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Sample records for pain relieving effect

  1. Effect of narcotic pain reliever on pulp tests in women.

    PubMed

    Kardelis, Anthony C; Meinberg, Trudy A; Sulte, Heather R; Gound, Tom G; Marx, David B; Reinhardt, Richard A

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of one dose of a common narcotic-based pain reliever (Vicodin) on a battery of oral sensitivity tests across time in women. Fifteen Caucasian women randomly were given an oral dose of 10 mg of hydrocodone/1000 mg of acetaminophen or placebo in a double-blind, cross-over design. At baseline (before drug) and after 2, 4, and 8 h each subject was evaluated for sensitivity thresholds with four tests around an experimental tooth: (a) electric pulp tester applied to exposed root; (b) electric pulp tester on adjacent mucosa; (c) increasing probe pressure (grams) on adjacent mucosa; and (d) decreasing cold probe (degrees C) on the exposed root. The outcomes of all tests were not statistically different between drug and placebo treatments at any time point (p > 0.05). These results suggest that a systemic dose of hydrocodone/acetaminophen has little impact on healthy pulp or mucosa sensitivity in women as measured by common diagnostic tests.

  2. Relieving Painful 'Shin Splints'.

    PubMed

    Fick, Daniel S; Albright, John P; Murray, Boyd P

    1992-12-01

    In brief Shin splints, or more precisely, medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), are painful and troublesome. Despite treatment or activity modification, they often recur. Distinguishing MTSS, the most common running overuse injury, from other overuse injuries can help focus treatment, which starts conservatively. Recommending activity modification, ice massage, NSAIDs, and stretching is a good first step. Patients who don't respond to treatment may need additional diagnostic workup and more restrictive activity guidelines.

  3. Effects of Competing Narratives on Public Perceptions of Opioid Pain Reliever Addiction during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Hendricks, Alene; McGinty, Emma E; Barry, Colleen L

    2016-10-01

    Opioid pain reliever addiction has increased among women of reproductive age over the last fifteen years. News media and public attention have focused on the implications of this trend for infants exposed to opioids prenatally, with state policy responses varying in the extent to which they are punitive or public health oriented. We fielded a six-group randomized experiment among a nationally representative sample of US adults to test the effects of narratives portraying a woman with opioid pain reliever addiction during pregnancy on beliefs about people addicted to opioid pain relievers, perceptions of treatment effectiveness, policy attitudes, and emotional responses. Portraying a high socioeconomic status (SES) woman in the narrative lowered perceptions of individual blame for addiction and reduced public support for punitive policies. Depicting the barriers to treatment faced by a low SES woman lowered support for punitive policies and increased support for expanded insurance coverage for treatment. The extent to which narratives portraying successfully treated addiction affected public attitudes depended on the SES of the woman portrayed. These findings can inform the development of communication strategies to reduce stigma toward this population, reduce support for punitive policies, and increase support for more public health-oriented approaches to addressing this problem. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  4. Inversion Therapy: Can It Relieve Back Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    Inversion therapy: Can it relieve back pain? Does inversion therapy relieve back pain? Is it safe? Answers from Edward R. Laskowski, M.D. Inversion therapy doesn't provide lasting relief from back ...

  5. The Effectiveness of Cupping Therapy on Relieving Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chi, Lee-Mei; Lin, Li-Mei; Chen, Chien-Lin; Wang, Shu-Fang; Lai, Hui-Ling; Peng, Tai-Chu

    2016-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate the effectiveness of cupping therapy (CT) in changes on skin surface temperature (SST) for relieving chronic neck and shoulder pain (NSP) among community residents. A single-blind experimental design constituted of sixty subjects with self-perceived NSP. The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups. The cupping group received CT at SI 15, GB 21, and LI 15 acupuncture points, and the control group received no intervention. Pain was assessed using the SST, visual analog scale (VAS), and blood pressure (BP). The main results were SST of GB 21 acupuncture point raised from 30.6°C to 32.7°C and from 30.7°C to 30.6°C in the control group. Neck pain intensity (NPI) severity scores were reduced from 9.7 to 3.6 in the cupping group and from 9.7 to 9.5 in the control group. The SST and NPI differences between the groups were statistically significant (P < 0.001). One treatment of CT is shown to increase SST. In conjunction with the physiological effect the subjective experience of NSP is reduced in intensity. Further studies are required to improve the understanding and potential long-term effects of CT.

  6. The Effectiveness of Cupping Therapy on Relieving Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Lee-Mei; Lin, Li-Mei; Chen, Chien-Lin; Wang, Shu-Fang; Lai, Hui-Ling; Peng, Tai-Chu

    2016-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate the effectiveness of cupping therapy (CT) in changes on skin surface temperature (SST) for relieving chronic neck and shoulder pain (NSP) among community residents. A single-blind experimental design constituted of sixty subjects with self-perceived NSP. The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups. The cupping group received CT at SI 15, GB 21, and LI 15 acupuncture points, and the control group received no intervention. Pain was assessed using the SST, visual analog scale (VAS), and blood pressure (BP). The main results were SST of GB 21 acupuncture point raised from 30.6°C to 32.7°C and from 30.7°C to 30.6°C in the control group. Neck pain intensity (NPI) severity scores were reduced from 9.7 to 3.6 in the cupping group and from 9.7 to 9.5 in the control group. The SST and NPI differences between the groups were statistically significant (P < 0.001). One treatment of CT is shown to increase SST. In conjunction with the physiological effect the subjective experience of NSP is reduced in intensity. Further studies are required to improve the understanding and potential long-term effects of CT. PMID:27073404

  7. How Do Pain Relievers Work? (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Español How Do Pain Relievers Work? KidsHealth / For Kids / How Do Pain Relievers Work? Print en español ¿ ...

  8. Augmentation enterocystoplasty is effective in relieving refractory ketamine-related bladder pain.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Wang, Chung-Cheng; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2014-11-01

    To report our early results of augmentation enterocystoplasty (AE) for severe bladder pain associated with chronic ketamine cystitis (KC). We performed AE for 14 patients with refractory KC-related bladder pain, which is based on the criteria including severe bladder pain, urgency and frequency and/or upper urinary tract damage such as bilateral hydronephrosis, and contracted bladder. Every patient had been treated conservatively with medication or cystoscopic hydrodistention for at least 1 year before they had received surgical intervention. Video-urodynamic studies were obtained before AE and 3-6 months after surgery. Outcome measurements included visual analogue score (VAS) for pain, cystometric bladder capacity (CBC), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual, and maximal detrusor pressure (Pdet). The patients' general satisfaction with regard to treatment outcome was also assessed by the Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC). A total of 4 men and 10 women underwent this procedure as indicated. The mean age was 26.7 (ranged 20-38) years old and the duration of ketamine abuse was 3.82 years (ranged 2-7). Contracted bladder was noted in all patients, hydronephrosis in nine and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in eight. At 3-6 months after AE, VAS was remarkably improved from baseline to the end-point (8.29 ± 1.54 vs. 2.14 ± 1.51, P < 0.0001), CBC increased from 50.9 ± 15.7 to 309.2 ± 58.0 ml (P < 0.0001), Qmax increased from 6.94 ± 3.60 to 15.2 ± 5.51 ml/sec (P < 0.0001) and Pdet reduced from 29.7 ± 16.0 to 17.9 ± 8.2 cmH2 O (P = 0.008). All patients reported marked improvement in PPBC from 6.0 to 1.4 ± 0.89 (P < 0.0001). All hydronephrosis disappeared and VUR was resolved in five patients after AE with ureteral reimplantation. This pilot study demonstrated that AE is effective in relieving refractory ketamine-related bladder pain and lower urinary tract symptoms. © 2013 Wiley

  9. Topical Pain Relievers May Cause Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... and joint pain relievers containing the active ingredients menthol, methyl salicylate and capsaicin. These cases were uncovered ... of people who purchase these products, Tan notes. Menthol, methyl salicylate and capsaicin create sensations of local ...

  10. Intervertebral Foramen Injection of Ozone Relieves Mechanical Allodynia and Enhances Analgesic Effect of Gabapentin in Animal Model of Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen-Jun; Yang, Fan; Yang, Fei; Sun, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Wu, Fang-Fang; Wang, Jiang-Lin; Wang, Jia-Shuang; Guan, Su-Min; Chen, Jun

    2017-07-01

    rats with neuropathic pain. Evaluation of the possible analgesic effects of the intraplantar injection of ozone was not performed. In the present study, we provided a line of evidence for the first time that IVF injection of ozone selectively relieved neuropathic pain but not inflammatory pain, and enhanced the analgesic effect of gabapentin. Chronic pain, neuropathic pain, inflammatory pain, ozone therapy, interventional therapy, gabapentin, spared nerve injury, bee venom, complete Freud's adjuvant.

  11. Pain-relieving agents for infantile colic.

    PubMed

    Biagioli, Elena; Tarasco, Valentina; Lingua, Carla; Moja, Lorenzo; Savino, Francesco

    2016-09-16

    Infantile colic is a common disorder in the first months of life, affecting somewhere between 4% and 28% of infants worldwide, depending on geography and definitions used. Although it is self limiting and resolves by four months of age, colic is perceived by parents as a problem that requires action. Pain-relieving agents, such as drugs, sugars and herbal remedies, have been suggested as interventions to reduce crying episodes and severity of symptoms. To assess the effectiveness and safety of pain-relieving agents for reducing colic in infants younger than four months of age. We searched the following databases in March 2015 and again in May 2016: CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase and PsycINFO, along with 11 other databases. We also searched two trial registers, four thesis repositories and the reference lists of relevant studies to identify unpublished and ongoing studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs evaluating the effects of pain-relieving agents given to infants with colic. We used the standard methodological procedures of The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 18 RCTs involving 1014 infants. All studies were small and at high risk of bias, often presenting major shortcomings across multiple design factors (e.g. selection, performance, attrition, lack of washout period).Three studies compared simethicone with placebo, and one with Mentha piperita; four studies compared herbal agents with placebo; two compared sucrose or glucose with placebo; five compared dicyclomine with placebo; and two compared cimetropium - one against placebo and the other at two different dosages. One multiple-arm study compared sucrose and herbal tea versus no treatment. Simethicone. Comparison with placebo revealed no difference in daily hours of crying reported for simethicone at the end of treatment in one small, low-quality study involving 27 infants. A meta-analysis of data from two cross-over studies comparing simethicone with placebo showed no

  12. Parecoxib relieves pain and has an opioid-sparing effect following major gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Essex, Margaret Noyes; Xu, Hao; Parsons, Bruce; Xie, Li; Li, Chunming

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Parecoxib provides analgesia following a variety of surgeries, including minor gastrointestinal procedures. To our knowledge, there is no data on parecoxib following major gastrointestinal surgery. This study assessed the efficacy and opioid-sparing effects of parecoxib following major gastrointestinal surgeries. Patients and methods Patients in this analysis were a subset from a large, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of parecoxib following noncardiac surgeries and consisted of those undergoing a variety of major gastrointestinal surgeries via laparotomy. Pain, pain interference with function, supplemental opioid utilization, opioid-related symptoms, and Patient/Physician Global Evaluation of Study Medication were compared between placebo and parecoxib groups in the 2−3 days following surgery. Results Significantly (p<0.001) lower pain scores were observed in the parecoxib group (n=111), relative to placebo (n=126), on Day 2 (−33%) and Day 3 (−35%). Pain interference with function scores was also significantly (p<0.001) lower among patients receiving parecoxib compared with placebo on Day 2 (−29%) and Day 3 (−36%). At 24, 48, and 72 hours, the cumulative amount of supplemental morphine consumed was 45%, 41%, and 40% less in patients receiving parecoxib compared with placebo (all p<0.001). The risk of experiencing ≥1 opioid-related symptoms was also significantly lower with parecoxib than with placebo on Day 2 (relative risk=0.75; p<0.001). Specifically, the risks of fatigue and drowsiness were significantly (both p<0.05) lower in patients receiving parecoxib compared to those receiving placebo. Patient and Physician Global Evaluation of Study Medication scores were significantly better in the parecoxib group than in the placebo group (p<0.001). Conclusion This study is the first to demonstrate that multiple-dose parecoxib, initiated upon recovery from anesthesia, provides analgesia and opioid-sparing effects following a

  13. Parecoxib relieves pain and has an opioid-sparing effect following major gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Essex, Margaret Noyes; Xu, Hao; Parsons, Bruce; Xie, Li; Li, Chunming

    2017-01-01

    Parecoxib provides analgesia following a variety of surgeries, including minor gastrointestinal procedures. To our knowledge, there is no data on parecoxib following major gastrointestinal surgery. This study assessed the efficacy and opioid-sparing effects of parecoxib following major gastrointestinal surgeries. Patients in this analysis were a subset from a large, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of parecoxib following noncardiac surgeries and consisted of those undergoing a variety of major gastrointestinal surgeries via laparotomy. Pain, pain interference with function, supplemental opioid utilization, opioid-related symptoms, and Patient/Physician Global Evaluation of Study Medication were compared between placebo and parecoxib groups in the 2-3 days following surgery. Significantly ( p <0.001) lower pain scores were observed in the parecoxib group (n=111), relative to placebo (n=126), on Day 2 (-33%) and Day 3 (-35%). Pain interference with function scores was also significantly ( p <0.001) lower among patients receiving parecoxib compared with placebo on Day 2 (-29%) and Day 3 (-36%). At 24, 48, and 72 hours, the cumulative amount of supplemental morphine consumed was 45%, 41%, and 40% less in patients receiving parecoxib compared with placebo (all p <0.001). The risk of experiencing ≥1 opioid-related symptoms was also significantly lower with parecoxib than with placebo on Day 2 (relative risk=0.75; p <0.001). Specifically, the risks of fatigue and drowsiness were significantly (both p <0.05) lower in patients receiving parecoxib compared to those receiving placebo. Patient and Physician Global Evaluation of Study Medication scores were significantly better in the parecoxib group than in the placebo group ( p <0.001). This study is the first to demonstrate that multiple-dose parecoxib, initiated upon recovery from anesthesia, provides analgesia and opioid-sparing effects following a variety of major gastrointestinal surgeries employing

  14. Health technology assessment of magnet therapy for relieving pain.

    PubMed

    Arabloo, Jalal; Hamouzadeh, Pejman; Eftekharizadeh, Fereshteh; Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Nejati, Mina; Doaee, Shila

    2017-01-01

    Background: Magnet therapy has been used increasingly as a new method to alleviate pain. Magnetic products are marketed with claims of effectiveness for reducing pain of various origins. However, there are inconsistent results from a limited number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing the analgesic efficacy of magnet therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of magnet therapy on reliving various types of pain. Methods: A systematic search of two main medical databases (Cochrane Library and Ovid Medline) was conducted from 1946 to May 2014. Only English systematic reviews that compared magnet therapy with other conventional treatments in patients with local pain in terms of pain relieving measures were included. The results of the included studies were thematically synthesized. Results: Eight studies were included. Magnet therapy could be used to alleviate pain of various origins including pain in various organs, arthritis, myofascial muscle pain, lower limb muscle cramps, carpal tunnel syndrome and pelvic pain. Results showed that the effectiveness of magnetic therapy was only approved in muscle pains, but its effectiveness in other indications and its application as a complementary treatment have not been established. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that magnet therapy could not be an effective treatment for relieving different types of pain. Our results highlighted the need for further investigations to be done in order to support any recommendations about this technology.

  15. Health technology assessment of magnet therapy for relieving pain

    PubMed Central

    Arabloo, Jalal; Hamouzadeh, Pejman; Eftekharizadeh, Fereshteh; Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Nejati, Mina; Doaee, Shila

    2017-01-01

    Background: Magnet therapy has been used increasingly as a new method to alleviate pain. Magnetic products are marketed with claims of effectiveness for reducing pain of various origins. However, there are inconsistent results from a limited number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing the analgesic efficacy of magnet therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of magnet therapy on reliving various types of pain. Methods: A systematic search of two main medical databases (Cochrane Library and Ovid Medline) was conducted from 1946 to May 2014. Only English systematic reviews that compared magnet therapy with other conventional treatments in patients with local pain in terms of pain relieving measures were included. The results of the included studies were thematically synthesized. Results: Eight studies were included. Magnet therapy could be used to alleviate pain of various origins including pain in various organs, arthritis, myofascial muscle pain, lower limb muscle cramps, carpal tunnel syndrome and pelvic pain. Results showed that the effectiveness of magnetic therapy was only approved in muscle pains, but its effectiveness in other indications and its application as a complementary treatment have not been established. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that magnet therapy could not be an effective treatment for relieving different types of pain. Our results highlighted the need for further investigations to be done in order to support any recommendations about this technology. PMID:29445660

  16. Comparison of pain-relieving effects of fentanyl versus ketorolac after eye amputation surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyung; Jang, Sun Young; Kim, Myung Jin; Lee, Sang Yeul; Yoon, Jin Sook

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the analgesic effect and incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) between the opioid fentanyl and the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketorolac in patients who underwent eye amputation surgery. Retrospective observational case series. Eighty-two patients underwent evisceration or enucleation surgery by one surgeon over a 2-year period. Fentanyl by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) at 20 µg/kg with 12 mg/kg ondansetron or intravenous ketorolac at 2 mg/kg/day was administered to patients at postoperative days 0, 1, and 2. The pain score was measured using an 11-point visual analog scale (VAS). The incidence of severe nausea requiring anti-emetics and the incidence of vomiting were reviewed. The mean postoperative VAS in the fentanyl group was significantly lower than that in the ketorolac group on the day of operation for both types of surgery (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively). At postoperative days 1 and 2, the mean VAS was not different between the two groups for either surgical type (p > 0.05 for both days). The mean VAS was significantly higher in eviscerated patients than in enucleated patients at postoperative days 0 and 1 in the fentanyl group (p = 0.023 and p = 0.016, respectively). However, this was not observed in the ketorolac group. The incidence of PONV was higher in the fentanyl group than in the ketorolac group, although this was not statistically significant for either surgical type (p > 0.05 for both groups). Fentanyl was more effective as an analgesic than was ketorolac on the day of operation for both surgical types. There was no difference between the two analgesics on postoperative day 1. The analgesic effect of fentanyl in enucleated patients was significantly higher than in eviscerated patients at postoperative days 0 and 1. The use of fentanyl by IV-PCA was associated with greater PONV despite co-administration with anti-emetics, although this finding was not significant.

  17. Comparison of Pain-relieving Effects of Fentanyl versus Ketorolac after Eye Amputation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyung; Jang, Sun Young; Kim, Myung Jin; Lee, Sang Yeul

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the analgesic effect and incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) between the opioid fentanyl and the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketorolac in patients who underwent eye amputation surgery. Methods Retrospective observational case series. Eighty-two patients underwent evisceration or enucleation surgery by one surgeon over a 2-year period. Fentanyl by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) at 20 µg/kg with 12 mg/kg ondansetron or intravenous ketorolac at 2 mg/kg/day was administered to patients at postoperative days 0, 1, and 2. The pain score was measured using an 11-point visual analog scale (VAS). The incidence of severe nausea requiring anti-emetics and the incidence of vomiting were reviewed. Results The mean postoperative VAS in the fentanyl group was significantly lower than that in the ketorolac group on the day of operation for both types of surgery (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively). At postoperative days 1 and 2, the mean VAS was not different between the two groups for either surgical type (p > 0.05 for both days). The mean VAS was significantly higher in eviscerated patients than in enucleated patients at postoperative days 0 and 1 in the fentanyl group (p = 0.023 and p = 0.016, respectively). However, this was not observed in the ketorolac group. The incidence of PONV was higher in the fentanyl group than in the ketorolac group, although this was not statistically significant for either surgical type (p > 0.05 for both groups). Conclusions Fentanyl was more effective as an analgesic than was ketorolac on the day of operation for both surgical types. There was no difference between the two analgesics on postoperative day 1. The analgesic effect of fentanyl in enucleated patients was significantly higher than in eviscerated patients at postoperative days 0 and 1. The use of fentanyl by IV-PCA was associated with greater PONV despite co-administration with anti-emetics, although this finding

  18. [The Effect of Pain Relieving Intervention During Infiltration among Gamma Knife Surgery Patients for Stereotactic Frame Fixation].

    PubMed

    Jang, Young Jun; Kim, Hyeon Ok

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of three interventions on pain, blood pressure, and pulse rate during infiltration anesthesia in patients about to undergo gamma knife surgeries. The three interventions employed in a university-affiliated Hospital in J City, South Korea were as follows: EMLA cream plus Vapocoolant spray (Vapocoolant, n=30), EMLA cream plus 10.0% Lidocaine spray (Lidocaine, n=30), and EMLA cream only (EMLA, n=30). The equivalent control-group pre test - post test study design was used. Pain was assessed subjectively using the numeric rating scale (NRS) and objectively using a Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) tester. NRS scores were assessed after infiltration anesthesia and the GSR was assessed during infiltration anesthesia. Blood pressure and pulse rate were assessed twice: before and after infiltration anesthesia. Data were collected between August 3, 2016 and March 24, 2017. NRS scores after infiltration anesthesia and the GSR during infiltration anesthesia were significantly lower in the Vapocoolant group than in the Lidocaine and EMLA groups (F=13.56, p<.001 and F=14.43, p<.001, respectively). The increase in systolic blood pressure (F=4.77, p=.011) and in pulse rates (F=4.78, p=.011) before and after infiltration anesthesia were significantly smaller in the Vapocoolant group than in the Lidocaine and EMLA groups; however, no significant differences were observed in diastolic blood pressures (F=1.51, p=.227). EMLA cream plus Vapocoolant spray was the most effective intervention to relieve pain and to lower increase in systolic blood pressure and pulse rate caused by infiltration anesthesia for stereotactic frame fixation. Thus, application of Vapocoolant spray in addition to EMLA cream is highly recommended as a nursing intervention for patients undergoing gamma knife surgeries. © 2018 Korean Society of Nursing Science.

  19. Relieving patients' pain with expectation interventions: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peerdeman, Kaya J; van Laarhoven, Antoinette I M; Keij, Sascha M; Vase, Lene; Rovers, Maroeska M; Peters, Madelon L; Evers, Andrea W M

    2016-06-01

    Patients' expectations are important predictors of the outcome of analgesic treatments, as demonstrated predominantly in research on placebo effects. Three commonly investigated interventions that have been found to induce expectations (verbal suggestion, conditioning, and mental imagery) entail promising, brief, and easy-to-implement adjunctive procedures for optimizing the effectiveness of analgesic treatments. However, evidence for their efficacy stems mostly from research on experimentally evoked pain in healthy samples, and these findings might not be directly transferable to clinical populations. The current meta-analysis investigated the effects of these expectation inductions on patients' pain relief. Five bibliographic databases were systematically searched for studies that assessed the effects of brief verbal suggestion, conditioning, or imagery interventions on pain in clinical populations, with patients experiencing experimental, acute procedural, or chronic pain, compared with no treatment or control treatment. Of the 15,955 studies retrieved, 30 met the inclusion criteria, of which 27 provided sufficient data for quantitative analyses. Overall, a medium-sized effect of the interventions on patients' pain relief was observed (Hedges g = 0.61, I = 73%), with varying effects of verbal suggestion (k = 18, g = 0.75), conditioning (always paired with verbal suggestion, k = 3, g = 0.65), and imagery (k = 6, g = 0.27). Subset analyses indicated medium to large effects on experimental and acute procedural pain and small effects on chronic pain. In conclusion, patients' pain can be relieved with expectation interventions; particularly, verbal suggestion for acute procedural pain was found to be effective.

  20. AMPAkines Target the Nucleus Accumbens to Relieve Postoperative Pain

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chen; Lin, Hau Yeuh; Yang, Runtao; Xu, Duo; Lee, Michelle; Pawlak, Natalie; Norcini, Monica; Sideris, Alexandra; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza; Huang, Dong; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background AMPAkines augment the function of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors in the brain to increase excitatory outputs. These drugs are known to relieve persistent pain. However, their role in acute pain is unknown. Furthermore, a specific molecular and anatomic target for these novel analgesics remains elusive. Methods We studied the analgesic role of an AMPAkine, CX546, in a rat paw incision (PI) model of acute postoperative pain. We measured the effect of AMPAkines on sensory as well as depressive symptoms of pain using mechanical hypersensitivity and forced swim tests. We asked whether AMPA receptors in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key node in the brain's reward and pain circuitry, can be a target for AMPAkine analgesia. Results Systemic administration of CX546 (n=13), compared with control (n=13), reduced mechanical hypersensitivity (50% withdrawal threshold of 6.05±1.30g (mean±SEM) vs. 0.62±0.13g), and it reduced depressive features of pain by decreasing immobility on the forced swim test in PI-treated rats (89.0±15.5s vs. 156.7±18.5s). Meanwhile, CX546 delivered locally into the NAc provided pain-relieving effects in both PI (50% withdrawal threshold of 6.81±1.91g vs. 0.50±0.03g; control n=6, CX546 n=8) and persistent postoperative pain (spared nerve injury – SNI) models (50% withdrawal threshold of 3.85±1.23g vs. 0.45±0.00g; control n=7, CX546 n=11). Blocking AMPA receptors in the NAc with 3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline-2, 3-dione (NBQX) inhibited these pain-relieving effects (50% withdrawal threshold of 7.18±1.52g vs. 1.59±0.66g; n=8 for PI groups; 10.70±3.45g vs. 1.39±0.88g; n=4 for SNI groups). Conclusions AMPAkines relieves postoperative pain by activating AMPA receptors in the NAc. PMID:27627816

  1. AMPAkines Target the Nucleus Accumbens to Relieve Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen; Lin, Hau Yeuh; Yang, Runtao; Xu, Duo; Lee, Michelle; Pawlak, Natalie; Norcini, Monica; Sideris, Alexandra; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza; Huang, Dong; Wang, Jing

    2016-11-01

    AMPAkines augment the function of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors in the brain to increase excitatory outputs. These drugs are known to relieve persistent pain. However, their role in acute pain is unknown. Furthermore, a specific molecular and anatomic target for these novel analgesics remains elusive. The authors studied the analgesic role of an AMPAkine, CX546, in a rat paw incision (PI) model of acute postoperative pain. The authors measured the effect of AMPAkines on sensory and depressive symptoms of pain using mechanical hypersensitivity and forced swim tests. The authors asked whether AMPA receptors in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key node in the brain's reward and pain circuitry, can be a target for AMPAkine analgesia. Systemic administration of CX546 (n = 13), compared with control (n = 13), reduced mechanical hypersensitivity (50% withdrawal threshold of 6.05 ± 1.30 g [mean ± SEM] vs. 0.62 ± 0.13 g), and it reduced depressive features of pain by decreasing immobility on the forced swim test in PI-treated rats (89.0 ± 15.5 vs. 156.7 ± 18.5 s). Meanwhile, CX546 delivered locally into the NAc provided pain-relieving effects in both PI (50% withdrawal threshold of 6.81 ± 1.91 vs. 0.50 ± 0.03 g; control, n = 6; CX546, n = 8) and persistent postoperative pain (spared nerve injury) models (50% withdrawal threshold of 3.85 ± 1.23 vs. 0.45 ± 0.00 g; control, n = 7; CX546, n = 11). Blocking AMPA receptors in the NAc with 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione inhibited these pain-relieving effects (50% withdrawal threshold of 7.18 ± 1.52 vs. 1.59 ± 0.66 g; n = 8 for PI groups; 10.70 ± 3.45 vs. 1.39 ± 0.88 g; n = 4 for spared nerve injury groups). AMPAkines relieve postoperative pain by acting through AMPA receptors in the NAc.

  2. Oral hyaluronan relieves knee pain: a review.

    PubMed

    Oe, Mariko; Tashiro, Toshiyuki; Yoshida, Hideto; Nishiyama, Hiroshi; Masuda, Yasunobu; Maruyama, Koh; Koikeda, Takashi; Maruya, Reiko; Fukui, Naoshi

    2016-01-27

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a component that is particularly abundant in the synovial fluid. Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials carried out between 2008 and 2015 have proven the effectiveness of HA for the treatment of symptoms associated with synovitis, and particularly, knee pain, relief of synovial effusion or inflammation, and improvement of muscular knee strength. The mechanism by which HA exerts its effects in the living body, specifically receptor binding in the intestinal epithelia, has gradually been clarified. This review examines the effects of HA upon knee pain as assessed in clinical trials, as well as the mechanism of these effects and the safety of HA.

  3. Comparative Study of the Effect of Intravenous Paracetamol and Tramadol in Relieving of Postoperative Pain after General Anesthesia in Nephrectomy Patients.

    PubMed

    Manne, Venkata Sesha Sai Krishna; Gondi, Srinivasa Rao

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intravenous paracetamol and tramadol in relieving of postoperative pain after general anesthesia for nephrectomy in prospective donor patients for kidney transplantation. A randomized study was conducted on 100 adult patients scheduled for nephrectomy aged from 35 to 55 years of both sexes and divided into two groups and were administered intravenous paracetamol and tramadol for postoperative pain relief and assessed with visual analog scale score and variations in vital parameters to assess extent of pain relief. After statistical interpretation of collected data, the observations were extrapolated. There was a statistically significant difference in the pain intensity scores obtained between the paracetamol and tramadol groups. On the basis of the present study, it is concluded that tramadol due to its lesser onset of action time was superior to paracetamol in providing acute postoperative pain relief.

  4. Activation of Corticostriatal Circuitry Relieves Chronic Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michelle; Manders, Toby R.; Eberle, Sarah E.; Su, Chen; D'amour, James; Yang, Runtao; Lin, Hau Yueh; Deisseroth, Karl; Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Neural circuits that determine the perception and modulation of pain remain poorly understood. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) provides top-down control of sensory and affective processes. While animal and human imaging studies have shown that the PFC is involved in pain regulation, its exact role in pain states remains incompletely understood. A key output target for the PFC is the nucleus accumbens (NAc), an important component of the reward circuitry. Interestingly, recent human imaging studies suggest that the projection from the PFC to the NAc is altered in chronic pain. The function of this corticostriatal projection in pain states, however, is not known. Here we show that optogenetic activation of the PFC produces strong antinociceptive effects in a rat model (spared nerve injury model) of persistent neuropathic pain. PFC activation also reduces the affective symptoms of pain. Furthermore, we show that this pain-relieving function of the PFC is likely mediated by projections to the NAc. Thus, our results support a novel role for corticostriatal circuitry in pain regulation. PMID:25834050

  5. Review of interventions to relieve postpartum pain from perineal trauma.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Melanie Robin

    2011-01-01

    As an increased risk for infection and potentially significant source of pain, perineal trauma can negatively impact a mother's postpartum recovery. A variety of nursing interventions aimed at relieving perineal pain are largely based on localized cooling. Unfortunately, these interventions may not follow best practice for providing adequate pain relief or preventing perineal postpartum infection. This article provides a review of the literature related to utilizing localized cooling for postpartum perineal pain relief, suggests clinical guidelines for safe implementation of these measures, and calls for further research for evidence of nursing interventions to relieve pain caused by perineal trauma.

  6. Using Alcohol to Relieve Your Pain: What Are the Risks?

    MedlinePlus

    ... neuropathy, the most common neurologic complication associated with alcoholism. If you use alcohol to relieve your pain, ... Into Health ® National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism www.niaaa.nih.gov • 301.443.3860 Updated ...

  7. Is reiki or prayer effective in relieving pain during hospitalization for cesarean? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Guilherme Augusto Rago; Rodrigues, Meline Rosseto Kron; Lima, Silvana Andrea Molina; Lima, Marcelo Aparecido Ferraz; Maia, Gabriela Lopes; Pilan, Carlos Alberto; Omodei, Michelle Sako; Molina, Ana Cláudia; El Dib, Regina; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha

    2017-01-01

    This systematic review compared reiki and prayer with drug use for relieving pain during hospitalization for cesarean, given that the popularity of integrative medicine and spiritual healing has been increasing. It had the aim of evaluating whether reiki or prayer is effective in relieving pain during cesarean section. Systematic review with meta-analysis conducted at Botucatu Medical School, UNESP, São Paulo, Brazil. The following databases were searched up to March 2016: MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS and CENTRAL. Randomized controlled trials published in English or Portuguese were included in the review. Two reviewers independently screened eligible articles, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. A GRADE table was produced to evaluate the risk of bias. There was evidence with a high risk of bias showing a statistically significant decrease in pain score through use of reiki and prayer, in relation to the protocol group: mean difference = -1.68; 95% confidence interval: -1.92 to -1.43; P < 0.00001; I2 = 92%. Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference in heart rate or systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Evidence with a high risk of bias suggested that reiki and prayer meditation might be associated with pain reduction.

  8. Understanding Americans' views on opioid pain reliever abuse.

    PubMed

    Barry, Colleen L; Kennedy-Hendricks, Alene; Gollust, Sarah E; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Bachhuber, Marcus A; Webster, Daniel W; McGinty, Emma E

    2016-01-01

    Opioid pain reliever abuse rates have increased sharply in the United States. This study examines Americans' personal experience with opioid pain reliever use and abuse, and views about the seriousness of the problem, factors causing it, responsibility for addressing it and support for policies to resolve it. Public opinion survey. A nationally representative US adult sample (n = 1111). Experiences with opioid pain relievers and views about the seriousness, causes of and responsibility for addressing the problem, and support for policies to reduce opioid pain reliever abuse. 28.2 per cent of Americans reported using opioid pain relievers in the last 12 months, 69.5% have used them in their life-time and 17.3% reported using these medications when not prescribed to them. Fifty-eight per cent ranked the problem as serious, on a par with other major health concerns. Individual-orientated factors, including a lack of understanding about how easy it is to become addicted (80.0%) and improper storage (65.1%) and disposal (64.1%), ranked highest as causes, and those abusing opioid pain relievers (83.8%) and their physicians (78.0%) were viewed as most responsible for solving the problem. Of the policies recommended to curb the epidemic, 14 of 16 were supported by a majority of Americans. Americans view the problem of opioid pain reliever abuse as serious, and support nearly all the policies recommended by medical, law enforcement, disease control and public health experts to curb the epidemic. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Pain Relievers: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... are two main types of OTC pain medicines: acetaminophen (Tylenol) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Aspirin, naproxen ( ... American Rhinologic Society) Don't Double Up on Acetaminophen (Food and Drug Administration) Also in Spanish Narcotic ...

  10. Over-the-counter pain relievers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Waltham, MA: Elsevier; 2016:236-272. Dinakar P. Principles of pain management. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 54.

  11. New pain-relieving strategies for topical photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldin, Christina B.; Paoli, John; Sandberg, Carin; Ericson, Marica B.; Gonzalez, Helena; Wennberg, Ann-Marie

    2009-06-01

    PDT is an effective method when treating multiple actinic keratoses (field cancerization). The major side effect is pain. Our objectives were to investigate the pain-relieving effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and peripheral nerve blocks during PDT of field cancerization (FC) of the face and scalp. Patients with field cancerization were included in three studies. In the first study, we examined TENS with an application site on the adjacent dermatome from the PDT area in order to allow the use of water spray during PDT for FC of the scalp and face. In the second study, patients with FC in the facial area received unilateral supraorbital, infraorbital and/or mental nerve blocks. The non-anaesthetised side of the treatment area served as control. In the third study, with similar methodology as in the second study, occipital and supraorbital nerve blocks were combined for FC of the forehead and scalp. The results of the studies strongly support the use of nerve blocks as pain relief during PDT. The use of TENS provided a limited pain reduction, but TENS might be an alternative if the patient disapproves of the use of nerve blocks or is afraid of injections.

  12. The Effectiveness of Manual Therapy for Relieving Pain, Stiffness, and Dysfunction in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinguang; Chen, Bei; Wang, Yueyi; Wang, Xuezong; Han, Dapeng; Ding, Daofang; Zheng, Yuxin; Cao, Yuelong; Zhan, Hongsheng; Zhou, Yao

    2017-05-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is the most common form of arthritis, leading to pain disability in seniors and increased health care utilization. Manual therapy is one widely used physical treatment for KOA. To evaluate the effectiveness and adverse events (AEs) of manual therapy compared to other treatments for relieving pain, stiffness, and physical dysfunction in patients with KOA. A systematic review and meta-analysis of manual therapy for KOA. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and Chinese databases for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of manual therapy for patients with KOA from the inception to October 2015 without language restrictions. RCTs compared manual therapy to the placebo or other interventional control with an appropriate description of randomization. Two reviewers independently conducted the search results identification, data extraction, and methodological quality assessment. The methodological quality was assessed by PEDro scale. Pooled data was expressed as standard mean difference (SMD), with 95% confident intervals (CIs) in a random effects model. The meta-analysis of manual therapy for KOA on pain, stiffness, and physical function were conducted. Fourteen studies involving 841 KOA participants compared to other treatments were included. The methodological quality of most included RCTs was poor. The mean PEDro scale score was 6.6. The meta-analyses results showed that manual therapy had statistically significant effects on relieving pain (standardized mean difference, SMD = -0.61, 95% CI -0.95 to -0.28, P = 76%), stiffness (SMD = -0.58, 95% CI -0.95 to -0.21, P = 81%), improving physical function (SMD = -0.49, 95% CI -0.76 to -0.22, P = 65%), and total score (SMD = -0.56, 95% CI -0.78 to -0.35, P = 50%). But in the subgroups, manual therapy did not show significant improvements on stiffness and physical function when treatment duration was less than 4 weeks. And the long-term information for manual therapy was

  13. Is low-level laser therapy in relieving neck pain effective? Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kadhim-Saleh, Amjed; Maganti, Harinad; Ghert, Michelle; Singh, Sheila; Farrokhyar, Forough

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in reducing acute and chronic neck pain as measured by the visual analog scale (VAS). A systematic search of nine electronic databases was conducted to identify original articles. For study selection, two reviewers independently assessed titles, abstracts, and full text for eligibility. Methodological quality was assessed using the Detsky scale. Data were analyzed using random-effects model in the presence of heterogeneity and fixed-effect model in its absence. Heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran's Q statistic and quantifying I (2). Risk ratios (RR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Eight randomized controlled trials involving 443 patients met the strict inclusion criteria. Inter-rater reliability for study selection was 92.8 % (95 % CIs 80.9-100 %) and for methodological quality assessment was 83.9 % (95 % CIs 19.4-96.8 %). Five trials included patients with cervical myofascial pain syndrome (CMPS), and three trials included different patient populations. A meta-analysis of five CMPS trials revealed a mean improvement of VAS score of 10.54 with LLLT (95 % CI 0.37-20.71; Heterogeneity I (2 )= 65 %, P = 0.02). This systematic review provides inconclusive evidence because of significant between-study heterogeneity and potential risk of bias. The benefit seen in the use of LLLT, although statistically significant, does not constitute the threshold of minimally important clinical difference.

  14. Nonmedical prescription pain reliever and alcohol consumption among cannabis users.

    PubMed

    Novak, Scott P; Peiper, Nicholas C; Zarkin, Gary A

    2016-02-01

    This study examined poly-drug use involving the use of cannabis with nonmedical prescription pain reliever use (NMPR) and alcohol use. Computer-assisted survey data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health were examined. The NSDUH is an annual, cross-sectional survey of non-institutionalized citizens in the United States (ages 12+). Replicate analyses were conducted using the 2013 and 2003 survey waves. Higher levels of cannabis use were consistently associated with more frequent consumption of prescription pain relievers, with findings replicating in both 2013 and 2003. While the prevalence of dual users declined from 2003 (2.5%) to 2013 (2.3%), the average number of days used among dual users increased by an average of 20 days over that period. These changes largely occurred among those aged 35 or older, males, whites, and non-illicit drug users. Past-year marijuana use increased by 16% (10.8-12.6%, p-value<.001) whereas NMPR decreased by 15% (4.9-4.2%, p-value<.001). The largest changes occurred after 2011. Persons using the most cannabis generally had higher levels of alcohol use relative to those using the least amount of cannabis. There was a significant increase in the prevalence of dual use between 2003 (10.2%) and 2013 (11.6%), while the prevalence of past-year alcohol use remained relatively stable. Clinical efforts and public health interventions should consider the possible co-ingestion of cannabis with NMPR and alcohol, as concomitant use may portend negative health effects in the short and long-term. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonmedical prescription pain reliever and alcohol consumption among cannabis users

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Scott P.; Peiper, Nicholas C.; Zarkin, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study examined poly-drug use involving the use of cannabis with nonmedical prescription pain reliever use (NMPR) and alcohol use. Methods Computer-assisted survey data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health were examined. The NSDUH is an annual, cross-sectional survey of non-institutionalized citizens in the United States (ages 12+). Replicate analyses were conducted using the 2013 and 2003 survey waves. Results Higher levels of cannabis use were consistently associated with more frequent consumption of prescription pain relievers, with findings replicating in both 2013 and 2003. While the prevalence of dual users declined from 2003 (2.5%) to 2013 (2.3%), the average number of days used among dual users increased by an average of 20 days over that period. These changes largely occurred among those aged 35 or older, males, whites, and non-illicit drug users. Past-year marijuana use increased by 16% (10.8–12.6%, p-value < .001) whereas NMPR decreased by 15% (4.9–4.2%, p-value < .001). The largest changes occurred after 2011. Persons using the most cannabis generally had higher levels of alcohol use relative to those using the least amount of cannabis. There was a significant increase in the prevalence of dual use between 2003 (10.2%) and 2013 (11.6%), while the prevalence of past-year alcohol use remained relatively stable. Conclusions Clinical efforts and public health interventions should consider the possible co-ingestion of cannabis with NMPR and alcohol, as concomitant use may portend negative health effects in the short and long-term. PMID:26748409

  16. Relieving Pain using Dose-Extending Placebos: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Enck, Paul; DeGrazia, David

    2017-01-01

    Placebos are often used by clinicians, usually deceptively and with little rationale or evidence of benefit, making their use ethically problematic. In contrast with their typical current use, a provocative line of research suggests that placebos can be intentionally exploited to extend analgesic therapeutic effects. Is it possible to extend the effects of drug treatments by interspersing placebos? We reviewed a database of placebo studies, searching for studies that indicate that placebos given after repeated administration of active treatments acquire medication-like effects. We found a total of 22studies in both animals and humans hinting of evidence that placebos may work as a sort of dose extender of active painkillers. Wherever effective in relieving clinical pain, such placebo use would offer several advantages. First, extending the effects of a painkiller through the use of placebos may reduce total drug intake and side effects. Second, dose-extending placebos may decrease patient dependence. Third, using placebos along with active medication, for part of the course of treatment, should limit dose escalation and lower costs. Importantly, provided that nondisclosure is pre-authorized in the informed consent process and that robust evidence indicates therapeutic benefit comparable to that of standard full-dose therapeutic regimens, introducing dose-extending placebos into the clinical arsenal should be considered. This novel prospect of placebo use has the potential to change our general thinking about painkiller treatments, the typical regimens of painkiller applications, and the ways in which treatments are evaluated. PMID:27023425

  17. Effect of Breast-Feeding and Maternal Holding in Relieving Painful Responses in Full-Term Neonates: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Hala M; Shuriquie, Mona A

    2015-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of breast-feeding with maternal holding as compared with maternal holding without breast-feeding in relieving painful responses during heel lance blood drawing in full-term neonates. A convenience sample of 128 full-term newborn infants, in their fourth to sixth days of life, undergoing heel lance blood drawing for screening of hypothyroidism were included in the study. The neonates were randomly assigned into 2 equivalent groups. During heel lance blood drawing for infants, they either breast-fed with maternal holding (group I) or were held in their mother's lap without breast-feeding (group II). The painful responses were assessed simultaneously by 2 neonatal nurses blinded to the purpose of the study. Outcome measures for painful responses of the full-term neonates were evaluated with the Premature Infant Pain Profile scale. Independent t test showed significant differences in Premature Infant Pain Profile scale scores among the 2 groups (t = -8.447, P = .000). Pain scores were significantly lower among infants who were breast-fed in addition to maternal holding. Evidence from this study indicates that the combination of breast-feeding with maternal holding reduces painful responses of full-term infants during heel lance blood drawing.

  18. SuperPain--a resource on pain-relieving compounds targeting ion channels.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Björn O; Preissner, Robert; Preissner, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Pain is more than an unpleasant sensory experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage: it is the most common reason for physician consultation and often dramatically affects quality of life. The management of pain is often difficult and new targets are required for more effective and specific treatment. SuperPain (http://bioinformatics.charite.de/superpain/) is freely available database for pain-stimulating and pain-relieving compounds, which bind or potentially bind to ion channels that are involved in the transmission of pain signals to the central nervous system, such as TRPV1, TRPM8, TRPA1, TREK1, TRESK, hERG, ASIC, P2X and voltage-gated sodium channels. The database consists of ∼8700 ligands, which are characterized by experimentally measured binding affinities. Additionally, 100 000 putative ligands are included. Moreover, the database provides 3D structures of receptors and predicted ligand-binding poses. These binding poses and a structural classification scheme provide hints for the design of new analgesic compounds. A user-friendly graphical interface allows similarity searching, visualization of ligands docked into the receptor, etc.

  19. Intracutaneous sterile water injections do not relieve pain in cervicogenic headache.

    PubMed

    Sand, T; Bovim, G; Helde, G

    1992-11-01

    Intracutaneous sterile water injections have been reported to relieve acute labor pain and cervical pain in whip-lash patients. A double blind cross-over trial has presently been conducted in 10 women with cervicogenic headache in order to investigate whether sterile water injections were effective in this disorder. No benefit was observed for either treatment (isotonic saline or sterile water), neither on pain during the first 14 days nor on neck mobility. We conclude that intracutaneous sterile water injections is not effective in cervicogenic headache.

  20. Use of opioid pain relievers following extraction of third molars.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Breanna M; Wach, Anthony G; Kanar, Brent P; Castele, Matthew T; Sosovicka, Mark F; Cooke, Matthew R; Moore, Paul A

    2015-02-01

    Following extraction of third molars, it is common practice for oral and maxillofacial surgeons to provide a prescription for an opioid-containing analgesic such as hydrocodone with acetaminophen. Because the instructions for use most often indicate that these analgesics are to be taken "as needed for pain," it is unknown how many of the prescribed postoperative analgesic tablets are needed and actually taken. Therefore, an assessment of patient pain experiences and actual opioid analgesic usage was carried out using structured telephone interviews of patients performed 1 and 7 days following their thirdmolar extraction surgery. Forty-eight adolescents and young adults, ages 15 to 30 years, participated in this assessment. A review of the surgeon's notes indicated that the median number of prescribed opioid-containing analgesics (ie, Vicodin®, Norco®, Lorcet®, Percocet®) was 20 tablets (range 10 to 40). The median consumption during the first 24 hours was reported to be three tablets (range 0 to 10), and the total consumption for all 7 days was eight tablets (range 0 to 34). Four patients reported nausea or vomiting in the first 24 hours, and six patients reported nausea or vomiting during the following 6 days of recovery. The initial prescriptions provided adequate relief for 45 of the 48 patients. Higher consumption of opioid pain relievers (OPRs) was associated with a longer duration of surgery and the occurrence of postoperative infections.

  1. Well-Loved Music Robustly Relieves Pain: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Christine; Kong, Jian; Kirsch, Irving; Edwards, Robert R.; Jensen, Karin B.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Gollub, Randy L.

    2014-01-01

    Music has pain-relieving effects, but its mechanisms remain unclear. We sought to verify previously studied analgesic components and further elucidate the underpinnings of music analgesia. Using a well-characterized conditioning-enhanced placebo model, we examined whether boosting expectations would enhance or interfere with analgesia from strongly preferred music. A two-session experiment was performed with 48 healthy, pain experiment-naïve participants. In a first cohort, 36 were randomized into 3 treatment groups, including music enhanced with positive expectancy, non-musical sound enhanced with positive expectancy, and no expectancy enhancement. A separate replication cohort of 12 participants received only expectancy-enhanced music following the main experiment to verify the results of expectancy-manipulation on music. Primary outcome measures included the change in subjective pain ratings to calibrated experimental noxious heat stimuli, as well as changes in treatment expectations. Without conditioning, expectations were strongly in favor of music compared to non-musical sound. While measured expectations were enhanced by conditioning, this failed to affect either music or sound analgesia significantly. Strongly preferred music on its own was as pain relieving as conditioning-enhanced strongly preferred music, and more analgesic than enhanced sound. Our results demonstrate the pain-relieving power of personal music even over enhanced expectations. Trial Information Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01835275. PMID:25211164

  2. Pain-relieving prospects for adenosine receptors and ectonucleotidases

    PubMed Central

    Zylka, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptor agonists have potent antinociceptive effects in diverse preclinical models of chronic pain. In contrast, the efficacy of adenosine or adenosine receptor agonists at treating pain in humans is unclear. Two ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine in nociceptive neurons were recently identified. When injected spinally, these enzymes have long-lasting adenosine A1 receptor (A1R)-dependent antinociceptive effects in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. Furthermore, recent findings indicate that spinal adenosine A2A receptor activation can enduringly inhibit neuropathic pain symptoms. Collectively, these studies suggest the possibility of treating chronic pain in humans by targeting specific adenosine receptor subtypes in anatomically defined regions with agonists or with ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine. PMID:21236731

  3. Parecoxib increases muscle pain threshold and relieves shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hufei; Liu, Xinhe; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Zimeng; Zhang, Xu-Yu; Xie, Hong-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP) remains a common problem after laparoscopies. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between pressure pain threshold (PPT) of different muscles and PLSP after gynecologic laparoscopy, and to explore the effect of parecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on the changes of PPT. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups; group P and group C. In group P, parecoxib 40 mg was intravenously infused at 30 minutes before surgery and 8 and 20 hours after surgery. In group C, normal saline was infused at the corresponding time point. PPT assessment was performed 1 day before surgery and at postoperative 24 hours by using a pressure algometer at bilateral shoulder muscles (levator scapulae and supraspinatus) and forearm (flexor carpi ulnaris). Meanwhile, bilateral shoulder pain was evaluated through visual analog scale score at 24 hours after surgery. Preoperative PPT level of the shoulder, but not of the forearm, was significantly and negatively correlated with the intensity of ipsilateral PLSP. In group C, PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, decreased after laparoscopy at postoperative 24 hours. The use of parecoxib significantly improved the decline of PPT levels of bilateral shoulder muscles (all P <0.01). Meanwhile, parecoxib reduced the incidence of PLSP (group P: 45% vs group C: 83.3%; odds ratio: 0.164; 95% confidence interval: 0.07-0.382; P <0.001) and the intensity of bilateral shoulder pain (both P <0.01). Preoperative PPT levels of shoulder muscles are closely associated with the severity of shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy. PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, significantly decreased after surgery. Parecoxib improved the decrease of PPT and relieved PLSP.

  4. Effect of 5% benzocaine gel on relieving pain caused by fixed orthodontic appliance activation. A double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, L; Gholami, H; Mortazavi, S A R; Soheilifar, S

    2016-11-01

    To compare the effectiveness of 5% benzocaine gel and placebo gel on reducing pain caused by fixed orthodontic appliance activation. Thirty subjects (15-25 years) undergoing fixed orthodontics. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled and cross-over clinical trial study was conducted. Subjects were asked to apply a placebo gel and 5% benzocaine gel, exchangeable in two consecutive appointments, twice a day for 3 days and mark their level of pain on a VAS scale. The pain severity was evaluated by means of Mann-Whitney U-test for comparing two gel groups, Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test for overall differences and post hoc test of Dunnett for paired multiple comparisons. p-value was assigned <0.05. The overall mean value of pain intensity for benzocaine and placebo gels was 0.89 and 1.15, respectively. The Mann-Whitney U-test indicated that there was no significant difference between overall pain in both groups (mean difference = 0.258 p ˂ 0.21). For both groups, pain intensity was significantly lower at 2, 6 and 24 h compared with pain experienced at days 2, 3 and 7. Benzocaine gel caused a decrease in pain perception at 2 h compared with placebo gel. Peak pain intensity was at 2 h for placebo gel and at 6 h for benzocaine gel, followed by a decline in pain perception from that point to day 7 for both gels. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current demonstrate similar effects in relieving acute and chronic pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camila Cadena de; Silva, Vinicius Z Maldaner da; Júnior, Gerson Cipriano; Liebano, Richard Eloin; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2018-02-02

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current have been widely used in clinical practice. However, a systematic review comparing their effects on pain relief has not yet been performed. To investigate the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current on acute and chronic pain. We use Pubmed, Embase, LILACS, PEDro and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials as data sources. Two independent reviewers that selected studies according to inclusion criteria, extracted information of interest and verified the methodological quality of the studies made study selection. The studies were selected if transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current were used as treatment and they had pain as the main outcome, as evaluated by a visual analog scale. Secondary outcomes were the Western Ontario Macmaster and Rolland Morris Disability questionnaires, which were added after data extraction. Eight studies with a pooled sample of 825 patients were included. The methodological quality of the selected studies was moderate, with an average of six on a 0-10 scale (PEDro). In general, both transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current improved pain and functional outcomes without a statistical difference between them. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and interferential current have similar effects on pain outcome The low number of studies included in this meta-analysis indicates that new clinical trials are needed. Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. [Theory analysis and clinical application of spirit-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture method].

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Tang, Lewei; Du, Huaibin; Zheng, Hui; Liang, Fanrong

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical foundation and scientific connotation of spirit-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture method as well as its clinical application for pain are discussed. During spirit regulation, attention should be paid on regulating heart and brain, while acupoints should be selected mainly from the Heart Meridian, Pericardium Meridian and Governor Vessel. It has significant efficacy for refractory pain in clinical treatment. Spirit-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture method is development of acupuncture treating spirit, and it is an important method for pain in clinic. Improvement on sensitization of pain center and brain function is considered as one of the mechanisms in spirit-regulating and pain-relieving acupuncture method.

  7. Misuse of Prescription Pain Relievers: The Buzz Takes Your Breath Away. Permanently.

    MedlinePlus

    ... parents, doctors, relatives, teachers, or school guidance counselors. Substance abuse ruins lives. Don't let it happen to ... is hooked on prescription pain relievers, call the substance abuse treatment 24-hour helpline: 1.800.662.HELP ...

  8. Subcutaneous Administration of Tramadol after Elective Surgery Is as Effective as Intravenous Administration in Relieving Acute Pain and Inflammation in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Buhari, Salisu; Hashim, Kalthum; Yong Meng, Goh; Mustapha, Noordin Mohamed; Gan, Siew Hua

    2012-01-01

    Subcutaneous (SC) administration of tramadol was compared with intravenous (IV) administration to evaluate analgesia following canine ovariohysterectomy (OHE). Healthy female dogs (n = 12) between 1 and 3 years of age (1.95 ± 0.65 years), weighing between 10.5 and 17.1 kg (13.12 ± 1.95 kg), were used. Pain was assessed at baseline before surgery and then hourly for 8 hr after surgery. Tramadol was administered both SC and IV at a dose of 3 mg/kg and provided significant postoperative analgesia, as indicated by analgesiometry, β-endorphin levels, and interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels. The respiratory rates and rectal temperatures remained normal and were not significantly different between or within the groups. A significant increase in heart rate was observed at 4 hr for dogs in both groups relative to the baseline, but there was no significant difference in heart rates between the groups at any time point. A significant decrease in mechanical pain threshold was observed within each group after surgery, but both groups responded similarly, suggesting that SC administration of tramadol is as effective as IV administration. Increased serum levels of both IL-6 and β-endorphin 3 hr postoperatively further indicate that both routes of administration achieve similar pain control. Thus, the relative analgesic efficacy of SC tramadol is comparable to that of IV administration and can be used to achieve similar effects for postsurgical pain management in dogs undergoing OHE. PMID:22778699

  9. Nerve transfer to relieve pain in upper brachial plexus injuries: Does it work?

    PubMed

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Andalib, Sasan

    2017-12-01

    Patients with C5 and C6 nerve root avulsion may complain from pain. For these patients, end-to-side nerve transfer of the superficial radial nerve into the median nerve is suggested to relieve pain. Eleven patients (with a primary brachial plexus reconstruction) undergoing end-to-side nerve transfer of the superficial radial nerve into the ulnovolar part of the median nerve were assessed. Pain before surgery was compared to that at 6-month follow-up using visual analog scale (VAS) scores. A significant difference was seen between the mean VAS before (8.5) and after surgery (0.7) (P=0.0). After the six-month follow-up, 6 patients felt no pain according to VAS, notwithstanding 5 patients with a mild pain. The evidence from the present study suggests that end-to-side nerve transfer of the superficial radial nerve into the ulnovolar part of the median nerve is an effective technique in reducing pain in patients with C5 and C6 nerve root avulsion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiofrequency Procedures to Relieve Chronic Knee Pain: An Evidence-Based Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Anuj; Peng, Philip; Cohen, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Chronic knee pain from osteoarthritis or following arthroplasty is a common problem. A number of publications have reported analgesic success of radiofrequency (RF) procedures on nerves innervating the knee, but interpretation is hampered by lack of clarity regarding indications, clinical protocols, targets, and longevity of benefit from RF procedures. We reviewed the following medical literature databases for publications on RF procedures on the knee joint for chronic pain: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Google Scholar up to August 9, 2015. Data on scores for pain, validated scores for measuring physical disability, and adverse effects measured at any timepoint after 1 month following the interventions were collected, analyzed, and reported in this narrative review. Thirteen publications on ablative or pulsed RF treatments of innervation of the knee joint were identified. A high success rate of these procedures in relieving chronic pain of the knee joint was reported at 1 to 12 months after the procedures, but only 2 of the publications were randomized controlled trials. There was evidence for improvement in function and a lack of serious adverse events of RF treatments. Radiofrequency treatments on the knee joint (major or periarticular nerve supply or intra-articular branches) have the potential to reduce pain from osteoarthritis or persistent postarthroplasty pain. Ongoing concerns regarding the quality, procedural aspects, and monitoring of outcomes in publications on this topic remain. Randomized controlled trials of high methodological quality are required to further elaborate role of these interventions in this population.

  11. SuperPain—a resource on pain-relieving compounds targeting ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Gohlke, Björn O.; Preissner, Robert; Preissner, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Pain is more than an unpleasant sensory experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage: it is the most common reason for physician consultation and often dramatically affects quality of life. The management of pain is often difficult and new targets are required for more effective and specific treatment. SuperPain (http://bioinformatics.charite.de/superpain/) is freely available database for pain-stimulating and pain-relieving compounds, which bind or potentially bind to ion channels that are involved in the transmission of pain signals to the central nervous system, such as TRPV1, TRPM8, TRPA1, TREK1, TRESK, hERG, ASIC, P2X and voltage-gated sodium channels. The database consists of ∼8700 ligands, which are characterized by experimentally measured binding affinities. Additionally, 100 000 putative ligands are included. Moreover, the database provides 3D structures of receptors and predicted ligand-binding poses. These binding poses and a structural classification scheme provide hints for the design of new analgesic compounds. A user-friendly graphical interface allows similarity searching, visualization of ligands docked into the receptor, etc. PMID:24271391

  12. Artificial pneumothorax: a safe and simple method to relieve pain during microwave ablation of subpleural lung malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaowei; Zhuang, Xingjun; Zhang, Haiwen; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Yuanxin

    2017-08-01

    Microwave ablation has been extensively used for eliminating pulmonary tumors; however, it is usually associated with severe pain under local anesthesia. Decreasing the power and shortening the ablation time can help to relieve the pain; however, this leads to incomplete ablation and an increasing recurrence rate. This research aims to employ an artificial pneumothorax to increase both the curative effect and pain relief during the ablation procedure. From July 2013 to January 2015, nine patients presenting with 10 subpleural lung tumors (age: 44-78 years) with a high possibility of severe pain underwent the artificial pneumothorax during microwave ablation. The pain assessment scores and complications induced by the artificial pneumothorax were recorded and analyzed by a CT scan follow-up. The tumors of the nine patients were eliminated successfully using microwave ablation with artificial pneumothorax under local anesthesia. The pain caused by the ablation was relieved to a great extent with an average rate of 94.66% (range: 63.3%-100%) and all tumors were ablated completely. No severe complications occurred after the operation. The artificial pneumothorax is a reliable therapy to improve the curative effect of microwave ablation under local anesthesia by relieving the pain of the patients.

  13. Volar denervation and osteophyte resection to relieve volar CMC joint pain.

    PubMed

    Dellon, A Lee

    2017-01-01

    At mean 125.6 months, pain was reduced from mean of 8.7 to 0.67, p  < .001. Each of three patients, two of whom were musicians, returned to full professional ability. It is concluded that volar CMC joint denervation is a useful procedure, preserving joint function and relieving pain long-term.

  14. Widespread pain reliever profile of a flower extract of Tanacetum parthenium.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Tenci, Barbara; Zanardelli, Matteo; Maidecchi, Anna; Lugli, Andrea; Mattoli, Luisa; Ghelardini, Carla

    2015-07-15

    Tanacetum parthenium L., commonly called Feverfew, is known for anti-inflammatory and anti-migraine properties. Aimed to individuate new therapeutical strategies to control acute and persistent pain induced by different origins we tested two hydroalcoholic extracts obtained from Feverfew flowers and leaves, respectively. Extracts were characterized according to the European Pharmacopoeia monograph. Both the extracts were tested after acute per os administration in the dose range 30-1000 mg kg(-1). The anti-nociceptive properties were evaluated by the Writhing test in mice. The number of abdominal contractions was dose dependently reduced by the flower extract. It reduced mechanical hypersensitivity (Paw pressure test) related to the acute inflammatory phase induced by carrageenan similarly to diclofenac and ibuprofen. In the osteoarthritis model induced by intra articular injection of monoiodoacetate (MIA) the flower extract significantly increased the pain threshold peaking 30 min after treatment. Moreover, it was effective in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain showing activity similar to the anti-epileptic drug gabapentin. The flower extract activity was confirmed in rat models of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. The mechanical hypersensitivity induced by repeated treatments with the anticancer drug oxaliplatin and with the antiviral dideoxycytidine was significantly reduced after a single injection of Feverfew flower extract. The leaf extract showed lesser efficacy and potency and it was devoid of any effect in carrageenan-, MIA- and chemotherapy-induced pain. The present Feverfew flower extract behaves as a potent pain reliever in acute, inflammatory, articular and neuropathic pain. It appears as a natural strategy potentially suitable for the treatment of different kinds of pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of a cold patch for relieving pain after transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yuan; Li, Yi; Gao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A return toward toward photorefractive keratectomy has occurred due to better corneal stability and fewer corneal flap complications; however, pain remains a major drawback of the procedure. Currently, clinical pain control measures focus on the administration of pain medications, which may delay corneal epithelial healing and has, occasionally, led to serious corneal toxicity. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the safety and efficacy of a cold patch on postoperative pain and other relevant consequences of transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy. METHODS: A prospective, randomized controlled study was conducted. Forty patients (80 eyes) scheduled to undergo transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy for myopia or myopic astigmatism were randomly and equally assigned to be treated with ice-cold balanced salt solution during surgery (wash group) or to wear a postoperative cold patch on the eye for 24 h. The main outcomes were pain score on a visual analogue scale, postoperative eyelid edema, conjunctival hyperemia, epithelial healing time, haze and postoperative best-corrected visual acuity. RESULTS: All patients completed the final tests. Demographic characteristics and pain scores during surgery were similar between the two groups. The mean postoperative pain scores of patients in the cold patch group at 8 h, 16 h and 24 h were significantly lower than those of patients in the wash group. Scores for postoperative eyelid edema and conjunctival hyperemia in the cold patch group were also lower than in the wash group. Patients in the cold patch group used fewer painkillers. Epithelial healing time, haze and early recovery of visual acuity were similar between the two groups. No eyelid frostbite was observed. CONCLUSION: Wearing a cold patch on the eye after transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy effectively relieved pain and inflammation, and reduced the use of painkillers without any side effects. PMID:25992866

  16. Local cooling for relieving pain from perineal trauma sustained during childbirth.

    PubMed

    East, C E; Begg, L; Henshall, N E; Marchant, P; Wallace, K

    2007-10-17

    Perineal trauma is common during childbirth and may be painful. Contemporary maternity practice includes offering women numerous forms of pain relief, including the local application of cooling treatments. To evaluate the effectiveness and side effects of localised cooling treatments compared with no treatment, other forms of cooling treatments and non-cooling treatments. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (January 2007), CINAHL (1982 to January 2007) and contacted experts in the field. Published and unpublished randomised and quasi-randomised trials (RCTs) that compared localised cooling treatment applied to the perineum with no treatment or other treatments applied to relieve pain related to perineal trauma sustained during childbirth. At least two independent authors performed data extraction for each study. Analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis where data allowed. We sought additional information from the authors of three trials. Seven published RCTs were included, comparing local cooling treatments (ice packs, cold gel pads or cold/iced baths) with no treatment, hamamelis water (witch hazel), pulsed electromagnetic energy (PET), hydrocortisone/pramoxine foam [Epifoam] or warm baths. The RCTs reported on a total of 859 women. Ice packs provided improved pain relief 24 to 72 hours after birth compared with no treatment (risk ratio (RR) 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41 to 0.91). Women preferred the utility of the gel pads compared with ice packs or no treatment, although no differences in pain relief were detected between the treatments. None of our comparisons of treatments resulted in differences detected in perineal oedema or bruising. Women reported more pain (RR 5.60, 95% CI 2.35 to 13.33) and used more additional analgesia (RR 4.00, 95% CI 1.44 to 11.13) following the application of ice packs compared with PET. There is only limited evidence to support the effectiveness of local cooling

  17. Five Patients With Burning Mouth Syndrome in Whom an Antidepressant (Serotonin-Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitor) Was Not Effective, but Pregabalin Markedly Relieved Pain.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mikiko; Tokura, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Keizo; Nagashima, Wataru; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Umemura, Eri; Tachibana, Masako; Miyauchi, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Yuka; Arao, Munetaka; Ozaki, Norio; Kurita, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) causes idiopathic pain or a burning sensation in clinically normal oral mucosa. Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic disease with an unknown etiology. Burning mouth syndrome is also idiopathic, and a consensus regarding diagnosis/treatment has not been reached yet. Recent studies have supported the suggestion that BMS is a neuropathic pain disorder in which both the peripheral and central nervous systems are involved. Tricyclic antidepressants (nortriptyline and amitriptyline), serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (duloxetine and milnacipran), and antiepileptic drugs, potential-dependent calcium channel α2δ subunit ligands (gabapentine and pregabalin), are currently recommended as the first-choice drugs for neuropathic pain. In this study, we report 5 patients with BMS in whom there was no response to SNRI (milnacipran or duloxetine), or administration was discontinued because of adverse reactions, but in whom pregabalin therapy markedly reduced or led to the disappearance of pain in a short period. Pregabalin, whose mechanism of action differs from that of SNRIs, may become a treatment option for BMS patients who are not responsive to or are resistant to SNRIs.

  18. Physical exercise: does it help in relieving pain and increasing mobility among older adults with chronic pain?

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Wan, Vanessa T C; Ho, Suki S K

    2011-03-01

    To provide a physical exercise programme for older adults living in nursing homes. Pain is common among older persons and for those already in long-term care and having difficulty in coping with pain will be at risk of further reducing their optimal independent function. A quasi-experimental single group pretest-posttest design. Older persons from a nursing home were invited to join an eight-week physical exercise programme. Each session lasted an hour and sessions were conducted once a week by physiotherapist and nurses. Physical exercise programme consisted of stretching, strengthening, balancing, towel dancing and self-administered massage to various acupressure points. On completion of each session, older persons were given a pamphlet with pictures to illustrate the exercise of the day and they were encouraged to practise these exercises by themselves. Outcome measures including pain intensity, range of movement, activities of daily living and mobility were collected before and after the physical exercise programme. There were 75 older adult participants (57 female and 18 male, mean age 85.14 SD 5.30). Seventy-three percent (n = 55) of them had pain in the previous three months and were referred as pain group, while 25% (n = 20) were no pain group. Pain scores of 4.89 (on a 10-point scale) indicated medium pain intensity before the intervention for the pain group; the location of pain was mainly in the knee, back and shoulder. On completion of the physical exercise programme, there was a significant decrease in pain intensity to 2.89 (SD 2.14) (p < 0.01). There was a significant increase in range of movement in the neck, shoulder, back, hip and knee rotation, flex and abduction (p < 0.01). Mobility level was significantly increased post intervention, yet activities of daily living remained unchanged. The present study demonstrated the effectiveness of a physical exercise programme in relieving pain and enhancing functional mobility for older persons. Relevance

  19. Pain-Relieving Interventions for Retinopathy of Prematurity: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Disher, Timothy; Cameron, Chris; Mitra, Souvik; Cathcart, Kelcey; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha

    2018-06-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity eye examinations conducted in the neonatal intensive care. To combine randomized trials of pain-relieving interventions for retinopathy of prematurity examinations using network meta-analysis. Systematic review and network meta-analysis of Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. All databases were searched from inception to February 2017. Abstract and title screen and full-text screening were conducted independently by 2 reviewers. Data were extracted by 2 reviewers and pooled with random effect models if the number of trials within a comparison was sufficient. The primary outcome was pain during the examination period; secondary outcomes were pain after the examination, physiologic response, and adverse events. Twenty-nine studies ( N = 1487) were included. Topical anesthetic (TA) combined with sweet taste and an adjunct intervention (eg, nonnutritive sucking) had the highest probability of being the optimal treatment (mean difference [95% credible interval] versus TA alone = -3.67 [-5.86 to -1.47]; surface under the cumulative ranking curve = 0.86). Secondary outcomes were sparsely reported (2-4 studies, N = 90-248) but supported sweet-tasting solutions with or without adjunct interventions as optimal. Limitations included moderate heterogeneity in pain assessment reactivity phase and severe heterogeneity in the regulation phase. Multisensory interventions including sweet taste is likely the optimal treatment for reducing pain resulting from eye examinations in preterm infants. No interventions were effective in absolute terms. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. A pilot study analyzing the effects of Chinese cupping as an adjunct treatment for patients with subacute low back pain on relieving pain, improving range of motion, and improving function.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Alycia; Sanford, Susan; Pikowski, Jenna; Fauvell, Daniel; Cimino, David; Caplan, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Cupping, a classic Chinese medicine treatment, is a technique that applies suction cups over soft tissue. Cupping is gaining popularity in physical medicine because of the simplicity in application, minimal adverse effects, and reduction in pain and muscle tenderness. These factors also make it a cost-effective intervention. For this study, cupping was used to treat low back pain (LBP). To evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese cupping in acutely reducing pain, decreasing tenderness to palpation, and improving range of motion for patients with subacute or chronic LBP. Twenty-one patients who reported back pain for at least 8 weeks volunteered at a multidisciplinary holistic outpatient clinic. After completion of a medical screening questionnaire and collection of baseline data, 4 glass cups were applied and pressurized over the lower erector spinae muscles. Baseline data included demographic characteristics and the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire score. Pre- and postintervention data included perceived pain on a visual analog scale (VAS), lumbar spine range of motion, straight-leg raise test (SLR), and pain-pressure threshold (PPT) assessed with a digital force gauge. The data were analyzed by using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Spearman rho correlations. Of the 17 patients who completed the study, there were significant post-treatment improvements in VAS scores (p=0.0001), SLR motion on the left (p=0.043), and lumbar flexion range of motion (p=0.016) and improvements in PPT at all 4 investigated points (p<0.007). Significant relationships were identified between the improvement in low back flexion with the improvement in PPT at bilateral lumbar paraspinal muscles at the L4 levels and at the left L2 level. Chinese cupping may be a low-risk, therapeutic treatment for the prompt reduction of symptoms associated with subacute and chronic low back pain. Cupping may allow patients to progress to functional movement training in a timely manner by promptly reducing

  1. Prescription Pain Reliever Abuse and Dependence among Adolescents: A Nationally Representative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Ringwalt, Christopher L.; Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2008-01-01

    The study investigates the prevalence, patterns, and correlates of adolescents' abuse, sub-threshold dependence, and dependence on prescription pain relievers (PPRs) in a nationally representative sample. Results show dependence on PPRs can take place without abuse and that sub-threshold dependence could have implications for major diagnostic…

  2. Single oral dose of cannabinoid derivate loaded PLGA nanocarriers relieves neuropathic pain for eleven days.

    PubMed

    Berrocoso, Esther; Rey-Brea, Raquel; Fernández-Arévalo, Mercedes; Micó, Juan Antonio; Martín-Banderas, Lucía

    2017-11-01

    Neuropathic pain, resistant to opiates and other drugs, is a chronic/persistent state with a complex treatment and often poor efficacy. In this scenario, cannabinoids are increasingly regarded as a genuine alternative. In this paper, and in an experimental animal model of neuropathic pain, we studied the efficacy of three kinds of PLGA nanoparticles containing synthetic cannabinoid CB13: (i) plain nanoparticles (PLGA); (ii) particles coated with PEG chains (PLGA+PEG) and (iii) particles possessing hydrophilic surfaces obtained by covalently binding PEG chains (PLGA-PEG). The optimized formulation, CB13-PLGA-PEG, showed high drug loading (13%) and small size (<300nm) with a narrow distribution and controlled surface properties (near-neutral zeta potential and stable PEG corona). Animal nociceptive behavioral studies were conducted by paw pressure and acetone tests. Versus the free CB13, CB13-PLGA-PEG nanoparticles showed a very noticeable analgesic efficacy with the longest sustained pain-relieving effect, lasting up to eleven days after one oral dose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanisms of topical analgesics in relieving pain in an animal model of muscular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wan-Ru; Lu, Jie; Xie, Yi-Kuan

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the possible mechanisms of topical analgesics in relieving pain in an animal model of muscular inflammation. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes were injected with complete Freund's adjuvant to induce inflammation in the anterior tibialis muscle of left hindlimb. One of two types of topical analgesics: Xiaotong Tiegao (XTT), a Tibetan herb compound, or Capzasin (CAP), a cream containing 0.1% capsaicin, was applied to the skin over the inflamed anterior tibialis muscle. The following experiments were performed: pain behavioral tests, evaluation of plasma extravasation in the affected limb, and electrophysiological recordings of afferent nerve fibers. The behavioral experiments demonstrated that applications of either type of topical analgesic to the skin over the inflamed muscle significantly reduced muscular inflammatory pain, as indicated by the increased weight bearing capacity on the affected hindlimb (with latencies of 10 minutes for XTT and 1-2 hours for CAP). Meanwhile, both analgesics caused plasma extravasation in the affected skin. Electrophysiological recordings from the afferent fibers in the related cutaneous nerve indicated that topical analgesics selectively activated C-fibers, but not A-fibers innervating the same region of receptive field. The latency and duration of C-fiber activation was similar to those of the reduction of muscular inflammatory pain. On the contrary, topical analgesics substantially decreased C-fiber afferent spontaneous firing in the nerve innervating the inflamed muscle. Moreover, denervation of the affected skin blocked the analgesic effects of both topical analgesics in muscular inflammatory pain. This study suggests that topical analgesics may reduce the nociceptive input from inflamed muscles via a reflex mechanism by activating the cutaneous nociceptive afferents. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Non-prescribed use of pain relievers among adolescents in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Pilowsky, Daniel J; Patkar, Ashwin A

    2008-04-01

    We examined gender-specific prevalences, patterns, and correlates of non-prescribed use of pain relievers - mainly opioids - in a representative sample of American adolescents (N=18,678). Data were drawn from the public use data file of the 2005 U.S. National Survey on Drug Use and Health, a survey of non-institutionalized American household residents. The patterns of non-prescribed use of prescription pain relievers were examined, and logistic regression procedures were conducted to identify correlates of non-prescribed use. Approximately one in 10 adolescents aged 12-17 years reported non-prescribed use of pain relievers in their lifetime (9.3% in males and 10.3% in females). The mean age of first non-prescribed use was 13.3 years, which was similar to the mean age of first use of alcohol and marijuana but older than the age of first inhalant use. Among all non-prescribed users, 52% reported having used hydrocodone products (Vicodin, Lortab, Lorcet, and Lorcet Plus, and hydrocodone), 50% had used propoxyphene (Darvocet or Darvon) or codeine (Tylenol with codeine), and 24% had used oxycodone products (OxyContin, Percocet, Percodan, and Tylox). Approximately one quarter (26%) of all non-prescribed users had never used other non-prescribed or illicit drugs. There were gender variations in correlates of non-prescribed use. Use of non-prescribed pain relievers occurs early in adolescence. Research is needed to understand whether early use of non-prescribed pain relievers is related to later drug use.

  5. Parecoxib added to ropivacaine prolongs duration of axillary brachial plexus blockade and relieves postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhao, Xuan; Lou, Jian; Wang, Yingwei; Shen, Xiaofang

    2013-02-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 antagonist is widely used for intravenous postoperative pain relief. Recent studies reported COX-2 in the spinal dorsal horn could modulate spinal nociceptive processes. Epidural parecoxib in rats showed no neurotoxicity. These findings suggested applying a COX-2 antagonist directly to the central or peripheral nerve might provide better analgesia. We therefore determined: (1) whether the addition of parecoxib to ropivacaine injected locally on the nerve block affected the sensory and motor block times of the brachial plexus nerve block; and (2) whether parecoxib injected locally on the nerve or intravenously had a similar analgesic adjuvant effect. We conducted a randomized controlled trial from January 2009 to November 2010 with 150 patients scheduled for elective forearm surgery, using a multiple-nerve stimulation technique. Patients were randomly allocated into one of three groups: Group A (n = 50) received ropivacaine 0.25% alone on the brachial plexus nerve; Group B (n = 50) received ropivacaine together with 20 mg parecoxib locally on the nerve block; and Group C (n = 50) received 20 mg parecoxib intravenously. We recorded the duration of the sensory and motor blocks, and the most severe pain score during a 24-hour postoperative period. Parecoxib added locally on the nerve block prolonged the motor and sensory block times compared with Group A. However, parecoxib injected intravenously had no such effect. Pain intensity scores in Group B were lower than those in Groups A and C. Parecoxib added to ropivacaine locally on the nerve block prolonged the duration of the axillary brachial plexus blockade and relieved postoperative pain for patients having forearm orthopaedic surgery. Level I, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  6. Reviewing the Literature on the Effectiveness of Pressure Relieving Movements

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, May

    2013-01-01

    Sitting for prolonged periods of time increases seating interface pressures, which is known to increase the risk of developing pressure ulcers. Those at risk of developing pressure ulcers are advised to perform pressure relieving movements such as “pushups” or “forward leans” in order to reduce the duration and magnitude of pressure acting on the vulnerable ischial tuberosity region. The aim of this review was to synthesize and critique the existing literature investigating the effectiveness of pressure relieving movements on seating interface pressures. The twenty-seven articles included in this paper highlight the need for further research investigating the effect of recommended pressure relieving movements on the pressures around the ischial tuberosities. Furthermore, this review found that the majority of individuals at risk of developing pressure ulcers do not adhere with the pressure relieving frequency or magnitude of movements currently recommended, indicating a need for pressure ulcer prevention to be explored further. PMID:23365733

  7. Non-Prescribed Use of Pain Relievers among Adolescents in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Pilowsky, Daniel J.; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2008-01-01

    Background We examined gender-specific prevalences, patterns, and correlates of non-prescribed use of pain relievers—mainly opioids—in a representative sample of American adolescents (N = 18,678). Methods Data were drawn from the public use data file of the 2005 U.S. National Survey on Drug Use and Health, a survey of non-institutionalized American household residents. The patterns of non-prescribed use of prescription pain relievers were examined, and logistic regression procedures were conducted to identify correlates of non-prescribed use. Results Approximately one in 10 adolescents aged 12−17 years reported non-prescribed use of pain relievers in their lifetime (9.3% in males and 10.3% in females). The mean age of first non-prescribed use was 13.3 years, which was similar to the mean age of first use of alcohol and marijuana but older than the age of first inhalant use. Among all non-prescribed users, 52% reported having used hydrocodone products (Vicodin, Lortab, Lorcet, and Lorcet Plus, and hydrocodone), 50% had used propoxyphene (Darvocet or Darvon) or codeine (Tylenol with codeine), and 24% had used oxycodone products (OxyContin, Percocet, Percodan, and Tylox). Approximately one quarter (26%) of all non-prescribed users had never used other non-prescribed or illicit drugs. There were gender variations in correlates of non-prescribed use. Conclusions Use of non-prescribed pain relievers occurs early in adolescence. Research is needed to understand whether early use of non-prescribed pain relievers is related to later drug use. PMID:18054444

  8. Relieving dyspnoea by non-invasive ventilation decreases pain thresholds in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dangers, Laurence; Laviolette, Louis; Georges, Marjolaine; Gonzalez-Bermejo, Jésus; Rivals, Isabelle; Similowski, Thomas; Morelot-Panzini, Capucine

    2017-03-01

    Dyspnoea is a threatening sensation of respiratory discomfort that presents many similarities with pain. Experimental dyspnoea in healthy subjects induces analgesia. This 'dyspnoea-pain counter-irritation' could, in reverse, imply that relieving dyspnoea in patients with chronic respiratory diseases would lower their pain thresholds. We first determined pressure pain thresholds in 25 healthy volunteers (22-31 years; 13 men; handheld algometer), during unloaded breathing (BASELINE) and during inspiratory threshold loading (ITL). Two levels of loading were used, adjusted to induce dyspnoea self-rated at 60% or 80% of a 10 cm visual analogue scale (ITL6 and ITL8). 18 patients with chronic respiratory failure due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) were then studied during unassisted breathing and after 30 and 60 min of non-invasive ventilation-NIV30 and NIV60-(same dyspnoea evaluation). In healthy volunteers, pressure pain thresholds increased significantly in the deltoid during ITL6 (p<0.05) and ITL8 (p<0.05) and in the trapezius during ITL8 (p<0.05), validating the use of pressure pain thresholds to study dyspnoea-pain counter-irritation. In patients with ALS, the pressure pain thresholds measured in the deltoid during unassisted breathing decreased by a median of 24.5%-33.0% of baseline during NIV30 and NIV60 (p<0.05). Relieving dyspnoea by NIV in patients with ALS having respiratory failure is associated with decreased pressure pain thresholds. Clinical implications have yet to be determined, but this observation suggests that patients with ALS could become more susceptible to pain after the institution of NIV, hence the need for reinforced attention towards potentially painful diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Case report: Long-standing complex regional pain syndrome relieved by a cephalosporin antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Ware, Mark A; Bennett, Gary J

    2014-07-01

    We describe a young woman who had had treatment-refractory complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) for 6 years before receiving antibiotic treatment with cefadroxil (a cephalosporin derivative) for a minor infection. Cefadroxil reduced the patient's pain and motor dysfunction (dystonia and impaired voluntary movement) within days; the pain and motor disorder returned when cefadroxil was discontinued; and both again abated when cefadroxil was re-instituted. The patient has now had symptom relief for more than 3 years on continuing cefadroxil therapy. We discuss this case in the context of previous reports of antibiotic treatment relieving neuropathic pain in experimental animals. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Will peripherally restricted kappa-opioid receptor agonists (pKORAs) relieve pain with less opioid adverse effects and abuse potential?

    PubMed

    Albert-Vartanian, A; Boyd, M R; Hall, A L; Morgado, S J; Nguyen, E; Nguyen, V P H; Patel, S P; Russo, L J; Shao, A J; Raffa, R B

    2016-08-01

    Optimal utilization of opioid analgesics is significantly limited by the central nervous system adverse effects and misuse/abuse potential of currently available drugs. It has been postulated that opioid-associated adverse effects and abuse potential would be greatly reduced if opioids could be excluded from reaching the brain. We review the basic science and clinical evidence of one such approach - peripherally restricted kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) agonists (pKORAs). Published and unpublished literature, websites and other sources were searched for basic science and clinical information related to the potential benefits and development of peripherally restricted kappa-opioid receptor agonists. Each source was summarized, reviewed and assessed. The historical development of pKORAs can be traced from the design of increasingly KOR-selective agonists, elucidation of the pharmacologic attributes of such compounds and strategies to restrict passage across the blood-brain barrier. Novel compounds are under development and have progressed to clinical trials. The results from recent clinical trials suggest that peripherally restricted opioids can be successfully designed and that they can retain analgesic efficacy with a more favourable adverse effect profile. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Electrical peripheral nerve stimulation relieves bone cancer pain by inducing Arc protein expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ke-fu; Feng, Wan-wen; Liu, Yue-peng; Dong, Yan-bin; Gao, Li; Yang, Hui-lin

    2018-01-01

    Objective The analgesic effect on chronic pain of peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) has been proven, but its underlying mechanism remains unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the analgesic effect of PNS on bone cancer pain in a rat model and to explore the underlying mechanism. Materials and methods PNS on sciatic nerves with bipolar electrode was performed in both naïve and bone cancer pain model rats. Then, the protein levels of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid–type glutamate receptor 1 (GluA1), and phosphate N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-type glutamate receptor subunit 2B (pGluNR2B) in spinal cord were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Thermal paw withdraw latency and mechanical paw withdraw threshold were used to estimate the analgesic effect of PNS on bone cancer pain. Intrathecal administration of Arc shRNA was used to inhibit Arc expression in the spinal cord. Results PNS at 60 and 120 Hz for 20 min overtly induced Arc expression in the spinal cord, increased thermal pain thresholds in naïve rats, and relieved bone cancer pain; meanwhile, 10 Hz PNS did not achieve those results. In addition, PNS at 60 and 120 Hz also reduced the expression of GluA1, but not pGluNR2B, in the spinal cord. Finally, the anti-nociceptive effect and GluA1 downregulation induced by PNS were inhibited by intrathecal administration of Arc shRNA. Conclusion PNS (60 Hz, 0.3 mA) can relieve bone-cancer-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia by upregulating Arc protein expression and then by decreasing GluA1 transcription in the spinal cord dorsal horn. PMID:29606887

  12. Shoulder tenotomies to improve passive motion and relieve pain in patients with spastic hemiplegia after upper motor neuron injury.

    PubMed

    Namdari, Surena; Alosh, Hassan; Baldwin, Keith; Mehta, Samir; Keenan, Mary Ann

    2011-07-01

    Shoulder adduction and internal rotation contractures commonly develop in patients with spastic hemiplegia after upper motor neuron (UMN) injury. Contractures are often painful, macerate skin, and impair axillary hygiene. We hypothesize that shoulder tenotomies are an effective means of pain relief and passive motion restoration in patients without active upper extremity motor function. A consecutive series of 36 adults (10 men, 26 women) with spastic hemiplegia from UMN injury, shoulder adduction, and internal rotation contractures, and no active movement, who underwent shoulder tenotomies of the pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, teres major, and subscapularis were evaluated. Patients were an average age of 52.2 years. Pain, passive motion, and satisfaction were considered preoperatively and postoperatively. Average follow-up was 14.3 months. Preoperatively, all patients had limited passive motion that interfered with passive functions. Nineteen patients had pain. After surgery, passive extension, flexion, abduction, and external rotation improved from 50%, 27%, 27%, and 1% to 85%, 70%, 66%, and 56%, respectively, compared with the normal contralateral side (P < .001). All patients with preoperative pain had improved pain relief at follow-up, with 18 (95%) being pain-free. Thirty-five (97%) were satisfied with the outcome of surgery, and all patients reported improved axillary hygiene and skin care. Age, gender, etiology, and chronicity of UMN injury were not associated with improvement in motion. We observed improvements in passive ROM and high patient satisfaction with surgery at early follow-up. Patients who had pain with passive motion preoperatively had significant improvements in pain after shoulder tenotomy. Shoulder tenotomy to relieve spastic contractures resulting from UMN injury can be an effective means of pain relief and improved passive range of motion in patients without active motor function. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow

  13. Patterns of analgesic use to relieve tooth pain among residents in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The use of prescription opioids has increased dramatically in Canada in recent decades. This rise in opioid prescriptions has been accompanied by increasing rates of opioid-related abuse and addiction, creating serious public health challenges in British Columbia (BC), one of Canada's most populated provinces. Our study explores the relationship between dental pain and prescription opioid use among residents in BC. We used data from the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), which asked respondents about their use of specific analgesic medications, including opioids, and their history of tooth pain in the past month. We used logistic regression, controlling for potential confounding variables, to identify the predictive value of socioeconomic factors, oral health-related variables, and dental care utilization indicators. The Relative Index of Inequality (RII) was calculated to assess the magnitude of socioeconomic inequalities in the use of particular analgesics by incorporating income-derived ridit values into a binary logistic regression model. Our results showed that conventional non-opioid based analgesics (such as aspirin or Tylenol) and opioids were more likely to be used by those who had experienced a toothache in the past month than those who did not report experiencing a toothache. The use of non-opioid painkillers to relieve tooth pain was associated with more recent and more frequent dental visits, better self-reported oral health, and a greater income. Conversely, a lower household income was associated with a preference for opioid use to relieve tooth pain. The RII for recent opioid use and conventional painkiller use were 2.06 (95% CI: 1.75–2.37) and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.35–0.91), respectively, among those who experienced recent tooth pain, suggesting that adverse socioeconomic conditions may influence the need for opioid analgesics to relieve dental pain. We conclude that programs and policies targeted at improving the dental health of the poor

  14. Correlates of Abusing and Misusing Over-the-Counter Pain Relievers Among Adult Population of Wrocław (Poland).

    PubMed

    Wójta-Kempa, Monika; Krzyżanowski, Dominik M

    2016-01-01

    Almost 90% of households in Poland buy medicines on their own initiative. The most popular OTC medicines bought by Polish consumers are painkillers and non-steroid-anti-inflammatory drugs. The aim of this article was to recognize and describe the most important predictive factors of the abuse and misuse of over-the-counter pain relievers among adults in Wrocław (Poland). The groups of users were selected and described. Some examples of misuse were analyzed. Three hundred eighty six adult inhabitants of Wrocław took part in the survey. The quota sample was representative referring to the most important socio-demographic factors (sex and median age). Almost 91% of participants declare taking OTC pain relievers, and 1.3% of them are their daily users. Only 6.2% of adult inhabitants of Wrocław never take OTC pain relievers. The category of "heavy users" embraces 11% of participants. The most important risk factors of overusing OTC pain relievers are sex (female), age over 55 years and the low health status. Only half of participants read the box label regularly and 25% of users admit they have modified recommended doses. Over 60% shortened recommended intervals between doses and 16% took two or more different pain medications (containing different substances). The non-medical purposes of using OTC pain relievers were: tiredness (7%), stressful situations (5.4%), and discomfort (18.4%). Some users take pain medications to cure hangovers (26%), or instead of the appropriate medicine (7%). About 20% take pain medications without a doctor's advice for longer than the recommended 3 days, and 10% never consult taking such medications with doctors. Pain should be treated aggressively and successfully, especially among chronically ill patients. We should monitor the consumption of OTC pain relievers and limit their current excessively supply and high availability.

  15. Medical marijuana policies and hospitalizations related to marijuana and opioid pain reliever.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuyan

    2017-04-01

    Twenty-eight states in the U.S have legalized medical marijuana, yet its impacts on severe health consequences such as hospitalizations remain unknown. Meanwhile, the prevalence of opioid pain reliever (OPR) use and outcomes has increased dramatically. Recent studies suggested unintended impacts of legalizing medical marijuana on OPR, but the evidence is still limited. This study examined the associations between state medical marijuana policies and hospitalizations related to marijuana and OPR. State-level annual administrative records of hospital discharges during 1997-2014 were obtained from the State Inpatient Databases (SID). The outcome variables were rates of hospitalizations involving marijuana dependence or abuse, opioid dependence or abuse, and OPR overdose in 1000 discharges. Linear time-series regressions were used to assess the associations of implementing medical marijuana policies to hospitalizations, controlling for other marijuana- and OPR-related policies, socioeconomic factors, and state and year fixed effects. Hospitalizations related to marijuana and OPR increased sharply by 300% on average in all states. Medical marijuana legalization was associated with 23% (p=0.008) and 13% (p=0.025) reductions in hospitalizations related to opioid dependence or abuse and OPR overdose, respectively; lagged effects were observed after policy implementation. The operation of medical marijuana dispensaries had no independent impacts on OPR-related hospitalizations. Medical marijuana polices had no associations with marijuana-related hospitalizations. Medical marijuana policies were significantly associated with reduced OPR-related hospitalizations but had no associations with marijuana-related hospitalizations. Given the epidemic of problematic use of OPR, future investigation is needed to explore the causal pathways of these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Medical marijuana policies and hospitalizations related to marijuana and opioid pain reliever*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuyan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Twenty-eight states in the U.S. have legalized medical marijuana, yet its impacts on severe health consequences such as hospitalizations remain unknown. Meanwhile, the prevalence of opioid pain reliever (OPR) use and outcomes has increased dramatically. Recent studies suggested unintended impacts of legalizing medical marijuana on OPR, but the evidence is still limited. This study examined the associations between state medical marijuana policies and hospitalizations related to marijuana and OPR. Methods State-level annual administrative records of hospital discharges during 1997–2014 were obtained from the State Inpatient Databases (SID). The outcome variables were rates of hospitalizations involving marijuana dependence or abuse, opioid dependence or abuse, and OPR overdose in 1,000 discharges. Linear time-series regressions were used to assess the associations of implementing medical marijuana policies to hospitalizations, controlling for other marijuana- and OPR-related policies, socioeconomic factors, and state and year fixed effects. Results Hospitalizations related to marijuana and OPR increased sharply by 300% on average in all states. Medical marijuana legalization was associated with 23% (p=.008) and 13% (p=.025) reductions in hospitalizations related to opioid dependence or abuse and OPR overdose, respectively; lagged effects were observed after policy implementation. The operation of medical marijuana dispensaries had no independent impacts on OPR- related hospitalizations. Medical marijuana polices had no associations with marijuana-related hospitalizations. Conclusion Medical marijuana policies were significantly associated with reduced OPR-related hospitalizations but had no associations with marijuana-related hospitalizations. Given the epidemic of problematic use of OPR, future investigation is needed to explore the causal pathways of these findings. PMID:28259087

  17. A Single Sub-anesthetic Dose of Ketamine Relieves Depression-like Behaviors Induced by Neuropathic Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Goffer, Yossef; Xu, Duo; Tukey, David S.; Shamir, D. B.; Eberle, Sarah E.; Zou, Anthony H.; Blanck, Thomas J.J.; Ziff, Edward B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is associated with depression. In rodents, pain is often assessed by sensory hypersensitivity, which does not sufficiently measure affective responses. Low-dose ketamine has been used to treat both pain and depression, but it is not clear whether ketamine can relieve depression associated with chronic pain and whether this antidepressant effect depends on its anti-nociceptive properties. Methods We examined whether the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain induces depressive behavior in rats, using sucrose preference test and forced swim test, and tested whether a subanesthetic dose of ketamine treats SNI-induced depression. Results SNI-treated rats, compared with control, showed decreased sucrose preference (0.719 ± 0.068 (mean ± SEM) vs. 0.946 ± 0.010) and enhanced immobility in the forced swim test (107.3 ± 14.6s vs. 56.2 ± 12.5s). Further, sham-operated rats demonstrated depressive behaviors in the acute postoperative period (0.790 ± 0.062 on postoperative day 2). A single subanesthetic dose of ketamine (10mg/kg) did not alter SNI-induced hypersensitivity; however, it treated SNI-associated depression-like behaviors (0.896 ± 0.020 for ketamine vs. 0.663 ± 0.080 for control 1 day after administration; 0.858 ± 0.017 for ketamine vs. 0.683 ± 0.077 for control 5 days after administration). Conclusions Chronic neuropathic pain leads to depression-like behaviors. The postoperative period also confers vulnerability to depression, possibly due to acute pain. Sucrose preference test and forced swim test may be used to compliment sensory tests for assessment of pain in animal studies. Low-dose ketamine can treat depression-like behaviors induced by chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:21934410

  18. St. John's Wort seed and feverfew flower extracts relieve painful diabetic neuropathy in a rat model of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Maidecchi, Anna; Mattoli, Luisa; Burico, Michela; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common complication of diabetes and the few approved therapies for the management of pain have limited efficacy and side effects. With the aim to explore and develop new pharmacological treatments, we investigated the antihyperalgesic properties of St. John's Wort (SJW) and feverfew in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats. Acute administration of a SJW seed extract reversed mechanical hyperalgesia with a prolonged effect. A SJW extract obtained from the aerial portion of the plant and a feverfew flower extract partially relieved neuropathic pain whereas a feverfew leaf extract was ineffective. The antihyperalgesic efficacy of these herbal drugs was comparable to that of clinically used antihyperalgesic drugs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, l-acetyl-levocarnitine). Further examinations of SJW and feverfew composition revealed that hyperforin and hypericin might be responsible for the antihyperalgesic properties of SJW whereas the efficacy of feverfew seems to be related to the presence of parthenolide. Rats undergoing treatment with SJW and feverfew did not show any behavioral side effect or sign of altered locomotor activity. Our results suggest that SJW and feverfew extracts may become new therapeutic perspectives for painful DPN. © 2013.

  19. Complementary and alternative therapies to relieve labor pain: A comparative study between music therapy and Hoku point ice massage.

    PubMed

    Dehcheshmeh, Faranak Safdari; Rafiei, Hossein

    2015-11-01

    Pain is a common experience for women during labor. In the present study, we compared the effect of two types of non-pharmacological pain relief methods "music therapy" and "Hoku point ice massage" on the severity of labor pain. This prospective, randomized, controlled trial was conducted in Shahrekord, Iran, from September 2013 to June 2014. We randomly assigned 90 primiparous women who expected a normal childbirth into three groups: group "A" received music therapy, group "B" received Hoku point ice massage, and group "C" received usual labor care. At the beginning of the active phase (4 cm cervical dilation) and before and after each intervention (at dilations 4, 6, and 8 cm), the intensities of labor pain were measured using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). At the beginning of the active phase, the mean VAS scores were 5.58 ± 1.29, 5.42 ± 1.31, and 6.13 ± 1.37 in the women in groups "A," "B," and "C," respectively (P > 0.05). After the intervention, the mean pain scores were significantly lower at all of the time points in groups "A" and "B" than in group "C" women (P < 0.05). Although the pain scores showed a more decreasing trend after the intervention in group "A" than that in group "B," the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Music therapy and Hoku point ice massage are easily available and inexpensive methods and have a similar effect in relieving labor pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Turkish Nurses' Use of Nonpharmacological Methods for Relieving Children's Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Çelebioğlu, Ayda; Küçükoğlu, Sibel; Odabaşoğlu, Emel

    2015-01-01

    The experience of pain is frequently observed among children undergoing surgery. Hospitalization and surgery are stressful experiences for those children. The research was conducted to investigate and analyze Turkish nurses' use of nonpharmacological methods to relieve postoperative pain in children. The study was cross-sectional and descriptive. The study took place at 2 hospitals in eastern Turkey. Participants were 143 nurses whose patients had undergone surgical procedures at the 2 hospitals. The researchers used a questionnaire, a checklist of nonpharmacological methods, and a visual analogue scale (VAS) to collect the data. To assess the data, descriptive statistics and the χ² test were used. Of the 143 nurses, 73.4% initially had applied medication when the children had pain. Most of the nurses (58.7%) stated the children generally experienced a middle level of postoperative pain. The most frequent practices that the nurses applied after the children's surgery were (1) "providing verbal encouragement" (90.2%), a cognitive-behavioral method; (2) "a change in the child's position" (85.3%), a physical method; (3) "touch" (82.5%), a method of emotional support; and (4) "ventilation of the room" (79.7%), a regulation of the surroundings. Compared with participants with other educational levels, the cognitive-behavioral methods were the ones most commonly used by the more educated nurses (P < .05): (1) encouraging patients with rewards, (2) helping them think happy thoughts, (3) helping them use their imaginations, (4) providing music, and (5) reading books. Female nurses used the following methods more than the male nurses did (P < .05): (1) providing encouragement with rewards, (2) helping patients with deep breathing, (3) keeping a desired item beside them, (4) changing their positions, and (5) ventilating the room. Undergoing surgery is generally a painful experience for children. Nurses most commonly use cognitive-behavioral methods in the postoperative

  1. Evaluation of U.S. Commercial-Off-the-Shelf Hand-Held Assays to Detect Opiate Pain Reliever Compounds in Multiple Biofluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    EVALUATION OF U.S. COMMERCIAL-OFF-THE-SHELF HAND-HELD ASSAYS TO DETECT OPIATE PAIN RELIEVER COMPOUNDS IN...Commercial-Off-the-Shelf Hand-Held Assays to Detect Opiate Pain Reliever Compounds in Multiple Biofluids 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER R...study, we evaluated the potential for several U.S. commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hand-held assays (HHAs) to detect members of the opiate pain reliever

  2. Perturbing NR2B-PSD-95 interaction relieves neuropathic pain by inactivating CaMKII-CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangxia; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Lin; Song, Jia; Zhu, Yingjun; Chu, Shuaishuai; Shao, Xueming; Li, Xiuxiu; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2017-09-06

    Neuropathic pain is characterized by central sensitization. The interaction between N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) plays a major role in central sensitization. Here, we aimed to investigate the analgesic effect of disruption of the interaction between NMDAR and PSD-95. Chronic dorsal root ganglia compression model rats were used to mimic sciatica. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia were evaluated. The expression of spinal phospho-NR2B, PSD-95, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) was measured using western blotting. A mimetic peptide Myr-NR2B9c was injected intrathecally to disrupt the interaction between PSD-95 and NR2B and detected by coimmunoprecipitation. Chronic dorsal root ganglia compression surgery induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, and upregulated pain-related proteins such as phospho-NR2B, PSD-95, CaMKII, and CREB expressions in the spinal cord. Myr-NR2B9c disrupted the interaction between NR2B-containing NMDARs and PSD-95 in the spinal cord. Intrathecal administration of Myr-NR2B9c attenuated neuropathic pain behaviors and downregulated the expressions of phospho-NR2B, PSD-95, CaMKII, and CREB in the spinal cord. The present study indicates that dissociation of NR2B-containing NMDARs from PSD-95 inactivates CaMKII and CREB signaling and relieves pain.

  3. Meta-analysis of oral Chinese herbal medicine as an adjuvant treatment in relieving pain secondary to bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Jun; Xu, Juan; Gong, Dan-Dan; Man, Chang-Feng; Fan, Yu

    2013-10-14

    To assess the effectiveness of oral Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in relieving pain secondary to bone metastases in patients. The searched electronic literature databases included both English and Chinese articles published in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Wanfang database and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (up to December 2012). The studies included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing CHM plus conventional treatment with conventional treatment alone for patients with pain secondary to bone metastases. The outcomes were the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the pain-relief rate and adverse events. A total of 16 RCTs involving 1,008 patients were identified and analyzed. All of the included RCTs were associated with a moderate to high risk of bias. In the metaanalysis, CHM plus conventional treatment increased the pain-relief rate compared with the conventional treatment alone (OR, 2.59; 95% CI 1.95 to 3.45). In subgroup analysis, the pooled OR of the pain-relief rate of CHM plus conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment was 3.11 (95% CI 2.01 to 4.79) for CHM plus bisphosphonates, 2.24 (95% CI 1.33 to 3.78) for CHM plus analgesics, 2.28 (95% CI 1.09 to 4.79) for CHM plus radiotherapy, and 2.22 (95% CI 0.95 to 5.15) for CHM plus analgesics and bisphosphonates. The adverse events included nausea, vomiting, dizziness, fever, and constipation. No serious adverse events were reported in any of the included studies. CHM interventions appear to have beneficial effects on pain secondary to bone metastases in patients. However, published efficacy trials are small in size to draw any firm conclusions.

  4. Variation among states in prescribing of opioid pain relievers and benzodiazepines--United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    Paulozzi, Leonard J; Mack, Karin A; Hockenberry, Jason M

    2014-12-01

    Overprescribing of opioid pain relievers (OPR) can result in multiple adverse health outcomes, including fatal overdoses. Interstate variation in rates of prescribing OPR and other prescription drugs prone to abuse, such as benzodiazepines, might indicate areas where prescribing patterns need further evaluation. CDC analyzed a commercial database (IMS Health) to assess the potential for improved prescribing of OPR and other drugs. CDC calculated state rates and measures of variation for OPR, long-acting/extended-release (LA/ER) OPR, high-dose OPR, and benzodiazepines. In 2012, prescribers wrote 82.5 OPR and 37.6 benzodiazepine prescriptions per 100 persons in the United States. State rates varied 2.7-fold for OPR and 3.7-fold for benzodiazepines. For both OPR and benzodiazepines, rates were higher in the South census region, and three Southern states were two or more standard deviations above the mean. Rates for LA/ER and high-dose OPR were highest in the Northeast. Rates varied 22-fold for one type of OPR, oxymorphone. Factors accounting for the regional variation are unknown. Such wide variations are unlikely to be attributable to underlying differences in the health status of the population. High rates indicate the need to identify prescribing practices that might not appropriately balance pain relief and patient safety. State policy makers might reduce the harms associated with the abuse of prescription drugs by implementing changes that will make the prescribing of these drugs more cautious and more consistent with clinical recommendations. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Implementing the PAIN RelieveIt Randomized Controlled Trial in Hospice Care: Mechanisms for Success and Meeting PCORI Methodology Standards.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, Miriam O; Suarez, Marie L; Carrasco, Jesus D; Hipp, Theresa; Gill, Anayza; Miller, Jacob; Shea, Robert; Shuey, David; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Angulo, Veronica; McCurry, Timothy; Martin, Joanna; Yao, Yingwei; Molokie, Robert E; Wang, Zaijie Jim; Wilkie, Diana J

    2017-07-01

    This purpose of this article is to describe how we adhere to the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute's (PCORI) methodology standards relevant to the design and implementation of our PCORI-funded study, the PAIN RelieveIt Trial. We present details of the PAIN RelieveIt Trial organized by the PCORI methodology standards and components that are relevant to our study. The PAIN RelieveIt Trial adheres to four PCORI standards and 21 subsumed components. The four standards include standards for formulating research questions, standards associated with patient centeredness, standards for data integrity and rigorous analyses, and standards for preventing and handling missing data. In the past 24 months, we screened 2,837 cancer patients and their caregivers; 874 dyads were eligible; 223.5 dyads consented and provided baseline data. Only 55 patients were lost to follow-up-a 25% attrition rate. The design and implementation of the PAIN RelieveIt Trial adhered to PCORI's methodology standards for research rigor.

  6. [Multimodal distraction to relieve pain in children undergoing acute medical procedures].

    PubMed

    Miller, Kate; Rodger, Sylvia; Bucolo, Sam; Wang, Xue-Qing; Kimble, Roy M

    2009-10-01

    Non-pharmacological approaches to pain management have been used by therapists for decades to reduce the anxiety and pain experienced by children during burn care procedures. With a greater understanding of pain and the principles behind what causes a child to be distracted, combined with access to state of the art technology, we have developed an easy to use, hand held multimodal distraction device (MMD). MMD is an interactive device that prepares the child for a procedure and uses developmentally appropriate distraction stories and games during the procedures to alleviate anxiety and pain. This paper summarizes the results of three randomized control trials. The trials aimed to understand the effectiveness of MMD as a distraction and preparation tool in reducing anxiety and pain in children undergoing burns and non-burns medical procedures compared to pure pharmacological approaches Standard Distraction (SD) and off the shelf video games (VG). Three separate prospective randomized control trials involving 182 children having 354 dressing changes were conducted in the burns and orthopedic departments at Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, to address the above aims. Pain and anxiety scores were completed for the child, caregiver and nursing staff according to the Modified Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability Scale, Faces Pain Scale-Revised, Visual Analogue Scale and Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale. Procedural length was recorded. MMD as a preparation and distraction tool were shown to have a significant impact on child, parent and nursing staff reported anxiety and pain during procedures compared to standard care and video games (P < 0.01). The MMD had a positive effect on clinical time and was shown to sustain its impact on pain and time with further dressing changes. MMD is more effective in reducing the pain and anxiety experienced by children in acute medical procedures as compared with SD and VG. MMD is continuing to be trialed and is

  7. Case Study: The Use of Massage Therapy to Relieve Chronic Low-Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Allen, Laura

    2016-09-01

    To study the effects of massage on chronic low-back pain in a patient with four different diagnoses: osteoarthritis, scoliosis, spinal stenosis, and degenerative disc disease. The patient's goal was to cut down on the amount of pain medication he takes. A 63-year-old man with chronic back pain received four massages across a twenty-day period. Progress was recorded using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale, as he self-reported on levels of pain and interference with his activities of daily living. Improvement was noted in 9 out of 10 measurements of self-reported pain and activities of daily living, with the only exception being his ability to lift heavy objects, which remained unchanged. The most dramatic differences were improvements in his ability to walk, and in the changing degrees of pain. The client also self-reported being able to decrease his pain medication and the ability to ride his bicycle for the first time in years. Massage therapy is a promising treatment for chronic low-back pain for patients who may have multiple pathologies, any one of which could be responsible for the condition. Further study is encouraged to determine the efficacy of massage therapy as a readily accessible, lower-cost alternative to more invasive therapies and as an adjunct to regular medical care, when appropriate.

  8. Curcumin slows osteoarthritis progression and relieves osteoarthritis-associated pain symptoms in a post-traumatic osteoarthritis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Leong, Daniel J; Xu, Lin; He, Zhiyong; Wang, Angela; Navati, Mahantesh; Kim, Sun J; Hirsh, David M; Hardin, John A; Cobelli, Neil J; Friedman, Joel M; Sun, Hui B

    2016-06-03

    Curcumin has been shown to have chondroprotective potential in vitro. However, its effect on disease and symptom modification in osteoarthritis (OA) is largely unknown. This study aimed to determine whether curcumin could slow progression of OA and relieve OA-related pain in a mouse model of destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM). Expression of selected cartilage degradative-associated genes was evaluated in human primary chondrocytes treated with curcumin and curcumin nanoparticles and assayed by real-time PCR. The mice subjected to DMM surgery were orally administered curcumin or topically administered curcumin nanoparticles for 8 weeks. Cartilage integrity was evaluated by Safranin O staining and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) score, and by immunohistochemical staining of cleaved aggrecan and type II collagen, and levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and ADAMTS5. Synovitis and subchondral bone thickness were scored based on histologic images. OA-associated pain and symptoms were evaluated by von Frey assay, and locomotor behavior including distance traveled and rearing. Both curcumin and nanoparticles encapsulating curcumin suppressed mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-1β and TNF-α, MMPs 1, 3, and 13, and aggrecanase ADAMTS5, and upregulated the chondroprotective transcriptional regulator CITED2, in primary cultured chondrocytes in the absence or presence of IL-1β. Oral administration of curcumin significantly reduced OA disease progression, but showed no significant effect on OA pain relief. Curcumin was detected in the infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP) following topical administration of curcumin nanoparticles on the skin of the injured mouse knee. Compared to vehicle-treated controls, topical treatment led to: (1) reduced proteoglycan loss and cartilage erosion and lower OARSI scores, (2) reduced synovitis and subchondral plate thickness, (3) reduced immunochemical staining of type II collagen and aggrecan

  9. Neural tissue engineering scaffold with sustained RAPA release relieves neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Tan; Zhu, Chao; Kou, Zhen-Zhen; Yin, Jun-Bin; Zhang, Ting; Lu, Ya-Cheng; Wang, Li-Ying; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Li, Yun-Qing

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effect of locally slow-released rapamycin (RAPA) from bionic peripheral nerve stent to reduce the incidence of neuropathic pain or mitigate the degree of pain after nerve injury. We constructed a neural tissue engineering scaffold with sustained release of RAPA to repair 20mm defects in rat sciatic nerves. Four presurgical and postsurgical time windows were selected to monitor the changes in the expression of pain-related dorsal root ganglion (DRG) voltage-gated sodium channels 1.3 (Nav1.3), 1.7 (Nav1.7), and 1.8 (Nav1.8) through immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western Blot, along with the observation of postsurgical pathological pain in rats by pain-related behavior approaches. Relatively small upregulation of DRG sodium channels was observed in the experimental group (RAPA+poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)+stent) after surgery, along with low degrees of neuropathic pain and anxiety, which were similar to those in the Autologous nerve graft group. Autoimmune inflammatory response plays a leading role in the occurrence of post-traumatic neuropathic pain, and that RAPA significantly inhibits the abnormal upregulation of sodium channels to reduce pain by alleviating inflammatory response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. American and German students' knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors with respect to over-the-counter pain relievers.

    PubMed

    Hanoch, Yaniv; Katsikopoulos, Konstantinos V; Gummerum, Michaela; Brass, Eric P

    2007-11-01

    To better understand the knowledge base and perceptions involved in the decision to buy and use over-the-counter pain relievers (OTCPRs) by taking into account the environment in which these decisions are made. The authors expected that the differences in access and marketing would affect knowledge and decision making related to OTCPRs in the United States and Germany. A survey was given to 108 undergraduate university students in the United States and Germany (58 and 50 participants, respectively). The authors found that significantly more Americans than Germans take OTCPRs and that they also take significantly more OTCPRs. Americans exhibited less knowledge about side effects than their German counterparts. When asked when they consulted package labels, Americans reported they were more likely to do so before buying a product, whereas Germans reported consulting labels before taking OTCPRs for the first time. Package labels affected more Americans' decisions to purchase OTCPRs; Americans were also less likely to consult a doctor when feeling pain but more likely to take OTCPRs. Finally, Americans viewed OTCPRs as riskier after their status changed from prescription only to over the counter, whereas Germans believed they posed less risk. This study analyzed health-related behavior by looking at how environmental factors shape decision processes related to over-the-counter drug use. The results indicate that looking at environmental factors does help to explain differences in knowledge, perceptions, and behaviors among German and American students. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. [Fentanyl Citrate Sublingual Tablets Were Effective in Relieving Symptoms of Akathisia - A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Kessoku, Takaomi; Kusakabe, Akihiko; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Honda, Yasushi; Yoshimi, Asuka; Goto, Ayumu; Yoshida, Haruhisa; Sukegawa, Akiko; Hata, Chiaki; Saito, Yukie; Miyashita, Yoko; Yashiro, Ryoko; Komori, Tomoya; Arai, Sachiko; Nakajima, Atsushi; Ichikawa, Yasushi

    2018-03-01

    Akathisia is a condition wherein sitting calmly and quietly is impossible, with a representative complaint of restless legs. It is generally assumed to be caused by anti-dopamine activity. In severe cases, it has been known to result in suicide attempt. We reported a case of drug-induced akathisia with difficulty in oral intake, in which fentanyl citrate sublingual tablets were found to be effective in relieving symptoms. The patient was a female aged 50's who had a gastric cancer with peritoneal dissemination causing pain and vomiting. Palliative care was requested for management of symptoms. Metoclopramide and haloperidol were administered for vomiting. However, because of the complaints of restless legs, the case was diagnosed as drug-induced akathisia. Fentanyl citrate sublingual tablets were then administered for pain management, resulting in temporary improvement of akathisia symptoms.

  12. Pressure relieving support surfaces (PRESSURE) trial: cost effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Cynthia; Nixon, Jane; Cranny, Gillian; Nelson, E Andrea; Hawkins, Kim; Phillips, Angela; Torgerson, David; Mason, Su; Cullum, Nicky

    2006-06-17

    To assess the cost effectiveness of alternating pressure mattresses compared with alternating pressure overlays for the prevention of pressure ulcers in patients admitted to hospital. Cost effectiveness analysis carried out alongside the pressure relieving support surfaces (PRESSURE) trial; a multicentre UK based pragmatic randomised controlled trial. 11 hospitals in six UK NHS trusts. Intention to treat population comprising 1971 participants. Kaplan Meier estimates of restricted mean time to development of pressure ulcers and total costs for treatment in hospital. Alternating pressure mattresses were associated with lower overall costs (283.6 pounds sterling per patient on average, 95% confidence interval--377.59 pounds sterling to 976.79 pounds sterling) mainly due to reduced length of stay in hospital, and greater benefits (a delay in time to ulceration of 10.64 days on average,--24.40 to 3.09). The differences in health benefits and total costs for hospital stay between alternating pressure mattresses and alternating pressure overlays were not statistically significant; however, a cost effectiveness acceptability curve indicated that on average alternating pressure mattresses compared with alternating pressure overlays were associated with an 80% probability of being cost saving. Alternating pressure mattresses for the prevention of pressure ulcers are more likely to be cost effective and are more acceptable to patients than alternating pressure overlays.

  13. Some physiotherapy treatments may relieve menstrual pain in women with primary dysmenorrhea: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Priya; Claydon, Leica Sarah

    2014-03-01

    In women with primary dysmenorrhoea, what is the effect of physiotherapeutic interventions compared to control (either no treatment or placebo/sham) on pain and quality of life? Systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis. Women with primary dysmenorrhea. Any form of physiotherapy treatment. The primary outcome was menstrual pain intensity and the secondary outcome was quality of life. The search yielded 222 citations. Of these, 11 were eligible randomised trials and were included in the review. Meta-analysis revealed statistically significant reductions in pain severity on a 0-10 scale from acupuncture (weighted mean difference 2.3, 95% CI 1.6 to 2.9) and acupressure (weighted mean difference 1.4, 95% CI 0.8 to 1.9), when compared to a control group receiving no treatment. However, these are likely to be placebo effects because when the control groups in acupuncture/acupressure trials received a sham instead of no treatment, pain severity did not significantly differ between the groups. Significant reductions in pain intensity on a 0-10 scale were noted in individual trials of heat (by 1.8, 95% CI 0.9 to 2.7), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (2.3, 95% CI 0.03 to 4.2), and yoga (3.2, 95% CI 2.2 to 4.2). Meta-analysis of two trials of spinal manipulation showed no significant reduction in pain. None of the included studies measured quality of life. Physiotherapists could consider using heat, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and yoga in the management of primary dysmenorrhea. While benefits were also identified for acupuncture and acupressure in no-treatment controlled trials, the absence of significant effects in sham-controlled trials suggests these effects are mainly attributable to placebo effects. Copyright © 2014 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pressure-relieving properties of various shoe inserts in older people with plantar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Daniel R; Landorf, Karl B; Menz, Hylton B

    2011-03-01

    Plantar heel pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal conditions affecting the foot and it is commonly experienced by older adults. Contoured foot orthoses and some heel inserts have been found to be effective for plantar heel pain, however the mechanism by which they achieve their effects is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of foot orthoses and heel inserts on plantar pressures in older adults with plantar heel pain. Thirty-six adults aged over 65 years with plantar heel pain participated in the study. Using the in-shoe Pedar(®) system, plantar pressure data were recorded while participants walked along an 8 m walkway wearing a standardised shoe and 4 different shoe inserts. The shoe inserts consisted of a silicon heel cup, a soft foam heel pad, a heel lift and a prefabricated foot orthosis. Data were collected for the heel, midfoot and forefoot. Statistically significant attenuation of heel peak plantar pressure was provided by 3 of the 4 shoe inserts. The greatest reduction was achieved by the prefabricated foot orthosis, which provided a fivefold reduction compared to the next most effective insert. The contoured nature of the prefabricated foot orthosis allowed for an increase in midfoot contact area, resulting in a greater redistribution of force. The prefabricated foot orthosis was also the only shoe insert that did not increase forefoot pressure. The findings from this study indicate that of the shoe inserts tested, the contoured prefabricated foot orthosis is the most effective at reducing pressure under the heel in older people with heel pain. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A comparison between pulsed radiofrequency and electro-acupuncture for relieving pain in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mu-Lien; Lin, Mu-Hung; Fen, Jun-Jeng; Lin, Wei-Tso; Lin, Chii-Wann; Chen, Po-Quang

    2010-01-01

    Many treatment options for chronic low back pain are available, including varied forms of electric stimulation. But little is known about the electricity effect between electro-acupuncture and pulsed radiofrequency. The objective of this study is to assess the difference in effectiveness of pain relief between pulsed radiofrequency and electro-acupuncture. Visual analog score (VAS) pain score, the Oswestry disability index (ODI) to measure a patient's permanent functional disability, and Short form 36 (SF-36) which is a survey used in health assessment to determine the cost-effectiveness of a health treatment, were used as rating systems to measure the pain relief and functional improvement effect of pulsed radiofrequency and electro-acupuncture, based on the methodological quality of the randomized controlled trials, the relevance between the study groups, and the consistency of the outcome evaluation. First, the baseline status before therapy shows no age and gender influence in the SF-36 and VAS score but it is significant in the ODI questionnaire. From ANOVA analyses, it is apparent that radiofrequency therapy is a significant improvement over electro-acupuncture therapy after one month. But electro-acupuncture also showed functional improvement in the lumbar spine from the ODI. This study provides sufficient evidence of the superiority of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) therapy for low back pain relief compared with both electro-acupuncture (EA) therapy and the control group. But the functional improvement of the lumbar spine was proved under EA therapy only. Both therapies are related to electricity effects.

  16. Psychological stress-relieving effects of chewing - Relationship between masticatory function-related factors and stress-relieving effects.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Akinori; Kikuchi, Manaki; Nakanishi, Kousuke; Ueda, Takayuki; Yamashita, Shuichiro; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between masticatory function-related factors (masticatory performance, occlusal contact area, maximum bite force, number of chewing strokes, and muscle activity) and the stress-relieving effects of chewing. A total of 28 healthy male subjects were instructed to rest or chew for 10min after 30min of stress loading with arithmetic calculations. Their stress state was assessed by measuring salivary cortisol levels. Saliva was collected at three time points: before stress loading, immediately after stress loading, and 10min after stress loading. Compared to resting, chewing produced a significantly greater reduction in the rate of change in salivary cortisol levels 10min after stress loading. A negative correlation was observed between the rate of decrease in salivary cortisol levels and the number of chewing strokes. No significant correlation was observed between the rate of decrease in salivary cortisol levels and other measurement items. In healthy dentulous people, the number of chewing strokes has been shown to be a masticatory function-related factor that affects stress relief from chewing, suggesting the possibility that more appropriate chewing would produce a greater effect psychological stress relief. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of CaMKIV relieves streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathic pain through regulation of HMGB1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Shen, Le; Xu, Li; Wang, Zhiyao; Ma, Chao; Huang, Yuguang

    2016-05-23

    The pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathic pain is complicated and its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) IV (CaMKIV), one of CaMKs, regulates several transcription factors in pain mechanisms. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a key mediator in diabetic neuropathic pain. This study aims to find the roles and mechanisms of CaMIV in diabetic neuropathic pain. Diabetic animal models were constructed by injecting with streptozotocin (STZ) intraperitoneally. They were randomly divided into seven groups (n = 6 per group): Naive, Normal Saline, STZ, STZ + Sham, STZ + DMSO and STZ + KN93 (an inhibitor of CaMKIV) (50 μg), STZ + KN93 (100 μg), which received KN93 (50 or 100 μg) intrathecally after the administration of STZ. Phospho-CaMKIV (pCaMKIV) and HMGB1 expression in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and RAW264.7 cell line were measured by western blot. Distribution of pCaMKIV immune reactivity in different subpopulations of DRG neurons was measured by double-immunofluorescence staining. The pCaMKIV and HMGB1 in DRG significantly increased after STZ administration, and pCaMKIV can regulate the expression of HMGB1 based on both cellular and animal models. Pretreatment with CaMKIV inhibitor attenuated STZ-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, as well as reduced HMGB1 expression in the DRG. This study demonstrates that CaMKIV can relieve STZ-induced diabetic neuropathic pain. The mechanism of this function depended on the process: pCaMKIV localized in the nuclei of DRG neurons and regulated HMGB1 which was an important mediator of neuropathic pain. These findings reported CaMKIV may be a potential target or important node in relieving diabetic neuropathic pain.

  18. Posttraumatic mid-facial pain and Meige's syndrome relieved by pressure on the nasion and retrocollis.

    PubMed

    Jacome, Daniel E

    2010-07-01

    A 42-year-old farmer developed persistent mid-facial segmental pain and Meige's syndrome several months after suffering facial trauma and a fracture of the nose. He was not afflicted by systemic ailments, had no family history of movement disorder and no history of exposure to neuroleptic drugs. He was capable of suppressing his facial pain by performing a ritual that included forcefully tilting his head backwards, lowering of his eyelids and applying strong pressure to his nasion. Exceptionally dystonic movements and elaborate behavioral rituals may serve as a mechanism of pain suppression. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of Arnica to relieve pain after carpal-tunnel release surgery.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, S L A; Belcher, H J C R

    2002-01-01

    Arnica is commonly used by the public as a treatment for bruising and swelling. To assess whether Arnica administration affects recovery from hand surgery. Double-blind, randomized comparison of Arnica administration versus placebo. Specialist hand surgery unit at the Queen Victoria NHS Trust. Thirty-seven patients undergoing bilateral endoscopic carpal-tunnel release between June 1998 and January 2000. Homeopathic Arnica tablets and herbal Arnica ointment compared to placebos. Grip strength, wrist circumference, and perceived pain measured 1 and 2 weeks after surgery. No difference in grip strength or wrist circumference was found between the 2 groups. However, there was a significant reduction in pain experienced after 2 weeks in the Arnica-treated group (P<.03). The role of homeopathic and herbal agents for recovery after surgery merits further investigation.

  20. The efficacy of cold-gel packing for relieving episiotomy pain - a quasi-randomised control trial.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu-Ying; Su, Mei-Ling; Gau, Meei-Ling; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Au, Heng-Kien

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of cold-gel packing on episiotomy pain among postpartum women who had normal spontaneous deliveries. A quasi-randomised control trial was conducted in a maternity ward of a regional teaching hospital in northern Taiwan. Seventy postpartum women were recruited, choosing to be in either the experimental or control group (35 women per group). Subjects in the experimental group received at least six interventions of cold-gel packing applied to the perineal wound and were provided oral analgesics routinely. The subjects in the control group received oral analgesics routinely. Pain intensity, pain interference on daily activities and satisfaction levels with pain management were assessed using Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and pain management questionnaire, respectively. The results showed that women in the experimental group reported significantly lower mean pain intensity score, pain interference on daily activities scores at 48 hours post-delivery, and higher level of satisfaction with pain management at 24 and 48 hours post-delivery than the control group after adjusting for demographic and obstetric data. Cold-gel packing on the perineum is a cost-effective, convenient, easy-to-deploy and non-pharmacologic approach to pain reduction, with an overall positive impact on postpartum recovery for parturients.

  1. Side Effects: Pain

    Cancer.gov

    Controlling pain is an important part of your cancer treatment plan. Learn how to track levels of pain. Find out how pain, a side effect of cancer treatment, is treated using acupuncture, biofeedback, and physical therapy.

  2. Relieving perineal pain after perineorrhaphy by diclofenac rectal suppositories: a randomized double-blinded placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Titapant, Vitaya

    2008-06-01

    Perineal pain after episiotomy is a common problem following vaginal birth. The pain affects either physical or mental function negatively. There are many methods in perineal pain relief such as local ice pack and a bath, ultrasound, oral anesthesia, and intravenous anesthesia. Analgesic rectal suppository is one of various methods in pain relief especially in drowsy patients, or when oral preparation causes gastric discomfort, nausea or vomiting. To assess the effectiveness of diclofenac rectal suppositories for relief perineal pain after perineorrhaphy. A randomized double-blinded placebo controlled trial. Seventy-two term, singleton, pregnant women who gave vaginal birth with second to third degree episiotomy tears were randomized with envelop concealment to either diclofenac or placebo rectal suppositories group. Each group received two tablets of 50 mg diclofenac or two tablets of look-alike placebo rectal suppositories. Visual analogue scale was used for scaling pain score before administration of the medications, and at 30 minutes, 1, 2, 12, and 24 hours after administration. No differences were found in the median pain scores before administration of medications and at 30 min, 1 hour and 2 hour after administration (p > 0.05), while the median pain scores were significantly reduced in the diclofenac group at 12 and 24 hours after administration compared to the control group (4.5 vs. 0.0; p < 0.001 and 2.0 vs. 0.0; p = 0.02 for 12 hours and 24 hours, consecutively). The present study suggested that diclofenac suppository was effective on reducing perineal pain after episiotomy, especially at 12 and 24 hours after administration.

  3. Smart Adaptive Socket to Improve Fit and Relieve Pain in Wounded Warriors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    compressing the distal element may have an inverse effect on volume accommodation because it would allow the residual limb to sink further into the...connection without restricting vertical movement a custom valve was designed. The new valve can be described as an inverse duckbill. It is a rubber...valve, which is normally closed but will be deformed into an open state by pushing it into a cylindrical hole. The inverse duckbill valve, unlike

  4. Examining the conspicuousness and prominence of two required warnings on OTC pain relievers

    PubMed Central

    Bix, Laura; Bello, Nora M.; Auras, Rafael; Ranger, Jon; Lapinski, Maria K.

    2009-01-01

    The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs is critical to their safe and effective use, and certain warnings are meant to be read at the point of purchase (POP). Examples include (i) warnings that alert consumers to the fact that the package is not child-resistant and (ii) warnings that alert consumers to potential product tampering. U.S. law mandates these warnings be “conspicuous” and “prominent” so that it is likely that consumers will read them before leaving the store. Our objective was to quantify the relative prominence and conspicuousness of these warnings. Sixty-one participants reviewed the packages of 5 commercially available analgesics to evaluate the prominence and conspicuousness of these warnings. Evaluated data included (i) the time spent examining the warnings compared with other areas of the label (using a bright pupil eye tracker), (ii) the ability to recall information from the OTCs viewed, and (iii) the legibility of the warnings relative to other elements of the labels (as measured by ASTM D7298-06). Eye-tracking data indicated that warnings were viewed by fewer participants and for less time than other elements of the packages. Recall and legibility data also indicated that the warning statements compared unfavorably with other elements of the labels tested. Evidence presented in this study suggests that 2 required warnings on 5 different OTCs are not prominent or conspicuous when compared with other elements of tested labels. PMID:19332798

  5. Pain Relievers - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... español (Spanish) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Fentanyl - Opioid addiction, part 6 - English PDF Fentanyl - Opioid addiction, part 6 - español (Spanish) PDF Fentanyl - Opioid addiction, ...

  6. Prescription Pain Relievers (Opiods)

    MedlinePlus

    ... derived from poppy flowers or lab-made, semi-synthetic substitutes. They work by attaching to particular sites ... to the terms & conditions Related Drugs Fentanyl & Other Synthetic Opioids OxyContin Heroin Morphine Next Steps Medicine Abuse: ...

  7. Aromatherapy: does it help to relieve pain, depression, anxiety, and stress in community-dwelling older persons?

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuk Kwan; Tse, M Y Mimi

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of an aromatherapy programme for older persons with chronic pain. The community-dwelling elderly people who participated in this study underwent a four-week aromatherapy programme or were assigned to the control group, which did not receive any interventions. Their levels of pain, depression, anxiety, and stress were collected at the baseline and at the postintervention assessment after the conclusion of the four-week programme. Eighty-two participants took part in the study. Forty-four participants (37 females, 7 males) were in the intervention group and 38 participants (30 females, 8 males) were in the control group. The pain scores were 4.75 (SD 2.32) on a 10-point scale for the intervention group and 5.24 (SD 2.14) for the control group before the programme. There was a slight reduction in the pain score of the intervention group. No significant differences were found in the same-group and between-group comparisons for the baseline and postintervention assessments. The depression, anxiety, and stress scores for the intervention group before the programme were 11.18 (SD 6.18), 9.64 (SD 7.05), and 12.91 (SD 7.70), respectively. A significant reduction in negative emotions was found in the intervention group (P<0.05). The aromatherapy programme can be an effective tool to reduce pain, depression, anxiety, and stress levels among community-dwelling older adults.

  8. Aromatherapy: Does It Help to Relieve Pain, Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in Community-Dwelling Older Persons?

    PubMed Central

    Tse, M. Y. Mimi

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of an aromatherapy programme for older persons with chronic pain. The community-dwelling elderly people who participated in this study underwent a four-week aromatherapy programme or were assigned to the control group, which did not receive any interventions. Their levels of pain, depression, anxiety, and stress were collected at the baseline and at the postintervention assessment after the conclusion of the four-week programme. Eighty-two participants took part in the study. Forty-four participants (37 females, 7 males) were in the intervention group and 38 participants (30 females, 8 males) were in the control group. The pain scores were 4.75 (SD 2.32) on a 10-point scale for the intervention group and 5.24 (SD 2.14) for the control group before the programme. There was a slight reduction in the pain score of the intervention group. No significant differences were found in the same-group and between-group comparisons for the baseline and postintervention assessments. The depression, anxiety, and stress scores for the intervention group before the programme were 11.18 (SD 6.18), 9.64 (SD 7.05), and 12.91 (SD 7.70), respectively. A significant reduction in negative emotions was found in the intervention group (P < 0.05). The aromatherapy programme can be an effective tool to reduce pain, depression, anxiety, and stress levels among community-dwelling older adults. PMID:25114901

  9. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    N ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Pain It’s important to treat pain. If ... help to pay for pain medicine. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain Keep track of the pain. Each ...

  10. Virtual Reality as a Distraction Intervention to Relieve Pain and Distress During Medical Procedures: A Comprehensive Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Indovina, Paola; Barone, Daniela; Gallo, Luigi; Chirico, Andrea; De Pietro, Giuseppe; Antonio, Giordano

    2018-02-26

    This review aims to provide a framework for evaluating the utility of virtual reality (VR) as a distraction intervention to alleviate pain and distress during medical procedures. We firstly describe the theoretical bases underlying the VR analgesic and anxiolytic effects and define the main factors contributing to its efficacy, which largely emerged from studies on healthy volunteers. Then, we provide a comprehensive overview of the clinical trials using VR distraction during different medical procedures, such as burn injury treatments, chemotherapy, surgery, dental treatment, and other diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A broad literature search was performed using as main terms "virtual reality", "distraction" and "pain". No date limit was applied and all the retrieved studies on immersive VR distraction during medical procedures were selected. VR has proven to be effective in reducing procedural pain, as almost invariably observed even in patients subjected to extremely painful procedures, such as patients with burn injuries undergoing wound care and physical therapy. Moreover, VR seemed to decrease cancer-related symptoms in different settings, including during chemotherapy. Only mild and infrequent side effects were observed. Despite these promising results, future long-term randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes and evaluating not only self-report measures but also physiological variables are needed. Further studies are also required both to establish predictive factors to select patients who can benefit from VR distraction and to design hardware/software systems tailored to the specific needs of different patients and able to provide the greatest distraction at the lowest cost.

  11. The relieving effects of shelter modes on physiological stress of traffic police in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, G. Z.; Wang, Y. J.; Bu, W. T.; Lu, Y. Z.; Li, Ke; Li, Z. H.

    2018-03-01

    In summer, high temperature and strong sun radiation last for a long time. However, traffic police still stick to their positions to ensure normal traffic order. Therefore, the health and safety of traffic police are challenged by the high temperature weather. To protect the safety of the traffic police in the outdoor high temperature environment, some shelter modes, such as sun hat and sun umbrella are selected for duty traffic police. The relieving effects on the physiological stress of the shelter modes are analyzed by comparison of the physiological parameters in these shelter modes. The results show that sun umbrella has a good effect on relieving physiological stress. And sun hat has no effect on relieving physiological stress, although it avoids the direct sunlight on the face. However, it causes the increase of the thermal sensation. This study can provide important methods for health protecting of traffic police in the outdoor high temperature environment. It also provides a theoretical support for the revision of the outdoor high temperature labour protection standard.

  12. Carpal Tunnel Exercises: Can They Relieve Symptoms?

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve symptoms, such as pain and numbness. These exercises are most effective when combined with other treatments, such as behavior changes or wrist splints, for mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome. If your symptoms ... exercises — one type of carpal tunnel exercise — might help ...

  13. Serotonergic mechanism of the relieving effect of bee venom acupuncture on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold allodynia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Li, Dong Xing; Yoon, Heera; Go, Donghyun; Quan, Fu Shi; Min, Byung-Il; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2014-12-06

    Oxaliplatin, an important chemotherapy drug for advanced colorectal cancer, often induces peripheral neuropathy, especially cold allodynia. Our previous study showed that bee venom acupuncture (BVA), which has been traditionally used in Korea to treat various pain symptoms, potently relieves oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia in rats. However, the mechanism for this anti-allodynic effect of BVA remains poorly understood. We investigated whether and how the central serotonergic system, a well-known pathway for acupuncture analgesia, mediates the relieving effect of BVA on cold allodynia in oxaliplatin-injected rats. The behavioral signs of cold allodynia in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were induced by a single injection of oxaliplatin (6 mg/kg, i.p.). Before and after BVA treatment, the cold allodynia signs were evaluated by immersing the rat's tail into cold water (4°C) and measuring the withdrawal latency. For BVA treatment, a diluted BV (0.25 mg/kg) was subcutaneously administered into Yaoyangguan (GV3) acupoint, which is located between the spinous processes of the fourth and the fifth lumbar vertebra. Serotonin was depleted by a daily injection of DL-p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 150 mg/kg, i.p.) for 3 days. The amount of serotonin in the spinal cord was measured by ELISA. Serotonergic receptor antagonists were administered intraperitoneally or intrathecally before BVA treatment. The serotonin levels in the spinal cord were significantly increased by BVA treatment and such increase was significantly reduced by PCPA. This PCPA pretreatment abolished the relieving effect of BVA on oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia. Either of methysergide (mixed 5-HT1/5-HT2 receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) or MDL-72222 (5-HT3 receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p) blocked the anti-allodynic effect of BVA. Further, an intrathecal injection of MDL-72222 (12 μg) completely blocked the BVA-induced anti-allodynic action, whereas NAN-190 (5-HT1A receptor antagonist, 15 μg, i.t.) or

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Second-Generation Antihistamines and Montelukast in Relieving Allergic Rhinitis Nasal Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Michael J.; Jhaveri, Mehul; Saverno, Kim; Meyer, Kellie; Nightengale, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Objective Allergic rhinitis imposes a significant health and economic burden both on individuals and the healthcare system. Second-generation prescription antihistamines, levocetirizine, fexofenadine, and desloratadine, and the leukotriene receptor antagonist, montelukast, differ in their ability to relieve common rhinitis symptoms. The purpose of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of prescription agents based on their effectiveness in relieving nasal symptoms. Methods Effectiveness was measured as the composite of nasal symptoms, including congestion, rhinorrhea, and sneezing, from clinical studies that compared each of the 4 comparators to placebo. Direct costs included prescription therapy and rhinitis-related physician office visits. Physician office visit costs were collected from an analysis of the PharMetrics insurance claims database. Sensitivity analyses were conducted using a Monte Carlo simulation to assess the robustness of the average and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Results The cost per clinically significant improvement of nasal symptoms for levocetirizine was less than for the other model comparator agents. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for levocetirizine dominated montelukast and desloratadine and was lower than either branded or generic fexofenadine. Conclusion Levocetirizine is a cost-effective therapy for the relief of nasal symptoms of allergic rhinitis. PMID:25126257

  15. A survey of nonmedical use of tranquilizers, stimulants, and pain relievers among college students: patterns of use among users and factors related to abstinence in non-users.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Sara A; Taverna, Elise C; Hallock, Robert M

    2014-10-01

    This study examined lifetime non-medical prescription drug use among college students at a small liberal arts college in the Northeast. We assessed the motives, frequency of use, sources, and perceived emotional/physical risks of nonmedical prescription drugs. Specifically, we examined the non-medical use of prescription pain relievers, stimulants, and anti-anxiety medication. We sent an internet-based survey to 1/3 of the student body and 303 students completed the survey. We found that 36.8% of the sample reported using prescription drugs for non-medical purposes. First-year students were less likely to have used the drugs than those in other class years. Of those reporting use, 48% reported non-medical use of pain relievers, 72.8% reported using stimulants, and 39.8% reported using anti-anxiety medication. The most commonly used pain relievers were Vicodin (hydrocodone/acetaminophen), OxyContin (oxycodone), and codeine (acetaminophen/codeine). The most commonly used stimulants were Adderall (amphetamine/dextroamphetamine) and Ritalin (methylphenidate), while the most commonly used anti-anxiety medication was Xanax (alprazolam). When non-users were asked what factors influenced their choice not to abuse prescription drugs, 82% cited a lack of interest, 61% responded it was due to a fear of damaging their physical health, and 60.1% responded fear of damaging their mental health. This study supports recent findings that show widespread non-medical use of prescription drugs among college students. Our report brings a more detailed understanding of the patterns of drug usage, and the factors influencing both drug use in those who use them and abstinence in those who choose not to use them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Different Levels of Pressure Relieving Air-Mattress Firmness on Cough Strength

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Norimichi; Taito, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Makoto; Sekikawa, Kiyokazu; Hamada, Hironobu

    2016-01-01

    Cough is an important host-defense mechanism. The elderly and patients who are severely ill cannot cough effectively when lying in the supine position. Furthermore, pressure relieving air-mattresses are recommended for preventing the development of pressure ulcers. In this study, we clarified whether or not the cough peak flow (CPF), an index of cough strength, is affected by different firmness levels of a pressure relieving air-mattress in healthy volunteers in the supine position. Fifty-two healthy young men participated. All the measurements were carried out on each participant in the supine position on a pressure relieving air-mattress. The participants were assessed at two firmness levels, a “hard” and “soft” mode. The CPF, forced vital capacity (FVC), maximal expiratory pressure (PEmax), and maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) were determined for each mode. The sinking distance of the body into the mattress was measured without any activity and the difference between the sinking distances of the two firmness levels was determined. The CPF, FVC, PEmax, and PImax were determined for each mode. The sinking distance of the body into the mattress was measured and the difference between the sinking distances of the two firmness levels was determined. The CPF, FVC, PEmax and PImax values of the participants coughing on the mattress were significantly lower when the mattress was in “soft” than in “hard” mode. The differences between the sinking distances of the mattress in “soft” and “hard” modes were larger for the anterior superior iliac spine. A harder mattress may lead to increased CPF in healthy young men lying in the supine position, and increased CPF may be important for host defense. PMID:26741497

  17. Effect of Different Levels of Pressure Relieving Air-Mattress Firmness on Cough Strength.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Norimichi; Taito, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Makoto; Sekikawa, Kiyokazu; Hamada, Hironobu

    2016-01-01

    Cough is an important host-defense mechanism. The elderly and patients who are severely ill cannot cough effectively when lying in the supine position. Furthermore, pressure relieving air-mattresses are recommended for preventing the development of pressure ulcers. In this study, we clarified whether or not the cough peak flow (CPF), an index of cough strength, is affected by different firmness levels of a pressure relieving air-mattress in healthy volunteers in the supine position. Fifty-two healthy young men participated. All the measurements were carried out on each participant in the supine position on a pressure relieving air-mattress. The participants were assessed at two firmness levels, a "hard" and "soft" mode. The CPF, forced vital capacity (FVC), maximal expiratory pressure (PEmax), and maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) were determined for each mode. The sinking distance of the body into the mattress was measured without any activity and the difference between the sinking distances of the two firmness levels was determined. The CPF, FVC, PEmax, and PImax were determined for each mode. The sinking distance of the body into the mattress was measured and the difference between the sinking distances of the two firmness levels was determined. The CPF, FVC, PEmax and PImax values of the participants coughing on the mattress were significantly lower when the mattress was in "soft" than in "hard" mode. The differences between the sinking distances of the mattress in "soft" and "hard" modes were larger for the anterior superior iliac spine. A harder mattress may lead to increased CPF in healthy young men lying in the supine position, and increased CPF may be important for host defense.

  18. Home-Based Palliative Care Program Relieves Chronic Pain in Kerala, India: Success Realized Through Patient, Family Narratives.

    PubMed

    Ajjarapu, Aparna Sai; Broderick, Ann

    2018-06-14

    An estimated 1.5 billion people across the globe live with chronic pain, and an estimated 61 million people worldwide experience unrelieved serious health-related suffering. One-sixth of the global population lives in India, where approximately 10 million people endure unrelieved serious health-related suffering. The state of Kerala is home to Pallium India, one of the most sophisticated palliative care programs in the country. This private organization in Trivandrum provides palliative and hospice care to underresourced populations and emphasizes holistic pain treatment. The current project features the pain stories of six patients who received treatment from Pallium India. Basic patient demographic information was collected, and a Pallium India staff member who was fluent in Malayalam and English asked questions about each patient's pain experience. Pain narratives illustrate the substantial impact of Pallium India's home visit program and the role of total pain assessment in delivering high-quality palliative care.

  19. P2Y12 shRNA treatment decreases SGC activation to relieve diabetic neuropathic pain in type 2 diabetes mellitus rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouyu; Wang, Zilin; Li, Lin; Zou, Lifang; Gong, Yingxin; Jia, Tianyu; Zhao, Shanhong; Yuan, Huilong; Shi, Liran; Liu, Shuangmei; Wu, Bing; Yi, Zhihua; Liu, Hui; Gao, Yun; Li, Guilin; Deussing, Jan M; Li, Man; Zhang, Chunping; Liang, Shangdong

    2018-06-26

    Diabetic neuropathic pain is a common complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Activation of satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) plays a crucial role in neuropathic pain through the release of proinflammatory cytokines. The P2Y12 receptor is expressed in SGCs of the DRG. In this study, our aim was to investigate the role of the P2Y12 receptor on the pathological changes in diabetic neuropathic pain. The present study showed that diabetic neuropathic pain increased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in type 2 DM model rats. The results showed that the expression levels of P2Y12 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in DRG SGCs were increased in DM model rats compared with control rats. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression levels in the DRG were increased in DM rats. Upregulation of GFAP is a marker of SGC activation. Targeting the P2Y12 receptor by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) decreased the upregulated expression of P2Y12 mRNA and protein, coexpression of P2Y12 and GFAP, the expression of GFAP, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-receptor 1 in the DRG of DM rats, and relieved mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in DM rats. After treatment with the P2Y12 receptor shRNA, the enhancing integrated OPTICAL density (IOD) ratios of p-P38 MAPK to P38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the DM rats treated with P2Y12 shRNA were significantly lower than that in the untreated DM rats. Therefore, P2Y12 shRNA treatment decreased SGC activation to relieve mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in DM rats. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Doxazosin oral intake therapy to relieve stent - related urinary symptoms and pain: a prospective, randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long; Li, Junping; Pan, Minjie; Han, Weiwei; Liu, Shucheng; Xiao, Yajun

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of Doxazosin Oral Intake Therapy on urinary symptoms and pain in patients with indwelling ureteral stents Patients and Methods: A total of 239 patients with ureteral stone-related hydronephrosis who underwent a double-J stent insertion after ureteroscopic lithotripsy were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive doxazosin cotrolled release 4 mg once daily for 4 weeks or matching placebo. Patients completed the brief-form Chinese version Ureteric Stent Symptom Questionnaire (USSQ) and quality of life (QoL) score 2 weeks and 4 weeks after stent placement and 4 weeks after stent withdrawal. The analgesic use was also recorded during the stenting period. Patients in Doxazosin Oral Intake Therapy group, in the first 2 weeks and second 2 weeks with the stent in situ, expressed significant lower daytime frequency (p=0.028 and p=0.038), nocturia (p=0.021 and p=0.008) and urgency (p=0.012 and p=0.014), respectively. Similarly, flank pain score, QoL score and analgesic use were also significant less in the stenting period. There was no significant difference in scores of urinary symptoms, pain and QoL during the post-stent period between two cohorts. Doxazosin Oral Intake Therapy reduced stent-related urinary symptoms, pain and the negative impact on QoL. Copyright© by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  1. Effects of listening to music on pain intensity and pain distress after surgery: an intervention.

    PubMed

    Vaajoki, Anne; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Kankkunen, Päivi; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of music listening on pain intensity and pain distress on the first and second postoperative days in abdominal surgery patients and the long-term effects of music on the third postoperative day. Music has been found to relieve pain intensity in surgery patients. There are only a few studies on music intervention in abdominal surgery. Music intervention studies assessing multidimensional pain such as pain intensity and pain distress are also scarce. Prospective clinical study with two parallel groups. Patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery (n = 168) were divided into either a music group (n = 83) or a control group (n = 85). Patients assessed pain intensity and pain distress in bed rest, during deep breathing and in shifting position once in the evening of the operation day and on the first and second postoperative days in the morning, at noon and in the evening. On the third postoperative day, the patients assessed their pain intensity and pain distress only once. In the music group, the patients' pain intensity and pain distress in bed rest, during deep breathing and in shifting position were significantly lower on the second postoperative day compared with control group of patients. On the third postoperative day, when long-term effects of music on pain intensity and pain distress were assessed, there were no significant differences between music and control groups. This study demonstrates that the use of music alleviates pain intensity and pain distress in bed rest, during deep breathing and in shifting position after abdominal surgery on the second postoperative day. Music intervention is safe, inexpensive and easily used to improve the healing environment for abdominal surgery patients. Music intervention should be offered as an adjunct alternative to pharmacological pain relief after abdominal surgery in nursing practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Nurses' and Parents' Perceptions of Parental Guidance on Using Nonpharmacological Pain-Relieving Methods Among Neonates in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Pölkki, Tarja; Laukkala, Helena; Korhonen, Anne

    2016-08-01

    Despite growing knowledge of parents' important role in their infants' pain management, the extent to which nurses in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) provide guidance to parents on nonpharmacological methods is unclear. This study aimed to describe and compare the perceptions of parental guidance in using nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods among neonates in NICUs from the viewpoints of nurses and parents, and to examine the participants' demographics related to the guidance. A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study using questionnaire surveys was conducted. Eight NICUs of 5 university hospitals in Finland. A total of 427 participants, including 294 nurses and 178 parents. The participants indicated that the methods of touching and holding were the most commonly introduced strategies in infants' pain alleviation, as they were given as an alternative "nearly always/always" (nurses 91%, 87% and parents 61%, 58%, respectively). In contrast, music and breast-feeding were the less commonly introduced nonpharmacological methods (nurses 11%, 6% and parents 1%, 6%, respectively). A significant difference (p < .001) was found between the parents' and nurses' perceptions of parental guidance; nurses reported providing more guidance about all nonpharmacological methods compared with parents. In addition, many demographic factors of the nurses, the parents, and their infants were related to the parental guidance. Our findings indicate that parental guidance should not be based on nurses' evaluations of their activities without taking into account parents' perspectives. When counseling parents to use nonpharmacological methods, neonatal nurses should actively interact with families and discuss parents' individual needs. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of pressure-relieving devices for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fleurence, Rachael L

    2005-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of alternating pressure-relieving devices, mattress replacements, and mattress overlays compared with a standard hospital (high-specification foam mattress) for the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers in hospital patients in the United Kingdom was investigated. A decision-analytic model was constructed to evaluate different strategies to prevent or treat pressure ulcers. Three scenarios were evaluated: the prevention of pressure ulcers, the treatment of superficial ulcers, and the treatment of severe ulcers. Epidemiological and effectiveness data were obtained from the clinical literature. Expert opinion using a rating scale technique was used to obtain quality of life data. Costs of the devices were obtained from manufacturers, whereas costs of treatment were obtained from the literature. Uncertainty was explored through probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Using 30,000 pounds sterling/QALY (quality-adjusted life year) as the decision-maker's cut off point (the current UK standard), in scenario 1 (prevention), the cost-effective strategy was the mattress overlay at 1, 4, and 12 weeks. In scenarios 2 and 3, the cost-effective strategy was the mattress replacement at 1, 4, and 12 weeks. Standard care was a dominated intervention in all scenarios for values of the decision-maker's ceiling ratio ranging from 5,000 pounds sterling to 100,000 pounds sterling/QALY. However, the probabilistic sensitivity analysis results reflected the high uncertainty surrounding the choice of devices. Current information suggests that alternating pressure mattress overlays may be cost-effective for the prevention of pressure ulcers, whereas alternating pressure mattress replacements appears to be cost-effective for the treatment of superficial and severe pressure ulcers.

  4. Effect of Music Therapy on Postoperative Pain Management in Gynecological Patients: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sin, Wai Man; Chow, Ka Ming

    2015-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may have a negative impact on the physiological and psychological well-being of patients. Pharmacological methods are currently used to relieve such pain in gynecological patients; however, inadequate pain control is still reported, and the use of nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods is increasingly being advocated, one of which is music therapy. The purpose of this literature review was to identify, summarize, and critically appraise current evidence on music therapy and postoperative pain management among gynecological patients. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, and Allied and Complementary Medicine was conducted using the search terms music, gynecological, pain, surgery, operative, and post-operative to identify relevant articles in English from 1995 to the present. All identified articles were assessed independently for inclusion into review. A total of 7 articles were included after removal of duplicates and exclusion of irrelevant studies. All the included studies assessed the effects of music therapy on postoperative pain intensity, and three of them measured pain-related physiological symptoms. The findings indicated that music therapy, in general, was effective in reducing pain intensity, fatigue, anxiety, and analgesic consumption in gynecological patients during the postoperative period. It is recommended as an adjunct to pharmacological pain-relieving methods in reducing postoperative pain. Future researches on music therapy to identify the most effective application and evaluate its effect by qualitative study are recommended. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. NIH Pain Consortium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Did You Know? Infographics on Pain Topics Resource Library Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory Pain Registries IOM Report: Relieving Pain ... Did You Know? Infographics on Pain Topics Resource Library Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory Pain Registries IOM Report: Relieving Pain ...

  6. Epidemiological evidence on extra-medical use of prescription pain relievers: transitions from newly incident use to dependence among 12-21 year olds in the United States using meta-analysis, 2002-13.

    PubMed

    Parker, Maria A; Anthony, James C

    2015-01-01

    Background. When 12-to-21-year-olds start using prescription pain relievers extra-medically, some of them transition into opioid dependence within 12 months after such use. Our main aim for this epidemiological research on 12-to-21-year-olds in the United States (US) is to estimate the risk of becoming a newly incident case of opioid dependence within 12 months after onset of using prescription pain relievers extra-medically (EMPPR). Methods. Meta-analyses from multiple independent replication samples now are possible, based upon nationally representative survey samples of US adolescents age 12-21 years. All 12-to-21-year-olds were sampled and recruited for the US National Surveys on Drug Use and Health, with standardized assessments of EMPPR use and opioid dependence (NSDUH, 2002-2013). Results. Peak risk for a transition from start of EMPPR use to opioid dependence within 12 months is seen at mid-adolescence among 14-to-15-year-olds (6.3%, 8.7% per year), somewhat earlier than peak risk for starting EMPPR use (seen for 16-to-19-year-olds at 4.1%, 5.9% per year). Applied to 12-to-21-year-olds in the US between 2002-2013, an estimated 8 million started using PPR extra-medically. Each year, roughly 42,000 to 58,000 transitioned into opioid dependence within 12 months after onset of such use. Discussion. These epidemiological estimates for the US in recent years teach us to expect one transition into adolescent-onset opioid dependence within 12 months for every 11-16 newly incident EMPPR users, yielding perhaps 120 newly incident opioid dependent cases in need of practitioner attention or treatment services, each day of each year. This evidence can be used to motivate more effective public health prevention, outreach, and early intervention programs as might prevent or delay occurrence of EMPPR use and opioid dependence.

  7. Alcohol involvement in opioid pain reliever and benzodiazepine drug abuse-related emergency department visits and drug-related deaths - United States, 2010.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher M; Paulozzi, Leonard J; Mack, Karin A

    2014-10-10

    The abuse of prescription drugs has led to a significant increase in emergency department (ED) visits and drug-related deaths over the past decade. Opioid pain relievers (OPRs) and benzodiazepines are the prescription drugs most commonly involved in these events. Excessive alcohol consumption also accounts for a significant health burden and is common among groups that report high rates of prescription drug abuse. When taken with OPRs or benzodiazepines, alcohol increases central nervous system depression and the risk for overdose. Data describing alcohol involvement in OPR or benzodiazepine abuse are limited. To quantify alcohol involvement in OPR and benzodiazepine abuse and drug-related deaths and to inform prevention efforts, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and CDC analyzed 2010 data for drug abuse-related ED visits in the United States and drug-related deaths that involved OPRs and alcohol or benzodiazepines and alcohol in 13 states. The analyses showed alcohol was involved in 18.5% of OPR and 27.2% of benzodiazepine drug abuse-related ED visits and 22.1% of OPR and 21.4% of benzodiazepine drug-related deaths. These findings indicate that alcohol plays a significant role in OPR and benzodiazepine abuse. Interventions to reduce the abuse of alcohol and these drugs alone and in combination are needed.

  8. Pain relief by rTMS: differential effect of current flow but no specific action on pain subtypes.

    PubMed

    André-Obadia, N; Mertens, P; Gueguen, A; Peyron, R; Garcia-Larrea, L

    2008-09-09

    To assess, against placebo, the pain-relieving effects of high-rate repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on neuropathic pain. Double-blind, randomized, cross-over study of high-rate rTMS against placebo in 28 patients. The effect of a change in coil orientation (posteroanterior vs lateromedial) on different subtypes of neuropathic pain was further tested in a subset of 16 patients. Pain relief was evaluated daily during 1 week. High-frequency, posteroanterior rTMS decreased pain scores significantly more than placebo. Posteroanterior rTMS also outmatched placebo in a score combining subjective (pain relief, quality of life) and objective (rescue drug intake) criteria of treatment benefit. Changing the orientation of the coil from posteroanterior to lateromedial did not yield any significant pain relief. The analgesic effects of posteroanterior rTMS lasted for approximately 1 week. The pain-relieving effects were observed exclusively on global scores reflecting the most distressing type of pain in each patient. Conversely, rTMS did not modify specifically any of the pain subscores that were separately tested (ongoing, paroxysmal, stimulus-evoked, or disesthesic pain). Posteroanterior repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was more effective than both placebo and lateromedial rTMS. When obtained, pain relief was not specific of any particular submodality, but rather reduced the global pain sensation whatever its type. This is in accord with recent models of motor cortex neurostimulation, postulating that its analgesic effects may derive in part from modulation of the affective appraisal of pain, rather than a decrease of its sensory components.

  9. [Clinical Therapeutic Effect of Oblique Needling with Tuina in Relieving Sacroiliac Joint Injury].

    PubMed

    Kuang, Jia-yi; Li, Yu-xuan; He, Yu-feng; Gan, Lin; Wang, Ai-ming; Tang, Shao-hua; Lu, Fei-yu; Yang, Li-juan; Cat, Xue-ling; Quan, Jian-lin

    2016-04-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of oblique needling in combination with Tuina at the sacroiliac joint for patients experiencing sacroiliac joint injury. One hundred and twenty patients with sacroiliac joint injury were randomized into routine Tuina group and oblique needling combined with Tuina (Acu+ Tuina) group (n = 60 in each group). For patients of the Tuina group, routine Tuina as rotating, pressing-rubbing, digital pressing, articular moving, etc. was manipulated at Shangliao (BL 31), Ciliao (BL 32), Zhongliao (BL 31), Xialiao (BL 30), Huantiao (GB 30), Zhibian (BL 54), Weizhong (BL 40) and sacroiliac joint area. For patients of the Acu+Tuina group, the anatomical points between the bilateral iliac crests and the sacral joints were punctured obliquely with disposable acupuncture needles. The treatment was conducted for 30 min every time, once daily for 3 weeks except weekends. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, concerning intensity of pain, lifting, ability to care for oneself, ability to walk, ability to sit, sexual function, ability to stand, social life, sleep quality, and ability to travel) were employed to evaluate the patients' reactions and functional activity changes before and after the treatment. Following the treatment, of the two 60 patients in the Tuina and Acu + Tuina groups, 12 and 26 cases were cured, 20 and 20 experienced marked improvement, 16 and 11 were effective, 12 and 3 invalid, with the effective rates being 80% and 95%, respectively. The effective rate of the Acu+ Tuina group was significantly superior to that of the Tuina group (P<0.05). The VAS scores and OD were considerably decreased in both groups after the treatment and were significantly lower in the Acu+Tuina group than in the Tuina group (P<0.01). Oblique needling the anatomical points in the sacroiliac joint region combined with Tuina manipulation is evidently better than simple Tuina in reducing pain and in improving functional activity

  10. Once-daily, controlled-release tramadol and sustained-release diclofenac relieve chronic pain due to osteoarthritis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, André D; Peloso, Paul M; Haraoui, Boulos; Bensen, William; Thomson, Glen; Wade, John; Quigley, Patricia; Eisenhoffer, John; Harsanyi, Zoltan; Darke, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The present study was a randomized, parallel, double-blind comparison between controlled-release (CR) tramadol and sustained-release (SR) diclofenac in patients with chronic pain due to osteoarthritis of the hips and/or knees. METHODS: Patients with at least moderate pain intensity, and having received analgesics over the past three months, underwent a two-to seven-day washout of current analgesics before initiation of 200 mg CR tramadol or 75 mg SR diclofenac. During the eight-week study, patients returned to the clinic biweekly. CR tramadol doses were titrated to a maximum of 200 mg, 300 mg or 400 mg per day. SR diclofenac doses were titrated to 75 mg or 100 mg once daily, or 75 mg twice a day based on pain relief and the presence of side effects. For rescue analgesic, patients took acetaminophen as needed, up to 650 mg three times a day. RESULTS: Forty-five patients on CR tramadol and 52 patients on SR diclofenac were evaluable. Significant improvements from prestudy treatment were shown for visual analogue scale pain (P=0.0001), stiffness (P<0.0005) and physical function (P=0.0001) scores for both treatments. There were no significant differences between the two treatments in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities subscales, overall pain, pain and sleep, or the clinical effectiveness evaluation. Overall incidence of adverse events was similar in both groups, with more opioid-related adverse events with CR tramadol, and two serious adverse events occurring with the use of SR diclofenac. CONCLUSIONS: CR tramadol is as effective as SR diclofenac in the treatment of pain due to knee or hip osteoarthritis, with the potential for fewer of the serious side effects that characterize nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration. PMID:18443672

  11. Pulsed radiofrequency of the composite nerve supply to the knee joint as a new technique for relieving osteoarthritic pain: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Vas, Lakshmi; Pai, Renuka; Khandagale, Nishigandha; Pattnaik, Manorama

    2014-01-01

    We report a new technique for pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) of the entire nerve supply of the knee as an option in treating osteoarthritis (OA) of knee. We targeted both sensory and motor nerves supplying all the structures around the knee: joint, muscles, and skin to address the entire nociception and stiffness leading to peripheral and central sensitization in osteoarthritis. Ten patients with pain, stiffness, and loss of function in both knees were treated with ultrasonography (USG) guided PRF of saphenous, tibial, and common peroneal nerves along with subsartorial, peripatellar, and popliteal plexuses. USG guided PRF of the femoral nerve was also done to address the innervation of the quadriceps muscle. Assessment of pain (Numerical Rating Scale [NRS], pain DETECT, knee function [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index- WOMAC]) were documented pre and post PRF at 3 and 6 months. Knee radiographs (Kellgren-Lawrence [K-L] grading) were done before PRF and one week later. All the patients showed a sustained improvement of NRS, pain DETECT, and WOMAC at 3 and 6 months. The significant improvement of patellar position and tibio-femoral joint space was concordant with the patient's reporting of improvement in stiffness and pain. The sustained pain relief and muscle relaxation enabled the patients to optimize physiotherapy thereby improving endurance training to include the daily activities of life. We conclude that OA knee pain is a product of neuromyopathy and that PRF of the sensory and motor nerves appeared to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive technique. The reduction of pain and stiffness improved the knee function and probably reduced the peripheral and central sensitization.

  12. Effect of near-infrared rays on female menstrual pain in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Min; Kim, Kye-Ha

    2017-09-01

    Most Korean women who experience menstrual pain have reported taking pain medicine and making use of complementary alternative therapies. However, because some interventions may cause side effects, more effective pain-relieving measures need to be identified. This study using a non-equivalent group design, evaluated the effects of near-infrared rays on dysmenorrhea among Korean women. The experimental group wore a near-infrared ray abdominal belt for the duration of one menstrual cycle until the end of the menstrual period, while the control group used hot packs. The level of menstrual pain, menstrual pain duration, and pain medicine use were measured. The menstrual pain, average menstrual pain duration, and use of analgesics were reduced in the near-infrared rays group. The results of this study indicate that the near-infrared ray LED belt was effective in reducing menstrual pain, menstrual pain duration compared to the use of analgesics in Korean women with dysmenorrhea. Therefore, near-infrared rays may be used to relieve menstrual pain and improve the quality of life of women with dysmenorrhea in Korea. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Topical moringin cream relieves neuropathic pain by suppression of inflammatory pathway and voltage-gated ion channels in murine model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Giacoppo, Sabrina; Iori, Renato; Bramanti, Placido

    2017-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain represents the major public health burden with a strong impact on quality life in multiple sclerosis patients. Although some advances have been obtained in the last years, the conventional therapies remain poorly effective. Thus, the discovery of innovative approaches to improve the outcomes for multiple sclerosis patients is a goal of primary importance. With this aim, we investigated the efficacy of the 4-(α−L-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate (moringin), purified from Moringa oleifera seeds and ready-to-use as topical treatment in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, murine model of multiple sclerosis. Female C57BL/6 mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35–55) were topically treated with 2% moringin cream twice daily from the onset of the symptoms until the sacrifice occurred about 21 days after experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induction. Results Our observations showed the efficacy of 2% moringin cream treatment in reducing clinical and histological disease score, as well as in alleviating neuropathic pain with consequent recovering of the hind limbs and response to mechanical stimuli. In particular, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical evaluations revealed that 2% moringin cream was able to counteract the inflammatory cascade by reducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-17 and interferon-γ) and in parallel by increasing the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin-10). Interestingly, 2% moringin cream treatment was found to modulate the expression of voltage-gated ion channels (results focused on P2X7, Nav 1.7, Nav 1.8 KV4.2, and α2δ-1) as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5 and xCT) involved in neuropathic pain initiation and maintenance. Conclusions Finally, our evidences suggest 2% moringin cream as a new pharmacological trend in the management of multiple sclerosis-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:28741431

  14. Unsedation colonoscopy can be not that painful: Evaluation of the effect of "Lamaze method of colonoscopy".

    PubMed

    Yu, Shao-Ping; Lin, Xiao-Dong; Wu, Guang-Yao; Li, Song-Hu; Wen, Zong-Quan; Cen, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Xian-Guang; Huang, Mei-Ting

    2015-10-25

    To evaluate the pain relieving effect of intervention with "Lamaze method of colonoscopy" in the process of colonoscopy. Five hundred and eighty-five patients underwent colonoscopy were randomly divided into three groups, Lamaze group, anesthetic group and control group. Two hundred and twenty-four patients of Lamaze group, the "Lamaze method of colonoscopy" were practiced in the process of colonoscopy. The Lamaze method of colonoscopy is modified from the Lamaze method of childbirth, which helped patients to relieve pain through effective breathing control. One hundred and seventy-eight patients in anesthetic group accepted sedation colonoscopy. For 183 patients in control group, colonoscopy was performed without any intervention. The satisfactory of colon cleaning, intestinal lesions, intubation time, success ratio, pain grading and complications were recorded. All data were statistically analyzed. There were no significant differences at base line of the three groups (P > 0.05). Anesthetic group shows advantage in intubation time than the other two groups (P < 0.05). Lamaze group shows no advantage in intubation time than that in control group (P > 0.05). The anesthetic group showed an apparent advantage in relieving pain (P < 0.01). Therefore, the "Lamaze method of colonoscopy" performed in colonoscopy could relieve pain effectively comparing with control group (P < 0.05). The patients in anesthetic group had the highest incidence of complications (P < 0.05). The performance of the "Lamaze method of colonoscopy" in the process of colonoscopy could relieve patients' pain, minimize the incidence of complications, and is worthy promotion in clinical practice.

  15. [Effects of pamidronate disodium (Bonin) combined with chemotherapy on bone pain in multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Leng, Yun; Chen, Shi-lun; Shi, Hong-zhi

    2002-10-01

    Objective. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of Disodium Pamidronate (Bonin) on bone pain in multiple myeloma. Method. 18 patients received only chemotherapy and 16 patients with addition of Bonin were compared. Result. The bone pain was significantly relieved both in chemotherapy alone group and in the combination group of Bonin with chemotherapy after treatment (P<0.01, as compared with before therapy). However, the effects of combination group were more dramatical than that of the other group (P<0.05). No obvious side-effects were observed except mild fever in one patient in the combination group. Conclusion. Bonin, as a safe and effective Bisphosphonates preparation, could relieve bone pain in multiple myeloma more effectively when combined with chemotherapy.

  16. [Study on origin of meridians and collaterals through pain relieving effect of muscle regions].

    PubMed

    Dong, Bao-Qiang; Li, Chun-Ri; Huang, Feng-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Jian; Xue, Li-Gong

    2011-08-01

    Through analysis on sequencing of meridians and their muscle regions, their pertaining organs, run ning courses, linking and indications described in Zubi Shiyimai (Eleven Meridian of Foot and Hand), Yinyang Shiyimai (Eleven Meridian of Yinyang), Lingshu: Jingmai (Miraculous Pivot: Meridian) and Lingshu: Jinjing (Miraculous Pivot: Muscle Meridian), it is found that most of the indications of acupuncture in ancient time are symptoms of the muscle regions. 62.59% points of the national standard acupoints location close to tender points of the muscle regions, which indicates that the origin of early acupoints are tender points along the running courses of the muscle regions. Thus, it is concluded that meridians and their muscle regions have the same origin, which provides new train of thinking for a better comprehension of origin of meridians and collaterals.

  17. Exploring effect of pain education on chronic pain patients' expectation of recovery and pain intensity.

    PubMed

    Mittinty, Manasi M; Vanlint, Simon; Stocks, Nigel; Mittinty, Murthy N; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2018-04-25

    results from this study highlight the importance of effective pain education focused on reconceptualization of pain and its management.

  18. Effect of musculoskeletal pain of care workers on job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, DeokJu

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the musculoskeletal pain of care workers and investigate its effect on their job satisfaction. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 87 care workers working at C elderly care service center in P region. The average age of men was 62.5 ± 3.4 years and that of women was 57.3 ± 2.7 years. The 'Guidelines for Risk Factor Survey on Tasks with Musculoskeletal Burden' of the KOSHA CODE (H-30-2003) of the Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency (KOSHA) was used for measurement of musculoskeletal pain. This survey tool for job satisfaction consisted of 12 questions including the areas of wage satisfaction, professional satisfaction, job performance satisfaction, and relationship satisfaction. [Results] Study results showed that musculoskeletal pain varied depending on professional satisfaction, job performance satisfaction, and relationship satisfaction. The correlation between the areas of musculoskeletal pain and job satisfaction was examined and the following was revealed. Professional satisfaction was correlated with arm/elbow pain and lower back pain, job performance satisfaction with lower back pain, and relationship satisfaction with shoulder pain and lower back pain. [Conclusion] In this study, subjects were older and could have been easily exposed to diseases because of their age. To improve job efficiency among care workers, continuing education related to the job should take precedence. In addition, social support is required that can alleviate the heavy workload related to physical activity support, which is among the responsibilities of care workers. Moreover, application standards and coverage of industrial insurance for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders of care workers should be extended further to relieve the burden of medical costs. A series of such measures will have a positive effect on improving the job satisfaction of care workers.

  19. The effects of aromatherapy in relieving symptoms related to job stress among nurses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Miao-Chuan; Fang, Shu-Hui; Fang, Li

    2015-02-01

    Workplace-related stress has become today's most serious occupational hazard. Aromatherapy is a simple, convenient and non-invasive method of stress relief. There is little research regarding the efficacy of aromatherapy by means of inhaling essential oil in reducing workplace stress-related symptoms among nurses. Therefore, this study was to examine the effectiveness of lavender oil inhalation in reducing job stress-related symptoms among nurses. The 53 nurses in the experimental group pinned small bottles containing 3% lavender oil on the clothes of their right chests, whereas 57 participants in the control group pinned bottles with no lavender oil. Aromatherapy was shown to be effective in the reduction of the number of stress symptoms for 3 or 4 days. The stress symptoms of the experimental group decreased from 6.1 to 2.8 after aromatherapy was carried out (P = 0.126, 0.159, 0.035 and 0.026). This represented a significant decrease in stress, whereas the stress symptoms in the control group increased from 5.6 to 5.8. Hospital staff managers are still encouraged to include aromatherapy concepts and techniques in the continuing education of nursing staff. Concurrently, future research should focus on the possible side effects of aromatherapy to assure safety. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Aromatherapy with peppermint, isopropyl alcohol, or placebo is equally effective in relieving postoperative nausea.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Lynn A; Gross, Jeffrey B

    2004-02-01

    To determine whether aromatherapy can reduce postoperative nausea, the investigators studied 33 ambulatory surgery patients who complained of nausea in the PACU. After indicating the severity of nausea on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS), subjects received randomized aromatherapy with isopropyl alcohol, oil of peppermint, or saline (placebo). The vapors were inhaled deeply through the nose from scented gauze pads held directly beneath the patients' nostrils and exhaled slowly through the mouth. Two and 5 minutes later, the subjects rated their nausea on the VAS. Overall nausea scores decreased from 60.6 +/- 4.3 mm (mean +/- SE) before aromatherapy to 43.1 +/- 4.9 mm 2 minutes after aromatherapy (P <.005), and to 28.0 +/- 4.6 mm 5 minutes after aromatherapy (P < 10(-6)). Nausea scores did not differ between the treatments at any time. Only 52% of the patients required conventional intravenous (IV) antiemetic therapy during their PACU stay. Overall satisfaction with postoperative nausea management was 86.9 +/- 4.1 mm and was independent of the treatment group. Aromatherapy effectively reduced the perceived severity of postoperative nausea. The fact that a saline "placebo" was as effective as alcohol or peppermint suggests that the beneficial effect may be related more to controlled breathing patterns than to the actual aroma inhaled.

  1. Effect of alpha-lipoic acid on relieving ammonia stress and hepatic proteomic analyses of broilers.

    PubMed

    Lu, M; Bai, J; Xu, B; Sun, Q Y; Wei, F X; Tang, X F; Zhang, H F; Li, J; Wang, G L; Yin, Q Q; Li, S Y

    2017-01-01

    Ammonia in poultry houses not only affects worker health but also induces a variety of poultry diseases. Alpha-lipoic acid (LA) is an effective antioxidant that protects cells against oxidative injury during various toxic and pathological processes. This study was designed to evaluate the mitigating effects of LA supplementation on ammonia stress and hepatic proteome changes in broilers. Male broilers (22 d old) were allocated to 3 groups: (1) a control group without ammonia stress (CTRL); (2) exposure to 70 ppm ammonia (AM); and (3) exposure to 70 ppm ammonia and dietary administration of 300 mg/kg LA (AM+LA). Ammonia exposure significantly decreased broiler growth performance and plasma glutathione peroxidase activity (P < 0.05), and increased plasma malondialdehyde content and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase activity (P < 0.05). These negative effects were eliminated by LA supplementation. Comparative proteomic analyses revealed 291 differentially expressed proteins in the AM group compared to the CTRL and AM+LA groups. A total of 30 proteins were differentially expressed between the AM/CTRL and (AM+LA)/AM groups. The addition of LA restored 24 of these proteins to control levels; these proteins were mainly related to transcription regulation, detoxification, protein translation and degradation, and immune and stress responses. The differentially expressed proteins included the high mobility group box (HMGB) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), which is closely related to immune response and oxidative stress, and collagens, which are implicated in liver injury. The addition of LA to broiler diet may reduce ammonia toxicity by maintaining the antioxidant system, xenobiotic metabolism, and metabolic pathways. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  2. Effect of Pain Management on Immunization Efficacy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kolstad, April M; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Kim, Caroline J; Hale, Laura P

    2012-01-01

    Immunization with complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund adjuvant (IFA) is commonly viewed as painful, yet rodents may not receive analgesics due to concerns that these drugs affect the desired immune responses. Here we tested the hypothesis that pain associated with immunization with CFA or IFA in mice can be relieved without compromising the effectiveness of the immune response. After subcutaneous immunization in the leg with antigen in CFA or IFA, mice were assessed for signs of pain by using behavioral tests, including unrestricted locomotion in an open field, forced running on an automated treadmill, and voluntary wheel running. Effects of the analgesics acetaminophen, meloxicam, and buprenorphine on behavioral and antibody responses were assessed after primary and secondary immunization with the model antigen ovalbumin and after repeated immunization with a limiting dose of recombinant protective antigen from Bacillus anthracis. Open field activity and the distance traveled during forced gait analysis and voluntary wheel running both decreased after immunization. Treatment with each of the analgesics normalized some but not all of these behaviors but did not decrease the mean or maximal antibody titer after primary or repeated immunization with a moderate dose of ovalbumin or after repeated immunization with a limiting dose of protective antigen. In summary, after immunization with CFA or IFA, mice showed behavioral responses suggestive of pain. Acetaminophen, meloxicam, and buprenorphine attenuated these effects without decreasing antibody responses. Therefore, the use of these analgesics for managing rodent pain associated with CFA- or IFA-containing vaccines can be encouraged. PMID:23043810

  3. Effects of Health Qigong Exercises on Relieving Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao Lei; Chen, Shihui; Wang, Yongtai

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Health Qigong on the treatment and releasing symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Fifty-four moderate PD patients ( N = 54) were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Twenty-eight PD patients were placed in the experimental group in which the prescribed medication plus Health Qigong exercise will be used as intervention. The other 26 PD patients as the control group were treated only with regular medication. Ten-week intervention had been conducted for the study, and participants completed the scheduled exercises 5 times per week for 60 minutes each time (10 minutes for warm-up, 40 minutes for the exercise, and 10 minutes for cooldown). Data which included the muscle hardness, one-legged blind balance, physical coordination, and stability was collected before, during, and after the intervention. Comparisons were made between the experimental and control groups through the Repeated Measures ANOVA. The results showed that PD patients demonstrate a significant improvement in muscle hardness, the timed "up and go," balance, and hand-eye coordination (the turn-over-jars test). There were no significant differences between the two groups in gender, age, and course of differences ( P < 0.05). The study concluded that Health Qigong exercises could reduce the symptoms of Parkinson's disease and improve the body functions of PD patients in both the mild and moderate stages. It can be added as an effective treatment of rehabilitation therapy for PD.

  4. Effects of Health Qigong Exercises on Relieving Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao Lei; Wang, Yongtai

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Health Qigong on the treatment and releasing symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Fifty-four moderate PD patients (N = 54) were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Twenty-eight PD patients were placed in the experimental group in which the prescribed medication plus Health Qigong exercise will be used as intervention. The other 26 PD patients as the control group were treated only with regular medication. Ten-week intervention had been conducted for the study, and participants completed the scheduled exercises 5 times per week for 60 minutes each time (10 minutes for warm-up, 40 minutes for the exercise, and 10 minutes for cooldown). Data which included the muscle hardness, one-legged blind balance, physical coordination, and stability was collected before, during, and after the intervention. Comparisons were made between the experimental and control groups through the Repeated Measures ANOVA. The results showed that PD patients demonstrate a significant improvement in muscle hardness, the timed “up and go,” balance, and hand-eye coordination (the turn-over-jars test). There were no significant differences between the two groups in gender, age, and course of differences (P < 0.05). The study concluded that Health Qigong exercises could reduce the symptoms of Parkinson's disease and improve the body functions of PD patients in both the mild and moderate stages. It can be added as an effective treatment of rehabilitation therapy for PD. PMID:27891159

  5. The effect of budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy on the risk of severe asthma exacerbations following episodes of high reliever use: an exploratory analysis of two randomised, controlled studies with comparisons to standard therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Divergent strategies have emerged for the management of severe asthma. One strategy utilises high and fixed doses of maintenance treatment, usually inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist (ICS/LABA), supplemented by a short-acting β2-agonist (SABA) as needed. Alternatively, budesonide/formoterol is used as both maintenance and reliever therapy. The latter is superior to fixed-dose treatment in reducing severe exacerbations while achieving similar or better asthma control in other regards. Exacerbations may be reduced by the use of budesonide/formoterol as reliever medication during periods of unstable asthma. We examined the risk of a severe exacerbation in the period after a single day with high reliever use. Methods Episodes of high reliever use were quantified and exacerbations occurring post-index day with these episodes were examined post hoc in two double-blind studies comparing the efficacy and safety of budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy (Symbicort SMART™, Turbuhaler®) 160/4.5 μg twice daily plus as needed with similar or higher maintenance doses of ICS/LABA plus SABA or formoterol. Results Budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy significantly reduced the risk of episodes of high reliever use (>6 inhalations/day) vs. all alternative ICS/LABA regimens. With conventional fixed-dose treatment the need for exacerbation treatment within 21 days ranged from 6.0–10.1% of days post-index for all regimens compared with 2.5–3.4% of days with budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy. Conclusions Budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy reduces the incidence of high reliever episodes and the exacerbation burden immediately following these episodes vs. alternative ICS/LABA plus SABA regimens at up to double the maintenance dose of ICS. Trial registration These studies do not have registration numbers as they were conducted before clinical trial registration was required PMID

  6. Relieving the Time Squeeze? Effects of a White-Collar Workplace Change on Parents

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Rachelle; Tranby, Eric; Kelly, Erin; Moen, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Employed parents perceive a time squeeze even as trends from the 1960s show they are spending more time with their children. Work conditions (e.g., hours and schedule control) would seem to affect both parents’ time with children and perceived time squeeze, but most studies rely on cross-sectional data that do not establish causality. The authors examined the effects of the introduction of a workplace flexibility initiative (Results Only Work Environment [ROWE]) on changes in mothers’ and fathers’ perceptions of the adequacy of their time with children and actual time spent with children (N = 225). Baseline data show the importance of work conditions for parents’ sense of perceived time adequacy. Panel data show that mothers (but not fathers) in ROWE report increased schedule control and improved time adequacy, but no change in actual time spent with children, except that ROWE increases evening meals with children for mothers sharing few meals at baseline. PMID:24436498

  7. Effect of the unfolded protein response on ER protein export: a potential new mechanism to relieve ER stress.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Alaa

    2018-05-05

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an adaptive cellular response that aims to relieve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress via several mechanisms, including inhibition of protein synthesis and enhancement of protein folding and degradation. There is a controversy over the effect of the UPR on ER protein export. While some investigators suggested that ER export is inhibited during ER stress, others suggested the opposite. In this article, their conflicting studies are analyzed and compared in attempt to solve this controversy. The UPR appears indeed to enhance ER export, possibly via multiple mechanisms. However, another factor, which is the integrity of the folding machinery/environment inside ER, determines whether ER export will appear increased or decreased during experimentation. Also, different methods of stress induction appear to have different effects on ER export. Thus, improvement of ER export may represent a new mechanism by which the UPR alleviates ER stress. This may help researchers to understand how the UPR works inside cells and how to manipulate it to alter cell fate during stress, either to promote cell survival or death. This may open up new approaches for the treatment of ER stress-related diseases.

  8. Stress-relieving effects of short-term balneotherapy - a randomized controlled pilot study in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Matzer, Franziska; Nagele, Eva; Bahadori, Babak; Dam, Karl; Fazekas, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Stress-relieving effects of balneotherapy compared to progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and to resting were investigated by measuring subjective relaxation and salivary cortisol. It was also examined whether participants with a high versus low stress level would have a different relaxation response. A sample of healthy volunteers was randomized to balneotherapy, PMR, or a resting control group, each intervention lasting for 25 min. Pre- and post-intervention salivary cortisol samples were collected, and participants rated their status of relaxation on a quantitative scale. In addition, 3 questionnaires were applied to detect participants' stress level and bodily complaints. 49 healthy participants were recruited (65.3% female). In a pre-post comparison, salivary cortisol decreased (F = 23.53, p < 0.001) and subjective relaxation ratings increased (F = 132.18, p < 0.001) in all 3 groups. Study participants in the balneotherapy group rated themselves as more relaxed after the intervention as compared to the other groups (F = 5.22, p < 0.009). Participants with a high versus low stress level differed in somatic symptoms and in morning cortisol levels, but showed a similar relaxation response. Findings suggest that compared to PMR and resting, balneotherapy seems to be more beneficial with regard to subjective relaxation effects and similarly beneficial with regard to a decrease in salivary cortisol. © 2014 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  9. Intracutaneous sterile water for back pain in labour.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Intracutaneous sterile water appears to be a simple, effective, and harmless technique for relieving back pain. This technique has been used to relieve pain of renal colic, whiplash, and back pain in labour. Family doctors often practise obstetrics in small or isolated units that have limited options for pain relief in labour. This technique is simple, is easy to learn, and appears effective for relieving back pain, which complicates about one third of all labours. Images Figures 1-2 Figures 3-4 PMID:7950471

  10. Use, perceived effectiveness, and gender differences of pain relief strategies among the community-dwelling elderly in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsing-Yi; Tang, Fu-In; Yeh, Ming-Chen; Kuo, Benjamin Ing-Tiau; Yu, Shu

    2011-03-01

    Pain is a common problem among the elderly. The entire scope of chronic pain relief strategies used by community elderly is still unclear. A limited number of studies have investigated this issue from diverse culture perspectives. In the present study, we investigated the use and perceived effectiveness of pain relief strategies adopted by the elderly; gender differences between frequently used relief strategies were also explored. Two hundred nineteen participants living in Taiwan City, Taiwan, were recruited by a random sampling method and interviewed face to face. The prevalence of chronic pain among the elderly was 42.0% (n = 92). The elderly tended to adopt multiple strategies (mean ± SD = 9.08 ± 3.56; range = 2-18) to relieve their chronic pain. In three domains of pain relief strategies, conventional medicine was used more frequently than complementary and alternative medicine and psychologic approaches. Most pain relief strategies were ineffective. Among the 22 strategies used, no strategy was reported as "much improved" by a majority of users. The top five pain relief strategies used by men and women were the same. Elderly women tended to adopt more psychologic approaches, such as acceptance and ignoring to relieve pain, than men. The findings suggest that nurses should pay more attention to the issue of chronic pain relief and provide the elderly with more effective pain relief strategies. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Relieved residual damage in the hematopoietic system of mice rescued by radiation-induced adaptive response (Yonezawa Effect)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Maruyama, Kouichi; VarèS, Guillaume; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    Existence of adaptive response (AR) was previously demonstrated in C57BL/6J mice. Irradiations were performed by delivering a priming low dose of X-rays (0.50 Gy) in combination with a challenge high dose of accelerated carbon or neon ion particles. AR was characterized by significantly decreased mortality in the 30-day survival test. This mouse AR model (‘Yonezawa Effect’) was originally established by using X-rays as both the priming and challenge irradiations. The underlying mechanism was due to radio-resistance occurring in blood-forming tissues. In this study, we verified the existence of AR and further investigated residual damage in the hematopoietic system in surviving animals. Results showed that the priming low dose of X-rays could relieve the detrimental effects on the hematopoietic system. We observed both an improvement in the blood platelet count and the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) to the sum of PCEs and normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs) and a marked reduction of the incidences of micronucleated PCEs and micronucleated NCEs. These findings suggest that the priming low dose of low linear energy transfer (LET) X-rays induced a protective effect on the hematopoietic system, which may play an important role in both rescue from acute lethal damage (mouse killing) and prevention of late detrimental consequences (residual anhematopoiesis and delayed genotoxic effects) caused by exposure to a high challenge dose from low-LET (X-ray) or high-LET (carbon and neon ion) irradiations. These findings provide new knowledge of the characterization of the Yonezawa Effect by providing new insight into the mechanistic study of AR in vivo. PMID:22923746

  12. Making the decision to stop pain: Probability and magnitude effects of expected pain relief on the choice of analgesics.

    PubMed

    Lin, C

    2013-04-01

    Pain is a major ailment that motivates individuals to look for treatment. Despite its enormous clinical relevance, very little is known about the factors that influence our preference of an analgesic (or pain-relieving treatment). The current study investigated the influence of the information regarding the probability and the magnitude of the expected analgesic effect on preference of analgesic options. Twenty-four healthy volunteers were instructed to imagine pain across different scenarios and choose between two hypothetical analgesics that differed in their probabilities to successfully relieve pain and the magnitude of their expected analgesic effects. The conservative analgesic was more reliable but less potent than the radical analgesic, whereas the radical analgesic was less reliable but more potent than the conservative analgesic. Consistent with the predictions of prospect theory, a larger proportion of the participants chose the radical analgesic when the overall probability of both analgesics decreased, and when the potency of the radical analgesic was expected to be stronger relative to the conservative analgesic. At the individual level, individuals' relative imagined pain relief (radical analgesic/conservative analgesic) predicted their preference for the radical analgesic. Our findings revealed that preference of analgesic options is mediated by the overall probability of analgesic effect and the relative potency of analgesics. The expected relief one imagines to obtain from analgesics would guide preference. The findings highlight the importance for clinicians to understand how patients subjectively frame the probability and magnitude factors related to decision making in medical context. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  13. A sigh of relief or a sigh to relieve: The psychological and physiological relief effect of deep breaths.

    PubMed

    Vlemincx, Elke; Van Diest, Ilse; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2016-10-15

    Both animal and human research have revealed important associations between sighs and relief. Previously we argued to conceive of sighs as resetters which temporarily induce relief. The present study aimed to investigate the psychological and physiological relief effect of sighs by instructed deep breaths and spontaneous sighs compared to a control breathing maneuver. Participants completed three blocks of 40 trials during which uncertainty cues were followed by either safety cues followed by a positive picture, or danger cues followed by a negative picture. One block was presented without breathing instructions, two subsequent blocks with breathing instructions. During the presentation of the safety and danger cues, an instruction was given to either 'take a deep breath' or 'postpone the next inhalation for 2 s (breath hold). Continuously, participants rated relief and Frontalis electromyography was recorded. Trait anxiety sensitivity was assessed by the Anxiety Sensitivity Index. Self-reported relief and physiological tension were compared 5s before and after instructed deep breaths and breath holds, and before and after spontaneous deep breaths and breath holds in the respective blocks. Results show that self-reported relief following an instructed deep breath was higher than before. Physiological tension decreased following a spontaneous sigh in high anxiety sensitive persons and following a spontaneous breath hold in low anxiety sensitive persons. These results are the first to show that a deep breath relieves and, in anxiety sensitive persons, reduces physiological tension. These findings support the hypothesis that sighs are psychological and physiological resetters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of intradiscal pulsed radiofrequency on refractory chronic discogenic neck pain: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kwak, So Young; Chang, Min Cheol

    2018-04-01

    Despite medication, exercise, and medical intervention, many patients complain of persistent discogenic neck pain. To manage discogenic neck pain, we performed intradiscal pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) stimulation in a patient with chronic discogenic neck pain refractory to oral medication and epidural steroid injection. A 26-year-old man presented with a numeric rating scale (NRS) score of 7 for chronic neck pain. His pain was worse when the neck was held in one position for a prolonged period. There was no pain in the upper extremities. Discography was positive at C4-5. Based on the pain characteristics, and the result of discography, we diagnosed him as having discogenic neck pain originating from C4-5. Intradiscal PRF on the C4-5 intervertebral disc was performed under C-arm fluoroscopy. The PRF treatment was administered at 2 Hz and a 20-ms pulsed width for 20 minutes at 60 V with the constraint that the electrode tip temperature should not exceed 42°C. At the 2-week, and 1-month follow-up visits, the patient's pain was completely relieved. At 2, and 3 months after intradiscal PRF, the pain was scored as NRS 2. No adverse effects of intradiscal PRF stimulation were observed. Application of intradiscal PRF appears to be an effective and safe technique for treating chronic discogenic neck pain.

  15. The Effect of Upper Limb Massage on Infants' Venipuncture Pain.

    PubMed

    Chik, Yuen-Man; Ip, Wan-Yim; Choi, Kai-Chow

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of upper limb massage on relieving pain among infants undergoing venipuncture in Hong Kong. This study was a crossover, double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Eighty infants at the neonatal intensive care unit were randomly assigned to 2 groups in different order to receive interventions. The massage first group (N = 40) received 2-minute massage before venipuncture on the first occasion then received usual care (control) on the second occasion, and vice versa in the massage second group (N = 40). The infants' behavior and physiological responses were recorded on two occasions: (1) right after the intervention and (2) during the first 30 seconds of venipuncture procedure. The mean pain scores (Premature Infant Pain Profile) were significantly lower in infants who received massage (massage first: 6.0 [standard deviation = 3.3]; massage second: 7.30 [standard deviation = 4.4]) versus control (massage first: 12.0 [standard deviation = 4.3]; massage second: 12.7 [standard deviation = 3.1]). The crude and adjusted generalized estimating equations model showed that the infants had significantly lower pain score when receiving massage as compared to receiving the control treatment, and there were no significant time and carryover effects: -6.03 (95% confidence interval: -7.67 to -4.38), p < .001 and -5.96 (95% confidence interval: -7.56 to -4.36), p < .001, respectively. Upper limb massage may be effective in decreasing infants' venipuncture pain perception. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Cannabinoids in pain medicine].

    PubMed

    Karst, M

    2018-06-07

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) controls a large number of vital functions. Suboptimal tone of the ECS in certain regions of the nervous system may be associated with disorders that are also associated with pain. Pain and inflammation processes can be modulated by the exogenous supply of cannabinoids. Low-to-moderate pain-relieving effects and in individual cases large pain-relieving effects were observed in randomized, controlled studies of various types of chronic pain. People with chronic neuropathic pain and stress symptoms seem to particularly benefit. The therapeutic range of cannabinoids is small; often small doses are sufficient for clinically significant effects. The "Cannabis-als-Medizin-Gesetz" (cannabis as medicine law) allows the prescription of cannabis preparations under certain conditions. Available data indicate good long-term efficacy and tolerability. However, there is little systematic long-term experience from clinical studies.

  17. Negative expectations interfere with the analgesic effect of safety cues on pain perception by priming the cortical representation of pain in the midcingulate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Almarzouki, Abeer F.; Brown, Christopher A.; Brown, Richard J.; Leung, Matthew H. K.; Jones, Anthony K. P.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that the efficacy of treatment effects, including those of placebos, is heavily dependent on positive expectations regarding treatment outcomes. For example, positive expectations about pain treatments are essential for pain reduction. Such positive expectations not only depend on the properties of the treatment itself, but also on the context in which the treatment is presented. However, it is not clear how the preceding threat of pain will bias positive expectancy effects. One hypothesis is that threatening contexts trigger fearful and catastrophic thinking, reducing the pain-relieving effects of positive expectancy. In this study, we investigated the disruptive influence of threatening contexts on positive expectancy effects while 41 healthy volunteers experienced laser-induced heat pain. A threatening context was induced using pain-threatening cues that preceded the induction of positive expectancies via subsequent pain-safety cues. We also utilised electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate potential neural mechanisms underlying these effects. Lastly, we used the Fear of Pain Questionnaire to address whether the disruptive effect of negative contexts on cued pain relief was related to the degree of fear of pain. As predicted, participants responded less to pain-safety cues (i.e., experienced more pain) when these were preceded by pain-threatening cues. In this threatening context, an enhancement of the N2 component of the laser-evoked potential was detected, which was more pronounced in fearful individuals. This effect was localised to the midcingulate cortex, an area thought to integrate negative affect with pain experience to enable adaptive behaviour in aversive situations. These results suggest that threatening contexts disrupt the effect of pain relief cues via an aversive priming mechanism that enhances neural responses in the early stages of sensory processing. PMID:28665973

  18. Diclofenac Topical (osteoarthritis pain)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gel (Voltaren) is used to relieve pain from osteoarthritis (arthritis caused by a breakdown of the lining ... Diclofenac topical liquid (Pennsaid) is used to relieve osteoarthritis pain in the knees. Diclofenac is in a ...

  19. Immediate effects of a distal gait modification during stair descent in individuals with patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Sandra; Mezêncio, Bruno; Amadio, Alberto Carlos; Serrão, Julio Cerca; Mochizuki, Luis

    2018-05-23

    Knee pain during stair managing is a common complaint among individuals with PFP and can negatively affect their activities of daily living. Gait modification programs can be used to decrease patellofemoral pain. Immediate effects of a stair descent distal gait modification session that intended to emphasize forefoot landing during stair descent are described in this study. To analyze the immediate effects of a distal gait modification session on lower extremity movements and intensity of pain in women with patellofemoral pain during stair descent. Nonrandomized controlled trial. Sixteen women with patellofemoral pain were allocated into two groups: (1) Gait Modification Group (n = 8); and 2) Control Group (n = 8). The intensity of pain (visual analog scale) and kinematics of knee, ankle, and forefoot (multi-segmental foot model) during stair descent were assessed before and after the intervention. After the gait modification session, there was an increase of forefoot eversion and ankle plantarflexion as well as a decrease of knee flexion. An immediate decrease in patellofemoral pain intensity during stair descent was also observed. The distal gait modification session changed the lower extremity kinetic chain strategy of movement, increasing foot and ankle movement contribution and decreasing knee contribution to the task. An immediate decrease in patellofemoral pain intensity during stair descent was also observed. To emphasize forefoot landing may be a useful intervention to immediately relieve pain in patients with patellofemoral pain during stair descent. Clinical studies are needed to verify the gait modification session effects in medium and long terms.

  20. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... They include Pain Relievers and other medicines Acupuncture Electrical stimulation Surgery Physical therapy Psychotherapy Relaxation and meditation therapy Biofeedback NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  1. Duloxetine Plasma Concentrations and Its Effectiveness in the Treatment of Nonorganic Chronic Pain in the Orofacial Region.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Nagashima, Wataru; Tokura, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Keizo; Umemura, Eri; Miyauchi, Tomoya; Arao, Munetaka; Ito, Mikiko; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kurita, Kenichi; Ozaki, Norio

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the pain-relieving effects of duloxetine and its plasma concentrations in patients with burning mouth syndrome and atypical odontalgia characterized by chronic nonorganic pain in the orofacial region. We administered duloxetine to 77 patients diagnosed as having burning mouth syndrome or atypical odontalgia for 12 weeks. The initial dose of duloxetine was established as 20 mg/d and was increased to 40 mg/d after week 2. We evaluated pain using the visual analog scale and depressive symptoms using the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale at weeks 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 and measured plasma concentrations of duloxetine 12 weeks after the start of its administration. Visual analog scale scores were significantly lower 12 weeks after than at the start of the administration of duloxetine (paired t test, t = 6.65, P < 0.0001). We examined the relationship between the rate of decreases in visual analog scale scores and plasma concentrations of duloxetine. There was no significant linear regression or quadratic regression. Duloxetine significantly relieved pain in patients with chronic nonorganic pain in the orofacial region. However, no relationship was observed between its pain-relieving effects and plasma concentrations.

  2. Experience of low-dose aminophylline use to relieve minor adverse effects of dipyridamole in patients undergoing stress myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Fan; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Hou, Cheng-Han; Ku, Chih-Hung; Tseng, Neng-Chuan; Shen, Daniel H Y

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous administration of aminophylline is widely adopted to reverse dipyridamole-related adverse effects (AEs) during stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). The study aimed to investigate the efficacy of lower-dose aminophylline to relieve minor AEs. 2,250 consecutive patients undergoing dipyridamole-stressed MPI were enrolled. Information concerning AE occurrence and dosages of aminophylline was collected to evaluate the efficacy of lower-dose aminophylline. A logistic regression was used to determine independent predictors of dipyridamole-related AE occurrence. No severe AE was noted. Overall mild AE incidence was 37.0% (833/2,250 patients). Initial low-dose (25 mg) aminophylline relieved symptoms in 98.8% of patients with mild AEs (823/833 patients). An extra 25 mg aminophylline sufficed to reverse all such AEs. Mean body mass index (BMI) differed significantly between patients with and without any AE [25.6 vs 25.1 (P = .009)]. There was no significant difference between two subgroups in mean age, male gender prevalence, body height and weight, dipyridamole dose/BMI, or prevalence of significant perfusion defect(s) on MPI. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated BMI remained the independent predictor of dipyridamole-related AE occurrence (odds ratio 1.028, 95% confidence interval 1.007-1.049, P = .01). Low-dose (≦50 mg, and usually 25 mg) aminophylline seems sufficient to relieve mild dipyridamole-related AEs during stress MPI.

  3. The Effect of Virtual Reality Distraction on Pain Relief During Dressing Changes in Children with Chronic Wounds on Lower Limbs.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yun; Qiu, Rong; Yao, Wen-Yan; Zhang, Qin; Chen, Xiao-Li

    2015-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that patients with chronic wounds experience the most pain during dressing changes. Currently, researchers focus mostly on analgesics and appropriate dressing materials to relieve pain during dressing changes of chronic wounds. However, the effect of nonpharmacologic interventions, such as virtual reality distraction, on pain management during dressing changes of pediatric chronic wounds remains poorly understood. To investigate the effect of virtual reality distraction on alleviating pain during dressing changes in children with chronic wounds on their lower limbs. A prospective randomized study. A pediatric center in a tertiary hospital. Sixty-five children, aged from 4 to 16 years, with chronic wounds on their lower limbs. Pain and anxiety scores during dressing changes were recorded by using the Wong-Baker Faces picture scale, visual analogue scale, and pain behavior scale, as well as physiological measurements including pulse rate and oxygen saturation. Time length of dressing change was recorded. Virtual reality distraction significantly relieved pain and anxiety scores during dressing changes and reduced the time length for dressing changes as compared to standard distraction methods. The use of virtual reality as a distraction tool in a pediatric ward offered superior pain reduction to children as compared to standard distractions. This device can potentially improve clinical efficiency by reducing length time for dressing changes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sodium oxybate relieves pain and improves function in fibromyalgia syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Russell, I Jon; Perkins, A Thomas; Michalek, Joel E

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of sodium oxybate for management of the symptoms of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Patients with FMS (according to the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria) were randomized, after discontinuing their prestudy medications for FMS, to receive 4.5 gm or 6 gm of sodium oxybate or matching placebo once per night for 8 weeks. The primary outcome variable (POV) was a composite score for changes from baseline in 3 coprimary self-report measures: patient's pain rating (in daily electronic diaries) on a visual analog scale (PVAS), the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) score, and the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGI-C). A beneficial response rate for the POV composite score was defined as >or=20% improvement in the PVAS and FIQ scores plus a rating of "much better" or "very much better" on the PGI-C. Secondary measures included subjective sleep outcomes (on the Jenkins Scale for Sleep) and quality-of-life measures. The analyses were based on an intent-to-treat (ITT) population. The ITT population included 188 patients with FMS, 78% of whom completed the trial. Significant benefit was observed with both dosages of sodium oxybate, according to changes in the POV and subjective sleep quality. Improvements in the PVAS score were significantly correlated with sleep outcomes. Sodium oxybate was well tolerated overall; dose-related nausea (

  5. Is TENS purely a placebo effect? A controlled study on chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Marchand, S; Charest, J; Li, J; Chenard, J R; Lavignolle, B; Laurencelle, L

    1993-07-01

    Although high-frequency low-intensity transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) has been extensively used to relieve low back pain, experimental studies of its effectiveness have yielded contradictory findings mainly due to methodological problems in pain evaluation and placebo control. In the present study, separate visual analog scales (VAS) were used to measure the sensory-discriminative and motivational-affective components of low back pain. Forty-two subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: TENS, placebo-TENS, and no treatment (control). In order to measure the short-term effect of TENS, VAS pain ratings were taken before and after each treatment session. Also, to measure long-term effects, patients rated their pain at home every 2 h throughout a 3-day period before and 1 week, 3 months and 6 months after the treatment sessions. In comparing the pain evaluations made immediately before and after each treatment session, TENS and placebo-TENS significantly reduced both the intensity and unpleasantness of chronic low back pain. TENS was significantly more efficient than placebo-TENS in reducing pain intensity but not pain unpleasantness. TENS also produced a significant additive effect over repetitive treatment sessions for pain intensity and relative pain unpleasantness. This additive effect was not found for placebo-TENS. When evaluated at home, pain intensity was significantly reduced more by TENS than placebo-TENS 1 week after the end of treatment, but not 3 months and 6 months later. At home evaluation of pain unpleasantness in the TENS group was never different from the placebo-TENS group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Pain and the ethics of pain management.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R B

    1984-01-01

    In this article I clarify the concepts of 'pain', 'suffering', 'pains of body', 'pains of soul'. I explore the relevance of an ethic to the clinical setting which gives patients a strong prima facie right to freedom from unnecessary and unwanted pain and which places upon medical professionals two concomitant moral obligations to patients. First, there is the duty not to inflict pain and suffering beyond what is necessary for effective diagnosis, treatment and research. Next, there is the duty to do all that can be done to relieve all the pain and suffering which can be alleviated. I develop in some detail that individuality of pain sensitivity must be taken into account in fulfilling these obligations. I explore the issue of the relevance of informed consent and the right to refuse treatment to the matter of pain relief. And I raise the question of what conditions, if any, should override the right to refuse treatment where pain relief is of paramount concern.

  7. Beneficial Effects of Trillium govanianum Rhizomes in Pain and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ur Rahman, Shafiq; Adhikari, Achyut; Ismail, Muhammad; Raza Shah, Muhammad; Khurram, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Ali, Farman; Haseeb, Abdul; Akbar, Fazal; Iriti, Marcello

    2016-08-20

    Trillium govanianum rhizome is used as an analgesic and anti-inflammatory remedy in traditional medicine in northern Pakistan. In an attempt to establish its medicinal value, the present research evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory potential of T. govanianum. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of extract and fractions was investigated in the carrageenan induced paw edema assay. The in vitro suppression of oxidative burst of extract, fractions and isolated compounds was assessed through luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay. The in vivo analgesic activity was assayed in chemical and thermal induced nociceptive pain models. The crude methanol extract and its solvent fractions showed anti-inflammatory and analgesic responses, exhibited by significant amelioration of paw edema and relieve of the tonic visceral chemical and acute phasic thermal nociception. In the oxidative burst assay, based on IC50, the crude methanol extract and n-butanol soluble fraction produced a significant inhibition, followed by chloroform and hexane soluble fractions as compared to ibuprofen. Similarly, the isolated compounds pennogenin and borassoside E exhibited significant level of oxidative burst suppressive activity. The in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities as well as the in vitro inhibition of oxidative burst validated the traditional use of T. govanianum rhizomes as a phytotherapeutic remedy for both inflammatory conditions and pain. The observed activities might be attributed to the presence of steroids and steroid-based compounds. Therefore, the rhizomes of this plant species could serve as potential novel source of compounds effective for alleviating pain and inflammation.

  8. Effect of artemisinin on neuropathic pain mediated by P2X4 receptor in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Ying, Mofeng; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Tengling; Jiang, Chenxu; Gong, Yingxin; Wu, Bing; Zou, Lifang; Yi, Zhihua; Rao, Shenqiang; Li, Guilin; Zhang, Chunping; Jia, Tianyu; Zhao, Shanhong; Yuan, Huilong; Shi, Liran; Li, Lin; Liang, Shangdong; Liu, Shuangmei

    2017-09-01

    Neuropathic pain is a type of chronic pain caused by nervous system damage and dysfunction. The pathogenesis of chronic pain is complicated, and there are no effective therapies for neuropathic pain. Studies show that the P2X 4 receptor expressed in the satellite glial cells (SGCs) of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) is related to neuropathic pain. Artemisinin is a monomeric component extracted from traditional Chinese medicine and has a variety of important pharmacological effects and potential applications. This study observed the effect of artemisinin on neuropathic pain and delineated its possible mechanism. The chronic constriction injury (CCI) rat model was used in this study. The results demonstrated that artemisinin relieved pain behaviors in the CCI rats, inhibited the expression of P2X 4 receptor in the DRG, and decreased the ATP-activated currents in HEK293 cells transfected with P2X 4 plasmid. Dual-labeling immunofluorescence showed that the coexpression of P2X 4 receptor and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the DRG of CCI rats was increased compared to control rats. After CCI rats were treated with artemisinin, the coexpression of P2X 4 receptor and GFAP in the DRG was significantly decreased compared to the CCI group. This finding suggested that artemisinin could inhibit the nociceptive transmission mediated by P2X 4 receptor in the DRG SGCs and thus relieve pain behaviors in the CCI rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Restoration of miR-1305 relieves the inhibitory effect of nicotine on periodontal ligament-derived stem cell proliferation, migration, and osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Hui-Li

    2017-04-01

    Nicotine hinders the regenerative potentials of human periodontal ligament-derived stem cells (PDLSCs) and delays the healing process of periodontal diseases, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. miR-1305 upregulation and its potential target RUNX2 downregulation exist in the PDLSCs exposed to nicotine. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether nicotine inhibits PDLSC proliferation, migration, and osteogenic differentiation by increasing miR-1305 level and decreasing RUNX2 level. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot assays were performed to detect the expression levels of miR-1305 and RUNX2 in the PDLSCs exposed to nicotine, respectively. PDLSCs with miR-1305 overexpression, low expression, or RUNX2 overexpression were constructed by lipofectin transfection. MTT, migration, and Western blot assays were applied to assess the effect of miR-1305 on PDLSC proliferation, migration, and osteogenic differentiation, respectively. Target prediction and luciferase reporter assays were performed to investigate the targets of miR-1305. Nicotine promoted miR-1305 expression and inhibited RUNX2 expression in PDLSCs. Cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation detection showed that nicotine suppressed proliferation, migration, and osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs, and restoration of miR-1305 relieved the inhibitory effect of nicotine on PDLSCs. Moreover, we identified and validated that RUNX2 was a direct target of miR-1305, and upregulation of RUNX2 had similar effects with the downregulation of miR-1305 on relieving the inhibitory effect of nicotine on PDLSCs. Nicotine suppresses proliferation, migration, and osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs, and restoration of miR-1305 relieves the inhibitory effect of nicotine on PDLSCs depending on its target RUNX2. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Real-life effectiveness of budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy in asthma patients across Asia: SMARTASIA study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of budesonide/formoterol in a single inhaler for both maintenance and reliever therapy is a recommended option for treatment of persistent asthma not responding well to inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) alone. Methods This was a multi-centre open-label study on patients whose asthma condition remained inadequately controlled by various asthma treatments other than budesonide/formoterol. After a 2-week run-in period, eligible patients underwent a 12-week treatment period with budesonide/formoterol (Symbicort SMART®, 160/4.5 μg) twice daily plus as needed. Patient’s asthma control and quality of life were assessed using the 5-item Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ-5) and the standardized Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ-S), respectively. Results A total of 862 eligible asthma patients who have had asthma for a mean duration of 10.73 ± 12.03 years entered a 12-week treatment with budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy. During treatment, ACQ-5 score improved significantly by 0.58 ± 0.93 (95% CI, 0.51 to 0.64, P < 0.0001) from the baseline level of 1.62 ± 1.00. AQLQ(S) score improved by 0.70 ± 0.89 (95% CI, 0.64 to 0.76, P < 0.0001) from baseline. Asthma symptom score was also reduced significantly (P < 0.0001); between run-in and treatment periods, night- and day-time symptom scores were reduced by 0.32 ± 0.54 (95% CI, 0.28 to 0.35) and 0.30 ± 0.52 (95% CI, 0.27 to 0.34), respectively. The percentage of nights with awakenings due to asthma symptoms was reduced by 11.09 ± 26.13% (95% CI, 9.34 to 12.85%), while the percentage of asthma-control and symptom-free days increased by 20.90 ± 34.40% (95% CI, 18.59 to 23.21%) and 23.89 ± 34.62% (95% CI, 21.56 to 26.21%), respectively (P < 0.0001). Together with the improvement in asthma control, the number of night- and day-time inhalations of as-needed reliever medication decreased by 0.30 ± 0.82 (95% CI, 0.24 to 0

  11. Real-life effectiveness of budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy in asthma patients across Asia: SMARTASIA study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nanshan; Lin, Jiangtao; Mehta, Parthiv; Ngamjanyaporn, Pintip; Wu, Tzu-Chin; Yunus, Faisal

    2013-04-04

    The use of budesonide/formoterol in a single inhaler for both maintenance and reliever therapy is a recommended option for treatment of persistent asthma not responding well to inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) alone. This was a multi-centre open-label study on patients whose asthma condition remained inadequately controlled by various asthma treatments other than budesonide/formoterol. After a 2-week run-in period, eligible patients underwent a 12-week treatment period with budesonide/formoterol (Symbicort SMART(®), 160/4.5 μg) twice daily plus as needed. Patient's asthma control and quality of life were assessed using the 5-item Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ-5) and the standardized Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ-S), respectively. A total of 862 eligible asthma patients who have had asthma for a mean duration of 10.73 ± 12.03 years entered a 12-week treatment with budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy. During treatment, ACQ-5 score improved significantly by 0.58 ± 0.93 (95% CI, 0.51 to 0.64, P < 0.0001) from the baseline level of 1.62 ± 1.00. AQLQ(S) score improved by 0.70 ± 0.89 (95% CI, 0.64 to 0.76, P < 0.0001) from baseline. Asthma symptom score was also reduced significantly (P < 0.0001); between run-in and treatment periods, night- and day-time symptom scores were reduced by 0.32 ± 0.54 (95% CI, 0.28 to 0.35) and 0.30 ± 0.52 (95% CI, 0.27 to 0.34), respectively. The percentage of nights with awakenings due to asthma symptoms was reduced by 11.09 ± 26.13% (95% CI, 9.34 to 12.85%), while the percentage of asthma-control and symptom-free days increased by 20.90 ± 34.40% (95% CI, 18.59 to 23.21%) and 23.89 ± 34.62% (95% CI, 21.56 to 26.21%), respectively (P < 0.0001). Together with the improvement in asthma control, the number of night- and day-time inhalations of as-needed reliever medication decreased by 0.30 ± 0.82 (95% CI, 0.24 to 0.35) inhalations and 0.30 ± 0.97 (95% CI, 0.23 to 0.36) inhalations, respectively (P

  12. Effects of Inhalation of Lavender Essential Oil on Open-heart Surgery Pain.

    PubMed

    Salamati, Armaiti; Mashouf, Soheyla; Sahbaei, Faezeh; Mojab, Faraz

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of inhalation of lavender essential oil on the pain of open-heart surgery. The main complaint of patients after open-heart surgery is chest pain. Due to the side effects of opioids, it is important to use a non-invasive way to effectively relieve pain including aromatherapy with analgesics. This study was a clinical single-blind trial and was conducted on 40 patients who had open-heart surgery in the cardiac ICU of 2 Hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 2012. Criteria included: full consciousness, spontaneous breathing ability and not using synthetic opioids within 2 hours before extubation. After extubation, the patients were asked to mark the intensity of their pain using the visual analogue scale. Then, a cotton swab which was impregnated with 2 drops of lavender essential oil 2% was placed in their oxygen mask, and they got breath for 10 minutes. 30 minutes after aromatherapy, they were asked to re-mark their pain intensity. The level of patient's pain before and after aroma therapy were compared. The pain mean level before and after inhaling lavender essential oil was 5.60 (SD = 2.262) and 4.98 (SD = 2.293), respectively (p-value>0.05). Therefore, there is no significant difference and the result of study proves that lavender essential oil inhalation has no effect on reducing the pain of open-heart surgery.

  13. Effects of Inhalation of Lavender Essential Oil on Open-heart Surgery Pain

    PubMed Central

    Salamati, Armaiti; Mashouf, Soheyla; Sahbaei, Faezeh; Mojab, Faraz

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of inhalation of lavender essential oil on the pain of open-heart surgery. The main complaint of patients after open-heart surgery is chest pain. Due to the side effects of opioids, it is important to use a non-invasive way to effectively relieve pain including aromatherapy with analgesics. This study was a clinical single-blind trial and was conducted on 40 patients who had open-heart surgery in the cardiac ICU of 2 Hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, 2012. Criteria included: full consciousness, spontaneous breathing ability and not using synthetic opioids within 2 hours before extubation. After extubation, the patients were asked to mark the intensity of their pain using the visual analogue scale. Then, a cotton swab which was impregnated with 2 drops of lavender essential oil 2% was placed in their oxygen mask, and they got breath for 10 minutes. 30 minutes after aromatherapy, they were asked to re-mark their pain intensity. The level of patient’s pain before and after aroma therapy were compared. The pain mean level before and after inhaling lavender essential oil was 5.60 (SD = 2.262) and 4.98 (SD = 2.293), respectively (p-value>0.05). Therefore, there is no significant difference and the result of study proves that lavender essential oil inhalation has no effect on reducing the pain of open-heart surgery. PMID:25587315

  14. Relieving Oral Mucositis - Palifermin Discovery

    Cancer.gov

    Painful mouth and throat sores can be a side effect of intensive cancer treatments for many patients. Learn how NCI scientists developed the drug, Palifermin, which vastly improves the quality of life for cancer patients.

  15. Effect of cryotherapy on relief of perineal pain after vaginal childbirth with episiotomy: a randomized and controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Beleza, Ana Carolina Sartorato; Ferreira, Cristine Homsi Jorge; Driusso, Patricia; Dos Santos, Claudia Benedita; Nakano, Ana Márcia Spanó

    2017-12-01

    Verify the effectiveness of cryotherapy in relieving perineal pain in women after vaginal delivery with episiotomy. Randomized controlled clinical trial. Reference Center of Women's Health of Ribeirão Preto (MATER), in the state of São Paulo. The study included 50 women who reported pain in the postpartum period following vaginal delivery with episiotomy. The women in the experimental group applied a bag of crushed ice to the perineal region for 20minutes. Both groups were assessed before, immediately after removal of the ice bag, and one hour after cryotherapy treatment. Complaint of pain was evaluated using a numerical pain assessment scale (0 to 10). Perineal temperature was also measured using an infrared thermometer, and the satisfaction of women undergoing the treatment was assessed using a questionnaire. Pain relief was verified for the experimental group compared to the control group in the second (immediately after use of cryotherapy) and third evaluations (one hour after cryotherapy). The temperature of the perineal region was found to be related to the intensity of pain, e.g. the lower the temperature provided by cryotherapy, the lower the woman's complaint of pain. 88% of women reported being satisfied with the treatment. After 20minutes of application, cryotherapy was effective in relieving perineal pain in women in the immediate postpartum period after vaginal birth with episiotomy. ACTRN12613000052730. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Ipomoea pes-caprae (L.) R. Br (Convolvulaceae) relieved nociception and inflammation in mice - A topical herbal medicine against effects due to cnidarian venom-skin contact.

    PubMed

    da Silva Barth, Cristiane; Tolentino de Souza, Hugo Guilherme; Rocha, Lilian W; da Silva, Gislaine Francieli; Dos Anjos, Mariana Ferreira; Pastor, Veronica D'Avila; Belle Bresolin, Tania Mari; Garcia Couto, Angelica; Roberto Santin, José; Meira Quintão, Nara Lins

    2017-03-22

    induced by histamine injection. Finally, the semisolid presented significant inhibition in trypsin- and capsaicin-induced spontaneous nociception. The hydroethanolic extract of I. pes-caprae showed compliance with the topical popular use of the herbal product to relieve the symptoms evoked by the cnidarian venom-skin contact, such as neurogenic oedema and nociception. The extract components seem to interfere with the effects resulting from the TRPV1, B 2 R and PAR-2 activation, once it interfered with painful-behaviour and oedema induced by capsaicin, BK and trypsin, pointing the histaminergic system as the main target, once it is an important mediator in the signalling pathway of the aforementioned receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Competing effects of pain and fear of pain on postural control in low back pain?

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Masood; Heidari, Elham; Mostamand, Javid; Negahban, Hossein; van Dieen, Jaap H

    2014-12-01

    A cross-sectional, observational study. To determine whether pain and fear of pain have competing effects on postural sway in patients with low back pain (LBP). Competing effects of pain and pain-related fear on postural control can be proposed as the likely explanation for inconsistent results regarding postural sway in the LBP literature. We hypothesized that although pain might increase postural sway, fear of pain might reduce sway through an increased cognitive effort or increased cocontraction to restrict body movement. The cognitive strategy would be less effective under dual-task conditions and the cocontraction strategy was expected to be less effective when standing on a narrow base of support surface. Postural sway was measured in combined conditions of base of support (full and narrow) and cognitive loading (single and dual tasks) in 3 experimental groups with current LBP, recent LBP, and no LBP. Sway amplitude, path length, mean power frequency, and sample entropy were extracted from center-of-pressure data. The current-LBP group and recent-LBP group reported significantly different levels of pain, but similar levels of pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia. The current-LBP group tended to display larger sway amplitudes in the anteroposterior direction compared with the other 2 groups. Mean power frequency values in mediolateral direction were lower in patients with the current LBP compared with recent LBP. Smaller sample entropy was found in the current-LBP group than the other groups in most experimental conditions, particularly when standing on a narrow base of support. Alterations of postural sway are mostly mediated by pain but not pain-related fear. LBP tends to increase sway amplitude, which seems to be counteracted by increased effort invested in postural control leading to decreased frequency and increased regularity of sway particularly under increased task demands. Cross-sectional study.

  18. The peer effect on pain tolerance.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, Solveig; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Engø-Monsen, Kenth; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; Stubhaug, Audun; de Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben; Nielsen, Christopher Sivert

    2018-05-19

    Twin studies have found that approximately half of the variance in pain tolerance can be explained by genetic factors, while shared family environment has a negligible effect. Hence, a large proportion of the variance in pain tolerance is explained by the (non-shared) unique environment. The social environment beyond the family is a potential candidate for explaining some of the variance in pain tolerance. Numerous individual traits have previously shown to be associated with friendship ties. In this study, we investigate whether pain tolerance is associated with friendship ties. We study the friendship effect on pain tolerance by considering data from the Tromsø Study: Fit Futures I, which contains pain tolerance measurements and social network information for adolescents attending first year of upper secondary school in the Tromsø area in Northern Norway. Pain tolerance was measured with the cold-pressor test (primary outcome), contact heat and pressure algometry. We analyse the data by using statistical methods from social network analysis. Specifically, we compute pairwise correlations in pain tolerance among friends. We also fit network autocorrelation models to the data, where the pain tolerance of an individual is explained by (among other factors) the average pain tolerance of the individual's friends. We find a significant and positive relationship between the pain tolerance of an individual and the pain tolerance of their friends. The estimated effect is that for every 1 s increase in friends' average cold-pressor tolerance time, the expected cold-pressor pain tolerance of the individual increases by 0.21 s (p-value: 0.0049, sample size n=997). This estimated effect is controlled for sex. The friendship effect remains significant when controlling for potential confounders such as lifestyle factors and test sequence among the students. Further investigating the role of sex on this friendship effect, we only find a significant peer effect of male friends

  19. Effects of foot reflexology on fatigue, sleep and pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongsoon; Han, Misook; Chung, Younghae; Kim, Jinsun; Choi, Jungsook

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of foot reflexology on fatigue, sleep and pain. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted. Electronic database and manual searches were conducted on all published studies reporting the effects of foot reflexology on fatigue, sleep, and pain. Forty four studies were eligible including 15 studies associated with fatigue, 18 with sleep, and 11 with pain. The effects of foot reflexology were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis Version 2.0. The homogeneity and the fail-safe N were calculated. Moreover, a funnel plot was used to assess publication bias. The effects on fatigue, sleep, and pain were not homogeneous and ranged from 0.63 to 5.29, 0.01 to 3.22, and 0.43 to 2.67, respectively. The weighted averages for fatigue, sleep, and pain were 1.43, 1.19, and 1.35, respectively. No publication bias was detected as evaluated by fail-safe N. Foot reflexology had a larger effect on fatigue and sleep and a smaller effect on pain. This meta-analysis indicates that foot reflexology is a useful nursing intervention to relieve fatigue and to promote sleep. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effects of foot reflexology on outcome variables other than fatigue, sleep and pain.

  20. Relieved kink effects in symmetrically graded In0.45Al0.55As/InxGa1-xAs metamorphic high-electron-mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching-Sung; Liao, Chen-Hsian

    2007-12-01

    Kink effects in an In-rich InxGa1-xAs (x=0.53-0.63) linearly graded channel of an In0.45Al0.55As/InxGa1-xAs metamorphic high-electron-mobility transistor have been effectively relieved by depositing a high-barrier Ni /Au gate with the silicon nitride passivation. Complete physical investigations for the relieved kink effects have been made by comparing identical devices with/without a high-barrier Schottky gate or the surface passivation. After successfully suppressing the kink effects, the proposed device has shown a superior voltage gain of 173.8, low output conductance of 2.09mS/mm, and excellent power-added efficiency of 54.1% with high output power (power gain) of 14.87dBm (14.53dB). Improved linearity and excellent thermal threshold coefficient (∂Vth/∂T) of -0.14mV/K have also been achieved. The proposed design provides good potential for high-gain and high-linearity circuit applications.

  1. Prolotherapy: An Effective Treatment for Low Back Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain? Is prolotherapy an effective treatment for chronic low back pain? Answers from Brent A. Bauer, M.D. Prolotherapy is ... reduced pain. Studies of prolotherapy in people with low back pain have had mixed results. A combination of prolotherapy ...

  2. Effective treatment options for musculoskeletal pain in primary care: A systematic overview of current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jonathan C.; Foster, Nadine E.; Protheroe, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims Musculoskeletal pain, the most common cause of disability globally, is most frequently managed in primary care. People with musculoskeletal pain in different body regions share similar characteristics, prognosis, and may respond to similar treatments. This overview aims to summarise current best evidence on currently available treatment options for the five most common musculoskeletal pain presentations (back, neck, shoulder, knee and multi-site pain) in primary care. Methods A systematic search was conducted. Initial searches identified clinical guidelines, clinical pathways and systematic reviews. Additional searches found recently published trials and those addressing gaps in the evidence base. Data on study populations, interventions, and outcomes of intervention on pain and function were extracted. Quality of systematic reviews was assessed using AMSTAR, and strength of evidence rated using a modified GRADE approach. Results Moderate to strong evidence suggests that exercise therapy and psychosocial interventions are effective for relieving pain and improving function for musculoskeletal pain. NSAIDs and opioids reduce pain in the short-term, but the effect size is modest and the potential for adverse effects need careful consideration. Corticosteroid injections were found to be beneficial for short-term pain relief among patients with knee and shoulder pain. However, current evidence remains equivocal on optimal dose, intensity and frequency, or mode of application for most treatment options. Conclusion This review presents a comprehensive summary and critical assessment of current evidence for the treatment of pain presentations in primary care. The evidence synthesis of interventions for common musculoskeletal pain presentations shows moderate-strong evidence for exercise therapy and psychosocial interventions, with short-term benefits only from pharmacological treatments. Future research into optimal dose and application of the most

  3. [Effect of oxytocin on human pain perception].

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, A-C; Ditzen, B; Neubauer, E; Schiltenwolf, M

    2016-10-01

    Over the years the effect of the neuropeptide oxytocin and its possible utilization for pain management has been increasingly more investigated and discussed. Initial results emphasized the effects of oxytocin with respect to labor and breastfeeding. Diverse animals studies were also able to demonstrate the effectiveness of the peptide in attachment behavior and pain perception; however, it is still unclear how oxytocin affects pain perception in humans. The potential therapeutic effectiveness of oxytocin could be particularly important for primary and secondary treatment of pain patients because chronification of pain can occur more frequently in this area. For this review the databases PubMed, Medline und PsycINFO were searched using the terms oxytocin, pain, human and analgesic. The search resulted in a total of 89 original articles after excluding articles regarding labor pain, breastfeeding and animal studies. Only those studies were included which were carried out between 1994 and 2015. A total of 17 articles remained for inclusion in this review and included 13 studies on the exogenous application of oxytocin and 4 on measurement of oxytocin levels in plasma. This review article gives a summary of the current state of research on oxytocin and its direct and indirect association with human pain perception and emphasizes its relevance for the multimodal management of pain.

  4. [Pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Donnadieu, S; Djian, M C

    1998-12-12

    NEW OPIOID ANALGESICS: Progress in pain reliet has recently been achieved with the introduction of new opioid analgesics such as tramadol and the pediatric preparation of codeine phosphate as well as powerful long-release opioids which can be administered per os, or percutaneously for transdermal fentanyl. CO-ANALGESICS: Other drugs, mainly antidepressants and anti-convulsants, can be usefully combined with analgesics. New serotonin uptake inhibitors and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and lamotrigin) have the advantage of better tolerance. None of these drugs has marketing approval in France for their pain relieving effects. The same is true for clonidine and neostigmine which, after spinal infusion, potentialize opioids and for ketamine which can relieve neuropathy pain by dissociative anesthesia. NEW ANTI-MIGRAINE DRUGS: New drugs have been developed for specific types of pain such as migraine. The new "triptans" are tolerated better than sumatriptan and is reimbursed by the national social security. REFRACTORY NEUROPATHY PAIN: Indications for electrical stimulation techniques conducted in a neurosurgery unit have been identified. Stimulators may be implanted in spinal or supra-spinal localizations. REGULATORY ASPECTS: New legislation has reorganized health care for pain relief in France. The new texts take into consideration personnel training, the health care network and progress in therapeutics.

  5. Tailbone Pain: How Can I Relieve It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... any other conditions. Your doctor might recommend using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to find out if you ... org," "Mayo Clinic Healthy Living," and the triple-shield Mayo Clinic logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation ...

  6. Can Botox Injections Relieve Arthritis Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Efficacy of botulinum toxin type A treatment of functional impairment of degenerative hip joint: Preliminary results. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine. 2010;42:691. Khenioui H, et al. Usefulness ...

  7. Pain Relievers: Understanding Your OTC Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... NSAIDs) There are several types of NSAIDs, including: aspirin (2 brand names: Bayer, St. Joseph) ibuprofen (2 ... muscle sprains). Some products contain both acetaminophen and aspirin (2 brand names: Excedrin, Vanquish). These typically contain ...

  8. Effect of aromatherapy massage on pain in primary dysmenorrhea: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sut, Necdet; Kahyaoglu-Sut, Hatice

    2017-05-01

    This meta-analysis investigates the effect of aromatherapy massage on pain in primary dysmenorrhea. Randomized controlled trials were searched by keywords in several databases (Pubmed, ISI Web of Sciences, and Google Scholar). Six randomized controlled trials that included 362 participants with primary dysmenorrhea, comparing abdominal aromatherapy massage (n = 184) with massage with placebo oils (n = 178), were analyzed in the meta-analysis. The change in the visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score from the first menstruation cycle to the second cycle at the first menstruation day was used as the primary outcome. Aromatherapy massage with essential oils was superior to massage with placebo oils (standardized mean difference = -1.06 [95% CI: -1.55 to -0.55]). Abdominal aromatherapy massage with essential oils is an effective complementary method to relieve pain in primary dysmenorrhea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effects of menstrual phase on orthodontic pain following initial archwire engagement.

    PubMed

    Long, H; Gao, M; Zhu, Y; Liu, H; Zhou, Y; Liao, L; Lai, W

    2017-04-01

    To explore the effects of menstrual cycle on orthodontic pain following initial archwire engagement. Female participants with regular menstrual cycles were recruited and assigned into follicular group or luteal group. Demographical and baseline variables were collected: age, education, menstrual duration, anxiety, oral health impact profile-14 (OHIP-14), and index of complexity outcome and need (ICON). Following initial archwire engagement, orthodontic pain was determined through visual analogue scale (VAS) on 1st day, 2nd day, and 3rd day. Demographical and baseline variables were compared between the two groups. Two-way repeated-measures anova was used to examine the effects of menstrual phase, time, and their interactions on orthodontic pain. Multivariate linear regression was employed to examine the independent effect of each variable on orthodontic pain. Finally, 37 and 39 were assigned to the follicular and luteal groups, respectively, with balanced demographical and baseline data. Orthodontic pain was significantly affected by menstrual phase and time (both P < 0.001), but there was no interaction (P > 0.05). Moreover, orthodontic pain was independently predicted by menstrual phase, OHIP, education level, and anxiety (all P < 0.05). We suggest that practitioners arrange female patients to receive initial archwire engagement during their follicular phases to relieve orthodontic pain. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effectiveness of myofascial release in treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Laimi, Katri; Mäkilä, Annika; Bärlund, Esa; Katajapuu, Niina; Oksanen, Airi; Seikkula, Valpuri; Karppinen, Jari; Saltychev, Mikhail

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the evidence on the effectiveness of myofascial release therapy to relieve chronic musculoskeletal pain and to improve joint mobility, functioning level, and quality of life in pain sufferers. Data sources and review: Randomized controlled trials were systematically gathered from CENTRAL, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, and PEDro databases. The methodological quality of articles was assessed according to the Cochrane Collaboration's domain-based framework. In addition, the effect sizes of main outcomes were calculated based on reported means and variances at baseline and in follow-up. Of 513 identified records, 8 were relevant. Two trials focused on lateral epicondylitis ( N = 95), two on fibromyalgia ( N = 145), three on low back pain ( N = 152), and one on heel pain ( N = 65). The risk of bias was considered low in three and high in five trials. The duration of therapy was 30-90 minutes 4 to 24 times during 2-20 weeks. The effect sizes did not reach the minimal clinically important difference for pain and disability in the studies of low back pain or fibromyalgia. In another three studies with the high risk of bias, the level of minimal clinically important difference was reached up to two-month follow-up. Current evidence on myofascial release therapy is not sufficient to warrant this treatment in chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  11. The effect of short-term continuous epidural morphine on postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, T; Nakamura, Y; Takeda, H; Matsusue, S; Kato, Y; Nishiwada, M

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether short-term continuous epidural analgesia using morphine would relieve pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of 182 cases who had undergone a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. These cases were divided into four groups according to their anesthetic modes as follows: a control group with general anesthesia only (n = 37); group I, general anesthesia combined with one shot of epidural morphine (n = 78); and group II, general anesthesia combined with continuous epidural analgesia using morphine (IIa for 12 h (n = 33); IIb for 8 h (n = 34)). The pain score on a four-category verbal scale and the frequency of analgesic use were investigated. There were no differences in the background characteristics of the patients among the groups, except for the duration of surgery (I vs IIa; P = 0.006). The pain scores were significantly different between the control group and the other groups. The frequency of analgesic use in the control group was also significantly higher than in the other groups. A tendency toward a higher frequency of analgesic use in group I, compared with that in groups IIa and IIb, was observed. These findings thus suggest that short-term continuous epidural analgesia using morphine can effectively relieve postoperative pain after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  12. Nutraceuticals and osteoarthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Angela; Leong, Daniel J; Cardoso, Luis; Sun, Hui B

    2018-02-24

    Arthritis is a chronic disease of joints. It is highly prevalent, particularly in the elderly, and is commonly associated with pain that interferes with quality of life. Because of its chronic nature, pharmacological approaches to pain relief and joint repair must be safe for long term use, a quality many current therapies lack. Nutraceuticals refer to compounds or materials that can function as nutrition and exert a potential therapeutic effect, including the relief of pain, such as pain related to arthritis, of which osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form. Of interest, nutraceuticals have recently been shown to have potential in relieving OA pain in human clinical trials. Emerging evidence indicates nutraceuticals may represent promising alternatives for the relief of OA pain. In this paper, we will overview OA pain and the use of nutraceuticals in OA pain management, focusing on those that have been evaluated by clinical trials. Furthermore, we discuss the biologic and pharmacologic actions underlying the nutraceutical effects on pain relief based on the potential active ingredients identified from traditional nutraceuticals in OA pain management and their potential for drug development. The review concludes by sharing our viewpoints that future studies should prioritize elucidating the mechanisms of action of nutraceuticals in OA and developing nutraceuticals that not only relieve OA pain, but also mitigate OA pathology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effectiveness of Acupuncture and Electroacupuncture for Chronic Neck Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Seo, See Yoon; Lee, Ki-Beom; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Kim, Me-Riong; Ha, In-Hyuk; Ko, Youme; Lee, Yoon Jae

    2017-01-01

    result reporting adverse effects, no serious outcome of adverse event was confirmed. Acupuncture and conventional medicine for chronic neck pain have similar effectiveness on pain and disability when compared solely between the two of them. When acupuncture was added onto conventional treatment it relieved pain better, and electroacupuncture relieved pain even more. It is difficult to draw conclusion because the included studies have a high risk of bias and imprecision. Therefore better designed large-scale studies are needed in the future.

  14. Effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in treating spinal (back and neck) pain: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Edith Meszaros; Jeannot, Emilien; Trewhela, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Considerable amount of money spent in health care is used for treatments of lifestyle related, chronic health conditions, which come from behaviors that contribute to morbidity and mortality of the population. Back and neck pain are two of the most common musculoskeletal problems in modern society that have significant cost in health care. Yoga, as a branch of complementary alternative medicine, has emerged and is showing to be an effective treatment against nonspecific spinal pain. Recent studies have shown positive outcome of yoga in general on reducing pain and functional disability of the spine. The objective of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the existing research within Iyengar yoga method and its effectiveness on relieving back and neck pain (defined as spinal pain). Database research form the following sources (Cochrane library, NCBI PubMed, the Clinical Trial Registry of the Indian Council of Medical Research, Google Scholar, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO) demonstrated inclusion and exclusion criteria that selected only Iyengar yoga interventions, which in turn, identified six randomized control trials dedicated to compare the effectiveness of yoga for back and neck pain versus other care. The difference between the groups on the postintervention pain or functional disability intensity assessment was, in all six studies, favoring the yoga group, which projected a decrease in back and neck pain. Overall six studies with 570 patients showed, that Iyengar yoga is an effective means for both back and neck pain in comparison to control groups. This systematic review found strong evidence for short-term effectiveness, but little evidence for long-term effectiveness of yoga for chronic spine pain in the patient-centered outcomes. PMID:25558128

  15. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... an anesthetic (pain reliever) into certain nerves. This blocks the pain signals. If the injection relieves the pain, it may be repeated. It is not a cure. Sympathectomy of the injured nerve. A surgeon will cut or clamp the nerve chain. This has been reported to improve pain caused ...

  16. Imagery and Verbal Counseling Methods in Stress Inoculation Training for Pain Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Everett L., Jr.; Shumate, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Pleasant imagery relieves pain and may account for much of the effectiveness of stress inoculation training. Women who used imagery controlled their pain better; women who did not use imagery had longer tolerance when they heard pain conceptualized as a multistage process. Self-instruction did not affect pain control. (Author)

  17. Pelvic Belt Effects on Health Outcomes and Functional Parameters of Patients with Sacroiliac Joint Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Niels; Möbius, Robert; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Hammer, Karl-Heinz; Klima, Stefan; Lange, Justin S.; Soisson, Odette; Winkler, Dirk; Milani, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a common source of low back pain. However, clinical and functional signs and symptoms correlating with SIJ pain are widely unknown. Pelvic belts are routinely applied to treat SIJ pain but without sound evidence of their pain-relieving effects. This case-control study compares clinical and functional data of SIJ patients and healthy control subjects and evaluates belt effects on SIJ pain. Methods 17 SIJ patients and 17 healthy controls were included in this prospective study. The short-form 36 survey and the numerical rating scale were used to characterize health-related quality of life in patients in a six-week follow-up and the pain-reducing effects of pelvic belts. Electromyography data were obtained from the gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, rectus femoris and medial vastus. Alterations of muscle activity, variability and gait patterns were compared in patients and controls along with the belts’ effects in a dynamic setting when walking. Results Significant improvements were observed in the short-form 36 survey of the SIJ patients, especially in the physical health subscores. Minor declines were also observed in the numerical rating scale on pain. Belt-related changes of muscle activity and variability were similar in patients and controls with one exception: the rectus femoris activity decreased significantly in patients with belt application when walking. Further belt effects include improved cadence and gait velocity in patients and controls. Conclusions Pelvic belts improve health-related quality of life and are potentially attributed to decreased SIJ-related pain. Belt effects include decreased rectus femoris activity in patients and improved postural steadiness during locomotion. Pelvic belts may therefore be considered as a cost-effective and low-risk treatment of SIJ pain. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02027038 PMID:26305790

  18. Effects of linear-polarized near-infrared light irradiation on chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong; Gu, Yong-Hong; Liao, Qin; Yan, Xue-Bin; Zhu, Shai-Hong; Gao, Chang-Qing

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the efficacy of linear-polarized near-infrared light irradiation (LPNIR) on relieving chronic pain in conjunction with nerve block (NB) or local block (LB), a 3-week prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study was conducted to evaluate the pre- and post-therapy pain intensity. Visual analogue scales (VASs) were measured in all patients before and 6 months after therapy visiting the pain clinic during the period of August 2007 to January 2008. A total of 52 patients with either shoulder periarthritis or myofascial pain syndrome or lateral epicondylitis were randomly assigned into two groups by drawing lots. Patients in Group I were treated with NB or LB plus LPNIR; Group II patients, for their part, were treated with the same procedures as in Group I, but not using LPNIR. In both groups, the pain intensity (VAS score) decreased significantly immediately after therapy as compared to therapy. There was a significant difference between the test and control groups immediately after therapy (P < 0.05), while no effect 6 months later. No side effects were observed. It is concluded that LPNIR is an effective and safe modality to treat various chronic pains, which has synergic effects with NB or LB.

  19. Effects of Linear-Polarized Near-Infrared Light Irradiation on Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dong; Gu, Yong-Hong; Liao, Qin; Yan, Xue-Bin; Zhu, Shai-Hong; Gao, Chang-Qing

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the efficacy of linear-polarized near-infrared light irradiation (LPNIR) on relieving chronic pain in conjunction with nerve block (NB) or local block (LB), a 3-week prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled study was conducted to evaluate the pre- and post-therapy pain intensity. Visual analogue scales (VASs) were measured in all patients before and 6 months after therapy visiting the pain clinic during the period of August 2007 to January 2008. A total of 52 patients with either shoulder periarthritis or myofascial pain syndrome or lateral epicondylitis were randomly assigned into two groups by drawing lots. Patients in Group I were treated with NB or LB plus LPNIR; Group II patients, for their part, were treated with the same procedures as in Group I, but not using LPNIR. In both groups, the pain intensity (VAS score) decreased significantly immediately after therapy as compared to therapy. There was a significant difference between the test and control groups immediately after therapy (P < 0.05), while no effect 6 months later. No side effects were observed. It is concluded that LPNIR is an effective and safe modality to treat various chronic pains, which has synergic effects with NB or LB. PMID:22593697

  20. [Cause and regulation of pain during root canal therapy].

    PubMed

    Buling, Wu; Zhao, Liu

    2016-10-01

    In stomatology, root canal therapy is a commonly used and effective treatment for dental pulp diseases and periapical diseases. However, pain may occur during or after treatment and may severely affect patients. This article aimed to analyze the mechanism and cause of pain during root canal therapy, which may reduce or relieve pain.

  1. Effect of oxidative stress induced by intracranial iron overload on central pain after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fan Xing; Hou, Jing Ming; Sun, Tian Sheng

    2017-02-08

    Central pain (CP) is a common clinical problem in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Recent studies found the pathogenesis of CP was related to the remodeling of the brain. We investigate the roles of iron overload and subsequent oxidative stress in the remodeling of the brain after SCI. We established a rat model of central pain after SCI. Rats were divided randomly into four groups: SCI, sham operation, SCI plus deferoxamine (DFX) intervention, and SCI plus nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor treatment. Pain behavior was observed and thermal pain threshold was measured regularly, and brain levels of iron, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), ferritin (Fn), and lactoferrin (Lf), were detected in the different groups 12 weeks after establishment of the model. Rats demonstrated self-biting behavior after SCI. Furthermore, the latent period of thermal pain was reduced and iron levels in the hind limb sensory area, hippocampus, and thalamus increased after SCI. Iron-regulatory protein (IRP) 1 levels increased in the hind limb sensory area, while Fn levels decreased. TfR1 mRNA levels were also increased and oxidative stress was activated. Oxidative stress could be inhibited by ferric iron chelators and NOS inhibitors. SCI may cause intracranial iron overload through the NOS-iron-responsive element/IRP pathway, resulting in central pain mediated by the oxidative stress response. Iron chelators and oxidative stress inhibitors can effectively relieve SCI-associated central pain.

  2. A novel and effective acupuncture modality as a complementary therapy to acute pain relief in inpatients with rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Chao-Wei; Li, Ming-Chieh; Hsu, Yu-Pao; Kang, Shih-Ching; Liu, Erh-Hao; Lee, Ko-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Pain control has been emphasized as a priority for both practitioners and inpatients with rib fractures, since analgesia could only offer limited relief from severe pain. A prospective and randomized controlled trial was conducted to analyze the efficacy and efficiency of acupuncture in acute pain relief for inpatients with rib fractures. A total of 58 inpatients were recruited and allocated to two groups, receiving identical doses of conventional oral analgesics as well as filiform needles as treatment and thumbtack intradermal (TI) needles placed upon the skin surface as a control, respectively, via novel acupuncture modality once daily for three consecutive days. The effect of pain relief was evaluated during activities that induce pain, and sustained maximal inspiration (SMI) lung volumes and sleep quality were assessed. The patients treated with filiform needles had more effective pain relief than those in the TI needle group during deep breathing, coughing, and turning over the body (p < 0.05), and the effect persisted for at least 6 h in most patients. Sustained maximal inspiration lung volumes and sleep quality did not show improvement through every acupuncture intervention, and they could not respond accurately to pain relief via acupuncture. The active evaluation could provide a more adaptive model for assessing pain intensity due to rib fractures. This novel acupuncture modality in which the needle insertion sites are corresponding to the pain spots can be a safe and viable therapy for relieving pain in inpatients with rib fractures.

  3. Multiple faces of pain: effects of chronic pain on the brain regulation of facial expression

    PubMed Central

    Vachon-Presseau, Etienne; Roy, Mathieu; Woo, Choong-Wan; Kunz, Miriam; Martel, Marc-Olivier; Sullivan, Michael J.; Jackson, Philip L.; Wager, Tor D.; Rainville, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Pain behaviors are shaped by social demands and learning processes, and chronic pain has been previously suggested to affect their meaning. In this study, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging with in-scanner video recording during thermal pain stimulations and use multilevel mediation analyses to study the brain mediators of pain facial expressions and the perception of pain intensity (self-reports) in healthy individuals and patients with chronic back pain (CBP). Behavioral data showed that the relation between pain expression and pain report was disrupted in CBP. In both patients with CBP and healthy controls, brain activity varying on a trial-by-trial basis with pain facial expressions was mainly located in the primary motor cortex and completely dissociated from the pattern of brain activity varying with pain intensity ratings. Stronger activity was observed in CBP specifically during pain facial expressions in several nonmotor brain regions such as the medial prefrontal cortex, the precuneus, and the medial temporal lobe. In sharp contrast, no moderating effect of chronic pain was observed on brain activity associated with pain intensity ratings. Our results demonstrate that pain facial expressions and pain intensity ratings reflect different aspects of pain processing and support psychosocial models of pain suggesting that distinctive mechanisms are involved in the regulation of pain behaviors in chronic pain. PMID:27411160

  4. Tramadol and propentofylline coadministration exerted synergistic effects on rat spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Wu, Dan; Xie, Cheng; Wang, Huan; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Rui; Xu, Li-Xian; Mei, Xiao-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is an intractable clinical problem. Drug treatments such as tramadol have been reported to effectively decrease neuropathic pain by inhibiting the activity of nociceptive neurons. It has also been reported that modulating glial activation could also prevent or reverse neuropathic pain via the administration of a glial modulator or inhibitor, such as propentofylline. Thus far, there has been no clinical strategy incorporating both neuronal and glial participation for treating neuropathic pain. Therefore, the present research study was designed to assess whether coadministration of tramadol and propentofylline, as neuronal and glial activation inhibitors, respectively, would exert a synergistic effect on the reduction of rat spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic pain. Rats underwent SNL surgery to induce neuropathic pain. Pain behavioral tests were conducted to ascertain the effect of drugs on SNL-induced mechanical allodynia with von-Frey hairs. Proinflammatory factor interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression was also detected by Real-time RT-PCR. Intrathecal tramadol and propentofylline administered alone relieved SNL-induced mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. Tramadol and propentofylline coadministration exerted a more potent effect in a synergistic and dose dependent manner than the intrathecal administration of either drug alone. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated IL-1β up-expression in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn after the lesion, which was significantly decreased by tramadol and propentofylline coadministration. Inhibiting proinflammatory factor IL-1β contributed to the synergistic effects of tramadol and propentofylline coadministration on rat peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. Thus, our study provided a rationale for utilizing a novel strategy for treating neuropathic pain by blocking the proinflammatory factor related pathways in the central nervous system.

  5. Tramadol and Propentofylline Coadministration Exerted Synergistic Effects on Rat Spinal Nerve Ligation-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Rui; Xu, Li-Xian; Mei, Xiao-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is an intractable clinical problem. Drug treatments such as tramadol have been reported to effectively decrease neuropathic pain by inhibiting the activity of nociceptive neurons. It has also been reported that modulating glial activation could also prevent or reverse neuropathic pain via the administration of a glial modulator or inhibitor, such as propentofylline. Thus far, there has been no clinical strategy incorporating both neuronal and glial participation for treating neuropathic pain. Therefore, the present research study was designed to assess whether coadministration of tramadol and propentofylline, as neuronal and glial activation inhibitors, respectively, would exert a synergistic effect on the reduction of rat spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic pain. Rats underwent SNL surgery to induce neuropathic pain. Pain behavioral tests were conducted to ascertain the effect of drugs on SNL-induced mechanical allodynia with von-Frey hairs. Proinflammatory factor interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression was also detected by Real-time RT-PCR. Intrathecal tramadol and propentofylline administered alone relieved SNL-induced mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. Tramadol and propentofylline coadministration exerted a more potent effect in a synergistic and dose dependent manner than the intrathecal administration of either drug alone. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated IL-1β up-expression in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn after the lesion, which was significantly decreased by tramadol and propentofylline coadministration. Inhibiting proinflammatory factor IL-1β contributed to the synergistic effects of tramadol and propentofylline coadministration on rat peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. Thus, our study provided a rationale for utilizing a novel strategy for treating neuropathic pain by blocking the proinflammatory factor related pathways in the central nervous system. PMID:24009718

  6. [Development of cough-relieving herbal teas].

    PubMed

    Puodziūniene, Gene; Janulis, Valdimaras; Milasius, Arvydas; Budnikas, Vytautas

    2005-01-01

    Cough-relieving medicinal herbs in tea are used from ancient times. Mucilage present in them or secretion produced under the influence of the active substances covers the oral and throat mucosa soothing its irritability and relieving dry, tiresome cough. It is known that the mixtures of medicinal herbs (Specias) have a complex influence on the human organism and the rational combination of medicinal herbs can improve their curative action and decrease the undesirable side effects. Having summarized the properties of those medicinal herbs we decided to create two formulations of cough-relieving herbal tea. The first formulation consists of marshmallow roots, liquorice roots and lime flowers, the second -- of marshmallow roots, Iceland moss and lime flowers. The methods for identification and assay of the active substances in the compounds were applied. The purity of the mixtures was regulated by limitation of the loss on drying, total ash, microbial contamination, contamination with radionuclides, heavy metals, pesticides and foreign matter. The expiry date of both cough-relieving herbal teas was approved to be 2 years.

  7. The effect of intravenous paracetamol for the prevention of rocuronium injection pain.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Sennur; Erden, Ismail A; Canbay, Ozgur; Aypar, Ulku

    2014-11-01

    Rocuronium is a nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent used in anesthesia induction and is associated with considerable discomfort and burning pain during injection, which is reported to occur in 50-80% of patients. This study was carried out to investigate the effectiveness of intravenous paracetamol pretreatment compared with lidocaine and normal saline to prevent rocuronium injection pain. The study included 150 ASA I-II patients undergoing elective orthopedic, gastrointestinal, and gynecological procedures under general anesthesia. They were allocated into three groups according to pretreatment drugs: lidocaine (40 mg) (n = 50), paracetamol (n = 50), and normal saline group (n = 50). Before anesthesia induction with propofol, all patients were pretreated with rocuronium. The pain caused by the injection was evaluated. Local signs were assessed on the arm at the end of the injection, as well as 24 hours after recovery from anesthesia. There were no patients with blurred speech or vision and there was no respiratory depression in any group after pretreatment with the study drug. The level of pain on injection was statistically lower in those who had received paracetamol compared to normal saline (p = 0.009). There were more patients in the saline group with severe pain (p < 0.001). Paracetamol relieved the rocuronium injection pain better than normal saline but lidocaine was the best of the three drugs (p < 0.001). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  8. Effect of virtual reality distraction on pain among patients with hand injury undergoing dressing change.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chunlan; Deng, Hongyan; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effect of virtual reality distraction on pain among patients with a hand injury undergoing a dressing change. Virtual reality distraction can effectively alleviate pain among patients undergoing a dressing change. Clinical research has not addressed pain control during a dressing change. A randomised controlled trial was performed. In the first dressing change sequence, 98 patients were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group, with 49 cases in each group. Pain levels were compared between the two groups before and after the dressing change using a visual analog scale. The sense of involvement in virtual environments was measured using the Pearson correlation coefficient analysis, which determined the relationship between the sense of involvement and pain level. The difference in visual analog scale scores between the two groups before the dressing change was not statistically significant (t = 0·196, p > 0·05), but the scores became statistically significant after the dressing change (t = -30·792, p < 0·01). The correlation between the sense of involvement in a virtual environment and pain level during the dressing was statistically significant (R(2) = 0·5538, p < 0·05). Virtual reality distraction can effectively alleviate pain among patients with a hand injury undergoing a dressing change. Better results can be obtained by increasing the sense of involvement in a virtual environment. Virtual reality distraction can effectively relieve pain without side effects and is not reliant on a doctor's prescription. This tool is convenient for nurses to use, especially when analgesics are unavailable. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Common medical pains

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Pain in infancy and childhood is extremely common. Sources of pain include illness, injury, and medical and dental procedures. Over the past two decades, tremendous progress has been made in the assessment, prevention and treatment of pain. It is important for the paediatric health care provider to be aware of the implications and consequences of pain in childhood. A multitude of interventions are available to reduce or alleviate pain in children of all ages, including neonates. These include behavioural and psychological methods, as well as a host of pharmacological preparations, which are safe and effective when used as indicated. Many complementary and alternative treatments appear to be promising in treating and relieving pain, although further research is required. The present article reviews the most common sources of pain in childhood and infancy, as well as current treatment strategies and options. PMID:19030348

  10. Pain and pain management in haemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Auerswald, Günter; Dolan, Gerry; Duffy, Anne; Hermans, Cedric; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Ljung, Rolf; Morfini, Massimo; Lambert, Thierry; Šalek, Silva Zupančić

    2016-01-01

    Joint pain is common in haemophilia and may be acute or chronic. Effective pain management in haemophilia is essential to reduce the burden that pain imposes on patients. However, the choice of appropriate pain-relieving measures is challenging, as there is a complex interplay of factors affecting pain perception. This can manifest as differences in patients’ experiences and response to pain, which require an individualized approach to pain management. Prophylaxis with factor replacement reduces the likelihood of bleeds and bleed-related pain, whereas on-demand therapy ensures rapid bleed resolution and pain relief. Although use of replacement or bypassing therapy is often the first intervention for pain, additional pain relief strategies may be required. There is an array of analgesic options, but consideration should be paid to the adverse effects of each class. Nevertheless, a combination of medications that act at different points in the pain pathway may be beneficial. Nonpharmacological measures may also help patients and include active coping strategies; rest, ice, compression, and elevation; complementary therapies; and physiotherapy. Joint aspiration may also reduce acute joint pain, and joint steroid injections may alleviate chronic pain. In the longer term, increasing use of prophylaxis or performing surgery may be necessary to reduce the burden of pain caused by the degenerative effects of repeated bleeds. Whichever treatment option is chosen, it is important to monitor pain and adjust patient management accordingly. Beyond specific pain management approaches, ongoing collaboration between multidisciplinary teams, which should include physiotherapists and pain specialists, may improve outcomes for patients. PMID:27439216

  11. Relievable effect of dietary Allium hookeri on LPS-induced intestinal inflammation response in young broiler chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study using 150 one-day- old broilers was conducted to assess the effects of Allium hookeri (AH) root and fermented root on inflammatory responses and intestinal barrier integrity of LPS challenged broiler chickens. Birds were randomly assigned to six groups (n = 25 birds/treatment) and fed standa...

  12. Filling the glass: Effects of a positive psychology intervention on executive task performance in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Boselie, J J L M; Vancleef, L M G; Peters, M L

    2018-03-24

    Chronic pain is associated with emotional problems as well as difficulties in cognitive functioning. Prior experimental studies have shown that optimism, the tendency to expect that good things happen in the future, and positive emotions can counteract pain-induced task performance deficits in healthy participants. More specifically, induced optimism was found to buffer against the negative effects of experimental pain on executive functioning. This clinical experiment examined whether this beneficial effect can be extended to a chronic pain population. Patients (N = 122) were randomized to a positive psychology Internet-based intervention (PPI; n = 74) or a waiting list control condition (WLC; n = 48). The PPI consisted of positive psychology exercises that particularly target optimism, positive emotions and self-compassion. Results demonstrated that patients in the PPI condition scored higher on happiness, optimism, positive future expectancies, positive affect, self-compassion and ability to live a desired life despite pain, and scored lower on pain catastrophizing, depression and anxiety compared to patients in the WLC condition. However, executive task performance did not improve following completion of the PPI, compared to the WLC condition. Despite the lack of evidence that positive emotions and optimism can improve executive task performance in chronic pain patients, this study did convincingly demonstrate that it is possible to increase positive emotions and optimism in chronic pain patients with an online positive psychology intervention. It is imperative to further explore amendable psychological factors that may reduce the negative impact of pain on executive functioning. We demonstrated that an Internet-based positive psychology intervention strengthens optimism and positive emotions in chronic pain patients. These emotional improvements are not associated with improved executive task performance. As pain itself often cannot be relieved, it is

  13. Keeping Fit: Stress Relievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crupi, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    With all the extra demands that are placed on teachers during the months of May and June, the end of the year can be an extremely stressful time. This article describes several tips for diminishing the effects of end of year stress. The following relaxation tips are described: (1) Neck and Upper Shoulder Stretch; (2) Superman Stretch; (3) Doorway…

  14. Clinical hypnosis for palliative care in severe chronic diseases: a review and the procedures for relieving physical, psychological and spiritual symptoms.

    PubMed

    Brugnoli, Maria Paola

    2016-10-01

    Hypnotic treatment in severe chronic diseases, for pain and symptoms relief, has proven efficacy as adjuvant therapy, and should be offered to any individual, who expresses an interest in this method. While some theorize hypnotizability as a changing attribute of the individual, there is a growing body of literature that indicates hypnotizability may be characterized as a constellation of potentially modifiable attitudes and skills, which are strongly influenced by related factors, as suffering, in severe chronic diseases. In this article, I briefly review representative studies recognizing how clinical hypnosis in medicine is an effective complementary therapy, for pain and symptom's relief in severe chronic diseases and in palliative care. This paper highlights: (I) a scientific review to underline how clinical hypnosis has an important impact on the treatment goals and integration in relieving pain and symptoms; (II) the advanced techniques for effectively relieving pain and symptoms.

  15. The effect of music therapy on postoperative pain, heart rate, systolic blood pressures and analgesic use following nasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Chan, M F; Benzie, Iris F F

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of unrelieved postoperative pain is high and may lead to adverse effects including prolonged hospitalization and delayed recovery. Distraction may be an effective pain-relieving strategy, and can be implemented by several means including affective imaging, games, and possibly music. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of music therapy on postoperative pain. Fifty-seven patients (24 females, 33 males; mean +/- SD age 39.9 +/- 14.35 years [range 15 to 69 years] were matched for age and sex and then nonselectively assigned to either an experimental (n = 27) or a control (n = 30) group. Music was played intermittently to members of the experimental group during the first 24 hour postoperative period. Pain intensity was measured using the Pain Verbal Rating Scales (VRS). Significant decreases in pain intensity over time were found in the experimental group compared to the control group (p < 0.0001). In addition, the experimental group had a lower systolic blood pressure and heart rate, and took fewer oral analgesics for pain. These findings suggest that music therapy is an effective nonpharmacologic approach for postoperative pain management.

  16. Effects of vicarious pain on self-pain perception: investigating the role of awareness

    PubMed Central

    Terrighena, Esslin L; Lu, Ge; Yuen, Wai Ping; Lee, Tatia MC; Keuper, Kati

    2017-01-01

    The observation of pain in others may enhance or reduce self-pain, yet the boundary conditions and factors that determine the direction of such effects are poorly understood. The current study set out to show that visual stimulus awareness plays a crucial role in determining whether vicarious pain primarily activates behavioral defense systems that enhance pain sensitivity and stimulate withdrawal or appetitive systems that attenuate pain sensitivity and stimulate approach. We employed a mixed factorial design with the between-subject factors exposure time (subliminal vs optimal) and vicarious pain (pain vs no pain images), and the within-subject factor session (baseline vs trial) to investigate how visual awareness of vicarious pain images affects subsequent self-pain in the cold-pressor test. Self-pain tolerance, intensity and unpleasantness were evaluated in a sample of 77 healthy participants. Results revealed significant interactions of exposure time and vicarious pain in all three dependent measures. In the presence of visual awareness (optimal condition), vicarious pain compared to no-pain elicited overall enhanced self-pain sensitivity, indexed by reduced pain tolerance and enhanced ratings of pain intensity and unpleasantness. Conversely, in the absence of visual awareness (subliminal condition), vicarious pain evoked decreased self-pain intensity and unpleasantness while pain tolerance remained unaffected. These findings suggest that the activation of defense mechanisms by vicarious pain depends on relatively elaborate cognitive processes, while – strikingly – the appetitive system is activated in highly automatic manner independent from stimulus awareness. Such mechanisms may have evolved to facilitate empathic, protective approach responses toward suffering individuals, ensuring survival of the protective social group. PMID:28831270

  17. Testicle Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... an over-the-counter pain reliever such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or acetaminophen (Tylenol, ... given you other instructions. Use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Though aspirin is approved ...

  18. Can gradual dose titration of ketamine for management of neuropathic pain prevent psychotomimetic effects in patients with advanced cancer?

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Tanimukai, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Yoichi; Ohno, Yumiko; Tsugane, Mamiko; Uejima, Etsuko

    2013-08-01

    Ketamine is often used to manage neuropathic pain in patients with cancer. However, it occasionally causes psychotomimetic effects such as vivid dreams, nightmares, illusions, hallucinations, and altered body image. To examine whether gradual dose titration of ketamine for management of neuropathic pain prevents psychotomimetic effects in patients with advanced cancer. This was a retrospective chart review. We administered ketamine when neuropathic pain in patients with advanced cancer became refractory to opioids and oral adjuvant analgesics. The starting dose of ketamine was 10 mg/d by continuous intravenous infusion. The dose was gradually increased by 10 mg/d every 4 to 6 hours to 50 mg/d or until the pain was relieved. It was subsequently increased by 25 mg/d every 12 to 24 hours until the pain was relieved. For this study, we enrolled 46 patients with advanced cancer. The mean age was 52.2 ± 16.9 years. The mean dose at onset of action and maximum dose of ketamine were 56 ± 58 and 272 ± 214 mg/d, respectively. The mean pain intensity (numerical rating scale) decreased significantly from 7.3 ± 2.0 to 3.5 ± 2.2 after the administration of ketamine (P < .01). The effectiveness was 69.5%. No psychotomimetic effect of less than 300 mg/d was observed during the introduction phase even though psychotropic drugs were not prescribed. Mild sedation was observed in 3 patients (7%) as the only adverse effect during the introduction phase. Gradual dose titration of ketamine for management of neuropathic pain can prevent psychotomimetic effects in patients with advanced cancer.

  19. The effectiveness of virtual reality distraction for pain reduction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Kevin M; Milling, Leonard S

    2010-12-01

    Virtual reality technology enables people to become immersed in a computer-simulated, three-dimensional environment. This article provides a comprehensive review of controlled research on the effectiveness of virtual reality (VR) distraction for reducing pain. To be included in the review, studies were required to use a between-subjects or mixed model design in which VR distraction was compared with a control condition or an alternative intervention in relieving pain. An exhaustive search identified 11 studies satisfying these criteria. VR distraction was shown to be effective for reducing experimental pain, as well as the discomfort associated with burn injury care. Studies of needle-related pain provided less consistent findings. Use of more sophisticated virtual reality technology capable of fully immersing the individual in a virtual environment was associated with greater relief. Overall, controlled research suggests that VR distraction may be a useful tool for clinicians who work with a variety of pain problems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of standard care, ibuprofen, and music on pain relief and patient satisfaction in adults with musculoskeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, P; Thomas, R; Paice, J; Spiller, M; Marcantonio, R

    2001-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the most effective nursing intervention to decrease pain for patients with minor musculoskeletal trauma and moderate pain at triage and to examine patient satisfaction. Patients were assigned to 1 of 3 intervention groups: (1) standard care (ice, elevation, and immobilization); (2) standard care and ibuprofen; or (3) standard care and music distraction. Patients were monitored for pain ratings for 60 minutes. Patients who sustained minor musculoskeletal trauma within the past 24 hours and presented with pain ratings of 4 or greater were included. Two patient satisfaction questions were asked upon discharge from the emergency department. Seventy-seven patients met the inclusion criteria. No differences in pain ratings between groups were demonstrated. A statistically significant reduction in pain for all patients occurred at 30 minutes (F = 16.18, P <.01) and was maintained at 60 minutes. However, 70% of patients continued to report pain ratings of 4 or greater (on a scale of 1 to 10) at 60 minutes. The reduction in pain was not found to be clinically significant.Eighty-four percent of patients stated that they were more satisfied with their overall care in the emergency department because of the immediate attention to pain relief they received at triage. No differences in satisfaction existed between treatment groups, although patients who reported higher pain ratings expressed statistically significant lower satisfaction with pain management scores (F = 9.375, P =.003). None of the therapies-standard care (ice, elevation, immobilization), standard care with ibuprofen, or standard care with music distraction-provided clinically significant pain relief to patients who had minor musculoskeletal trauma (ie, sprains and fractures) and moderate pain at triage. Interestingly, satisfaction scores were sometimes positive, even when pain was not relieved.

  1. [Effect of External Applying Compound Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F. on Joint Pain of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Juan; Tang, Xiao-po; Yuan, Jing; Liu, Xu; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Chun-yan; Wang, Li-ying; Jiang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    To observe the effectiveness and safety of external applying Compound Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F. (TwHF) in relieving joint pain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. In this double-blinded, randomized multicenter trial, a total of 174 moderately active RA patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to the treatment group (treated with Compound TwHF, 87 cases) and the placebo control group (87 cases). Compound TwHF or placebo was externally applied in painful joints, 20 g each time, once per day for 8 weeks. Self-reported joint pain relief was taken as a primary effective indicator. Visual analogue scale for pain (VAS), disease activity score of 28 joints (DAS28), VAS for general health (GH) were evaluated before treatment, at week 4 and after treatment. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and hypersensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP) were tested before and after treatment. Menstrual changes in females were observed during treatment. Skin irritation occurred during the recording process was assessed using skin irritation strength. Intention to treat (ITT) was statistically analyzed. The joint pain relief rate in the treatment group was 90.8% (79/87 cases), higher than that in the placebo control group (69.0%, 60/87 cases; P = 0.001). VAS pain score, DAS28, VAS for GH score were significantly improved in the two groups at week 4 of treatment and after treatment, as compared with before treatment (P < 0.01). ESR and hs-CRP levels significantly decreased in the treatment group after treatment (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). No difference was found in post-treatment VAS pain score, DAS28, VAS for GH score, ESR, or hs-CRP between the two groups (P > 0.05). Eight adverse events occurred in the treatment group (5 skin allergy, 1 intolerance of medical odor, and 2 mild liver injury), while 3 adverse events occurred in the placebo control group (2 skin allergy, 1 mild liver injury). There was no statistical difference in adverse event between the two groups (P > 0.05). No

  2. The effect of phloroglucinol on pain in first-trimester surgical abortion: a double-blind randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yaling; Zhu, Xiufang; Huang, Li-Li

    2010-02-01

    First-trimester surgical abortion is a common procedure. Pain control during this procedure is still an unsolved problem. In this randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study, women presenting for first-trimester surgical abortion received intramuscular phloroglucinol (4 mL) or placebo (normal saline, 4 mL). Visual analog scales (VAS) for pain immediately and 30 min after the procedure and side effects of the drug were recorded. There was no significant difference between groups in the pain level immediately and 30 min after the procedure; 70.7% of the phloroglucinol group (n=58 cases) and 56.9% of the placebo group (n=58 cases ) reported mild pain; 27.6% and 34.5%, respectively, reported moderate pain; and 1.7% and 8.6%, respectively, reported severe pain. Thirty minutes after the procedure, the median pain score was reduced to 1.3 in both groups. Postoperative side effects were reported, but there was no significant difference between groups for nausea or vomiting and blood pressure. The use of this dose of phloroglucinol, during first-trimester abortion by suction evacuation under local anesthesia with lidocaine, did not relieve pain, but caused no side effects.

  3. The Effect of Entonox, Play Therapy and a Combination on Pain Relief in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Simi; Nayak, Ruma; Thomas, Reju Joseph; Ravindran, Vinitha

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric pain is often undertreated/neglected due to time constraints, difficulties in timing of oral analgesics, fear of side effects of opioids and anxiolytics, and apprehension of additional pain in the use of local anesthetic injections. In this study, the researcher was prompted to choose rapidly acting interventions that were low dose and allowed the child to stay alert, suitable for a quick discharge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Entonox, play therapy, and a combination to relieve procedural pain in children aged 4-15 years. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial; the subjects were divided into four groups using a sequential allocation plan from 123 total subjects. Group A received Entonox, Group B received play therapy, Group C received both Entonox and play therapy, and Group D received existing standard interventions. The study was vetted by the departmental study review committee. The pain level was assessed using FLACC scale for children aged 4-9 years and the Wong Bakers Faces Pain Scale for children aged 10-15 years; scores ranged from 0 to 10. All the data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 with descriptive statistics and, inferential statistics. The mean pain scores were as follows: Entonox group, 2.87; Play therapy group, 4; combination group, 3; and control group, 5.87. When statistical testing was applied, a significant reduction in the pain score in all the three experimental groups when compared to the control group was found (p = .002), but not in the pain score among the three experimental groups (p = .350). The findings of this study indicated that all three interventions were effective in lowering pain scores when compared to the control group. Play therapy is as potent as Entonox in relieving procedural pain, though there was no additive effect on pain relief when play therapy and Entonox were combined. A protocol for age-related choice between play therapy and Entonox administration was introduced

  4. Minimally Invasive Microendoscopic Resection of the Transverse Process for Treatment of Low Back Pain with Bertolotti's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Toshinori; Higashino, Kosaku; Goda, Yuichiro; Mineta, Kazuaki; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Bertolotti's syndrome is characterized by anomalous enlargement of the transverse process of the most caudal lumbar segment, causing chronic and persistent low back pain or sciatica. We describe the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with left sciatic pain and low back pain due to a recurrent lumbar disc herniation at L4-5 with Bertolotti's syndrome. Selective L5 nerve root block and local injection of lidocaine into the articulation between the transverse process and sacral ala temporarily relieved the left sciatic pain and low back pain, respectively. To confirm the effect of local injection on low back pain, we gave a second local injection, which once again relieved the low back pain. Microendoscopic resection of the pseudoarticulation region and discectomy successfully relieved all symptoms. This report illustrates the effectiveness of minimally invasive resection of the transverse process for the treatment of low back pain with Bertolotti's syndrome. PMID:25045566

  5. Minimally Invasive Microendoscopic Resection of the Transverse Process for Treatment of Low Back Pain with Bertolotti's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takata, Yoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Higashino, Kosaku; Goda, Yuichiro; Mineta, Kazuaki; Sugiura, Kosuke; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Bertolotti's syndrome is characterized by anomalous enlargement of the transverse process of the most caudal lumbar segment, causing chronic and persistent low back pain or sciatica. We describe the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with left sciatic pain and low back pain due to a recurrent lumbar disc herniation at L4-5 with Bertolotti's syndrome. Selective L5 nerve root block and local injection of lidocaine into the articulation between the transverse process and sacral ala temporarily relieved the left sciatic pain and low back pain, respectively. To confirm the effect of local injection on low back pain, we gave a second local injection, which once again relieved the low back pain. Microendoscopic resection of the pseudoarticulation region and discectomy successfully relieved all symptoms. This report illustrates the effectiveness of minimally invasive resection of the transverse process for the treatment of low back pain with Bertolotti's syndrome.

  6. The Effect of Acupressure on Pain in Cancer Patients With Bone Metastasis: A Nonrandomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Serçe, Sibel; Ovayolu, Özlem; Pirbudak, Lütfiye; Ovayolu, Nimet

    2018-04-01

    Pain is a serious and common problem in bone metastases. For this purpose, complementary and supportive practices are also applied along with medical treatment. This study was conducted for the purpose of evaluating the effect of acupressure on pain in cancer patients with bone metastasis. The study was conducted in a nonrandomized controlled trial with patients who applied to the radiotherapy unit of an oncology hospital. The data of the study were collected by using a questionnaire and the Visual Analog Scale. A total of 8 acupressure sessions, which lasted for approximately 10 minutes each (with warming and acupressure periods), was applied to the intervention group. The data were analyzed by using χ 2 test, paired t test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient. It was determined that the pain mean score of the intervention group was 7.6 ± 1.9 before the acupressure and decreased to 6.8 ± 1.9 after the acupressure and this result was statistically significant. On the other hand, no significant difference was determined in the pain mean score of the control group. Acupressure is applicable for cancer patients with bone metastasis by nursing staff after receiving brief training and may make a difference in relieving pain of the patients. Further well-designed trials should be conducted.

  7. Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on chronic trapezius myofascial pain syndrome during dry needling therapy. Sixty patients were randomized into two groups of dry needling (DN) alone (group A) and DN combined with heat therapy group (group B). Each patient was treated once and the therapeutic effect was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment. Evaluation based on VAS and PPT showed that the pain of patients in groups A and B was significantly (P < 0.05) relieved at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment Compared to before treatment. There was significantly (P < 0.05) less pain in group B than group A at one and three months after treatment. The SF-36 evaluation demonstrated that the physical condition of patients in both groups showed significant (P < 0.05) improvement at one month and three months after treatment than before treatment. Our study suggests that both DN and DN heating therapy were effective in the treatment of trapezius MPS, and that DN heating therapy had better long-term effects than DN therapy. PMID:25383083

  8. The effect of the type of pain on the accuracy of memory of pain and affect.

    PubMed

    Bąbel, P; Pieniążek, L; Zarotyński, D

    2015-03-01

    Memory of chronic, acute and experimental pain may be inaccurate, but the research findings are inconsistent. The main aim of the study was to compare the memory of three types of pain and their associated affect. A total of 140 women, who gave birth by vaginal delivery or Caesarean section, or underwent gynaecological surgery, participated in the study. Before childbirth or surgery, the women rated their anxiety about the pain they would experience. Between 24 and 48 h after childbirth or surgery, they rated the intensity and unpleasantness of the pain, and their positive and negative affect. Either 3 or 6 months later, the participants recalled the pain and affect they had felt. The study found that the type of pain had an effect on memory of pain and affect. Surgery led to an overestimation of all but one of the recalled variables. Participants who gave birth by Caesarean section were the most accurate at recalling pain and affect. Memories of pain and affect were most variable in participants who gave birth by vaginal delivery. The three groups of participants differed in terms of the predictors of recalled pain intensity and unpleasantness, and the proportion of variance predicted by the same independent variables. The results of the current study suggest that memory of pain and affect is influenced by the meaning and affective value of the pain experience. This may help us to understand why the previous research on the memory of pain were so diverse. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  9. The effects of nature images on pain in a simulated hospital patient room.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Ellen; Battisto, Dina; Grimes, Larry; McCubbin, James

    2010-01-01

    Views of nature have been reported to relieve stress and pain, making nature an ideal medium for use in healthcare settings. In hospitals whose design does not allow for a view of nature, virtual and surrogate views of nature may be viable therapeutic options. This study tests the effects of specific nature images, as defined by Appleton's prospect refuge theory of landscape preference, on participants experiencing pain. The hypotheses were: (1) Nature views are variable in their impact on specific psychological and physiological health status indicators; and (2) Prospect and refuge nature scenes are more therapeutic than hazard nature scenes. The research question was (1) Which nature image categories are most therapeutic as evidenced by reduced pain and positive mood? An experiment using mixed methods assessed the effects of four different nature scenes on physiological (blood pressure, heart rate) and psychological (mood) responses when a person was subjected to a pain stressor. Four groups were subjected to a specific nature image category of prospect, refuge, hazard, or mixed prospect and refuge; the fifth group viewed no image. The Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Profile of Mood States survey instruments were used to assess pain and mood, respectively. Continuous physiological readings of heart rate and blood pressure were collected. Pain was induced through a cold pressor task, which required participants to immerse their nondominant hand in ice water for up to 120 seconds. The mixed prospect and refuge image treatment showed significantly lower sensory pain responses, and the no-image treatment indicated significantly higher affective pain perception responses. The hazard image treatment had significantly lower diastolic blood pressure readings during the pain treatment, but it also had significantly high total mood disturbance. Although there was no clear "most" therapeutic image, the mixed prospect and refuge image showed significant

  10. MF498 [N-{[4-(5,9-Diethoxy-6-oxo-6,8-dihydro-7H-pyrrolo[3,4-g]quinolin-7-yl)-3-methylbenzyl]sulfonyl}-2-(2-methoxyphenyl)acetamide], a selective E prostanoid receptor 4 antagonist, relieves joint inflammation and pain in rodent models of rheumatoid and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Patsy; Rowland, Steven E; Denis, Danielle; Mathieu, Marie-Claude; Stocco, Rino; Poirier, Hugo; Burch, Jason; Han, Yongxin; Audoly, Laurent; Therien, Alex G; Xu, Daigen

    2008-05-01

    Previous evidence has implicated E prostanoid receptor 4 (EP4) in mechanical hyperalgesia induced by subplantar inflammation. However, its role in chronic arthritis remains to be further defined because previous attempts have generated two conflicting lines of evidence, with one showing a marked reduction of arthritis induced by a collagen antibody in mice lacking EP4, but not EP1-EP3, and the other showing no impact of EP4 antagonism on arthritis induced by collagen. Here, we assessed the effect of a novel and selective EP4 antagonist MF498 [N-{[4-(5,9-diethoxy-6-oxo-6,8-dihydro-7H-pyrrolo[3,4-g]quinolin-7-yl)-3-methylbenzyl]sulfonyl}-2-(2-methoxyphenyl)acetamide] on inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA), a rat model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and joint pain in a guinea pig model of iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis (OA). In the AIA model, MF498, but not the antagonist for EP1, MF266-1 [1-(5-{3-[2-(benzyloxy)-5-chlorophenyl]-2-thienyl}pyridin-3-yl)-2,2,2-trifluoroethane-1,1-diol] or EP3 MF266-3 [(2E)-N-[(5-bromo-2-methoxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-3-[5-chloro-2-(2-naphthylmethyl)phenyl]acrylamide], inhibited inflammation, with a similar efficacy as a selective cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitor MF-tricyclic. In addition, MF498 was as effective as an nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac, or a selective microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 inhibitor, MF63 [2-(6-chloro-1H-phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazol-2-yl)isophthalonitrile], in relieving OA-like pain in guinea pigs. When tested in rat models of gastrointestinal toxicity, the EP4 antagonist was well tolerated, causing no mucosal leakage or erosions. Lastly, we evaluated the renal effect of MF498 in a furosemide-induced diuresis model and demonstrated that the compound displayed a similar renal effect as MF-tricyclic [3-(3,4-difluorophenyl)-4-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-2-(5H)-furanone], reducing furosemide-induced natriuresis by approximately 50%. These results not only suggest that EP4 is the major EP

  11. Opposing Effects of Expectancy and Somatic Focus on Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Tor D.

    2012-01-01

    High-pain expectancy increases pain and pain-related brain activity, creating a cycle of psychologically maintained pain. Though these effects are robust, little is known about how expectancy works and what psychological processes either support or mitigate its effects. To address this, we independently manipulated pain expectancy and “top-down” attention to the body, and examined their effects on both a performance-based measure of body-focus and heat-induced pain. Multi-level mediation analyses showed that high-pain expectancy substantially increased pain, replicating previous work. However, attention to the body reduced pain, partially suppressing the effects of expectancy. Furthermore, increased body-focus had larger pain-reducing effects when pain expectancy was high, suggesting that attempts to focus on external distractors are counterproductive in this situation. Overall, the results show that attention to the body cannot explain pain-enhancing expectancy effects, and that focusing on sensory/discriminative aspects of pain might be a useful pain-regulation strategy when severe pain is expected. PMID:22723896

  12. The Effect of Repeated Electroacupuncture Analgesia on Neurotrophic and Cytokine Factors in Neuropathic Pain Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junying; Duanmu, Chenlin; Feng, Xiumei; Yan, Yaxia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a common disability influencing quality of life. Results of previous studies showed that acupuncture has a cumulative analgesic effect, but the relationship with spinal cytokines neurotrophic factors released by astrocytes remains unknown. The present study was designed to observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) treatment on spinal cytokines neurotrophic factors in chronic neuropathic pain rats. The chronic neuropathic pain was established by chronic constrictive injury (CCI). EA treatment was applied at Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34) (both bilateral) once a day, for 30 min. IL-1β mRNA, TNF-α mRNA, and IL-1 mRNA were detected by quantitative real-time PCR, and the proteins of BDNF, NGF, and NT3/4 were detected by Western blot. The expression levels of cytokines such as IL-1β mRNA, TNF-α mRNA, IL-6 mRNA, and neurotrophic factors such as BDNF, NGF, and NT3/4 in the spinal cord were increased significantly after CCI. The astrocytes released more IL-1β and BDNF after CCI. Repeated EA treatment could suppress the elevated expression of IL-1β mRNA, TNFα mRNA, and BDNF, NGF, and NT3/4 but had no effect on IL-6 mRNA. It is suggested that cytokines and neurotrophic factors which may be closely associated with astrocytes participated in the process of EA relieving chronic pain. PMID:27800006

  13. Effect of an indwelling pleural catheter vs chest tube and talc pleurodesis for relieving dyspnea in patients with malignant pleural effusion: the TIME2 randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Davies, Helen E; Mishra, Eleanor K; Kahan, Brennan C; Wrightson, John M; Stanton, Andrew E; Guhan, Anur; Davies, Christopher W H; Grayez, Jamal; Harrison, Richard; Prasad, Anjani; Crosthwaite, Nicola; Lee, Y C Gary; Davies, Robert J O; Miller, Robert F; Rahman, Najib M

    2012-06-13

    Malignant pleural effusion causes disabling dyspnea in patients with a short life expectancy. Palliation is achieved by fluid drainage, but the most effective first-line method has not been determined. To determine whether indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) are more effective than chest tube and talc slurry pleurodesis (talc) at relieving dyspnea. Unblinded randomized controlled trial (Second Therapeutic Intervention in Malignant Effusion Trial [TIME2]) comparing IPC and talc (1:1) for which 106 patients with malignant pleural effusion who had not previously undergone pleurodesis were recruited from 143 patients who were treated at 7 UK hospitals. Patients were screened from April 2007-February 2011 and were followed up for a year. Indwelling pleural catheters were inserted on an outpatient basis, followed by initial large volume drainage, education, and subsequent home drainage. The talc group were admitted for chest tube insertion and talc for slurry pleurodesis. Patients completed daily 100-mm line visual analog scale (VAS) of dyspnea over 42 days after undergoing the intervention (0 mm represents no dyspnea and 100 mm represents maximum dyspnea; 10 mm represents minimum clinically significant difference). Mean difference was analyzed using a mixed-effects linear regression model adjusted for minimization variables. Dyspnea improved in both groups, with no significant difference in the first 42 days with a mean VAS dyspnea score of 24.7 in the IPC group (95% CI, 19.3-30.1 mm) and 24.4 mm (95% CI, 19.4-29.4 mm) in the talc group, with a difference of 0.16 mm (95% CI, −6.82 to 7.15; P = .96). There was a statistically significant improvement in dyspnea in the IPC group at 6 months, with a mean difference in VAS score between the IPC group and the talc group of −14.0 mm (95% CI, −25.2 to −2.8 mm; P = .01). Length of initial hospitalization was significantly shorter in the IPC group with a median of 0 days (interquartile range [IQR], 0-1 day) and 4 days

  14. Effect of parecoxib combined with thoracic epidural analgesia on pain after thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiao-Min; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Ding, Ming; Liu, Qiu-A-Xue; Cang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Thoracotomy results in severe postoperative pain potentially leading to chronic pain. We investigated the potential benefits of intravenous parecoxib on postoperative analgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). Eighty-six patients undergoing thoracic surgery were randomized into two groups. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) was used until chest tubes were removed. Patients received parecoxib (group P) or placebo (group C) intravenously just 0.5 h before the operation and every 12 h after operation for 3 days. The intensity of pain was measured by using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and recorded at 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, 72 h after operation. The valid number of PCA, the side effects and the overall satisfaction to analgesic therapy in 72 h were recorded. Venous blood samples were taken before operation, the 1(st) and 3(rd) day after operation for plasma cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α level. The occurrence of residual pain was recorded using telephone questionnaire 2 and 12 months after surgery. Postoperative pain scores at rest and on coughing were significantly lower with the less valid count of PCA and greater patient satisfaction in group P (P<0.01). Adverse effect and the days fit for discharge were comparable between two groups. The cortisol levels in placebo group were higher than parecoxib group at T2. The level of ACTH both decreased in two groups after operation but it was significantly lower in group P than that in group C. There were no changes in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels before and after analgesia at T1 and T2 (P>0.05). The occurrence of residual pain were 25% and 51.2% separately in group P and C 3 months postoperatively (P<0.05). Intravenous parecoxib in multimodal analgesia improves postoperative analgesia provided by TEA, relieves stress response after thoracotomy, and may restrain the development of chronic pain.

  15. Anti-Nociceptive Effects of Elcatonin Injection for Postmenopausal Women with Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Shota; Kamimura, Mikio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Hashidate, Hiroyuki; Takahara, Kenji; Takahashi, Jun; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Background: Eel calcitonin (elcatonin) injection is widely used for elderly patients suffering from somatic pain in Japan. However, there have been few reports on the analgesic effects of elcatonin injection. The purpose of this study was to examine the analgesic effects of elcatonin injection in postmenopausal women with lower back pain. Methods: This study was designed as a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Thirty-six women aged ≥50 years with acute lower back pain participated in this study. They were randomly divided into two treatment groups according to whether they received a placebo or a weekly trigger point injection of elcatonin (20 units). They were observed for 5 weeks and the extent of pain at motion and at rest according to the visual analog scale (VAS) was evaluated. The mean VAS scores for the elcatonin group were then compared with those of the placebo group. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the mean VAS scores for pain at rest between the two groups during the 5-week treatment course. However, the mean VAS scores for motion pain in the elcatonin group were significantly lower than those in the placebo group at the third, fifth and sixth weeks. Conclusions: Elcatonin injection (20 units) significantly relieved motion pain in the lower back in postmenopausal women after three weeks of treatment. This analgesic effect continued for the subsequent 3 weeks. PMID:20448810

  16. Effect of Footwear on Joint Pain and Function in Older Adults With Lower Extremity Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Amy; Luna, Sarah

    Lower extremity osteoarthritis (OA) is a common condition among older adults; given the risks of surgical and pharmaceutical interventions, conservative, lower-cost management options such as footwear warrant further investigation. This systematic review investigated the effects of footwear, including shoe inserts, in reducing lower extremity joint pain and improving gait, mobility, and quality of life in older adults with OA. The CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, PubMed, RECAL, and Web of Knowledge databases were searched for publications from January 1990 to September 2014, using the terms "footwear," "shoes," "gait," "pain," and "older adult." Participants who were 50 years or older and those who had OA in at least one lower extremity joint narrowed the results. Outcomes of interest included measures of pain, comfort, function, gait, or quality of life. Exclusion criteria applied to participants with rheumatoid arthritis, amputation, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, use of modified footwear or custom orthotics, purely biomechanical studies, and outcomes of balance or falls only. Single-case studies, qualitative narrative descriptions, and expert opinions were also excluded. The initial search resulted in a total of 417 citations. Eleven articles met inclusion criteria. Two randomized controlled trials and 3 quasiexperimental studies reported lateral wedge insoles may have at least some pain-relieving effects and improved functional mobility in older adults at 4 weeks to 2 years' follow-up, particularly when used with subtalar and ankle strapping. Three randomized controlled trials with large sample sizes reported that lateral wedges provided no knee pain relief compared with flat insoles. Hardness of shoe soles did not significantly affect joint comfort in the foot in a quasiexperimental study. A quasiexperimental designed study investigating shock-absorbing insoles showed reduction in knee joint pain with 1 month of wear. Finally, a cross-sectional prognostic study indicated

  17. Pain relief effect of breast feeding and music therapy during heel lance for healthy-term neonates in China: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiemin; Hong-Gu, He; Zhou, Xiuzhu; Wei, Haixia; Gao, Yaru; Ye, Benlan; Liu, Zuguo; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi

    2015-03-01

    to test the effectiveness of breast feeding (BF), music therapy (MT), and combined breast feeding and music therapy (BF+MT) on pain relief in healthy-term neonates during heel lance. randomised controlled trial. in the postpartum unit of one university-affiliated hospital in China from August 2013 to February 2014. among 288 healthy-term neonates recruited, 250 completed the trial. All neonates were undergoing heel lancing for metabolic screening, were breast fed, and had not been fed for the previous 30 minutes. all participants were randomly assigned into four groups - BF, MT, BF+MT, and no intervention - with 72 neonates in each group. Neonates in the control group received routine care. Neonates in the other three intervention groups received corresponding interventions five minutes before the heel lancing and throughout the whole procedure. Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS), latency to first cry, and duration of first crying. mean changes in NIPS scores from baseline over time was dependent on the interventions given. Neonates in the BF and combined BF+MT groups had significantly longer latency to first cry, shorter duration of first crying, and lower pain mean score during and one minute after heel lance, compared to the other two groups. No significant difference in pain response was found between BF groups with or without music therapy. The MT group did not achieve a significantly reduced pain response in all outcome measures. BF could significantly reduce pain response in healthy-term neonates during heel lance. MT did not enhance the effect of pain relief of BF. healthy-term neonates should be breast fed to alleviate pain during heel lance. There is no need for the additional input of classical music on breast feeding in clinic to relieve procedural pain. Nurses should encourage breast feeding to relieve pain during heel lance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Altering gender role expectations: effects on pain tolerance, pain threshold, and pain ratings.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael E; Gagnon, Christine M; Riley, Joseph L; Price, Donald D

    2003-06-01

    The literature demonstrating sex differences in pain is sizable. Most explanations for these differences have focused on biologic mechanisms, and only a few studies have examined social learning. The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of gender-role stereotypes to sex differences in pain. This study used experimental manipulation of gender-role expectations for men and women. One hundred twenty students participated in the cold pressor task. Before the pain task, participants were given 1 of 3 instructional sets: no expectation, 30-second performance expectation, or a 90-second performance expectation. Pain ratings, threshold, and tolerance were recorded. Significant sex differences in the "no expectation" condition for pain tolerance (t = 2.32, df = 38, P <.05) and post-cold pressor pain ratings (t = 2.6, df = 37, P <.05) were found. Women had briefer tolerance times and higher post-cold pressor ratings than men. When given gender-specific tolerance expectations, men and women did not differ in their pain tolerance, pain threshold, or pain ratings. This is the first empirical study to show that manipulation of expectations alters sex differences in laboratory pain.

  19. Effect of local anaesthetic infiltration on chronic postsurgical pain after total hip and knee replacement: the APEX randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, Vikki; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Beswick, Andrew D.; Marques, Elsa; Noble, Sian; Horwood, Jeremy; Pyke, Mark; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) are usually effective at relieving pain; however, 7% to 23% of patients experience chronic postsurgical pain. These trials aimed to investigate the effect of local anaesthetic wound infiltration on pain severity at 12 months after primary THR or TKR for osteoarthritis. Between November 2009 and February 2012, 322 patients listed for THR and 316 listed for TKR were recruited into a single-centre double-blind randomised controlled trial. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive local anaesthetic infiltration and standard care or standard care alone. Participants and outcomes assessors were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was pain severity on the WOMAC Pain Scale at 12 months after surgery. Analyses were conducted using intention-to-treat and per-protocol approaches. In the hip trial, patients in the intervention group had significantly less pain at 12 months postoperative than patients in the standard care group (differences in means: 4.74; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95-8.54; P = 0.015), although the difference was not clinically significant. Post hoc analysis found that patients in the intervention group were more likely to have none to moderate pain than severe pain at 12 months than those in the standard care group (odds ratio: 10.19; 95% CI: 2.10-49.55; P = 0.004). In the knee trial, there was no strong evidence that the intervention influenced pain severity at 12 months postoperative (difference in means: 3.83; 95% CI: −0.83 to 8.49; P = 0.107). In conclusion, routine use of infiltration could be beneficial in improving long-term pain relief for some patients after THR. PMID:25659070

  20. Effectiveness of liposome bupivacaine for postoperative pain control in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhan-Xia; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Yao, Lu-Lan

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Adequate pain control after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) enables quicker recovery and reduces readmissions and treatment costs. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of liposomal bupivacaine (LB) for postoperative pain control in patients prepared for TKA. Methods: We searched for the reports that evaluating the effect of liposomal bupivacaine for postoperative pain control in patients prepared for TKA between March 1983 and May 2017 in the electronic database Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Ovid. The main outcomes were visual analog scale (VAS) at 24, 48, and 72 hours. The secondary outcomes were total morphine consumption, the length of hospital stay, range of motion, and the occurrence of nausea. Results: Seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs) enrolling 825 patients, with 413 in the LB group and 412 in the control group, were included in this meta-analysis. Our results suggested that administration LB was associated with a reduction of VAS by 4.22 points at 72 hours after TKA (WMD = −4.22, 95% CI −7.47, −0.97, P = .011) on a 100-point VAS. What's more, LB can decrease the occurrence of nausea when compared with traditional bupivacaine by 18.3% (risk ratio  = 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.55, 0.89, P = .003). LB was associated with an increase of the range of motion than traditional bupivacaine (P < .05). There was no significant difference between the VAS at 24, 48 hours, total morphine consumption and the length of hospital stay. Conclusions: Administration with LB was associated with pain-relieving effects and reduces the morphine-related complications (nausea). Due the limited number of the included RCTs, large number and high quality RCTs are still need to identify the effects of LB for pain control after TKA. PMID:29595645

  1. A comparison of the effects of reflexology and relaxation on pain in women with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Fatemeh; Soheili, Mozhgan; Hosseini, SayedMohsen; Shaygannejad, Vahid

    2016-03-01

    reflexology group after the intervention, compared with the two other groups, but showed no significant differences between relaxation and control groups. There were no significant differences between the three groups 2 months after the interventions (p > 0.05). The results showed that both interventions are effective on relieving pain in women with MS; however, it appears that the effect of reflexology on pain reduction is greater than that of relaxation. Hence, these two methods can be recommended as effective techniques.

  2. [Progress on painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy treated by integrative medicine].

    PubMed

    Hong, Hong-Bin; Xu, Rong-Juan

    2005-04-01

    The article reviewed clinical studies on painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PDPN) treated by integrative medicine. PDPN, a common complication of diabetes mellitus, which could severely influence patients' quality of life. The keystone and difficulty of PDPN treatment is to relieve pain. Tricyclic anti-depressants are the firstline agents for neuropathic pain but with obvious adverse reactions. Antiepileptic drugs and capsicin can relieve PDPN with less adverse reactions. In recent years, lots of report of clinical studies on DPN treated by TCM or integrative medicine were issued, but those pertinent to PDPN were seldom. Only the papers with independent statistical analysis on effect of pain relieving were selected to review in this article, and the authors presumed that it is feasible to treat PDPN with integrative medicine.

  3. The effectiveness of Kinesio Taping on pain and disability in cervical myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ay, Saime; Konak, Hatice Ecem; Evcik, Deniz; Kibar, Sibel

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping and sham Kinesio Taping on pain, pressure pain threshold, cervical range of motion, and disability in cervical myofascial pain syndrome patients (MPS). This study was designed as a randomized, double-blind placebo controlled study. Sixty-one patients with MPS were randomly assigned into two groups. Group 1 (n=31) was treated with Kinesio Taping and group 2 (n=30) was treated sham taping five times by intervals of 3 days for 15 days. Additionally, all patients were given neck exercise program. Patients were evaluated according to pain, pressure pain threshold, cervical range of motion and disability. Pain was assessed by using Visual Analog Scale, pressure pain threshold was measured by using an algometer, and active cervical range of motion was measured by using goniometry. Disability was assessed with the neck pain disability index disability. Measurements were taken before and after the treatment. At the end of the therapy, there were statistically significant improvements on pain, pressure pain threshold, cervical range of motion, and disability (p<0.05) in both groups. Also there was a statistical difference between the groups regarding pain, pressure pain threshold, cervical flexion-extension (p<0.05); except cervical rotation, cervical lateral flexion and disability (p>0.05). This study shows that Kinesio Taping leads to improvements on pain, pressure pain threshold and cervical range of motion, but not disability in short time. Therefore, Kinesio Taping can be used as an alternative therapy method in the treatment of patients with MPS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Intraoperative electroacupuncture relieves remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia via inhibiting spinal glial activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Changxi; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Wei; Lei, Yishan; Lu, Cui'e; Sun, Rao; Sun, Yu'e; Jiang, Ming; Gu, Xiaoping; Ma, Zhengliang

    2017-01-01

    Background Accumulating studies have suggested that remifentanil, the widely-used opioid analgesic in clinical anesthesia, can activate the pronociceptive systems and enhance postoperative pain. Glial cells are thought to be implicated in remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia. Electroacupuncture is a complementary therapy to relieve various pain conditions with few side effects, and glial cells may be involved in its antinociceptive effect. In this study, we investigated whether intraoperative electroacupuncture could relieve remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia by inhibiting the activation of spinal glial cells, the production of spinal proinflammatory cytokines, and the activation of spinal mitogen-activated protein kinases. Methods A rat model of remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia was used in this study. Electroacupuncture during surgery was conducted at bilateral Zusanli (ST36) acupoints. Behavior tests, including mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, were performed at different time points. Astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein, microglial marker Iba1, proinflammatory cytokines, and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases in the spinal cord were detected by Western blot and/or immunofluorescence. Results Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were induced by both surgical incision and remifentanil infusion, and remifentanil infusion significantly exaggerated and prolonged incision-induced pronociceptive effects. Glial fibrillary acidic protein, Iba1, proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α), and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (p-p38, p-JNK, and p-ERK1/2) were upregulated after surgical incision, remifentanil infusion, and especially after their combination. Intraoperative electroacupuncture significantly attenuated incision- and/or remifentanil-induced pronociceptive effects, spinal glial activation, proinflammatory cytokine upregulation, and

  5. Intraoperative electroacupuncture relieves remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia via inhibiting spinal glial activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Changxi; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Wei; Lei, Yishan; Lu, Cui’e; Sun, Rao; Sun, Yu’e; Jiang, Ming; Gu, Xiaoping; Ma, Zhengliang

    2017-01-01

    Background Accumulating studies have suggested that remifentanil, the widely-used opioid analgesic in clinical anesthesia, can activate the pronociceptive systems and enhance postoperative pain. Glial cells are thought to be implicated in remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia. Electroacupuncture is a complementary therapy to relieve various pain conditions with few side effects, and glial cells may be involved in its antinociceptive effect. In this study, we investigated whether intraoperative electroacupuncture could relieve remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia by inhibiting the activation of spinal glial cells, the production of spinal proinflammatory cytokines, and the activation of spinal mitogen-activated protein kinases. Methods A rat model of remifentanil-induced postoperative hyperalgesia was used in this study. Electroacupuncture during surgery was conducted at bilateral Zusanli (ST36) acupoints. Behavior tests, including mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, were performed at different time points. Astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein, microglial marker Iba1, proinflammatory cytokines, and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases in the spinal cord were detected by Western blot and/or immunofluorescence. Results Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were induced by both surgical incision and remifentanil infusion, and remifentanil infusion significantly exaggerated and prolonged incision-induced pronociceptive effects. Glial fibrillary acidic protein, Iba1, proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α), and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (p-p38, p-JNK, and p-ERK1/2) were upregulated after surgical incision, remifentanil infusion, and especially after their combination. Intraoperative electroacupuncture significantly attenuated incision- and/or remifentanil-induced pronociceptive effects, spinal glial activation, proinflammatory cytokine upregulation, and

  6. Effects of a back-pain-reducing program during pregnancy for Korean women: a non-equivalent control-group pretest-posttest study.

    PubMed

    Shim, Mi-Jung; Lee, Young-Sook; Oh, Hyun-Ei; Kim, Jin-Sun

    2007-01-01

    Although many pregnant women experience back pain, it has not considered an important health problem. No study has investigated the effects of a back-pain-reducing program (BPRP) during pregnancy for Korean women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a program designed to reduce back pain in pregnant women. A non-equivalent control-group pretest-posttest design was used. Pregnant women who attended an antenatal clinic and experienced back pain during their pregnancy were included in an intervention group (n=29), and their intensity of back pain, functional limitation and anxiety were compared with women in a control group from another antenatal clinic (n=27). The data were collected at three time points: prior to intervention, and 6 and 12 weeks after intervention. At 12 weeks after intervention, the intensity of back pain experienced by the intervention group was significantly lower than that of the control group. However, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups with respect to functional limitations and anxiety. The findings show that the pain-reducing program developed for this study was effective in reducing the intensity of back pain experienced by pregnant women. Promoting good posture and regular exercise can be recommended as a method to relieve back pain in pregnancy women. Further studies are needed to confirm the effect of the BPRP during pregnancy.

  7. Co-morbid pain and opioid addiction: Long term effect of opioid maintenance on acute pain

    PubMed Central

    Wachholtz, Amy; Gonzalez, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Medication assisted treatment for opioid dependence alters the pain experience. This study will evaluate changes pain sensitivity and tolerance with opioid treatments; and duration of this effect after treatment cessation. Method 120 individuals with chronic pain were recruited in 4 groups (n=30): 1-methadone for opioid addiction; 2-buprenorphine for opioid addiction; 3-history of opioid maintenance treatment for opioid addiction but with prolonged abstinence (M=121 weeks; SD=23.3); and 4-opioid naïve controls. Participants completed a psychological assessment and a cold water task including, time to first pain (sensitivity) and time to stopping the pain task (tolerance). Data analysis used survival analyses. Results A Kaplan-Meier-Cox survival analysis showed group differences for both pain sensitivity (Log rank=15.50; p<.001) and tolerance (Log rank=20.11; p<.001). Current or historical use of opioid maintenance resulted in differing pain sensitivity compared to opioid naïve (p’s<.01). However, tolerance to pain was better among those with a history of opioid maintenance compared to active methadone patients (p<.05), with the highest tolerance found among opioid naïve control group participants (p’s<.001). Correlations within the prolonged abstinent group indicated pain tolerance was significantly improved as length of opioid abstinence increased (R=.37; p<.05); but duration of abstinence did not alter sensitivity (ns). Conclusion Among individuals with a history of prolonged opioid maintenance, there appears to be long-term differences in pain sensitivity that do not resolve with discontinuation of opioid maintenance. Although pain sensitivity does not change, pain tolerance does improve after opioid maintenance cessation. Implications for treating co-morbid opioid addiction and pain (acute and chronic) are discussed. PMID:25456326

  8. Co-morbid pain and opioid addiction: long term effect of opioid maintenance on acute pain.

    PubMed

    Wachholtz, Amy; Gonzalez, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    Medication assisted treatment for opioid dependence alters the pain experience. This study will evaluate changes pain sensitivity and tolerance with opioid treatments; and duration of this effect after treatment cessation. 120 Individuals with chronic pain were recruited in 4 groups (N = 30): 1-methadone for opioid addiction; 2-buprenorphine for opioid addiction; 3-history of opioid maintenance treatment for opioid addiction but with prolonged abstinence (M = 121 weeks; SD = 23.3); and 4-opioid naïve controls. Participants completed a psychological assessment and a cold water task including, time to first pain (sensitivity) and time to stopping the pain task (tolerance). Data analysis used survival analyses. A Kaplan-Meier-Cox survival analysis showed group differences for both pain sensitivity (log rank = 15.50; p < .001) and tolerance (log rank = 20.11; p < .001). Current or historical use of opioid maintenance resulted in differing pain sensitivity compared to opioid naïve (p's < .01). However, tolerance to pain was better among those with a history of opioid maintenance compared to active methadone patients (p < .05), with the highest tolerance found among opioid naïve control group participants (p's < .001). Correlations within the prolonged abstinent group indicated pain tolerance was significantly improved as length of opioid abstinence increased (R = .37; p < .05); but duration of abstinence did not alter sensitivity (ns). Among individuals with a history of prolonged opioid maintenance, there appears to be long-term differences in pain sensitivity that do not resolve with discontinuation of opioid maintenance. Although pain sensitivity does not change, pain tolerance does improve after opioid maintenance cessation. Implications for treating co-morbid opioid addiction and pain (acute and chronic) are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effectiveness of balneotherapy and spa therapy for the treatment of chronic low back pain: a review on latest evidence.

    PubMed

    Karagülle, Mine; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2015-02-01

    In most European countries, balneotherapy and spa therapy are widely prescribed by physicians and preferred by European citizens for the treatment of musculoskeletal problems including chronic low back pain (LBP). We aimed to review and evaluate the recent evidence on the effectiveness of balneotherapy and spa therapy for patients with LBP. We comprehensively searched data bases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in English between July 2005 and December 2013. We identified all trials testing balneotherapy or spa therapy for LBP that reported that the sequence of allocation was randomized. We finally included total of eight RCTs: two on balneotherapy and six on spa therapy. All reviewed trials reported that balneotherapy was superior in long term to tap water therapy in relieving pain and improving function and that spa therapy combining balneotherapy with mud pack therapy and/or exercise therapy, physiotherapy, and/or education was effective in the management of low back pain and superior or equally effective to the control treatments in short and long terms. We used Jadad scale to grade the methodological quality. Only three out of total eight had a score of above 3 indicating the good quality. The data from the RCTs indicates that overall evidence on effectiveness of balneotherapy and spa therapy in LBP is encouraging and reflects the consistency of previous evidence. However, the overall quality of trials is generally low. Better quality RCTs (well designed, conducted, and reported) are needed testing short- and long-term effects for relieving chronic back pain and proving broader beneficial effects.

  10. Ketamine in the treatment of acute pain.

    PubMed

    Brinck, Elina; Kontinen, Vesa

    2017-01-01

    Ketamine is an old anesthetic agent that relieves pain by reducing central sensitization in the central nervous system. This is advantageous for patients suffering from severe pain prior to surgery or are using a strong opioid. The S enantiomer of ketamine used for anesthesia is more powerful than racemic ketamine. The ideal dose of ketamine for pain relief is not yet known, and its adverse effects on the central nervous system, including hallucinations, sedation, and diplopia have limited its use in pain management. The significance of these effects at low doses is probably less than expected, particularly if benzodiazepines or an alpha-2 agonist, such as dexmedetomidine, are administered in addition to ketamine.

  11. The effects of reflexology on chronic low back pain intensity in nurses employed in hospitals affiliated with Isfahan University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Eghbali, Maryam; Safari, Reza; Nazari, Fatemeh; Abdoli, Samereh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Humans have been involved with the phenomena of pain and pain relief from the ancient times. Back pain is the most common pain. In fact, eight out of ten people experience it in their lifetime. However, individuals with specific jobs, including nurses, are faced with this problem more. Nursing is in the top ten careers suffering from the most severe musculoskeletal injuries. There are non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments to relieve back pain. One of the non-medical treatments of pain is called reflexology which is a branch of complementary and alternative therapies. This research has been conducted to investigate the effect of reflexology on chronic low back pain intensity. Materials and Methods: This study was a double-blind clinical trial. The study population consisted of 50 female and male nurses suffering from chronic low back pain working in hospitals affiliated with Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. The participants were divided into two groups of reflexology and non-specific massage. A questionnaire was completed through interviews and a 40 minute sessions of interventions were performed three times a week for two weeks. Pain intensity was measured by Numerical Analogue Scale for pain before and after the intervention. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including independent t-test and chi-square test, were used to analyze the data. Findings: The results showed a significantly higher reduction in pain intensity scores in the reflexology group after the intervention as compared with the non-specific massage group. However, the non-specific massage was also significantly effective in reducing pain. Conclusions: Reflexology can be effective in reducing the severity of chronic back pain, i.e. it is able to reduce pain from moderate to mild. Thus, this technique is recommended to be performed by nurses as a complementary therapy in patient care. PMID:23833620

  12. Effectiveness of a new cervical pillow on pain and sleep quality in recreational athletes with chronic mechanical neck pain: a preliminary comparative study.

    PubMed

    DI Cagno, Alessandra; Minganti, Carlo; Quaranta, Federico; Pistone, Eugenio M; Fagnani, Federica; Fiorilli, Giovanni; Giombini, Arrigo

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this intervention study was to determine the effects of a new experimental cervical pillow, on symptomatic adults affected by chronic mechanical neck pain. Twelve recreational athletes of both sexes (mean age 40.5 years; range 35-55), affected by grade II chronic mechanical neck pain, were evaluated with a daily diary type of self-report questionnaire, which incorporated an 11-point Numerical Rating Pain Scale, to collect the primary outcome measures of pre- and post-sleep neck pain and with the Neck Pain Disability Scale. Tympanic temperature, heart rate (HR) variability continuous monitoring during sleep, overnight pillow comfort and sleep quality were assessed. Average weekly scores in overall questionnaires, tympanic temperature and the HR low frequency (LF) / high frequency (HF) ratio were significantly lower (P<0.05) after the use of the DM2 pillow than the own pillow. The 80% of participants considered the DM2 "perfectly comfortable" and reported a "good" quality of sleep lying over it. The use of an appropriate pillow is a determinant factor in relieving neck pain, improving LF/HF ratio and enhancing-vagal activity, promoting deeper stages during the sleep. The shape of this pillow maintains an appropriate cervical curvature, reduces intra-disc pressure allowing a better distribution of loads between cervical discs. The round shaped portion of the pillow, facilitates breathing and avoids the narrowing of the airway due to the incorrect position during the sleep. The peculiar material of the DM2 pillow, contributed to lower brain temperature promoting dry heat loss from the head to the pillow, reducing sweating.

  13. Analgesic effect of clobazam in chronic low-back pain but not in experimentally induced pain.

    PubMed

    Schliessbach, J; Vuilleumier, P H; Siegenthaler, A; Bütikofer, L; Limacher, A; Juni, P; Zeilhofer, H U; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Curatolo, M

    2017-09-01

    Chronic pain is frequently associated with hypersensitivity of the nervous system, and drugs that increase central inhibition are therefore a potentially effective treatment. Benzodiazepines are potent modulators of GABAergic neurotransmission and are known to exert antihyperalgesic effects in rodents, but translation into patients are lacking. This study investigates the effect of the benzodiazepine clobazam in chronic low-back pain in humans. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of GABA modulation on chronic low-back pain and on quantitative sensory tests. In this double-blind cross-over study, 49 patients with chronic low-back pain received a single oral dose of clobazam 20 mg or active placebo tolterodine 1 mg. Pain intensity on the 0-10 numeric rating scale and quantitative sensory tests were assessed during 2 h after drug intake. Pain intensity in the supine position was significantly reduced by clobazam compared to active placebo (60 min: 2.9 vs. 3.5, p = 0.008; 90 min: 2.7 vs. 3.3, p = 0.024; 120 min: 2.4 vs. 3.1, p = 0.005). Pain intensity in the sitting position was not significantly different between groups. No effects on quantitative sensory tests were observed. This study suggests that clobazam has an analgesic effect in patients with chronic low-back pain. Muscle relaxation or sedation may have contributed to the effect. Development of substances devoid of these side effects would offer the potential to further investigate the antihyperalgesic action of GABAergic compounds. Modulation of GABAergic pain-inhibitory pathways may be a potential future therapeutic target. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  14. Effect of ketamine on endogenous pain modulation in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Niesters, Marieke; Dahan, Albert; Swartjes, Maarten; Noppers, Ingeborg; Fillingim, Roger B; Aarts, Leon; Sarton, Elise Y

    2011-03-01

    Inhibitory and facilitatory descending pathways, originating at higher central nervous system sites, modulate activity of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons, and thereby influence pain perception. Dysfunction of inhibitory pain pathways or a shift in the balance between pain facilitation and pain inhibition has been associated with the development of chronic pain. The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine has a prolonged analgesic effect in chronic pain patients. This effect is due to desensitization of sensitized N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. Additionally, ketamine may modulate or enhance endogenous inhibitory control of pain perception. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC) and offset analgesia (OA) are 2 mechanisms involved in descending inhibition. The present study investigates the effect of a ketamine infusion on subsequent DNIC and OA responses to determine whether ketamine has an influence on descending pain control. Ten healthy subjects (4 men/6 women) received a 1-hour placebo or S(+)-ketamine (40mg per 70kg) infusion on 2 separate occasions in random order. Upon the termination of the infusion, DNIC and OA responses were obtained. After placebo treatment, significant descending inhibition of pain responses was present for DNIC and OA. In contrast, after ketamine infusion, no DNIC was observed, but rather a significant facilitatory pain response (P<0.01); the OA response remained unchanged. These findings suggest that the balance between pain inhibition and pain facilitation was shifted by ketamine towards pain facilitation. The absence of an effect of ketamine on OA indicates differences in the mechanisms and neurotransmitter influences between OA and DNIC. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control responses following a 1-hour low-dose ketamine treatment displayed facilitation of pain in response to experimental noxious thermal stimulation. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  15. Nursing Process in Post Tonsillectomy Pain Diagnosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanifard, Fateme; Khademolhoseyni, Seyyed Mohamad; Nouri, Jamile Mokhtari

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Tonsillectomy is the most common surgery in the field of ENT. Pain is the most common post tonsillectomy complaint. Considering the importance of nursing cares in relieving post-surgery pain in general and post-tonsillectomy pain in particular, this study is conducted with the aim of presenting nursing process in post tonsillectomy pain diagnosis for decreasing loss of appropriate opportunities in nursing cares and achieving appropriate results in taking care of the patients. Methods: This study is a targeted systematic review focusing on “effective nursing measures in relieving children’s post tonsillectomy pain”. The main stages of searching strategy included searching in electronic sources of Latin databases; Pub Med, Science Direct, and EMBASE and Persian databases; SID, Iran medex, ISC to find published articles from 2009 to 2014. In the end, final synthesis was done on eight articles in English. Findings: Effective nursing measurements for relieving post tonsillectomy pain include: decreasing children’s anxiety through children and their families’ psychological preparation by nurses and other caregivers, using cold compress to reduce neck and jaw pain, presenting distraction techniques, offering fluids and cold foods immediately in the period after surgery, creating a comfortable environment for the children, avoiding too much of talking and adequate sleep. Conclusion: It is recommended to the nursing managers and nurses to perform cares achieved from this systematic review to achieve appropriate results in relieving post tonsillectomy pain. PMID:25560345

  16. The effect of inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose (Rosa damascena) essence on the pain intensity after dressing in patients with burns: A clinical randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Harorani, Mehdi; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah; Moradkhani, Shirin; Falahinia, Golam Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Pain is one of the common problems encountered by patients with burns, which increases after each dressing. This study aimed to investigate the effect of inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose essence on the pain of patients with burns that is caused after dressing. A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 50 patients with second- and third-degree burn wounds. The baseline pain of the patients was assessed 30 min before they entered into the dressing room on the first and second days of intervention. The patients in the experimental group inhaled five drops of damask rose essence 40% in distilled water, while those in the control group inhaled five drops of distilled water as placebo. The pain intensity was assessed using Visual Analogue Scale at 15 and 30 min after the patients exited from the dressing room. Data were analyzed by SPSS (version 18) using descriptive and inferential statistics. There was significant difference between the mean of pain intensity before and after intervention at 15 and 30 min after dressing (P < 0.001). Moreover, there was significant difference in reduction of pain intensity before and after aromatherapy in the experimental group (P < 0.05). Also, there was a significant reduction in severity of pain after dressing in the experimental group compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose could be effective for relieving the pain caused after dressing in patients with burns. Therefore, it could be suggested as a complementary therapy in burn patients for pain relief.

  17. Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCCIH Researchers Describe Specialized Neurons That Play a Unique Role in Mechanical Pain ( August 16, 2017 ) ... Funding for Pain Initiatives Current Funding Opportunities Research on the Impact of Creative Arts in Military ...

  18. The effects of music therapy on pain in patients with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Korhan, Esra Akın; Uyar, Meltem; Eyigör, Can; Hakverdioğlu Yönt, Gülendam; Çelik, Serkan; Khorshıd, Leyla

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of relaxing music on pain intensity in patients with neuropathic pain. A quasi-experimental study, repeated measures design was used. Thirty patients, aged 18-70 years, with neuropathic pain and hospitalized in an Algology clinic were identified as a convenience sample. Participants received 60 minutes of music therapy. Classical Turkish music was played to patients using a media player (MP3) and headphones. Participants had pain scores taken immediately before the intervention and at the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention. Data were collected over a 6-month period in 2012. The patients' mean pain intensity scores were reduced by music, and that decrease was progressive over the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The results of this study implied that the inclusion of music therapy in the routine care of patients with neuropathic pain could provide nurses with an effective practice for reducing patients' pain intensity. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of traditional wet cupping on shoulder pain and neck pain: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Müzeyyen; Gökgöz, Nurcan; Dane, Şenol

    2016-05-01

    Wet cupping therapy (WCT) is a traditional complementary method recommended to decrease the symptoms of a lot of diseases and used in the treatment of pain syndromes. In this pilot study, the possible effects of wet cupping therapy on nonspecific neck and upper shoulder pain were investigated. Sixty one eligible volunteer participants with nonspecific neck and upper shoulder pain for at least 3 months were allocated. The Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) was used to assess pain scores. Pain scores were recorded before and after wet cupping therapy. The mean scores of neck pain in study group were 7.02 (SD = 1.8) before and 3.70 (SD = 2.2) after cupping therapy. The decrease of pain scores between pre- and post-test was statistically significant (p < 0.05). It can be stated that WCT has potential therapeutic effect in nonspecific neck and upper shoulder pain. Future full-scale randomized controlled trials will be needed to provide firm evidence of the effectiveness of this intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of neuroscience education on pain, disability, anxiety, and stress in chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Diener, Ina; Butler, David S; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of neuroscience education (NE) for pain, disability, anxiety, and stress in chronic musculoskeletal (MSK) pain. Systematic searches were conducted on Biomed Central, BMJ.com, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, NLM Central Gateway, OVID, ProQuest (Digital Dissertations), PsycInfo, PubMed/Medline, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Secondary searching (PEARLing) was undertaken, whereby reference lists of the selected articles were reviewed for additional references not identified in the primary search. All experimental studies including randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized clinical trials, and case series evaluating the effect of NE on pain, disability, anxiety, and stress for chronic MSK pain were considered for inclusion. Additional limitations: studies published in English, published within the last 10 years, and patients older than 18 years. No limitations were set on specific outcome measures of pain, disability, anxiety, and stress. Data were extracted using the participants, interventions, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) approach. Methodological quality was assessed by 2 reviewers using the Critical Review Form-Quantitative Studies. This review includes 8 studies comprising 6 high-quality RCTs, 1 pseudo-RCT, and 1 comparative study involving 401 subjects. Most articles were of good quality, with no studies rated as poor or fair. Heterogeneity across the studies with respect to participants, interventions evaluated, and outcome measures used prevented meta-analyses. Narrative synthesis of results, based on effect size, established compelling evidence that NE may be effective in reducing pain ratings, increasing function, addressing catastrophization, and improving movement in chronic MSK pain. For chronic MSK pain disorders, there is compelling evidence that an educational strategy addressing neurophysiology and neurobiology of pain can have a positive effect on pain, disability, catastrophization, and

  1. Efficacy and safety of topical Trikatu preparation in, relieving mosquito bite reactions: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Maenthaisong, Ratree; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Tiyaboonchai, Waree; Tawatsin, Apiwat; Rojanawiwat, Archawin; Thavara, Usavadee

    2014-02-01

    Trikatu is composed of dried fruits of Piper nigrum L and Piper retrofractum Vahl, and dried rhizomes of Zingiber officinale R. Although this preparation has been used to relieve pruritis, pain, and inflammation for a long time, there is no clinical evidence to confirm its efficacy and safety. Therefore, we performed a double-blind, within person-randomized controlled study of 30 healthy volunteers to determine efficacy and safety of topical Trikatu on mosquito bite reactions. All subjects were bitten by Aedes aegypti laboratory mosquitoes on their forearms and they were randomly assigned arms to apply either Trikatu or reference product on the mosquito bite papule. The main outcome was the difference of papule size reduction at 30 min, measured by a caliper, between the Trikatu and reference arms. Pruritis, redness, pain, and patient satisfaction were assessed at 15, 30, 60, 180, and 360 min as secondary outcomes. There were no significant differences between treatment and reference arms on any outcome at any time of measurement. Trikatu did not show additional effects for relieving mosquito bite reaction as compared with the reference product containing camphor, menthol, and eucalyptus. For further study, it is very important to consider a proper selection of subjects, comparator product, and concentration of extract when Trikatu preparation is investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of music on power, pain, depression and disability.

    PubMed

    Siedliecki, Sandra L; Good, Marion

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports a study testing the effect of music on power, pain, depression and disability, and comparing the effects of researcher-provided music (standard music) with subject-preferred music (patterning music). Chronic non-malignant pain is characterized by pain that persists in spite of traditional interventions. Previous studies have found music to be effective in decreasing pain and anxiety related to postoperative, procedural and cancer pain. However, the effect of music on power, pain, depression, and disability in working age adults with chronic non-malignant pain has not been investigated. A randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out with a convenience sample of 60 African American and Caucasian people aged 21-65 years with chronic non-malignant pain. They were randomly assigned to a standard music group (n = 22), patterning music group (n = 18) or control group (n = 20). Pain was measured with the McGill Pain Questionnaire short form; depression was measured with the Center for Epidemiology Studies Depression scale; disability was measured with the Pain Disability Index; and power was measured with the Power as Knowing Participation in Change Tool (version II). The music groups had more power and less pain, depression and disability than the control group, but there were no statistically significant differences between the two music interventions. The model predicting both a direct and indirect effect for music was supported. Nurses can teach patients how to use music to enhance the effects of analgesics, decrease pain, depression and disability, and promote feelings of power.

  3. Effect of palliative oxygen versus medical (room) air in relieving breathlessness in patients with refractory dyspnea: a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Abernethy, Amy P.; McDonald, Christine F.; Frith, Peter A.; Clark, Katherine; Herndon, James E.; Marcello, Jennifer; Young, Iven H.; Bull, Janet; Wilcock, Andrew; Booth, Sara; Wheeler, Jane L.; Tulsky, James A.; Crockett, Alan J.; Currow, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Palliative oxygen therapy is widely used for dyspnea in individuals with life-limiting illness ineligible for long-term oxygen therapy. Methods This international double-blind randomized controlled trial evaluatedeffectiveness of oxygen vs. medical (room) air for relieving breathlessness in patients with life-limiting illness, refractory dyspnea, and PaO2>55 mm Hg. Participants were recruited from outpatient clinics at 9 sites (Australia, United States, England). Participants received oxygen or medical air via concentrator through nasal cannulae at 2 liters/minute for 7 days. The primary outcome measure was breathlessness (0-10 numerical rating scale [NRS]), measured twice daily. Findings Participants (N=239) were: mean age, 73 (standard deviation [SD] 10); 62% male; mean PaO2, 77 mm Hg (SD 12); mean morning dyspnea, 4.5 on NRS (SD 2.2); chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 64%; cancer, 16%. Oxygen was not significantly superior to medical air for relief of breathlessness. Over the 7-day period, after provision of medical gas, mean morning and evening dyspnea decreased by -0.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.1, -0.5) and -0.4 (CI: -0.7, 0.1), respectively (p<0.001), regardless of intervention. Baseline dyspnea predicted improvement with medical gas; participants with moderate (4-6 NRS) and severe (7-10 NRS) baseline dyspnea had average decreases in morning dyspnea of -0.7 (CI: -1.1, -0.4) and -2.4 (CI: -3.0, -1.8), respectively. Interpretation There is no additional symptomatic benefit of oxygen over room air delivered by nasal cannulae for relieving refractory dyspnea related to life-limiting illness in patients with PaO2>55 mm Hg. Dyspnea intensity decreased in both study arms, temporally related to provision of medical gas. PMID:20816546

  4. Effect of kangaroo mother care vs expressed breast milk administration on pain associated with removal of adhesive tape in very low birth weight neonates: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, Ruchi N; Balan, Rajiv; Kabra, Nandkishor S

    2013-11-08

    To compare the pain relief effect of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) and Expressed Breast Milk (EBM) on the pain associated with adhesive tape removal in very low birth weight (VLBW) neonates. Randomized Controlled Trial. Neonatal intensive care unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital. 15 VLBW neonates who needed adhesive tape removal for the first part and 50 VLBW neonates needing adhesive tape removal for the second part. In first stage of the study, we studied whether adhesive tape removal in VLBW neonates was painful. In the second stage, eligible VLBW neonates were randomised to compare the efficacy of KMC and EBM in reducing the pain during the procedure of adhesive tape removal. Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) Score, heart rate, oxygen saturation. There was significant increase in pain associated with the removal of adhesive tape (Mean pre-procedure PIPP score 3.47 ± 0.74; post-procedure mean PIPP score 12.13 ± 2.59; P<0.0001). The post intervention mean PIPP pain score was not significantly different between the KMC and EBM groups (P= 0.62). Removal of adhesive tape is a painful procedure for VLBW neonates. There was no difference between KMC and EBM in relieving pain associated with adhesive tape removal.

  5. Effect of manipulated state aggression on pain tolerance.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Richard; Allsop, Claire

    2012-08-01

    Swearing produces a pain lessening (hypoalgesic) effect for many people; an emotional response may be the underlying mechanism. In this paper, the role of manipulated state aggression on pain tolerance and pain perception is assessed. In a repeated-measures design, pain outcomes were assessed in participants asked to play for 10 minutes a first-person shooter video game vs a golf video game. Sex differences were explored. After playing the first-person shooter video game, aggressive cognitions, aggressive affect, heart rate, and cold pressor latency were increased, and pain perception was decreased. These data indicate that people become more pain tolerant with raised state aggression and support our theory that raised pain tolerance from swearing occurs via an emotional response.

  6. Effects of Listening to Music versus Environmental Sounds in Passive and Active Situations on Levels of Pain and Fatigue in Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Mercadíe, Lolita; Mick, Gérard; Guétin, Stéphane; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    In fibromyalgia, pain symptoms such as hyperalgesia and allodynia are associated with fatigue. Mechanisms underlying such symptoms can be modulated by listening to pleasant music. We expected that listening to music, because of its emotional impact, would have a greater modulating effect on the perception of pain and fatigue in patients with fibromyalgia than listening to nonmusical sounds. To investigate this hypothesis, we carried out a 4-week study in which patients with fibromyalgia listened to either preselected musical pieces or environmental sounds when they experienced pain in active (while carrying out a physical activity) or passive (at rest) situations. Concomitant changes of pain and fatigue levels were evaluated. When patients listened to music or environmental sounds at rest, pain and fatigue levels were significantly reduced after 20 minutes of listening, with no difference of effect magnitude between the two stimuli. This improvement persisted 10 minutes after the end of the listening session. In active situations, pain did not increase in presence of the two stimuli. Contrary to our expectations, music and environmental sounds produced a similar relieving effect on pain and fatigue, with no benefit gained by listening to pleasant music over environmental sounds. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of exercise frequency on neuropathic pain and pain-related cellular reactions in the spinal cord and midbrain in a rat sciatic nerve injury model

    PubMed Central

    Sumizono, Megumi; Otsuka, Shotaro; Terashi, Takuto; Nakanishi, Kazuki; Ueda, Koki; Takada, Seiya; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi

    2018-01-01

    Background Exercise regimens are established methods that can relieve neuropathic pain. However, the relationship between frequency and intensity of exercise and multiple cellular responses of exercise-induced alleviation of neuropathic pain is still unclear. We examined the influence of exercise frequency on neuropathic pain and the intracellular responses in a sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Materials and methods Rats were assigned to four groups as follows: CCI and high-frequency exercise (HFE group), CCI and low-frequency exercise (LFE group), CCI and no exercise (No-Ex group), and naive animals (control group). Rats ran on a treadmill, at a speed of 20 m/min, for 30 min, for 5 (HFE) or 3 (LFE) days a week, for a total of 5 weeks. The 50% withdrawal threshold was evaluated for mechanical sensitivity. The activation of glial cells (microglia and astrocytes), expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and μ-opioid receptor in the spinal dorsal horn and endogenous opioid in the midbrain were examined using immunohistochemistry. Opioid receptor antagonists (naloxone) were administered using intraperitoneal injection. Results The development of neuropathic pain was related to the activation of glial cells, increased BDNF expression, and downregulation of the μ-opioid receptor in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn. In the No-Ex group, neuropathic pain showed the highest level of mechanical hypersensitivity at 2 weeks, which improved slightly until 5 weeks after CCI. In both exercise groups, the alleviation of neuropathic pain was accelerated through the regulation of glial activation, BDNF expression, and the endogenous opioid system. The expression of BDNF and endogenous opioid in relation to exercise-induced alleviation of neuropathic pain differed in the HFE and LFE groups. The effects of exercise-induced alleviation of mechanical hypersensitivity were reversed by the administration of naloxone. Conclusion The LFE and HFE

  8. Disentangling opposing effects of motivational states on pain perception

    PubMed Central

    Geuter, Stephan; Cunningham, Jonathan T.; Wager, Tor D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Although the motivation to avoid injury and pain is central to human and animal behavior, this goal compete priority with other homeostatic goals. Animal studies have shown that competing motivational states, such as thirst, reduce pain. However, such states may also induce negative mood, which in humans has been found to increase pain. These opposing effects complicate study of the effects of motivational states in humans. Objectives: To evaluate concurrent effects of motivational state competition and mood on pain ratings. Methods: We compared a thirst challenge against a control group and measured thirst and mood as potential mediators. Pain induced through contact heat stimulation on the left forearm and was tested at 3 time points: before group randomization, after thirst induction, and after rehydration. Results: Overall, the thirst group reported more pain when thirsty compared with baseline and controls. Mediation analyses showed evidence for two opposing effects. First, the thirst challenge increased negative mood and thirstiness, which was related to increased pain. Second, the thirst challenge produced a direct, pain-reducing effect. Conclusion: Competing motivational states reduce pain but also induce concurrent mood changes that can mask motivational state-related effects. PMID:27747310

  9. Analgesic effectiveness of D-phenylalanine in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, N E; Ramamurthy, S; Schoenfeld, L; Hoffman, J

    1986-07-01

    Enkephalins are a biochemical pathway for endogenous analgesia. A number of compounds inhibit degradation of enkephalins within the body. One of these compounds, D-phenylalanine (DPA), has been shown to increase the pain threshold in animals. It is hypothesized that this naloxone reversible analgesia is induced by DPA blockage of enkephalin degradation by the enzyme carboxypeptidase A. Preliminary studies of chronic pain patients have shown a response rate to DPA from 32% to 75%. This study was a double-blind crossover evaluation of a randomized parallel design to determine the efficacy of DPA in 30 subjects with chronic pain from varied etiology which was unrelieved by multiple therapeutic interventions. Each patient received a stabilized therapeutic regimen during this study consisting of four weeks of either DPA 250 mg or lactose (placebo) orally four times a day. After four weeks the DPA and placebo groups were crossed over for an additional four weeks of treatment. Pain was quantified using a visual analog pain scale and a cold pressor test. Data from the pain questionnaires revealed more pain relief on DPA reported by 25% of the patients, more pain relief on placebo reported by 22% of the patients, and no difference in pain relief reported by 53% of the patients. Lowest pain level of the visual analog scale was reported by 47% of the patients on DPA and 53% on placebo. There appears to be no significant analgesic effect from D-phenylalanine in chronic pain patients when compared to placebo.

  10. The effect of culture on pain sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Al-Harthy, M; Ohrbach, R; Michelotti, A; List, T

    2016-02-01

    Cross-cultural differences in pain sensitivity have been identified in pain-free subjects as well as in chronic pain patients. The aim was to assess the impact of culture on psychophysical measures using mechanical and electrical stimuli in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain and pain-free matched controls in three cultures. This case-control study compared 122 female cases of chronic TMD pain (39 Saudis, 41 Swedes and 42 Italians) with equal numbers of age- and gender-matched TMD-free controls. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) and tolerance (PPTo) were measured over one hand and two masticatory muscles. Electrical perception threshold and electrical pain threshold (EPT) and tolerance (EPTo) were recorded between the thumb and index fingers. Italian females reported significantly lower PPT in the masseter muscle than other cultures (P < 0.001) and in the temporalis muscle than Saudis (P = 0.003). Swedes reported significantly higher PPT in the thenar muscle than other cultures (P = 0.017). Italians reported significantly lower PPTo in all muscles than Swedes (P ≤ 0.006) and in the masseter muscle than Saudis (P < 0.001). Italians reported significantly lower EPTo than other cultures (P = 0.01). Temporomandibular disorder cases, compared to TMD-free controls, reported lower PPT and PPTo in all the three muscles (P < 0.001). This study found cultural differences between groups in the PPT, PPTo and EPTo. Overall, Italian females reported the highest sensitivity to both mechanical and electrical stimulation, while Swedes reported the lowest sensitivity. Mechanical pain thresholds differed more across cultures than did electrical pain thresholds. Cultural factors may influence response to type of pain test. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effect of Radiofrequency Denervation on Pain Intensity Among Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Juch, Johan N. S.; Ostelo, Raymond W. J. G.; Groeneweg, J. George; Kallewaard, Jan-Willem; Koes, Bart W.; Verhagen, Arianne P.; van Dongen, Johanna M.; Huygen, Frank J. P. M.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Radiofrequency denervation is a commonly used treatment for chronic low back pain, but high-quality evidence for its effectiveness is lacking. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of radiofrequency denervation added to a standardized exercise program for patients with chronic low back pain. Design, Setting, and Participants Three pragmatic multicenter, nonblinded randomized clinical trials on the effectiveness of minimal interventional treatments for participants with chronic low back pain (Mint study) were conducted in 16 multidisciplinary pain clinics in the Netherlands. Eligible participants were included between January 1, 2013, and October 24, 2014, and had chronic low back pain, a positive diagnostic block at the facet joints (facet joint trial, 251 participants), sacroiliac joints (sacroiliac joint trial, 228 participants), or a combination of facet joints, sacroiliac joints, or intervertebral disks (combination trial, 202 participants) and were unresponsive to conservative care. Interventions All participants received a 3-month standardized exercise program and psychological support if needed. Participants in the intervention group received radiofrequency denervation as well. This is usually a 1-time procedure, but the maximum number of treatments in the trial was 3. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was pain intensity (numeric rating scale, 0-10; whereby 0 indicated no pain and 10 indicated worst pain imaginable) measured 3 months after the intervention. The prespecified minimal clinically important difference was defined as 2 points or more. Final follow-up was at 12 months, ending October 2015. Results Among 681 participants who were randomized (mean age, 52.2 years; 421 women [61.8%], mean baseline pain intensity, 7.1), 599 (88%) completed the 3-month follow-up, and 521 (77%) completed the 12-month follow-up. The mean difference in pain intensity between the radiofrequency denervation and control groups at 3 months was −0

  12. Analgesic Effect of Xenon in Rat Model of Inflammatory Pain.

    PubMed

    Kukushkin, M L; Igon'kina, S I; Potapov, S V; Potapov, A V

    2017-02-01

    The analgesic effects of inert gas xenon were examined on rats. The formalin model of inflammatory pain, tail-flick test, and hot-plate test revealed the antinociceptive effects of subanesthetizing doses of inhalation anesthetic xenon. Inhalation of 50/50 xenon/oxygen mixture moderated the nociceptive responses during acute and tonic phases of inflammatory pain.

  13. Spontaneous Chronic Pain After Experimental Thoracotomy Revealed by Conditioned Place Preference: Morphine Differentiates Tactile Evoked Pain From Spontaneous Pain.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jeffrey Chi-Fei; Strichartz, Gary R

    2015-09-01

    Chronic pain after surgery limits social activity, interferes with work, and causes emotional suffering. A major component of such pain is reported as resting or spontaneous pain with no apparent external stimulus. Although experimental animal models can simulate the stimulus-evoked chronic pain that occurs after surgery, there have been no studies of spontaneous chronic pain in such models. Here the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm was used to reveal resting pain after experimental thoracotomy. Male Sprague Dawley rats received a thoracotomy with 1-hour rib retraction, resulting in evoked tactile hypersensitivity, previously shown to last for at least 9 weeks. Intraperitoneal injections of morphine (2.5 mg/kg) or gabapentin (40 mg/kg) gave equivalent 2- to 3-hour-long relief of tactile hypersensitivity when tested 12 to 14 days postoperatively. In separate experiments, single trial CPP was conducted 1 week before thoracotomy and then 12 days (gabapentin) or 14 days (morphine) after surgery, followed the next day by 1 conditioning session with morphine or gabapentin, both versus saline. The gabapentin-conditioned but not the morphine-conditioned rats showed a significant preference for the analgesia-paired chamber, despite the equivalent effect of the 2 agents in relieving tactile allodynia. These results show that experimental thoracotomy in rats causes spontaneous pain and that some analgesics, such as morphine, that reduce evoked pain do not also relieve resting pain, suggesting that pathophysiological mechanisms differ between these 2 aspects of long-term postoperative pain. Perspective: Spontaneous pain, a hallmark of chronic postoperative pain, is demonstrated here in a rat model of experimental postthoracotomy pain, further validating the use of this model for the development of analgesics to treat such symptoms. Although stimulus-evoked pain was sensitive to systemic morphine, spontaneous pain was not, suggesting different mechanistic

  14. The short-term effects of TENS plus therapeutic ultrasound combinations in chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Sayilir, Selcuk

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the effects of TENS plus therapeutic ultrasound combinations on symptom relief, physical functionality, perceived stress levels, daytime sleepiness and neck mobility in patients with chronic neck pain (CNP). A total of 64 patients were divided into two groups as the TENS plus ultrasound group (n = 39) and the control CNP group (n = 25). The therapy comprised TENS and therapeutic ultrasound applications for 10 sessions. The control subjects were discouraged from using analgesics but were allowed to use paracetamol daily, if necessary. The Neck Disability Index (NDI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), visual analog scale (VAS) and tragus-wall/chin-manubrium distances were recorded at the baseline and after therapy. Significant improvements were detected in the TENS plus ultrasound group compared to the control CNP subjects in respect of VAS, PSS and NDI scores after the TENS plus therapeutic ultrasound therapies (all p < 0.05). The combination of therapeutic ultrasound plus TENS can be an effective modality for relieving pain/stress levels and improving functionality in the short-term of CNP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Brain mediators of predictive cue effects on perceived pain

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, Lauren Y.; Bolger, Niall; Lindquist, Martin A.; Wager, Tor D.

    2010-01-01

    Information about upcoming pain strongly influences pain experience in experimental and clinical settings, but little is known about the brain mechanisms that link expectation and experience. To identify the pathways by which informational cues influence perception, analyses must jointly consider both the effects of cues on brain responses and the relationship between brain responses and changes in reported experience. Our task and analysis strategy were designed to test these relationships. Auditory cues elicited expectations for low or high painful thermal stimulation, and we assessed how cues influenced human subjects’ pain reports and BOLD fMRI responses to matched levels of noxious heat. We used multi-level mediation analysis to identify brain regions that 1) are modulated by predictive cues, 2) predict trial-to-trial variations in pain reports, and 3) formally mediate the relationship between cues and reported pain. Cues influenced heat-evoked responses in most canonical pain-processing regions, including both medial and lateral pain pathways. Effects on several regions correlated with pre-task expectations, suggesting that expectancy plays a prominent role. A subset of pain-processing regions, including anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and thalamus, formally mediated cue effects on pain. Effects on these regions were in turn mediated by cue-evoked anticipatory activity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and ventral striatum, areas not previously directly implicated in nociception. These results suggest that activity in pain-processing regions reflects a combination of nociceptive input and top-down information related to expectations, and that anticipatory processes in OFC and striatum may play a key role in modulating pain processing. PMID:20881115

  16. Why Do I Have Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Sprains Are a Pain What Is an Ear Infection? Headaches How Do Pain Relievers ... All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, ...

  17. Effects of non-pharmacological pain treatments on brain states

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Sherlin, Leslie H.; Askew, Robert L.; Fregni, Felipe; Witkop, Gregory; Gianas, Ann; Howe, Jon D.; Hakimian, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To (1) evaluate the effects of a single session of four non-pharmacological pain interventions, relative to a sham tDCS procedure, on pain and electroencephalogram- (EEG-) assessed brain oscillations, and (2) determine the extent to which procedure-related changes in pain intensity are associated with changes in brain oscillations. Methods 30 individuals with spinal cord injury and chronic pain were given an EEG and administered measures of pain before and after five procedures (hypnosis, meditation, transcranial direct current stimulation [tDCS], and neurofeedback) and a control sham tDCS procedure. Results Each procedure was associated with a different pattern of changes in brain activity, and all active procedures were significantly different from the control procedure in at least three bandwidths. Very weak and mostly non-significant associations were found between changes in EEG-assessed brain activity and pain. Conclusions Different non-pharmacological pain treatments have distinctive effects on brain oscillation patterns. However, changes in EEG-assessed brain oscillations are not significantly associated with changes in pain, and therefore such changes do not appear useful for explaining the benefits of these treatments. Significance The results provide new findings regarding the unique effects of four non-pharmacological treatments on pain and brain activity. PMID:23706958

  18. Effective Spine Triage: Patterns of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Hamilton

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common cause of recurring lost time from work, low back pain is a huge burden on society. Medical training dictates that we must establish a cause for pain before we can treat it and then base our treatment on a recognized and agreed-upon pathology. But in the overwhelming majority of low back pain cases, the issue is nothing more than a minor mechanical malfunction, the inevitable consequence of normal wear and tear. The severity of the pain does not reflect the benign nature of the underlying problem and its limited extent makes a definitive diagnosis impossible. One important component of the solution is improved spinal triage. Using patterns or syndromes in the initial assessment of low back pain is gaining renewed interest and clinical acceptance. Methods Identifying a patient's pain pattern is achieved primarily through an assessment of the patient's history. The patient interview begins with a series of questions to determine the specific syndrome. A subsequent physical examination supports or refutes the findings in history. Combining information from the history with the findings of the physical examination, the clinician has the ability to rule out a number of potentially grim diagnoses. Results More than 90% of back pain patients have benign mechanical problems and their pain can be classified into 4 distinct patterns: 2 back-dominant patterns and 2 leg-dominant patterns. Conclusion A clinical perspective capable of recognizing a defined syndrome at first contact will lead to a better outcome. Most patients with low back pain can be treated successfully with simple, pattern-specific, noninvasive primary management. Patients without a pattern and those who do not respond as anticipated require further investigation and specialized care. PMID:24688339

  19. Effective spine triage: patterns of pain.

    PubMed

    Hall, Hamilton

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of recurring lost time from work, low back pain is a huge burden on society. Medical training dictates that we must establish a cause for pain before we can treat it and then base our treatment on a recognized and agreed-upon pathology. But in the overwhelming majority of low back pain cases, the issue is nothing more than a minor mechanical malfunction, the inevitable consequence of normal wear and tear. The severity of the pain does not reflect the benign nature of the underlying problem and its limited extent makes a definitive diagnosis impossible. One important component of the solution is improved spinal triage. Using patterns or syndromes in the initial assessment of low back pain is gaining renewed interest and clinical acceptance. Identifying a patient's pain pattern is achieved primarily through an assessment of the patient's history. The patient interview begins with a series of questions to determine the specific syndrome. A subsequent physical examination supports or refutes the findings in history. Combining information from the history with the findings of the physical examination, the clinician has the ability to rule out a number of potentially grim diagnoses. More than 90% of back pain patients have benign mechanical problems and their pain can be classified into 4 distinct patterns: 2 back-dominant patterns and 2 leg-dominant patterns. A clinical perspective capable of recognizing a defined syndrome at first contact will lead to a better outcome. Most patients with low back pain can be treated successfully with simple, pattern-specific, noninvasive primary management. Patients without a pattern and those who do not respond as anticipated require further investigation and specialized care.

  20. The effect of pain on task switching: pain reduces accuracy and increases reaction times across multiple switching paradigms.

    PubMed

    Attridge, Nina; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    Pain disrupts attention, which may have negative consequences for daily life for people with acute or chronic pain. It has been suggested that switching between tasks may leave us particularly susceptible to pain-related attentional disruption, because we need to disengage our attention from one task before shifting it onto another. Switching tasks typically elicit lower accuracies and/or longer reaction times when participants switch to a new task compared with repeating the same task, and pain may exacerbate this effect. We present 3 studies to test this hypothesis. In study 1, participants completed 2 versions of an alternating runs switching task under pain-free and thermal pain-induction conditions. Pain did not affect performance on either task. In studies 2 and 3, we examined 7 versions of the switching task using large general population samples, experiencing a variety of naturally occurring pain conditions, recruited and tested on the internet. On all tasks, participants with pain had longer reaction times on both switch and repeat trials compared with participants without pain, but pain did not increase switch costs. In studies 2 and 3, we also investigated the effects of type of pain, duration of pain, and analgesics on task performance. We conclude that pain has a small dampening effect on performance overall on switching tasks. This suggests that pain interrupts attention even when participants are engaged in a trial, not only when attention has been disengaged for shifting to a new task set.

  1. Efficacy of the device combining high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and thermotherapy for relieving primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Banghyun; Hong, Seung Hwa; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Wee Chang; No, Jae Hong; Lee, Jung Ryeol; Jee, Byung Chul; Yang, Eun Joo; Cha, Eun-Jong; Kim, Yong Beom

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of the combined therapy with high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (hf-TENS) and thermotherapy in relieving primary dysmenorrheal pain. In this randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study, 115 women with moderate or severe primary dysmenorrhea were assigned to the study or control group at a ratio of 1:1. Subjects in the study group used an integrated hf-TENS/thermotherapy device, whereas control subjects used a sham device. A visual analog scale was used to measure pain intensity. Variables related to pain relief, including reduction rate of dysmenorrheal score, were compared between the groups. The dysmenorrheal score was significantly reduced in the study group compared to the control group following the use of the devices. The duration of pain relief was significantly increased in the study group compared to the control group. There were no differences between the groups in the brief pain inventory scores, numbers of ibuprofen tablets taken orally, and World Health Organization quality of life-BREF scores. No adverse events were observed related to the use of the study device. The combination of hf-TENS and thermotherapy was effective in relieving acute pain in women with moderate or severe primary dysmenorrhea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Acupuncture for Cancer-Induced Bone Pain?

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Carole A.; Bennett, Michael I.; Johnson, Mark I.

    2011-01-01

    Bone pain is the most common type of pain in cancer. Bony metastases are common in advanced cancers, particularly in multiple myeloma, breast, prostate or lung cancer. Current pain-relieving strategies include the use of opioid-based analgesia, bisphosphonates and radiotherapy. Although patients experience some pain relief, these interventions may produce unacceptable side-effects which inevitably affect the quality of life. Acupuncture may represent a potentially valuable adjunct to existing strategies for pain relief and it is known to be relatively free of harmful side-effects. Although acupuncture is used in palliative care settings for all types of cancer pain the evidence-base is sparse and inconclusive and there is very little evidence to show its effectiveness in relieving cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP). The aim of this critical review is to consider the known physiological effects of acupuncture and discuss these in the context of the pathophysiology of malignant bone pain. The aim of future research should be to produce an effective protocol for treating CIBP with acupuncture based on a sound, evidence-based rationale. The physiological mechanisms presented in this review suggest that this is a realistic objective. PMID:21799687

  3. Effect of Pain and Mild Cognitive Impairment on Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Schepker, Caroline A.; Leveille, Suzanne G.; Pedersen, Mette M.; Ward, Rachel E.; Kurlinski, Laura A.; Grande, Laura; Kiely, Dan K.; Bean, Jonathan F.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Pain, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and mobility limitations are common among older adults. The separate and combined effect of pain and MCI on mobility has not yet been elucidated. This study examines the associations of pain and MCI on performance-based and patient-reported mobility outcomes among older primary care patients with mild-to-moderate self-reported mobility limitations. Design Cross-sectional analysis. Setting Academic community outpatient clinic. Participants 430 primary care patients aged ≥ 65 years at risk for mobility decline enrolled in the Boston Rehabilitative Impairment Study in the Elderly. Measurements The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) identified participants with an average score of >3 with pain. MCI was defined using age-adjusted scores on a neuropsychological battery. Multivariable linear regression models assessed associations between Pain/MCI status and mobility performance (habitual gait speed, the Short Physical Performance Battery), and patient reports (Late Life Function and Disability Instrument [LLFDI]). Results The prevalence of pain and MCI were 34% and 42%, respectively. Pain only and MCI only were present among 17% and 25%, respectively. Both pain and MCI was present in 17%; 41% had neither condition. Participants with both pain and MCI performed significantly worse than all others on all mobility outcomes (p<0.001). Participants with MCI only or pain only also performed significantly worse in all mobility outcomes as compared to participants with neither condition (p<0.001). Conclusion The presence of mild-to-moderate pain or MCI was independently associated with poor mobility status, and the presence of both comorbidities was associated with the poorest status. Primary care practitioners who encounter older patients in need of mobility rehabilitation should consider both pain and MCI within their screening tools and paradigms of care. PMID:26782863

  4. Effect of Aromatherapy Massage on Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathic Pain and Fatigue in Patients Receiving Oxaliplatin: An Open Label Quasi-Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Izgu, Nur; Ozdemir, Leyla; Bugdayci Basal, Fatma

    2017-12-02

    Patients receiving oxaliplatin may experience peripheral neuropathic pain and fatigue. Aromatherapy massage, a nonpharmacological method, may help to control these symptoms. The aim of this open-label, parallel-group, quasi-randomized controlled pilot study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy massage on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathic pain and fatigue in patients receiving oxaliplatin. Stratified randomization was used to allocate 46 patients to 2 groups: intervention (n = 22) and control (n = 24). Between week 1 and week 6, participants in the intervention group (IG) received aromatherapy massage 3 times a week. There was no intervention in weeks 7 and 8. The control group (CG) received routine care. Neuropathic pain was identified using the Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions; severity of painful paresthesia was assessed with the numerical rating scale; fatigue severity was identified with the Piper Fatigue Scale. At week 6, the rate of neuropathic pain was significantly lower in the IG, when compared with the CG. The severity of painful paresthesia based on numerical rating scale in the IG was significantly lower than that in the CG at weeks 2, 4, and 6. At week 8, fatigue severity in the IG was significantly lower when compared with CG (P < .05). Aromatherapy massage may be useful in the management of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathic pain and fatigue. This pilot study suggests that aromatherapy massage may be useful to relieve neuropathic pain and fatigue. However, there is a need for further clinical trials to validate the results of this study.

  5. Is the Use of Dexamethasone Effective in Controlling Pain Associated with Symptomatic Irreversible Pulpitis? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Brenna M L; Silva, Ludmylla G; Mesquita, Carla R M; Menezes, Sílvio A F; Menezes, Tatiany O A; Faria, Antônio G M; Porpino, Mariana T M

    2018-05-01

    Endodontic pain is a symptom of pulpal and/or periapical inflammation. One strategy for pain reduction is using medications, such as dexamethasone. A definitive protocol for preventing and controlling pain caused by irreversible pulpitis during endodontic treatment has not yet been established. This is a systematic review to answer the following question: is the use of dexamethasone effective in controlling pain associated with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis? This study was registered in the PROSPERO database (CRD42017058704), and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement recommendations were followed. MEDLINE, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar databases were used in our research. No restrictions were applied to dates or language of publication. All records identified electronically were organized and evaluated by 2 independent authors, and, in case of doubt, a third author made the decision. The Cochrane Collaboration tool was used. The data were analyzed with RevMan 5 software (The Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, Denmark), and data from eligible studies were dichotomous (with and without pain). A total of 4825 studies were identified. After screening, 523 studies were selected, and, after careful evaluation, only 5 articles remained. All meta-analyses revealed a global effect (P < .05, P < .05, and P < .05), which means that 4 mg dexamethasone helps relieve pain, sometimes for up to 8, 12, and 24 hours. The pain felt by patients diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis may be alleviated by administering 4 mg dexamethasone either by mouth or through intraligamentary and mainly supraperiosteal injections into the root canal for up to 24 hours. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effects of therapeutic touch on pain.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Carolyn Magdalen

    2009-06-01

    To better understand how Therapeutic Touch can be used in today's health care arena, this integrative literature review will examine current research that will help answer the question, Does Therapeutic Touch reduce pain? An extensive search was conducted of the online databases MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PsychLIT, and PubMed to retrieve research articles published from 1997 to 2007. Seven studies that were conducted between 1997 and 2004 were found and only five of the seven were included as pertinent evidence to answer the question. All of the research that was reviewed to answer whether Therapeutic Touch could significantly reduce pain revealed a majority of statistically significant positive results for implementing this intervention. Because there are no identified risks to Therapeutic Touch as a pain relief measure, it is safe to recommend despite the limitations of current research. Therapeutic Touch should be considered among the many possible nursing interventions for the treatment of pain.

  7. Effects of Pain Acceptance and Pain Control Strategies on Physical Impairment in Individuals with Chronic Low Back Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vowles, Kevin E.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Gross, Richard T.; McDaniel, Michael L.; Mouse, Angela; Bates, Mick; Gallimore, Paula; McCall, Cindy

    2007-01-01

    Psychosocial treatments for chronic pain are effective. There is a need, however, to understand the processes involved in determining how these treatments contribute to behavior change. Control and acceptance strategies represent two potentially important processes involved in treatment, although they differ significantly in approach. Results from…

  8. Comparison of the analgesic effects of oral tramadol and naproxen sodium on pain relief during IUD insertion.

    PubMed

    Karabayirli, Safinaz; Ayrim, Aylin Aker; Muslu, Bunyamin

    2012-01-01

    To compare the analgesic efficacy of oral tramadol and naproxen sodium on pain during insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD). Randomized, double-blinded, clinical trial (Canadian Task Force classification I). University-affiliated hospital. Single-center. One hundred three patients scheduled for insertion of an IUD. Patients were randomly assigned to receive oral tramadol 50 mg capsules (n = 35) or naproxen sodium 550 mg tablets (n = 34) or placebo (n = 34) 1 hour before insertion of the IUD. After insertion of the IUD, pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS, 0-10). Adverse effects, patient satisfaction with the medication, and preference for using it during future insertions were also recorded. The VAS scores were significantly different during IUD insertion among the 3 groups (p = .001). Pain scores in the tramadol group were significantly lower than in the naproxen group (p = .003), and the scores in the naproxen group was significantly lower than in the control group (p = .001). Patient satisfaction with the medication and preference for its future use were significantly lower in the control group than in the other 2 groups (p = .001). Prophylactic analgesia using 50 mg tramadol and 550 mg naproxen, delivered orally, can be used to relieve pain during IUD insertion. However, tramadol capsules were found to be more effective than naproxen tablets. Copyright © 2012 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of insoles on foot pain and daily activities.

    PubMed

    Amer, Ahmed O; Jarl, Gustav M; Hermansson, Liselotte N

    2014-12-01

    Foot pain decreases individuals' ability to perform daily activities. Insoles are often prescribed to reduce the pain which, in turn, may promote return to normal activities. To evaluate the effects of insoles on foot pain and daily activities, and to investigate the relationship between individuals' satisfaction with insoles and actual use of them. A 4-week pre-post intervention follow-up. Brief Pain Inventory, International Physical Activity Questionnaire and Lower Extremities Functional Status were used as outcome measures. Client Satisfaction with Device was used in the follow-up. A total of 67 participants answered the questionnaires (81% women). Overall, a reduction in Pain Severity (p = 0.002) and Pain Interference (p = 0.008) was shown. Secondary analyses revealed a significant effect only in women. No changes in daily activities (Walking, p = 0.867; Total Physical Activity, p = 0.842; Lower Extremities Functional Status, p = 0.939) could be seen. There was no relation between Client Satisfaction with Device measures and duration of insole use. A difference in sex was shown; women scored higher than men on Pain Severity. Insoles reduce pain and pain interference with daily activities for women with foot pain. Satisfaction with the insoles is not a predictor of actual insole use. The effect of insoles on activity performance needs further study. This study provides evidence for prescribing insoles to people with foot pain. Nonetheless, insoles are not enough to increase their physical activity level in the short term. Satisfaction with insoles and duration of use are not correlated and cannot be inferred from each other. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  10. Brain mediators of the effects of noxious heat on pain.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Lauren Y; Lindquist, Martin A; Bolger, Niall; Wager, Tor D

    2014-08-01

    Recent human neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural correlates of either noxious stimulus intensity or reported pain. Although useful, analyzing brain relationships with stimulus intensity and behavior separately does not address how sensation and pain are linked in the central nervous system. In this study, we used multi-level mediation analysis to identify brain mediators of pain--regions in which trial-by-trial responses to heat explained variability in the relationship between noxious stimulus intensity (across 4 levels) and pain. This approach has the potential to identify multiple circuits with complementary roles in pain genesis. Brain mediators of noxious heat effects on pain included targets of ascending nociceptive pathways (anterior cingulate, insula, SII, and medial thalamus) and also prefrontal and subcortical regions not associated with nociceptive pathways per se. Cluster analysis revealed that mediators were grouped into several distinct functional networks, including the following: somatosensory, paralimbic, and striatal-cerebellar networks that increased with stimulus intensity; and 2 networks co-localized with "default mode" regions in which stimulus intensity-related decreases mediated increased pain. We also identified "thermosensory" regions that responded to increasing noxious heat but did not predict pain reports. Finally, several regions did not respond to noxious input, but their activity predicted pain; these included ventromedial prefrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, cerebellar regions, and supplementary motor cortices. These regions likely underlie both nociceptive and non-nociceptive processes that contribute to pain, such as attention and decision-making processes. Overall, these results elucidate how multiple distinct brain systems jointly contribute to the central generation of pain. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of a program to promote play to reduce children's post-surgical pain: with plush toys, it hurts less.

    PubMed

    Ullán, Ana M; Belver, Manuel H; Fernández, Esperanza; Lorente, Felix; Badía, Marta; Fernández, Beatriz

    2014-03-01

    Various nonpharmacological strategies to relieve hospitalized children's pain propose play as a central element. Play is considered an essential resource to improve the negative psychosocial effects of the disease and the hospitalization itself. However, the empirical research of play in health settings has not received much attention. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of a program to promote play in the hospital on postsurgical pain in pediatric patients. The research hypothesis was that children will manifest less pain if they are distracted through play during the postsurgical period. We carried out a randomized parallel trial with two groups, an experimental group and a control group. The control group did not receive any specific treatment, only the standard attention contemplated in the hospital. The parents of the children from the experimental group received instructions to play with their children in the postsurgical period and specific play material with which to play. The results obtained support the research hypothesis. On average, the children from the experimental group scored lower on a pain scale than the children from the control group. This occurred in the three postsurgical measurements of pain. It is concluded that the program to promote play can decrease children's perception of pain. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Depression Treatment on Chronic Pain Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Carrie Farmer; Zaslavsky, Alan; Reynolds, Charles F.; Cleary, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective People with chronic pain and depression have worse health outcomes than those with chronic pain alone. Little is known about the effectiveness of depression treatment for this population. We examined the effect of depression treatment on medical and social outcomes for individuals with chronic pain and depression Methods Propensity score weighted analyses using both waves (1997-1998 and 2000-2001) of the National Survey of Alcohol, Drug, and Mental Health Problems were used to examine the effect of (1) any depression treatment and (2) minimally adequate depression treatment on persistence of depression symptoms, depression severity, pain severity, overall health, mental health status, physical health status, social functioning, employment status, and number of work days missed. Analyses were limited to those who met CIDI-SF criteria for major depressive disorder, reported having at least one chronic pain condition, and completed both interviews (n=553). Results Receiving any depression treatment was associated with higher scores on the mental component summary of the MOS SF-12, indicating better mental health (difference = 2.65 points, p=0.002) and less interference of pain on work (OR=0.57, p=0.02). Among those receiving treatment, minimal adequacy of treatment was not significantly associated with better outcomes. Conclusions Depression treatment improves mental health and reduces the effects of pain on work among those with chronic pain and depression. Understanding the effect of depression treatment on outcomes for this population is important for employers, healthcare providers treating this population, and policymakers working in this Decade of Pain Control and Research to improve care for chronic pain sufferers. PMID:19875633

  13. Effect of depression treatment on chronic pain outcomes.

    PubMed

    Teh, Carrie Farmer; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Reynolds, Charles F; Cleary, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effect of depression treatment on medical and social outcomes for individuals with chronic pain and depression. People with chronic pain and depression have worse health outcomes than those with chronic pain alone. Little is known about the effectiveness of depression treatment for this population. Propensity score-weighted analyses, using both waves (1997-1998 and 2000-2001) of the National Survey of Alcohol, Drug, and Mental Health Problems, were used to examine the effect of a) any depression treatment and b) minimally adequate depression treatment on persistence of depression symptoms, depression severity, pain severity, overall health, mental health status, physical health status, social functioning, employment status, and number of workdays missed. Analyses were limited to those who met Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short-Form criteria for major depressive disorder, reported having at least one chronic pain condition, and completed both interviews (n = 553). Receiving any depression treatment was associated with higher scores on the mental component summary of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12, indicating better mental health (difference = 2.65 points, p = .002) and less interference of pain on work (odds ratio = 0.57, p = .02). Among those receiving treatment, minimal adequacy of treatment was not significantly associated with better outcomes. Depression treatment improves mental health and reduces the effects of pain on work among those with chronic pain and depression. Understanding the effect of depression treatment on outcomes for this population is important for employers, healthcare providers treating this population, and policymakers working in this decade of pain control and research to improve care for chronic pain sufferers.

  14. [Clinical observation on therapeutic effect of cupping combined with acupuncture stimulation at trigger points for lumbar myofascial pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong

    2014-08-01

    To observe the clinical effect of cupping combined with acupuncture stimulation of trigger points on lumbar myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). Sixty MPS patients were randomly divided into acupuncture + TDP group (n = 30), and cupping + acupuncture group (n = 30). Patients in the acupuncture + TDP group were treated by acupuncture stimulation of trigger points and local TDP irradiation, and patients of the cupping + acupuncture group treated by intensive cupping applied to the myofascial band and acupuncture stimulation of the locus according to the position of muscular tension band. The therapeutic effects were assessed according to the score of the McGill pain questionnaire composing of pain rating index (PRI), visual analogue scale (VAS) and present pain intensity (PPI) before, immediately and 1 month after the treatment. After the treatment, the total effective rates of the acupuncture+ TDP and cupping + acupuncture groups were 83.3% (25/30) and 96.6% (29/30), respectively, without significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). One month's follow-up showed that the total effective rates of the acupuncture + TDP and cupping + acupuncture groups were 40.0% and 90.0% respectively, and the latter group was significantly better than the acupuncture + TDP group in the therapeutic effect (P < 0.05). The scores of PRI, VAS, PPI after the treatment were markedly decreased in both groups (P < 0.05). One month later, the scores of PRI, VAS and PPI in the cupping + acupuncture group were obviously lower than those of the acupuncture group (P < 0.05). Both acupuncture stimulation of trigger points plus TDP and cupping plus acupuncture can effectively relieve pain in MPS patients, while the therapeutic effect of cupping plus acupuncture treatment lasts longer analgesic effect.

  15. Effects of music engagement on responses to painful stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, David H; Chapman, C Richard; Jacobson, Robert C; Donaldson, Gary W

    2012-06-01

    We propose a theoretical framework for the behavioral modulation of pain based on constructivism, positing that task engagement, such as listening for errors in a musical passage, can establish a construction of reality that effectively replaces pain as a competing construction. Graded engagement produces graded reductions in pain as indicated by reduced psychophysiological arousal and subjective pain report. Fifty-three healthy volunteers having normal hearing participated in 4 music listening conditions consisting of passive listening (no task) or performing an error detection task varying in signal complexity and task difficulty. During all conditions, participants received normally painful fingertip shocks varying in intensity while stimulus-evoked potentials (SEP), pupil dilation responses (PDR), and retrospective pain reports were obtained. SEP and PDR increased with increasing stimulus intensity. Task performance decreased with increasing task difficulty. Mixed model analyses, adjusted for habituation/sensitization and repeated measures within person, revealed significant quadratic trends for SEP and pain report (Pchange<0.001) with large reductions from no task to easy task and smaller graded reductions corresponding to increasing task difficulty/complexity. PDR decreased linearly (Pchange<0.001) with graded task condition. We infer that these graded reductions in indicators of central and peripheral arousal and in reported pain correspond to graded increases in engagement in the music listening task. Engaging activities may prevent pain by creating competing constructions of reality that draw on the same processing resources as pain. Better understanding of these processes will advance the development of more effective pain modulation through improved manipulation of engagement strategies.

  16. The effectiveness of a multidisciplinary pain management programme managing chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Dysvik, Elin; Vinsnes, Anne Guttormsen; Eikeland, Ole-Johan

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the effects of a multidisciplinary pain management programme on coping, health-related quality of life and pain intensity. Seventy-six outpatients suffering from chronic pain completed this eight-week programme with the primary aims to increase coping, as measured by the Ways of Coping Checklist, and health-related quality of life, as measured by the Short Form-36 Health Survey. Therapeutic dialogues and education, combined with physical activity, were given in order to increase understanding of and attention to non-medical factors that might affect pain perception. The programme was active, time-limited and structured on the basis of multidisciplinary pain management programmes based on a cognitive-behavioural approach. The findings suggest that this programme has the potential to improve coping skills and health-related quality of life. Additionally, pain intensity, as measured by the Visual Analogue Scale, was reduced. Age and disability were revealed as the prominent predictors of change after treatment. The differences in this sample indicated that the drop-outs tended to be older and reported more health problems, although these findings were non-significant. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  17. Effect of music therapy on pain behaviors in rats with bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ji; Chen, Shaoqin; Lin, Suyong; Han, Hongjing

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of music therapy on the pain behaviors and survival of rats with bone cancer pain and analyze the mediating mechanism of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathway. Male Wistar rats aged 5-8 weeks and weighing 160-200 g were collected. The rat models of colorectal cancer bone cancer pain was successfully established. Animals were divided into experimental and control group, each with 10 rats. The animals in the observation group were given Mozart K448 sonata, sound intensity of 60 db, played the sonata once every 1 hr in the daytime, stopped playing during the night, and this cycle was kept for 2 weeks. On the other hand, rats in the control group were kept under the same environment without music. Animals in the experimental group consumed more feed and gained significant weight in comparison to the control group. The tumor volume of the experimental group was significantly smaller than that of the control group (p<0.05). After 1-2 weeks of treatment, spontaneous foot withdrawal reflection caused by pain in the experimental group was significantly lower than that in the control group, heat pain threshold and free walking pain scoring in the experimental group were also significantly higher as compared with the control group (p<0.05). The expression of p38á and p38β in animals' spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (p< 0.05). Music therapy may improve the pain behaviors in rats with bone cancer pain, which might be related with low expression of p38á and p38β in the MAPK signal transduction pathway.

  18. Effect of chronic nonmalignant pain on highway driving performance.

    PubMed

    Veldhuijzen, D S; van Wijck, A J M; Wille, F; Verster, J C; Kenemans, J L; Kalkman, C J; Olivier, B; Volkerts, E R

    2006-05-01

    Most pain patients are treated in an outpatient setting and are engaged in daily activities including driving. Since several studies showed that cognitive functioning may be impaired in chronic nonmalignant pain, the question arises whether or not chronic nonmalignant pain affects driving performance. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the effects of chronic nonmalignant pain on actual highway driving performance during normal traffic. Fourteen patients with chronic nonmalignant pain and 14 healthy controls, matched on age, educational level, and driving experience, participated in the study. Participants performed a standardized on-the-road driving test during normal traffic, on a primary highway. The primary parameter of the driving test is the Standard Deviation of Lateral Position (SDLP). In addition, driving-related skills (tracking, divided attention, and memory) were examined in the laboratory. Subjective assessments, such as pain intensity, and subjective driving quality, were rated on visual analogue scales. The results demonstrated that a subset of chronic nonmalignant pain patients had SDLPs that were higher than the matched healthy controls, indicating worse highway driving performance. Overall, there was a statistically significant difference in highway driving performance between the groups. Further, chronic nonmalignant pain patients rated their subjective driving quality to be normal, although their ratings were significantly lower than those of the healthy controls. No significant effects were found on the laboratory tests.

  19. The effect of balneotherapy on pain relief, stiffness, and physical function in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiromi; Hagino, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Kunihiko; Ideno, Yuki; Wada, Takashi; Ogata, Toru; Akai, Masami; Seichi, Atsushi; Iwaya, Tsutomu

    2017-08-01

    This meta-analysis was performed to determine the effect of balneotherapy on relieving pain and stiffness and improving physical function, compared to controls, among patients with knee osteoarthritis. We searched electronic databases for eligible studies published from 2004 to December 31, 2016, with language restrictions of English or Japanese. We screened publications in Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, and the Japan Medical Abstracts Society Database using two approaches, MeSH terms and free words. Studies that examined the effect of balneotherapy for treating knee osteoarthritis of a ≥2-week duration were included. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were used as the outcome measure. A total of 102 publications were assessed according to the exclusion criteria of the study; eight clinical trial studies, which comprised a total of 359 cases and 375 controls, were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis analyzed improvement in WOMAC score at the final follow-up visit, which varied from 2 to 12 months post-intervention. Our meta-analysis indicates that balneotherapy was clinically effective in relieving pain and stiffness, and improving function, as assessed by WOMAC score, compared to controls. However, there was high heterogeneity (88 to 93%). It is possible that balneotherapy may reduce pain and stiffness, and improve function, in individuals with knee osteoarthritis, although the quality of current publications contributes to the heterogeneity observed in this meta-analysis.

  20. Effects of a water extract of Lepidium meyenii root in different models of persistent pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Tenci, Barbara; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Maresca, Mario; Micheli, Laura; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Mulinacci, Nadia; Ghelardini, Carla

    2017-10-26

    Lepidium meyenii (Walp.), commonly called maca, is an Andean crop belonging to the Brassicaceae family. Maca hypocotils are habitually consumed as customary food as well as traditional remedies for pathological conditions such as infertility. Moreover, the characterization of maca extracts revealed the presence of compounds that are able to modulate the nervous system. Aimed to evaluate the efficacy of L. meyenii in persistent pain, the present study analyzed the effects of a commercial root extract from maca in different animal models reproducing the most common causes of chronic painful pathologies. A qualitative characterization of this commercial extract by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry analyses allowed us to confirm the presence of some macamides known as bioactive constituents of this root and the absence of the main aromatic glucosinolates. The acute oral administration of maca extract is able to reduce mechanical hypersensitivity and postural unbalance induced by the intra-articular injection of monoiodoacetate and the chronic-constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. Furthermore, L. meyenii extract reverts pain threshold alterations evoked by oxaliplatin and paclitaxel. A good safety profile in mice and rats was shown. In conclusion, the present maca extract could be considered as a therapeutic opportunity to relieve articular and neuropathic pain.

  1. Effect of Pain and Mild Cognitive Impairment on Mobility.

    PubMed

    Schepker, Caroline A; Leveille, Suzanne G; Pedersen, Mette M; Ward, Rachel E; Kurlinski, Laura A; Grande, Laura; Kiely, Dan K; Bean, Jonathan F

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effect of pain and mild cognitive impairment (MCI)-together and separately-on performance-based and self-reported mobility outcomes in older adults in primary care with mild to moderate self-reported mobility limitations. Cross-sectional analysis. Academic community outpatient clinic. Individuals aged 65 and older in primary care enrolled in the Boston Rehabilitative Impairment Study in the Elderly who were at risk of mobility decline (N=430). Participants with an average score greater than three on the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) were defined as having pain. MCI was defined using age-adjusted scores on a neuropsychological battery. Multivariable linear regression models assessed associations between pain and MCI, together and separately, and mobility performance (habitual gait speed, Short Physical Performance Battery), and self-reports of function and disability in various day-to-day activities (Late Life Function and Disability Instrument). The prevalence of pain was 34% and of MCI was 42%; 17% had pain only, 25% had MCI only, 17% had pain and MCI, and 41% had neither. Participants with pain and MCI performed significantly worse than all others on all mobility outcomes (P<.001). Participants with MCI only or pain only also performed significantly worse on all mobility outcomes than those with neither (P<.001). Mild to moderate pain and MCI were independently associated with poor mobility, and the presence of both comorbidities was associated with the poorest status. Primary care practitioners who encounter older adults in need of mobility rehabilitation should consider screening them for pain and MCI to better inform subsequent therapeutic interventions. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  2. Immediate effects of foot orthoses on pain during functional tasks in people with patellofemoral osteoarthritis: A cross-over, proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Collins, Natalie J; Hinman, Rana S; Menz, Hylton B; Crossley, Kay M

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether prefabricated foot orthoses immediately reduce pain during functional tasks in people with patellofemoral osteoarthritis, compared to flat insoles and shoes alone. Eighteen people with predominant lateral patellofemoral osteoarthritis (nine women; mean [SD] age 59 [10]years; body mass index 27.9 [3.2]kg/m 2 ) performed functional tasks wearing running sandals, and then wearing foot orthoses and flat insoles (random order). Participants rated knee pain during each task (11-point numerical rating scales), ease of performance and knee stability (five-point Likert scales), and comfort (100mm visual analogue scales). Compared to shoes alone, foot orthoses (p=0.002; median difference 1.5 [IQR 3]) and flat insoles (p<0.001; 2 [3]) significantly reduced pain during step-downs; foot orthoses reduced pain during walking (p=0.008; 1 [1.25]); and flat insoles reduced pain during stair ambulation (p=0.001; 1 [1.75]). No significant differences between foot orthoses and flat insoles were observed for pain severity, ease of performance or knee stability. Foot orthoses were less comfortable than flat insoles and shoes alone (p<0.05). In people with patellofemoral osteoarthritis, immediate pain-relieving effects of prefabricated, contoured foot orthoses are equivalent to flat insoles. Further studies should investigate whether similar outcomes occur with longer-term wear or different orthosis designs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Muscarinic receptor activation potentiates the effect of spinal cord stimulation on pain-related behavior in rats with mononeuropathy.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiyang; Meyerson, Björn A; Linderoth, Bengt

    2008-05-02

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has proven to be a valuable treatment in neuropathic pain. Our previous animal experiments performed on rat models of SCS and ensuing clinical trials have demonstrated that intrathecal (i.t.) administration of subeffective doses of certain drugs may enhance the pain relieving effect of SCS in cases with unsatisfactory SCS outcome. Recently, an augmented release of spinal acetylcholine acting on muscarinic receptors has been shown to be one of the mechanisms involved in SCS. The present study was performed to examine whether cold hypersensitivity and heat hyperalgesia in rats with partial sciatic nerve injuries can be attenuated by SCS in the same way as tactile hypersensitivity and to explore a possibly synergistic effect of SCS and a muscarinic receptor agonist, oxotremorine. Rats with signs of neuropathy were subjected to SCS applied in awake, freely moving condition. Oxotremorine was administered intrathecally. Tactile, cold and heat sensitivities were assessed by using von Frey filaments, cold spray and focused radiant heat, respectively. Oxotremorine i.t. dose-dependently suppressed the tactile hypersensitivity. SCS markedly increased withdrawal thresholds (WTs), withdrawal latencies and cold scores. When combining SCS with a subeffective dose of oxotremorine i.t., the suppressive effect of SCS on the pain-related symptoms was dramatically enhanced in rats failing to obtain a satisfactory effect with SCS alone. In conclusion, the combination of SCS and a drug with selective muscarinic receptor agonistic properties could be an optional therapy, when SCS per se has proven inefficient.

  4. Effectiveness of Splanchnic Nerve Neurolysis for Targeting Location of Cancer Pain: Using the Pain Drawing as an Outcome Variable.

    PubMed

    Novy, Diane M; Engle, Mitchell P; Lai, Emily A; Cook, Christina; Martin, Emily C; Trahan, Lisa; Yu, Jun; Koyyalagunta, Dhanalakshmi

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of splanchnic nerve neurolysis (SNN) for cancer-related abdominal pain has been investigated using numeric pain intensity rating as an outcome variable. The outcome variable in this study used the grid method for obtaining a targeted pain drawing score on 60 patients with pain from pancreatic or gastro-intestinal primary cancers or metastatic disease to the abdominal region. Results demonstrate excellent inter-rater agreement (intra-class correlation [ICC] coefficient at pre-SNN = 0.97 and ICC at within one month post-SNN = 0.98) for the grid method of scoring the pain drawing and demonstrate psychometric generalizability among patients with cancer-related pain. Using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and associated effect sizes, results show significant improvement in dispersion of pain following SNN. Effect sizes for the difference in pre-SNN to 2 post-SNN time points were higher for the pain drawing than for pain intensity rating. Specifically, the effect size difference from pre- to within one month post-SNN was r = 0.42 for pain drawing versus r = 0.23 for pain intensity rating. Based on a smaller subset of patients who were seen within 1 - 6 months following SNN, the effect size difference from pre-SNN was r = 0.46 for pain drawing versus r = 0.00 for pain intensity rating. Collectively, these data support the use of the pain drawing as a reliable outcome measure among patients with cancer pain for procedures such as SNN that target specific location and dispersion of pain.

  5. Effects of (S)-3,4-DCPG, an mGlu8 receptor agonist, on inflammatory and neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Marabese, I; de Novellis, V; Palazzo, E; Scafuro, M A; Vita, D; Rossi, F; Maione, S

    2007-02-01

    In this study, the effect of (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine (DCPG), a selective mGlu8 receptor agonist, has been investigated in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models in order to elucidate the role of mGlu8 receptor in modulating pain perception. Inflammatory pain was induced by the peripheral injection of formalin or carrageenan in awake mice. Systemic administration of (S)-3,4-DCPG, performed 15 min before formalin, decreased both early and delayed nociceptive responses of the formalin test. When this treatment was carried out 15 min after the peripheral injection of formalin it still reduced the late hyperalgesic phase. Similarly, systemic (S)-3,4-DCPG reduced carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia when administered 15 min before carrageenan, but no effect on pain behaviour was observed when (S)-3,4-DCPG was given after the development of carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain. When microinjected into the lateral PAG (RS)-alpha-methylserine-O-phoshate (MSOP), a group III receptor antagonist, antagonised the analgesic effect induced by systemic administration of (S)-3,4-DCPG in both of the inflammatory pain models. Intra-lateral PAG (S)-3,4-DCPG reduced pain behaviour when administered 10 min before formalin or carrageenan; both the effects were blocked by intra-lateral PAG MSOP. (S)-3,4-DCPG was ineffective in alleviating thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia 7 days after the chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, whereas it proved effective 3 days after surgery. Taken together these results suggest that stimulation of mGlu8 receptors relieve formalin and carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia in inflammatory pain, whereas it would seem less effective in established inflammatory or neuropathic pain.

  6. Using the mouse grimace scale to assess pain associated with routine ear notching and the effect of analgesia in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, A L; Leach, M C

    2015-04-01

    Social housing is recommended where possible for laboratory mice. In order to achieve this, mice must be individually identifiable. Although, various methods are available, permanent identification is often required, such as ear notching. This method is likely to be painful and to date there is limited literature on pain assessment and alleviation for this routine husbandry practice. Here we aimed to determine if the mouse grimace scale (MGS) could be used to assess pain in C57BL/6 mice following routine ear notching. Langford et al. found that very acute noxious stimuli (i.e. < 10 min in duration) did not produce a change in MGS score in comparison to baseline. Here, no significant difference was found between MGS scores at baseline and immediately post ear notching, potentially indicating that the pain associated with ear notching is either too acute to assess using the MGS tool or the practice is not painful. Studies in other species indicate that ear notching is painful, therefore, unless we can confidently conclude that the process of ear notching is not painful, we should err on the side of caution and assume it is painful due to the large number of mice ear-notched and potential welfare consequences. Alternative methods of assessing pain following this routine practice should be used in order to assess both the potential pain in mice, and the effectiveness of analgesics or local anaesthetics to relieve any associated pain. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. Foot massage: effectiveness on postoperative pain in breast surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Ucuzal, Meral; Kanan, Nevin

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of foot massage on pain after breast surgery, and provide guidance for nurses in nonpharmacologic interventions for pain relief. This was a quasiexperimental study with a total of 70 patients who had undergone breast surgery (35 in the experimental group and 35 in the control group). Patients in the control group received only analgesic treatment, whereas those in the experimental group received foot massage in addition to analgesic treatment. Patients received the first dose of analgesics during surgery. As soon as patients came from the operating room, they were evaluated for pain severity. Patients whose pain severity scored ≥4 according to the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were accepted into the study. In the experimental group, pain and vital signs (arterial blood pressure, pulse, and respiration) were evaluated before foot massage at the time patients complained about pain (time 0) and then 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after foot massage. In the control group, pain and vital signs were also evaluated when the patients complained about pain (time 0) and again at 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes, in sync with the times when foot massage was completed in the experimental group. A patient information form was used to collect descriptive characteristics data of the patients, and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire was used to determine pain severity. Data were analyzed for frequencies, mean, standard deviation, chi-square, Student t, Pillai trace, and Bonferroni test. The results of the statistical analyses showed that patients in the experimental group experienced significantly less pain (p ≤ .001). Especially notable, patients in the experimental group showed a decrease in all vital signs 5 minutes after foot massage, but patients in the control group showed increases in vital signs except for heart rate at 5 minutes. The data obtained showed that foot massage in breast surgery patients was

  8. The therapeutic potential of renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) in chronic pain: from preclinical studies to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bessaguet, Flavien; Magy, Laurent; Desmoulière, Alexis; Demiot, Claire

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence rate of chronic pain is 15% to 25% in adults while the therapeutic arsenal is still insufficient, especially in relieving neuropathic pain. Peripheral pain transmission is conducted by the small Aδ and C sensory nerve fibres. They express elements from the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), a well-known blood pressure regulator. Recently, studies have demonstrated the role of angiotensin II, its derivatives and aldosterone in the modulation of pain perception, by interacting with receptors expressed by sensory nerve fibres or through the central nervous system. Here, we assess the effects of RAAS modulators in the conduction of pain with molecular, preclinical and clinical approaches, in normal or pathological conditions. Currently, some clinical studies have been carried out on the pain-relieving effect of RAAS modulators and suggest their potential in the management of chronic, inflammatory or neuropathic pain.

  9. The minimal effective dose of cis-9-cetylmyristoleate (CMO) in persons presenting with knee joint pain: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Chul; Jin, Hyun Seung; Joo, Young; Kim, Yong Chul; Moon, Jee Youn

    2017-03-01

    Nutraceuticals containing cis-9-cetylmyristoleate (CMO) are used to improve knee pain despite the lack of placebo-controlled studies in humans. The aim of the study was to explore the minimal effective dose of CMO for relieving knee joint pain. Twenty-eight subjects with mild degree arthritic knee joint pain were randomized into 4 groups; groups A, B, and C that contained 100%, 80%, and 62.4% of fatty acid component with 12.5% of CMO, and control group D (starch 100%). The pain intensity, functional disability, and the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) were assessed for a 12-week ingestion period. Compared to group D (n = 6), there were significant differences in pain score in group A (n = 7, P = 0.005) and group C (n = 7, P = 0.012), but not significant in group B (n = 6, P = 0.180). Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis (WOMAC) score decreased significantly in groups A and C. The PGIC was positive in the majority (>50%) in groups A, B, and C, whereas negative in 83.3% in group D (control). CMO is effective in alleviating knee pain in persons with mild degree arthritis of the knee joint, at an effective dose of 62.4%.

  10. Brain mediators of the effects of noxious heat on pain

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, Lauren Y.; Lindquist, Martin A.; Bolger, Niall; Wager, Tor D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent human neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural correlates of either noxious stimulus intensity or reported pain. While useful, analyzing brain relationships with stimulus intensity and behavior separately does not address how sensation and pain are linked in the central nervous system. In this paper, we used multi-level mediation analysis to identify brain mediators of pain—regions whose trial-by-trial responses to heat explained variability in the relationship between noxious stimulus intensity (across four levels) and pain. This approach has the potential to identify multiple circuits with complementary roles in pain genesis. Brain mediators of noxious heat effects on pain included targets of ascending nociceptive pathways (anterior cingulate, insula, SII, and medial thalamus) and also prefrontal and subcortical regions not associated with nociceptive pathways per se. Cluster analysis revealed that mediators were grouped into several distinct functional networks, including: a) somatosensory, paralimbic, and striatal-cerebellar networks that increased with stimulus intensity; and b) two networks co-localized with ‘default mode’ regions in which stimulus intensity-related decreases mediated increased pain. We also identified ‘thermosensory’ regions that responded to increasing noxious heat but did not predict pain reports. Finally, several regions did not respond to noxious input, but their activity predicted pain; these included ventromedial prefrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, cerebellar regions, and supplementary motor cortices. These regions likely underlie both nociceptive and non-nociceptive processes that contribute to pain, such as attention and decision-making processes. Overall, these results elucidate how multiple distinct brain systems jointly contribute to the central generation of pain. PMID:24845572

  11. Effectiveness of opioid analgesics in chronic noncancer pain.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Renata; Zanolin, Maria E; Duse, Genni; Visentin, Marco

    2015-03-01

    There is general agreement about the need to perform a screening test to assess the risk of opioid misuse prior to starting a long-term opioid treatment for chronic noncancer pain. The evidence supporting the effectiveness of opioid long-term treatment is weak, and no predictors of its usefulness have been assessed. The aim of this study was to assess the effect on pain and quality of life of chronic opioid treatment, and detect the possible predictors of its effectiveness. This observational, prospective study was conducted in 2 Italian Pain Relief Units on 77 patients affected by intractable chronic pain. Patients were submitted to psycho-logical tests, investigating the individual pain experience, risk of opioid misuse, mood states, quality of life, and personality characteristics prior to starting treatment and at 2,4, and 6-month follow-up. Both maximum and habitual pain, as measured with VAS, underwent a statistically significant reduction at 2, 4, and 6-month follow-up. In multivariate analysis, lower scores in the Pain Medication Questionnaire (PMQ) were predictive of a major reduction in maximum VAS (P = 0.005). Both low PMQ and MMPI-cynicism scores were predictive of habitual VAS decrease (P = 0.012 and P = 0.028, respectively). The results indicate that pain relief significantly improved over a 6-month period of opioid treatment, together with quality of life. The outcome was better in patients with a pretreatment low risk of opioid misuse, low scores in the Cynicism scale of MMPI-2, and no aberrant drug behaviors at follow-up. Therefore, a psychological screening and support is crucial for a good outcome of opioid therapy for chronic noncancer pain patients.

  12. The Effects of Music on Pain: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Numerous meta-analyses have been conducted on the topic of music and pain, with the latest comprehensive study published in 2006. Since that time, more than 70 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been published, necessitating a new and comprehensive review. The aim of this meta-analysis was to examine published RCT studies investigating the effect of music on pain. The present study included RCTs published between 1995 and 2014. Studies were obtained by searching 12 databases and hand-searching related journals and reference lists. Main outcomes were pain intensity, emotional distress from pain, vital signs, and amount of analgesic intake. Study quality was evaluated according to the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Analysis of the 97 included studies revealed that music interventions had statistically significant effects in decreasing pain on 0-10 pain scales (MD = -1.13), other pain scales (SMD = -0.39), emotional distress from pain (MD = -10.83), anesthetic use (SMD = -0.56), opioid intake (SMD = -0.24), non-opioid intake (SMD = -0.54), heart rate (MD = -4.25), systolic blood pressure (MD = -3.34), diastolic blood pressure (MD = -1.18), and respiration rate (MD = -1.46). Subgroup and moderator analyses yielded additional clinically informative outcomes. Considering all the possible benefits, music interventions may provide an effective complementary approach for the relief of acute, procedural, and cancer/chronic pain in the medical setting. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Pain in hospitalized children: Effect of a multidimensional knowledge translation strategy on pain process and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Bonnie J; Yamada, Janet; Estabrooks, Carole A; Stinson, Jennifer; Campbell, Fiona; Scott, Shannon D; Cummings, Greta

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalized children frequently receive inadequate pain assessment and management despite substantial evidence to support effective pediatric pain practices. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a multidimensional knowledge translation intervention, Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality (EPIQ), on procedural pain practices and clinical outcomes for children hospitalized in medical, surgical and critical care units. A prospective cohort study compared 16 interventions using EPIQ and 16 standard care (SC) units in 8 Canadian pediatric hospitals. Chart reviews at baseline (time 1) and intervention completion (time 2) determined the nature and frequency of painful procedures and of pain assessment and pain management practices. Trained pain experts evaluated pain intensity 6 months post-intervention (time 3) during routine, scheduled painful procedures. Generalized estimating equation models compared changes in outcomes between EPIQ and SC units over time. EPIQ units used significantly more validated pain assessment tools (P<0.001) and had a greater proportion of patients who received analgesics (P=0.03) and physical pain management strategies (P=0.02). Mean pain intensity scores were significantly lower in the EPIQ group (P=0.03). Comparisons of moderate (4-6/10) and severe (7-10/10) pain, controlling for child and unit level factors, indicated that the odds of having severe pain were 51% less for children in the EPIQ group (adjusted OR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.26-0.83; P=0.009). EPIQ was effective in improving practice and clinical outcomes for hospitalized children. Additional exploration of the influence of contextual factors on research use in hospital settings is required to explain the variability in pain processes and clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of ethnicity and gender role expectations of pain on experimental pain: a cross-cultural study.

    PubMed

    Alabas, O A; Tashani, O A; Johnson, M I

    2013-05-01

    Gender role expectations of pain (GREP) have been shown to mediate sex differences in experimental pain. Few studies have investigated the role of ethnicity in shaping GREP. The aim of this study was to examine interactions between ethnicity and GREP on experimentally induced pressure and ischaemic pain in Libyan and white British students in their respective countries. Libyan (n = 124) and white British (n = 51) students completed a GREP questionnaire and their response to experimental pain was measured. Blunt pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured over the 1st interosseous muscle using algometry. Pain intensity and pain unpleasantness (100 mm visual analogue scale) were measured at 1-min intervals during a submaximal effort tourniquet test on the forearm. Multivariate analysis of variance detected significant effects for Sex and Ethnicity on pain measurements. Men had higher PPTs than women (p < 0.001). Libyans had higher PPTs than white British participants (p < 0.001). There were significant effects for Sex and Ethnicity for pain intensity ratings (p < 0.01) but no significant differences between the sexes in pain unpleasantness (p > 0.05). Libyan participants had higher pain intensity (p < 0.01) and pain unpleasantness (p < 0.05) ratings compared with white British participants. There were effects for Sex and Ethnicity for all GREP dimensions. Libyan participants exhibited stronger stereotypical views in GREP than white British participants (p < 0.001). GREP was the mediator of sex but not ethnic differences in pain report, suggesting that gender stereotypical attitudes to pain account for differences in pain expression between men and women. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  15. Effects of Tetrodotoxin in Mouse Models of Visceral Pain

    PubMed Central

    González-Cano, Rafael; Tejada, Miguel Ángel; Artacho-Cordón, Antonia; Nieto, Francisco Rafael; Entrena, José Manuel; Wood, John N.; Cendán, Cruz Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Visceral pain is very common and represents a major unmet clinical need for which current pharmacological treatments are often insufficient. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin that exerts analgesic actions in both humans and rodents under different somatic pain conditions, but its effect has been unexplored in visceral pain. Therefore, we tested the effects of systemic TTX in viscero-specific mouse models of chemical stimulation of the colon (intracolonic instillation of capsaicin and mustard oil) and intraperitoneal cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis. The subcutaneous administration of TTX dose-dependently inhibited the number of pain-related behaviors in all evaluated pain models and reversed the referred mechanical hyperalgesia (examined by stimulation of the abdomen with von Frey filaments) induced by capsaicin and cyclophosphamide, but not that induced by mustard oil. Morphine inhibited both pain responses and the referred mechanical hyperalgesia in all tests. Conditional nociceptor‑specific Nav1.7 knockout mice treated with TTX showed the same responses as littermate controls after the administration of the algogens. No motor incoordination after the administration of TTX was observed. These results suggest that blockade of TTX-sensitive sodium channels, but not Nav1.7 subtype alone, by systemic administration of TTX might be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of visceral pain. PMID:28635651

  16. Effects of a Peer-Led Pain Management Program for Nursing Home Residents with Chronic Pain: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Yeung, Suey Shuk Yu; Lee, Paul Hong; Ng, Shamay Sheung Mei

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVES : To examine the feasibility of a peer-led pain management program among nursing home residents. DESIGN : A quasi-experimental design. SETTING : Two nursing homes. SUBJECTS : Fifty nursing home residents. METHODS : The experimental group (n = 32) was given a 12-week group-based peer-led pain management program. There were two 1-hour sessions per week. Education in pain and demonstrations of nonpharmacological pain management strategies were provided. The research team and 12 trained peers led the sessions. The control group (n = 18) received one 1-hour session of pain management program each week over 12 weeks from the research team only. Outcome measures for the participants were collected at baseline (P1) and at week 12 (P2). Data from peer volunteers were collected prior to training (V1) and at week 12 (V2). T-tests were used to compare the differences in outcome measures collected at two time points. RESULTS : There was a significant reduction in pain intensity from 5.8 ± 2.6 (P1) to 3.4 ± 2.5 (P2) for the experimental group (p = 0.003) and from 6.3 ± 3.0 (P1) to 3.1 ± 2.4 (P2) for the control group (p = 0.001). Activities of daily living significantly improved for both the experimental group (p = 0.008) and the control group (p = 0.014). There was an enhancement in happiness level for the experimental group (p < 0.001), while the loneliness level dropped significantly for the experimental group (p < 0.001) and the control group (p = 0.031). The peer volunteers showed a significant increase in self-rated pain management knowledge (2.9 ± 2.6 to 8.1 ± 1.2, p < 0.001) and self-efficacy in volunteering (5.8 ± 2.9 to 8.3 ± 1.5, p = 0.032). CONCLUSION : The peer-led pain management program was feasible and has potential in relieving chronic pain and enhancing the physical and psychological health of nursing home residents. © 2016 American Academy of Pain

  17. Effects of Reiki on Post-cesarean Delivery Pain, Anxiety, and Hemodynamic Parameters: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Midilli, Tulay Sagkal; Eser, Ismet

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Reiki on pain, anxiety, and hemodynamic parameters on postoperative days 1 and 2 in patients who had undergone cesarean delivery. The design of this study was a randomized, controlled clinical trial. The study took place between February and July 2011 in the Obstetrical Unit at Odemis Public Hospital in Izmir, Turkey. Ninety patients equalized by age and number of births were randomly assigned to either a Reiki group or a control group (a rest without treatment). Treatment applied to both groups in the first 24 and 48 hours after delivery for a total of 30 minutes to 10 identified regions of the body for 3 minutes each. Reiki was applied for 2 days once a day (in the first 24 and 48 hours) within 4-8 hours of the administration of standard analgesic, which was administered intravenously by a nurse. A visual analog scale and the State Anxiety Inventory were used to measure pain and anxiety. Hemodynamic parameters, including blood pressure (systolic and diastolic), pulse and breathing rates, and analgesic requirements also were recorded. Statistically significant differences in pain intensity (p = .000), anxiety value (p = .000), and breathing rate (p = .000) measured over time were found between the two groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the time (p = .000) and number (p = .000) of analgesics needed after Reiki application and a rest without treatment. Results showed that Reiki application reduced the intensity of pain, the value of anxiety, and the breathing rate, as well as the need for and number of analgesics. However, it did not affect blood pressure or pulse rate. Reiki application as a nursing intervention is recommended as a pain and anxiety-relieving method in women after cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of a lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic on pain and discomfort associated with orthodontic elastomeric separator placement.

    PubMed

    Al-Melh, M Abu; Andersson, L

    2017-12-01

    The initial placement of orthodontic elastomeric separators can be uncomfortable and painful. Therefore, it is important to relieve this disturbing sensation to create a discomfort or pain-free orthodontic visit. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic on pain and discomfort associated with the placement of orthodontic elastomeric separators. Fifty subjects aging between 20-35 years were included in this study. In the maxillary arch, a lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic was placed around the ginigval margins of the premolar and molar on side. On the other side, a placebo agent was placed around the ginigval margins of the premolar and molar. After two minutes, an elastomeric separator was placed between the premolar and molar on both sides. The subjects were then asked to report their findings on a Verbal Scale and a Visual Analogue Scale every second minute for a period of 10 min. The subjects were also given a questionnaire to evaluate the overall impression on the topical anesthetic use. The overall mean discomfort/pain score was found to be significantly lower (p < 0.001) with the topical anesthetic than with the placebo. Repeated measures ANOVA with a Greenhouse-Geisser correction determined that mean pain scores were statistically significantly low with the 10-min time duration (F (1.54,42.2)  = 40.7, p = 0.001), with an estimated grand mean (8.37, 95% CI 6.75-9.98). The questionnaire responses revealed that 87% of the subjects reported an overall satisfaction and agreement with the topical anesthetic than with the placebo or no difference (13%) after the initial separator placement. The discomfort and pain resulting from the initial placement of orthodontic elastomeric separators can be significantly reduced with the lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic.

  19. Effect of pain-free range exercise on shoulder pain and range of motion in an amateur skier.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] This study prescribed pain-free range exercises for a female amateur skier who complained of limitations in her shoulder range of motion, and pain caused by protective spasms; the tester evaluated the effects of such exercise on pain. [Subject and Methods] A 23-year-old female who complained of pain of 3 weeks in duration in the right glenohumoral and scapulothoracic joints was enrolled. [Results] After pain-free range exercises, the visual analog pain score was 2 and the shoulder flexion and abduction angles improved compared to the initial values. [Conclusion] Thus, this study suggests muscle-strengthening exercises within the pain-free range, rather than simple pain treatments, as therapy for acute muscle injuries in skiers.

  20. Effectiveness of Biomodulator in treating chronic pain and reducing medications pain and reducing medications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-12

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the efficacy of self -treatment with Pulsed Electromagnetic Frequency (PEMF) therapy, delivered via the Biomodulator...3 Abstract Purpose: To determine the efficacy of self -treatment with Pulsed Electromagnetic Frequency (PEMF) therapy, delivered via the...sought to determine whether adjunctive self -treatment PEMF had any effect on the biopsychosocial secondary sequelae of chronic pain, namely

  1. The analgesic effect of orexin-A in a murine model of chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Satoshi; Shimoyama, Naohito; Shimoyama, Megumi

    2017-02-01

    Orexins are neuropeptides that are localized to neurons in the lateral and dorsal hypothalamus but its receptors are distributed to many different regions of the central nervous system. Orexins are implicated in a variety of physiological functions including sleep regulation, energy homeostats, and stress reactions. Furthermore, orexins administered exogenously have been shown to have analgesic effects in animal models. A type of intractable pain in patients is pain due to chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Several chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of malignant diseases induce dose-limiting neuropathic pain that compromises patients' quality of life. Here, we examined the analgesic effect of orexin-A in a murine model of CIPN, and compared it with the effect of duloxetine, the only drug recommended for the treatment of CIPN pain in patients. CIPN was induced in male BALB/c mice by repeated intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin, a platinum chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. Neuropathic mechanical allodynia was assessed by the von Frey test, and the effect on acute thermal pain was assessed by the tail flick test. Intracerebroventricularly administered orexin-A dose-dependently attenuated oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and increased tail flick latencies. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was completely reversed by orexin-A at a low dose that did not increase tail flick latency. Duloxetine only partially reversed mechanical allodynia and had no effect on tail flick latency. The analgesic effect of orexin-A on oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was completely antagonized by prior intraperitoneal injection of SB-408124 (orexin type-1 receptor antagonist), but not by prior intraperitoneal injection of TCS-OX2-29 (orexin type-2 receptor antagonist). Our findings suggest that orexin-A is more potent than duloxetine in relieving pain CIPN pain and its analgesic effect is

  2. Effect of terazosin on lower urinary tract symptoms and pain due to double-J stent: a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Gholamreza; Shakiba, Maryam; Ghodsi, Sara; Farzan, Alireza; Heidari Nejad, Sayeh; Esmaeili, Samaneh

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of terazosin in the improvement of lower urinary tract symptoms and flank pain in patients with internal ureteral stents. In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, 73 patients with unilateral ureteral stone and hydroureteronephrosis who underwent insertion of an internal ureteral stent after transureteral lithotripsy (TUL) were randomized into two groups. 37 patients received terazosin 2 mg (once nightly) for 4 weeks and 36 patients received placebo for the same time duration. After 4 weeks, all patients were asked about the incidence of frequency, nocturia and urgency by an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire, flank pain and pain during urination by a visual analog scale (VAS) score, and hematuria. The mean VAS score was 2.21 in the terazosin group compared with 4.93 in the control group (p < 0.001). Nearly all the patients in the placebo group reported flank pain during urination but this was only reported in 54.5% of the patients in the terazosin group (p < 0.001). All criteria measured by the IPSS in the terazosin group were significantly lower than those in the placebo group (p = 0.0001). Administration of terazosin for patients with an internal ureteral stent relieved some stent-related symptoms such as flank pain, pain during voiding, frequency, nocturia and urgency, but had no effect on hematuria. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Effects of neonatal pain, stress and their interrelation on pain sensitivity in later life in male rats.

    PubMed

    Butkevich, Irina P; Mikhailenko, Viktor A; Vershinina, Elena A; Aloisi, Anna Maria

    2016-08-31

    Neonatal pain and stress induce long-term changes in pain sensitivity. Therefore their interrelation is a topical subject of clinical and basic research. The present study investigated the effects of inflammatory peripheral pain and stress of maternal deprivation (MD)-isolation in 1-2- and 7-8-day-old Wistar rats (P1,2 and P7,8 respectively, ages comparable to preterm and full-term human babies) on basal pain and pain sensitivity in conditions of inflammatory pain (formalin test) during adolescence. The neonatal impacts were: pain (formalin injection, FOR in the paw), stress (a short 60-min MD), or pain+stress combination (FOR+MD), and appropriate controls. We found that stress of short-term maternal deprivation-isolation and inflammatory pain on P1,2 and P7,8 significantly increased the vulnerability of the nociceptive system to inflammatory pain. Maternal deprivation-isolation on P1,2 as compared with a similar impact on P7,8 had a greater effect on pain sensitivity of the adolescent rats, but the influence of early pain was independent of the injury age. Only adolescent rats with an early combination of pain and maternal deprivation-isolation showed hypoalgesia in the hot plate (HP) test. However licking duration (reflecting pain sensitivity) in these rats did not exceed licking duration in animals exposed only to maternal deprivation-isolation or pain. This study adds new data to the growing body of work demonstrating that early noxious impacts have long-term consequences for the functional activity of the nociceptive system. Our new findings may help to understand the impact of pain and maternal separation in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  4. Effects of LLLT for pain: a clinical study on different pain types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Giuseppe

    2002-10-01

    Objective: The aim of this clinical study is to determine the efficacy of the JR diode laser 904 nm pulsed on pain reduction therapy. Summary Background Data: With respect to pain, the existence of a filter (Rolando's substantia gelatinosa) in the spinal marrow is fundamental. Opening or closing, this filter is able to block transmission of pain impulses to a higher cerebral center. This is in proportion with the A big fibres and C small fibres. The action of the laser influences this mechanism. Additionally, laser interferes in the cytochines (TNf-α , interleukin-1 and interleukin-6) that drive inflammation in the arthritis and are secreted from CD4 e T cells. Low power density laser increases the endorphin synthesis in the dorsal posterior horn of the spinal cord. Besides, laser causes local vasodilatation of the capillaries and an improved circulation of drainage liquids in interstitial space causing an analgesic effect. Methods: Treatment was carried out on 482 cases and 464 patients (274 women and 190 men) in the period between 1987 and 2000. The patients, whose age ranged from 25 to 70, with a mean age of 45 years, were suffering from rheumatic, degenerative and traumatic pathologies as well as cutaneous ulcers. The majority of the patients had been seen by orthopaedists and rheumatologists and had undergone x-ray, ultrasound scanning, TAC, RM examination. All patients had previously received drug-based treatment and/or physiotherapy with poor results. Two thirds were experiencing acute symptomatic pain, while the others presented a chronic pathology with recurrent crises. We used a pulsed JR diode laser, GaAs 904 nm wavelength. Results: Jn the evaluation of the results the following parameters have been considered: disappearance of spontaneous and induced pain, anatomic and functional evaluation of the joints, muscular growth, verbal rating scales, hand dinamometer, patient's pain diary. Very good results were achieved especially with cases of symptomatic

  5. Effectiveness of different cryotherapies on pain and disease activity in active rheumatoid arthritis. A randomised single blinded controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, H E; Mikkelsson, M K; Kautiainen, H; Pohjolainen, T H; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2006-01-01

    Local cryotherapy is used to relieve pain and inflammation in injuries and inflammatory conditions. Whole-body cryotherapy is an extreme method administered at -110 degrees C for 2 to 3 minutes. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of cryotherapies on pain and inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Sixty patients with active seropositive RA were recruited in a randomised controlled single-blinded study to receive whole-body cryotherapy at -110 degrees C, whole-body cryotherapy at -60 degrees C, application of local cold air at -30 degrees C and the use of cold packs locally. In the final analysis, the last 2 groups were pooled. The patients had 2-3 cryotherapy sessions daily for one week plus conventional physiotherapy. Clinical and laboratory variables and patient's and physician's global assessments were used to assess the outcome. Disease activity was calculated by DAS. Pain decreased in all treatment groups, most markedly in the whole-body cryotherapy (-110 degrees C) group. DAS decreased slightly with no statistically significant differences between the groups. No serious or permanent adverse effects were detected. Six of 40 patients (15%) discontinued the whole-body cryotherapy. Pain seemed to decrease more in patients in the whole-body cryotherapy at -110 degrees C than during other cryotherapies, but there were no significant differences in the disease activity between the groups. However, cryotherapy at -110 degrees C is expensive and available only in special centres and may have minor adverse effects. Based on our results, whole-body cryotherapy at -110 degrees C is not superior to local cryotherapy commonly used in RA patients for pain relief and as an adjunct to physiotherapy.

  6. A Simple and Effective Daily Pain Management Method for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Regiane S.; UPMC Radiation Oncology Outreach Program; Proctor, Julian W., E-mail: proctorj@upmc.ed

    Purpose: The incidence of painful bone metastases increases with longer survival times. Although external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is an effective palliative treatment, it often requires several days from the start of treatment to produce a measurable reduction in pain scores and a qualitative amelioration of patient pain levels. Meanwhile, the use of analgesics remains the best approach early on in the treatment course. We investigated the role of radiation therapists as key personnel for collecting daily pain scores to supplement assessments by physician and oncology nursing staff and manage pain more effectively during radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Dailymore » pain scores were obtained by the radiation therapists for 89 patients undertaking a total of 124 courses of EBRT for bone metastases and compared with pretreatment pain scores. The majority of patients (71%) were treated to 30 Gy (range, 20-37.5) in 10 fractions (range, 8-15 fractions). Results: One hundred nineteen treatment courses (96%) were completed. Pain scores declined rapidly to 37.5%, 50%, and 75% of the pretreatment levels by Days 2, 4, and 10, respectively. Pain was improved in 91% of patients with only 4% of worse pain at the end of treatment. Improved pain scores were maintained in 83% of patients at 1-month follow-up, but in 35% of them, the pain was worse than at the end of treatment. Conclusions: Collection of daily pain scores by radiation therapists was associated with an effective reduction in pain scores early on during EBRT of painful osseous metastases.« less

  7. Can pain beliefs change in middle school students? A study of the effectiveness of pain neuroscience education.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Podalak, Jessie; Zimney, Kory; Schmidt, Stephen; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2018-07-01

    Pain neuroscience education (PNE) is an educational strategy aimed at teaching people more about pain from a neurobiological and neurophysiological perspective. Current best-evidence provides strong support for PNE to positively influence pain ratings, dysfunctions, fear-avoidance and pain catastrophization, limitations in movement, pain knowledge, and healthcare utilization. To date, all PNE studies have been conducted on adult populations. This study set out to explore if an abbreviated PNE lecture to middle school children would result in a positive shift in pain knowledge as well as healthier beliefs regarding pain. One-hundred-and-thirty-three middle school students spanning 5th to 8th grade attended a 30-minute PNE lecture. The primary outcome measures of pain knowledge (neurophysiology of pain questionnaire [NPQ]) and beliefs regarding pain (numeric rating scale) were measured before and immediately after the PNE lecture. Significant improvement in knowledge was found with mean score on NPQ test scores improving from 3.83 (29.5%) pre-PNE to 7.90 (60.8%) post-PNE (p < 0.001), with a large effect size (r = .711). Significant shifts in beliefs were also found in all but one of the pain beliefs questions, with a medium effect size for "you can control how much pain you feel" (p < 0.001; r = 0.354) and large effect size for "your brain decides if you feel pain, not your tissues" (p < 0.001; r = 0.545). This study shows that a 30-minute PNE lecture to middle school children resulted in a significant increase in their knowledge of pain as well various beliefs regarding pain.

  8. Chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Slawomir

    2016-06-02

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) affects about 10-40% of women presenting to a physician, and is characterised by pain within the minor pelvis persisting for over 6 months. The Medline database was searched using the key words 'chronic pelvic pain' and 'pelvic congestion syndrome', published in English during the past 15 years. The condition markedly deteriorates the quality of life of the affected. Its aetiology has not been fully described and elucidated, although organic, functional and psychosomatic factors are implicated. Pain associated with parametrial varices was defined as pelvis congestion syndrome (PCS). Since the aetiology of CPP is complex, multi-directional diagnostic procedures are required. The main diagnostic methods employed are imaging examinations (ultrasound, computer tomography, magnetic resonance). Advances in interventional radiology considerably contributed to the CPP treatment. Currently, embolization of parametrial vessels is one of the most effective methods to relieve pain associated with pelvic congestion syndrome. Due to the complex aetiology of chronic pelvic pain, the most beneficial effects are obtained when the therapy is based on cooperation of the gynaecologist, physiotherapist, psychologist and interventional radiologist.

  9. Gender differences and pain medication.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jen; Holdcroft, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Subtle genetic and psychological variations are increasingly recognized to contribute to pain and analgesic efficacy and safety. The influence of sex on this relationship remains poorly understood, particularly in humans. The issue is complicated by the overlay of gender onto physical sex, and its associated stereotypes and expectations. Women appear to use more pain-relieving medications than men; however, it remains unclear whether these observations represent true differences in analgesic usage patterns, or reporting bias. Differences in analgesic efficacy relating to body composition, metabolism and hormonal profiles have been demonstrated. Psychological and social elements of gender have also been associated with altered pain experiences and analgesic use profiles, albeit with significant individual variations. Intra-group differences may ultimately prove more important than sex differences. Further research may unravel the various threads linking gender and sex effects on analgesia with the aim of individualizing analgesia to optimize pain relief.

  10. Spa therapy (balneotherapy) relieves mental stress, sleep disorder, and general health problems in sub-healthy people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bei; Qin, Qi-zhong; Han, Ling-li; Lin, Jing; Chen, Yu

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the relieving effects of hot spring balneotherapy on mental stress, sleep disorder, general health problems, and women's health problems in sub-healthy people, we recruited 500 volunteers in sub-health in Chongqing, and 362 volunteers completed the project, including 223 in the intervention group and 139 in the control group. The intervention group underwent hot spring balneotherapy for 5 months, while the control group did not. The two groups took questionnaire investigation (general data, mental stress, emotional status, sleep quality, general health problems, as well as some women's health problems) and physical examination (height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, blood lipid, blood sugar) 5 months before and after the intervention, respectively. After intervention, sleep disorder (difficulty in falling asleep ( P = 0.017); dreaminess, nightmare suffering, and restless sleep ( P = 0.013); easy awakening ( P = 0.003) and difficulty in falling into sleep again after awakening( P = 0.016); and mental stress ( P = 0.031) and problems of general health (head pain ( P = 0.026), joint pain( P = 0.009), leg or foot cramps ( P = 0.001), blurred vision ( P = 0.009)) were relieved significantly in the intervention group, as compared with the control group. While other indicators (fatigue, eye tiredness, limb numbness, constipation, skin allergy) and women's health problems (breast distending pain; dysmenorrhea, irregular menstruation) were relieved significantly in the self-comparison of the intervention group before and after intervention ( P < 0.05), but showed no statistically significant difference between two groups ( P > 0.05). All indications (except bad mood, low mood, and worry or irritability) in the intervention group significantly improved, with effect size from 0.096 to 1.302. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the frequency, length, and location of balneotherapy in the intervention group were the factors influencing

  11. Spa therapy (balneotherapy) relieves mental stress, sleep disorder, and general health problems in sub-healthy people.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bei; Qin, Qi-Zhong; Han, Ling-Li; Lin, Jing; Chen, Yu

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the relieving effects of hot spring balneotherapy on mental stress, sleep disorder, general health problems, and women's health problems in sub-healthy people, we recruited 500 volunteers in sub-health in Chongqing, and 362 volunteers completed the project, including 223 in the intervention group and 139 in the control group. The intervention group underwent hot spring balneotherapy for 5 months, while the control group did not. The two groups took questionnaire investigation (general data, mental stress, emotional status, sleep quality, general health problems, as well as some women's health problems) and physical examination (height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, blood lipid, blood sugar) 5 months before and after the intervention, respectively. After intervention, sleep disorder (difficulty in falling asleep (P = 0.017); dreaminess, nightmare suffering, and restless sleep (P = 0.013); easy awakening (P = 0.003) and difficulty in falling into sleep again after awakening(P = 0.016); and mental stress (P = 0.031) and problems of general health (head pain (P = 0.026), joint pain(P = 0.009), leg or foot cramps (P = 0.001), blurred vision (P = 0.009)) were relieved significantly in the intervention group, as compared with the control group. While other indicators (fatigue, eye tiredness, limb numbness, constipation, skin allergy) and women's health problems (breast distending pain; dysmenorrhea, irregular menstruation) were relieved significantly in the self-comparison of the intervention group before and after intervention (P < 0.05), but showed no statistically significant difference between two groups (P > 0.05). All indications (except bad mood, low mood, and worry or irritability) in the intervention group significantly improved, with effect size from 0.096 to 1.302. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the frequency, length, and location of balneotherapy in the intervention group were the factors

  12. Partners' Empathy Increases Pain Ratings: Effects of Perceived Empathy and Attachment Style on Pain Report and Display

    PubMed Central

    Hurter, Sarah; Paloyelis, Yannis; de C. Williams, Amanda C.; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Pain can be influenced by its social context. We aimed to examine under controlled experimental conditions how empathy from a partner and personal attachment style affect pain report, tolerance, and facial expressions of pain. Fifty-four participants, divided into secure, anxious, and avoidant attachment style groups, underwent a cold pressor task with their partners present. We manipulated how much empathy the participants perceived that their partners had for them. We observed a significant main effect of perceived empathy on pain report, with greater pain reported in the high perceived empathy condition. No such effects were found for pain tolerance or facial display. We also found a significant interaction of empathy with attachment style group, with the avoidant group reporting and displaying less pain than the secure and the anxious groups in the high perceived empathy condition. No such findings were observed in the low empathy condition. These results suggest that empathy from one's partner may influence pain report beyond behavioral reactions. In addition, the amount of pain report and expression that people show in high empathy conditions depends on their attachment style. Perspective Believing that one's partner feels high empathy for one's pain may lead individuals to rate the intensity of pain as higher. Individual differences in attachment style moderate this empathy effect. PMID:24953886

  13. Reduction of conditioned pain modulation in humans by naltrexone: an exploratory study of the effects of pain catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Burel; Kindler, Lindsay L.; Caudle, Robert M.; Edwards, Robert R.; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Riley, Joseph L.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2013-01-01

    The current study tested the hypothesis that conditioned pain modulation is mediated by the release of endogenous opioids with a placebo-controlled (sugar pill) study of naltrexone (50 mg) in 33 healthy volunteers over two counter-balanced sessions. Pain modulation consisted of rating of heat pain (palm) during concurrent cold water immersion (foot). Compared to baseline heat pain ratings, concurrent foot immersion lowered pain intensity ratings, which suggests an inhibitory effect, was reduced with naltrexone, suggesting at least partial dependence of inhibition on endogenous opioids. An exploratory analysis revealed that individual differences in catastrophizing moderated the effects of naltrexone; endogenous opioid blockade abolished modulation in subjects lower in catastrophizing while modulation was unaffected by naltrexone among high catastrophizers. The results suggest a role of endogenous opioids in endogenous analgesia, but hint that multiple systems might contribute to conditioned pain modulation, and that these systems might be differentially activated as a function of individual differences in responses to pain. PMID:22534819

  14. Effect of training on corticomotor excitability in clinical neck pain.

    PubMed

    Rittig-Rasmussen, B; Kasch, H; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, A; Svensson, P; Jensen, T S

    2014-09-01

    Corticomotor excitability has been shown to correlate with motor learning and functional recovery. The aim of the present study was to monitor changes in excitability of the corticomotor pathways induced by neck training and to compare the effects in patients with neck or knee pain and pain-free participants. Corticomotor excitability was assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography at baseline, after 30 min and 1 h, and at a 1-week follow-up visit. The primary outcome measures were changes in amplitudes and latencies of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) at 1-week follow-up. MEP responses induced by neck training yielded significantly different outcomes in the three groups. In the group with neck pain and training, MEP amplitudes were significantly reduced between baseline and 30 min (p ≤ 0.05), but with no significant difference between baseline, 1 h (p = 0.178) and 1 week (p = 0.067). In the group with knee pain and training, MEP amplitudes significantly increased between baseline and 30 min (p ≤ 0.01) and 1 h (p < 0.001), but not after 1 week (p = 0.524) compared with baseline. In the pain-free group, there were no changes over time. Neck training reduced neuroplastic responsiveness of corticomotor pathways in neck pain patients in contrast to knee pain patients and pain-free participants. Increased attention to adaptive and maladaptive neuroplastic responses induced by training may prove valuable in the process of optimizing clinical outcomes. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  15. Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy on pain intensity, pressure pain threshold, and SF-MPQ indexes of women with myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Magri, Laís Valencise; Carvalho, Vinícius Almeida; Rodrigues, Flávia Cássia Cabral; Bataglion, César; Leite-Panissi, Christie Ramos Andrade

    2017-02-01

    Women with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) frequently report pain areas in body regions. This process is associated with central sensitization phenomena, present in chronic pain. The low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been reported as a therapeutic option for the painful TMD treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of LLLT on pain intensity (visual analogue scale, VAS), pain sensitivity in orofacial and corporal points (pressure pain threshold, PPT), and on Short Form-McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) indexes of women with myofascial pain (subtype of muscle TMD). Ninety-one women (18-60 years) were included in the study, among which 61 were diagnosed with myofascial pain (Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorder-Ia and Ib) and were divided into laser (n = 31) and placebo group (n = 30), and 30 were controls. The LLLT was applied at pre-established points, twice a week, eight sessions (780 nm; masseter and anterior temporal = 5 J/cm 2 , 20 mW, 10 s; TMJ area = 7.5 J/cm 2 , 30 mW, 10 s). Pain intensity, pain sensitivity, and the SF-MPQ indexes were measured at the baseline, during laser sessions, and 30 days after treatment. For intra-group comparisons, the Friedman test was performed, and for inter-group, the Mann-Whitney test. Increased pain sensitivity was found in women with myofascial pain when compared to controls (p < 0.05). There was a reduction in pain intensity for both groups after LLLT. The LLLT did not change the PPT for any group (p > 0.05). Active laser and placebo reduced the indexes of sensory, total pain, and VAS, maintaining the results after 30 days; there was a reduction in the affective pain rating index for both groups, with no maintenance after 30 days for placebo, and the present pain intensity decreased in the laser group and did not change in the placebo after LLLT. In conclusion, the LLLT active or placebo are effective in reducing the overall subjective perception

  16. Effects of S 38093, an antagonist/inverse agonist of histamine H3 receptors, in models of neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Chaumette, T; Chapuy, E; Berrocoso, E; Llorca-Torralba, M; Bravo, L; Mico, J A; Chalus, M; Eschalier, A; Ardid, D; Marchand, F; Sors, A

    2018-01-01

    Histamine H3 receptors are mainly expressed on CNS neurons, particularly along the nociceptive pathways. The potential involvement of these receptors in pain processing has been suggested using H3 receptor inverse agonists. The antinociceptive effect of S 38093, a novel inverse agonist of H3 receptors, has been evaluated in several neuropathic pain models in rat and compared with those of gabapentin and pregabalin. While S 38093 did not change vocalization thresholds to paw pressure in healthy rats, it exhibited a significant antihyperalgesic effect in the Streptozocin-induced diabetic (STZ) neuropathy model after acute and chronic administration and, in the chronic constriction injury (CCI) model only after chronic administration, submitted to the paw-pressure test. Acute S 38093 administration at all doses tested displayed a significant cold antiallodynic effect in a model of acute or repeated administration of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy submitted to cold tail immersion, cold allodynia being the main side effect of oxaliplatin in patients. The effect of S 38093 increased following chronic administration (i.e. twice a day during 5 days) in the CCI and STZ models except in the oxaliplatin models where its effect was already maximal from the first administration The kinetics and size of effect of S 38093 were similar to gabapentin and/or pregabalin. Finally, the antinociceptive effect of S 38093 could be partially mediated by α2 adrenoreceptors desensitization in the locus coeruleus. These results highlight the interest of S 38093 to relieve neuropathic pain and warrant clinical trials especially in chemotherapeutic agent-induced neuropathic pain. S 38093, a new H3 antagonist/inverse agonist, displays antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effect in neuropathic pain, especially in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy after chronic administration. This effect of S 38093 in neuropathic pain could be partly mediated by α2 receptors desensitization in the locus coeruleus

  17. Cost effectiveness analysis of intravenous ketorolac and morphine for treating pain after limb injury: double blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rainer, Timothy H; Jacobs, Philip; Ng, Y C; Cheung, N K; Tam, Michael; Lam, Peggo K W; Wong, Robert; Cocks, Robert A

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the cost effectiveness of intravenous ketorolac compared with intravenous morphine in relieving pain after blunt limb injury in an accident and emergency department. Design Double blind, randomised, controlled study and cost consequences analysis. Setting Emergency department of a university hospital in the New Territories of Hong Kong. Participants 148 adult patients with painful isolated limb injuries (limb injuries without other injuries). Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure was a cost consequences analysis comparing the use of ketorolac with morphine; secondary outcome measures were pain relief at rest and with limb movement, adverse events, patients' satisfaction, and time spent in the emergency department. Results No difference was found in the median time taken to achieve pain relief at rest between the group receiving ketorolac and the group receiving morphine, but with movement the median reduction in pain score in the ketorolac group was 1.09 per hour (95% confidence interval 1.05 to 2.02) compared with 0.87 (0.84 to 1.06) in the morphine group (P=0.003). The odds of experiencing adverse events was 144.2 (41.5 to 501.6) times more likely with morphine than with ketorolac. The median time from the initial delivery of analgesia to the participant leaving the department was 20 (4.0 to 39.0) minutes shorter in the ketorolac group than in the morphine group (P=0.02). The mean cost per person was $HK44 (£4; $5.6) in the ketorolac group and $HK229 in the morphine group (P<0.0001). The median score for patients' satisfaction was 6.0 for ketorolac and 5.0 for morphine (P<0.0001). Conclusion Intravenous ketorolac is a more cost effective analgesic than intravenous morphine in the management of isolated limb injury in an emergency department in Hong Kong, and its use may be considered as the dominant strategy. PMID:11082083

  18. Pain and Poppies: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Opioid Analgesics.

    PubMed

    Trang, Tuan; Al-Hasani, Ream; Salvemini, Daniela; Salter, Michael W; Gutstein, Howard; Cahill, Catherine M

    2015-10-14

    Treating pain is one of the most difficult challenges in medicine and a key facet of disease management. The isolation of morphine by Friedrich Sertürner in 1804 added an essential pharmacological tool in the treatment of pain and spawned the discovery of a new class of drugs known collectively as opioid analgesics. Revered for their potent pain-relieving effects, even Morpheus the god of dreams could not have dreamt that his opium tincture would be both a gift and a burden to humankind. To date, morphine and other opioids remain essential analgesics for alleviating pain. However, their use is plagued by major side effects, such as analgesic tolerance (diminished pain-relieving effects), hyperalgesia (increased pain sensitivity), and drug dependence. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the key causes of these adverse effects and explores the effect of chronic pain on opioid reward. Chronic pain is pervasive and afflicts >100 million Americans. Treating pain in these individuals is notoriously difficult and often requires opioids, one of the most powerful and effective classes of drugs used for controlling pain. However, their use is plagued by major side effects, such as a loss of pain-relieving effects (analgesic tolerance), paradoxical pain (hyperalgesia), and addiction. Despite the potential side effects, opioids remain the pharmacological cornerstone of modern pain therapy. This review highlights recent breakthroughs in understanding the key causes of these adverse effects and explores the cellular control of opioid systems in reward and aversion. The findings will challenge traditional views of the good, the bad, and the ugly of opioids. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3513879-10$15.00/0.

  19. Pain and Poppies: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Opioid Analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hasani, Ream; Salvemini, Daniela; Salter, Michael W.; Gutstein, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Treating pain is one of the most difficult challenges in medicine and a key facet of disease management. The isolation of morphine by Friedrich Sertürner in 1804 added an essential pharmacological tool in the treatment of pain and spawned the discovery of a new class of drugs known collectively as opioid analgesics. Revered for their potent pain-relieving effects, even Morpheus the god of dreams could not have dreamt that his opium tincture would be both a gift and a burden to humankind. To date, morphine and other opioids remain essential analgesics for alleviating pain. However, their use is plagued by major side effects, such as analgesic tolerance (diminished pain-relieving effects), hyperalgesia (increased pain sensitivity), and drug dependence. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the key causes of these adverse effects and explores the effect of chronic pain on opioid reward. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic pain is pervasive and afflicts >100 million Americans. Treating pain in these individuals is notoriously difficult and often requires opioids, one of the most powerful and effective classes of drugs used for controlling pain. However, their use is plagued by major side effects, such as a loss of pain-relieving effects (analgesic tolerance), paradoxical pain (hyperalgesia), and addiction. Despite the potential side effects, opioids remain the pharmacological cornerstone of modern pain therapy. This review highlights recent breakthroughs in understanding the key causes of these adverse effects and explores the cellular control of opioid systems in reward and aversion. The findings will challenge traditional views of the good, the bad, and the ugly of opioids. PMID:26468188

  20. The effects of local anesthetics on postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Roberge, C W; McEwen, M

    1998-12-01

    This study was performed to determine if intraoperative local anesthesia improved control of postoperative pain after inguinal herniorrhaphy and to compare the effects of two commonly used local anesthetics on pain management. The Gate Control Theory of Pain formed the theoretical basis for this study. A retrospective nonexperimental study in an ex post facto design was used. Data were collected from 1990 through 1997 on 120 patient charts. The use of local anesthetic intraoperatively significantly decreased patients' lengths of stay postoperatively (P = 0.00) and need for postoperative narcotics (P = 0.00). Bupivacaine was found to be superior to lidocaine in decreasing the need for postoperative narcotic analgesia. Researchers concluded that many patients would benefit from intraoperative injection of local anesthesia. This information can affect patient care outcomes through decreasing recovery time, reducing postoperative pain, and reducing health care costs.

  1. The effect of inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose (Rosa damascena) essence on the pain intensity after dressing in patients with burns: A clinical randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Harorani, Mehdi; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah; Moradkhani, Shirin; Falahinia, Golam Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain is one of the common problems encountered by patients with burns, which increases after each dressing. This study aimed to investigate the effect of inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose essence on the pain of patients with burns that is caused after dressing. Materials and Methods: A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 50 patients with second- and third-degree burn wounds. The baseline pain of the patients was assessed 30 min before they entered into the dressing room on the first and second days of intervention. The patients in the experimental group inhaled five drops of damask rose essence 40% in distilled water, while those in the control group inhaled five drops of distilled water as placebo. The pain intensity was assessed using Visual Analogue Scale at 15 and 30 min after the patients exited from the dressing room. Data were analyzed by SPSS (version 18) using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: There was significant difference between the mean of pain intensity before and after intervention at 15 and 30 min after dressing (P < 0.001). Moreover, there was significant difference in reduction of pain intensity before and after aromatherapy in the experimental group (P < 0.05). Also, there was a significant reduction in severity of pain after dressing in the experimental group compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose could be effective for relieving the pain caused after dressing in patients with burns. Therefore, it could be suggested as a complementary therapy in burn patients for pain relief. PMID:27186201

  2. Effects of music on pain in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Alparslan, Güler Balcı; Babadağ, Burcu; Özkaraman, Ayşe; Yıldız, Pınar; Musmul, Ahmet; Korkmaz, Cengiz

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic syndrome characterized by diffuse musculoskeletal system pain and painful tender points in certain areas of the body. The aim of the investigation was to determine the effects of music on pain in fibromyalgia patients. This randomized clinical trial was carried out with 37 fibromyalgia outpatients as an experimental group (n = 21) and control group (n = 16) at a University Hospital Internal Medicine and Rheumatology Clinic between 1 June and 1 December 2014. The research instruments used were descriptive characteristics questionnaire, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), music CD which includes water and wave sounds recommended by the Turkish Psychological Association for psychological relaxation, and pain evaluation form. According to the findings, the average age of patients was 43.59 years ± 10.30, 94.6 % were women and 81.1 % were married. The fibromyalgia patients had the disease ranged from 1 month to 20 years, the average of disease duration was 23.6 ± 45.5 months, and the average of pain intensity was 6.89 ± 1.64 on the VAS. Average pain was reported in the experimental group in VAS on day 1 (5.45 ± 2.73), day 7 (4.57 ± 2.71), and day 14 (4.14 ± 2.45), and significant reduction in pain in the listening music group was seen (p = 0.026). A repeated measure analysis of variance controlling for differences between days demonstrated a significant decrease in pain between day 1 and day 14 (p = 0.022). There was no significant decrease in pain among control group participants. The effect of music has been found to control pain in fibromyalgia patients. Music therapy should be suggested in pain management for fibromyalgia patients as an non-pharmacologic nursing intervention.

  3. The Prophylactic Effects of Zintoma and Ibuprofen on Post-endodontic Pain of Molars with Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Mohsen; Hamidi, Mahmoud Reza; Moghaddamnia, Ali Akbar; Ramazani, Nahid; Zarenejad, Nafiseh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Post endodontic pain is often linked to the inflammatory process as well as additional central mechanisms. The purpose of the present double-blind randomized clinical trial study was to compare the prophylactic effects of a derivative of Zingiber Officinale, Zintoma, and Ibuprofen on post endodontic pain of molars with irreversible pulpitis. Materials and Methods The post endodontic pain of 72 enrolled patients suffering from irreversible pulpitis was assessed after prophylactic use of 400 mg Ibuprofen, 2 gr Zintoma and placebo. Using the Heft-Parker Visual Analogue Scale, the patients recorded their perceived pain before taking the medicament (baseline), immediately after and also at 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h post one-visit endodontic treatment. The statistical analysis was done using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Freedman tests (P<0.05). Results At all times, there was significant difference between the Ibuprofen and Zintoma (P<0.05) and also between the Ibuprofen and placebo (P<0.05). However, there was no significant difference between Zintoma and the placebo in any of time intervals (P>0.05). No side effects were observed. Conclusion The obtained results of the trial revealed that prophylactic use of 2 gr Zintoma is not an effective pain relieving agent. PMID:23922575

  4. Surgical pain management at the Medical School of Salerno (11th-13th centuries).

    PubMed

    Giuffra, Valentina

    2013-06-01

    Before the advent of general anesthesia, only poorly effective remedies were known to relieve pain. Although classical medical authorities describe a number of elaborate surgical techniques, no references about some forms of anesthesia are reported. Only the authors of pharmaceutical or botanical texts mention the use of substances, especially mandrake, to induce sleep in the patient. The first and most detailed evidences of general anesthesia described in medical texts of the western world can be found at the Medical School of Salerno. However, the use of substances aimed to relieve pain or to induce sleep during surgery is mentioned only by the authors of pharmaceutical or botanical texts and not by surgeons. Furthermore, the efficacy of these preparations to produce a profound and lasting sleep is doubtful. The general impression is that surgeons knew how to relieve pain, but considered it a necessary appendix of surgery and therefore an incisive effort to eliminate it was not pursued.

  5. Effect of Transversus Abdominis Plane Block on Postoperative Pain after Colorectal Surgery: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Xie, Yan-Hu; Zhang, Wei; Chai, Xiao-Qing

    2018-01-01

    To assess the analgesic efficacy of transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block in patients undergoing colorectal surgery (CRS). The databases of PubMed, ISI Web of Science, and Embase were searched, and randomized controlled studies (RCTs) that compared TAP block to control for relief of postoperative pain in patients who underwent CRS were included. Outcomes, including postoperative pain at rest and with movement, morphine use, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and the length of hospital stay, were analyzed using STATA software. The weighted mean differences (WMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) or relative risk with 95% CI were used to present the strength of associations. A total of 7 RCTs with 511 patients were included. The results of this study suggested that TAP block significantly relieved postoperative pain during postanesthetic recovery after CRS at rest and during movement (WMDs were -0.98 [95% CI -1.57 to -0.38] and -0.68 [-1.07 to -0.30], respectively), and also decreased pain intensity during movement 24 h after CRS (WMD: -0.57 [95% CI -1.06 to -0.08]). TAP block significantly reduced opioid consumption within 24 h when compared to controls, with a WMD of 15.66 (95% CI -23.93 to -7.39). However, TAP block did not shorten the length of hospital stay. TAP block was an effective approach for relief of postoperative pain and reduced postoperative consumption of morphine. More RCTs with large sample sizes are required to confirm these findings. © 2018 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. The effects of elevated pain inhibition on endurance exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Flood, Andrew; Waddington, Gordon; Keegan, Richard J; Thompson, Kevin G; Cathcart, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    The ergogenic effects of analgesic substances suggest that pain perception is an important regulator of work-rate during fatiguing exercise. Recent research has shown that endogenous inhibitory responses, which act to attenuate nociceptive input and reduce perceived pain, can be increased following transcranial direct current stimulation of the hand motor cortex. Using high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS; 2 mA, 20 min), the current study aimed to examine the effects of elevated pain inhibitory capacity on endurance exercise performance. It was hypothesised that HD-tDCS would enhance the efficiency of the endogenous pain inhibitory response and improve endurance exercise performance. Twelve healthy males between 18 and 40 years of age ( M  = 24.42 ± 3.85) were recruited for participation. Endogenous pain inhibitory capacity and exercise performance were assessed before and after both active and sham (placebo) stimulation. The conditioned pain modulation protocol was used for the measurement of pain inhibition. Exercise performance assessment consisted of both maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and submaximal muscular endurance performance trials using isometric contractions of the non-dominant leg extensors. Active HD-tDCS (pre-tDCS, -.32 ± 1.33 kg; post-tDCS, -1.23 ± 1.21 kg) significantly increased pain inhibitory responses relative to the effects of sham HD-tDCS (pre-tDCS, -.91 ± .92 kg; post-tDCS, -.26 ± .92 kg; p  = .046). Irrespective of condition, peak MVC force and muscular endurance was reduced from pre- to post-stimulation. HD-tDCS did not significantly influence this reduction in maximal force (active: pre-tDCS, 264.89 ± 66.87 Nm; post-tDCS, 236.33 ± 66.51 Nm; sham: pre-tDCS, 249.25 ± 88.56 Nm; post-tDCS, 239.63 ± 67.53 Nm) or muscular endurance (active: pre-tDCS, 104.65 ± 42.36 s; post-tDCS, 93.07 ± 33.73 s; sham: pre-tDCS, 123.42 ± 72.48 s; post-tDCS, 100.27 ± 44.25 s). Despite increasing pain

  7. Effectiveness of sucrose analgesia in newborns undergoing painful medical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Taddio, Anna; Shah, Vibhuti; Hancock, Rebecca; Smith, Ryan W.; Stephens, Derek; Atenafu, Eshetu; Beyene, Joseph; Koren, Gideon; Stevens, Bonnie; Katz, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Background Sucrose is widely used to manage procedural pain in term newborns despite a lack of evidence of its effectiveness for different procedures and infant populations. Our objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of sucrose in newborns undergoing various medical procedures within 2 days of birth. Methods We performed a double-blind, randomized controlled trial. We included newborns (≥ 36 weeks gestation) of diabetic mothers and nondiabetic mothers. Each newborn received 2 mL of a 24%-sucrose or placebo solution before all procedures. We used the Premature Infant Pain Profile to assess pain during intramuscular injection of vitamin K, venipuncture for the newborn screening test and the first 3 heel lances for glucose monitoring (newborns of diabetic mothers only). Scores ranged from from 0 (no pain) to 18 (maximum pain). Results We included 240 newborns (120 from diabetic mothers, 120 from nondiabetic mothers). The overall mean pain score was lower among newborns who received sucrose than among those who received a placebo (mean difference –1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] –2.0 to –0.6). We found that pain scores during intramuscular injection did not differ significantly between the sucrose and placebo groups for newborns of diabetic or nondiabetic mothers (newborns of nondiabetic mothers: mean difference –1.1, 95% CI –2.4 to 0.2; newborns of diabetic mothers: mean difference –1.0, 95% CI –2.4 to 0.4). During venipuncture, newborns who received sucrose had lower pain scores compared with those who received a placebo (newborns of nondiabetic mothers: mean difference –3.2, 95% CI –4.6 to –1.8; newborns of diabetic mothers: mean difference –2.4, 95% CI –3.8 to –1.0). Among newborns of diabetic mothers, there was no difference in pain during the first 3 heel lances or mean glucose levels between the sucrose and placebo groups (p = 0.94 and p = 0.29 respectively). Interpretation We found a modest reduction of pain in

  8. Evaluating selection and efficacy of pressure-relieving equipment.

    PubMed

    Chaloner, Donna; Stevens, Jenny

    2003-06-01

    The drive towards evidence-based practice has highlighted the lack of randomized controlled trials that compare interventions such as pressure-relieving medical devices. This may influence practitioners, particularly purchasing practitioners, to consider other types of evidence when appraising literature to determine clinical practice and support recommendations and local guidelines. This article will illustrate the development of an audit tool used to evaluate nurses' knowledge and skills in patient assessment, selection and installation of appropriate pressure-relieving equipment. The tool also assists in assessing clinical effectiveness and user satisfaction of equipment. This article focuses on a small audit of the Karomed Ltd Transair 1500 (also known as the 3-Comm) mattress replacement system.

  9. Is cannabis an effective treatment for joint pain?

    PubMed

    Miller, Richard J; Miller, Rachel E

    2017-01-01

    Cannabis has been used to treat pain for thousands of years. However, since the early part of the 20th century, laws restricting cannabis use have limited its evaluation using modern scientific criteria. Over the last decade, the situation has started to change because of the increased availability of cannabis in the United States for either medical or recreational purposes, making it important to provide the public with accurate information as to the effectiveness of the drug for joint pain among other indications. The major psychotropic component of cannabis is Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), one of some 120 naturally occurring phytocannabinoids. Cannabidiol (CBD) is another molecule found in herbal cannabis in large amounts. Although CBD does not produce psychotropic effects, it has been shown to produce a variety of pharmacological effects. Hence, the overall effects of herbal cannabis represent the collective activity of THC, CBD and a number of minor components. The action of THC is mediated by two major G-protein coupled receptors, cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and CB2, and recent work has suggested that other targets may also exist. Arachidonic acid derived endocannabinoids are the normal physiological activators of the two cannabinoid receptors. Natural phytocannabinoids and synthetic derivatives have produced clear activity in a variety of models of joint pain in animals. These effects are the result of both inhibition of pain pathway signalling (mostly CB1) and anti-inflammatory effects (mostly CB2). There are also numerous anecdotal reports of the effectiveness of smoking cannabis for joint pain. Indeed, it is the largest medical request for the use of the drug. However, these reports generally do not extend to regulated clinical trials for rheumatic diseases. Nevertheless, the preclinical and human data that do exist indicate that the use of cannabis should be taken seriously as a potential treatment of joint pain.

  10. Arthritis Pain: Do's and Don'ts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis is a leading cause of pain and disability worldwide. You can find plenty of advice about ... a winter indoors. Cream containing capsaicin may be applied to skin over a painful joint to relieve ...

  11. Burn injury pain: the continuing challenge.

    PubMed

    Summer, Gretchen J; Puntillo, Kathleen A; Miaskowski, Christine; Green, Paul G; Levine, Jon D

    2007-07-01

    The development of more effective methods of relieving pain associated with burn injury is a major unmet medical need. Not only is acute burn injury pain a source of immense suffering, but it has been linked to debilitating chronic pain and stress-related disorders. Although pain management guidelines and protocols have been developed and implemented, unrelieved moderate-to-severe pain continues to be reported after burn injury. One reason for this is that the intensity of pain associated with wound care and rehabilitation therapy, the major source of severe pain in this patient population, varies widely over the 3 phases of burn recovery, making it difficult to estimate analgesic requirements. The effects of opioids, the most commonly administered analgesics for burn injury procedural pain, are difficult to gauge over the course of burn recovery because the need for an opioid may change rapidly, resulting in the overmedication or undermedication of burn-injured patients. Understanding the mechanisms that contribute to the intensity and variability of burn injury pain over time is crucial to its proper management. We provide an overview of the types of pain associated with a burn injury, describe how these different types of pain interfere with the phases of burn recovery, and summarize pharmacologic pain management strategies across the continuum of burn care. We conclude with a discussion and suggestions for improvement. Rational management, based on the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the intensity and variability of burn injury pain, is in its infancy. The paucity of information highlights the need for research that explores and advances the identification of mechanisms of acute and chronic burn injury pain. Researchers continue to report that burn pain is undertreated. This review examines burn injury pain management across the phases of burn recovery, emphasizing 3 types of pain that require separate assessment and management. It provides insights

  12. Effects of Reflexology on Pain in Patients With Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Akin Korhan, Esra; Uyar, Meltem; Eyigör, Can; Yönt, Gülendam Hakverdioğlu; Khorshid, Leyla

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of reflexology on pain intensity in patients with fibromyalgia, using an experimental repeated-measures design, and a convenience sample of 30 fibromyalgia inpatients. Thirty patients aged 18 to 70 years with fibromyalgia and hospitalized in the algology clinic were taken as a convenience sample. Patients received a total of 12 60-minute sessions of reflexology over a period of 6 consecutive weeks. Reflexology was carried out bilaterally on the hands and feet of patients at the reflex points relating to their pain at a suitable intensity and angle. Subjects had pain scores taken immediately before the intervention (0 minute), and at the 60th minute of the intervention. Data were collected over a 10-month period in 2012. The patients' mean pain intensity scores were reduced by reflexology, and this decrease improved progressively in the first and sixth weeks of the intervention, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The results of this study implied that the inclusion of reflexology in the routine care of patients with fibromyalgia could provide nurses with an effective practice for reducing pain intensity in these patients.

  13. The Martyrdom Effect: When Pain and Effort Increase Prosocial Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Olivola, Christopher Y; Shafir, Eldar

    2013-01-01

    Most theories of motivation and behavior (and lay intuitions alike) consider pain and effort to be deterrents. In contrast to this widely held view, we provide evidence that the prospect of enduring pain and exerting effort for a prosocial cause can promote contributions to the cause. Specifically, we show that willingness to contribute to a charitable or collective cause increases when the contribution process is expected to be painful and effortful rather than easy and enjoyable. Across five experiments, we document this “martyrdom effect,” show that the observed patterns defy standard economic and psychological accounts, and identify a mediator and moderator of the effect. Experiment 1 showed that people are willing to donate more to charity when they anticipate having to suffer to raise money. Experiment 2 extended these findings to a non-charity laboratory context that involved real money and actual pain. Experiment 3 demonstrated that the martyrdom effect is not the result of an attribute substitution strategy (whereby people use the amount of pain and effort involved in fundraising to determine donation worthiness). Experiment 4 showed that perceptions of meaningfulness partially mediate the martyrdom effect. Finally, Experiment 5 demonstrated that the nature of the prosocial cause moderates the martyrdom effect: the effect is strongest for causes associated with human suffering. We propose that anticipated pain and effort lead people to ascribe greater meaning to their contributions and to the experience of contributing, thereby motivating higher prosocial contributions. We conclude by considering some implications of this puzzling phenomenon. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23559692

  14. Mindful2Work: Effects of Combined Physical Exercise, Yoga, and Mindfulness Meditations for Stress Relieve in Employees. A Proof of Concept Study.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Esther I; Formsma, Anne R; Frijstein, Gerard; Bögels, Susan M

    2017-01-01

    Work-related stress and associated illness and burnout is rising in western society, with now as much as almost a quarter of European and half of USA's employees estimated to be at the point of burnout. Mindfulness meditation, yoga, and physical exercise have all shown beneficial effects for work-related stress and illness. This proof of concept study assessed the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effects of the newly developed Mindful2Work training, a combination of physical exercise, restorative yoga, and mindfulness meditations, delivered in six weekly group sessions plus a follow-up session. Participants ( n  = 26, four males), referred by company doctors with (work-related) stress and burnout complaints, completed measurements pre and post the intervention, as well as at 6-week (FU1) and 6-month (FU2) follow-up. Results showed very high feasibility and acceptability of the Mindful2Work training. The training and trainers were rated with an 8.1 and 8.4 on a 1-10 scale, respectively, and training dropout rate was zero. Significant improvements with (very) large effect sizes were demonstrated for the primary outcome measures of physical and mental workability, and for anxiety, depression, stress, sleep quality, positive and negative affect, which remained (very) large and mostly increased further over time. Risk for long-term dropout from work (checklist individual strength [CIS]) was 92 % at pre-test, reduced to 67 % at post-test, to 44 % at FU1, and 35 % at FU2, whereas employees worked (RTWI) 65 % of their contract hours per week at pre-test, which increased to 73 % at post-test, 81 % at FU1 and 93 % at FU2. Intensity of home practice or number of attended sessions were not related to training effects. To conclude, the newly developed Mindful2Work training seems very feasible, and acceptable, and although no control group was included, the large effects of Mindful2Work are highly promising.

  15. The effect of local anaesthetic wound infiltration on chronic pain after lower limb joint replacement: A protocol for a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background For the majority of patients with osteoarthritis (OA), joint replacement is a successful intervention for relieving chronic joint pain. However, between 10-30% of patients continue to experience chronic pain after joint replacement. Evidence suggests that a risk factor for chronic pain after joint replacement is the severity of acute post-operative pain. The aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to determine if intra-operative local anaesthethic wound infiltration additional to a standard anaethesia regimen can reduce the severity of joint pain at 12-months after total knee replacement (TKR) and total hip replacement (THR) for OA. Methods 300 TKR patients and 300 THR patients are being recruited into this single-centre double-blind RCT. Participants are recruited before surgery and randomised to either the standard care group or the intervention group. Participants and outcome assessors are blind to treatment allocation throughout the study. The intervention consists of an intra-operative local anaesthetic wound infiltration, consisting of 60 mls of 0.25% bupivacaine with 1 in 200,000 adrenaline. Participants are assessed on the first 5 days post-operative, and then at 3-months, 6-months and 12-months. The primary outcome is the WOMAC Pain Scale, a validated measure of joint pain at 12-months. Secondary outcomes include pain severity during the in-patient stay, post-operative nausea and vomiting, satisfaction with pain relief, length of hospital stay, joint pain and disability, pain sensitivity, complications and cost-effectiveness. A nested qualitative study within the RCT will examine the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention for both patients and healthcare professionals. Discussion Large-scale RCTs assessing the effectiveness of a surgical intervention are uncommon, particulary in orthopaedics. The results from this trial will inform evidence-based recommendations for both short-term and long-term pain management after lower

  16. Unravelling nocebo effect: the mediating effect of anxiety between anticipation and pain at wound dressing change.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mediating effect of anxiety in the relationship between anticipation and pain in people with chronic wounds. Pain is common in people with chronic wounds. Anticipation or negative expectation of discomfort has been shown to have an augmenting effect on pain; also known as nocebo hyperalgesia. This was a cross-sectional study with repeated measures. Prior to dressing change, anticipatory pain level was evaluated by a 11-point numerical rating scale and anxiety by the Six-items State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-6). During wound dressing changes, pain was measured before dressing removal, at dressing removal, at cleansing and dressing application using the numerical scale. Analysis was completed based on the data from a convenience sample of 96 patients. Participants reported more pain at cleansing and dressing removal than baseline. High levels of anticipation, anxiety and pain at dressing change for wounds were related to heavy exudate and wound that were covered with necrotic tissue. Finally, the relationship between anticipation and pain perception was mediated by anxiety. Anticipation of pain triggers anxiety that can lead to increased pain. There is a need to incorporate evaluation of anxiety and personal expectations as part of comprehensive pain assessment. Clinicians should be aware of the impact of emotions and anticipation on overall pain experience. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Evaluation of the effect of aromatherapy with lavender essential oil on post-tonsillectomy pain in pediatric patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Rasool; Soheilipour, Saeed; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Asghari, Gholamreza; Bagheri, Mahdi; Molavi, Mahdi

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of aromatherapy with Lavandula angustifolia essential oil on post-tonsillectomy pain in pediatric patients. This was a randomized controlled prospective clinical trial. In this study, 48 post-tonsillectomy patients aged 6-12 years were randomly assigned to two groups (24 patients in each group). After tonsillectomy surgery, all patients received acetaminophen (10-15 mg/kg/dose, PO) every 6h as necessary to relieve pain. The patients of the case group also inhaled lavender essential oil. The frequencies of daily use of acetaminophen and nocturnal awakening due to pain, and pain intensity (evaluated using visual analog scale [VAS]) were recorded for each patient for 3 days after surgery. Finally, the mean values of variables were compared between two groups separately for each post-operative day. The use of lavender essential oil caused statistically significant reduction in daily use of acetaminophen in all three post-operative days but had not significant effects on pain intensity and frequency of nocturnal awakening. Aromatherapy with lavender essential oil decreases the number of required analgesics following tonsillectomy in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effects of Forest Therapy on Coping with Chronic Widespread Pain: Physiological and Psychological Differences between Participants in a Forest Therapy Program and a Control Group.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Woo; Choi, Han; Jeon, Yo-Han; Yoon, Chong-Hyeon; Woo, Jong-Min; Kim, Won

    2016-02-24

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of a two-day forest therapy program on individuals with chronic widespread pain. Sixty one employees of a public organization providing building and facilities management services within the Seoul Metropolitan area participated in the study. Participants were assigned to an experimental group (n = 33) who participated in a forest therapy program or a control group (n = 28) on a non-random basis. Pre- and post-measures of heart rate variability (HRV), Natural Killer cell (NK cell) activity, self-reported pain using the visual analog scale (VAS), depression level using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and health-related quality of life measures using the EuroQol Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS) were collected in both groups. The results showed that participants in the forest therapy group, as compared to the control group, showed physiological improvement as indicated by a significant increase in some measures of HRV and an increase in immune competence as indicated by NK cell activity. Participants in the forest therapy group also reported significant decreases in pain and depression, and a significant improvement in health-related quality of life. These results support the hypothesis that forest therapy is an effective intervention to relieve pain and associated psychological and physiological symptoms in individuals with chronic widespread pain.

  19. Effect of harmane on mononeuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Aricioglu, Feyza; Korcegez, Eylem; Ozyalcin, Suleyman

    2003-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of the endogenous beta-carboline, harmane, on neuropathic pain produced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Thermal allodynia evaluations were made preoperatively, postoperatively on the fifteenth day, and after harmane administration. Harmane (1, 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally for 5 days beginning from postoperative day 15. Treatment with harmane had a profound anti-allodynic effect in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, harmane might provide a new approach to treatment of neuropathic pain.

  20. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left premotor/dorsolateral prefrontal cortex does not have analgesic effect on central poststroke pain.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rogério Adas Ayres; de Andrade, Daniel Ciampi; Mendonça, Melina; Barros, Rafael; Luvisoto, Tatiana; Myczkowski, Martin Luiz; Marcolin, Marco Antonio; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2014-12-01

    Central poststroke pain (CPSP) is caused by an encephalic vascular lesion of the somatosensory pathways and is commonly refractory to current pharmacologic treatments. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the premotor cortex/dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PMC/DLPFC) can change thermal pain threshold toward analgesia in healthy subjects and has analgesic effects in acute postoperative pain as well as in fibromyalgia patients. However, its effect on neuropathic pain and in CPSP, in particular, has not been assessed. The aim of this prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of PMC/DLPFC rTMS in CPSP patients. Patients were randomized into 2 groups, active (a-) rTMS and sham (s-) rTMS, and were treated with 10 daily sessions of rTMS over the left PMC/DLPFC (10 Hz, 1,250 pulses/d). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, during the stimulation phase, and at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after the last stimulation. The main outcome was pain intensity changes measured by the visual analog scale on the last stimulation day compared to baseline. Interim analysis was scheduled when the first half of the patients completed the study. The study was terminated because of a significant lack of efficacy of the active arm after 21 patients completed the whole treatment and follow-up phases. rTMS of the left PMC/DLPFC did not improve pain in CPSP. The aim of this double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to evaluate the analgesic effects of rTMS to the PMC/DLPFC in CPSP patients. An interim analysis showed a consistent lack of analgesic effect, and the study was terminated. rTMS of the PMC/DLPFC is not effective in relieving CPSP. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [The Effectiveness of Cooling Packaging Care in Relieving Chemotherapy-Induced Skin Toxicity Reactions in Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy: A Systematic Review].

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Hui; Hung, Hsing-Wei; Chen, Shu-Ching

    2017-08-01

    Anti-cancer chemotherapy may cause skin-toxicity reactions. Different types of cooling packages affect chemotherapy-induced skin toxicity reactions differently. To evaluate the effects of cooling packing care on chemotherapy-induced skin toxicity reactions in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. A systematic review approach was used. Searches were conducted in databases including Cochrane Library, Embase, MEDLINE, PubMed and Airiti Library using the keywords "chemotherapy cutaneous toxicity", "chemotherapy skin reaction", "chemotherapy skin toxicity", "frozen glove", "frozen sock", "cooling packaging care", "ice gloves", "ice socks", "usual care", "severity", "comfort", "satisfaction", "severity", and "comfort". The search focused on articles published before December 2016. Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 5 articles involving relevant randomized controlled trials were extracted for review. Elasto-Gel ice gloves or ice socks that were chilled to -25°C- -30°C and used for 15 mins during initial chemotherapy, for one hour during chemotherapy infusion, and for 15 mins after chemotherapy were shown to improve the frequency and severity of chemotherapy-induced skin toxicity reactions. Several studies were limited by small sample sizes and different types of cooling packing programs, temperature, timing, and frequency. Thus, further research is recommended to verify the effects of cooling packing care. Cancer patients who were treated with docetaxel or PLD and who used ice gloves or ice socks that were chilled to -25°C- -30°C for 15 mins during initial chemotherapy, for one hour during chemotherapy infusion, and for 15 mins after chemotherapy improved significantly in terms of the frequency and severity of their chemotherapy-induced skin toxicity reactions. Local cooling packing care is a non-pharmacotherapy approach that is low cost and free of side effects. This review is intended to provide a reference for clinical care.

  2. Adding Agnus Castus and Magnolia to Soy Isoflavones Relieves Sleep Disturbances Besides Postmenopausal Vasomotor Symptoms-Long Term Safety and Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    De Franciscis, Pasquale; Grauso, Flavio; Luisi, Anna; Schettino, Maria Teresa; Torella, Marco; Colacurci, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness for vasomotor symptoms and sleep disorders plus the long-term safety of a nutraceutical combination of agnus-castus and magnolia extracts combined with soy isoflavones (SI) and lactobacilli were assessed in postmenopausal women. A controlled study was carried out in menopausal women comparing this nutraceutical combination (ESP group) with a formulation containing isoflavones alone (C group) at the dosage recommended. The Kuppermann index, The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Short Form 36 (SF-36) were determined at baseline, three, six and 12 months. Endometrial thickness, mammary density and liver function were evaluated at baseline and after 12 months. One hundred and eighty women were enrolled in the study (100 in the ESP group and 80 in the C group). At the end of the treatment, mammary density, endometrial thickness, and hepatic function did not show substantial differences between groups. The Kuppermann index and particularly the tendency for hot flashes progressively and significantly decreased in frequency and severity during ESP versus C treatment. At the same time, a significant increase in sleep quality and psychophysical wellness parameters was observed in the ESP versus C groups. No adverse events were observed. Agnus-castus and magnolia, combined with SI + lactobacilli, can effectively and safely be used in symptomatic postmenopausal women, mainly when quality of sleep is the most disturbing complaint. The endometrium, mammary glands and liver function were unaffected after 12 months of treatment. PMID:28208808

  3. Adding Agnus Castus and Magnolia to Soy Isoflavones Relieves Sleep Disturbances Besides Postmenopausal Vasomotor Symptoms-Long Term Safety and Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    De Franciscis, Pasquale; Grauso, Flavio; Luisi, Anna; Schettino, Maria Teresa; Torella, Marco; Colacurci, Nicola

    2017-02-13

    The effectiveness for vasomotor symptoms and sleep disorders plus the long-term safety of a nutraceutical combination of agnus-castus and magnolia extracts combined with soy isoflavones (SI) and lactobacilli were assessed in postmenopausal women. A controlled study was carried out in menopausal women comparing this nutraceutical combination (ESP group) with a formulation containing isoflavones alone (C group) at the dosage recommended. The Kuppermann index, The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Short Form 36 (SF-36) were determined at baseline, three, six and 12 months. Endometrial thickness, mammary density and liver function were evaluated at baseline and after 12 months. One hundred and eighty women were enrolled in the study (100 in the ESP group and 80 in the C group). At the end of the treatment, mammary density, endometrial thickness, and hepatic function did not show substantial differences between groups. The Kuppermann index and particularly the tendency for hot flashes progressively and significantly decreased in frequency and severity during ESP versus C treatment. At the same time, a significant increase in sleep quality and psychophysical wellness parameters was observed in the ESP versus C groups. No adverse events were observed. Agnus-castus and magnolia, combined with SI + lactobacilli, can effectively and safely be used in symptomatic postmenopausal women, mainly when quality of sleep is the most disturbing complaint. The endometrium, mammary glands and liver function were unaffected after 12 months of treatment.

  4. The Relieving Effects of BrainPower Advanced, a Dietary Supplement, in Older Adults with Subjective Memory Complaints: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingfen; Shi, Rong; Chen, Su; Dai, Lihua; Shen, Tian; Feng, Yi; Gu, Pingping; Shariff, Mina; Nguyen, Tuong; Ye, Yeats; Rao, Jianyu; Xing, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Subjective memory complaints (SMCs) are common in older adults that can often predict further cognitive impairment. No proven effective agents are available for SMCs. The effect of BrainPower Advanced, a dietary supplement consisting of herbal extracts, nutrients, and vitamins, was evaluated in 98 volunteers with SMCs, averaging 67 years of age (47-88), in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjective hypomnesis/memory loss (SML) and attention/concentration deficits (SAD) were evaluated before and after 12-week supplementation of BrainPower Advanced capsules (n = 47) or placebo (n = 51), using a 5-point memory questionnaire (1 = no/slight, 5 = severe). Objective memory function was evaluated using 3 subtests of visual/audio memory, abstraction, and memory recall that gave a combined total score. The BrainPower Advanced group had more cases of severe SML (severity ⩾ 3) (44/47) and severe SAD (43/47) than the placebo group (39/51 and 37/51, < 0.05, < 0.05, resp.) before the treatment. BrainPower Advanced intervention, however, improved a greater proportion of the severe SML (29.5%)(13/44) (P < 0.01) and SAD (34.9%)(15/43)(P < 0.01) than placebo (5.1% (2/39) and 13.5% (5/37), resp.). Thus, 3-month BrainPower Advanced supplementation appears to be beneficial to older adults with SMCs.

  5. Effects of low energy shock wave therapy on inflammatory moleculars, bladder pain, and bladder function in a rat cystitis model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hung-Jen; Lee, Wei-Chia; Tyagi, Pradeep; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Chuang, Yao-Chi

    2017-08-01

    Low energy shock wave (LESW) is known to facilitate tissue regeneration with analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. We examined the effects of LESW on the expression of inflammatory molecules, pain behavior, and bladder function in a rat cystitis model. Control and experimental animals were injected with saline or cyclophosphamide (CYP; 75 mg/kg intraperitoneally) on day 1 and 4. After lower midline incision, the bladders were exposed to LESW (300 pulses, 0.12 mJ/mm 2 ) or sham operation on day 2. In study 1 (N = 12, 4 for each group), the nociceptive effects of CYP were evaluated for 30 min by behavioral assessment on day 4 one hour after CYP injection. In study 2 (N = 21, 7 for each group), continuous cystometry (CMG) was performed on day 8. The bladder was harvested after behavioral assessment or CMG for histology and Western blotting. CYP-induced upregulation of COX2 and IL6 expression, caused pain behavior (eye closing and hypolocomotion), and bladder inflammation was noted on days 4 and 8 along with bladder hyperactivity. LESW treatment reduced pain behavior and downregulated the NGF expression (33.3%, P < 0.05) on day 4 and IL6 (40.9%, P < 0.05). LESW treatment suppressed bladder overactivity (intercontraction interval 77.8% increase, P < 0.05) by decreasing inflammation and COX2 (38.6%, P < 0.05) expression and NGF expression (25.2%, P = 0.0812). CYP-induced bladder pain, inflammation, and overactivity involves activation of IL6, NGF, and COX2 expression. These changes are suppressed by LESW, indicating it as a potential candidate for relieving bladder inflammatory conditions and overactivity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Dopaminergic tone does not influence pain levels during placebo interventions in patients with chronic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Skyt, Ina; Moslemi, Kurosh; Baastrup, Cathrine; Grosen, Kasper; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Petersen, Gitte L; Price, Donald D; Hall, Kathryn T; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S; Vase, Lene

    2017-10-23

    Placebo effects have been reported in patients with chronic neuropathic pain. Expected pain levels and positive emotions are involved in the observed pain relief, but the underlying neurobiology is largely unknown. Patients with neuropathic pain are highly motivated for pain relief, and as motivational factors such as expectations of reward, as well as pain processing in itself, are related to the dopaminergic system, it can be speculated that dopamine release contributes to placebo effects in neuropathic pain. Nineteen patients with neuropathic pain after thoracic surgery were tested during a placebo intervention consisting of open and hidden applications of the pain-relieving agent lidocaine (2 mL) and no treatment. The dopamine antagonist haloperidol (2 mg) and the agonist levodopa/carbidopa (100/25 mg) were administered to test the involvement of dopamine. Expected pain levels, desire for pain relief, and ongoing and evoked pain were assessed on mechanical visual analog scales (0-10). Significant placebo effects on ongoing (P ≤ 0.003) and evoked (P ≤ 0.002) pain were observed. Expectancy and desire accounted for up to 41.2% and 71.5% of the variance in ongoing and evoked pain, respectively, after the open application of lidocaine. We found no evidence for an effect of haloperidol and levodopa/carbidopa on neuropathic pain levels (P = 0.071-0.963). Dopamine seemed to influence the levels of expectancy and desire, yet there was no evidence for indirect or interaction effects on the placebo effect. This is the first study to suggest that dopamine does not contribute to placebo effects in chronic neuropathic pain.

  7. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on pain, mood and serum endorphin level in the treatment of fibromyalgia: A double blinded, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Eman M; Omran, Eman A H; Ismail, Nadia M; El-Hammady, Dina H; Goma, Samar H; Kotb, Hassan; Galal, Hannan; Osman, Ayman M; Farghaly, Hannan S M; Karim, Ahmed A; Ahmed, Gehad A

    Recent studies have shown that novel neuro-modulating techniques can have pain-relieving effects in the treatment of chronic pain. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in relieving fibromyalgia pain and its relation with beta-endorphin changes. Forty eligible patients with primary fibromyalgia were randomized to receive real anodal tDCS or sham tDCS of the left motor cortex (M1) daily for 10 days. Each patient was evaluated using widespread pain index (WPI), symptom severity of fibromyalgia (SS), visual analogue scale (VAS), and determination of pain threshold as a primary outcome. Hamilton depression and anxiety scales (HAM-D and HAM-A) and estimation of serum beta-endorphin level pre and post-sessions were used as secondary outcome. All rating scales were conducted at the baseline, after the 5th, 10th session, 15 days and 1 month after the end of the sessions. Eighteen patients from each group completed the follow-up schedule with no significant difference between them regarding the duration of illness or the baseline scales. A significant TIME × GROUP interaction for each rating scale (WPI, SS, VAS, pain threshold, HAM-A, HAM-D) indicated that the effect of treatment differed in the two groups with higher improvement in the experimental scores of the patients in the real tDCS group (P = 0.001 for WPI, SS, VAS, pain threshold, and 0.002, 0.03 for HAM-A, HAM-D respectively). Negative correlations between changes in serum beta-endorphin level and the changes in different rating scales were found (P = 0.003, 0.003, 0.05, 0.002, 0002 for WPI, SS, VAS, HAM-A, and HAM-D respectively). Ten sessions of real tDCS over M1 can induce pain relief and mood improvement in patients with fibromyalgia, which were found to be related to changes in serum endorphin levels. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02704611. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Mechanism of pain sensation].

    PubMed

    Gyulaházi, Judit

    2009-11-15

    Pain, as subjective content of consciousness, is an essential attention-calling sign that helps to survive. Pain relieve is obligatory for every physician, thus, its individual appearance can make the analgesia difficult to carry out. The improving neuroimaging techniques allow understanding the development of pain sensation. Through the 24 articles on the PubMed found with keywords 'pain' and 'neuroimaging', we review here the parts of the pain neuron matrix, their tasks and the assumed mechanism of the acute pain sensation. The mechanism of the individual pain sensation is illustrated by the view of the modular function of the medial part of the pain matrix. Experimental results of empathic pain suggest that pain sensation may occur without real damage of the tissues, as well. The pain network plays main role in chronic pain.

  9. Is LLLT effective in the management of TMJ pain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Manzi, Cecilia T.; Rolim, Aluizio B.; Vieira, Alessandro L. B.

    1999-05-01

    This paper reports the result of the use of LLLT on the treatment of TMJ pain and present LLLT as an effective method of treating such problem. One hundred and eighty one female and 23 male patients aged between 7 and 81 years old (average 36.9 years old) suffering TMJ pain were treated with 632.8, 670, and 830nm diodes lasers at the Laser Center of the UFPE. The treatment consisted of a series of 12 applications twice a week. Patients were treated with an average dose of 3 J/cm2. One hundred forty one out of 204 patients were asymptomatic at the end of the treatment, 37 improved considerably and 26 were symptomatic. These result show although LLLT does not cure TMJ disorders it is effective in reducing TMJ pain.

  10. Effects of intrathecal ketorolac on human experimental pain

    PubMed Central

    Eisenach, James C.; Curry, Regina; Tong, Chuanyao; Houle, Timothy T.; Yaksh, Tony L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, the most commonly used analgesics, reduce pain by inhibiting cyclooxygenase at peripheral sites of inflammation, but potentially also by inhibiting cyclooxygenase in the central nervous system, especially the spinal cord. Animal studies suggest that products of cyclooxygenase in the spinal cord do not alter pain responses to acute noxious stimuli, but reduce pain and sensitization following peripheral inflammation. We used spinal injection of small doses of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, ketorolac, to survey the role of spinal cyclooxygenase in human experimental pain and hypersensitivity states. Methods Following regulatory agency approval and informed consent, we examined the effect of 2.0 mg intrathecal ketorolac in 41 healthy volunteers to acute noxious thermal stimuli in normal skin and to mechanical stimuli in skin sensitized by topical capsaicin or ultraviolet burn. We also examined the effect of intravenous ketorolac, Results Intrathecal ketorolac reduced hypersensitivity when it was induced by a combination of ultraviolet burn plus intermittent heat and, according to one of two analytical strategies, when it was induced by ultraviolet burn alone. Conclusions These data suggest a more limited role for spinal cord cyclooxygenase in human pain states than predicted by studies in animals. PMID:20395821

  11. Anger Suppression and Subsequent Pain Behaviors among Chronic Low Back Pain Patients: Moderating Effects of Anger Regulation Style

    PubMed Central

    Quartana, Phillip; Bruehl, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Background Suppression of anger is linked to subsequent pain intensity among chronic low back patients, but it is not clear whether anger regulation style (trait anger-out, anger-in) moderates these effects or if aroused anger accounts for links between anger regulation style and pain. Method Chronic low back pain patients (N=58) were assigned to Suppression or No Suppression conditions for a task with harassing confederate and then underwent structured pain behavior procedures. Spielberger Anger Expression Inventory tapped trait anger-out (AOS) and anger-in (AIS). Results Regressions tested Emotion Regulation condition × AOS and AIS effects on outcomes. AOS was related to grimacing and sighing for Suppression condition patients. AIS was related negatively to guarding and bracing for Suppression condition patients. Anger report partly mediated effects for AOS and AIS. Conclusions Anger regulation style moderated effects of state anger suppression on subsequent pain behaviors, effects that were partly explained by aroused anger. PMID:21544702

  12. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials on the effectiveness of exercise programs on Lumbo Pelvic Pain among postnatal women.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Pei-Ching; Puthussery, Shuby; Pappas, Yannis; Gau, Meei-Ling

    2015-11-26

    A substantial number of women tend to be affected by Lumbo Pelvic Pain (LPP) following child birth. Physical exercise is indicated as a beneficial method to relieve LPP, but individual studies appear to suggest mixed findings about its effectiveness. This systematic review aimed to synthesise evidence from randomised controlled trials on the effectiveness of exercise on LPP among postnatal women to inform policy, practice and future research. A systematic review was conducted of all randomised controlled trials published between January 1990 and July 2014, identified through a comprehensive search of following databases: PubMed, PEDro, Embase, Cinahl, Medline, SPORTDiscus, Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register, and electronic libraries of authors'institutions. Randomised controlled trials were eligible for inclusion if the intervention comprised of postnatal exercise for women with LPP onset during pregnancy or within 3 months after delivery and the outcome measures included changes in LPP. Selected articles were assessed using the PEDro Scale for methodological quality and findings were synthesised narratively as meta-analysis was found to be inappropriate due to heterogeneity among included studies. Four randomised controlled trials were included, involving 251 postnatal women. Three trials were rated as of 'good' methodological quality. All trials, except one, were at low risk of bias. The trials included physical exercise programs with varying components, differing modes of delivery, follow up times and outcome measures. Intervention in one trial, involving physical therapy with specific stabilising exercises, proved to be effective in reducing LPP intensity. An improvement in gluteal pain on the right side was reported in another trial and a significant difference in pain frequency in another. Our review indicates that only few randomised controlled trials have evaluated the effectiveness of exercise on LPP among postnatal women. There is

  13. Effectiveness of knowledge translation interventions to improve cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Greta G; Olivo, Susan Armijo; Biondo, Patricia D; Stiles, Carla R; Yurtseven, Ozden; Fainsinger, Robin L; Hagen, Neil A

    2011-05-01

    Cancer pain is prevalent, yet patients do not receive best care despite widely available evidence. Although national cancer control policies call for education, effectiveness of such programs is unclear and best practices are not well defined. To examine existing evidence on whether knowledge translation (KT) interventions targeting health care providers, patients, and caregivers improve cancer pain outcomes. A systematic review and meta-analysis were undertaken to evaluate primary studies that examined effects of KT interventions on providers and patients. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. Five studies reported interventions targeting health care providers, four focused on patients or their families, one study examined patients and their significant others, and 16 studies examined patients only. Seven quantitative comparisons measured the statistical effects of interventions. A significant difference favoring the treatment group in least pain intensity (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.44, 1.42) and in usual pain/average pain (95% CI: 0.13, 0.74) was observed. No other statistical differences were observed. However, most studies were assessed as having high risk of bias and failed to report sufficient information about the intervention dose, quality of educational material, fidelity, and other key factors required to evaluate effectiveness of intervention design. Trials that used a higher dose of KT intervention (characterized by extensive follow-up, comprehensive educational program, and higher resource allocation) were significantly more likely to have positive results than trials that did not use this approach. Further attention to methodological issues to improve educational interventions and research to clarify factors that lead to better pain control are urgently needed. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of intravenous parecoxib on post-craniotomy pain.

    PubMed

    Williams, D L; Pemberton, E; Leslie, K

    2011-09-01

    Pain management in craniotomy patients is challenging, with mild-to-moderate pain intensity, moderate-to-high risk of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), and potentially catastrophic consequences of analgesic-related side-effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether i.v. parecoxib administered at dural closure during craniotomy decreased total morphine consumption and morphine-related side-effects compared with placebo. One hundred adult patients presenting for supratentorial craniotomy under propofol/remifentanil anaesthesia were randomized to receive parecoxib, 40 mg i.v., or placebo in a double-blind manner. All patients received local anaesthetic scalp infiltration, regular i.v. paracetamol, nurse-administered morphine in the post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU) until verbal analogue pain scores were ≤4/10 and patient-controlled morphine thereafter. Morphine consumption, pain intensity, and analgesia-related side-effects were recorded during the first 24 h after operation. Ninety-six patients (49 control and 47 parecoxib) were included in the analyses. Fifty-nine (61%) patients received morphine in the PACU and only one patient (control) did not receive any morphine in the postoperative period. There were no significant differences between the two groups in morphine consumption [20 (range: 0-102) vs 16 (range: 1-92) mg; P=0.38], pain intensity [excellent/very good pain relief in 78% of parecoxib patients; 74% of control patients (P=0.72)] or analgesia-related side-effects (PONV in 51% of parecoxib patients; 56% of control patients; P=0.55) in the first 24 h after operation. No major morbidity was recorded. Our study demonstrated no clinical benefit to adding i.v. parecoxib to local anaesthetic scalp infiltration, i.v. paracetamol, and patient-controlled i.v. morphine after supratentorial craniotomy.

  15. Effect of music intervention on burn patients' pain and anxiety during dressing changes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuo-Cheng; Chen, Li Fen; Hsiep, Pi Hsia

    2016-12-01

    For burn patients, the daily dressing process causes pain and anxiety. Although drugs can relieve them, the degree of pain during dressing changes is often moderate to severe. Therefore, relevant supporting interventions, like music as an ideal intervention, could alleviate the patient's pain. This study investigated the impact of music intervention at dressing change time on burn patients' pain and anxiety. This was a prospective, randomized clinical trial; patients were randomly assigned into control (standard intervention) and experimental groups (crystal music intervention) for five consecutive days (35 patients in each group). Patients' pain and anxiety measurements were collected before, during, and after dressing changes and morphine usage was recorded. The study period was October 2014 to September 2015. There was no difference in morphine dosage for both groups. By the fourth day of music intervention, burn patients' pain before, during, and after dressing changes had significantly decreased; anxiety on the fourth day during and after dressing changes had also significantly decreased. Nurses may use ordered prescription analgesics, but if non-pharmacological interventions are increased, such as providing timely music intervention and creating a friendly, comfortable hospital environment, patients' pain and anxiety will reduce. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel TRPM8 agonist relieves dry eye discomfort.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jee Myung; Li, Fengxian; Liu, Qin; Rüedi, Marco; Wei, Edward Tak; Lentsman, Michael; Lee, Hyo Seok; Choi, Won; Kim, Seong Jin; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2017-06-26

    Physical cooling of the eye surface relieves ocular discomfort, but translating this event to drug treatment of dry eye discomfort not been studied. Here, we synthesized a water-soluble TRPM8 receptor agonist called cryosim-3 (C3, 1-diisopropylphosphorylnonane) which selectively activates TRPM8 (linked to cooling) but not TRPV1 or TRPA1 (linked to nociception) and tested C3 in subjects with mild forms of dry eye disease. A set of 1-dialkylphosphoryalkanes were tested for activation of TRPM8, TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors in transfected cells. The bioactivity profiles were compared by perioral, topical, and intravenous delivery to anesthetized rats. The selected lead candidate C3 or vehicle (water) was applied with a cotton gauze pad to upper eyelids of patients with dry eye disease (n = 30). Cooling sensation, tear film break-up time (TBUT), basal tear secretion, and corneal staining were evaluated. C3 was then applied four times daily for 2 weeks to patients using a pre-loaded single unit applicator containing 2 mg/mL of C3 in water (n = 20) or water only. TBUT, basal tear secretion, and corneal staining, and three questionnaires surveys of ocular discomfort (VAS scale, OSDI, and CVS symptoms) were analyzed before and at 1 and 2 weeks thereafter. C3 was a selective and potent TRPM8 agonist without TRPV1 or TRPA1 activity. In test animals, the absence of shaking behavior after C3 perioral administration made it the first choice for further study. C3 increased tear secretion in an animal model of dry eye disease and did not irritate when wiped on eyes of volunteers. C3 singly applied (2 mg/ml) produced significant cooling in <5 min, an effecting lasting 46 min with an increase in tear secretion for 60 min. C3 applied for 2 weeks also significantly increased basal tear secretion with questionnaire surveys of ocular discomfort indices clearly showing improvement of symptoms at 1 and 2 weeks. No complaints of irritation or pain were reported by any subject. C3

  17. Increased PIO2 at Exhaustion in Hypoxia Enhances Muscle Activation and Swiftly Relieves Fatigue: A Placebo or a PIO2 Dependent Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Losa-Reyna, José; Morales-Alamo, David; González-Izal, Miriam; Pérez-Suárez, Ismael; Ponce-González, Jesús G.; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, José A. L.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the level of hypoxia from which muscle activation (MA) is reduced during incremental exercise to exhaustion (IE), and the role played by PIO2 in this process, ten volunteers (21 ± 2 years) performed four IE in severe acute hypoxia (SAH) (PIO2 = 73 mmHg). Upon exhaustion, subjects were asked to continue exercising while the breathing gas mixture was swiftly changed to a placebo (73 mmHg) or to a higher PIO2 (82, 92, 99, and 142 mmHg), and the IE continued until a new exhaustion. At the second exhaustion, the breathing gas was changed to room air (normoxia) and the IE continued until the final exhaustion. MA, as reflected by the vastus medialis (VM) and lateralis (VL) EMG raw and normalized root mean square (RMSraw, and RMSNz, respectively), normalized total activation index (TAINz), and burst duration were 8–20% lower at exhaustion in SAH than in normoxia (P < 0.05). The switch to a placebo or higher PIO2 allowed for the continuation of exercise in all instances. RMSraw, RMSNz, and TAINz were increased by 5–11% when the PIO2 was raised from 73 to 92, or 99 mmHg, and VL and VM averaged RMSraw by 7% when the PIO2 was elevated from 73 to 142 mmHg (P < 0.05). The increase of VM-VL average RMSraw was linearly related to the increase in PIO2, during the transition from SAH to higher PIO2 (R2 = 0.915, P < 0.05). In conclusion, increased PIO2 at exhaustion reduces fatigue and allows for the continuation of exercise in moderate and SAH, regardless of the effects of PIO2 on MA. At task failure, MA is increased during the first 10 s of increased PIO2 when the IE is performed at a PIO2 close to 73 mmHg and the PIO2 is increased to 92 mmHg or higher. Overall, these findings indicate that one of the central mechanisms by which severe hypoxia may cause central fatigue and task failure is by reducing the capacity for reaching the appropriate level of MA to sustain the task. The fact that at exhaustion in severe hypoxia the exercise was continued with the placebo

  18. Prevalence of Burnout Among Pain Medicine Physicians and Its Potential Effect upon Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Oncologic Pain or Chronic Pain of Nononcologic Origin.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Irene; Chacón, José-Ignacio; Gándara, Alba-Violeta; Muro, Inmaculada; Traseira, Susana; Monsalve, Vicente; Soriano, José-Francisco

    2018-01-19

    To evaluate the prevalence of burnout among physicians treating patients with chronic pain and to assess the potential relationships between the presence of burnout and patients' clinical outcomes such as pain relief, satisfaction with pain control, and quality of life. An observational, prospective, and noncomparative study. Pain medicine clinics. Physicians from medical departments involved in the management of chronic pain. Patients aged ≥18 years who exhibited moderate chronic pain lasting at least three months. Physicians were evaluated with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). Patients were evaluated with the Charlson Comorbidity Index, the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF), the EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D), and ad hoc instruments for evaluating satisfaction with pain control, the extent to which the treatment met patients' expectations, and subjective impressions of improvement. Of the 301 physician participants, 22 (7.3%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9 to 10.8) met the criteria of burnout. Burnout was higher among physicians from pain units, while none of the 35 primary care physicians reported burnout. The presence of burnout was positively associated with patients' pain relief (odds ratio [OR] = 1.423, 95% CI = 1.090 to 1.858) but not with satisfaction with pain control or quality of life. Of the remaining independent variables, being treated by pain unit physicians was significantly associated with worse pain relief (OR = 0.592, 95% CI = 0.507 to 0.691), lower satisfaction (β = -0.680, 95% CI = -0.834 to -0.525), and worse quality of life (β = -4.047, 95% CI = -5.509 to -2.585) compared with being treated by physicians from other specialties (e.g., traumatologists, oncologists, etc.). Our study shows a lack of negative or clinically relevant (as shown by the negligible to small effect sizes) impact of burnout on patient-reported outcomes (namely, pain relief, satisfaction, and quality of life) in patients with

  19. Old and in pain: Enduring and situational effects of cultural aging stereotypes on older people's pain experiences.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, S F; Marques, S; Matos, M

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the interplay between enduring and situational aging stereotype (AS) effects in older adults' self-reports of clinical and experimentally induced pain. We expected that, as compared with the situational activation of positive AS or a neutral condition, the activation of negative AS would lead to more severe self-reports of clinical pain (H1, hypothesis 1), higher cold pressor task (CPT) pain threshold (H2) and lower CPT pain tolerance (H3), especially among older adults who more strongly endorsed AS. This was a prospective study across two moments in time. At time 1 (T1), 52 older adults (Mage  = 74.7; 51.9% women) filled out measures of cultural AS endorsement, clinical pain severity and interference. Three months afterwards (T2), some of these participants collaborated in an experimental study on the effects of AS activation on reported clinical pain (n = 40) and experimentally induced (using CPT) pain threshold and tolerance (n = 35). Our results supported H2, i.e., as compared with the activation of positive AS or a neutral condition, when negative AS were activated older adults showed higher CPT pain thresholds, but this effect was more salient among those who more strongly endorsed AS at T1. This study stresses the influence of cultural AS in older adults' pain experiences showing that the situational activation of negative AS greatly increases experimentally induced pain thresholds of elders who more strongly endorse those stereotypes. It also highlights the relevance of interventions at the level of the physical and/or social environments surrounding elders in pain. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  20. Anterior herniation of lumbar disc induces persistent visceral pain: discogenic visceral pain: discogenic visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuan-Zhang; Shannon, Moore-Langston; Lai, Guang-Hui; Li, Xuan-Ying; Li, Na; Ni, Jia-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Visceral pain is a common cause for seeking medical attention. Afferent fibers innervating viscera project to the central nervous system via sympathetic nerves. The lumbar sympathetic nerve trunk lies in front of the lumbar spine. Thus, it is possible for patients to suffer visceral pain originating from sympathetic nerve irritation induced by anterior herniation of the lumbar disc. This study aimed to evaluate lumbar discogenic visceral pain and its treatment. Twelve consecutive patients with a median age of 56.4 years were enrolled for investigation between June 2012 and December 2012. These patients suffered from long-term abdominal pain unresponsive to current treatment options. Apart from obvious anterior herniation of the lumbar discs and high signal intensity anterior to the herniated disc on magnetic resonance imaging, no significant pathology was noted on gastroscopy, vascular ultrasound, or abdominal computed tomography (CT). To prove that their visceral pain originated from the anteriorly protruding disc, we evaluated whether pain was relieved by sympathetic block at the level of the anteriorly protruding disc. If the block was effective, CT-guided continuous lumbar sympathetic nerve block was finally performed. All patients were positive for pain relief by sympathetic block. Furthermore, the average Visual Analog Scale of visceral pain significantly improved after treatment in all patients (P < 0.05). Up to 11/12 patients had satisfactory pain relief at 1 week after discharge, 8/12 at 4 weeks, 7/12 at 8 weeks, 6/12 at 12 weeks, and 5/12 at 24 weeks. It is important to consider the possibility of discogenic visceral pain secondary to anterior herniation of the lumbar disc when forming a differential diagnosis for seemingly idiopathic abdominal pain. Continuous lumbar sympathetic nerve block is an effective and safe therapy for patients with discogenic visceral pain.

  1. Vitamin D supplementation has no major effect on pain or pain behavior in bedridden geriatric patients with advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Mikko; Sorva, Antti; Tilvis, Reijo

    2008-08-01

    In a few, earlier, uncontrolled trials, alleviation of chronic pain has been documented by vitamin D supplementation. This randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial addressed the association between pain and vitamin D deficiency and the effects of vitamin D supplementation on pain in institutionalized aged patients. 216 long-term care patients were enrolled in Helsinki, Finland. Pain was assessed by three tools: Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI), Discomfort Behavior Scale, and Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia Scale. Scores for Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS) and other clinical assessments were also collected from the RAI-database. Levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25- OHD) and parathyroid hormone were also determined. Patients in pain (n=202) were randomized into three treatment groups, each receiving 0, 400, or 1200 IU cholecalciferol per day, respectively. Assessments were repeated after six-month vitamin D supplementation. Patients were aged (84.5+/-7.5 yrs), demented (CPS= 4.9+/-1.4, range 1-6), and chronically bedridden. Pain was present in 38.4% to 83.8% of patients depending on assessment tool. Low 25-OHD levels (<50 nmol/L) were very common (98.1%). However, vitamin D deficiency was not associated with pain or pain behavior. The supplementation resulted in a marked increase in 25-OHD levels. However, neither prevalence of painlessness nor pain scores changed significantly after vitamin D supplementation. We were not able either to show an association between vitamin D deficiency and pain or to observe alleviation of pain by vitamin D supplementation. The independent role of vitamin D in the etiology of pain remains controversial.

  2. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of acupuncture on neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Ziyong; Cui, Huashun; Guo, Xiaohui; Yang, Huayuan; He, Jinsen; Wang, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used to treat neuropathic pain for a long time, but its mechanisms of action remain unknown. In this study, we observed the effects of electroacupuncture and manual acu-puncture on neuropathic pain and on ephrin-B/EphB signaling in rats models of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain. The results showed that manual acupuncture and elec-puncture significantly reduced mechanical hypersensitivity following chronic constriction injury, es-pecially electroacupuncture treatment. Real-time PCR results revealed that ephrin-B1/B3 and EphB1/B2 mRNA expression levels were significantly increased in the spinal dorsal horns of chronic constriction injury rats. Electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture suppressed the high sion of ephrin-B1 mRNA, and elevated EphB3/B4 mRNA expression. Electroacupuncture signifi-cantly enhanced the mRNA expression of ephrin-B3 and EphB3/B6 in the dorsal horns of neuro-pathic pain rats. Western blot results revealed that electroacupuncture in particular, and manual acupuncture, significantly up-regulated ephrin-B3 protein levels in rat spinal dorsal horns. The re-sults of this study suggest that acupuncture could activate ephrin-B/EphB signaling in neuropathic pain rats and improve neurological function. PMID:25206545

  3. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of acupuncture on neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Ju, Ziyong; Cui, Huashun; Guo, Xiaohui; Yang, Huayuan; He, Jinsen; Wang, Ke

    2013-09-05

    Acupuncture has been used to treat neuropathic pain for a long time, but its mechanisms of action remain unknown. In this study, we observed the effects of electroacupuncture and manual acu-puncture on neuropathic pain and on ephrin-B/EphB signaling in rats models of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain. The results showed that manual acupuncture and elec-puncture significantly reduced mechanical hypersensitivity following chronic constriction injury, es-pecially electroacupuncture treatment. Real-time PCR results revealed that ephrin-B1/B3 and EphB1/B2 mRNA expression levels were significantly increased in the spinal dorsal horns of chronic constriction injury rats. Electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture suppressed the high sion of ephrin-B1 mRNA, and elevated EphB3/B4 mRNA expression. Electroacupuncture signifi-cantly enhanced the mRNA expression of ephrin-B3 and EphB3/B6 in the dorsal horns of neuro-pathic pain rats. Western blot results revealed that electroacupuncture in particular, and manual acupuncture, significantly up-regulated ephrin-B3 protein levels in rat spinal dorsal horns. The re-sults of this study suggest that acupuncture could activate ephrin-B/EphB signaling in neuropathic pain rats and improve neurological function.

  4. Evaluation of the effect of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena Mill. on postoperative pain intensity in hospitalized children in selected hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Marofi, Maryam; Sirousfard, Motahareh; Moeini, Mahin; Ghanadi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pain is the common complication after a surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena Mill. on the postoperative pain in children. Materials and Methods: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, we selected 64 children of 3–6 years of age through convenient sampling and divided them randomly into two groups. Patients in group A were given inhalation aromatherapy with R. damascena Mill., and in group B, the patients were given almond oil as a placebo. Inhalation aromatherapy was used at the first time of subjects’ arrival to the ward and then at 3, 6, 9, and 12 h afterward. Common palliative treatments to relieve pain were used in both groups. Thirty minutes after aromatherapy, the postoperative pain in children was evaluated with the Toddler Preschooler Postoperative Pain Scale (TPPPS). Data were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: There was no significant difference in pain scores at the first time of subjects’ arrival to the ward (before receiving any aromatherapy or palliative care) between the two groups. After each time of aromatherapy and at the end of treatment, the pain score was significantly reduced in the aromatherapy group with R. damascena Mill. compared to the placebo group. Conclusions: According to our results, aromatherapy with R. damascena Mill. can be used in postoperative pain in children, together with other common treatments without any significant side effects. PMID:25878704

  5. Side effects of pain and analgesia in animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Jirkof, Paulin

    2017-03-22

    This review highlights selected effects of untreated pain and of widely used analgesics such as opioids, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and antipyretics, to illustrate the relevance of carefully planned, appropriate and controlled analgesia for greater reproducibility in animal experiments involving laboratory rodents.

  6. Swimming Training Reduces Neuroma Pain by Regulating Neurotrophins.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jinge; Yu, Tingting; Xu, Yongming; Pu, Shaofeng; Lv, Yingying; Zhang, Xin; DU, Dongping

    2018-01-01

    Neuroma formation after peripheral nerve transection leads to severe neuropathic pain in amputees. Previous studies suggested that physical exercise could bring beneficial effect on alleviating neuropathic pain. However, the effect of exercise on neuroma pain still remained unclear. In addition, long-term exercise can affect the expression of neurotrophins (NT), such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which play key roles in nociceptor sensitization and nerve sprouting after nerve injury. Here, we investigated whether long-term swimming exercise could relieve neuroma pain by modulating NT expression. We used a tibial neuroma transposition (TNT) rat model to mimic neuroma pain. After TNT surgery, rats performed swimming exercise for 5 wk. Neuroma pain and tactile sensitivities were detected using von Frey filaments. Immunofluorescence was applied to analyze neuroma formation. NGF and BDNF expressions in peripheral neuroma, dorsal root ganglion, and the spinal cord were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting. TNT led to neuroma formation, induced neuroma pain, and mechanical allodynia in hind paw. Five-week swimming exercise inhibited neuroma formation and relieved mechanical allodynia in the hind paw and neuroma pain in the lateral ankle. The analgesic effect lasted for at least 1 wk, even when the exercise ceased. TNT elevated the expressions of BDNF and NGF in peripheral neuroma, dorsal root ganglion, and the spinal cord to different extents. Swimming also decreased the elevation of NT expression. Swimming exercise not only inhibits neuroma formation induced by nerve transection but also relieves pain behavior. These effects might be associated with the modulation of NT.

  7. Swimming Training Reduces Neuroma Pain by Regulating Neurotrophins

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, JINGE; YU, TINGTING; XU, YONGMING; PU, SHAOFENG; LV, YINGYING; ZHANG, XIN; DU, DONGPING

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction Neuroma formation after peripheral nerve transection leads to severe neuropathic pain in amputees. Previous studies suggested that physical exercise could bring beneficial effect on alleviating neuropathic pain. However, the effect of exercise on neuroma pain still remained unclear. In addition, long-term exercise can affect the expression of neurotrophins (NT), such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which play key roles in nociceptor sensitization and nerve sprouting after nerve injury. Here, we investigated whether long-term swimming exercise could relieve neuroma pain by modulating NT expression. Methods We used a tibial neuroma transposition (TNT) rat model to mimic neuroma pain. After TNT surgery, rats performed swimming exercise for 5 wk. Neuroma pain and tactile sensitivities were detected using von Frey filaments. Immunofluorescence was applied to analyze neuroma formation. NGF and BDNF expressions in peripheral neuroma, dorsal root ganglion, and the spinal cord were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting. Results TNT led to neuroma formation, induced neuroma pain, and mechanical allodynia in hind paw. Five-week swimming exercise inhibited neuroma formation and relieved mechanical allodynia in the hind paw and neuroma pain in the lateral ankle. The analgesic effect lasted for at least 1 wk, even when the exercise ceased. TNT elevated the expressions of BDNF and NGF in peripheral neuroma, dorsal root ganglion, and the spinal cord to different extents. Swimming also decreased the elevation of NT expression. Conclusions Swimming exercise not only inhibits neuroma formation induced by nerve transection but also relieves pain behavior. These effects might be associated with the modulation of NT. PMID:28846565

  8. Hand-held instrument should relieve hematoma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raggio, L. J.; Robertson, T. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable instrument relieves hematomas beneath fingernails and toenails without surgery. This device simplifies the operative procedure with an instant variable heating tip, adjustable depth settings and interchangeable tip sizes for cauterizing small areas and relieving pressurized clots.

  9. [The effects of hand acupuncture therapy on pain, ROM, ADL and depression among elders with low back pain and knee joint pain].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Hyang

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of hand acupuncture therapy on pain, ROM, ADL, and depression among older people with low back pain and knee joint pain. The research was a quasi-experimental design using a non-equivalent control group pre-post test. The participants were 40 patients, 18 in the experimental group and 22 in the control group. A pretest and 2 posttest were conducted to measure the main variables. For the experimental group, hand acupuncture therapy, consisting of hand acupuncture and press-pellets based on corresponding points, was given. There were statistically significant differences in pain, ROM in knee joint, and ADL in the experimental group but not in depression compared to the control group over two different times. The hand acupuncture therapy was effective for low back pain, knee joint pain, ROM in knee joint and ADL among the elders in this study. Therefore, the hand acupuncture therapy can be utilized in the field of geriatric nursing as a nursing intervention for older people with low back pain and knee joint pain.

  10. The effect of topical arnica on muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Adkison, Julie D; Bauer, David W; Chang, Terence

    2010-10-01

    The herb Arnica montana, in topical formulations, has been reputed to decrease bruising and muscle pain. This claim has been inadequately and incompletely addressed. To determine whether topical A. montana cream could decrease subjective leg pain following calf raises. Secondary outcomes were effects on ankle range of motion and muscle tenderness. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 53 subjects. Active range of motion was measured in both ankles, and then a series of calf-raises were completed according to a standardized protocol. Each participant received 2 tubes of cream, 1 with active arnica and 1 with placebo. The creams were applied to the lower legs immediately after the exercise, and again at 24 and 48 hours postexercise according to the "RIGHT" or "LEFT" labels. At 48 hours postexercise, subjects had their ankle range of motion and muscle tenderness measured. Subjects used the analog scale to rate pain in each leg at baseline, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours. No significant differences in pain scores were seen before exercise (arnica: 0.07 vs placebo: 0.09, p = 0.32). Pain scores on legs treated with arnica were higher than scores on those receiving placebo 24 hours after exercise (3.04 vs 2.36, respectively; p < 0.005). Pain scores on day 3 (arnica: 3.44 vs placebo: 3.20, p = 0.66) and day 4 (arnica: 2.36 vs placebo: 2.31, p = 0.62) were not significantly different. There was no difference in muscle tenderness (arnica: 1.05 vs placebo: 1.05, p = 1.0). Ankle range of motion did not differ significantly on either day 1 (arnica: 64.70 degrees vs placebo: 66.15, p = 0.352 or day 3 (arnica: 63.32 degrees vs placebo: 65.94, p = 0.058). Rather than decreasing leg pain, arnica was found to increase leg pain 24 hours after eccentric calf exercises. This effect did not extend to the 48-hour measurement.

  11. Pain in thalassaemia: the effects of age on pain frequency and severity.

    PubMed

    Haines, Dru; Martin, Marie; Carson, Susan; Oliveros, Olivia; Green, Sage; Coates, Thomas; Eile, Jennifer; Schilling, Leann; Dinu, Bogan; Mendoza, Tito; Gerstenberger, Eric; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Vichinsky, Elliott

    2013-03-01

    Pain is not a symptom generally associated with thalassaemia. However, providers have noted increasing patient reports of pain, creating an impetus for this prospective, observational assessment of pain in thalassaemia patients. The primary study goals were to assess pain prevalence, severity, location, and potential risk factors. This was a multicentre, prospective study of thalassaemia patients receiving care at 12 Thalassaemia Clinical Research Network sites. Pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Two hundred and fifty-two thalassaemia patients ranging in age from 12 to 71 years (mean 28.8) were enrolled. Sixty-four per cent reported experiencing pain during the last 4 weeks, 22% of whom reported pain on a daily basis. Ordinal regression analysis of pain ratings demonstrated significant (P < 0.001) correlation of increased age with increased pain, irrespective of diagnosis, transfusion status, gender, bone density, chelator type or iron overload. Eighty-one per cent reported having pain for 1 year or longer and 31% reported pain for five or more years. Pain is a major cause of morbidity and an unrecognized problem for patients with thalassaemia. Age is the strongest predictor of frequency and severity. Little else is known about the aetiology and predictors of this pain syndrome. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Additional therapeutic effect of balneotherapy in low back pain.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Murat; Sahin, Ozlem; Elden, Hasan; Hayta, Emrullah; Kaptanoglu, Ece

    2011-08-01

    Balneotherapy has been widely used for treatment of chronic low back pain recently. However there are only a few clinical controlled trials on balneotherapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of balneotherapy in patients with chronic low back pain. Sixty patients with lumbar spondylosis were included in the study. In Group 1, patients received both balneotherapy and physiotherapy and in Group 2, patients received only physiotherapy for three weeks. The intensity of the pain was evaluated by Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and functional disability was scored according to Revised Oswestry Index (ROI). Spinal mobility was assessed by the Schober and lateral flexion tests. Variables were evaluated before and after the three weeks of treatment. The groups were comparable regarding age (P = 0.970) and sex (P = 0.357). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups for baseline VAS (P = 0.838), Schober test (P = 0.226), and right (P = 0.642) and left (P = 0.674) lateral flexion measurements, and ROI scores (P = 0.798). At the end of the therapy, all clinical parameters significantly improved in patients in both of the groups (P < 0.05). VAS, Schober test, and ROI scores after the therapy were clearly superior in Group 1 in comparison to Group 2 (P < 0.05). The results of the present study reiterate that besides conventional physiotherapy, balneotherapy may be effective in the treatment of patients with chronic low back pain.

  13. [Effectiveness of physiotherapy on painful shoulder impingement syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gomora-García, Mónica; Rojano-Mejía, David; Solis-Hernández, José Luis; Escamilla-Chávez, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Painful shoulder impingement syndrome is one of the first reasons for care in rehabilitation centres. As the evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical measures as adjuvant treatment is limited, the aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of physiotherapy on shoulder pain. A retrospective and analytical study was conducted using the medical records of patients with shoulder pain who attended in a rehabilitation centre from October 2010 to September 2011. The demographic and clinical data were collected, and the clinical improvement was determined as: complete, incomplete, or no improvement. Chi squared was used to determine whether there were differences between the different modalities of physiotherapy, as well as the level of improvement. The study included a total of 181 patients, with a mean age of 54.3 years, and a mean of 4.6 months of onset of pain. The physiotherapy treatments included: warm compresses plus interferential current (60.2%), and warm compresses plus ultrasound (17.1%). Just over half (53.6%) obtained a moderate recovery, 36.4% slight improvement, and 9.9% no improvement. No significant differences were found between the different forms of therapy. The supervised rehabilitation program consists of 9 sessions of physiotherapy. A functional improvement of 90% was obtained, without finding any statistical differences between the therapies used. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. The effectiveness of balneotherapy in chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Onat, Şule Şahin; Taşoğlu, Özlem; Güneri, Fulya Demircioğlu; Özişler, Zuhal; Safer, Vildan Binay; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of balneotherapy plus physical therapy versus only physical therapy in patients with chronic low back pain. In this trial, 81 patients with low back pain were followed up in two groups. Patients in group I (n = 44) were treated with physical therapy alone. Patients in group II (n = 37) were treated with balneotherapy in addition to the same physical therapy protocol in group I. Patients in both groups were given a home-based standardized exercise program. The following parameters were measured: visual analog scale (0-10 cm), fingertip-to-floor distance (cm), Oswestry Disability Index, and Short Form 36 quality of life scale. First evaluations were done at the time of enrollment, and second evaluations were done after accomplishment of a 3-week treatment program. There were no significant differences between the two groups for the sociodemographic features. All of the measured parameters improved in both groups. However, improvements in pain, functionality, and quality of life scores were found to be superior in the balneotherapy plus physical therapy group. For the patients with chronic low back pain, balneotherapy plus physical therapy is more effective, compared to physical therapy alone.

  15. [The effectiveness of therapeutic touch on pain, depression and sleep in patients with chronic pain: clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Marta, Ilda Estefani Ribeiro; Baldan, Sueli Santiago; Berton, Ani Fabiana; Pavam, Michele; da Silva, Maria Júlia Paes

    2010-12-01

    This research aimed to check the effectiveness of Therapeutic Touch on decreased pain intensity, depression self-assessment scores and improved sleep quality. A clinical before-after trial is presented. The study was carried out at a Basic Health Unit in Fernandópolis, SP-Brazil, involving 30 elderly patients with chronic non-oncologic pain who received 8 sessions of Therapeutic Touch in accordance with the Krieger-Kunz method. The Visual Analogue Scale for pain was applied before and after each session, and Beck Depression Inventory and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index before the first and after the last session. Data analysis showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in pain intensity, depression self-assessment scores and the sleep quality index. It is concluded that the Therapeutic Touch was effective to decrease pain intensity and depressive attitudes and symptoms, as well as to improve sleep quality.

  16. Relative effectiveness of additive pain interventions during vaccination in infants

    PubMed Central

    Taddio, Anna; Riddell, Rebecca Pillai; Ipp, Moshe; Moss, Steven; Baker, Stephen; Tolkin, Jonathan; Malini, Dave; Feerasta, Sharmeen; Govan, Preeya; Fletcher, Emma; Wong, Horace; McNair, Caitlin; Mithal, Priyanjali; Stephens, Derek

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vaccine injections can cause acute pain and distress in infants, which can contribute to dissatisfaction with the vaccination experience and vaccine hesitancy. We sought to compare the effectiveness of additive pain interventions administered consistently during vaccine injections in the first year of life. METHODS: We conducted a multicentre, longitudinal, double-blind, add-on, randomized controlled trial. Healthy infants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 levels of pain management for all vaccine injections at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months: (i) placebo control; (ii) parent-directed video education about infant soothing; (iii) the video plus sucrose administered orally or (iv) the video plus sucrose plus liposomal lidocaine applied topically. All infants benefit from injection techniques that minimize pain. We used a double-dummy design; hence all parents watched a video (active psychological intervention or placebo) and all infants received oral solution (sucrose or placebo) and topical cream (lidocaine or placebo). We assessed infant distress during 3 phases — preinjection (baseline), vaccine injection (needle), and 1 minute postinjection (recovery) — using the Modified Behavioural Pain Scale (range 0–10). We compared scores between groups and across infant ages using a mixed-model repeated-measures analysis. RESULTS: A total of 352 infants participated in the study, from Jan. 17, 2012, to Feb. 2, 2016. Demographics did not differ among intervention groups (p > 0.05). Baseline pain scores did not differ among intervention groups (p = 0.4), but did differ across ages (p < 0.001). Needle pain scores differed among groups (p = 0.003) and across ages (p < 0.001). The mean (± standard deviation) needle score was 6.3 (± 0.8) in the video–sucrose–lidocaine group compared with 6.7 (± 0.8) in each of the other groups. There were no other between-group differences. Recovery scores did not differ among groups (p = 0.98), but did differ across ages (p < 0

  17. Effectiveness of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block and rectus sheath block in pain control and recovery after gynecological transumbilical single-incision laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mugita, M; Kawahara, R; Tamai, Y; Yamasaki, K; Okuno, S; Hanada, R; Inaoka, M; Funato, T

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) and rectus sheath (RS) blocks in pain management and recovery after gynecological single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS). Abilateral TAP block (Group A, n = 9), bilateral TAP and RS blocks (Group B, n = 10), and a bilateral RS block (Group C, n = 9) with 40 ml ropivacaine per patient were conducted in 28 patients undergoing SILS for ovarian tumors. A pain score and walking distance in a 6-minute walk test (6MWT) were examined. Pain scores were significantly lower on postoperative day (POD) 3 than on POD 1 in Groups B (p = 0.03) and C (p = 0.02). The walking distance on POD 3 was comparable with that before surgery in Group C (p = 0.75), but shorter in Groups A (p = 0.004) and B (p = 0.02). The RS block alone was the most effective in relieving pain and accelerating general recovery after gynecological SILS.

  18. Age effects on pain thresholds, temporal summation and spatial summation of heat and pressure pain.

    PubMed

    Lautenbacher, Stefan; Kunz, Miriam; Strate, Peter; Nielsen, Jesper; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2005-06-01

    Experimental data on age-related changes in pain perception have so far been contradictory. It has appeared that the type of pain induction method is critical in this context, with sensitivity to heat pain being decreased whereas sensitivity to pressure pain may be even enhanced in the elderly. Furthermore, it has been shown that temporal summation of heat pain is more pronounced in the elderly but it has remained unclear whether age differences in temporal summation are also evident when using other pain induction methods. No studies on age-related changes in spatial summation of pain have so far been conducted. The aim of the present study was to provide a comprehensive survey on age-related changes in pain perception, i.e. in somatosensory thresholds (warmth, cold, vibration), pain thresholds (heat, pressure) and spatial and temporal summation of heat and pressure pain. We investigated 20 young (mean age 27.1 years) and 20 elderly (mean age 71.6 years) subjects. Our results confirmed and extended previous findings by showing that somatosensory thresholds for non-noxious stimuli increase with age whereas pressure pain thresholds decrease and heat pain thresholds show no age-related changes. Apart from an enhanced temporal summation of heat pain, pain summation was not found to be critically affected by age. The results of the present study provide evidence for stimulus-specific changes in pain perception in the elderly, with deep tissue (muscle) nociception being affected differently by age than superficial tissue (skin) nociception. Summation mechanisms contribute only moderately to age changes in pain perception.

  19. Ketamine for Pain Management-Side Effects & Potential Adverse Events.

    PubMed

    Allen, Cheryl A; Ivester, Julius R

    2017-12-01

    An old anesthetic agent, ketamine is finding new use in lower doses for analgesic purposes. There are concerns stemming from its potential side effects-specifically psychomimetic effects. These side effects are directly related to dose amount. The doses used for analgesic purposes are much lower than those used for anesthesia purposes. A literature review was performed to ascertain potential side effects and/or adverse events when using ketamine for analgesia purposes. The search included CINAHL, PubMed, and Ovid using the search terms "ketamine," "ketamine infusion," "pain," "adverse events," "practice guideline," and "randomized controlled trial." Searches were limited to full-text, peer-reviewed articles and systematic reviews. Initially 1,068 articles were retrieved. The search was then narrowed by using the Boolean connector AND with various search term combinations. After adjusting for duplication, article titles and abstracts were reviewed, leaving 25 articles for an in-depth analysis. Specific exclusion criteria were then applied. The literature supports the use of ketamine for analgesic purposes, and ketamine offers a nonopioid option for the management of some pain conditions. Because ketamine is still classified as an anesthetic agent, health care institutions should develop their own set of policies and protocols for the administration of ketamine. By using forethought and understanding of the properties of ketamine, appropriate care may be planned to mitigate potential side effects and adverse events so that patients are appropriately cared for and their pain effectively managed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Diclofenac rectal suppository: an effective modality for perineal pain.

    PubMed

    Naz, Shabnam; Memon, Naila Yousuf; Sattar, Asma; Baloch, Rafia

    2016-08-01

    To determine the frequency of perineal pain after childbirth after a single dose of diclofenac rectal suppository. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Shaikh Zayed Women Hospital, Larkana, Pakistan, from April to September 2014, and comprised patients who were admitted to the labour room for normal vaginal delivery. A single dose of rectal diclofenac suppository of 100mg was given to the patients delivered vaginally or by second-stage emergency Caesarean section. Post-partum pain was noted after 12 and 24 hours of the administration of analgesia. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. Of the 169 subjects, 63(37.28%) were aged 20 years or less, 85(50.3%) between 21 and 30 years, and 21(12.43%) between 31 and 40 years. Frequency of perineal pain was predominantly mild in 95(56%) patients, moderate in 60(35.5%) and severe in 14(8.28%). The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory rectal suppositories was found to be a simple and highly effective modality of reducing the perineal pain.

  1. Effect of thermal stresses on the mechanism of tooth pain.

    PubMed

    Oskui, Iman Z; Ashtiani, Mohammed N; Hashemi, Ata; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2014-11-01

    Daily hot and cold thermal loadings on teeth may result in structural deformation, mechanical stress, and pain signaling. The aim of this study was to compare the adverse effects of hot and cold beverages on an intact tooth and, then, to provide physical evidence to support the hydrodynamic theory of tooth pain sensation mechanism. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed on a premolar model subjected to hot and cold thermal loadings. Elapsed times for heat diffusion and stress detection at the pulp-dentin junction were calculated as measures of the pain sensation. Extreme tensile stress within the enamel resulted in damage in cold loadings. Also, extreme values of stress at the pulpal wall occurred 21.6 seconds earlier than extreme temperatures in hot and cold loadings. The intact tooth was remarkably vulnerable to cold loading. Earlier changes in mechanical stress rather than temperature at the pulp-dentin junction indicate that the dental pain caused by hot or cold beverages may be based on the hydrodynamic theory. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effectiveness of balneotherapy in chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Engin; Ökmen, Burcu Metin; Özkuk, Kağan; Taşoğlu, Özlem; Özgirgin, Neşe

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of balneotherapy (BT), which is applied in addition to physical therapy (PT), in the treatment of chronic neck pain. Sixty patients with chronic neck pain were divided into study (n = 30) and control (n = 30) groups. All of the patients in both groups were treated with a 15-session standard PT program consisting of hot pack, ultrasound, and transcutaneous electrical stimulation. Patients in the study group were also treated with a 15-session BT program lasting 20 min/day in addition to the standard PT program. Visual analogue scale (VAS), modified neck disability index (mNDI), and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) scores of all patients were evaluated at three different times as pretreatment, posttreatment, and posttreatment third week. There was no statistically significant difference between the clinical and demographic characteristics of the patients in different groups before treatment. Intragroup analysis revealed significant improvement in all parameters for both of the groups at all time intervals. Intergroup analysis uncovered the superiority of the study group. According to the results of this study, BT in combination with PT is superior to PT alone in reducing pain and disability and improving quality of life in patients with chronic neck pain.

  3. The effect of pain on hip and knee kinematics during running in females with chronic patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Noehren, Brian; Sanchez, Zack; Cunningham, Tom; McKeon, Patrick Owen

    2012-07-01

    Despite the growing recognition of the role of abnormal hip and knee mechanics in patellofemoral pain (PFP), few studies have assessed if or how these mechanics change when the person experiences pain while running. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if the development of pain while running resulted in altered hip and knee kinematics in female runners with PFP as compared to healthy female runners. Thirty female runners (15 PFP, 15 controls) participated in an instrumented gait analysis while running for 30 min at a self-selected pace. Pain and fatigue were recorded every minute while participants ran. Variables of interest included peak hip adduction, hip internal rotation, knee abduction, knee external rotation, pain, and fatigue. There were significant group by pain interactions for hip adduction (p<0.01) and hip internal rotation (p<0.01). The healthy group, who did not develop pain had significant increases in both motions compared to the PFP group, who did develop pain. There was also a trend toward less knee external rotation in the PFP group in presence of pain (p=0.059). No differences were found for knee abduction (p=0.32). A group main effect was found for hip internal rotation (p=0.008) in which the PFP group had significantly larger values. Runners with PFP did not alter their hip mechanics over the course of the run. This may have resulted in repetitive stress to the same aspect of the patellofemoral joint and contributed to the initial development of pain. However, the PFP group did attempt to make a compensation once in pain by reducing knee external rotation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on Pain in Patients With Chronic Refractory Coccydynia: A Quasi-Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Haghighat, Shila; Mashayekhi Asl, Mahboobeh

    2016-08-01

    Several nonsurgical and surgical treatment modalities are available for patients with chronic coccydynia, with controversial results. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ECSWT) is effective in the treatment of many musculoskeletal disorders; however, it has not been tested for chronic coccydynia. We performed the current study to determine the effects of ECSWT on pain in patients with chronic coccydynia. This quasi-interventional clinical study included 10 patients with chronic coccydynia without acute fracture. All the patients received ECSWT with a radial probe delivering 3,000 shock waves of 2 bar per session at 21 Hz frequency directed to the coccyx. Each patient received four sessions of ECSWT at one-week intervals. The pain severity was recorded according to the visual analog scale (VAS) at one, two, three, and four weeks after initiation of therapy. The VAS score was also evaluated at one and six months after ending the therapy. Most of the participants were women (90.0%), and the participants' mean age was 39.1 ± 9.1 (ranging from 28 to 52) years. The VAS score did not decrease significantly seven months after therapy when compared to baseline (3.3 ± 3.6 vs. 7.3 ± 2.1; P = 0.011). However, the VAS score at two months (2.6 ± 2.9 vs. 7.3 ± 2.1; P = 0.007) and at four weeks (3.2 ± 2.8 vs. 7.3 ± 2.1; P = 0.007) significantly decreased when compared to baseline. The decrease in VAS scores was not persistent after cessation of the therapy. ECSWT is an effective modality in relieving the pain intensity in patients with refractory chronic coccydynia for the early period after intervention.

  5. Expectations contribute to reduced pain levels during prayer in highly religious participants.

    PubMed

    Jegindø, Else-Marie Elmholdt; Vase, Lene; Skewes, Joshua Charles; Terkelsen, Astrid Juhl; Hansen, John; Geertz, Armin W; Roepstorff, Andreas; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2013-08-01

    Although the use of prayer as a religious coping strategy is widespread and often claimed to have positive effects on physical disorders including pain, it has never been tested in a controlled experimental setting whether prayer has a pain relieving effect. Religious beliefs and practices are complex phenomena and the use of prayer may be mediated by general psychological factors known to be related to the pain experience, such as expectations, desire for pain relief, and anxiety. Twenty religious and twenty non-religious healthy volunteers were exposed to painful electrical stimulation during internal prayer to God, a secular contrast condition, and a pain-only control condition. Subjects rated expected pain intensity levels, desire for pain relief, and anxiety before each trial and pain intensity and pain unpleasantness immediately after on mechanical visual analogue scales. Autonomic and cardiovascular measures provided continuous non-invasive objective means for assessing the potential analgesic effects of prayer. Prayer reduced pain intensity by 34 % and pain unpleasantness by 38 % for religious participants, but not for non-religious participants. For religious participants, expectancy and desire predicted 56-64 % of the variance in pain intensity scores, but for non-religious participants, only expectancy was significantly predictive of pain intensity (65-73 %). Conversely, prayer-induced reduction in pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were not followed by autonomic and cardiovascular changes.

  6. Child and parent pain catastrophizing and pain from presurgery to 6 weeks postsurgery: examination of cross-sectional and longitudinal actor-partner effects.

    PubMed

    Birnie, Kathryn A; Chorney, Jill; El-Hawary, Ron

    2017-10-01

    Child and parent pain catastrophizing are reported preoperative risk factors for children's acute and persistent postsurgical pain. This study examined dyadic relations between child and parent pain catastrophizing and child and parent ratings of child pain prior to (M = 4.01 days; "baseline") and following surgery (M = 6.5 weeks; "acute follow-up"), as well changes in pain catastrophizing during this time in 167 youth (86% female; Mage = 14.55 years) undergoing spinal fusion surgery and 1 parent (89% mothers). Actor-partner interdependence models assessed cross-sectional and longitudinal intra- and interpersonal effects. Cross-sectionally, child pain catastrophizing was positively associated with child pain at baseline and acute follow-up (actor effects: βbaseline = 0.288 and βfollow-up = 0.262; P < 0.01), and parents' ratings of child pain at baseline (partner effect: βbaseline = 0.212; P < 0.01). Parent pain catastrophizing was not cross-sectionally associated with ratings of child pain. Longitudinally, higher pain catastrophizing at baseline predicted higher pain catastrophizing at acute follow-up for children (actor effect: β = 0.337; P < 0.01) and parents (actor effect: β = 0.579; P < 0.01) with a significantly smaller effect for children (respondent × actor interaction: β = 0.121; P < 0.05). No longitudinal partner effects for catastrophizing were observed. Baseline child and parent pain catastrophizing did not predict child pain at acute follow-up. In conclusion, child, not parent, pain catastrophizing was associated with children's pre- and postsurgical pain, and showed significantly less stability over time. There is a need to better understand contributors to the stability or changeability of pain catastrophizing, the prospective relation of catastrophizing to pain, and contexts in which child vs parent pain catastrophizing is most influential for pediatric postsurgical pain.

  7. No effects of hydrocortisone and dexamethasone on pain sensitivity in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Wingenfeld, K; Wolf, S; Kunz, M; Krieg, J-C; Lautenbacher, S

    2015-07-01

    There is some evidence that stress-induced cortisol increase leads to a decrease in pain, while lowering cortisol levels enhances pain sensitivity, but no study has yet investigated both pharmacological enhancement and reduction of cortisol levels in the same individuals. Firstly, we tested in 16 healthy individuals whether the treatment with hydrocortisone and dexamethasone, respectively, results in altered pain thresholds. Secondly, we aimed to test whether hormone effects are different across the pain range by using ratings for pain stimuli with varying intensity; and thirdly, we tested whether cortisol levels influence the discrimination ability for painful stimuli. Despite substantial effects of dexamethasone and hydrocortisone administration on cortisol levels, no effect of these drugs was seen in terms of pain sensitivity (pain threshold, pain rating, pain discrimination ability), although comprehensively examined. However, in the placebo condition, a significant negative correlation between cortisol and pain thresholds was seen. Similarly, there were also strong negative associations between cortisol levels in the placebo condition and pain thresholds after drug treatment (especially after hydrocortisone). These findings suggest that short-term variations of cortisol do not influence pain sensitivity whereas, in general, high levels of cortisol are associated with increased pain sensitivity, at least for weak to moderate stimuli. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  8. Testing the impact of a multimedia video CD of patient-controlled analgesia on pain knowledge and pain relief in patients receiving surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsing-Hsia; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Yang, Hui-Ju

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to develop a multimedia video CD (VCD) of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and test its effects on pain knowledge and pain relief in patients receiving surgery. This multimedia VCD of PCA was created to convey fundamental knowledge to both patients and their family members and help patients properly utilize PCA devices to relieve pain and improve recovery. The content of multimedia VCD of PCA included pre-admission pain education, introduction of PCA, nursing care procedures, and questions and answers. This study used a quasi-experimental research design to test effects of the multimedia education program in the experimental group of 30 subjects compared to the control subjects of equal number (without the multimedia VCD of PCA). (1) The intervention of multimedia VCD of PCA resulted in a statistically significant difference in pain knowledge between the experimental and control groups. (2) Subjects in the experimental group obtained a better outcome of pain relief compared to control subjects. (3) Subjects in the experimental group indicated that the multimedia VCD of PCA indeed helped them effectively operate their PCA devices to relieve surgery pain. The clinical application of the multimedia VCD of PCA could help patients improve knowledge on pain, learn how to use PCA devices, achieve proper pain relief, and increase effectiveness of recovery activities.

  9. Contact and nutrient caregiving effects on newborn infant pain responses.

    PubMed

    Gormally, S; Barr, R G; Wertheim, L; Alkawaf, R; Calinoiu, N; Young, S N

    2001-01-01

    To understand how the 'caregiving context' could affect responses to procedural pain, the authors sought to determine whether (1) the combined effects of sweet taste and holding (caregiving contact) were greater than the effects of either alone, (2) any combined effects were additive or interactive, and (3) the interventions had similar effects on behavioral (crying and facial activity) and physiological (heart rate, vagal tone) responses to the heel-stick procedure in newborn infants in a randomized two-factorial intervention trial. Eighty-five normally developing newborn infants were studied with a mean gestational age of 39.4 weeks on the 2nd or 3rd day of life. Infants were randomized in blocks of eight to receive (1) no holding and water taste (control participants), (2) no holding and sucrose taste (sucrose group), (3) holding and water taste (holding group), or (4) holding and sucrose taste (holding and sucrose group). Crying was reduced significantly by taste and holding, and the interventions combined additively. Facial activity was only significantly reduced by holding. For physiological measures, the interventions interacted with each other and preintervention levels to reduce heart rate and lower vagal tone more during the procedure in infants in whom heart rate and vagal tone were higher before intervention. Consequently, sweet taste and holding interventions combined in complex ways when acting on different behavioral and physiological response systems to modify stressful pain experiences. The results suggest that providing a caregiving context when painful procedures are performed may be a simple and practical method of reducing pain experience in infants, and that no one measure captures these effects.

  10. Effect of an orally formulated processed black cumin, from Iranian traditional medicine pharmacopoeia, in relieving symptoms of knee osteoarthritis: A prospective, randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Salimzadeh, Ahmad; Ghourchian, Anahita; Choopani, Rasool; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Abolhasani, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    Osteoarthritis is a global health problem, especially for the elderly. A good replacement for non-surgical treatments is the use of traditional medicines. We selected a revere plant (Nigella sativa L.), a widely utilized medicinal herb for the treatment of inflammatory conditions, from the Iranian traditional medicine (ITM) pharmacopoeia with proven anti-inflammatory and analgesic actions. We performed a prospective, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled clinical trial, in order to investigate whether the herb is useful in alleviating the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis. American College of Rheumatology clinical criteria were the basis of diagnosis, while the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire was considered as the main outcome measure. One hundred and ten eligible patients were assigned to receive a placebo or an active intervention (2 g/day of processed N. sativa seed powder in divided doses). Acetaminophen tablets were the rescue medicine. Finally, 40 patients in the placebo group and 37 patients in the active group completed the trial and were included in the statistical analysis. Both cohorts demonstrated statistically significant within-group differences (P < 0.05) in some subscales that were more prominent in the active group without any considerable adverse effects. Nevertheless, KOOS score results and the mean number of acetaminophen tablets used by patients showed no statistically significant between-group differences. It can be concluded that future programmed studies with larger sample sizes, longer follow-up periods, and other forms of N. sativa seeds as an active intervention is necessary to evaluate its efficacy in relieving the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Suppressive Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture on Paclitaxel-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Rats: Mediation by Spinal α2-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jiho; Jeon, Changhoon; Jang, Jo Ung; Quan, Fu Shi; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Woojin

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel, a chemotherapy drug for solid tumors, induces peripheral painful neuropathy. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA) has been reported to have potent analgesic effects, which are known to be mediated by activation of spinal α-adrenergic receptor. Here, we investigated the effect of BVA on mechanical hyperalgesia and spinal neuronal hyperexcitation induced by paclitaxel. The role of spinal α-adrenergic receptor subtypes in the analgesic effect of BVA was also observed. Administration of paclitaxel (total 8 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) on four alternate days (days 0, 2, 4, and 6) induced significant mechanical hyperalgesic signs, measured using a von Frey filament. BVA (1 mg/kg, ST36) relieved this mechanical hyperalgesia for at least two hours, and suppressed the hyperexcitation in spinal wide dynamic range neurons evoked by press or pinch stimulation. Both melittin (0.5 mg/kg, ST36) and phospholipase A2 (0.12 mg/kg, ST36) were shown to play an important part in this analgesic effect of the BVA, as they significantly attenuated the pain. Intrathecal pretreatment with the α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist (idazoxan, 50 µg), but not α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist (prazosin, 30 µg), blocked the analgesic effect of BVA. These results suggest that BVA has potent suppressive effects against paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain, which were mediated by spinal α2-adrenergic receptor. PMID:29088102

  12. Higher pain scores, similar opioid doses and side effects associated with antipyretic analgesics in specialised tertiary pain care.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Freynhagen, Rainer; von Hentig, Nils; Griessinger, Norbert; Zimmermann, Michael; Sittl, Reinhard; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate whether non-opioid antipyretic analgesics are associated with lower pain scores, opioid doses and side effects in pain patients in tertiary care. In a cross-sectional observational study, data from 519 Caucasians (197 men, 322 women; mean age 55.6 ± 15 years) who had undertaken pain therapy for various causes for 77.5 ± 90.8 months, obtained in three separate study centres, was analysed for actual 24-h pain scores, daily opioid doses and the occurrence of side effects. Of the 519 patients, 352 received opioids and 260 antipyretic analgesics, from whom 154 received both classes and 304 only either class. The administration of non-opioid antipyretic analgesics was associated with higher average pain scores (4.6 ± 2.5 vs 3.9 ± 2.6; P = 0.01), tendentially higher average oral morphine equivalent doses (121.8 ± 162.2 vs 146.7 ± 242.4 mg/d; P = 0.25) and a similar incidence of side effects (P = 0.21). These results were correspondingly seen when analysing the three study centres separately as independent cohorts. With the caution advised for cross-sectional data, the results dispute a clinical benefit of non-opioid antipyretic analgesics for most chronic pain patients in tertiary care and draw attention towards prospectively re-evaluating the utility of non-opioid antipyretic analgesics in tertiary pain care in a randomised placebo controlled trial.

  13. Partner-delivered reflexology: effects on cancer pain and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Nancy L N; Swanson, Melvin; Dalton, Joann; Keefe, Frances J; Engelke, Martha

    2007-01-01

    To compare the effects of partner-delivered foot reflexology and usual care plus attention on patients' perceived pain and anxiety. The experimental pretest/post-test design included patient-partner dyads randomly assigned to an experimental or control group. Four hospitals in the southeastern United States. 42 experimental and 44 control subjects comprised 86 dyads of patients with metastatic cancer and their partners, representing 16 different types of cancer; 23% of patients had lung cancer, followed by breast, colorectal, and head and neck cancer and lymphoma. The subjects had a mean age of 58.3 years, 51% were female, 66% had a high school education or less, and 58% were Caucasian, 40% were African American, and 1% were Filipino. The intervention included a 15- to 30-minute teaching session on foot reflexology to the partner by a certified reflexologist, an optional 15- to 30-minute foot reflexology session for the partner, and a 30-minute, partner-delivered foot reflexology intervention for the patient. The control group received a 30-minute reading session from their partners. Pain and anxiety. Following the initial partner-delivered foot reflexology, patients experienced a significant decrease in pain intensity and anxiety. A nurse reflexologist taught partners how to perform reflexology on patients with metastatic cancer pain in the hospital, resulting in an immediate decrease in pain intensity and anxiety; minimal changes were seen in the control group, who received usual care plus attention. Hospitals could have qualified professionals offer reflexology as a complementary therapy and teach interested partners the modality.

  14. Interventions of the nursing diagnosis „Acute Pain“ – Evaluation of patients' experiences after total hip arthroplasty compared with the nursing record by using Q-DIO-Pain: a mixed methods study

    PubMed

    Zanon, David C; Gralher, Dieter; Müller-Staub, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pain affects patients' rehabilitation after hip replacement surgery. Aim: The study aim was to compare patients' responses, on their received pain relieving nursing interventions after hip replacement surgery, with the documented interventions in their nursing records. Method: A mixed methods design was applied. In order to evaluate quantitative data the instrument „Quality of Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes“ (Q-DIO) was further developed to measure pain interventions in nursing records (Q-DIO-Pain). Patients (n = 37) answered a survey on the third postoperative day. The patients' survey findings were then compared with the Q-DIO-Pain results and cross-validated by qualitative interviews. Results: The most reported pain level was „no pain“ (NRS 0 – 10 Points). However, 17 – 50 % of patients reported pain levels of three or higher and 11 – 22 % of five or higher in situations of motion / ambulation. A significant match between patients' findings and Q-DIO-Pain results was found for the intervention „helping to adapt medications“ (n = 32, ICC = 0.111, p = 0.042, CI 95 % 2-sided). Otherwise no significant matches were found. Interviews with patients and nurses confirmed that far more pain-relieving interventions affecting „Acute Pain“ were carried out, than were documented. Conclusions: Based on the results, pain assessments and effective pain-relieving interventions, especially before or after motion / ambulation should be improved and documented. It is recommended to implement a nursing standard for pain control.

  15. Music and the reduction of post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly

    The prevention and treatment of post-operative pain, and the promotion of comfort are the challenges facing practitioners working in the recovery room setting. Surgical pain produces autonomic, psychological, immunological and behavioural responses that can delay or inhibit normal healing. Nurses spend more time with patients experiencing pain than any other healthcare professional. Therefore, they are in an ideal position to consider other pain-relieving strategies to complement the analgesics currently used. The studies reviewed cannot prove that music is effective in reducing post-operative pain, because the research methodology in the majority is poor. Patients, experience of listening to music post-operatively was positive, aiding distraction and increasing comfort. This shows the difference between inconsistent results for the objective measures of pain and what the patient is reporting.

  16. Effects of natural and synthetic isothiocyanate-based H2S-releasers against chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain: Role of Kv7 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Lucarini, Elena; Micheli, Laura; Mosca, Ilaria; Ambrosino, Paolo; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Martelli, Alma; Testai, Lara; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Calderone, Vincenzo; Ghelardini, Carla

    2017-07-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is a crucial signaling molecule involved in several physiological and pathological processes. Nonetheless, the role of this gasotransmitter in the pathogenesis and treatment of neuropathic pain is controversial. The aim of the present study was to investigate the pain relieving profile of a series of slow releasing H 2 S donors (the natural allyl-isothiocyanate and the synthetics phenyl- and carboxyphenyl-isothiocyanate) in animal models of neuropathic pain induced by paclitaxel or oxaliplatin, anticancer drugs characterized by a dose-limiting neurotoxicity. The potential contribution of Kv7 potassium channels modulation was also studied. Mice were treated with paclitaxel (2.0 mg kg -1 ) i.p. on days 1, 3, 5 and 7; oxaliplatin (2.4 mg kg -1 ) was administered i.p. on days 1-2, 5-9, 12-14. Behavioral tests were performed on day 15. In both models, single subcutaneous administrations of H 2 S donors (1.33, 4.43, 13.31 μmol kg -1 ) reduced the hypersensitivity to cold non-noxious stimuli (allodynia-related measurement). The prototypical H 2 S donor NaHS was also effective. Activity was maintained after i.c.v. administrations. On the contrary, the S-lacking molecule allyl-isocyanate did not increase pain threshold; the H 2 S-binding molecule hemoglobin abolished the pain-relieving effects of isothiocyanates and NaHS. The anti-neuropathic properties of H 2 S donors were reverted by the Kv7 potassium channel blocker XE991. Currents carried by Kv7.2 homomers and Kv7.2/Kv7.3 heteromers expressed in CHO cells were potentiated by H 2 S donors. Sistemically- or centrally-administered isothiocyanates reduced chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain by releasing H 2 S. Activation of Kv7 channels largely mediate the anti-neuropathic effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of strengthening and aerobic exercises on pain severity and function in patients with knee rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, Nader; Mazloum, Vahid

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two types of rehabilitation techniques, including aerobic and strengthening exercises on patients with knee rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 48 male patients with knee RA were randomly assigned into 3 groups, including aerobic exercises, strengthening exercise, and control. The two first groups completed their treatment protocol for 8 weeks, 3 days per week. Visual Analogue Scale, WOMAC questionnaire, 6-minute walking test, standard goniometer were used to assess pain severity, functional ability, walking ability, knee joint ROM respectively at baseline and after applying therapeutic interventions. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at P < 0.05 significant level. Participants had a mean ± SD age of 58.6 ± 7.8 years (height 1.72 ± 0.07 m, weight 81.0 ± 6.4 kg) with no significant difference between three groups. Both therapeutic interventions reduced pain significantly (P < 0.001) compared to the control group, without significant difference between the two experimental groups. The patients fulfilled aerobic exercise attained higher levels of function and walking ability compared to strengthening group significantly (P < 0.001). The knee range of motion (ROM)wassignificantly (P < 0.001) improved in the two experimental groups in comparison to controls, the strengthening group had more significant (P < 0.001) improvement. It can be concluded that an aerobic exercise program improves functional and walking ability in patients with knee RA, and strengthening exercise has more efficient effect on knee ROM, both aerobic and strengthening exercises can equally relieve pain.

  18. Spinal cord stimulation: Current applications for treatment of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Vannemreddy, Prasad; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is thought to relieve chronic intractable pain by stimulating nerve fibers in the spinal cord. The resulting impulses in the fibers may inhibit the conduction of pain signals to the brain, according to the pain gate theory proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 and the sensation of pain is thus blocked. Although SCS may reduce pain, it will not eliminate it. After a period of concern about safety and efficacy, SCS is now regaining popularity among pain specialists for the treatment of chronic pain. The sympatholytic effect of SCS is one of its most interesting therapeutic properties. This effect is considered responsible for the effectiveness of SCS in peripheral ischemia, and at least some cases of complex regional pain syndrome. The sympatholytic effect has also been considered part of the management of other chronic pain states such as failed back surgery syndrome, phantom pain, diabetic neuropathy, and postherpetic neuralgia. In general, SCS is part of an overall treatment strategy and is used only after the more conservative treatments have failed. The concept of SCS has evolved rapidly following the technological advances that have produced leads with multiple contact electrodes and battery systems. The current prevalence of patients with chronic pain requiring treatment other than conventional medical management has significantly increased and so has been the need for SCS. With the cost benefit analysis showing significant support for SCS, it may be appropriate to offer this as an effective alternative treatment for these patients.

  19. ANALGESIC EFFECT OF INTRATHECAL BACLOFEN BOLUS ON NEUROPATHIC PAIN IN SPINAL CORD INJURY PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Hatice; Benito-Penalva, Jesus; Kofler, Markus; Vidal, Joan

    2018-05-18

    GABA-ergic neurons are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system, including the spinal cord which is important for the transmission of pain impulses to the brain. Here we hypothesized that intrathecal baclofen (ITB) which is a GABA analogue might exert analgesic effects on neuropathic pain, which could be related to subtypes of pain in spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI patients with a cervical or thoracic lesion and neuropathic pain were randomized to receive either a single ITB bolus or placebo. Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI), and Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) were obtained for assessment of neuropathic pain. Spasticity was assessed using Modified Ashworth Scale and visual analogue scale. Evaluations were performed at baseline, and 4, 8, and 24 hours after application of ITB or placebo. Eight patients received ITB, 5 placebo. Neuropathic pain improved significantly in the ITB group based on NRS, BPI, and NPSI, which revealed an effect on all subtypes of pain. Spasticity declined significantly. In the placebo group, there was neither significant change in pain nor in spasticity. An ITB bolus exerted a significant analgesic effect on all subtypes of neuropathic pain in SCI patients. ITB has analgesic effects on all subtypes of neuropathic pain and can improve interference of neuropathic pain with activities of daily living. ITB might be a promising analgesic treatment to control neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Effect of Radiofrequency Denervation on Pain Intensity Among Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: The Mint Randomized Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Juch, Johan N S; Maas, Esther T; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Groeneweg, J George; Kallewaard, Jan-Willem; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P; van Dongen, Johanna M; Huygen, Frank J P M; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-07-04

    Radiofrequency denervation is a commonly used treatment for chronic low back pain, but high-quality evidence for its effectiveness is lacking. To evaluate the effectiveness of radiofrequency denervation added to a standardized exercise program for patients with chronic low back pain. Three pragmatic multicenter, nonblinded randomized clinical trials on the effectiveness of minimal interventional treatments for participants with chronic low back pain (Mint study) were conducted in 16 multidisciplinary pain clinics in the Netherlands. Eligible participants were included between January 1, 2013, and October 24, 2014, and had chronic low back pain, a positive diagnostic block at the facet joints (facet joint trial, 251 participants), sacroiliac joints (sacroiliac joint trial, 228 participants), or a combination of facet joints, sacroiliac joints, or intervertebral disks (combination trial, 202 participants) and were unresponsive to conservative care. All participants received a 3-month standardized exercise program and psychological support if needed. Participants in the intervention group received radiofrequency denervation as well. This is usually a 1-time procedure, but the maximum number of treatments in the trial was 3. The primary outcome was pain intensity (numeric rating scale, 0-10; whereby 0 indicated no pain and 10 indicated worst pain imaginable) measured 3 months after the intervention. The prespecified minimal clinically important difference was defined as 2 points or more. Final follow-up was at 12 months, ending October 2015. Among 681 participants who were randomized (mean age, 52.2 years; 421 women [61.8%], mean baseline pain intensity, 7.1), 599 (88%) completed the 3-month follow-up, and 521 (77%) completed the 12-month follow-up. The mean difference in pain intensity between the radiofrequency denervation and control groups at 3 months was -0.18 (95% CI, -0.76 to 0.40) in the facet joint trial; -0.71 (95% CI, -1.35 to -0.06) in the sacroiliac joint

  1. Cobedding of twin premature infants: calming effects on pain responses.

    PubMed

    Badiee, Zohreh; Nassiri, Zohreh; Armanian, Amirmohammad

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this trial was to determine whether cobedding of preterm twins has analgesic effects during heel lancing or not. One hundred premature twins (50 sets) born between 26 weeks' and 34 weeks' gestation undergoing heel blood sampling were randomly assigned into two groups: the cobedding group (receiving care in the same incubator) and the standard care group (receiving care in separate incubators). Pain was assessed using the premature infant pain profile score. Duration of crying was measured after heel blood sampling, and salivary cortisol was measured prior to and after heel blood sampling. Infants in the standard care group cried for a longer time during heel lancing than those in the cobedding group (42.6 ± 19.8 seconds vs. 36.4 ± 21.7 seconds, p = 0.03). The mean premature infant pain profile score after heel lancing was significantly higher in the standard care group (9.8 ± 2.6 vs. 8.06 ± 2.8, p = 0.002). The mean salivary cortisol after heel lancing was also significantly higher in the standard care group (24.3 ± 7.4 nmol/L vs. 20.8 ± 7.4 nmol/L, p = 0.02). No significant adverse effects were seen with cobedding. Cobedding is a comforting measure for twin premature infants during heel lancing, which can be performed without any significant adverse effects. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Nurse practitioners can effectively deliver pain coping skills training to osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain: A randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Joan E.; Keefe, Francis J.; Bruckenthal, Patricia; Junghaenel, Doerte U.; Schneider, Stefan; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Kaell, Alan T.; Caldwell, David S.; McKee, Daphne; Reed, Shelby; Gould, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    A multisite, randomized, controlled clinical effectiveness trial was conducted for osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain of the knee or hip. Adult health nurse practitioners provided a 10-session intervention, pain coping skills training (PCST), in patients’ doctors’ offices (N = 129 patients); the control group received usual care (N = 127 patients). Primary outcomes assessed at baseline, posttreatment, 6-month follow-up, and 12-month follow-up were: pain intensity, physical functioning, psychological distress, self-efficacy, catastrophizing, use of coping strategies, and quality of life. Secondary measures included fatigue, social functioning, health satisfaction, and use of pain medication. Methods favoring external validity, consistent with pragmatic, effectiveness research, were utilized. Primary ITT and secondary per-protocol analyses were conducted. Attrition was within the expected range: 11% at posttreatment and 29% at 12-month follow-up; rates did not differ be