder biochemically characterized by elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, normal or decreased serum calcium (Ca) and inorganic phosphate concentrations, secondary hyperparathyroidism and decreased serum 25−hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels. In stage 1 VDDR, urinary amino acid and phosphate excretion are normal with minimal or no findings of rickets on radiographs. Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is an inherited disorder characterized by end−organ resistance to parathormone (PTH). VDDR occasionally resembles PHP type 2 in clinical presentation and biochemical features, creating difficulties in the differential diagnosis of these two entities. Here we report an infant diagnosed with VDDR. In addition to inadequate vitamin D intake, usage of antiepileptic drugs (AED) may have led to the worsening of the vitamin D deficiency. The patient presented with a history of febrile convulsions, for which he received phenobarbital treatment. The initial findings of hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia and normal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, mimicking PHP 2, responded well to vitamin D and oral Ca treatment with normalization of serum Ca, phosphorus (P), ALP and PTH levels Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274319

  15. Pontine lesions mimicking acute peripheral vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Thomke, F.; Hopf, H. C.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Clinical signs of acute peripheral vestibulopathy (APV) were repeatedly reported with pontine lesions. The clinical relevance of such a mechanism is not known, as most studies were biased by patients with additional clinical signs of brainstem dysfunction.
METHODS—Masseter reflex (MassR), blink reflex (BlinkR), brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), and DC electro-oculography (EOG) were tested in 232 consecutive patients with clinical signs of unilateral APV.
RESULTS—Forty five of the 232 patients (19.4%) had at least one electrophysiological abnormality suggesting pontine dysfunction mainly due to possible vertebrobasilar ischaemia (22 patients) and multiple sclerosis (eight patients). MassR abnormalities were seen in 24patients, and EOG abnormalities of saccades and following eye movements occurred in 22 patients. Three patients had BlinkR-R1 abnormalities, and one had delayed BAEP waves IV and V. Clinical improvement was almost always (32 of 34 re-examined patients) associated with improvement or normalisation of at least one electrophysiological abnormality. Brain MRI was done in 25 of the 44 patients and confirmed pontine lesions in six (two infarcts, three inflammations, one tumour).
CONCLUSIONS—Pontine dysfunction was suggested in 45 of 232 consecutive patients with clinical signs of APV on the basis of abnormal electrophysiological findings, and was mainly attributed to brainstem ischaemia and multiple sclerosis. The frequency of pontine lesions mimicking APV is underestimated if based on MRI established lesions only.

 PMID:10084533

  16. Egg white ovalbumin digestion mimicking physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Martos, Gustavo; Contreras, Patricia; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2010-05-12

    Gastrointestinal digestion of ovalbumin (OVA) was simulated using an in vitro system in two steps, which mimicked digestion in the stomach and duodenum, to assess the effect of different gastric pHs, different concentrations of proteases, and the presence of surfactants, such as phosphatidylcholine (PC) and bile salts (BS). OVA was very resistant to pepsin action at an enzyme/substrate ratio that would resemble a physiological situation (1:20 w/w, 172 units/mg) at pH values equal or above 2. The presence of PC did not change the susceptibility of OVA to proteolysis with pepsin. Fluorescence experiments showed that OVA interacted with PC vesicles, particularly at acidic pH, but it is likely that the protein maintained a high degree of conformational stability, resisting pepsin action. The presence of BS at physiological concentrations considerably increased the proteolysis of OVA by a mixture of pancreatic enzymes. The addition of PC made OVA even more sensitive to proteolytic degradation, suggesting that OVA could associate with the surfactants under duodenal conditions, increasing its exposure to pancreatic proteinases. Immunoreactivity against IgE from sera of allergic patients was retained after in vitro gastric digestion, depending on the reactivity of the sera, but it decreased considerably after in vitro duodenal digestion.

  17. [Unusual presentation of scurvy mimicking a neuroblastoma].

    PubMed

    Rethore, S; Leblond, P; Thebaud, E; Sonna, M; Legrand, C; Rocourt, N; Defachelles, A-S

    2011-01-01

    Scurvy, a disease related to ascorbic acid deficiency, remains rare in industrial countries. Ascorbic acid is a vitamin that intervenes most notably in the synthesis of collagen and catecholamines. We report the case of a 2-year-old boy hospitalized in a pediatric oncology unit because of an unusual presentation of scurvy revealed by pain and a significant increase in urinary catecholamine levels, raising fear of a neuroblastoma.

  18. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  19. Neonatal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback.

  20. Non-harmful insertion of data mimicking computer network attacks

    DOEpatents

    Neil, Joshua Charles; Kent, Alexander; Hash, Jr, Curtis Lee

    2016-06-21

    Non-harmful data mimicking computer network attacks may be inserted in a computer network. Anomalous real network connections may be generated between a plurality of computing systems in the network. Data mimicking an attack may also be generated. The generated data may be transmitted between the plurality of computing systems using the real network connections and measured to determine whether an attack is detected.

  1. Undigested Pills in Stool Mimicking Parasitic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Fazia; Achakzai, Ilyas; Ibdah, Jamal A.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Orally ingested medications now come in both immediate release and controlled release preparations. Controlled release preparations were developed by pharmaceutical companies to improve compliance and decrease frequency of pill ingestion. Case Report. A 67-year-old obese male patient presented to our clinic with focal abdominal pain that had been present 3 inches below umbilicus for the last three years. This pain was not associated with any trauma or recent heavy lifting. Upon presentation, the patient reported that for the last two months he started to notice pearly oval structures in his stool accompanying his chronic abdominal pain. This had coincided with initiation of his nifedipine pills for his hypertension. He reported seeing these undigested pills daily in his stool. Conclusion. The undigested pills may pose a cause of concern for both patients and physicians alike, as demonstrated in this case report, because they can mimic a parasitic infection. This can result in unnecessary extensive work-up. It is important to review the medication list for extended release formulations and note that the outer shell can be excreted whole in the stool. PMID:28255472

  2. Undigested Pills in Stool Mimicking Parasitic Infection.

    PubMed

    Mir, Fazia; Achakzai, Ilyas; Ibdah, Jamal A; Tahan, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    Background. Orally ingested medications now come in both immediate release and controlled release preparations. Controlled release preparations were developed by pharmaceutical companies to improve compliance and decrease frequency of pill ingestion. Case Report. A 67-year-old obese male patient presented to our clinic with focal abdominal pain that had been present 3 inches below umbilicus for the last three years. This pain was not associated with any trauma or recent heavy lifting. Upon presentation, the patient reported that for the last two months he started to notice pearly oval structures in his stool accompanying his chronic abdominal pain. This had coincided with initiation of his nifedipine pills for his hypertension. He reported seeing these undigested pills daily in his stool. Conclusion. The undigested pills may pose a cause of concern for both patients and physicians alike, as demonstrated in this case report, because they can mimic a parasitic infection. This can result in unnecessary extensive work-up. It is important to review the medication list for extended release formulations and note that the outer shell can be excreted whole in the stool.

  3. Bilateral axillary masses mimicking as accessory breast with multiple fibroadenoma and bilateral gigantomastia in HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saumya; Mishra, Anand K; Tewari, S; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2013-06-24

    Accessory breast is a rare entity that can present as asymptomatic masses or can cause symptoms like heaviness, pain, restriction of arm movement and limitation in daily pursuits with allied apprehension and anxiety for the patient. We present a case of bilateral axillary masses mimicking as accessory breast with multiple fibroadenoma in a 28 years, nulliparous, Indian woman who is HIV positive, which proves to be a diagnostic dilemma. Excisional biopsy was diagnostic. The rarity of such cases imposes challenges on the management in terms of diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic options.

  4. [A case of liver abscess with subcapsular hematoma mimicking ruptured hepatic cholangiocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyun Jung; Lee, Young Sun; Choi, Jong Hwan; Jung, Young Kul; Yeon, Jong Eun; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2009-03-01

    Subcapsular hematoma is a very rare complication of liver abscess. We report a case of liver abscess with subcapsular hematoma mimicking ruptured hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. A 59-year-old man presented with right upper quadrant pain and febrile sense. Computed tomography showed a low attenuated mass with extensive subcapsular hematoma on the right hepatic lobe. The initial impression was a hematoma caused by the rupture of cholangiocarcinoma. Hepatic arteriography was performed, but no active bleeding focus was found. After drainage of the subcapsular hematoma, a hematoma wall biopsy through the drainage catheter and a liver biopsy of the low attenuated mass were performed. The biopsies showed many neutrophils, macrophages, and granulation tissues consistent with an abscess, but no malignant cells were detected. After antibiotics therapy for 6 weeks, computed tomography was performed 4 months later, and revealed complete resolution of the hematoma and the low attenuated hepatic lesion.

  5. IgG4-related disease presenting with destructive sinonasal lesion mimicking malignancy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Nien

    2016-11-01

    IgG4-related disease is a newly recognized systemic fibroinflammatory disorder. We report a 36-year-old man who presented with intractable right nasal pain and frontal headache for 1 month. Computed tomography revealed an ill-defined lesion with bony erosion over the right anterior ethmoid sinus and middle turbinate. The lesion was resected through endoscopic anterior ethmoidectomy and middle turbinectomy. IgG4-related disease was definitively diagnosed according to histopathological features. Prednisolone was administered postoperatively. IgG4-related disease presenting with destructive sinonasal lesion mimicking malignancy is rare. Awareness is essential to avoid delayed diagnosis or unnecessary invasive intervention, because the disorder responds to glucocorticoid and immunosuppressant therapy.

  6. Rare Presentation of Chorioadenoma Destruens as Acute Haemoperitoneum Mimicking Ruptured Ectopic Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, M; Kaur, R; Gupta, R; Rani, R; Aggarwal, A

    2014-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasms (GTN) are proliferative degenerative disorders of placental elements and include complete or partial mole (90%), invasivemole (5-8%), choriocarcinoma (1-2%) and placental site tumor (1-2%). Chorioadenoma destruens is a trophoblastic tumor, characterized by myometrial invasion through direct extension or via venous channels. We present a case of invasive mole eroding uterus and uterine vasculature, causing sudden rupture of uterus with massive haemoperitoneum mimicking ectopic pregnancy. A 20 year old G1P0 at 6 weeks gestation presented in Casualty of Kasturba Hospital complaining of severe acute onset lower abdominal pain for one hour. Clinical examination revealed shock. Sonography suggested ectopic pregnancy and immediate exploratory laparotomy was decided. On laparotomy, 2000cc of haemoperitoneum was noted. Grape like vesicles protruding through fundal perforation with profuse active bleeding was seen. Bleeding persisted despite evacuation. Step wise uterine devascularisation failed to achieve haemostasis. Total abdominal hysterectomy was performed as a life saving measure.

  7. Osteoid osteoma mimicking Brodie's abscess in a 13-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Schlur, Charles; Bachy, Manon; Wajfisz, Anthony; Ducou le Pointe, Hubert; Josset, Patrice; Vialle, Raphaël

    2013-04-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a solitary, benign lesion of bone causing significant nocturnal pain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and bone scan are commonly used in this diagnosis. A case of osteoid osteoma of the distal femur mimicking chronic osteomyelitis with Brodie's abscess is reported and discussed. Initial radiographs and MRI showed a lesion of the distal femur consistent with subacute osteomyelitis with a Brodie's abscess. Because primary malignant tumor could not be eliminated, surgical biopsy was carried out. Histological examination showed a typical nidus consistent with the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. Subacute osteomyelitis (Brodie's abscess) may be difficult to distinguish from other malignant or benign bone lesions as osteoid osteoma. CT usually is recommended as the best imaging procedure to identify the nidus and confirm the diagnosis. MRI also can be used for this purpose. Surgical biopsy remains mandatory for unclear lesions before deciding on appropriate treatment.

  8. Noncavernous arteriovenous shunts mimicking carotid cavernous fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Kobkitsuksakul, Chai; Jiarakongmun, Pakorn; Chanthanaphak, Ekachat; Singhara Na Ayudya, Sirintara (Pongpech)

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The classic symptoms and signs of carotid cavernous sinus fistula or cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) consist of eye redness, exophthalmos, and gaze abnormality. The angiography findings typically consist of arteriovenous shunt at cavernous sinus with ophthalmic venous drainage with or without cortical venous reflux. In rare circumstances, the shunts are localized outside the cavernous sinus, but mimic symptoms and radiography of the cavernous shunt. We would like to present the other locations of the arteriovenous shunt, which mimic the clinical presentation of carotid cavernous fistulae, and analyze venous drainages. METHODS We retrospectively examined the records of 350 patients who were given provisional diagnoses of carotid cavernous sinus fistulae or cavernous sinus dural AVF in the division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok between 2008 and 2014. Any patient with cavernous arteriovenous shunt was excluded. RESULTS Of those 350 patients, 10 patients (2.85%) were identified as having noncavernous sinus AVF. The angiographic diagnoses consisted of three anterior condylar (hypoglossal) dural AVF, two traumatic middle meningeal AVF, one lesser sphenoid wing dural AVF, one vertebro-vertebral fistula (VVF), one intraorbital AVF, one direct dural artery to cortical vein dural AVF, and one transverse-sigmoid dural AVF. Six cases (60%) were found to have venous efferent obstruction. CONCLUSION Arteriovenous shunts mimicking the cavernous AVF are rare, with a prevalence of only 2.85% in this series. The clinical presentation mainly depends on venous outflow. The venous outlet of the arteriovenous shunts is influenced by venous afferent-efferent patterns according to the venous anatomy of the central nervous system and the skull base, as well as by architectural disturbance, specifically, obstruction of the venous outflow. PMID:27767958

  9. Calea zacatechichi dichloromethane extract exhibits antidiarrheal and antinociceptive effects in mouse models mimicking irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sałaga, M; Kowalczuk, A; Zielinska, M; Błażewicz, A; Fichna, J

    2015-10-01

    Calea zacatechichi Schltdl. (Asteraceae alt. Compositae) is a Mexican plant commonly used in folk medicine to treat respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. The objective of this study is to characterize the effect of C. zacatechichi extracts in mouse models mimicking the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Powdered C. zacatechichi herb (leaves, stems, and flowers) was extracted with methanol. Methanolic extract was filtered and evaporated giving methanolic fraction. The residue was extracted with dichloromethane (DCM). Methanolic and DCM (200 mg/kg, per os) extracts were screened for their effect on GI motility in several in vitro tests, and the antidiarrheal and antinociceptive effects were assessed using mouse models. The influence of the DCM extract on motoric parameters and exploratory behaviors was also assessed. Finally, the composition of C. zacatechichi DCM extract was qualitatively analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method. C. zacatechichi DCM extract significantly inhibited the contractility of mouse colon in vitro (IC50 = 17 ± 2 μg/ml). Administration of the DCM extract in vivo (200 mg/kg, per os) significantly prolonged the time of whole GI transit (46 ± 1 vs. 117 ± 27 min for control and DCM-treated animals, respectively; P = 0.0023), inhibited hypermotility, and reduced pain in mouse models mimicking functional GI disorders. Our findings suggest that constituents of the C. zacatechichi DCM extract exhibit antidiarrheal and analgesic activity. The extract may thus become an attractive material for isolation of compounds that may be used as a supplementary treatment for pain and diarrhea associated with IBS in the future.

  10. Acute pelvic pain in females in septic and aseptic contexts.

    PubMed

    Pages-Bouic, E; Millet, I; Curros-Doyon, F; Faget, C; Fontaine, M; Taourel, P

    2015-10-01

    Acute pelvic pain in women is a common reason for emergency department admission. There is a broad range of possible aetiological diagnoses, with gynaecological and gastrointestinal causes being the most frequently encountered. Gynaecological causes include upper genital tract infection and three types of surgical emergency, namely ectopic pregnancy, adnexal torsion, and haemorrhagic ovarian cyst rupture. The main gastrointestinal cause is acute appendicitis, which is the primary differential diagnosis for acute pelvic pain of gynaecological origin. The process of diagnosis will be guided by the clinical examination, laboratory study results, and ultrasonography findings, with suprapubic transvaginal pelvic ultrasonography as the first-line examination in this young population, and potentially cross-sectional imaging findings (computed tomography and MR imaging) if diagnosis remains uncertain.

  11. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  12. Propulsion efficiency of bodies appended with multiple flapping fins: When more is less

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Leinhos, Henry A.

    2013-04-01

    Underwater animals propel themselves by flapping their pectoral and caudal fins in a narrow range of frequencies, given by Strouhal number St, to produce transitional vortex jets (St is generally expressed non-dimensionally as the product of flapping frequency and stroke (arc) length divided by forward speed). The organized nature of the selection of St and of the vortex jet is thought to maximize hydrodynamic efficiency, although the exact mechanism is not known. Our recent Stuart-Landau equation models, which have self-regulation properties, indicate that the fin and its jet vortices couple. Temporal maps of forces in single isolated fins show a bimodal behavior in certain ranges of the transitional Reynolds number; this behavior bears resemblance to neural bifurcation properties that owe their origin to the self-regulation mechanism. In view of our theoretical and biorobotic evidence of self-regulation in single flapping fins, we explore if this property is altered in a fin-appended body, the goal being to understand how the narrow selection of St, self-regulation, and maximization of hydrodynamic efficiency are related. Swimming vehicles of 1-m scale have been built where a rigid cylindrical body is appended with six flapping fins, three at each end. The fins are rigid, have a rounded leading edge and a laminar section (NACA 0012), and are hinged at one end. The planform is an abstracted version of the penguin wing; it has low aspect ratio and a chord Reynolds number that varies in the transitional range from 10 000 to 60 000. The fin geometry, Reynolds number range, and the nonflexible nature of the main body are in common with those in penguins, and the length and displacement volume are similar to those of sharks. The maximum hydrodynamic efficiency of the fin-appended body (0.40) is lower than that of the single fin (0.57), but is close to that of a fish using several fins. The propulsion density (kW/m3 of displacement volume) of the fin-appended cylinder

  13. Osteomalacia mimicking spondyloarthropathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Garip, Y; Dedeoglu, M; Bodur, H

    2014-07-01

    Osteomalacia is a metabolic bone disorder characterized by impaired mineralization of bone matrix. Symptoms of osteomalacia can be confused with other conditions such as spondyloarthropathy, polymyalgia rheumatica, polymyositis, and fibromyalgia. In this case, we report a patient with axial osteomalacia who developed low back pain, morning stiffness, and "grade 3 sacroiliitis" in pelvis X-ray, leading to the misdiagnosis as seronegative spondyloarthropathy. Serum biochemical studies revealed low serum phosphorus, low 25-hydroxy vitamin D3, normal calcium, elevated parathyroid hormone, and alkaline phosphatase levels. Her symptoms were relieved with vitamin D and calcium therapy. The diagnosis of osteomalacia should be considered in case of sacroiliitis and spondylitis.

  14. Osteoid osteoma mimicking overuse syndromes in athletes.

    PubMed

    Giombini, A; Dragoni, S; Averna, T; Ripani, M; Longo, U G; Maffulli, N

    2009-06-01

    This article reports the clinical features, findings at imaging, management and outcome of five athletes who presented with osteoid osteoma. The diagnosis was missed initially in all the athletes, who were managed for an overuse syndrome for many months before receiving a correct diagnosis. Osteoid osteoma can cause atypical pain, and therefore lead to delay in diagnosis and inappropriate management. Each injured athlete must be fully evaluated by history, physical examination and appropriate imaging investigations to minimize the rate of misdiagnosis and underestimation, unnecessary procedures, and delayed management.

  15. Ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning mimicking burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heir, Gary M

    2005-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a condition in which the patient perceives a sensation of intraoral burning, typically of the anterior tongue. This article presents a case report of a patient presenting for orofacial pain evaluation in whom ciguatera neurotoxin poisoning is diagnosed. The clinician should be aware of neurotoxin poisoning as a possible cause of symptoms of burning mouth, especially among patients who have recently traveled to a tropical area. Recognition of this condition in this case highlights the need for a detailed and accurate patient history.

  16. Incidental findings on computed tomography scans for acute appendicitis: prevalence, costs, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Ozao-Choy, Junko; Kim, Unsup; Vieux, Ulrich; Menes, Tehillah S

    2011-11-01

    CT scan is increasingly being used to diagnose appendicitis due to its specificity and literature suggesting its cost-effectiveness. CT scans are associated with incidental findings. We sought to investigate the rates of incidental findings identified on CT scans, the follow-up of these findings, and the added cost associated with this follow-up. A retrospective review of patients who underwent appendectomies for acute appendicitis between 2003 and 2005 was completed at Elmhurst Hospital Center (Elmhurst, NY). Incidental findings were grouped into low and high significance, based on workup or follow-up needed. The diagnostic workup and cost of each incidental finding was ascertained. For patients who did not receive a workup due to lack of follow-up, an estimate of the minimum workup was calculated. Of 1142 patients with acute appendicitis, 876 (77%) had a CT scan. This rate increased over time (from 66% in 2003 to 85% in 2005, P < 0.01) and with age (70% in patients under 20 and 98% in patients over 50, P < 0.001). Incidental findings were common and increased with age (23% in the youngest group vs 78% in patients older than 50, P < 0.001). The cost associated with workup of these incidental findings increased with age as well. The increased use of CT scans is associated with a high rate of incidental findings. These findings are usually of low clinical significance but may require further workup and follow-up. Physicians need to be aware of the high rate of incidental findings, the need for further workup, and the associated costs.

  17. Use and accuracy of computed tomography scan in diagnosing perforated appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Richa; Grechushkin, Vadim; Carter, Dorothy; Barish, Matthew; Pryor, Aurora; Telem, Dana

    2015-04-01

    Perforated appendicitis has major implications on patient care. The ability of computed tomography (CT) scan to distinguish perforation in the absence of phlegmon or abscess is unknown. The purpose of this study is to assess the use and accuracy of CT scans in diagnosing perforated appendicitis without phlegmon or abscess. A retrospective chart review of 102 patients who underwent appendectomy from 2011 to 2013 was performed. Patient demographics and operative and postoperative course were recorded. Two radiologists were then blinded to operative findings and CT scans reread and results correlated. Findings on CT scan were also analyzed for correlation with perforation. Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis was performed. Of the 102 patients, 49 were perforated and 53 nonperforated. Analysis of patient populations demonstrated patients with perforation were significantly older (45 vs 34 years, P = 0.002), had longer operative times (132 vs 81 minutes, P = 0.001), and longer length of stay (8.2 vs 1.5 days, P < 0.001). Nineteen perforations (37%) were correctly diagnosed by CT scan. The sensitivity of CT scan to detect perforation was 38 per cent, specificity 96 per cent, and positive predictive value of 90 per cent. After multivariate analysis of significant variables, three were demonstrated to significantly correlate with presence of perforation: presence of extraluminal air (odds ratio [OR], 28.9; P = 0.02); presence of intraluminal fecalith (OR, 5.7; P = 0.03); and wall thickness greater than 3 mm (OR, 3.2; P = 0.02). CT scan has a low sensitivity for diagnosing perforated appendicitis without abscess or phlegmon. Presence of extraluminal air bubbles, increased wall thickness, and intraluminal fecalith should increase suspicion for perforation and are highly correlated with outcomes after appendectomy.

  18. Laparoscopy-Assisted Single-Port Appendectomy in Children: Safe Alternative also for Perforated Appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Sesia, Sergio B; Berger, Eliane; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Mayr, Johannes; Häcker, Frank-Martin

    2015-12-01

    Because of its low complication rate, favorable safety, cost-effectiveness, and technical ease, mono-instrumental, laparoscopy-assisted single-port appendectomy (SPA) has been the standard therapy for appendicitis in our department since its introduction 10 years ago. We report our experience with this technique and compare its outcome to open appendectomy (OA). The records of all children who underwent appendectomy at our institution over a period of 8 years were analyzed retrospectively. Patient baseline data, markers of inflammation, operative time, length of hospital stay, complication rate according to the classification of Clavien-Dindo, and histologic grading were assessed to compare the 2 surgical techniques (SPA and OA). The chi square test, the Student's t test and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test were used to analyze the data and the comparisons of the mean values. A P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Overall, 975 patients were included in the study. A total of 555 children had undergone SPA and 420 had been treated by OA. Median operative time of SPA was longer than that of OA (60.8  min vs 57.4  min; P < 0.05). Length of hospital stay after SPA was shorter than after OA (4.4 days and 5.9 days, respectively; P < 0.001). The overall complication rate was lower for SPA than that for OA (4.0% vs 5.7%), but the difference of complications for SPA and OA was not statistically significant (P < 0.22). SPA was successfully performed in 85.9% of children. In 53.8% of patients with perforated appendicitis, no conversion was required. In the group of children with perforated appendicitis, the complication rate of ∼20% was independent of the surgical technique applied. With respect to operative time, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complication rate, SPA is not inferior to OA. SPA is safe and efficient, even in the management of perforated appendicitis.

  19. Enterobius Vermicularis infection of the appendix as a cause of acute appendicitis in a Greek adolescent: a case report.

    PubMed

    Efraimidou, Eleni; Gatopoulou, Anthia; Stamos, Charilaos; Lirantzopoulos, Nikolaos; Kouklakis, George

    2008-12-06

    Gastrointestinal infection due to Enterobius vermicularis occurs worldwide and is considered to be the most common helminth infection. The simple presence of E. vermicularis in the appendix usually produces symptoms of acute appendicitis. The association of this parasitic infestation with acute appendicitis varies from 0.2%-41.8% worldwide. We present a case of a 15 year old female with enterobiasis of appendix presented with clinical features of acute appendicitis. The appendix was surgically removed and the specimen was pathologically diagnosed to contain of E. vermicularis in non-inflamed and histologically normal appendix. Even if this condition is not uncommon in the Greek population, to the best of our knowledge this is the first report presented in the English literature.

  20. Enterobius Vermicularis infection of the appendix as a cause of acute appendicitis in a Greek adolescent: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Efraimidou, Eleni; Gatopoulou, Anthia; Stamos, Charilaos; Lirantzopoulos, Nikolaos; Kouklakis, George

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infection due to Enterobius vermicularis occurs worldwide and is considered to be the most common helminth infection. The simple presence of E. vermicularis in the appendix usually produces symptoms of acute appendicitis. The association of this parasitic infestation with acute appendicitis varies from 0.2%–41.8% worldwide. We present a case of a 15 year old female with enterobiasis of appendix presented with clinical features of acute appendicitis. The appendix was surgically removed and the specimen was pathologically diagnosed to contain of E. vermicularis in non-inflamed and histologically normal appendix. Even if this condition is not uncommon in the Greek population, to the best of our knowledge this is the first report presented in the English literature. PMID:19061517

  1. Bladder Endometriosis Mimicking TCC - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asish; Bhatnagar, Atul; Seth, B N; Dang, Arbinder; Gupta, Vineeta

    2016-02-01

    Endometriosis is the ectopic presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterus. Though on its own endometriosis is not a rare lesion, the involvement of the urinary tract is rare but with the bladder being the most commonly affected organ. Endometriosis is usually seen in females between the ages of 30-40 years and may occur due to fluctuating levels of oestrogen and progesterone. Clinically the patient maybe asymptomatic or show symptoms of dysmenorrhea, irregular or heavy periods, pain in the pelvic area, lower abdomen or in the back. It has been suggested that ultrasonography should be done either before or during menstruation as the lesion becomes more evident and a biopsy taken during this period is a strong aid in reaching a final diagnosis. We report here an unusual case of bladder endometriosis where the patient came with severe pelvic pain and an endoluminal mass seen on the ultrasonographic report. Based on these findings a differential of transitional cell carcinoma was given which was ruled out based on the cystoscopic findings.

  2. Synovial Cyst Mimicking an Intraspinal Sacral Mass

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 68-year-old female had a three-week history of severe low back pain radiating down the posterior left buttocks and left leg exacerbated by standing and walking. Lumbar spine MRI revealed cystic mass with similar intensity to cerebrospinal fluid located on dorsolateral left side of the sacral spinal canal inferior to the S1 pedicle. There was compression of left exiting S1 and traversing S2 nerve roots. Neurosurgery consult was requested to evaluate the cystic mass in the sacral spinal canal. After clinical evaluation, an unusually located synovial cyst was thought possible. Cyst contents were heterogeneous, suggestive of small hemorrhage and acute clinical history seemed reasonable. Left S1 and partial left S2 hemilaminectomy was performed and an epidural, partially hemorrhagic cyst was removed. There was no obvious connection to the ipsilateral L5-S1 facet joint. Pathology revealed synovial cyst, and the patient's leg pain was improved postoperatively. This synovial cyst was unusual as it had no connection with the facet joint intraoperatively and its location in the sacral canal was uncommon. PMID:24716025

  3. The diagnostic value of white cell count, C-reactive protein and bilirubin in acute appendicitis and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, D; Lin, R; Antonowicz, S; Wells, AD; Bajwa, FM; Krijgsman, B

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory markers such as white cell count (WCC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) and, more recently, bilirubin have been used as adjuncts in the diagnosis of appendicitis. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the above markers in acute and perforated appendicitis as well as their value in excluding the condition. Methods A retrospective analysis of 1,169 appendicectomies was performed. Patients were grouped according to histological examination of appendicectomy specimens (normal appendix = NA, acute appendicitis = AA, perforated appendicitis = PA) and preoperative laboratory test results were correlated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area analysis (area under the curve [AUC]) was performed to examine diagnostic accuracy. Results ROC analysis of all laboratory variables showed that no independent variable was diagnostic for AA. Good diagnostic accuracy was seen for AA when all variables were combined (WCC/CRP/bilirubin combined AUC: 0.8173). In PA, the median CRP level was significantly higher than that of AA (158mg/l vs 30mg, p<0.0001). CRP also showed the highest sensitivity (100%) and negative predictive value (100%) for PA. CRP had the highest diagnostic accuracy in PA (AUC: 0.9322) and this was increased when it was combined with WCC (AUC: 0.9388). Bilirubin added no diagnostic value in PA. Normal levels of WCC, CRP and bilirubin could not rule out appendicitis. Conclusions CRP provides the highest diagnostic accuracy for PA. Bilirubin did not provide any discriminatory value for AA and its complications. Normal inflammatory markers cannot exclude appendicitis, which remains a clinical diagnosis. PMID:23827295

  4. A Feasibility Study of Real-Time Remote CT Reading for Suspected Acute Appendicitis Using an iPhone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changsun; Kang, Bossng; Choi, Hyuk Joong; Park, Joon Bum

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an iPhone-based remote control system as a real-time remote computed tomography (CT) reading tool for suspected appendicitis using a third-generation (3G) network under suboptimal illumination. One hundred twenty abdominal CT scans were selected; 60 had no signs of appendicitis, whereas the remaining 60 had signs of appendicitis. The 16 raters reviewed the images using the liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor of a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) workstation, as well as using an iPhone connected to the PACS workstation via a remote control system. We graded the probability of the presence of acute appendicitis for each examination using a five-point Likert scale. The overall sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of suspected appendicitis using the iPhone and the LCD monitor were high, and they were not significantly different (sensitivity P = 1.00, specificity P = 0.14). The average areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for all CT readings with the iPhone and LCD monitor were 0.978 (confidence interval 0.965-0.991) and 0.974 (0.960-0.988), respectively, and the two devices did not have significantly different diagnostic performances (P = 0.55). The inter-rater agreement for both devices was very good; the kappa value for the iPhone was 0.809 (0.793-0.826), and that for the LCD monitor was 0.817 (0.801-0.834). Each rater had moderate-to-very good intra-observer agreement between the two devices. We verified the feasibility of an iPhone-based remote control system as a real-time remote CT reading tool for identifying suspected appendicitis using a 3G network and suboptimal illumination.

  5. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... call your doctor. In Spanish— Dolor abdominal en niños menores de 12 años What is recurrent abdominal ... Functional abdominal pain (FAP) typically affects kids ages 4-12, and is quite common, affecting up to ...

  6. [Elbow pain].

    PubMed

    Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Miintyselkii, Pekka; Havulinna, Jouni

    2010-01-01

    Pain and disability in the elbow are not as common as in the neck, shoulder or wrist, for example. The elbow may, however, present disorders that may in a prolonged state be difficult and cause significant loss of working capacity. These include epicondylitis, osteoarthritis and entrapment of the ulnar nerve.

  7. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  8. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck. If neck pain involves compression of your nerves, you may feel numbness, tingling, or weakness in your arm or ... When to Contact a Medical Professional ... fever and headache, and your neck is so stiff that you cannot touch your chin to your chest. This may be ...

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking Klatskin tumour on radiology.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Yousaf Bashir; Sohail, Abdul Malik Amir Humza; Haider, Zishan

    2015-04-09

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is categorised into two distinct types, AIP type 1 and 2. Although there can be multisystem involvement, rarely, the cholangitis associated with AIP can present radiologically in a manner similar to that of Klatskin tumour. We present the case of a 65-year-old man who was almost misdiagnosed with a Klatskin tumour because of the similarity in radiological features of the two aforementioned clinical entities. The patient presented with a history of jaundice, pruritus and abdominal pain, and work up showed deranged liver function tests, elevated cancer antigen 19-9 levels and positive antinuclear antibodies. CT scan of the abdomen showed findings suggestive of Klatskin tumour but due to diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and surrounding low-attenuation halo found on a closer review, a diagnosis of AIP was performed. The patient was started on standard corticosteroid therapy and responded well, with complete resolution of the radiological findings.

  10. Aeromonas hydrophila Sepsis Mimicking Vibrio vulnificus Infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Young; Nam, Hyun Min; Park, Kun; Park, Seok Don

    2011-09-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a facultatively anaerobic, asporogenous gram-negative rod that has often been regarded as an opportunistic pathogen in hosts with impairment of a local or general defense mechanism. A 68-year-old alcoholic woman presented with shock and gangrene on the right arm. At first, her clinical presentations were severe painful erythematous swelling that worsened within a few hours with development of gangrene, edema, and blisters. Bullous fluid and blood cultures yielded A. hydrophila. Histopathological findings of sections obtained from the vesicle revealed subepidermal vesicles; necrosis of the epidermis, papillary dermis, and subcutaneous fat; and massive hemorrhage in the subcutis. Despite all efforts to save the patient, she died 8 hours after admission. Clinical features of A. hydrophila sepsis resemble those of Vibrio vulnificus sepsis. Therefore, in addition to the case report, we compared the cultural, biochemical, and morphological differences between A. hydrophila and V. vulnificus for facilitation of early and accurate identification of the causative agent.

  11. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  12. Chlamydia Peritonitis and Ascites Mimicking Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Macer, Matthew; Azodi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) rarely results in diffuse ascites. Severe adhesive disease secondary to PID may lead to the formation of inclusion cysts and even pelvic peritoneal nodularity due to postinflammatory scarring and cause an elevation of serum CA-125 levels. The constellation of these findings may mimic an ovarian neoplasm. Case. We report a case of a 22-year-old female who presented with multiple pelvic cysts and diffuse ascites due to Chlamydia trachomatis infection. The initial gynecologic exam did not reveal obvious evidence of PID; however, a positive Chlamydia trachomatis test, pathologic findings, and the exclusion of other etiologies facilitated the diagnosis. Conclusion. Chlamydia trachomatis and other infectious agents should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a young sexually active female with abdominal pain, ascites, and pelvic cystic masses. Thorough workup in such a population may reduce the number of more invasive procedures as well as unnecessary repeat surgical procedures. PMID:27747116

  13. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Chronic Pain By Beth Loy, Ph.D. Preface Introduction Information ... at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Chronic Pain How prevalent is chronic pain? Chronic pain has ...

  14. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  15. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  16. Unique domain appended to vertebrate tRNA synthetase is essential for vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoling; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Hui-Min; Swindell, Eric C.; Marshall, Alan G.; Guo, Min; Kishi, Shuji; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2012-01-01

    New domains were progressively added to cytoplasmic aminoacyl transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetases during evolution. One example is the UNE-S domain, appended to seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) in species that developed closed circulatory systems. Here we show using solution and crystal structure analyses and in vitro and in vivo functional studies that UNE-S harbours a robust nuclear localization signal (NLS) directing SerRS to the nucleus where it attenuates vascular endothelial growth factor A expression. We also show that SerRS mutants previously linked to vasculature abnormalities either deleted the NLS or have the NLS sequestered in an alternative conformation. A structure-based second-site mutation, designed to release the sequestered NLS, restored normal vasculature. Thus, the essential function of SerRS in vascular development depends on UNE-S. These results are the first to show an essential role for a tRNA synthetase-associated appended domain at the organism level, and suggest that acquisition of UNE-S has a role in the establishment of the closed circulatory systems of vertebrates. PMID:22353712

  17. Previous appendicitis may affect peritoneal overlap of the mesh in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, R; Di Martino, M; Lipari, G; Sambataro, L

    2002-02-01

    Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is now increasingly performed in bilateral and recurrent groin hernias. The avoidance of direct exposure of the commonly used meshes to the abdominal viscera is considered essential to reduce the risk of bowel adhesions. We report a case of bilateral inguinal hernia repair in a patients who had had an appendectomy performed 8 years earlier for a perforated appendicitis. Probably as a result of previous inflammation, any attempt to dissect the preperitoneal layer in the right side resulted in peritoneal lacerations. Since the peritoneum could not be used to cover the mesh, we decided to position an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) mesh to avoid postoperative adhesions. The mesh was fixed with tacks to the symphysis pubis, Cooper's ligament, the ilio-pubic tract, and the transversalis fascia 2 cm above the hernia defect. This case suggests that in patient with previous appendicitis, a difficult preperitoneal dissection can be expected. In such cases, especially in young patients for whom future surgical operations cannot be excluded, any attempt to reduce adhesions is justified. At the present time, the use of e-PTFE meshes, which induce no tissue reaction, is a good option in this situation.

  18. A history of the treatment of appendicitis in children: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Hamill, James K; Hill, Andrew G

    2016-10-01

    During the latter half of the 19th century, surgeons increasingly reported performing appendicectomies. Fitz from Harvard, Groves from Canada and Tait from Britain all recorded successful removal of the appendix. McBurney described the point of maximal tenderness in classic appendicitis and also the muscle-splitting incision centred on this point. Priority is given to McArthur in describing the lateral muscle-splitting incision. The direction of the cutaneous incision was later modified by Elliott and Lanz. Incisions that healed well were essential to recovery. Appendicectomy became a 'fashionable' operation after the London surgeon, Treves, removed the appendix of King Edward VII. Through the 20th century, the mortality from appendicitis fell notably with the advent of sulphonamide and penicillin, improvements in fluid therapy and safer anaesthesia. By 1990, diagnostic delay was the main cause of death. Semm performed the first laparoscopic appendicectomy in 1990, roundly criticized at the time for what is now a routine procedure. We view contemporary debates on the indications for appendicectomy, the best approach and how to optimize recovery in the light of the history of this intriguing disease.

  19. Munchausen syndrome mimicking psychiatric disease with concomitant genuine physical illness

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jaime; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Xavier, Miguel; Gusmão, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Munchausen syndrome is a disorder in which patients intentionally produce symptoms mimicking physical or psychiatric illnesses with the aim to assume the sick role and to gain medical attention. Once a patient receives a Munchausen syndrome diagnosis every complaint made thence tends to be regarded with scepticism by clinical staff. However, it is possible that a bona fide illness, which might be disregarded, may coexist in these patients. We report a case of MS mimicking psychiatric disease with concomitant genuine acute physical illness. Despite the initial doubts about the veracity of the latter, due to its prompt recognition, treatment was successful. PMID:22798096

  20. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  1. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis due to Actinomyces Mimicking a Perforation of the Proximal Jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Eenhuis, Louise L.; de Lange, Marleen E.; Samson, Anda D.; Busch, Olivier R.C.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 42 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous pelvic-abdominal peritonitis due to actinomyces Symptoms: Abdominal distension • abdominal pain • acute abdomen • fever • intermenstrual bleeding • nausea • sepsis • septic shock Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Pelvic-abdominal actinomycosis is a rare chronic condition caused by an anaerobic, gram-negative rod-shaped commensal bacterium of the Actinomyces species. When Actinomyces becomes pathogenic, it frequently causes a chronic infection with granulomatous abscess formation with pus. Due to diversity in clinical and radiological presentation, actinomycosis can easily be mistaken for several other conditions. Peritonitis without preceding abscess formation caused by Actinomyces species has been described in only few cases before in literature. Case report: We report a case of spontaneous pelvic-abdominal peritonitis with presence of pneumoperitoneum and absence of preceding abscesses due to acute actinomycosis mimicking a perforation of the proximal jejunum in a 42-year-old female with an intra-uterine contraceptive device in place. Explorative laparotomy revealed 2 liters of odorless pus but no etiological explanation for the peritonitis. The intra-uterine contraceptive device was removed. Cultivation showed growth of Actinomyces turicensis. The patient was successfully treated with penicillin. Conclusions: In the case of primary bacterial peritonitis or lower abdominal pain without focus in a patient with an intrauterine device in situ, Actinomyces should be considered as a pathogen. PMID:27561364

  2. Hepatobiliary rhabdomyosarcoma mimicking choledochal cyst: Lessons learned☆

    PubMed Central

    Elwahab, Mohamed Abd; Hamed, Hosam; Shehta, Ahmed; Ali, Mahmoud; Zalata, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The differential diagnosis of hepatic cystic lesions is a challenging process especially in case of hepatic rhabdomyosarcoma (HRMS) presenting as hepatic cyst. PRESENTATION OF CASE We introduce our experience with a case of HRMS in a 3-year-old female patient who was misdiagnosed to have type IV-A choledochal cyst and definitive correct diagnosis was reached after the pathological and immunohistochemical examination of the surgically resected lesion. This case presentation is followed by important practical messages to hepatobiliary surgeons regarding HRMS. DISCUSSION HRMS is a rare pediatric tumor. Jaundice is the most common presentation of HRMS followed by abdominal pain and vomiting. Great effort is needed to differentiate the tumor from choledochal cyst and infectious hepatitis. Through evaluation using available imaging studies together with clinical anticipation is mandatory for establishing the correct diagnosis. CONCLUSION Differentiation of HRMs from choledochal cyst mandates through evaluation and clinical anticipation. HRMS should be suspected in any child with obstructive jaundice. Once diagnosis is established, multidisciplinary treatment is the best management strategy and it has proved better surgical outcome and long term survival. PMID:24636980

  3. Clinical significance of C-reactive protein levels in the determination of pathological type of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Feng-Qin; Zhang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the significance of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the discrimination of acute appendicitis pathology and its guiding role in the timing of surgery. Methods: 307 patients in our hospital from July 2012 to December 2013 were selected, who received appendectomy and simultaneous detections of WBC, neutrophil percentage and CRP; and Logistic regression analysis and Roc analysis of these indicators were conducted; Roc curve was drawn. Results: Logistic regression analysis showed that the proportion of neutrophils and CRP were the risk factors to determine gangrenous appendicitis, but the box chart and Roc curves showed that C-reactive protein was superior to neutrophil classification in determining gangrenous appendicitis (areas under the curve were 0.882 and 0.667 respectively), and the best diagnostic cutoff value was 44.42 mg/L (sensitivity 73.1%, specificity 89.5%). Conclusion: C-reactive protein levels can help distinguish pathological types of acute appendicitis, which can be used as a reference index for surgery determination. PMID:26550344

  4. Can computed tomography scan be performed effectively in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis without the added morbidity of rectal contrast?

    PubMed

    Dearing, Daniel D; Recabaren, James A; Alexander, Magdi

    2008-10-01

    The highest degrees of accuracy have been demonstrated for CT scans using rectal contrast in diagnosing appendicitis. However, the administration of rectal contrast is associated with patient discomfort and rarely, rectosigmoid perforation (0.04%). Additionally, the commonly accepted negative appendectomy rate is around 16 per cent. We performed a retrospective review of radiology, operative, and pathology reports of consecutive patients undergoing appendectomy or CT examination for appendicitis during 2006. CT scans were performed without rectal contrast. The accuracy of each type of inpatient CT examination and negative appendectomy rates were determined. Two hundred and thirty-eight patients underwent appendectomy. One hundred and thirty-four appendectomy patients (56%) received a preoperative CT scan. The negative appendectomy rates were 6.3 per cent overall, 8.7 per cent without CT examination and 4.5 per cent with CT (P = 0.3). Two hundred and forty-five inpatient CT scans were performed for suspected appendicitis with a sensitivity of 90 per cent, specificity of 98 per cent, accuracy of 94 per cent, positive predictive value of 98 per cent, and negative predictive value of 91 per cent. CT scanning without rectal contrast is effective for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis making rectal contrast, with its attendant morbidity, unnecessary. The previously acceptable published negative appendectomy rate is higher than that found in current surgical practice likely due to preoperative CT scanning.

  5. Amine-Appended Hierarchical Ca-A Zeolite for Enhancing CO2 /CH4 Selectivity of Mixed-Matrix Membranes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tien Hoa; Gong, Heqing; Lee, Siew Siang; Bae, Tae-Hyun

    2016-10-18

    An amine-appended hierarchical Ca-A zeolite that can selectively capture CO2 was synthesized and incorporated into inexpensive membrane polymers, in particular polyethylene oxide and Matrimid, to design mixed-matrix membranes with high CO2 /CH4 selectivities. Binary mixture permeation testing reveals that amine-appended mesoporous Ca-A is highly effective in improving CO2 /CH4 selectivity of polymeric membranes. In particular, the CO2 /CH4 selectivity of the polyethylene oxide membrane increases from 15 to 23 by incorporating 20 wt % amine-appended Ca-A zeolite. Furthermore, the formation of filler/polymer interfacial defects, which is typically found in glassy polymer-zeolite pairs, is inhibited owing to the interaction between the amine groups on the external surface of zeolites and polymer chains. Our results suggest that the amine-appended hierarchial Ca-A, which was utilized in membrane fabrication for the first time, is a good filler material for fabricating a CO2 -selective mixed-matrix membrane with defect-free morphology.

  6. Misdiagnosis of Acute Appendicitis in Children Attending the Emergency Department: The Experience of a Large, Tertiary Care Pediatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Galai, Tut; Beloosesky, Osnat Zmora; Scolnik, Dennis; Rimon, Ayelet; Glatstein, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    Background Missed appendicitis is a frequent cause of professional liability for emergency department (ED) physicians. Our objective was to assess and compare the presentations of patients in whom the diagnosis of appendicitis was missed with those in whom it was correctly diagnosed on their first ED visit and to identify the clinical features that characterized the two groups. Methods This study is a retrospective review of all ED children with proven appendicitis between January 2010 and December 2013. Historical, clinical, and laboratory features of patients missed and correctly diagnosed during their first ED visit were compared. The literature on this subject was also reviewed. Results A total of 400 patients were included in this study. Fifteen (3.75%) patients were considered to be misdiagnoses, the most common misdiagnosis being acute gastroenteritis (26.6%). Thirty-three percent of misdiagnosed patients had undergone an ultrasound compared with 87% of correctly diagnosed patients (p < 0.05). Conclusion Our incidence of missed appendicitis compares favorably with the 6.9 to 27.6% incidence reported in the literature. Our relatively low incidence may be a result of medical practice, especially during night shifts, and the availability of ultrasound 24 hours a day.

  7. Abdominal CT scanning in reproductive-age women with right lower quadrant abdominal pain: does its use reduce negative appendectomy rates and healthcare costs?

    PubMed

    Morse, Bryan C; Roettger, Richard H; Kalbaugh, Corey A; Blackhurst, Dawn W; Hines, William B

    2007-06-01

    Although acute appendicitis is the most frequent cause of the acute abdomen in the United States, its accurate diagnosis in reproductive-age women remains difficult. Problems in making the diagnosis are evidenced by negative appendectomy rates in this group of 20 per cent to 45 per cent. Abdominal CT scanning has been used in diagnosing acute appendicitis, but its reliability and usefulness remains controversial. There is concern that the use of CT scanning to make this diagnosis leads to increased and unwarranted healthcare charges and costs. The purpose of our study is to determine if abdominal CT scanning is an effective test in making the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in reproductive-age women (age, 16-49 years) with right lower quadrant abdominal pain and to determine if its use is cost-effective. From January 2003 to December 2006, 439 patients were identified from our academic surgical database and confirmed by chart review as undergoing an appendectomy with a pre- or postoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Data, including age, presence and results of preoperative abdominal CT scans, operative findings, and pathology reports were reviewed. Comparison of patients receiving a preoperative CT scan with those who did not was performed using chi-squared analysis. In the subgroup of reproductive-age women, there was a significant difference in negative appendectomy rates of 17 per cent in the group that received abdominal CT scans versus 42 per cent in the group that did not (P < 0.038). After accounting for the patient and insurance company costs, abdominal CT scan savings averaged $1412 per patient. Abdominal CT scanning is a reliable, useful, and cost-effective test for evaluating right lower quadrant abdominal pain and making the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in reproductive-age women.

  8. Pain Management: Post-Amputation Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain Management Post-Amputation Pain Volume 8 · Issue 2 · March/April 1998 Text size Larger text Smaller text Java Required Print page Save and share ... by G. Edward Jeffries, MD, FACS Post-Amputation Pain Post-amputation pain is one of the most ...

  9. Body mass index, pain score and Alvarado score are useful predictors of appendix visualization at ultrasound in adults.

    PubMed

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; Lertlumsakulsub, Waraporn; Srichareon, Pungkava

    2015-06-01

    The study objective was to find factors predictive of ultrasound visualization of the appendix in patients with suspected appendicitis. A total of 238 consecutive adult patients (178 women, mean age 38.9 y, weight 58.2 kg, body mass index 22.7) who underwent appendiceal ultrasound from January to December 2011 were included. Appendicitis was confirmed in 171 patients (171/238, 71.9%). Ultrasound sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 64%, 90% and 71%, respectively. The appendix was visualized at ultrasound in 126 patients (group 1) and not visualized in 112 patients (group 2). Group 1 had a lower body mass index, higher pain score and higher Alvarado score. The chances of visualizing the appendix in patients with body mass indexes ≤22, pain scores ≥6, and Alvarado scores ≥6 were 2.3, 2.9, and 3.8 times higher than those of their counterparts, respectively. Therefore, in patients with these factors, the use of ultrasound may be beneficial in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis.

  10. Undertreatment of caner pain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Lee, Shiu-Yu C

    2015-06-01

    Pain is a burdensome symptom that can commonly exist chronically along the cancer trajectory. Uncontrolled pain will impact on cancer patients' quality of life, even further negatively affect cancer survivors' employment. Based on systemic reviews of studies for past 10 years, the paper reported that although there is enormous advancement on the knowledge of cancer pain and pain management, studies still documented undertreatment of cancer pain globally. Additionally, pain distress a significant portion of cancer survivors. The pain in cancer survivors distinct from the pain related with cancer, instead emphasize on pain related with cancer treatment, such as neuropathic pain, muscular syndrome. Evidence-based pain management with common pain problems in cancer survivors is lacking. Further studies are needed to understand the pain in cancer survivors and to develop effective strategies in helping cancer survivors to manage their pain.

  11. Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia mimicking cutaneous lymphoma in a hyperthyroid cat.

    PubMed

    Snead, Elisabeth; Kerr, Moira; Macdonald, Valerie

    2013-10-01

    A 12-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat presented for chronic, localized, swelling and crusting of the left upper lip, weight loss, sporadic vomiting, and focal alopecia between the scapulae was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and regional eosinophilic lymphadenitis. Treatment with methimazole exacerbated an underlying hypersensitivity disorder leading to marked generalized lymphadenopathy that histologically mimicked lymphoma.

  12. Osteoid osteoma of the radial styloid mimicking de quervain tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Chloros, George D; Themistocleous, George S; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Khaldi, Lubna; Efstathopoulos, Dimitrios G; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2007-10-01

    A very unusual location of osteoid osteoma arising in the radial styloid is presented, which strongly mimicked de Quervain tenosynovitis, thereby resulting in the patient undergoing an additional unnecessary operation and a substantial delay of more than 2 years in diagnosis.

  13. [Ectopic pancreas mimicking advanced gastric malignancy--case report].

    PubMed

    Zawada, Iwona; Lewosiuk, Agnieszka; Hnatyszyn, Krzysztof; Patalan, Michał; Woyke, Stanisław; Kostyrka, Roman; Marlicz, Krzysztof; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2012-04-01

    Ectopic pancreas is the most common type of ectopic tissue in gastrointestinal tract. It is typically asymptomatic, presenting as a small submucosal lesion in prepyloric region of stomach. The diagnosis is usually incidental, during gastroscopy. The patient with symptomatic heterotropic pancreas, mimicking gastric malignancy was described.

  14. Headache attributed to unruptured saccular aneurysm, mimicking hemicrania continua.

    PubMed

    Vikelis, Michail; Xifaras, Michail; Magoufis, Georgios; Gekas, Georgios; Mitsikostas, Dimos Dimitrios

    2005-06-01

    Unruptured cerebral arterial aneurysms most often remain asymptomatic, but they may cause headache or other symptoms or signs. We describe herewith a case of headache attributed to an unruptured internal carotid artery aneurysm, clearly mimicking the phenotype of hemicrania continua. Potential pathophysiological explanations and recommendations for recognition of similar cases are discussed.

  15. Organic diseases mimicking acral lick dermatitis in six dogs.

    PubMed

    Denerolle, Philippe; White, Stephen D; Taylor, Tara S; Vandenabeele, Sophie I J

    2007-01-01

    Acral lick dermatitis ("lick granuloma") in dogs is often thought to have a behavioral etiology. However, other diseases may cause lesions on the distal legs, mimicking acral lick dermatitis. In this report, six dogs were presented with acral lick dermatitis-like lesions from different underlying causes-namely lymphoma, an orthopedic pin, deep pyoderma, mast cell tumor, leishmaniasis, and (presumptive) sporotrichosis.

  16. Rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    Özçelik, Ümit; Bircan, Hüseyin Yüce; Eren, Eryiğit; Demiralay, Ebru; Işıklar, İclal; Demirağ, Alp; Moray, Gökhan

    2015-01-01

    Although diverticular disease of the colon is common, the occurrence of rectal diverticula is extremely rare with only sporadic reports in the literature since 1911. Symptomatic rectal diverticula are seen even less frequently, and surgical intervention is needed for only complicated cases. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with rectal diverticulitis mimicking rectal carcinoma with intestinal obstruction.

  17. Trichophyton Schoenleinii-induced widespread tinea corporis mimicking parapsoriasis.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, P; Farshi, S; Khosravi, A R; Naraghi, Z S; Chalangari, R

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of extensive tinea corporis in an 80-year-old woman on her forearms, thighs, legs, buttocks and trunk, mimicking parapsoriasis due to Trichophyton schoenleinii, without scalp involvement. Diagnosis of Trichophyton schoenleinii was confirmed by microscopy and mycological culture specimens.

  18. Retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst mimicking hydatid liver: a case report.

    PubMed

    Parray, Fazl Q; Sherwani, Afak Yusuf; Dangroo, Sajad Ahmad; Bisati, Rafia Aziz; Malik, Nighat Shaffi

    2012-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts frequently occur in the mediastinum. They may be rarely encountered in the abdomen and retroperitoneum. Bronchogenic cysts can in fact mimic hydatid cysts. We report a case of retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst below the right hemidiaphragm mimicking a hydatid cyst of the liver in a 30-year-old female.

  19. Retroperitoneal Bronchogenic Cyst Mimicking Hydatid Liver: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Fazl Q.; Sherwani, Afak Yusuf; Dangroo, Sajad Ahmad; Bisati, Rafia Aziz; Malik, Nighat Shaffi

    2012-01-01

    Bronchogenic cysts frequently occur in the mediastinum. They may be rarely encountered in the abdomen and retroperitoneum. Bronchogenic cysts can in fact mimic hydatid cysts. We report a case of retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst below the right hemidiaphragm mimicking a hydatid cyst of the liver in a 30-year-old female. PMID:22606600

  20. Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia mimicking cutaneous lymphoma in a hyperthyroid cat

    PubMed Central

    Snead, Elisabeth; Kerr, Moira; MacDonald, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat presented for chronic, localized, swelling and crusting of the left upper lip, weight loss, sporadic vomiting, and focal alopecia between the scapulae was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and regional eosinophilic lymphadenitis. Treatment with methimazole exacerbated an underlying hypersensitivity disorder leading to marked generalized lymphadenopathy that histologically mimicked lymphoma. PMID:24155419

  1. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  2. Giant cell myocarditis mimicking idiopathic fascicular ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Weidenbach, Michael; Springer, Tina; Daehnert, Ingo; Klingel, Karin; Doll, Susanne; Janousek, Jan

    2008-02-01

    We report an adolescent with giant cell myocarditis (GCM) mimicking tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy. His electrocardiogram (ECG) was typical for an incessant form of fascicular ventricular tachycardia. The patient rapidly deteriorated and required support using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Biopsy revealed GCM with massive myocyte necrosis. He was successfully heart transplanted 6 days after admission.

  3. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Netanel; Ben-Itzhak, Ofer; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    In a patient with systemic multiorgan disease with overlapping features, the differential diagnosis included infectious diseases, malignancies, and systemic autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. We present an unusual case of a young male with B cell lymphoma who presented with symptoms mimicking systemic vasculitis and review the existing literature. PMID:27293945

  4. Heel lipoma mimicking plantar fasciitis in a ballroom dancer.

    PubMed

    Taweel, Nicholas R; Raikin, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The present case illustrates a lipoma as an unusual cause of heel pain. A 64-year-old female ballroom dancer presented with 8 months of pain that was unresponsive to previous treatment of plantar fasciitis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heel lipoma. Her pain was fully resolved after surgical excision. Soft tissue tumors should be included in the differential diagnosis of heel pain, especially when symptoms and treatment response do not follow the typical course of plantar fasciitis.

  5. Definitions and Types of Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Therapy Pain Management Recommendations References April 15, 2017 Definitions and Types of Pain Defining Pain Pain is ... there are many mechanisms involved in nociception. More definitions ... Classifying Pain Pain can be "acute" or "chronic." ...

  6. Synthesis, characterization and cation-induced dimerization of new aza-crown ether-appended metalloporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Mikhalitsyna, Elena A; Tyurin, Vladimir S; Zamylatskov, Ilia A; Khrustalev, Victor N; Beletskaya, Irina P

    2012-07-07

    New metalloporphyrins bearing one or two aryl-aza-crown ether moieties at meso-positions have been synthesized using a palladium catalyzed amination reaction and fully characterized by spectral techniques. X-Ray structural data have been presented for the zinc and copper complexes of mono-substituted aza-crown ether appended metalloporphyrins. UV-Vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopic studies showed that addition of K(+) cations to a solution of monomeric aza-crowned porphyrins in CHCl(3)/MeOH led to cation-induced dimerization of these porphyrins, whereas addition of Na(+) cations yielded a monomeric complex. Axial coordination of the exobidentate ligand (DABCO) to zinc complexes of aza-crowned porphyrins and following binding metal ions led to formation of sandwich complexes with high stability constants.

  7. Rare extra-adrenal paraganglioma mimicking a painful Schwannoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Picchetto, Andrea; M Paganini, Alessandro; Balla, Andrea; Quaresima, Silvia; Cantisani, Vito; D'Ambrosio, Giancarlo; Lezoche, Emanuele

    2014-09-26

    I paragangliomi hanno un’incidenza annuale di circa 1/100000; essi originano dai tessuti cromaffini dei corpi di Zurckerkandl. In questo case report riportiamo il caso di un uomo di 53 anni, già trattato e seguito per un precedente limfoma di Hodkin che è stato sottoposta a RMN dell’addome per una lombalgia cronica che durava da due anni e che non riusciva ad alleviare con i FANS. La RMN ha rivelato un’incidentaloma: una massa in regione para-aortica, a livello della loggia surrenalica sinistra con le caratteristiche di una massa nodulare solida (29*25mm), che non sembrava originare direttamente dal surrene. Il pz ha inoltre eseguito un TC dell’addome che ha mostrato una massa localizzata di fronte al surrene di sinistra; il collega radiologo ha definito questa massa come un tumore maligno delle guaine nervose periferiche (Schwannoma) o come un linfonodo colliquato (essendo nota la patologia linfomatosa già descritta in anamnesi). Il paziente non riferiva cefalea, palpitazioni, picchi ipertensivi ne’ altri sintomi sistemici. Durante il suo ricovero, sono stati dosati i marker tumorali cromogranina e l’enolasi neurono-specifica che sono risultati essere rispettivamente 187.00 ng/mL and 7.7 ng/mL. La lombalgia è stata trattata inizialmente con Ketorolac, senza beneficio alcuno, quindi con Ketorolac più Tramadolo in pompa elastomerica, nuovamente senza beneficio per il paziente, infine con infusione continua di Morfina. Dato che l’esatta natura della neoformazione non era nota e che l’esecuzione di una biopsia TC guidata non era tecnicamente possibile, è stata eseguita un’escissione per via laparoscopica della massa, con approccio anteriore submesocolico trans peritoneale, così come gli Autori sono soliti eseguire per la surrenalectomia sinistra. Sin dai primi giorni postoperatori il paziente non ha più necessitato della morfina. Il decorso postoperatorio è stato del tutto regolare. L’esame istologico è risultato essere paraganglioma. I paragangliomi extra-surrenalici sono raramente riconosciuti duranti gli esami preoperatori. Questo errore è spesso dovuto alla sua capacità di simulare vari altri tipi di tumore. Gli Autori credono che i paragangliomi possano essere resecati con successo tramite approccio laparoscopico, che essi sono difficili da distinguere altri tipi di tumore e che debbano essere sospettati anche se i risultati preoperatori depongono per qualcos’altro.

  8. Cardiac sarcoma presenting with abdominal pain and mimicking myxoma on echocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Smelt, Jeremy; Fletcher, Nick; Sarsam, Mazin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma’s are highly aggressive tumours. Clear resection margins ± autotransplant, followed by chemotherapy, offers the best survival chance. Therefore, frozen section should be preformed when there is ambiguity in diagnosis. PMID:27688897

  9. Mean Platelet Volume and Platelet Distribution Width as Markers in the Diagnosis of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhe; Pan, Jiyong; Zhang, Yingyi; Wang, Ziyi; Zhu, Ming; Yang, Baoshun; Shi, Lei; Jing, Huirong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Acute gangrenous appendicitis (AGA) is a common medical condition; however, the grade of appendicitis usually cannot be established preoperatively. We have attempted to identify some indicators, such as the mean platelet volume (MPV) and the platelet distribution width (PDW), to diagnose AGA. Aims. To evaluate whether or not the MPV and PDW are suitable markers to diagnose AGA. Methods. A retrospective study of 160 patients with AGA and 160 healthy patients was undertaken. Disease diagnosis was confirmed based on the pathologic examination of surgical specimens. Patient white blood cell (WBC) count, neutrophil ratio (NR), platelet (PLT) count, MPV, PDW, and hematocrit (HCT) were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of these indices in AGA. Results. There were no significant differences between the AGA and control groups in age and gender. Compared to the control group, the WBC count, NR, and PDW were significantly higher (P < 0.001, resp.) and the MPV and HCT were significantly lower (P < 0.001, resp.) in the AGA group. The diagnostic specificities of the WBC count, NR, PLT count, MPV, PDW, and HCT were 86.3%, 92.5%, 58.1%, 81.7%, 83.9%, and 66.3%, respectively. Therefore, the NR had the highest diagnostic specificity for the diagnosis of AGA. Conclusions. This is the first study to assess the MPV and PDW in patients with AGA. Our present study showed that the MPV is reduced and the PDW is increased in patients with AGA; the sensitivity of PDW was superior to the MPV. A decreased MPV value and an increased PDW could serve as two markers to diagnose AGA. The NR had the highest specificity for the diagnosis of AGA. PMID:26688600

  10. A Novel Oxidative Stress Mediator in Acute Appendicitis: Thiol/Disulphide Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Turan, Umit; Kuvvetli, Adnan; Kilavuz, Huseyin; Karakaya, Burak; Ozaltun, Pınar; Alısık, Murat; Erel, Ozcan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the role of a novel oxidative stress marker, thiol/disulphide homeostasis, in patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis (AA). Methods. In this study, seventy-one (43 male and 28 female) patients diagnosed with AA and 71 (30 male and 41 female) healthy volunteers were included. Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), haemoglobin (Hb), white blood cell (WBC), c-reactive protein (CRP), and thiol/disulphide homeostasis parameters (native thiol, total thiol, disulphide, disulphide/native thiol, native thiol/total thiol, and disulphide/total thiol ratios) were compared between the groups. Thiol/disulphide homeostasis was determined by a newly developed method by Erel and Neselioglu. Results. The native thiol, total thiol, and the native thiol/total thiol ratio levels were statistically significantly decreased in the AA compared with the control group (p < 0.001). Disulphide level and the ratios of disulphide/native thiol and disulphide/total thiol were higher in the AA group than in the control group (p < 0.001). There was a negative correlation of CRP with native thiol, total thiol, and native thiol/total thiol ratio while there was a positive correlation of CRP with disulphide/native thiol and disulphide/total thiol in the AA group. In the stepwise regression model, risk factors as disulphide/native thiol (OR = 1.368; p = 0.018) and CRP (OR = 1.635; p = 0.003) were determined as predictors of perforated appendicitis compared to the nonperforated group. Conclusion. This is the first study examining the thiol/disulphide homeostasis as a diagnostic aid in AA and establishing thiol/disulphide homeostatis balance shifted towards the disulphide formation due to thiol oxidation. Further studies are needed to optimize the use of this novel oxidative stress marker in AA. PMID:27642237

  11. Bis-benzimidazol-appended binucleating porphyrin ligands: synthesis, characterization, and x-ray structure

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, N.G.; Boyd, P.D.W.; Rodgers, S.J.; Wuenschell, G.E.; Koch, C.A.; Rasmussen, S.; Tate, J.R.; Erler, B.S.; Reed, C.A.

    1986-10-29

    The synthesis and characterization of some new binucleating tetraarylporphyrin ligands is reported. The potentially most useful example is ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..,5-15-bis(N-(2-methylbenzimidazolyl) acetamidophenyl)-..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..,10-20-bis(pivalamidophenyl)porphine (8). The ligands have two appended benzimidazole arms which are designed to chelate a second metal directly above the porphyrin. The synthetic methodology for obtaining both the 5,15 (i.e. trans) and the 5,10 (i.e., cis) bis-appended ligand from an ..cap alpha.., ..cap alpha.., ..cap alpha.., ..cap alpha..,5,10,15,20 tetra-functionalized starting material is described in detail. A key design feature of the ligand system is amenability to single-crystal x-ray structure determination and this is demonstrated with an x-ray structure of a copper(II) complex. Crystal data for CuC/sub 74/H/sub 66/N/sub 12/O/sub 3/1.5 (diethyl ether) toluene are the following: monoclinic, C2/c, a = 31.240 (4) A, b = 16.769 (5) A, c = 35.199 (4) A, ..beta.. = 121.4 (1)/sup 0/; R = 0.0826, R/sub W/ = 0.0826. H bonding between the benzimidazole moieties and the pivalamido pickets is seen to determine the structural disposition of the appendages lying above the porphyrin ring. Iron(III) porphyrin complexes of these new ligands exist in a hydroxo monomer form as well as the familiar ..mu..-oxo dimer form.

  12. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed.

  13. Neuropathic Pain After Lung Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Chronic Neuropathic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Pain, Postoperative; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Neuropathic Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Pain; Chronic Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy

  14. Pain and pain management in haemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Auerswald, Günter; Dolan, Gerry; Duffy, Anne; Hermans, Cedric; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Ljung, Rolf; Morfini, Massimo; Lambert, Thierry; Šalek, Silva Zupančić

    2016-01-01

    Joint pain is common in haemophilia and may be acute or chronic. Effective pain management in haemophilia is essential to reduce the burden that pain imposes on patients. However, the choice of appropriate pain-relieving measures is challenging, as there is a complex interplay of factors affecting pain perception. This can manifest as differences in patients’ experiences and response to pain, which require an individualized approach to pain management. Prophylaxis with factor replacement reduces the likelihood of bleeds and bleed-related pain, whereas on-demand therapy ensures rapid bleed resolution and pain relief. Although use of replacement or bypassing therapy is often the first intervention for pain, additional pain relief strategies may be required. There is an array of analgesic options, but consideration should be paid to the adverse effects of each class. Nevertheless, a combination of medications that act at different points in the pain pathway may be beneficial. Nonpharmacological measures may also help patients and include active coping strategies; rest, ice, compression, and elevation; complementary therapies; and physiotherapy. Joint aspiration may also reduce acute joint pain, and joint steroid injections may alleviate chronic pain. In the longer term, increasing use of prophylaxis or performing surgery may be necessary to reduce the burden of pain caused by the degenerative effects of repeated bleeds. Whichever treatment option is chosen, it is important to monitor pain and adjust patient management accordingly. Beyond specific pain management approaches, ongoing collaboration between multidisciplinary teams, which should include physiotherapists and pain specialists, may improve outcomes for patients. PMID:27439216

  15. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... doses of these medicines can help with chronic low back pain , even if the person does not feel sad ... notices pain. Antidepressants most commonly used for chronic low back pain also help you sleep. Antidepressants most often used ...

  16. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back ... During Pregnancy FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during ...

  17. Pain medications - narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    Painkillers; Drugs for pain; Analgesics; Opioids ... Narcotics are also called opioid pain relievers. They are used only for pain that is severe and is not helped by other types of painkillers. When used ...

  18. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... regional pain syndrome is an uncommon form of chronic pain that usually affects an arm or a leg. ... exercises may be. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) . Chronic pain is sometimes eased by applying electrical impulses to ...

  19. Granuloma inguinale mimicking as squamous cell carcinoma of penis

    PubMed Central

    Pilani, Abhishek; Vora, Rita; Anjaneyan, Gopikrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Granuloma inguinale (GI) is an acquired chronic, slowly progressive, mildly contagious disease of venereal origin, characterized by granulomatous ulceration of the genitalia and neighboring sites, with little or no tendency to spontaneous healing caused by Klebsiella (Calymmatobacterium) granulomatis. A 55-year-old male presented with fissured, foul smelling, fungating growth over prepuce with phimosis mimicking squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) without lymphadenopathy. It started with painless papulonodular showed pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia, infiltration in dermis, acanthosis and vacuolated macrophages suggestive of GI and not showing any histopathological features of SCC. Patient was successfully treated by giving cotrimoxazole twice a day for 21 days. Here, we presented a case of GI mimicking SCC of penis, which was diagnosed on basis of histopathology and treated with excision followed by medical therapy with cotrimoxazole. PMID:24958990

  20. Rational Design of Pathogen-Mimicking Amphiphilic Materials as Nanoadjuvants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulery, Bret D.; Petersen, Latrisha K.; Phanse, Yashdeep; Kong, Chang Sun; Broderick, Scott R.; Kumar, Devender; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E.; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Rajan, Krishna; Wannemuehler, Michael J.; Bellaire, Bryan H.; Metzger, Dennis W.; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2011-12-01

    An opportunity exists today for cross-cutting research utilizing advances in materials science, immunology, microbial pathogenesis, and computational analysis to effectively design the next generation of adjuvants and vaccines. This study integrates these advances into a bottom-up approach for the molecular design of nanoadjuvants capable of mimicking the immune response induced by a natural infection but without the toxic side effects. Biodegradable amphiphilic polyanhydrides possess the unique ability to mimic pathogens and pathogen associated molecular patterns with respect to persisting within and activating immune cells, respectively. The molecular properties responsible for the pathogen-mimicking abilities of these materials have been identified. The value of using polyanhydride nanovaccines was demonstrated by the induction of long-lived protection against a lethal challenge of Yersinia pestis following a single administration ten months earlier. This approach has the tantalizing potential to catalyze the development of next generation vaccines against diseases caused by emerging and re-emerging pathogens.

  1. A patient with plaque type morphea mimicking systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Datau, E A

    2015-04-01

    Morphea is an uncommon connective tissue disease with the most prominent feature being thickening or fibrosis of the dermal without internal organ involvement. It is also known as a part of localized scleroderma. Based on clinical presentation and depth of tissue involvement, morphea is classified into several forms, and about two thirds of adults with morphea have plaque type. Overproduction of collagen production by fibroblast is the cause of abnormality in morphea, and the hyperactivity mechanism of fibroblast is still unknown, although there are several mechanisms already proposed. Plaque type morphea is actually a benign and self limited. Plaque type morphea that mimicking systemic lupus erythematosus in clinical appearance, such as alopecia and oral mucosal ulcers, is uncommon. A case of plaque type morphea mimicking systemic lupus erythematosus in a 20 year old woman was discussed. The patient was treated with local and systemic immunosuppressant and antioxydant. The patient's condition is improved without any significant side effects.

  2. Differential diagnosis of pain around the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Tibor, Lisa M; Sekiya, Jon K

    2008-12-01

    The differential diagnosis of hip pain is broad and includes intra-articular pathology, extra-articular pathology, and mimickers, including the joints of the pelvic ring. With the current advancements in hip arthroscopy, more patients are being evaluated for hip pain. In recent years, our understanding of the functional anatomy around the hip has improved. In addition, because of advancements in magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnosis of soft tissue causes of hip pain has improved. All of these advances have broadened the differential diagnosis of pain around the hip joint and improved the treatment of these problems. In this review, we discuss the causes of intra-articular hip pain that can be addressed arthroscopically: labral tears, loose bodies, femoroacetabular impingement, capsular laxity, tears of the ligamentum teres, and chondral damage. Extra-articular diagnoses that can be managed arthroscopically are also discussed, including: iliopsoas tendonitis, "internal" snapping hip, "external" snapping hip, iliotibial band and greater trochanteric bursitis, and gluteal tendon injury. Finally, we discuss extra-articular causes of hip pain that are often managed nonoperatively or in an open fashion: femoral neck stress fracture, adductor strain, piriformis syndrome, sacroiliac joint pain, athletic pubalgia, "sports hernia," "Gilmore's groin," and osteitis pubis.

  3. [Chronic postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Cachemaille, Matthieu; Blanc, Catherine

    2016-06-22

    Chronic postoperative pain remains a frequent pathology whose global impact approximates 20 and 30% and accounts for 20% of the consultations in a pain center. Risk factors consider firstly each patient's feature and comorbidity and also different surgical procedures with their technical approach. Neuropathic pain compared to nociceptive pain is a great component in the postoperative period and needs to be recognized by specific tests (DN4). Pain prevention involves risk factors' detection, appropriate anesthetic support and effective postoperative pain management. Treatment is based on the type of pain and includes a multimodal analgesia with interventional pain therapy.

  4. Reactive arthritis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Trabulo, D; Mangualde, J; Cremers, I; Oliveira, A P

    2014-01-01

    Reactive arthritis comprises a subgroup of infection-associated arthritis which occurs after genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract infection in genetically susceptible hosts. Studies have proposed Salmonella, Shigella or Yersinia infection as the microorganisms responsible for the post-dysenteric form. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is a well recognised best-known predisposing factor. We report a case of HLA-B27-associated reactive arthritis after Salmonella goldcoast enteritis, mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis.

  5. Testicular Schistosomiasis Mimicking Malignancy in a Child: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ekenze, Sebastian O; Modekwe, Victor O; Nzegwu, Martin A; Ekpemo, Samuel C; Ezomike, Uchechukwu O

    2015-08-01

    Schistosomiasis is an important communicable disease in the developing world. However, testicular schistosomiasis is an extremely rare condition. We report a case of testicular schistosomiasis mimicking testicular tumour in a 13 year old who presented with huge unilateral testicular mass. The dilemma encountered in the diagnosis and treatment of this child is presented to highlight the need for high index of suspicion of this pathology in children with testicular mass presenting from schistosomiasis-endemic areas.

  6. Osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Prakash, Mahesh; Saibaba, Balaji; Das, Ashim

    2016-01-01

    Osteofibrous dysplasia or ossifying fibroma is an uncommon benign fibro-osseous lesion of childhood, commonly described in the maxilla and the mandible. Among long bones, it usually presents in the tibia as a painless swelling or anterior bowing. Ossifying fibroma of clavicle has never been reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge. Here, we would like to present an unusual case of osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis. PMID:27413281

  7. Cartilage Delamination Flap Mimicking a Torn Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Amit Kanta, Mitra

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a chondral delamination lesion due to medial parapatellar plica friction syndrome involving the medial femoral condyle. This mimicked a torn medial meniscus in clinical and radiological presentation. Arthroscopy revealed a chondral delamination flap, which was debrided. Diagnosis of chondral lesions in the knee can be challenging. Clinical examination and MRI have good accuracy for diagnosis and should be used in tandem. Early diagnosis and treatment of chondral lesions are important to prevent progression to early osteoarthritis. PMID:28070434

  8. Mimicking biological functionality with polymers for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Jordan J.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2016-12-01

    The vast opportunities for biomaterials design and functionality enabled by mimicking nature continue to stretch the limits of imagination. As both biological understanding and engineering capabilities develop, more sophisticated biomedical materials can be synthesized that have multifaceted chemical, biological and physical characteristics designed to achieve specific therapeutic goals. Mimicry is being used in the design of polymers for biomedical applications that are required locally in tissues, systemically throughout the body, and at the interface with tissues.

  9. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:27651110

  10. Localized IgG4-related Cholecystitis Mimicking Gallbladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tadahisa; Okumura, Fumihiro; Mizushima, Takashi; Nishie, Hirotada; Iwasaki, Hiroyasu; Anbe, Kaiki; Ozeki, Takanori; Kachi, Kenta; Fukusada, Shigeki; Suzuki, Yuta; Watanabe, Kazuko; Sano, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    We encountered a case of localized IgG4-cholecystitis mimicking gallbladder cancer with focal/segmental type1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). In this case, we were unable to exclude a diagnosis of gallbladder cancer and thus performed radical cholecystectomy. Type1 AIP is often associated with gallbladder lesions, accompanied by generally diffuse, circumferential thickening of the gallbladder wall. Although localized IgG4-related cholecystitis is extremely rare, differentiating this condition from gallbladder cancer is often very difficult.

  11. A giant ancient schwannoma mimicking an adnexal mass

    PubMed Central

    Karaköse, Oktay; Pülat, Hüseyin; Oğuz, Serhat; Zihni, İsmail; Özçelik, Kazım Çağlar; Yalta, Tülin Deniz; Eken, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Ancient schwannoma is a rare tumor of the peripheral nerve sheath. As degenerative properties are defined histologically, it can be wrongly interpreted as malignant. Case presentation: The case presented here is of a giant ancient schwannoma with a pelvic retroperitoneal location, which was mimicking an adnexal mass. Conclusion: In the rarely seen cases in the retroperitoneum, it may reach very large dimensions. PMID:27472696

  12. Regional bone change in intramuscular haemangioma mimicking primary bone tumour.

    PubMed

    Shikhare, Sumer; Chacko, Julio K; Chuah, Khoon L

    2015-04-01

    Intramuscular haemangiomas are benign soft-tissue tumours, commonly located in the extremities. We present a right-leg intramuscular haemangioma with florid periosteal reaction in adjacent tibia, mimicking a primary bone tumour. Plain radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging features are illustrated with the surgical and histopathological findings. Radiologists need to be familiar with reactive bone changes secondary to deep-seated intramuscular haemangiomas to avoid potential misdiagnosis.

  13. Pain and musculoskeletal pain syndromes in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Aura Ligia; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Leone, Claudio; Doria-Filho, Ulysses; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2006-06-01

    The presence of musculoskeletal pain was evaluated in adolescents. Pain was reported by 40% of respondents, benign joint hypermobility syndrome by 10%, myofascial syndrome by 5%, tendonitis by 2%, and fibromialgia by 1%. Logistical regression analysis indicated that sex and age were predictive of pain.

  14. Fetal pain perception and pain management.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; Jani, Jacques; De Buck, Frederik; Deprest, J

    2006-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of current science related to the concept of fetal pain. We have answered three important questions: (1) does fetal pain exist? (2) does management of fetal pain benefit the unborn child? and (3) which techniques are available to provide good fetal analgesia?

  15. Heparin-Mimicking Polymers: Synthesis and Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heparin is a naturally occurring, highly sulfated polysaccharide that plays a critical role in a range of different biological processes. Therapeutically, it is mostly commonly used as an injectable solution as an anticoagulant for a variety of indications, although it has also been employed in other forms such as coatings on various biomedical devices. Due to the diverse functions of this polysaccharide in the body, including anticoagulation, tissue regeneration, anti-inflammation, and protein stabilization, and drawbacks of its use, analogous heparin-mimicking materials are also widely studied for therapeutic applications. This review focuses on one type of these materials, namely, synthetic heparin-mimicking polymers. Utilization of these polymers provides significant benefits compared to heparin, including enhancing therapeutic efficacy and reducing side effects as a result of fine-tuning heparin-binding motifs and other molecular characteristics. The major types of the various polymers are summarized, as well as their applications. Because development of a broader range of heparin-mimicking materials would further expand the impact of these polymers in the treatment of various diseases, future directions are also discussed. PMID:27739666

  16. Management of necrotising appendicitis associated with widespread necrotising enterocolitis of the small and large bowel and perforated duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vaibhav; Zani, Augusto; Jackson, Paul; Singh, Shailinder

    2015-06-08

    A 7-year-old boy presented in septic shock secondary to appendicitis with generalised peritonitis. Following crystalloid resuscitation, he underwent surgery. Faecopurulent contamination and free air were found. This was secondary to a perforated and gangrenous appendix, multiple large and small bowel segments with perforations, patches of necrosis, interspersed with healthy bowel and segments of questionable viability. There was also a perforated duodenal ulcer. Necrotic segments were resected using a 'clip-and-drop' technique to shorten operative duration and guide resection to preserve bowel length. After six laparotomies and multiple bowel resections, the child was discharged home with an ileostomy that was subsequently reversed. He is currently on a normal diet and pursuing all activities appropriate for his age. Perforated appendicitis can be associated with widespread bowel necrosis and multiple perforations. A conservative damage limitation approach using the 'clip-and-drop' technique and relook laparotomies is useful in the management of extensive bowel necrosis in children.

  17. [Postoperative pain in craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Peón, Andréa Ungaro; Diccini, Solange

    2005-01-01

    In the postoperative period, 47% to 75% of the patients report some degree of pain. This study aimed to evaluate pain in the pre and postoperative period of patients submitted to craniotomy. This prospective research was carried out at the neurosurgery unit of a large Brazilian hospital. For a quantitative evaluation of pain, the verbal numeric 0-10 rating scale was used. Forty patients with a mean age of 36 years were evaluated. In the preoperative period, 34 (85%) patients indicated headache as the main cause of pain. In the postoperative period, 37 (93%) patients complained of pain while three (7%) reported absence of pain. Pain peaks were observed on the 2nd postoperative day, when 12 (32%) of the patients reported severe pain and 10 (27%) moderate pain. Absence of severe pain occurred after the 8th postoperative day. It was concluded that protocols of analgesia in craniotomy are needed, such as training nurses to better evaluate and handle pain.

  18. Case report of ovarian torsion mimicking ovarian cancer as an uncommon late complication of laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Arkadiusz; Słabuszewska-Jóźwiak, Aneta; Jakiel, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH) is an example of a partial hysterectomy, performed due to benign gynaecological complaints. Better endoscopic instruments and operational techniques have led to a great reduction in the number of abdominal hysterectomies. It is believed that LSH is a safe and minimally invasive hysterectomy technique. The Cochrane Database meta-analysis proves the benefits of minimally invasive surgery compared with abdominal gynaecological surgery, including decreased pain, surgical-site infections and hospital stay, quicker return to activity, and fewer postoperative adhesions. According to recent publications, the overall complication rate of all hysterectomy methods is about 1-4.5%. Adnexal torsion is a correlated complication. About 3-5% of patients undergoing emergency surgery due to pelvic pain are diagnosed with this condition. It may be the cause of acute abdomen and correlated symptoms such as vomiting, nausea, or severe pain. To the best of our knowledge a case of asymptomatic, delayed ovarian torsion mimicking ovarian tumour has not been reported so far. In the presented case, torsion successfully imitated neoplastic process as both ROMA score and IOTA ‘simple rules’ indicated a malignancy with high degree of probability. This case demonstrates that, if ovarian tumour is detected in the postoperative period, a torsion of ovarian pedicle should be taken into consideration as it may mimic malignant neoplasm. PMID:28250728

  19. Pain management in neonates.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Gall, Olivier; Annequin, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest an increased sensitivity to pain in neonates. Repeated and prolonged pain exposure may affect the subsequent development of pain systems, as well as potentially contribute to alterations in long-term development and behavior. Despite impressive gains in the knowledge of neonatal pain mechanisms and strategies to treat neonatal pain acquired during the last 15 years, a large gap still exists between routine clinical practice and research results. Accurate assessment of pain is crucial for effective pain management in neonates. Neonatal pain management should rely on current scientific evidence more than the attitudes and beliefs of care-givers. Parents should be informed of pain relief strategies and their participation in the health care plan to alleviate pain should be encouraged. The need for systemic analgesia for both moderate and severe pain, in conjunction with behavioral/environmental approaches to pain management, is emphasized. A main sources of pain in the neonate is procedural pain which should always be prevented and treated. Nonpharmacological approaches constitute important treatment options for managing procedural pain. Nonpharmacological interventions (environmental and preventive measures, non-nutritive sucking, sweet solutions, skin-skin contact, and breastfeeding analgesia) can reduce neonatal pain indirectly by reducing the total amount of noxious stimuli to which infants are exposed, and directly, by blocking nociceptive transduction or transmission or by activation of descending inhibitory pathways or by activating attention and arousal systems that modulate pain. Opioids are the mainstay of pharmacological pain treatment but there are other useful medications and techniques that may be used for pain relief. National guidelines are necessary to improve neonatal pain management at the institutional level, individual neonatal intensive care units need to develop specific practice guidelines regarding pain

  20. Carbohydrate-appended tumor targeting iron(III) complexes showing photocytotoxicity in red light.

    PubMed

    Basu, Uttara; Khan, Imran; Hussain, Akhtar; Gole, Bappaditya; Kondaiah, Paturu; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2014-02-17

    Glucose-appended photocytotoxic iron(III) complexes of a tridentate Schiff base phenolate ligand [Fe(bpyag)(L)](NO3) (1-3), where bpyag is N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2-aminoethyl-β-D-glucopyranoside and H2L is 3-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)-1-phenylbutan-1-one (H2phap) in 1, 3-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)-9-anthrylbutan-1-one (H2anap) in 2, and 3-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)-1-pyrenylbutan-1-one (H2pyap) in 3, were synthesized and characterized. The complex [Fe(dpma)(anap)](NO3) (4), having bis-(2-pyridylmethyl)benzylamine (dpma), in which the glucose moiety of bpyag is substituted by a phenyl group, was used as a control, and the complex [Fe(dpma)(anap)](PF6) (4a) was structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure shows a FeN4O2 core in a distorted octahedral geometry. The high-spin iron(III) complexes with magnetic moment value of ∼5.9 μB showed a low-energy phenolate-to-Fe(III) charge-transfer (CT) absorption band as a shoulder near 500 nm with a tail extending to 700 nm and an irreversible Fe(III)-Fe(II) redox couple near -0.6 V versus saturated calomel electrode. The complexes are avid binders to calf thymus DNA and showed photocleavage of supercoiled pUC19 DNA in red (647 nm) and green (532 nm) light. Complexes 2 and 3 displayed significant photocytotoxicity in red light, with an IC50 value of ∼20 μM in HeLa and HaCaT cells, and no significant toxicity in dark. The cell death is via an apoptotic pathway, by generation of reactive oxygen species. Preferential internalization of the carbohydrate-appended complexes 2 and 3 was evidenced in HeLa cells as compared to the control complex 4. A 5-fold increase in the cellular uptake was observed for the active complexes in HeLa cells. The photophysical properties of the complexes are rationalized from the density functional theory calculations.

  1. Facts and Figures on Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room Position Statements AAPM Facts and Figures on Pain Overview What is Chronic Pain? Incidence of Pain, ... of them. Back to Top What is Chronic Pain? While acute pain is a normal sensation triggered ...

  2. Back pain - returning to work

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain - work; Backache - work; Lumbar pain - work; Pain - back - chronic; Low back pain - work; Lumbago - work ... Exercise helps to prevent future back pain: Exercise a little ... keep your heart healthy and your muscles strong. If walking is ...

  3. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Pain It’s important to treat pain. If you ... to pay for pain medicine. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain Keep track of the pain. Each day, ...

  4. PFAPA syndrome mimicking familial Mediterranean fever: report of a Turkish child.

    PubMed

    Ataş, Bülent; Caksen, Hüseyin; Arslan, Sükrü; Tuncer, Oğuz; Kirimi, Ercan; Odabaş, Dursun

    2003-11-01

    The PFAPA (Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, Pharyngitis, Adenitidis) syndrome is characterized by periodic fever, adenitis, pharyngitis, and aphthous stomatitis. Herein, we present a Turkish child with PFAPA syndrome mimicking familial Mediterranean fever because of a rare presentation. A 9-year-old boy was admitted with recurrent fever, aphthous stomatitis, sore throat, headache, and general body pains, lasting 2 to 3 days since 3.5 years of age. He was completely symptom-free between the attacks. He was diagnosed as having familial Mediterranean fever according to the clinical findings when he was 6 years of age and Colchicum tablet was administrated. Despite colchicines therapy for 8 months, his attacks did not subside; therefore, the drug was discontinued. He had high fever, a painful cervical lymphadenopathy, aphthous stomatitis, and tonsillo-pharyngitis. The patient was then diagnosed as having PFAPA syndrome. He was given a single dose of prednisolone (0.35 mg/kg/dose). His complaints dramatically and completely disappeared 3 h after administration of the drug. During the 8th month of follow-up, a similar febrile attack lasting only 1 day was noted and it was controlled with a single dose of prednisolone (0.5 mg/kg/day). At this writing the patient is in the 12th month of follow-up, and there have been no symptoms after the second attack. In conclusion, our patient shows that PFAPA syndrome can be confused with familial Mediterranean fever. We also would like to emphasize that the typical PFAPA syndrome can be easily diagnosed by detailed history-taking and physical findings.

  5. Pain Management Task Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    conditions [e.g., peripheral neuropathies , lower extremity arthritis, non-specific LBP], cancer-related pain, post-surgical pain, and other acute pain...Integrative Pain Treatment Medicine .......................................................... 42 4.2.2 Osteopathic Manipulation...VHA and civilian hospitals. Visits outside of Army Medical Treatment Facilities (MTFs) were scheduled based on recommendations from Service

  6. GBT440 Inhibits Sickling of Sickle Cell Trait Blood Under In Vitro Conditions Mimicking Strenuous Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Dufu, Kobina; Lehrer-Graiwer, Josh; Ramos, Eleanor; Oksenberg, Donna

    2016-01-01

    In sickle cell trait (SCT), hemoglobin A (HbA) and S (HbS) are co-expressed in each red blood cell (RBC). While homozygous expression of HbS (HbSS) leads to polymerization and sickling of RBCs resulting in sickle cell disease (SCD) characterized by hemolytic anemia, painful vaso-occlusive episodes and shortened life-span, SCT is considered a benign condition usually with minor or no complications related to sickling. However, physical activities that cause increased tissue oxygen demand, dehydration and/or metabolic acidosis leads to increased HbS polymerization and life-threatening complications including death. We report that GBT440, an agent being developed for the treatment of SCD, increases the affinity of oxygen for Hb and inhibits in vitro polymerization of a mixture of HbS and HbA that simulates SCT blood. Moreover, GBT440 prevents sickling of SCT blood under in vitro conditions mimicking strenuous exercise with hypoxia, dehydration and acidosis. Together, our results indicate that GBT440 may have the potential to protect SCT individuals from sickling-related complications during conditions that favor HbS polymerization. PMID:27757216

  7. Acute inflammatory bowel disease complicating chronic alcoholism and mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-05-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome.

  8. Acute Inflammatory Bowel Disease Complicating Chronic Alcoholism and Mimicking Carcinoid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Dattolo, Pietro; Mangialavori, Giuseppe; Ferro, Giuseppe; Fusco, Francesca; Consalvo, Matteo; Chiodi, Leandro; Pizzarelli, Francesco; Zuppiroli, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a woman with a history of chronic alcohol abuse who was hospitalized with diarrhea, severe hypokalemia refractory to potassium infusion, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, alternations of high blood pressure with phases of hypotension, irritability and increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and cortisol. Although carcinoid syndrome was hypothesized, abdominal computed tomography and colonoscopy showed non-specific inflammatory bowel disease with severe colic wall thickening, and multiple colic biopsies confirmed non-specific inflammation with no evidence of carcinoid cells. During the following days diarrhea slowly decreased and the patient's condition progressively improved. One year after stopping alcohol consumption, the patient was asymptomatic and serum potassium was normal. Chronic alcohol exposure is known to have several deleterious effects on the intestinal mucosa and can favor and sustain local inflammation. Chronic alcohol intake may also be associated with high blood pressure, behavior disorders, abnormalities in blood pressure regulation with episodes of hypotension during hospitalization due to impaired baroreflex sensitivity in the context of an alcohol withdrawal syndrome, increased urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid as a result of malabsorption syndrome, and increased urinary cortisol as a result of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. These considerations, together with the regression of symptoms and normalization of potassium levels after stopping alcohol consumption, suggest the intriguing possibility of a alcohol-related acute inflammatory bowel disease mimicking carcinoid syndrome. PMID:22949895

  9. Breakthrough cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew N

    2014-06-01

    Breakthrough pain is a distinct pain state that is common in patients with cancer pain and which is associated with significant morbidity in this group of patients. The aim of this article is to highlight important journal articles relating to breakthrough pain that have been published within the last year, including a systematic review of the epidemiology of breakthrough pain, the largest-ever study of the clinical features of breakthrough pain, and a network meta-analysis of the treatment of breakthrough pain.

  10. Pain, emotion, headache.

    PubMed

    Bussone, Gennaro; Grazzi, Licia; Panerai, Alberto E

    2012-10-01

    Pain has been considered as part of a defensive strategy whose specific role is to signal an immediate active danger to the organism. This definition fits well for acute pain. It does not work well, however, for chronic pain that is maintained even in absence of an ongoing, active threat. Currently, acute and chronic pain are considered to be separate conditions. What follows is a review of the different theories about pain and its history. Different hypotheses regarding pain mechanisms are illustrated. New data emerging from scientific research on chronic pain (migraine in particular) involving innovative imaging techniques are reported and discussed.

  11. Hispanic Inpatient Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Ambrose, Margaret; Morey, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Hispanic adults experience significant pain, but little is known about their pain during hospitalization. The purpose of this research was to describe Hispanic inpatients' pain intensity and compare their pain intensity with that of non-Hispanic patients. A post hoc descriptive design was used to examine 1,466 Hispanic inpatients' medical records (63.2% English speakers) and 12,977 non-Hispanic inpatients' medical records from one hospital for 2012. Mean documented pain intensity was mild for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatients. Pain intensity was greater for English-speaking Hispanic patients than Spanish speakers. The odds of being documented with moderate or greater pain intensity decreased 30% for Spanish-speaking patients. Greater pain intensity documented for English-speaking Hispanic inpatients suggests underreporting of pain intensity by Spanish-speaking patients. Practitioners should use interpreter services when assessing and treating pain with patients who speak languages different from the practitioners' language(s).

  12. Endothelial Fas-Ligand in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and in Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kokkonen, Tuomo S.; Karttunen, Tuomo J.

    2015-01-01

    Fas-mediated induction of apoptosis is a major factor in the selection of lymphocytes and downregulation of immunological processes. In the present study, we have assessed endothelial Fas-ligand (FasL) expression in normal human ileum, appendix, and colon, and compared the expression levels with that in inflammatory bowel disease and in acute appendicitis. In a normal appendix, endothelial FasL levels were constant in almost half of the mucosal vessels; but, in the normal ileum and colon, endothelial FasL was practically restricted to areas in close proximity to lymphatic follicles, and was expressed mainly in the submucosal aspect of the follicles in the vessels with high endothelium. In samples from subjects with either Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, the extent of endothelial FasL expression was elevated in the submucosa and associated with an elevated number of lymphoid follicles. In inflammatory bowel disease, ulcers and areas with a high density of mononuclear cells expressing FasL also showed an elevated density of blood vessels with endothelial FasL expression. Although the function of endothelial FasL remains unclear, such a specific expression pattern suggests that endothelial FasL expression has a role in the regulation of lymphocyte access to the peripheral lymphoid tissues, including the intestinal mucosa. PMID:26374830

  13. Comparing the cost and outcomes of laparoscopic versus open appendectomy for perforated appendicitis in children.

    PubMed

    Groves, Leslie B; Ladd, Mitchell R; Gallaher, Jared R; Swanson, John; Becher, Robert D; Pranikoff, Thomas; Neff, Lucas P

    2013-09-01

    Although laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) is accepted treatment for perforated appendicitis (PA) in children, concerns remain whether it has equivalent outcomes with open appendectomy (OA) and increased cost. A retrospective review was conducted of patients younger than age 17 years treated for PA over a 12.5-year period at a tertiary medical center. Patient characteristics, preoperative indices, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed for patients undergoing LA and OA. Of 289 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 86 had LA (29.8%) and 203 OA (70.2%), the two groups having equivalent patient demographics and preoperative indices. Inpatient costs were not significantly different between LA and OA. LA had a lower rate of wound infection (1.2 vs. 8.9%, P = 0.017), total parenteral nutrition use (23.3 vs. 50.7%, P < 0.0001), and length of stay (5.56 ± 2.38 days vs. 7.25 ± 3.77 days, P = 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the rate of postoperative organ space abscess, surgical re-exploration, or rehospitalization. In children with PA, LA had fewer surgical site infections and shorter lengths of hospital stay compared with OA without an increase in inpatient costs.

  14. Flower-like supramolecular self-assembly of phosphonic acid appended naphthalene diimide and melamine

    PubMed Central

    Bhosale, Rajesh S; Al Kobaisi, Mohammad; Bhosale, Sidhanath V.; Bhargava, Suresh; Bhosale, Sheshanath V.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse supramolecular assemblies ranging from nanometres to micrometers of small aromatic π-conjugated functional molecules have attracted enormous research interest in light of their applications in optoelectronics, chemosensors, nanotechnology, biotechnology and biomedicines. Here we study the mechanism of the formation of a flower-shaped supramolecular structure of phosphonic acid appended naphthalene diimide with melamine. The flower-shaped assembly formation was visualised by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, furthermore, XRD and DLS used to determined mode of aggregation. Characteristically, phosphonic acid-substituted at imide position of NDIs possess two important properties resulting in the formation of controlled flower-like nanostructures: (i) the aromatic core of the NDI which is designed to optimize the dispersive interactions (π-π stacking and van der Waals interactions) between the cores within a construct and (ii) phosphonic acid of NDI interact with malamine through molecular recognition i.e. strong hydrogen-bonding (H-bonding). We believe such arrangements prevent crystallization and favour the directional growth of flower-like nanostructure in 3D fashion. These works demonstrate that complex self-assembly can indeed be attained through hierarchical non-covalent interactions of two components. Furthermore, flower-like structures built from molecular recognition by these molecules indicate their potential in other fields if combined with other chemical entities. PMID:26416382

  15. Involvement of autophagy in antitumor activity of folate-appended methyl-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Risako; Motoyama, Keiichi; Tanaka, Nao; Ohyama, Ayumu; Okamatsu, Ayaka; Higashi, Taishi; Kariya, Ryusho; Okada, Seiji; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2014-03-20

    Autophagy, the major lysosomal pathway for recycling intracellular components including organelles, is emerging as a key process regulating tumorigenesis and cancer therapy. Most recently, we newly synthesized folate-appended methyl-β-cyclodextrin (FA-M-β-CyD), and demonstrated the potential of FA-M-β-CyD as a new antitumor drug. In this study, we investigated whether anticancer activity of FA-M-β-CyD in folate receptor-α (FR-α)-positive tumor cells is involved in autophagy. In contrast to methyl-β-cyclodextrin (M-β-CyD), FA-M-β-CyD entered KB cells (FR-α (+)) through CLIC/GEEC endocytosis. No significant depression in the DNA content was observed in KB cells after treatment with FA-M-β-CyD. Additionally, the transmembrane potential of mitochondria after treatment with FA-M-β-CyD was drastically elevated. Meanwhile, FA-M-β-CyD induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles, which were partially colocalized with mitochondria, in KB cells. Taken together, these results suggest that FR-α-expressing cell-selective cytotoxic activity of FA-M-β-CyD could be mediated by the regulation of autophagy, rather than the induction of apoptosis.

  16. Cooperative insertion of CO2 in diamine-appended metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Thomas M; Mason, Jarad A; Kong, Xueqian; Bloch, Eric D; Gygi, David; Dani, Alessandro; Crocellà, Valentina; Giordanino, Filippo; Odoh, Samuel O; Drisdell, Walter S; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Dzubak, Allison L; Poloni, Roberta; Schnell, Sondre K; Planas, Nora; Lee, Kyuho; Pascal, Tod; Wan, Liwen F; Prendergast, David; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Smit, Berend; Kortright, Jeffrey B; Gagliardi, Laura; Bordiga, Silvia; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Long, Jeffrey R

    2015-03-19

    The process of carbon capture and sequestration has been proposed as a method of mitigating the build-up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. If implemented, the cost of electricity generated by a fossil fuel-burning power plant would rise substantially, owing to the expense of removing CO2 from the effluent stream. There is therefore an urgent need for more efficient gas separation technologies, such as those potentially offered by advanced solid adsorbents. Here we show that diamine-appended metal-organic frameworks can behave as 'phase-change' adsorbents, with unusual step-shaped CO2 adsorption isotherms that shift markedly with temperature. Results from spectroscopic, diffraction and computational studies show that the origin of the sharp adsorption step is an unprecedented cooperative process in which, above a metal-dependent threshold pressure, CO2 molecules insert into metal-amine bonds, inducing a reorganization of the amines into well-ordered chains of ammonium carbamate. As a consequence, large CO2 separation capacities can be achieved with small temperature swings, and regeneration energies appreciably lower than achievable with state-of-the-art aqueous amine solutions become feasible. The results provide a mechanistic framework for designing highly efficient adsorbents for removing CO2 from various gas mixtures, and yield insights into the conservation of Mg(2+) within the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase family of enzymes.

  17. Diagnosis and Treatment of Mucinous Appendiceal Neoplasm Presented as Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Kehagias, Ioannis; Markopoulos, Georgios; Papandreou, Thanasis; Kraniotis, Pantelis

    2016-01-01

    Appendiceal mucocele is a rare cause of acute abdomen. Mucinous appendiceal neoplasms represent 0.2–0.7% of all appendix specimens. The aim of this study is to report a case of a mucinous appendiceal neoplasm presented as acute appendicitis, discussing the clinical and surgical approach in the emergency setting. A 72-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency department with a clinical examination indicative of acute abdomen. The patient underwent abdominal computed tomography scan which revealed a cystic lesion in the right iliac fossa measuring 8.3 × 5.2 × 4.1 cm, with calcified walls, and a mean density indicative of high protein content. The patient was taken to the operating room and a right hemicolectomy was performed. The postoperative course was unremarkable. The histopathological examination revealed a low-grade mucinous appendiceal neoplasm with negative regional lymph nodes. Ultrasound and CT are useful in diagnosing appendiceal mucocele and synchronous cancers in the emergency setting. The initial operation should include appendectomy and resection of the appendicular mesenteric fat along with any fluid collection for cytologic examination. During urgent appendectomy it is important to consider every mucocele as malignant in order to avoid iatrogenic perforation causing pseudomyxoma peritonei. Although laparotomy is recommended, the laparoscopic approach is not contraindicated. PMID:27066284

  18. Low molecular weight PEI-appended polyesters as non-viral gene delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Xun, Miao-Miao; Liu, Yan-Hong; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Qin-Fang; Wu, Wan-Xia; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2014-05-06

    Routine clinical implementation of human gene therapy requires safe and efficient gene delivery methods. Linear biodegradable polyesters with carbon-carbon double bonds are prepared from unsaturated diacids and diols. Subsequent appending of low molecular weight PEI by Michael addition gives target cationic polymers efficiently. Agarose gel retardation and fluorescence quenching assays show that these materials have good DNA binding ability and can completely retard plasmid DNA at weight ratio of 0.8. The formed polyplexes have appropriate sizes around 275 nm and zeta-potential values about +20-35 mV. The cytotoxicities of these polymers assayed by MTT are much lower than that of 25 kDa PEI. In vitro transfection toward 7402, HEK293 and U-2OS cells show that polymer P1 may give dramatically higher transfection efficiency (TE) than 25 kDa PEI, especially in U-2OS cells, suggesting that such polymer might be promising non-viral gene vectors.

  19. Is there a role for interval appendectomy in the management of acute appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Friedell, M L; Perez-Izquierdo, M

    2000-12-01

    Interval appendectomy (IA) remains a controversial subject in surgery. To determine its effectiveness we reviewed our results with this approach. From January 1990 through December 1998 a total of 73 patients underwent appendectomy, five (7%) of which were interval in nature. These IA patients had a palpable abdominal mass or delayed presentation that led to CT scan. The decision to delay surgery was determined by two factors: 1) a CT scan that showed advanced inflammatory changes (phlegmon or abscess) associated with acute appendicitis and 2) a rapid response to conservative management. All patients received antibiotics-first intravenous and then oral. Repeat CT scans were performed before surgery and showed a virtual resolution of the inflammatory process. Appendectomy was delayed from 35 to 66 days from the time of diagnosis (average 51 days). There were no preoperative complications, the operations were uneventful, and there were no significant postoperative sequelae. IA appears to convert an unfavorable surgical situation potentially fraught with complications (fistula, abscess, wound infection) to one that is essentially elective in nature. It should be considered for the patient who is found to have an extensive periappendiceal inflammatory process, is clinically stable, and responds favorably to initial nonoperative management.

  20. Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate and reliable global positioning system (GPS)-based vehicle use data are highly valuable for many transportation, analysis, and automotive considerations. Model-based design, real-world fuel economy analysis, and the growing field of autonomous and connected technologies (including predictive powertrain control and self-driving cars) all have a vested interest in high-fidelity estimation of powertrain loads and vehicle usage profiles. Unfortunately, road grade can be a difficult property to extract from GPS data with consistency. In this report, we present a methodology for appending high-resolution elevation data to GPS speed traces via a static digital elevation model. Anomalous data points in the digital elevation model are addressed during a filtration/smoothing routine, resulting in an elevation profile that can be used to calculate road grade. This process is evaluated against a large, commercially available height/slope dataset from the Navteq/Nokia/HERE Advanced Driver Assistance Systems product. Results will show good agreement with the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems data in the ability to estimate road grade between any two consecutive points in the contiguous United States.