Science.gov

Sample records for pain systematic review

  1. Central poststroke pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Singer, Jonathan; Conigliaro, Alyssa; Spina, Elizabeth; Law, Susan W; Levine, Steven R

    2017-06-01

    Background Physical, psychological, and/or social impairment can result after a stroke and can be exacerbated by pain. One type of pain after stroke, central poststroke pain, is believed to be due to primary central nervous system mechanisms. Estimated prevalence of central poststroke pain ranges widely from 8% to 55% of stroke patients, suggesting a difficulty in reliably, accurately, and consistently identifying central poststroke pain. This may be due to the absence of a generally accepted definition. Aim We aimed to clarify the role of thalamic strokes and damage to the spinothalamic pathway in central poststroke pain patients. Also, we aimed to gain a current understanding of anatomic substrates, brain imaging, and treatment of central poststroke pain. Summary of review Two independent reviewers identified 10,144 publications. Based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines, we extracted data from 23 papers and categorized the articles' aims into four sections: somatosensory deficits, pathway stimulation, clinical trials, and brain imaging. Conclusions Our systematic review suggests that damage to the spinothalamic pathway is associated with central poststroke pain and this link could provide insights into mechanisms and treatment. Moreover, historical connection of strokes in the thalamic region of the brain and central poststroke pain should be reevaluated as many studies noted that strokes in other regions of the brain have high occurrence of central poststroke pain as well.

  2. Chronic Pain and Mortality: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Diane; Wilkie, Ross; Uthman, Olalekan; Jordan, Joanne L.; McBeth, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is common, often widespread and has a substantial impact on health and quality of life. The relationship between chronic pain and mortality is unclear. This systematic review aimed to identify and evaluate evidence for a relationship between chronic pain and mortality. Methods A search of ten electronic databases including EMBASE and MEDLINE was conducted in March 2012, and updated until March 2014. Observational studies investigating the association between chronic or widespread pain (including fibromyalgia) and mortality were included. Risk of bias was assessed and a meta-analysis was undertaken to quantify heterogeneity and pool results. A narrative review was undertaken to explore similarities and differences between the included studies. Results Ten studies were included in the review. Three reported significant associations between chronic or widespread pain and mortality in unadjusted results. In adjusted analyses, four studies reported a significant association. The remaining studies reported no statistically significant association. A meta-analysis showed statistically significant heterogeneity of results from studies using comparable outcome measures (n = 7)(I2 = 78.8%) and a modest but non-significant pooled estimate (MRR1.14,95%CI 0.95–1.37) for the relationship between chronic pain and all-cause mortality. This association was stronger when analysis was restricted to studies of widespread pain (n = 5,I2 = 82.3%) MRR1.22(95%CI 0.93–1.60). The same pattern was observed with deaths from cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Heterogeneity is likely to be due to differences in study populations, follow-up time, pain phenotype, methods of analysis and use of confounding factors. Conclusion This review showed a mildly increased risk of death in people with chronic pain, particularly from cancer. However, the small number of studies and methodological differences prevented clear conclusions from being drawn

  3. Cupping for Treating Pain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-In; Lee, Myeong Soo; Lee, Dong-Hyo; Boddy, Kate; Ernst, Edzard

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the evidence for or against the effectiveness of cupping as a treatment option for pain. Fourteen databases were searched. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) testing cupping in patients with pain of any origin were considered. Trials using cupping with or without drawing blood were included, while trials comparing cupping with other treatments of unproven efficacy were excluded. Trials with cupping as concomitant treatment together with other treatments of unproven efficacy were excluded. Trials were also excluded if pain was not a central symptom of the condition. The selection of studies, data extraction and validation were performed independently by three reviewers. Seven RCTs met all the inclusion criteria. Two RCTs suggested significant pain reduction for cupping in low back pain compared with usual care (P < .01) and analgesia (P < .001). Another two RCTs also showed positive effects of cupping in cancer pain (P < .05) and trigeminal neuralgia (P < .01) compared with anticancer drugs and analgesics, respectively. Two RCTs reported favorable effects of cupping on pain in brachialgia compared with usual care (P = .03) or heat pad (P < .001). The other RCT failed to show superior effects of cupping on pain in herpes zoster compared with anti-viral medication (P = .065). Currently there are few RCTs testing the effectiveness of cupping in the management of pain. Most of the existing trials are of poor quality. Therefore, more rigorous studies are required before the effectiveness of cupping for the treatment of pain can be determined. PMID:19423657

  4. [Pain scales used in the newborn infant: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Pereira Da Silva, Tiago; Justo Da Silva, Lincoln

    2010-01-01

    For many years, appropriate relevance has not been given for pain in newborn infants, but research brought to light this important subject in neonatal medicine. Pain scores have been organized in scales and validated to be used in clinical practice. Currently, there are several scales based on different pain indicators. These scales should be used according to different circumstances. With the purpose of helping health professionals, a systematic review of neonatal pain scales based on gestational age, duration of painful episode and type of pain indicator was carried out. Data concerning validation of the scales were also analyzed and two scales for use in clinical practice or in research are suggested.

  5. Acupuncture for low back pain: an overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lizhou; Skinner, Margot; McDonough, Suzanne; Mabire, Leon; Baxter, George David

    2015-01-01

    Objective. As evidence of the effectiveness of acupuncture for low back pain (LBP) is inconsistent, we aimed to critically appraise the evidence from relevant systematic reviews. Methods. Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning acupuncture and LBP were searched in seven databases. Internal validity and external validity of systematic reviews were assessed. Systematic reviews were categorized and high quality reviews assigned greater weightings. Conclusions were generated from a narrative synthesis of the outcomes of subgroup comparisons. Results. Sixteen systematic reviews were appraised. Overall, the methodological quality was low and external validity weak. For acute LBP, evidence that acupuncture has a more favorable effect than sham acupuncture in relieving pain was inconsistent; it had a similar effect on improving function. For chronic LBP, evidence consistently demonstrated that acupuncture provides short-term clinically relevant benefits for pain relief and functional improvement compared with no treatment or acupuncture plus another conventional intervention. Conclusion. Systematic reviews of variable quality showed that acupuncture, either used in isolation or as an adjunct to conventional therapy, provides short-term improvements in pain and function for chronic LBP. More efforts are needed to improve both internal and external validity of systematic reviews and RCTs in this area.

  6. Acupuncture for Low Back Pain: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lizhou; Skinner, Margot; McDonough, Suzanne; Mabire, Leon; Baxter, George David

    2015-01-01

    Objective. As evidence of the effectiveness of acupuncture for low back pain (LBP) is inconsistent, we aimed to critically appraise the evidence from relevant systematic reviews. Methods. Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) concerning acupuncture and LBP were searched in seven databases. Internal validity and external validity of systematic reviews were assessed. Systematic reviews were categorized and high quality reviews assigned greater weightings. Conclusions were generated from a narrative synthesis of the outcomes of subgroup comparisons. Results. Sixteen systematic reviews were appraised. Overall, the methodological quality was low and external validity weak. For acute LBP, evidence that acupuncture has a more favorable effect than sham acupuncture in relieving pain was inconsistent; it had a similar effect on improving function. For chronic LBP, evidence consistently demonstrated that acupuncture provides short-term clinically relevant benefits for pain relief and functional improvement compared with no treatment or acupuncture plus another conventional intervention. Conclusion. Systematic reviews of variable quality showed that acupuncture, either used in isolation or as an adjunct to conventional therapy, provides short-term improvements in pain and function for chronic LBP. More efforts are needed to improve both internal and external validity of systematic reviews and RCTs in this area. PMID:25821485

  7. Classical conditioning differences associated with chronic pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Harvie, Daniel S; Moseley, G Lorimer; Hillier, Susan L; Meulders, Ann

    2017-04-03

    Prominent clinical models of chronic pain propose a fundamental role of classical conditioning in the development of pain-related disability. If classical conditioning is key to this process, then people with chronic pain may show a different response to pain-related conditioned stimuli (CS) than healthy controls. We set out to determine whether this is the case by undertaking a comprehensive and systematic review of the literature. To identify studies comparing classical conditioning between people with chronic pain and healthy controls, the databases MEDLINE, PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, Scopus, CINAHL, were searched using key words and MESH headings consistent with 'classical conditioning' AND 'pain'. Articles were included when a) pain-free control and chronic pain groups were included, and b) a differential classical conditioning design was used. The systematic search revealed seven studies investigating differences in classical conditioning between people with chronic pain and healthy controls. The included studies involved a total of 129 people with chronic pain (Fibromyalgia syndrome, Spinal pain, Hand pain, Irritable bowel syndrome), and 104 healthy controls. Outcomes included indices of pain-related conditioning such as unconditioned stimulus (US) expectancy and contingency awareness, self-report and physiological measures of pain-related fear, evaluative judgments of conditioned stimulus (CS) pleasantness, and muscular and cortical responses. Due to variability in outcomes, meta-analyses included a maximum of four studies. People with chronic pain tended to show reduced differential learning and flatter generalisation gradients with respect to US-expectancy and fear-potentiated eyeblink startle responses. Some studies demonstrated a propensity for greater muscular responses and perceptions of unpleasantness in response to pain-associated cues, relative to control cues.

  8. Pain Experience in Dementia Subtypes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Binnekade, Tarik T; Van Kooten, Janime; Lobbezoo, Frank; Rhebergen, Didi; Van der Wouden, J C; Smalbrugge, Martin; Scherder, Erik J A

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the number of studies focusing on pain in dementia has increased considerably. Still, little attention has been paid to the influence of the neuropathology of different dementia subtypes on pain experience. In 2003, a review identified several studies that indicated a relation between dementia subtype and pain experience. Now, ten years later, an update is warranted. We conducted a systematic review to identify studies that assessed pain experience and dementia subtypes by searching PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library. Inclusion criteria were: (1) major dementia subtype diagnosis i.e. Alzheimer's dementia (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB); (2) age ≥60 years; and (3) pain experience. We identified twelve studies that addressed AD, three studies VaD, one study FTD, and no studies DLB. In AD, studies on clinical pain indicate a reduced pain experience compared to controls, whereas experimental studies show inconsistent findings. In VaD, clinical studies found that primary caregivers rated pain equal to cognitively intact controls, although more painful locations were reported. During self-report, elderly with VaD reported higher pain levels than cognitively intact controls. In FTD, a significantly lower pain sensitivity to experimental pain was found. Considering the limited number of studies, these findings should be considered with caution. Existing literature provides some evidence that dementia subtype affects pain experience. Further research is needed to clarify the relation between dementia subtype and pain experience as it could serve as basis for improving the assessment and management of pain in people with dementia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation for chronic low back pain: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Jaime; Esmail, Rosmin; Karjalainen, Kaija; Malmivaara, Antti; Irvin, Emma; Bombardier, Claire

    2001-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation on clinically relevant outcomes in patients with chronic low back pain. Design Systematic literature review of randomised controlled trials. Participants A total of 1964 patients with disabling low back pain for more than three months. Main outcome measures Pain, function, employment, quality of life, and global assessments. Results Ten trials reported on a total of 12 randomised comparisons of multidisciplinary treatment and a control condition. There was strong evidence that intensive multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation with functional restoration improves function when compared with inpatient or outpatient non-multidisciplinary treatments. There was moderate evidence that intensive multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation with functional restoration reduces pain when compared with outpatient non-multidisciplinary rehabilitation or usual care. There was contradictory evidence regarding vocational outcomes of intensive multidisciplinary biopsychosocial intervention. Some trials reported improvements in work readiness, but others showed no significant reduction in sickness leaves. Less intensive outpatient psychophysical treatments did not improve pain, function, or vocational outcomes when compared with non-multidisciplinary outpatient therapy or usual care. Few trials reported effects on quality of life or global assessments. Conclusions The reviewed trials provide evidence that intensive multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation with functional restoration reduces pain and improves function in patients with chronic low back pain. Less intensive interventions did not show improvements in clinically relevant outcomes. What is already known on this topicDisabling chronic pain is regarded as the result of interrelating physical, psychological, and social or occupational factors requiring multidisciplinary interventionTwo previous systematic reviews of

  10. Pain in multiple sclerosis: a systematic review of neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Seixas, D; Foley, P; Palace, J; Lima, D; Ramos, I; Tracey, I

    2014-01-01

    While pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) is common, in many cases the precise mechanisms are unclear. Neuroimaging studies could have a valuable role in investigating the aetiology of pain syndromes. The aim of this review was to synthesise and appraise the current literature on neuroimaging studies of pain syndromes in MS. We systematically searched PubMed and Scopus from their inception dates to the 2nd of April 2013. Studies were selected by predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Methodological quality was appraised. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted. We identified 38 studies of variable methodology and quality. All studies but one used conventional structural magnetic resonance imaging, and the majority reported a positive association between location of demyelinating lesions and specific neuropathic pain syndromes. Most investigated headache and facial pain, with more common pain syndromes such as limb pain being relatively understudied. We identified a number of methodological concerns, which along with variable study design and reporting limit our ability to synthesise data. Higher quality studies were however less likely to report positive associations of lesion distribution to pain syndromes. Further high quality hypothesis-driven neuroimaging studies of pain syndromes in MS are required to clarify pain mechanisms, particularly for the commonest pain syndromes.

  11. Pain in multiple sclerosis: A systematic review of neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Seixas, D.; Foley, P.; Palace, J.; Lima, D.; Ramos, I.; Tracey, I.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) is common, in many cases the precise mechanisms are unclear. Neuroimaging studies could have a valuable role in investigating the aetiology of pain syndromes. The aim of this review was to synthesise and appraise the current literature on neuroimaging studies of pain syndromes in MS. Methods We systematically searched PubMed and Scopus from their inception dates to the 2nd of April 2013. Studies were selected by predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Methodological quality was appraised. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted. Results We identified 38 studies of variable methodology and quality. All studies but one used conventional structural magnetic resonance imaging, and the majority reported a positive association between location of demyelinating lesions and specific neuropathic pain syndromes. Most investigated headache and facial pain, with more common pain syndromes such as limb pain being relatively understudied. We identified a number of methodological concerns, which along with variable study design and reporting limit our ability to synthesise data. Higher quality studies were however less likely to report positive associations of lesion distribution to pain syndromes. Conclusions Further high quality hypothesis-driven neuroimaging studies of pain syndromes in MS are required to clarify pain mechanisms, particularly for the commonest pain syndromes. PMID:25161898

  12. Systematic review of conservative interventions for subacute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Pengel, Heloise M; Maher, Chris G; Refshauge, Kathryn M

    2002-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of conservative interventions on clinically relevant outcome measures for patients with subacute low back pain. This is particularly important because effective treatment for subacute low back pain will prevent the transition to chronic low back pain, a condition that is largely responsible for the high health care costs of low back pain. Systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Methodological quality of each trial was assessed. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for pain and disability and risk ratios for return to work. Thirteen trials were located, evaluating the following interventions: manipulation, back school, exercise, advice, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), hydrotherapy, massage, corset, cognitive behavioural treatment and co-ordination of primary health care. Most studies were of low quality and did not show a statistically significant effect of intervention. For the strict duration of low back pain (six weeks to three months), no evidence of high internal validity was found but when other methodological criteria were considered, evidence was found for the efficacy of advice. Furthermore, there is evidence that when a broader view is taken of the duration of subacute low back pain (seven days to six months), other treatments (e.g. manipulation, exercise, TENS) may be effective. Our review identified a major gap in the evidence for interventions that are currently recommended in clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of subacute low back pain. Lack of a uniform definition of subacute low back pain further limited current evidence.

  13. Nursing Process in Post Tonsillectomy Pain Diagnosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanifard, Fateme; Khademolhoseyni, Seyyed Mohamad; Nouri, Jamile Mokhtari

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Tonsillectomy is the most common surgery in the field of ENT. Pain is the most common post tonsillectomy complaint. Considering the importance of nursing cares in relieving post-surgery pain in general and post-tonsillectomy pain in particular, this study is conducted with the aim of presenting nursing process in post tonsillectomy pain diagnosis for decreasing loss of appropriate opportunities in nursing cares and achieving appropriate results in taking care of the patients. Methods: This study is a targeted systematic review focusing on “effective nursing measures in relieving children’s post tonsillectomy pain”. The main stages of searching strategy included searching in electronic sources of Latin databases; Pub Med, Science Direct, and EMBASE and Persian databases; SID, Iran medex, ISC to find published articles from 2009 to 2014. In the end, final synthesis was done on eight articles in English. Findings: Effective nursing measurements for relieving post tonsillectomy pain include: decreasing children’s anxiety through children and their families’ psychological preparation by nurses and other caregivers, using cold compress to reduce neck and jaw pain, presenting distraction techniques, offering fluids and cold foods immediately in the period after surgery, creating a comfortable environment for the children, avoiding too much of talking and adequate sleep. Conclusion: It is recommended to the nursing managers and nurses to perform cares achieved from this systematic review to achieve appropriate results in relieving post tonsillectomy pain. PMID:25560345

  14. Systematic Review of Multidisciplinary Chronic Pain Treatment Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Fashler, Samantha R.; Cooper, Lynn K.; Oosenbrug, Eric D.; Burns, Lindsay C.; Razavi, Shima; Goldberg, Lauren; Katz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study reviewed the published literature evaluating multidisciplinary chronic pain treatment facilities to provide an overview of their availability, caseload, wait times, and facility characteristics. A systematic literature review was conducted using PRISMA guidelines following a search of MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases. Inclusion criteria stipulated that studies be original research, survey more than one pain treatment facility directly, and describe a range of available treatments. Fourteen articles satisfied inclusion criteria. Results showed little consistency in the research design used to describe pain treatment facilities. Availability of pain treatment facilities was scarce and the reported caseloads and wait times were generally high. A wide range of medical, physical, and psychological pain treatments were available. Most studies reported findings on the percentage of practitioners in different health care professions employed. Future studies should consider using more comprehensive search strategies to survey facilities, improving clarity on what is considered to be a pain treatment facility, and reporting on a consistent set of variables to provide a clear summary of the status of pain treatment facilities. This review highlights important information for policymakers on the scope, demand, and accessibility of pain treatment facilities. PMID:27445618

  15. Pain management in Guillain-Barre syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Peña, L; Moreno, C B; Gutierrez-Alvarez, A M

    2015-09-01

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome. Intensity is moderate to severe in most cases and pain may persist after resolution of the disease. Identify the most appropriate analgesic therapy for pain management in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome. Systematic review and selection of scientific articles on treatment of pain in Guillain-Barre syndrome patients, published between January 1985 and December 2012. We included only randomised, double-blind, controlled trials assessing the effectiveness of drugs for pain management in these patients. Four articles met the inclusion criteria. One evaluated the use of gabapentin, another evaluated carbamazepine, a third compared gabapentin to carbamazepine, and the last evaluated use of methylprednisolone. Both carbamazepine and gabapentin were useful for pain management. Patients experienced lower-intensity pain with gabapentin treatment in the study comparing that drug to carbamazepine. Methylprednisolone was not shown to be effective for reducing pain. The published data did not permit completion of a meta-analysis. There is no robust evidence at present that would point to a single treatment option for this disorder. Further clinical studies of larger patient samples and with a longer duration are needed to characterise types of pain for each patient and measure pain intensity in an objective way. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [Mirror therapy for phantom limb pain--a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Seidel, Stefan; Kasprian, Gregor; Sycha, Thomas; Auff, Eduard

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the treatment of phantom limb pain with mirror therapy. Randomised controlled studies were identified by a systematic search strategy in the databases "Medline" and "The Cochrane Library". The studies were evaluated using the quality criteria of the JADAD-scale. Three small-sized randomised controlled studies were identified. Unfortunately, these studies lacked methodological quality. One of them found a significant decrease of phantom pain after four weeks of daily mirror therapy sessions. Two other studies could not find a significant difference in the reduction of phantom limb pain between intervention- and control-groups. To date, there is only circumstantial evidence for mirror therapy in phantom pain. Hence, no firm recommendations regarding this treatment option are possible. More sufficiently powered randomised controlled studies with high methodological quality are mandatory to investigate the analgesic effect of mirror therapy in phantom limb pain.

  17. Systematic review of chronic pain in persons with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Velvin, G; Bathen, T; Rand-Hendriksen, S; Geirdal, A Ø

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the literature on chronic pain in adults with Marfan syndrome (MFS), critically appraising and synthesizing relevant literature. A systematic review was conducted by searching the published literature databases using available medical, physical, psychological, social databases and other sources. All studies that addressed pain in MFS, published in peer-reviewed journals were assessed. Of 351 search results, 18 articles satisfied the eligibility criteria. All studies were cross-sectional and quantitative; no randomized controlled trials or intervention studies were found. Most studies had small sample sizes, low response rates and mainly dealt with other aspects of the diagnosis than pain. Only one article dealt mainly with pain. The research on chronic pain in MFS is limited in size and quality. Despite these limitations, studies describe that the prevalence of pain in patients with MFS is high, varying from 47 to 92% and affecting several anatomic sites. In addition, chronic pain limits daily function and few studies describe treatment options for pain in patients with MFS. Research is needed to obtain more evidence-based knowledge for developing more appropriate rehabilitation programs for people with MFS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Manual therapy and exercise for neck pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita; D'Sylva, Jonathan; Burnie, Stephen J; Goldsmith, Charles H; Graham, Nadine; Haines, Ted; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L

    2010-06-01

    Manual therapy is often used with exercise to treat neck pain. This cervical overview group systematic review update assesses if manual therapy, including manipulation or mobilisation, combined with exercise improves pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect, and patient satisfaction for adults with neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache or radiculopathy. Computerized searches were performed to July 2009. Two or more authors independently selected studies, abstracted data, and assessed methodological quality. Pooled relative risk (pRR) and standardized mean differences (pSMD) were calculated. Of 17 randomized controlled trials included, 29% had a low risk of bias. Low quality evidence suggests clinically important long-term improvements in pain (pSMD-0.87(95% CI:-1.69,-0.06)), function/disability, and global perceived effect when manual therapy and exercise are compared to no treatment. High quality evidence suggests greater short-term pain relief [pSMD-0.50(95% CI:-0.76,-0.24)] than exercise alone, but no long-term differences across multiple outcomes for (sub)acute/chronic neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache. Moderate quality evidence supports this treatment combination for pain reduction and improved quality of life over manual therapy alone for chronic neck pain; and suggests greater short-term pain reduction when compared to traditional care for acute whiplash. Evidence regarding radiculopathy was sparse. Specific research recommendations are made.

  19. Manual therapy and exercise for neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita; D'Sylva, Jonathan; Burnie, Stephen J; Goldsmith, Charles H; Graham, Nadine; Haines, Ted; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L

    2010-08-01

    Manual therapy is often used with exercise to treat neck pain. This cervical overview group systematic review update assesses if manual therapy, including manipulation or mobilisation, combined with exercise improves pain, function/disability, quality of life, global perceived effect, and patient satisfaction for adults with neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache or radiculopathy. Computerized searches were performed to July 2009. Two or more authors independently selected studies, abstracted data, and assessed methodological quality. Pooled relative risk (pRR) and standardized mean differences (pSMD) were calculated. Of 17 randomized controlled trials included, 29% had a low risk of bias. Low quality evidence suggests clinically important long-term improvements in pain (pSMD-0.87(95% CI: -1.69, -0.06)), function/disability, and global perceived effect when manual therapy and exercise are compared to no treatment. High quality evidence suggests greater short-term pain relief [pSMD-0.50(95% CI: -0.76, -0.24)] than exercise alone, but no long-term differences across multiple outcomes for (sub)acute/chronic neck pain with or without cervicogenic headache. Moderate quality evidence supports this treatment combination for pain reduction and improved quality of life over manual therapy alone for chronic neck pain; and suggests greater short-term pain reduction when compared to traditional care for acute whiplash. Evidence regarding radiculopathy was sparse. Specific research recommendations are made.

  20. Occupational risk factors for shoulder pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van der Windt, D. A W M; Thomas, E.; Pope, D.; de Winter, A. F; Macfarlane, G.; Bouter, L.; Silman, A.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To systematically evaluate the available evidence on occupational risk factors of shoulder pain.
METHODS—Relevant reports were identified by a systematic search of Medline, Embase, Psychlit, Cinahl, and Current Contents. The quality of the methods of all selected publications was assessed by two independent reviewers using a standardised checklist. Details were extracted on the study population, exposures (physical load and psychosocial work environment), and results for the association between exposure variables and shoulder pain.
RESULTS—29 Studies were included in the review; three case-control studies and 26 cross sectional designs. The median method score was 60% of the maximum attainable score. Potential risk factors related to physical load and included heavy work load, awkward postures, repetitive movements, vibration, and duration of employment. Consistent findings were found for repetitive movements, vibration, and duration of employment (odds ratio (OR) 1.4-46 in studies with method scores ⩾ 60%). Nearly all studies that assessed psychosocial risk factors reported at least one positive association with shoulder pain, but the results were not consistent across studies for either high psychological demands, poor control at work, poor social support, or job dissatisfaction. Studies with a method score ⩾60% reported ORs between 1.3 and 4.0. Substantial heterogeneity across studies for methods used for exposure assessment and data analysis impeded statistical pooling of results.
CONCLUSIONS—It seems likely that shoulder pain is the result of many factors, including physical load and the psychosocial work environment. The available evidence was not consistent across studies, however, and the associations were generally not strong. Future longitudinal research should evaluate the relative importance of each individual risk factor and the role of potential confounding variables—such as exposure during leisure time—to set

  1. Nebulized Fentanyl in Acute Pain: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Joshua P; Thompson, Dennis F

    2016-10-01

    To provide a systematic review of the current role of nebulized fentanyl in acute pain and potentially other conditions. A MEDLINE literature search inclusive of the dates 1946 to May 2016 was performed using the following search terms: fentanyl and administration, inhaled Excerpta Medica was searched from 1980 to May 2016 using the following search terms: exp fentanyl/inhalation drug administration Additionally, Web of Science was searched using the terms fentanyl and pain inclusive of 1945 to May 2016. We utilized the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines to select English language, human primary literature, review articles, and supporting data assessing the efficacy of nebulized fentanyl in acute pain. Seven clinical trials have demonstrated no difference in efficacy between nebulized fentanyl and intravenous (IV) opioids. Few adverse effects were reported; however, the trials were of short duration. Nebulized fentanyl appeared to be a rapid-acting analgesic that does not require IV access. Evidence suggests that nebulized fentanyl is as effective as IV opioids in the treatment of acute pain, with relatively few adverse effects. However, questions remain about the extemporaneous preparation of fentanyl nebulized solution, the variability in nebulization devices, and ensuring consistent drug delivery to distal airways in the clinical setting. The abuse potential of nebulized fentanyl should also be considered. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Treatment of Female Sexual Pain Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Al-Abbadey, Miznah; Liossi, Christina; Curran, Natasha; Schoth, Daniel E; Graham, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    Sexual pain disorders affect women's sexual and reproductive health and are poorly understood. Although many treatments have been evaluated, there is no one "gold standard" treatment. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate what treatments for female sexual pain have been evaluated in clinical studies and their effectiveness. The search strategy resulted in 65 papers included in this review. The articles were divided into the following categories: medical treatments; surgical treatments; physical therapies; psychological therapies; comparative treatment studies; and miscellaneous and combined treatments. Topical and systemic medical treatments have generally been found to lead to improvements in, but not complete relief of, pain, and side effects are quite common. Surgical procedures have demonstrated very high success rates, although there has been variability in complete relief of pain after surgery, which suggests less invasive treatments should be considered first. Physical therapies and psychological therapies have been shown to be promising treatments, supporting a biopsychosocial approach to sexual pain disorders. Although most of the interventions described have been reported as effective, many women still experience pain. A multidisciplinary team with active patient involvement may be needed to optimize treatment outcome.

  3. Prolotherapy injections for chronic low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yelland, Michael J; Del Mar, Christopher; Pirozzo, Sandi; Schoene, Mark L

    2004-10-01

    A systematic review of randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials. To determine the efficacy of prolotherapy injections in adults with chronic low back pain. Prolotherapy is an injection-based treatment for chronic low back pain. Proponents of prolotherapy suggest that some back pain stems from weakened or damaged ligaments. Repeatedly injecting them with irritant solutions is thought to strengthen the ligaments and reduce pain and disability. Prolotherapy protocols usually include co-interventions to enhance the effectiveness of the injections. The authors searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Science Citation Index up to January 2004, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register 2004, issue 1, and consulted content experts. Both randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing prolotherapy injections to control injections, either alone or in combination with other treatments, were included. Studies had to include measures of pain and disability before and after the intervention. Two reviewers independently selected the trials and assessed them for methodologic quality. Treatment and control group protocols varied from study to study, making meta-analysis impossible. Four studies, all of high quality and with a total of 344 participants, were included. All trials measured pain and disability levels at 6 months, three measured the proportion of participants reporting a greater than 50% reduction in pain or disability scores from baseline to 6 months. Two studies showed significant differences between the treatment and control groups for those reporting more than 50% reduction in pain or disability. Their results could not be pooled. In one, co-interventions confounded interpretation of results; in the other, there was no significant difference in mean pain and disability scores between the groups. In the third study, there was little or no difference between groups in the number of individuals who reported more than 50% improvement in pain and

  4. Complementary therapies for bladder pain syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Tina S; Riordain, Richael Ni; Champaneria, Rita; Latthe, Pallavi M

    2016-08-01

    Bladder pain syndrome is a difficult condition to treat. The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of various complementary therapies available for treatment. This review was conducted in adherence with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews. Citations were retrieved using a comprehensive database search (from inception to July 2014: CINAHL, Cochrane, EMBASE, Medline and SIGEL and grey literature). Studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were selected. Eligibility consisted of women with bladder pain syndrome, an intervention of alternative/complementary therapies and an outcome of improvement of symptoms. Information regarding study characteristics and primary outcomes was collated. The Cochrane risk of bias scale was used to evaluate the quality of the studies included. A total of 1,454 citations were identified, 11 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria (4 randomised control trials [RCTs] and 7 prospective studies). The key interventions studied were acupuncture, relaxation therapy, physical therapy, hydrogen-rich therapy, diet and nitric oxide synthetase. Therapies with the potential for benefit in patients with bladder pain syndrome are dietary management, acupuncture and physical therapy. These findings were obtained from small studies and hence caution is advised. Robustly designed multicentre RCTs on these complementary therapies are needed to guide patients and clinicians.

  5. A systematic review of hydromorphone in acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Columba; Wiffen, Phil

    2003-02-01

    While morphine is historically the gold standard for the management of severe cancer pain, some patients either do not achieve adequate analgesia, or suffer intolerable side effects from this drug. For these patients, alternatives such as hydromorphone are recommended. This review explores the evidence for the efficacy of hydromorphone in the management of pain. A systematic search, from 1966 to 2000, of published and unpublished randomized trials that involved the administration of hydromorphone for both acute and chronic pain conditions in adults and children, was conducted. Forty-three studies were included in the review; 11 involved chronic cancer pain and 32 acute pain. Approximately half the studies received a low quality score. In addition, the heterogeneity of the studies precluded combination of data and results. Overall, hydromorphone appears to be a potent analgesic. The limited number of studies available suggests that there is little difference between hydromorphone and other opioids in terms of analgesic efficacy, adverse effect profile and patient preference. However, most studies involved small numbers of patients and wide ranges in equianalgesic dose ratios, making it difficult to determine real differences between interventions.

  6. Acetaminophen for Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review on Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Zandra Nymand; Dideriksen, Dorthe; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte; Pottegård, Anton

    2016-03-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is the most commonly used analgesic worldwide and recommended as first-line treatment in all pain conditions by WHO. We performed a systematic literature review to evaluate the efficacy of acetaminophen when used for chronic pain conditions. Applying three broad search strategies for acetaminophen use in chronic pain in both Embase and PubMed, 1551 hits were obtained. After cross-reference searches of both trials and 38 reviews, seven studies comparing acetaminophen in continuous dosing regimens of more than 2 weeks with placebo were included. The review was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. All studies were conducted in patients with hip- or knee osteoarthritis and six of seven studies had observation periods of less than 3 months. All included studies showed no or little efficacy with dubious clinical relevance. In conclusion, there is little evidence to support the efficacy of acetaminophen treatment in patients with chronic pain conditions. Assessment of continuous efficacy in the many patients using acetaminophen worldwide is recommended. © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  7. Pain in elderly people with severe dementia: A systematic review of behavioural pain assessment tools

    PubMed Central

    Zwakhalen, Sandra MG; Hamers, Jan PH; Abu-Saad, Huda Huijer; Berger, Martijn PF

    2006-01-01

    Background Pain is a common and major problem among nursing home residents. The prevalence of pain in elderly nursing home people is 40–80%, showing that they are at great risk of experiencing pain. Since assessment of pain is an important step towards the treatment of pain, there is a need for manageable, valid and reliable tools to assess pain in elderly people with dementia. Methods This systematic review identifies pain assessment scales for elderly people with severe dementia and evaluates the psychometric properties and clinical utility of these instruments. Relevant publications in English, German, French or Dutch, from 1988 to 2005, were identified by means of an extensive search strategy in Medline, Psychinfo and CINAHL, supplemented by screening citations and references. Quality judgement criteria were formulated and used to evaluate the psychometric aspects of the scales. Results Twenty-nine publications reporting on behavioural pain assessment instruments were selected for this review. Twelve observational pain assessment scales (DOLOPLUS2; ECPA; ECS; Observational Pain Behavior Tool; CNPI; PACSLAC; PAINAD; PADE; RaPID; Abbey Pain Scale; NOPPAIN; Pain assessment scale for use with cognitively impaired adults) were identified. Findings indicate that most observational scales are under development and show moderate psychometric qualities. Conclusion Based on the psychometric qualities and criteria regarding sensitivity and clinical utility, we conclude that PACSLAC and DOLOPLUS2 are the most appropriate scales currently available. Further research should focus on improving these scales by further testing their validity, reliability and clinical utility. PMID:16441889

  8. A Systematic Review of Dextrose Prolotherapy for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Ross A; Lackner, Johanna B; Steilen-Matias, Danielle; Harris, David K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review dextrose (d-glucose) prolotherapy efficacy in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Electronic databases PubMed, Healthline, OmniMedicalSearch, Medscape, and EMBASE were searched from 1990 to January 2016. Prospectively designed studies that used dextrose as the sole active prolotherapy constituent were selected. Two independent reviewers rated studies for quality of evidence using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database assessment scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the Downs and Black evaluation tool for non-RCTs, for level of evidence using a modified Sackett scale, and for clinically relevant pain score difference using minimal clinically important change criteria. Study population, methods, and results data were extracted and tabulated. Fourteen RCTs, 1 case-control study, and 18 case series studies met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Pain conditions were clustered into tendinopathies, osteoarthritis (OA), spinal/pelvic, and myofascial pain. The RCTs were high-quality Level 1 evidence (Physiotherapy Evidence Database ≥8) and found dextrose injection superior to controls in Osgood-Schlatter disease, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, traumatic rotator cuff injury, knee OA, finger OA, and myofascial pain; in biomechanical but not subjective measures in temporal mandibular joint; and comparable in a short-term RCT but superior in a long-term RCT in low back pain. Many observational studies were of high quality and reported consistent positive evidence in multiple studies of tendinopathies, knee OA, sacroiliac pain, and iliac crest pain that received RCT confirmation in separate studies. Eighteen studies combined patient self-rating (subjective) with psychometric, imaging, and/or biomechanical (objective) outcome measurement and found both positive subjective and objective outcomes in 16 studies and positive objective but not subjective outcomes in two studies. All 15 studies

  9. A Systematic Review of Dextrose Prolotherapy for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Ross A.; Lackner, Johanna B.; Steilen-Matias, Danielle; Harris, David K.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to systematically review dextrose (d-glucose) prolotherapy efficacy in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. DATA SOURCES Electronic databases PubMed, Healthline, OmniMedicalSearch, Medscape, and EMBASE were searched from 1990 to January 2016. STUDY SELECTION Prospectively designed studies that used dextrose as the sole active prolotherapy constituent were selected. DATA EXTRACTION Two independent reviewers rated studies for quality of evidence using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database assessment scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the Downs and Black evaluation tool for non-RCTs, for level of evidence using a modified Sackett scale, and for clinically relevant pain score difference using minimal clinically important change criteria. Study population, methods, and results data were extracted and tabulated. DATA SYNTHESIS Fourteen RCTs, 1 case–control study, and 18 case series studies met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Pain conditions were clustered into tendinopathies, osteoarthritis (OA), spinal/pelvic, and myofascial pain. The RCTs were high-quality Level 1 evidence (Physiotherapy Evidence Database ≥8) and found dextrose injection superior to controls in Osgood–Schlatter disease, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, traumatic rotator cuff injury, knee OA, finger OA, and myofascial pain; in biomechanical but not subjective measures in temporal mandibular joint; and comparable in a short-term RCT but superior in a long-term RCT in low back pain. Many observational studies were of high quality and reported consistent positive evidence in multiple studies of tendinopathies, knee OA, sacroiliac pain, and iliac crest pain that received RCT confirmation in separate studies. Eighteen studies combined patient self-rating (subjective) with psychometric, imaging, and/or biomechanical (objective) outcome measurement and found both positive subjective and objective outcomes in 16 studies and positive

  10. The efficacy of anticonvulsants on orofacial pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Martin, Wilhelmus J J M; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2011-05-01

    Controversy exists about the effectiveness of anticonvulsants for the management of orofacial pain disorders. To ascertain appropriate therapies, a systematic review was conducted of existing randomized controlled trials. Trials were identified from PubMed, Cochrane, and Ovid Medline databases from 1962 through March 2010, from references in retrieved reports, and from references in review articles. Eight useful trials were identified for this review. Six studies were randomized placebo-controlled trials and 2 studies were randomized active-controlled. Two independent investigators reviewed these articles by using a 15-item checklist. Four studies were classified as "high quality." However, heterogeneity of the trials and the small sample sizes precluded the drawing of firm conclusions about the efficacy of the interventions studied on orofacial pain patients. There is limited to moderate evidence supporting the efficacy of commonly used anticonvulsants for treatment of patients with orofacial pain disorders. More randomized controlled trials are needed on the efficacy of anticonvulsants. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Associations between psychological variables and pain in experimental pain models. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M S; Horjales-Araujo, E; Dahl, J B

    2015-10-01

    The association between pain and psychological characteristics has been widely debated. Thus, it remains unclear whether an individual's psychological profile influences a particular pain experience, or if previous pain experience contributes to a certain psychological profile. Translational studies performed in healthy volunteers may provide knowledge concerning psychological factors in healthy individuals as well as basic pain physiology. The aim of this review was to investigate whether psychological vulnerability or specific psychological variables in healthy volunteers are predictive of the level of pain following experimental pain models. A systematic search on the databases, PubMed, Embase, Cochcrane library, and Clinicaltrials.gov was performed during September 2014. All trials investigating the association between psychological variables and experimental pain in healthy volunteers were considered for inclusion. Twenty-nine trials met the inclusion criteria, with a total of 2637 healthy volunteers. The included trials investigated a total of 45 different psychological tests and 27 different types of pain models. The retrieved trials did not present a sufficiently homogenous group to perform meta-analysis. The collected results were diverse. A total of 16 trials suggested that psychological factors may predict the level of pain, seven studies found divergent results, and six studies found no significant association between psychological variables and experimental pain. Psychological factors may have predictive value when investigating experimental pain. However, due to substantial heterogeneity and methodological shortcomings of the published literature, firm conclusions are not possible. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The efficacy of pain neuroscience education on musculoskeletal pain: A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Zimney, Kory; Puentedura, Emilio J; Diener, Ina

    2016-07-01

    Systematic review of randomized control trials (RCTs) for the effectiveness of pain neuroscience education (PNE) on pain, function, disability, psychosocial factors, movement, and healthcare utilization in individuals with chronic musculoskeletal (MSK) pain. Systematic searches were conducted on 11 databases. Secondary searching (PEARLing) was undertaken, whereby reference lists of the selected articles were reviewed for additional references not identified in the primary search. All experimental RCTs evaluating the effect of PNE on chronic MSK pain were considered for inclusion. Additional Limitations: Studies published in English, published within the last 20 years, and patients older than 18 years. No limitations were set on specific outcome measures. Data were extracted using the participants, interventions, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) approach. Study quality of the 13 RCTs used in this review was assessed by 2 reviewers using the PEDro scale. Narrative summary of results is provided for each study in relation to outcomes measurements and effectiveness. Current evidence supports the use of PNE for chronic MSK disorders in reducing pain and improving patient knowledge of pain, improving function and lowering disability, reducing psychosocial factors, enhancing movement, and minimizing healthcare utilization.

  13. Pain catastrophizing as a risk factor for chronic pain after total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Lindsay C; Ritvo, Sarah E; Ferguson, Meaghan K; Clarke, Hance; Seltzer, Ze’ev; Katz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a common and costly surgical procedure. Despite high success rates, many TKA patients develop chronic pain in the months and years following surgery, constituting a public health burden. Pain catastrophizing is a construct that reflects anxious preoccupation with pain, inability to inhibit pain-related fears, amplification of the significance of pain vis-à-vis health implications, and a sense of helplessness regarding pain. Recent research suggests that it may be an important risk factor for untoward TKA outcomes. To clarify this impact, we systematically reviewed the literature to date on pain catastrophizing as a prospective predictor of chronic pain following TKA. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases to identify articles related to pain catastrophizing, TKA, risk models, and chronic pain. We reviewed titles and abstracts to identify original research articles that met our specified inclusion criteria. Included articles were then rated for methodological quality. including methodological quality. Due to heterogeneity in follow-up, analyses, and outcomes reported across studies, a quantitative meta-analysis could not be performed. Results We identified six prospective longitudinal studies with small-to-mid-sized samples that met the inclusion criteria. Despite considerable variability in reported pain outcomes, pain catastrophizing was identified as a significant predictor of chronic pain persisting ≥3 months following TKA in five of the studies assessed. Limitations of studies included lack of large-scale data, absence of standardized pain measurements, inadequate multivariate adjustment, such as failure to control for analgesic use and other relevant covariates, and failure to report non-significant parameter estimates. Conclusion This study provides moderate-level evidence for pain catastrophizing as an independent predictor of chronic pain post-TKA. Directions for future research include

  14. Effectiveness of Pilates exercise in treating people with chronic low back pain: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Systematic reviews provide clinical practice recommendations that are based on evaluation of primary evidence. When systematic reviews with the same aims have different conclusions, it is difficult to ascertain which review reported the most credible and robust findings. Methods This study examined five systematic reviews that have investigated the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain. A four-stage process was used to interpret findings of the reviews. This process included comparison of research questions, included primary studies, and the level and quality of evidence of systematic reviews. Two independent reviewers assessed the level of evidence and the methodological quality of systematic reviews, using the National Health and Medical Research Council hierarchy of evidence, and the Revised Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews respectively. Any disagreements were resolved by a third researcher. Results A high level of consensus was achieved between the reviewers. Conflicting findings were reported by the five systematic reviews regarding the effectiveness of Pilates in reducing pain and disability in people with chronic low back pain. Authors of the systematic reviews included primary studies that did not match their questions in relation to treatment or population characteristics. A total of ten primary studies were identified across five systematic reviews. Only two of the primary studies were included in all of the reviews due to different inclusion criteria relating to publication date and status, definition of Pilates, and methodological quality. The level of evidence of reviews was low due to the methodological design of the primary studies. The methodological quality of reviews varied. Those which conducted a meta-analysis obtained higher scores. Conclusion There is inconclusive evidence that Pilates is effective in reducing pain and disability in people with chronic low back pain. This is due to the small

  15. Occupational Therapy Interventions in Chronic Pain--A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hesselstrand, Malin; Samuelsson, Kersti; Liedberg, Gunilla

    2015-12-01

    The use of interventions based on the best available evidence in occupational therapy is essential, and evaluation of research is part of an evidence-based practice. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of studies describing and evaluating the effects of occupational therapy interventions on chronic pain. A systematic review of studies with diverse designs was carried out. A quality assessment was conducted, and the level of evidence was defined using the Research Pyramid Model. Of 19 included studies, three received the highest evidence level, and three were considered to be of high quality. The clinical recommendations that can be derived from this study are the following: occupational therapy interventions should start from the identified needs of the person with chronic pain; no support exists for the effectiveness of electromyographic biofeedback training as a supplement, more studies are needed to confirm this result; the efficacy of instructions on body mechanics was significant during work-hardening treatment; and occupational therapists need to perform and present more clinical studies of high quality and high-evidence level to build up a trustworthy arsenal of evidence-based interventions, for example, in persons with chronic pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Reliability of conditioned pain modulation: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Donna L.; Kemp, Harriet I.; Ridout, Deborah; Yarnitsky, David; Rice, Andrew S.C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A systematic literature review was undertaken to determine if conditioned pain modulation (CPM) is reliable. Longitudinal, English language observational studies of the repeatability of a CPM test paradigm in adult humans were included. Two independent reviewers assessed the risk of bias in 6 domains; study participation; study attrition; prognostic factor measurement; outcome measurement; confounding and analysis using the Quality in Prognosis Studies (QUIPS) critical assessment tool. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) less than 0.4 were considered to be poor; 0.4 and 0.59 to be fair; 0.6 and 0.75 good and greater than 0.75 excellent. Ten studies were included in the final review. Meta-analysis was not appropriate because of differences between studies. The intersession reliability of the CPM effect was investigated in 8 studies and reported as good (ICC = 0.6-0.75) in 3 studies and excellent (ICC > 0.75) in subgroups in 2 of those 3. The assessment of risk of bias demonstrated that reporting is not comprehensive for the description of sample demographics, recruitment strategy, and study attrition. The absence of blinding, a lack of control for confounding factors, and lack of standardisation in statistical analysis are common. Conditioned pain modulation is a reliable measure; however, the degree of reliability is heavily dependent on stimulation parameters and study methodology and this warrants consideration for investigators. The validation of CPM as a robust prognostic factor in experimental and clinical pain studies may be facilitated by improvements in the reporting of CPM reliability studies. PMID:27559835

  17. Musculoskeletal pain and effort-reward imbalance- a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain may be triggered by physical strains and psychosocial risk factors. The effort-reward imbalance model (ERI model) is a stress model which measures psychosocial factors in the working world. The question is whether workers with an effort-reward imbalance report musculoskeletal pain more frequently than those with no effort-reward imbalance. A systematic review using a best evidence synthesis approach was conducted to answer this question. Methods A literature search was conducted for the period from 1996 to 2012, using three databases (Pubmed, Embase and PsycINFO). The research criteria related to psychosocial, work-related stress as per the ERI model and to musculoskeletal pain. A quality score was developed using various quality criteria to assess the standard of the studies. The level of evidence was graded as in (Am J Ind Med 39:180–193, 2001). Results After applying the inclusion criteria, a total of 19 studies were included in the review: 15 cross-sectional studies, three prospective studies and one case–control study. 74% of all studies exhibited good methodological quality, 53% collected data using the original ERI questionnaire, and in 42% of the studies, there was adequate control for physical working conditions. Furthermore, different cut-off points were used to classify exposed and non-exposed individuals. On the basis of 13 studies with a positive, statistically significant association, a moderate level of evidence was inferred for the association between effort-reward imbalance and musculoskeletal pain. The evidence for a role of over-commitment and for its interaction with effort-reward imbalance was rated as inconclusive - on the basis of eight and five studies, respectively. Conclusions On the basis of the available evidence, no reliable conclusion may be drawn about any association between the psychosocial factors ascertained using the ERI model and musculoskeletal pain. Before a reliable statement can be made on

  18. Relations Between Brain Alterations and Clinical Pain Measures in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Coppieters, Iris; Meeus, Mira; Kregel, Jeroen; Caeyenberghs, Karen; De Pauw, Robby; Goubert, Dorien; Cagnie, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    Compelling evidence has shown chronic widespread and exaggerated pain experience in chronic musculoskeletal pain (MSKP) conditions. In addition, neuroimaging research has revealed morphological and functional brain alterations in these patients. It is hypothesized that brain alterations play a role in the persistent pain complaints of patients with chronic MSKP. Nevertheless, lack of overview exists regarding the relations between brain alterations and clinical measures of pain. The present systematic review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, to investigate the relations between structural or functional brain alterations, using magnetic resonance imaging scans, and clinical pain measures in patients with chronic MSKP. PubMed, Web of Science, Cinahl, and Cochrane databases were searched. First, the obtained articles were screened according to title and abstract. Second, the screening was on the basis of full-text. Risk of bias in included studies was investigated according to the modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria. Moderate evidence shows that higher pain intensity and pressure pain sensitivity are related to decreased regional gray matter (GM) volume in brain regions encompassing the cingulate cortex, the insula, and the superior frontal and temporal gyrus. Further, some evidence exists that longer disease duration in fibromyalgia is correlated with decreased total GM volume. Yet, inconclusive evidence exists regarding the association of longer disease duration with decreased or increased regional GM volume in other chronic MSKP conditions. Inconclusive evidence was found regarding the direction of the relation of pain intensity and pressure pain sensitivity with microstructural white matter and functional connectivity alterations. In conclusion, preliminary to moderate evidence demonstrates relations between clinical pain measures, and structural and

  19. Systematic review of treatments for recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Weydert, Joy A; Ball, Thomas M; Davis, Melinda F

    2003-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review of evaluated treatments for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in children. Online bibliographic databases were searched for the terms "recurrent abdominal pain," "functional abdominal pain," "children," or "alternative therapies" in articles classified as randomized controlled trials. The abstracts or full text of 57 relevant articles were examined; 10 of these met inclusion criteria. Inclusion criteria required that the study involve children aged 5 to 18 years, subjects have a diagnosis of RAP, and that subjects were allocated randomly to treatment or control groups. The methodology and findings of these articles were evaluated critically, and data were extracted from each article regarding study methods, specific interventions, outcomes measured, and results. Studies that evaluated famotidine, pizotifen, cognitive-behavioral therapy, biofeedback, and peppermint oil enteric-coated capsules showed a decrease in measured pain outcomes for those who received the interventions when compared with others in control groups. The studies that evaluated dietary interventions had conflicting results, in the case of fiber, or showed no efficacy, in the case of lactose avoidance. Evidence for efficacy of treatment of RAP in children was found for therapies that used famotidine, pizotifen, cognitive-behavioral therapy, biofeedback, and peppermint oil enteric-coated capsules. The effects of dietary fiber were less conclusive, and the use of a lactose-free diet showed no improvement. There seemed to be greater improvement when therapy (famotidine, pizotifen, peppermint oil) was targeted to the specific functional gastrointestinal disorder (dyspepsia, abdominal migraine, irritable bowel syndrome). The behavioral interventions seemed to have a general positive effect on children with nonspecific RAP. Many of these therapies have not been used widely as standard treatment for children with RAP. Although the mechanism of action for each effective therapy

  20. Postoperative pain treatment after total knee arthroplasty: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wetterslev, Mik; Hansen, Signe Elisa; Hansen, Morten Sejer; Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Jørgen B.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this systematic review was to document efficacy, safety and quality of evidence of analgesic interventions after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods This PRISMA-compliant and PROSPERO-registered review includes all-language randomized controlled trials of medication-based analgesic interventions after TKA. Bias was evaluated according to Cochrane methodology. Outcomes were opioid consumption (primary), pain scores at rest and during mobilization, adverse events, and length of stay. Interventions investigated in three or more trials were meta-analysed. Outcomes were evaluated using forest plots, Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE), L’Abbe Plots and trial sequential analysis. Results The included 113 trials, investigating 37 different analgesic interventions, were characterized by unclear/high risk of bias, low assay sensitivity and considerable differences in pain assessment tools, basic analgesic regimens, and reporting of adverse events. In meta-analyses single and continuous femoral nerve block (FNB), intrathecal morphine, local infiltration analgesia, intraarticular injection of local anaesthetics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and gabapentinoids demonstrated significant analgesic effects. The 24-hour morphine-sparing effects ranged from 4.2 mg (CI: 1.3, 7.2; intraarticular local anaesthetics), to 16.6 mg (CI: 11.2, 22; single FNB). Pain relieving effects at rest at 6 hours ranged from 4 mm (CI: -10, 2; gabapentinoids), to 19 mm (CI: 8, 31; single FNB), and at 24 hours from 3 mm (CI: -2, 8; gabapentinoids), to 16 mm (CI: 8, 23; continuous FNB). GRADE-rated quality of evidence was generally low. Conclusion A low quality of evidence, small sample sizes and heterogeneity of trial designs prohibit designation of an optimal procedure-specific analgesic regimen after TKA. PMID:28273133

  1. Treatment of Neuropathic Pain with Venlafaxine: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Rohit; Barkin, Robert L; Bhatia, Anurag

    2016-11-11

    OBJECTIVE : To investigate the efficacy of venlafaxine for neuropathic pain and review literature to determine if the medication provides adequate neuropathic pain relief. METHODS : Literature was reviewed on MEDLINE using various key words. These key words include: "venlafaxine and pain," "venlafaxine ER and pain," "venlafaxine XR and pain," "venlafaxine and neuropathic pain," "venlafaxine and neuropathy," "SSRI and neuropathic pain," "SSRI and neuropathy," "SNRI and neuropathic pain," "SNRI and neuropathy," "serotonin reuptake inhibitor and neuropathic pain," "serotonin reuptake inhibitor and neuropathy," "serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor and neuropathic pain" and "serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor and neuropathy." Using this guideline, 13 articles were reviewed. RESULTS : A total of 13 studies reviewed, which are organized by date and diagnosis. It is evident that in the majority of studies, when compared with a placebo, there was a clinical significant reduction in neuropathic pain relief when using venlafaxine. Additionally, one study showed even more significant pain relief when using higher doses of venlafaxine (at least 150 mg). However, when compared with alternative neuropathic medications, venlafaxine for the most part did not perform any better in terms of efficacy. CONCLUSION : In conclusion, venlafaxine is a safe and well-tolerated analgesic drug for the symptomatic treatment of neuropathic pain, and there is limited evidence that high-dose venlafaxine (150 mg/day) can be even more beneficial. While the present evidence is quite encouraging regarding venlafaxine's use for neuropathic pain, further research is needed to continue to expand on these findings, particularly when in consideration with other possible pharmacological agents. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Factors associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lankhorst, Nienke E; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2013-03-01

    This review systematically summarises factors associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). A systematic literature search was conducted. Studies including ≥20 patients with PFPS that examined ≥1 possible factor associated with PFPS were included. A meta-analysis was performed, clinical heterogeneous data were analysed descriptively. The 47 included studies examined 523 variables, eight were pooled. Pooled data showed a larger Q-angle, sulcus angle and patellar tilt angle (weighted mean differences (WMD) 2.08; 95% CI 0.64, 3.63 and 1.66; 95% CI 0.44, 2.77 and 4.34; 95% CI 1.16 to 7.52, respectively), less hip abduction strength, lower knee extension peak torque and less hip external rotation strength (WMD -3.30; 95% CI -5.60, -1.00 and -37.47; 95% CI -71.75, -3.20 and -1.43; 95% CI -2.71 to -0.16, respectively) in PFPS patients compared to controls. Foot arch height index and congruence angle were not associated with PFPS. Six out of eight pooled variables are associated with PFPS, other factors associated with PFPS were based on single studies. Further research is required.

  3. Prevalence of chronic low back pain: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Meucci, Rodrigo Dalke; Fassa, Anaclaudia Gastal; Faria, Neice Muller Xavier

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate worldwide prevalence of chronic low back pain according to age and sex. METHODS We consulted Medline (PubMed), LILACS and EMBASE electronic databases. The search strategy used the following descriptors and combinations: back pain, prevalence, musculoskeletal diseases, chronic musculoskeletal pain, rheumatic, low back pain, musculoskeletal disorders and chronic low back pain. We selected cross-sectional population-based or cohort studies that assessed chronic low back pain as an outcome. We also assessed the quality of the selected studies as well as the chronic low back pain prevalence according to age and sex. RESULTS The review included 28 studies. Based on our qualitative evaluation, around one third of the studies had low scores, mainly due to high non-response rates. Chronic low back pain prevalence was 4.2% in individuals aged between 24 and 39 years old and 19.6% in those aged between 20 and 59. Of nine studies with individuals aged 18 and above, six reported chronic low back pain between 3.9% and 10.2% and three, prevalence between 13.1% and 20.3%. In the Brazilian older population, chronic low back pain prevalence was 25.4%. CONCLUSIONS Chronic low back pain prevalence increases linearly from the third decade of life on, until the 60 years of age, being more prevalent in women. Methodological approaches aiming to reduce high heterogeneity in case definitions of chronic low back pain are essential to consistency and comparative analysis between studies. A standard chronic low back pain definition should include the precise description of the anatomical area, pain duration and limitation level. PMID:26487293

  4. Treatments of traumatic neuropathic pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chenglun; Zhou, Xijie; Zhao, Bin; Sun, Chao; Poonit, Keshav; Yan, Hede

    2017-08-22

    Traumatic neuropathic pain caused by traumatic neuroma has long been bothering both doctors and patients, the mechanisms of traumatic neuropathic pain are widely discussed by researchers and the treatment is challenging. Clinical treatment of painful neuroma is unclear. Numerous treatment modalities have been introduced by experts in this field. However, there is still no single standard recognized treatment. Different forms of treatments have been tested in animals and humans, but pharmacotherapies (antidepressants, antiepileptics) remain the basis of traumatic neuropathic pain management. For intractable cases, nerve stump transpositions into a muscle, vein or bone are seen as traditional surgical procedures which provide a certain degree of efficacy. Novel surgical techniques have emerged in recent years, such as tube guided nerve capping, electrical stimulation and adipose autograft have substantially enriched the abundance of the treatment for traumatic neuropathic pain. Several treatments show advantages over the others in terms of pain relief and prevention of neuroma formation, making it difficult to pick out a single modality as the reference. An effective and standardized treatment for traumatic neuropathic pain would provide better choice for researchers and clinical workers. In this review, we summarized current knowledge on the treatment of traumatic neuropathic pain, and found a therapeutic strategy for this intractable pain. We tried to provide a useful guideline for choosing the right modality in management of traumatic neuropathic pain.

  5. Interventions for postoperative pain in children: An overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Boric, Krste; Dosenovic, Svjetlana; Jelicic Kadic, Antonia; Batinic, Marijan; Cavar, Marija; Urlic, Marjan; Markovina, Nikolina; Puljak, Livia

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct an overview of systematic reviews that summarizes the results about efficacy and safety from randomized controlled trials involving the various strategies used for postoperative pain management in children. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, Database of Reviews of Effect, Embase, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO from the earliest date to January 24, 2016. This overview included 45 systematic reviews that evaluated interventions for postoperative pain in children. Out of 45 systematic reviews that investigated various interventions for postoperative pain in children, 19 systematic reviews (42%) presented conclusive evidence of efficacy. Positive conclusive evidence was reported in 18 systematic reviews (40%) for the efficacy of diclofenac, ketamine, caudal analgesia, dexmedetomidine, music therapy, corticosteroid, epidural analgesia, paracetamol, and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and transversus abdominis plane block. Only one systematic review reported conclusive evidence of equal efficacy that involved a comparison of dexmedetomidine vs morphine and fentanyl. Safety of interventions was reported as conclusive in 14 systematic reviews (31%), with positive conclusive evidence for dexmedetomidine, corticosteroid, epidural analgesia, transversus abdominis plane block, and clonidine. Seven systematic reviews reported equal conclusive safety for epidural infusion, diclofenac intravenous vs ketamine added to opioid analgesia, bupivacaine, ketamine, paracetamol, and dexmedetomidine vs intravenous infusions of various opioid analgesics, oral suspension and suppository of diclofenac, only opioid, normal saline, no treatment, placebo, and midazolam. Negative conclusive statement for safety was reported in one systematic review for caudal analgesia vs noncaudal regional analgesia. More than half of systematic reviews included in this overview were rated as having medium methodological quality. Of 45 included

  6. Chinese manipulation for mechanical neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian Hua; Chiu, Thomas Tai Wing; Hu, Jia

    2012-11-01

    To assess whether Chinese manipulation improves pain, function/disability and global perceived effect in adults with acute/subacute/chronic neck pain. CAJ Full-text Database (Chinese), Wanfang Database (Chinese), Cochrane Database (English) and Medline (English). Literature searching was performed with the following keywords and their combination: 'manual therapy/bone setting/Chinese manipulation', 'neck/cervical pain', 'cervical vertebrae', 'cervical spondylosis/radiculopathy' and 'randomized controlled trial/review.' Two independent reviewers selected studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias for each included study. Randomized controlled trials or quasi-randomized controlled trials on the effect of Chinese manipulation in treating adult patients with neck pain were selected. Mean differences with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Quality of the evidence was assessed by the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Four studies (610 participants) were included in this review. There was very low-quality evidence suggesting that, compared to cervical traction in sitting, Chinese manipulation produced more immediate post-intervention pain relief (mean difference: -1.06; 95% CI: -1.37~ -0.75; P < 0.001) and improvement of global signs and symptoms (mean difference: -3.81; 95% CI: -4.71 ~ -2.91; P < 0.001). Very low-quality evidence showed that Chinese manipulation alone was superior to Chinese traditional massage in immediate post-intervention pain relief (mean difference: -2.02; 95% CI: -2.78~ -1.26; P < 0.001). There was limited evidence showing Chinese manipulation could produce short-term improvement for neck pain.

  7. Chronic musculoskeletal pain in patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Meeus, Mira; Nijs, Jo; Meirleir, Kenny De

    2007-05-01

    In addition to debilitating fatigue the majority of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) experience chronic widespread pain. Conducting a systematic review to critically assess the existing knowledge on chronic pain in CFS. We focussed on the definition, the prevalence and incidence, the aetiology, the relevance and the therapy strategy for chronic musculoskeletal pain and post-exertional pain in CFS. To identify relevant articles, we searched eight medical search engines. The search terms "chronic fatigue syndrome" AND "pain", "nociception", "arthralgia" and "myalgia", were used to identify articles concerning pain in CFS. Included articles were reviewed by two blinded researchers. Twenty-five articles and two abstract were identified and selected for further appraisal. Only 11 search results focussed on musculoskeletal pain in CFS patients. Regarding the standardized review of the articles, a 96% agreement between the researchers was observed. There is no consensus in defining chronic widespread pain in CFS, and although there is little or no strong proof for the exact prevalence, chronic pain is strongly disabling in CFS. Aetiological theories are proposed (sleep abnormalities, tryptophan, parovirus-B, hormonal and brain abnormalities and central sensitisation) and a reduction of pain threshold after exercise has been shown. Furthermore depression seemed not related to pain in CFS and a staphylococcus toxoid vaccine caused no significant pain reduction. The results from the systematic review highlight the clinical importance of chronic pain in CFS, but only few studies addressing the aetiology or treatment of chronic pain in CFS are currently available.

  8. Early changes in somatosensory function in spinal pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Anna; Dean, Catherine M; Wrigley, Paul J; Hush, Julia M

    2015-02-01

    Alterations in sensory processing have been demonstrated in chronic low back and neck pain. However, it has not been yet systematically summarized how early these changes occur in spinal pain. This systematic review examines the available literature measuring somatosensory function in acute (<6 weeks) and subacute (6-12 weeks) spinal pain. The protocol for this review has been registered on the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO). An electronic search of 4 databases was conducted to retrieve studies assessing somatosensory function by quantitative sensory testing in adults with spinal pain of up to 12 weeks duration. Two reviewers independently screened the studies and assessed the risk of bias. Studies were grouped according to spinal pain condition (whiplash injury, idiopathic neck pain, and nonspecific low back pain), and, where possible, meta-analyses were performed for comparable results. Fifteen studies were included. Sources of bias included lack of assessor blinding, unclear sampling methods, and lack of control for confounders. We found that: (1) there is consistent evidence for thermal and widespread mechanical pain hypersensitivity in the acute stage of whiplash, (2) there is no evidence for pain hypersensitivity in the acute and subacute stage of idiopathic neck pain, although the body of evidence is small, and (3) hyperalgesia and spinal cord hyperexcitability have been detected in early stages of nonspecific low back pain, although evidence about widespread effects are conflicting. Future longitudinal research using multiple sensory modalities and standardized testing may reveal the involvement of somatosensory changes in the development and maintenance of chronic pain.

  9. A Systematic Review of the Prevalence and Measurement of Chronic Pain in Asian Adults.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Zaki, Lily R; Hairi, Noran N

    2015-06-01

    There are limited epidemiologic studies on chronic pain in Asian populations. The aim of this review was to gather all epidemiologic studies of chronic pain in Asian countries and systematically describe the measurement and prevalence of chronic pain in Asian adults. A systematic review was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Psych INFO, Cochrane Database for Systematic Review, and CINAHL. Additional studies were identified manually by searching bibliographies. We identified 19 relevant articles for this review. Most articles used the definition of chronic pain set by the International Association for the Study of Pain. The majority of the articles used simple single-question methods to measure chronic pain. The prevalence of chronic pain among Asian adults ranges from 7.1% (Malaysia) to 61% (Cambodia and Northern Iraq), whereas among the Asian geriatric population, the prevalence is even higher and ranges from 42% to 90.8%. This review showed that there is great variation in the reported prevalence of chronic pain in Asian adults and the prevalence of chronic pain is high among the Asian geriatric population. To measure the distribution of chronic pain in adults, a uniform measurement strategy should be adopted. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A systematic review of prolotherapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Rabago, David; Best, Thomas M; Beamsley, Mark; Patterson, Jeffrey

    2005-09-01

    Prolotherapy, an injection-based treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain, has grown in popularity and has received significant recent attention. The objective of this review is to determine the effectiveness of prolotherapy for treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. We searched Medline, PreMedline, Embase, CINAHL, and Allied and Complementary Medicine with search strategies using all current and historical names for prolotherapy and injectants. Reference sections of included articles were scanned, and content area specialists were consulted. All published studies involving human subjects and assessing prolotherapy were included. Data from 34 case reports and case series and 2 nonrandomized controlled trials suggest prolotherapy is efficacious for many musculoskeletal conditions. However, results from 6 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are conflicting. Two RCTs on osteoarthritis reported decreased pain, increased range of motion, and increased patellofemoral cartilage thickness after prolotherapy. Two RCTs on low back pain reported significant improvements in pain and disability compared with control subjects, whereas 2 did not. All studies had significant methodological limitations. There are limited high-quality data supporting the use of prolotherapy in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain or sport-related soft tissue injuries. Positive results compared with controls have been reported in nonrandomized and randomized controlled trials. Further investigation with high-quality randomized controlled trials with noninjection control arms in studies specific to sport-related and musculoskeletal conditions is necessary to determine the efficacy of prolotherapy.

  11. Chemical sympathectomy for neuropathic pain: does it work? Case report and systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Furlan, A D; Lui, P W; Mailis, A

    2001-12-01

    To determine if chemical sympathectomy successfully reduces limb neuropathic pain. Systematic literature review of the effectiveness of phenol or alcohol sympathectomy for extremity neuropathic pain. A 29-year-old female with complex regional pain syndrome of both lower extremities after back surgery who was submitted to bilateral lumbar chemical sympathectomy. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Medline, and EMBASE were systematically searched. (1) For the patient in question: spontaneous pain, allodynia, pinprick hyperalgesia, pressure evoked pain; (2) For the literature review: meaningful versus nonmeaningful pain relief based on degree and duration (>2 weeks) of pain relief. (1) The case reported experienced partial temporary relief of pain primarily related to selective modulation of allodynia, but not deep pain or pinprick hyperalgesia; (2) 44% of 66 patients in 13 studies that met the authors' inclusion criteria experienced meaningful pain relief. Whereas 19% experienced no meaningful relief, for the remaining 37% of the patients no conclusions regarding duration and degree of relief could be drawn due to poor reporting of outcomes. Based on the case reported and systematic literature review, chemical sympathectomy seems to have at best a temporary effect, limited to cutaneous allodynia. Despite the popularity of chemical sympatholysis, only few patients and poorly defined outcomes are reported in the literature, substantiating the need for well-designed studies on the effectiveness of the procedure.

  12. Sex differences in experimental pain among healthy children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Katelynn E; Birnie, Kathryn A; Caes, Line; Schinkel, Meghan; Chambers, Christine T

    2014-05-01

    Sex differences in response to experimental pain are commonly reported in systematic reviews in the adult literature. The objective of the present research was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of sex differences in healthy children's responses to experimental pain (e.g., cold pressor, heat pain, pressure pain) and, where possible, to conduct analyses separately for children and adolescents. A search was conducted of electronic databases for published papers in English of empirical research using experimental pain tasks to examine pain-related outcomes in healthy boys and girls between 0 and 18 years of age. Eighty articles were eligible for inclusion and were coded to extract information relevant to sex differences. The systematic review indicated that, across different experimental pain tasks, the majority of studies reported no significant differences between boys and girls on pain-related outcomes. However, the meta-analysis of available combined data found that girls reported significantly higher cold pressor pain intensity compared to boys in studies where the mean age of participants was greater than 12 years. Additionally, a meta-analysis of heat pain found that boys had significantly higher tolerance than girls overall, and boys had significantly higher heat pain threshold than girls in studies where the mean age of participants was 12 years or younger. These findings suggest that developmental stage may be relevant for understanding sex differences in pain.

  13. Systematic Review of the Literature on Pain in Patients with Polytrauma Including Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dobscha, Steven K.; Clark, Michael E.; Morasco, Benjamin J.; Freeman, Michele; Campbell, Rose; Helfand, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the literature addressing the assessment and management of pain in patients with polytraumatic injuries including traumatic brain injury (TBI) and blast-related headache, and to identify patient, clinician and systems factors associated with pain-related outcomes. Design Systematic review. Methods We conducted searches in MEDLINE of literature published from 1950 through July 2008. Due to a limited number of studies using controls or comparators, we included observational and rigorous qualitative studies. We systematically rated the quality of systematic reviews, cohort, and case-control design studies. Results One systematic review, 93 observational studies, and one qualitative research study met inclusion criteria. The literature search yielded no published studies that assessed measures of pain intensity or pain-related functional interference among patients with cognitive deficits due to TBI, that compared patients with blast-related headache with patients with other types of headache, or that assessed treatments for blast-related headache pain. Studies on the association between TBI severity and pain reported mixed findings. There was limited evidence that the following factors are associated with pain among TBI patients: severity, location, and multiplicity of injuries; insomnia; fatigue; depression; and post-traumatic stress disorder. Conclusions Very little evidence is currently available to guide pain assessment and treatment approaches in patients with polytrauma. Further research employing systematic observational as well as controlled intervention designs is clearly indicated. PMID:19818031

  14. The effectiveness of massage therapy for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Saravana; Beaton, Kate; Hughes, Tricia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The last decade has seen a growth in the utilization of complementary and alternative medicine therapies, and one of the most popular and sought-after complementary and alternative medicine therapies for nonspecific low back pain is massage. Massage may often be perceived as a safe therapeutic modality without any significant risks or side effects. However, despite its popularity, there continues to be ongoing debate on the effectiveness of massage in treating nonspecific low back pain. With a rapidly evolving research evidence base and access to innovative means of synthesizing evidence, it is time to reinvestigate this issue. Methods A systematic, step-by-step approach, underpinned by best practice in reviewing the literature, was utilized as part of the methodology of this umbrella review. A systematic search was conducted in the following databases: Embase, MEDLINE, AMED, ICONDA, Academic Search Premier, Australia/New Zealand Reference Centre, CINAHL, HealthSource, SPORTDiscus, PubMed, The Cochrane Library, Scopus, Web of Knowledge/Web of Science, PsycINFO, and ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health Source, investigating systematic reviews and meta-analyses from January 2000 to December 2012, and restricted to English-language documents. Methodological quality of included reviews was undertaken using the Centre for Evidence Based Medicine critical appraisal tool. Results Nine systematic reviews were found. The methodological quality of the systematic reviews varied (from poor to excellent) although, overall, the primary research informing these systematic reviews was generally considered to be weak quality. The findings indicate that massage may be an effective treatment option when compared to placebo and some active treatment options (such as relaxation), especially in the short term. There is conflicting and contradictory findings for the effectiveness of massage therapy for the treatment of nonspecific low back pain when compared against other

  15. Early pain after laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. A qualitative systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tolver, M A; Rosenberg, J; Bisgaard, T

    2012-05-01

    Early post-operative pain after laparoscopic groin hernia repair may, as in other laparoscopic operations, have its own individual pain pattern and patient-related predictors of early pain. The purpose of this review was to characterise pain within the first post-operative week after transabdominal pre-peritoneal repair (TAPP) and total extraperitoneal repair (TEP), and to identify patient-related predictors of early pain. A qualitative systematic review was conducted. Pubmed, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane database were searched for studies on early pain (first week) after TAPP or TEP. We included 71 eligible studies with 14,023 patients. Post-operative pain is most severe on day 0 and mainly on a level of 13-58 mm on a visual analogue scale and decreases to low levels on day 3. There seems to be no difference in pain intensity and duration when TEP and TAPP are compared. Deep abdominal pain (i.e. groin pain/visceral pain) dominates over superficial pain (i.e. somatic pain) and shoulder pain (i.e. referred pain) after TAPP. Predictors of early pain are young age and pre-operative high pain response to experimental heat stimulation. Furthermore, evidence supported early pain intensity as a predictive risk factor of chronic pain after laparoscopic groin hernia repair. Early pain within the first week after TAPP and TEP is most severe on the first post-operative day, and the pain pattern is dominated by deep abdominal pain. Early post-operative pain is most intense in younger patients and can be predicted by pre-operative high pain response to experimental heat stimulation. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  16. Contemporary use of the cold pressor task in pediatric pain research: a systematic review of methods.

    PubMed

    Birnie, Kathryn A; Petter, Mark; Boerner, Katelynn E; Noel, Melanie; Chambers, Christine T

    2012-09-01

    The cold pressor task (CPT) is an ethical experimental pain task widely used by pediatric pain researchers to examine a variety of important theoretical and clinical questions. The purpose of this systematic review was to describe contemporary use of the CPT in pediatric pain research to identify possible methodological and procedural inconsistencies and inform future research. All papers using the CPT to examine pain-related outcomes in children ≤18 years old published after 2005 were identified, 2005 being when published pediatric CPT studies were last reviewed and guidelines for pediatric use of the CPT were published. Information related to samples, CPT methodology, and pain outcomes was recorded. Thirty-six published papers, involving 2,242 children (aged 3-18 years) from both healthy and clinical samples, met review inclusion criteria. Several aspects of CPT methodology with significant potential to impact pain outcomes were found to be inconsistently implemented and reported, including water temperature, use of informed versus uninformed ceilings, and the presence of observers during the CPT. Self-report child pain intensity and pain tolerance were common outcomes. A number of refinements for use of the CPT in pediatric pain research are suggested. The cold pressor task is a commonly used experimental method in pediatric pain research. This systematic review reveals important methodological inconsistencies in its use and suggestions for improvements to previously published guidelines. Copyright © 2012 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pain in patients with COPD: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Dam van Isselt, Eléonore F; Groenewegen-Sipkema, Karin H; Spruit-van Eijk, Monica; Chavannes, Niels H; de Waal, Margot W M; Janssen, Daisy J A; Achterberg, Wilco P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To systematically investigate the prevalence of pain, factors related with pain and pain management interventions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources and study eligibility criteria PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE, CINAHL and PsychINFO from 1966 to December 2013. Studies were included if they presented clinical data on pain or symptom burden in patients with COPD, or pain as a domain of quality of life (QoL). All types of study designs were included. Results Of the 1571 articles that were identified, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Fourteen studies focused on pain and symptom burden (including pain) in patients with COPD and 25 studies focused on QoL using a questionnaire that included a separate pain domain. Reported pain prevalence in high-quality studies ranged from 32 to 60%. Included studies report that pain is more prevalent in patients with COPD compared to participants from the general population. Comorbidity, nutritional status, QoL and several symptoms were related to pain. None of the included studies reported a significant relationship between lung function and pain prevalence or severity. However, studies investigating pain in patients with moderate COPD reported higher pain prevalence compared to studies in patients with severe of very severe COPD. Conclusions Although literature on this topic is limited and shows substantial heterogeneity, pain seems to be a significant problem in patients with COPD and is related to several other symptoms, comorbidity and QoL. Data synthesis suggests that pain is more prevalent in patients with moderate COPD compared to patients with severe or very severe COPD. Further research is needed and should focus on determining a more accurate pain prevalence, investigating the relationship between pain prevalence, disease severity and comorbidity and explore implementation and efficacy of pain management

  18. Systematic review of family functioning in families of children and adolescents with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Amy S.; Palermo, Tonya M.; Stinson, Jennifer; Handley, Susannah; Chambers, Christine T.

    2010-01-01

    Disturbances in family functioning have been identified in youth with chronic pain and are associated with worse child physical and psychological functioning. Assessment measures of family functioning used in research and clinical settings vary. This systematic review summarizes studies investigating relationships among family functioning, pain and pain-related disability in youth with chronic pain. Sixteen articles were reviewed. All studies were cross-sectional, seven utilized between-group comparisons (chronic pain versus healthy/control) and twelve examined within-group associations among family functioning, pain and/or pain-related disability. Studies represented youth with various pain conditions (e.g., headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia) aged 6 – 20 years. Findings revealed group differences in family functioning between children with chronic pain and healthy controls in five of seven studies. Significant associations emerged among family variables and pain-related disability in six of nine studies with worse family functioning associated with greater child disability; relationships between family functioning and children’s pain were less consistent. Different patterns of results emerged depending on family functioning measure used. Overall, findings showed that families of children with chronic pain generally have poorer family functioning than healthy populations, and that pain-related disability is more consistently related to family functioning than pain intensity. PMID:21055709

  19. Musculoskeletal injuries and pain in dancers: a systematic review update.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Craig L; Hincapié, Cesar A; Cassidy, J David

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assemble and synthesize the best available literature from 2004 to 2008 on musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. MEDLINE and CINAHL were the primary sources of data. Indexed terms such as dance, dancer, dancing, athletic injuries, occupational injuries, sprains and strains, musculoskeletal diseases, bone density, menstruation disturbances, and eating disorders were used to search the databases. Citations were screened for relevance using a priori criteria, and relevant studies were critically reviewed for scientific merit by the best-evidence synthesis method. After screening, 19 articles were found to be scientifically admissible. Data from accepted studies were abstracted into evidence tables relating to: prevalence and associated factors; incidence and risk factors; intervention; and injury characteristics and prognosis of musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. Principal findings included: a high prevalence and incidence of lower extremity, hip and back injuries; preliminary evidence that psychosocial and psychological issues such as stress and coping strategies affect injury frequency and duration; history of a previous lateral ankle sprain is associated with an increased risk of ankle sprain in the contralateral ankle in dance students; fatigue may play a role in ACL injury in dancers; acute hamstring strains in dancers affect tendon more than muscle tissue, often resulting in prolonged absence from dance. It is concluded that, while there are positive developments in the literature on the epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and prevention of MSK injuries and pain in dancers, much room for improvement remains. Suggestions for future research are offered.

  20. Mindfulness-based stress reduction for low back pain. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is frequently used for pain conditions. While systematic reviews on MBSR for chronic pain have been conducted, there are no reviews for specific pain conditions. Therefore a systematic review of the effectiveness of MBSR in low back pain was performed. Methods MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CAMBASE, and PsycInfo were screened through November 2011. The search strategy combined keywords for MBSR with keywords for low back pain. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing MBSR to control conditions in patients with low back pain were included. Two authors independently assessed risk of bias using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Clinical importance of group differences was assessed for the main outcome measures pain intensity and back-specific disability. Results Three RCTs with a total of 117 chronic low back pain patients were included. One RCT on failed back surgery syndrome reported significant and clinically important short-term improvements in pain intensity and disability for MBSR compared to no treatment. Two RCTs on older adults (age ≥ 65 years) with chronic specific or non-specific low back pain reported no short-term or long-term improvements in pain or disability for MBSR compared to no treatment or health education. Two RCTs reported larger short-term improvements of pain acceptance for MBSR compared to no treatment. Conclusion This review found inconclusive evidence of effectiveness of MBSR in improving pain intensity or disability in chronic low back pain patients. However, there is limited evidence that MBSR can improve pain acceptance. Further RCTs with larger sample sizes, adequate control interventions, and longer follow-ups are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:23009599

  1. Pharmacological Treatment of Pain in Cancer Patients: The Role of Adjuvant Analgesics, a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    van den Beuken-van Everdingen, Marieke H J; de Graeff, Alexander; Jongen, Joost L M; Dijkstra, Denise; Mostovaya, Irina; Vissers, Kris C

    2017-03-01

    In patients with cancer, pain is one of the most feared and burdensome symptoms. Adjuvant analgesics are an important cornerstone on which treatment of pain in patients with cancer is based. To update our guidelines for the treatment of pain in patients with cancer, we performed a systematic review on the use of adjuvant analgesics in pain in cancer. A systematic search of the literature was performed searching for articles that studied the effect of (1) antidepressants, (2) anti-epileptics, (3) N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, and (4) other adjuvant analgesics in patients with cancer pain and described their effects on pain intensity and/or side effects. Based on the keywords and after reading the full papers, we could include 12 papers on anticonvulsants, 10 papers on antidepressants, four on NMDA receptor antagonists, and 10 papers on other adjuvant analgesics. The methodological quality of the included papers was graded as low to very low. Overall, there was a low quality of evidence that gabapentin, pregabalin, amitriptyline, and venlafaxine were effective in reducing pain intensity in patients with cancer pain. There was insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of lamotrigine, levetiracetam, NMDA antagonists, cannabinoids, corticosteroids, and local anesthetics on reducing pain intensity in patients with cancer pain. The quality of currently available evidence on the effectiveness of adjuvant analgesics in the treatment of cancer pain is low. The treatment of pain associated with cancer should be tailored to the patient's personal preferences. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  2. The management of the painful bipartite patella: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Samuel E; LeRoux, Johannes A; Smith, Toby O; Hing, Caroline B

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to identify the most effective method for the treatment of the symptomatic bipartite patella. A systematic review of the literature was completed, and all studies assessing the management of a bipartite patella were included. Owing to the paucity of randomised controlled trials, a narrative review of 22 studies was completed. A range of treatments were assessed: conservative measures, open and arthroscopic fixation or excision and soft tissue release and excision. All of the methods provided results ranging from good to excellent, with acceptable complication rates. This is a poorly answered treatment question. No firm guidance can be given as to the most appropriate method of treating the symptomatic bipartite patella. This study suggests that there are a number of effective treatments with acceptable complication rates and it may be that treatments that conserve the patella are more appropriate for larger fragments. IV.

  3. The effect of tailored Web-based interventions on pain in adults: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Martorella, Géraldine; Gélinas, C; Bérubé, M; Boitor, M; Fredericks, S; LeMay, S

    2016-04-12

    Information technologies can facilitate the implementation of health interventions, especially in the case of widespread conditions such as pain. Tailored Web-based interventions have been recognized for health behavior change among diverse populations. However, none of the systematic reviews looking at Web-based interventions for pain management has specifically addressed the contribution of tailoring. The aims of this systematic review are to assess the effect of tailored Web-based pain management interventions on pain intensity and physical and psychological functions. Randomized controlled trials including adults suffering from any type of pain and involving Web-based interventions for pain management, using at least one of the three tailoring strategies (personalization, feedback, or adaptation), will be considered. The following types of comparisons will be carried out: tailored Web-based intervention with (1) usual care (passive control group), (2) face-to-face intervention, and (3) standardized Web-based intervention. The primary outcome will be pain intensity measured using a self-report measure such as the numeric rating scale (e.g., 0-10) or visual analog scale (e.g., 0-100). Secondary outcomes will include pain interference with activities and psychological well-being. A systematic review of English and French articles using MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library will be conducted from January 2000 to December 2015. Eligibility assessment will be performed independently in an unblinded standardized manner by two reviewers. Extracted data will include the following: sample size, demographics, dropout rate, number and type of study groups, type of pain, inclusion and exclusion criteria, study setting, type of Web-based intervention, tailoring strategy, comparator, type of pain intensity measure, pain-related disability and psychological well-being outcomes, and times of measurement. Disagreements between reviewers at the

  4. The outcome of hip exercise in patellofemoral pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Catherine; Krouwel, Oliver; Kuisma, Raija; Hebron, Clair

    2016-12-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is one of the most common lower extremity conditions seen in clinical practice. Current evidence shows that there are hip strength deficits, delayed onset and shorter activation of gluteus medius in people with PFP. The aim of this review was to systematically review the literature to investigate the outcome of hip exercise in people with PFP.

  5. A Systematic Review on the Prevalence, Etiology, and Pathophysiology of Intrinsic Pain in Dermal Scar Tissue.

    PubMed

    Bijlard, Eveline; Uiterwaal, Lisa; Kouwenberg, Casimir A E; Mureau, Marc A M; Hovius, Steven E R; Huygen, Frank J P M

    2017-02-01

    Scars can cause pain, even without symptoms of underlying nerve damage. A lack of knowledge on intrinsic scar pain hampers effective treatment of these complaints. Aggregate current knowledge on the prevalence, etiology, and pathophysiology of intrinsic pain in dermal scars. Systematic review. University Medical Center. We searched the Embase, Medline, Cochrane central, CINAHL, Web-of-Science, and Pubmed databases with search terms: scar, skin, pain, and etiology/pathology, adding all synonyms of these terms. Relevant papers were selected and analyzed by 3 reviewers. Intrinsic pain in scars has a low prevalence. However, pathologic scars and burns regularly cause pain of high intensity. The etiology is multifactorial, the extent of trauma was an important predicting factor. Nerve fiber density did not explain the intrinsic pain when pan-neuronal markers were used, while a correlation with an increased number of C-fiber subtypes seems plausible. Nerve growth factor (that stimulate these C-fibers) plays an important role in wound healing. Thereby, it also sensitizes neurons and promotes inflammation, releasing even more neurotrophic factors. Central sensitization causes a long-lasting effect even after wounds are healed. Furthermore, the opioid-system, that influences inflammation and healing and possible systemic sensory alterations after injury, is discussed. Liberal selection criteria challenged the systematic selection of papers. Burn and pathologic scars often lead to high intensity pain symptoms. This pain has many characteristics of neuropathic pain that could be caused by an imbalance of C-fibers subtypes. The scar tissue itself may alter the nerve fiber distribution; the imbalance results in ongoing neuro-inflammation and pain symptoms. Key words: Systematic review, scar, pain, epidermal innervation, prevalence, neuro inflammatory response, peptidergic fibers.

  6. Analgesic effects of manual therapy in patients with musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Voogt, Lennard; de Vries, Jurryt; Meeus, Mira; Struyf, Filip; Meuffels, Duncan; Nijs, Jo

    2015-04-01

    Current evidence shows that manual therapy elicits analgesic effect in different populations (healthy, pain inflicted and patients with musculoskeletal pain) when carried out at the spinal column, although the clinical significance of these effects remains unclear. Also the analgesic effects of manual therapy on peripheral joints have not been systematically reviewed. A systematic review was carried out following the PRISMA-guidelines. Manual therapy was defined as any manual induced articular motion with the aim of inducing analgesic effects. Outcome measure was pain threshold. A total of 13 randomized trials were included in the review. In 10 studies a significant effect was found. Pressure pain thresholds increased following spinal or peripheral manual techniques. In three studies both a local and widespread analgesic effect was found. No significant effect was found on thermal pain threshold. Moderate evidence indicated that manual therapy increased local pressure pain thresholds in musculoskeletal pain, immediately following the intervention. No consistent result was found on remote pressure pain threshold. No significant changes occured on thermal pain threshold values. The clinical relevance of these effects remains contradictory and therefore unclear. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Does pain in individuals with multiple sclerosis affect employment? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shahrbanian, Shahnaz; Auais, Mohammad; Duquette, Pierre; Andersen, Katie; Anderson, Katie; Mayo, Nancy E

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience some of the highest unemployment rates among all groups of chronic illnesses. Pain has been found to be a common reason for sick leave or early retirement in healthy populations or other groups with chronic illness; however, there is little awareness regarding the effect of pain on the work status of individuals with MS. To estimate the extent to which individuals with pain differ in employment status compared with those without pain among MS patients. An extensive systematic review of the scientific literature was performed within the framework of the Cochrane Collaboration to identify studies focusing on the effect of pain on employment in individuals with MS. The following databases were searched: PubMed, EMBASE, PsychInfo, Web of Science, MD Consult and Elsevier, and Science Direct. The methodological quality of studies was assessed using the McMaster Critical Review Form. Ten articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review. Of these studies, five that exhibited clinical, methodological and statistical homogeneity were included in the meta-analysis. The between-groups (pain + versus pain -) pooled random OR of being employed was 0.7 (strong), and was significantly different from unity (95% CI 0.5 to 0.9; P=0.001). The results of the present study indicated that individuals with MS who experience pain were significantly more likely to report a decreased employment rate than individuals with MS who were pain free.

  8. What Are the Predictors of Altered Central Pain Modulation in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Populations? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jacqui; Nijs, Jo; Yeowell, Gillian; Goodwin, Peter Charles

    2017-09-01

    Altered central pain modulation is the predominant pain mechanism in a proportion of chronic musculoskeletal pain disorders and is associated with poor outcomes. Although existing studies predict poor outcomes such as persistent pain and disability, to date there is little consensus on what factors specifically predict altered central pain modulation. To review the existing literature on the predictive factors specifically for altered central pain modulation in musculoskeletal pain populations. This is a systematic review in accordance with supplemented PRISMA guidelines. A systematic search was performed by 2 mutually blinded reviewers. Relevant articles were screened by title and abstract from Medline, Embase, PubMed, CINAHL, and Web of Science electronic databases. Alternative sources were also sought to locate missed potential articles. Eligibility included studies published in English, adults aged 18 to 65, musculoskeletal pain, baseline measurements taken at the pre-morbid or acute stage, > 3-month follow-up time after pain onset, and primary outcome measures specific to altered central pain modulation. Studies were excluded where there were concurrent diseases or they were non-predictive studies. Risk of bias was assessed using the quality in prognostic studies (QUIPS) tool. Study design, demographics, musculoskeletal region, inclusion/exclusion criteria, measurement timelines, predictor and primary outcome measures, and results were extracted. Data were synthesized qualitatively and strength of evidence was scored using the grading of recommendations, assessment, development, and evaluations (GRADE) scoring system. Nine eligible articles were located, in various musculoskeletal populations (whiplash, n = 2; widespread pain, n = 5; temporomandibular disorder, n = 2). Moderate evidence was found for 2 predictive factors of altered central pain modulation: 1) high sensory sensitivity (using genetic testing or quantitative sensory tests), and 2) psychological

  9. Yoga for low back pain: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Posadzki, Paul; Ernst, Edzard

    2011-09-01

    It has been suggested that yoga has a positive effect on low back pain and function. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a treatment option for low back pain. Seven databases were searched from their inception to March 2011. Randomized clinical trials were considered if they investigated yoga in patients with low back pain and if they assessed pain as an outcome measure. The selection of studies, data extraction and validation were performed independently by two reviewers. Seven randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. Their methodological quality ranged between 2 and 4 on the Jadad scale. Five RCTs suggested that yoga leads to a significantly greater reduction in low back pain than usual care, education or conventional therapeutic exercises. Two RCTs showed no between-group differences. It is concluded that yoga has the potential to alleviate low back pain. However, any definitive claims should be treated with caution.

  10. Complementary and alternative medicine for cancer pain: an overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanju; Kong, Xiangying; Yang, Liping; Liu, Rui; Shi, Zhan; Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Hou, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective. Now with more and more published systematic reviews of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) on adult cancer pain, it is necessary to use the methods of overview of systematic review to summarize available evidence, appraise the evidence level, and give suggestions to future research and practice. Methods. A comprehensive search (the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge) was conducted to identify all systematic reviews or meta-analyses of CAM on adult cancer pain. And the evidence levels were evaluated using GRADE approach. Results. 27 systematic reviews were included. Based on available evidence, we could find that psychoeducational interventions, music interventions, acupuncture plus drug therapy, Chinese herbal medicine plus cancer therapy, compound kushen injection, reflexology, lycopene, TENS, qigong, cupping, cannabis, Reiki, homeopathy (Traumeel), and creative arts therapies might have beneficial effects on adult cancer pain. No benefits were found for acupuncture (versus drug therapy or shame acupuncture), and the results were inconsistent for massage therapy, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), and Viscum album L plus cancer treatment. However, the evidence levels for these interventions were low or moderate due to high risk of bias and/or small sample size of primary studies. Conclusion. CAM may be beneficial for alleviating cancer pain, but the evidence levels were found to be low or moderate. Future large and rigor randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm the benefits of CAM on adult cancer pain.

  11. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Cancer Pain: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yanju; Kong, Xiangying; Yang, Liping; Liu, Rui; Shi, Zhan; Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Hou, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective. Now with more and more published systematic reviews of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) on adult cancer pain, it is necessary to use the methods of overview of systematic review to summarize available evidence, appraise the evidence level, and give suggestions to future research and practice. Methods. A comprehensive search (the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Knowledge) was conducted to identify all systematic reviews or meta-analyses of CAM on adult cancer pain. And the evidence levels were evaluated using GRADE approach. Results. 27 systematic reviews were included. Based on available evidence, we could find that psychoeducational interventions, music interventions, acupuncture plus drug therapy, Chinese herbal medicine plus cancer therapy, compound kushen injection, reflexology, lycopene, TENS, qigong, cupping, cannabis, Reiki, homeopathy (Traumeel), and creative arts therapies might have beneficial effects on adult cancer pain. No benefits were found for acupuncture (versus drug therapy or shame acupuncture), and the results were inconsistent for massage therapy, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS), and Viscum album L plus cancer treatment. However, the evidence levels for these interventions were low or moderate due to high risk of bias and/or small sample size of primary studies. Conclusion. CAM may be beneficial for alleviating cancer pain, but the evidence levels were found to be low or moderate. Future large and rigor randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm the benefits of CAM on adult cancer pain. PMID:24817897

  12. Cardiovascular and lifestyle risk factors in lumbar radicular pain or clinically defined sciatica: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shiri, Rahman; Karppinen, Jaro; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Solovieva, Svetlana; Varonen, Helena; Kalso, Eija; Ukkola, Olavi; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2007-12-01

    Lumbar radicular pain is a fairly common health problem, yet its risk factors are far from clear. There are no published systematic reviews on associations between cardiovascular or lifestyle risk factors and lumbar radicular pain or sciatica. The aim of this systematic literature review was to assess associations between these risk factors and lumbar radicular pain or sciatica. We conducted a systematic search of the Medline database for all original articles on lumbar radicular pain or sciatica published until August 2006. Twenty-two papers from 19 studies were included in the review. Overweight or obesity was associated with sciatica in most of the case-control and cohort studies. Some studies showed an increased risk of lumbar radicular pain in smokers with a long smoking history or in those with high levels of physical activity. A few case-control studies showed an association between serum C-reactive protein and sciatica. No consistent associations were found for serum lipids levels or high blood pressure. In summary, the associations of overweight, long smoking history, high physical activity and a high serum C-reactive protein level with lumbar radicular pain or sciatica were substantiated by the present review. However, more prospective studies are needed in order to further clarify these associations and the mechanisms of action.

  13. Pain in people living with HIV/AIDS: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Parker, Romy; Stein, Dan J; Jelsma, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Pain is one of the most commonly reported symptoms in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). However, wide ranges of pain prevalence have been reported, making it difficult to determine the relative impact of pain in PLWHA. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to establish the prevalence and characteristics of pain and to explore pain management in PLWHA. Studies that included cross-sectional data were included in the search, which was conducted in April 2012. Databases searched using a time limit of March 1982 to March 2012 included PubMed, Scopus, Africa-wide: NIPAD, CINAHL, PsychARTICLES, PSYCINFO, PSYCHIATRYONLINE, ScienceDirect and Web of Science. Search terms selected were "pain" and "HIV" or "acquired immune deficiency syndrome." Two reviewers independently screened all citation abstracts for inclusion. Methodological quality was evaluated using a standardized 11-item critical appraisal tool. After full text review, 61 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Prevalence of pain ranged from a point prevalence of 54% (95%CI 51.14-56.09) to 83% (95%CI 76-88) using a three-month recall period. The reported pain was of moderate-to-severe intensity, and pain was reported in one to two and a half different anatomical sites. Moderate levels of pain interference with function were reported. All nine studies reporting on the adequacy of pain management recorded marked under-treatment of pain. The studies reviewed reported that pain commonly presents at multiple pain sites with a range of severity suggesting that there are several differing pathological processes contributing to pain at one time. The interplay of variables associated with pain suggests that the biopsychosocial model of pain is an appropriate paradigm from which to view pain in PLWHA and from which to approach the problem, explore causes and establish effective treatment. The results highlight that pain is common in PLWHA at all stages of the disease. The prevalence rates for pain in PLWHA

  14. Cannabinoids for treatment of chronic non-cancer pain; a systematic review of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Mary E; Campbell, Fiona

    2011-11-01

    Effective therapeutic options for patients living with chronic pain are limited. The pain relieving effect of cannabinoids remains unclear. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining cannabinoids in the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain was conducted according to the PRISMA statement update on the QUORUM guidelines for reporting systematic reviews that evaluate health care interventions. Cannabinoids studied included smoked cannabis, oromucosal extracts of cannabis based medicine, nabilone, dronabinol and a novel THC analogue. Chronic non-cancer pain conditions included neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, and mixed chronic pain. Overall the quality of trials was excellent. Fifteen of the eighteen trials that met the inclusion criteria demonstrated a significant analgesic effect of cannabinoid as compared with placebo and several reported significant improvements in sleep. There were no serious adverse effects. Adverse effects most commonly reported were generally well tolerated, mild to moderate in severity and led to withdrawal from the studies in only a few cases. Overall there is evidence that cannabinoids are safe and modestly effective in neuropathic pain with preliminary evidence of efficacy in fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis. The context of the need for additional treatments for chronic pain is reviewed. Further large studies of longer duration examining specific cannabinoids in homogeneous populations are required.

  15. Cannabinoids for treatment of chronic non-cancer pain; a systematic review of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Mary E; Campbell, Fiona

    2011-01-01

    Effective therapeutic options for patients living with chronic pain are limited. The pain relieving effect of cannabinoids remains unclear. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining cannabinoids in the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain was conducted according to the PRISMA statement update on the QUORUM guidelines for reporting systematic reviews that evaluate health care interventions. Cannabinoids studied included smoked cannabis, oromucosal extracts of cannabis based medicine, nabilone, dronabinol and a novel THC analogue. Chronic non-cancer pain conditions included neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, and mixed chronic pain. Overall the quality of trials was excellent. Fifteen of the eighteen trials that met the inclusion criteria demonstrated a significant analgesic effect of cannabinoid as compared with placebo and several reported significant improvements in sleep. There were no serious adverse effects. Adverse effects most commonly reported were generally well tolerated, mild to moderate in severity and led to withdrawal from the studies in only a few cases. Overall there is evidence that cannabinoids are safe and modestly effective in neuropathic pain with preliminary evidence of efficacy in fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis. The context of the need for additional treatments for chronic pain is reviewed. Further large studies of longer duration examining specific cannabinoids in homogeneous populations are required. Linked Article This article is linked to a themed issue in the British Journal of Pharmacology on Respiratory Pharmacology. To view this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-1 PMID:21426373

  16. Pain in people living with HIV/AIDS: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Romy; Stein, Dan J; Jelsma, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pain is one of the most commonly reported symptoms in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). However, wide ranges of pain prevalence have been reported, making it difficult to determine the relative impact of pain in PLWHA. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to establish the prevalence and characteristics of pain and to explore pain management in PLWHA. Methods Studies that included cross-sectional data were included in the search, which was conducted in April 2012. Databases searched using a time limit of March 1982 to March 2012 included PubMed, Scopus, Africa-wide: NIPAD, CINAHL, PsychARTICLES, PSYCINFO, PSYCHIATRYONLINE, ScienceDirect and Web of Science. Search terms selected were “pain” and “HIV” or “acquired immune deficiency syndrome.” Two reviewers independently screened all citation abstracts for inclusion. Methodological quality was evaluated using a standardized 11-item critical appraisal tool. Results After full text review, 61 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Prevalence of pain ranged from a point prevalence of 54% (95%CI 51.14–56.09) to 83% (95%CI 76–88) using a three-month recall period. The reported pain was of moderate-to-severe intensity, and pain was reported in one to two and a half different anatomical sites. Moderate levels of pain interference with function were reported. All nine studies reporting on the adequacy of pain management recorded marked under-treatment of pain. Discussion The studies reviewed reported that pain commonly presents at multiple pain sites with a range of severity suggesting that there are several differing pathological processes contributing to pain at one time. The interplay of variables associated with pain suggests that the biopsychosocial model of pain is an appropriate paradigm from which to view pain in PLWHA and from which to approach the problem, explore causes and establish effective treatment. Conclusions The results highlight that pain is common in PLWHA

  17. Pain and distress outcomes in infants and children: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, N.C.A.C.; Gaspardo, C.M.; Linhares, M.B.M.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to systematically review the recent literature about pain and distress outcomes in children and critically analyze the methodological quality of the reports. The systematic review was based on the PRISMA statement and performed by selecting articles that are indexed in scientific databases. The methodological quality of reports was examined using STROBE statement, for observational studies, and CONSORT statement, for randomized controlled trials. The PedIMMPACT consensus was used to evaluate the psychometric quality of pain instruments. We analyzed 23 empirical studies, including 14 randomized controlled trials, seven cross-sectional studies, and two studies with cohort designs. Fourteen studies included preschool- and schoolchildren, and nine studies included infants. Regarding studies with infants, pain responses were evaluated by heart rate, crying and behavioral observation scales, and distress was evaluated only by salivary cortisol. Four-handed care and sensorial saturation interventions were used to evaluate efficacy to reduce pain and distress responses. Concerning studies with children, both pain and distress responses were evaluated by self- and hetero-reports, behavioral observation and/or physiological measures. Distraction was effective for reducing pain and distress during burn dressing changes and needle procedures, and healing touch intervention reduced distress and pain in chronic patients. All of the studies scored at least 60% in the methodological quality assessment. The pain outcomes included measures of validity that were classified as well-established by the PedIMMPACT. This systematic review gathers scientific evidence of distress-associated pain in children. Pain and distress were measured as distinct constructs, and their associations were poorly analyzed. PMID:28678920

  18. Pain Experience and Perception in the Obese Subject Systematic Review (Revised Version).

    PubMed

    Torensma, Bart; Thomassen, Irene; van Velzen, Monique; In 't Veld, Bastiaan Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Pain is an integral part of life and has an important protective function. Pain perception has been shown to differ between subjects and changes with gender, race, and culture. In addition, it has been suggested that obesity influences pain perception and that obesity can be a risk factor for increased pain thresholds. The aim of this systematic review was to examine pain thresholds in obese subjects compared to non-obese subjects. The electronic databases of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, and EMBASE were searched using combinations of terms for obese, pain measurement, visual analog scale, quantitative sensory testing, and pain perception. Studies without comparison as well as cross-sectional studies, case series, and case reports were excluded. The search was conducted without restrictions on language or date of publication. From a total of 1818 identified studies, seven studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria, whereby only one study tested the pain threshold difference between obese and non-obese and also before and after body weight loss surgery. Two studies showed a lower pain threshold and four studies a higher pain threshold in obese subjects compared to non-obese subjects. Two studies showed no difference in pain threshold before and after substantial body weight loss due to surgery. Weight loss after surgery was not identified as a factor for higher pain thresholds in obese subjects. In view of the heterogeneity of the studies, the variability of the subjects and differences in methodological quality, a meta-analysis could not be performed. From the available literature, there is a tendency towards higher pain thresholds in obese subjects. Neither substantial weight loss, nor gender, were factors explaining difference in threshold. Future randomized, controlled trials should explore demographic variables that could influence pain perception or pain thresholds in obese individuals, and multimodal pain testing is

  19. A systematic review of smartphone applications for chronic pain available for download in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lorraine S; Dhingra, Lara K

    2014-01-01

    A Smartphone app could be useful in aiding patients in self-monitoring and self-managing their chronic pain-related symptoms. The purpose of this study was to systematically review English-language pain-related Smartphone apps available for download in the United States. During July 2012, official Android, BlackBerry, and iPhone Smartphone app platform stores were searched. "Pain" was entered into the search-bar of each Smartphone app store. Of the pain apps meeting inclusion criteria, the following were retrieved: release date, download cost (US dollars [US $], file size, documentation of a healthcare professional's (HCP) involvement in app development, primary purpose of the app (pain education, pain self-management, or a combination of pain education and self-management), targeted pain-related condition(s), and inclusion of features that addressed four common self-monitoring and/or management strategies. Of the 220 apps meeting inclusion criteria, the majority were available through the iPhone (80.0 percent). The cost for downloading each app ranged from US $0.00 to 89.99; however, the majority of apps were ≤US $4.99. There was no evidence of HCP involvement in the development of the majority of apps (65.0 percent). Chronic, nonspecific pain was the focus of half (50.5 percent) of the apps, followed by back and/or neck pain (25.9 percent). The primary purpose of the apps was categorized as follows: pain education (n = 53, 24.1 percent), pain self-management (n = 137, 62.3 percent), and both pain education and self management (n = 30, 13.6 percent). Overall, most of the pain-related apps included within our review not only lacked evidence of HCP input regarding development but also contained few evidence-based pain management features.

  20. Development of Cardiovascular Indices of Acute Pain Responding in Infants: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Waxman, Jordana A.; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca R.; Tablon, Paula; Schmidt, Louis A.; Pinhasov, Angelina

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cardiovascular indices of pain are pervasive in the hospital setting. However, no prospective research has examined the development of cardiac responses to acutely painful procedures in the first year of life. Objectives. Our main goal was to synthesize existing evidence regarding the development of cardiovascular responses to acutely painful medical procedures over the first year of life in preterm and term born infants. Methods. A systematic search retrieved 6994 articles to review against inclusion criteria. A total of 41 studies were included in the review. Results. In response to acutely painful procedures, most infants had an increase in mean heart rate (HR) that varied in magnitude both across and within gestational and postnatal ages. Research in the area of HR variability has been inconsistent, limiting conclusions. Conclusions. Longitudinal research is needed to further understand the inherent variability of cardiovascular pain responses across and within gestational and postnatal ages and the causes for the variability. PMID:27445630

  1. Therapeutic challenges in cancer pain management: a systematic review of methadone.

    PubMed

    Good, Phillip; Afsharimani, Banafsheh; Movva, Ramya; Haywood, Alison; Khan, Sohil; Hardy, Janet

    2014-09-01

    The proven therapeutic efficacy of methadone in cancer pain is hindered by a challenging pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic profile, considerable interpatient variation, and increasing concern about the complexities of dosing. The objective of this study was to assess the evidence for the use of methadone in cancer pain management. The authors conducted a systematic literature search for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published post the 2007 Cochrane review of methadone in cancer pain. Trial quality was assessed using the Oxford Quality Scoring System and Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Of the 152 abstracts found, 4 were RCTs (272 participants). Two RCTs compared the efficacy and safety of methadone with placebo or active control and two investigated rotation to methadone from other opioids. The studies used different routes of administration, dosing, initiation, and titration of methadone and distinct pain scoring tools and did not address the issues raised by the Cochrane review. Methadone has an important role in the management of cancer pain, with many advantages including low cost, high oral bioavailability, rapid onset of action, once-daily dosing, and postulated benefits in difficult pain control scenarios. However, due to limited research in this area, methadone dosing remains a challenge, with vigilant dose initiation, adjustment, and monitoring required. There is a need for further studies using standardized methodology to evaluate the optimal dosing strategy of methadone, the effect on different types of pain, and the role of pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics in clinical outcomes.

  2. Effectiveness of Manual Physical Therapy for Painful Shoulder Conditions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Camarinos, James; Marinko, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Multiple disease-specific systematic reviews on the effectiveness of physical therapy intervention for shoulder dysfunction have been inconclusive. To date, there have been two systematic reviews that examined manual therapy specifically but both considered effects within diagnoses. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the effectiveness of manual therapy to the glenohumeral joint across all painful shoulder conditions. A search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Randomized Controlled Trials for articles dated 1996 to June 2009 was performed. Inclusion for review were manual therapy performed to the glenohumeral joint only; non-surgical painful shoulder disorders; subjects 18-80 years; and outcomes of range of motion, pain, function, and/or quality of life. Quality assessment was performed using the PEDro scale with subsequent data extraction. Seventeen related articles were found with seven fitting the inclusion criteria. The average PEDro score was 7.86, meeting the cutoff score for high quality. Significant heterogeneity in outcome measures prohibited meta-analysis. Five studies demonstrated benefits utilizing manual therapy for mobility, and four demonstrated a trend towards decreasing pain values. Functional outcomes and quality-of-life measures varied greatly among all studies. Manual therapy appears to increase either active or passive mobility of the shoulder. A trend was found favoring manual therapy for decreasing pain, but the effect on function and quality of life remains inconclusive. Future research utilizing consistent outcome measurements is necessary. PMID:20140151

  3. Nurse-led educational interventions on cancer pain outcomes for oncology outpatients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Liu, X-L; Tan, J-Y; Yu, H-P; Pratt, J; Peng, Y-Q

    2015-06-01

    Cancer pain management is still unsatisfactory, although some effective guidelines exist. Educational interventions are reported to be useful in pain relief for oncology outpatients. The aims of this systematic review were to evaluate the effects of nurse-led educational interventions on improving cancer pain outcomes for oncology patients, and to establish an effective cancer pain protocol for clinical nursing practice in China. A three-step search strategy was utilized. Eight databases were searched using the standards provided by the Joanna Briggs Institute that guided article selection, critical appraisal, data collection and data synthesis. A total of 1093 studies were identified through a literature search. Only six studies complied with the inclusion criteria and were found to be methodologically sound. In general, the included studies indicated positive results pertaining to patient's knowledge and attitudes towards analgesics and cancer pain management and decreased pain intensity. Studies reported minimal effects of intervention on anxiety, depression, satisfaction regarding cancer pain management and patient's quality of life. Educational interventions were reported as effective methods to improve cancer pain outcomes. Analysis of the six included studies demonstrated the overall positive effects of nurse-led educational interventions for improving cancer pain management. The results suggest that an effective cancer pain protocol for improving cancer pain management can be established in China. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  4. Frequency of Non-Odontogenic Pain After Endodontic Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nixdorf, Donald R.; Moana-Filho, Estephan J.; Law, Alan S.; McGuire, Lisa A.; Hodges, James S.; John, Mike T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about ill-defined pain that persists following endodontic procedures, including an estimate of the problem’s magnitude. We conducted a systematic review of prospective studies that reported the frequency of non-odontogenic pain in patients who had undergone endodontic procedures. Methods Non-odontogenic pain was defined as dentoalveolar pain present for 6 months or more after endodontic treatment without evidence of dental pathology. Endodontic procedures reviewed were non-surgical root canal treatment, retreatment, and surgical root canal treatment. Studies were searched in four databases electronically, complemented by hand searching. A summary estimate of non-odontogenic tooth pain frequency was derived using random-effects meta-analysis. Results Of 770 articles retrieved and reviewed, 10 met inclusion criteria and 9 had data on both odontogenic and non-odontogenic causes of pain. A total of 3,343 teeth were included; 1,125 had follow-up information regarding pain status. We identified 48 teeth with non-odontogenic pain and estimated a 3.4% (95% CI: 1.4 to 5.5%) frequency of occurrence. In 9 articles containing data regarding both odontogenic and non-odontogenic causes of tooth pain, 56% (44/78) of all cases were thought to have a non-odontogenic cause. Conclusions Non-odontogenic pain is not an uncommon outcome following root canal therapy and may represent half of all cases of persistent tooth pain. These findings have implications for diagnosis and treatment of painful teeth that were previously root canal treated since therapy directed at the tooth in question would not be expected to resolve non-odontogenic pain. PMID:20728716

  5. A Systematic Review of NMDA Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Rohit; Mehta, Neel; Gungor, Semih; Gulati, Amitabh

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the efficacy of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA) receptor antagonists for neuropathic pain and review literature to determine if specific pharmacologic agents provide adequate neuropathic pain relief. Literature was reviewed on PubMed using a variety of key words for 8 NMDA receptor antagonists. These key words include: "Ketamine and Neuropathy", "Ketamine and Neuropathic Pain", "Methadone and Neuropathy", "Methadone and Neuropathic Pain", "Memantine and Neuropathic pain", "Memantine and Neuropathy", "Amantadine and Neuropathic Pain", "Amantadine and Neuropathy", "Dextromethorphan and Neuropathic Pain", "Dextromethorphan and Neuropathy", "Carbamazepine and Neuropathic Pain", "Carbamazepine and Neuropathy", "Valproic Acid and Neuropathy", "Valproic Acid and Neuropathic Pain", "Phenytoin and Neuropathy" and "Phenytoin and Neuropathic Pain". With the results, the papers were reviewed using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting in Systematic and Meta-Analyses) guideline. A total of 58 randomized controlled trials were reviewed among 8 pharmacologic agents, which are organized by date and alphabetical order. Of the trials for ketamine, 15 showed some benefit for analgesia. Methadone had 3 beneficiary trials, while amantadine and memantine each only had 2 trials showing neuropathic analgesic properties. Dextromethorphan and Valproic Acid both had 4 randomized controlled trials that showed some neuropathic treatment benefit while carbamazepine had over 8 trials showing efficacy. Finally, phenytoin only had 1 trial that showed clinical response in treatment. It is evident there are a variety of NMDA receptor antagonist agents that should be considered for treatment of neuropathic pain. Nevertheless, continued and further investigation of the 8 pharmacologic agents is needed to continue to evaluate their efficacy for treatment of neuropathic pain.

  6. Generic prognostic factors for musculoskeletal pain in primary care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Artus, Majid; Campbell, Paul; Mallen, Christian D; van der Windt, Danielle A W

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To summarise the evidence for generic prognostic factors across a range of musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions. Setting primary care. Methods and outcomes Comprehensive systematic literature review. MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsychINFO and EMBASE were searched for prospective cohort studies, based in primary care (search period—inception to December 2015). Studies were included if they reported on adults consulting with MSK conditions and provided data on associations between baseline characteristics (prognostic factors) and outcome. A prognostic factor was identified as generic when significantly associated with any outcome for 2 or more different MSK conditions. Evidence synthesis focused on consistency of findings and study quality. Results 14 682 citations were identified and 78 studies were included (involving more than 48 000 participants with 18 different outcome domains). 51 studies were on spinal pain/back pain/low back pain, 12 on neck/shoulder/arm pain, 3 on knee pain, 3 on hip pain and 9 on multisite pain/widespread pain. Total quality scores ranged from 5 to 14 (mean 11) and 65 studies (83%) scored 9 or more. Out of a total of 78 different prognostic factors for which data were provided, the following factors are considered to be generic prognostic factors for MSK conditions: widespread pain, high functional disability, somatisation, high pain intensity and presence of previous pain episodes. In addition, consistent evidence was found for use of pain medications not to be associated with outcome, suggesting that this factor is not a generic prognostic factor for MSK conditions. Conclusions This large review provides new evidence for generic prognostic factors for MSK conditions in primary care. Such factors include pain intensity, widespread pain, high functional disability, somatisation and movement restriction. This information can be used to screen and select patients for targeted treatment in clinical research as well as to inform the

  7. Prevalence of neuropathic pain in knee or hip osteoarthritis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    French, Helen P; Smart, Keith M; Doyle, Frank

    2017-08-01

    Discordance between radiographic and pain severity in osteoarthritis (OA) has led researchers to investigate other pain mechanisms, including neuropathic pain. Accurate identification of any neuropathic pain in hip or knee OA is important for appropriate management, but neuropathic pain prevalence is unknown. We aimed to obtain an overall prevalence estimate by systematically reviewing and meta-analysing the prevalence of neuropathic pain in people with hip or knee OA. Observational studies which measured neuropathic pain in people aged 18 years and older with hip or knee OA were considered for inclusion. Electronic databases were searched up to February 2016. Two reviewers independently identified eligible studies and assessed methodological quality. Prevalence estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random effects meta-analytic techniques. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Study samples were from general population, hospital and community settings and all used self-report questionnaires to determine neuropathic pain. The overall prevalence estimate was 23% (95% CI: 10-39%), with considerable heterogeneity (I(2) = 97.9%, p < 0.001). This estimate was largely unchanged with subgroup analyses based on index joint, questionnaire type, setting and consideration of other potential causes of neuropathic pain. However, the estimate for two studies that excluded other potential causes of neuropathic pain was substantially higher (32%, 95% CI: 29-35%). Neuropathic pain prevalence in people with knee or hip OA is considerable at 23%, and may be higher after other potential causes of neuropathic pain are excluded. Concerns regarding the validity of neuropathic pain questionnaires, selection bias, methodological quality and study heterogeneity suggest caution with interpretation of these findings. Prevalence studies using standardised criteria for neuropathic pain are required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality assessment of systematic reviews for surgical treatment of low back pain: an overview.

    PubMed

    Martins, Delio Eulalio; Astur, Nelson; Kanas, Michel; Ferretti, Mário; Lenza, Mario; Wajchenberg, Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    Low back pain is one of the most frequent reasons for medical appointments. Surgical treatment is widely controversial, and new surgical techniques and treatment modalities have been developed within the last decade. Treatment for low back pain should be evidence-based through systematic reviews and meta-analysis. Thus, the quality of these reviews is sometimes put into question as methodological mistakes are frequently seen. The aim of this study was to gather all systematic reviews for the surgical treatment of low back pain and analyze their outcomes, quality, and conclusion. This is an overview of systematic reviews. The outcome measures were the AMSTAR (A MeaSurement Tool to Assess systematic Reviews) score, PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement, and conclusion supported by descriptive statistics. A literature search for systematic reviews containing low back pain surgical treatment was conducted through different medical databases. Two investigators independently assessed all titles and abstracts for inclusion. Studies should have at least one surgical procedure as an intervention. Diagnoses were categorized as lumbar disc herniation, spondylolisthesis, stenosis, facet joint syndrome, and degenerative disc disease. Quality was assessed through the PRISMA and AMSTAR questionnaires. Study quality related to its PRISMA or AMSTAR score percentage was rated as very poor (<30%), poor (30%-50%), fair (50%-70%), good (70%-90%), and excellent (>90%). Articles were considered conclusive if they had a conclusion for their primary outcome supported by descriptive statistical evidence. This study was funded exclusively by the authors' own resources. None of the authors have any potential conflict of interest to declare. Overall, there were 40 systematic reviews included. According to AMSTAR and PRISMA scores, 5% to 7.5% of the systematic reviews were rated as excellent and most of them were rated as a fair review. AMSTAR

  9. Risk Factors for Postoperative Pain Intensity in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Disc Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Löbner, Margrit; Stein, Janine; Konnopka, Alexander; Meisel, Hans J.; Günther, Lutz; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Stengler, Katarina; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Pain relief has been shown to be the most frequently reported goal by patients undergoing lumbar disc surgery. There is a lack of systematic research investigating the course of postsurgical pain intensity and factors associated with postsurgical pain. This systematic review focuses on pain, the most prevalent symptom of a herniated disc as the primary outcome parameter. The aims of this review were (1) to examine how pain intensity changes over time in patients undergoing surgery for a lumbar herniated disc and (2) to identify socio-demographic, medical, occupational and psychological factors associated with pain intensity. Methods Selection criteria were developed and search terms defined. The initial literature search was conducted in April 2015 and involved the following databases: Web of Science, Pubmed, PsycInfo and Pubpsych. The course of pain intensity and associated factors were analysed over the short-term (≤ 3 months after surgery), medium-term (> 3 months and < 12 months after surgery) and long-term (≥ 12 months after surgery). Results From 371 abstracts, 85 full-text articles were reviewed, of which 21 studies were included. Visual analogue scales indicated that surgery helped the majority of patients experience significantly less pain. Recovery from disc surgery mainly occurred within the short-term period and later changes of pain intensity were minor. Postsurgical back and leg pain was predominantly associated with depression and disability. Preliminary positive evidence was found for somatization and mental well-being. Conclusions Patients scheduled for lumbar disc surgery should be selected carefully and need to be treated in a multimodal setting including psychological support. PMID:28107402

  10. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Chronic Intractable Pain: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Dustin G; Pouratian, Nader

    2017-10-01

    Since the advent of neuromodulation, the role and efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for chronic pain has not been carefully scrutinized. To perform a systematic review to evaluate the clinical efficacy, both short- and long-term, of SRS for the treatment of chronic intractable pain. A systematic search in PubMed, Web of Science, and PsycINFO was performed using keywords and controlled vocabulary. The search included peer-reviewed articles reporting clinical outcomes of SRS for chronic pain with a minimum 3-mo follow-up for nonmalignant and 1 mo for malignant pain. Six articles (113 patients) were evaluated on the basis of radiation target (thalamus vs pituitary) and pain etiology (malignant vs nonmalignant). Across studies, at least 35% of patients were reported to have lasting significant pain relief. By cohort, clinical success was achieved in 51% of pituitary SRS, at least 23% of thalamic SRS, 39% of nonmalignant, and at least 33% of malignant pain patients. Adverse events were noted in 21% of patients; the majority related to hormonal deficits from pituitary SRS. Despite decreased utilization, SRS is effective for select patients with chronic pain and is associated with an acceptable complication rate. Pituitary SRS is superior in patients with cancer-related pain (87% success), while thalamic SRS is superior in patients with nonmalignant pain (65% success). Because reports of SRS for pain largely stem from a period before the common use of neuromodulatory and intrathecal therapies, the efficacy in patients who fail such therapies remains unclear and requires further characterization.

  11. Effectiveness of Reirradiation for Painful Bone Metastases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Huisman, Merel; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Wijlemans, Joost W.; Vulpen, Marco van; Linden, Yvette M. van der; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation of painful bone metastases in nonresponders or patients with recurrent pain after initial response is performed in up to 42% of patients initially treated with radiotherapy. Literature on the effect of reirradiation for pain control in those patients is scarce. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we quantify the effectiveness of reirradiation for achieving pain control in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A free text search was performed to identify eligible studies using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Collaboration library electronic databases. After study selection and quality assessment, a pooled estimate was calculated for overall pain response for reirradiation of metastatic bone pain. Results: Our literature search identified 707 titles, of which 10 articles were selected for systematic review and seven entered the meta-analysis. Overall study quality was mediocre. Of the 2,694 patients initially treated for metastatic bone pain, 527 (20%) patients underwent reirradiation. Overall, a pain response after reirradiation was achieved in 58% of patients (pooled overall response rate 0.58, 95% confidence interval = 0.49-0.67). There was a substantial between-study heterogeneity (I{sup 2} = 63.3%, p = 0.01) because of clinical and methodological differences between studies. Conclusions: Reirradiation of painful bone metastases is effective in terms of pain relief for a small majority of patients; approximately 40% of patients do not benefit from reirradiation. Although the validity of results is limited, this meta-analysis provides a comprehensive overview and the most quantitative estimate of reirradiation effectiveness to date.

  12. Analysis of scapular muscle EMG activity in patients with idiopathic neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Castelein, Birgit; Cools, Ann; Bostyn, Emma; Delemarre, Jolien; Lemahieu, Trees; Cagnie, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    It is proposed that altered scapular muscle function can contribute to abnormal loading of the cervical spine. However, it is not clear if patients with idiopathic neck pain show altered activity of the scapular muscles. The aim of this paper was to systematically review the literature regarding the differences or similarities in scapular muscle activity, measured by electromyography ( = EMG), between patients with chronic idiopathic neck pain compared to pain-free controls. Case-control (neck pain/healthy) studies investigating scapular muscle EMG activity (amplitude, timing and fatigue parameters) were searched in Pubmed and Web of Science. 25 articles were included in the systematic review. During rest and activities below shoulder height, no clear differences in mean Upper Trapezius ( = UT) EMG activity exist between patients with idiopathic neck pain and a healthy control group. During overhead activities, no conclusion for scapular EMG amplitude can be drawn as a large variation of results were reported. Adaptation strategies during overhead tasks are not the same between studies. Only one study investigated timing of the scapular muscles and found a delayed onset and shorter duration of the SA during elevation in patients with idiopathic neck pain. For scapular muscle fatigue, no definite conclusions can be made as a wide variation and conflicting results are reported. Further high quality EMG research on scapular muscles (broader than the UT) is necessary to understand/draw conclusions on how scapular muscles react in the presence of idiopathic neck pain.

  13. Symptoms of depression as a prognostic factor for low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Marina B; Ferreira, Manuela L; Refshauge, Kathryn; Maher, Christopher G; Ordoñana, Juan R; Andrade, Tude B; Tsathas, Alexandros; Ferreira, Paulo H

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that depression plays an important role in the course of low back pain; however, there is considerable uncertainty on its predictive value. This systematic review aims to investigate the effect of depression on the course of acute and subacute low back pain. This is a systematic review. We searched the following databases using optimized search strategies: AMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, Health & Society Database, LILACS, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Scopus, and Web of Science. We only included prospective studies that investigated a cohort of participants with acute or subacute non-specific low back pain (pain of less than 12 weeks' duration). The prognostic factor of interest was depression or symptoms of depression assessed at baseline. The outcomes of interest included pain intensity, chronicity (non-recovery from low back pain), disability, return to work, health-related quality of life, and overall patient satisfaction. Two independent reviewers selected the studies, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the studies that were included. This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors. The authors declare no conflicts of interest-associated biases. Seventeen articles reporting 13 cohort studies were included in this review. There was considerable variability between studies in terms of the method of assessment of depression and low back pain, statistical methods, and follow-up length, which precluded the quantitative synthesis of the results. Definition of outcomes varied across studies, but overall they could be divided into work-related outcome measures, followed by disability, pain, self-perceived recovery, and mixed outcomes. Eleven out of 17 articles (or 8 out of 13 cohorts) reported that symptoms of depression at baseline are related to worse low back pain outcomes (measured in various ways) at follow-up, and the effect sizes (odds ratio [OR]) ranged from 1

  14. Postoperative Pain Control Following Craniotomy: A Systematic Review of Recent Clinical Literature.

    PubMed

    Tsaousi, Georgia G; Logan, Simon W; Bilotta, Federico

    2016-12-20

    Pain intensity after craniotomy is considered to be moderate to severe during the first 2 postoperative days. The ideal pain treatment to facilitate a rapid postoperative recovery and optimize outcome is unknown. This systematic review aims to report current clinical evidence related to pharmacological and adjuvant analgesic modalities for postcraniotomy pain control. Systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (January 2011 to April 2016). Original research involving the use of any analgesic drug, analgesic method, or nonpharmacological intervention for postcraniotomy pain relief, as assessed by pain scores up to 48 hours postoperatively, supplemental analgesic requirements, or occurence of adverse events. Nineteen RCTs enrolling a total of 1,805 patients were included. Most of the retrieved studies were of moderate-to-good methodological quality. Systemic pharmacological intervention was assessed in 14 RCTs. Opioids (5 RCTs) provided superior pain relief to other analgesics with no significant side effects, but the quality of studies was low. Diclofenac (3 RCTs) presented adequate craniotomy pain control without any adverse effects, while the use of parecoxib is not supported. Dexmedetomidine (3 RCTs) provided adequate transitional analgesia, but further research is needed. Data on the analgesic efficacy of gabapentin, pregabalin, and intravenous lidocaine are very limited (1 RCT for each). Scalp infiltration/block (3 RCTs) provided adequate analgesia in the early postoperative period, while more studies are needed to verify the analgesic benefit obtained from nonpharmacological interventions, such as multipoint electro-acupuncture, in craniotomy surgery (2 RCTs). No definite recommendations can be made based on this systematic review of pharamacological interventions following craniotomy due to significant divergence in the methodology of available studies. Limited evidence on scalp

  15. Effect of Corticosteroids on Pain Relief Following Root Canal Treatment: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Foad; Parirokh, Masoud; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Abbott, Paul V

    2017-01-01

    Post-operative pain and flare-up may occur in up to 58% of patients following root canal treatment. The aim was to conduct a systematic review and a possible meta-analysis to determine the effect of glucocorticosteroid (GCS) on pain following root canal treatment. Scopus, MEDLINE and CENTRAL databases were searched up to 30(th) January 2017 with broad key words. In addition, the reference lists in eligible papers and text books were hand-searched. Assessment of the eligibility of papers and data extraction were performed by two independent reviewers. Of 9891 articles, 18 were recruited as eligible papers. Most of these papers showed pain reducing effect of GCS on post-endodontic pain. Because of wide heterogeneity among the recruited papers, it was not possible to perform meta-analysis. Based on the results of this systematic review, there is a vast heterogeneity amongst articles regarding the use of GCS and their effect on post-operative pain after endodontic treatment. Further investigations with similar methods and materials are needed before meta-analysis on the effect of GCS on post-operative pain following root canal treatment can be performed.

  16. Early changes in somatosensory function in spinal pain: protocol for a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Anna; Dean, Catherine M; Hush, Julia M

    2013-10-02

    Back and neck pain are common conditions that have a high burden of disease. Changes in somatosensory function in the periphery, the spinal cord and the brain have been well documented at the time when these conditions have become chronic. It is unknown, however, how early these changes occur, what the timecourse is of sensory dysfunction and what the specific nature of these changes are in the first 12 weeks after onset of pain. In this paper, we describe the protocol for a systematic review of the literature on somatosensory dysfunction in the first 12 weeks after pain onset. We will conduct a comprehensive search for articles indexed in the databases Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Ovid PsycINFO and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial (CENTRAL) from their inception to August 2013 that report on any aspect of somatosensory function in acute or subacute neck or back pain. Two independent reviewers will screen studies for eligibility, assess risk of bias and extract relevant data. Results will be tabulated and a narrative synthesis of the results conducted. Currently, there is a gap in our knowledge about the timing of somatosensory changes in back and neck pain. The systematic review outlined in this protocol aims to address this knowledge gap and inform developments in diagnostic tools and pain mechanism-based treatments. Our protocol has been registered on PROSPERO, CRD42013005113.

  17. Early changes in somatosensory function in spinal pain: protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Back and neck pain are common conditions that have a high burden of disease. Changes in somatosensory function in the periphery, the spinal cord and the brain have been well documented at the time when these conditions have become chronic. It is unknown, however, how early these changes occur, what the timecourse is of sensory dysfunction and what the specific nature of these changes are in the first 12 weeks after onset of pain. In this paper, we describe the protocol for a systematic review of the literature on somatosensory dysfunction in the first 12 weeks after pain onset. Methods and design We will conduct a comprehensive search for articles indexed in the databases Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Ovid PsycINFO and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial (CENTRAL) from their inception to August 2013 that report on any aspect of somatosensory function in acute or subacute neck or back pain. Two independent reviewers will screen studies for eligibility, assess risk of bias and extract relevant data. Results will be tabulated and a narrative synthesis of the results conducted. Discussion Currently, there is a gap in our knowledge about the timing of somatosensory changes in back and neck pain. The systematic review outlined in this protocol aims to address this knowledge gap and inform developments in diagnostic tools and pain mechanism-based treatments. Trial Registration Our protocol has been registered on PROSPERO, CRD42013005113. PMID:24088219

  18. Measurement properties of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS) in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Green, Andrew; Liles, Clive; Rushton, Alison; Kyte, Derek G

    2014-12-01

    This systematic review investigated the measurement properties of disease-specific patient-reported outcome measures used in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. Two independent reviewers conducted a systematic search of key databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINHAL+ and the Cochrane Library from inception to August 2013) to identify relevant studies. A third reviewer mediated in the event of disagreement. Methodological quality was evaluated using the validated COSMIN (Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) tool. Data synthesis across studies determined the level of evidence for each patient-reported outcome measure. The search strategy returned 2177 citations. Following the eligibility review phase, seven studies, evaluating twelve different patient-reported outcome measures, met inclusion criteria. A 'moderate' level of evidence supported the structural validity of several measures: the Flandry Questionnaire, Anterior Knee Pain Scale, Functional Index Questionnaire, Eng and Pierrynowski Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales for 'usual' and 'worst' pain. In addition, there was a 'Limited' level of evidence supporting the test-retest reliability and validity (cross-cultural, hypothesis testing) of the Persian version of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale. Other measurement properties were evaluated with poor methodological quality, and many properties were not evaluated in any of the included papers. Current disease-specific outcome measures for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome require further investigation. Future studies should evaluate all important measurement properties, utilising an appropriate framework such as COSMIN to guide study design, to facilitate optimal methodological quality.

  19. Effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in treating spinal (back and neck) pain: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Edith Meszaros; Jeannot, Emilien; Trewhela, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Considerable amount of money spent in health care is used for treatments of lifestyle related, chronic health conditions, which come from behaviors that contribute to morbidity and mortality of the population. Back and neck pain are two of the most common musculoskeletal problems in modern society that have significant cost in health care. Yoga, as a branch of complementary alternative medicine, has emerged and is showing to be an effective treatment against nonspecific spinal pain. Recent studies have shown positive outcome of yoga in general on reducing pain and functional disability of the spine. The objective of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the existing research within Iyengar yoga method and its effectiveness on relieving back and neck pain (defined as spinal pain). Database research form the following sources (Cochrane library, NCBI PubMed, the Clinical Trial Registry of the Indian Council of Medical Research, Google Scholar, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO) demonstrated inclusion and exclusion criteria that selected only Iyengar yoga interventions, which in turn, identified six randomized control trials dedicated to compare the effectiveness of yoga for back and neck pain versus other care. The difference between the groups on the postintervention pain or functional disability intensity assessment was, in all six studies, favoring the yoga group, which projected a decrease in back and neck pain. Overall six studies with 570 patients showed, that Iyengar yoga is an effective means for both back and neck pain in comparison to control groups. This systematic review found strong evidence for short-term effectiveness, but little evidence for long-term effectiveness of yoga for chronic spine pain in the patient-centered outcomes. PMID:25558128

  20. Effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in treating spinal (back and neck) pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Crow, Edith Meszaros; Jeannot, Emilien; Trewhela, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Considerable amount of money spent in health care is used for treatments of lifestyle related, chronic health conditions, which come from behaviors that contribute to morbidity and mortality of the population. Back and neck pain are two of the most common musculoskeletal problems in modern society that have significant cost in health care. Yoga, as a branch of complementary alternative medicine, has emerged and is showing to be an effective treatment against nonspecific spinal pain. Recent studies have shown positive outcome of yoga in general on reducing pain and functional disability of the spine. The objective of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the existing research within Iyengar yoga method and its effectiveness on relieving back and neck pain (defined as spinal pain). Database research form the following sources (Cochrane library, NCBI PubMed, the Clinical Trial Registry of the Indian Council of Medical Research, Google Scholar, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychINFO) demonstrated inclusion and exclusion criteria that selected only Iyengar yoga interventions, which in turn, identified six randomized control trials dedicated to compare the effectiveness of yoga for back and neck pain versus other care. The difference between the groups on the postintervention pain or functional disability intensity assessment was, in all six studies, favoring the yoga group, which projected a decrease in back and neck pain. Overall six studies with 570 patients showed, that Iyengar yoga is an effective means for both back and neck pain in comparison to control groups. This systematic review found strong evidence for short-term effectiveness, but little evidence for long-term effectiveness of yoga for chronic spine pain in the patient-centered outcomes.

  1. Neuropathic pain in the general population: a systematic review of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    van Hecke, O; Austin, Sophie K; Khan, Rafi A; Smith, B H; Torrance, N

    2014-04-01

    Most patients with neuropathic pain symptoms present and are managed in primary care, with only a minority being referred for specialist clinical assessment and diagnoses. Previous reviews have focused mainly on specific neuropathic pain conditions based in specialist settings. This is the first systematic review of epidemiological studies of neuropathic pain in the general population. Electronic databases were searched from January 1966 to December 2012, and studies were included where the main focus was on neuropathic pain prevalence and/or incidence, either as part of a specific neuropathic pain-related condition or as a global entity in the general population. We excluded studies in which data were extracted from pain or other specialist clinics or focusing on specific population subgroups. Twenty-one articles were identified and underwent quality assessment and data extraction. Included studies differed in 3 main ways: method of data retrieval, case ascertainment tool used, and presentation of prevalence/incidence rates. This heterogeneity precluded any meta-analysis. We categorised comparable incidence and prevalence rates into 2 main subgroups: (1) chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics (range 3-17%), and (2) neuropathic pain associated with a specific condition, including postherpetic neuralgia (3.9-42.0/100,000 person-years [PY]), trigeminal neuralgia (12.6-28.9/100,000 PY), painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (15.3-72.3/100,000 PY), glossopharyngeal neuralgia (0.2-0.4/100,000 PY). These differences highlight the importance of a standardised approach for identifying neuropathic pain in future epidemiological studies. A best estimate of population prevalence of pain with neuropathic characteristics is likely to lie between 6.9% and 10%. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Current knowledge of pain after breast cancer treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Marese A; Culleton-Quinn, Elizabeth; Stokes, Emma

    2013-06-01

    Pain and functional compromise are reported as effects that can be expected after breast cancer treatment. The reported prevalence of pain after breast cancer treatment varies widely, ranging from 13% (n = 74) to 93% (n = 590). To date, pain after breast cancer treatment has not been the focus of a systematic review. The aim of this study was to present what is known about the prevalence, location, intensity, nature, and temporal factors of the pain experienced by patients after breast cancer treatment. Searches of the Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, Amed, and Cinhal databases identified 69 articles on the topic. Studies were methodologically assessed by two independent reviewers using a checklist of 18 criteria. Twenty-six of the articles were identified as meeting inclusion criteria. Findings related to research conducted on 15 patient cohorts. Pain is confirmed as a prevalent treatment-related symptom experienced by 13%-51% of women in several different anatomic locations. The onset is variable, ranging from immediate to 24 months, highlighting the need to assess for pain at every evaluation interval. Little is known about the nature of the pain, but descriptors used (tenderness, soreness) suggest that the type of pain may not be confined to neuropathic pain. Reported average numeric intensity is low, but no study measured the impact of pain on function. Incidence of posttreatment pain has yet to be established. Further exploration of the nature, temporal factors, and impact that the pain experienced after treatment has on function, activity, and participation is needed to guide intervention and test its efficacy.

  3. Interventions to improve the management of pain in emergency departments: systematic review and narrative synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sampson, F C; Goodacre, S W; O'Cathain, A

    2014-10-01

    Pain management in emergency departments (ED) is often inadequate despite the availability of effective analgesia, with many patients receiving insufficient and untimely analgesia. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify interventions that could improve pain management in the ED. We systematically searched seven databases for studies reporting pain management outcomes after intervention to change professional practice to improve pain management in the ED, compared with pain management before or without intervention. Data was synthesised using principles of narrative synthesis. We identified 43 relevant studies, including 40 uncontrolled before-and-after studies. Interventions included implementation of guidelines and protocols, educational interventions, pain scoring tools and changes in nursing roles, with many multifaceted interventions incorporating two or more of these elements. Interventions aimed to improve assessment and documentation of pain, knowledge and awareness of pain management and reduce time to analgesia. Due to the high probability of bias in study design and significant variation between studies, it was not possible to estimate the overall effectiveness of interventions, or identify which had the greatest impact. Intervention to improve pain management was reported to have some positive impact in most studies, but these findings may be explained by limitations in study design. Many interventions reported improvements in pain management, but current evidence is insufficient to recommend any for widespread adoption. In order to improve pain management we need to understand more about the theory underlying interventions, the context in which interventions work, and develop interventions based on this stronger theoretical understanding. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. The Effects of Qigong for Adults with Chronic Pain: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhenggang; Guan, Zhen; Fan, Yuan; Liu, Chuan; Yang, Kehu; Ma, Bin; Wu, Bei

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of qigong as a treatment for chronic pain. Five electronic databases were searched from their date of establishment until July 2014. The review included 10 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that compared the impacts of qigong on chronic pain with waiting list or placebo or general care. Random effect models and standard mean differences were used to present pain scores. A total of 10 RCTs met inclusion criteria. There was a statistically significant difference on reducing chronic pain between internal qigong and control (SMD: -1.23 95% CI= -2.23, -0.24p = 0.02), external qigong and general care (SMD: -1.53 95% CI= -2.15, -0.91p < 0.05), external qigong and placebo (SMD: -0.51 95% CI = 0.95, -0.06p = 0.03), and internal qigong for chronic neck pain at 6 months (SMD: -1.00 95% CI= -1.94, -0.06p = 0.04). The differences between external qigong and control, external qigong and waiting list, internal qigong and waiting list, and external for premenstrual syndromes were not significant. This study showed that internal qigong generated benefits on treating some chronic pain with significant differences. External qigong showed nonsignificant differences in treating chronic pain. Higher quality randomized clinical trials with scientific rigor are needed to establish the effectiveness of qigong in reducing chronic pain.

  5. Patients’ experiences of chronic non-malignant musculoskeletal pain: a qualitative systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Toye, Francine; Seers, Kate; Allcock, Nick; Briggs, Michelle; Carr, Eloise; Andrews, JoyAnn; Barker, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain is one of the most predominant types of pain and accounts for a large portion of the primary care workload. Aim To systematically review and integrate the findings of qualitative research to increase understanding of patients’ experiences of chronic non-malignant MSK pain. Design and setting Synthesis of qualitative research using meta-ethnography using six electronic databases up until February 2012 (Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Psychinfo, Amed and HMIC). Method Databases were searched from their inception until February 2012, supplemented by hand-searching contents lists of specific journals for 2001–2011 and citation tracking. Full published reports of qualitative studies exploring adults’ own experience of chronic non-malignant MSK pain were eligible for inclusion. Results Out of 24 992 titles, 676 abstracts, and 321 full texts were screened, 77 papers reporting 60 individual studies were included. A new concept of pain as an adversarial struggle emerged. This adversarial struggle was to: 1) affirm self; 2) reconstruct self in time; 3) construct an explanation for suffering; 4) negotiate the healthcare system; and 5) prove legitimacy. However, despite this struggle there is also a sense for some patients of 6) moving forward alongside pain. Conclusions This review provides a theoretical underpinning for improving patient experience and facilitating a therapeutic collaborative partnership. A conceptual model is presented, which offers opportunities for improvement by involving patients, showing them their pain is understood, and forming the basis to help patients move forward alongside their pain. PMID:24351499

  6. The effectiveness of cannabinoids in the management of chronic nonmalignant neuropathic pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Boychuk, Darrell G; Goddard, Greg; Mauro, Giovanni; Orellana, Maria F

    2015-01-01

    To carry out a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of cannabis extracts and cannabinoids in the management of chronic nonmalignant neuropathic pain. Electronic database searches were performed using Medline, PubMed, Embase, all evidence-based medicine reviews, and Web of Science, through communication with the Canadian Consortium for the Investigation of Cannabinoids (CCIC), and by searching printed indices from 1950. Terms used were marijuana, marihuana, cannabis, cannabinoids, nabilone, delta- 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, ajulemic acid, dronabinol, pain, chronic, disease, and neuropathic. Randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) involving cannabis and cannabinoids for the treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain were selected. Outcomes considered were reduction in pain intensity and adverse events. Of the 24 studies that examined chronic neuropathic pain, 11 studies were excluded. The 13 included studies were rated using the Jadad Scale to measure bias in pain research. Evaluation of these studies suggested that cannabinoids may provide effective analgesia in chronic neuropathic pain conditions that are refractory to other treatments. Cannabis-based medicinal extracts used in different populations of chronic nonmalignant neuropathic pain patients may provide effective analgesia in conditions that are refractory to other treatments. Further high-quality studies are needed to assess the impact of the duration of the treatment as well as the best form of drug delivery.

  7. Effects of pilates on patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ting; Hung, Wei-Ching; Hung, Jia-Ling; Wu, Pei-Shan; Liaw, Li-Jin; Chang, Jia-Hao

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the effects of Pilates on patients with chronic low back pain through a systematic review of high-quality articles on randomized controlled trials. [Subjects and Methods] Keywords and synonyms for "Pilates" and "Chronic low back pain" were used in database searches. The databases included PubMed, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Medline, and the Cochrane Library. Articles involving randomized controlled trials with higher than 5 points on the PEDro scale were reviewed for suitability and inclusion. The methodological quality of the included randomized controlled trials was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Relevant information was extracted by 3 reviewers. [Results] Eight randomized controlled trial articles were included. Patients with chronic low back pain showed statistically significant improvement in pain relief and functional ability compared to patients who only performed usual or routine health care. However, other forms of exercise were similar to Pilates in the improvement of pain relief and functional capacity. [Conclusion] In patients with chronic low back pain, Pilates showed significant improvement in pain relief and functional enhancement. Other exercises showed effects similar to those of Pilates, if waist or torso movement was included and the exercises were performed for 20 cumulative hours.

  8. Is Traumatic and Non-Traumatic Neck Pain Associated with Brain Alterations? - A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    DePauw, Robby; Coppieters, Iris; Meeus, Mira; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Danneels, Lieven; Cagnie, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    Chronic neck pain affects 50% - 85% of people who have experienced an acute episode. This transition and the persistence of chronic complaints are believed to be mediated by brain alterations among different central mechanisms. This study aimed to systematically review and critically appraise the current existing evidence regarding structural and functional brain alterations in patients with whiplash associated disorders (WAD) and idiopathic neck pain (INP). Additionally, associations between brain alterations and clinical symptoms reported in neck pain patients were evaluated. Systematic review. The present systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases were searched. First, the obtained articles were screened based on title and abstract. Secondly, the screening was based on the full text. Risk of bias in included studies was investigated. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. Alterations in brain morphology and function, including perfusion, neurotransmission, and blood oxygenation level dependent-signal, were demonstrated in chronic neck pain patients. There is some to moderate evidence for both structural and functional brain alterations in patients with chronic neck pain. In contrast, no evidence for structural brain alterations in acute neck pain patients was found. Only 12 articles were included, which allows only cautious conclusions to be drawn. Brain alterations were observed in both patients with chronic WAD and chronic INP. Furthermore, more evidence exists for brain alterations in chronic WAD, and different underlying mechanisms might be present in both pathologies. In addition, pain and disability were correlated with the observed brain alterations. Accordingly, morphological and functional brain alterations should be further investigated in patients with chronic WAD and chronic INP with newer and more sensitive techniques, and associative clinical measurements seem indispensable

  9. What is the effect of sensory discrimination training on chronic low back pain? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kälin, Samuel; Rausch-Osthoff, Anne-Kathrin; Bauer, Christoph Michael

    2016-04-02

    Sensory discrimination training (SDT) for people with chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a novel approach based on theories of the cortical reorganization of the neural system. SDT aims to reverse cortical reorganization, which is observed in chronic pain patients. SDT is still a developing therapeutic approach and its effects have not been systematically reviewed. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate if SDT decreases pain and improves function in people with CLBP. A systematic review was performed on the available literature to evaluate the effects of SDT. Randomised controlled trials compared the effectiveness of SDT on pain and function in people with CLBP with the effectiveness of other physiotherapy interventions, no treatment, or sham therapy. The methodological quality of the included studies and the clinical relevance of reported treatment effects were investigated. The original search revealed 42 records of which 6 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies showed that SDT caused statistically significant improvements in pain and function, but only two studies reported clinically relevant improvements. The applied SDT varied considerably with regard to dosage and content. The methodological quality of the included studies also varied, which hampered the comparability of results. Although SDT seems to improve pain and function in people with CLBP, study limitations render firm conclusions unsafe. Future studies should pay closer attention to power and sample selection as well as to the content and dosage of the SDT intervention. We recommend a large, well-powered, prospective randomized control study that uses a standardized SDT approach to address the hypothesis that SDT causes clinically relevant improvements in pain and function.

  10. Nonpharmacologic Intervention on the Prevention of Pain and Anxiety During Pediatric Dental Care: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Goettems, Marília Leão; Zborowski, Eduardo Jung; Costa, Francine Dos Santos; Costa, Vanessa Polina Pereira; Torriani, Dione Dias

    2017-03-01

    Nonpharmacologic interventions may be used to reduce fear and anxiety during dental treatment. To systematically review trials on the effect of nonpharmacologic interventions in behavior, anxiety, and pain perception in children undergoing dental treatment. Medline, Scopus, Web of Science and CINAHL, Google Scholar, and studies' reference lists. Studies performed with children and adolescents that evaluated the effect of interventions on children's behavior, anxiety, and pain perception during dental treatment were included. Independent quality assessment of the studies was carried out following the classification categories present on the Cochrane Handbook for Development of Systematic Reviews of Intervention. Twenty-two articles, reporting 21 studies, were selected. Most studies tested distraction techniques. Eight studies presented bias and results were not considered. The remaining 13 studies had control groups with inactive controls, and 4 also included a variation of the intervention. Of the 4 studies assessing behavior, 3 found difference between intervention and control. Anxiety was evaluated by 10 studies: 4 found differences between intervention and control and 2 found differences between interventions. Five studies investigated pain perception: 3 found difference comparing active versus inactive interventions. In 1 of the 3, variations in the intervention decreased pain perception. More research is needed to know whether the techniques are effective for improving behavior and reducing children's pain and distress during dental treatment. However, the majority of the techniques improved child's behavior, anxiety, and pain perception. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy and safety of repeated oral sucrose for repeated procedural pain in neonates: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haixia; Gao, Honglian; Xu, Guihua; Li, Mei; Du, Shizheng; Li, Fang; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Danwen

    2016-10-01

    Although sucrose is most extensively examined for its analgesia effect on a single procedural pain, neonates in neonatal intensive care units can be exposed to numerous painful procedures every day requiring multiple doses of sucrose. Some experiments have been performed to examine the efficacy and safety of repeated sucrose administration for repeated procedural pain; however, a systematic review of this topic has not yet been carried out. To identify and assess the evidence demonstrating the efficacy and safety of repeated sucrose for repeated procedural pain in neonates. A systematic review was conducted using the Cochrane methodology. Pubmed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), CBMdisc, CNKI, VIP, and Wanfang databases were searched through December 2015. All related abstracts were reviewed and the full texts of relevant articles were studied. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Risk of bias was assessed for RCTs using quality critical appraisal criteria recommended by Cochrane Handbook. A standardised data form was used to extract information. Eight RCTs met our inclusion criteria. Different study designs were used in the included RCTs, which did not allow us to carry out a meta-analysis. The findings from this review indicated that repeated sucrose was effective in reducing both behavioral pain response and composite pain scores during repeated procedural pain. However, as for physiological pain response, one trial found less variability in physiological pain response for term neonates in the sucrose group than the sterile water group, while two trials demonstrated repeated sucrose was inefficacious for preterm neonates. Regarding the clinical outcomes, no study reported adverse effects related to the repeated sucrose administration. Regarding the neurobehavioral development, two trials reported repeated sucrose for repeated procedural pain would not lead to poor neurologic

  12. The effect of spinal manipulative therapy on experimentally induced pain: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) can reduce pain, the mechanisms involved are not well established. There is a need to review the scientific literature to establish the evidence-base for the reduction of pain following SMT. Objectives To determine if SMT can reduce experimentally induced pain, and if so, if the effect is i) only at the level of the treated spinal segment, ii) broader but in the same general region as SMT is performed, or iii) systemic. Design A systematic critical literature review. Methods A systematic search was performed for experimental studies on healthy volunteers and people without chronic syndromes, in which the immediate effect of SMT was tested. Articles selected were reviewed blindly by two authors. A summary quality score was calculated to indicate level of manuscript quality. Outcome was considered positive if the pain-reducing effect was statistically significant. Separate evidence tables were constructed with information relevant to each research question. Results were interpreted taking into account their manuscript quality. Results Twenty-two articles were included, describing 43 experiments, primarily on pain produced by pressure (n = 27) or temperature (n = 9). Their quality was generally moderate. A hypoalgesic effect was shown in 19/27 experiments on pressure pain, produced by pressure in 3/9 on pain produced by temperature and in 6/7 tests on pain induced by other measures. Second pain provoked by temperature seems to respond to SMT but not first pain. Most studies revealed a local or regional hypoalgesic effect whereas a systematic effect was unclear. Manipulation of a “restricted motion segment” (“manipulable lesion”) seemed not to be essential to analgesia. In relation to outcome, there was no discernible difference between studies with higher vs. lower quality scores. Conclusions These results indicate that SMT has a direct local/regional hypoalgesic effect on

  13. Well-being outcomes of chiropractic intervention for lower back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Lynne; Sibbritt, David; Bolton, Philip; van Rotterdam, Joan; Villadsen, Inger

    2013-02-01

    The usefulness of chiropractic for treatment of low back pain is a contentious issue. Chiropractors advocate holism and general well-being as a key principle on which they base their clinical practice, yet the quality of life, lifestyle, health and economic impacts of chiropractic intervention for back pain in adults have rarely been investigated. This article provides an overview of chiropractic principles and practices, together with the results of a systematic review of peer-reviewed publications between 2000 and 2010 retrieved from MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. This review sought to determine the benefits of chiropractic treatment and care to well-being, and to what extent chiropractic treatment and care improve quality of life. Of 1,165 articles, 12 articles were retained, representing six studies (four randomised controlled trial, two observational) of varying quality. There was a high degree of inconsistency and lack of standardisation in measurement instruments and outcome measures. Three studies reported reduced use of other/extra treatments as a positive outcome; two studies reported a positive effect of chiropractic intervention on pain, and two studies reported a positive effect on disability. The six studies reviewed concentrated on the impact of chiropractic care on physical health and disability, rather than the wider holistic view which was the focus of this study. It is difficult, therefore, to defend any conclusion about the impact of chiropractic intervention on the quality of life, lifestyle, health and economic impact on chiropractic patients presenting with back pain.

  14. Pain Management of Pediatric Musculoskeletal Injury in the Emergency Department: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, Evelyne D.; Gouin, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pain management for children with musculoskeletal injuries is suboptimal and, in the absence of clear evidence-based guidelines, varies significantly. Objective. To systematically review the most effective pain management for children presenting to the emergency department with musculoskeletal injuries. Methods. Electronic databases were searched systematically for randomized controlled trials of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for children aged 0–18 years, with musculoskeletal injury, in the emergency department. The primary outcome was the risk ratio for successful reduction in pain scores. Results. Of 34 studies reviewed, 8 met inclusion criteria and provided data on 1169 children from 3 to 18 years old. Analgesics used greatly varied, making comparisons difficult. Only two studies compared the same analgesics with similar routes of administration. Two serious adverse events occurred without fatalities. All studies showed similar pain reduction between groups except one study that favoured ibuprofen when compared to acetaminophen. Conclusions. Due to heterogeneity of medications and routes of administration in the articles reviewed, an optimal analgesic cannot be recommended for all pain categories. Larger trials are required for further evaluation of analgesics, especially trials combining a nonopioid with an opioid agent or with a nonpharmacological intervention. PMID:27445614

  15. Prognosis of acute idiopathic neck pain is poor: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hush, Julia M; Lin, C Christine; Michaleff, Zoe A; Verhagen, Arianne; Refshauge, Kathryn M

    2011-05-01

    To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on the prognosis of acute idiopathic neck pain and disability. EMBASE, CINAHL, Medline, AMED, PEDro, and CENTRAL were searched from inception to July 2009, limited to human studies. Reference lists of relevant systematic reviews were searched by hand. Search terms included: neck pain, prognosis, inception, cohort, longitudinal, observational, or prospective study and randomized controlled trial. Eligible studies were longitudinal cohort studies and randomized controlled trials with a no treatment or minimal treatment arm that recruited an inception cohort of acute idiopathic neck pain and reported pain or disability outcomes. Eligibility was determined by 2 authors independently. Seven of 20,085 references were included. Pain and disability data were extracted independently by 2 authors. Risk of bias was assessed independently by 2 authors. Statistical pooling showed a weighted mean pain score (0-100) of 64 (95% confidence interval [CI], 61-67) at onset and 35 (95% CI, 32-38) at 6.5 weeks. At 12 months, neck pain severity remained high at 42 (95% CI, 39-45). Disability reduced from a pooled weighted mean score (0-100) at onset of 30 (95% CI, 28-32) to 17 (95% CI, 15-19) by 6.5 weeks, without further improvement at 12 months. Studies varied in length of follow-up, design, and sample size. This review provides Level I evidence that the prognosis of acute idiopathic neck pain is worse than currently recognized. This evidence can guide primary care clinicians when providing prognostic information to patients. Further research to identify prognostic factors and long-term outcomes from inception cohorts would be valuable. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of exergames on musculoskeletal pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Collado-Mateo, D; Merellano-Navarro, E; Olivares, P R; García-Rubio, J; Gusi, N

    2017-04-27

    The main objective was to systematically review the scientific literature about the effects of exergame-based interventions on musculoskeletal pain, as well as to provide directions for the clinical practice. A systematic search was conducted in four electronic databases following PRISMA guidelines. The inclusion criteria were as follows: (a) the subjects were suffering musculoskeletal pain, (b) the study was randomized controlled trial (RCT), (c) intervention was based on exergames, (d) the article was written in English, and (e) the article was not an abstract or summary presented in a congress or conference. Risk of bias and quality of evidence were evaluated using the PEDro Scale and GRADE approach, respectively. A meta-analysis was carried out to determine effect sizes. Seven studies were selected in the systematic review. The meta-analysis included those six articles which reported means and SD before and after treatment and used a visual analog scale or a Numeric Pain Rating Scale. Four of the seven articles reported significant reduction in pain while the rest did not found any significant change in pain after the intervention. The overall effect size for pain was -0.51 (95% CI from -1.25 to 0.23) with large heterogeneity. Although four of the seven articles reported significant within-group differences, zero was included in the CI of the overall effect size. Therefore, up-to-date there is not enough evidence to conclude that exergames improve musculoskeletal pain. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Quality and Usability of Arthritic Pain Self-Management Apps for Older Adults: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Priyanka; Newton-John, Tro; Phillips, Jane L

    2017-05-25

     To appraise the quality and usability of currently available pain applications that could be used by community-dwelling older adults to self-manage their arthritic pain. A systematic review. Searches were conducted in App Store and Google Play to identify pain self-management apps relevant to arthritic pain management. English language pain management apps providing pain assessment and documentation function and pain management education were considered for inclusion. A quality evaluation audit tool based on the Stanford Arthritis Self-Management Program was developed a priori to evaluate app content quality. The usability of included apps was assessed using an established usability evaluation tool. Out of the 373 apps that were identified, four met the inclusion criteria. The included apps all included a pain assessment and documentation function and instructions on medication use, communication with health professionals, cognitive behavioral therapy-based pain management, and physical exercise. Management of mood, depression, anxiety, and sleep were featured in most apps (N = 3). Three-quarters (N = 3) of the apps fell below the acceptable moderate usability score (≥3), while one app obtained a moderate score (3.2).  Few of the currently available pain apps offer a comprehensive pain self-management approach incorporating evidence-based strategies in accordance with the Stanford Arthritis Self-Management Program. The moderate-level usability across the included apps indicates a need to consider the usability needs of the older population in future pain self-management app development endeavors.

  18. Therapeutic aquatic exercise in the treatment of low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Waller, Benjamin; Lambeck, Johan; Daly, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of therapeutic aquatic exercise in the treatment of low back pain. A systematic review. A search was performed of PEDro, CINAHL (ovid), PUBMED, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and SPORTDiscus databases to identify relevant studies published between 1990 and 2007. Adults suffering from low back pain. All types of therapeutic aquatic exercise. All clinical trials using a control group. Oswestry Disability Index, McGill Pain Questionnaire, subjective assessment scale for pain (e.g. visual analogue scale) and number of work days lost as a direct result of low back pain. Methodological quality was assessed using the PEDro scale and the SIGN 50 assessment forms. Thirty-seven trials were found and seven were accepted into the review. Therapeutic aquatic exercise appeared to have a beneficial effect, however, no better than other interventions. Methodological quality was considered low in all included studies. The heterogeneity among studies, in numbers of subjects, symptoms durations, interventions and reporting of outcomes, precluded any extensive meta-analysis of the results. There was sufficient evidence to suggest that therapeutic aquatic exercise is potentially beneficial to patients suffering from chronic low back pain and pregnancy-related low back pain. There is further need for high-quality trials to substantiate the use of therapeutic aquatic exercise in a clinical setting.

  19. Shoulder pain in water polo: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Webster, Marilyn J; Morris, Meg E; Galna, Brook

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this systematic review is to synthesize and critically evaluate literature on the incidence and clinical presentation of shoulder pain in water polo. A secondary aim is to examine the contributing factors to shoulder pain in water polo. Medline, Cinahl, Embase, Ausport, Ovid, Sports Discus, Pubmed and Google Scholar data bases were electronically searched. Data were extracted regarding research design, injuries, pain, incidence, interventions and therapy outcomes. Of an initial yield of 23 papers, 11 fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were categorized into studies on incidence, shoulder pain, shoulder mobility, strength and throwing injuries. Methodological limitations included sampling and measurement biases, inadequate internal validity of measurement tools, poor specification of testing protocols and limitations in statistical analysis. The review found a high incidence of shoulder pain in water polo. Although there was limited evidence regarding causation, the repeated action of throwing was identified as a contributing factor to shoulder pain. Future studies need to explore the relative contributions of hyper-mobility and muscle strength imbalance to shoulder pain in water polo.

  20. Systematic reviews of bed rest and advice to stay active for acute low back pain.

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, G; Feder, G; Lewis, M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the United Kingdom (UK), 9% of adults consult their doctor annually with back pain. The treatment recommendations are based on orthopaedic teaching, but the current management is causing increasing dissatisfaction. Many general practitioners (GPs) are confused about what constitutes effective advice. AIM: To review all randomized controlled trials of bed rest and of medical advice to stay active for acute back pain. METHOD: A systematic review based on a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE from 1966 to April 1996 with complete citation tracking for randomized controlled trials of bed rest or medical advice to stay active and continue ordinary daily activities. The inclusion criteria were: primary care setting, patients with low back pain of up to 3 months duration, and patient-centred outcomes (rate of recovery from the acute attack, relief of pain, restoration of function, satisfaction with treatment, days off work and return to work, development of chronic pain and disability, recurrent attacks, and further health care use). RESULTS: Ten trials of bed rest and eight trials of advice to stay active were identified. Consistent findings showed that bed rest is not an effective treatment for acute low back pain but may delay recovery. Advice to stay active and to continue ordinary activities results in a faster return to work, less chronic disability, and fewer recurrent problems. CONCLUSION: A simple but fundamental change from the traditional prescription of bed rest to positive advice about staying active could improve clinical outcomes and reduce the personal and social impact of back pain. PMID:9474831

  1. [Pain assessment using the Facial Action Coding System. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Rojo, Rosa; Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; López-Valverde, Antonio

    2015-10-21

    Self-reporting is the most widely used pain measurement tool, although it may not be useful in patients with loss or deficit in communication skills. The aim of this paper was to undertake a systematic review of the literature of pain assessment through the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). The initial search found 4,335 references and, within the restriction «FACS», these were reduced to 40 (after exclusion of duplicates). Finally, only 26 articles meeting the inclusion criteria were included. Methodological quality was assessed using the GRADE system. Most patients were adults and elderly health conditions, or cognitive deficits and/or chronic pain. Our conclusion is that FACS is a reliable and objective tool in the detection and quantification of pain in all patients.

  2. Acupuncture for Pain Management in Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Caiqiong; Zhang, Haibo; Wu, Wanyin; Yu, Weiqing; Li, Yong; Bai, Jianping; Luo, Baohua; Li, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for cancer-related pain. Methods. A systematic review of literatures published from database inception to February 2015 was conducted in eight databases. RCTs involving acupuncture for treatment of cancer-related pain were identified. Two researchers independently performed article selection, data extraction, and quality assessment of data. Results. 1,639 participants in twenty RCTs were analyzed. All selected RCTs were associated with high risk of bias. Meta-analysis indicated that acupuncture alone did not have superior pain-relieving effects as compared with conventional drug therapy. However, as compared with the drug therapy alone, acupuncture plus drug therapy resulted in increased pain remission rate, shorter onset time of pain relief, longer pain-free duration, and better quality of life without serious adverse effects. However, GRADE analysis revealed that the quality of all outcomes about acupuncture plus drug therapy was very low. Conclusions. Acupuncture plus drug therapy is more effective than conventional drug therapy alone for cancer-related pain. However, multicenter high-quality RCTs with larger sample sizes are needed to provide stronger evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in cancer-related pain due to the low data quality of the studies included in the current meta-analysis. PMID:26977172

  3. Effects of pilates on patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Ting; Hung, Wei-Ching; Hung, Jia-Ling; Wu, Pei-Shan; Liaw, Li-Jin; Chang, Jia-Hao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the effects of Pilates on patients with chronic low back pain through a systematic review of high-quality articles on randomized controlled trials. [Subjects and Methods] Keywords and synonyms for “Pilates” and “Chronic low back pain” were used in database searches. The databases included PubMed, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Medline, and the Cochrane Library. Articles involving randomized controlled trials with higher than 5 points on the PEDro scale were reviewed for suitability and inclusion. The methodological quality of the included randomized controlled trials was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Relevant information was extracted by 3 reviewers. [Results] Eight randomized controlled trial articles were included. Patients with chronic low back pain showed statistically significant improvement in pain relief and functional ability compared to patients who only performed usual or routine health care. However, other forms of exercise were similar to Pilates in the improvement of pain relief and functional capacity. [Conclusion] In patients with chronic low back pain, Pilates showed significant improvement in pain relief and functional enhancement. Other exercises showed effects similar to those of Pilates, if waist or torso movement was included and the exercises were performed for 20 cumulative hours. PMID:27821970

  4. Descending pain modulation in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chakiath, Rosemary J; Siddall, Philip J; Kellow, John E; Hush, Julia M; Jones, Mike P; Marcuzzi, Anna; Wrigley, Paul J

    2015-12-10

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder. While abdominal pain is a dominant symptom of IBS, many sufferers also report widespread hypersensitivity and present with other chronic pain conditions. The presence of widespread hypersensitivity and extra-intestinal pain conditions suggests central nervous dysfunction. While central nervous system dysfunction may involve the spinal cord (central sensitisation) and brain, this review will focus on one brain mechanism, descending pain modulation. We will conduct a comprehensive search for the articles indexed in the databases Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Ovid PsycINFO and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trial (CENTRAL) from their inception to August 2015, that report on any aspect of descending pain modulation in irritable bowel syndrome. Two independent reviewers will screen studies for eligibility, assess risk of bias and extract relevant data. Results will be tabulated and, if possible, a meta-analysis will be carried out. The systematic review outlined in this protocol aims to summarise current knowledge regarding descending pain modulation in IBS. PROSPERO CRD42015024284.

  5. Changes in Pain Sensitivity following Spinal Manipulation: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Rogelio A; Gay, Charles W.; Bialosky, Joel E.; Carnaby, Giselle D.; Bishop, Mark D.; George, Steven Z.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal manipulation (SMT) is commonly used for treating individuals experiencing musculoskeletal pain. The mechanisms of SMT remain unclear; however, pain sensitivity testing may provide insight into these mechanisms. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine the literature on the hypoalgesic effects of SMT on pain sensitivity measures and to quantify these effects using meta-analysis. We performed a systematic search of articles using CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus from each databases’ inception until May 2011. We examined methodological quality of each study and generated pooled effect size estimates using meta-analysis software. Of 997 articles identified, 20 met inclusion criteria for this review. Pain sensitivity testing used in these studies included chemical, electrical, mechanical, and thermal stimuli applied to various anatomical locations. Meta-analysis was appropriate for studies examining the immediate effect of SMT on mechanical pressure pain threshold (PPT). SMT demonstrated a favorable effect over other interventions on increasing PPT. Subgroup analysis showed a significant effect of SMT on increasing PPT at the remote sites of stimulus application supporting a potential central nervous system mechanism. Future studies of SMT related hypoalgesia should include multiple experimental stimuli and test at multiple anatomical sites. PMID:22296867

  6. Psychosocial predictors and correlates for chronic post-surgical pain (CPSP) - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs-Rocker, Anke; Schulz, Kerstin; Järvinen, Imke; Lefering, Rolf; Simanski, Christian; Neugebauer, Edmund A M

    2009-08-01

    Chronic post-surgical pain (CPSP) is a serious problem. Incidence as high as 50% has been reported, depending on type of surgery undergone. Because the etiology of chronic pain is grounded in the bio-psychosocial model, physical, psychological, and social factors are implicated in the development of CPSP. Biomedical factors such as pre-operative pain, severe acute post-operative pain, modes of anesthesia, and surgical approaches have been extensively examined, therefore this systematic review focuses on psychosocial elements. A systematic search was performed using the PubMed, PsychINFO, Embase, and Cochrane Databases. Fifty relevant publications were selected from this search, in which psychosocial predictors for and correlates to CPSP were identified. The level of evidence was assessed for each study, and corresponding score points were awarded for ease of comparison. The grade of association with CPSP for each predictor/correlate was then determined. Depression, psychological vulnerability, stress, and late return to work showed likely correlation with CPSP (grade of association=1). Other factors were determined to have either unlikely (grade of association=3) or inconclusive (grade of association=2) correlations. In addition, results were examined in light of the type of surgery undergone. This review is intended as a first step to develop an instrument for identifying patients at high risk for CPSP, to optimize clinical pain management.

  7. Systematic Review of the Use of Phytochemicals for Management of Pain in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Andrew M.; Heritier, Fabrice; Childs, Bennett G.; Bostwick, J. Michael; Dziadzko, Mikhail A.

    2015-01-01

    Pain in cancer therapy is a common condition and there is a need for new options in therapeutic management. While phytochemicals have been proposed as one pain management solution, knowledge of their utility is limited. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review of the biomedical literature for the use of phytochemicals for management of cancer therapy pain in human subjects. Of an initial database search of 1,603 abstracts, 32 full-text articles were eligible for further assessment. Only 7 of these articles met all inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The average relative risk of phytochemical versus control was 1.03 [95% CI 0.59 to 2.06]. In other words (although not statistically significant), patients treated with phytochemicals were slightly more likely than patients treated with control to obtain successful management of pain in cancer therapy. We identified a lack of quality research literature on this subject and thus were unable to demonstrate a clear therapeutic benefit for either general or specific use of phytochemicals in the management of cancer pain. This lack of data is especially apparent for psychotropic phytochemicals, such as the Cannabis plant (marijuana). Additional implications of our findings are also explored. PMID:26576425

  8. Development of dependence following treatment with opioid analgesics for pain relief: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Minozzi, Silvia; Amato, Laura; Davoli, Marina

    2013-04-01

    To assess the incidence or prevalence of opioid dependence syndrome in adults (with and without previous history of substance abuse) following treatment with opioid analgesics for pain relief. Medline, Embase, CINHAL and the Cochrane Library were searched up to January 2011. Systematic reviews and primary studies were included if they reported data about incidence or prevalence of opioid dependence syndrome (as defined by DSM-IV or ICD-10) in patients receiving strong opioids (or opioid-type analgesics) for treatment of acute or chronic pain due to any physical condition. The data were abstracted, and the methodological quality was assessed using validated checklists. Data were extracted from 17 studies involving a total of 88 235 participants. The studies included three systematic reviews, one randomized controlled trial, eight cross-sectional studies and four uncontrolled case series. Most studies included adult patients with chronic non-malignant pain; two also included patients with cancer pain; only one included patients with a previous history of dependence. Incidence ranged from 0 to 24% (median 0.5%); prevalence ranged from 0 to 31% (median 4.5%). The available evidence suggests that opioid analgesics for chronic pain conditions are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Content and outcome of usual primary care for back pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Simon; Hay, Elaine; Lewis, Martyn; Barber, Julie; van der Windt, Danielle; Hill, Jonathan; Sowden, Gail

    2008-01-01

    Background Most patients seeking help for back pain are managed in primary care. Aim To describe the content and outcome of ‘usual care’ for low back pain in primary care trials. Design of study A systematic review of randomised controlled trials published since 1998. Setting Primary care. Method Randomised controlled trials of back pain in adults were scrutinised to obtain data on treatment and outcome measures in groups receiving usual primary care. A narrative review of the resulting heterogeneous data was undertaken. Results Thirty-three papers were identified for analysis. Overall the exact nature of the treatment received in the ‘usual’ primary care group was poorly recorded. Medication was frequently used, and there were suggestions that levels of opioid prescription were higher than might be expected from clinical guidelines. Requesting of plain-film X-rays occurred more often than recommended. There was very little information to suggest that doctors were promoting physical activity for patients with back pain. Disability scores (Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire) and pain scores improved over time for patients with acute or subacute back pain, but not for those with chronic pain. Conclusion Treatment received by patients with back pain was varied and often not in line with back-pain guidelines, particularly with respect to opioid prescription and X-ray investigation. The content of the ‘usual care’ arm in trials is crucial to interpreting the outcome of studies, but was poorly described in the papers reviewed. Future trials should more fully describe the ‘usual care’ arm. PMID:19000402

  10. Classification of patients with low back-related leg pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stynes, Siobhán; Konstantinou, Kika; Dunn, Kate M

    2016-05-23

    The identification of clinically relevant subgroups of low back pain (LBP) is considered the number one LBP research priority in primary care. One subgroup of LBP patients are those with back related leg pain. Leg pain frequently accompanies LBP and is associated with increased levels of disability and higher health costs than simple low back pain. Distinguishing between different types of low back-related leg pain (LBLP) is important for clinical management and research applications, but there is currently no clear agreement on how to define and identify LBLP due to nerve root involvement. The aim of this systematic review was to identify, describe and appraise papers that classify or subgroup populations with LBLP, and summarise how leg pain due to nerve root involvement is described and diagnosed in the various systems. The search strategy involved nine electronic databases including Medline and Embase, reference lists of eligible studies and relevant reviews. Selected papers were appraised independently by two reviewers using a standardised scoring tool. Of 13,358 initial potential eligible citations, 50 relevant papers were identified that reported on 22 classification systems. Papers were grouped according to purpose and criteria of the classification systems. Five themes emerged: (i) clinical features (ii) pathoanatomy (iii) treatment-based approach (iv) screening tools and prediction rules and (v) pain mechanisms. Three of the twenty two systems focused specifically on LBLP populations. Systems that scored highest following quality appraisal were ones where authors generally included statistical methods to develop their classifications, and supporting work had been published on the systems' validity, reliability and generalisability. There was lack of consistency in how LBLP due to nerve root involvement was described and diagnosed within the systems. Numerous classification systems exist that include patients with leg pain, a minority of them focus

  11. Effect of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on arthritic pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Abdulrazaq, Mozghan; Innes, Jacqueline K; Calder, Philip C

    Pain is a significant problem in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is associated with prostaglandins derived from the ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid. The ω-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid have been shown to reduce inflammation, with some studies showing clinical improvements in RA. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the effect of ω-3 PUFAs on arthritic pain. A systematic literature review of ω-3 PUFAs and pain associated with RA was performed up to December 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of ω-3 PUFAs (>2 g/d) on patient or physician assessment of pain, or assessment by both patient and physician, were included. The Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk for bias was employed. Data for outcomes of interest were extracted and collated for interpretation. Eighteen RCTs published between 1985 and 2013 involving 1143 patients were included. Dosage of ω-3 PUFAs used was 2.1 to 9.1 g/d, with study durations of 12 to 52 wk. Ten studies supported the hypothesis that there is a reduction in patient or physician assessment of pain associated with RA after intake of ω-3 PUFAs. Eight studies found no statistically significant effect of ω-3 PUFAs on arthritic pain. ω-3 PUFAs may have a therapeutic role in decreasing pain associated with RA, with doses of 3 to 6 g/d appearing to have a greater effect. Due to the limitations identified in the RCTs included in this review, more research is needed to investigate ω-3 PUFAs in larger populations and over extended periods of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pain and Physical Functioning in Neuropathic Pain: A Systematic Review of Psychometric Properties of Various Outcome Measures.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Poonam; Claydon, Leica S; Hendrick, Paul; Cook, Chad; Baxter, David G

    2016-04-01

    A range of outcome measures across various domains are used to evaluate change following an intervention in clinical trials on chronic neuropathic pain (NeP). However, to capture a real change in the variable of interest, the psychometric properties of a particular measure should demonstrate appropriate methodological quality. Various outcome measures in the domains of pain and physical functioning have been used in the literature for NeP, for which individual properties (eg, reliability/validity) have been reported. To date, there is no definitive synthesis of evidence on the psychometric properties of those outcome measures; thus, the aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the methodological quality [COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) guidelines] of studies that evaluated psychometric properties of pain and physical functioning outcome measures used for NeP. Specific MeSH/keywords related to 3 areas (pain and/or physical functioning, psychometric properties, and NeP) were used to retrieve relevant studies (English language) in key electronic databases (MEDLINE (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO), Scopus, AMED, and Web of Science) from database inception-July 2012. Articles retrieval/screening and quality analysis (COSMIN) were carried out by 2 independent reviewers. Twenty-four pain and thirty-seven physical functioning outcome measures were identified, varying in methodological quality from poor-excellent. Although a variety of pain and physical functioning outcome measures have been reported in the literature, few have demonstrate methodologically strong psychometric properties. Thus, future research is required to further investigate the psychometric properties of existing pain and physical functioning outcome measures used for clinical and research purposes. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  13. Static magnets for reducing pain: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Pittler, Max H.; Brown, Elizabeth M.; Ernst, Edzard

    2007-01-01

    Background Static magnets are marketed with claims of effectiveness for reducing pain, although evidence of scientific principles or biological mechanisms to support such claims is limited. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the clinical evidence from randomized trials of static magnets for treating pain. Methods Systematic literature searches were conducted from inception to March 2007 for the following data sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine Database), CINAHL, Scopus, the Cochrane Library and the UK National Research Register. All randomized clinical trials of static magnets for treating pain from any cause were considered. Trials were included only if they involved a placebo control or a weak magnet as the control, with pain as an outcome measure. The mean change in pain, as measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale, was defined as the primary outcome and was used to assess the difference between static magnets and placebo. Results Twenty-nine potentially relevant trials were identified. Nine randomized placebo-controlled trials assessing pain with a visual analogue scale were included in the main meta-analysis; analysis of these trials suggested no significant difference in pain reduction (weighted mean difference [on a 100-mm visual analogue scale] 2.1 mm, 95% confidence interval –1.8 to 5.9 mm, p = 0.29). This result was corroborated by sensitivity analyses excluding trials of acute effects and conditions other than musculoskeletal conditions. Analysis of trials that assessed pain with different scales suggested significant heterogeneity among the trials, which means that pooling these data is unreliable. Interpretation The evidence does not support the use of static magnets for pain relief, and therefore magnets cannot be recommended as an effective treatment. For osteoarthritis, the evidence is insufficient to exclude a clinically important benefit, which creates an opportunity for further

  14. Co-occurrence of Pain Symptoms and Somatosensory Sensitivity in Burning Mouth Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Moisset, Xavier; Calbacho, Valentina; Torres, Pilar; Gremeau-Richard, Christelle; Dallel, Radhouane

    2016-01-01

    Background Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic and spontaneous oral pain with burning quality in the tongue or other oral mucosa without any identifiable oral lesion or laboratory finding. Pathogenesis and etiology of BMS are still unknown. However, BMS has been associated with other chronic pain syndromes including other idiopathic orofacial pain, the dynias group and the family of central sensitivity syndromes. This would imply that BMS shares common mechanisms with other cephalic and/or extracephalic chronic pains. The primary aim of this systematic review was to determine whether BMS is actually associated with other pain syndromes, and to analyze cephalic and extracephalic somatosensory sensitivity in these patients. Methods This report followed the PRISMA Statement. An electronic search was performed until January 2015 in PubMed, Cochrane library, Wiley and ScienceDirect. Searched terms included “burning mouth syndrome OR stomatodynia OR glossodynia OR burning tongue OR oral burning”. Studies were selected according to predefined inclusion criteria (report of an association between BMS and other pain(s) symptoms or of cutaneous cephalic and/or extracephalic quantitative sensory testing in BMS patients), and a descriptive analysis conducted. Results The search retrieved 1512 reports. Out of these, twelve articles met criteria for co-occurring pain symptoms and nine studies for quantitative sensory testing (QST) in BMS patients. The analysis reveals that in BMS patients co-occurring pain symptoms are rare, assessed by only 0.8% (12 of 1512) of the retrieved studies. BMS was associated with headaches, TMD, atypical facial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, post-herpetic facial pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, joint pain, abdominal pain, rectal pain or vulvodynia. However, the prevalence of pain symptoms in BMS patients is not different from that in the age-matched general population. QST studies reveal no or inconsistent evidence of abnormal cutaneous cephalic

  15. Interventions to prevent back pain and back injury in nurses: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Anna P; McLennan, Skye N; Schiller, Stefan D; Jull, Gwendolen A; Hodges, Paul W; Stewart, Simon

    2007-10-01

    A systematic literature review was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of interventions that aim to prevent back pain and back injury in nurses. Ten relevant databases were searched; these were examined and reference lists checked. Two reviewers applied selection criteria, assessed methodological quality and extracted data from trials. A qualitative synthesis of evidence was undertaken and sensitivity analyses performed. Eight randomised controlled trials and eight non-randomised controlled trials met eligibility criteria. Overall, study quality was poor, with only one trial classified as high quality. There was no strong evidence regarding the efficacy of any interventions aiming to prevent back pain and injury in nurses. The review identified moderate level evidence from multiple trials that manual handling training in isolation is not effective and multidimensional interventions are effective in preventing back pain and injury in nurses. Single trials provided moderate evidence that stress management programs do not prevent back pain and limited evidence that lumbar supports are effective in preventing back injury in nurses. There is conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of exercise interventions and the provision of manual handling equipment and training. This review highlights the need for high quality randomised controlled studies to examine the effectiveness of interventions to prevent back pain and injury in nursing populations. Implications for future research are discussed.

  16. Interventions to prevent back pain and back injury in nurses: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Anna P; McLennan, Skye N; Schiller, Stefan D; Jull, Gwendolen A; Hodges, Paul W; Stewart, Simon

    2007-01-01

    A systematic literature review was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of interventions that aim to prevent back pain and back injury in nurses. Ten relevant databases were searched; these were examined and reference lists checked. Two reviewers applied selection criteria, assessed methodological quality and extracted data from trials. A qualitative synthesis of evidence was undertaken and sensitivity analyses performed. Eight randomised controlled trials and eight non‐randomised controlled trials met eligibility criteria. Overall, study quality was poor, with only one trial classified as high quality. There was no strong evidence regarding the efficacy of any interventions aiming to prevent back pain and injury in nurses. The review identified moderate level evidence from multiple trials that manual handling training in isolation is not effective and multidimensional interventions are effective in preventing back pain and injury in nurses. Single trials provided moderate evidence that stress management programs do not prevent back pain and limited evidence that lumbar supports are effective in preventing back injury in nurses. There is conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of exercise interventions and the provision of manual handling equipment and training. This review highlights the need for high quality randomised controlled studies to examine the effectiveness of interventions to prevent back pain and injury in nursing populations. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:17522134

  17. Does mindfulness improve outcomes in patients with chronic pain? Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Fathima L Marikar; Mercer, Stewart W; Atherton, Rachel J; Clague, Fiona; Keen, Andrew; Scott, Neil W; Bond, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic pain and its associated distress and disability are common reasons for seeking medical help. Patients with chronic pain use primary healthcare services five times more than the rest of the population. Mindfulness has become an increasingly popular self-management technique. Aim To assess the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for patients with chronic pain. Design and setting Systematic review and meta-analysis including randomised controlled trials of mindfulness-based interventions for chronic pain. There was no restriction to study site or setting. Method The databases MEDLINE®, Embase, AMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Index to Theses were searched. Titles, abstracts, and full texts were screened iteratively against inclusion criteria of: randomised controlled trials of mindfulness-based intervention; patients with non-malignant chronic pain; and economic, clinical, or humanistic outcome reported. Included studies were assessed with the Yates Quality Rating Scale. Meta-analysis was conducted. Results Eleven studies were included. Chronic pain conditions included: fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic musculoskeletal pain, failed back surgery syndrome, and mixed aetiology. Papers were of mixed methodological quality. Main outcomes reported were pain intensity, depression, physical functioning, quality of life, pain acceptance, and mindfulness. Economic outcomes were rarely reported. Meta-analysis effect sizes for clinical outcomes ranged from 0.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.05 to 0.30) (depression) to 1.32 (95% CI = −1.19 to 3.82) (sleep quality), and for humanistic outcomes 0.03 (95% CI = −0.66 to 0.72) (mindfulness) to 1.58 (95% CI = −0.57 to 3.74) (pain acceptance). Studies with active, compared with inactive, control groups showed smaller effects. Conclusion There is limited evidence for effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for patients with chronic pain. Better-quality studies are required. PMID

  18. Economic evaluation in chronic pain: a systematic review and de novo flexible economic model.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, W; Hirst, M; Beard, S; Gladwell, D; Fagnani, F; López Bastida, J; Phillips, C; Dunlop, W C N

    2016-07-01

    There is unmet need in patients suffering from chronic pain, yet innovation may be impeded by the difficulty of justifying economic value in a field beset by data limitations and methodological variability. A systematic review was conducted to identify and summarise the key areas of variability and limitations in modelling approaches in the economic evaluation of treatments for chronic pain. The results of the literature review were then used to support the development of a fully flexible open-source economic model structure, designed to test structural and data assumptions and act as a reference for future modelling practice. The key model design themes identified from the systematic review included: time horizon; titration and stabilisation; number of treatment lines; choice/ordering of treatment; and the impact of parameter uncertainty (given reliance on expert opinion). Exploratory analyses using the model to compare a hypothetical novel therapy versus morphine as first-line treatments showed cost-effectiveness results to be sensitive to structural and data assumptions. Assumptions about the treatment pathway and choice of time horizon were key model drivers. Our results suggest structural model design and data assumptions may have driven previous cost-effectiveness results and ultimately decisions based on economic value. We therefore conclude that it is vital that future economic models in chronic pain are designed to be fully transparent and hope our open-source code is useful in order to aspire to a common approach to modelling pain that includes robust sensitivity analyses to test structural and parameter uncertainty.

  19. Early insights into the neurobiology of pain in sickle cell disease: A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brandow, Amanda M; Farley, Rebecca A; Panepinto, Julie A

    2015-09-01

    Novel insights into the neurobiology of sickle cell disease (SCD) pain have recently been discovered. We systematically reviewed the literature focusing on original research that examined the biology of pain in SCD and/or addressed assessment or treatment of neuropathic pain in SCD. This review of 15 articles that met inclusion criteria provides epidemiological, basic, and clinical data that support central and/or peripheral nervous system abnormalities likely contribute to sickle cell pain. Continued basic and clinical investigation into pain neurobiology is imperative to translate these discoveries into novel ways to assess and treat neuropathic pain and decrease patient suffering.

  20. Non-opioid pain management in benign minimally invasive hysterectomy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Emily; Lamvu, Georgine; Patanwala, Insiyyah; Barron, Kenneth I; Witzeman, Kathryn; Tu, Frank F; As-Sanie, Sawsan

    2017-06-01

    Less postoperative pain typically is associated with a minimally invasive hysterectomy compared with a laparotomy approach; however, poor pain control can still be an issue. Multiple guidelines exist for managing postoperative pain, yet most are not specialty-specific and are based on procedures that bear little relevance to a minimally invasive hysterectomy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is enough quality evidence within the benign gynecology literature to make non-opioid pain control recommendations for women who undergo a benign minimally invasive hysterectomy. We queried PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Cochrane databases using MeSH terms: "postoperative pain," "perioperative pain," "postoperative analgesia," "pain management," "pain control," "minimally invasive gynecologic surgery," and "hysterectomy." A manual examination of references from identified studies was also performed. All PubMed published studies that involved minimally invasive hysterectomies through November 9, 2016, were included. This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Studies were restricted to benign minimally invasive hysterectomies evaluating non-opioid pharmacologic therapies. Primary outcomes included amount of postoperative analgesics consumed and postoperative pain scores. Two reviewers independently completed an in-depth evaluation of each study for characteristics and results using an established database, according to inclusion/exclusion criteria. A risk assessment was performed, and a quality rating was assigned with the use of the Cochrane Collaboration's Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. Initially 1155 studies were identified, and 24 studies met all inclusion criteria. Based on limited data of varying quality, intravenous acetaminophen, anticonvulsants and dexamethasone demonstrate opioid-sparing benefits; ketorolac shows

  1. The Effectiveness of Technology-Supported Exercise Therapy for Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Matheve, Thomas; Brumagne, Simon; Timmermans, Annick A A

    2017-05-01

    Various technological systems have been developed to assist exercise therapy for low back pain. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an overview and to assess the effectiveness of the available technology-supported exercise therapy (TSET) programs for low back pain. The electronic databases Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, IEEE, and ACM were searched until January 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using electronic technological systems simultaneously with exercise therapy for patients with low back pain were included. Twenty-five RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Seventeen studies involved patients with chronic low back pain, and electromyography biofeedback was the most prevalent type of technological support. This review shows that TSET seems to improve pain, disability, and quality of life for patients with low back pain, and that a standard treatment combined with an additional TSET program might be superior to a standard treatment alone. However, TSET seems not more effective compared to other interventions or a placebo intervention for improving these outcomes, which may partially be explained by the analytical approach of the current TSET-programs. For most technologies, only a limited number of RCTs are available, making it difficult to draw firm conclusions about the effectiveness of individual technological systems.

  2. The Association Between Neck Pain and Pulmonary Function: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kahlaee, Amir Hossein; Ghamkhar, Leila; Arab, Amir Massoud

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence on respiratory function changes in patients with chronic neck pain. MEDLINE, Elsevier, ProQuest, PubMed, Scopus, Springer, and Google scholar electronic databases were explored thorough December 2015. English-language studies investigating cervical musculoskeletal and respiratory parameters in patients with chronic neck pain were included. Characteristics of the patients, sampling method and size, musculoskeletal and respiratory parameters studied, and appropriateness of the statistical tests were considered. Studies were rated based on study design and performance. Of the 68 studies reviewed, 9 observational studies met our inclusion criteria. Significant difference in maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressures were reported in patients with chronic neck pain compared to asymptomatic subjects. Some of the respiratory volumes were found to be lower in patients with chronic neck pain. Muscle strength and endurance, cervical range of motion, and psychological states were found to be significantly correlated with respiratory parameters. Lower Pco2 in patients and significant relationship between chest expansion and neck pain were also shown. Respiratory retraining was found to be effective in improving some cervical musculoskeletal and respiratory impairment. Functional pulmonary impairments accompany chronic neck pain. Based on the observed association, investigation of the effectiveness of management of CNP on respiratory function is strongly suggested.

  3. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Laura S; Clark, Jodi; Colclough, Janette A; Dale, Elizabeth; McMillan, Dean

    2017-06-01

    Chronic pain places a burden on individuals and the economy. Although there is evidence for the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy, it is recognized that the effects are limited. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), which aims to increase valued action in the presence of pain, has been suggested as an alternative approach. The objective of this review was to determine the clinical effectiveness of ACT for chronic pain in adults when compared with control conditions and other active treatments. The searches of this systematic review were conducted in the Cochrane library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus (EBSCO), and PsycINFO. Grey literature, reference list, and reverse citation searches were also completed. Eleven trials were included. ACT was favored over controls (no alternative intervention or treatment as usual). Significant, medium to large effect sizes were found for measures of pain acceptance and psychological flexibility, which are typically considered processes of ACT. Significant small to medium effect sizes were found for measures of functioning, anxiety, and depression. Measures of pain intensity and quality of life were not significantly different than zero. Generally effect sizes were smaller at follow-up. ACT was more clinically effective than controls on a number of outcomes. It is possible that methodological limitations, some of which are common to psychological trials, may have led to overestimated effects. Only a few studies compared ACT to active treatments and while the evidence is promising for ACT in the treatment of chronic pain, further methodologically robust trials are required.

  4. A Systematic Review of Pharmacological Treatments of Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, Robert W.; Mehta, Swati; Aubut, Jo-Anne L.; Foulon, Brianne; Wolfe, Dalton L.; Hsieh, Jane T.C.; Townson, Andrea F.; Short, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Objective To conduct a systematic review of published research on the pharmacological treatment of pain after spinal cord injury (SCI). Data Sources Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles published 1980 to June 2009 addressing the treatment of pain post SCI. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were assessed for methodological quality using the PEDro assessment scale, while non-RCTs were assessed using the Downs and Black evaluation tool. A level of evidence was assigned to each intervention using a modified Sackett scale. Study Selection The review included randomized controlled trials and non-randomized controlled trials which included prospective controlled trials, cohort, case series, case-control, pre-post and post studies. Case studies were included only when there were no other studies found. Data Extraction Data extracted included the PEDro or Downs and Black score, the type of study, a brief summary of intervention outcomes, type of pain, type of pain scale and the study findings.. Data Synthesis Articles selected for this particular review evaluated different interventions in the pharmacological management of pain post SCI. 28 studies met inclusion criteria: there were 21 randomized controlled trials of these 19 had Level 1 evidence. Treatments were divided into five categories: anticonvulsants, antidepressants, analgesics, cannabinoids and antispasticity medications. Conclusions Most studies did not specify participants’ types of pain; hence making it difficult to identify the type of pain being targeted by the treatment. Anticonvulsant and analgesic drugs had the highest levels of evidence and were the drugs most often studied. Gabapentin and pregabalin had strong evidence (five Level 1 RCTs) for effectiveness in treating post-SCI neuropathic pain, as did intravenous analgesics (lidocaine, ketamine and morphine) but the latter only had short term benefits. Tricyclic antidepressants only showed benefit for neuropathic

  5. The effect of bodily illusions on clinical pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Eva; Bellan, Valeria; Moseley, G Lorimer; Stanton, Tasha R

    2016-03-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis critically examined the evidence for bodily illusions to modulate pain. Six databases were searched; 2 independent reviewers completed study inclusion, risk of bias assessment, and data extraction. Included studies evaluated the effect of a bodily illusion on pain, comparing results with a control group/condition. Of the 2213 studies identified, 20 studies (21 experiments) were included. Risk of bias was high due to selection bias and lack of blinding. Consistent evidence of pain decrease was found for illusions of the existence of a body part (myoelectric/Sauerbruch prosthesis vs cosmetic/no prosthesis; standardized mean differences = -1.84, 95% CI = -2.67 to -1.00) and 4 to 6 weeks of mirror therapy (standardized mean differences = -1.11, 95% CI = -1.66 to -0.56). Bodily resizing illusions had consistent evidence of pain modulation (in the direction hypothesized). Pooled data found no effect on pain for 1 session of mirror therapy or for incongruent movement illusions (except for comparisons with congruent mirrored movements: incongruent movement illusion significantly increased the odds of experiencing pain). Conflicting results were found for virtual walking illusions (both active and inactive control comparisons). Single studies suggest no effect of resizing illusions on pain evoked by noxious stimuli, no effect of embodiment illusions, but a significant pain decrease with synchronous mirrored stroking in nonresponders to traditional mirror therapy. There is limited evidence to suggest that bodily illusions can alter pain, but some illusions, namely mirror therapy, bodily resizing, and use of functional prostheses show therapeutic promise.

  6. Exercise therapy for office workers with nonspecific neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sihawong, Rattaporn; Janwantanakul, Prawit; Sitthipornvorakul, Ekalak; Pensri, Praneet

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of various types of exercise for prevention and cure of nonspecific neck pain in office workers. Publications between 1980 and April 2010 were systematically searched in various databases (PubMed, CINAHL Plus with full text, The Cochrane Library, Science Direct, PEDro, ProQuest, PsycNet, and Scopus). The following key words were used: neck pain, cervical pain, exercise, strengthening, stretching, endurance, office workers, visual display unit, visual display terminal, and computer users. A hand search of relevant journals was also carried out. Relevant randomized controlled trials were retrieved and assessed for methodological quality by 2 independent reviewers. The strength of the evidence was based on methodological quality and consistency of the results. Nine randomized controlled trials were included in this review, of which 6 were rated as high-quality studies. No exercise type was identified as being effective in the prevention of nonspecific neck pain in office workers. Strong evidence was found for the effectiveness of muscle strengthening and endurance exercises in treating neck pain. Moderate evidence supported the use of muscle endurance exercise in reducing disability attributed to neck pain. Literature investigating the efficacy of exercise in office workers with nonspecific neck pain was heterogeneous. Within the limitations, for treatment of neck pain, either muscle strengthening or endurance exercise is recommended, whereas for reduction of pain-related disability, muscle endurance exercise is suggested. Further research is needed before any firm conclusions regarding the most effective exercise programs for office workers can be reached. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of calcium hydroxide on the post-treatment pain in Endodontics: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Anjaneyulu, K.; Nivedhitha, Malli Sureshbabu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pain of endodontic origin has been a major concern to the patients and the clinicians for many years. Post-operative pain is associated with inflammation in the periradicular tissues caused by irritants egressing from root canal during treatment. It has been suggested that calcium hydroxide intra-canal medicament has pain-preventive properties because of its anti-microbial or tissue altering effects. Some dispute this and reasoned that calcium hydroxide may initiate or increase pain by inducing or increasing inflammation. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of calcium hydroxide in reducing the post-treatment pain when used as an intra-canal medicament Materials and Methods: The following databases were searched: PubMed CENTRAL (until July 2013), MEDLINE, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Bibliographies of clinical studies and reviews identified in the electronic search were analyzed for studies published outside the electronically searched journals. The primary outcome measure was to evaluate the post-treatment pain reduction when calcium hydroxide is used as an intra-canal medicament in patients undergoing root canal therapy. Results: The reviews found some clinical evidence that calcium hydroxide is not very effective in reducing post-treatment pain when it is used alone, but its effectiveness can be increased when used in combination with other medicaments like chlorhexidine and camphorated monochlorophenol (CMCP). Conclusion: Even though calcium hydroxide is one of the most widely used intra-canal medicament due to its anti-microbial properties, there is no clear evidence of its effect on the post-treatment pain after the chemo-mechanical root canal preparation. PMID:24944439

  8. Quality indicators for the assessment and management of pain in the emergency department: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Antonia S; Hartling, Lisa; Fera, Cassandra; Johnson, David; Ali, Samina

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence indicates that pain is undertreated in the emergency department (ED). The first step in improving the pain experience for ED patients is to accurately and systematically assess the actual care being provided. Identifying gaps in the assessment and treatment of pain and improving patient outcomes requires relevant, evidence-based performance measures. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the literature and identify quality indicators specific to the assessment and management of pain in the ED. METHODS: Four major bibliographical databases were searched from January 1980 to December 2010, and relevant journals and conference proceedings were manually searched. Original research that described the development or collection of data on one or more quality indicators relevant to the assessment or management of pain in the ED was included. RESULTS: The search identified 18,078 citations. Twenty-three articles were included: 15 observational (cohort) studies; three before-after studies; three audits; one quality indicator development study; and one survey. Methodological quality was moderate, with weaknesses in the reporting of study design and methodology. Twenty unique indicators were identified, with the majority (16 of 20) measuring care processes. Overall, 91% (21 of 23) of the studies reported indicators for the assessment or management of presenting pain, as opposed to procedural pain. Three of the studies included children; however, none of the indicators were developed specifically for a pediatric population. CONCLUSION: Gaps in the existing literature include a lack of measures reflecting procedural pain, patient outcomes and the pediatric population. Future efforts should focus on developing indicators specific to these key areas. PMID:25337856

  9. Is higher serum cholesterol associated with altered tendon structure or tendon pain? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Benjamin J; Cook, Jill L; Docking, Sean I; Gaida, James E

    2015-12-01

    Tendon pain occurs in individuals with extreme cholesterol levels (familial hypercholesterolaemia). It is unclear whether the association with tendon pain is strong with less extreme elevations of cholesterol. To determine whether lipid levels are associated with abnormal tendon structure or the presence of tendon pain. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant articles were found through an electronic search of 6 medical databases-MEDLINE, Cochrane, AMED, EMBASE, Web of Science and Scopus. We included all case-control or cross-sectional studies with data describing (1) lipid levels or use of lipid-lowering drugs and (2) tendon structure or tendon pain. 17 studies (2612 participants) were eligible for inclusion in the review. People with altered tendon structure or tendon pain had significantly higher total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; with mean difference values of 0.66, 1.00, 0.33, and -0.19 mmol/L, respectively. The results of this review indicate that a relationship exists between an individual's lipid profile and tendon health. However, further longitudinal studies are required to determine whether a cause and effect relationship exists between tendon structure and lipid levels. This could lead to advancement in the understanding of the pathoaetiology and thus treatment of tendinopathy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Is higher serum cholesterol associated with altered tendon structure or tendon pain? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Benjamin J; Cook, Jill L; Docking, Sean I; Gaida, James E

    2015-01-01

    Background Tendon pain occurs in individuals with extreme cholesterol levels (familial hypercholesterolaemia). It is unclear whether the association with tendon pain is strong with less extreme elevations of cholesterol. Objective To determine whether lipid levels are associated with abnormal tendon structure or the presence of tendon pain. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant articles were found through an electronic search of 6 medical databases—MEDLINE, Cochrane, AMED, EMBASE, Web of Science and Scopus. We included all case–control or cross-sectional studies with data describing (1) lipid levels or use of lipid-lowering drugs and (2) tendon structure or tendon pain. Results 17 studies (2612 participants) were eligible for inclusion in the review. People with altered tendon structure or tendon pain had significantly higher total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; with mean difference values of 0.66, 1.00, 0.33, and −0.19 mmol/L, respectively. Conclusions The results of this review indicate that a relationship exists between an individual’s lipid profile and tendon health. However, further longitudinal studies are required to determine whether a cause and effect relationship exists between tendon structure and lipid levels. This could lead to advancement in the understanding of the pathoaetiology and thus treatment of tendinopathy. PMID:26474596

  11. Lack of evidence for central sensitization in idiopathic, non-traumatic neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Malfliet, Annaleen; Kregel, Jeroen; Cagnie, Barbara; Kuipers, Mandy; Dolphens, Mieke; Roussel, Nathalie; Meeus, Mira; Danneels, Lieven; Bramer, Wichor M; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic neck pain is a common problem with a poorly understood pathophysiology. Often no underlying structural pathology can be found and radiological imaging findings are more related to age than to a patient's symptoms. Besides its common occurrence, chronic idiopathic neck pain is also very disabling with almost 50% of all neck pain patients showing moderate disability at long-term follow-up. Central sensitization (CS) is defined as "an amplification of neural signaling within the central nervous system that elicits pain hypersensitivity," "increased responsiveness of nociceptive neurons in the central nervous system to their normal or subthreshold afferent input," or "an augmentation of responsiveness of central neurons to input from unimodal and polymodal receptors." There is increasing evidence for involvement of CS in many chronic pain conditions. Within the area of chronic idiopathic neck pain, there is consistent evidence for the presence and clinical importance of CS in patients with traumatic neck pain, or whiplash-associated disorders. However, the majority of chronic idiopathic neck pain patients are unrelated to a traumatic injury, and hence are termed chronic idiopathic non-traumatic neck pain. When comparing whiplash with idiopathic non-traumatic neck pain, indications for different underlying mechanisms are found. The goal of this article was to review the existing scientific literature on the role of CS in patients with chronic idiopathic non-traumatic neck pain. Systematic review. All selected studies were case control studies. A systematic search of existing, relevant literature was performed via the electronic databases Medline, Embase, Web of Science, Cinahl, PubMed, and Google Scholar. All titles and abstracts were checked to identify relevant articles. An article was considered eligible if it met following inclusion criteria: (1) participants had to be human adults (> 18 years) diagnosed with idiopathic non-traumatic chronic (present for at

  12. Low-level laser therapy for orthodontic pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Li, F J; Zhang, J Y; Zeng, X T; Guo, Y

    2015-08-01

    This review aimed to evaluate the clinical outcome of different lasers management on orthodontic pain. Cochrane Library (Issue 7, 2014) and MEDLINE (1966-2014.7) were searched to collect randomized controlled trials on lasers for orthodontic pain. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were systematically evaluated. The Cochrane Collaboration tools RevMan5.1.7 and GRADEpro 3.6 were used in this systematic review and meta-analysis. As a result, 11 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) studying on low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for orthodontic pain control were included. Meta-analysis and risk of bias assessment were implemented using RevMan5.1.7, and level of evidence assessments was measured by GRADEpro 3.6. In the outcome of the score of the most painful day, the comparison of laser versus placebo (pain associated with tooth movement) demonstrated that LLLT reduced the pain score significantly compared with placebo groups (MD = -4.39, 95% CI range -5.9--2.88, P < 0.00001). In the same way, the most painful day was significantly brought forward in laser versus control group (MD = -0.42, 95% CI range -0.74--0.10, P = 0.009). Furthermore, the outcome of the end of pain day showed a trend of pain termination earlier in laser versus control and placebo groups, but without statistical significance (MD = -1.37, 95% CI range -3.37-0.64, P = 0.18 and MD = -1.04, 95% CI range -4.22-2.15, P = 0.52). However, for the reason of downgrade factors, all the GRADE level of evidences of eight comparisons for three outcomes showed a very low quality. Therefore, for the methodological shortcomings and risk of bias of RCTs included, insufficient evidence was submitted to judge whether LLLT was effective in relieving orthodontic pain. Further and more perfect researches should be done in order to recommend LLLT as a routine method for orthodontic pain.

  13. Imperfect placebos are common in low back pain trials: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Machado, L A C; Kamper, S J; Herbert, R D; Maher, C G; McAuley, J H

    2008-07-01

    The placebo is an important tool to blind patients to treatment allocation and therefore minimise some sources of bias in clinical trials. However, placebos that are improperly designed or implemented may introduce bias into trials. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the adequacy of placebo interventions used in low back pain trials. Electronic databases were searched systematically for randomised placebo-controlled trials of conservative interventions for low back pain. Trial selection and data extraction were performed by two reviewers independently. A total of 126 trials using over 25 different placebo interventions were included. The strategy most commonly used to enhance blinding was the provision of structurally equivalent placebos. Adequacy of blinding was assessed in only 13% of trials. In 20% of trials the placebo intervention was a potentially genuine treatment. Most trials that assessed patients' expectations showed that the placebo generated lower expectations than the experimental intervention. Taken together, these results demonstrate that imperfect placebos are common in low back pain trials; a result suggesting that many trials provide potentially biased estimates of treatment efficacy. This finding has implications for the interpretation of published trials and the design of future trials. Implementation of strategies to facilitate blinding and balance expectations in randomised groups need a higher priority in low back pain research.

  14. Does Acupuncture Alter Pain-related Functional Connectivity of the Central Nervous System? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Villarreal Santiago, María; Tumilty, Steve; Mącznik, Aleksandra; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Acupuncture has been studied for several decades to establish evidence-based clinical practice. This systematic review aims to evaluate evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in influencing the functional connectivity of the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain. A systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify studies in which the central response of acupuncture in patients with musculoskeletal pain was evaluated by neuroimaging techniques. Databases searched were AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PEDro, Pubmed, SCOPUS, SPORTDiscuss, and Web of Science. Included studies were assessed by two independent reviewers for their methodological quality by using the Downs and Black questionnaire and for their levels of completeness and transparency in reporting acupuncture interventions by using Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) criteria. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Three studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four studies were nonrandomized controlled trials (NRCTs). The neuroimaging techniques used were functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Positive effects on the functional connectivity of the central nervous system more consistently occurred during long-term acupuncture treatment. The results were heterogeneous from a descriptive perspective; however, the key findings support acupuncture's ability to alter pain-related functional connectivity in the central nervous system in patients with musculoskeletal pain.

  15. Imperfect placebos are common in low back pain trials: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kamper, S. J.; Herbert, R. D.; Maher, C. G.; McAuley, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    The placebo is an important tool to blind patients to treatment allocation and therefore minimise some sources of bias in clinical trials. However, placebos that are improperly designed or implemented may introduce bias into trials. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the adequacy of placebo interventions used in low back pain trials. Electronic databases were searched systematically for randomised placebo-controlled trials of conservative interventions for low back pain. Trial selection and data extraction were performed by two reviewers independently. A total of 126 trials using over 25 different placebo interventions were included. The strategy most commonly used to enhance blinding was the provision of structurally equivalent placebos. Adequacy of blinding was assessed in only 13% of trials. In 20% of trials the placebo intervention was a potentially genuine treatment. Most trials that assessed patients’ expectations showed that the placebo generated lower expectations than the experimental intervention. Taken together, these results demonstrate that imperfect placebos are common in low back pain trials; a result suggesting that many trials provide potentially biased estimates of treatment efficacy. This finding has implications for the interpretation of published trials and the design of future trials. Implementation of strategies to facilitate blinding and balance expectations in randomised groups need a higher priority in low back pain research. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00586-008-0664-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18421484

  16. Recommendations for physical therapists on the treatment of lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Benten, Esther; Pool, Jan; Mens, Jan; Pool-Goudzwaard, Annelies

    2014-07-01

    Systematic review of the literature. To review and assess the peer-reviewed literature on the effectiveness of physical therapy interventions in treating lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy. Current guidelines on interventions for lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy differ in their recommendations for assessment and intervention. Recent publications may allow revising current recommendations for the treatment of this complex problem. An electronic search strategy was conducted in PubMed, PEDro, Scopus, and CINAHL of literature published from January 1992 to November 2013. Two authors independently assessed all abstracts for eligibility. Articles were independently rated for quality by 2 authors, using the Cochrane Back Review Group criteria for methodological quality. Where possible, effect sizes were calculated for the different interventions. A total of 22 articles (all randomized controlled trials) reporting on 22 independent studies were included. Overall, the methodological quality of the studies was moderate. Data for 4 types of interventions were considered: a combination of interventions (7 studies, n = 1202), exercise therapy (9 studies, n = 2149), manual therapy (5 studies, n = 360), and material support (1 study, n = 115). All included studies on exercise therapy, and most of the studies on interventions combined with patient education, reported a positive effect on pain, disability, and/or sick leave. Evidence-based recommendations can be made for the use of exercise therapy for the treatment of lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy. Therapy, level 1a-. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2014;44(7):464-473. Epub 10 May 2014. doi:10.2519/jospt.2014.5098.

  17. Systematic Review of Central Post Stroke Pain: What Is Happening in the Central Nervous System?

    PubMed

    Akyuz, Gulseren; Kuru, Pinar

    2016-08-01

    Central poststroke pain (CPSP) is one of the most common central neuropathic pain syndromes seen after stroke. It is mainly related with vascular damage at certain brain territory and pain related to corresponding body areas. In the past, it was described as one of the definitive symptoms of thalamic lesion. However, recent findings suggest that it is not only seen after thalamic lesions but also seen after vascular lesions in any part of the central nervous system. Although there are certain hypotheses to explain physiopathologic mechanisms of CPSP, further evidence is needed. The majority of the cases are intractable and unresponsive to analgesic treatment. Electrical stimulation such as deep brain stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation seems to be effective in certain cases. In this systematic review, recent advancements related to CPSP mechanisms have been evaluated. Further investigations are needed in order to reveal the mystery of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of CPSP.

  18. Chest pain, panic disorder and coronary artery disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Soares-Filho, Gastão L F; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Santulli, Gaetano; Silva, Adriana C; Machado, Sergio; Valenca, Alexandre M; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-01-01

    Chest pain may be due benign diseases but often suggests an association with coronary artery disease, which justifies a quick search for medical care. However, some people have anxiety disorder with symptoms that resemble clearly an acute coronary syndrome. More specifically, during a panic attack an abrupt feeling of fear accompanied by symptoms such as breathlessness, palpitations and chest pain, makes patients believe they have a heart attack and confuse physicians about the diagnosis. The association between panic disorder and coronary artery disease has been extensively studied in recent years and, although some studies have shown anxiety disorders coexisting or increasing the risk of heart disease, one causal hypothesis is still missing. The aim of this systematic review is to present the various ways in which the scientific community has been investigating the relation between chest pain, panic disorder and coronary artery disease.

  19. Patient expectations for management of chronic non-cancer pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Jose W; Willems, Paul C; Lockwood, Craig; van Kleef, Maarten; Kleijnen, Jos; Dirksen, Carmen

    2016-12-23

    Chronic pain is a major economic and social health problem. Up to 79% of chronic pain patients are unsatisfied with their pain management. Meeting patients' expectations is likely to produce greater satisfaction with care. The challenge is to explore patients' genuine expectations and needs. However, the term expectation encompasses several concepts and may concern different aspects of health-care provision. This review aimed to systematically collect information on types and subject of patients' expectations for chronic pain management. We searched for quantitative and qualitative studies. Because of the multidimensional character of the term "expectations," the search included subject headings and free text words related to the concept of expectations. A framework for understanding patients' expectations was used to map types of expectations within structure, process or outcome of health care. Twenty-three research papers met the inclusion criteria: 18 quantitative and five qualitative. This review found that assessment of patients' expectations for treatment is mostly limited to outcome expectations (all 18 quantitative papers and four qualitative papers). Patients generally have high expectations regarding pain reduction after treatment, but expectations were higher when expressed as an ideal expectation (81-93% relief) than as a predicted expectation (44-64%). For health-care providers, for pain management and for pain research purposes, the awareness that patients express different types of expectations is important. For shared decision making in clinical practice, it is important that predicted expectations of the patient are known to the treating physician and discussed. Structure and process expectations are under-represented in our findings. However, exploring and meeting patients' expectations regarding structure, process and outcome aspects of pain management may increase patient satisfaction. © 2016 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John

  20. Evidence of Impaired Proprioception in Chronic, Idiopathic Neck Pain: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leake, Hayley B.; Chalmers, K. Jane; Moseley, G. Lorimer

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite common use of proprioceptive retraining interventions in people with chronic, idiopathic neck pain, evidence that proprioceptive dysfunction exists in this population is lacking. Determining whether proprioceptive dysfunction exists in people with chronic neck pain has clear implications for treatment prescription. Purpose The aim of this study was to synthesize and critically appraise all evidence evaluating proprioceptive dysfunction in people with chronic, idiopathic neck pain by completing a systematic review and meta-analysis. Data Sources MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, Allied and Complementary Medicine, EMBASE, Academic Search Premier, Scopus, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), and Cochrane Collaboration databases were searched. Study Selection All published studies that compared neck proprioception (joint position sense) between a chronic, idiopathic neck pain sample and asymptomatic controls were included. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers extracted relevant population and proprioception data and assessed methodological quality using a modified Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement. Data Synthesis Thirteen studies were included in the present review. Meta-analysis on 10 studies demonstrated that people with chronic neck pain perform significantly worse on head-to-neutral repositioning tests, with a moderate standardized mean difference of 0.44 (95% confidence interval=0.25, 0.63). Two studies evaluated head repositioning using trunk movement (no active head movement thus hypothesized to remove vestibular input) and showed conflicting results. Three studies evaluated complex or postural repositioning tests; postural repositioning was no different between groups, and complex movement tests were impaired only in participants with chronic neck pain if error was continuously evaluated throughout the movement. Limitations A paucity of studies evaluating complex or postural repositioning

  1. Adverse Effects of Antidepressants for Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Carina; Schuster, Tibor; Barlinn, Kristian; Maier, Sarah; Weitz, Jürgen; Siepmann, Timo

    2017-01-01

    Antidepressants are widely used in the treatment of chronic pain. Applied doses are lower than those needed to unfold an antidepressive effect. While efficacy of antidepressants for chronic pain has been reported in large randomized-controlled trials (RCT), there is inconsistent data on adverse effects and tolerability. We aimed at synthesizing data from RCT to explore adverse effect profiles and tolerability of antidepressants for treatment of chronic pain. Systematic literature research and meta-analyses were performed regarding side effects and safety of different antidepressants in the treatment of chronic pain according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The National Center for Biotechnology Information library and MEDLINE were searched. Randomized placebo-controlled trials were included in quantitative data synthesis. Out of 1,975 screened articles, 33 papers published between 1995 and 2015 were included in our review and 23 studies were included in the meta-analyses. A higher risk for adverse effects compared to placebo was observed in all antidepressants included in our analyses, except nortriptyline. The most prevalent adverse effects were dry mouth, dizziness, nausea, headache, and constipation. Amitriptyline, mirtazapine, desipramine, venlafaxine, fluoxetine, and nortriptyline showed the highest placebo effect-adjusted risk of adverse effects. Risk for withdrawal due to adverse effects was highest in desipramine (risk ratio: 4.09, 95%-confidence interval [1.31; 12.82]) followed by milnacipran, venlafaxine, and duloxetine. The most common adverse effects under treatment with antidepressants were dry mouth, dizziness, nausea, headache, and constipation followed by palpitations, sweating, and drowsiness. However, overall tolerability was high. Each antidepressant showed distinct risk profiles of adverse effects. Our synthesized data analysis confirmed overall tolerability of low-dose antidepressants for the

  2. The Social Modulation of Pain: Others as Predictive Signals of Salience – a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Krahé, Charlotte; Springer, Anne; Weinman, John A.; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2013-01-01

    Several studies in cognitive neuroscience have investigated the cognitive and affective modulation of pain. By contrast, fewer studies have focused on the social modulation of pain, despite a plethora of relevant clinical findings. Here we present the first review of experimental studies addressing how interpersonal factors, such as the presence, behavior, and spatial proximity of an observer, modulate pain. Based on a systematic literature search, we identified 26 studies on experimentally induced pain that manipulated different interpersonal variables and measured behavioral, physiological, and neural pain-related responses. We observed that the modulation of pain by interpersonal factors depended on (1) the degree to which the social partners were active or were perceived by the participants to possess possibility for action; (2) the degree to which participants could perceive the specific intentions of the social partners; (3) the type of pre-existing relationship between the social partner and the person in pain, and lastly, (4) individual differences in relating to others and coping styles. Based on these findings, we propose that the modulation of pain by social factors can be fruitfully understood in relation to a recent predictive coding model, the free energy framework, particularly as applied to interoception and social cognition. Specifically, we argue that interpersonal interactions during pain may function as social, predictive signals of contextual threat or safety and as such influence the salience of noxious stimuli. The perception of such interpersonal interactions may in turn depend on (a) prior beliefs about interpersonal relating and (b) the certainty or precision by which an interpersonal interaction may predict environmental threat or safety. PMID:23888136

  3. Incidence and severity of chronic pain after caesarean section: A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Stephanie; Neubert, Katharina; Jelting, Yvonne; Meissner, Winfried; Wöckel, Achim; Roewer, Norbert; Kranke, Peter

    2016-11-01

    The frequency of caesarean section has increased dramatically in recent decades. Despite this, robust data regarding the consequences of caesarean section in terms of developing chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) are still lacking. This systematic review analysed the incidence and severity of CPSP in women 3 to less than 6, 6 to less than 12, and at least 12 months after caesarean section. Systematic review of prospective and retrospective observational studies and randomised controlled trials with meta-analysis. We searched MEDLINE to May 2015. We included all studies investigating the incidence and/or severity of CPSP at least 3 months after caesarean section. The primary outcome was chronic postsurgical wound pain (CPSP 'wound'). Secondary outcomes were persistent pain in the back area, pelvic region or reported as residual pain, and severity of 'birth-related' chronic pain. Meta-analysis using the random-effects model based on 15 studies (n = 4475) reporting CPSP 'wound' at 3 to less than 6 months after caesarean section revealed an incidence of 15.4% [95% confidence interval (CI): 9.9 to 20.9%]. For 6 to less than 12 and at least 12 months after caesarean section, the incidence of CPSP 'wound' was estimated at 11.5% (95% CI: 8.1 to 15.0%, n = 3345) and 11.2% (95% CI: 7.4 to 15.0%, n = 3451), respectively. Meta-regression analysis using the publication year as predictor revealed stable CPSP 'wound' incidences at each postoperative time slot from 2002 to the present. Of those patients who reported chronic pain, 9.6% (95% CI: 0.0 to 21.0%) had severe pain, 23.5% (95% CI: 10.0 to 37.0%) had moderate pain and 49.2% (95% CI: 18.9 to 79.4%) had mild pain at 6 months. Major limitations are high statistical heterogeneity of the meta-analyses and inconsistencies in reporting severity of chronic 'birth-related' pain. This meta-analysis finds a clinically relevant incidence of CPSP 'wound' after caesarean section ranging from 15% at 3 months to 11% at 12 months

  4. Effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patellofemoral pain syndrome patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Thiago R. T.; Oliveira, Bárbara A.; Ocarino, Juliana M.; Holt, Kenneth G.; Fonseca, Sérgio T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is characterized by anterior knee pain, which may limit the performance of functional activities. The influence of hip joint motion on the development of this syndrome has already been documented in the literature. In this regard, studies have investigated the effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patients with PFPS. Objectives: The aims of this systematic review were (1) to summarize the literature related to the effects of hip muscle strengthening on pain intensity, muscle strength, and function in individuals with PFPS and (2) to evaluate the methodological quality of the selected studies. Method: A search for randomized controlled clinical trials was conducted using the following databases: Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PEDro, LILACS, and SciELO. The selected studies had to distinguish the effects of hip muscle strengthening in a group of patients with PFPS, as compared to non-intervention or other kinds of intervention, and had to investigate the following outcomes: pain, muscle strength, and function. The methodological quality of the selected studies was analyzed by means of the PEDro scale. Results: Seven studies were selected. These studies demonstrated that hip muscle strengthening was effective in reducing pain. However, the studies disagreed regarding the treatments' ability to improve muscle strength. Improvement in functional capabilities after hip muscle strengthening was found in five studies. Conclusion: Hip muscle strengthening is effective in reducing the intensity of pain and improving functional capabilities in patients with PFPS, despite the lack of evidence for its ability to increase muscle strength. PMID:26039034

  5. Radiotherapy for the treatment of pain in malignant pleural mesothelioma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Macleod, N; Price, A; O'Rourke, N; Fallon, M; Laird, B

    2014-02-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly used to treat pain in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). The purpose of this systematic review is to examine the evidence for this practice. Medline (1946-2013), Embase (1974-2013) and Central (The Cochrane Library Issue 9, 2012) databases were searched. Eligible studies met the following criteria: MPM (histological or radiological diagnosis), radiotherapy given with the intent of improving pain, response rates to radiotherapy reported, dose and fractionation reported and the relationship between radiotherapy and pain response explored. All studies had independent review and were graded according to evidence level. Eight studies met the eligibility criteria. Two studies were prospective single arm phase II studies while the remainder were retrospective case series. All were graded as either Level 2 or Level 3 evidence. Due to marked heterogeneity among studies, quantitative synthesis of results was not possible. No high quality evidence currently exists to support radiotherapy in treating pain in MPM. Studies focusing on clear pain endpoints and improving target delineation are needed. Such studies should also use modern radiotherapy techniques and concentrate on dose escalation.

  6. No additional value of fusion techniques on anterior discectomy for neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Ostelo, Raymond; van Tulder, Maurits W; Peul, Wilco; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2012-11-01

    We aimed to assess the effects of additional fusion on surgical interventions to the cervical spine for patients with neck pain with or without radiculopathy or myelopathy by performing a systematic review. The search strategy outlined by the Cochrane Back Review Group (CBRG) was followed. The primary search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL and PEDro up to June 2011. Only randomised, controlled trials of adults with neck pain that evaluated at least one clinically relevant primary outcome measure (pain, functional status, recovery) were included. Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias by using the criteria recommended by the CBRG and extracted the data. Data were pooled using a random effects model. The quality of the evidence was rated using the GRADE method. In total, 10 randomised, controlled trials were identified comparing additional fusion upon anterior decompression techniques, including 2 studies with a low risk of bias. Results revealed no clinically relevant differences in recovery: the pooled risk difference in the short-term follow-up was -0.06 (95% confidence interval -0.22 to 0.10) and -0.07 (95% confidence interval -0.14 to 0.00) in the long-term follow-up. Pooled risk differences for pain and return to work all demonstrated no differences. There is no additional benefit of fusion techniques applied within an anterior discectomy procedure on pain, recovery and return to work.

  7. Do implementation strategies increase adherence to pain assessment in hospitals? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ista, Erwin; van Dijk, Monique; van Achterberg, Theo

    2013-04-01

    Pain assessment and reassessment is an essential part of the treatment of hospitalised patients and must be integrated in pain management protocols. Yet nurses' adherence to pain assessment recommendations is problematic. We sought to review the comparative evidence for implementation strategies aiming to improve nurses' adherence to pain assessment recommendations in hospitalised patients. Systematic review using the narrative method. PubMed (MEDLINE), CINAHL, Cochrane library and hand searching. Studies published since 1990, reporting implementation strategies that aimed to improve nurses' adherence to pain assessment recommendations in hospitalised patients were included. According to the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care group (EPOC) classification system, strategies were categorized as directed at: health professionals, organizations, financing, or regulations. Given the heterogeneity in strategies, samples, outcomes and settings, evidence from the studies was synthesized using a narrative approach. From 743 initial citations, 23 studies were included. They reported a variety of implementation strategies, but only directed at health professionals and/or organizations. In seven studies, a single strategy was applied (e.g. education or feedback). The remaining 16 studies used multifaceted approaches. The effectiveness of the implementation strategies varied. In all studies but one, adherence rates had improved after implementation compared to the before measurement, by 9% up to 49%. These effects were measured at different time points after completion of the implementation, ranging from 2 weeks to 6 months. Half of the reviewed studies reported an adherence rate of 80% or higher after implementation activities; other reported rates ranging from 24 to 80%. In two controlled studies the adherence to pain assessment recommendations increased significantly when feedback was provided compared to no feedback. Sustained effects were reported in three

  8. Social functioning and peer relationships in children and adolescents with chronic pain: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Forgeron, Paula A; King, Sara; Stinson, Jennifer N; McGrath, Patrick J; MacDonald, Amanda J; Chambers, Christine T

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peer relationships during childhood and adolescence are acknowledged to be negatively impacted by chronic pain; however, to date there has been no synthesis of this literature. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review existing literature describing the social functioning and peer relationships in children and adolescents with recurrent or continuous chronic pain. METHODS: Articles on peer relationship factors studied in samples of children and adolescents with chronic pain published in English or French were identified using EMBASE, Medline, CINAHL and PsycINFO. Two independent reviewers performed initial screenings using study titles and abstracts, and reviewed each eligible article in full. RESULTS: Of 1740 published papers yielded by the search, 42 articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the present review. Nine studies had peer relationship investigation as the primary purpose of the study; the remaining 33 examined peer relationships as part of a broader study. A range of specific and more general measures was used to examine peer relationships. Across studies, children and adolescents with chronic pain were reported to have fewer friends, be subjected to more peer victimization, and were viewed as more isolated and less likeable than healthy peers. CONCLUSIONS: Children and adolescents with chronic pain have peer relationship deficiencies. However, the majority of studies to date measure peer relationships as part of a broader study and, thus, little attention has been paid specifically to peer relationships in this group. Additional research examining the quality of peer relationships of children and adolescents with chronic pain, as well as development of measures specifically designed to assess these relationships, is needed. PMID:20195556

  9. Acupuncture for chronic knee pain: a protocol for an updated systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinhong; Yue, Jinhuan; Sun, Zhongren; Lu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for patients with chronic knee pain. Methods and analysis MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases will be searched from their inception to present. We will also manually retrieve eligible studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which acupuncture is assessed as the sole treatment or as an adjunct treatment for chronic knee pain will be included. The primary outcome of our analysis is pain measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale or the 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes will include the quality of life, measured by the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and adverse events. Two researchers will conduct the study selection, data extraction and quality assessment independently. Any disagreement will be resolved through discussion with a third reviewer. The Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) checklist will be used to assess the methodological quality of the trials. Dissemination This systematic review will assess the current evidence on acupuncture therapy for chronic knee pain. It uses aggregated published data instead of individual patient data and does not require an ethical board review and approval. The findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated in conference presentations. It will provide the latest analysis of the currently available evidence for acupuncture treating chronic knee pain. Trial registration number CRD42014015514. PMID:26911581

  10. Acupuncture for chronic knee pain: a protocol for an updated systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinhong; Yue, Jinhuan; Sun, Zhongren; Lu, Ying

    2016-02-24

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for patients with chronic knee pain. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTERAL, CINAHL and four Chinese medical databases will be searched from their inception to present. We will also manually retrieve eligible studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in which acupuncture is assessed as the sole treatment or as an adjunct treatment for chronic knee pain will be included. The primary outcome of our analysis is pain measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale or the 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS). The secondary outcomes will include the quality of life, measured by the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and adverse events. Two researchers will conduct the study selection, data extraction and quality assessment independently. Any disagreement will be resolved through discussion with a third reviewer. The Cochrane risk-of-bias criteria and the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA) checklist will be used to assess the methodological quality of the trials. This systematic review will assess the current evidence on acupuncture therapy for chronic knee pain. It uses aggregated published data instead of individual patient data and does not require an ethical board review and approval. The findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and disseminated in conference presentations. It will provide the latest analysis of the currently available evidence for acupuncture treating chronic knee pain. CRD42014015514. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Effects of exercise on pain of musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Elisângela Valevein; Gomes, Anna Raquel Silveira; Tanhoffer, Aldre Izabel Pchevozniki; Leite, Neiva

    2014-01-01

    Work related musculoskeletal disorders are a major concern for public health and pain is the most important symptom. The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness of workplace exercises to control musculoskeletal pain and its frequency, intensity, duration and type of exercises used. The search was conducted systematically in Medline, Pubmed, Embase, Bireme, Web of Knowledge and Pedro databases. The keywords "workplace", "exercise" and "musculoskeletal disorders" were used combined. Randomized control trials which performed worksite exercises were selected and the studies were assessed by their methodological soundness. Ten articles were selected which investigated the resistance training, cardio respiratory exercises, Pilates, stretching, postural orientation and exercises for relaxation. Workplace resistance training performed at 70-85% RM, three times a week for 20 minutes promotes reduction of the pain in shoulders, wrists, cervical, dorsal and lumbar spine. However, there is no consensus regarding the total duration of the intervention for the decrease of musculoskeletal pain in these regions. Level of Evidence I, Therapeutic Studies Investigating the Results of Treatment, Systematic Review of RCTs (Randomized and Controlled Clinical Studies). PMID:25538482

  12. Effects of Pilates exercise programs in people with chronic low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Patti, Antonino; Bianco, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio; Messina, Giuseppe; Montalto, Maria Alessandra; Bellafiore, Marianna; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Iovane, Angelo; Palma, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Pilates method has recently become a fast-growing popular way of exercise recommended for healthy individuals and those engaged in rehabilitation. Several published studies have examined the effects of Pilates method in people with chronic low back pain (LBP). The objective of this study is to describe and provide an extensive overview of the scientific literature comparing the effectiveness of the Pilates method on pain and disability in patients with chronic nonspecific LBP. The study is based on the data from the following sources: MEDLINE-NLM, MEDLINE-EBSCO, Scopus Elsevier, Cochrane, DOAJ, SciELO, and PLOSONE. Original articles and systematic reviews of adults with chronic nonspecific LBP that evaluated pain and/or disability were included in this study; studies in which the primary treatment was based on Pilates method exercises compared with no treatment, minimal intervention, other types of intervention, or other types of exercises. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) were adopted. The literature search included 7 electronic databases and the reference list of relevant systematic reviews and original articles to July 2014. Two independent investigators conducted the literature search and performed the synthesis as follows: Study Design; Sample (n); Disability measure; Intervention; and Main results. The searches identified a total of 128 articles. From these, 29 were considered eligible and were included in the analysis. The items were stratified as follows: Pilates method versus other kind of exercises (n = 6 trials) and Pilates method versus no treatment group or minimal intervention for short-term pain (n = 9 trials); the therapeutic effect of the Pilates method in randomized cohorts (n = 5); and analysis of reviews (n = 9). We found that there is a dearth of studies that clearly demonstrates the efficacy of a specific Pilates exercise program over another in the treatment of chronic pain. However, the

  13. Risk factors for shoulder pain and injury in swimmers: A critical systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hill, Lee; Collins, Malcolm; Posthumus, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Swimming is one of the most popular recreational and competitive sporting activities. In the 2013/2014 swimming season, 9630 men and 12,333 women were registered with the National Collegiate Athletics Association in the USA. The repetitive nature of the swimming stroke and demanding training programs of its athletes raises a number of concerns regarding incidence and severity of injuries that a swimmer might experience during a competitive season. A number of risk factors have previously been identified but the level of evidence from individual studies, as well as the level of certainty that these factors predispose a swimmer to pain and injury, to our knowledge has yet to be critically evaluated in a systematic review. Therefore, the primary objective of this review is to conduct a systematic review to critically assess the published evidence for risk factors that may predispose a swimmer to shoulder pain and injury. Three electronic databases, ScienceDirect, PubMed and SpringerLink, were searched using keywords "(Injury OR pain) AND (Swim*)" and "(Shoulder) AND (Swim*)". Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 2731 unique titles were identified and were analyzed to a final 29 articles. Only articles with a level of evidence of I, II and III were included according to robust study design and data analysis. The level of certainty for each risk factor was determined. No studies were determined to have a high level of certainty, clinical joint laxity and instability, internal/external rotation, previous history of pain and injury and competitive level were determined to have a moderate level of certainty. All other risk factors were evaluated as having a low level of certainty. Although several risk factors were identified from the reviewed studies, prospective cohort studies, larger sample sizes, consistent and robust measures of risk should be employed in future research.

  14. Neuropathic Pain Post Spinal Cord Injury Part 2: Systematic Review of Dorsal Root Entry Zone Procedure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pharmacotherapy may not sufficiently reduce neuropathic pain in many individuals post spinal cord injury (SCI). The use of alternative therapies such as surgery may be effective in reducing neuropathic pain in these individuals. However, because of the invasive nature of surgery, it is important to examine the evidence for use of this treatment. Objective: The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of published literature on the surgical treatment of neuropathic pain after SCI. Methods: MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles in which surgical treatment of pain after SCI was examined. Articles were restricted to the English language. Article selection was conducted by 2 independent reviewers with the following inclusion criteria: the subjects participated in a surgical intervention for neuropathic pain; at least 50% of the subjects had an SCI; at least 3 subjects had an SCI; and a definable intervention involving the dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) procedure was used to reduce pain. Data extracted included study design, study type, subject demographics, inclusion and exclusion criteria, sample size, outcome measures, and study results. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were assessed for quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) assessment scale. Levels of evidence were assigned to each intervention using a modified Sackett scale. Results: Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. One study provided level 2 evidence, and the rest provided level 4 evidence. The DREZ procedure was shown to be more effective for segmental pain than for diffuse pain after SCI. Further, individuals with conus medullaris level injury were found to have a higher level of neuropathic pain relief than those with cervical, thoracic, or cauda equina injury. Conclusions: The studies demonstrated that the DREZ procedure may be effective in reducing segmental pain. Hence, DREZ may be important in treatment of

  15. Systematic review and meta-analysis of acupuncture to reduce cancer-related pain.

    PubMed

    Chiu, H Y; Hsieh, Y J; Tsai, P S

    2017-03-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on malignancy-related, chemotherapy (CT)- or radiation therapy (RT)-induced, surgery-induced, and hormone therapy (HT)-induced pain. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of acupuncture on cancer-related pain were reached from the EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Airiti library, Taiwan Electrical Periodical Service, Wanfang Data (a Chinese database) and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database from inception through June 2014. Heterogeneity, moderator analysis, publication bias and risk of bias associated with the included studies were examined. A total of 29 RCTs yielding 36 effect sizes were included. The overall effect of acupuncture on cancer-related pain was -0.45 [95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.63 to -0.26]. The subanalysis indicated that acupuncture relieved malignancy-related and surgery-induced pain [effect size (g) = -0.71, and -0.40; 95% CI = -0.94 to -0.48, and -0.69 to -0.10] but not CT- or RT-induced and HT-induced pain (g = -0.05, and -0.64, 95% CI = -0.33 to 0.24, and -1.55 to 0.27). Acupuncture is effective in relieving cancer-related pain, particularly malignancy-related and surgery-induced pain. Our findings suggest that acupuncture can be adopted as part of a multimodal approach for reducing cancer-related pain.

  16. Assessment and classification of cancer breakthrough pain: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg; Hjermstad, Marianne Jensen; Hagen, Neil; Caraceni, Augusto; Kaasa, Stein

    2010-06-01

    Temporal variations in cancer pain intensity are highly prevalent, and are often difficult to manage. However, the phenomenon is not well understood: several definitions and approaches to classification and bedside assessment of cancer breakthrough pain (BTP) have been described. The present study is a systematic review of published literature on cancer BTP to answer the following questions: which terms and definitions have been used; are there validated assessment tools; which domains of BTP do the tools delineate, and which items do they contain; how have assessment tools been applied within clinical studies; and are there validated classification systems for BTP. A systematic search of the peer-reviewed literature was performed using five major databases. Of 375 titles and abstracts initially identified, 51 articles were examined in detail. Analysis of these publications indicates a range of overlapping but distinct definitions have been used to characterize BTP; 42 of the included papers presented one or more ways of classifying BTP; and while 10 tools to assess patients' experience of BTP were identified, only 2 have been partially validated. We conclude that there is no widely accepted definition, classification system or well-validated assessment tool for cancer-related breakthrough pain, but there is strong concurrence on most of its key attributes. With further work in this area, an internationally agreed upon definition and classification system for cancer-related breakthrough pain, and a standard approach on how to measure it, hold the promise to improve patient care and support research in this poor-prognosis cancer pain syndrome.

  17. Pharmacologic treatment in pediatric functional abdominal pain disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Korterink, Judith J; Rutten, Juliette M T M; Venmans, Leonie; Benninga, Marc A; Tabbers, Merit M

    2015-02-01

    To systematically review literature assessing efficacy and safety of pharmacologic treatments in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs). MEDLINE and Cochrane Database were searched for systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials investigating efficacy and safety of pharmacologic agents in children aged 4-18 years with AP-FGIDs. Quality of evidence was assessed using Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. We included 6 studies with 275 children (aged 4.5-18 years) evaluating antispasmodic, antidepressant, antireflux, antihistaminic, and laxative agents. Overall quality of evidence was very low. Compared with placebo, some evidence was found for peppermint oil in improving symptoms (OR 3.3 (95% CI 0.9-12.0) and for cyproheptadine in reducing pain frequency (relative risk [RR] 2.43, 95% CI 1.17-5.04) and pain intensity (RR 3.03, 95% CI 1.29-7.11). Compared with placebo, amitriptyline showed 15% improvement in overall quality of life score (P = .007) and famotidine only provides benefit in global symptom improvement (OR 11.0; 95% CI 1.6-75.5; P = .02). Polyethylene glycol with tegaserod significantly decreased pain intensity compared with polyethylene glycol only (RR 3.60, 95% CI 1.54-8.40). No serious adverse effects were reported. No studies were found concerning antidiarrheal agents, antibiotics, pain medication, anti-emetics, or antimigraine agents. Because of the lack of high-quality, placebo-controlled trials of pharmacologic treatment for pediatric AP-FGIDs, there is no evidence to support routine use of any pharmacologic therapy. Peppermint oil, cyproheptadine, and famotidine might be potential interventions, but well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Injection therapy and denervation procedures for chronic low-back pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, Ton; Rubinstein, Sidney M.; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Ostelo, Raymond; Verhagen, Arianne; Koes, Bart W.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2010-01-01

    Injection therapy and denervation procedures are commonly used in the management of chronic low-back pain (LBP) despite uncertainty regarding their effectiveness and safety. To provide an evaluation of the current evidence associated with the use of these procedures, a systematic review was performed. Existing systematic reviews were screened, and the Cochrane Back Review Group trial register was searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Studies were included if they recruited adults with chronic LBP, evaluated the use of injection therapy or denervation procedures and measured at least one clinically relevant outcome (such as pain or functional status). Two review authors independently assessed studies for eligibility and risk of bias (RoB). A meta-analysis was performed with clinically homogeneous studies, and the GRADE approach was used to determine the quality of evidence. In total, 27 RCTs were included, 14 on injection therapy and 13 on denervation procedures. 18 (66%) of the studies were determined to have a low RoB. Because of clinical heterogeneity, only two comparisons could be pooled. Overall, there is only low to very low quality evidence to support the use of injection therapy and denervation procedures over placebo or other treatments for patients with chronic LBP. However, it cannot be ruled out that in carefully selected patients, some injection therapy or denervation procedures may be of benefit. PMID:20424870

  19. Efficacy of Auricular Therapy for Pain Management: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chao Hsing; Chiang, Yi Chien; Hoffman, Samuel L.; Liang, Zhan; Klem, Mary Lou; Tam, Wilson W. S.; Chien, Lung-Chang; Suen, Lorna Kwai-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy of auricular therapy by including a sham therapy control group. Methods. Relevant, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) were identified by searching medical related databases from, depending on journal, 1900 (at the earliest) to 1994 (at the latest) through May 2013. The outcome measure was a pain intensity score. Results. Twenty-two RCTs were identified and 13 RCTs were included for meta-analysis. In these studies, auricular therapy provided significant pain relief when compared to a sham or control group. The overall standardized mean differences (SMD) was 1.59 (95% CI [−2.36, −0.82]) (13 trials, total subject numbers = 806), indicating that, on average, the mean decrease in pain score for auricular therapy group was 1.59 standard deviations greater than the mean decrease for the sham control. In terms of the efficacy of the different treatment methods, auricular acupressure boasts the largest strength of evidence for pain relief, followed by auricular acupuncture. Electroacupuncture stimulation did not show significant evidence for efficacy, which may be due to the small sample size (i.e., only 19 subjects were included). Conclusion. Further large-scale RCTs are needed to determine the efficacy of auricular therapy for pain. PMID:25165482

  20. Thoracic manipulation versus mobilization in patients with mechanical neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Young, Jodi L; Walker, Doug; Snyder, Shane; Daly, Kelly

    2014-08-01

    Thoracic manipulation is widely used in physical therapy and has been shown to be effective at addressing mechanical neck pain. However, thoracic mobilization may produce similar effects. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the current literature regarding the effectiveness of thoracic manipulation versus mobilization in patients with mechanical neck pain. ProQuest, NCBI-PubMed, APTA's Hooked on Evidence, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus were searched to identify relevant studies. Fourteen studies meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and the GRADE approach. The literature as assessed by the PEDro scale was fair and the GRADE method showed overall quality ranging from very low to moderate quality. The 14 included studies showed positive outcomes on cervical pain levels, range of motion, and/or disability with the use of thoracic manipulation or mobilization. There was a paucity of literature directly comparing thoracic manipulation and mobilization. Current limitations in the body of research, specifically regarding the use of thoracic mobilization, limit the recommendation of its use compared to thoracic manipulation for patients with mechanical neck pain. There is, however, a significant amount of evidence, although of varied quality, for the short-term benefits of thoracic manipulation in treating patients with this condition. Further high quality research is necessary to determine which technique is more effective in treating patients with mechanical neck pain.

  1. Thoracic manipulation versus mobilization in patients with mechanical neck pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jodi L; Walker, Doug; Snyder, Shane; Daly, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Thoracic manipulation is widely used in physical therapy and has been shown to be effective at addressing mechanical neck pain. However, thoracic mobilization may produce similar effects. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the current literature regarding the effectiveness of thoracic manipulation versus mobilization in patients with mechanical neck pain. Methods: ProQuest, NCBI-PubMed, APTA's Hooked on Evidence, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and SPORTDiscus were searched to identify relevant studies. Fourteen studies meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and the GRADE approach. Results: The literature as assessed by the PEDro scale was fair and the GRADE method showed overall quality ranging from very low to moderate quality. The 14 included studies showed positive outcomes on cervical pain levels, range of motion, and/or disability with the use of thoracic manipulation or mobilization. There was a paucity of literature directly comparing thoracic manipulation and mobilization. Discussion: Current limitations in the body of research, specifically regarding the use of thoracic mobilization, limit the recommendation of its use compared to thoracic manipulation for patients with mechanical neck pain. There is, however, a significant amount of evidence, although of varied quality, for the short-term benefits of thoracic manipulation in treating patients with this condition. Further high quality research is necessary to determine which technique is more effective in treating patients with mechanical neck pain. PMID:25125936

  2. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments for chronic pain in individuals with HIV: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Jessica S; Bulls, Hailey W; Vucovich, Lee A; Edelman, E Jennifer; Starrels, Joanna L

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pain occurs in as many as 85% of individuals with HIV and is associated with substantial functional impairment. Little guidance is available for HIV providers seeking to address their patients' chronic pain. We conducted a systematic review to identify clinical trials and observational studies that examined the impact of pharmacologic or non-pharmacologic interventions on pain and/or functional outcomes among HIV-infected individuals with chronic pain in high-development countries. Eleven studies met inclusion criteria and were mostly low or very low quality. Seven examined pharmacologic interventions (gabapentin, pregabalin, capsaicin, analgesics including opioids) and four examined non-pharmacologic interventions (cognitive behavioral therapy, self-hypnosis, smoked cannabis). The only controlled studies with positive results were of capsaicin and cannabis, and had short-term follow-up (≤12 weeks). Among the seven studies of pharmacologic interventions, five had substantial pharmaceutical industry sponsorship. These findings highlight several important gaps in the HIV/chronic pain literature that require further research.

  3. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Espinosa, Maríam L.; Sanmartí-García, Gemma; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of neuropathic pain, and they include the use of different antiepileptic drugs. However, the lack of high quality studies indicates that results on the different neuropathic disorders under study do not recommend a particular drug treatment. This study makes a systematic review of the published literature on the use of several antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain, and has the objective of considering both its clinical characteristics and pharmacological use, which will depend on their level of scientific evidence and will follow the principles of evidence-based dentistry. The articles were stratified according to their scientific evidence using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy), and it included those articles that only have level 1 or 2. Randomized clinical trials were stratified according to their level of quality using the JADAD scale, an instrument described by Jadad et al. (7). to assess the quality of clinical trials, while studies with a level below 3 were discarded. Recently, type A or B recommendations are given in favor or against the use of antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain on the basis of their scientific quality. Key words:Neuropathic pain, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, post- herpetic neuralgia, burning mouth syndrome, persistent idiopathic facial pain. PMID:22549682

  4. Acupuncture for postoperative pain following total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Young; Cho, Jae-Heung; Chung, Seok-hee

    2015-11-18

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a common surgical method in orthopaedics; however, pain management after TKA remains a significant challenge. This review provides a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of acupuncture for postoperative pain after TKA. The following 10 databases will be searched until August 2015: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, AMED, CINAHL, three Chinese databases (the China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database, the Chongqing VIP Chinese Science and Technology Periodical Database, and Wanfang Database) and five Korean databases (the Korean Medical Database, the Korean Studies Information Service System, the National Discovery for Science Leaders, the Database Periodical Information Academic, and the Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System). All eligible randomised controlled trials related to the use of acupuncture for postoperative pain after TKA will be included. Assessment of risk of bias will be performed with the Cochrane risk-of-bias method. Mean differences or standardised mean differences will be calculated with 95% CIs for continuous data; the risk ratio will be used with 95% CIs for dichotomous data. This systematic review will be presented in a peer-reviewed journal. The result of this review will also be disseminated at a relevant conference presentation. PROSPERO 2015: CRD42015020924. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Prevalence of low back pain in Latin America: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Joao Batista S; Hernandez-Castro, John J; Nunez, Rocio G; Pazos, Maria Ar; Aguirre, Jorge O; Jreige, Asisa; Delgado, Willian; Serpentegui, Manuel; Berenguel, Maria; Cantemir, Catalin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is considered as a high-impact condition that affects the working population of Latin America, with long reaching social and economic repercussions. Its true frequency is unknown due to the absence of well-designed clinical trials that use standardized definitions and criteria. To evaluate the prevalence of chronic non-specific low back pain among the Latin American population. A systematic review of chronic non-specific low back pain in Latin America. Meeting of Change Pain Latin America, Mexico. Data sources included relevant literature identified through searches of published studies between August 30, 2002, and August 30, 2012, in 7 electronic databases: Cochrane BVS, Pubmed, Medline, Lilacs, Scielo, Hinari, and MedCarib. Publications dealing with low back pain of a post-traumatic, infectious, or malignant origin were excluded. Two reviewers selected in an independent manner all eligible studies using the MOOSE checklist and extracted data on both prevalence and risk factors associated with low back pain. A narrative synthesis of the results was drafted, which was later validated by a panel of clinical experts on pain. Twenty-eight studies were included in the review, comprising a total of 20,559 subjects from 7 countries in the region. Four of these studies, with significant methodological differences between them, measured the frequency of chronic low back pain with results that varied from 4.2% to 10.1%. Four studies are part of the Community Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) program reports, and were pooled and analyzed separately because of their particular design. Their prevalence estimations varied between 1.8% and 11.3%. The remaining 20 studies evaluated a total population of 6,992 subjects, and found a prevalence of low back pain of 31.3%. Based on an epidemiological model constructed on both times to resolution and low back pain recurrence rates, the prevalence of chronic low back pain in Latin America

  6. The effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wells, Cherie; Kolt, Gregory S; Marshall, Paul; Hill, Bridget; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP) through a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). A search for RCTs was undertaken using Medical Search Terms and synonyms for "Pilates" and "low back pain" within the maximal date range of 10 databases. Databases included the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; Cochrane Library; Medline; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; ProQuest: Health and Medical Complete, Nursing and Allied Health Source, Dissertation and Theses; Scopus; Sport Discus; Web of Science. Two independent reviewers were involved in the selection of evidence. To be included, relevant RCTs needed to be published in the English language. From 152 studies, 14 RCTs were included. Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological quality of RCTs using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. The author(s), year of publication, and details regarding participants, Pilates exercise, comparison treatments, and outcome measures, and findings, were then extracted. The methodological quality of RCTs ranged from "poor" to "excellent". A meta-analysis of RCTs was not undertaken due to the heterogeneity of RCTs. Pilates exercise provided statistically significant improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity between 4 and 15 weeks, but not at 24 weeks. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in improvements in pain and functional ability with Pilates exercise, massage therapy, or other forms of exercise at any time period. Pilates exercise offers greater improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity in the short term. Pilates exercise offers equivalent improvements to massage therapy and other forms of exercise. Future research should explore optimal Pilates exercise designs, and whether some people with CLBP may benefit from Pilates exercise more than

  7. Nonpharmacologic relief of pain during labor: systematic reviews of five methods.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Penny P; O'hara, MaryAnn

    2002-05-01

    Nonpharmacologic measures to reduce labor pain have been used throughout history. Despite reports that some of these methods reduce pain, increase maternal satisfaction, and improve other obstetric outcomes, they have received limited attention in the medical literature and are not commonly available to women in North America. The controlled studies of nonpharmacologic methods are limited in number and sometimes provide conflicting results. This systematic review was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of the best studied techniques, as well as to highlight areas in need of further research. Five comfort measures were selected for review, based on these criteria: they have been evaluated with prospective controlled studies and they require institutional support (eg, skills, policies, equipment). These 5 methods included continuous labor support, baths, touch and massage, maternal movement and positioning, and intradermal water blocks for back pain relief. An extensive search of electronic databases and other sources identified studies for consideration. Critical evaluation of controlled studies of these 5 methods suggests that all 5 may be effective in reducing labor pain and improving other obstetric outcomes, and they are safe when used appropriately. Additional well-designed studies are warranted to further clarify their effect and to evaluate their cost effectiveness.

  8. A systematic review of the effectiveness of knowledge translation interventions for chronic noncancer pain management

    PubMed Central

    Ospina, Maria B; Taenzer, Paul; Rashiq, Saifee; MacDermid, Joy C; Carr, Eloise; Chojecki, Dagmara; Harstall, Christa; Henry, James L

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reliable evidence detailing effective treatments and management practices for chronic noncancer pain exists. However, little is known about which knowledge translation (KT) interventions lead to the uptake of this evidence in practice. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a systematic review of the effectiveness of KT interventions for chronic noncancer pain management. METHODS: Comprehensive searches of electronic databases, the gray literature and manual searches of journals were undertaken. Randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and controlled before-and-after studies of KT interventions were included. Data regarding interventions and primary outcomes were categorized using a standard taxonomy; a risk-of-bias approach was adopted for study quality. A narrative synthesis of study results was conducted. RESULTS: More than 8500 titles and abstracts were screened, with 230 full-text articles reviewed for eligibility. Nineteen studies were included, of which only a small proportion were judged to be at low risk of bias. Interactive KT education for health care providers has a positive effect on patients’ function, but its benefits for other health provider- and patient-related outcomes are inconsistent. Interactive education for patients leads to improvements in knowledge and function. Little research evidence supports the effectiveness of structural changes in health systems and quality improvement processes or coordination of care. CONCLUSIONS: KT interventions incorporating interactive education in chronic noncancer pain led to positive effects on patients’ function and knowledge about pain. Future studies should provide implementation details and use consistent theoretical frameworks to better estimate the effectiveness of such interventions. PMID:24308029

  9. Compliance with momentary pain measurement using electronic diaries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Morren, Mattijn; van Dulmen, Sandra; Ouwerkerk, Jessika; Bensing, Jozien

    2009-04-01

    Electronic diaries are increasingly used to assess daily pain in many different forms and populations. This systematic review aims to survey the characteristics of studies using electronic pain diaries and to examine how these characteristics affect compliance. A literature search of 11 electronic databases was conducted. Studies were evaluated on the basis of predetermined inclusion criteria by two independent reviewers. Study characteristics were grouped into four categories: general, population, electronic diary, and sampling procedure (i.e., response, attrition, and compliance rates) including strategies to enhance compliance. The 62 included publications reported from 43 different datasets. Papers were usually written in English and published as from 2000. Samples mostly consisted of female chronic pain patients aged 19-65 years from western countries. Most diaries held less than 20 items and were completed up to 6 times daily at fixed or prompted times for 1 month at most. Less than 25% of the studies reported both response and attrition rates; however, a majority reported compliance. Compliance was generally high, and positively associated with shorter diaries, age, having a user's manual, financial compensation and using an alarm. It is important that the various study characteristics are catalogued carefully, especially response and attrition rates, because they can affect compliance. Measures of momentary pain are often developed for the purpose of a certain study; standardisation and validation of these measures is recommended. Finally, authors should mention whether they report on data that has also been used in previous studies.

  10. [Use of methadone in the elderly with cancer pain: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Taberna, Miren; Villavicencio-Chávez, Christian; González-Barboteo, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    To identify the clinical use of methadone as an analgesic in the management of cancer pain in elderly patients. We performed a systemic review of the literature on the specific use of methadone in elderly with cancer pain in MEDLINE, COCHRANE DATABASE and SCOPUS. A second search was conducted in MEDLINE to look for clinical trials and systematic review of the use of methadone in cancer pain, selecting only those in which the mean age of patients was ≥ 65 years old. Four articles were obtained in the first search, and from the second 7 clinical trials, none of them specific to methadone use in elderly patients with cancer. There are insufficient data on the use of methadone as an analgesic in the elderly with cancer. Given its pharmacological characteristics it must be used by trained personnel. Several recommendations are proposed for its use as an analgesic in the treatment of cancer pain in the elderly. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation for pain relief during labor: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mello, Larissa F D; Nóbrega, Luciana F; Lemos, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological pain relief method. It is an auxiliary method and not intended to replace other techniques. To perform a systematic review assessing the effectiveness of TENS compared to no TENS treatment or placebo with the following outcomes: pain relief (primary outcome), analgesic requirements, duration of labor, the mother's satisfaction, type of delivery and fetal repercussions (secondary outcomes). The Pubmed, LILACS and Scielo databases were searched for randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials published between 1966 and 2008 using the keywords 'TENS', 'Labor', 'Labor pain' and 'obstetric labor'. The selection of eligible items and assessment of methodological quality were performed independently by two researchers. Random effects meta-analysis was performed for studies that were sufficiently homogeneous. Nine studies involving a total of 1076 pregnant women were included. There was no statistically significant difference between groups in pain relief during labor (pooled RR = 1.09, 95% CI = 0.72 to 1.65) or the need of additional analgesia (pooled RR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.74 to 1.08). There was no evidence that TENS interfered in any of the outcomes except the mothers' desire to use TENS in future deliveries. The use of TENS had no impact on mother or child and no influence on labor. According to the results of this review, there is no evidence that TENS reduces the use of additional analgesia.

  12. Predicting response to physiotherapy treatment for musculoskeletal shoulder pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background People suffering from musculoskeletal shoulder pain are frequently referred to physiotherapy. Physiotherapy generally involves a multimodal approach to management that may include; exercise, manual therapy and techniques to reduce pain. At present it is not possible to predict which patients will respond positively to physiotherapy treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify which prognostic factors are associated with the outcome of physiotherapy in the management of musculoskeletal shoulder pain. Methods A comprehensive search was undertaken of Ovid Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL and AMED (from inception to January 2013). Prospective studies of participants with shoulder pain receiving physiotherapy which investigated the association between baseline prognostic factors and change in pain and function over time were included. Study selection, data extraction and appraisal of study quality were undertaken by two independent assessors. Quality criteria were selected from previously published guidelines to form a checklist of 24 items. The study protocol was prospectively registered onto the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. Results A total of 5023 titles were retrieved and screened for eligibility, 154 articles were assessed as full text and 16 met the inclusion criteria: 11 cohort studies, 3 randomised controlled trials and 2 controlled trials. Results were presented for the 9 studies meeting 13 or more of the 24 quality criteria. Clinical and statistical heterogeneity resulted in qualitative synthesis rather than meta-analysis. Three studies demonstrated that high functional disability at baseline was associated with poor functional outcome (p ≤ 0.05). Four studies demonstrated a significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between longer duration of shoulder pain and poorer outcome. Three studies, demonstrated a significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between increasing age and poorer function; three studies

  13. Predicting response to physiotherapy treatment for musculoskeletal shoulder pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chester, Rachel; Shepstone, Lee; Daniell, Helena; Sweeting, David; Lewis, Jeremy; Jerosch-Herold, Christina

    2013-07-08

    People suffering from musculoskeletal shoulder pain are frequently referred to physiotherapy. Physiotherapy generally involves a multimodal approach to management that may include; exercise, manual therapy and techniques to reduce pain. At present it is not possible to predict which patients will respond positively to physiotherapy treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify which prognostic factors are associated with the outcome of physiotherapy in the management of musculoskeletal shoulder pain. A comprehensive search was undertaken of Ovid Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL and AMED (from inception to January 2013). Prospective studies of participants with shoulder pain receiving physiotherapy which investigated the association between baseline prognostic factors and change in pain and function over time were included. Study selection, data extraction and appraisal of study quality were undertaken by two independent assessors. Quality criteria were selected from previously published guidelines to form a checklist of 24 items. The study protocol was prospectively registered onto the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. A total of 5023 titles were retrieved and screened for eligibility, 154 articles were assessed as full text and 16 met the inclusion criteria: 11 cohort studies, 3 randomised controlled trials and 2 controlled trials. Results were presented for the 9 studies meeting 13 or more of the 24 quality criteria. Clinical and statistical heterogeneity resulted in qualitative synthesis rather than meta-analysis. Three studies demonstrated that high functional disability at baseline was associated with poor functional outcome (p ≤ 0.05). Four studies demonstrated a significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between longer duration of shoulder pain and poorer outcome. Three studies, demonstrated a significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between increasing age and poorer function; three studies demonstrated no association (p > 0

  14. Osteopathic manipulative treatment for nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Franke, Helge; Franke, Jan-David; Fryer, Gary

    2014-08-30

    Nonspecific back pain is common, disabling, and costly. Therefore, we assessed effectiveness of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) in the management of nonspecific low back pain (LBP) regarding pain and functional status. A systematic literature search unrestricted by language was performed in October 2013 in electronic and ongoing trials databases. Searches of reference lists and personal communications identified additional studies. Only randomized clinical trials were included; specific back pain or single treatment techniques studies were excluded. Outcomes were pain and functional status. Studies were independently reviewed using a standardized form. The mean difference (MD) or standard mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and overall effect size were calculated at 3 months posttreatment. GRADE was used to assess quality of evidence. We identified 307 studies. Thirty-one were evaluated and 16 excluded. Of the 15 studies reviewed, 10 investigated effectiveness of OMT for nonspecific LBP, 3 effect of OMT for LBP in pregnant women, and 2 effect of OMT for LBP in postpartum women. Twelve had a low risk of bias. Moderate-quality evidence suggested OMT had a significant effect on pain relief (MD, -12.91; 95% CI, -20.00 to -5.82) and functional status (SMD, -0.36; 95% CI, -0.58 to -0.14) in acute and chronic nonspecific LBP. In chronic nonspecific LBP, moderate-quality evidence suggested a significant difference in favour of OMT regarding pain (MD, -14.93; 95% CI, -25.18 to -4.68) and functional status (SMD, -0.32; 95% CI, -0.58 to -0.07). For nonspecific LBP in pregnancy, low-quality evidence suggested a significant difference in favour of OMT for pain (MD, -23.01; 95% CI, -44.13 to -1.88) and functional status (SMD, -0.80; 95% CI, -1.36 to -0.23), whereas moderate-quality evidence suggested a significant difference in favour of OMT for pain (MD, -41.85; 95% CI, -49.43 to -34.27) and functional status (SMD, -1.78; 95% CI, -2.21 to -1

  15. Systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Milner, Kerry A

    2015-01-01

    Systematic reviews are a type of literature review in which authors systematically search for, critically appraise, and synthesize evidence from several studies on the same topic (Grant & Booth, 2009). The precise and systematic method differentiates systematic reviews from traditional reviews (Khan, Kunz, Kleijnen, & Antes, 2003). In all types of systematic reviews, a quality assessment is done of the individual studies that meet inclusion criteria. These individual assessments are synthesized, and aggregated results are reported. Systematic reviews are considered the highest level of evidence in evidence-based health care because the reviewers strive to use transparent, rigorous methods that minimize bias.

  16. Pregabalin, the lidocaine plaster and duloxetine in patients with refractory neuropathic pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients frequently fail to receive adequate pain relief from, or are intolerant of, first-line therapies prescribed for neuropathic pain (NeP). This refractory chronic pain causes psychological distress and impacts patient quality of life. Published literature for treatment in refractory patients is sparse and often published as conference abstracts only. The aim of this study was to identify published data for three pharmacological treatments: pregabalin, lidocaine plaster, and duloxetine, which are typically used at 2nd line or later in UK patients with neuropathic pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR was carried out and supplemented with extensive conference and grey literature searching. Studies of any design (except single patient case studies) that enrolled adult patients with refractory NeP were included in the review and qualitatively assessed. Results Seventeen studies were included in the review: nine of pregabalin, seven of the lidocaine plaster, and one of duloxetine. No head-to-head studies of these treatments were identified. Only six studies included treatments within UK licensed indications and dose ranges. Reported efficacy outcomes were not consistent between studies. Pain scores were most commonly assessed in studies including pregabalin; trials of pregabalin and the lidocaine plaster reported the proportion of responders. Significant improvements in the total, sensory and affective scores of the Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and in function interference, sleep interference and pain associated distress, were associated with pregabalin treatment; limited or no quality of life data were available for the other two interventions. Limitations to the review are the small number of included studies, which are generally small, of poor quality and heterogeneous in patient population and study design. Conclusions Little evidence is available relevant to the treatment of refractory

  17. Some physiotherapy treatments may relieve menstrual pain in women with primary dysmenorrhea: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Priya; Claydon, Leica Sarah

    2014-03-01

    In women with primary dysmenorrhoea, what is the effect of physiotherapeutic interventions compared to control (either no treatment or placebo/sham) on pain and quality of life? Systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis. Women with primary dysmenorrhea. Any form of physiotherapy treatment. The primary outcome was menstrual pain intensity and the secondary outcome was quality of life. The search yielded 222 citations. Of these, 11 were eligible randomised trials and were included in the review. Meta-analysis revealed statistically significant reductions in pain severity on a 0-10 scale from acupuncture (weighted mean difference 2.3, 95% CI 1.6 to 2.9) and acupressure (weighted mean difference 1.4, 95% CI 0.8 to 1.9), when compared to a control group receiving no treatment. However, these are likely to be placebo effects because when the control groups in acupuncture/acupressure trials received a sham instead of no treatment, pain severity did not significantly differ between the groups. Significant reductions in pain intensity on a 0-10 scale were noted in individual trials of heat (by 1.8, 95% CI 0.9 to 2.7), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (2.3, 95% CI 0.03 to 4.2), and yoga (3.2, 95% CI 2.2 to 4.2). Meta-analysis of two trials of spinal manipulation showed no significant reduction in pain. None of the included studies measured quality of life. Physiotherapists could consider using heat, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and yoga in the management of primary dysmenorrhea. While benefits were also identified for acupuncture and acupressure in no-treatment controlled trials, the absence of significant effects in sham-controlled trials suggests these effects are mainly attributable to placebo effects. Copyright © 2014 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of birth ball on labor pain relief: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Makvandi, Somayeh; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Sadeghi, Ramin; Karimi, Leila

    2015-11-01

    To critically evaluate the available evidence related to the impact of using a birth ball on labor pain relief. The Cochrane library, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE/PubMed and Scopus were searched from their inception to January 2015 using keywords: (Birth* OR Swiss OR Swedish OR balance OR fitness OR gym* OR Pezzi OR sport* OR stability) AND (ball*) AND (labor OR labour OR Obstetric). All available randomized controlled trials involving women using a birth ball for pain relief during labor were considered. The search resulted in 341 titles and abstracts, which were narrowed down to eight potentially relevant articles. Of these, four studies met the inclusion criteria. Pain intensity on a 10 cm visual analogue scale was used as the main outcome measure. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Comprehensive Meta-Analysis Version 2 was used for statistical analysis. Four RCTs involving 220 women were included in the systematic review. One study was excluded from the meta-analysis because of heterogeneous interventions and a lack of mean and standard deviation results of labor pain score. The meta-analysis showed that birth ball exercises provided statistically significant improvements to labor pain (pooled mean difference -0.921; 95% confidence interval -1.28, -0.56; P = 0.0000005; I(2)  = 33.7%). The clinical implementation of a birth ball exercise could be an effective tool for parturient women to reduce labor pain. However, rigorous RCTs are needed to evaluate the effect of the birth ball on labor pain relief. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Analgesics for pain after traumatic or orthopaedic surgery: what is the evidence--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Montané, E; Vallano, A; Aguilera, C; Vidal, X; Laporte, J R

    2006-11-01

    To assess analgesic drugs in the treatment of postoperative pain after traumatic and orthopaedic surgery (TOS). A systematic review of randomised clinical trials (RCTs). Electronic PubMed, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and hand searches. RCTs of analgesics administered by oral, intramuscular, intravenous, subcutaneous or rectal route, were compared to other analgesics or placebo, in patients under TOS. Study design, characteristics of the study population, analgesic drugs tested, pain intensity and pain relief scores, and adverse effects were assessed. Ninety-two RCTs (9,596 patients) met our inclusion criteria. Forty-two (46%) were placebo-controlled, and 50 (54%) were direct comparisons between non-opioid, opioid, and/or combinations of both. Patients' mean age (SD) was 49 years (18). In most trials, gastrointestinal ulcer, liver and renal diseases were exclusion criteria. Only 30 trials (33%) were double-blind and reported standardised outcomes of pain intensity and pain relief; 19 of these were single-dose, and follow up of analgesic effects lasted no more than 12 h in 23 (77%). Globally, only nine trials (10%) were double blind, described dropouts or withdrawals, performed analysis by intention to treat, and reported the effects magnitude. Evidence from RCTs on the treatment of postoperative pain after TOS is inadequate for clinical decision making. Assessment of analgesics in pain after TOS should be based on agreed clinically relevant outcomes, in representative patients, and for longer observation periods. In addition, it should include direct comparisons between candidate drugs or their combinations and between various drug administration schedules.

  20. Acupuncture and related techniques for postoperative pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Gan, T J; Dubose, J W; Habib, A S

    2008-08-01

    Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. The objective of this systematic review was to quantitatively evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture and related techniques as adjunct analgesics for acute postoperative pain management. We searched the databases of Medline (1966-2007), CINAHL, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2006), and Scopus for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using acupuncture for postoperative pain management. We extracted data about postoperative opioid consumption, postoperative pain intensity, and opioid-related side-effects. Combined data were analysed using a random effects model. Fifteen RCTs comparing acupuncture with sham control in the management of acute postoperative pain were included. Weighted mean difference for cumulative opioid analgesic consumption was -3.14 mg (95% confidence interval, CI: -5.15, -1.14), -8.33 mg (95% CI: -11.06, -5.61), and -9.14 mg (95% CI: -16.07, -2.22) at 8, 24, and 72 h, respectively. Postoperative pain intensity (visual analogue scale, 0-100 mm) was also significantly decreased in the acupuncture group at 8 and 72 h compared with the control group. The acupuncture treatment group was associated with a lower incidence of opioid-related side-effects such as nausea (relative risk, RR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.53, 0.86), dizziness (RR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.52, 0.81), sedation (RR: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.99), pruritus (RR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.96), and urinary retention (RR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.74). Perioperative acupuncture may be a useful adjunct for acute postoperative pain management.

  1. Intra-articular facet joint injections for low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vekaria, Rajni; Bhatt, Ree'thee; Ellard, David R; Henschke, Nicholas; Underwood, Martin; Sandhu, Harbinder

    2016-04-01

    Evidence supporting the use of therapeutic intra-articular facet joint injections for patients with suspected facet joint pain is sparse. A systematic review including a narrative synthesis was carried out to determine if intra-articular facet joint injections with active drug are more effective in reducing back pain and back pain-related disability than a sham procedure or a placebo/inactive injection. Secondly, to determine if intra-articular facet joint injections with active drug or placebo/inactive injection are more effective in reducing back pain and back pain-related disability than conservative treatment. Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL, Index to Chiropractic Literature and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from inception through April 2015. Data were screened and single extraction with independent verification and risk of bias assessment was performed. A total of 391 records were screened, and six trials were included. The trials included were small (range 18-109 participants) and overall in terms of pain and disability outcomes most were inconclusive. Only two of the trials report any significant between-group differences in pain (mean difference -1.0, 95% CI -2.0 to -0.1) and (p = 0.032) or disability (mean difference -3.0, 95% CI -6.2 to 0.2) and (p = 0.013) outcomes. The studies found here were clinically diverse and precluded any meta-analysis. A number of methodological issues were identified. The positive results, whilst interpreted with caution, do suggest that there is a need for further high-quality work in this area.

  2. Prognostic value of quantitative sensory testing in low back pain: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Marcuzzi, Anna; Dean, Catherine M; Wrigley, Paul J; Chakiath, Rosemary J; Hush, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative sensory testing (QST) measures have recently been shown to predict outcomes in various musculoskeletal and pain conditions. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the emerging body of evidence investigating the prognostic value of QST measures in people with low back pain (LBP). The protocol for this review was prospectively registered on the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. An electronic search of six databases was conducted from inception to October 2015. Experts in the field were contacted to retrieve additional unpublished data. Studies were included if they were prospective longitudinal in design, assessed at least one QST measure in people with LBP, assessed LBP status at follow-up, and reported the association of QST data with LBP status at follow-up. Statistical pooling of results was not possible due to heterogeneity between studies. Of 6,408 references screened after duplicates removed, three studies were finally included. None of them reported a significant association between the QST measures assessed and the LBP outcome. Three areas at high risk of bias were identified which potentially compromise the validity of these results. Due to the paucity of available studies and the methodological shortcomings identified, it remains unknown whether QST measures are predictive of outcome in LBP. PMID:27660486

  3. Prognostic value of quantitative sensory testing in low back pain: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Anna; Dean, Catherine M; Wrigley, Paul J; Chakiath, Rosemary J; Hush, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative sensory testing (QST) measures have recently been shown to predict outcomes in various musculoskeletal and pain conditions. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the emerging body of evidence investigating the prognostic value of QST measures in people with low back pain (LBP). The protocol for this review was prospectively registered on the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. An electronic search of six databases was conducted from inception to October 2015. Experts in the field were contacted to retrieve additional unpublished data. Studies were included if they were prospective longitudinal in design, assessed at least one QST measure in people with LBP, assessed LBP status at follow-up, and reported the association of QST data with LBP status at follow-up. Statistical pooling of results was not possible due to heterogeneity between studies. Of 6,408 references screened after duplicates removed, three studies were finally included. None of them reported a significant association between the QST measures assessed and the LBP outcome. Three areas at high risk of bias were identified which potentially compromise the validity of these results. Due to the paucity of available studies and the methodological shortcomings identified, it remains unknown whether QST measures are predictive of outcome in LBP.

  4. Spinal cord stimulation for chronic pain of neuropathic or ischaemic origin: systematic review and economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, E L; Duenas, A; Holmes, M W; Papaioannou, D; Chilcott, J

    2009-03-01

    This report addressed the question 'What is the clinical and cost-effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in the management of chronic neuropathic or ischaemic pain?' Thirteen electronic databases [including MEDLINE (1950-2007), EMBASE (1980-2007) and the Cochrane Library (1991-2007)] were searched from inception; relevant journals were hand-searched; and appropriate websites for specific conditions causing chronic neuropathic/ischaemic pain were browsed. Literature searches were conducted from August 2007 to September 2007. A systematic review of the literature sought clinical and cost-effectiveness data for SCS in adults with chronic neuropathic or ischaemic pain with inadequate response to medical or surgical treatment other than SCS. Economic analyses were performed to model the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of SCS in patients with neuropathic or ischaemic pain. From approximately 6000 citations identified, 11 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the clinical effectiveness review: three of neuropathic pain and eight of ischaemic pain. Trials were available for the neuropathic conditions failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type I, and they suggested that SCS was more effective than conventional medical management (CMM) or reoperation in reducing pain. The ischaemic pain trials had small sample sizes, meaning that most may not have been adequately powered to detect clinically meaningful differences. Trial evidence failed to demonstrate that pain relief in critical limb ischaemia (CLI) was better for SCS than for CMM; however, it suggested that SCS was effective in delaying refractory angina pain onset during exercise at short-term follow-up, although not more so than coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) for those patients eligible for that surgery. The results for the neuropathic pain model suggested that the cost-effectiveness estimates for SCS in patients with FBSS who had inadequate

  5. Neuropathic Pain in Low Back-Related Leg Pain Patients: What Is the Evidence of Prevalence, Characteristics, and Prognosis in Primary Care? A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Harrisson, Sarah A; Stynes, Siobhán; Dunn, Kate M; Foster, Nadine E; Konstantinou, Kika

    2017-06-12

    This systematic review synthesizes literature describing prevalence, characteristics, and prognosis of low back-related leg pain (LBLP) patients with neuropathic pain in primary care and/or similar settings. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were developed and used by independent reviewers to screen citations for eligibility. The initial search yielded 24,948 citations; after screening 12 studies were included. Neuropathic pain was identified using case ascertainment tools (n = 5), clinical history with examination (n = 4), and using LBLP samples assumed neuropathic (n = 3). Neuropathic pain prevalence varied from 19% to 80%. There was consistent evidence for higher back-related disability (n = 3), poorer health-related quality of life (n = 2), and some evidence for more severe depression (n = 2), anxiety (n = 3), and pain intensity (n = 4) in patients with neuropathic pain. Results were less consistent when cases were identified through clinical history with examination than those identified using case ascertainment tools. Prognosis (n = 1) of LBLP patients with neuropathic pain was worse compared with those without, in all outcomes (leg pain intensity, leg and back-related disability, self-reported general health) except back pain intensity. No studies described prognostic factors. This systematic review highlights the evidence gap in neuropathic pain in LBLP in primary care, especially with respect to prognosis. Patients with LBLP may have neuropathic pain. This systematic review emphasizes the paucity of evidence describing the characteristics and prognosis of neuropathic pain in this patient population. Future research investigating prognosis of these patients with neuropathic pain is likely to contribute to better understanding and management. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Systematic Review: Predisposing, Precipitating, Perpetuating, and Present Factors Predicting Anticipatory Distress to Painful Medical Procedures in Children

    PubMed Central

    Pillai Riddell, Rebecca R.; Khan, Maria; Calic, Masa; Taddio, Anna; Tablon, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Objective To conduct a systematic review of the factors predicting anticipatory distress to painful medical procedures in children. Methods A systematic search was conducted to identify studies with factors related to anticipatory distress to painful medical procedures in children aged 0–18 years. The search retrieved 7,088 articles to review against inclusion criteria. A total of 77 studies were included in the review. Results 31 factors were found to predict anticipatory distress to painful medical procedures in children. A narrative synthesis of the evidence was conducted, and a summary figure is presented. Conclusions Many factors were elucidated that contribute to the occurrence of anticipatory distress to painful medical procedures. The factors that appear to increase anticipatory distress are child psychopathology, difficult child temperament, parent distress promoting behaviors, parent situational distress, previous pain events, parent anticipation of distress, and parent anxious predisposition. Longitudinal and experimental research is needed to further elucidate these factors. PMID:26338981

  7. Structural Changes of Lumbar Muscles in Non-specific Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Goubert, Dorien; Oosterwijck, Jessica Van; Meeus, Mira; Danneels, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar muscle dysfunction due to pain might be related to altered lumbar muscle structure. Macroscopically, muscle degeneration in low back pain (LBP) is characterized by a decrease in cross-sectional area and an increase in fat infiltration in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. In addition microscopic changes, such as changes in fiber distribution, might occur. Inconsistencies in results from different studies make it difficult to draw firm conclusions on which structural changes are present in the different types of non-specific LBP. Insights regarding structural muscle alterations in LBP are, however, important for prevention and treatment of non-specific LBP. The goal of this article is to review which macro- and/or microscopic structural alterations of the lumbar muscles occur in case of non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP), recurrent low back pain (RLBP), and acute low back pain (ALBP). Systematic review. All selected studies were case-control studies. A systematic literature search was conducted in the databases PubMed and Web of Science. Only full texts of original studies regarding structural alterations (atrophy, fat infiltration, and fiber type distribution) in lumbar muscles of patients with non-specific LBP compared to healthy controls were included. All included articles were scored on methodological quality. Fifteen studies were found eligible after screening title, abstract, and full text for inclusion and exclusion criteria. In CLBP, moderate evidence of atrophy was found in the multifidus; whereas, results in the paraspinal and the erector spinae muscle remain inconclusive. Also moderate evidence occurred in RLBP and ALBP, where no atrophy was shown in any lumbar muscle. Conflicting results were seen in undefined LBP groups. Results concerning fat infiltration were inconsistent in CLBP. On the other hand, there is moderate evidence in RLBP that fat infiltration does not occur, although a larger muscle fat index was found in the erector spinae

  8. [Efficacy of inpatient rehabilitation for chronic back pain in Germany: update of a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Hüppe, A; Raspe, H

    2005-02-01

    The ninth book of the German social code, SGB IX, has intensified questions on the effectiveness and usefulness of medical rehabilitation, a multimodal multidisciplinary team care model, especially but not exclusively for chronic back pain. In 2002 back pain was the reported leading cause for 29 % of all medical and other rehabilitative services provided by German statutory pension funds. A previous systematic review of all available German studies (January 1980 to June 2001) analysed the effectiveness of inpatient rehabilitation for chronic back pain. The present report provides an update and critical appraisal of the review. Again we conducted a systematic search for relevant German studies from between July 2001 and December 2003 using electronic data bases, hand-searching of congress abstracts and postal questionnaires. The quality of relevant studies was assessed according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Back Review Group. For each study effect sizes for up to six central outcome parameters were calculated using pre-post comparisons from short and medium term follow-ups, they were correlated with prognostically relevant characteristics of the studies and samples. The combined weighted intra-group effect sizes were compared with results from international studies. 16 studies, both controlled and uncontrolled, were included. Again we could not identify any study confirming the effectiveness of medical rehabilitation in chronic back pain compared to no treatment or usual care. The methodological quality of the new studies did not seem to exceed that of the earlier ones. Depending on the outcome variable, small effects (e. g. on functional ability) to relevant effects (e. g. vitality) can be observed at or immediately after the end of rehabilitation. Now the effects after three to 12 months seem to be smaller than previously observed. The small size of medium term effects indicates a basic problem of inpatient rehabilitation for chronic back pain in Germany

  9. The Effectiveness of Pilates Exercise in People with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Cherie; Kolt, Gregory S.; Marshall, Paul; Hill, Bridget; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP) through a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Data Sources A search for RCTs was undertaken using Medical Search Terms and synonyms for “Pilates” and “low back pain” within the maximal date range of 10 databases. Databases included the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; Cochrane Library; Medline; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; ProQuest: Health and Medical Complete, Nursing and Allied Health Source, Dissertation and Theses; Scopus; Sport Discus; Web of Science. Study Selection Two independent reviewers were involved in the selection of evidence. To be included, relevant RCTs needed to be published in the English language. From 152 studies, 14 RCTs were included. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological quality of RCTs using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. The author(s), year of publication, and details regarding participants, Pilates exercise, comparison treatments, and outcome measures, and findings, were then extracted. Data Synthesis The methodological quality of RCTs ranged from “poor” to “excellent”. A meta-analysis of RCTs was not undertaken due to the heterogeneity of RCTs. Pilates exercise provided statistically significant improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity between 4 and 15 weeks, but not at 24 weeks. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in improvements in pain and functional ability with Pilates exercise, massage therapy, or other forms of exercise at any time period. Conclusions Pilates exercise offers greater improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity in the short term. Pilates exercise offers equivalent improvements to massage therapy and other forms of exercise. Future research should explore optimal Pilates

  10. Prevalence and severity of pain in adult end-stage renal disease patients on chronic intermittent hemodialysis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Brkovic, Tonci; Burilovic, Eliana; Puljak, Livia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Understanding the epidemiology of pain in patients on hemodialysis (HD) is crucial for further improvement in managing pain. The aim of this study was to systematically review available evidence on the prevalence and severity of pain in adult end-stage renal disease patients on chronic intermittent HD. Materials and methods We carried out a systematic review of the literature and developed a comprehensive search strategy based on search terms on pain and HD. We searched the databases MEDLINE, Scopus, PsycINFO, and CINAHL from the earliest date of each database to July 24, 2014. Manuscripts in all languages were taken into consideration. Two authors performed each step independently, and all disagreements were resolved after discussion with the third author. The quality of studies was estimated using the STROBE checklist and Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. Results We included 52 studies with 6,917 participants. The prevalence of acute and chronic pain in HD patients was up to 82% and 92%, respectively. A considerable number of patients suffered from severe pain. Various locations and causes of pain were described, with most of the studies reporting pain in general, pain related to arteriovenous access, headache, and musculoskeletal pain. Conclusion The findings of this systematic review indicate high prevalence of pain in HD patients and considerable gaps and limitations in the available evidence. Pain in this population should be recognized as a considerable health concern, and the nephrology community should promote pain management in HD patients as a clinical and research priority to improve patients’ quality of life and pain-related disability. PMID:27382261

  11. The effect of psychological interventions on the prevention of chronic pain in adults: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Bérubé, Mélanie; Gélinas, Céline; Choinière, Manon; Feeley, Nancy; Martorella, Géraldine; Parent, Stefan; Streiner, David L

    2017-09-21

    Numerous psychological risk and protective factors have been identified as contributing to or preventing the development of the prevalent issue of chronic pain. Systematic reviews of studies on psychological interventions that tackle these factors have shown limited effects on chronic pain. Therefore, implementing psychological interventions before pain becomes chronic has been put forward. However, the efficacy of such interventions in preventing the transition from acute to chronic pain has not yet been systematically assessed. The aims of this systematic review are to assess the effects of psychological interventions applied in the acute pain phase on pain severity as well as on physical, psychological, and social functions at 3 months and beyond. Randomized controlled trials including psychological intervention as a treatment of primary interest and participants with pain of less than 3 months duration will be considered. The following comparisons will be undertaken: psychological interventions with (1) standard treatment, (2) information, (3) waiting-list, and (4) active treatment. The primary outcome will be pain severity using indicators such the presence or absence of pain and self-report measures such as the numeric pain intensity rating scale. Secondary outcomes will include pain-related disability, mood, coping with pain, quality of life, health care utilization, and work capability. A systematic review of English and French articles in MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials will be conducted without date restriction. Extracted data will include demographics and clinical characteristics, sample size, intervention and control group types, assessment tools used, time interval of measurement, fidelity of the intervention, and attrition rate. Standardized mean differences (SMD) and risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI) will be used to assess treatment effects. This systematic review is the first

  12. Lumiracoxib for acute postoperative dental pain: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ricardo Carvalho Lopes; Riera, Rachel; Saconato, Humberto

    2011-01-01

    Lumiracoxib is an anti-inflammatory drug that has been used to treat acute dental pain, mainly in postsurgical settings, in which the greatest levels of pain and discomfort are experienced during the first 24 hours. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of lumiracoxib for treating acute postsurgical dental pain. Systematic review developed at the Brazilian Cochrane Centre, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. An electronic search was conducted in the PubMed, Cochrane Library, Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde), SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online) and Embase databases. A manual search was also performed. Only randomized controlled trials were included, and these were selected and assessed by two researchers with regard to the risk of bias. Three clinical trials with 921 participants were included. Lumiracoxib 400 mg produced onset of analgesia in a shorter time than shown by lumiracoxib 100 mg, celecoxib 200 mg and ibuprofen 400 mg. There was no difference between lumiracoxib 400 mg and rofecoxib 50 mg. In two studies, the mean time taken to attain onset of analgesia for the placebo was not estimated because the number of participants who reached onset was too small. There is evidence with a moderate risk of bias that recommends the use of lumiracoxib for acute postoperative dental pain. However, the adverse effects are not completely known. Given that lumiracoxib is currently available in only three countries, further studies are likely to be rare and discouraged.

  13. Mental Status as a Common Factor for Masticatory Muscle Pain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wieckiewicz, Mieszko; Zietek, Marek; Smardz, Joanna; Zenczak-Wieckiewicz, Dobrochna; Grychowska, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    Masticatory muscle pain (MMP) is the primary reason for chronic non-odontogenic orofacial pain in the human population. MMP has become a considerable social problem, which affects about 12–14% of the adult population and is 1.5–2 times more frequent in women than in men. This term defines a pain which has its origins in the masticatory muscles. Although MMP is typically felt in the face, jaws, and preauricular area, MMP can radiate to the ear, teeth, head, and neck. This systematic review explains the relationship between MMP and common mental states, such as anxiety, depression, mood and stress-related disorders, and is reported in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. We performed a search in the PubMed database for peer-reviewed articles published after November 1st 2006 in the context of MMP and mental states. According to the defined criteria, 38 studies were finally included into the systematic review, of which prospective cohort studies were found to be the most common. We investigated four primary outcomes (anxiety, depression, mood disorders, and stress-related disorders) and several secondary outcomes of search. Seventy-nine percent of studies concerned depression, 42% anxiety, 29% mood disorders, and 21% stress-related disorders. Most of the studies showed a relationship between MMP and alterations in mental status. Nonetheless, the researchers usually evidenced only the co-occurrence of psychiatric disorders and dysfunctions of the masticatory muscles among the group of patients, in large part in women. Moreover, some studies were marked with limited generalizability of the reported results, quality flaws and heterogeneity. In the light of the analyzed literature, the causal relationship between mental states and MMP is still not clearly established. PMID:28536539

  14. Mental Status as a Common Factor for Masticatory Muscle Pain: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wieckiewicz, Mieszko; Zietek, Marek; Smardz, Joanna; Zenczak-Wieckiewicz, Dobrochna; Grychowska, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    Masticatory muscle pain (MMP) is the primary reason for chronic non-odontogenic orofacial pain in the human population. MMP has become a considerable social problem, which affects about 12-14% of the adult population and is 1.5-2 times more frequent in women than in men. This term defines a pain which has its origins in the masticatory muscles. Although MMP is typically felt in the face, jaws, and preauricular area, MMP can radiate to the ear, teeth, head, and neck. This systematic review explains the relationship between MMP and common mental states, such as anxiety, depression, mood and stress-related disorders, and is reported in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. We performed a search in the PubMed database for peer-reviewed articles published after November 1st 2006 in the context of MMP and mental states. According to the defined criteria, 38 studies were finally included into the systematic review, of which prospective cohort studies were found to be the most common. We investigated four primary outcomes (anxiety, depression, mood disorders, and stress-related disorders) and several secondary outcomes of search. Seventy-nine percent of studies concerned depression, 42% anxiety, 29% mood disorders, and 21% stress-related disorders. Most of the studies showed a relationship between MMP and alterations in mental status. Nonetheless, the researchers usually evidenced only the co-occurrence of psychiatric disorders and dysfunctions of the masticatory muscles among the group of patients, in large part in women. Moreover, some studies were marked with limited generalizability of the reported results, quality flaws and heterogeneity. In the light of the analyzed literature, the causal relationship between mental states and MMP is still not clearly established.

  15. The effectiveness of manual stretching in the treatment of plantar heel pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plantar heel pain is a commonly occurring foot complaint. Stretching is frequently utilised as a treatment, yet a systematic review focusing only on its effectiveness has not been published. This review aimed to assess the effectiveness of stretching on pain and function in people with plantar heel pain. Methods Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and The Cochrane Library were searched from inception to July 2010. Studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria were independently assessed, and their quality evaluated using the modified PEDro scale. Results Six studies including 365 symptomatic participants were included. Two compared stretching with a control, one study compared stretching to an alternative intervention, one study compared stretching to both alternative and control interventions, and two compared different stretching techniques and durations. Quality rating on the modified Pedro scale varied from two to eight out of a maximum of ten points. The methodologies and interventions varied significantly between studies, making meta-analysis inappropriate. Most participants improved over the course of the studies, but when stretching was compared to alternative or control interventions, the changes only reached statistical significance in one study that used a combination of calf muscle stretches and plantar fascia stretches in their stretching programme. Another study comparing different stretching techniques, showed a statistically significant reduction in some aspects of pain in favour of plantar fascia stretching over calf stretches in the short term. Conclusions There were too few studies to assess whether stretching is effective compared to control or other interventions, for either pain or function. However, there is some evidence that plantar fascia stretching may be more effective than Achilles tendon stretching alone in the short-term. Appropriately powered randomised controlled trials, utilizing validated outcome measures, blinded assessors and

  16. Physiotherapy-provided operant conditioning in the management of low back pain disability: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bunzli, Samantha; Gillham, David; Esterman, Adrian

    2011-03-01

     Non-specific low back pain (LBP) is a leading cause of disability in developed countries. Behavioural interventions have been found efficacious in reducing disability in LBP. Operant conditioning is one type of behavioural intervention being employed by physiotherapists; however, the effectiveness of physiotherapist-provided operant conditioning (POC) in the management of LBP disability is unknown. This review aims to answer the question: is POC more effective than comparison interventions in reducing LBP disability?   A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted using a qualitative analysis of effect. Participants were adults ≥18 years with non-specific LBP. The intervention was defined as a time contingent, graduated increase in activity including goal setting and the education and reinforcement of positive pain behaviours with the aim of decreasing disability. The primary outcome measure was back pain specific disability. Secondary outcomes included generic functional status, pain intensity, sick leave, fear avoidance beliefs or behaviour and adverse effects.   Fifteen trials involving 3737 people were included. Eight studies reported a clinically significant difference. The POC intervention was not found to be inferior to any of the comparison interventions in reducing disability. Moderate evidence was found that POC is more effective than other behavioural interventions in reducing long term disability in chronic LBP. Moderate evidence showed POC may be more effective than other treatments in reducing post-treatment fear avoidance beliefs in a sub-acute population but less effective in reducing short term fear avoidance beliefs in a population with mixed LBP. Moderate evidence showed POC is more effective than a placebo intervention in reducing short term pain in sub-acute LBP.   POC may be considered efficacious in the treatment of LBP. Physiotherapists may also consider POC for its additional effect of reducing long term

  17. Core stability exercises for low back pain in athletes: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stuber, Kent J; Bruno, Paul; Sajko, Sandy; Hayden, Jill A

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence for the effectiveness of core stability exercises for treating athletes with low back pain (LBP). We searched several databases (Medline, AMED, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and EMBASE). Our eligibility criteria consisted of articles published in a peer-reviewed journal in English, using any prospective clinical study design, where athletes with nonspecific LBP were treated with core stability exercises in at least 1 study arm, and back pain intensity and/or disability were used as outcome measures. All included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were assessed for risk of bias using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool, whereas non-RCT studies were assessed for quality using the Downs and Black checklist. Five studies including 151 participants met the inclusion criteria, including 2 RCTs. The quality of the literature on this topic was deemed to be low overall, with only 1 non-RCT having a moderate quality score, and 1 RCT having a lower risk of bias. Four studies reported statistically significant decreases in back pain intensity in their core stability intervention group. The quantity and quality of literature on the use of core stability exercises for treating LBP in athletes is low. The existing evidence has been conducted on small and heterogeneous study populations using interventions that vary drastically with only mixed results and short-term follow-up. This precludes the formulation of strong conclusions, and additional high quality research is clearly needed.

  18. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy Combined With Physical Therapy in Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Espí-López, Gemma Victoria; Arnal-Gómez, Anna; Balasch-Bernat, Mercè; Inglés, Marta

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to determine the treatment effectiveness of the combination of manual therapy (MT) with other physical therapy techniques. Systematic searches of scientific literature were undertaken on PubMed and the Cochrane Library (2004-2014). The following terms were used: "patellofemoral pain syndrome," "physical therapy," "manual therapy," and "manipulation." RCTs that studied adults diagnosed with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) treated by MT and physical therapy approaches were included. The quality of the studies was assessed by the Jadad Scale. Five RCTs with an acceptable methodological quality (Jadad ≥ 3) were selected. The studies indicated that MT combined with physical therapy has some effect on reducing pain and improving function in PFPS, especially when applied on the full kinetic chain and when strengthening hip and knee muscles. The different combinations of MT and physical therapy programs analyzed in this review suggest that giving more emphasis to proximal stabilization and full kinetic chain treatments in PFPS will help better alleviation of symptoms.

  19. β-Adrenoreceptor agonists in the management of pain associated with renal colic: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Graham David; Fakis, Apostolos; Surtees, Jane; Lennon, Robert Iain

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether β-adrenoreceptor agonists are effective analgesics for patients with renal colic through a systematic review of the literature. Setting Adult emergency departments or acute assessment units. Participants Human participants with proven or suspected renal colic. Interventions β-adrenoreceptor agonists. Outcome measures Primary: level of pain at 30 min following administration of the β-agonist. Secondary: level of pain at various time points following β-agonist administration; length of hospital stay; analgesic requirement; stone presence, size and position; degree of hydronephrosis. Results 256 records were screened and 4 identified for full-text review. No articles met the inclusion criteria. Conclusions and implications There is no evidence to support or refute the proposed use of β-agonists for analgesia in patients with renal colic. Given the biological plausibility and existing literature base, clinical trials investigating the use of β-adrenoreceptor agonists in the acute setting for treatment of the pain associated with renal colic are recommended. Trial registration number CRD42015016266. PMID:27324714

  20. An update of stabilisation exercises for low back pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin E; Littlewood, Chris; May, Stephen

    2014-12-09

    Non-specific low back pain (NSLBP) is a large and costly problem. It has a lifetime prevalence of 80% and results in high levels of healthcare cost. It is a major cause for long term sickness amongst the workforce and is associated with high levels of fear avoidance and kinesiophobia. Stabilisation (or 'core stability') exercises have been suggested to reduce symptoms of pain and disability and form an effective treatment. Despite it being the most commonly used form of physiotherapy treatment within the UK there is a lack of positive evidence to support its use. The aims of this systematic review update is to investigate the effectiveness of stabilisation exercises for the treatment of NSLBP, and compare any effectiveness to other forms of exercise. A systematic review published in 2008 was updated with a search of PubMed, CINAHL, AMED, Pedro and The Cochrane Library, October 2006 to October 2013. Two authors independently selected studies, and two authors independently extracted the data. Methodological quality was evaluated using the PEDro scale. Meta-analysis was carried out when appropriate. 29 studies were included: 22 studies (n = 2,258) provided post treatment effect on pain and 24 studies (n = 2,359) provided post treatment effect on disability. Pain and disability scores were transformed to a 0 to 100 scale. Meta-analysis showed significant benefit for stabilisation exercises versus any alternative treatment or control for long term pain and disability with mean difference of -6.39 (95% CI -10.14 to -2.65) and -3.92 (95% CI -7.25 to -0.59) respectively. The difference between groups was clinically insignificant. When compared with alternative forms of exercise, there was no statistical or clinically significant difference. Mean difference for pain was -3.06 (95% CI -6.74 to 0.63) and disability -1.89 (95% CI -5.10 to 1.33). There is strong evidence stabilisation exercises are not more effective than any other form of active exercise in the long

  1. Does evidence support physiotherapy management of adult Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type One? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Daly, Anne E; Bialocerkowski, Andrea E

    2009-04-01

    To source and critically evaluate the evidence on the effectiveness of Physiotherapy to manage adult CRPS-1. Systematic literature review. Electronic databases, conference proceedings, clinical guidelines and text books were searched for quantitative studies on CRPS-1 in adults where Physiotherapy was a sole or significant component of the intervention. Data were extracted according to predefined criteria by two independent reviewers. Methodological quality was assessed using the Critical Review Form. The search strategy identified 1320 potential articles. Of these, 14 articles, representing 11 studies, met inclusion criteria. There were five randomised controlled trials, one comparative study and five case series. Methodological quality was dependent on study type, with randomised controlled trials being higher in quality. Physiotherapy treatments varied between studies and were often provided in combination with medical management. This did not allow for the 'stand-alone' value of Physiotherapy to be determined. Heterogeneity across the studies, with respect to participants, interventions evaluated and outcome measures used, prevented meta-analysis. Narrative synthesis of the results, based on effect size, found there was good to very good quality level II evidence that graded motor imagery is effective in reducing pain in adults with CRPS-1, irrespective of the outcome measure used. No evidence was found to support treatments frequently recommended in clinical guidelines, such as stress loading. Graded motor imagery should be used to reduce pain in adult CRPS-1 patients. Further, the results of this review should be used to update CRPS-1 clinical guidelines.

  2. A systematic review of the outcomes reported in multimodal pain therapy for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Deckert, S; Kaiser, U; Kopkow, C; Trautmann, F; Sabatowski, R; Schmitt, J

    2016-01-01

    There are no recommendations provided for the outcome domains of chronic pain that should be explicitly considered in each clinical trial to describe the efficacy and effectiveness of multimodal pain therapy (MPT). Our aims were to summarize all reported outcome domains in studies assessing the effects of MPT for chronic pain, and to subsequently inform a consensus-based development of a core outcome set of domains in this field. Medline, Embase and AMED were searched for studies reporting on chronic pain for at least 3 months that applied MPT and investigated outcome domains. All reported outcome domains were extracted from eligible articles. The patient-reported outcome measurement information system (PROMIS) was applied for conceptual classification. From 3626 potentially relevant titles, 70 studies were included. The median and maximal numbers of outcome domains were 8 and 34, respectively. Although most studies (n = 45/70) assessed a combination of all three core health areas, i.e. physical, mental and social health, there was great variation in the specific domains chosen to address these core health areas. No outcome domain was measured consistently in all studies. After selection of all outcome domains which were reported in at least 10% of all studies included, we identified 14 different outcome domains, mostly operationalized through the domains pain intensity (n = 56/70) and depressive symptoms (n = 42/70). The current lack of standardization of outcome domains in MPT studies hinders to readily compare interventions from different trials and is a barrier towards evidence-based decision making. Based on these results, the development of a core outcome set of domains for MPT has been initiated. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  3. The use of glucosamine for chronic low back pain: a systematic review of randomised control trials

    PubMed Central

    Sodha, Reena; Sivanadarajah, Naveethan; Alam, Mahbub

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain whether the use of oral glucosamine influences symptoms or functional outcomes in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) thought to be related to spinal osteoarthritis (OA). Design Systematic review of randomised control trials. Searches were performed up to March 2011 on Medline, AMED, CINHAL, Cochrane and EMBASE with subsequent reference screening of retrieved studies. In addition, the grey literature was searched via opensigle. Included studies were required to incorporate at least one of the Cochrane Back Pain Review Group's outcome measures as part of their design. Trials with participants over 18 years with a minimum of 12 weeks of back pain, in combination with radiographic changes of OA in the spine, were included. Studies were rated for risk-of-bias and graded for quality. Results 148 studies were identified after screening and meeting eligibility requirements, and three randomised controlled trials (n=309) were included in the quantitative synthesis. The review found that there was low quality but generally no evidence of an effect from glucosamine on function, with no change in the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire score in all studies. Conflicting evidence was demonstrated with pain scores with two studies showing no difference and one study with a high risk-of-bias showing both a statistically and clinically significant improvement from taking glucosamine. Conclusions On the basis of the current research, any clinical benefit of oral glucosamine for patients with chronic LBP and radiographic changes of spinal OA can neither be demonstrated nor excluded based on insufficient data and the low quality of existing studies. PMID:23794557

  4. Zingiberaceae extracts for pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lakhan, Shaheen E; Ford, Christopher T; Tepper, Deborah

    2015-05-14

    Members of the family Zingiberaceae including turmeric, ginger, Javanese ginger, and galangal have been used for centuries in traditional medicine. Preclinical studies of Zingiberaceae extracts have shown analgesic properties. This study aims to systematically review and meta-analyze whether extracts from Zingiberaceae are clinically effective hypoalgesic agents. Literature was screened from electronic databases using the key words Zingiberaceae AND pain OR visual analogue score (VAS) to identify randomized trials. From this search, 18 studies were identified, and of these, 8 randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials were found that measured pain by VAS for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Findings indicated significant efficacy of Zingiberaceae extracts in reducing subjective chronic pain (SMD - 0.67; 95 % CI - 1.13 to - 0.21; P = 0.004). A linear dose-effect relationship was apparent between studies (R(2) = 0.71). All studies included in the systematic review reported a good safety profile for extracts, without the renal risks associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and with similar effectiveness. Our findings indicated that Zingiberaceae extracts are clinically effective hypoalgesic agents and the available data show a better safety profile than non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and Zingiberaceae have been associated with a heightened bleeding risk, and there have been no comparator trials of this risk. Further clinical studies are recommended to identify the most effective type of Zingiberaceae extract and rigorously compare safety, including bleeding risk.

  5. [Cancer pain management: Systematic review and critical appraisal of clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Nicolás, I; Ángel-García, D; Saturno, P J; López-Soriano, F

    2016-01-01

    Although several clinical practice guidelines have been developed in the last decades, cancer pain management is still deficient. The purpose of this work was to carry out a comprehensive and systematic literature review of current clinical practice guidelines on cancer pain management, and critically appraise their methodology and content in order to evaluate their quality and validity to cope with this public health issue. A systematic review was performed in the main databases, using English, French and Spanish as languages, from 2008 to 2013. Reporting and methodological quality was rated with the Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II (AGREE-II) tool, including an inter-rater reliability analysis. Guideline recommendations were extracted and classified into several categories and levels of evidence, aiming to analyse guidelines variability and evidence-based content comprehensiveness. Six guidelines were included. A wide variability was found in both reporting and methodological quality of guidelines, as well as in the content and the level of evidence of their recommendations. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guideline was the best rated using AGREE-II, while the Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica guideline was the worst rated. The Ministry of Health Malaysia guideline was the most comprehensive, and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guideline was the second one. The current guidelines on cancer pain management have limited quality and content. We recommend Ministry of Health Malaysia and Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines, whilst Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica guideline still needs to improve. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. The clinical course and prognostic factors of non-specific neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Borghouts, J A; Koes, B W; Bouter, L M

    1998-07-01

    Neck pain occurs frequently in western societies. In the majority of cases, no specific cause can be identified. In order to gain insight into the clinical course and prognostic factors of non-specific neck pain, a systematic review was conducted. A computerized literature search was carried out to identify observational studies on non-specific neck pain and randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on conservative treatment of non-specific neck pain. Two reviewers scored independently, the methodological quality of all identified publications, using a standardized set of 13 criteria which were divided into five categories according to: study population, study design, follow-up, outcome measures and analysis/data presentation. To determine prognosis per study, an overall percentage of recovery for the most important outcome measures (pain, general improvement, functional status, health care utilization and lost days of work) was calculated. In total 23 eligible publications were identified (six observational studies and 17 RCTs). Only seven of 23 studies scored 50% or more of the 13 items, indicating a generally poor quality of methods. The most prevalent methodological shortcomings appeared to be selection of the study population, the sample size and analysis techniques. Most information regarding the clinical course is available for the group of patients with complaints for more than 6 months, who are treated in a secondary care or an occupational setting. In this group of patients, 46% (median) had less pain, with a range of 22-79% and a general improvement that ranged between 37 and 95% (47% median). The reduction in the use of analgesics ranged between 32 and 80% (37% median). Six studies reported on prognostic factors. Bearing in mind the limited number of studies and the low methodological quality, there are some indications that the localization (radiation to the arms/neurologic signs) and radiologic findings (degenerative changes in the discs and joints) are not

  7. Efficacy of treatments and pain management for trapeziometacarpal (thumb base) osteoarthritis: protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Tokiko; Lalonde, Lyne; Harris, Patrick; Bureau, Nathalie J; Gaudreault, Nathaly; Ziegler, Daniela; Choinière, Manon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The thumb is essential for daily activities. Unfortunately, this digit is commonly affected by trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis (TMO), handicapping a large number of individuals. TMO constitutes an increasing human and economic burden for our society whose population is ageing. Limited access to adequate treatment is among the most important obstacles to optimal TMO management. Poor understanding of TMO characteristics, lack of knowledge about evidence-based treatments, simplistic pain management plans based solely on the patient's physical condition, absence of interprofessional communication and lack of multidisciplinary treatment guidelines contribute to inadequate TMO management. On the long term, our research project aims at improving the quality of care and services offered to patients with TMO by developing a patient-centred, evidence-based multidisciplinary management clinical pathway coordinated across the healthcare system. This proposed systematic review is a prerequisite to ensuring evidence-based practices and aims to document the efficacy of all the existing modalities for TMO management. Methods and analysis The protocol of the systematic review is registered with PROSPERO and will be conducted using the guidelines Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We will identify studies in English and French concerning TMO treatments through searches in Cochrane Central, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CINHAL, PubMed, OT Seekers, PEDRO and the grey literature. 2 reviewers will independently screen study eligibility, extract data and appraise studies using published assessment tools. Meta-analyses will be undertaken where feasible; otherwise, narrative syntheses will be carried out. The robustness of evidence will be assessed using the GRADE system. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required for this study. A comprehensive knowledge exchange and transfer plan incorporating effective strategies will be used to

  8. Endogenous Opioid Antagonism in Physiological Experimental Pain Models: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Mads U.; Pereira, Manuel P.; Andersen, Lars Peter H.; Dahl, Jørgen B.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid antagonists are pharmacological tools applied as an indirect measure to detect activation of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) in experimental pain models. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) antagonists in placebo-controlled, double-blind studies using ʻinhibitoryʼ or ʻsensitizingʼ, physiological test paradigms in healthy human subjects. The databases PubMed and Embase were searched according to predefined criteria. Out of a total of 2,142 records, 63 studies (1,477 subjects [male/female ratio = 1.5]) were considered relevant. Twenty-five studies utilized ʻinhibitoryʼ test paradigms (ITP) and 38 studies utilized ʻsensitizingʼ test paradigms (STP). The ITP-studies were characterized as conditioning modulation models (22 studies) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation models (rTMS; 3 studies), and, the STP-studies as secondary hyperalgesia models (6 studies), ʻpainʼ models (25 studies), summation models (2 studies), nociceptive reflex models (3 studies) and miscellaneous models (2 studies). A consistent reversal of analgesia by a MOR-antagonist was demonstrated in 10 of the 25 ITP-studies, including stress-induced analgesia and rTMS. In the remaining 14 conditioning modulation studies either absence of effects or ambiguous effects by MOR-antagonists, were observed. In the STP-studies, no effect of the opioid-blockade could be demonstrated in 5 out of 6 secondary hyperalgesia studies. The direction of MOR-antagonist dependent effects upon pain ratings, threshold assessments and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), did not appear consistent in 28 out of 32 ʻpainʼ model studies. In conclusion, only in 2 experimental human pain models, i.e., stress-induced analgesia and rTMS, administration of MOR-antagonist demonstrated a consistent effect, presumably mediated by an EOS-dependent mechanisms of analgesia and hyperalgesia. PMID:26029906

  9. Efficacy of complementary and alternative medicine therapies in relieving cancer pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bardia, Aditya; Barton, Debra L; Prokop, Larry J; Bauer, Brent A; Moynihan, Timothy J

    2006-12-01

    Despite widespread popular use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies, a rigorous evidence base about their efficacy for cancer-related pain is lacking. This is a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating CAM therapies for cancer-related pain. RCTs using CAM interventions for cancer-related pain were abstracted using Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and Cochrane database. Eighteen trials were identified (eight poor, three intermediate, and seven high quality based on Jadad score), with a total of 1,499 patients. Median sample size was 53 patients, and median intervention duration was 45 days. All studies were from single institutions, four had sample size justification, and none reported any adverse effects. Seven trials reported significant benefit for the following CAM therapies: acupuncture (n = 1), support groups (n = 2), hypnosis (n = 1), relaxation/imagery (n = 2), and herbal supplement/HESA-A (n = 1, but study was of low quality without control data). Seven studies reported immediate postintervention or short-term benefit of the following CAM interventions: acupuncture (n = 2), music (n = 1), herbal supplement/Ai-Tong-Ping (n = 1), massage (n = 1), and healing touch (n = 2). Four studies reported no benefit of CAM interventions (music, n = 2; massage, n = 2) in reducing cancer pain compared with a control arm. There is paucity of multi-institutional RCTs evaluating CAM interventions for cancer pain with adequate power, duration, and sham control. Hypnosis, imagery, support groups, acupuncture, and healing touch seem promising, particularly in the short term, but none can be recommended because of a paucity of rigorous trials. Future research should focus on methodologically strong RCTs to determine potential efficacy of these CAM interventions.

  10. Manipulative therapy for shoulder pain and disorders: expansion of a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Brantingham, James W; Cassa, Tammy Kay; Bonnefin, Debra; Jensen, Muffit; Globe, Gary; Hicks, Marian; Korporaal, Charmaine

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review on manual and manipulative therapy (MMT) for common shoulder pain and disorders. A search of the literature was conducted using the Cumulative Index of Nursing Allied Health Literature; PubMed; Manual, Alternative, and Natural Therapy Index System; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; and Index to Chiropractic Literature dating from January 1983 to July 7, 2010. Search limits included the English language and human studies along with MeSH terms such as manipulation, chiropractic, osteopathic, orthopedic, musculoskeletal, physical therapies, shoulder, etc. Inclusion criteria required a shoulder peripheral diagnosis and MMT with/without multimodal therapy. Exclusion criteria included pain referred from spinal sites without a peripheral shoulder diagnosis. Articles were assessed primarily using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale in conjunction with modified guidelines and systems. After synthesis and considered judgment scoring were complete, with subsequent participant review and agreement, evidence grades of A, B, C, and I were applied. A total of 211 citations were retrieved, and 35 articles were deemed useful. There is fair evidence (B) for the treatment of a variety of common rotator cuff disorders, shoulder disorders, adhesive capsulitis, and soft tissue disorders using MMT to the shoulder, shoulder girdle, and/or the full kinetic chain (FKC) combined with or without exercise and/or multimodal therapy. There is limited (C) and insufficient (I) evidence for MMT treatment of minor neurogenic shoulder pain and shoulder osteoarthritis, respectively. This study found a level of B or fair evidence for MMT of the shoulder, shoulder girdle, and/or the FKC combined with multimodal or exercise therapy for rotator cuff injuries/disorders, disease, or dysfunction. There is a fair or B level of evidence for MMT of the shoulder/shoulder girdle and FKC combined with a multimodal treatment approach for shoulder

  11. Paracetamol for the management of pain in inflammatory arthritis: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Hazlewood, Glen; van der Heijde, Désirée M; Bombardier, Claire

    2012-09-01

    To systematically review the literature on the efficacy and safety of paracetamol (acetaminophen) in the management of pain in inflammatory arthritis. A systematic search was performed in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and 2008/2009 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) conference abstracts for clinical trials and observational studies of paracetamol in patients with inflammatory arthritis. Included trials were appraised for risk of bias, and relevant study details were abstracted. Efficacy was assessed from clinical trials using improvement in pain as the outcome measure, and safety was assessed using total adverse events and withdrawals due to adverse events as outcome measures. Safety data from observational studies were assessed separately. Eleven articles containing 12 clinical trials and 1 observational study were identified, all in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The trials were of short duration, used atypical doses of paracetamol, and all had a high risk of bias. Overall, there was weak evidence of a benefit of paracetamol over placebo and an additive benefit of paracetamol in combination with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID). The benefit of paracetamol to NSAID alone was uncertain. No significant differences in safety were seen in the limited clinical trial data. One cohort study showed an increased rate of serious gastrointestinal events with paracetamol over NSAID when used concurrently with corticosteroids and other analgesics, but had significant methodological limitations. There is weak evidence for the efficacy of paracetamol in patients with inflammatory arthritis, and insufficient disease-specific safety data to draw conclusions.

  12. Offspring of parents with chronic pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis of pain, health, psychological, and family outcomes.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Kristen S; Birnie, Kathryn A; Chambers, Christine T; Wilson, Anna C; Caes, Line; Clark, Alexander J; Lynch, Mary; Stinson, Jennifer; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha

    2015-11-01

    Offspring of parents with chronic pain may be at risk for poorer outcomes than offspring of healthy parents. The objective of this research was to provide a comprehensive mixed-methods systematic synthesis of all available research on outcomes in offspring of parents with chronic pain. A systematic search was conducted for published articles in English examining pain, health, psychological, or family outcomes in offspring of parents with chronic pain. Fifty-nine eligible articles were identified (31 population-based, 25 clinical, 3 qualitative), including offspring from birth to adulthood and parents with varying chronic pain diagnoses (eg, mixed pain samples, arthritis). Meta-analysis was used to synthesize the results from population-based and clinical studies, while meta-ethnography was used to synthesize the results of qualitative studies. Increased pain complaints were found in offspring of mothers and of fathers with chronic pain and when both parents had chronic pain. Newborns of mothers with chronic pain were more likely to have adverse birth outcomes, including low birthweight, preterm delivery, caesarian section, intensive care admission, and mortality. Offspring of parents with chronic pain had greater externalizing and internalizing problems and poorer social competence and family outcomes. No significant differences were found on teacher-reported externalizing problems. The meta-ethnography identified 6 key concepts (developing independence, developing compassion, learning about health and coping, missing out, emotional health, and struggles communicating with parents). Across study designs, offspring of parents with chronic pain had poorer outcomes than other offspring, although the meta-ethnography noted some constructive impact of having a parent with chronic pain.

  13. Offspring of Parents with Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Pain, Health, Psychological, and Family Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Kristen S.; Birnie, Kathryn A.; Chambers, Christine T.; Wilson, Anna C.; Caes, Line; Clark, Alexander J.; Lynch, Mary; Stinson, Jennifer; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha

    2015-01-01

    Offspring of parents with chronic pain may be at risk for poorer outcomes than offspring of healthy parents. The objective of this research was to provide a comprehensive mixed-methods, systematic synthesis of all available research on outcomes in offspring of parents with chronic pain. A systematic search was conducted for published articles in English examining pain, health, psychological, or family outcomes in offspring of parents with chronic pain. Fifty-nine eligible articles were identified (31 population-based, 25 clinical, 3 qualitative), including offspring from birth to adulthood and parents with varying chronic pain diagnoses (e.g., mixed pain samples, arthritis). Meta-analysis was used to synthesize the results from population-based and clinical studies, while meta-ethnography was used to synthesize the results of qualitative studies. Increased pain complaints were found in offspring of mothers and of fathers with chronic pain, and when both parents had chronic pain. Newborns of mothers with chronic pain were more likely to have adverse birth outcomes, including low birthweight, preterm delivery, caesarean section, intensive care admission, and mortality. Offspring of parents with chronic pain had greater externalizing and internalizing problems and poorer social competence and family outcomes. No significant differences were found on teacher-reported externalizing problems. The meta-ethnography identified six key concepts (developing independence, developing compassion, learning about health and coping, missing out, emotional health, and struggles communicating with parents). Across study designs, offspring of parents with chronic pain had poorer outcomes than other offspring, although the meta-ethnography noted some constructive impact of having a parent with chronic pain. PMID:26172553

  14. Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of neuropathic pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Espinosa, María-Lucila; Sanmartí-García, Gemma; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2012-09-01

    Many therapies have been proposed for the management of neuropathic pain, and they include the use of different antiepileptic drugs. However, the lack of high quality studies indicates that results on the different neuropathic disorders under study do not recommend a particular drug treatment. This study makes a systematic review of the published literature on the use of several antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain, and has the objective of considering both its clinical characteristics and pharmacological use, which will depend on their level of scientific evidence and will follow the principles of evidence-based dentistry. The articles were stratified according to their scientific evidence using the SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy), and it included those articles that only have level 1 or 2. Randomized clinical trials were stratified according to their level of quality using the JADAD scale, an instrument described by Jadad et al. (7). to assess the quality of clinical trials, while studies with a level below 3 were discarded. Recently, type A or B recommendations are given in favor or against the use of antiepileptic drugs to treat neuropathic pain on the basis of their scientific quality.

  15. Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS): a systematic review of anatomy and potential risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Waryasz, Gregory R; McDermott, Ann Y

    2008-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS), a common cause of anterior knee pain, is successfully treated in over 2/3 of patients through rehabilitation protocols designed to reduce pain and return function to the individual. Applying preventive medicine strategies, the majority of cases of PFPS may be avoided if a pre-diagnosis can be made by clinician or certified athletic trainer testing the current researched potential risk factors during a Preparticipation Screening Evaluation (PPSE). We provide a detailed and comprehensive review of the soft tissue, arterial system, and innervation to the patellofemoral joint in order to supply the clinician with the knowledge required to assess the anatomy and make recommendations to patients identified as potentially at risk. The purpose of this article is to review knee anatomy and the literature regarding potential risk factors associated with patellofemoral pain syndrome and prehabilitation strategies. A comprehensive review of knee anatomy will present the relationships of arterial collateralization, innervations, and soft tissue alignment to the possible multifactoral mechanism involved in PFPS, while attempting to advocate future use of different treatments aimed at non-soft tissue causes of PFPS. Methods A systematic database search of English language PubMed, SportDiscus, Ovid MEDLINE, Web of Science, LexisNexis, and EBM reviews, plus hand searching the reference lists of these retrieved articles was performed to determine possible risk factors for patellofemoral pain syndrome. Results Positive potential risk factors identified included: weakness in functional testing; gastrocnemius, hamstring, quadriceps or iliotibial band tightness; generalized ligamentous laxity; deficient hamstring or quadriceps strength; hip musculature weakness; an excessive quadriceps (Q) angle; patellar compression or tilting; and an abnormal VMO/VL reflex timing. An evidence-based medicine model was utilized to report evaluation

  16. Efficacy of platelet-rich plasma injections in pain associated with chronic tendinopathy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Umatheepan; Dissanayake, Ravi; Annabell, Lucas

    2015-07-01

    Chronic tendinopathy has often been a management dilemma for general practitioners. With our understanding of the pathophysiology of tendinopathy evolving, so has our management, with the advent of newer strategies such as topical glycerol trinitrate, extracorporeal shock-wave therapy, as well as platelet-rich plasma (PRP). To systematically review the literature regarding PRP therapy in chronic tendinopathy. The databases used in our search include the Elton B. Stephens Co. (EBSCO) database, Medline, the Cochrane library, Ovid, and Embase (the Excerpta Medica database). A total of 389 articles were reviewed from Feb 2010 to April 2014, for possible inclusion. Of these articles, a total of 9 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met our inclusion criteria. Only 1 RCT was excluded due to previous surgery in both the trial and control groups. Each article was reviewed independently by 2 authors. Each article was analyzed using the Cochrane Criteria checklist. Where any discrepancy occurred in results, a third independent reviewer was consulted. Our review found that PRP was most effective in patellar and lateral epicondylar tendinopathy, with both RCTs in the patellar section of our study supporting the use of PRP in pain reduction at 3 and 12 months, whereas 2 of 4 studies in the lateral epicondylar section showed improvements in pain and disability at 6 and 12 months. There was a lack of evidence to support the use of PRP in Achilles and rotator cuff tendinopathy. Although the results of this review show promise for the use of PRP in chronic tendinopathy, the analysis highlighted the need for more controlled clinical trials comparing PRP with placebo.

  17. Modifying patterns of movement in people with low back pain -does it help? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Physiotherapy for people with low back pain frequently includes assessment and modification of lumbo-pelvic movement. Interventions commonly aim to restore normal movement and thereby reduce pain and improve activity limitation. The objective of this systematic review was to investigate: (i) the effect of movement-based interventions on movement patterns (muscle activation, lumbo-pelvic kinematics or postural patterns) of people with low back pain (LBP), and (ii) the relationship between changes in movement patterns and subsequent changes in pain and activity limitation. Methods MEDLINE, Cochrane Central, EMBASE, AMI, CINAHL, Scopus, AMED, ISI Web of Science were searched from inception until January 2012. Randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials of people with LBP were eligible for inclusion. The intervention must have been designed to influence (i) muscle activity patterns, (ii) lumbo-pelvic kinematic patterns or (iii) postural patterns, and included measurement of such deficits before and after treatment, to allow determination of the success of the intervention on the lumbo-pelvic movement. Twelve trials (25% of retrieved studies) met the inclusion criteria. Two reviewers independently identified, assessed and extracted data. The PEDro scale was used to assess method quality. Intervention effects were described using standardised differences between group means and 95% confidence intervals. Results The included trials showed inconsistent, mostly small to moderate intervention effects on targeted movement patterns. There was considerable heterogeneity in trial design, intervention type and outcome measures. A relationship between changes to movement patterns and improvements in pain or activity limitation was observed in one of six studies on muscle activation patterns, one of four studies that examined the flexion relaxation response pattern and in two of three studies that assessed lumbo-pelvic kinematics or postural

  18. The impact of chronic pain on opioid addiction treatment: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Brittany B; Bawor, Monica; Paul, James; Varenbut, Michael; Daiter, Jeff; Plater, Carolyn; Pare, Guillaume; Marsh, David C; Worster, Andrew; Desai, Dipika; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2015-04-16

    The consequences of opioid relapse among patients being treated with opioid substitution treatment (OST) are serious and can result in abnormal cardiovascular function, overdose, and mortality. Chronic pain is a major risk factor for opioid relapse within the addiction treatment setting. There exist a number of opioid maintenance therapies including methadone, buprenorphine, naltrexone, and levomethadyl acetate (LAAM), of which the mediating effects of pain on treatment attrition, substance use behavior, and social functioning may differ across therapies. We aim to 1) evaluate the impact of pain on the treatment outcomes of addiction patients being managed with OST and 2) identify the most recently published opioid maintenance treatment guidelines from the United States, Canada, and the UK to determine how the evidence is being translated into clinical practice. The authors will search Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ProQuest Dissertations and theses Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and the National Institutes for Health Clinical Trials Registry. We will search www. gov and the National Institute for Care and Excellence (NICE) databases to identify the most recently published OST guidelines. All screening and data extraction will be completed in duplicate. Provided the data are suitable, we will perform a multiple treatment comparison using Bayesian meta-analytic methods to produce summary statistics estimating the effect of chronic pain on all OSTs. Our primary outcome is substance use behavior, which includes opioid and non-opioid substance use. We will also evaluate secondary endpoints such as treatment retention, general physical health, intervention adherence, personal and social functioning, as well as psychiatric symptoms. This review will capture the experience of treatment

  19. The Outcomes of Manipulation or Mobilization Therapy Compared with Physical Therapy or Exercise for Neck Pain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Josh; Kaplan, Leon; Fischer, Dena J.; Skelly, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale Neck pain is a prevalent condition. Spinal manipulation and mobilization procedures are becoming an accepted treatment for neck pain. However, data on the effectiveness of these treatments have not been summarized. Objective To compare manipulation or mobilization of the cervical spine to physical therapy or exercise for symptom improvement in patients with neck pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse Database, and bibliographies of key articles, which compared spinal manipulation or mobilization therapy with physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. Articles were included based on predetermined criteria and were appraised using a predefined quality rating scheme. Results From 197 citations, 7 articles met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. There were no differences in pain improvement when comparing spinal manipulation to exercise, and there were inconsistent reports of pain improvement in subjects who underwent mobilization therapy versus physical therapy. No disability improvement was reported between treatment groups in studies of acute or chronic neck pain patients. No functional improvement was found with manipulation therapy compared with exercise treatment or mobilization therapy compared with physical therapy groups in patients with acute pain. In chronic neck pain subjects who underwent spinal manipulation therapy compared to exercise treatment, results for short-term functional improvement were inconsistent. Conclusion The data available suggest that there are minimal short- and long-term treatment differences in pain, disability, patient-rated treatment improvement, treatment satisfaction, health status, or functional improvement when comparing manipulation or mobilization therapy to physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. This systematic review is limited by the variability of

  20. The outcomes of manipulation or mobilization therapy compared with physical therapy or exercise for neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Josh; Kaplan, Leon; Fischer, Dena J; Skelly, Andrea C

    2013-04-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale Neck pain is a prevalent condition. Spinal manipulation and mobilization procedures are becoming an accepted treatment for neck pain. However, data on the effectiveness of these treatments have not been summarized. Objective To compare manipulation or mobilization of the cervical spine to physical therapy or exercise for symptom improvement in patients with neck pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse Database, and bibliographies of key articles, which compared spinal manipulation or mobilization therapy with physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. Articles were included based on predetermined criteria and were appraised using a predefined quality rating scheme. Results From 197 citations, 7 articles met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. There were no differences in pain improvement when comparing spinal manipulation to exercise, and there were inconsistent reports of pain improvement in subjects who underwent mobilization therapy versus physical therapy. No disability improvement was reported between treatment groups in studies of acute or chronic neck pain patients. No functional improvement was found with manipulation therapy compared with exercise treatment or mobilization therapy compared with physical therapy groups in patients with acute pain. In chronic neck pain subjects who underwent spinal manipulation therapy compared to exercise treatment, results for short-term functional improvement were inconsistent. Conclusion The data available suggest that there are minimal short- and long-term treatment differences in pain, disability, patient-rated treatment improvement, treatment satisfaction, health status, or functional improvement when comparing manipulation or mobilization therapy to physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. This systematic review is limited by the variability of

  1. Dose or content? Effectiveness of pain rehabilitation programs for patients with chronic low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Waterschoot, Franka P C; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Hollak, Niek; de Vries, Haitze J; Geertzen, Jan H B; Reneman, Michiel F

    2014-01-01

    We sought to systematically analyze the influence of dose of pain rehabilitation programs (PRPs) for patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) on disability, work participation, and quality of life (QoL). Literature searches were performed in PubMed, Cochrane Library, Cinahl, and Embase up to October 2012, using MeSH terms, other relevant terms and free-text words. Randomized controlled trials in English, Dutch, and German, analyzing the effect of PRPs, were included. One of the analyzed interventions had to be a PRP. Outcomes should be reported regarding disability, work participation, or QoL. To analyze dose, the number of contact hours should be reported. Two reviewers independently selected titles, abstracts, and full-text articles on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted and risk of bias was assessed. Effect sizes (ES) were calculated for each intervention, and influence of dose variables was analyzed by a mixed model analysis. Eighteen studies were identified, reporting a wide variety of dose variables and contents of PRPs. Analyses showed that evaluation moment, number of disciplines, type of intervention, duration of intervention in weeks, percentage of women, and age influenced the outcomes of PRPs. The independent effect of dose variables could not be distinguished from content because these variables were strongly associated. Because dose variables were never studied separately or reported independently, we were not able to disentangle the relationship between dose, content, and effects of PRPs on disability, work participation, and QoL. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Acupuncture for Acute Postoperative Pain after Back Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Hun; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Heo, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ha, In-Hyuk; Son, Dong Wuk; Choi, Byung Kwan; Song, Geun-Sung; Shin, Byung-Cheul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Acupuncture is commonly used as a complimentary treatment for pain management. However, there has been no systematic review summarizing the current evidence concerning the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. This systematic review aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain (≤1 week) after back surgery. Methods We searched 15 electronic databases without language restrictions. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for eligibility and extracted data, outcomes, and risk of bias. Random effect meta-analyses and subgroup analyses were performed. Results Five trials, including 3 of high quality, met our inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed positive results for acupuncture treatment of pain after surgery in terms of the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain intensity 24 hours after surgery, when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference −0.67 (−1.04 to −0.31), P = 0.0003), whereas the other meta-analysis did not show a positive effect of acupuncture on 24-hour opiate demands when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference −0.23 (−0.58 to 0.13), P = 0.21). Conclusion Our systematic review finds encouraging but limited evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. Further rigorously designed clinical trials are required. PMID:24766648

  3. Adverse event reporting in nonpharmacologic, noninterventional pain clinical trials: ACTTION systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hunsinger, Matthew; Smith, Shannon M; Rothstein, Daniel; McKeown, Andrew; Parkhurst, Melissa; Hertz, Sharon; Katz, Nathaniel P; Lin, Allison H; McDermott, Michael P; Rappaport, Bob A; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of treatment safety is 1 of the primary goals of clinical trials. Organizations and working groups have created reporting guidelines for adverse events (AEs). Previous research examining AE reporting for pharmacologic clinical trials of analgesics in major pain journals found many reporting inadequacies, suggesting that analgesic trials are not adhering to existing AE reporting guidelines. The present systematic review documented AE reporting in 3 main pain journals for nonpharmacologic, noninterventional (NP/NI) trials examining pain treatments. To broaden our pool of nonpharmacologic trials, we also included trials examining acupuncture, leech therapy, and noninvasive stimulation techniques (eg, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation). We documented AE reporting at 2 levels of specificity using coding manuals based on the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) harms reporting standards and Analgesic, Anesthetic, and Addiction Clinical Trial Translations, Innovations, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTTION) AE reporting checklist. We identified a number of inadequacies in AE reporting across the 3 journals. For example, using the ACTTION coding manual, we found that less than one-half of the trials reported specific AE assessment methods; approximately one-third of the trials reported withdrawals due to AEs for each study arm; and about one-fourth of the trials reported all specific AEs. We also examined differences in AE reporting across several trial characteristics, finding that AE reporting was generally more detailed in trials with patients versus those using healthy volunteers undergoing experimentally evoked pain. These results suggest that investigators conducting and reporting NP/NI clinical trials are not adequately describing the assessment and occurrence of AEs.

  4. Effect of laser on pain relief and wound healing of recurrent aphthous stomatitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Suter, Valerie G A; Sjölund, Sophia; Bornstein, Michael M

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess a potential benefit of laser use in the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). The primary outcome variables were pain relief, duration of wound healing and reduction in episode frequency. A PICO approach was used as a search strategy in Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases. After scanning and excluding titles, abstracts and full texts, 11 studies (ten RCTs and one non-randomised controlled trial) were included. Study selection and data extraction was done by two observers. Study participants varied between 7-90 for the laser and 5-90 for the control groups. Laser treatment included Nd:YAG laser ablation, CO2 laser applied through a transparent gel (non-ablative) and diode laser in a low-level laser treatment (LLLT) mode. Control groups had placebo, no therapy or topical corticosteroid treatment. Significant pain relief immediately after treatment was found in five out of six studies. Pain relief in the days following treatment was recorded in seven studies. The duration of RAS wound healing was also reduced in five studies. However, criteria of evaluation differed between the studies. The episode frequency was not evaluated as only one study addressed this outcome parameter, but did not discriminate between the study (LLLT) and control (corticosteroid) groups. Jadad scores (ranging from 0 to 5) for quality assessment of the included studies range between 0 and 2 (mean = 1.0) for studies analysing pain relief and between 0 and 3 (mean = 1.1) for studies evaluating wound healing. The use of lasers (CO2 laser, Nd:YAG laser and diode laser) to relieve symptoms and promote healing of RAS is a therapeutic option. More studies for laser applications are necessary to demonstrate superiority over topical pharmaceutical treatment and to recommend a specific laser type, wavelength, power output and applied energy (ablative versus photobiomodulation).

  5. The Efficacy of Movement Representation Techniques for Treatment of Limb Pain--A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Holm; Morkisch, Nadine; Rietz, Christian; Dohle, Christian; Borgetto, Bernhard

    2016-02-01

    Relatively new evidence suggests that movement representation techniques (ie, therapies that use the observation and/or imagination of normal pain-free movements, such as mirror therapy, motor imagery, or movement and/or action observation) might be effective in reduction of some types of limb pain. To summarize the evidence regarding the efficacy of those techniques, a systematic review with meta-analysis was performed. We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, PsychINFO, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and OT-seeker up to August 2014 and hand-searched further relevant resources for randomized controlled trials that studied the efficacy of movement representation techniques in reduction of limb pain. The outcomes of interest were pain, disability, and quality of life. Study selection and data extraction were performed by 2 reviewers independently. We included 15 trials on the effects of mirror therapy, (graded) motor imagery, and action observation in patients with complex regional pain syndrome, phantom limb pain, poststroke pain, and nonpathological (acute) pain. Overall, movement representation techniques were found to be effective in reduction of pain (standardized mean difference [SMD] = -.82, 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.32 to -.31, P = .001) and disability (SMD = .72, 95% CI, .22-1.22, P = .004) and showed a positive but nonsignificant effect on quality of life (SMD = 2.61, 85% CI, -3.32 to 8.54, P = .39). Especially mirror therapy and graded motor imagery should be considered for the treatment of patients with complex regional pain syndrome. Furthermore, the results indicate that motor imagery could be considered as a potential effective treatment in patients with acute pain after trauma and surgery. To date, there is no evidence for a pain reducing effect of movement representation techniques in patients with phantom limb pain and poststroke pain other than complex regional pain syndrome

  6. The Effectiveness of Distraction as Procedural Pain Management Technique in Pediatric Oncology Patients: A Meta-analysis and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bukola, Ibitoye M; Paula, Dawson

    2017-07-14

    Diagnostic tests and treatment regimens for pediatric cancers involve invasive and painful procedures. Effective management of such pain has been shown to be suboptimal in many parts of the world, often because of the cost and limited availability of appropriate medications. Current evidence suggests that distraction (a relatively low-cost technique) is a promising intervention for procedural pain management. There is, however, limited evidence demonstrating its effectiveness in pediatric oncology patients. A systematic review was conducted to ascertain the effectiveness of distraction as a procedural pain management technique in pediatric oncology patients. Using a comprehensive search strategy, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, AMED, CINAHL, Web of Science, and EMBASE electronic databases were searched for studies comparing distraction techniques to standard care/any intervention. Using the selected studies, a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Two hundred ninety-nine studies were identified, with seven randomized control trials identified as eligible for inclusion. Pain was assessed using self-report, observer-report, and physiological measures. A meta-analysis of four studies showed distraction as effective in reducing procedural pain, based on self-reported pain. A meta-analysis of three studies, based on pulse rates, demonstrated similar results. For observer-reported pain, limited evidence supported the effectiveness of distraction. This systematic review demonstrates that distraction is a promising intervention for procedural pain. Future research should assess effectiveness of distraction in varied populations, to explore evidence of cultural influences on pain expression, measurement, and management approaches. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. All rights reserved.

  7. WHO systematic review of prevalence of chronic pelvic pain: a neglected reproductive health morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Latthe, Pallavi; Latthe, Manish; Say, Lale; Gülmezoglu, Metin; Khan, Khalid S

    2006-01-01

    Background Health care planning for chronic pelvic pain (CPP), an important cause of morbidity amongst women is hampered due to lack of clear collated summaries of its basic epidemiological data. We systematically reviewed worldwide literature on the prevalence of different types of CPP to assess the geographical distribution of data, and to explore sources of variation in its estimates. Methods We identified data available from Medline (1966 to 2004), Embase (1980 to 2004), PsycINFO (1887 to 2003), LILACS (1982 to 2004), Science Citation index, CINAHL (January 1980 to 2004) and hand searching of reference lists. Two reviewers extracted data independently, using a piloted form, on participants' characteristics, study quality and rates of CPP. We considered a study to be of high quality (valid) if had at least three of the following features: prospective design, validated measurement tool, adequate sampling method, sample size estimation and response rate >80%. We performed both univariate and multivariate meta-regression analysis to explore heterogeneity of results across studies. Results There were 178 studies (459975 participants) in 148 articles. Of these, 106 studies were (124259 participants) on dysmenorrhoea, 54 (35973 participants) on dyspareunia and 18 (301756 participants) on noncyclical pain. There were only 19/95 (20%) less developed and 1/45 (2.2%) least developed countries with relevant data in contrast to 22/43 (51.2%) developed countries. Meta-regression analysis showed that rates of pain varied according to study quality features. There were 40 (22.5%) high quality studies with representative samples. Amongst them, the rate of dysmenorrhoea was 16.8 to 81%, that of dyspareunia was 8 to 21.8%, and that for noncyclical pain was 2.1 to 24%. Conclusion There were few valid population based estimates of disease burden due to CPP from less developed countries. The variation in rates of CPP worldwide was due to variable study quality. Where valid data were

  8. Identifying and Managing Pain in People with Alzheimer's Disease and Other Types of Dementia: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Husebo, Bettina S; Achterberg, Wilco; Flo, Elisabeth

    2016-06-01

    Pain in patients with Alzheimer's disease is a complex issue; these patients suffer from the common causes of acute and chronic pain, and some also have neuropathic or nociceptive pain. Whatever the mechanism of pain in these patients, their pain will require careful assessment and management, to insure the correct type and level of analgesia is given. The objective of this systematic review was the identification of studies that have investigated the efficacy of different analgesics on pain intensity or pain-related behavior during nursing home stay and at the end of life. A search using pain, pain treatment, and dementia MESH terms and keywords was conducted (October 15, 2015) in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane libraries. Our search yielded 3138 unique hits, published between 1990 and October 2015. We read titles and abstracts, identified 124 papers for full-text evaluation, and included 12 papers to reflect and synthesize the following questions: (1) Which pain assessment tools for people with dementia are responsive to change in pain intensity scores? (2) Which analgesics are efficacy-tested by controlled trials including people with dementia living in nursing homes, including at the end of life? (3) Which outcome measures have been used to identify pain, pain behavior, and/or treatment efficacy in people with dementia? Despite increased use of analgesics, pain is still prevalent in people with dementia. Validated pain tools are available but not implemented and not fully tested on responsiveness to treatment. Official guidelines for pain assessment and treatment addressing people with dementia living in a nursing home are lacking. The efficacy of analgesic drug use on pain or neuropsychiatric behavior related to dementia has been hardly investigated.

  9. Systematic review of the effectiveness of nursing interventions in reducing or relieving post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Linda; Chang, Anne; Fraser, Jennifer A; Gaskill, Deanne; Nash, Robyn; Wallace, Karen

    2008-12-01

    Objectives  The primary objective of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of nursing interventions for the relief/reduction of post-operative pain when compared with either standard care or other nursing interventions. Inclusion criteria  Types of studies This review included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and other quasi-randomised experimental research designs. Types of participants Adults treated for post-operative pain in an acute care hospital. Types of interventions Interventions included in the review were only those directly administered by nursing staff such as: (i) administration of analgesia: including oral, intramuscular injection, patient controlled analgesia, epidural; (ii) pre-operative patient education; (iii) assessment and documentation of intensity of pain at regular intervals; (iv) protocols, clinical pathways or flow-sheets used in the management of pain; and (v) non-pharmacological interventions such as massage and relaxation. Types of outcome measures The primary outcome was the relief or reduction of post-operative pain. Other measures included analgesia consumption, patient satisfaction and length of hospital stay. Search strategy  Search terms were chosen after reviewing text words and MeSH terms in relevant articles and databases. A search for published and unpublished research covering the period 1985-2004 (inclusive) was conducted, using 11 major electronic databases. Reference lists of retrieved articles were hand searched. The search was restricted to reports published in English. Assessment of quality  The methodological quality of eligible studies was appraised by two independent reviewers, using a standardised critical appraisal tool. Differences in opinion were decided by consensus after discussion with a third investigator. Data extraction and analysis  Data were extracted from the studies that met the criteria for methodological quality. Two reviewers independently extracted data for each

  10. Use of Art-Making Intervention for Pain and Quality of Life Among Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Loring, Sarah; Kwekkeboom, Kristine

    2017-08-01

    Although pain is one of the most prevalent symptoms among cancer patients, medications do not always result in sufficient pain relief. Furthermore, these medications only address the physical component of pain. Art making, a holistic approach, may distract the user's attention from pain and allow expression of the nonphysical (e.g., psychological, spiritual) components of pain. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate evidence for the efficacy of art-making interventions in reducing pain and improving health-related quality of life (QoL) among cancer patients. PubMed, Academic Search Premier, ProQuest, and CINAHL were searched from database inception to September 2016 using the following search terms: neoplasm, cancer, tumor, pain, pain management, quality of life (QoL), well-being, art therapy, painting, and drawing. Fourteen articles reporting 13 studies were reviewed. Some studies reported beneficial effects of art making on pain and QoL, but the evidence was weakened by poor study quality ratings, heterogeneity in art-making interventions and outcome measures, interventions including non-art-making components, and few randomized controlled studies. More rigorous research is needed to demonstrate the efficacy of art making in relieving cancer-related pain and improving QoL.

  11. Predictors of Pain Relief Following Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Back and Leg Pain and Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rod S; Desai, Mehul J; Rigoard, Philippe; Taylor, Rebecca J

    2014-01-01

    We sought to assess the extent to which pain relief in chronic back and leg pain (CBLP) following spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is influenced by patient-related factors, including pain location, and technology factors. A number of electronic databases were searched with citation searching of included papers and recent systematic reviews. All study designs were included. The primary outcome was pain relief following SCS, we also sought pain score (pre- and post-SCS). Multiple predictive factors were examined: location of pain, history of back surgery, initial level of pain, litigation/worker's compensation, age, gender, duration of pain, duration of follow-up, publication year, continent of data collection, study design, quality score, method of SCS lead implant, and type of SCS lead. Between-study association in predictive factors and pain relief were assessed by meta-regression. Seventy-four studies (N = 3,025 patients with CBLP) met the inclusion criteria; 63 reported data to allow inclusion in a quantitative analysis. Evidence of substantial statistical heterogeneity (P < 0.0001) in level of pain relief following SCS was noted. The mean level of pain relief across studies was 58% (95% CI: 53% to 64%, random effects) at an average follow-up of 24 months. Multivariable meta-regression analysis showed no predictive patient or technology factors. SCS was effective in reducing pain irrespective of the location of CBLP. This review supports SCS as an effective pain relieving treatment for CBLP with predominant leg pain with or without a prior history of back surgery. Randomized controlled trials need to confirm the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of SCS in the CLBP population with predominant low back pain. PMID:23834386

  12. The role of hydromorphone in cancer pain treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pigni, Alessandra; Brunelli, Cinzia; Caraceni, Augusto

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the scientific evidence for the efficacy and side effects of hydromorphone in the management of moderate to severe cancer pain. Randomized and non-randomized clinical trials, reporting data on efficacy and/or side effects of hydromorphone, were identified. Thirteen eligible studies, involving 1208 patients, were selected. Seven studies compared hydromorphone with other opioids (five with morphine, one with oxycodone and one with fentanyl and buprenorphine) and five of them were randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Most of the studies were conducted on patients already receiving opioid treatment, often at stabilized doses, and most had methodological limitations. The RCTs comparing hydromorphone with morphine and oxycodone showed similar analgesic results, while the comparison of side effects showed minor differences, not consistent across studies. Due to clinical and methodological heterogeneity of the studies, a meta-analysis was not performed. In conclusion there is evidence to support the efficacy and tolerability of hydromorphone for moderate to severe cancer pain as an alternative to morphine and oxycodone, while there is no evidence to demonstrate its superiority or inferiority in comparison with morphine as the first choice opioid for the same indication.

  13. Drug-based pain management in people with dementia after hip or pelvic fractures: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Kuske, S; Moschinski, K; Andrich, S; Stephan, A; Gnass, I; Sirsch, E; Icks, A

    2016-07-13

    Studies show that people with dementia do not receive the same amount of analgesia after a hip or pelvic fracture compared to those without cognitive impairment. However, there is no systematic review that shows to what extent and how drug-based pain management is performed for people with dementia following a hip or pelvic fracture. The aim of this systematic review is to identify studies addressing drug-based pain management for people with dementia who have had a hip or pelvic fracture for which they had either an operation or conservative treatment. We will analyse to what extent and how the drug-based pain treatment for people with dementia is performed across all settings and how it is assessed in the studies. The development of this systematic review protocol was guided by the PRISMA-P requirements, which will be taken into consideration during the review procedure. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Knowledge and ScienceDirect will be searched, using keywords such as "analgesia", "dementia", "cognitive impairment", "pain treatment", "hip fracture" or "pelvic fracture". Publications published up to January 2016 will be included. The data extraction and a content analysis will be carried out systematically, followed by a critical appraisal. This review will provide a valuable overview on the current evidence on drug-based pain management for PwD in all settings who were conservatively treated after a hip or pelvic fracture. The review may expose a need to enhance pain management for PwD. It may also provide motivation for healthcare providers and policymakers to give this topic their attention and to facilitate further research by considering aspects of care transitions in all settings. PROSPERO CRD42016037309.

  14. Psychological Interventions in the Rehabilitation of Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: Evidence and Recommendations from Systematic Reviews and Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Christina; Mittag, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to summarize evidence and recommendations for psychological interventions in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. We carried out a systematic literature search in several databases and on the websites of professional associations to identify relevant reviews and guidelines. In addition to the…

  15. Psychological Interventions in the Rehabilitation of Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: Evidence and Recommendations from Systematic Reviews and Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Christina; Mittag, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to summarize evidence and recommendations for psychological interventions in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. We carried out a systematic literature search in several databases and on the websites of professional associations to identify relevant reviews and guidelines. In addition to the…

  16. Central hyperexcitability as measured with nociceptive flexor reflex threshold in chronic musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lim, Edwin Choon Wyn; Sterling, Michele; Stone, Andrew; Vicenzino, Bill

    2011-08-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal conditions are increasingly conceived as involving altered central nervous system processing, and impaired nociceptive flexor reflex (NFR) appears to reflect altered central nervous system processing. The primary objective was to synthesize the evidence for impaired NFR in these conditions. The secondary objective was to evaluate the NFR stimuli parameters employed by reviewed studies. Electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, PEDro, Google Scholar, and Cochrane library were searched from the mid-1960s to June 2010. Experimental reports were systematically reviewed and meta-analysis (where possible) was performed. NFR thresholds and parameters of NFR stimuli were extracted. Sixteen trials were identified, 11 of which were suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Compared to healthy controls, standardized mean differences in NFR threshold were significantly lower in subjects with primary headache (-0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.77 to -0.13, P=0.005), fibromyalgia (-0.63; 95% CI -0.93 to -0.34, P<0.0001), knee pain (-1.51; 95% CI -2.10 to -0.93, P<0.00001) and whiplash (-0.73; 95% CI -1.11 to -0.35, P=0.0002). Employed stimuli parameters vary between studies, with inter-pulse duration (P=0.044) being identified by multiple regression analysis as independent predictors of the variability in NFR threshold in healthy controls. The results indicate that there is evidence of central hyperexcitability in people with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Our review also suggests that shorter inter-pulse duration tends to yield smaller variability in NFR threshold. However, further research investigating optimal stimulation parameters is still warranted.

  17. Drug-based pain management for people with dementia after hip or pelvic fractures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Moschinski, Kai; Kuske, Silke; Andrich, Silke; Stephan, Astrid; Gnass, Irmela; Sirsch, Erika; Icks, Andrea

    2017-02-14

    Studies indicate that people with dementia do not receive the same amount of analgesia after a hip or pelvic fracture compared to those without cognitive impairment. However, there is no systematic review that shows to what extent drug-based pain management is performed for people with dementia following a hip or pelvic fracture. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and analyse studies that investigate drug-based pain management for people with dementia with a hip or pelvic fracture in all settings. Treatment could be surgical or conservative. We also analysed study designs, methods and variables, as well as which assessments were applied to measure pain management and mental status. The development of this systematic review protocol was guided by the PRISMA-P requirements, which were taken into consideration during the review procedures. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Knowledge and ScienceDirect were searched. Studies published up to January 2016 were included. The data extraction, content and quantitative descriptive analysis were carried out systematically, followed by a critical appraisal. Eight of the 13 included studies focusing on patient data showed that people with dementia received less drug-based pain management than people without cognitive impairment. Four studies based on surveys of healthcare professionals stated that cognitive impairment is a major barrier for effective pain management. There was heterogeneity regarding the assessment of the mental status and the pain assessment of the patients. The assessment of the drugs administered in all of the studies working with patient data was achieved through chart reviews. People with dementia do not seem to receive the same amount of opioid analgesics after hip fracture as people without cognitive impairment. There is need to enhance pain assessment and management for these patients. Future research should pay more attention to the use of the appropriate items for assessing cognitive

  18. Efficacy of Botulinum toxin A for the treatment of Bladder pain syndrome: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ochoa Vargas, D C; García Perdómo, H A

    2017-07-04

    To determine the efficacy and safety of BTX-A, compared with other interventions for the treatment of BPS to improve quality of life. This systematic review fulfils all the requirements of the Cochrane manual and PRISMA reporting guidelines. The PROSPERO registration number is: CRD42016039480.Clinical trials without language discrimination were included. BPS patients over 18 y/o that were treated with BTX-A were included. Studies were searched in published databases and no published literature from inception to the present day. Risk of bias analysis was done using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. 88 articles were found with the designed search strategies. After exclusions, four studies were included in the qualitative analyses. Kasyan et al., 2012 compared BTX-A with hydrodistention. Manning et al., 2014 compared the injection of BTX-A with the injection of normal saline in previously hydrodistended bladders. In both cases, primary end point was measured by the O'Leary-Sant questionnaire score. El-Bahnasy et al., 2009 compared BTX-A with BCG administration, through Global Response Assessment. Kuo et al., 2015 compared hydrodistention plus suburothelial injections of BTX-A with hydrodistension plus normal saline injections. Reduction in pain was estimated by VAS bladder pain score. A similar efficacy to their controls had been found in Kasyan and Manning studies. El-Bahnasy had found improvement in BTX-A in all parameters. Kuo el al. 2015, found a significantly reduction in pain in the BTX-A group. Regarding the risk of bias, three studies did not have adequate descriptions of selection, performance and detection bias. The study of Manning had low risk of selection, attrition and reporting bias. There is not enough evidence to conclude the efficacy of BTX-A for the treatment of interstitial cystitis to improve quality of life. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Multimodal analgesia: A systematic review of local NSAIDs for non-ophthalmologic postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Lisa; Kendall, Lauren; Reina, Eva

    2016-08-01

    While the analgesic benefits of systemically administered non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for postoperative pain are well established, benefits of locally administered NSAIDs remain unclear outside the field of ophthalmologic surgery. Studies of local NSAID administration for postoperative analgesia vary considerably in terms of dosing and methodologic quality, making it difficult to derive clinically useful information. The primary objective of this systematic review is to summarize the currently available literature in order to assess the value of local NSAIDs as a component of the multimodal postoperative pain management regimen. A comprehensive search of PubMed and CENTRAL identified twelve randomized controlled trials comparing the use of local NSAIDs to systemic NSAIDs and/or placebo for postoperative multimodal pain management in patients undergoing non-ophthalmologic surgery. Nine trials met eligibility criteria (n = 532); each trial was classified into a subgroup based on time of NSAID administration (pre- or postoperatively) and comparison group (systemic NSAID or placebo). A frequency analysis was performed for similar outcomes reported in two or more studies. The risk of bias for each outcome and quality of evidence were assessed utilizing the Cochrane Risk of Bias instrument and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, respectively. Low to moderate quality evidence exists indicating that pre- or postoperative administration of local NSAIDs may provide adequate postoperative analgesia within a multimodal regimen. Additional across-study analysis reveals clinically important but non-statistically significant trends towards a decreased use of additional analgesics during the postoperative period. The risk of adverse effects secondary to local NSAID administration is low. Local NSAIDs may be effective agents in the multimodal postoperative analgesia regimen. However, small sample size and

  20. Systematic review and meta-analysis of cannabis treatment for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sánchez, Eva; Furukawa, Toshiaki A; Taylor, Julian; Martin, Jose Luis R

    2009-11-01

    Cannabis preparations have been used as a remedy for thousands of years in traditional medicine. Clinical use of cannabinoid substances is restricted, due to legal and ethical reasons, as well as limited evidence showing benefits. To assess the efficacy and harms of cannabis preparations in the treatment of chronic pain. Systematic review and meta-analysis of double-blind randomized controlled trials that compared any cannabis preparation to placebo among subjects with chronic pain. An electronic search was made in Medline/Pubmed, Embase, and The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (TRIALS CENTRAL) of all literature published until February 2008, as well as specific web pages devoted to cannabis. Studies were cross-checked, selected, and assessed. Eighteen trials were included. The efficacy analysis (visual analog scales) displayed a difference in standardized means in favor of the cannabis arm of -0.61 (-0.84 to -0.37), with statistical homogeneity (I(2) = 0.0%; P = 0.50). For the analysis of harms, the following Odds Ratios (OR) and number needed to harm (NNH) were obtained: for events linked to alterations to perception, OR: 4.51 (3.05-6.66), NNH: 7 (6-9); for events affecting motor function, 3.93 (2.83-5.47), NNH: 5 (4-6); for events that altered cognitive function, 4.46 (2.37-8.37), NNH: 8 (6-12). Currently available evidence suggests that cannabis treatment is moderately efficacious for treatment of chronic pain, but beneficial effects may be partially (or completely) offset by potentially serious harms. More evidence from larger, well-designed trials is needed to clarify the true balance of benefits to harms.

  1. Systemic Pharmacologic Therapies for Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review for an American College of Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Chou, Roger; Deyo, Richard; Friedly, Janna; Skelly, Andrea; Weimer, Melissa; Fu, Rochelle; Dana, Tracy; Kraegel, Paul; Griffin, Jessica; Grusing, Sara

    2017-04-04

    A 2007 American College of Physicians guideline addressed pharmacologic options for low back pain. New evidence and medications have now become available. To review the current evidence on systemic pharmacologic therapies for acute or chronic nonradicular or radicular low back pain. Ovid MEDLINE (January 2008 through November 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists. Randomized trials that reported pain, function, or harms of systemic medications versus placebo or another intervention. One investigator abstracted data, and a second verified accuracy; 2 investigators independently assessed study quality. The number of trials ranged from 9 (benzodiazepines) to 70 (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). New evidence found that acetaminophen was ineffective for acute low back pain, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs had smaller benefits for chronic low back pain than previously observed, duloxetine was effective for chronic low back pain, and benzodiazepines were ineffective for radiculopathy. For opioids, evidence remains limited to short-term trials showing modest effects for chronic low back pain; trials were not designed to assess serious harms. Skeletal muscle relaxants are effective for short-term pain relief in acute low back pain but caused sedation. Systemic corticosteroids do not seem to be effective. For effective interventions, pain relief was small to moderate and generally short-term; improvements in function were generally smaller. Evidence is insufficient to determine the effects of antiseizure medications. Qualitatively synthesized new trials with prior meta-analyses. Only English-language studies were included, many of which had methodological shortcomings. Medications injected for local effects were not addressed. Several systemic medications for low back pain are associated with small to moderate, primarily short-term effects on pain. New evidence suggests that

  2. Should exercises be painful in the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin E; Hendrick, Paul; Smith, Toby O; Bateman, Marcus; Moffatt, Fiona; Rathleff, Michael S; Selfe, James; Logan, Pip

    2017-06-08

    Chronic musculoskeletal disorders are a prevalent and costly global health issue. A new form of exercise therapy focused on loading and resistance programmes that temporarily aggravates a patient's pain has been proposed. The object of this review was to compare the effect of exercises where pain is allowed/encouraged compared with non-painful exercises on pain, function or disability in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain within randomised controlled trials. Two authors independently selected studies and appraised risk of bias. Methodological quality was evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment system was used to evaluate the quality of evidence. The literature search identified 9081 potentially eligible studies. Nine papers (from seven trials) with 385 participants met the inclusion criteria. There was short- term significant difference in pain, with moderate quality evidence for a small effect size of -0.27 (-0.54 to -0.05) in favour of painful exercises. For pain in the medium and long term, and function and disability in the short, medium and long term, there was no significant difference. Protocols using painful exercises offer a small but significant benefit over pain-free exercises in the short term, with moderate quality of evidence. In the medium and long term there is no clear superiority of one treatment over another. Pain during therapeutic exercise for chronic musculoskeletal pain need not be a barrier to successful outcomes. Further research is warranted to fully evaluate the effectiveness of loading and resistance programmes into pain for chronic musculoskeletal disorders. CRD42016038882. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Diagnostic indicators of non-cardiovascular chest pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) has a high healthcare cost, but insufficient guidelines exist for its diagnostic investigation. The objective of the present work was to identify important diagnostic indicators and their accuracy for specific and non-specific conditions underlying NCCP. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. In May 2012, six databases were searched. Hand and bibliography searches were also conducted. Studies evaluating a diagnostic test against a reference test in patients with NCCP were included. Exclusion criteria were having <30 patients per group, and evaluating diagnostic tests for acute cardiovascular disease. Diagnostic accuracy is given in likelihood ratios (LR): very good (LR+ >10, LR- <0.1); good (LR + 5 to 10, LR- 0.1 to 0.2); fair (LR + 2 to 5, LR- 0.2 to 0.5); or poor (LR + 1 to 2, LR- 0.5 to 1). Joined meta-analysis of the diagnostic test sensitivity and specificity was performed by applying a hierarchical Bayesian model. Results Out of 6,316 records, 260 were reviewed in full text, and 28 were included: 20 investigating gastroesophageal reflux disorders (GERD), 3 musculoskeletal chest pain, and 5 psychiatric conditions. Study quality was good in 15 studies and moderate in 13. GERD diagnosis was more likely with typical GERD symptoms (LR + 2.70 and 2.75, LR- 0.42 and 0.78) than atypical GERD symptoms (LR + 0.49, LR- 2.71). GERD was also more likely with a positive response to a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) test (LR + 5.48, 7.13, and 8.56; LR- 0.24, 0.25, and 0.28); the posterior mean sensitivity and specificity of six studies were 0.89 (95% credible interval, 0.28 to 1) and 0.88 (95% credible interval, 0.26 to 1), respectively. Panic and anxiety screening scores can identify individuals requiring further testing for anxiety or panic disorders. Clinical findings in musculoskeletal pain either had a fair to moderate LR + and a poor LR- or vice versa. Conclusions In

  4. Pain and Opioid Addiction: A Systematic Review and Evaluation of Pain Measurement in Patients with Opioid Dependence on Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dennis, B B; Bawor, M; Paul, J; Plater, C; Pare, G; Worster, A; Varenbut, M; Daiter, J; Marsh, D C; Desai, D; Thabane, L; Samaan, Z

    2016-01-01

    While chronic pain has been said to impact patient's response to methadone maintenance treatment for opioid dependence, the reported findings are inconsistent. These discrepancies may be a direct result of variations in the measurement of chronic pain or definitions of response to methadone treatment. The goal of this study is to evaluate the association between pain and substance use behaviour to determine the real impact of comorbid pain in the methadone population. We also aim to examine sources of variation across the literature with a specific focus on the measurement of pain. We performed a systematic review using an electronic search strategy across CINAHL, MEDLINE, Web of Science, PsychINFO, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library including Cochrane Reviews and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. Title, abstract, as well as full text screening and extraction were performed in duplicate. Studies evaluating the association between chronic pain and methadone maintenance treatment response were eligible for inclusion in this review. Using a sample of 297 methadone patients from the Genetics of Opioid Addiction (GENOA) research collaborative, we assessed the reliability of patient self-reported pain and the validated Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) assessment tool. After screening 826 articles we identified five studies eligible for full text extraction, of which three showed a significant relationship between the presence of pain and the increase in substance abuse among patients on methadone for the treatment of opioid dependence. Studies varied largely in the definitions and measurement of both pain and response to treatment. Results from our validation of pain measurement in the GENOA sample (n=297) showed the use of a simple self-reported pain question is highly correlated to the use of the BPI. Simply asking patients whether they have pain showed a 44.2% sensitivity, 88.8% specificity, 84.4% PPV and 53.6% NPV to the BPI. The area under the

  5. Brain changes associated with cognitive and emotional factors in chronic pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Malfliet, A; Coppieters, I; Van Wilgen, P; Kregel, J; De Pauw, R; Dolphens, M; Ickmans, K

    2017-02-01

    An emerging technique in chronic pain research is MRI, which has led to the understanding that chronic pain patients display brain structure and function alterations. Many of these altered brain regions and networks are not just involved in pain processing, but also in other sensory and particularly cognitive tasks. Therefore, the next step is to investigate the relation between brain alterations and pain related cognitive and emotional factors. This review aims at providing an overview of the existing literature on this subject. Pubmed, Web of Science and Embase were searched for original research reports. Twenty eight eligible papers were included, with information on the association of brain alterations with pain catastrophizing, fear-avoidance, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Methodological quality of eligible papers was checked by two independent researchers. Evidence on the direction of these associations is inconclusive. Pain catastrophizing is related to brain areas involved in pain processing, attention to pain, emotion and motor activity, and to reduced top-down pain inhibition. In contrast to pain catastrophizing, evidence on anxiety and depressive symptoms shows no clear association with brain characteristics. However, all included cognitive or emotional factors showed significant associations with resting state fMRI data, providing that even at rest the brain reserves a certain activity for these pain-related factors. Brain changes associated with illness perceptions, pain attention, attitudes and beliefs seem to receive less attention in literature.

  6. Experiences of acute pain in children who present to a healthcare facility for treatment: a systematic review of qualitative evidence.

    PubMed

    Pope, Nicole; Tallon, Mary; McConigley, Ruth; Leslie, Gavin; Wilson, Sally

    2017-06-01

    Pain is a universal and complex phenomenon that is personal, subjective and specific. Despite growing knowledge in pediatric pain, management of children's pain remains sub-optimal and is linked to negative behavioral and physiological consequences later in life. As there is no synthesis of these studies, it was timely to undertake a systematic review. To identify, evaluate and synthesize the existing qualitative evidence on children's experiences of acute pain, including pain management, within a healthcare facility. Children aged four to 18 years (inclusive) attending a healthcare facility who experienced acute pain associated with any injury, medical condition or treatment. Children's experiences and perceptions of their acute pain, pain management and expectations of others in managing their pain. Studies on children's experiences of pain in the postoperative context were excluded as a systematic review exploring this phenomenon had previously been published. Studies reporting on children's experiences of chronic pain were also excluded. Any healthcare facility including general practitioners' surgeries, hospitals, emergency departments and outpatient clinics. Qualitative studies including phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research designs. Using a three-step search strategy, databases were searched in December 2015 to identify both published and unpublished articles from 2000 to 2015. Studies published in languages other than English were excluded. All studies that met the inclusion criteria were assessed by at least two independent reviewers for methodological quality using a standardized critical appraisal tool from the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-QARI). Data were extracted from the papers included in the review using standardized data extraction tool from JBI-QARI. Findings were pooled using JBI-QARI. Findings were rated according to their level of credibility and

  7. Too many crying babies: a systematic review of pain management practices during immunizations on YouTube.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Denise; Sampson, Margaret; Reszel, Jessica; Abdulla, Koowsar; Barrowman, Nick; Cumber, Jordi; Fuller, Ann; Li, Claudia; Nicholls, Stuart; Pound, Catherine M

    2014-05-29

    Early childhood immunizations, although vital for preventative health, are painful and too often lead to fear of needles. Effective pain management strategies during infant immunizations include breastfeeding, sweet solutions, and upright front-to-front holding. However, it is unknown how often these strategies are used in clinical practice. We aimed to review the content of YouTube videos showing infants being immunized to ascertain parents' and health care professionals' use of pain management strategies, as well as to assess infants' pain and distress. A systematic review of YouTube videos showing intramuscular injections in infants less than 12 months was completed using the search terms "baby injection" and "baby vaccine" to assess (1) the use of pain management strategies and (2) infant pain and distress. Pain was assessed by crying duration and pain scores using the FLACC (Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability) tool. A total of 142 videos were included and coded by two trained individual viewers. Most infants received one injection (range of one to six). Almost all (94%) infants cried before or during the injections for a median of 33 seconds (IQR = 39), up to 146 seconds. FLACC scores during the immunizations were high, with a median of 10 (IQR = 3). No videos showed breastfeeding or the use of sucrose/sweet solutions during the injection(s), and only four (3%) videos showed the infants being held in a front-to-front position during the injections. Distraction using talking or singing was the most commonly used (66%) pain management strategy. YouTube videos of infants being immunized showed that infants were highly distressed during the procedures. There was no use of breastfeeding or sweet solutions and limited use of upright or front-to-front holding during the injections. This systematic review will be used as a baseline to evaluate the impact of future knowledge translation interventions using YouTube to improve pain management practices for infant

  8. Acupuncture for pelvic and back pain in pregnancy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ee, Carolyn C; Manheimer, Eric; Pirotta, Marie V; White, Adrian R

    2008-03-01

    The objective of our study was to review the effectiveness of needle acupuncture in treating the common and disabling problem of pelvic and back pain in pregnancy. Two small trials on mixed pelvic/back pain and 1 large high-quality trial on pelvic pain met the inclusion criteria. Acupuncture, as an adjunct to standard treatment, was superior to standard treatment alone and physiotherapy in relieving mixed pelvic/back pain. Women with well-defined pelvic pain had greater relief of pain with a combination of acupuncture and standard treatment, compared to standard treatment alone or stabilizing exercises and standard treatment. We used a narrative synthesis due to significant clinical heterogeneity between trials. Few and minor adverse events were reported. We conclude that limited evidence supports acupuncture use in treating pregnancy-related pelvic and back pain. Additional high-quality trials are needed to test the existing promising evidence for this relatively safe and popular complementary therapy.

  9. The effect of patient-practitioner communication on pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mistiaen, P; van Osch, M; van Vliet, L; Howick, J; Bishop, F L; Di Blasi, Z; Bensing, J; van Dulmen, S

    2016-05-01

    Communication between patients and health care practitioners is expected to benefit health outcomes. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of experimentally varied communication on clinical patients' pain. We searched in July 2012, 11 databases supplemented with forward and backward searches for (quasi-) randomized controlled trials in which face-to-face communication was manipulated. We updated in June 2015 using the four most relevant databases (CINAHL, Cochrane Central, Psychinfo, PubMed). Fifty-one studies covering 5079 patients were included. The interventions were separated into three categories: cognitive care, emotional care, procedural preparation. In all but five studies the outcome concerned acute pain. We found that, in general, communication has a small effect on (acute) pain. The 19 cognitive care studies showed that a positive suggestion may reduce pain, whereas a negative suggestion may increase pain, but effects are small. The 14 emotional care studies showed no evidence of a direct effect on pain, although four studies showed a tendency for emotional care lowering patients' pain. Some of the 23 procedural preparation interventions showed a weak to moderate effect on lowering pain. Different types of communication have a significant but small effect on (acute) pain. Positive suggestions and informational preparation seem to lower patients' pain. Communication interventions show a large variety in quality, complexity and methodological rigour; they often used multiple components and it remains unclear what the effective elements of communication are. Future research is warranted to identify the effective components. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  10. Frequency of Persistent Tooth Pain Following Root Canal Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nixdorf, Donald R.; Moana-Filho, Estephan J.; Law, Alan S.; McGuire, Lisa A.; Hodges, James S.; John, Mike T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about the frequency of persistent pain after endodontic procedures, even though pain is a core patient-oriented outcome. We estimated the frequency of persistent pain, regardless of etiology, following endondontic treatment. Methods Persistent tooth pain was defined as pain present ≥ 6 months after endodontic treatment. Endodontic procedures included in the review were pulpectomy, non-surgical root canal treatment, surgical root canal treatment, as well as retreatment. Four databases were searched electronically, complemented by hand searching. Two independent reviewers determined eligibility, abstracted data, and assessed study quality. A summary estimate of persistent all-cause tooth pain frequency was established by using a random-effects meta-analysis. Using subgroup analyses, we explored the influence of treatment approach (surgical/non-surgical), longitudinal study design (prospective/retrospective), follow-up rate, follow-up duration, initial treatment versus re-treatment, and quality of reporting (STROBE rankings) on the pain frequency estimate. Results Of 770 articles retrieved and reviewed, 26 met inclusion criteria. A total of 5,777 teeth were enrolled, and 2,996 had follow-up information regarding pain status. We identified 168 teeth with pain and derived a frequency of 5.3% (95%CI: 3.5–7.2%, p<0.001) for persistent all-cause tooth pain. High and statistically significant heterogeneity among studies (I2=80%) was present. In subgroup analysis, prospective studies had a higher pain frequency (7.6%) than retrospectives studies did (0.9%). Quality of study reporting was identified as the most influential reason for study heterogeneity. Conclusions Frequency of all-cause persistent tooth pain following endodontic procedures was estimated to be 5.3%, with higher report quality studies suggesting >7%. PMID:20113779

  11. Frequency of persistent tooth pain after root canal therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nixdorf, Donald R; Moana-Filho, Estephan J; Law, Alan S; McGuire, Lisa A; Hodges, James S; John, Mike T

    2010-02-01

    Little is known about the frequency of persistent pain after endodontic procedures even though pain is a core patient-oriented outcome. We estimated the frequency of persistent pain, regardless of etiology, after endodontic treatment. Persistent tooth pain was defined as pain present > or = 6 months after endodontic treatment. Endodontic procedures included in the review were pulpectomy, nonsurgical root canal treatment, surgical root canal treatment, and retreatment. Four databases were searched electronically complemented by hand searching. Two independent reviewers determined eligibility, abstracted data, and assessed study quality. A summary estimate of persistent all-cause tooth pain frequency was established by using a random-effects meta-analysis. Using subgroup analyses, we explored the influence of treatment approach (surgical/nonsurgical), longitudinal study design (prospective/retrospective), follow-up rate, follow-up duration, initial treatment versus retreatment, and quality of reporting (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology rankings) on the pain frequency estimate. Of 770 articles retrieved and reviewed, 26 met inclusion criteria. A total of 5,777 teeth were enrolled, and 2,996 had follow-up information regarding pain status. We identified 168 teeth with pain and derived a frequency of 5.3% (95% confidence interval, 3.5%-7.2%, p < 0.001) for persistent all-cause tooth pain. High and statistically significant heterogeneity among studies (I2 = 80%) was present. In subgroup analysis, prospective studies had a higher pain frequency (7.6%) than retrospectives studies did (0.9%). Quality of study reporting was identified as the most influential reason for study heterogeneity. The frequency of all-cause persistent tooth pain after endodontic procedures was estimated to be 5.3%, with higher report quality studies suggesting >7%. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Prevalence of low back pain in Africa: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Quinette A; Morris, Linzette D; Grimmer-Somers, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP) is the most prevalent musculoskeletal condition and one the most common causes of disability in the developed nations. Anecdotally, there is a general assumption that LBP prevalence in Africa is comparatively lower than in developed countries. The aim of this review was to systematically appraise the published prevalence studies conducted on the African continent to establish the prevalence of LBP in Africa. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted in April 2006. The following databases PEDro, Psychinfo, Science Direct, SportsDiscus, PubMed, CINAHL, Biblioline Pro-African Wide NiPAD and SA ePublications were individually searched using specifically developed search strategies for epidemiological research conducted on LBP amongst the African population. Two reviewers independently evaluated the methodological quality of the studies reviewed. Results A total of 27 eligible epidemiological studies were included in this review. The majority of the studies (63%) were conducted in South Africa (37%) and Nigeria (26%). The most common population group involved workers (48%), while scholars comprised 15% of the population. 67% of the studies were found to be methodologically sound, and the LBP prevalence of these were analyzed. The mean LBP point prevalence among the adolescents was 12% and among adults was 32%. The average one year prevalence of LBP among adolescents was 33% and among adults was 50%. The average lifetime prevalence of LBP among the adolescents was 36% and among adults was 62%. Conclusion The findings support the global burden of disease of LBP, in addition to suggesting that LBP prevalence among Africans is rising and is of concern. Further research into the most effective strategies to prevent and manage LBP in Africa is warranted. PMID:17976240

  13. Diagnostic imaging for chronic plantar heel pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic plantar heel pain (CPHP) is a generalised term used to describe a range of undifferentiated conditions affecting the plantar heel. Plantar fasciitis is reported as the most common cause and the terms are frequently used interchangeably in the literature. Diagnostic imaging has been used by many researchers and practitioners to investigate the involvement of specific anatomical structures in CPHP. These observations help to explain the underlying pathology of the disorder, and are of benefit in forming an accurate diagnosis and targeted treatment plan. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the diagnostic imaging features associated with CPHP, and evaluate study findings by meta-analysis where appropriate. Methods Bibliographic databases including Medline, Embase, CINAHL, SportDiscus and The Cochrane Library were searched electronically on March 25, 2009. Eligible articles were required to report imaging findings in participants with CPHP unrelated to inflammatory arthritis, and to compare these findings with a control group. Methodological quality was evaluated by use of the Quality Index as described by Downs and Black. Meta-analysis of study data was conducted where appropriate. Results Plantar fascia thickness as measured by ultrasonography was the most widely reported imaging feature. Meta-analysis revealed that the plantar fascia of CPHP participants was 2.16 mm thicker than control participants (95% CI = 1.60 to 2.71 mm, P < 0.001) and that CPHP participants were more likely to have plantar fascia thickness values greater than 4.0 mm (OR = 105.11, 95% CI = 3.09 to 3577.28, P = 0.01). CPHP participants were also more likely to show radiographic evidence of subcalcaneal spur than control participants (OR = 8.52, 95% CI = 4.08 to 17.77, P < 0.001). Conclusion This systematic review has identified 23 studies investigating the diagnostic imaging appearance of the plantar fascia and inferior calcaneum in people with CPHP

  14. Optimal Strategies for Reporting Pain in Clinical Trials and Systematic Reviews: Recommendations from an OMERACT 12 Workshop.

    PubMed

    Busse, Jason W; Bartlett, Susan J; Dougados, Maxime; Johnston, Bradley C; Guyatt, Gordon H; Kirwan, John R; Kwoh, Kent; Maxwell, Lara J; Moore, Andrew; Singh, Jasvinder A; Stevens, Randall; Strand, Vibeke; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Tugwell, Peter; Wells, George A

    2015-10-01

    Pain is a patient-important outcome, but current reporting in randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews is often suboptimal, impeding clinical interpretation and decision making. A working group at the 2014 Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT 12) was convened to provide guidance for reporting treatment effects regarding pain for individual studies and systematic reviews. For individual trials, authors should report, in addition to mean change, the proportion of patients achieving 1 or more thresholds of improvement from baseline pain (e.g., ≥ 20%, ≥ 30%, ≥ 50%), achievement of a desirable pain state (e.g., no worse than mild pain), and/or a combination of change and state. Effects on pain should be accompanied by other patient-important outcomes to facilitate interpretation. When pooling data for metaanalysis, authors should consider converting all continuous measures for pain to a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and use the established, minimally important difference (MID) of 10 mm, and the conventionally used, appreciably important differences of 20 mm, 30 mm, and 50 mm, to facilitate interpretation. Effects ≤ 0.5 units suggest a small or very small effect. To further increase interpretability, the pooled estimate on the VAS should also be transformed to a binary outcome and expressed as a relative risk and risk difference. This transformation can be achieved by calculating the probability of experiencing a treatment effect greater than the MID and the thresholds for appreciably important differences in pain reduction in the control and intervention groups. Presentation of relative effects regarding pain will facilitate interpretation of treatment effects.

  15. The Effects of Cannabis Among Adults With Chronic Pain and an Overview of General Harms: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Shannon M; Morasco, Benjamin J; O'Neil, Maya E; Freeman, Michele; Low, Allison; Kondo, Karli; Elven, Camille; Zakher, Bernadette; Motu'apuaka, Makalapua; Paynter, Robin; Kansagara, Devan

    2017-09-05

    Cannabis is increasingly available for the treatment of chronic pain, yet its efficacy remains uncertain. To review the benefits of plant-based cannabis preparations for treating chronic pain in adults and the harms of cannabis use in chronic pain and general adult populations. MEDLINE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and several other sources from database inception to March 2017. Intervention trials and observational studies, published in English, involving adults using plant-based cannabis preparations that reported pain, quality of life, or adverse effect outcomes. Two investigators independently abstracted study characteristics and assessed study quality, and the investigator group graded the overall strength of evidence using standard criteria. From 27 chronic pain trials, there is low-strength evidence that cannabis alleviates neuropathic pain but insufficient evidence in other pain populations. According to 11 systematic reviews and 32 primary studies, harms in general population studies include increased risk for motor vehicle accidents, psychotic symptoms, and short-term cognitive impairment. Although adverse pulmonary effects were not seen in younger populations, evidence on most other long-term physical harms, in heavy or long-term cannabis users, or in older populations is insufficient. Few methodologically rigorous trials; the cannabis formulations studied may not reflect commercially available products; and limited applicability to older, chronically ill populations and patients who use cannabis heavily. Limited evidence suggests that cannabis may alleviate neuropathic pain in some patients, but insufficient evidence exists for other types of chronic pain. Among general populations, limited evidence suggests that cannabis is associated with an increased risk for adverse mental health effects. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. (PROSPERO: CRD42016033623).

  16. Anxiety and pain in children undergoing elective surgical procedures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jia Shermin, Chieng Ying; Sally, Chan Wai-Chi; Hong-Gu, He

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety and pain are two significant problems experienced by children undergoing elective surgical procedures, which may lead to suboptimal postoperative outcomes. Previous studies have shown a correlation between perioperative anxiety and pain in children. This review aimed to present the best available evidence on the correlation between perioperative anxiety and pain in children undergoing elective surgical procedures, and to determine the relationship between children's demographics, their anxiety and pain level in the perioperative period. Participants were children aged between five to 18 years old who were scheduled for an elective surgical procedure in the hospital setting.No specific intervention was of interest. So long as the primary studies examined correlation of children's anxiety and pain in the perioperative period, they were considered for inclusion.This review focused on children's preoperative level of anxiety; children's postoperative level of anxiety; children's postoperative pain intensity; and/or children's postoperative behavioural changes.This review included quantitative research studies, such as randomised-controlled trials, cohort studies, and descriptive studies which addressed the correlation between perioperative anxiety and perioperative pain in children undergoing elective surgical procedures. A three-step search strategy was utilised in this review. The following databases were searched for articles published in English from the inception date of databases to December 2010: CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, Mednar, Trip Database, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, Scirus ETD and Web of Science. Papers selected for retrieval were assessed independently by two reviewers for methodological quality prior to inclusion in the review using standardised critical appraisal tools from Joanna Briggs Institute. There were no disagreements between the two reviewers, so the third reviewer was not required. Data were extracted using the

  17. Treatment Efficacy for Non-Cardiovascular Chest Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Burgstaller, Jakob M.; Jenni, Boris F.; Steurer, Johann; Held, Ulrike; Wertli, Maria M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) leads to impaired quality of life and is associated with a high disease burden. Upon ruling out cardiovascular disease, only vague recommendations exist for further treatment. Objectives To summarize treatment efficacy for patients presenting with NCCP. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis. In July 2013, Medline, Web of Knowledge, Embase, EBSCOhost, Cochrane Reviews and Trials, and Scopus were searched. Hand and bibliography searches were also conducted. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating non-surgical treatments in patients with NCCP were included. Exclusion criteria were poor study quality and small sample size (<10 patients per group). Results Thirty eligible RCT’s were included. Most studies assessed PPI efficacy for gastroesophageal reflux disorders (GERD, n = 10). Two RCTs included musculoskeletal chest pain, seven psychotropic drugs, and eleven various psychological interventions. Study quality was high in five RCTs and acceptable in 25. PPI treatment in patients with GERD (5 RCTs, 192 patients) was more effective than placebo [pooled OR 11.7 (95% CI 5.5 to 25.0, heterogeneity I2 = 6.1%)]. The pooled OR in GERD negative patients (4 RCTs, 156 patients) was 0.8 (95% CI 0.2 to 2.8, heterogeneity I2 = 50.4%). In musculoskeletal NCCP (2 RCTs, 229 patients) manual therapy was more effective than usual care but not than home exercise [pooled mean difference 0.5 (95% CI −0.3 to 1.3, heterogeneity I2 = 46.2%)]. The findings for cognitive behavioral treatment, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants were mixed. Most evidence was available for cognitive behavioral treatment interventions. Limitations Only a small number of studies were available. Conclusions Timely diagnostic evaluation and treatment of the disease underlying NCCP is important. For patients with suspected GERD, high-dose treatment with PPI is effective. Only limited evidence was available for most

  18. Osteopathic intervention in chronic non-specific low back pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic Non Specific Low Back Pain (CNSLBP) is a common, complex and disabling condition that has been present for longer than three months and is not caused by a serious pathology. Osteopaths are health practitioners who commonly diagnose and treat CNSLBP patients using a complex set of interventions that includes manual therapy. The study aimed to complete a Systematic Review of clinical research into osteopathic intervention in CNSLBP using a rigorous assessment of study quality. Methods The literature was searched to August 2011 using the following databases: AMED, CINAHL Plus, Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials, MEDLINE Plus, EMBASE, MANTIS, OSTMED, PEDro, ScienceDirect. Multiple search terms were used in various combinations: osteopathy/osteopathic, osteopathic manipulative technique, OMT, Spinal Manipulative Therapy, SMT, clinical trial, back pain, chronic back pain. The inclusion criteria were papers that: reported clinical trials; had adult participants; tested the effectiveness and/or efficacy of osteopathic manual therapy intervention applied by osteopaths, and had a study condition of CNSLBP. The quality of the papers was assessed using the Cochrane Back Review Risk of Bias criteria. A meta-analysis would proceed if the studies had adequate clinical and methodological homogeneity. Results Initial searches revealed 809 papers, 772 of which were excluded on the basis of abstract alone. The remaining 37 trial papers were subjected to a more detailed analysis of the full text, which resulted in 35 being excluded. The two remaining trials had a lack of methodological and clinical homogeneity, precluding a meta-analysis. The trials used different comparators with regards to the primary outcomes, the number of treatments, the duration of treatment and the duration of follow-up. Conclusion There are only two studies assessing the effect of the manual therapy intervention applied by osteopathic clinicians in adults with CNSLBP. One trial

  19. Effectiveness of therapeutic physical exercise in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alba-Martín, Pablo; Gallego-Izquierdo, T; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Romero-Franco, Natalia; Núñez-Nagy, Susana; Pecos-Martín, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of conservative treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome with physical exercise. [Subjects and Methods] A computer-based review conducted of four databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, PEDro, and the University Library) was completed based on the inclusion criteria of patellofemoral pain syndrome patients treated with physical exercise methods and examination with self-reported pain and/or functional questionnaires. [Results] The findings of ten clinical trials of moderate to high quality were evaluated to determine the effectiveness of physical exercise as conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Conclusion] The intervention programs that were most effective in relieving pain and improving function in patellofemoral pain syndrome included proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and strengthening exercises for the hip external rotator and abductor muscles and knee extensor muscles.

  20. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Cancer Pain Management: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Priyanka; Chaturvedi, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) encompasses the physical, psychosocial, social and spiritual dimensions of life lived by a person. Cancer pain is one of the physical component has tremendous impact on the QoL of the patient. Cancer pain is multifaceted and complex to understand and managing cancer pain involves a tool box full of pharmacological and non pharmacological interventions but still there are 50-70% of cancer patients who suffer from uncontrolled pain and they fear pain more than death. Aggressive surgeries, radiotherapy and chemotherapy focus more on prolonging the survival of the patient failing to realize that the QoL lived also matters equally. This paper reviews complementary and alternative therapy approaches for cancer pain and its impact in improving the QoL of cancer patients. PMID:25709198

  1. Are manual therapies effective in reducing pain from tension-type headache?: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Miangolarra, Juan Carlos; Barriga, Francisco J; Pareja, Juan A

    2006-01-01

    A systematic review was performed to establish whether manual therapies have specific efficacy in reducing pain from tension-type headache (TTH). Computerized literature searches were performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, MANTIS, CINAHL, PEDro, and Cochrane databases. Papers were included if they described clinical (open noncontrolled studies) or randomized controlled trials in which any form of manual therapy was used for TTH, and if they were published after 1994 in the English language. The methodologic quality of the trials was assessed using the PEDro scale. Levels of scientific evidence, based on the quality and the outcomes of the studies, were established for each manual therapy: strong, moderate, limited, and inconclusive evidence. Only six studies met the inclusion criteria. These trials evaluated different manual therapy modalities: spinal manipulation (three trials), classic massage (one trial), connective tissue manipulation (two trials), soft tissue massage (one trial), Dr. Cyriax's vertebral mobilization (one trial), manual traction (one trial), and CV-4 craniosacral technique (one trial). Methodologic PEDro quality scores ranged from 2 to 8 points out of a theoretical maximum of 10 points (mean=5.8+/-2.1). Analysis of the quality and the outcomes of all trials did not provide rigorous evidence that manual therapies have a positive effect in reducing pain from TTH: spinal manipulative therapy showed inconclusive evidence of effectiveness (level 4), whereas soft tissue techniques showed limited evidence (level 3). The authors found no rigorous evidence that manual therapies have a positive effect in the evolution of TTH. The most urgent need for further research is to establish the efficacy beyond placebo of the different manual therapies currently applied in patients with TTH.

  2. The evidence of neuraxial administration of analgesics for cancer-related pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kurita, G P; Benthien, K S; Nordly, M; Mercadante, S; Klepstad, P; Sjøgren, P

    2015-10-01

    The present systematic review analysed the existing evidence of analgesic efficacy and side effects of opioids without and with adjuvant analgesics delivered by neuraxial route (epidural and subarachnoid) in adult patients with cancer. Search strategy was elaborated with words related to cancer, pain, neuraxial route, analgesic and side effects. The search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane for the period until February 2014. Studies were analysed according to methods, results, quality of evidence, and strength of recommendation. The number of abstracts retrieved was 2147, and 84 articles were selected for full reading. The final selection comprised nine articles regarding randomised controlled trials (RCTs) divided in four groups: neuraxial combinations of opioid and adjuvant analgesic compared with neuraxial administration of opioid alone (n = 4); single neuraxial drug in bolus compared with continuous administration (n = 2); single neuraxial drug compared with neuraxial placebo (n = 1); and neuraxial opioid combined with or without adjuvant analgesic compared with other comprehensive medical management than neuraxial analgesics (n = 2). The RCTs presented clinical and methodological diversity that precluded a meta-analysis. They also presented several limitations, which reduced study internal validity. However, they demonstrated better pain control for all interventions analysed. Side effects were described, but there were few significant differences in favour of the tested interventions. Heterogeneous characteristics and several methodological limitations of the studies resulted in evidence of low quality and a weak recommendation for neuraxial administration of opioids with or without adjuvant analgesics in adult patients with cancer. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Prevalence of Back Pain in Sports: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Trompeter, Katharina; Fett, Daniela; Platen, Petra

    2017-06-01

    Back pain is a frequent health problem in the general population. The epidemiology of back pain in the general population is well researched, but detailed data on the prevalence and risk factors of back pain in athletes are rare. The primary objective was to review articles about back pain in athletes to provide an overview of its prevalence in different sports and compare its prevalence among various types of sports and the general population. A comprehensive search of articles published through May 2015 was conducted. Two independent reviewers searched six databases from inception (PubMed(®), Embase, MEDLINE(®), Cochrane Library, PsycINFO and PSYNDEX), using specifically developed search strategies, for relevant epidemiological research on back pain in 14- to 40-year-old athletes of Olympic disciplines. The reviewers independently evaluated the methodological quality of reviewed articles meeting the inclusion criteria to identify potential sources of bias. Relevant data were extracted from each study. Forty-three articles were judged to meet the inclusion criteria and were included in the assessment of methodological quality. Of these, 25 were assessed to be of high quality. Lifetime prevalence and point prevalence were the most commonly researched episodes and the lower back was the most common localization of pain. In the high-quality studies, lifetime prevalence of low back pain in athletes was 1-94%, (highest prevalence in rowing and cross-country skiing), and point prevalence of low back pain was 18-65% (lowest prevalence in basketball and highest prevalence in rowing). The methodological heterogeneity of the included studies showed a wide range of prevalence rates and did not enable a detailed comparison of data among different sports, within one discipline, or versus the general population. Based on the results of this review, however, it seems obvious that back pain requires further study in some sports.

  4. More in hope than expectation: a systematic review of women's expectations and experience of pain relief in labour

    PubMed Central

    Lally, Joanne E; Murtagh, Madeleine J; Macphail, Sheila; Thomson, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background Childbirth is one of the most painful events that a woman is likely to experience, the multi-dimensional aspect and intensity of which far exceeds disease conditions. A woman's lack of knowledge about the risks and benefits of the various methods of pain relief can heighten anxiety. Women are increasingly expected, and are expecting, to participate in decisions about their healthcare. Involvement should allow women to make better-informed decisions; the National Institute for Clinical Excellence has stated that we need effective ways of supporting pregnant women in making informed decisions during labour. Our aim was to systematically review the empirical literature on women's expectations and experiences of pain and pain relief during labour, as well as their involvement in the decision-making process. Methods A systematic review was conducted using the following databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Bath Information and Database Service (BIDS), Excerpta Medica Database Guide (EMBASE), Midwives Information and Resource (MIDIRS), Sociological Abstracts and PsychINFO. Studies that examined experience and expectations of pain, and its relief in labour, were appraised and the findings were integrated into a systematic review. Results Appraisal revealed four key themes: the level and type of pain, pain relief, involvement in decision-making and control. Studies predominantly showed that women underestimated the pain they would experience. Women may hope for a labour free of pain relief, but many found that they needed or benefited from it. There is a distinction between women's desire for a drug-free labour and the expectation that they may need some sort of pain relief. Inaccurate or unrealistic expectations about pain may mean that women are not prepared appropriately for labour. Many women acknowledged that they wanted to participate in decision

  5. More in hope than expectation: a systematic review of women's expectations and experience of pain relief in labour.

    PubMed

    Lally, Joanne E; Murtagh, Madeleine J; Macphail, Sheila; Thomson, Richard

    2008-03-14

    Childbirth is one of the most painful events that a woman is likely to experience, the multi-dimensional aspect and intensity of which far exceeds disease conditions. A woman's lack of knowledge about the risks and benefits of the various methods of pain relief can heighten anxiety. Women are increasingly expected, and are expecting, to participate in decisions about their healthcare. Involvement should allow women to make better-informed decisions; the National Institute for Clinical Excellence has stated that we need effective ways of supporting pregnant women in making informed decisions during labour. Our aim was to systematically review the empirical literature on women's expectations and experiences of pain and pain relief during labour, as well as their involvement in the decision-making process. A systematic review was conducted using the following databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Bath Information and Database Service (BIDS), Excerpta Medica Database Guide (EMBASE), Midwives Information and Resource (MIDIRS), Sociological Abstracts and PsychINFO. Studies that examined experience and expectations of pain, and its relief in labour, were appraised and the findings were integrated into a systematic review. Appraisal revealed four key themes: the level and type of pain, pain relief, involvement in decision-making and control. Studies predominantly showed that women underestimated the pain they would experience. Women may hope for a labour free of pain relief, but many found that they needed or benefited from it. There is a distinction between women's desire for a drug-free labour and the expectation that they may need some sort of pain relief. Inaccurate or unrealistic expectations about pain may mean that women are not prepared appropriately for labour. Many women acknowledged that they wanted to participate in decision-making, but the degree of

  6. Effectiveness of psychological interventions for chronic pain on health care use and work absence: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pike, Andrew; Hearn, Leslie; Williams, Amanda C de C

    2016-04-01

    Psychological interventions for chronic pain and its consequences have been shown to improve mood, disability, pain, and catastrophic thinking, but there has been no systematic review specifically of their effects on health care use or time lost from work as treatment outcomes in mixed chronic pain. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of psychological therapies for chronic pain (excluding headache) in adults for these outcomes. We used searches from 2 previous systematic reviews and updated them. Eighteen randomized controlled trials were found that reported health care use (15 studies) and work loss (9 studies) as outcomes. Fourteen studies provided data for meta-analysis. There were moderate effects for psychological interventions compared with active controls, treatment as usual and waiting list controls in reducing health care use, with confidence in the findings. No benefits were found for medication reduction, but with less confidence in this result. Analysis of work loss showed no significant effects of psychological interventions over comparisons, but the use of many different metrics necessitated fragmenting the planned analyses, making summary difficult. The results are encouraging for the potential of routine psychological intervention to reduce posttreatment health care use, with associated cost savings, but it is likely that the range and complexity of problems affecting work necessitate additional intervention over standard group psychological intervention.

  7. Systematic review and meta-analysis of pharmacological therapies for pain associated with postherpetic neuralgia and less common neuropathic conditions.

    PubMed

    Snedecor, S J; Sudharshan, L; Cappelleri, J C; Sadosky, A; Desai, P; Jalundhwala, Y; Botteman, M

    2014-07-01

    To estimate the relative efficacy of pharmacological therapies for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), multiple sclerosis (MS)-related pain, posttraumatic pain, central poststroke pain (CPSP) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related neuropathic pain (NeP). This systematic review (through June 2011) identified randomised, controlled trials of treatments for these conditions. Bayesian mixed treatment comparison (MTC) methods were used to determine the relative efficacy and safety among the treatments within each pain condition. Fifty studies were identified: 33 PHN, 2 MS-related pain, 3 CPSP, 3 posttraumatic pain and 9 HIV-related NeP. Data from 28 PHN studies including 21 interventions and 4317 patients were included into the PHN MTC. Of treatments studied in ≥ 50 patients, opioids had the greatest mean pain reduction of -1.70 vs. placebo on an 11-point numeric rating scale. Pregabalin ≥ 300 mg/day was most effective for ≥ 30% and ≥ 50% pain reduction [relative risk (RR) vs. placebo = 2.44 and 2.13, respectively]. Data identified for MS-related pain, CPSP, posttraumatic pain and HIV-related NeP were sparse; only 7 of 17 studies had ≥ 50 patients. Adverse events (AEs) and discontinuations for most treatments were not significantly greater than placebo except in PHN, where 8 of 12 treatments had higher risks of AEs compared with placebo and tricyclic antidepressants and opioids had higher risk of discontinuation compared with placebo. Guideline-recommended treatments for PHN were more effective than placebo on the pain NRS and for ≥ 30% and ≥ 50% pain reduction. Although guidelines exist for the management of less common NeP conditions, little published evidence supports them. These results highlight the need for additional evaluations and more complete reporting of outcomes to help guide physicians' treatment selections. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part III, Surgical Pain Populations.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Courtney; Crawford, Cindy; Paat, Charmagne F; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of the evidence for massage therapy's efficacy in treating pain, function-related, and health-related quality of life outcomes in surgical pain populations. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A professionally diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Twelve high quality and four low quality studies were included in the review. Results indicate massage therapy is effective for treating pain [standardized mean difference (SMD) = -0.79] and anxiety (SMD = -0.57) compared to active comparators. Based on the available evidence, weak recommendations are suggested for massage therapy, compared to active comparators for reducing pain intensity/severity and anxiety in patients undergoing surgical procedures. This review also discusses massage therapy safety, challenges within this research field, how to address identified research gaps, and next steps for future research. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine.

  9. Reliability of physical functioning tests in patients with low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Denteneer, Lenie; Van Daele, Ulrike; Truijen, Steven; De Hertogh, Willem; Meirte, Jill; Stassijns, Gaetane

    2017-09-04

    The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive overview of physical functioning tests in patients with low back pain (LBP) and to investigate their reliability. A systematic computerized search was finalized in four different databases on the 24th of June 2017: Pubmed, Web of Science, Embase and Medline. PRISMA guidelines were followed during all stages of this review. Clinical studies that investigate the reliability of physical functioning tests in patients with LBP were eligible. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed with the use of the COSMIN checklist. To come to final conclusions for reliability of the identified clinical tests, the current review assessed three factors namely outcome assessment, methodological quality and consistency of description. A total of 20 studies were found eligible and 38 clinical tests were identified. Good overall test retest reliability was concluded for the extensor endurance (ICC = .93-.97), flexor endurance (ICC = .90-.97), 5 minute walking (ICC = .89-.99), 50 foot walking (ICC = .76-.96), shuttle walk (ICC = .92-.99), sit to stand (ICC = .91-.99) and the loaded forward reach test (ICC = .74-.98). For interrater reliability, only one test namely the Biering-Sörensen (ICC = .88-.99) test could be concluded to have an overall good interrater reliability. None of the identified clinical tests could be concluded to have a good intrarater reliability. Further investigation should focus on a better overall study methodology and the use of identical protocols for the description of clinical tests. The assessment of reliability is only a first step in the recommendation process for the use of clinical tests. In future research, the identified clinical tests in the current review should be further investigated for validity. Only when these clinimetric properties of a clinical test have been thoroughly investigated, a final conclusion regarding the clinical and scientific use of the identified tests can

  10. Red flags to screen for malignancy and fracture in patients with low back pain: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher M; Henschke, Nicholas; Hancock, Mark J; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; de Vet, Henrica C W; Macaskill, Petra; Irwig, Les; van Tulder, Maurits W; Koes, Bart W; Maher, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the evidence on diagnostic accuracy of red flag signs and symptoms to screen for fracture or malignancy in patients presenting with low back pain to primary, secondary, or tertiary care. Design Systematic review. Data sources Medline, OldMedline, Embase, and CINAHL from earliest available up to 1 October 2013. Inclusion criteria Primary diagnostic studies comparing red flags for fracture or malignancy to an acceptable reference standard, published in any language. Review methods Assessment of study quality and extraction of data was conducted by three independent assessors. Diagnostic accuracy statistics and post-test probabilities were generated for each red flag. Results We included 14 studies (eight from primary care, two from secondary care, four from tertiary care) evaluating 53 red flags; only five studies evaluated combinations of red flags. Pooling of data was not possible because of index test heterogeneity. Many red flags in current guidelines provide virtually no change in probability of fracture or malignancy or have untested diagnostic accuracy. The red flags with the highest post-test probability for detection of fracture were older age (9%, 95% confidence interval 3% to 25%), prolonged use of corticosteroid drugs (33%, 10% to 67%), severe trauma (11%, 8% to 16%), and presence of a contusion or abrasion (62%, 49% to 74%). Probability of spinal fracture was higher when multiple red flags were present (90%, 34% to 99%). The red flag with the highest post-test probability for detection of spinal malignancy was history of malignancy (33%, 22% to 46%). Conclusions While several red flags are endorsed in guidelines to screen for fracture or malignancy, only a small subset of these have evidence that they are indeed informative. These findings suggest a need for revision of many current guidelines. PMID:24335669

  11. Electric Stimulation for Pain Relief in Patients with Fibromyalgia: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Ana Paula de Silva; Stein, Cinara; Marchese, Ritchele Redivo; Plentz, Rodrigo Della Mea; Pagnussat, Aline De Souza

    2017-02-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome whose primary symptoms include chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue. The treatment of patients with FM aims to provide symptomatic relief and improvement in physical capacities to perform daily tasks and quality of life. Invasive or non-invasive electric stimulation (ES) is used for pain relief in patients with FM. This systematic review aimed to assess the effects of treatment with ES, combined or not combined with other types of therapy, for pain relief in patients with FM. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Electronic search was conducted on databases (from the inception to April 2016): MEDLINE (accessed by PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane CENTRAL), and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Two independent reviewers assessed the eligibility of studies based on the inclusion criteria: randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of ES combined or not with other types of treatment for pain relief in patients with FM (according to the American College of Rheumatology), regardless of the ES dosages. The primary outcome was pain, assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS). The secondary outcomes extracted were quality of life, assessed by short form-36 health survey (SF- 36), and fatigue, assessed by VAS. Nine studies were included, with 301 patients. The meta-analysis for pain showed positive effect of ES treatment versus control [-1.24 (95% CI: -2.39 to -0.08; I²: 87%, P = 0.04) n = 8 RCTs]. The sensitivity analysis for pain showed significant results for invasive ES, combined or not with other types of therapy [-0.94 (95% CI, -1.50 to -0.38; I² 0%, P = 0.001) n = 3 RCTs]. No significant improvement was found regarding quality of life [-3.48 (95% CI: -12.58 to 5.62; I²: 0%, P = 0.45), n = 2 RCTs] or fatigue [-0.57 (95% CI, -1.25 to 0.11; I² 34%, P = 0.100; n = 4 RCTs]. This systematic review included a small number of studies and reduced number of participants in

  12. Systematic review of enriched enrolment, randomised withdrawal trial designs in chronic pain: a new framework for design and reporting.

    PubMed

    Moore, R Andrew; Wiffen, Philip J; Eccleston, Christopher; Derry, Sheena; Baron, Ralf; Bell, Rae F; Furlan, Andrea D; Gilron, Ian; Haroutounian, Simon; Katz, Nathaniel P; Lipman, Arthur G; Morley, Stephen; Peloso, Paul M; Quessy, Steve N; Seers, Kate; Strassels, Scott A; Straube, Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    Enriched enrolment, randomised withdrawal (EERW) pain trials select, before randomisation, patients who respond by demonstrating a predetermined degree of pain relief and acceptance of adverse events. There is uncertainty over the value of this design. We report a systematic review of EERW trials in chronic noncancer pain together with a critical appraisal of methods and potential biases in the methods used and recommendations for the design and reporting of future EERW trials. Electronic and other searches found 25 EERW trials published between 1995 and June 2014, involving 5669 patients in a randomised withdrawal phase comparing drug with placebo; 13 (median, 107 patients) had a randomised withdrawal phase of 6 weeks or less, and 12 (median, 334) lasted 12 to 26 weeks. Risks of bias included short duration, inadequate outcome definition, incomplete outcome data reporting, small size, and inadequate dose tapering on randomisation to placebo. Active treatment was usually better than placebo (22/25 trials). This review reduces the uncertainty around the value of EERW trials in pain. If properly designed, conducted, and reported, they are feasible and useful for making decisions about pain therapies. Shorter, small studies can be explanatory; longer, larger studies can inform practice. Current evidence is inadequate for valid comparisons in outcome between EERW and classical trials, although no gross differences were found. This systematic review provides a framework for assessing potential biases and the value of the EERW trials, and for the design of future studies by making recommendations for the conduct and reporting of EERW trials.

  13. Deficiencies in reporting of statistical methodology in recent randomized trials of nonpharmacologic pain treatments: ACTTION systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Jordan D; McKeown, Andrew; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Hunsinger, Matthew; Kerns, Robert D; McDermott, Michael P; Rappaport, Bob A; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; Gewandter, Jennifer S

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the quality of reporting of statistical methods in randomized clinical trials (RCTs), including identification of primary analyses, missing data accommodation, and multiplicity adjustment, in studies of nonpharmacologic, noninterventional pain treatments (e.g., physical therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture, and massage). Systematic review of 101 articles reporting RCTs of pain treatments that were published between January 2006 and June 2013 in the European Journal of Pain, the Journal of Pain, and Pain. Systematic review. Sixty-two percent of studies identified a primary outcome variable, 46% identified a primary analysis, and of those with multiple primary analyses, only 21% adjusted for multiplicity. Slightly over half (55%) of studies reported using at least one method to accommodate missing data. Only four studies reported prespecifying at least one of these four study methods. This review identified deficiencies in the reporting of primary analyses and methods to adjust for multiplicity and accommodate missing data in articles disseminating results of nonpharmacologic, noninterventional trials. Investigators should be encouraged to indicate whether their analyses were prespecified and to clearly and completely report statistical methods in clinical trial publications to maximize the interpretability of trial results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Predictors of Treatment Outcome in Contextual Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies for Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Helen R; Keyes, Alexandra; Stahl, Daniel R; Greig, Riannon; McCracken, Lance M

    2017-04-26

    There is increasing evidence that contextual forms of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) are effective in the management of chronic pain, yet little is understood about the factors that moderate or predict outcomes in these treatments. This systematic review aimed to identify pretreatment participant characteristics associated with positive treatment responses in contextual CBT for chronic pain. Medline, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and CENTRAL were searched to identify eligible studies. Studies were included if the participants were adults with chronic pain, designs were longitudinal, treatments focused on psychological flexibility or mindfulness, and reported results allowed for examination of moderators or predictors of standard treatment outcomes. Of 991 records initially identified, 20 were eligible for inclusion in the review. Some evidence suggested that baseline emotional functioning predicts treatment response, but the direction of this association varied between studies. Substantive findings were inconsistent and inconclusive, however, methodological limitations were consistent. These included treatment heterogeneity, and a lack of theoretical, a priori guidance in examining potential predictors. Future research should adopt a theoretically based approach to examining moderators in relation to specific treatment methods and therapeutic processes. Considering moderation without first considering mediation is probably a limited strategy. In this systematic review we examined evidence for potential predictors or moderators of outcomes in contextual CBT for chronic pain. Substantive findings were inconclusive but important methodological limitations and a lack of theoretical guidance were found. Future research should explicitly plan relevant methods and follow clear theoretical models. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Most red flags for malignancy in low back pain guidelines lack empirical support: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Arianne P; Downie, Aron; Maher, Chris G; Koes, Bart W

    2017-10-01

    Clinicians do not want to miss underlying serious pathology, but it is still unclear which red flags are relevant. We aimed to evaluate the origin and evidence on diagnostic accuracy of red flags for malignancy for management of low back pain (LBP) in primary care. We performed a comprehensive overview and searched the literature using snowballing techniques and reference checking for evidence on red flags endorsed in clinical guidelines for identifying patients with higher likelihood of malignancy. We selected studies including people with LBP without any restriction on study design. We extracted data on prevalence and diagnostic accuracy. Furthermore, we assessed the methodological quality of studies evaluating diagnostic accuracy. We identified 13 red flags endorsed in a total of 16 guidelines and 2 extra red flags not endorsed in any guideline. We included 33 publications varying from systematic reviews to case reports. The origin of many red flags was unclear or was sourced from case reports. The incidence of malignancy in patients presenting with LBP in primary care varied between 0% and 0.7%. Seven studies provided diagnostic accuracy data on red flags. We found 5 red flags with accuracy data from 2 or more studies, with 2 ("history of malignancy" and "strong clinical suspicion") considered informative. In conclusion, the origin and diagnostic accuracy of many red flags endorsed in guidelines are unclear. A "history of malignancy" and "strong clinical suspicion" are the only red flags with empirical evidence of acceptably high diagnostic accuracy.

  16. Frequent Abdominal Pain in Childhood and Youth: A Systematic Review of Psychophysiological Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Judith; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Schlarb, Angelika Anita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Frequent abdominal pain (AP) in children and adolescents is often designated as functional gastrointestinal disorder. In contrast to research on psychological and social influences on the experience of AP in this population, psychophysiological features such as function of the autonomic nervous system, the central nervous system, or the endocrine system have rarely been studied. Methods. We conducted a systematic literature search for peer-reviewed journal articles referring to children with AP between 4 and 18 years. Studies on experimental baseline characteristics or reactivity of psychophysiological outcome parameters (autonomous nervous system, central nervous system, and endocrine parameters) were included. Key Results. Twelve of 18 included studies found psychophysiological differences between children with AP and healthy ones. These studies indicate a possible autonomic dysregulation and hypersensitivity of the central nervous system in children with AP following stimulation with stress or other intense stimuli. Mainly conflicting results were found regarding baseline comparisons of autonomic and endocrine parameters. Conclusions and Inferences. Frequent AP in children may be associated with an altered psychophysiological reaction on intense stimuli. It has to be considered that the current literature on psychophysiological characteristics of childhood AP is small and heterogeneous. In particular, multiparameter studies using validated experimental paradigms are lacking. PMID:24744777

  17. Frequent abdominal pain in childhood and youth: a systematic review of psychophysiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gulewitsch, Marco Daniel; Müller, Judith; Enck, Paul; Weimer, Katja; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Schlarb, Angelika Anita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Frequent abdominal pain (AP) in children and adolescents is often designated as functional gastrointestinal disorder. In contrast to research on psychological and social influences on the experience of AP in this population, psychophysiological features such as function of the autonomic nervous system, the central nervous system, or the endocrine system have rarely been studied. Methods. We conducted a systematic literature search for peer-reviewed journal articles referring to children with AP between 4 and 18 years. Studies on experimental baseline characteristics or reactivity of psychophysiological outcome parameters (autonomous nervous system, central nervous system, and endocrine parameters) were included. Key Results. Twelve of 18 included studies found psychophysiological differences between children with AP and healthy ones. These studies indicate a possible autonomic dysregulation and hypersensitivity of the central nervous system in children with AP following stimulation with stress or other intense stimuli. Mainly conflicting results were found regarding baseline comparisons of autonomic and endocrine parameters. Conclusions and Inferences. Frequent AP in children may be associated with an altered psychophysiological reaction on intense stimuli. It has to be considered that the current literature on psychophysiological characteristics of childhood AP is small and heterogeneous. In particular, multiparameter studies using validated experimental paradigms are lacking.

  18. Nonpharmacologic Therapies for Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review for an American College of Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Chou, Roger; Deyo, Richard; Friedly, Janna; Skelly, Andrea; Hashimoto, Robin; Weimer, Melissa; Fu, Rochelle; Dana, Tracy; Kraegel, Paul; Griffin, Jessica; Grusing, Sara; Brodt, Erika D

    2017-04-04

    A 2007 American College of Physicians guideline addressed nonpharmacologic treatment options for low back pain. New evidence is now available. To systematically review the current evidence on nonpharmacologic therapies for acute or chronic nonradicular or radicular low back pain. Ovid MEDLINE (January 2008 through February 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists. Randomized trials of 9 nonpharmacologic options versus sham treatment, wait list, or usual care, or of 1 nonpharmacologic option versus another. One investigator abstracted data, and a second checked abstractions for accuracy; 2 investigators independently assessed study quality. The number of trials evaluating nonpharmacologic therapies ranged from 2 (tai chi) to 121 (exercise). New evidence indicates that tai chi (strength of evidence [SOE], low) and mindfulness-based stress reduction (SOE, moderate) are effective for chronic low back pain and strengthens previous findings regarding the effectiveness of yoga (SOE, moderate). Evidence continues to support the effectiveness of exercise, psychological therapies, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, spinal manipulation, massage, and acupuncture for chronic low back pain (SOE, low to moderate). Limited evidence shows that acupuncture is modestly effective for acute low back pain (SOE, low). The magnitude of pain benefits was small to moderate and generally short term; effects on function generally were smaller than effects on pain. Qualitatively synthesized new trials with prior meta-analyses, restricted to English-language studies; heterogeneity in treatment techniques; and inability to exclude placebo effects. Several nonpharmacologic therapies for primarily chronic low back pain are associated with small to moderate, usually short-term effects on pain; findings include new evidence on mind-body interventions. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (PROSPERO: CRD42014014735).

  19. Which factors differentiate athletes with hip/groin pain from those without? A systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mosler, Andrea B; Agricola, Rintje; Weir, Adam; Hölmich, Per; Crossley, Kay M

    2015-01-01

    Background Hip and groin injuries are common in many sports. Understanding the factors differentiating athletes with hip/groin pain from those without these injuries could facilitate management and prevention. Objective Conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature on factors differentiating athletes with and without hip/groin pain. Methods The review was registered as PROSPERO CRD42014007416 and a comprehensive, systematic search was conducted in June 2014. Inclusion criteria were: cross-sectional, cohort or case–control study designs of n>10 that examined outcome measures differentiating athletes with and without hip/groin pain. Two authors independently screened search results, assessed study quality, and performed data extraction. Methodological heterogeneity was determined and data pooled for meta-analysis when appropriate. A best evidence synthesis was performed on the remaining outcome measures. Results Of 2251 titles identified, 17 articles were included of which 10 were high quality. Sixty two different outcome measures were examined, 8 underwent meta-analysis. Pooled data showed strong evidence that athletes with hip/groin pain demonstrated: pain and lower strength on the adductor squeeze test, reduced range of motion in hip internal rotation and bent knee fall out; however, hip external rotation range was equivalent to controls. Strong evidence was found that lower patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores, altered trunk muscle function, and moderate evidence of bone oedema and secondary cleft sign were associated with hip/groin pain. Conclusions PROs, pain and reduced strength on the adductor squeeze test, reduced range of motion in internal rotation and bent knee fall out are the outcome measures that best differentiate athletes with hip/groin pain from those without this pain. PMID:26031646

  20. Pre-operative Predictive Factors of Post-operative Pain in Patients With Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Clara; Díaz-Heredia, Jorge; Berraquero, María Luisa; Crespo, Pablo; Loza, Estíbaliz; Ruiz Ibán, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    To analyze pre-surgical predictive factors of post-surgical pain in patients undergoing hip or knee arthoplasty. A systematic literature review was performed. We defined a sensitive strategy on Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library up to May 2013. The inclusion criteria were: patients undertaking knee and/or hip arthroplasty, adults with moderate or severe pain (≥4 on a Visual Analog Scale) in whom predictive factors of post-surgical pain were evaluated before surgery. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, controlled trials and observational studies were selected. We excluded animals and basic science articles, reviews of prosthesis, prosthesis due to fractures, patients with rheumatic diseases or studies with mixed population in which disaggregated data was not possible to obtain. A total 37 articles of moderate quality were selected. The articles included representative patients undergoing a knee or hip arthroplasty in our country; most of them were aged 60 years or above, with osteoarthritis, and with a high rate of obesity and comorbidities. We found great variability regarding the type of studies and predictive factors. There was a strong association between post-surgical pain and the following pre-surgical factors: female gender, low socio-economic status, higher pain, comorbidities, low back pain, poor functional status, and psychological factors (depression, anxiety or catastrophic pain). There are pre-surgical factors that might influence post-surgical pain in patients undergoing a knee or hip arthroplasty. Therefore, they should be taken into account when considering an arthroplasty. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  1. Gabapentinoids for chronic low back pain: a protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Shanthanna, Harsha; Gilron, Ian; Thabane, Lehana; Devereaux, Philip J; Bhandari, Mohit; AlAmri, Rizq; Rajarathinam, Manikandan; Kamath, Sriganesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a common condition and causes significant pain, distress and disability across the world. It is multifactorial in aetiology and is challenging to manage. Although the underlying mechanism of pain is predominantly non-specific, many argue that there is a substantial neuropathic pain element. Neuropathic pain is more severe, with significant disability. Gabapentinoids, including gabapentin and pregabalin, have proven efficacy in some neuropathic pain conditions. Despite no clear evidence, a substantial population of patients with CLBP are treated with gabapentinoids. Objectives We aim to assess whether the use of gabapentinoids is effective and safe in the treatment of predominant CLBP, by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised control trials (RCTs). Methodology We will search the databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane for RCTs published in English language and have used gabapentinoids for the treatment of CLBP. Study selection and data extraction will be performed independently by paired reviewers using structured electronic forms, piloted between pairs of reviewers. The review outcomes will be guided by Initiative on Methods, Measurement and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials guidelines, with pain relief as the primary outcome. We propose to carry out meta-analysis if there are three or more studies in a particular outcome domain, using a random effects model. Pooled outcomes will be reported as weighted mean differences or standardised mean differences and risk ratios with their corresponding 95% CIs, for continuous outcomes and dichotomous outcomes, respectively. Rating of quality of evidence will be reported using GRADE summary of findings table. Discussion The proposed systematic review will be able to provide valuable evidence to help decision-making in the use of gabapentinoids for the treatment of CLBP. This will help advance patient care and potentially highlight limitations in existing

  2. Does pre-surgical central modulation of pain influence outcome after total knee replacement? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Baert, I A C; Lluch, E; Mulder, T; Nijs, J; Noten, S; Meeus, M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to systematically review whether the presence of altered central pain modulation pre-surgical influences outcome after total knee replacement (TKR) in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and if so which indices of central pain modulation predict poor outcome after TKR. To identify relevant articles, PubMed and Web of Science were searched. The search strategy was a combination of key words related to "Knee Osteoarthritis and Total Knee Replacement", "Central Pain Modulation" and "Post-Surgical Outcome Measures". Articles fulfilling the inclusion criteria were screened for methodological quality and results were analyzed and summarized. Sixteen prospective cohort studies were included. Strong evidence is available that presence of catastrophic thinking and poor coping strategies predict more pain after TKR and that there is no association between fear of movement and post-surgical pain or function. Evidence on other psychosocial influences is limited or conflicting. Literature on the influence of other signs of altered central pain modulation on post-surgical outcome is scarce. It is plausible that pre-surgical signs of altered central pain modulation, such as joint pain at rest or widespread pain sensitization, predict more post-surgical pain. Surgeons should be attentive for patients with signs of altered central pain modulation before surgery as they might be at risk for unfavorable outcome. A broader therapeutic approach aiming to desensitize the central nervous system can be adapted in these patients. Further research is however needed to identify the influence of central pain modulation pre-surgical in predicting outcome after TKR. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of low back pain in older Brazilians: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Leopoldino, Amanda Aparecida Oliveira; Diz, Juliano Bergamaschine Mata; Martins, Vítor Tigre; Henschke, Nicholas; Pereira, Leani Souza Máximo; Dias, Rosângela Correa; Oliveira, Vinícius Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence of low back pain (LBP) is expected to increase worldwide with aging of the population but its prevalence in older people is not clear, mainly in developing countries. To estimate the prevalence of LBP in older Brazilians. Electronic searches on SciELO, LILACS, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL, as well as hand-searching identified studies investigating prevalence of LBP in older Brazilians aged 60 years or over. Two independent reviewers selected studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria, assessed risk of bias for each included study and extracted relevant data. Meta-analysis was conducted when enough homogeneity allowed and the GRADE system was used to summarize the overall quality of the evidence. Sixteen studies were included with a total of 28,448 participants. Data from point- and period-prevalence of LBP were obtained. Meta-analysis was conducted for 13 studies reporting point-prevalence. Pooled point-prevalence of LBP was 25.0% (95% CI 18.0-32.0). Other three studies investigated period-prevalence: one-week prevalence=15.0% (95% CI 13.0-18.0); six-month prevalence=43.0% (95% CI 42.0-44.0); and 12-month prevalence=13.0% (95% CI 11.0-16.0). Sensitivity analyses were performed for point-prevalence and exclusion of studies with poorer methodological quality tended to increase the estimated prevalence of LBP. Moderate-quality evidence showed that at any point in time one in four older Brazilians suffers from LBP. This was the first systematic review investigating nationwide data on the prevalence of LBP in older people and contributes important clinical and epidemiological evidence for policymakers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Adverse outcomes associated with opioid prescription for acute low back pain: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Mouravska, Natalia; Zielinski, Laura; Bhatt, Meha; Sanger, Nitika; Bawor, Monica; Dennis, Brittany; Banfield, Laura; MacKillop, James; Paul, James; Worster, Andrew; Laplante, Philip; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2017-08-14

    Acute low back pain (ALBP) is the top cause of global disability, demonstrating a significant impact on individuals and society and demanding the need for appropriate management. There is a trend towards an increasing number of opioid prescriptions for ALBP despite the lack of investigation for its various short- and long-term outcomes. The objective of this review is to examine adverse outcomes associated with opioid use for ALBP. Using a search strategy, the search will be conducted using the following electronic databases: PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Web of Science, Cochrane Library, the National Institutes for Health Clinical Trials Registry and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP). We will include randomized clinical trials and observational studies investigating the impact of opioid use in ALBP in the adult population. All phases of screening, data extraction and assessment of methodological quality will be performed by two independent reviewers. We will perform quality and risk of bias assessment for the included articles and compare high and low risk of bias with a sensitivity analysis. We will conduct random- and fixed-effects meta-analyses with heterogeneity calculated using the I (2) statistic and evaluate publication bias. There are current guidelines published to alert clinicians in prescribing opioids for ALBP due to its likelihood of misuse, yet there is little change in prescribing patterns. To date, there is an absence of systematic information about the outcomes of prescription opioid in patients with ALBP. We will address this gap by providing evidence that will be useful for clinical practice. PROSPERO CRD42016033090.

  5. Work-relatedness of low back pain in nursing personnel: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yassi, Annalee; Lockhart, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Although non-specific low back pain (LBP) is known to be multifactorial, studies from across the globe have documented their higher prevalence in nurses. This systematic review was conducted to ascertain whether this much-documented association constitutes a causal relationship, and whether there is a discernible threshold of exposures associated with this elevated risk. PRISMA guidelines were followed and standard critical appraisal tools were applied. The outcome of interest was non-specific LBP or back injury; exposure was "performing nursing duties." Applicable studies, published in English during 1980-2012, were identified through database searches, screened against preset inclusion/exclusion criteria. Ergonomic assessments of nursing tasks were included along with epidemiological studies. Bradford Hill considerations for causation were utilized as a framework for discussing findings. Of 987 studies identified, 89 qualified for inclusion, comprising 21 longitudinal, 36 cross-sectional analytic, 23 descriptive biomechanical/ergonomic, and 9 review studies. Overall studies showed that nursing activities conferred increased risk for, and were associated with back disorders regardless of nursing technique, personal characteristics, and non-work-related factors. Patient handling appears to confer the highest risk, but other nursing duties are also associated with elevated risk, and confound dose-response assessments related to patient handling alone. Associations were strong, consistent, temporally possible, plausible, coherent, and analogous to other exposure-outcomes, with risk estimates ranging from 1·2 to 5·5 depending on definitions. A threshold of nursing activities below which the risk of back disorders is not elevated has not been established. Notwithstanding the bio-psycho-social nature of LBP, and complexities of studying this area, sufficient evidence exists of a causal relationship between nursing tasks and back disorders to warrant new policies.

  6. Are inflammatory cells increased in painful human tendinopathy? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dean, Benjamin John Floyd; Gettings, Peter; Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Carr, Andrew Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    The role of inflammation in tendinopathy has historically been a subject of significant controversy. Our primary aim was to determine whether inflammatory cell numbers were increased in painful human tendinopathy versus healthy control tendons. Our secondary aim was to assess whether the inflammatory cells had been linked with symptoms or disease stage. We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature using the PRISMA and Cochrane guidelines of the Medline database using specific search criteria. Only studies measuring inflammatory cells using specific markers in tissue from human patients with the clinical diagnosis of tendinopathy were included. Inclusion was agreed on by 2 independent researchers on review of abstracts or full-text using specific predetermined criteria. The search yielded 5 articles in total. There were increased numbers of macrophages (4 studies) and mast cells (3 studies) in tendinopathic versus healthy control tissues. One study demonstrated increased numbers of T cells in tendinopathic tissue versus healthy control tendons. There were reduced numbers of T cells (1 study), macrophages (2 studies) and mast cells (2 studies) in torn tendon versus intact tendinopathic tissue. The existing evidence supports the hypothesis that increased numbers of inflammatory cells are present in pathological tendons. The lack of high-quality quantitative studies in this area demonstrates a clear need for future research to better understand the role of inflammation in tendinopathy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. TENS and heat therapy for pain relief and quality of life improvement in individuals with primary dysmenorrhea: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Igwea, Sylvester Emeka; Tabansi-Ochuogu, Chidinma Samantha; Abaraogu, Ukachukwu Okoroafor

    2016-08-01

    The present systematic review aimed to synthesize evidence for the effectiveness of TENS and heat therapy interventions from randomized trials. Six relevant databases were searched for studies on TENS and heat therapy for primary dysmenorrhea. Menstrual pain intensity and quality of life were the primary and secondary outcomes respectively. The search yielded 46 citations from which six studies on TENS and three studies on heat therapy were systematically reviewed. On the PEDRO quality scale, the trials methodological quality was 4.8 out of 10 for TENS and 6.3 out of 10 for heat therapy. TENS and heat therapy both showed evidence of pain reduction, but no study included quality of life as an outcome. Meta-analysis was not possible due to substantial heterogeneity in included studies. TENS and heat therapy show potential as adjunct remedies in the management of primary dysmenorrhea, but rigorous high quality trials are still needed to made conclusive recommendation.

  8. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part III, Surgical Pain Populations

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cindy; Paat, Charmagne F.; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of the evidence for massage therapy’s efficacy in treating pain, function-related, and health-related quality of life outcomes in surgical pain populations. Methods. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A professionally diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Results. Twelve high quality and four low quality studies were included in the review. Results indicate massage therapy is effective for treating pain [standardized mean difference (SMD) = −0.79] and anxiety (SMD = −0.57) compared to active comparators. Conclusion. Based on the available evidence, weak recommendations are suggested for massage therapy, compared to active comparators for reducing pain intensity/severity and anxiety in patients undergoing surgical procedures. This review also discusses massage therapy safety, challenges within this research field, how to address identified research gaps, and next steps for future research. PMID:27165970

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals for Palliation of Bone Pain in Patients with Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Metastatic to Bone: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jong, Joyce M van Dodewaard-de; Oprea-Lager, Daniela E; Hooft, Lotty; de Klerk, John M H; Bloemendal, Haiko J; Verheul, Henk M W; Hoekstra, Otto S; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M

    2016-09-01

    The majority of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer develop bone metastatic disease. It is often challenging to optimally palliate malignant bone pain. In case of multifocal pain due to diffuse osteoblastic metastases, treatment with bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals can be considered. This systematic review evaluates the efficacy of different bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals for palliation of malignant bone pain from prostate cancer. The PubMed (Medline) and Embase databases were searched for publications on 89-strontium-chloride ((89)Sr), 153-samarium-EDTMP ((153)Sm), 186-rhenium-HEDP ((186)Re), 188-rhenium-HEDP ((188)Re), and 223-radium-chloride ((223)Ra). Randomised controlled trials and prospective cohort studies were included. Metastatic bone pain had to be registered as outcome measure for prostate cancer patients separately. This review included 36 articles of which 13 randomised trials and 23 prospective studies. Of all trials, 10 studies used (89)Sr, 7 (153)Sm, 12 (186)Re, 2 (188)Re, and 2 (223)Ra; three reported on a combination of different radionuclides. Only a few trials contained a blinding procedure and several studies contained incomplete follow-up or lack of intention-to-treat analysis. It was not possible to calculate a pooled estimate of pain response to treatment with any of the radionuclides because different definitions of pain response were used. Overall, pain response percentages greater than 50-60% were seen with each radionuclide. Haematological toxicity was reported in 26 of the 36 studies and more than half of these trials stated no grade 3/4 leukopenia or thrombocytopenia occurred. In this report we reviewed the efficacy of bone-seeking radionuclides for treating bone pain from metastatic prostate cancer. Overall, treatment with bone-seeking radionuclides resulted in pain responses greater than 50-60%. Copyright © 2015 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of Chronic Pain on Treatment Prognosis for Patients with Opioid Use Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Brittany B; Bawor, Monica; Naji, Leen; Chan, Carol K; Varenbut, Jaymie; Paul, James; Varenbut, Michael; Daiter, Jeff; Plater, Carolyn; Pare, Guillaume; Marsh, David C; Worster, Andrew; Desai, Dipika; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND While a number of pharmacological interventions exist for the treatment of opioid use disorder, evidence evaluating the effect of pain on substance use behavior, attrition rate, and physical or mental health among these therapies has not been well established. We aim to evaluate these effects using evidence gathered from a systematic review of studies evaluating chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) in patients with opioid use disorder. METHODS We searched the Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ProQuest Dissertations and theses Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and National Institutes for Health Clinical Trials Registry databases to identify articles evaluating the impact of pain on addiction treatment outcomes for patients maintained on opioid agonist therapy. RESULTS Upon screening 3,540 articles, 14 studies with a combined sample of 3,128 patients fulfilled the review inclusion criteria. Results from the meta-analysis suggest that pain has no effect on illicit opioid consumption [pooled odds ratio (pOR): 0.70, 95%CI 0.41–1.17; I2 = 0.0] but a protective effect for reducing illicit non-opioid substance use (pOR: 0.57, 95%CI 0.41–0.79; I2 = 0.0). Studies evaluating illicit opioid consumption using other measures demonstrate pain to increase the risk for opioid abuse. Pain is significantly associated with the presence of psychiatric disorders (pOR: 2.18; 95%CI 1.6, 2.9; I2 = 0.0%). CONCLUSION CNCP may increase risk for continued opioid abuse and poor psychiatric functioning. Qualitative synthesis of the findings suggests that major methodological differences in the design and measurement of pain and treatment response outcomes are likely impacting the effect estimates. PMID:26417202

  11. Suture techniques of the intercostal space in thoracotomy and their relationship with post-thoracotomy pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    García-Tirado, Javier; Rieger-Reyes, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Post-thoracotomy pain is a symptom of high incidence among patients who have undergone thoracotomy and is a major risk factor in the pathogenesis of several postoperative complications. Chronic pain after thoracotomy reaches a high prevalence. Since the earliest studies, this pain has been seen to be related with intercostal nerve injury, thus the need to avoid these lesions during thoracotomy has been recommended. This review aims to establish the appropriate surgical procedure for closure of the thoracotomy through a systematic review of the literature and analysis of levels of evidence provided by the studies found. After an exhaustive search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, IME, IBECS and Cochrane Library, few studies were found. Each focuses on different aspects of thoracotomy surgical techniques, with a common denominator focused on the preservation of the intercostal nerves, and conclusions with different levels of evidence.

  12. The prevalence of neuropathic pain is high following treatment for breast cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ilhan, Emre; Chee, Edwin; Hush, Julia; Moloney, Niamh

    2017-07-03

    Pain is common, but often poorly managed following breast cancer treatment. Screening questionnaires and the Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group (NeuPSIG) criteria are two clinical approaches used to determine whether pain has neuropathic components, which may enable better pain management. The aims of this review were (1) to synthesise data from the literature on neuropathic pain prevalence in women following breast cancer treatment; (2) to investigate whether the prevalence of neuropathic pain differed between studies using screening questionnaires and the NeuPSIG criteria. We searched for studies that administered a validated neuropathic pain screening questionnaire and/or the NeuPSIG criteria to women treated for early-stage (I-III) breast cancer. Thirteen studies using screening questionnaires (N=3,792), and 3 studies using components of the NeuPSIG criteria (N=621) were included. Meta-analyses were conducted for questionnaire data but not NeuPSIG criteria data due to inadequate homogeneity. Among all participants treated for early-stage breast cancer, pooled prevalence estimates (95% confidence interval) ranged between 14.2% (8.3 to 21.4) to 27.2% (24.7 to 88.4) for studies using screening questionnaires; studies using NeuPSIG criteria reported prevalence rates from 24.1% to 31.3%. Among those who reported pain following treatment, the pooled prevalence estimate (95% confidence interval) of neuropathic pain from screening questionnaires ranged from 32.6% (24.2 to 41.6) to 58.2% (24.7 to 88.4); studies using NeuPSIG criteria reported prevalence rates from 29.5% to 57.1%. These prevalence estimates are higher than those reported for other types of cancer, and emphasise the need to assess the contribution of neuropathic pain following breast cancer treatment.

  13. Gender role affects experimental pain responses: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Alabas, O A; Tashani, O A; Tabasam, G; Johnson, M I

    2012-10-01

    Gender role refers to the culturally and socially constructed meanings that describe how women and men should behave in certain situations according to feminine and masculine roles learned throughout life. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the relationship between gender role and experimental pain responses in healthy human participants. We searched computerized databases for studies published between January 1950 and May 2011 that had measured gender role in healthy human adults and pain response to noxious stimuli. Studies were entered into a meta-analysis if they calculated a correlation coefficient (r) for gender role and experimental pain. Searches yielded 4465 'hits' and 13 studies were eligible for review. Sample sizes were 67-235 participants and the proportion of female participants was 45-67%. Eight types of gender role instrument were used. Meta-analysis of six studies (406 men and 539 women) found a significant positive correlation between masculine and feminine personality traits and pain threshold and tolerance, with a small effect size (r = 0.17, p = 0.01). Meta-analysis of four studies (263 men and 297 women) found a significant negative correlation between gender stereotypes specific to pain and pain threshold and tolerance, with a moderate effect size (r = -0.41, p < 0.001). In conclusion, individuals who considered themselves more masculine and less sensitive to pain than the typical man showed higher pain thresholds and tolerances. Gender stereotypes specific to pain scales showed stronger associations with sex differences in pain sensitivity response than masculine and feminine personality trait scales.

  14. An Overview of Systematic Reviews on Prognostic Factors in Neck Pain: Results from the International Collaboration on Neck Pain (ICON) Project

    PubMed Central

    Walton, David M; Carroll, Linda J; Kasch, Helge; Sterling, Michele; Verhagen, Arianne P; MacDermid, Joy C; Gross, Anita; Santaguida, P. Lina; Carlesso, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Given the challenges of chronic musculoskeletal pain and disability, establishing a clear prognosis in the acute stage has become increasingly recognized as a valuable approach to mitigate chronic problems. Neck pain represents a condition that is common, potentially disabling, and has a high rate of transition to chronic or persistent problems. As a field of research, prognosis in neck pain has stimulated several empirical primary research papers, and a number of systematic reviews. As part of the International Consensus on Neck (ICON) project, we sought to establish the general state of knowledge in the area through a structured, systematic review of systematic reviews (overview). An exhaustive search strategy was created and employed to identify the 13 systematic reviews (SRs) that served as the primary data sources for this overview. A decision algorithm for data synthesis, which incorporated currency of the SR, risk of bias assessment of the SRs using AMSTAR scoring and consistency of findings across SRs, determined the level of confidence in the risk profile of 133 different variables. The results provide high confidence that baseline neck pain intensity and baseline disability have a strong association with outcome, while angular deformities of the neck and parameters of the initiating trauma have no effect on outcome. A vast number of predictors provide low or very low confidence or inconclusive results, suggesting there is still much work to be done in this field. Despite the presence of multiple SR and this overview, there is insufficient evidence to make firm conclusions on many potential prognostic variables. This study demonstrates the challenges in conducting overviews on prognosis where clear synthesis critieria and a lack of specifics of primary data in SR are barriers. PMID:24115971

  15. An Overview of Systematic Reviews on Prognostic Factors in Neck Pain: Results from the International Collaboration on Neck Pain (ICON) Project.

    PubMed

    Walton, David M; Carroll, Linda J; Kasch, Helge; Sterling, Michele; Verhagen, Arianne P; Macdermid, Joy C; Gross, Anita; Santaguida, P Lina; Carlesso, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Given the challenges of chronic musculoskeletal pain and disability, establishing a clear prognosis in the acute stage has become increasingly recognized as a valuable approach to mitigate chronic problems. Neck pain represents a condition that is common, potentially disabling, and has a high rate of transition to chronic or persistent problems. As a field of research, prognosis in neck pain has stimulated several empirical primary research papers, and a number of systematic reviews. As part of the International Consensus on Neck (ICON) project, we sought to establish the general state of knowledge in the area through a structured, systematic review of systematic reviews (overview). An exhaustive search strategy was created and employed to identify the 13 systematic reviews (SRs) that served as the primary data sources for this overview. A decision algorithm for data synthesis, which incorporated currency of the SR, risk of bias assessment of the SRs using AMSTAR scoring and consistency of findings across SRs, determined the level of confidence in the risk profile of 133 different variables. The results provide high confidence that baseline neck pain intensity and baseline disability have a strong association with outcome, while angular deformities of the neck and parameters of the initiating trauma have no effect on outcome. A vast number of predictors provide low or very low confidence or inconclusive results, suggesting there is still much work to be done in this field. Despite the presence of multiple SR and this overview, there is insufficient evidence to make firm conclusions on many potential prognostic variables. This study demonstrates the challenges in conducting overviews on prognosis where clear synthesis critieria and a lack of specifics of primary data in SR are barriers.

  16. State of the evidence: Cannabinoids and cancer pain-A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tateo, Sydney

    2017-02-01

    Cannabinoids are widely used to alleviate intractable symptoms such as pain, nausea, and muscle spasticity. The purpose of this review was to ascertain the current state of the science regarding use of cannabinoids for cancer pain. Four electronic databases were searched for randomized control trials of cannabinoids and cancer pain. Studies included examined the analgesic effects of cannabinoids for cancer pain. Methodological quality was assessed using the Jadad scale. Eight randomized control trials met the inclusion criteria for review. Most trials found analgesic effects from cannabinoids when compared to placebo, although not all associations reached statistical significance. The analgesic effects of cannabinoids were also limited by dose-dependent side effects. Side effects most commonly reported were changes in cognition, sedation, and dizziness. There is evidence that cannabinoids are effective adjuvants for cancer pain not completely relieved by opioid therapy, but there is a dearth of high-quality studies to support a stronger conclusion. Cannabinoids appear to be safe in low and medium doses. Methodological limitations of the trials limited the ability to make sound conclusions. Further research is warranted before efficacy, safety, and utility of cannabinoids for cancer pain can be determined. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. Acupuncture and moxibustion for lateral elbow pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture and moxibustion have widely been used to treat lateral elbow pain (LEP). A comprehensive systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) including both English and Chinese databases was conducted to assess the efficacy of acupuncture and moxibustion in the treatment of LEP. Methods Revised STRICTA (2010) criteria were used to appraise the acupuncture procedures, the Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies. A total of 19 RCTs that compared acupuncture and/or moxibustion with sham acupuncture, another form of acupuncture, or conventional treatment were included. Results All studies had at least one domain rated as high risk or uncertain risk of bias in the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Results from three RCTs of moderate quality showed that acupuncture was more effective than sham acupuncture. Results from 10 RCTs of mostly low quality showed that acupuncture or moxibustion was superior or equal to conventional treatment, such as local anesthetic injection, local steroid injection, non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs, or ultrasound. There were six low quality RCTs that compared acupuncture and moxibustion combined with manual acupuncture alone, and all showed that acupuncture and moxibustion combined was superior to manual acupuncture alone. Conclusion Moderate quality studies suggest that acupuncture is more effective than sham acupuncture. Interpretations of findings regarding acupuncture vs. conventional treatment, and acupuncture and moxibustion combined vs. manual acupuncture alone are limited by the methodological qualities of these studies. Future studies with improved methodological design are warranted to confirm the efficacy of acupuncture and moxibustion for LEP. PMID:24726029

  18. Metamizole/dipyrone for the relief of cancer pain: A systematic review and evidence-based recommendations for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gaertner, Jan; Stamer, Ulrike M; Remi, Constanze; Voltz, Raymond; Bausewein, Claudia; Sabatowski, Rainer; Wirz, Stefan; Müller-Mundt, Gabriele; Simon, Steffen T; Pralong, Anne; Nauck, Friedemann; Follmann, Markus; Radbruch, Lukas; Meißner, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    Dipyrone (metamizole) is one of the most widely used non-opioid analgesics for the treatment of cancer pain. Because evidence-based recommendations are not yet available, a systematic review was conducted for the German Guideline Program in Oncology to provide recommendations for the use of dipyrone in cancer pain. First, a systematic review for clinical trials assessing dipyrone in adult patients with cancer pain was conducted. Endpoints were pain intensity, opioid-sparing effects, safety, and quality of life. The search was performed in MedLine, Embase (via Ovid), and the Cochrane Library (1948-2013) and additional hand search was conducted. Finally, recommendations were developed and agreed in a formal structured consensus process by 53 representatives of scientific medical societies and 49 experts. Of 177 retrieved studies, 4 could be included (3 randomized controlled trials and 1 cohort study, n = 252 patients): dipyrone significantly decreased pain intensity compared to placebo, even if low doses (1.5-2 g/day) were used. Higher doses (3 × 2 g/day) were more effective than low doses (3 × 1 g/day), but equally effective as 60 mg oral morphine/day. Pain reduction of dipyrone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs did not differ significantly. Compared to placebo, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and morphine, the incidence of adverse effects was not increased. Dipyrone can be recommended for the treatment of cancer pain as an alternative to other non-opioids either alone or in combination with opioids. It can be preferred over non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs due to the presumably favorable side effect profile in long-term use, but comparative studies are not available for long-term use.

  19. Effect of low-level laser therapy on pain levels in patients with temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    MAIA, Mila Leite de Moraes; BONJARDIM, Leonardo Rigoldi; QUINTANS, Jullyana de Souza Siqueira; RIBEIRO, Maria Amália Gonzaga; MAIA, Luiz Guilherme Martins; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are characterized by the presence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and/or masticatory muscle pain and dysfunction. Low-level laser is presented as an adjuvant therapeutic modality for the treatment of TMD, especially when the presence of inflammatory pain is suspected. Objective To systematically review studies that investigated the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on the pain levels in individuals with TMD. Material and Methods The databases Scopus, embase, ebsco and PubMed were reviewed from January/2003 to October/2010 with the following keywords: laser therapy, low-level laser therapy, temporomandibular joint disorders, temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome, temporomandibular joint, temporomandibular, facial pain and arthralgia, with the inclusion criteria for intervention studies in humans. exclusion criteria adopted were intervention studies in animals, studies that were not written in english, Spanish or Portuguese, theses, monographs, and abstracts presented in scientific events. Results After a careful review, 14 studies fit the criteria for inclusion, of which, 12 used a placebo group. As for the protocol for laser application, the energy density used ranged from 0.9 to 105 J/cm2, while the power density ranged from 9.8 to 500 mW. The number of sessions varied from 1 to 20 and the frequency of applications ranged from daily for 10 days to 1 time per week for 4 weeks. A reduction in pain levels was reported in 13 studies, with 9 of these occurring only in the experimental group, and 4 studies reporting pain relief for both the experimental group and for the placebo. Conclusion Most papers showed that LLLT seemed to be effective in reducing pain from TMD. However, the heterogeneity of the standardization regarding the parameters of laser calls for caution in interpretation of these results. Thus, it is necessary to conduct further research in order to obtain a consensus regarding the best application protocol

  20. Comparing the Efficacy of Surgery and Medical Therapy for Pain Management in Endometriosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaichian, Shahla; Kabir, Ali; Mehdizadehkashi, Adolfazl; Rahmani, Khaled; Moghimi, Mehrdad; Moazzami, Bahram

    2017-03-01

    Pain is considered as one of the main symptoms of endometriosis. The treatment for endometriosis remains controversial. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of medical or surgical treatments for pain-relief in patients with endometriosis. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Published papers about evaluating pain treatment in endometriosis in PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. After searching all studies evaluating pain treatment in endometriosis in PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar, there were 23 related studies, containing 1,847 patients enrolled in our study. We used a variety of tests: fixed and random effects models, Q Cochrane test and I2 index, Egger and Begg tests, forest and funnel plots, Trim and fill method, and meta-regression in our analysis. There was no statistically significant difference in pain improvement between surgical and medical treatment. Interestingly, pain relief was more prominent longer after treatment. Both clinical trials and cross sectional studies showed higher improvement in pain than cohort studies. High quality studies and lower body mass index (BMI) had a greater effect on pain relief. All studies were heterogeneous, but there was no publication bias. There was a higher probability of risk of bias in blinding, random sequence generation, and selective outcome reporting in clinical trial studies entered in our meta-analysis. Our results could not demonstrate the preference of each medical or surgical treatment effect for dysmenorrhea in endometriosis. Additional data is required before a standardized medical protocol can be offered, but we believe this study may encourage clinicians to consider a less invasive alternative for treating their patients' chronic pelvic pain in the near future.Key words: Endometriosis, pain, meta-analysis, therapy, disease management.

  1. YouTube as a Tool for Pain Management With Informal Caregivers of Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Swarz, Jeff; Rendo, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Context Cancer caregivers have information and support needs, especially about cancer pain management. With high Internet use reported among caregivers, YouTube may be an accessible option when looking for information on cancer pain management. Objectives The purpose of this study was to explore the availability and characteristics of instructional cancer pain management videos on YouTube and determine to what extent these videos addressed the role of informal caregivers in cancer pain management. Methods A systematic review of videos on YouTube resulting from search terms “pain and cancer,” “pain and hospice,” and “pain and palliative care” was conducted in May 2013. If the video addressed pain management, was in English, and was instructional, it was coded for the scope and design of instructional content that included caregivers. Results The search terms yielded 1118 unique videos and 43 videos met the inclusion criteria. Overall, 63% of videos were viewed 500 times or less and half of the videos received “like” ratings by viewers. Video instruction was primarily talk without any onscreen action (65%), user-generated amateur video (79%), and had poor quality sources of information. Videos were mainly clinician-centered (77%). Although the majority of videos addressed the need for caregiver pain assessment (35%) and caregiver education (23%), few actually addressed specific caregiver pain management barriers. Conclusion The majority of videos were primarily directed toward a clinical audience. Future research is necessary to determine if the platform is feasible and beneficial as a support tool for oncology caregivers. PMID:24793505

  2. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part II, Cancer Pain Populations.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Courtney; Crawford, Cindy; Paat, Charmagne F; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-08-01

    Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of massage therapy research and evidence for its efficacy in treating pain, function-related and health-related quality of life in cancer populations. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using the SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Twelve high quality and four low quality studies were subsequently included in the review. Results demonstrate massage therapy is effective for treating pain compared to no treatment [standardized mean difference (SMD)  = -.20] and active (SMD = -0.55) comparators. Compared to active comparators, massage therapy was also found to be beneficial for treating fatigue (SMD = -1.06) and anxiety (SMD = -1.24). Based on the evidence, weak recommendations are suggested for massage therapy, compared to an active comparator, for the treatment of pain, fatigue, and anxiety. No recommendations were suggested for massage therapy compared to no treatment or sham control based on the available literature to date. This review addresses massage therapy safety, research challenges, how to address identified research gaps, and necessary next steps for implementing massage therapy as a viable pain management option for cancer pain populations. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine.

  3. The effect of complementary therapies on post-operative pain control in ambulatory knee surgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Timothy; Downham, Christopher; Barlow, David

    2013-10-01

    Ambulatory knee surgery is a common procedure with over 100,000 knee arthroscopies performed in the U.K. in 2010-2011. Pain after surgery can decrease patient satisfaction, delay discharge, and decrease cost effectiveness. Multi-modal therapies, including complementary therapies, to improve pain control after surgery have been recommended. However, a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the use of complementary therapies to enhance pain control after ambulatory knee surgery is lacking, and this article aims to address this deficit. CINHAL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, AMED and CENTRAL databases were searched. Only Randomised Controlled Trials were included. All eligible papers were quality assessed using the Jadad system, and data was extracted using piloted forms. Two independent reviewers performed each stage of the review. Full details of the study methodology can be found on Prospero, a systematic review register. Five studies satisfied our eligibility criteria: three reporting on acupuncture, one on homeopathy, and one on acupoints. Acupoint pressure was the only study that demonstrated reduced pain compared with placebo. This study was the least methodologically robust. Arnica, although demonstrating a significant reduction in swelling, did not affect post-operative pain. Acupuncture did not affect post-operative pain; however, a reduction in ibuprofen use was demonstrated in two studies. Before recommending complementary therapy for routine use in ambulatory knee surgery, further work is required. Two areas of future research likely to bear fruit are demonstrating robust evidence for the effect of acupoint pressure on post-operative pain, and quantifying the positive effect of homeopathic arnica on post-operative swelling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Too many crying babies: a systematic review of pain management practices during immunizations on YouTube

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Early childhood immunizations, although vital for preventative health, are painful and too often lead to fear of needles. Effective pain management strategies during infant immunizations include breastfeeding, sweet solutions, and upright front-to-front holding. However, it is unknown how often these strategies are used in clinical practice. We aimed to review the content of YouTube videos showing infants being immunized to ascertain parents’ and health care professionals’ use of pain management strategies, as well as to assess infants’ pain and distress. Methods A systematic review of YouTube videos showing intramuscular injections in infants less than 12 months was completed using the search terms "baby injection" and "baby vaccine" to assess (1) the use of pain management strategies and (2) infant pain and distress. Pain was assessed by crying duration and pain scores using the FLACC (Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability) tool. Results A total of 142 videos were included and coded by two trained individual viewers. Most infants received one injection (range of one to six). Almost all (94%) infants cried before or during the injections for a median of 33 seconds (IQR = 39), up to 146 seconds. FLACC scores during the immunizations were high, with a median of 10 (IQR = 3). No videos showed breastfeeding or the use of sucrose/sweet solutions during the injection(s), and only four (3%) videos showed the infants being held in a front-to-front position during the injections. Distraction using talking or singing was the most commonly used (66%) pain management strategy. Conclusions YouTube videos of infants being immunized showed that infants were highly distressed during the procedures. There was no use of breastfeeding or sweet solutions and limited use of upright or front-to-front holding during the injections. This systematic review will be used as a baseline to evaluate the impact of future knowledge translation interventions using

  5. Manual therapy with or without physical medicine modalities for neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    D'Sylva, Jonathan; Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita; Burnie, Stephen J; Goldsmith, Charles H; Graham, Nadine; Haines, Ted; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L

    2010-10-01

    Manual therapy interventions are often used with or without physical medicine modalities to treat neck pain. This review assessed the effect of 1) manipulation and mobilisation, 2) manipulation, mobilisation and soft tissue work, and 3) manual therapy with physical medicine modalities on pain, function, patient satisfaction, quality of life (QoL), and global perceived effect (GPE) in adults with neck pain. A computerised search for randomised trials was performed up to July 2009. Two or more authors independently selected studies, abstracted data, and assessed methodological quality. Pooled relative risk (RR) and standardised mean differences (SMD) were calculated when possible. We included 19 trials, 37% of which had a low risk of bias. Moderate quality evidence (1 trial, 221 participants) suggested mobilisation, manipulation and soft tissue techniques decrease pain and improved satisfaction when compared to short wave diathermy, and that this treatment combination paired with advice and exercise produces greater improvements in GPE and satisfaction than advice and exercise alone for acute neck pain. Low quality evidence suggests a clinically important benefit favouring mobilisation and manipulation in pain relief [1 meta-analysis, 112 participants: SMD -0.34(95% CI: -0.71, 0.03), improved function and GPE (1 trial, 94 participants) for participants with chronic cervicogenic headache when compared to a control at intermediate and long term follow-up; but no difference when used with various physical medicine modalities.

  6. Psychological Treatments for Chronic Pain in East and Southeast Asia: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Yin; McCracken, Lance M; Moss-Morris, Rona

    2016-08-01

    Psychological treatments are recognised as generally effective for chronic pain. However, little is known about the evidence for psychological treatments for chronic pain in Asia. This study aimed (1) to identify all treatment outcome studies in the area of psychological approaches to chronic pain in adult populations of East Asia and Southeast Asia and (2) to evaluate the treatment types, the evidence for treatment outcomes and research design quality with regard to these studies. We identified all psychologically based treatment outcome studies for chronic pain in East and Southeast Asia by searching CENTRAL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, MEDLINE (via Ovid), Global Health and Web of Science from the beginning of each abstracting service until December 2014 (week 4). Seventeen studies met inclusion criteria including a total of N = 1,890 participants. Four were randomised controlled trials (RCTs), five controlled clinical trials (CCTs) and eight cohort studies. Treatment outcomes included pain, disability, depression and anxiety. Overall, the studies included in this review showed small to medium within-group effect sizes for all four outcomes. A majority of the studies were rated as weak in design quality. Three RCTs were found to be of strong quality, one of moderate quality and only one CCT of moderate quality. The current available literature on psychological treatments for chronic pain in East and Southeast Asia is generally small in scale, mostly preliminary and lags behind on some developments occurring in North America and Europe. Further development of treatment methods and research designs is warranted.

  7. Electroencephalographic Patterns in Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Cleber Luz; do Nascimento, Marion Alves; Ito, Clara Hikari; Silva, Manuela; Benevides, Silvia; Miranda, José Garcia Vivas; Sá, Katia Nunes

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to review and summarize recent findings on electroencephalographic patterns in individuals with chronic pain. We also discuss recent advances in the use of quantitative Electroencephalography (qEEG) for the assessment of pathophysiology and biopsychosocial factors involved in its maintenance over time. Data collection took place from February 2014 to July 2015 in PubMed, SciELO and PEDro databases. Data from cross-sectional studies and longitudinal studies, as well as clinical trials involving chronic pain participants were incorporated into the final analysis. Our primary findings related to chronic pain were an increase of theta and alpha EEG power at rest, and a decrease in the amplitude of evoked potentials after sensory stimulation and cognitive tasks. This review suggests that qEEG could be considered as a simple and objective tool for the study of brain mechanisms involved in chronic pain, as well as for identifying the specific characteristics of chronic pain condition. In addition, results show that qEEG probably is a relevant outcome measure for assessing changes in therapeutic studies. PMID:26914356

  8. The effectiveness of virtual reality distraction for pain reduction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Kevin M; Milling, Leonard S

    2010-12-01

    Virtual reality technology enables people to become immersed in a computer-simulated, three-dimensional environment. This article provides a comprehensive review of controlled research on the effectiveness of virtual reality (VR) distraction for reducing pain. To be included in the review, studies were required to use a between-subjects or mixed model design in which VR distraction was compared with a control condition or an alternative intervention in relieving pain. An exhaustive search identified 11 studies satisfying these criteria. VR distraction was shown to be effective for reducing experimental pain, as well as the discomfort associated with burn injury care. Studies of needle-related pain provided less consistent findings. Use of more sophisticated virtual reality technology capable of fully immersing the individual in a virtual environment was associated with greater relief. Overall, controlled research suggests that VR distraction may be a useful tool for clinicians who work with a variety of pain problems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effects of Yoga on Pain, Mobility, and Quality of Life in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaqi; Yang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To systematically assess the effects of yoga on pain, mobility, and quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods. Pubmed, Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), and other sources were searched systematically in this study. Two reviewers identified eligible studies and extracted data independently. Downs and Black's Quality Index were used to evaluate the methodological quality of the included studies. Results. A total of 9 articles (6 studies) involving 372 patients with knee osteoarthritis met the inclusion criteria. The most common yoga protocol is 40~90 minutes/session, lasting for at least 8 weeks. The effect of yoga on pain relief and function improvement could be seen after two-week intervention. Conclusion. This systematic review showed that yoga might have positive effects in relieving pain and mobility on patients with KOA, but the effects on quality of life (QOL) are unclear. Besides, more outcome measure related to mental health of yoga effects on people with KOA should be conducted. PMID:27777597

  10. Percutaneous and Endoscopic Adhesiolysis in Managing Low Back and Lower Extremity Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Helm, Standiford; Racz, Gabor B; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Justiz, Rafael; Hayek, Salim M; Kaplan, Eugene D; El Terany, Mohamed Ahamed; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2016-02-01

    Chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain is frustrating to treat. Percutaneous adhesiolysis and spinal endoscopy are techniques which can treat chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain.Percutaneous adhesiolysis is performed by placing the catheter into the tissue plane at the ventrolateral aspect of the foramen so that medications can be injected. Adhesiolysis is used both for pain caused by scarring which is not resistant to catheter placement and other sources of pain, including inflammation in the absence of scarring.Mechanical lysis of scars with a catheter may or may not be necessary for percutaneous adhesiolysis to be effective. Spinal endoscopy allows direct visualization of the epidural space and has the possibility to use laser energy to treat pathology. A systematic review of the effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis and spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis to treat chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain. To evaluate and update the effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis and spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis to treat chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain. The available literature on percutaneous adhesiolysis and spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis in treating persistent low back and leg pain was reviewed. The quality of each article used in this analysis was assessed. The level of evidence was classified on a 5-point scale from strong, based upon multiple randomized controlled trials to weak, based upon consensus, as developed by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and modified by ASIPP. Data sources included relevant literature identified through searches of PubMed and EMBASE from 1966 to September 2015, and manual searches of the bibliographies of known primary and review articles. Pain relief of at least 50% and functional improvement of at least 40% were the primary outcome measures. Short-term efficacy was defined as improvement of 6 months or less; whereas, long-term efficacy was defined

  11. Individual and intervention-related factors associated with adherence to home exercise in chronic low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Beinart, Naomi A; Goodchild, Claire E; Weinman, John A; Ayis, Salma; Godfrey, Emma L

    2013-12-01

    Exercise has been shown to reduce pain and increase function in patients with chronic low back pain. However up to 70% of patients do not engage in prescribed home exercise. Physiotherapists need to understand more about the complex factors influencing patients' adherence to prescribed home exercise to tailor their exercise interventions more effectively and support patients to self-manage. This review identifies factors associated with adherence to health care practitioner-prescribed home exercise in adults with chronic low back pain. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were used for the reporting of this review. We explored literature in which the authors studied adherence to home exercise in adults with CLBP. Adherence to home exercise was the primary outcome. Additional outcome measures were recorded in the data extraction table. The following databases were searched: Embase, PsychINFO, MEDLINE, PEDro, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Data were independently extracted and assessed for methodologic quality by two reviewers. Eleven randomized controlled trials, including 1,088 participants, met the inclusion criteria. Moderate evidence was found for one individual patient subfactor and three intervention-related subfactors associated with increased adherence to home exercise. These subfactors were greater health locus of control, supervision, participation in an exercise program, and participation in a general behavior change program incorporating motivational strategies. This is the first systematic review investigating adherence to prescribed home exercise in a chronic low back pain population. It is difficult to draw firm conclusions because the research lacks detailed descriptions of intervention content. The use of a taxonomy of behavior change techniques has been suggested to overcome this key problem. This review has highlighted the lack of standardized measures of adherence to

  12. Effectiveness of dry needling and injections of myofascial trigger points associated with plantar heel pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis) is one of the most common musculoskeletal pathologies of the foot. Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling and/or injection of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) however the evidence for its effectiveness is uncertain. Therefore, we aimed to systematically review the current evidence for the effectiveness of dry needling and/or injections of MTrPs associated with plantar heel pain. Methods We searched specific electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and AMI) in April 2010 to identify randomised and non-randomised trials. We included trials where participants diagnosed with plantar heel pain were treated with dry needling and/or injections (local anaesthetics, steroids, Botulinum toxin A and saline) alone or in combination with acupuncture. Outcome measures that focussed on pain and function were extracted from the data. Trials were assessed for quality using the Quality Index tool. Results Three quasi-experimental trials matched the inclusion criteria: two trials found a reduction in pain for the use of trigger point dry needling when combined with acupuncture and the third found a reduction in pain using 1% lidocaine injections when combined with physical therapy. However, the methodological quality of the three trials was poor, with Quality Index scores ranging form 7 to 12 out of a possible score of 27. A meta-analysis was not conducted because substantial heterogeneity was present between trials. Conclusions There is limited evidence for the effectiveness of dry needling and/or injections of MTrPs associated with plantar heel pain. However, the poor quality and heterogeneous nature of the included studies precludes definitive conclusions being made. Importantly, this review highlights the need for future trials to use rigorous randomised controlled methodology with measures such as blinding to reduce bias. We also recommend that such trials adhere to the Standards for Reporting

  13. Effectiveness of dry needling and injections of myofascial trigger points associated with plantar heel pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cotchett, Matthew P; Landorf, Karl B; Munteanu, Shannon E

    2010-09-01

    Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis) is one of the most common musculoskeletal pathologies of the foot. Plantar heel pain can be managed with dry needling and/or injection of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) however the evidence for its effectiveness is uncertain. Therefore, we aimed to systematically review the current evidence for the effectiveness of dry needling and/or injections of MTrPs associated with plantar heel pain. We searched specific electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and AMI) in April 2010 to identify randomised and non-randomised trials. We included trials where participants diagnosed with plantar heel pain were treated with dry needling and/or injections (local anaesthetics, steroids, Botulinum toxin A and saline) alone or in combination with acupuncture. Outcome measures that focussed on pain and function were extracted from the data. Trials were assessed for quality using the Quality Index tool. Three quasi-experimental trials matched the inclusion criteria: two trials found a reduction in pain for the use of trigger point dry needling when combined with acupuncture and the third found a reduction in pain using 1% lidocaine injections when combined with physical therapy. However, the methodological quality of the three trials was poor, with Quality Index scores ranging form 7 to 12 out of a possible score of 27. A meta-analysis was not conducted because substantial heterogeneity was present between trials. There is limited evidence for the effectiveness of dry needling and/or injections of MTrPs associated with plantar heel pain. However, the poor quality and heterogeneous nature of the included studies precludes definitive conclusions being made. Importantly, this review highlights the need for future trials to use rigorous randomised controlled methodology with measures such as blinding to reduce bias. We also recommend that such trials adhere to the Standards for Reporting Interventions in Controlled Trials of

  14. Patient-professional partnerships and chronic back pain self-management: a qualitative systematic review and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; McNichol, Elaine; Marczewski, Kathryn; Closs, S José

    2016-05-01

    Chronic back pain is common, and its self-management may be a lifelong task for many patients. While health professionals can provide a service or support for pain, only patients can actually experience it. It is likely that optimum self-management of chronic back pain may only be achieved when patients and professionals develop effective partnerships which integrate their complementary knowledge and skills. However, at present, there is no evidence to explain how such partnerships can influence patients' self-management ability. This review aimed to explore the influence of patient-professional partnerships on patients' ability to self-manage chronic back pain, and to identify key factors within these partnerships that may influence self-management. A systematic review was undertaken, aiming to retrieve relevant studies using any research method. Five databases were searched for papers published between 1980 and 2014, including Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Medline, EMBASE and PsycINFO. Eligible studies were those reporting on patients being supported by professionals to self-manage chronic back pain; patients being actively involved for self-managing chronic back pain; and the influence of patient-professional partnerships on self-management of chronic back pain. Included studies were critically appraised for quality, and findings were extracted and analysed thematically. A total of 738 studies were screened, producing 10 studies for inclusion, all of which happened to use qualitative methods. Seven themes were identified: communication, mutual understanding, roles of health professionals, information delivery, patients' involvement, individualised care and healthcare service. These themes were developed into a model suggesting how factors within patient-professional partnerships influence self-management. Review findings suggest that a partnership between patients and professionals supports patients' self-management ability, and effective communication is a

  15. Reporting Characteristics of Cancer Pain: A Systematic Review and Quantitative Analysis of Research Publications in Palliative Care Journals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil P

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A common disorder requiring symptom palliation in palliative and end-of-life care is cancer. Cancer pain is recognized as a global health burden. This paper sought to systematically examine the extent to which there is an adequate scientific research base on cancer pain and its reporting characteristics in the palliative care journal literature. Materials and Methods: Search conducted in MEDLINE and CINAHL sought to locate all studies published in 19 palliative/ hospice/ supportive/ end-of-life care journals from 2009 to 2010. The journals included were: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care, BMC Palliative Care, Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care, End of Life Care Journal, European Journal of Palliative Care, Hospice Management Advisor, Indian Journal of Palliative Care, International Journal of Palliative Nursing, Internet Journal of Pain Symptom Control and Palliative Care, Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy, Journal of Palliative Care, Journal of Palliative Medicine, Journal of Social Work in End-of-life and Palliative Care, Journal of Supportive Oncology, Palliative Medicine, Palliative and Supportive Care, and Supportive Care in Cancer. Journal contents were searched to identify studies that included cancer pain in abstract. Results: During the years 2009 and 2010, of the selected 1,569 articles published in the journals reviewed, only 5.86% (92 articles) were on cancer pain. Conclusion: While researchers in the field of palliative care have studied cancer pain, the total percentage for studies is still a low 5.86%. To move the field of palliative care forward so that appropriate guidelines for cancer pain management can be developed, it is critical that more research be reported upon which to base cancer pain therapy in an evidence-based palliative care model. PMID:21633623

  16. The Placebo Response in Pediatric Abdominal Pain-Related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoekman, Daniël R; Zeevenhooven, Judith; van Etten-Jamaludin, Faridi S; Douwes Dekker, Iuke; Benninga, Marc A; Tabbers, Merit M; Vlieger, Arine M

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the magnitude and determinants of the placebo response in studies with pediatric abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched for systematic reviews and randomized placebo-controlled trials concerning children 4-18 years of age with an abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder. The primary outcome was the pooled proportion of subjects assigned to placebo with improvement as defined by the authors. The effect of trial characteristics on the magnitude of the placebo response was investigated using univariate meta-regression analysis. Twenty-one trials were identified. The pooled proportion of subjects with improvement was 41% (95% CI, 34%-49%; 17 studies) and with no pain was 17% (95% CI, 8%-32%; 7 studies). The pooled standardized mean difference on the Faces Pain Scales compared with baseline was -0.73 (95% CI, -1.04 to -0.42; 8 studies). There was significant heterogeneity across studies with respect to both outcomes. Lower dosing frequency (P = .04), positive study (P = .03), longer duration of treatment (P < .001), and higher placebo dropout (P < .001) were associated with higher report of no pain. Response on Faces Pain Scales was greater in studies conducted in the Middle East (P = .002), in studies that did not report the randomization schedule (P = .02), and in studies with a higher percentage of females (P = .04). Approximately 41% of children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders improve on placebo. Several trial characteristics are correlated significantly with the proportion of patients with no pain on placebo and with the magnitude of the placebo response on Faces Pain Scales. These data could be valuable for the design of future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Regional anaesthesia to improve pain outcomes in paediatric surgical patients: a qualitative systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Schaldenbrand, K; Wallis, B; De Oliveira, G S

    2014-09-01

    Summary The development of analgesic interventions in paediatric surgical patients is often limited by the inherent difficulties of conducting large randomized clinical trials to test interventions in those patients. Regional anaesthesia is a valid strategy to improve postoperative pain in the adult surgical population, but the effects of regional anaesthesia on postoperative pain outcomes in paediatric patients are currently not well defined. The main objective of the current review was to systematically evaluate the use of regional anaesthesia techniques to minimize postoperative pain in paediatric patients. A systematic search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of the regional anaesthesia techniques on postoperative pain outcomes in paediatric surgical patients' procedures. Seventy-three studies on 5125 paediatric patients were evaluated. Only few surgical procedures had more than one small randomized controlled trial favouring the use of regional anaesthesia to minimize postoperative pain (ophthalmological surgery, cleft lip repair, inguinal hernia, and urological procedures). Additional evidence is required to support the use of specific regional anaesthesia techniques to improve postoperative pain for several surgical procedures (craniectomy, adenotonsillectomy, appendectomy, cardiac surgery, umbilical hernia repair, upper and lower extremity) in paediatric patients. Currently, only a very limited number of regional anaesthesia techniques have demonstrated significant improvement on postoperative pain outcomes for a restricted number of surgical procedures. More studies are needed in order to establish regional anaesthesia as a valid strategy to improve analgesia in the paediatric surgical population. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A Systematic Review of Technology-assisted Self-Management Interventions for Chronic Pain: Looking Across Treatment Modalities.

    PubMed

    Heapy, Alicia A; Higgins, Diana M; Cervone, Dana; Wandner, Laura; Fenton, Brenda T; Kerns, Robert D

    2015-06-01

    The use of technology to provide chronic pain self-management interventions has increased in the recent years. Individual studies have primarily focused on a single technology-assisted modality and direct comparisons of different technology-assisted modalities are rare. Thus, little is known about the relative strengths and weaknesses of each technology-assisted modality. This article is a systematic review of technology-assisted self-management interventions for chronic nonheadache, noncancer pain in adults. We examined 3 treatment modalities: telephone, interactive voice response, and Internet. Electronic searches of OVID MEDLINE, OVID PsychINFO, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were conducted. Forty-four articles including 9890 participants were reviewed. Across modalities, the existing evidence suggests that technology-assisted psychological interventions are efficacious for improving self-management of chronic pain in adults. All modalities have been shown to provide benefit and no clearly superior modality has emerged. The primary gaps in the literature are lack of in-person comparison groups, lack of direct comparison among technology-assisted modalities, and heterogeneity of methods and interventions that limit comparability across studies and modalities. Future trials should focus on direct comparisons of technology-assisted interventions with in-person treatment and head to head comparisons of different technology-assisted modalities. Additional areas of focus include quantifying the cost of technology-assisted interventions, examining the effect of treatment "dose" on outcomes, and establishing guidelines for developing treatments for the technology-assisted environment.

  19. Does walking improve disability status, function, or quality of life in adults with chronic low back pain? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lawford, Belinda J; Walters, Julie; Ferrar, Katia

    2016-06-01

    To establish the effectiveness of walking alone and walking compared to other non-pharmacological management methods to improve disability, quality of life, or function in adults with chronic low back pain. A systematic search of the following databases was undertaken: Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, Pedro, SportDiscus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. The following keywords were used: 'back pain' or 'low back pain' or 'chronic low back pain' and 'walk*' or 'ambulation' or 'treadmill*' or 'pedometer*' or 'acceleromet*' or 'recreational' and 'disability' or 'quality of life' or 'function*'. Primary research studies with an intervention focus that investigated walking as the primary intervention compared to no intervention or any other non-pharmacological method in adults with chronic low back pain (duration >3 months). Seven randomised controlled trials involving 869 participants were included in the review. There was no evidence that walking was more effective than other management methods such as usual care, specific strength exercises, medical exercise therapy, or supervised exercise classes. One study found over-ground walking to be superior to treadmill walking, and another found internet-mediated walking to be more beneficial than non-internet-mediated walking in the short term. There is low quality evidence to suggest that walking is as effective as other non-pharmacological management methods at improving disability, function, and quality of life in adults with chronic low back pain. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Knowledge discovery in clinical decision support systems for pain management: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pombo, Nuno; Araújo, Pedro; Viana, Joaquim

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of pain accounts for billions of dollars in annual medical expenditures; loss of quality of life and decreased worker productivity contribute to indirect costs. As pain is highly subjective, clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) can be critical for improving the accuracy of pain assessment and offering better support for clinical decision-making. This review is focused on computer technologies for pain management that allow CDSSs to obtain knowledge from the clinical data produced by either patients or health care professionals. A comprehensive literature search was conducted in several electronic databases to identify relevant articles focused on computerised systems that constituted CDSSs and include data or results related to pain symptoms from patients with acute or chronic pain, published between 1992 and 2011 in the English language. In total, thirty-nine studies were analysed; thirty-two were selected from 1245 citations, and seven were obtained from reference tracking. The results highlighted the following clusters of computer technologies: rule-based algorithms, artificial neural networks, nonstandard set theory, and statistical learning algorithms. In addition, several methodologies were found for content processing such as terminologies, questionnaires, and scores. The median accuracy ranged from 53% to 87.5%. Computer technologies that have been applied in CDSSs are important but not determinant in improving the systems' accuracy and the clinical practice, as evidenced by the moderate correlation among the studies. However, these systems play an important role in the design of computerised systems oriented to a patient's symptoms as is required for pain management. Several limitations related to CDSSs were observed: the lack of integration with mobile devices, the reduced use of web-based interfaces, and scarce capabilities for data to be inserted by patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Harpgophytum procumbens for osteoarthritis and low back pain: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gagnier, Joel J; Chrubasik, Sigrun; Manheimer, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Background The objective of this review is to determine the effectiveness of Harpagophytum procumbens preparations in the treatment of various forms of musculoskeletal pain. Methods Several databases and other sources were searched to identify randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomized controlled trials, and controlled clinical trials testing Harpagophytum preparations in adults suffering from pain due to osteoarthritis or low back pain. Results Given the clinical heterogeneity and insufficient data for statistical pooling, trials were described in a narrative way, taking into consideration methodological quality scores. Twelve trials were included with six investigating osteoarthritis (two were identical trials), four low back pain, and three mixed-pain conditions. Conclusions There is limited evidence for an ethanolic Harpagophytum extract containing less than <30 mg harpagoside per day in the treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis. There is moderate evidence of effectiveness for (1) the use of a Harpagophytum powder at 60 mg harpagoside in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the spine, hip and knee; (2) the use of an aqueous Harpagophytum extract at a daily dose of 100 mg harpagoside in the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic non-specific low back pain; and (3) the use of an aqueous extract of Harpagophytum procumbens at 60 mg harpagoside being non-inferior to 12.5 mg rofecoxib per day for chronic non-specific low-back pain (NSLBP) in the short term. Strong evidence exists for the use of an aqueous Harpagophytum extract at a daily dose equivalent of 50 mg harpagoside in the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic NSLBP. PMID:15369596

  2. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part II, Cancer Pain Populations

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cindy; Paat, Charmagne F.; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of massage therapy research and evidence for its efficacy in treating pain, function-related and health-related quality of life in cancer populations. Methods. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using the SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Results. Twelve high quality and four low quality studies were subsequently included in the review. Results demonstrate massage therapy is effective for treating pain compared to no treatment [standardized mean difference (SMD)  = −.20] and active (SMD = −0.55) comparators. Compared to active comparators, massage therapy was also found to be beneficial for treating fatigue (SMD = −1.06) and anxiety (SMD = −1.24). Conclusion. Based on the evidence, weak recommendations are suggested for massage therapy, compared to an active comparator, for the treatment of pain, fatigue, and anxiety. No recommendations were suggested for massage therapy compared to no treatment or sham control based on the available literature to date. This review addresses massage therapy safety, research challenges, how to address identified research gaps, and necessary next steps for implementing massage therapy as a viable pain management option for cancer pain populations. PMID:27165967

  3. Effects of yoga on chronic neck pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Dol

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of yoga in the management of chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Five electronic databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of yoga intervention on chronic neck pain. The trials were published in the English language between January 1966 and December 2015. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess the quality of the trials. [Results] Three trials were identified and included in this review. A critical appraisal was performed on the trials, and the result indicated a high risk of bias. A narrative description was processed because of the small number of RCTs. Neck pain intensity and functional disability were significantly lower in the yoga groups than in the control groups. [Conclusion] Evidence from the 3 randomly controlled trials shows that yoga may be beneficial for chronic neck pain. The low-quality result of the critical appraisal and the small number of trials suggest that high-quality RCTs are required to examine further the effects of yoga intervention on chronic neck pain relief.

  4. Effects of yoga on chronic neck pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Dol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of yoga in the management of chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Five electronic databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of yoga intervention on chronic neck pain. The trials were published in the English language between January 1966 and December 2015. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess the quality of the trials. [Results] Three trials were identified and included in this review. A critical appraisal was performed on the trials, and the result indicated a high risk of bias. A narrative description was processed because of the small number of RCTs. Neck pain intensity and functional disability were significantly lower in the yoga groups than in the control groups. [Conclusion] Evidence from the 3 randomly controlled trials shows that yoga may be beneficial for chronic neck pain. The low-quality result of the critical appraisal and the small number of trials suggest that high-quality RCTs are required to examine further the effects of yoga intervention on chronic neck pain relief. PMID:27512290

  5. The importance and impact of patients' health literacy on low back pain management: a systematic review of literature.

    PubMed

    Edward, Jean; Carreon, Leah Yacat; Williams, Mark V; Glassman, Steven; Li, Jing

    2017-09-19

    Health literacy (HL) and the overall ability of patients to seek, understand and apply health information play an important role in the management of chronic pain conditions. Awareness of how patients' health literacy skills influence their pain experience and how their ability to understand the treatment regimen and manage chronic pain may allow physicians to adjust clinical treatment accordingly. Despite the prevalence and substantial economic impact of chronic low back pain (LBP), little is known about the relationship between health literacy and the treatment and management of this common disease entity. The purpose of this systematic review of published research was to examine the importance and implications of HL in the treatment and management of LBP. A literature search was performed in Web of Science, PubMed, CINAHL, PsychInfo using MeSH terms related to low back pain, health literacy and patient education, which yielded only 3 studies that directly addressed HL among patients suffering from LBP. We identified only a limited number of studies that focused specifically on HL in the LBP population that were included in this review. The majority of studies excluded from this review focused on patient levels of educational attainment and patient education programs without addressing patients' HL levels and its impact on adherence to educational programs, self-care management and rehabilitation, among other factors. The 3 studies that are critically reviewed in this review either use a direct measure of HL or make an effort to address HL in their programs. All three studies emphasize the importance of considering HL of patients in the treatment and management of LBP. Building on these studies and narrative review of other relevant literature, we identified significant gaps in current research addressing HL in the treatment and management of LBP. We developed recommendations for future research based on an assessment of strengths and limitations of available

  6. Efficacy of the Pilates method for pain and disability in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Gisela C.; Costa, Leonardo O. P.; Cabral, Cristina M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the available evidence on the efficacy of the Pilates method in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Method Searches were performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, SciELO, LILACS, CINAHL and CENTRAL in March 2013. Randomized controlled trials that tested the effectiveness of the Pilates method (against a nontreatment group, minimal intervention or other types of interventions) in adults with chronic low back pain were included regardless the language of publication. The outcome data were extracted from the eligible studies and were combined using a meta-analysis approach. Results The searches identified a total of 1,545 articles. From these, eight trials were considered eligible, and seven trials were combined in the meta-analysis. The comparison groups were as follows: Pilates versus other types of exercises (n=2 trials), and Pilates versus no treatment group or minimal intervention (n=4 trials) for short term pain; Pilates versus minimal intervention for short-term disability (n=4).We determined that Pilates was not better than other types of exercises for reducing pain intensity. However, Pilates was better than a minimal intervention for reducing short-term pain and disability (pain: pooled mean difference=1.6 points; 95% CI 1.4 to 1.8; disability: pooled mean difference=5.2 points; 95% CI 4.3 to 6.1). Conclusions Pilates was better than a minimal intervention for reducing pain and disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Pilates was not better than other types of exercise for short-term pain reduction. PMID:24346291

  7. Efficacy of the Pilates method for pain and disability in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Gisela C; Costa, Leonardo O P; Cabral, Cristina M N

    2013-01-01

    To systematically review the available evidence on the efficacy of the Pilates method in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Searches were performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, SciELO, LILACS, CINAHL and CENTRAL in March 2013. Randomized controlled trials that tested the effectiveness of the Pilates method (against a nontreatment group, minimal intervention or other types of interventions) in adults with chronic low back pain were included regardless the language of publication. The outcome data were extracted from the eligible studies and were combined using a meta-analysis approach. The searches identified a total of 1,545 articles. From these, eight trials were considered eligible, and seven trials were combined in the meta-analysis. The comparison groups were as follows: Pilates versus other types of exercises (n=2 trials), and Pilates versus no treatment group or minimal intervention (n=4 trials) for short term pain; Pilates versus minimal intervention for short-term disability (n=4).We determined that Pilates was not better than other types of exercises for reducing pain intensity. However, Pilates was better than a minimal intervention for reducing short-term pain and disability (pain: pooled mean difference=1.6 points; 95% CI 1.4 to 1.8; disability: pooled mean difference=5.2 points; 95% CI 4.3 to 6.1). Pilates was better than a minimal intervention for reducing pain and disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Pilates was not better than other types of exercise for short-term pain reduction.

  8. Relationship between physical activity and disability in low back pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; McAuley, James H; Macedo, Luciana; Barnett, Dominique C; Smeets, Rob J; Verbunt, Jeanine A

    2011-03-01

    It is often assumed that patients with pain-related disability due to low back pain (LBP) will have reduced physical activity levels, but recent studies have provided results that challenge this assumption. The aim of our systematic review was to examine the relationship between physical activity and disability in LBP. The literature search included 6 electronic databases and the reference list of relevant systematic reviews and studies to May 2010. To be included, studies had to measure both disability (eg, with the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire) and physical activity (eg, by accelerometry) in patients with non-specific LBP. Two independent reviewers screened search results and extracted data, and authors were contacted for additional data. Correlation coefficients were pooled using the random-effects model. The search identified 3213 records and 18 studies were eligible for inclusion. The pooled results showed a weak relationship between physical activity and disability in acute or subacute (<3months) LBP (r=-0.08, 95% confidence interval=-0.17 to 0.002), and a moderate and negative relationship in chronic (>3months) LBP (r=-0.33, 95% confidence interval=-0.51 to -0.15). That is, persons with acute or subacute LBP appear to vary in the levels of physical activity independent of their pain-related disability. Persons with chronic LBP with high levels of disability are also likely to have low levels of physical activity. Persons with acute or subacute back pain appear to vary in the levels of physical activity independent of disability. Persons with chronic back pain with high levels of disability will likely have low levels of physical activity.

  9. Web-Based Interventions for Chronic Back Pain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Divya; Turin, Tanvir C; Chowdhury, M Faruq U

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain is one of the most common presenting complaints to a physician’s office. Treatment is often challenging and recovery depends on various factors, often resulting in significant investments of time and resources. Objective The aim of this review is to determine which Web-based interventions aimed at chronic low back pain are of benefit to patients. Methods Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) studying Web-based interventions directed at adults with chronic low back pain were included. Retrospective studies, narrative reviews, nonrandomized trials, and observational studies were excluded. Electronic databases and bibliographies were searched. Results In total, nine unique RCTs were identified (total participants=1796). The number of patients randomized in each trial ranged from 51 to 580. Four trials studied online cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and five trials studied other Web-based interventions with interactive features. Empowerment/control was improved in six studies. Use of CBT was associated with reduced catastrophization among patients. Mixed results were reported with regards to reduction in pain levels and disability, although some studies showed promise in reducing disability in the short term. One study that measured health care utilization reported reduced utilization with the use of moderated email discussion. Conclusions Limited data are available regarding effective Web-based interventions to improve outcomes for patients with chronic low back pain. Nine RCTs with small sample sizes were identified in this review. Online CBT appears to show some promise in terms of reducing catastrophization and improving patient attitudes. Further research in this area with larger-scale studies focusing on appropriate outcomes appears to be a priority. PMID:27460413

  10. Yoga as a treatment for chronic low back pain: A systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Douglas G.; Holt, Jacquelyn A.; Sklar, Marisa; Groessl, Erik J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic low back pain (CLBP) affects millions of people worldwide, and appears to be increasing in prevalence. It is associated not only with pain, but also with increased disability, psychological symptoms, and reduced quality of life. There are various treatment options for CLBP, but no single therapy stands out as being the most effective. In the past 10 years, yoga interventions have been studied as a CLBP treatment approach. The objective of this paper is to review the current literature supporting the efficacy of yoga for CLBP. Methods A literature search through the beginning of 2015 was conducted in Pub Med for randomized control trials addressing treatment of CLBP with yoga. Results In this review we evaluate the use of yoga as a treatment for CLBP. Specifically we evaluate how yoga impacts physical functioning and disability, pain, and associated psychological symptoms. We also evaluate possible mediators of the effect of yoga and the safety of yoga. Discussion With few exceptions, previous studies and the recent randomized control trials (RCTs) indicate that yoga can reduce pain and disability, can be practiced safely, and is well received by participants. Some studies also indicate that yoga may improve psychological symptoms, but these effects are currently not as well established. PMID:27231715

  11. How is the experience of pain measured in older, community-dwelling people with osteoarthritis? A systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    de Luca, Katie; Parkinson, Lynne; Pollard, Henry; Byles, Julie; Blyth, Fiona

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the study was to perform a systematic review to identify and appraise outcome measures and measures of pain that are used to assess the experience of pain by older people with osteoarthritis, and to assess whether these measures are effective at capturing the multidimensional nature of the experience of this pain. A systematic review of five electronic databases from January 1996 to March 2013 was done. Inclusion criteria were cohort/observational and cross-sectional studies; specific diagnosis of OA; employed outcome measures of pain and/or health and/or quality of life which included questions about pain; and considered older adults. Articles were reviewed for methodological quality using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies. A total of 14 publications met the inclusion criteria, and 11 discrete studies were included in the review. The studies used 21 different outcome measures, utilizing 13 measures of pain. Sensory, affective and cognitive dimensions of pain were captured by the measures, albeit studies predominantly measured intensity or severity alone. Measures of pain used in epidemiological studies do not adequately capture the multidimensional nature of the experience of pain in osteoarthritis. There is a fraught complexity in the multidimensionality of the experience of pain in osteoarthritis, and studies exploring osteoarthritis pain in older people should attempt to capture this multidimensionality by employing multiple valid and reliable outcome measures that capture specific dimensions of the pain experience.

  12. Music as an adjuvant therapy in control of pain and symptoms in hospitalized adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cole, Linda C; LoBiondo-Wood, Geri

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this review is to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of music as an adjuvant therapy for pain control in hospitalized adults. The search terms music, music therapy, pain, adults, inpatient, and hospitalized were used to search the Cochrane Library, Cinahl, Medline, Natural Standard, and Scopus databases from January 2005 to March 2011. (A systematic review conducted by the Cochrane Collaboration has extensively covered the time frame from 1966 to 2004.) Seventeen randomized controlled trials met criteria for review and inclusion. Seven of the research studies were conducted with surgical patients, three with medical patients, one with medical-surgical patients, four with intensive care patients, and two with pregnant patients. The combined findings of these studies provide support for the use of music as an adjuvant approach to pain control in hospitalized adults. The use of music is safe, inexpensive, and an independent nursing function that can be easily incorporated into the routine care of patients. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Predictors of persistent pain after breast cancer surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Kennedy, Sean A.; Romerosa, Beatriz; Kwon, Henry Y.; Kaushal, Alka; Chang, Yaping; Craigie, Samantha; de Almeida, Carlos P.B.; Couban, Rachel J.; Parascandalo, Shawn R.; Izhar, Zain; Reid, Susan; Khan, James S.; McGillion, Michael; Busse, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Persistent pain after breast cancer surgery affects up to 60% of patients. Early identification of those at higher risk could help inform optimal management. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies to explore factors associated with persistent pain among women who have undergone surgery for breast cancer. Methods: We searched the MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases from inception to Mar. 12, 2015, to identify cohort or case–control studies that explored the association between risk factors and persistent pain (lasting ≥ 2 mo) after breast cancer surgery. We pooled estimates of association using random-effects models, when possible, for all independent variables reported by more than 1 study. We reported relative measures of association as pooled odds ratios (ORs) and absolute measures of association as the absolute risk increase. Results: Thirty studies, involving a total of 19 813 patients, reported the association of 77 independent variables with persistent pain. High-quality evidence showed increased odds of persistent pain with younger age (OR for every 10-yr decrement 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24–1.48), radiotherapy (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.16–1.57), axillary lymph node dissection (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.73–3.35) and greater acute postoperative pain (OR for every 1 cm on a 10-cm visual analogue scale 1.16, 95% CI 1.03–1.30). Moderate-quality evidence suggested an association with the presence of preoperative pain (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.01–1.64). Given the 30% risk of pain in the absence of risk factors, the absolute risk increase corresponding to these ORs ranged from 3% (acute postoperative pain) to 21% (axillary lymph node dissection). High-quality evidence showed no association with body mass index, type of breast surgery, chemotherapy or endocrine therapy. Interpretation: Development of persistent pain after breast cancer surgery was associated with younger age, radiotherapy, axillary

  14. Physiotherapists' beliefs and attitudes influence clinical practice in chronic low back pain: a systematic review of quantitative and qualitative studies.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Tania; Refshauge, Kathryn; Smith, Lorraine; McAuley, James; Hübscher, Markus; Goodall, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    What influence do physiotherapists' beliefs and attitudes about chronic low back pain have on their clinical management of people with chronic low back pain? Systematic review with data from quantitative and qualitative studies. Quantitative and qualitative studies were included if they investigated an association between physiotherapists' attitudes and beliefs about chronic low back pain and their clinical management of people with chronic low back pain. Five quantitative and five qualitative studies were included. Quantitative studies used measures of treatment orientation and fear avoidance to indicate physiotherapists' beliefs and attitudes about chronic low back pain. Quantitative studies showed that a higher biomedical orientation score (indicating a belief that pain and disability result from a specific structural impairment, and treatment is selected to address that impairment) was associated with: advice to delay return to work, advice to delay return to activity, and a belief that return to work or activity is a threat to the patient. Physiotherapists' fear avoidance scores were positively correlated with: increased certification of sick leave, advice to avoid return to work, and advice to avoid return to normal activity. Qualitative studies revealed two main themes attributed to beliefs and attitudes of physiotherapists who have a relationship to their management of chronic low back pain: treatment orientation and patient factors. Both quantitative and qualitative studies showed a relationship between treatment orientation and clinical practice. The inclusion of qualitative studies captured the influence of patient factors in clinical practice in chronic low back pain. There is a need to recognise that both beliefs and attitudes regarding treatment orientation of physiotherapists, and therapist-patient factors need to be considered when introducing new clinical practice models, so that the adoption of new clinical practice is maximised. [Gardner T

  15. A systematic review of vapocoolants for reducing pain from venipuncture and venous cannulation in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Mary-Ellen; Smart, Sarah; Shah, Vibhuti; Taddio, Anna

    2014-12-01

    Studies of vapocoolants for pain reduction from venipuncture have demonstrated conflicting results. Our aim was to systematically review the literature regarding the analgesic effectiveness of vapocoolants in children and adults. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and Cochrane Central Register of Trials using key words: vapocoolant, pain, venipuncture, and cannulation. We included randomized or quasi-randomized studies comparing vapocoolants to placebo or no treatment. Two authors reviewed titles and abstracts and extracted data. Quality was assessed by consensus using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The primary outcome was self-reported pain using a 100-mm visual analog scale, a 0- to 10-point numerical scale, or observational scale for preverbal children. Data were pooled using a random effects model. Twelve studies including 1266 patients (509 children, 757 adults) were identified. No significant pain reduction was found in children receiving vapocoolants vs. placebo or no treatment (mean difference -10 mm; 95% confidence interval [CI] -26 to 6). In adults, less pain was reported when vapocoolants were compared with no treatment: -10 mm on a 100-mm scale (95% CI -17 to -4); but not when compared to placebo (-12 mm; 95% CI -26 to 2). Pain from application of vapocoolants was greater than placebo (8 mm; 95% CI 4 to 2). Vapocoolants were ineffective in children and adults when compared to placebo, and effective in adults only when compared to no treatment. The magnitude of effect was low and was offset by increased pain from application. They cannot be recommended for routine use in children or adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dose-specific effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on experimental pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Claydon, Leica S; Chesterton, Linda S; Barlas, Panos; Sim, Julius

    2011-09-01

    To determine the hypoalgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) parameter combinations on experimental models in healthy humans. Searches were performed using the electronic databases Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, and Web of Science (from inception to December 2009). Manual searches of journals and reference lists of retrieved trials were also performed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the review if they compared the hypoalgesic effect of TENS relative with placebo and control, using an experimental pain model in healthy human participants. Two reviewers independently selected the trials, assessed their methodologic quality and extracted data. Forty-three RCTs were eligible for inclusion. A best evidence synthesis revealed: Overall "conflicting" (inconsistent findings in multiple RCTs) evidence of TENS efficacy on experimental pain irrespective of TENS parameters used. Overall intense TENS has "moderate" evidence of efficacy (1 high-quality and 2 low-quality trials). Conventional TENS has overall conflicting evidence of efficacy, this is derived from "strong" evidence of efficacy (generally consistent findings in multiple high-quality RCTs) on pressure pain but strong evidence of inefficacy on other pain models. "Limited" evidence (positive findings from 1 RCT) of hypoalgesia exists for some novel parameters. Low-intensity, low-frequency, local TENS has strong evidence of inefficacy. Inappropriate TENS (using "barely perceptible" intensities) has moderate evidence of inefficacy. The level of hypoalgesic efficacy of TENS is clearly dependent on TENS parameter combination selection (defined in terms of intensity, frequency, and stimulation site) and experimental pain model. Future clinical RCTs may consider these TENS dose responses.

  17. Marine Oil Supplements for Arthritis Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Senftleber, Ninna K.; Nielsen, Sabrina M.; Andersen, Jens R.; Bliddal, Henning; Tarp, Simon; Lauritzen, Lotte; Furst, Daniel E.; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E.; Lyddiatt, Anne; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Arthritis patients often take fish oil supplements to alleviate symptoms, but limited evidence exists regarding their efficacy. The objective was to evaluate whether marine oil supplements reduce pain and/or improve other clinical outcomes in patients with arthritis. Six databases were searched systematically (24 February 2015). We included randomized trials of oral supplements of all marine oils compared with a control in arthritis patients. The internal validity was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and heterogeneity was explored using restricted maximum of likelihood (REML)-based meta-regression analysis. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to rate the overall quality of the evidence. Forty-two trials were included; 30 trials reported complete data on pain. The standardized mean difference (SMD) suggested a favorable effect (−0.24; 95% confidence interval, CI, −0.42 to −0.07; heterogeneity, I2 = 63%. A significant effect was found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (22 trials; −0.21; 95% CI, −0.42 to −0.004) and other or mixed diagnoses (3 trials; −0.63; 95% CI, −1.20 to −0.06), but not in osteoarthritis patients (5 trials; −0.17; 95% CI, −0.57–0.24). The evidence for using marine oil to alleviate pain in arthritis patients was overall of low quality, but of moderate quality in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:28067815

  18. Marine Oil Supplements for Arthritis Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    PubMed

    Senftleber, Ninna K; Nielsen, Sabrina M; Andersen, Jens R; Bliddal, Henning; Tarp, Simon; Lauritzen, Lotte; Furst, Daniel E; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Lyddiatt, Anne; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-06

    Arthritis patients often take fish oil supplements to alleviate symptoms, but limited evidence exists regarding their efficacy. The objective was to evaluate whether marine oil supplements reduce pain and/or improve other clinical outcomes in patients with arthritis. Six databases were searched systematically (24 February 2015). We included randomized trials of oral supplements of all marine oils compared with a control in arthritis patients. The internal validity was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and heterogeneity was explored using restricted maximum of likelihood (REML)-based meta-regression analysis. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to rate the overall quality of the evidence. Forty-two trials were included; 30 trials reported complete data on pain. The standardized mean difference (SMD) suggested a favorable effect (-0.24; 95% confidence interval, CI, -0.42 to -0.07; heterogeneity, I² = 63%. A significant effect was found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (22 trials; -0.21; 95% CI, -0.42 to -0.004) and other or mixed diagnoses (3 trials; -0.63; 95% CI, -1.20 to -0.06), but not in osteoarthritis patients (5 trials; -0.17; 95% CI, -0.57-0.24). The evidence for using marine oil to alleviate pain in arthritis patients was overall of low quality, but of moderate quality in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  19. Effectiveness of physical therapy treatment of clearly defined subacromial pain: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Haik, M N; Alburquerque-Sendín, F; Moreira, R F C; Pires, E D; Camargo, P R

    2016-09-01

    To summarise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical therapy on pain, function and range of motion in individuals with subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS). Systematic review. PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane, Embase, Lilacs, Ibecs and Scielo databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating physical therapy modalities for SAPS on pain, function/disability or range of motion were included. 64 high-quality RCTs were included. Exercise therapy provided high evidence of being as effective as surgery intervention and better than no treatment or placebo treatment to improve pain, function and range of motion in the short, mid and long terms. The combination of mobilisation and exercises provided high evidence to decrease pain and improve function in the short term. There is limited evidence for improvements on the outcomes with the isolated application of manual therapy. High level of evidence was synthesised regarding the lack of beneficial effects of physical resources such as low-level laser, ultrasound and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on pain, function or range of motion in the treatment of SAPS. There is limited evidence for microwave diathermy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There is moderate evidence to no benefits with taping in the short term. Effects of diacutaneous fibrolysis and acupuncture are not well established yet. Exercise therapy should be the first-line treatment to improve pain, function and range of motion. The addition of mobilisations to exercises may accelerate reduction of pain in the short term. Low-level laser therapy, PEMF and taping should not be recommended. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. The Efficacy of Acupuncture in Post-Operative Pain Management: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Shun; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Chen, I-Fan; Huang, Shihping Kevin; Tzeng, Pei-Chuan; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative pain resulting from surgical trauma is a significant challenge for healthcare providers. Opioid analgesics are commonly used to treat postoperative pain; however, these drugs are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. Objective This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupuncture-related techniques in treating postoperative pain. Data Source MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases were searched until Sep 30, 2014. Study Eligibility Criteria Randomized controlled trials of adult subjects (≥ 18 years) who had undergone surgery and who had received acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or acupoint electrical stimulation for managing acute post-operative pain were included. Results We found that patients treated with acupuncture or related techniques had less pain and used less opioid analgesics on Day 1 after surgery compared with those treated with control (P < 0.001). Sensitivity analysis using the leave-one-out approach indicated the findings are reliable and are not dependent on any one study. In addition, no publication bias was detected. Subgroup analysis indicated that conventional acupuncture and transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) were associated with less postoperative pain one day following surgery than control treatment, while electroacupuncture was similar to control (P = 0.116). TEAS was associated with significantly greater reduction in opioid analgesic use on Day 1 post surgery than control (P < 0.001); however conventional acupuncture and electroacupuncture showed no benefit in reducing opioid analgesic use compared with control (P ≥ 0.142). Conclusion Our findings indicate that certain modes of acupuncture improved postoperative pain on the first day after surgery and reduced opioid use. Our findings support the use of acupuncture as adjuvant therapy in treating postoperative pain. PMID:26959661

  1. The Efficacy of Acupuncture in Post-Operative Pain Management: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Shun; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Chen, I-Fan; Huang, Shihping Kevin; Tzeng, Pei-Chuan; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pain resulting from surgical trauma is a significant challenge for healthcare providers. Opioid analgesics are commonly used to treat postoperative pain; however, these drugs are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of acupuncture and acupuncture-related techniques in treating postoperative pain. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and EMBASE databases were searched until Sep 30, 2014. Randomized controlled trials of adult subjects (≥ 18 years) who had undergone surgery and who had received acupuncture, electroacupuncture, or acupoint electrical stimulation for managing acute post-operative pain were included. We found that patients treated with acupuncture or related techniques had less pain and used less opioid analgesics on Day 1 after surgery compared with those treated with control (P < 0.001). Sensitivity analysis using the leave-one-out approach indicated the findings are reliable and are not dependent on any one study. In addition, no publication bias was detected. Subgroup analysis indicated that conventional acupuncture and transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) were associated with less postoperative pain one day following surgery than control treatment, while electroacupuncture was similar to control (P = 0.116). TEAS was associated with significantly greater reduction in opioid analgesic use on Day 1 post surgery than control (P < 0.001); however conventional acupuncture and electroacupuncture showed no benefit in reducing opioid analgesic use compared with control (P ≥ 0.142). Our findings indicate that certain modes of acupuncture improved postoperative pain on the first day after surgery and reduced opioid use. Our findings support the use of acupuncture as adjuvant therapy in treating postoperative pain.

  2. Quality Assessment of Randomized Control Trials Applied Psychotherapy for Chronic Pains in Iran: A Systematic Review of Domestic Trials

    PubMed Central

    Faizi, Fakhrudin; Tavallaee, Abbas; Rahimi, Aboulfazl; Saburi, Amin; Saghafinia, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Context: Keeping in mind the burden of psychotherapy can play a crucial role concerning chronic pain (CP). Psychotherapy techniques are widely used to relief Chronic Pain (CP) worldwide. Appling psychotherapy needs to consider both individual and popular cultures. In addition to international requirements; nation-wide legitimacy should be regarded too. Psychological methods have provided a lot of articles in Iran, but they were neglected by the reviewers because the documents only have abstracts in English. The current study aimed to assess all Farsi Randomized Control Trials (RCTs) addressing psychotherapy to relieve chronic pains. Evidence Acquisition: Six nation-wide medical databases were investigated in 2012 using the keyword chronic pain in the Abstracts, systematically. Appling PICO question format (patient problem or population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes) all the interventional studies were reviewed for eligibility. Retrieving full text (in Farsi) and making the articles indistinguishable, two native reviewers assessed the quality of the articles independently using Jadad scale. Results: Inclusion criteria met 1542 abstracts. After refining and excluding, seventeen experimental studies were retrieved and evaluated. Mean quality score of Jadad was 1.53 ± 1.37 (median = 1.0). Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) was the dominant approach (11 out of 17) and the majority (6 out of 17 studies) of the treated cases was Low Back Pain (LBP). Patient-therapist gender adjustment has clearly reported in most of the studies, based on the requirements. Conclusions: Cognitive Behavior Therapy was more effective than the other psychotherapy approaches relieving chronic pain in the studies. Well-designed studies and comprehensive clarification of the studies demonstrating groups, intervention, follow-up and drop outs can improve the quality of the RCTs. PMID:25593723

  3. Brain signature of chronic orofacial pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis on neuroimaging research of trigeminal neuropathic pain and temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Shu

    2014-01-01

    Brain neuroimaging has been widely used to investigate the bran signature of chronic orofacial pain, including trigeminal neuropathic pain (TNP) and pain related to temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). We here systematically reviewed the neuroimaging literature regarding the functional and structural changes in the brain of TNP and TMD pain patients, using a computerized search of journal articles via PubMed. Ten TNP studies and 14 TMD studies were reviewed. Study quality and risk of bias were assessed based on the criteria of patient selection, the history of medication, the use of standardized pain/psychological assessments, and the model and statistics of imaging analyses. Qualitative meta-analysis was performed by examining the brain regions which showed significant changes in either brain functions (including the blood-oxygen-level dependent signal, cerebral blood flow and the magnetic resonance spectroscopy signal) or brain structure (including gray matter and white matter anatomy). We hypothesized that the neuroimaging findings would display a common pattern as well as distinct patterns of brain signature in the disorders. This major hypothesis was supported by the following findings: (1) TNP and TMD patients showed consistent functional/structural changes in the thalamus and the primary somatosensory cortex, indicating the thalamocortical pathway as the major site of plasticity. (2) The TNP patients showed more alterations at the thalamocortical pathway, and the two disorders showed distinct patterns of thalamic and insular connectivity. Additionally, functional and structural changes were frequently reported in the prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia, suggesting the role of cognitive modulation and reward processing in chronic orofacial pain. The findings highlight the potential for brain neuroimaging as an investigating tool for understanding chronic orofacial pain.

  4. Psychological interventions in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain: evidence and recommendations from systematic reviews and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Reese, Christina; Mittag, Oskar

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of the article is to summarize evidence and recommendations for psychological interventions in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. We carried out a systematic literature search in several databases and on the websites of professional associations to identify relevant reviews and guidelines. In addition to the electronic search, a handsearch was carried out. Eligible publications were selected. We extracted and summarized both evidence for psychological interventions and recommendations on psychological diagnostics and interventions. Six systematic reviews and 14 guidelines were included. We collected recommendations and partially restricted evidence on the following psychological interventions: behavioural therapy, fear-avoidance training, stress management, relaxation therapy, patient education and back school. Most available evidence for psychological interventions in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain is of moderate to low quality. In addition, some of the older evidence is inapplicable to modern interventions using a biopsychosocial approach. Thus, high quality and current evidence is needed. The summary of guidelines shows that multimodal, multidisciplinary programmes including psychological interventions have become standard in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic low back pain. In most guidelines, however, there are no recommendations on which (psychological) intervention should be considered for which specific problem (problem-treatment pairs). Suggestions for future research and future guidelines are made.

  5. How does pain lead to disability? A systematic review and meta-analysis of mediation studies in people with back and neck pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hopin; Hübscher, Markus; Moseley, G Lorimer; Kamper, Steven J; Traeger, Adrian C; Mansell, Gemma; McAuley, James H

    2015-06-01

    Disability is an important outcome from a clinical and public health perspective. However, it is unclear how disability develops in people with low back pain or neck pain. More specifically, the mechanisms by which pain leads to disability are not well understood. Mediation analysis is a way of investigating these mechanisms by examining the extent to which an intermediate variable explains the effect of an exposure on an outcome. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to identify and examine the extent to which putative mediators explain the effect of pain on disability in people with low back pain or neck pain. Five electronic databases were searched. We found 12 studies (N = 2961) that examined how pain leads to disability with mediation analysis. Standardized regression coefficients (β) of the indirect and total paths were pooled. We found evidence to show that self-efficacy (β = 0.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.10 to 0.34), psychological distress (β = 0.10, 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.18), and fear (β = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.14) mediated the relationship between pain and disability, but catastrophizing did not (β = 0.07, 95% CI = -0.06 to 0.19). The methodological quality of these studies was low, and we highlight potential areas for development. Nonetheless, the results suggest that there are significant mediating effects of self-efficacy, psychological distress, and fear, which underpins the direct targeting of these constructs in treatment.

  6. Physical exercise and reduction of pain in adults with lower limb osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Escalante, Yolanda; Saavedra, Jose M; García-Hermoso, Antonio; Silva, Antonio J; Barbosa, Tiago M

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease. The knee and hip joints are the most frequently affected. Treatments fall into three main categories: pharmacological, non-pharmacological, and surgical. Treatments can be applied alone or in combination. In the last few years, within the non-pharmacological category have been a growing importance of physical exercise programs aimed to reduce pain in knee and hip joints. The purpose of this review was to summarize evidence for the effectiveness and structure of exercise programs on pain in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis. To that end, several databases were searched, retrieving 33 studies that evaluated the influence of different exercise programs on pain. These studies were grouped according to the characteristics of the exercise program: land-based intervention (strength program, Tai Chi, aerobic program), aquatic intervention (hydrotherapy), and mixed exercise programs. The main conclusions drawn were: (i) despite recommendations for the use of exercise programs as pain therapy in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis, very few randomized clinical studies were conducted; (ii) the structure of the exercise programs (content, duration, frequency and duration of the session) is very heterogeneous; (iii) on overall, exercise programs based on Tai Chi have better results than mixed exercise programs, but without clear differences.

  7. Needling therapies in the management of myofascial trigger point pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cummings, T M; White, A R

    2001-07-01

    To establish whether there is evidence for or against the efficacy of needling as a treatment approach for myofascial trigger point pain. PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, AMED, and CISCOM databases, searched from inception to July 999. Randomized, controlled trials in which some form of needling therapy was used to treat myofascial pain. Two reviewers independently extracted data concerning trial methods, quality, and outcomes. Twenty-three papers were included. No trials were of sufficient quality or design to test the efficacy of any needling technique beyond placebo in the treatment of myofascial pain. Eight of the 10 trials comparing injection of different substances and all 7 higher quality trials found that the effect was independent of the injected substance. All 3 trials that compared dry needling with injection found no difference in effect. Direct needling of myofascial trigger points appears to be an effective treatment, but the hypothesis that needling therapies have efficacy beyond placebo is neither supported nor refuted by the evidence from clinical trials. Any effect of these therapies is likely because of the needle or placebo rather than the injection of either saline or active drug. Controlled trials are needed to investigate whether needling has an effect beyond placebo on myofascial trigger point pain. Copyright 2001 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  8. Massage Therapy for Pain and Function in Patients With Arthritis: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicole L; Churilla, James R

    2017-09-01

    Massage therapy is gaining interest as a therapeutic approach to managing osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. To date, there have been no systematic reviews investigating the effects of massage therapy on these conditions. Systematic review was used. The primary aim of this review was to critically appraise and synthesize the current evidence regarding the effects of massage therapy as a stand-alone treatment on pain and functional outcomes among those with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Relevant randomized controlled trials were searched using the electronic databases Google Scholar, MEDLINE, and PEDro. The PEDro scale was used to assess risk of bias, and the quality of evidence was assessed with the GRADE approach. This review found seven randomized controlled trials representing 352 participants who satisfied the inclusion criteria. Risk of bias ranged from four to seven. Our results found low- to moderate-quality evidence that massage therapy is superior to nonactive therapies in reducing pain and improving certain functional outcomes. It is unclear whether massage therapy is more effective than other forms of treatment. There is a need for large, methodologically rigorous randomized controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of massage therapy as an intervention for individuals with arthritis.

  9. Traditional Chinese Medicine for Neck Pain and Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qi-ling; Guo, Tuan-mao; Liu, Liang; Sun, Fu; Zhang, Yin-gang

    2015-01-01

    Background Neck pain (NP) and low back pain (LBP) are common symptoms bothering people in daily life. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat various symptoms and diseases in China and has been demonstrated to be effective. The objective of the present study was to review and analyze the existing data about pain and disability in TCM treatments for NP and LBP. Methods Studies were identified by a comprehensive search of databases, such as MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library, up to September 1, 2013. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of TCM in managing NP and LBP. Results Seventy five randomized controlled trials (n = 11077) were included. Almost all of the studies investigated individuals experiencing chronic NP (CNP) or chronic LBP (CLBP). We found moderate evidence that acupuncture was more effective than sham-acupuncture in reducing pain immediately post-treatment for CNP (visual analogue scale (VAS) 10 cm, mean difference (MD) = -0.58 (-0.94, -0.22), 95% confidence interval, p = 0.01), CLBP (standardized mean difference = -0.47 (-0.77, -0.17), p = 0.003), and acute LBP (VAS 10 cm, MD = -0.99 (-1.24, -0.73), p< 0.001). Cupping could be more effective than waitlist in VAS (100 mm) (MD = -19.10 (-27.61, -10.58), p < 0. 001) for CNP or medications (e.g. NSAID) for CLBP (MD = -5.4 (-8.9, -0.19), p = 0.003). No serious or life-threatening adverse effects were found. Conclusions Acupuncture, acupressure, and cupping could be efficacious in treating the pain and disability associated with CNP or CLBP in the immediate term. Gua sha, tai chi, qigong, and Chinese manipulation showed fair effects, but we were unable to draw any definite conclusions, and further research is still needed. The efficacy of tuina and moxibustion is unknown because no direct evidence was obtained. These TCM modalities are relatively safe. PMID:25710765

  10. Systematic review of randomized controlled trials of clinical prediction rules for physical therapy in low back pain.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shilpa; Friede, Tim; Froud, Robert; Evans, David W; Underwood, Martin

    2013-04-20

    Systematic review. To evaluate randomized controlled trials validating the effects of a clinical prediction rule for patients with non-specific low back pain (LBP). The outcomes of interest were any back pain or pain-related measures. LBP is a common and costly condition. Interventions for back pain seem to have, at best, small to moderate mean beneficial effects. Identifying subgroups of patients who may respo